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Sample records for chiral carbon nanotubes

  1. The formation mechanism of chiral carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Liren; Lu, Junzhe; Zhu, Hengjiang

    2018-02-01

    The nuclei and the formation mechanism of chiral carbon nanotubes, namely, single-, double-, and triple-walled carbon nanotubes are simulated by the first principle density functional theory. The formation mechanism from nuclei to corresponding infinitely long carbon nanotubes occurs spirally and via absorbing carbon atoms layer by layer. Carbon atoms at the open end are metastable state compared with ones in the tube wall or the closed end, which indicate the growth point of chiral carbon nanotubes is located at the open end. Growth of outer layer tubular clusters takes precedence over the inner layer in the process of forming multi-walled nuclear structures. Because of the ratio of carbon atoms at the open end to all carbon atoms decreases, the stability of the tubular clusters increases with their length. The infinitely long carbon nanotubes are obtained by executing periodic boundary conditions depend on corresponding nuclear structures.

  2. Chiral Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Nitti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic nanotubes, as assembled nanospaces, in which to carry out host–guest chemistry, reversible binding of smaller species for transport, sensing, storage or chemical transformation purposes, are currently attracting substantial interest, both as biological ion channel mimics, or for addressing tailored material properties. Nature’s materials and machinery are universally asymmetric, and, for chemical entities, controlled asymmetry comes from chirality. Together with carbon nanotubes, conformationally stable molecular building blocks and macrocycles have been used for the realization of organic nanotubes, by means of their assembly in the third dimension. In both cases, chiral properties have started to be fully exploited to date. In this paper, we review recent exciting developments in the synthesis and assembly of chiral nanotubes, and of their functional properties. This review will include examples of either molecule-based or macrocycle-based systems, and will try and rationalize the supramolecular interactions at play for the three-dimensional (3D assembly of the nanoscale architectures.

  3. On the Mechanical Properties of Chiral Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Zakeri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are specific structures with valuable characteristics. In general, the structure of each nanotube is defined by a unique chiral vector. In this paper, different structures of short single-walled CNTs are simulated and their mechanical properties are determined using finite element method. For this aim, a simple algorithm is presented which is able to model the geometry of single-walled CNTs with any desired structure based on nano-scale continuum mechanics approach. By changing the chiral angle from 0 to 30 degree for constant length to radius ratio, the effect of nanotube chirality on its mechanical properties is evaluated. It is observed that the tensile modulus of CNTs changes between 0.93-1.02 TPa for different structures, and it can be higher for chiral structures than zigzag and armchair ones. Also, for different chiral angles, the bending modulus changes between 0.76-0.82 TPa, while the torsional modulus varies in the range of 0.283-0.301TPa.

  4. Thermoelectric effects in electron chiral tunneling in metallic carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parafilo, A. V.; Ilinskaya, O. A.; Krive, I. V.; Park, Y. W.

    2015-12-01

    Thermoelectric effects in a metallic single-wall carbon nanotube in the presence of long-range electrostatic and pseudomagnetic potentials (produced by strain) are considered. It is shown that for strong scattering potentials (chiral tunneling) a pronounced energy "gap" appears in the energy dependence of electron transmission coefficient. This results in strong violation of Wiedemann-Franz law and in a peak-like behavior of thermopower as a function of chemical potential. The electronic figure-of-merit (ZT) is calculated and shown to be sensitive at low temperatures to nanotube chirality. By tuning chemical potential, ZT can reach high values (ZT≃5) that makes specially engineered nanotube-based thermocouple to be a promising nano-device with a high thermoelectric performance.

  5. Quantum rainbow characterization of short chiral carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ćosić, M., E-mail: mcosic@vinca.rs [Laboratory of Physics, Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); School of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar kralja Aleksandra 73, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Petrović, S.; Nešković, N. [Laboratory of Physics, Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-03-15

    In this work, we present a study of the quantum angular distributions of 1 MeV positrons channeled through the chiral (7, 3), (8, 5), (9, 7), (14, 4), (16, 5) and (17, 7) single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), having the same length of 200 nm and the corresponding nanotube radiuses of 0.35, 0.45, 0.55, 0.65, 0.75 and 0.85 nm, respectively. The continuum positron–nanotube interaction potential was obtained using the thermally averaged Molière’s positron–carbon interaction potential. A positron beam is treated as an ensemble of non-interacting quantum particles each represented by a Gaussian wave packet. Evolution of a channeled positron was obtained from the numerical solution of the corresponding time-dependent Schrödinger equation. For the comparison, the classical angular rainbows for cases under the consideration are investigated as well. They were obtained using the numerical solution of the corresponding Newton’s equations of positron motion in the transverse plane of carbon nanotube. We show that the quantum angular transmission patterns can be successfully used for the characterization of short chiral carbon nanotubes.

  6. Capillary electrophoresis of covalently functionalized single-chirality carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Pingli; Meany, Brendan; Wang, Chunyan; Piao, Yanmei; Kwon, Hyejin; Deng, Shunliu; Wang, YuHuang

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate the separation of chirality-enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by degree of surface functionalization using high-performance CE. Controlled amounts of negatively charged and positively charged functional groups were attached to the sidewall of chirality-enriched SWCNTs through covalent functionalization using 4-carboxybenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate or 4-diazo-N,N-diethylaniline tetrafluoroborate, respectively. Surfactant- and pH-dependent studies confirmed that under conditions that minimized ionic screening effects, separation of these functionalized SWCNTs was strongly dependent on the surface charge density introduced through covalent surface chemistry. For both heterogeneous mixtures and single-chirality-enriched samples, covalently functionalized SWCNTs showed substantially increased peak width in electropherogram spectra compared to nonfunctionalized SWCNTs, which can be attributed to a distribution of surface charges along the functionalized nanotubes. Successful separation of functionalized single-chirality SWCNTs by functional density was confirmed with UV-Vis-NIR absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies of fraction collected samples. These results suggest a high degree of structural heterogeneity in covalently functionalized SWCNTs, even for chirality-enriched samples, and show the feasibility of applying CE for high-performance separation of nanomaterials based on differences in surface functional density. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Electroluminescence from chirality-sorted (9,7)-semiconducting carbon nanotube devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pfeiffer, Martin H P; Stürzl, Ninette; Marquardt, Christoph W; Engel, Michael; Dehm, Simone; Hennrich, Frank; Kappes, Manfred M; Lemmer, Uli; Krupke, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    We have measured the electroluminescence and photoluminescence of (9,7)-semiconducting carbon nanotube devices and demonstrate that the electroluminescence wavelength is determined by the nanotube's chiral index (n,m...

  8. Atomic Structure and Energy Distribution of Collapsed Carbon Nanotubes of Different Chiralities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Baimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For carbon nanotubes of sufficiently large diameter at sufficiently low temperature, due to the action of the van der Waals forces, the ground state is a bilayer graphene with closed edges, the so-called collapsed configuration. Molecular dynamics simulation of collapsed carbon nanotubes is performed. The effect of length, diameter, and chirality of the nanotubes on their properties is investigated. It is shown that collapsed nanotubes after relaxation have rippled structure which is strongly dependent on the nanotube chirality. The structural properties are studied by calculating the radial distribution function and energy distribution along various regions in the collapsed carbon nanotubes.

  9. Separation of carbon nanotubes into chirally enriched fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorn, Stephen K [Los Alamos, NM; Niyogi, Sandip [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-04-10

    A mixture of single-walled carbon nanotubes ("SWNTs") is separated into fractions of enriched chirality by preparing an aqueous suspension of a mixture of SWNTs and a surfactant, injecting a portion of the suspension on a column of separation medium having a density gradient, and centrifuging the column. In some embodiments, salt is added prior to centrifugation. In other embodiments, the centrifugation is performed at a temperature below room temperature. Fractions separate as colored bands in the column. The diameter of the separated SWNTs decreases with increasing density along the gradient of the column. The colored bands can be withdrawn separately from the column.

  10. Investigation of Chirality Selection Mechanism of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-13

    ALD) followed by coating with a 1-nm-thick Fe thin film by e-beam evaporation. The substrates were cut into small pieces in the dimensions of about...60 keV at Korea Multi-Purpose Accelerator Complex. The dose of Fe+ ion was 1016/cm2. As a control sample, 1 nm- thin Fe film was deposited on a...research involved investigation of two fundamental mechanisms of carbon nanotube (CNT) growth: chirality selection of single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and

  11. Investigation of Chirality Selection Mechanism of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-17

    deposition of carbon nanotubes : a review on growth mechanism and mass production ,” J. Nanosci. Nanotechnol., 10, 3739 (2010). List of Publications...Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-14-1-4047 5b. GRANT NUMBER Grant 14IOA058_144047 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F...of two significant mechanistic aspects of carbon nanotube (CNT) array growth under chemical vapor deposition conditions: chirality selectivity and

  12. Conformational analysis and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Geraldo de Faria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Geometry and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride (CNx nanotubes were investigated through quantum chemical methods. Finite nanotubes with diameters ranging from 5 to 10 Å and containing up to 500 atoms were considered. CNx structures were built through random substitution of carbon atoms by nitrogen. The molecules were fully optimized by semi-empirical quantum chemical method (PM3. Our results show that the energy associated with nitrogen incorporation depends strongly upon the tube helicity and diameter. The doping of nanotubes with nitrogen contributes to reduce the stress caused by the small diameter of the studied systems. Density of States (DOS results for pure carbon and CNx nanostructures, obtained through DFT and Hartree-Fock calculations, were analyzed. The introduction of nitrogen in the tube produce states in the gap region which characterizes the metallic behavior, as expected for these systems after N-doping.

  13. Effect of chirality and curvature of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the adsorption of uracil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajarajeswari, M.; Iyakutti, K. [School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, Tamil Nadu 625 021 (India); Kawazoe, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Adsorption of uracil on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) (5,2) and (5,5) in the presence of water molecules has been investigated using first-principles technique. Uracil is adsorbed on the nanotube noncovalently through {pi}-{pi} stacking interaction. The binding strength of uracil varies with the chirality of the carbon nanotubes. Addition of water molecules inside and outside the nanotube altered the interaction of the uracil with the nanotube and modifies the binding strength. Orientation of the water molecule and the charge transfer through the C-H bonds are the important factors in the interaction of the water molecule with the carbon nanotube. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. A systematic procedure for determining the chiral indices of multi-walled carbon nanotubes using electron diffraction-each and every shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deniz, Hakan; Derbakova, Anna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Qin, Lu-Chang, E-mail: lcqin@physics.unc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Electron diffraction technique has been developed and refined to establish a systematic procedure to determine the chirality (chiral indices) of each and every shell in a carbon nanotube. We have introduced a zoning scheme to sort the reflection layer lines from the multiple shells of a carbon nanotube. An application of the procedure is demonstrated as an example for an eleven-shell carbon nanotube whose chiral indices of each and every shell were determined unambiguously. The revealed structure of the carbon nanotube suggests that there is no strong correlation among the shells as the nanotube was formed. The limitations of the current method are also discussed. -- Research Highlights: {yields} Systematic procedure to obtain chirality of carbon nanotubes;{yields} Nano-electron diffraction from carbon nanotube;{yields} Determination of chiral indices of each and every shell of an eleven-shell carbon nanotube.

  15. Application of Carbon Nanotubes in Chiral and Achiral Separations of Pharmaceuticals, Biologics and Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemasa, Ayman L.; Maher, William A.; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess unique mechanical, physical, electrical and absorbability properties coupled with their nanometer dimensional scale that renders them extremely valuable for applications in many fields including nanotechnology and chromatographic separation. The aim of this review is to provide an updated overview about the applications of CNTs in chiral and achiral separations of pharmaceuticals, biologics and chemicals. Chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been directly applied for the enantioseparation of pharmaceuticals and biologicals by using them as stationary or pseudostationary phases in chromatographic separation techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), capillary electrophoresis (CE) and gas chromatography (GC). Achiral MWCNTs have been used for achiral separations as efficient sorbent objects in solid-phase extraction techniques of biochemicals and drugs. Achiral SWCNTs have been applied in achiral separation of biological samples. Achiral SWCNTs and MWCNTs have been also successfully used to separate achiral mixtures of pharmaceuticals and chemicals. Collectively, functionalized CNTs have been indirectly applied in separation science by enhancing the enantioseparation of different chiral selectors whereas non-functionalized CNTs have shown efficient capabilities for chiral separations by using techniques such as encapsulation or immobilization in polymer monolithic columns. PMID:28718832

  16. Application of Carbon Nanotubes in Chiral and Achiral Separations of Pharmaceuticals, Biologics and Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemasa, Ayman L; Naumovski, Nenad; Maher, William A; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2017-07-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess unique mechanical, physical, electrical and absorbability properties coupled with their nanometer dimensional scale that renders them extremely valuable for applications in many fields including nanotechnology and chromatographic separation. The aim of this review is to provide an updated overview about the applications of CNTs in chiral and achiral separations of pharmaceuticals, biologics and chemicals. Chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been directly applied for the enantioseparation of pharmaceuticals and biologicals by using them as stationary or pseudostationary phases in chromatographic separation techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), capillary electrophoresis (CE) and gas chromatography (GC). Achiral MWCNTs have been used for achiral separations as efficient sorbent objects in solid-phase extraction techniques of biochemicals and drugs. Achiral SWCNTs have been applied in achiral separation of biological samples. Achiral SWCNTs and MWCNTs have been also successfully used to separate achiral mixtures of pharmaceuticals and chemicals. Collectively, functionalized CNTs have been indirectly applied in separation science by enhancing the enantioseparation of different chiral selectors whereas non-functionalized CNTs have shown efficient capabilities for chiral separations by using techniques such as encapsulation or immobilization in polymer monolithic columns.

  17. Application of Carbon Nanotubes in Chiral and Achiral Separations of Pharmaceuticals, Biologics and Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman L. Hemasa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs possess unique mechanical, physical, electrical and absorbability properties coupled with their nanometer dimensional scale that renders them extremely valuable for applications in many fields including nanotechnology and chromatographic separation. The aim of this review is to provide an updated overview about the applications of CNTs in chiral and achiral separations of pharmaceuticals, biologics and chemicals. Chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs have been directly applied for the enantioseparation of pharmaceuticals and biologicals by using them as stationary or pseudostationary phases in chromatographic separation techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, capillary electrophoresis (CE and gas chromatography (GC. Achiral MWCNTs have been used for achiral separations as efficient sorbent objects in solid-phase extraction techniques of biochemicals and drugs. Achiral SWCNTs have been applied in achiral separation of biological samples. Achiral SWCNTs and MWCNTs have been also successfully used to separate achiral mixtures of pharmaceuticals and chemicals. Collectively, functionalized CNTs have been indirectly applied in separation science by enhancing the enantioseparation of different chiral selectors whereas non-functionalized CNTs have shown efficient capabilities for chiral separations by using techniques such as encapsulation or immobilization in polymer monolithic columns.

  18. Narrow-chirality distributed single-walled carbon nanotube growth from nonmagnetic catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorannevis, Zohreh; Kato, Toshiaki; Kaneko, Toshiro; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2010-07-21

    We present the first demonstration of the nonmagnetic catalyzed synthesis of narrow-chirality distributed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Based on the systematic investigation using different combinations of catalyst types (magnetic or nonmagnetic) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods (thermal CVD (TCVD) or plasma CVD (PCVD)), PCVD with the nonmagnetic catalyst under the appropriate H(2) concentration is found to be critical as the methodological element of realizing the narrow-chirality distribution. Electrical measurements of thin film SWNTs produced under the different combinations of catalyst types and CVD methods are also investigated, which reveals the SWNTs grown from the nonmagnetic catalyst with PCVD display the best device performance.

  19. Empirical Equation Based Chirality (n, m Assignment of Semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes from Resonant Raman Scattering Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shamsul Arefin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a technique for the chirality (n, m assignment of semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes by solving a set of empirical equations of the tight binding model parameters. The empirical equations of the nearest neighbor hopping parameters, relating the term (2n, m with the first and second optical transition energies of the semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes, are also proposed. They provide almost the same level of accuracy for lower and higher diameter nanotubes. An algorithm is presented to determine the chiral index (n, m of any unknown semiconducting tube by solving these empirical equations using values of radial breathing mode frequency and the first or second optical transition energy from resonant Raman spectroscopy. In this paper, the chirality of 55 semiconducting nanotubes is assigned using the first and second optical transition energies. Unlike the existing methods of chirality assignment, this technique does not require graphical comparison or pattern recognition between existing experimental and theoretical Kataura plot.

  20. Torsional behavior of chiral single-walled and double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dian-Rong, Han; Lei, Zhu; Ya-Fei, Dai; Cheng-Lin, Luo

    2017-10-01

    The torsional behavior of the chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) is investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) method. The results show that the torsional behavior of chiral DWCNTs presents a weaker direction dependent than that of SWCNTs. The critical buckling shear strain of DWCNT in the untwisting direction of the outer tube is always greater than that in the opposite direction. The torsional rigidities of the DWCNT and its outer tubes are approximately identical. However, torsional elastic range of the DWCNT is much higher than that of the outer tube. Moreover, the torsional direction dependency of incommensurate chiral (n 1  +  m 1, -m1)@ (n 2,m 2) tube is weaker than that of commensurate (n 1,m 1)@ (n 2,m 2) tube, which implies that if the chiral angles of the inner and the outer tube of a DWCNT are arranged in opposite directions, the torsional direction dependency of a DWCNT will be further reduced. Meanwhile, rotational inertia of the DWCNT remains nearly unchanged under torsion in a quite large torsional range. These conclusions will be helpful in designing torsional components of NEMS (nano-electromechanical system) using carbon tubes.

  1. Formation of Coaxial Nanocables with Amplified Supramolecular Chirality through an Interaction between Carbon Nanotubes and a Chiral π-Gelator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedhanarayanan, Balaraman; Nair, Vishnu S; Nair, Vijayakumar C; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2016-08-22

    In an attempt to gather experimental evidence for the influence of carbon allotropes on supramolecular chirality, we found that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) facilitate amplification of the molecular chirality of a π-gelator (MC-OPV) to supramolecular helicity at a concentration much lower than that required for intermolecular interaction. For example, at a concentration 1.8×10(-4)  m, MC-OPV did not exhibit a CD signal; however, the addition of 0-0.6 mg of SWNTs resulted in amplified chirality as evident from the CD spectrum. Surprisingly, AFM analysis revealed the formation of thick helical fibers with a width of more than 100 nm. High-resolution TEM analysis and solid-state UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopy revealed that the thick helical fibers were cylindrical cables composed of individually wrapped and coaxially aligned SWNTs. Such an impressive effect of CNTs on supramolecular chirality and cylindrical-cable formation has not been reported previously. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Chirality Separation of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes using Aqueous Two-Phase Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Jeffrey

    2014-03-01

    Aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) was recently demonstrated to enable the separation of individual species of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) across the separated phases. In this presentation I will describe the use of a dextran - polyethylene glycol aqueous two-phase system along with a separation scheme of varying surfactant concentrations to enable isolation at high purity of specific small diameter SWCNT species. Separation by ATPE is rapid and robust, with a remarkable tunability that allows isolation of most single nanotube chiralities at high purity. Choice of surfactant(s), temperature, polymer concentrations, and the addition of small molecule salts can all be used to tune the exact partitioning of single SWCNT species between the two phases.

  3. Organic/hybrid nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes: preparation methods and chiral applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassen, Haysem; Antony, Vijy; Ghanem, Ashraf; Yajadda, Mir Massoud Aghili; Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles are molecular-sized solids with at least one dimension measuring between 1-100 nm or 10-1000 nm depending on the individual discipline's perspective. They are aggregates of anywhere from a few hundreds to tens of thousands of atoms which render them larger than molecules but smaller than bulk solids. Consequently, they frequently exhibit physical and chemical properties somewhere between. On the other hand, nanocrystals are a special class of nanoparticles which have started gaining attention recently owing to their unique crystalline structures which provide a larger surface area and promising applications including chiral separations. Hybrid nanoparticles are supported by the growing interest of chemists, physicists, and biologists, who are researching to fully exploit them. These materials can be defined as molecular or nano-composites with mixed (organic or bio) and inorganic components, where at least one of the component domain has a dimension ranging from a few Å to several nanometers. Similarly, and due to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and electrical properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research. In this short review, the focus is mainly on the current well-established simple preparation techniques of chiral organic and hybrid nanoparticles as well as single-walled carbon nanotubes and their applications in separation science. Of particular interest, cinchonidine, chitosan, and β-CD-modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are discussed as model examples for organic and hybrid nanoparticles. Likewise, the chemical vapor deposition method, used in the preparation of single-walled carbon nanotubes, is discussed. The enantioseparation applications of these model nanomaterials is also presented. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Chiral-Selective Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Lattice-Mismatched Epitaxial Cobalt Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Jiang, Hua; Liu, Bilu

    2013-01-01

    Controlling chirality in growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is important for exploiting their practical applications. For long it has been conceptually conceived that the structural control of SWNTs is potentially achievable by fabricating nanoparticle catalysts with proper structur...

  5. Growth Mechanism of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Iron–Copper Catalyst and Chirality Studies by Electron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Liu, Bilu; Chernov, Alexander I.

    2012-01-01

    Chiralities of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown on an atomic layer deposition prepared bimetallic FeCu/MgO catalyst were evaluated quantitatively using nanobeam electron diffraction. The results reveal that the growth yields nearly 90% semiconducting tubes, 45% of which are of the (6,5) type....... The growth mechanisms as well as the roles of different components in the catalyst were studied in situ using environmental transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. On the basis of the understanding of carbon nanotube growth mechanisms, an MgO-supported FeCu catalyst was prepared...... by impregnation, showing similar catalytic performance as the atomic layer deposition-prepared catalyst, yielding single-walled carbon nanotubes with a similar narrow chirality distribution....

  6. Characterizing the chiral index of a single-walled carbon nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiuchen; Zhang, Jin

    2014-11-01

    The properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) mainly depend on their geometry. However, there are still formidable difficulties to determine the chirality of SWCNTs accurately. In this review, some efficient methods to characterize the chiral indices of SWCNTs are illuminated. These methods are divided into imaging techniques and spectroscopy techniques. With these methods, diameter, helix angle, and energy states can be measured. Generally speaking, imaging techniques have a higher accuracy and universality, but are time-consuming with regard to the sample preparation and characterization. The spectroscopy techniques are very simple and fast in operation, but these techniques can be applied only to the particular structure of the sample. Here, the principles and operations of each method are introduced, and a comprehensive understanding of each technique, including their advantages and disadvantages, is given. Advanced applications of some methods are also discussed. The aim of this review is to help readers to choose methods with the appropriate accuracy and time complexity and, furthermore, to put forward an idea to find new methods for chirality characterization. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Potential Super-Toughness Behavior of Chiral (10,5) Carbon Nanotubes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Welch, C. R; Haskins, R. W; Majure, D. L; Ebeling, R. M; Marsh, C. P; Bednar, A. J; Maier, R. S; Barker, B. C; Wu, David T; Simeon, T. M

    2006-01-01

    ...) carbon nanotube using Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics. The (5,5) carbon nanotubes exhibited extraordinary tensile strengths and brittle failures in agreement with the findings of other researchers...

  8. Comparison of complex permittivities of isotonic colloids containing single-wall carbon nanotubes of varying chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Tejas; Symanowski, James T; Gach, H Michael

    2012-02-01

    The application of bio-compatible, conductive nanoparticles in combination with radiofrequency (RF) irradiation to raise tissue temperatures between 40 and 60 °C for hyperthermia and ablation spurred interest in the complex permittivities of isotonic nanoparticle-based colloids. Nanoparticles with large aspect ratios and high permittivities increase the bulk permittivity of the colloid and RF losses at the macroscopic scale. The complex permittivities of isotonic colloids with and without single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) containing either metallic, semiconducting, or mixed chiralities were measured from 20 MHz to 1 GHz at room temperature. The colloids were made with one of three different isotonic solvents: phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and Dulbecco's modified eagle medium (DMEM) with and without 0.5% weight/volume bovine serum albumin to simulate cytosol and blood, respectively. The concentration of elemental carbon from the SWCNTs in the colloids ranged from 16 to 17 mM. The permittivities were corrected for electrode polarization effects by fitting the data to the Cole-Cole relaxation model with a constant phase angle element. The presence of SWCNTs increased both the real and imaginary components of the permittivities of the colloids. For all three solvents, the direct current (DC) components of the real and imaginary permittivities were greatest for the colloids containing the mixed chirality SWCNTs, followed by the colloids with semiconducting SWCNTs, and then metallic SWCNTs. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Multiple exciton generation in chiral carbon nanotubes: Density functional theory based computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryjevski, Andrei; Mihaylov, Deyan; Kilina, Svetlana; Kilin, Dmitri

    2017-10-01

    We use a Boltzmann transport equation (BE) to study time evolution of a photo-excited state in a nanoparticle including phonon-mediated exciton relaxation and the multiple exciton generation (MEG) processes, such as exciton-to-biexciton multiplication and biexciton-to-exciton recombination. BE collision integrals are computed using Kadanoff-Baym-Keldysh many-body perturbation theory based on density functional theory simulations, including exciton effects. We compute internal quantum efficiency (QE), which is the number of excitons generated from an absorbed photon in the course of the relaxation. We apply this approach to chiral single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), such as (6,2) and (6,5). We predict efficient MEG in the (6,2) and (6,5) SWCNTs within the solar spectrum range starting at the 2Eg energy threshold and with QE reaching ˜1.6 at about 3Eg, where Eg is the electronic gap.

  10. Bundle and chirality influences on properties of carbon nanotubes studied with van der Waals density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumlich, Heiko; Gegg, Michael; Reich, Stephanie [Fachbereich Physik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Hennrich, Frank [Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    We study the binding strength and intertube distance of carbon nanotube bundles in dependence of their structure (chirality) with van der Waals density functional theory. We try to understand the bundling and debundling process of nanotube bundles and test whether an influence of chirality exists. The distance between the nanotubes in the bundles vary only in a small range within 3.3 and 3.4A, without any chiral angle and diameter dependence. We find an increase of van der Waals energy per length with increasing diameter of the nanotubes (E{sub vdW}{sup length}{proportional_to} d or{radical}(d)) for tubes with diameters between 5.6 and 27.3A, but no obvious correlation between the chirality of the tubes and the van der Waals energy per length. The van der Waals energy per atom is decreasing with increasing tube diameter (E{sub vdW}{sup atom}{proportional_to} 1/d or1/{radical}(d)). (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. The effect of carbon nanotube chirality on the spiral flow of copper atoms in their cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, M.C.G., E-mail: M070041@e.ntu.edu.sg [Nanyang Technological University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Zhong, Z.W. [Nanyang Technological University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2012-12-14

    The effect of carbon nanotube (CNT) chirality on the flow of copper atoms along its core has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The investigation is conducted using CNTs of different chirality, and different flow conditions such as temperatures, bias voltages and the initial positions of the copper atoms. The results show that the atoms flow in a spiral fashion along the CNT channels. The effect is most evident in the CNT channel with zigzag CNTs. The movement of the copper atoms is more erratic when the temperature is increased at a low biased voltage, regardless of the types of channel used. The initial positions of the copper atoms affect the way they converge as they move downstream along the channel. A bias voltage of 4 V favours the initiation of a spiral flow, especially when the position of the copper atoms is far from the central axis of the channel. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the transportation of copper atoms in armchair and zigzag CNT channels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The spiral flow of copper atoms occurs in a semiconductor-semiconductor CNT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compact copper mass is predicted to occur at 673 K with a 4 V bias voltage.

  12. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, F.; Shi, W.; Ideue, T.; Yoshida, M.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.; Kikitsu, T.; Inoue, D.; Hashizume, D.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity--unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures.

  13. Photoactuators and motors based on carbon nanotubes with selective chirality distributions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Yu, Zhibin; Wang, Chuan; Zarrouk, David; Seo, Jung-Woo Ted; Cheng, Jim C; Buchan, Austin D; Takei, Kuniharu; Zhao, Yang; Ager, Joel W; Zhang, Junjun; Hettick, Mark; Hersam, Mark C; Pisano, Albert P; Fearing, Ronald S; Javey, Ali

    2014-01-01

    ... fabrication and large deflection. Here, we demonstrate highly versatile photoactuators, oscillators and motors based on polymer/single-walled carbon nanotube bilayers that meet all the above requirements...

  14. Electronic and optoelectronic devices based on chirality-enriched wafer-scale single-wall carbon nanotube thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weilu; He, Xiaowei; Xie, Lijuan; Zhang, Qi; Haroz, Erik; Doorn, Stephen K.; Kono, Junichiro

    2015-03-01

    The unique and rich material properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) make them attractive for nano-electronic and optoelectronic applications. Slight changes in tube diameter and wrapping angle, defined by the chirality indices (n, m), can dramatically modify the bandstructure, which can be utilized for designing devices with tailored properties. However, it remains to be a challenge to fabricate macroscopic, single-chirality devices. Here, we introduce a simple way of producing chirality-enriched wafer-scale SWCNT films by combining recently developed solution-based polymer-modified sorting method and vacuum filtration. The produced thin films can be easily transferred onto any substrate to have a CMOS compatible wafer. We fabricated a transistor of (6,5)-enriched SWCNTs with an on/off ratio >103. Large-scale photothermoelectric-effect-based and photovoltaic-effect-based photodetectors made of (6,6)- and (6,5)-enriched films, respectively, will also be discussed.

  15. Gas phase synthesis of non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes with near-armchair chiralities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustonen, K.; Laiho, P.; Kaskela, A.; Zhu, Z.; Reynaud, O.; Houbenov, N.; Tian, Y.; Susi, T.; Jiang, H.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Kauppinen, E. I.

    2015-07-01

    We present a floating catalyst synthesis route for individual, i.e., non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a narrow chiral angle distribution peaking at high chiralities near the armchair species. An ex situ spark discharge generator was used to form iron particles with geometric number mean diameters of 3-4 nm and fed into a laminar flow chemical vapour deposition reactor for the continuous synthesis of long and high-quality SWCNTs from ambient pressure carbon monoxide. The intensity ratio of G/D peaks in Raman spectra up to 48 and mean tube lengths up to 4 μm were observed. The chiral distributions, as directly determined by electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope, clustered around the (n,m) indices (7,6), (8,6), (8,7), and (9,6), with up to 70% of tubes having chiral angles over 20°. The mean diameter of SWCNTs was reduced from 1.10 to 1.04 nm by decreasing the growth temperature from 880 to 750 °C, which simultaneously increased the fraction of semiconducting tubes from 67% to 80%. Limiting the nanotube gas phase number concentration to ˜105 cm-3 prevented nanotube bundle formation that is due to collisions induced by Brownian diffusion. Up to 80% of 500 as-deposited tubes observed by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy were individual. Transparent conducting films deposited from these SWCNTs exhibited record low sheet resistances of 63 Ω/□ at 90% transparency for 550 nm light.

  16. Gas phase synthesis of non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes with near-armchair chiralities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustonen, K.; Laiho, P.; Kaskela, A.; Zhu, Z.; Reynaud, O.; Houbenov, N.; Tian, Y.; Jiang, H.; Kauppinen, E. I., E-mail: esko.kauppinen@aalto.fi [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 15100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Susi, T. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nasibulin, A. G. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 15100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Nobel str. 3, 143026 (Russian Federation); Saint-Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 29 Polytechniheskaya st., St. Petersburg, 195251 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-06

    We present a floating catalyst synthesis route for individual, i.e., non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a narrow chiral angle distribution peaking at high chiralities near the armchair species. An ex situ spark discharge generator was used to form iron particles with geometric number mean diameters of 3–4 nm and fed into a laminar flow chemical vapour deposition reactor for the continuous synthesis of long and high-quality SWCNTs from ambient pressure carbon monoxide. The intensity ratio of G/D peaks in Raman spectra up to 48 and mean tube lengths up to 4 μm were observed. The chiral distributions, as directly determined by electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope, clustered around the (n,m) indices (7,6), (8,6), (8,7), and (9,6), with up to 70% of tubes having chiral angles over 20°. The mean diameter of SWCNTs was reduced from 1.10 to 1.04 nm by decreasing the growth temperature from 880 to 750 °C, which simultaneously increased the fraction of semiconducting tubes from 67% to 80%. Limiting the nanotube gas phase number concentration to ∼10{sup 5 }cm{sup −3} prevented nanotube bundle formation that is due to collisions induced by Brownian diffusion. Up to 80% of 500 as-deposited tubes observed by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy were individual. Transparent conducting films deposited from these SWCNTs exhibited record low sheet resistances of 63 Ω/□ at 90% transparency for 550 nm light.

  17. Fe-Ti-O based catalyst for large-chiral-angle single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Zhang, Lili; Jiang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Catalyst selection is very crucial for controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Here we introduce a well-designed Fe-Ti-O solid solution for SWNT growth with a high preference to large chiral angles. The Fe-Ti-O catalyst was prepared by combining Ti layer deposition onto premade...... Fe nanoparticles with subsequent high-temperature air calcination, which favours the formation of a homogeneous Fe-Ti-O solid solution. Using CO as the carbon feedstock, chemical vapour deposition growth of SWNTs at 800 °C was demonstrated on the Fe-Ti-O catalyst. Nanobeam electron diffraction...... characterization on a number of individual SWNTs revealed that more than 94% of SWNTs have chiral angles larger than 15°. In situ environmental transmission electron microscopy study was carried out to reveal the catalyst dynamics upon reduction. Our results identify that the phase segregation through reducing Fe...

  18. Thin-film transistors using DNA-wrapped semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with selected chiralities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Yuki; Nihey, Fumiyuki; Ohmori, Shigekazu; Saito, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    Selected semiconducting chiralities, (7,5), (7,6), and (8,4), of DNA-wrapped single-wall carbon nanotubes (DNA-SWCNTs) were used for thin-film transistors (TFTs). Chirality separation was carried out by ion exchange chromatography (IEX) with the ssDNA of the (TAT)4 sequence. An on/off ratio of 3.8 × 106 with a carrier mobility of 11 cm2/(V·s) was successfully achieved in the fabricated SWCNT-TFTs. The comparison between the on/off ratios obtained before (101-102) and after IEX (104-107) indicated that the IEX separation process sufficiently improves the performance of SWCNT-TFTs because of the reducing metallic SWCNT pathways in the TFT channel.

  19. Thin single-walled carbon nanotubes with narrow chirality distribution: constructive interplay of plasma and Gibbs-Thomson effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Mehdipour, Hamid

    2011-10-25

    Multiscale, multiphase numerical modeling is used to explain the mechanisms of effective control of chirality distributions of single-walled carbon nanotubes in direct plasma growth and suggest effective approaches to further improvement. The model includes an unprecedented combination of the plasma sheath, ion/radical transport, species creation/loss, plasma-surface interaction, heat transfer, surface/bulk diffusion, graphene layer nucleation, and bending/lift-off modules. It is shown that the constructive interplay between the plasma and the Gibbs-Thomson effect can lead to the effective nucleation and lift-off of small graphene layers on small metal catalyst nanoparticles. As a result, much thinner nanotubes with narrower chirality distributions can nucleate at much lower process temperatures and pressures compared to thermal CVD. This approach is validated by a host of experimental results, substantially reduces the amounts of energy and atomic matter required for the nanotube growth, and can be extended to other nanoscale structures and materials systems, thereby nearing the ultimate goal of energy- and matter-efficient nanotechnology.

  20. Fractal structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes in biologically relevant conditions: role of chirality vs. media conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Iftheker A; Aich, Nirupam; Afrooz, A R M Nabiul; Flora, Joseph R V; Schierz, P Ariette; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Saleh, Navid B

    2013-11-01

    Aggregate structure of covalently functionalized chiral specific semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was systematically studied employing static light scattering (SLS). Fractal dimensions (Df) of two specific chirality SWNTs-SG65 and SG76 with (6, 5) and (7, 6) chiral enrichments-were measured under four biological exposure media conditions, namely: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM), Minimum Essential Medium (MEM), Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 medium, and 0.9% saline solution. The SWNTs exhibited chiral dependence on Df with SG65 showing more fractal or loosely bound aggregate structures, i.e., lower Df values (range of 2.24±0.03 to 2.64±0.05), compared to the SG76 sample (range of 2.58±0.13 to 2.90±0.08). All the Df values reported are highly reproducible, measured from multiple SLS runs and estimated with 'random block-effects' statistical analysis that yielded all p values to be fractal aggregates. Moreover, presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), used to mimic the in vitro cell culture condition, reduced the Df values, i.e., created more fractal structures. Steric hindrance to aggregation was identified as the key mechanism for creating the fractal structures. Also, increase in FBS concentration from 1% to 10% resulted in increasingly lower Df values. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Control of the Diameter and Chiral Angle Distributions during Production of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Many applications of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), especially in microelectronics, will benefit from use of certain (n,m) nanotube types (metallic, small gap semiconductor, etc.) Especially fascinating is the possibility of quantum conductors that require metallic armchair nanotubes. However, as produced SWCNT samples are polydisperse, with many (n,m) types present and typical approx.1:2 metal/semiconductor ratio. Nanotube nucleation models predict that armchair nuclei are energetically preferential due to formation of partial triple bonds along the armchair edge. However, nuclei can not reach any meaningful thermal equilibrium in a rapidly expanding and cooling plume of carbon clusters, leading to polydispersity. In the present work, SWCNTs were produced by a pulsed laser vaporization (PLV) technique. The carbon vapor plume cooling rate was either increased by change in the oven temperature (expansion into colder gas), or decreased via "warm-up" with a laser pulse at the moment of nucleation. The effect of oven temperature and "warm-up" on nanotube type population was studied via photoluminescence, UV-Vis-NIR absorption and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that reduced temperatures leads to smaller average diameters, progressively narrower diameter distributions, and some preference toward armchair structures. "Warm-up" shifts nanotube population towards arm-chair structures as well, but the effect is small. Possible improvement of the "warm-up" approach to produce armchair SWCNTs will be discussed. These results demonstrate that PLV production technique can provide at least partial control over the nanotube (n,m) population. In addition, these results have implications for the understanding the nanotube nucleation mechanism in the laser oven.

  2. Dynamics of ultra-short electromagnetic pulses in the system of chiral carbon nanotube waveguides in the presence of external alternating electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konobeeva, N.N., E-mail: yana_nn@inbox.ru [Volgograd State University, University Avenue 100, Volgograd 400062 (Russian Federation); Belonenko, M.B. [Volgograd Institute of Business, Uzhno-ukrainskaya str., Volgograd 400048 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-01

    The paper addresses the propagation of ultra-short optical pulses in chiral carbon nanotubes in the presence of external alternating electric field. Following the assumption that the considered optical pulses are represented in the form of discrete solitons, we analyze the wave equation for the electromagnetic field and consider the dynamics of pulses in external field, their initial amplitudes and frequencies.

  3. Insights into chirality distributions of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown on different CoxMg1-xO solid solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Jiang, Hua; Kauppi, Inkeri

    2014-01-01

    Low-temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was achieved on two different types of Co xMg1-xO catalysts prepared by different techniques: atomic layer deposition (ALD) and impregnation. The chirality distribution of SWNTs grown on the ALD...

  4. Spin-orbit interaction in chiral carbon nanotubes probed in pulsed magnetic fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jhang, S.H.; Marganska, M.; Skourski, Y.; Preusche, D.; Witkamp, B.; Grifoni, M.; Van der Zant, H.; Wosnitza, J.; Strunk, C.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetoconductance of an open carbon nanotube (CNT)-quantum wire was measured in pulsed magnetic fields. At low temperatures, we find a peculiar split magnetoconductance peak close to the chargeneutrality point. Our analysis of the data reveals that this splitting is intimately connected to the

  5. Self-Assemblies of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes through Tunable Tethering of Pyrenes by Dextrin for Rapidly Chiral Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Li Wei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrene-modified dextrin (Py-Dex was synthesized via the Schiff base reaction between reducing end of dextrins and 1-aminopyrene, and then self-assemblies of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs were fabricated through the tunable tethering of pyrene to SWNTs by dextrin chains. The Py-Dex-SWNTs assemblies were found to be significantly water-soluble because of the synergistic effect of dextrin chains and pyrene moieties. Py-Dex and Py-Dex-SWNTs were adequately characterized by NMR, UV-vis, fluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The tethering effect of dextrin toward pyrene moieties was clearly revealed and was found to be tunable by adjusting the length of dextrin chains. The fluorescence of pyrene moieties was sufficiently quenched by SWNTs with the support of dextrin chains. Furthermore, the Py-Dex-SWNTs assemblies were used for chiral selective sensing by introducing cyclodextrins as chiral binding sites. The rapid chiral sensing was successfully tested for different enantiomers.

  6. Proton channeling through long chiral carbon nanotubes: The rainbow route to equilibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, S. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)], E-mail: petrovs@vin.bg.ac.yu; Telecki, I.; Borka, D.; Neskovic, N. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2008-09-15

    In this work we investigate the rainbows appearing in channeling of 1 GeV protons through the long (11,9) single-wall carbon nanotubes. The nanotube length is varied from 10 to 500 {mu}m. The angular distributions of channeled protons are computed using the numerical solution of the proton equations of motion in the transverse plane and the Monte Carlo method. The rainbows are identified as the rings in the angular distributions, which correspond to the extrema of the proton deflection functions. Each rainbow is characterized by a sharp decrease of the proton yield on its large angle side. As the nanotube length increases, the number of rainbows increases and the average distance between them decreases in an easily predictable way. When the average distance between the rainbows becomes smaller than the resolution of the angular distribution, one cannot distinguish between the adjacent rainbows, and the angular distribution becomes equilibrated. We call this route to equilibration the rainbow route to equilibration. This work is a demonstration of how a simple one-dimensional bound dynamic system can exhibit a complex collective behavior.

  7. A Ratiometric Sensor Using Single Chirality Near-Infrared Fluorescent Carbon Nanotubes: Application to In Vivo Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Juan P; Landry, Markita P; Kwak, Seon-Yeong; Jain, Rishabh M; Wong, Min Hao; Iverson, Nicole M; Ben-Naim, Micha; Strano, Michael S

    2015-08-26

    Advances in the separation and functionalization of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) by their electronic type have enabled the development of ratiometric fluorescent SWCNT sensors for the first time. Herein, single chirality SWCNT are independently functionalized to recognize either nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), or no analyte (remaining invariant) to create optical sensor responses from the ratio of distinct emission peaks. This ratiometric approach provides a measure of analyte concentration, invariant to the absolute intensity emitted from the sensors and hence, more stable to external noise and detection geometry. Two distinct ratiometric sensors are demonstrated: one version for H(2)O(2), the other for NO, each using 7,6 emission, and each containing an invariant 6,5 emission wavelength. To functionalize these sensors from SWCNT isolated from the gel separation technique, a method for rapid and efficient coating exchange of single chirality sodium dodecyl sulfate-SWCNT is introduced. As a proof of concept, spatial and temporal patterns of the ratio sensor response to H(2)O(2) and, separately, NO, are monitored in leaves of living plants in real time. This ratiometric optical sensing platform can enable the detection of trace analytes in complex environments such as strongly scattering media and biological tissues. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Chirality dependence of exciton effects for E{sub 33} and E{sub 44} in single wall carbon nanotubes under axial magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Guili, E-mail: yuguili_lxy@cumt.edu.cn [Department of Physics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008 (China); Tang, Gang [Department of Physics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008 (China); Jia, Yonglei [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang 464000 (China); Wu, Ling [Department of Physics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008 (China)

    2012-05-14

    Within the framework of tight-binding model, we have studied the excitons and binding energies of E{sub 33} and E{sub 44} transitions in the semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) under axial magnetic field (B). The obtained results show that the E{sub 33} and E{sub 44} excitons are split by the axial magnetic field, and the splitting depends on both diameter and chirality. In addition, it is more interesting to find that the binding energies of E{sub 33} and E{sub 44} transitions are also split by the axial magnetic field, whose splitting presents a clear family behavior, diameter and chirality dependence. However, due to the contrary family behavior of E{sub 33} and E{sub 44} transitions, a crossover of the splitting appears for some of the carbon nanotubes, which is similar to the overlap of E{sub 33} and E{sub 44} transition energies detected by the experiment. -- Highlights: ► Exciton splitting depends on diameter and chirality for E{sub 33} and E{sub 44} in single wall nanotube under axial magnetic field. ► Binding energy was split by the magnetic field, showing a family behavior. ► A crossover is found for the binding energy splitting.

  9. 148. Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Hedmer, Maria; Kåredal, Monica; Gustavsson, Per; Rissler, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be seen as graphene sheets rolled to form cylinders. CNTs may be categorised as single- (SWCNT) or multi-walled (MWCNT). Due to the small size, the number of particles as well as the surface area per mass unit is extremely high. CNTs are highly diverse, differing with respect to e.g., diameter, length, chiral angles, chemical functionalisation, purity, stiffness and bulk density. Today, CNTs are utilised primarily for the reinforcement of composite polymers, but th...

  10. Change in Chirality of Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Can Overcome Anionic Surfactant Stabilization: A Systematic Study of Aggregation Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Iftheker A; Flora, Joseph R V; Nabiul Afrooz, A R M; Aich, Nirupam; Schierz, P Ariette; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Saleh, Navid B

    2015-05-20

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes' (SWNT) effectiveness in applications is enhanced by debundling or stabilization. Anionic surfactants are known to effectively stabilize SWNTs. However, the role of specific chirality on surfactant-stabilized SWNT aggregation has not been studied to date. The aggregation behavior of chirally enriched (6,5) and (7,6) semiconducting SWNTs, functionalized with three anionic surfactants-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), and sodium deoxycholate (SDOCO)-was evaluated with time-resolved dynamic light scattering. A wide range of mono- (NaCl) and di-valent (CaCl2) electrolytes as well as a 2.5 mg TOC/L Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) were used as background chemistry. Overall, SDBS showed the most effectiveness in SWNT stability, followed by SDOCO and SDS. However, the relatively larger diameter (7,6) chiral tubes compromised the surfactant stability, compared to (6,5) chiral enrichment, due to enhanced van der Waals interaction. The presence of di-valent electrolytes overshadowed the chirality effects and resulted in similar aggregation behavior for both the SWNT samples. Molecular modeling results enumerated key differences in surfactant conformation on SWNT surfaces and identified interaction energy changes between the two chiralities to delineate aggregation mechanisms. The stability of SWNTs increased in the presence of SRHA under 10 mM monovalent and mixed electrolyte conditions. The results suggest that change in chirality can overcome surfactant stabilization of semiconducting SWNTs. SWNT stability can also be strongly influenced by the anionic surfactant structure.

  11. Self-formation of highly aligned metallic, semiconducting and single chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes assemblies via a crystal template method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Hideki; Hasegawa, Kai; Yanagi, Kazuhiro, E-mail: yanagi-kazuhiro@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Oyane, Ayako [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Naitoh, Yasuhisa [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan)

    2014-09-01

    The fabrication of an aligned array of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a single chiral state has been a significant challenge for SWCNT applications as well as for basic science research. Here, we developed a simple, unique technique to produce assemblies in which metallic, semiconducting, and single chiral state SWCNTs were densely and highly aligned. We utilized a crystal of surfactant as a template on which mono-dispersed SWCNTs in solution self-assembled. Micro-Raman measurements and scanning electron microscopy measurements clearly showed that the SWCNTs were highly and densely aligned parallel to the crystal axis, indicating that approximately 70% of the SWCNTs were within 7° of being parallel. Moreover, the assemblies exhibited good field effect transistor characteristics with an on/off ratio of 1.3 × 10{sup 5}.

  12. Chirality controlled responsive self-assembled nanotubes in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijken, D. J.; Stacko, P.; Stuart, M. C. A.; Browne, W. R.; Feringa, B. L.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of using chirality to dictate dimensions and to store chiral information in self-assembled nanotubes in a fully controlled manner is presented. We report a photoresponsive amphiphile that co-assembles with its chiral counterpart to form nanotubes and demonstrate how chirality can be used

  13. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms...... an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From...... the calculated energies we determine the elastic properties of the single-wall carbon nanotubes (Young modulus, curvature constant) and perform a comparison with available experimental measurements and earlier theoretical predictions....

  14. Carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    SLOBODAN N. MARINKOVIC

    2008-01-01

    Nanotubes, the last in the focus of scientists in a series of “all carbon” materials discovered over the last several decades are the most interesting and have the greatest potential. This review aims at presenting in a concise manner the considerable amount of knowledge accumulated since the discovery of this amazing form of solid carbon, particularly during the last 15 years. The topics include methods of synthesis, mathematical description, characterization by Raman spectroscopy, most impo...

  15. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  16. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  17. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small

  18. Symmetry of chiral nanotubes: Natural torsion and diffraction evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovic, Tatjana; Lazic, Natasa; Milosevic, Ivanka; Damnjanovic, Milan [NanoLab, Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia)

    2012-12-15

    Optimizations performed with geometrical, molecular mechanics, and density functional models show that chiral carbon nanotube configuration is slightly twisted with respect to the rolled-up geometry. The torsion angle is small, <1 Aa{sup -1} for ultrathin tubes, and decreases with tube diameter. The effect can be explained through breaking of local symmetry of the equally distant neighbors in graphene, which is diminished by the torsion. Although, the twist is small, still, we single out features in diffraction patterns which can distinguish between twisted and non-twisted configurations, at least for narrow single-walled carbon nanotubes. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Strongly correlated electron behavior in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hone James

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available One dimensional systems offer a fascinating platform for investigating and understanding the collective and many-body behavior of interacting electron systems. We report low-temperature transport experiments on carbon nanotubes, which are archetypal one-dimensional systems that have either semiconducting or metallic band structure depending on their radius and chirality. Semiconducting nanotubes at low densities exhibit Wigner crystal behavior, while nominally metallic nanotubes are observed to have an energy gap at half filling, consistent with theories of a Mott insulating state in nanotubes. Our results demonstrate nanotubes’ promise for studying a variety of tunable correlated electron phenomena in one dimension.

  20. Carbon nanotubes decorating methods

    OpenAIRE

    A.D. Dobrzańska-Danikiewicz; Łukowiec, D.; D. Cichock; W. Wolany

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The work is to present and characterise various methods of depositing carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles of precious metals, and also to present the results of own works concerning carbon nanotubes coated with platinum nanoparticles.Design/methodology/approach: Electron transmission and scanning microscopy has been used for imaging the structure and morphology of the nanocomposites obtained and the distribution of nanoparticles on the surface of carbon nanotubes.Findings: The studie...

  1. Chirality-Controlled Growth of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Vapor Phase Epitaxy: Mechanistic Understanding and Scalable Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-15

    the Diels–Alder reaction (reaction 3). The C-C single bond created by reaction 3 can be converted into a double bond via a radical (CH3• or H...nanotubes grown from pretreated C50H10 end-caps possess exceptionally small diameters, we speculate that nanotube diameter-induced stability

  2. Change in Chirality of Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Can Overcome Anionic Surfactant Stabilization: A Systematic Study of Aggregation Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Iftheker A.; Flora, Joseph R. V.; Nabiul Afrooz, A. R. M.; Aich, Nirupam; Schierz, P. Ariette; Ferguson, P. Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Navid B. Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes’ (SWNT) effectiveness in applications is enhanced by debundling or stabilization. Anionic surfactants are known to effectively stabilize SWNTs. However, the role of specific chirality on surfactant-stabilized SWNT aggregation has not been studied to date. The aggregation behavior of chirally enriched (6,5) and (7,6) semiconducting SWNTs, functionalized with three anionic surfactants—sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), and sodiu...

  3. Carbon nanotubes cement composites

    OpenAIRE

    Simone Musso; Jean-Marc Tulliani; Giuseppe Ferro

    2011-01-01

    The present paper reviews the current state of the art of carbon nanotubes cement-based composites and the possible applications. The influence of carbon nanotubes additions onto cement paste mechanical and electrical properties are discussed in detail. Though promising, several challenges have still to be solved before the introduction of these new materials into the public sphere through civil infrastructures.

  4. Investigation of growth dynamics of carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna V. Kharlamova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with defined properties is required for both fundamental investigations and practical applications. The revealing and thorough understanding of the growth mechanism of SWCNTs is the key to the synthesis of nanotubes with required properties. This paper reviews the current status of the research on the investigation of growth dynamics of carbon nanotubes. The review starts with the consideration of the peculiarities of the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes. The physical and chemical states of the catalyst during the nanotube growth are discussed. The chirality selective growth of nanotubes is described. The main part of the review is dedicated to the analysis and systematization of the reported results on the investigation of growth dynamics of nanotubes. The studies on the revealing of the dependence of the growth rate of nanotubes on the synthesis parameters are reviewed. The correlation between the lifetime of catalyst and growth rate of nanotubes is discussed. The reports on the calculation of the activation energy of the nanotube growth are summarized. Finally, the growth properties of inner tubes inside SWCNTs are considered.

  5. Investigation of growth dynamics of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with defined properties is required for both fundamental investigations and practical applications. The revealing and thorough understanding of the growth mechanism of SWCNTs is the key to the synthesis of nanotubes with required properties. This paper reviews the current status of the research on the investigation of growth dynamics of carbon nanotubes. The review starts with the consideration of the peculiarities of the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes. The physical and chemical states of the catalyst during the nanotube growth are discussed. The chirality selective growth of nanotubes is described. The main part of the review is dedicated to the analysis and systematization of the reported results on the investigation of growth dynamics of nanotubes. The studies on the revealing of the dependence of the growth rate of nanotubes on the synthesis parameters are reviewed. The correlation between the lifetime of catalyst and growth rate of nanotubes is discussed. The reports on the calculation of the activation energy of the nanotube growth are summarized. Finally, the growth properties of inner tubes inside SWCNTs are considered. PMID:28503394

  6. Purification of carbon nanotubes via selective heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, John A.; Wilson, William L.; Jin, Sung Hun; Dunham, Simon N.; Xie, Xu; Islam, Ahmad; Du, Frank; Huang, Yonggang; Song, Jizhou

    2017-11-21

    The present invention provides methods for purifying a layer of carbon nanotubes comprising providing a precursor layer of substantially aligned carbon nanotubes supported by a substrate, wherein the precursor layer comprises a mixture of first carbon nanotubes and second carbon nanotubes; selectively heating the first carbon nanotubes; and separating the first carbon nanotubes from the second carbon nanotubes, thereby generating a purified layer of carbon nanotubes. Devices benefiting from enhanced electrical properties enabled by the purified layer of carbon nanotubes are also described.

  7. Carbon nanotube macroelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialu

    In this dissertation, I discuss the application of carbon nanotubes in macroelectronis. Due to the extraordinary electrical properties such as high intrinsic carrier mobility and current-carrying capacity, single wall carbon nanotubes are very desirable for thin-film transistor (TFT) applications such as flat panel display, transparent electronics, as well as flexible and stretchable electronics. Compared with other popular channel material for TFTs, namely amorphous silicon, polycrystalline silicon and organic materials, nanotube thin-films have the advantages of low-temperature processing compatibility, transparency, and flexibility, as well as high device performance. In order to demonstrate scalable, practical carbon nanotube macroelectroncis, I have developed a platform to fabricate high-density, uniform separated nanotube based thin-film transistors. In addition, many other essential analysis as well as technology components, such as nanotube film density control, purity and diameter dependent semiconducting nanotube electrical performance study, air-stable n-type transistor fabrication, and CMOS integration platform have also been demonstrated. On the basis of the above achievement, I have further demonstrated various kinds of applications including AMOLED display electronics, PMOS and CMOS logic circuits, flexible and transparent electronics. The dissertation is structured as follows. First, chapter 1 gives a brief introduction to the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes, which serves as the background knowledge for the following chapters. In chapter 2, I will present our approach of fabricating wafer-scale uniform semiconducting carbon nanotube thin-film transistors and demonstrate their application in display electronics and logic circuits. Following that, more detailed information about carbon nanotube thin-film transistor based active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays is discussed in chapter 3. And in chapter 4, a technology to

  8. Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, S.; Xue, Yong-Qinag; Anantram, M. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses coupling between carbon nanotubes (CNT), simple metals (FEG) and a graphene sheet. The graphene sheet did not couple well with FEG, but the combination of a graphene strip and CNT did couple well with most simple metals.

  9. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuanping

    2010-01-01

    .... The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor...

  10. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C

    2015-01-01

    .... In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one...

  11. Morphing Carbon Nanotube Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-20

    muscle inspired by spider dragline silk. Nat. Commun. 5, 3322 (2014). 13. Hart, A. J. & Slocum , A. H. Rapid Growth and Flow-Mediated Nucleation of...Phys. Lett. 87, 123110 (2005). 15. A. J. Hart, A. H. Slocum . Rapid growth and flow-mediated nucleation of millimeter-scale aligned carbon nanotube... Slocum , B. L. Wardle. High-yield growth and morphology control of aligned carbon nanotubes on ceramic fibers for multifunctional enhancement of

  12. Carbon Nanotubes in Neuroscience

    OpenAIRE

    Malarkey, Erik B.; Parpura, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have electrical, mechanical and chemical properties that make them one of the most promising materials for applications in neuroscience. Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes have been increasingly used as scaffolds for neuronal growth and more recently for neural stem cell growth and differentiation. They are also used in interfaces with neurons, where they can detect neuronal electrical activity and also deliver electrical stimulation to these cells. The emerging ...

  13. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  14. Polymer-free near-infrared photovoltaics with single chirality (6,5) semiconducting carbon nanotube active layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Rishabh M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Howden, Rachel; Tvrdy, Kevin; Shimizu, Steven; Hilmer, Andrew J.; McNicholas, Thomas P.; Gleason, Karen K.; Strano, Michael S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-08-22

    We demonstrate a polymer-free carbon-based photovoltaic device that relies on exciton dissociation at the SWNT/C{sub 60} interface, as shown in the figure. Through the construction of a carbon-based photovoltaic completely free of polymeric active or transport layers, we show both the feasibility of this novel device as well as inform the mechanisms for inefficiencies in SWNTs and carbon based solar cells. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. A Review of Electronic Band Structure of Graphene and Carbon Nanotubes Using Tight Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Fathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The electronic band structure variations of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs using Huckle/tight binding approximation theory are studied. According to the chirality indices, the related expressions for energy dispersion variations of these elements are derived and plotted for zigzag and chiral nanotubes.

  16. Evaluation of carbon nanostructures as chiral selectors for direct enantiomeric separation of ephedrines by EKC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moliner-Martínez, Yolanda; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2007-08-01

    Single-walled nanotubes and multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) have been evaluated as chiral selectors for the enantiomeric separation of ephedrines by using EKC with surfactant-coated carbon nanotubes. The analysed compounds were (+/-)-ephedrine, (+/-)-norephedrine and (+/-)-N-methylephedrine. The potential of those carbon nanostructures as chiral selectors has been evaluated by changing different experimental variables such as pH, addition of organic modifiers, potential and injection time. The capability of MWNTs to resolve enantiomeric mixtures was demonstrated by using partial filling of the capillary with concentrated surfactant-coated MWNTs. Differences in the enantioselectivity were discussed.

  17. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or

  18. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage. PMID:20672061

  19. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  20. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuanping

    2010-01-05

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  1. Generalizing thermodynamic properties of bulk single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R., E-mail: krodriguez@chemistry.csudh.edu; Nanney, Warren A.; Maddux, Cassandra J.A.; Martínez, Hernán L. [Department of Chemistry, California State University, Dominguez Hills, CA 90747 (United States); Malone, Marvin A.; Coe, James V. [Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy thermodynamical potentials of single walled carbon nanotubes were studied of all types (armchairs, zig-zags, chirals (n>m), and chiral (nnanotube. Results of this study led to the proposal of a single equation for the thermodynamical potential of ΔH{sub AB}{sup 298 K} or ΔG{sub AB}{sup 298 K} (assembly of nanotubes from atoms) versus the chiral vector indexes n and m for any given nanotube. The equations show a good level of accuracy in predicting thermodynamic potentials for practical applications.

  2. Differentiating Left- and Right-Handed Carbon Nanotubes by DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Geyou; Streit, Jason K; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Zheng, Ming

    2016-12-28

    New structural characteristics emerge when solid-state crystals are constructed in lower dimensions. This is exemplified by single-wall carbon nanotubes, which exhibit a degree of freedom in handedness and a multitude of helicities that give rise to three distinct types of electronic structures: metals, quasi-metals, and semiconductors. Here we report the use of intrinsically chiral single-stranded DNA to achieve simultaneous handedness and helicity control for all three types of nanotubes. We apply polymer aqueous two-phase systems to select special DNA-wrapped carbon nanotubes, each of which we argue must have an ordered DNA structure that binds to a nanotube of defined handedness and helicity and resembles a well-folded biomacromolecule with innate stereoselectivity. We have screened over 300 short single-stranded DNA sequences with palindrome symmetry, leading to the selection of more than 20 distinct carbon nanotube structures that have defined helicity and handedness and cover the entire chiral angle range and all three electronic types. The mechanism of handedness selection is illustrated by a DNA sequence that adopts two distinct folds on a pair of (6,5) nanotube enantiomers, rendering them large differences in fluorescence intensity and chemical reactivity. This result establishes a first example of functionally distinguishable left- and right-handed carbon nanotubes. Taken together, our work demonstrates highly efficient enantiomer differentiation by DNA and offers a first comprehensive solution to achieve simultaneous handedness and helicity control for all three electronic types of carbon nanotubes.

  3. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  4. Carbon Nanotubes: Measuring Dispersion and Length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Bauer, Barry J.; Hobbie, Erik K.; Becker, Matthew L.; Hight-Walker, Angela; Simpson, Jeffrey R.; Chun, Jaehun; Obrzut, Jan; Bajpai, Vardhan; Phelan, Fred R.; Simien, Daneesh; Yeon Huh, Ji; Migler, Kalman B.

    2011-03-01

    Advanced technological uses of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) rely on the production of single length and chirality populations that are currently only available through liquid phase post processing. The foundation of all of these processing steps is the attainment of individualized nanotube dispersion in solution; an understanding of the collodial properties of the dispersed SWCNTs can then be used to designed appropriate conditions for separations. In many instances nanotube size, particularly length, is especially active in determining the achievable properties from a given population, and thus there is a critical need for measurement technologies for both length distribution and effective separation techniques. In this Progress Report, we document the current state of the art for measuring dispersion and length populations, including separations, and use examples to demonstrate the desirability of addressing these parameters.

  5. Magnetic solid-phase extraction based on magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotubes for the simultaneous enantiomeric analysis of five β-blockers in the environmental samples by chiral liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaokun; Zhang, Xue; Jiang, Shenmeng; Guo, Xingjie

    2018-04-01

    In this work, the magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Mag-MWCNTs) were prepared by self-assembly method and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray and vibrating sample magnetometer. Then, these synthetic Mag-MWCNTs were used as sorbents to extract five β-blockers (atenolol, metoprolol, esmolol, pindolol and arotinolol) by magnetic solid-phase extraction. The target analytes adsorbed on Mag-MWCNTs were eluted and determined on a chiral α-acid glycoprotein column coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Eventually, the proposed method was applied to the analysis of the enantiomeric composition of the studied β-blockers in three environmental samples, including river water, influent wastewater and effluent wastewater. Method detection and quantification limits for all enantiomers were in the range of 0.50-1.45 and 1.63-3.75ng/L, respectively. Satisfactory recovery (82.9-95.6%), good intra-day precision (RSD 0.4-10.4%) and inter-day precision (RSD 2.9-7.4%) were also obtained. With numerous advantages such as simplicity of operation, rapidity and high enrichment factor, the newly developed method has potential to assess the enantioselectivity of chiral drugs in ecotoxicity and biodegradation processes, which is also a new expanded application of Mag-MWCNTs in the environmental analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural characterization of carbon nanotubes via the vibrational density of states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, Albert J.; Jain, Sandeep K.; Barkema, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    The electrical and chemical properties of carbon nanotubes vary significantly with different chirality and diameter, making the experimental determination of these structural properties important. Here, we show that the vibrational density of states (VDOS) contains information on the structure of

  7. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    OpenAIRE

    Li Jianyi; Pan Hui; Feng YuanPing

    2010-01-01

    Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disad...

  8. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  9. Thermodynamics on Soluble Carbon Nanotubes: How Do DNA Molecules Replace Surfactants on Carbon Nanotubes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yuichi; Inoue, Ayaka; Niidome, Yasuro; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2012-01-01

    Here we represent thermodynamics on soluble carbon nanotubes that enables deep understanding the interactions between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and molecules. We selected sodium cholate and single-stranded cytosine oligo-DNAs (dCn (n = 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 15, and 20)), both of which are typical SWNT solubilizers, and successfully determined thermodynamic properties (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS values) for the exchange reactions of sodium cholate on four different chiralities of SWNTs ((n,m) = (6,5), (7,5), (10,2), and (8,6)) for the DNAs. Typical results contain i) the dC5 exhibited an exothermic exchange, whereas the dC6, 8, 10, 15, and 20 materials exhibited endothermic exchanges, and ii) the energetics of the dC4 and dC7 exchanges depended on the associated chiral indices and could be endothermic or exothermic. The presented method is general and is applicable to any molecule that interacts with nanotubes. The study opens a way for science of carbon nanotube thermodynamics. PMID:23066502

  10. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Photovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiadis, Harry; Haldar, Pradeep; Landi, Brian J.; Denno, Patrick L.; DiLeo, Roberta A.; VanDerveer, William; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be envisioned as an individual graphene sheet rolled into a seamless cylinder (single-walled, SWNT), or concentric sheets as in the case of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) (1). The role-up vector will determine the hexagonal arrangement and "chirality" of the graphene sheet, which will establish the nanotube to be metallic or semiconducting. The optoelectronic properties will depend directly on this chiral angle and the diameter of the SWNT, with semiconductor types exhibiting a band gap energy (2). Characteristic of MWNTs are the concentric graphene layers spaced 0.34 nm apart, with diameters from 10-200 nm and lengths up to hundreds of microns (2). In the case of SWNTs, the diameters range from 0.4 - 2 nm and lengths have been reported up to 1.5 cm (3). SWNTs have the distinguishable property of "bundling" together due to van der Waal's attractions to form "ropes." A comparison of these different structural types is shown in Figure 1. The use of SWNTS in space photovoltaic (PV) applications is attractive for a variety of reasons. Carbon nanotubes as a class of materials exhibit unprecedented optical, electrical, mechanical properties, with the added benefit of being nanoscale in size which fosters ideal interaction in nanomaterial-based devices like polymeric solar cells. The optical bandgap of semiconducting SWNTs can be varied from approx. 0.4 - 1.5 eV, with this property being inversely proportional to the nanotube diameter. Recent work at GE Global Research has shown where a single nanotube device can behave as an "ideal" pn diode (5). The SWNT was bridged over a SiO2 channel between Mo contacts and exhibited an ideality factor of 1, based on a fit of the current-voltage data using the diode equation. The measured PV efficiency under a 0.8 eV monochromatic illumination showed a power conversion efficiency of 0.2 %. However, the projected efficiency of these junctions is estimated to be > 5 %, especially when one considers the

  11. Amino acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes for improving compatibility with chiral poly(amide-ester-imide) containing L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine linkages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdolmaleki, Amir, E-mail: abdolmaleki@cc.iut.ac.ir [Organic Polymer Chemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Institute, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mallakpour, Shadpour, E-mail: mallakpour84@alumni.ufl.edu [Organic Polymer Chemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Institute, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Borandeh, Sedigheh [Organic Polymer Chemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Amino acid functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs)/poly(amide-ester-imide) (PAEI) composites were fabricated by solution mixing method. Proper functionalization and mixing strategy of MWCNTs provides the best opportunity for better distribution and bonding of nanoparticles to the polymer matrix. MWCNTs have been chemically modified with L-phenylalanine to improve their compatibility with L-phenylalanine based PAEI. Field emission scanning electron microscopy micrographs of composite revealed that f-MWCNTs made a good interaction with polymer chains by wrapping the polymer around them, and transmission electron microscopy results confirmed well dispersion with nano size of f-MWCNTs in the polymer matrix. In addition, thermal analysis showed good enhancement in thermal properties of composites compared to pure polymer. Thermal stability of the composites containing f-MWCNTs was enhanced due to their good dispersion and improved interfacial interaction between the amino acid based PAEI matrix and f-MWCNTs.

  12. Carbon Nanotubes and Modern Nanoagriculture

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2015-01-27

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have been prominent members of the nanomaterial family. Owing to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been proven to be a useful tool in the field of plant science. They were frequently perceived to bring about valuable biotechnological and agricultural applications that still remain beyond experimental realization. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the ability of carbon nanotubes to traverse different plant cell barriers. These studies, also, assessed the toxicity and environmental impacts of these nanomaterials. The knowledge provided by these studies is of practical and fundamental importance for diverse applications including intracellular labeling and imaging, genetic transformation, and for enhancing our knowledge of plant cell biology. Although different types of nanoparticles have been found to activate physiological processes in plants, carbon nanotubes received particular interest. Following addition to germination medium, carbon nanotubes enhanced root growth and elongation of some plants such as onion, cucumber and rye-grass. They, also, modulated the expression of some genes that are essential for cell division and plant development. In addition, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were evidenced to penetrate thick seed coats, stimulate germination, and to enhance growth of young tomato seedlings. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes can penetrate deeply into the root system and further distribute into the leaves and the fruits. In recent studies, carbon nanotubes were reported to be chemically entrapped into the structure of plant tracheary elements. This should activate studies in the fields of plant defense and wood engineering. Although, all of these effects on plant physiology and plant developmental biology have not been fully understood, the valuable findings promises more research activity in the near future toward complete scientific understanding of

  13. Electron configuration of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojkovic, S.M.; Setrajcic, J.P. [Novi Sad Univ. (Yugoslavia). Inst. of Physics; Vragovic, I.D. [Technical Faculty M. Pupin, Zrenjanin (Yugoslavia)

    2000-07-01

    In the paper the analysis of electron band structure of infinite carbon nanotubes was performed using Green's function method. The electron dispersion law was found in harmonic and nearest neighbor approximation. One can see that carbon nanotubes of infinite length can be divided into two classes: metallic and semiconducting. Additional spatial confinement of the system along the nanotube axes leads to the opening of the forbidden gap even in nanotubes that are metallic for infinite length. The value of the forbidden gap decreases by increasing the tube length. The dependence of the forbidden gap on the tube length is not monotonic; it has oscillatory character for short tubes. (orig.)

  14. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  15. Advanced carbon nanotubes functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setaro, A.

    2017-10-01

    Similar to graphene, carbon nanotubes are materials made of pure carbon in its sp2 form. Their extended conjugated π-network provides them with remarkable quantum optoelectronic properties. Frustratingly, it also brings drawbacks. The π-π stacking interaction makes as-produced tubes bundle together, blurring all their quantum properties. Functionalization aims at modifying and protecting the tubes while hindering π-π stacking. Several functionalization strategies have been developed to circumvent this limitation in order for nanotubes applications to thrive. In this review, we summarize the different approaches established so far, emphasizing the balance between functionalization efficacy and the preservation of the tubes’ properties. Much attention will be given to a functionalization strategy overcoming the covalent-noncovalent dichotomy and to the implementation of two advanced functionalization schemes: (a) conjugation with molecular switches, to yield hybrid nanosystems with chemo-physical properties that can be tuned in a controlled and reversible way, and; (b) plasmonic nanosystems, whose ability to concentrate and enhance the electromagnetic fields can be taken advantage of to enhance the optical response of the tubes.

  16. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  17. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  19. Confinement in single walled carbon nanotubes investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battie, Y., E-mail: yann.battie@univ-lorraine.fr [LCP-A2MC, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57070 Metz (France); Jamon, D. [Université de Lyon, Université Jean Monnet, EA 3523, Laboratoire Télécom Claude Chappe, 25 rue du Dr Rémy Annino, 42000 Saint Etienne (France); Lauret, J.S. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, UPR 3321, ENS Cachan, 94245 Cachan (France); Gu, Q.; Gicquel-Guézo, M. [FOTON, UMR 6082, INSA, Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, 35043 Rennes (France); En Naciri, A. [LCP-A2MC, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57070 Metz (France); Loiseau, A. [Laboratoire d' étude des microstructures, ONERA-CNRS UMR 104, 29 Av. de la Division Leclerc, 92322 Chatillon (France)

    2014-11-28

    Thick films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameter and chirality distributions are characterized by combining transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The dependence of the dielectric function with the increase of the SWCNT diameter occurs with a drastic redshift of the S{sub 11}, S{sub 22} and M{sub 11} transition energies. The transfer integral parameter γ{sub 0} of SWCNT is also evaluated and analyzed. We demonstrate that parts of the optical properties of SWCNTs are attributed to a one dimensional confinement effect. - Highlights: • Ellipsometric measurements are performed on carbon nanotube thick films. • The complex dielectric functions of conventional carbon nanotubes are given. • Confinement effects explain the variations of dielectric function of nanotubes.

  20. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  1. Carbon nanotubes: engineering biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Burgos, Juan C; Yu, Jiamei; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylinder-shaped allotropic forms of carbon, most widely produced under chemical vapor deposition. They possess astounding chemical, electronic, mechanical, and optical properties. Being among the most promising materials in nanotechnology, they are also likely to revolutionize medicine. Among other biomedical applications, after proper functionalization carbon nanotubes can be transformed into sophisticated biosensing and biocompatible drug-delivery systems, for specific targeting and elimination of tumor cells. This chapter provides an introduction to the chemical and electronic structure and properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a description of the main synthesis and post-synthesis methods. These sections allow the reader to become familiar with the specific characteristics of these materials and the manner in which these properties may be dependent on the specific synthesis and post-synthesis processes. The chapter ends with a review of the current biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes, highlighting successes and challenges. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Single carbon nanotube photovoltaic device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barkelid, K.M.; Zwiller, V.G.

    2013-01-01

    Here we present photocurrent measurements on a single suspended carbon nanotube p-n junction. The p-n junction was induced by electrostatic doping by local gates, and the E11 and E22 resonances in the nanotube could be probed using photocurrent spectroscopy. Current-voltage characteristics were

  3. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  4. Enhanced Carbon Nanotube Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation utilizes carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with pseudo-capacitive MnO2 material as nano-composite electrode and ionic electrolyte for the...

  5. Transparent, Conductive Carbon Nanotube Films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhuangchun Wu; Zhihong Chen; Xu Du; Jonathan M. Logan; Jennifer Sippel; Maria Nikolou; Katalin Kamaras; John R. Reynolds; David B. Tanner; Arthur F. Hebard; Andrew G. Rinzler

    2004-01-01

    We describe a simple process for the fabrication of ultrathin, transparent, optically homogeneous, electrically conducting films of pure single-walled carbon nanotubes and the transfer of those films...

  6. A modal analysis of carbon nanotube using elastic network model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Hyeok; Seo, Sang Jae; Lim, Byeong Soo; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Moon Ki [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Wing Kam [Northwestern Univ., Evanston (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Although it is widely known that both size and chirality play significant roles in vibration behaviors of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), there haven't been yet enough studies specifying the relationship between structure and vibration mode shape of SWCNTs. We have analyzed the chirality and length dependence of SWCNT by using normal mode analysis based elastic network model in which all interatomic interactions of the given SWCNTs structure are represented by a network of linear spring connections. As this method requires relatively short computation time compared to molecular dynamics simulation, we can efficiently analyze vibration behavior of SWCNTs. To ensure the relationship between SWCNT structure and its vibration mode shapes, we simulated more than one hundred SWCNTs having different types of chirality and length. Results indicated that the first two major mode shapes are bending and breathing. The minimum length of nanotube for maintaining the bending mode does not depend on chirality but on its diameter. Our simulations pointed out that there is a critical aspect ratio between diameter and length to determine vibration mode shapes, and it can be empirically formulated as a function of nanotube length and diameter. Therefore, uniformity control is the most important premise in order to utilize vibration features of SWCNTs. It is also expected that the obtained vibration aspect will play an important role in designing nanotube based devices such as resonators and sensors more accurately.

  7. The use of NH3 to promote the production of large-diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes with a narrow (n,m) distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhen; Jiang, Hua; Susi, Toma; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2011-02-09

    We demonstrate here a simple and effective (n,m)-selective growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in an aerosol floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process by introducing a certain amount of ammonia (NH(3)). Chiralities of carbon nanotubes produced in the presence of 500 ppm NH(3) at 880 °C are narrowly distributed around the major semiconducting (13,12) nanotube with over 90% of SWCNTs having large chiral angles in the range 20°-30°, and nearly 50% in the range 27°-29°. The developed synthesis process enables chiral-selective growth at high temperature for structurally stable carbon nanotubes with large diameters.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes and Related Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kingsuk Mukhopadhyay; Kanik Ram; K.U. Bhasker Rao

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists world wide. The small dimensions,strength, and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review, the structural aspects, the advantages and disadvantages of different for their procedures synthesis, the qualitative and quantitative estimation of carbon nanotubes by different analytical techniques, the present status on their applications a...

  9. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individual......, electrically-gated carbon nanotubes, and present experimental efforts to understand their electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom, which in the future may enable quantum applications....

  10. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  11. Chiral acidic amino acids induce chiral hierarchical structure in calcium carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenge; Pacella, Michael S.; Athanasiadou, Dimitra; Nelea, Valentin; Vali, Hojatollah; Hazen, Robert M.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; McKee, Marc D.

    2017-04-01

    Chirality is ubiquitous in biology, including in biomineralization, where it is found in many hardened structures of invertebrate marine and terrestrial organisms (for example, spiralling gastropod shells). Here we show that chiral, hierarchically organized architectures for calcium carbonate (vaterite) can be controlled simply by adding chiral acidic amino acids (Asp and Glu). Chiral, vaterite toroidal suprastructure having a `right-handed' (counterclockwise) spiralling morphology is induced by L-enantiomers of Asp and Glu, whereas `left-handed' (clockwise) morphology is induced by D-enantiomers, and sequentially switching between amino-acid enantiomers causes a switch in chirality. Nanoparticle tilting after binding of chiral amino acids is proposed as a chiral growth mechanism, where a `mother' subunit nanoparticle spawns a slightly tilted, consequential `daughter' nanoparticle, which by amplification over various length scales creates oriented mineral platelets and chiral vaterite suprastructures. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for how biomineralization-related enantiomers might exert hierarchical control to form extended chiral suprastructures.

  12. Carbon nanotube computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulaker, Max M; Hills, Gage; Patil, Nishant; Wei, Hai; Chen, Hong-Yu; Wong, H-S Philip; Mitra, Subhasish

    2013-09-26

    The miniaturization of electronic devices has been the principal driving force behind the semiconductor industry, and has brought about major improvements in computational power and energy efficiency. Although advances with silicon-based electronics continue to be made, alternative technologies are being explored. Digital circuits based on transistors fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to outperform silicon by improving the energy-delay product, a metric of energy efficiency, by more than an order of magnitude. Hence, CNTs are an exciting complement to existing semiconductor technologies. Owing to substantial fundamental imperfections inherent in CNTs, however, only very basic circuit blocks have been demonstrated. Here we show how these imperfections can be overcome, and demonstrate the first computer built entirely using CNT-based transistors. The CNT computer runs an operating system that is capable of multitasking: as a demonstration, we perform counting and integer-sorting simultaneously. In addition, we implement 20 different instructions from the commercial MIPS instruction set to demonstrate the generality of our CNT computer. This experimental demonstration is the most complex carbon-based electronic system yet realized. It is a considerable advance because CNTs are prominent among a variety of emerging technologies that are being considered for the next generation of highly energy-efficient electronic systems.

  13. Effect of tubular chiralities of single-walled ZnO nanotubes on electronic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qin; Liu, Zhenghui; Zhou, Liping; Yu, Yiqing; Wu, Xuemei

    2017-04-01

    The electronic transport properties of single-walled ZnO nanotubes with different chiralities are investigated by nonequilibrium Green's function combined with density functional theory. In this paper we consider three representative ZnO nanotubes, namely (3, 3) armchair, (5, 0) zigzag, and (4, 2) chiral, with a similar diameter of about 5.4 Å. Short nanotubes exhibit good conductance behavior. As the tube length increases, the conductance decreases at low bias and the nanotubes indicate semiconducting behavior. The current-voltage characteristics of the nanotubes longer than 3 nm depend weakly on the length of the tubes. The armchair and chiral ZnO nanotubes with the same length and diameter have almost overlapped current-voltage curves. The electron transport behaviors are analyzed in terms of the transmission spectra, density of states and charge population of these nanotubes. The results indicate that the resonant peaks above the Fermi level are responsible for electric currents. However, the zigzag ZnO nanotubes exhibit asymmetric current-voltage curves attributed to the built-in polarization field and give larger current than the armchair and chiral nanotubes at the same bias. The features explored here strongly suggest that the ZnO nanotubes are stable, flexible structures, which are valuable in Nano-Electromechanical System.

  14. Assessment of chemically separated carbon nanotubes for nanoelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zaric, Sasa; Tu, Xiaomin; Wang, Xinran; Zhao, Wei; Dai, Hongjie

    2008-02-27

    It remains an elusive goal to obtain high performance single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWNT) electronics such as field effect transistors (FETs) composed of single- or few-chirality SWNTs, due to broad distributions in as-grown materials. Much progress has been made by various separation approaches to obtain materials enriched in metal or semiconducting nanotubes or even in single chiralties. However, research in validating SWNT separations by electrical transport measurements and building functional electronic devices has been scarce. Here, we performed length, diameter, and chirality separation of DNA functionalized HiPco SWNTs by chromatography methods, and we characterized the chiralities by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, and electrical transport measurements. The use of these combined methods provided deeper insight to the degree of separation than either technique alone. Separation of SWNTs by chirality and diameter occurred at varying degrees that decreased with increasing tube diameter. This calls for new separation methods capable of metallicity or chirality separation of large diameter SWNTs (in the approximately 1.5 nm range) needed for high performance nanoelectronics. With most of the separated fractions enriched in semiconducting SWNTs, nanotubes placed in parallel in short-channel (approximately 200 nm) electrical devices fail to produce FETs with high on/off switching, indicating incomplete elimination of metallic species. In rare cases with a certain separated SWNT fraction, we were able to fabricate FET devices composed of small-diameter, chemically separated SWNTs in parallel, with high on-/off-current (I(on)/I(off)) ratios up to 105 owing to semiconducting SWNTs with only a few (n,m) chiralities in the fraction. This was the first time that chemically separated SWNTs were used for short channel, all-semiconducting SWNT electronics dominant by just a few (n,m)'s. Nevertheless, the results suggest that

  15. Magnetic Behaviour of Transition Metal Complexes with Functionalized Chiral and C60-Filled Nanotubes as Bridging Ligands: A Theoretical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Coca, Silvia; Ruiz, Eliseo

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized nanotubes are promising candidates to promote communication between paramagnetic centres at large distances through their highly delocalized π systems. Here, Density Functional Theory methods are employed to study the exchange coupling interaction between FeIII paramagnetic centres coordinated at terminal carboxylate ligands of functionalized nanotubes. Chiral nanotubes exhibit ferromagnetic coupling at long distances while non-chiral systems usually favor antiferromagnetic cou...

  16. Intershell resistance in multiwall carbon nanotubes: A Coulomb drag study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Anders Mathias; Flensborg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the intershell resistance R-21 in a multiwall carbon nanotube as a function of temperature T and Fermi level epsilon(F) (e.g., a gate voltage), varying the chirality of the inner and outer tubes. This is done in a so-called Coulomb drag setup, where a current I-1 in one shell induces...... effects for the Coulomb drag between different tubes due to selection rules combined with mismatching of wave vector and crystal angular momentum conservation near the Fermi level. This gives rise to orders of magnitude changes in R-21 and even the sign of R-21 can change depending on the chirality...

  17. Theoretical properties of carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Palser, A H

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are invariably terminated with hemi-fullerene caps. In order to investigate the effect of these caps on the electronic structure, a method is developed to enumerate every hemi-fullerene cap which is commensurate with a given nanotube body. This algorithm is then applied to nanotubes for which I + m <= 25. The results of this algorithm are then used to study the effects of caps with different symmetries on the electronic structure of metallic and semi-conducting nanotubes within the Hueckel model. It is found that caps can cause localised and resonance states, although the likelihood of localised states occurring in capped metallic nanotubes is shown to be small. In addition, caps induce a non-uniform charge distribution, in which negative charge tends to accumulate on pentagon vertices. The thesis ends by describing two new density matrix methods for performing linear-scaling electronic-structure calculations within the independent electron approximation. Example calculations demonstrate t...

  18. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  19. Optical absorption of charged excitons in semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnow, Troels Frimodt; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Cornean, Horia

    2012-01-01

    In this article we examine the absorption coefficient of charged excitons in carbon nanotubes. We investigate the temperature and damping dependence of the absorption spectra. We show that the trion peak in the spectrum is asymmetric for temperatures greater than approximately 1 K whereas...... the absorption peak arising from excitons is symmetric. We expect the positive and negative trion absorption line shapes to be identical, independently of the chiral index (n,m)....

  20. Index assignment of a carbon nanotube rope using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goss, Karin; Schneider, Claus M.; Meyer, Carola [Peter Gruenberg Institut, Forschungszentrum Juelich and JARA Juelich Aachen Research Alliance, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Peica, Niculina; Thomsen, Christian; Maultzsch, Janina [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenberg Str. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    We used tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to study the diameter-dependent Raman modes in a contacted carbon nanotube (CNT) rope. We show that with the near-field tip enhancement a large number of nanotubes within a rope can be identified, even if the nanotube modes cannot be distinguished in the far-field signal. Several metallic and semiconducting nanotubes can be identified and assigned to nanotube families. Additionally, we provide a tentative chiral index assignment. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Universally dispersible carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevoteau, Alexandre; Soulié-Ziakovic, Corinne; Leibler, Ludwik

    2012-12-12

    We show that supramolecular chemistry provides a convenient tool to prepare carbone nanotubes (CNTs) that can be dispersed in solvents of any chemical nature, easily recovered and redispersed. Thymine-modified CNTs (CNT-Thy) can be dispersed in solution in the presence of diaminotriazine (DAT) end-functionalized polymers, through supramolecular Thy/DAT association. DAT-polymer chains are selected according to the solvent chemical nature: polystyrene (PS) for hydrophobic/low polarity solvents and a propylene oxide/ethylene oxide copolymer (predominantly propylene oxide based, PPO/PEO) for polar solvents or water. Long-term stable supramolecular CNT dispersions are reversibly aggregated by adding a few droplets of a selective dissociating agent of the Thy/DAT association (DMSO). CNT-Thy, simply recycled by centrifugation or filtration, can be redispersed in another solvent in presence of a suitable soluble DAT-polymer. Dispersion and aggregation can also be switched on and off by choosing a polymer for which a given solvent is close to Θ-conditions, e.g., PS in cyclohexane or PPO/PEO in water.

  2. A possible role of the dipole moment of the catalyst droplet in nanotube growth, alignment, chirality, and characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, S Noor

    2012-03-02

    Why vapor species land on the surface of the nanoparticle seed for nanotube synthesis is a vital question. An investigation has been carried out to find an answer to it. For this, a model of the dipole moment has been developed. A bimetallic alloy (non-alloy, solid solution) exhibiting the shape of a cap has been assumed to function as the nanoparticle seed. Various features of the dipole moment have been examined. The influence of the dipole moment on nanotube synthesis, alignment, chirality, and characteristics has also been studied. Available experiments on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes employing bimetallic catalysts have been compared with the results from calculations. Close correspondence between the two demonstrates that the catalysts may exhibit a dipole moment and have a crucial role in nanotube synthesis and characteristics. The dipole moment has also been employed to determine why some nanotubes grow vertically, while others are bent. Calculated results appear to explain the basic causes for this. These results suggest that the electric field resulting from the dipole moment of catalysts may be important for the vertical alignment of nanotubes. They may attest to the validity of the model and to the existence of a dipole moment in seeds. Although considered for nanotube syntheses, the results may be applicable to other nanomaterials (nanotubes, nanowires, nanodots).

  3. Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Plasma CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Kato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD for single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT growth has achieved low-temperature synthesis, individually freestanding formation, and structure control of diameter, chirality, and length. Detailed growth kinetics of SWNTs are revealed using a combination of techniques for plasma control and nanomaterial analysis. Plasma CVD also allows tube metallicity to be controlled by tuning the mean diameter of SWNTs. This plasma CVD progress contributes to the next stage of nanotube fabrication, which is required for practical use of SWNTs in a variety of applications.

  4. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end

  5. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  6. Self-Assembly of Hierarchical Chiral Nanostructures Based on Metal-Benzimidazole Interactions: Chiral Nanofibers, Nanotubes, and Microtubular Flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Jin, Qingxian; Zhang, Li; Shen, Zhaocun; Jiang, Long; Liu, Minghua

    2016-09-01

    Controlled hierarchical self-assembly of synthetic molecules into chiral nanoarchitectures to mimic those biological chiral structures is of great importance. Here, a low-molecular-weight organogelator containing a benzimidazole moiety conjugated with an amphiphilic l-glutamic amide has been designed and its self-assembly into various hierarchical chiral nanostructures is investigated. Upon gel formation in organic solvents, 1D chiral nanostructure such as nanofiber and nanotube are obtained depending on the solvents. In the presence of transition and rare earth metal ions, hierarchical chiral nanostructures are formed. Specifically, the addition of TbCl3 , EuCl3 , and AgNO3 leads to nanofiber structures, while the addition of Cu(NO3 )2 , Tb(NO3 )3 , or Eu(NO3 )3 provides the microflower structures and microtubular flower structures, respectively. While Eu(III) and Tb(III)-containing microtubular flowers keep the chirality, the Cu(II)-coordinated microflowers lose chirality. More interestingly, the nanofibers formed by the gelator coordinated with Eu(III) or Tb(III) ions show not only the supramolecular chirality but also the circularly polarized luminescence. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennett, Thomas [Denver, CO; Raffaelle, Ryne P [Honeoye Falls, NY; Landi, Brian J [Rochester, NY; Heben, Michael J [Denver, CO

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  8. Synthesis, assembly, and applications of single-walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Koungmin

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, and their applications in both nano-electronics such as transistor and integrated circuits and macro-electronics in energy conversion devices as transparent conducting electrodes. Also, the high performance chemical sensor using metal oxide nanowire has been demonstrated. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction of carbon nanotube, followed by discussion of a new synthesis technique using nanosphere lithography to grow highly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes atop quartz and sapphire substrates. This method offers great potential to produce carbon nanotube arrays with simultaneous control over the nanotube orientation, position, density, diameter and even chirality. Chapter 3 introduces the wafer-scale integration and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, including full-wafer scale synthesis and transfer of massively aligned carbon nanotube arrays, and nanotube device fabrication on 4 inch Si/SiO2 wafer to yield submicron channel transistors with high on-current density ˜ 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratio and CMOS integrated circuits. In addition, various chemical doping methods for n-type nanotube transistors are studied to fabricate CMOS integrated nanotube circuits such as inverter, NAND and NOR logic devices. Furthermore, defect-tolerant circuit design for NAND and NOR is proposed and demonstrated to guarantee the correct operation of logic circuit, regardless of the presence of mis-aligned or mis-positioned nanotubes. Carbon nanotube flexible electronics and smart textiles for ubiquitous computing and sensing are demonstrated in chapter 4. A facile transfer printing technique has been introduced to transfer massively aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from the original sapphire/quartz substrates to virtually any other substrates, including glass, silicon, polymer sheets, and even fabrics. The characterization of transferred nanotubes reveals that the transferred

  9. Carbon nanotubes: synthesis, structure, functionalization, and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamolo, Valeria Anna; Vazquez, Ester; Prato, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have generated great expectations in the scientific arena, mainly due to their spectacular properties, which include a high aspect ratio, high strain resistance, and high strength, along with high conductivities. Nowadays, carbon nanotubes are produced by a variety of methods, each of them with advantages and disadvantages. Once produced, carbon nanotubes can be chemically modified, using a wide range of chemical reactions. Functionalization makes these long wires much easier to manipulate and dispersible in several solvents. In addition, the properties of carbon nanotubes can be combined with those of organic appendages. Finally, carbon nanotubes need to be carefully characterized, either as pristine or modified materials.

  10. Biomedical applications of carbon-nanotube composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Jay Russell; Jin, Chunming; Narayan, Roger J; Aggarwal, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    The unique physical, chemical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes make them attractive for a variety of biomedical applications. Carbon nanotubes have been used to modify conventional biomedical materials to enhance mechanical properties, biocompatibility, or to impart other functionalities. New multifunctional composite materials using carbon nanotubes have been developed by combining them with inorganic, polymeric or biological materials. The biomedical applications for which novel carbon nanotube composites have been investigated include antimicrobial coatings, neural implants, tissue engineering scaffolds and electrochemical biosensors. In this paper, research on development and application of carbon nanotube composites for biomedical applications has been reviewed.

  11. Carbon nanotubes and methods of making carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-04-27

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods that can be used to produce carbon nanotubes (hereinafter CNT) having an inner diameter about 5-55 nm, methods of tuning the inner diameter of CNTs (e.g., by adjusting reaction pressure), CNTs having an inner diameter of greater than 20 nm or more, and the like.

  12. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  13. Electrical conductance of carbon nanotubes with misaligned ends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantano, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.pantano@unipa.it; Muratore, Giuseppe; Montinaro, Nicola [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Gestionale, Informatica e Meccanica (Italy)

    2013-09-15

    During a manufacturing process, when a straight carbon nanotube is placed on a substrate, e.g., production of transistors, its two ends are often misaligned. In this study, we investigate the effects of multiwall carbon nanotubes' (MWCNTs) outer diameter and chirality on the change in conductance due to misalignment of the two ends. The length of the studied MWCNTs was 120 nm, while the diameters ranged between 4 and 7 nm. A mixed finite element-tight-binding approach was carefully designed to realize reduction in computational time by orders of magnitude in calculating the deformation-induced changes in the electrical transport properties of the nanotubes. Numerical results suggest that armchair MWCNTs of small diameter should work better if used as conductors, while zigzag MWCNTs of large diameter are more suitable for building sensors.Graphical Abstract.

  14. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirscher, M; Becher, M

    2003-01-01

    The article gives a comprehensive overview of hydrogen storage in carbon nanostructures, including experimental results and theoretical calculations. Soon after the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, different research groups succeeded in filling carbon nanotubes with some elements, and, therefore, the question arose of filling carbon nanotubes with hydrogen by possibly using new effects such as nano-capillarity. Subsequently, very promising experiments claiming high hydrogen storage capacities in different carbon nanostructures initiated enormous research activity. Hydrogen storage capacities have been reported that exceed the benchmark for automotive application of 6.5 wt% set by the U.S. Department of Energy. However, the experimental data obtained with different methods for various carbon nanostructures show an extreme scatter. Classical calculations based on physisorption of hydrogen molecules could not explain the high storage capacities measured at ambient temperature, and, assuming chemisorption of hydrogen atoms, hydrogen release requires temperatures too high for technical applications. Up to now, only a few calculations and experiments indicate the possibility of an intermediate binding energy. Recently, serious doubt has arisen in relation to several key experiments, causing considerable controversy. Furthermore, high hydrogen storage capacities measured for carbon nanofibers did not survive cross-checking in different laboratories. Therefore, in light of today's knowledge, it is becoming less likely that at moderate pressures around room temperature carbon nanostructures can store the amount of hydrogen required for automotive applications.

  15. Comparison of Mechanical Properties and Effects in Micro- and Nanocomposites with Carbon Fillers (Carbon Microfibers, Graphite Microwhiskers, and Carbon Nanotubes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guz', I. A.; Rushchitskii, Ya. Ya.

    2004-05-01

    The mechanical properties and effects in fibrous composite materials are compared. The materials are based on the same matrix (EPON-828 epoxy resin) and differ in the type of fibers: Thornel-300 carbon microfibers, graphite microwhiskers, carbon zigzag nanotubes, and carbon chiral nanotubes. Two material models are considered: a model of elastic medium (macrolevel model) and a model of elastic mixture (micro-nanolevel model). Mechanical constants of 40 materials (4 types + 10 modifications) are calculated and compared. The theoretical ultimate compression strength along the fibers is discussed. The effects accompanying the propagation of longitudinal waves in the fiber direction are investigated.

  16. Channeling of protons in various types of radially compressed carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabarbounis, A. [Department of Physics, Section of Nuclear and Particle Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilissia, 15771 Athens (Greece); Sarros, S., E-mail: stsarros@phys.uoa.gr [Department of Physics, Section of Nuclear and Particle Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilissia, 15771 Athens (Greece); Trikalinos, Ch. [Department of Philosophy and History of Science, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilissia, 15771 Athens (Greece)

    2015-07-15

    Channeling of 10 MeV protons in various types of radially compressed chiral carbon nanotubes is considered. Monte Carlo simulation program is used for the calculation of the trajectories, energy losses and angular distributions of protons in nanotubes of various lengths, where the potential in Doyle–Turner approximation is used to describe the interaction between a proton and a nanotube. Carbon nanotubes, which are considered, are radially compressed at the centre or at both ends. The results show that in some cases a decreased angular distribution of the beam is observed, compared with propagation through a straight nanotube. Furthermore, the energy distribution of channeled protons in nanotubes present a series of small peaks besides a main one, the number of which depends on the nanotube length and the angle of incidence, which in some cases are significantly high.

  17. Electrical Transport Properties of Carbon Nanotube Metal-Semiconductor Heterojunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been proved to have promising applicability in various fields of science and technology. Their fascinating mechanical, electrical, thermal, optical properties have caught the attention of today’s world. We have discussed here the great possibility of using CNTs in electronic devices. CNTs can be both metallic and semiconducting depending on their chirality. When two CNTs of different chirality are joined together via topological defects, they may acquire rectifying diode property. We have joined two tubes of different chiralities through circumferential Stone-Wales defects and calculated their density of states by nearest neighbor tight binding approximation. Transmission function is also calculated to analyze whether the junctions can be used as electronic devices. Different heterojunctions are modeled and analyzed in this study. Internal stresses in the heterojunctions are also calculated by molecular dynamics simulation.

  18. Modelling Heat Transfer of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xin-She

    2010-01-01

    Modelling heat transfer of carbon nanotubes is important for the thermal management of nanotube-based composites and nanoelectronic device. By using a finite element method for three-dimensional anisotropic heat transfer, we have simulated the heat conduction and temperature variations of a single nanotube, a nanotube array and a part of nanotube-based composite surface with heat generation. The thermal conductivity used is obtained from the upscaled value from the molecular simulations or ex...

  19. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laird, E.A.; Kuemmeth, F.; Steele, G.A.; Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Nygard, J.; Flensberg, K.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This

  20. A Carbon Nanotube Optical Reporter Maps Endolysosomal Lipid Flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Prakrit V; Roxbury, Daniel; Galassi, Thomas V; Akkari, Leila; Horoszko, Christopher P; Iaea, David B; Budhathoki-Uprety, Januka; Pipalia, Nina; Haka, Abigail S; Harvey, Jackson D; Mittal, Jeetain; Maxfield, Frederick R; Joyce, Johanna A; Heller, Daniel A

    2017-11-28

    Lipid accumulation within the lumen of endolysosomal vesicles is observed in various pathologies including atherosclerosis, liver disease, neurological disorders, lysosomal storage disorders, and cancer. Current methods cannot measure lipid flux specifically within the lysosomal lumen of live cells. We developed an optical reporter, composed of a photoluminescent carbon nanotube of a single chirality, that responds to lipid accumulation via modulation of the nanotube's optical band gap. The engineered nanomaterial, composed of short, single-stranded DNA and a single nanotube chirality, localizes exclusively to the lumen of endolysosomal organelles without adversely affecting cell viability or proliferation or organelle morphology, integrity, or function. The emission wavelength of the reporter can be spatially resolved from within the endolysosomal lumen to generate quantitative maps of lipid content in live cells. Endolysosomal lipid accumulation in cell lines, an example of drug-induced phospholipidosis, was observed for multiple drugs in macrophages, and measurements of patient-derived Niemann-Pick type C fibroblasts identified lipid accumulation and phenotypic reversal of this lysosomal storage disease. Single-cell measurements using the reporter discerned subcellular differences in equilibrium lipid content, illuminating significant intracellular heterogeneity among endolysosomal organelles of differentiating bone-marrow-derived monocytes. Single-cell kinetics of lipoprotein-derived cholesterol accumulation within macrophages revealed rates that differed among cells by an order of magnitude. This carbon nanotube optical reporter of endolysosomal lipid content in live cells confers additional capabilities for drug development processes and the investigation of lipid-linked diseases.

  1. Elastic properties of noncarbon nanotubes as compared to carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochaev, Aleksey

    2017-10-01

    A comparative study of stability, structural, and elastic properties of single-wall noncarbon nanotubes, including BN, AlN, GaN, AlP, GaP, and B nanotubes using ab initio simulation is presented. The proposed nanotubes can be found in nature, which is confirmed by calculation of their binding energy. The values of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio for (0,n ) and (n ,n ) proposed nanotubes with n =3 ⋯20 are obtained. The conception of two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus of planar and tubular materials was developed. The calculations show that stable forms of boron nitride nanotubes have the 2D Young's modulus almost similar to carbon nanotubes. At the same time, it is stated that boron nanotubes have a higher 2D Young's modulus than any other known carbon and noncarbon nanostructures.

  2. Applications of carbon nanotubes in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarkey, Erik B; Parpura, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are one of the most promising materials for the electronics, computer and aerospace industries. There are numerous properties of carbon nanotubes that make them attractive for applications in neurobiology: small size, flexibility, strength, inertness, electrical conductivity and ease of modification with biological compounds. Here, we discuss the current applications of carbon nanotubes in neuroscience. Carbon nanotubes and their derivatives can be used as substrates/scaffolds for neural cell growth. The chemical properties of carbon nanotubes can be systematically varied by attaching different functional groups; manipulation of the charge carried by functionalized carbon nanotubes can be used to control the outgrowth and branching pattern of neuronal processes. The ease with which carbon nanotubes can be patterned makes them attractive for studying the organization of neural networks and the electrical conductivity of nanotubes can provide a mechanism to monitor or stimulate neurons through the substrate itself. However, it is important to recognize that carbon nanotubes themselves can affect neuronal function, most likely by interaction with ion channels. The use of carbon nanotubes in neurobiology is a promising application that has the potential to develop new methods and techniques to advance the study of neuroscience.

  3. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  4. Periodic density functional theory study of structural and electronic properties of single-walled zinc oxide and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marana, Naiara L. [Modeling and Molecular Simulations Group, São Paulo State University, UNESP, 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil); Albuquerque, Anderson R. [Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Sertão Pernambucano, 56400-000 Floresta, PE (Brazil); La Porta, Felipe A. [Chemistry Department, Federal Technological University of Paraná, 86036-370 Londrina, PR (Brazil); Longo, Elson [São Paulo State University, Chemistry Institute, UNESP, 14801-907 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Sambrano, Julio R. [Modeling and Molecular Simulations Group, São Paulo State University, UNESP, 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    Periodic density functional theory calculations with the B3LYP hybrid functional and all-electron Gaussian basis set were performed to simulate the structural and electronic properties as well as the strain and formation energies of single-walled ZnO nanotubes (SWZnONTs) and Carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different chiralities as functions of their diameters. For all SWZnONTs, the band gap, strain energy, and formation energy converge to ~4.5 eV, 0.0 eV/atom, and 0.40 eV/atom, respectively. This result suggests that the nanotubes are formed more easily from the surface than from the bulk. For SWCNTs, the strain energy is always positive, while the formation energy is negative for armchair and zigzag nanotubes, therefore suggesting that these types of nanotubes can be preferentially formed from the bulk. The electronic properties of SWCNTs depend on the chirality; all armchair nanotubes are metallic, while zigzag and chiral nanotubes can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on the n and m vectors. - Graphical abstract: DFT/B3LYP were performed to simulate the structural and electronic properties as well as the strain and formation energies of SWZnONTs and SWCNTs with different chiralities as functions of their diameters. - Highlights: • The energies of SWZnONTs converge for chirality with diameters up 20 Å. • SWCNTs electronic properties depend on the chirality. • The properties of SWZnONTs are very similar to those of monolayer surface.

  5. Dynamic characteristics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    walled carbon nanotubes; transverse magnetic field; van der Waals force. 1. Introduction. Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (Iijima. 1991), extensive research related to the carbon nanotubes in the fields of chemistry, physics, ...

  6. Carbon Nanotube Thermoelectric Coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-06

    fitting the sharp features with the Gauss bell curves as was suggested earlier in Ref. (Yang, Fedorov et al. 2012). Comparing the  eG V curves...Yang, Fedorov et al. 2012). Our experimental results suggest that the electric current along the nanotube induces an impressive change of local...fermions, Eur. Phys. J. B (2014) 87: 99 DOI: 10.1140/epjb/e2014-40794-0. 2. Y. Yang, G. Fedorov , J. Zhang, A. Tselev, S. Shafraniuk and P. Barbara

  7. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  8. Emerging Carbon Nanotube Electronic Circuits, Modeling, and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Yao Xu; Ashok Srivastava; Sharma, Ashwani K.

    2010-01-01

    Current transport and dynamic models of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors are presented. A model of single-walled carbon nanotube as interconnect is also presented and extended in modeling of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. These models are applied in studying the performances of circuits such as the complementary carbon nanotube inverter pair and carbon nanotube as interconnect. Cadence/Spectre simulations show that carbon nanotube field-effect transistor circuits can operate a...

  9. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  10. Carbon nanotubes as excitonic insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsano, Daniele; Sorella, Sandro; Sangalli, Davide; Barborini, Matteo; Corni, Stefano; Molinari, Elisa; Rontani, Massimo

    2017-11-13

    Fifty years ago Walter Kohn speculated that a zero-gap semiconductor might be unstable against the spontaneous generation of excitons-electron-hole pairs bound together by Coulomb attraction. The reconstructed ground state would then open a gap breaking the symmetry of the underlying lattice, a genuine consequence of electronic correlations. Here we show that this excitonic insulator is realized in zero-gap carbon nanotubes by performing first-principles calculations through many-body perturbation theory as well as quantum Monte Carlo. The excitonic order modulates the charge between the two carbon sublattices opening an experimentally observable gap, which scales as the inverse of the tube radius and weakly depends on the axial magnetic field. Our findings call into question the Luttinger liquid paradigm for nanotubes and provide tests to experimentally discriminate between excitonic and Mott insulators.

  11. Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-26

    First, both sides of the membrane were sputter-coated with a thin layer of platinum. On one side, a thin film of CNT was next deposited by filtration...absorption spectra of thin films or solutions containing predominantly aggregated SWNTs are dominated by inhomogeneously broadened optical transitions...electrochemical actuation. This objective was attained by welding carbon nanotube structures with polymer derived ceramic (PDC), silicon carbonitride (SiCN

  12. Carbon nanotube and conducting polymer composites for supercapacitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chuang Peng Shengwen Zhang Daniel Jewell George Z. Chen

    2008-01-01

    Composites of carbon nanotubes and conducting polymers can be prepared via chemical synthesis, electrochemical deposition on preformed carbon nanotube electrodes, or by electrochemical co-deposition...

  13. Center for Applications of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resasco, Daniel E

    2008-02-21

    This report describes the activities conducted under a Congressional Direction project whose goal was to develop applications for Single-walled carbon nanotubes, under the Carbon Nanotube Technology Center (CANTEC), a multi-investigator program that capitalizes on OU’s advantageous position of having available high quality carbon nanotubes. During the first phase of CANTEC, 11 faculty members and their students from the College of Engineering developed applications for carbon nanotubes by applying their expertise in a number of areas: Catalysis, Reaction Engineering, Nanotube synthesis, Surfactants, Colloid Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Spectroscopy, Tissue Engineering, Biosensors, Biochemical Engineering, Cell Biology, Thermal Transport, Composite Materials, Protein synthesis and purification, Molecular Modeling, Computational Simulations. In particular, during this phase, the different research groups involved in CANTEC made advances in the tailoring of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) of controlled diameter and chirality by Modifying Reaction Conditions and the Nature of the catalyst; developed kinetic models that quantitatively describe the SWNT growth, created vertically oriented forests of SWNT by varying the density of metal nanoparticles catalyst particles, and developed novel nanostructured SWNT towers that exhibit superhydrophobic behavior. They also developed molecular simulations of the growth of Metal Nanoparticles on the surface of SWNT, which may have applications in the field of fuell cells. In the area of biomedical applications, CANTEC researchers fabricated SWNT Biosensors by a novel electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition method, which may have an impact in the control of diabetes. They also functionalized SWNT with proteins that retained the protein’s biological activity and also retained the near-infrared light absorbance, which finds applications in the treatment of cancer.

  14. The two classes of low-energy spectra in finite carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marganska, Magdalena; Chudzinski, Piotr; Grifoni, Milena

    2015-01-01

    We study the spectra of finite-length carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of arbitrary chirality. They divide into two classes, which arise because of different rotational symmetries of the low-energy eigenstates. In one of them (the zigzag class), the spinless spectrum is doubly degenerate and the two states

  15. Carbon Nanotubes: Applications in Pharmacy and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hua; Pham-Huy, Lien Ai; Dramou, Pierre; Xiao, Deli; Zuo, Pengli

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are allotropes of carbon, made of graphite and constructed in cylindrical tubes with nanometer in diameter and several millimeters in length. Their impressive structural, mechanical, and electronic properties are due to their small size and mass, their strong mechanical potency, and their high electrical and thermal conductivity. CNTs have been successfully applied in pharmacy and medicine due to their high surface area that is capable of adsorbing or conjugating with a wide variety of therapeutic and diagnostic agents (drugs, genes, vaccines, antibodies, biosensors, etc.). They have been first proven to be an excellent vehicle for drug delivery directly into cells without metabolism by the body. Then other applications of CNTs have been extensively performed not only for drug and gene therapies but also for tissue regeneration, biosensor diagnosis, enantiomer separation of chiral drugs, extraction and analysis of drugs and pollutants. Moreover, CNTs have been recently revealed as a promising antioxidant. This minireview focuses the applications of CNTs in all fields of pharmacy and medicine from therapeutics to analysis and diagnosis as cited above. It also examines the pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity of different forms of CNTs and discusses the perspectives, the advantages and the obstacles of this promising bionanotechnology in the future. PMID:24195076

  16. Carbon nanotubes: applications in pharmacy and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hua; Pham-Huy, Lien Ai; Dramou, Pierre; Xiao, Deli; Zuo, Pengli; Pham-Huy, Chuong

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are allotropes of carbon, made of graphite and constructed in cylindrical tubes with nanometer in diameter and several millimeters in length. Their impressive structural, mechanical, and electronic properties are due to their small size and mass, their strong mechanical potency, and their high electrical and thermal conductivity. CNTs have been successfully applied in pharmacy and medicine due to their high surface area that is capable of adsorbing or conjugating with a wide variety of therapeutic and diagnostic agents (drugs, genes, vaccines, antibodies, biosensors, etc.). They have been first proven to be an excellent vehicle for drug delivery directly into cells without metabolism by the body. Then other applications of CNTs have been extensively performed not only for drug and gene therapies but also for tissue regeneration, biosensor diagnosis, enantiomer separation of chiral drugs, extraction and analysis of drugs and pollutants. Moreover, CNTs have been recently revealed as a promising antioxidant. This minireview focuses the applications of CNTs in all fields of pharmacy and medicine from therapeutics to analysis and diagnosis as cited above. It also examines the pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity of different forms of CNTs and discusses the perspectives, the advantages and the obstacles of this promising bionanotechnology in the future.

  17. Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Nanoribbons: Potentials for Nanoscale Electrical Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swastik Kar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon allotropes have generated much interest among different scientific communities due to their peculiar properties and potential applications in a variety of fields. Carbon nanotubes and more recently graphene have shown very interesting electrical properties along with the possibility of being grown and/or deposited at a desired location. In this Review, we will focus our attention on carbon-based nanostructures (in particular, carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons which could play an important role in the technological quest to replace copper/low-k for interconnect applications. We will provide the reader with a number of possible architectures, including single-wall as well as multi-wall carbon nanotubes, arranged in horizontal and vertical arrays, regarded as individual objects as well as bundles. Modification of their functional properties in order to fulfill interconnect applications requirements are also presented. Then, in the second part of the Review, recently discovered graphene and in particular graphene and few-graphene layers nanoribbons are introduced. Different architectures involving nanostructured carbon are presented and discussed in light of interconnect application in terms of length, chirality, edge configuration and more.

  18. Plasticity and Kinky Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor

    2000-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research interest based on early predictions of their unique mechanical, electronic, and chemical properties. Materials with the predicted unique properties of carbon nanotubes are of great interest for use in future generations of aerospace vehicles. For their structural properties, carbon nanotubes could be used as reinforcing fibers in ultralight multifunctional composites. For their electronic properties, carbon nanotubes offer the potential of very high-speed, low-power computing elements, high-density data storage, and unique sensors. In a continuing effort to model and predict the properties of carbon nanotubes, Ames accomplished three significant results during FY99. First, accurate values of the nanomechanics and plasticity of carbon nanotubes based on quantum molecular dynamics simulations were computed. Second, the concept of mechanical deformation catalyzed-kinky-chemistry as a means to control local chemistry of nanotubes was discovered. Third, the ease of nano-indentation of silicon surfaces with carbon nanotubes was established. The elastic response and plastic failure mechanisms of single-wall nanotubes were investigated by means of quantum molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. Dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotube devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria

    The purpose of this project has been to assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes on electrodes at the tip of a biocompatible cantilever and use these for chemical species sensing in air and liquid, for example in order to measure the local activity from ion channels in the cell membrane....... The electrical resistance of carbon nanotubes has been shown to be extremely sensitive to gas molecules. Dielectrophoresis is a method capable of quickly attracting nanotubes on microelectrodes by using an electric field, thus enabling nanotube integration in microsystems. Dielectrophoresis offers also...... the potential of distinguishing between nanotubes of different electrical properties, which is very important for the optimisation of the properties of the carbon nanotube sensors. Various cantilever and planar structures were designed, fabricated and tested both with multi-walled and single-walled carbon...

  20. Growing carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Ando, Yoshinori; Zhao, Xinluo; Sugai, Toshiki; Kumar, Mukul

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of ‘fullerenes’ added a new dimension to the knowledge of carbon science1; and the subsequent discovery of ‘carbon nanotubes’ (CNTs, the elongated fullerene) added a new dimension to the knowledge of technology2;. Today, ‘nanotechnology’ is a hot topic attracting scientists, industrialists, journalists, governments, and even the general public. Nanotechnology is the creation of functional materials, devices, and systems through control of matter on the nanometer scale and the ex...

  1. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  2. Edge effects in finite elongated carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Hod, Oded; Peralta, Juan E.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2006-01-01

    The importance of finite-size effects for the electronic structure of long zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes is studied. We analyze the electronic structure of capped (6,6), (8,0), and (9,0) single walled carbon nanotubes as a function of their length up to 60 nm, using a divide and conquer density functional theory approach. For the metallic nanotubes studied, most of the physical features appearing in the density of states of an infinite carbon nanotube are recovered at a length of 40 nm...

  3. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  5. Carbon nanobamboo: Junctions between left and right handed single walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusznyak, A.; Koltai, J.; Kuerti, J. [Department of Biological Physics, Eoetvoes University, Pazmany Peter setany 1/A, 1117 Budapest (Hungary); Zolyomi, V. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Center for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2012-12-15

    Heating of organic molecules, for example, fullerenes encapsulated in single walled carbon nanotubes can result in the coalescence of the molecules forming an inner tube. The growth of tubes with different diameters and/or chiralities can start at different places at the same time. The formation of a junction between the two different tubes depends on many parameters. A special case is when the two tubes have the same chiralities, but opposite handedness. We have shown using topological and combinatorial arguments that at least two non-equivalent junctions can be formed in these cases, with different arrangements of the pentagons and heptagons in the junction. We optimized the geometry using first principles method and investigated the effect of the junction on the electronic density of states of the bamboo-type nanotube. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Glucose oxidase immobilization onto carbon nanotube networking

    CERN Document Server

    Karachevtsev, V A; Zarudnev, E S; Karachevtsev, M V; Leontiev, V S; Linnik, A S; Lytvyn, O S; Plokhotnichenko, A M; Stepanian, S G

    2012-01-01

    When elaborating the biosensor based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), it is necessary to solve such an important problem as the immobilization of a target biomolecule on the nanotube surface. In this work, the enzyme (glucose oxidase (GOX)) was immobilized on the surface of a nanotube network, which was created by the deposition of nanotubes from their solution in 1,2-dichlorobenzene by the spray method. 1-Pyrenebutanoic acid succinimide ester (PSE) was used to form the molecular interface, the bifunctional molecule of which provides the covalent binding with the enzyme shell, and its other part (pyrene) is adsorbed onto the nanotube surface. First, the usage of such a molecular interface leaves out the direct adsorption of the enzyme (in this case, its activity decreases) onto the nanotube surface, and, second, it ensures the enzyme localization near the nanotube. The comparison of the resonance Raman (RR) spectrum of pristine nanotubes with their spectrum in the PSE environment evidences the creat...

  7. Interaction between methanol and single-walled carbon nanotubes: Density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganji, M.D., E-mail: ganji_md@yahoo.co [Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr Branch, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hesami, M.; Shokry, M. [Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr Branch, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoudi, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Payam-e-noor, Sari, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Density functional calculations have been performed to investigate the dependence of methanol interaction with the side walls of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on the nanotube's type, curvature and chirality. The author's results show that methanol prefers to be physically adsorbed on semiconducting CNTs in comparison with the metallic one. It was found that the binding energy of methanol is increased for adsorption on larger-diameter nanotubes. Furthermore, we find that when a methanol molecule was adsorbed on higher chiral angle nanotubes the binding energy was increased. The study of the electronic structures and Mulliken analysis indicate that the methanol and CNT are interacting rather weakly, consistent with recent experimental observation.

  8. Twisting Effects on Carbon Nanotubes: A First-Principles Study with Helical Symmetry Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Koichiro; Koretsune, Takashi; Saito, Susumu, E-mail: kato@stat.phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Oh-okayama, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2011-07-20

    We report the energetics and the electronic properties of twisted carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We use a real-space density functional theory with helical-symmetry operation, and apply it for several CNTs with the diameters of around 0.8 nm including the experimentally abundant (6,5) nanotube. By using this computational code, one can now obtain the total energies with enough accuracies to optimize the CNT geometries including quasi-continuous twisting levels for any type of nanotube in principle. As a result, it is found that chiral nanotubes possess twisted geometries at their ground states. The electronic structures of CNTs depend sensitively on twisting levels in this diameter region, and the twisting effects on their fundamental gap values can be judged by the value of mod(n - m, 3), where n and m are the chiral indices.

  9. Ophthalmologial Applications of Carbon Nanotube Nanotechology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, David; Girten, Beverly (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The development of an implantable device consisting of an array of carbon nanotubes on a silicon chip for restoration of vision in patients with macular degeneration and other retinal disorders is presented. The use of carbon nanotube bucky paper for retinal cell transplantation is proposed. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  10. Carbon Nanotubes – Interactions with Biological Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Joana; Capela-Silva, Fernando; Potes, José; Fonseca, Alexandra; Oliveira, Mónica; Kanagaraj, Subramani; Marques, António Torres

    2011-01-01

    his book chapter discusses the prospective biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes based materials, the impact of carbon nanotubes properties in the interaction with biological systems. Protein adsorption, impact on cell viability and cytokine production are explored. Potential respiratory and dermal toxicity are reviewed, as the difficulties on studying the biological response. In face of recent studies, special attention is drawn upon promising orthopaedic use.

  11. Features of electron-phonon interactions in nanotubes with chiral symmetry in magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kibis, O V

    2001-01-01

    Interaction of the electrons with acoustic phonons in the nanotube with chiral symmetry by availability of the magnetic field, parallel to the nanotube axis, is considered. It is shown that the electron energy spectrum is asymmetric relative to the electron wave vector inversion and for that reason the electron-phonon interaction appears to be different for similar phonons with mutually contrary directions of the wave vector. This phenomenon leads to origination of the electromotive force by the spatially uniform electron gas heating and to appearance of the quadrupole component in the nanotube volt-ampere characteristics

  12. Epoxy-based carbon nanotubes reinforced composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kesavan Pillai, Sreejarani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available developed strategy offering promising results is to reinforce epoxy matrices with nano-sized organic and inorganic particles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibres (CNFs), nanoclays, metal oxide nanoparticles, etc. and make new materials...

  13. Structural and electronic properties of chiral single-wall copper nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, YingNi; Zhang, JianMin; Xu, KeWei

    2014-04-01

    The structural, energetic and electronic properties of chiral ( n, m) (3⩽ n⩽6, n/2⩽ m⩽ n) single-wall copper nanotubes (CuNTs) have been investigated by using projector-augmented wave method based on density-functional theory. The (4, 3) CuNT is energetically stable and should be observed experimentally in both free-standing and tip-suspended conditions, whereas the (5, 5) and (6, 4) CuNTs should be observed in free-standing and tip-suspended conditions, respectively. The number of conductance channels in the CuNTs does not always correspond to the number of atomic strands comprising the nanotube. Charge density contours show that there is an enhanced interatomic interaction in CuNTs compared with Cu bulk. Current transporting states display different periods and chirality, the combined effects of which lead to weaker chiral currents on CuNTs.

  14. Thermophoresis of water droplets inside carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Harvey; Walther, Jh; Oyarzua, Elton; Rojano, Andres

    2016-11-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) offer unique possibilities as fluid conduits with applications ranging from lab on a chip devices to encapsulation media for drug delivery. CNTs feature high mechanical strength, chemical and thermal stability and biocompatibility therefore they are promising candidates for nanodevice fabrication. Thermal gradients have been proposed as mechanism to drive particles, fullerenes and droplets inside CNTs. Here, by conducting Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, we study thermophoresis of water droplets inside CNTs. We systematically change the size of the droplets, the axial thermal gradient and CNT chirality. We find that the droplet motion in the armchair CNTs exhibits two clearly delimited stages, a regime wherein the droplet is accelerated and subsequently, a regime wherein the droplet moves with constant velocity. Inside the zig zag CNTs, the droplet accelerates during a very short time and then it moves with constant velocity. We compute the net force during the droplet acceleration and find a correlation between the droplet acceleration and the magnitude of the thermal gradient without any dependence on the droplet size. Moreover, we conduct velocity constrained MD simulations to determine the friction and thermophoretic forces acting on the droplet. We acknowledge partial funding from FONDECYT through the Project No. 11130559 and from VRID Universidad de Concepcion.

  15. Cationic Carbon Nanotubes for Nucleic Acids Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Battigelli, Alessia

    2012-01-01

    2010/2011 Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a new form of carbon discovered in the ’50/’60, but described at the atomic level only in 1991 by Iijima. CNTs are constituted by one or more rolled up graphene sheets and they can be classified in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The peculiar properties of CNTs, characterized by their physical, chemical and mechanical properties, by their thermic conductivity and their large aspect ratio, rendered this...

  16. Systematic determination of absolute absorption cross-section of individual carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaihui; Hong, Xiaoping; Choi, Sangkook; Jin, Chenhao; Capaz, Rodrigo B; Kim, Jihoon; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; Louie, Steven G; Wang, Enge; Wang, Feng

    2014-05-27

    Optical absorption is the most fundamental optical property characterizing light-matter interactions in materials and can be most readily compared with theoretical predictions. However, determination of optical absorption cross-section of individual nanostructures is experimentally challenging due to the small extinction signal using conventional transmission measurements. Recently, dramatic increase of optical contrast from individual carbon nanotubes has been successfully achieved with a polarization-based homodyne microscope, where the scattered light wave from the nanostructure interferes with the optimized reference signal (the reflected/transmitted light). Here we demonstrate high-sensitivity absorption spectroscopy for individual single-walled carbon nanotubes by combining the polarization-based homodyne technique with broadband supercontinuum excitation in transmission configuration. To our knowledge, this is the first time that high-throughput and quantitative determination of nanotube absorption cross-section over broad spectral range at the single-tube level was performed for more than 50 individual chirality-defined single-walled nanotubes. Our data reveal chirality-dependent behaviors of exciton resonances in carbon nanotubes, where the exciton oscillator strength exhibits a universal scaling law with the nanotube diameter and the transition order. The exciton linewidth (characterizing the exciton lifetime) varies strongly in different nanotubes, and on average it increases linearly with the transition energy. In addition, we establish an empirical formula by extrapolating our data to predict the absorption cross-section spectrum for any given nanotube. The quantitative information of absorption cross-section in a broad spectral range and all nanotube species not only provides new insight into the unique photophysics in one-dimensional carbon nanotubes, but also enables absolute determination of optical quantum efficiencies in important

  17. Carbon nanotube woven textile photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Ahmed; Wang, Xuan; Mirri, Francesca; Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Fujimura, Naoki; Suzuki, Daichi; Soundarapandian, Karuppasamy P.; Kawano, Yukio; Pasquali, Matteo; Kono, Junichiro

    2018-01-01

    The increasing interest in mobile and wearable technology demands the enhancement of functionality of clothing through incorporation of sophisticated architectures of multifunctional materials. Flexible electronic and photonic devices based on organic materials have made impressive progress over the past decade, but higher performance, simpler fabrication, and most importantly, compatibility with woven technology are desired. Here we report on the development of a weaved, substrateless, and polarization-sensitive photodetector based on doping-engineered fibers of highly aligned carbon nanotubes. This room-temperature-operating, self-powered detector responds to radiation in an ultrabroad spectral range, from the ultraviolet to the terahertz, through the photothermoelectric effect, with a low noise-equivalent power (a few nW/Hz 1 /2) throughout the range and with a Z T -factor value that is twice as large as that of previously reported carbon nanotube-based photothermoelectric photodetectors. Particularly, we fabricated a ˜1 -m-long device consisting of tens of p+-p- junctions and weaved it into a shirt. This device demonstrated a collective photoresponse of the series-connected junctions under global illumination. The performance of the device did not show any sign of deterioration through 200 bending tests with a bending radius smaller than 100 μ m as well as standard washing and ironing cycles. This unconventional photodetector will find applications in wearable technology that require detection of electromagnetic radiation.

  18. Single-walled carbon nanotube-based polymer monoliths for the enantioselective nano-liquid chromatographic separation of racemic pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Marwa; Yajadda, Mir Massoud Aghili; Han, Zhao Jun; Su, Dawei; Wang, Guoxiu; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2014-09-19

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were encapsulated into different polymer-based monolithic backbones. The polymer monoliths were prepared via the copolymerization of 20% monomers, glycidyl methacrylate, 20% ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 60% porogens (36% 1-propanol, 18% 1,4-butanediol) or 16.4% monomers (16% butyl methacrylate, 0.4% sulfopropyl methacrylate), 23.6% ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 60% porogens (36% 1-propanol, 18% 1,4-butanediol) along with 6% single-walled carbon nanotubes aqueous suspension. The effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the chiral separation of twelve classes of pharmaceutical racemates namely; α- and β-blockers, antiinflammatory drugs, antifungal drugs, dopamine antagonists, norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitors, catecholamines, sedative hypnotics, diuretics, antihistaminics, anticancer drugs and antiarrhythmic drugs was investigated. The enantioselective separation was carried out under multimodal elution to explore the chiral recognition capabilities of single-walled carbon nanotubes using reversed phase, polar organic and normal phase chromatographic conditions using nano-liquid chromatography. Baseline separation was achieved for celiprolol, chlorpheniramine, etozoline, nomifensine and sulconazole under multimodal elution conditions. Satisfactory repeatability was achieved through run-to-run, column-to-column and batch-to-batch investigations. Our findings demonstrate that single-walled carbon nanotubes represent a promising stationary phase for the chiral separation and may open the field for a new class of chiral selectors. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Separation of Metallic and Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambraparni, Madhava B; Wang, Shiren

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are currently the focus of intense interest due to their extraordinary properties. However, as-grown nanotubes exist as bundles of metallic and semiconducting. This hinders their widespread applications. Much progress has been made to overcome this limitation. Many separation methods have been investigated, including combination of physical, chemical, or biochemical methods. These methods have demonstrated their own advantages and limitations. This paper reviews recent patents progress made for the separation of metallic and semiconducting nanotubes.

  20. Carbon nanotubes as heat dissipaters in microelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Paz, Alejandro; García-Lastra, Juan María; Markussen, Troels

    2013-01-01

    We review our recent modelling work of carbon nanotubes as potential candidates for heat dissipation in microelectronics cooling. In the first part, we analyze the impact of nanotube defects on their thermal transport properties. In the second part, we investigate the loss of thermal properties...... of nanotubes in presence of an interface with various substances, including air and water. Comparison with previous works is established whenever is possible....

  1. Carbon nanotube-based synthetic gecko tapes

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Liehui; Sethi, Sunny; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a synthetic gecko tape by transferring micropatterned carbon nanotube arrays onto flexible polymer tape based on the hierarchical structure found on the foot of a gecko lizard. The gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micrometer-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscop...

  2. Carbon nanotubes: Sensor properties. A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Zaporotskova, Irina V.; Natalia P. Boroznina; Parkhomenko, Yuri N.; Kozhitov, Lev V.

    2017-01-01

    Recent publications dealing with dealing with the fabrication of gas and electrochemical biosensors based on carbon nanotubes have been reviewed. Experimental and theoretical data on the working principles of nanotubes have been presented. The main regularities of the structure, energy parameters and sensor properties of modified semiconducting systems on the basis of cabon nanotubes have been studied by analyzing the mechanisms of nanotubule interaction with functional groups (including carb...

  3. Electronic structures and three-dimensional effects of boron-doped carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Koretsune and Susumu Saito

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We study boron-doped carbon nanotubes by first-principles methods based on the density functional theory. To discuss the possibility of superconductivity, we calculate the electronic band structure and the density of states (DOS of boron-doped (10,0 nanotubes by changing the boron density. It is found that the Fermi level density of states D(epsilonF increases upon lowering the boron density. This can be understood in terms of the rigid band picture where the one-dimensional van Hove singularity lies at the edge of the valence band in the DOS of the pristine nanotube. The effect of three-dimensionality is also considered by performing the calculations for bundled (10,0 nanotubes and boron-doped double-walled carbon nanotubes (10,0@(19,0. From the calculation of the bundled nanotubes, it is found that interwall dispersion is sufficiently large to broaden the peaks of the van Hove singularity in the DOS. Thus, to achieve the high D(epsilonF using the bundle of nanotubes with single chirality, we should take into account the distance from each nanotube. In the case of double-walled carbon nanotubes, we find that the holes introduced to the inner tube by boron doping spread also on the outer tube, while the band structure of each tube remains almost unchanged.

  4. Enzymatic degradation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Allen, Brett L; Star, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    Because of their unique properties, carbon nanotubes and, in particular, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been used for the development of advanced composite and catalyst materials. Despite their growing commercial applications and increased production, the potential environmental and toxicological impacts of MWNTs are not fully understood; however, many reports suggest that they may be toxic. Therefore, a need exists to develop protocols for effective and safe degradation of MWNTs. In this article, we investigated the effect of chemical functionalization of MWNTs on their enzymatic degradation with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). We investigated HRP/H(2)O(2) degradation of purified, oxidized, and nitrogen-doped MWNTs and proposed a layer-by-layer degradation mechanism of nanotubes facilitated by side wall defects. These results provide a better understanding of the interaction between HRP and carbon nanotubes and suggest an eco-friendly way of mitigating the environmental impact of nanotubes. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifen [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian Guo [Newton, MA; Lao, Jing Y [Chestnut Hill, MA; Li, Wenzhi [Brookline, MA

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  6. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  7. Influence of carbon nanotubes on the buckling of microtubule bundles in viscoelastic cytoplasm using nonlocal strain gradient theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Farajpour

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are a new class of microtubule-stabilizing agents since they interact with protein microtubules in living cells, interfering with cell division and inducing apoptosis. In the present work, a modified beam model is developed to investigate the effect of carbon nanotubes on the buckling of microtubule bundles in living cell. A realistic interaction model is employed using recent experimental data on the carbon nanotube-stabilized microtubules. Small scale and surface effects are taken into account applying the nonlocal strain gradient theory and surface elasticity theory. Pasternak model is used to describe the normal and shearing effects of enclosing filament matrix on the buckling behavior of the system. An exact solution is obtained for the buckling growth rates of the mixed bundle in viscoelastic surrounding cytoplasm. The present results are compared with those reported in the open literature for single microtubules and an excellent agreement is found. Finally, the effects of different parameters such as the size, chirality, position and surface energy of carbon nanotubes on the buckling growth rates of microtubule bundles are studied. It is found that the buckling growth rate may increase or decrease by adding carbon nanotubes, depending on the diameter and chirality of carbon nanotubes. Keywords: Microtubules, Carbon nanotubes, Buckling, Size effects

  8. Investigations on the antiretroviral activity of carbon nanotubes using computational molecular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaraj, R Navanietha; Chandran, Saravanan; Pal, Parimal; Berchmans, Sheela

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are the interesting class of materials with wide range of applications. They have excellent physical, chemical and electrical properties. Numerous reports were made on the antiviral activities of carbon nanotubes. However the mechanism of antiviral action is still in infancy. Herein we report, our recent novel findings on the molecular interactions of carbon nanotubes with the three key target proteins of HIV using computational chemistry approach. Armchair, chiral and zigzag CNTs were modeled and used as ligands for the interaction studies. The structure of the key proteins involved in HIV mediated infection namely HIV- Vpr, Nef and Gag proteins were collected from the PDB database. The docking studies were performed to quantify the interaction of the CNT with the three different disease targets. Results showed that the carbon nanotubes had high binding affinity to these proteins which confirms the antagonistic molecular interaction of carbon nanotubes to the disease targets. The modeled armchair carbon nanotubes had the binding affinities of -12.4 Kcal/mole, -20 Kcal/mole and -11.7 Kcal/mole with the Vpr, Nef and Gag proteins of HIV. Chiral CNTs also had the maximum affinity of -16.4 Kcal/mole to Nef. The binding affinity of chiral CNTs to Vpr and Gag was found to be -10.9 Kcal/mole and -10.3 Kcal/mole respectively. The zigzag CNTs had the binding affinity of -11.1 Kcal/mole with Vpr, -18.3 Kcal/mole with Nef and -10.9 with Gag respectively. The strong molecular interactions suggest the efficacy of CNTs for targeting the HIV mediated retroviral infections.

  9. Covalent enzyme immobilization onto carbon nanotubes using a membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voicu, Stefan Ioan; Nechifor, Aurelia Cristina; Gales, Ovidiu; Nechifor, Gheorghe

    2011-05-01

    Composite porous polysulfone-carbon nanotubes membranes were prepared by dispersing carbon nanotubes into a polysulfone solution followed by the membrane formation by phase inversion-immersion precipitation technique. The carbon nanotubes with amino groups on surface were functionalized with different enzymes (carbonic anhydrase, invertase, diastase) using cyanuric chloride as linker between enzyme and carbon nanotube. The composite membrane was used as a membrane reactor for a better dispersion of carbon nanotubes and access to reaction centers. The membrane also facilitates the transport of enzymes to active carbon nanotubes centers for functionalization (amino groups). The functionalized carbon nanotubes are isolated by dissolving the membranes after the end of reaction. Carbon nanotubes with covalent immobilized enzymes are used for biosensors fabrications. The obtained membranes were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Thermal analysis, FT-IR Spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, and functionalized carbon nanotubes were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy.

  10. Coulomb drag in multiwall armchair carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, A.M.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the transresistivity rho(21) between two concentric armchair nanotubes in a diffusive multiwall carbon nanotube as a function of temperature T and Fermi level epsilon(F). We approximate the tight-binding band structure by two crossing bands with a linear dispersion near the Fermi...... surface. The cylindrical geometry of the nanotubes and the different parities of the Bloch states are accounted for in the evaluation of the effective Coulomb interaction between charges in the concentric nanotubes. We find a broad peak in rho(21) as a function of temperature at roughly T similar to 0.4T...

  11. Channeling of protons through carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borka, D; Petrovic, S; Neskovic, N [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P. O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Mowbray, D J; Miskovic, Z L [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L3G1 (Canada)], E-mail: dusborka@vin.bg.ac.yu

    2008-10-01

    We investigate how dynamic polarization of carbon valence electrons influences both the angular and spatial distributions of protons channeled in a (11, 9) single-wall carbon nanotube placed in vacuum and in different dielectric media. Proton speeds between 3 and 10 a.u., corresponding to energies of 0.223 and 2.49 MeV, are chosen with the nanotube length varied between 0.1 and 1 {mu}m. In all performed calculations we describe the interaction between proton and carbon atoms on the nanotube wall using the Doyle-Turner potential. The image force on a proton is calculated using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the dynamic response of the nanotube valence electrons and the dielectric media surrounding the nanotube. The angular distributions of channeled protons are generated using a computer simulation method which solves the proton equations of motion in the transverse plane numerically. The best level of ordering and straightening of carbon nanotube arrays is often achieved when they are grown in a dielectric matrix. Consequently, we investigate here how the dynamic polarization of carbon valence electrons in the presence of various surrounding dielectric media affects the angular distributions of protons channeled through (11, 9) single-wall carbon nanotubes. Our analysis shows that the inclusion of the image interaction, gives rise to a number of rainbow maxima in the corresponding angular and spatial distribution. Our analysis shows that the presence of dielectric media surrounding the nanotube influences the positions and appearance of rainbows in the corresponding angular and spatial distributions. In addition, we analyze the possibility of production of nano-sized beams by carbon nanotubes.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  13. Deconvoluting hepatic processing of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidori, Simone; Bowman, Robert L.; Yarilin, Dmitry; Romin, Yevgeniy; Barlas, Afsar; Mulvey, J. Justin; Fujisawa, Sho; Xu, Ke; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Riabov, Vladimir; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ulmert, Hans David S.; Brea, Elliott J.; Behling, Katja; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes present unique opportunities for drug delivery, but have not advanced into the clinic. Differential nanotube accretion and clearance from critical organs have been observed, but the mechanism not fully elucidated. The liver has a complex cellular composition that regulates a range of metabolic functions and coincidently accumulates most particulate drugs. Here we provide the unexpected details of hepatic processing of covalently functionalized nanotubes including receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular trafficking and biliary elimination. Ammonium-functionalized fibrillar nanocarbon is found to preferentially localize in the fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver but not resident macrophages. Stabilin receptors mediate the endocytic clearance of nanotubes. Biocompatibility is evidenced by the absence of cell death and no immune cell infiltration. Towards clinical application of this platform, nanotubes were evaluated for the first time in non-human primates. The pharmacologic profile in cynomolgus monkeys is equivalent to what was reported in mice and suggests that nanotubes should behave similarly in humans.

  14. Collapsed carbon nanotubes as building blocks for high-performance thermal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghalith, Jihong; Xu, Hao; Dumitricǎ, Traian

    2017-10-01

    The influence of collapsed shape on the thermal transport of carbon nanotubes is studied by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. Nanotubes of different lengths, diameters, chiralities, and degrees of twist are simulated in the regime in which the thermal transport extends from ballistic to diffusive. In contrast with graphene nanoribbons, which are known to exhibit substantial rough-edge and cross-plain phonon scatterings, the collapsed tubes preserve the quasiballistic phononic transport encountered in cylindrical nanotubes. Stacked-collapsed nanotube architectures, closely related with the strain-induced aligned tubes occurring in stretched nanotube sheets, are shown to inherit the ultrahigh thermal conductivities of individual tubes, and are therefore proposed to form highways for efficient heat transport in lightweight composite materials.

  15. Carbon Nanotube Tape Vibrating Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibrating gyroscope includes a piezoelectric strip having length and width dimensions. The piezoelectric strip includes a piezoelectric material and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) substantially aligned and polled along the strip's length dimension. A spindle having an axis of rotation is coupled to the piezoelectric strip. The axis of rotation is parallel to the strip's width dimension. A first capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The first capacitance sensor is positioned at one of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from one of the strip's opposing faces. A second capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The second capacitance sensor is positioned at another of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from another of the strip's opposing faces. A voltage source applies an AC voltage to the piezoelectric strip.

  16. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:23091380

  17. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.

  18. Photonics based on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qingyuan; Gicquel-Guézo, Maud; Loualiche, Slimane; Pouliquen, Julie Le; Batte, Thomas; Folliot, Hervé; Dehaese, Olivier; Grillot, Frederic; Battie, Yann; Loiseau, Annick; Liang, Baolai; Huffaker, Diana

    2013-06-26

    Among direct-bandgap semiconducting nanomaterials, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) exhibit strong quasi-one-dimensional excitonic optical properties, which confer them a great potential for their integration in future photonics devices as an alternative solution to conventional inorganic semiconductors. In this paper, we will highlight SWCNT optical properties for passive as well as active applications in future optical networking. For passive applications, we directly compare the efficiency and power consumption of saturable absorbers (SAs) based on SWCNT with SA based on conventional multiple quantum wells. For active applications, exceptional photoluminescence properties of SWCNT, such as excellent light-emission stabilities with temperature and excitation power, hold these nanometer-scale materials as prime candidates for future active photonics devices with superior performances.

  19. Carbon nanotubes based vacuum gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudyk, N. N.; Il’in, O. I.; Il’ina, M. V.; Fedotov, A. A.; Klimin, V. S.; Ageev, O. A.

    2017-11-01

    We have created an ionization type Vacuum gauge with sensor element based on an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. Obtained asymmetrical current-voltage characteristics at different voltage polarity on the electrode with the CNTs. It was found that when applying a negative potential on an electrode with the CNTs, the current in the gap is higher than at a positive potential. In the pressure range of 1 ÷ 103 Torr vacuum gauge sensitivity was 6 mV/Torr (at a current of 4.5·10-5 A) and in the range of 10-5 ÷ 1 Torr was 10 mV/Torr (at a current of 1.3·10-5 A). It is shown that the energy efficiency of vacuum gauge can be increased in the case where electrode with CNT operates as an emitter of electrons.

  20. Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metal oxides, nanotubes, nanowires, quantum dots, and carbon fullerenes (buckyballs), among others. Early scientific studies have indicated ... to minimize worker exposure. This NIOSH CIB, (1) reviews the animal and other toxicological data relevant to ...

  1. Carbon nanotubes dispersed polymer nanocomposites: mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CNT composite showed that the rough ... data storage, sensors, and biomedical applications [9]. The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and ... that undergoes big distortions without deteriorations [15,16]. The carbon nanotubes (CNTs) consist of ...

  2. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M

    2016-01-01

    .... Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature...

  3. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clay Mayberry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  4. Carbon nanotube polymer composition and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao [Oakland, CA; Johnson, Stephen [Richmond, CA; Kerr, John B [Oakland, CA; Minor, Andrew M [El Cerrito, CA; Mao, Samuel S [Castro Valley, CA

    2011-06-14

    A thin film device and compound having an anode, a cathode, and at least one light emitting layer between the anode and cathode, the at least one light emitting layer having at least one carbon nanotube and a conductive polymer.

  5. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-11-11

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  6. Self Assembled Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this NASA STTR program is to develop single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based ultracapacitors for energy storage devices (ESD) application, using...

  7. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Polypropylene Composite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene (PP composites reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs were prepared by using twin screw extruder. The experimental results showed that with the increasing amount of MWNTs the elongation at break decreased whereas the tensile strength, bending strength, and impact strength increased. By using scanning electron microscope (SEM, we find that the hydroxyl-modified carbon nanotube has better dispersion performance in PP and better mechanical properties.

  8. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2017-09-12

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  9. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-12-13

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  10. Carbon nanotubes as near infrared laser susceptors

    OpenAIRE

    Bahrami, Amir

    2011-01-01

    The coupling efficiency of carbon nanotubes with near infrared laser radiation at 940nm wavelength was investigated. Nanotubes treated with different post processing methods were irradiated at different laser power intensities as dry samples and suspensions in water or ethanol. The interaction with the laser beam was measured and quantified based on the temperature increase in the samples as well as the amount of energy transmitted through them. Parallel experiments using carbon black reveale...

  11. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  12. Single electron-ics with carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Götz, G.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally investigate Quantum Dots, formed in Carbon Nanotubes. The first part of this thesis deals with charge sensing on such quantum dots. The charge sensor is a metallic Single-electron-transistor, sensitive to the charge of a single electron on the quantum dot. We use this technique for real-time charge readout and precise tuning of the tunnel barriers of the quantum dot. The second part of this thesis describes the realization of exceptionally clean Carbon Nanotube quantum dots....

  13. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-11-15

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  14. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-10-25

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  15. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  16. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reece D. Gately

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications.

  17. Method for manufacturing high quality carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A non-catalytic process for the production of carbon nanotubes includes supplying an electric current to a carbon anode and a carbon cathode which have been securely positioned in the open atmosphere with a gap between them. The electric current creates an electric arc between the carbon anode and the carbon cathode, which causes carbon to be vaporized from the carbon anode and a carbonaceous residue to be deposited on the carbon cathode. Inert gas is pumped into the gap to flush out oxygen, thereby preventing interference with the vaporization of carbon from the anode and preventing oxidation of the carbonaceous residue being deposited on the cathode. The anode and cathode are cooled while electric current is being supplied thereto. When the supply of electric current is terminated, the carbonaceous residue is removed from the cathode and is purified to yield carbon nanotubes.

  18. Environmental transmission electron microscopy investigations of Pt-Fe2O3 nanoparticles for nucleating carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Jin, Hua; Zhang, Lili

    2016-01-01

    of the metallic Fe reacts with active carbon atoms to form Fe2.5C instead of Fe3C, catalyzing the nucleation of carbon nanotubes. Nanobeam electron diffraction characterizations on SWCNTs grown under ambient pressure at 800 °C demonstrate that their chiral angle and diameter distributions are similar to those......Elucidating the evolution of bimetallic catalyst for nucleating carbon nanotube has been challenging. In this work, acorn-like Pt-Fe2O3 nanoparticles are developed for the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition. Using in situ environmental transmission...... of SWCNTs grown on monometallic Fe. The results further indicate that the active components in both the catalysts, determining the chirality distribution of SWCNTs, are similar. In addition, Pt facilitates the reduction of Fe2O3, rendering SWCNT growth at a relatively low temperature of 700 °C. This work...

  19. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Insepov, Zeke [Darien, IL; Hassanein, Ahmed [Bolingbrook, IL

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  20. Quantum conductance of a helically coiled carbon nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wengang Lu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a π-orbital tight-binding model, we investigate the transport properties of a coiled carbon nanotube (also called carbon nanotube spring, which we construct by connecting carbon nanotubes periodically in three-dimensional (3D space. The conductance is quantized due to the translational symmetry in the coiled direction. However, the conductance behaviors differ greatly from those of pristine metallic carbon nanotubes but similar to those of carbon nanotube superlattices. We explain that conductance behaviors of the coiled carbon nanotube.

  1. Carbon nanotube stationary phases for microchip electrochromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Bøggild, Peter; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    The use of nanomaterials in separation science has increased rapidly in the last decade. The reason for this is to take advantage of the unique properties of these materials, such as a very high surface-to-volume ratio and favourable sorbent behaviour. Carbon nanostructures, such as carbon......, microfluidic devices with microfabricated carbon nanotube columns for electrochromatographic separations will be presented. The electrically conductive carbon nanotube layer has been patterned into hexoganol micropillars in order to support electroosmotic flow without forming gas bubbles from electrolysis...

  2. Synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes from a lamellar type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    walled nanotubes. These nanotubes are applicable to store more hydrogen. Keywords. AlPO4-L; single wall carbon nanotubes. 1. Introduction. Carbon nanotubes (Iijima 1991) are nano-scale structures formed by self assembly. They possess excellent chemical and physical properties (Rodney and Donald 1995; Chen.

  3. Polymerization initated at sidewalls of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Hudson, Jared L. (Inventor); Krishnamoorti, Ramanan (Inventor); Yurekli, Koray (Inventor); Mitchell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to aryl halide (such as aryl bromide) functionalized carbon nanotubes that can be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials with improved dispersion ability in polymer matrices. In this process the aryl halide is reacted with an alkyllithium species or is reacted with a metal to replace the aryl-bromine bond with an aryl-lithium or aryl-metal bond, respectively. It has further been discovered that other functionalized carbon nanotubes, after deprotonation with a deprotonation agent, can similarly be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials. Additionally or alternatively, a ring opening polymerization process can be performed. The resultant materials can be used by themselves due to their enhanced strength and reinforcement ability when compared to their unbound polymer analogs. Additionally, these materials can also be blended with pre-formed polymers to establish compatibility and enhanced dispersion of nanotubes in otherwise hard to disperse matrices resulting in significantly improved material properties. The resultant polymer-carbon nanotube materials can also be used in drug delivery processes due to their improved dispersion ability and biodegradability, and can also be used for scaffolding to promote cellular growth of tissue.

  4. Acrylonitrile, an advantageous precursor to synthesize nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Elguézabal, A.; Román-Aguirre, M.; De la Torre, L.; Zaragoza, E. A.

    2017-05-01

    The nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes present specific characteristics that offer better performance than pure carbon nanotubes for application like biomedicine, hydrogen adsorption and electrocataytic devices. This work present a simple method to obtain well-aligned nitrogen doped multi wall carbon nanotubes, which present open channels with diameter around 50 nm. These carbon nanotubes are obtained using acrylonitrile as carbon and nitrogen source, which offers some advantages on the use of other precursors like ammonia, pyridine, benzylamine, acetonitrile or melamine.

  5. Dual distributions for the metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes observed by Raman spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Sakai

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The prospective applicability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT is highly dependent on its controlled synthesis.Effects of few macroscopic growth-conditions (such as catalyst composition, temperature of deposition etc. reflected on thedistributions of SWNT (diameter, chiralities and semiconducting-metallic nature, are studied by Raman spectroscopicanalysis. We report the presence of two different diameter distributions for as-grown metallic and semiconducting SWNT, themetallic tubes having larger average diameters than their semiconducting counterpart. We hope that, in future, it should bepossible to selectively synthesize SWNT with pre-determined chirality, diameter and metallic/semiconducting nature.

  6. Purification of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by spiral counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Martha; Lazo-Portugal, Rodrigo; Ahn, Saeyoung Nate; Stefansson, Steingrimur

    2017-02-03

    Over the last decade man-made carbon nanostructures have shown great promise in electronic applications, but they are produced as very heterogeneous mixtures with different properties so the achievement of a significant commercial application has been elusive. The dimensions of single-wall carbon nanotubes are generally a nanometer wide, up to hundreds of microns long and the carbon nanotubes have anisotropic structures. They are processed to have shorter lengths but they need to be sorted by diameter and chirality. Thus counter-current chromatography methods developed for large molecules are applied to separate these compounds. A modified mixer-settler spiral CCC rotor made with 3 D printed disks was used with a polyethylene glycol-dextran 2-phase solvent system and a surfactant gradient to purify the major species in a commercial preparation. We isolated the semi-conducting single walled carbon nanotube chiral species identified by UV spectral analysis. The further development of spiral counter-current chromatography instrumentation and methods will enable the scalable purification of carbon nanotubes useful for the next generation electronics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in amphibians: assessment of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and comparison with double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchet, Florence; Landois, Perine; Puech, Pascal; Pinelli, Eric; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Gauthier, Laury

    2010-08-01

    The potential impact of industrial multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was investigated under normalized laboratory conditions according to the International Standard micronucleus assay ISO 21427-1 for 12 days of half-static exposure to 0.1, 1, 10 and 50 mg/l of MWNTs in water. Three different end points were carried out for 12 days of exposure: mortality, growth inhibition and micronuclei induction in erythrocytes of the circulating blood of larvae. Raman spectroscopy analysis was used to study the presence of carbon nanotubes in the biological samples. Considering the high diversity of carbon nanotubes according to their different characteristics, MWNTs were analyzed in Xenopus larvae, comparatively to double-walled carbon nanotubes used in a previous study in similar conditions. Growth inhibition in larvae exposed to 50 mg/l of MWNTs was evidenced; however, no genetoxicity (micronucleus assay) was noticed, at any concentration. Carbon nanotube localization in the larvae leads to different possible hypothesis of mechanisms explaining toxicity in Xenopus.

  8. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  9. Experimental determination of excitonic band structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes using circular dichroism spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Tanaka, Takeshi; Yomogida, Yohei; Sato, Naomichi; Saito, Riichiro; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-10-05

    Experimental band structure analyses of single-walled carbon nanotubes have not yet been reported, to the best of our knowledge, except for a limited number of reports using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate the experimental determination of the excitonic band structures of single-chirality single-walled carbon nanotubes using their circular dichroism spectra. In this analysis, we use gel column chromatography combining overloading selective adsorption with stepwise elution to separate 12 different single-chirality enantiomers. Our samples show higher circular dichroism intensities than the highest values reported in previous works, indicating their high enantiomeric purity. Excitonic band structure analysis is performed by assigning all observed Eii and Eij optical transitions in the circular dichroism spectra. The results reproduce the asymmetric structures of the valence and conduction bands predicted by density functional theory. Finally, we demonstrate that an extended empirical formula can estimate Eij optical transition energies for any (n,m) species.

  10. Stable double helical iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Zhen [College of Science, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou, Liaoning, 121001 (China); Liu, Chun-Jian [College of Mathematics and Physics, Bohai University, Jinzhou, Liaoning, 121000 (China); Lv, Hang [Institute of New Energy, Bohai University, Jinzhou, Liaoning, 121000 (China); Liu, Bing-Bing, E-mail: liubb@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China)

    2016-08-12

    The helicity of stable double helical iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied by calculating the systematic interaction energy. Our results present clear images of stable double helical structures inside SWCNTs. The optimum helical radius and helical angle increase and decrease with increasing diameter, respectively. The tube's diameter plays a leading role in the helicity of encapsulated structures, while the tube's chirality may induce different metastable structures. This study indicates that the observed double helical iodine chains in experiments are not necessarily the optimum structures, but may also be metastable structures. - Highlights: • The stable double helical iodine chain inside single-walled carbon nanotubes is proposed. • The influence of tube's diameter and chirality on the stability of encapsulated iodine chains is studied. • The metastable double helical structures may be co-existence with the stable structure but not in the same tubes.

  11. Selective Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Khare, Bishun

    2010-01-01

    An alternative method of low-temperature plasma functionalization of carbon nanotubes provides for the simultaneous attachment of molecular groups of multiple (typically two or three) different species or different mixtures of species to carbon nanotubes at different locations within the same apparatus. This method is based on similar principles, and involves the use of mostly the same basic apparatus, as those of the methods described in "Low-Temperature Plasma Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes" (ARC-14661-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 5 (May 2004), page 45. The figure schematically depicts the basic apparatus used in the aforementioned method, with emphasis on features that distinguish the present alternative method from the other. In this method, one exploits the fact that the composition of the deposition plasma changes as the plasma flows from its source in the precursor chamber toward the nanotubes in the target chamber. As a result, carbon nanotubes mounted in the target chamber at different flow distances (d1, d2, d3 . . .) from the precursor chamber become functionalized with different species or different mixtures of species. In one series of experiments to demonstrate this method, N2 was used as the precursor gas. After the functionalization process, the carbon nanotubes from three different positions in the target chamber were examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to identify the molecular groups that had become attached. On carbon nanotubes from d1 = 1 cm, the attached molecular groups were found to be predominantly C-N and C=N. On carbon nanotubes from d2 = 2.5 cm, the attached molecular groups were found to be predominantly C-(NH)2 and/or C=NH2. (The H2 was believed to originate as residual hydrogen present in the nanotubes.) On carbon nanotubes from d3 = 7 cm no functionalization could be detected - perhaps, it was conjectured, because this distance is downstream of the plasma source, all of the free ions and free radicals of

  12. Role of Surfactant Molecular Structure on Self Assembly: Aqueous SDBS on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttipong, Manaswee; Thompson, John R.; Tummala, Naga Rajesh; Kitiyanan, Boonyarach; Striolo, Alberto

    2011-03-01

    Stabilizing aqueous dispersions of carbon nanotubes mono-dispersed in diameter and chirality remains elusive. Surfactants have proven useful in deploying ultra-centrifugation techniques, but the molecular mechanism responsible for their effectiveness remains not fully understood. Based on a number of recent molecular simulation results, including those from our group, it appears that the morphology of the self-assembled surfactant aggregates on the carbon nanotubes strongly affects the effective potential of mean force between pairs of interacting carbon nanotubes. In this work we explore the effect of surfactant molecular structure on the properties of aqueous surfactant self-assembled aggregates. We employ equilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We consider the surfactant SDBS (sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate) with benzene ring located on the fifth or on the twelfth carbon atom in the tail, and the surfactant AOT [sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate]. The simulations are conducted at room conditions for different surface coverages on (6,6), (12,12), and (20,20) single walled carbon nanotubes. These new results will help us identify the surfactant properties that allow us to manipulate nanotube-nanotube effective interactions. Research supported by the Department of Energy via CANTEC.

  13. A Review: Carbon Nanotube-Based Piezoresistive Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Obitayo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon nanotubes for piezoresistive strain sensors has acquired significant attention due to its unique electromechanical properties. In this comprehensive review paper, we discussed some important aspects of carbon nanotubes for strain sensing at both the nanoscale and macroscale. Carbon nanotubes undergo changes in their band structures when subjected to mechanical deformations. This phenomenon makes them applicable for strain sensing applications. This paper signifies the type of carbon nanotubes best suitable for piezoresistive strain sensors. The electrical resistivities of carbon nanotube thin film increase linearly with strain, making it an ideal material for a piezoresistive strain sensor. Carbon nanotube composite films, which are usually fabricated by mixing small amounts of single-walled or multiwalled carbon nanotubes with selected polymers, have shown promising characteristics of piezoresistive strain sensors. Studies also show that carbon nanotubes display a stable and predictable voltage response as a function of temperature.

  14. Co-TPP functionalized carbon nanotube composites for detection of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Electrical properties; nanostructure materials; porphyrin functionalized carbon nanotubes; sensor for chlorobenzene and nitrobenzene vapour. Abstract. We report preparation of nanocomposites by non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with metal-tetraphenylporphyrins (M-TPP). Fourier ...

  15. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymers for Radiation Shielding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, S. (Technical Monitor); Vaidyanathan, Ranji

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the use of Extrusion Freeform Fabrication (EEF) for the fabrication of carbon nanotubes. The presentation addresses TGA analysis, Raman spectroscopy, radiation tests, and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotubes.

  17. A carbon nanotube wall membrane for water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeongho; Baek, Youngbin; Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong; Lee, Hong H; Yoon, Jeyong; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2015-05-14

    Various forms of carbon nanotubes have been utilized in water treatment applications. The unique characteristics of carbon nanotubes, however, have not been fully exploited for such applications. Here we exploit the characteristics and corresponding attributes of carbon nanotubes to develop a millimetre-thick ultrafiltration membrane that can provide a water permeability that approaches 30,000 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1), compared with the best water permeability of 2,400 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) reported for carbon nanotube membranes. The developed membrane consists only of vertically aligned carbon nanotube walls that provide 6-nm-wide inner pores and 7-nm-wide outer pores that form between the walls of the carbon nanotubes when the carbon nanotube forest is densified. The experimental results reveal that the permeance increases as the pore size decreases. The carbon nanotube walls of the membrane are observed to impede bacterial adhesion and resist biofilm formation.

  18. Release characteristics of selected carbon nanotube polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are commonly used in polymer formulations to improve strength, conductivity, and other attributes. A developing concern is the potential for carbon nanotube polymer nanocomposites to release nanoparticles into the environment as the polymer ...

  19. Carbon Nanotube Tower-Based Supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A supercapacitor system, including (i) first and second, spaced apart planar collectors, (ii) first and second arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) towers or single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) towers, serving as electrodes, that extend between the first and second collectors where the nanotube towers are grown directly on the collector surfaces without deposition of a catalyst and without deposition of a binder material on the collector surfaces, and (iii) a porous separator module having a transverse area that is substantially the same as the transverse area of at least one electrode, where (iv) at least one nanotube tower is functionalized to permit or encourage the tower to behave as a hydrophilic structure, with increased surface wettability.

  20. Liquid crystalline order of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Ahlawat, Aditya; Mulkern, Brian; Doyle, Robert; Mongeau, Jennifer; Ogilvie, Alex

    2007-03-01

    Topological defects formed during phase transitions in liquid crystals provide a direct proof of the standard Cosmological model and are direct links to the Early Universe. On the other hand in Nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes can be manipulated and oriented directly by changing the liquid crystalline state of the nanotubes, in combination with organic liquid crystals. Currently there are no nano-assemblers, which makes the liquid crystal state of the nanotubes, one of the few ways of controlling them. We show the design of a fast and efficient polarized light ellipsometric system (a new modification of previous optical systems) that can provide fast quantitative real time measurements in two dimensions of the formation of topological defects in liquid crystals during phase transitions in lab settings. Our aim is to provide fundamental information about the formation of optically anisotropic structures in liquid crystals and the orientation of carbon nanotubes in electric field.

  1. Functionalized carbon nanotubes for potential medicinal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Bai, Yuhong; Yan, Bing

    2010-06-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes display unique properties that enable a variety of medicinal applications, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, infectious diseases and central nervous system disorders, and applications in tissue engineering. These potential applications are particularly encouraged by their ability to penetrate biological membranes and relatively low toxicity. High aspect ratio, unique optical property and the likeness as small molecule make carbon nanotubes an unusual allotrope of element carbon. After functionalization, carbon nanotubes display potentials for a variety of medicinal applications, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, infectious diseases and central nervous system disorders, and applications in tissue engineering. These potential applications are particularly encouraged by their ability to penetrate biological membranes and relatively low toxicity. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steini Moura, Cassio [Faculty of Physics, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul, 90619-900, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Balzaretti, Naira Maria; Amaral, Livio [Institute of Physics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, C.P.: 15051, 91501-070, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Gribel Lacerda, Rodrigo; Pimenta, Marcos A. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, C.P.: 702, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  3. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio Stein Moura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  4. Immobilization of enzymes onto carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prlainović Nevena Ž.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs has opened a new door in nanotechnology. With their high surface area, unique electronic, thermal and mechanical properties, CNTs have been widely used as carriers for protein immobilization. In fact, carbon nanotubes present ideal support system without diffusional limitations, and also have the possibility of surface covalent functionalization. It is usually the oxidation process that introduces carboxylic acid groups. Enzymes and other proteins could be adsorbed or covalently attached onto carbon nanotubes. Adsorption of enzyme is a very simple and inexpensive immobilization method and there are no chemical changes of the protein. It has also been found that this technique does not alter structure and unique properties of nanotubes. However, a major problem in process designing is relatively low stability of immobilized protein and desorption from the carrier. On the other hand, while covalent immobilization provides durable attachment the oxidation process can reduce mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes. It can also affect the active site of enzyme and cause the loss of enzyme activity. Bioimmobilization studies have showed that there are strong interactions between carbon nanotubes surface and protein. The retention of enzyme structure and activity is critical for their application and it is of fundamental interest to understand the nature of these interactions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy provide an insight into the structural changes that occur during the immobilization. The aim of this paper is to summarize progress of protein immobilization onto carbon nanotubes.

  5. Carbon nanotube fiber terahertz polarizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Ahmed; Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Young, Colin C.; Heimbeck, Martin S.; Everitt, Henry O.; Pasquali, Matteo; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-04-01

    Conventional, commercially available terahertz (THz) polarizers are made of uniformly and precisely spaced metallic wires. They are fragile and expensive, with performance characteristics highly reliant on wire diameters and spacings. Here, we report a simple and highly error-tolerant method for fabricating a freestanding THz polarizer with nearly ideal performance, reliant on the intrinsically one-dimensional character of conduction electrons in well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The polarizer was constructed on a mechanical frame over which we manually wound acid-doped CNT fibers with ultrahigh electrical conductivity. We demonstrated that the polarizer has an extinction ratio of ˜-30 dB with a low insertion loss (fiber polarizer and found comparable attenuation to a commercial metallic wire-grid polarizer. Furthermore, based on the classical theory of light transmission through an array of metallic wires, we demonstrated the most striking difference between the CNT-fiber and metallic wire-grid polarizers: the latter fails to work in the zero-spacing limit, where it acts as a simple mirror, while the former continues to work as an excellent polarizer even in that limit due to the one-dimensional conductivity of individual CNTs.

  6. Elastomer Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jared L.; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2009-01-01

    Elastomers are reinforced with functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) giving them high-breaking strain levels and low densities. Cross-linked elastomers are prepared using amine-terminated, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), with an average molecular weight of 5,000 daltons, and a functionalized SWNT. Cross-link densities, estimated on the basis of swelling data in toluene (a dispersing solvent) indicated that the polymer underwent cross-linking at the ends of the chains. This thermally initiated cross-linking was found to occur only in the presence of the aryl alcohol functionalized SWNTs. The cross-link could have been via a hydrogen-bonding mechanism between the amine and the free hydroxyl group, or via attack of the amine on the ester linage to form an amide. Tensile properties examined at room temperature indicate a three-fold increase in the tensile modulus of the elastomer, with rupture and failure of the elastomer occurring at a strain of 6.5.

  7. Carbon nanotube fiber terahertz polarizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubair, Ahmed [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Young, Colin C. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Heimbeck, Martin S. [Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Everitt, Henry O. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Pasquali, Matteo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Kono, Junichiro, E-mail: kono@rice.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2016-04-04

    Conventional, commercially available terahertz (THz) polarizers are made of uniformly and precisely spaced metallic wires. They are fragile and expensive, with performance characteristics highly reliant on wire diameters and spacings. Here, we report a simple and highly error-tolerant method for fabricating a freestanding THz polarizer with nearly ideal performance, reliant on the intrinsically one-dimensional character of conduction electrons in well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The polarizer was constructed on a mechanical frame over which we manually wound acid-doped CNT fibers with ultrahigh electrical conductivity. We demonstrated that the polarizer has an extinction ratio of ∼−30 dB with a low insertion loss (<0.5 dB) throughout a frequency range of 0.2–1.1 THz. In addition, we used a THz ellipsometer to measure the Müller matrix of the CNT-fiber polarizer and found comparable attenuation to a commercial metallic wire-grid polarizer. Furthermore, based on the classical theory of light transmission through an array of metallic wires, we demonstrated the most striking difference between the CNT-fiber and metallic wire-grid polarizers: the latter fails to work in the zero-spacing limit, where it acts as a simple mirror, while the former continues to work as an excellent polarizer even in that limit due to the one-dimensional conductivity of individual CNTs.

  8. Superconductivity in the Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieong, Chao

    This is an experimental study of the superconductivity of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs)--more specifically the CNTs studied is 0.4 nm diameter single-wall CNTs existing inside the channels of the AFI zeolite crystal, abbreviated as CNT AFI--by probing the magnetization property of this CNT AFI system. These human engineered 4-Angstrom CNTs, which is a nanoscale and low-dimensional material, are approaching the limit set by nature, and superconductivity in the CNTs in general is theoretically (microscopic or first-principles) both interesting and challenging. Hence, empirical studies are important in providing useful guiding information. The magnetization and specific-heat studies could provide convincing evidences supporting or critiquing the electrical transport results of the CNT AFI system. But probing the superconductivity in this system, as the superconducting signal is very small in a large background, is another challenge. Therefore the high-resolution calorimetry and magnetometry techniques detailedin this thesis are invaluable. With improved method of fabrication to increase the CNTs content inside the channels of the AFI crystallites, the empirical results [Nanoscale 4, 21-41 (2012)]were markedly different from those published in 2001 [Science 292, 2462 (2001)]. The magnetization results of this thesis largely agree with the results from the electrical transport study [Phys. Rev. B 81, 174530 (2010)], but there is some result that raises doubt in the critical current interpretation there. Lastly, there is still some electrical transport result of this system that has not been explained convincingly and is of interest.

  9. Determinants of carbon nanotube toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanone, Sophie; Andujar, Pascal; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Boczkowski, Jorge

    2013-12-01

    In the last few years questions have been raised regarding the potential toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to humans and environment. It is believed that the physico-chemical characteristics of these materials are key determinants of CNT interaction with living organisms, and hence determine their toxicity. As for other nanomaterials, the most important of these characteristics are the length, diameter, surface area, tendency to agglomerate, bio-durability, presence and nature of catalyst residues as well as chemical functionalization of the CNT. This review highlights the recent advancements in the understanding of the CNT properties which are essential in determining CNT toxicity. Hence the focus is on CNT dimensions, surface properties, bio-durability and corona formation as these fields have evolved greatly in recent years. A deeper understanding of these events and their underlying mechanisms could provide a molecular explanation of the biological and physiological responses following CNT administration and therefore help in the development of safe by design materials. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Directed Assembly of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzo, Erika; Palma, Matteo; Chenet, Daniel A; Ao, Geyou; Zheng, Ming; Hone, James C; Wind, Shalom J

    2016-02-23

    The outstanding electronic properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have made them prime candidates for future nanoelectronics technologies. One of the main obstacles to the implementation of advanced SWCNT electronics to date is the inability to arrange them in a manner suitable for complex circuits. Directed assembly of SWCNT segments onto lithographically patterned and chemically functionalized substrates is a promising way to organize SWCNTs in topologies that are amenable to integration for advanced applications, but the placement and orientational control required have not yet been demonstrated. We have developed a technique for assembling length sorted and chirality monodisperse DNA-wrapped SWCNT segments on hydrophilic lines patterned on a passivated oxidized silicon substrate. Placement of individual SWCNT segments at predetermined locations was achieved with nanometer accuracy. Three terminal electronic devices, consisting of a single SWCNT segment placed either beneath or on top of metallic source/drain electrodes were fabricated. Devices made with semiconducting nanotubes behaved as typical p-type field effect transistors (FETs), whereas devices made with metallic nanotubes had a finite resistance with little or no gate modulation. This scalable, high resolution approach represents an important step forward toward the potential implementation of complex SWCNT devices and circuits.

  11. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors.

  12. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A; Abdel-Daiem, A

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact.

  13. Molecular dynamics analysis on axial buckling of functionalized carbon nanotubes in thermal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehralian, Fahimeh; Tadi Beni, Yaghoub

    2017-11-04

    Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to investigate the buckling characteristics of functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs) under axial compression at various temperatures. The influences of functionalization, content of functional groups, chirality and diameter, as well as temperature on buckling response of pristine and functionalized CNTs are investigated. It is found that the buckling capacity of CNTs deteriorates drastically by functionalization, though the increase in the content of functional groups slightly enhances their stability. Besides, the results show that temperature considerably contributes to the stability of nanotubes but interestingly it has the most pronounced impact on pristine CNTs than functionalized ones, as defective CNTs.

  14. Bulk Cutting of Carbon Nanotubes Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Kirk J. (Inventor); Rauwald, Urs (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Schmidt, Howard K. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Gu, Zhenning (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a method for attaining short carbon nanotubes utilizing electron beam irradiation, for example, of a carbon nanotube sample. The sample may be pretreated, for example by oxonation. The pretreatment may introduce defects to the sidewalls of the nanotubes. The method is shown to produces nanotubes with a distribution of lengths, with the majority of lengths shorter than 100 tun. Further, the median length of the nanotubes is between about 20 nm and about 100 nm.

  15. Synthesis of silver impregnated carbon nanotubes and cyclodextrin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Silver impregnated carbon nanotubes and cyclodextrin polymers were synthesised by first functionalising carbon nanotubes in a mixture of nitric and sulphuric acid before impregnating them with silver nanoparticles. The silver impregnated functionalised carbon nanotubes were then polymerised with β cyclodextrin using ...

  16. Periodic density functional theory study of structural and electronic properties of single-walled zinc oxide and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marana, Naiara L.; Albuquerque, Anderson R.; La Porta, Felipe A.; Longo, Elson; Sambrano, Julio R.

    2016-05-01

    Periodic density functional theory calculations with the B3LYP hybrid functional and all-electron Gaussian basis set were performed to simulate the structural and electronic properties as well as the strain and formation energies of single-walled ZnO nanotubes (SWZnONTs) and Carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different chiralities as functions of their diameters. For all SWZnONTs, the band gap, strain energy, and formation energy converge to ~4.5 eV, 0.0 eV/atom, and 0.40 eV/atom, respectively. This result suggests that the nanotubes are formed more easily from the surface than from the bulk. For SWCNTs, the strain energy is always positive, while the formation energy is negative for armchair and zigzag nanotubes, therefore suggesting that these types of nanotubes can be preferentially formed from the bulk. The electronic properties of SWCNTs depend on the chirality; all armchair nanotubes are metallic, while zigzag and chiral nanotubes can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on the n and m vectors.

  17. Carbon nanotubes: Synthesis, characterization, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deck, Christian Peter

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess exceptional material properties, making them desirable for use in a variety of applications. In this work, CNTs were grown using two distinct catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) procedures, floating catalyst CVD and thermal CVD, which differed in the method of catalyst introduction. Reaction conditions were optimized to synthesize nanotubes with desired characteristics, and the effects of varying growth parameters were studied. These parameters included gas composition, temperature, reaction duration, and catalyst and substrate material. The CNT products were then examined using several approaches. For each CVD method, nanotube growth rates were determined and the formation and termination mechanisms were investigated. The effects of reaction parameters on nanotube diameters and morphology were also explored to identify means of controlling these important properties. In addition to investigating the effects of different growth parameters, the material properties of nanotubes were also studied. The floating catalyst CVD method produced thick mats of nanotubes, and the mechanical response of these samples was examined using in-situ compression and tension testing. These results indicated that mat structure is composed of discontinuous nanotubes, and a time-dependent response was also observed. In addition, the electrical resistance of bulk CNT samples was found to increase for tubes grown with higher catalyst concentrations and with bamboo morphologies. The properties of nanotubes synthesized using thermal CVD were also examined. Mechanical testing was performed using the same in-situ compression approach developed for floating catalyst CVD samples. A second characterization method was devised, where an optical approach was used to measure the deflection of patterned nanotubes exposed to an applied fluid flow. This response was also simulated, and comparisons with the experimental data were used to determine the flexural

  18. Channeling of protons in double-walled carbon nanotubes in kinetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You Shuyan; Song Yuanhong [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Wang Younian [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)], E-mail: ynwang@dlut.edu.cn

    2009-09-15

    A kinetic model combined with the dielectric response theory is employed to study the electronic excitation on the nanotube walls during the channeling of protons through double-walled carbon nanotubes. Analytical expressions of the self-energy and stopping power are obtained with protons moving along the axis of the double-walled nanotubes. Calculation results show us interesting double-peak curves of the self-energy and stopping power, under strong influence of the damping factor and the special double-walled nanotube geometry. Relatively increasing the damping factor and the chiral parameter of the outer wall can reduce the interference effects between the two walls and weaken the double-peak to one-peak shapes.

  19. Covalent modification of single wall carbon nanotubes upon gamma irradiation in aqueous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Svetlana P.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs were exposed to gamma radiation, absorbing the doses of 25, 50 and 100 kGy in aqueous environment. After the irradiation treatment, the changes in the structure were studied using Fourier Transform Infrared and Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and atomic force microscopy. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy has shown that the irradiation of SWCNTs in aqueous environment leads to covalent functionalization of SWCNTs. The irradiation of water leads to its radiolysis and the formation of free radical species of different types. These species react with nanotube sidewalls and in such way carboxylic and hydroxylic groups are covalently bonded to the sidewalls of SWCNTs. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to estimate the total amount of covalently bonded groups. The highest ratio of covalently bonded groups appears in nanotubes irradiated with the 100 kGy dose. Raman spectroscopy proves that the increase in irradiation doses leads to an increase of structural disorder of SWCNTs, presumably in the form of defects in carbon nanotube walls. Examination of ID to IG ratio shows a three times larger degree of structural disorder after the irradiation treatment with 100 kGy. The analysis of carbon nanotube Raman spectra RBM bands determined the presence of both semiconducting and metallic carbon nanotubes after gamma irradiation treatment. These measurements prove that gamma irradiation treatments have a nonselective effect regarding different chirality and therefore conductance of nanotubes. Atomic force microscopy shows a significant carbon nanotube shortening as the effect of gamma radiation treatment. Nanotubes with length between 500 nm and 1 μm are predominant.

  20. Graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials and use as electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tour, James M.; Zhu, Yu; Li, Lei; Yan, Zheng; Lin, Jian

    2016-09-27

    Provided are methods of making graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials. Such methods generally include: (1) associating a graphene film with a substrate; (2) applying a catalyst and a carbon source to the graphene film; and (3) growing carbon nanotubes on the graphene film. The grown carbon nanotubes become covalently linked to the graphene film through carbon-carbon bonds that are located at one or more junctions between the carbon nanotubes and the graphene film. In addition, the grown carbon nanotubes are in ohmic contact with the graphene film through the carbon-carbon bonds at the one or more junctions. The one or more junctions may include seven-membered carbon rings. Also provided are the formed graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials.

  1. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  2. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Abukari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ωB for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ωB for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  3. Modelling Carbon Nanotubes-Based Mediatorless Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julija Razumiene

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mathematical model of carbon nanotubes-based mediatorless biosensor. The developed model is based on nonlinear non-stationary reaction-diffusion equations. The model involves four layers (compartments: a layer of enzyme solution entrapped on a terylene membrane, a layer of the single walled carbon nanotubes deposited on a perforated membrane, and an outer diffusion layer. The biosensor response and sensitivity are investigated by changing the model parameters with a special emphasis on the mediatorless transfer of the electrons in the layer of the enzyme-loaded carbon nanotubes. The numerical simulation at transient and steady state conditions was carried out using the finite difference technique. The mathematical model and the numerical solution were validated by experimental data. The obtained agreement between the simulation results and the experimental data was admissible at different concentrations of the substrate.

  4. Orientational Growth of Carbon Nanotube for Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the superior properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) could improve numerous devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been made in investigating the growth mechanism of MWCNT to synthesize high quality MWCNT. Most applications require uniform aligned CNT. In this presentation, a directional growth of CNT will be reported. Carbon nanotubes are synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition. Temperature and pressure are two important growth parameters for fabricating carbon nanotubes. It is found that the nanotube diameter distribution mainly depends on the growth-temperature. With the substrate surface normal either along or against the gravity vector, different growth orientations of MWCNT are observed by scanning electron microscopy although the Raman spectra are similar for samples synthesized at different locations. The sizes of these carbon nanotubes in each sample are quite uniform and the length of the tube is up to several tens of micrometers. These results suggest the gravitation effects in the growth of long and small diameter CNT.

  5. Vibrational Behavior of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, I.-Ling; Huang, Chang-Ming

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the vibrational behaviors of both armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The natural longitudinal/flexural/torsional/radial frequencies of CNTs were extracted and analyzed simultaneously from an equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation without imposing any initial modal displacement or force. Initial random atomic velocities, which were assigned to fit the simulated temperature, could be considered as an excitation on CNTs composing of wide range of spatial frequencies. The position and velocity of each atom at every time step was calculated using finite difference algorithm, and fast Fourier transform (FFT) was used to perform time-to-frequency domain transform. The effects of CNT length, radius, chirality, and boundary condition on the vibrational behaviors of CNTs were systematically examined. Moreover, the simulated natural frequencies and mode shapes were compared with the predictions based on continuum theories, i.e., rod, Euler-Bernoulli beam and nonlocal Timoshenko beam, to examine their applicability in nanostructures.

  6. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes for Lithium Ion Battery Anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung-Joon Jin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have displayed great potential as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs due to their unique structural, mechanical, and electrical properties. The measured reversible lithium ion capacities of CNT-based anodes are considerably improved compared to the conventional graphite-based anodes. Additionally, the opened structure and enriched chirality of CNTs can help to improve the capacity and electrical transport in CNT-based LIBs. Therefore, the modification of CNTs and design of CNT structure provide strategies for improving the performance of CNT-based anodes. CNTs could also be assembled into free-standing electrodes without any binder or current collector, which will lead to increased specific energy density for the overall battery design. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of lithium ion intercalation and diffusion in CNTs, and the influence of different structures and morphologies on their performance as anode materials for LIBs.

  7. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes for Lithium Ion Battery Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhili; Yun, Young Soo; Jin, Hyoung-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have displayed great potential as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) due to their unique structural, mechanical, and electrical properties. The measured reversible lithium ion capacities of CNT-based anodes are considerably improved compared to the conventional graphite-based anodes. Additionally, the opened structure and enriched chirality of CNTs can help to improve the capacity and electrical transport in CNT-based LIBs. Therefore, the modification of CNTs and design of CNT structure provide strategies for improving the performance of CNT-based anodes. CNTs could also be assembled into free-standing electrodes without any binder or current collector, which will lead to increased specific energy density for the overall battery design. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of lithium ion intercalation and diffusion in CNTs, and the influence of different structures and morphologies on their performance as anode materials for LIBs. PMID:28809361

  8. First-principles calculations on double-walled inorganic nanotubes with hexagonal chiralities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovskii, Yuri F.; Evarestov, Robert A.; Bandura, Andrei V.; Losev, Maxim V.

    2011-06-01

    The two sets of commensurate double-walled boron nitride and titania hexagonally-structured nanotubes (DW BN and TiO2 NTs) possessing either armchair- or zigzag-type chiralities have been considered, i.e., (n1,n1)@(n2,n2) or (n1,0)@(n2,0), respectively. For symmetry analysis of these nanotubes, the line symmetry groups for one-periodic (1D) nanostructures with rotohelical symmetry have been applied. To analyze the structural and electronic properties of hexagonal DW NTs, a series of large-scale ab initio DFT-LCAO calculations have been performed using the hybrid Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation functional PBE0 (as implemented in CRYSTAL-09 code). To establish the optimal inter-shell distances within DW NTs corresponding to the minima of calculated total energy, the chiral indices n1 and n2 of the constituent single-walled (SW) nanotubes have been successively varied.

  9. First-principles calculations on double-walled inorganic nanotubes with hexagonal chiralities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukovskii, Yuri F [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, 8 Kengaraga Str., LV-1063, Riga (Latvia); Evarestov, Robert A; Bandura, Andrei V; Losev, Maxim V, E-mail: quantzh@latnet.lv [Department of Quantum Chemistry, St. Petersburg State University, 26 Universitetsky Ave., 198504, Petrodvorets (Russian Federation)

    2011-06-23

    The two sets of commensurate double-walled boron nitride and titania hexagonally-structured nanotubes (DW BN and TiO{sub 2} NTs) possessing either armchair- or zigzag-type chiralities have been considered, i.e., (n{sub 1},n{sub 1})-(n{sub 2},n{sub 2}) or (n{sub 1},0)-(n{sub 2},0), respectively. For symmetry analysis of these nanotubes, the line symmetry groups for one-periodic (1D) nanostructures with rotohelical symmetry have been applied. To analyze the structural and electronic properties of hexagonal DW NTs, a series of large-scale ab initio DFT-LCAO calculations have been performed using the hybrid Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation functional PBE0 (as implemented in CRYSTAL-09 code). To establish the optimal inter-shell distances within DW NTs corresponding to the minima of calculated total energy, the chiral indices n{sub 1} and n{sub 2} of the constituent single-walled (SW) nanotubes have been successively varied.

  10. Lipid nanoscaffolds in carbon nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukner, Catharina; Koziol, Krzysztof K. K.; Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V.

    2013-09-01

    We present the fabrication of lipid nanoscaffolds inside carbon nanotube arrays by employing the nanostructural self-assembly of lipid molecules. The nanoscaffolds are finely tunable into model biomembrane-like architectures (planar), soft nanochannels (cylindrical) or 3-dimensionally ordered continuous bilayer structures (cubic). Carbon nanotube arrays hosting the above nanoscaffolds are formed by packing of highly oriented multiwalled carbon nanotubes which facilitate the alignment of lipid nanostructures without requiring an external force. Furthermore, the lipid nanoscaffolds can be created under both dry and hydrated conditions. We show their direct application in reconstitution of egg proteins. Such nanoscaffolds find enormous potential in bio- and nano-technological fields.We present the fabrication of lipid nanoscaffolds inside carbon nanotube arrays by employing the nanostructural self-assembly of lipid molecules. The nanoscaffolds are finely tunable into model biomembrane-like architectures (planar), soft nanochannels (cylindrical) or 3-dimensionally ordered continuous bilayer structures (cubic). Carbon nanotube arrays hosting the above nanoscaffolds are formed by packing of highly oriented multiwalled carbon nanotubes which facilitate the alignment of lipid nanostructures without requiring an external force. Furthermore, the lipid nanoscaffolds can be created under both dry and hydrated conditions. We show their direct application in reconstitution of egg proteins. Such nanoscaffolds find enormous potential in bio- and nano-technological fields. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) data on the alignment of lipid nanostructures, control and time resolved 2-d images of egg ovalbumin encapsulation and a summary picture of the present work. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02068a

  11. Phase Behavior of Carbon Nanotube Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Philippe

    2006-03-01

    We study the phase behavior of nanotube suspensions stabilized by surfactants or amphiphilic polymers. The control of the composition of the solutions allows the interaction potential between the nanotubes to be finely tuned. As a consequence, it is possible to quantitatively analyze important phenomena such as percolation or liquid crystalline phase transitions. In particular, we describe how the percolation of rod-like particles is quantitatively decreased in the presence of attractive interactions (1). We show that rod-like particles respond much more strongly than spheres to attractive interactions; strengthening thereby the technological interest of carbon nanotubes to achieve low percolation thresholds for electrostatic dissipation or electromagnetic shielding. By contrast, carbon nanotubes which experience repulsive interactions can spontaneously order and form liquid crystalline solutions (2). Aligning and packing nanotubes is a major challenge to obtain macroscopic materials with improved properties. We will briefly discuss at the end of the presentation, our latest results concerning the fabrication of fibers aligned nanotubes (3). In particular, we will present new treatments of these fibers which lead to unusual mechanical properties and shape memory effects with giant stress recovery (4). *B. Vigolo, C. Coulon, M. Maugey, C. Zakri, P. Poulin, Science 2005. *S. Badaire, C. Zakri, M. Maugey, A. Derr'e, J. Barisci, G. Wallace, P. Poulin, Adv. Mat. 2005. *P. Miaudet, M. Maugey, A. Derr'e, V. Pichot, P. Launois, P. Poulin, C. Zakri, Nanoletters 2005. *P. Miaudet, A. Derr'e, M. Maugey, C. Zakri, P. Poulin, in preparation.

  12. A carbon nanotube optical rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Asha; Singh, Virendra; Bougher, Thomas L.; Cola, Baratunde A.

    2015-12-01

    An optical rectenna—a device that directly converts free-propagating electromagnetic waves at optical frequencies to direct current—was first proposed over 40 years ago, yet this concept has not been demonstrated experimentally due to fabrication challenges at the nanoscale. Realizing an optical rectenna requires that an antenna be coupled to a diode that operates on the order of 1 PHz (switching speed on the order of 1 fs). Diodes operating at these frequencies are feasible if their capacitance is on the order of a few attofarads, but they remain extremely difficult to fabricate and to reliably couple to a nanoscale antenna. Here we demonstrate an optical rectenna by engineering metal-insulator-metal tunnel diodes, with a junction capacitance of ˜2 aF, at the tip of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (˜10 nm in diameter), which act as the antenna. Upon irradiation with visible and infrared light, we measure a d.c. open-circuit voltage and a short-circuit current that appear to be due to a rectification process (we account for a very small but quantifiable contribution from thermal effects). In contrast to recent reports of photodetection based on hot electron decay in a plasmonic nanoscale antenna, a coherent optical antenna field appears to be rectified directly in our devices, consistent with rectenna theory. Finally, power rectification is observed under simulated solar illumination, and there is no detectable change in diode performance after numerous current-voltage scans between 5 and 77 °C, indicating a potential for robust operation.

  13. Laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin; Park, Cheol

    2010-03-02

    An improved method for the production of single walled carbon nanotubes that utilizes an RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of such. Such a method, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently permits the use of a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization. The method of the present invention utilizes a free electron laser operating at high average and peak fluence to illuminate a rotating and translating graphite/catalyst target to obtain high yields of SWNTs without the use of a vacuum chamber.

  14. Carbon nanotubes as anti-bacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocan, Teodora; Matea, Cristian T; Pop, Teodora; Mosteanu, Ofelia; Buzoianu, Anca Dana; Suciu, Soimita; Puia, Cosmin; Zdrehus, Claudiu; Iancu, Cornel; Mocan, Lucian

    2017-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections that have evolved via natural selection have increased alarmingly at a global level. Thus, there is a strong need for the development of novel antibiotics for the treatment of these infections. Functionalized carbon nanotubes through their unique properties hold great promise in the fight against multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. This new family of nanovectors for therapeutic delivery proved to be innovative and efficient for the transport and cellular translocation of therapeutic molecules. The current review examines the latest progress in the antibacterial activity of carbon nanotubes and their composites.

  15. Carbon nanotubes as nanopipette: modelling and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ho Jung; Byun, Ki Ryang; Kang, Jeong Won

    2004-06-01

    This paper shows that carbon nanotubes can be applied to a nanopipette. Nanospace in atomic force microscope multi-wall carbon nanotube tips is filled with molecules and atoms with charges and then, the tips can be applied to nanopipette when the encapsulated media flow off under applying electrostatic forces. Since the nanospace inside the tips can be refilled, the tips can be permanently used in ideal conditions of no chemical reaction and no mechanical deformation. Molecular dynamics simulations for nanopipette applications showed the possibility of nanolithography or single-metallofullerene-transistor array fabrication.

  16. Topological phase diagram of superconducting carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milz, Lars; Marganska-Lyzniak, Magdalena; Grifoni, Milena [Institut I - Theoretische Physik Universitaet Regensburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The topological superconducting phase diagram of superconducting carbon nanotubes is discussed. Under the assumption of a short-ranged pairing potential, there are two spin-singlet states: an s-wave and an exotic p + ip-wave that are possible because of the special structure of the honeycomb lattice. The consequences for the possible presence of Majorana edge states in carbon nanotubes are addressed. In particular, regions in the magnetic field-chemical potential plane possibly hosting localized Majorana modes are discussed.

  17. Carbon Nanotube-Enhanced Carbon-Phenenolic Ablator Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikolaev, P.; Stackpoole, M.; Fan, W.; Cruden, B. A.; Waid, M.; Moloney, P.; Arepalli, S.; Arnold, J.; Partridge, H.; Yowell, L.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of PICA (phenolic impregnated carbon ablator) as the selected material for heat shielding for future earth return vehicles. It briefly reviews the manufacturing of PICA and the advantages for the use of heat shielding, and then explains the reason for using Carbon Nanotubes to improve strength of phenolic resin that binds carbon fibers together. It reviews the work being done to create a carbon nanotube enhanced PICA. Also shown are various micrographic images of the various PICA materials.

  18. Computational Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Wei, Chenyu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomechanics of individual carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes and their application as reinforcing fibers in polymer composites has been reviewed with interplay of theoretical modeling, computer simulations and experimental observations. The emphasis in this work is on elucidating the multi-length scales of the problems involved, and of different simulation techniques that are needed to address specific characteristics of individual nanotubes and nanotube polymer-matrix interfaces. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are shown to be sufficient to describe the generic behavior such as strength and stiffness modulus but are inadequate to describe elastic limit and nature of plastic buckling at large strength. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations are shown to bring out explicit atomic nature dependent behavior of these nanoscale materials objects that are not accessible either via continuum mechanics based descriptions or through classical molecular dynamics based simulations. As examples, we discus local plastic collapse of carbon nanotubes under axial compression and anisotropic plastic buckling of boron-nitride nanotubes. Dependence of the yield strain on the strain rate is addressed through temperature dependent simulations, a transition-state-theory based model of the strain as a function of strain rate and simulation temperature is presented, and in all cases extensive comparisons are made with experimental observations. Mechanical properties of nanotube-polymer composite materials are simulated with diverse nanotube-polymer interface structures (with van der Waals interaction). The atomistic mechanisms of the interface toughening for optimal load transfer through recycling, high-thermal expansion and diffusion coefficient composite formation above glass transition temperature, and enhancement of Young's modulus on addition of nanotubes to polymer are discussed and compared with experimental observations.

  19. Nickel oxide nanotube synthesis using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sacrificial templates for supercapacitor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ahmed M; Sahu, Rakesh P; Wallar, Cameron J; Chen, Ri; Zhitomirsky, Igor; Puri, Ishwar K

    2017-02-17

    A novel approach for the fabrication of nickel oxide nanotubes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sacrificial template is described. Electroless deposition is employed to deposit nickel onto carbon nanotubes. The subsequent annealing of the product in the presence of air oxidizes nickel to nickel oxide, and carbon is released as gaseous carbon dioxide, leaving behind nickel oxide nanotubes. Electron microscopy and elemental mapping confirm the formation of nickel oxide nanotubes. New chelating polyelectrolytes are used as dispersing agents to achieve high colloidal stability for both the nickel-coated carbon nanotubes and the nickel oxide nanotubes. A gravimetric specific capacitance of 245.3 F g(-1) and  an areal capacitance of 3.28 F cm(-2) at a scan rate of 2 mV s(-1) is achieved, with an electrode fabricated using nickel oxide nanotubes as the active element with a mass loading of 24.1 mg cm(-2).

  20. Shear Flow Induced Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes in Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure for the fabrication of natural rubber composite with aligned carbon nanotubes is provided in this study. The two-step approach is based on (i the preparation of mixture latex of natural rubber, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and other components and (ii the orientation of carbon nanotubes by a flow field. Rubber composite sheets filled with variable volume fraction of aligned carbon nanotubes were fabricated and then confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy studies. An obvious increase in thermal conductivity has been obtained after the alignment of carbon nanotubes. The dynamic mechanical analysis was carried out in a tear mode for the composite.

  1. Geckolike high shear strength by carbon nanotube fiber adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeno, Y.; Nakayama, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube adhesives can adhere strongly to surfaces as a gecko does. The number of carbon nanotube layers is an important determinant of the contact area for adhesion. Balancing the catalyst ratio and buffer layer used for chemical vapor deposition processing controls the number of carbon nanotube layers and their distribution. The features of carbon nanotubes determine the shear strength of adhesion. Carbon nanotubes with a broad distribution of layers exhibit enhanced shear strength with equivalent adhesive capability to that of a natural Tokay Gecko (Gekko gecko)

  2. Growth of carbon nanotubes from C{sub 60}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morjan, R.E.; Nerushev, O.A.; Sveningsson, M.; Rohmund, F.; Falk, L.K.L.; Campbell, E.E.B. [Department of Experimental Physics, Goeteborg University and Chalmers University of Technology, 41296, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2004-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes can be obtained from a multitude of molecular precursors in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. Here we demonstrate that the use of C{sub 60} as the carbon feedstock gas in an iron-catalyzed thermal CVD experiment leads to the formation of films of multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The critical role of the diameter of the catalyst particles in determining the efficiency of nanotube growth is clearly demonstrated. Electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were employed for the characterisation of the nanotube material. The structural properties of the individual nanotubes show distinctive differences to acetylene-grown multi-walled nanotubes. (orig.)

  3. Titania carbon nanotube composites for enhanced photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios

    Photocatalytic composites have been used for the past few decades in a wide range of applications. The most common application is the purification of air and water by removing toxic compounds. There is limited use however towards biocidal applications. Despite their high efficiency, photocatalytic materials are not comparable to the effectiveness of conventional biocidal compounds such as chlorine and alcoholic disinfectants. On the other hand, nearly a decade ago with the discovery of the carbon nanotubes a new vibrant scientific field emerged. Nanotubes are unique structures of carbon that posse amazing electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. In this research carbon nanotubes are used as photocatalytic enhancers. They were coated with anatase titania to form a composite material. Two different types of nanotubes (metallic versus non-metallic) were used and the photocatalytic activity was measured. The metallic tubes demonstrated exceptional photocatalytic properties, while non-metallic tubes had low photocatalytic efficiency. The reason for that difference was investigated and was the major focus of this research. The research concluded that the reasons for the high efficiency of the carbon nanotubes were (i) the metallic nature of the tubes and (ii) the possible bond between the titania coating and the underlying graphite layers (C-O-Ti). Since both composites had the same indications regarding the C-O-Ti bond, the metallic nature of the carbon nanotubes is believed to be the most dominant factor contributing to the enhancement of the photocatalysis. The composite material may have other potential applications such as for sensing and photovoltaic uses.

  4. Improved Method of Purifying Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D.

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of removing the residues of fabrication from carbon nanotubes has been invented. These residues comprise amorphous carbon and metal particles that are produced during the growth process. Prior methods of removing the residues include a variety of processes that involved the use of halogens, oxygen, or air in both thermal and plasma processes. Each of the prior methods entails one or more disadvantages, including non-selectivity (removal or damage of nanotubes in addition to removal of the residues), the need to dispose of toxic wastes, and/or processing times as long as 24 hours or more. In contrast, the process described here does not include the use of toxic chemicals, the generation of toxic wastes, causes little or no damage to the carbon nanotubes, and involves processing times of less than 1 hour. In the improved method, purification is accomplished by flowing water vapor through the reaction chamber at elevated temperatures and ambient pressures. The impurities are converted to gaseous waste products by the selective hydrogenation and hydroxylation by the water in a reaction chamber. This process could be performed either immediately after growth or in a post-growth purification process. The water used needs to be substantially free of oxygen and can be obtained by a repeated freeze-pump-thaw process. The presence of oxygen will non-selectively attach the carbon nanotubes in addition to the amorphous carbon.

  5. Multiscale Evaluation of the Nonlinear Elastic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Under Finite Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Shahabodini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the calculation of the elastic properties for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs under axial deformation and hydrostatic pressure using the atomistic-based continuum approach and the deformation mapping technique. A hyperelastic model based on the higher-order Cauchy-Born (HCB rule being applicable at finite strains and accounting for the chirality and material nonlinearity is presented. Mechanical properties of several carbon nanotubes (CNTs are computed and compared with the existing theoretical results and a good agreement is observed. Moreover, by comparison with atomistic calculations, it is found that the present model can reproduce the energetics of axially deformed CNTs. The model is then adopted to study the dependence of the elastic properties on chirality, radius and strain which yields an upper bound on the stability limit of axially and circumferentially stretched nanotubes. The influence of chirality is found to be more prominent for smaller tubes and as the diameter increases, the anisotropy induced by finite deformations gets nullified. It is discerned that the constitutive properties of the CNT can vary with deformation in a nonlinear manner. It is also found that the CNT displays a martial softening behavior at finite tensile strains and a hardening behavior at slightly compressive strains.

  6. Selective ion transport in functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylova, Olga N.; Calixte, Emvia I.; Shuford, Kevin L.

    2017-11-01

    Ion transport through functionalized carbon nanotubes in an external electric field is studied using all atom molecular dynamics simulations. The surface of carbon nanotubes has been functionalized with hydrogens and hydroxyl groups, and ionic current passing through the nanochannels has been examined with respect to the extent of surface modification. We are able to dramatically increase the ionic current passing through the nanotube via the appropriate surface modification. An analysis of the electrostatic potential within the tube shows higher ionic currents result from an increase in accessible pathways coupled with a global shift toward more direct ion passage. Moreover, through judicious choice of structure, the current can be modulated to a large degree with ion selectivity.

  7. Coupling of carbon and peptide nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Javier; Vázquez-Vázquez, Carlos; Kalinin, Arseny; Geckeler, Kurt E; Granja, Juan R

    2014-02-12

    Two of the main types of nanotubular architectures are the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and the self-assembling cyclic peptide nanotubes (SCPNs). We here report the preparation of the dual composite resulting from the ordered combination of both tubular motifs. In the resulting architecture, the SWCNTs can act as templates for the assembly of SCPNs that engage the carbon nanotubes noncovalently via pyrene "paddles", each member of the resulting hybrid stabilizing the other in aqueous solution. The particular hybrids obtained in the present study formed highly ordered oriented arrays and display complementary properties such as electrical conductivity. Furthermore, a self-sorting of the cyclic peptides toward semiconducting rather than metallic SWCNTs is also observed in the aqueous dispersions. It is envisaged that a broad range of exploitable properties may be achieved and/or controlled by varying the cyclic peptide components of similar SWCNT/SCPN hybrids.

  8. Flow-driven voltage generation in carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The flow of various liquids and gases over single-walled carbon nanotube bundles induces an electrical signal (voltage/current) in the sample along the ... to the nanotubes, the gas flow effect can be seen for a variety of solids ranging from single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, graphite and doped semiconductors.

  9. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    modifies their transport behaviour. Interaction between electrons inside and outside a quantum dot is manifested in SU(4) Kondo behavior and level renormalization. Interaction within a dot leads to Wigner molecules and more complex correlated states. This review takes an experimental perspective informed...... and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and from valley freedom. We focus on the interplay between the two....... In single quantum dots defined in short lengths of nanotube, the energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are revealed by Coulomb blockade spectroscopy. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli...

  10. Making junctions between carbon nanotubes using an ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Krasheninnikov, A V; Keinonen, J; Banhart, F

    2003-01-01

    Making use of empirical potential molecular dynamics, we study ion bombardment of crossed single-walled carbon nanotubes as a tool to join the nanotubes. We demonstrate that ion irradiation should result in welding of crossed nanotubes, both suspended and deposited on substrates. We further predict optimum ion doses and energies for ion-mediated nanotube welding which may potentially be used for developing complicated networks of joined nanotubes.

  11. A New Resistance Formulation for Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Huan He

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A new resistance formulation for carbon nanotubes is suggested using fractal approach. The new formulation is also valid for other nonmetal conductors including nerve fibers, conductive polymers, and molecular wires. Our theoretical prediction agrees well with experimental observation.

  12. Spatially resolved spectroscopy on carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are small cylindrical molecules with a typical diameter of 1 nm and lengths of up to micrometers. These intriguing molecules exhibit, depending on the exact atomic structure, either semiconducting or metallic behavior. This makes them ideal candidates for possible future molecular

  13. Effective models for excitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the low lying spectrum of a model of excitons in carbon nanotubes. Consider two particles with opposite charges and a Coulomb self-interaction, placed on an infinitely long cylinder. If the cylinder radius becomes small, the low lying spectrum of their relative motion is well described...

  14. Bioaccumulation and ecotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Petra; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Baun, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have numerous industrial applications and may be released to the environment. In the aquatic environment, pristine or functionalized CNT have different dispersion behavior, potentially leading to different risks of exposure along the water column. Data included in this review...

  15. Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes for Everyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu-Dutt, Sharmistha; Minus, Marilyn L.; Jain, Rahul; Nepal, Dhriti; Kumar, Satish

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the extraordinary potential to change our lives by improving existing products and enabling new ones. Current and future research and industrial workforce professionals are very likely to encounter some aspects of nanotechnology including CNT science and technology in their education or profession. The simple structure…

  16. Biodistribution of Carbon Nanotubes in Animal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Møller, Peter Horn; Clausen, Per Axel

    2017-01-01

    The many interesting physical and chemical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) make it one of the most commercially attractive materials in the era of nanotechnology. Here, we review the recent publications on in vivo biodistribution of pristine and functionalized forms of single-walled and multi...

  17. Effective models for excitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    We analyse the low lying spectrum of a model of excitons in carbon nanotubes. Consider two particles with a Coulomb self-interaction, placed on an infinitely long cylinder. If the cylinder radius becomes small, the low lying spectrum is well described by a one-dimensional effective Hamiltonian...

  18. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube (CNT Composite Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Losic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are attractive approach for designing of new membranes for advanced molecular separation because of their unique transport properties and ability to mimic biological protein channels. In this work the synthetic approach for fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs composite membranes is presented. The method is based on growth of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT using chemical vapour deposition (CVD on the template of nanoporous alumina (PA membranes. The influence of experimental conditions including carbon precursor, temperature, deposition time, and PA template on CNT growth process and quality of fabricated membranes was investigated. The synthesis of CNT/PA composites with controllable nanotube dimensions such as diameters (30–150 nm, and thickness (5–100 µm, was demonstrated. The chemical composition and morphological characteristics of fabricated CNT/PA composite membranes were investigated by various characterisation techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and x-ray diffraction (XRD. Transport properties of prepared membranes were explored by diffusion of dye (Rose Bengal used as model of hydrophilic transport molecule.

  19. Single electron-ics with carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, G.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally investigate Quantum Dots, formed in Carbon Nanotubes. The first part of this thesis deals with charge sensing on such quantum dots. The charge sensor is a metallic Single-electron-transistor, sensitive to the charge of a single electron on the quantum dot. We use this technique for

  20. In-line manufacture of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Nicol Michele; Signorelli, Riccardo; Martini, Fabrizio; Corripio Luna, Oscar Enrique

    2015-04-28

    Mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNT) are facilitated by methods and apparatus disclosed herein. Advantageously, the methods and apparatus make use of a single production unit, and therefore provide for uninterrupted progress in a fabrication process. Embodiments of control systems for a variety of CNT production apparatus are included.

  1. Conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gets, A. V.; Krainov, V. P., E-mail: vpkrainov@mail.ru [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes at low temperatures is calculated. It is shown that it is much higher than the well-known conductivity of a model 1D Fermi system. This is a purely quantum-mechanical effect.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotube forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, J.; Zhong, G.; Esconjauregui, S.; Zhang, C.; Fouquet, M.; Hofmann, S. [Engineering Department, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    We review the growth mechanisms of vertically aligned carbon nanotube forests, in terms of what controls the growth rate and control of the catalyst lifetime. We also review the production of very high-density forests, in terms of increasing the catalyst particle density. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Electrochemical Metal Deposition on Carbon Nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dunsch, L.; Janda, Pavel; Mukhopadhyay, K.; Shinohara, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 6 (2001), s. 427-435 ISSN 1344-9931 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * electrodeposition * cyclic voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 0.800, year: 2001

  4. Exploring the Immunotoxicity of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yanmei

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their applications in nanomedicine lead to the increased exposure risk of nanomaterials to human beings. Although reports on toxicity of nanomaterials are rapidly growing, there is still a lack of knowledge on the potential toxicity of such materials to immune systems. This article reviews some existing studies assessing carbon nanotubes’ toxicity to immune system and provides the potential mechanistic explanation.

  5. Defect complexes in carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of defect complexes on the stability, structural and electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes is investigated using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method implemented...

  6. Synthesis, characterisation and applications of coiled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanus, Monica J; Harris, Andrew T

    2010-04-01

    Coiled carbon nanotubes are helical carbon structures formed when heptagonal and pentagonal rings are inserted into the hexagonal backbone of a 'straight' nanotube. Coiled carbon nanotubes have been reported with both regular and irregular helical structures. In this work the structure, growth mechanism(s), synthesis, properties and potential applications of coiled carbon nanotubes are reviewed. Published data suggests that coiled carbon nanotube synthesis occurs due to nonuniform extrusion of carbon from a catalyst surface. To date, coiled carbon nanotubes have been synthesised using catalyst modification techniques including: (i) the addition of S or P containing compounds during synthesis; (ii) the use of binary or ternary metal catalysts; (iii) the use of microwaves to create a local temperature gradient around individual catalyst particles and; (iv) the use of pH control during catalyst preparation. In most instances coiled carbon nanotubes are produced as a by-product; high yield and/or large-scale synthesis of coiled carbon nanotubes remains problematic. The qualitative analysis of coiled carbon nanotubes is currently hindered by the absence of specific characterisation data in the literature, e.g., oxidation profiles measured by thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectra of pure coiled carbon nanotube samples.

  7. Nicotine adsorption on single wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girao, Eduardo C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Fagan, Solange B.; Zanella, Ivana [Area de Ciencias Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario Franciscano - UNIFRA, 97010-032 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Filho, Antonio G. Souza, E-mail: agsf@fisica.ufc.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    This work reports a theoretical study of nicotine molecules interacting with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through ab initio calculations within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Different adsorption sites for nicotine on the surface of pristine and defective (8,0) SWCNTs were analyzed and the total energy curves, as a function of molecular position relative to the SWCNT surface, were evaluated. The nicotine adsorption process is found to be energetically favorable and the molecule-nanotube interaction is intermediated by the tri-coordinated nitrogen atom from the nicotine. It is also predicted the possibility of a chemical bonding between nicotine and SWCNT through the di-coordinated nitrogen.

  8. Porous carbon nanotubes: Molecular absorption, transport, and separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yzeiri, Irena; Patra, Niladri; Král, Petr

    2014-03-01

    We use classical molecular dynamics simulations to study nanofluidic properties of porous carbon nanotubes. We show that saturated water vapor condenses on the porous nanotubes, can be absorbed by them and transported in their interior. When these nanotubes are charged and placed in ionic solutions, they can selectively absorb ions in their interior and transport them. Porous carbon nanotubes can also be used as selective molecular sieves, as illustrated on a room temperature separation of benzene and ethanol.

  9. Preparation of carbon nanotube bioconjugates for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhuang; Tabakman, Scott M; Chen, Zhuo; Dai, Hongjie

    2009-01-01

    Biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes have attracted much attention in recent years. Here, we summarize our previously developed protocols for functionalization and bioconjugation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for various biomedical applications including biological imaging; using nanotubes as Raman, photoluminescence and photoacoustic labels; sensing using nanotubes as Raman tags and drug delivery. Sonication of SWNTs in solutions of phospholipid-polyethylene glycol (PL-PEG...

  10. International Assessment of Carbon Nanotube Manufacturing and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    in Japan. Similarly, nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) have been added to ceramic materials (e.g., alumina ) to enhance the fracture toughness of the...ICMR was built around Eklund’s work to mass- produce nanopowders produced by CO2 laser pyrolysis. ICMR moved to Silicon Valley two years later and...nanotube secondary battery using carbon nanotubes (Korea) • Method of synthesizing carbon nanotubes in the multistage bipolar alumina mould and

  11. Formation of helical organic-inorganic hybrid silica nanotubes using a chiral anionic gelator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liwen; Wang, Hairui; Li, Yi; Zhuang, Wei; Zhu, Zhaoyong; Chen, Yuanli; Li, Baozong; Yang, Yonggang

    2011-03-01

    Right-handed helical organic-inorganic hybrid silica nanotubes were prepared using a chiral anionic gelator with 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane as a co-structure-directing agent and 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)benzene, 4,4'-bis(triethoxysilyl)-1,1'-biphenyl, bis(triethoxysilyl)methane, 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane, and 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethene as the precursors. The sol-gel reactions were carried out in a mixture of water and ethanol at the volume ratio of 2.2:1.8. The nanostructures were studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For 4,4'-biphenylene-silica nanotube, the circular dichroism spectrum indicates at least some of the biphenyl rings within the walls stack in chiral form. The TEM images taken after different reaction time reveal a cooperative mechanism. The growth of the organic self-assemblies and the adsorption of the hybrid silica oligomers occurred at the same time.

  12. Functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloise Van Hooijdonk

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses and summarizes recent studies on the functionalization of carbon nanotubes oriented perpendicularly to their substrate, so-called vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs. The intrinsic properties of individual nanotubes make the VA-CNTs ideal candidates for integration in a wide range of devices, and many potential applications have been envisaged. These applications can benefit from the unidirectional alignment of the nanotubes, the large surface area, the high carbon purity, the outstanding electrical conductivity, and the uniformly long length. However, practical uses of VA-CNTs are limited by their surface characteristics, which must be often modified in order to meet the specificity of each particular application. The proposed approaches are based on the chemical modifications of the surface by functionalization (grafting of functional chemical groups, decoration with metal particles or wrapping of polymers to bring new properties or to improve the interactions between the VA-CNTs and their environment while maintaining the alignment of CNTs.

  13. Channeling potential in single-walled carbon nanotubes: The effect of radial deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Assy, M.K. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez-Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt); Soliman, M.S., E-mail: Mahmoud_einstien2@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez-Canal University, El-Arish (Egypt)

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of radial deformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), due to one external factor, on the channeling potential. The calculations covered the channeling potential for positrons of 100 MeV move along the z-axis, which is the axis of the radially deformed SWCNTs (6, 0), (8, 0) under external mechanical stress at different values for the induced strain and also for radially deformed SWCNT (5, 5) under external transverse electric field of 1.8 and 2.6 V/Å. The calculations executed according to the continuum model approximation given by Lindhard for the case of an axial channeling in single crystals. The results of the calculations in this work agreed well with previous calculations depending on the equilibrium electron density in perfect carbon nanotubes. It has been found that, for perfect nanotubes, the channeling potential, i.e., the potential at any point (x, y) in a plane normal to the nanotube axis (xy-plane), is a function of the distance from the nanotube center whatever the (x, y) coordinate and hence, it could be expressed in terms of one independent variable. On the other hand, in radially deformed SWCNTs, the channeling potential was found to be a function of two independent variables (x, y) and could be given here by a general formula in terms of fitting parameters for each nanotube with chiral index (n, m). The obtained formula has been used in plotting the contour plot for the channeling potential.

  14. Synthesis and optical characterization of carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Md. Mahfuzur, E-mail: mrahman@masdar.ac.ae [Institute Centre for Energy (iEnergy), Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology (MIST), P.O. Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Younes, Hammad [Institute Centre for Energy (iEnergy), Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology (MIST), P.O. Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Ni, George [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zhang, TieJun [Institute Centre for Energy (iEnergy), Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology (MIST), P.O. Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Al Ghaferi, Amal, E-mail: aalghaferi@masdar.ac.ae [Institute Centre for Energy (iEnergy), Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology (MIST), P.O. Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Controlling metallicity and vertical alignment of CNT forest by changing hydrogen catalyst annealing time and growth pressure. • Verifying metallicity using Raman spectroscopy of top CNT layer. • Optical characterization of CNT forest using UV–vis–NIR spectrophotometer. - Abstract: Catalyst annealing time and growth pressure play a crucial role in the chiral selective and high-efficiency growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) during low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). We achieved a high growth rates for SWCNTs and a change the chiral distribution towards metallic (n, m) increasing the catalyst annealing time in hydrogen. A strong correlation is revealed between the catalyst annealing time at lower growth pressures and the shape of the G band, which indicates the metallic or semiconducting nature of the SWCNT and predict the chirality distribution. Under a 15 min annealing time and 10 mbar of growth pressure, the bottom of the G band is broadened with a sharp G{sup −} peak, and the G-band exhibited asymmetrical Breit–Wigner–Fano (BWF) shape. In addition, the growth of SWCNTs with smaller diameters and rich in metallic character is confirmed by the shift of the G-band to a smaller Raman frequency. Homogeneity and vertical alignment of as-grown SWCNT arrays are optically studied using UV/vis/NIR Spectrophotometer. Wavelength-independent and low reflectance resulted from the growth of uniform arrays of SWCNTs. Because of their tunable electronic and optical properties, selective growth of SWCNTs promises great application potential, particularly in electronics and solar industries.

  15. Double quantum dots in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stecher, Javier; Wunsch, Bernhard; Lukin, Mikhail; Demler, Eugene; Rey, Ana Maria

    2010-03-01

    We study the behavior of few-electrons confined in a double-well quantum dot in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. These carbon nanostructures exhibit richer physics than GaAs ones due to the additional valley degree of freedom. We calculate and characterize the low energy eigenstates in the presence of a magnetic field and double-well detuning. Spin-orbit coupling lifts the spin and valley degeneracy and, in the presence of exchange interactions, leads, at small detunings and weak magnetic fields, to a spin-valley antisymmetric two-electron ground state which is not a pure spin-singlet state. At large detuning, the strong Coulomb interactions accessible in carbon nanotubes can substantially modify the non-interacting eigenstates via higher orbital-level mixing. The latter manifest in current transport experiments by the disappearance of the Pauli blockade.

  16. Optical trapping of carbon nanotubes and graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vasi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We study optical trapping of nanotubes and graphene. We extract the distribution of both centre-of-mass and angular fluctuations from three-dimensional tracking of these optically trapped carbon nanostructures. The optical force and torque constants are measured from auto and cross-correlation of the tracking signals. We demonstrate that nanotubes enable nanometer spatial, and femto-Newton force resolution in photonic force microscopy by accurately measuring the radiation pressure in a double frequency optical tweezers. Finally, we integrate optical trapping with Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrating the use of a Raman and photoluminescence tweezers by investigating the spectroscopy of nanotubes and graphene flakes in solution. Experimental results are compared with calculations based on electromagnetic scattering theory.

  17. Contact resistance of carbon nanotubes and metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyoung Joon; Ihm, Jisoon; Yoon, Young-Gui; Louie, Steven G.

    2000-03-01

    The quantum conductance of a metallic carbon nanotube with one end immersed in a jellium metal is studied. We find that the incident π-band electrons go through the tube without being scattered by the surrounding metal and contribute a quantum unit (2e^2/h) to the conductance. On the other hand, the incident π-band electrons experience strong resonant back-scattering because the low-angular-momentum states at the Fermi level have a dominantly metallic character in the nanotube-jellium metal coexistence region. These results provide a possible explanation for the experimentally observed conductance of one quantum unit instead of two for nanotubes with one end dipped into liquid metal such as mercury. The detailed form of the immersion-length dependence of the conductance, which is strongly related to the coherence of the electronic state in the immersed part of the tube, will also be discussed.

  18. On the Nanoindentation of the Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre P. Teodorescu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new inverse approach is proposed in this paper, which combines elements of nonlocal theory and molecular mechanics, based on the experimental results available in the nanoindentation literature. The effect of the inlayer van der Waals atomistic interactions for carbon nanotubes with multiple walls (MWCNT is included by means of the Brenner-Tersoff potential and experimental results. The neighboring walls of MWCNT are coupled through van der Waals interactions, and the shell buckling would initiate in the outermost shell, when nanotubes are short. The nanoindentation technique is simulated for the axially compressed of individual nanotubes, in order to evaluate the load-unloaded-displacement, the curve critical buckling and the appropriate values for local Lamé constants.

  19. Calculation of phonon dispersion in carbon nanotubes using a continuum-atomistic finite element approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Leamy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Dispersion calculations are presented for cylindrical carbon nanotubes using a manifold-based continuum-atomistic finite element formulation combined with Bloch analysis. The formulated finite elements allow any (n,m chiral nanotube, or mixed tubes formed by periodically-repeating heterojunctions, to be examined quickly and accurately using only three input parameters (radius, chiral angle, and unit cell length and a trivial structured mesh, thus avoiding the tedious geometry generation and energy minimization tasks associated with ab initio and lattice dynamics-based techniques. A critical assessment of the technique is pursued to determine the validity range of the resulting dispersion calculations, and to identify any dispersion anomalies. Two small anomalies in the dispersion curves are documented, which can be easily identified and therefore rectified. They include difficulty in achieving a zero energy point for the acoustic twisting phonon, and a branch veering in nanotubes with nonzero chiral angle. The twisting mode quickly restores its correct group velocity as wavenumber increases, while the branch veering is associated with a rapid exchange of eigenvectors at the veering point, which also lessens its impact. By taking into account the two noted anomalies, accurate predictions of acoustic and low-frequency optical branches can be achieved out to the midpoint of the first Brillouin zone.

  20. Carbon nanotube materials from hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Bekkedahl, T.A.; Cahill, A.F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The lack of convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage is a major impediment to wide scale use of hydrogen in the United States energy economy. Improvements in the energy densities of hydrogen storage systems, reductions in cost, and increased compatibility with available and forecasted systems are required before viable hydrogen energy use pathways can be established. Carbon-based hydrogen adsorption materials hold particular promise for meeting and exceeding the U.S. Department of Energy hydrogen storage energy density targets for transportation if concurrent increases in hydrogen storage capacity and carbon density can be achieved. These two goals are normally in conflict for conventional porous materials, but may be reconciled by the design and synthesis of new adsorbent materials with tailored pore size distributions and minimal macroporosity. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to explore new designs for adsorbents because they can be fabricated with small size distributions, and naturally tend to self-assemble by van der Waals forces. This year we report heats of adsorption for hydrogen on nanotube materials that are 2 and 3 times greater than for hydrogen on activated carbon. The hydrogen which is most strongly bound to these materials remains on the carbon surface to temperatures greater than 285 K. These results suggest that nanocapillary forces are active in stabilizing hydrogen on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes, and that optimization of the adsorbent will lead to effective storage at higher temperatures. In this paper we will also report on our activities which are targeted at understanding and optimizing the nucleation and growth of single wall nanotubes. These experiments were made possible by the development of a unique feedback control circuit which stabilized the plasma-arc during a synthesis run.

  1. C{sub 60} fullerene decoration of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demin, V. A., E-mail: victordemin88@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Emanuel Institute of Biochemical Physics (Russian Federation); Blank, V. D.; Karaeva, A. R.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Mordkovich, V. Z. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials (Russian Federation); Parkhomenko, Yu. N. [National University of Science and Technology MISiS (Russian Federation); Perezhogin, I. A.; Popov, M. Yu. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials (Russian Federation); Skryleva, E. A. [National University of Science and Technology MISiS (Russian Federation); Urvanov, S. A. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials (Russian Federation); Chernozatonskii, L. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Emanuel Institute of Biochemical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    A new fully carbon nanocomposite material is synthesized by the immersion of carbon nanotubes in a fullerene solution in carbon disulfide. The presence of a dense layer of fullerene molecules on the outer nanotube surface is demonstrated by TEM and XPS. Fullerenes are redistributed on the nanotube surface during a long-term action of an electron beam, which points to the existence of a molecular bond between a nanotube and fullerenes. Theoretical calculations show that the formation of a fullerene shell begins with the attachment of one C{sub 60} molecule to a defect on the nanotube surface.

  2. Carbon nanotubes: Sensor properties. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Zaporotskova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent publications dealing with dealing with the fabrication of gas and electrochemical biosensors based on carbon nanotubes have been reviewed. Experimental and theoretical data on the working principles of nanotubes have been presented. The main regularities of the structure, energy parameters and sensor properties of modified semiconducting systems on the basis of cabon nanotubes have been studied by analyzing the mechanisms of nanotubule interaction with functional groups (including carboxyl and amino groups, metallic nanoparticles and polymers leading to the formation of chemically active sensors. The possibility of using boundary modified nanotubes for the identification of metals has been discussed. Simulation results have been reported for the interaction of nanotubes boundary modified by –СООН and –NH2 groups with atoms and ions of potassium, sodium and lithium. The simulation has been carried out using the molecular cluster model and the MNDO and DFT calculation methods. Sensors fabricated using this technology will find wide application for the detection of metallic atoms and their ions included in salts and alkali.

  3. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Using Sol Gel Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Tarek

    2002-12-01

    Since 1990, carbon nanotubes were discovered and they have been the object of intense scientific study ever since. A carbon nanotube is a honeycomb lattice rolled into a cylinder. The diameter of a carbon nanotube is of nanometer size and the length is in the range of micrometer. Many of the extraordinary properties attributed to nanotubes, such as tensile strength and thermal stability, have inspired predictions of microscopic robots, dent-resistant car bodies and earthquake-resistant buildings. The first products to use nanotubes were electrical. Some General Motors cars already include plastic parts to which nanotubes were added; such plastic can be electrified during painting so that the paint will stick more readily. Two nanotube-based lighting and display products are well on their way to market. In the long term, perhaps the most valuable applications will take further advantage of nanotubes' unique electronic properties. Carbon nanotubes can in principle play the same role as silicon does in electronic circuits, but at a molecular scale where silicon and other standard semiconductors cease to work. There are several routes to synthesize carbon nanotubes; laser vaporization, carbon arc and vapor growth. We have applied a different route using sol gel chemistry to obtain carbon nanotubes. This work is patent-pending.

  4. Surfactant-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes as a novel pseudostationary phase in capillary EKC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Beatriz; Simonet, Bartolomé M; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2007-06-01

    The analytical potential of the use of surfactant-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SC-SWNTs) as pseudostationary phase in CE is described. The pseudostationary phase shows an efficient alternative in enhancing electrochromatographic resolution of compounds which are capable of interacting with a nanotube surface, such as aromatic compounds. In general, the resolution is enhanced by increasing nanotube concentration in the buffer but the maximum amount of SWNTs that can be added to background electrolyte was found limited by compatibility with the UV/visible detection. As an alternative, a low-extension partial filling was used, consisting of the introduction into the capillary of concentrated SC-SWNT, just before the sample, with a plug length similar to the sample one. This has been showed as a reliable procedure in increasing resolution and sensitivity by sweeping phenomena. Finally, the potential of SC-SWNTs to perform chiral separations is discussed.

  5. A step toward production of smaller diameter single wall carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lemos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-wall carbon nanotubes were produced with, either, a bimetallic or a mixture of three catalysts. Raman scattering and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were used as characterization tools. The mixture LiNi0.5Co0.5O2 leaded to a sample relatively free from impurities with long bundles, each containing a few tubes. A narrow distribution of diameters for the sample produced with this mixture was evidenced by Raman scattering experiences. The mean tube diameter was found to be smaller than those measured for the nanotubes obtained with the bimetallic catalysts, Fe/Ni and Ni/Co. Possible chiralities were calculated for the semiconductor nanotubes formed. Assignments of the Raman radial breathing mode frequencies to the calculated structures are presented.

  6. Fabrication and application of polymer composites comprising carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylvaganam, Kausala; Zhang, Liangchi C

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being used in place of carbon fibers in making composites due to their high strength, high aspect-ratio and excellent thermal and electrical conductivity. Although carbon nanotubes were discovered more than a decade ago, works on preparation of satisfactory composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes have encountered difficulties. This review will discuss some registered patents and relevant papers on the fabrication of carbon nanotube-polymer composites on improving material properties such as electrical conductivity, mechanical strength, and radiation detection which have a broad range of applications in nano-electronic devices, and space and medical elements.

  7. Use of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes for Covalent Attachment of Nanotubes to Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M.; Dyke, Christopher A.; Maya, Francisco; Stewart, Michael P.; Chen, Bo; Flatt, Austen K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to covalently attach functionalized carbon nanotubes to silicon. This step allows for the introduction of carbon nanotubes onto all manner of silicon surfaces, and thereby introduction of carbon nano - tubes covalently into silicon-based devices, onto silicon particles, and onto silicon surfaces. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed as individuals in surfactant were functionalized. The nano - tube was first treated with 4-t-butylbenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate to give increased solubility to the carbon nanotube; the second group attached to the sidewall of the nanotube has a silyl-protected terminal alkyne that is de-protected in situ. This gives a soluble carbon nanotube that has functional groups appended to the sidewall that can be attached covalently to silicon. This reaction was monitored by UV/vis/NJR to assure direct covalent functionalization.

  8. Carbon Micronymphaea: Graphene on Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Won Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the morphology of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotube (CNT, graphene, and their hybrid structure under various operating conditions during a one-step synthesis via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD. We focus on the synthetic aspects of carbon hybrid material composed of heteroepitaxially grown graphene on top of a vertical array of carbon nanotubes, called carbon micronymphaea. We characterize the structural features of this unique nanocomposite by uses of electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. We observe carbon nanofibers, poorly aligned and well-aligned vertical arrays of CNT sequentially as the growth temperature increases, while we always discover the carbon hybrids, called carbon micronymphaea, at specific cooling rate of 15°C/s, which is optimal for the carbon precipitation from the Ni nanoparticles in this study. We expect one-pot synthesized graphene-on-nanotube hybrid structure poses great potential for applications that demand ultrahigh surface-to-volume ratios with intact graphitic nature and directional electronic and thermal transports.

  9. Nucleation Mechanisms of Aromatic Polyesters, PET, PBT, and PEN, on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes: Early Nucleation Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Espinoza-Martínez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleation mechanisms of poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET, poly(butylene terephthalate (PBT, and poly(ethylene naphthalate (PEN on single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs are proposed, based on experimental evidence, theoretical epitaxy analysis, and semiempirical quantum chemical calculations. In order to elucidate early nucleation stages polyester-coated nanotubes were obtained from highly diluted solutions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM revealed helical morphologies for PET/SWNTs and PEN/SWNTs and the formation of lobules with different orientations for PBT/SWNTs. To explain the morphological behavior one model was proposed based on crystallographic interactions, that is, epitaxy. Theoretical epitaxy calculations indicated that epitaxy is not possible from the strict epitaxy point of view. Instead, aromatic self-assembly mechanism was proposed based on π-π interactions and the chirality of the nanotube. It was proposed that the mechanism implies two steps to produce helical or lobular morphologies with different orientations. In the first step polymer chains were approached, aligned parallel to the nanotube axis and adsorbed due to electrostatic interactions and the flexibility of the molecule. However, due to π-π interactions between the aromatic rings of the polymer and the nanotube, in the second step chains reoriented on the nanotube surface depending on the chirality of the nanotube. The mechanism was supported by semi-empirical calculations.

  10. Carbon nanotube based stationary phases for microchip chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide an overview and critical evaluation of the use of carbon nanotubes and related carbon-based nanomaterials for microchip chromatography. The unique properties of carbon nanotubes, such as a very high surface area and intriguing adsorptive behaviour, have...... already been demonstrated in more classical formats, for improved separation performance in gas and liquid chromatography, and for unique applications in solid phase extraction. Carbon nanotubes are now also entering the field of microfluidics, where there is a large potential to be able to provide...... integrated, tailor-made nanotube columns by means of catalytic growth of the nanotubes inside the fluidic channels. An evaluation of the different implementations of carbon nanotubes and related carbon-based nanomaterials for microfluidic chromatography devices is given in terms of separation performance...

  11. The Vibration of a Linear Carbon Chain in Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Ding

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An explicit solution for the vibration of a carbon chain inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs was obtained using continuum modeling of the van der Waals (vdW interactions between them. The effect of the initial tensile force and the amplitude of the carbon chain as well as the radii of the CNTs on the vibration frequency were analyzed in detail, respectively. Our analytical results show that the vibration frequency of the carbon chain in a (5,5 CNT could be around two orders of magnitude higher than that of an independent carbon chain without initial tensile force. For a given CNT radius, the vibration frequency nonlinearly increases with increasing amplitude and initial tensile force. The obtained analytical cohesive energy and vibration frequency are reasonable by comparison of present molecular dynamics (MD simulations. These findings will be a great help towards understanding the vibration property of a nanowire in nanotubes, and designing nanoelectromechanical devices.

  12. Multifunctional Flexible Composites Based on Continuous Carbon Nanotube Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-28

    emitters, solid-phase microextraction and catalysis . Different from graphene- based aerogels (GBAs) and membranes (GBMs), GBFs have demonstrated...nanotube dry-spun yarns, Carbon, 48, 2802–2811, 2010. 22. A. S. Wu and T. -W. Chou. Carbon nanotube fibers for advanced composites, Materials Today , 15...Applied Physics Letters, 100, 201908, 2012. 8. A. S. Wu and T. -W. Chou. Carbon nanotube fibers for advanced composites, Materials Today , 15, 302

  13. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2010-01-01

    An improved protocol for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of samples of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material has been developed to increase the degree of consistency among results so that meaningful comparisons can be made among different samples. This improved TGA protocol is suitable for incorporation into the protocol for characterization of carbon nanotube material. In most cases, TGA of carbon nanotube materials is performed in gas mixtures that contain oxygen at various concentrations. The improved protocol is summarized.

  14. Quantum dot attachment and morphology control by carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Juarez, Beatriz H.; Klinke, Christian; Kornowski, Andreas; Weller, Horst

    2008-01-01

    Novel applications in nanotechnology rely on the design of tailored nano-architectures. For this purpose, carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles are intensively investigated. In this work we study the influence of non-functionalized carbon nanotubes on the synthesis of CdSe nanoparticles by means of organometallic colloidal routes. This new synthesis methodology does not only provide an effective path to attach nanoparticles non-covalently to carbon nanotubes but represents also a new way to cont...

  15. Quantum Dot Attachment and Morphology Control by Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez, Beatriz H.; Klinke, Christian; Kornowski, Andreas; Weller, Horst

    2007-12-01

    Novel applications in nanotechnology rely on the design of tailored nano-architectures. For this purpose, carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles are intensively investigated. In this work we study the influence of non-functionalized carbon nanotubes on the synthesis of CdSe nanoparticles by means of organometallic colloidal routes. This new synthesis methodology does not only provide an effective path to attach nanoparticles non-covalently to carbon nanotubes but represents also a new way to control the shape of nanoparticles.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-08-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  18. Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng F [Newton, MA; Tu, Yi [Belmont, MA

    2008-12-16

    CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

  19. Carbon Nanotube Composites from Modified Plant Oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAninch, Ian; Wool, Richard

    2006-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with their impressive mechanical properties are ideal reinforcement material. Acrylated epoxidized soy oil (AESO) has been previously shown to have favorable interactions with carbon nanotubes. CNTs mixed into AESO, both with and without styrene as a co-monomer, using mechanical shear mixing showed dispersion only on the micron level, resulting in modest mechanical property improvements. Greater improvements were seen, especially in the rubbery modulus, when the resin's viscosity was kept high, either through a reduction of the styrene content, or by curing at a lower temperature. CNTs were also dispersed via sonication in methyl methacrylate. The resulting dispersion was then mixed with AESO. The resulting composites showed better CNT dispersion, with no micron-sized aggregates, as verified using SEM and optical microscopy. The mechanical properties also showed greater improvement.

  20. Action-derived molecular dynamics simulations for the migration and coalescence of vacancies in graphene and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alex Taekyung; Ryu, Byungki; Lee, In-Ho; Chang, K J

    2014-03-19

    We report the results of action-derived molecular dynamics simulations for the migration and coalescence processes of monovacancies in graphene and carbon nanotubes with different chiralities. In carbon nanotubes, the migration pathways and barriers of a monovacancy depend on the tube chirality, while there is no preferential pathway in graphene due to the lattice symmetry and the absence of the curvature effect. The probable pathway changes from the axial to circumferential direction as the chirality varies from armchair to zigzag. The chirality dependence is attributed to the preferential orientation of the reconstructed bond formed around each vacancy site. It is energetically more favourable for two monovacancies to coalesce into a divacancy via alternative movements rather than simultaneous movements. The energy barriers for coalescence are generally determined by the migration barrier for the monovacancy, although there are some variations due to interactions between two diffusing vacancies. In graphene and armchair nanotubes, two monovacancies prefer to migrate along different zigzag atomic chains rather than a single atomic chain connecting these vacancies. On the other hand, in zigzag tubes, the energy barrier for coalescence increases significantly unless monovacancies lie on the same circumference.

  1. Direct growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on silicon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes have been synthesized by spray pyrolysis from Glycine max oil on silicon substrate using ferrocene as catalyst at 650 °C. Glycine max oil, a plant-based hydrocarbon precursor was used as a source of carbon and argon as a carrier gas. The as-grown vertically aligned carbon nanotubes ...

  2. A Carbon Nanotube Cable for a Space Elevator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are discussed in connection with the possibility to use them for the construction of a space elevator. From the fundamental information about the structure of a carbon nanotube and the chemical bond between carbon atoms, Young's modulus and the ultimate tensile strength are…

  3. Electrostatic sensing and electrochemistry with single carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heller, I.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the experimental study of devices based on single carbon nanotubes in the context of (bio)sensing in aqueous solutions. Carbon nanotubes are cylindrical molecules of sp2- carbon, about one nanometer in diameter and typically several micrometers long, which have semiconducting

  4. Metallic/semiconducting ratio of carbon nanotubes in a bundle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since from the discovery of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by. Iijima and Ichihashi [1], much efforts have been devoted to improve the methods of nanotube production, and significant progress has been made to narrow the diame- ter distribution of nanotubes produced by different catalysts and growth processes.

  5. Effects of feed gas composition and catalyst thickness on carbon nanotube and nanofiber synthesis by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R K; Kim, S S; Hash, D B; Gore, J P; Fisher, T S

    2008-06-01

    Many engineering applications require carbon nanotubes with specific characteristics such as wall structure, chirality and alignment. However, precise control of nanotube properties grown to application specifications remains a significant challenge. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) offers a variety of advantages in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes in that several important synthesis parameters can be controlled independently. This paper reports an experimental study of the effects of reacting gas composition (percentage methane in hydrogen) and catalyst film thickness on carbon nanotube (CNT) growth and a computational study of gas-phase composition for the inlet conditions of experimentally observed carbon nanotube growth using different chemical reaction mechanisms. The simulations seek to explain the observed effects of reacting gas composition and to identify the precursors for CNT formation. The experimental results indicate that gas-phase composition significantly affects the synthesized material, which is shown to be randomly aligned nanotube and nanofiber mats for relatively methane-rich inlet gas mixtures and non-tubular carbon for methane-lean incoming mixtures. The simulation results suggest that inlet methane-hydrogen mixture coverts to an acetylene-methane-hydrogen mixture with minor amounts of ethylene, hydrogen atom, and methyl radical. Acetylene appears to be the indicator species for solid carbon formation. The simulations also show that inlet methane-hydrogen mixture does not produce enough gas-phase precursors needed to form quality CNTs below 5% CH4 concentrations in the inlet stream.

  6. Super-tough carbon-nanotube fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Alan B.; Collins, Steve; Muñoz, Edgar; Razal, Joselito M.; Ebron, Von Howard; Ferraris, John P.; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Kim, Bog G.; Baughman, Ray H.

    2003-06-01

    The energy needed to rupture a fibre (its toughness) is five times higher for spider silk than for the same mass of steel wire, which has inspired efforts to produce spider silk commercially. Here we spin 100-metre-long carbon-nanotube composite fibres that are tougher than any natural or synthetic organic fibre described so far, and use these to make fibre supercapacitors that are suitable for weaving into textiles.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakajin, Olgica

    2009-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are an excellent platform for the fundamental studies of transport through channels commensurate with molecular size. Water transport through carbon nanotubes is also believed to be similar to transport in biological channels such as aquaporins. I will discuss the transport of gas, water and ions through microfabricated membranes with sub-2 nanometer aligned carbon nanotubes as ideal atomically-smooth pores. The measured gas flow through carbon nanotubes exceeded predictions of the Knudsen diffusion model by more than an order of magnitude. The measured water flow exceeded values calculated from continuum hydrodynamics models by more than three orders of magnitude and is comparable to flow rates extrapolated from molecular dynamics simulations and measured for aquaporins. More recent reverse osmosis experiments reveal ion rejection by our membranes. Based on our experimental findings, the current understanding of the fundamentals of water and gas transport and of ion rejection will be discussed. The potential application space that exploits these unique nanofluidic phenomena will be explored. The extremely high permeabilities of these membranes, combined with their small pore size will enable energy efficient filtration and eventually decrease the cost of water purification.[4pt] In collaboration with Francesco Fornasiero, Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, PLS, LLNL, Livermore, CA 94550; Sangil Kim, NSF Center for Biophotonics Science & Technology, University of California at Davis, Sacramento CA 95817; Jung Bin In, Mechanical Engineering Department, UC Berkeley, Berkeley CA 94720; Hyung Gyu Park, Jason K Holt, and Michael Stadermann, Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, PLS, LLNL; Costas P. Grigoropoulos, Mechanical Engineering Department, UC Berkeley; Aleksandr Noy, Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, PLS, LLNL and School of Natural Sciences, University of California at Merced.

  8. Aqueous solution dispersement of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are dispersed in an aqueous buffer solution consisting of at least 50 weight percent water and a remainder weight percent that includes a buffer material. The buffer material has a molecular structure defined by a first end, a second end, and a middle disposed between the first and second ends. The first end is a cyclic ring with nitrogen and oxygen heteroatomes, the middle is a hydrophobic alkyl chain, and the second end is a charged group.

  9. Carbon Nanotubes by CVD and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassell, Alan; Delzeit, Lance; Nguyen, Cattien; Stevens, Ramsey; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) exhibits extraordinary mechanical and unique electronic properties and offers significant potential for structural, sensor, and nanoelectronics applications. An overview of CNT, growth methods, properties and applications is provided. Single-wall, and multi-wall CNTs have been grown by chemical vapor deposition. Catalyst development and optimization has been accomplished using combinatorial optimization methods. CNT has also been grown from the tips of silicon cantilevers for use in atomic force microscopy.

  10. Fermentation based carbon nanotube bionic functional composites

    OpenAIRE

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique mechanical and physical properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Based on grape must and bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at r...

  11. Carbon nanotubes from synthesis to in vivo biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Muhammad Imran; Jamshaid, Usama; Jamshaid, Talha; Zafar, Nadiah; Fessi, H; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2016-03-30

    Owing to their unique and interesting properties, extensive research round the globe has been carried out on carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotubes based systems to investigate their practical usefulness in biomedical applications. The results from these studies demonstrate a great promise in their use in targeted drug delivery systems, diagnostic techniques and in bio-analytical applications. Although, carbon nanotubes possess quite interesting properties, which make them potential candidates in the biomedical science, but they also have some inherent properties which arise great concern regarding their biosafety. In this comprehensive review, we have discussed different aspects of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube based systems related to biomedical applications. In the beginning, a short historical account of these tiny yet powerful particles is given followed by discussion regarding their types, properties, methods of synthesis, large scale production method, purification techniques and characterization aspects of carbon nanotubes. In the second part of the review, the functionalization of carbon nanotubes is reviewed in detail, which is not only important to make them biocompatible and stable in biological systems but also render them a great property of loading various biomolecules, diagnostic and therapeutic moieties resulting in diversified applications. In the final part of the review, emphasis is given on the pharmacokinetic aspects of carbon nanotubes including administration routes, absorption mechanisms, distribution and elimination of carbon nanotubes based systems. Lastly, a comprehensive account about the potential biomedical applications has been given followed by insights into the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen spillover mechanism on carbon nanotubes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Juarez-Mosqueda, Rosalba; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Kuc, Agnieszka B; Pettersson, Lars G M; Heine, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The spillover mechanism of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotubes in the presence of catalytically active platinum clusters was critically and systematically investigated by using density-functional theory...

  13. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Parilla, P.A.; Jones, K.M.; Riker, G.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are essentially elongated pores of molecular dimensions and are capable of adsorbing hydrogen at relatively high temperatures and low pressures. This behavior is unique to these materials and indicates that SWNTs are the ideal building block for constructing safe, efficient, and high energy density adsorbents for hydrogen storage applications. In past work the authors developed methods for preparing and opening SWNTs, discovered the unique adsorption properties of these new materials, confirmed that hydrogen is stabilized by physical rather than chemical interactions, measured the strength of interaction to be {approximately} 5 times higher than for adsorption on planar graphite, and performed infrared absorption spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the surface terminations before, during, and after oxidation. This year the authors have made significant advances in synthesis and characterization of SWNT materials so that they can now prepare gram quantities of high-purity SWNT samples and measure and control the diameter distribution of the tubes by varying key parameters during synthesis. They have also developed methods which purify nanotubes and cut nanotubes into shorter segments. These capabilities provide a means for opening the tubes which were unreactive to the oxidation methods that successfully opened tubes, and offer a path towards organizing nanotube segments to enable high volumetric hydrogen storage densities. They also performed temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy on high purity carbon nanotube material obtained from collaborator Prof. Patrick Bernier and finished construction of a high precision Seivert`s apparatus which will allow the hydrogen pressure-temperature-composition phase diagrams to be evaluated for SWNT materials.

  14. Ferroelectric-carbon nanotube memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashok; Shivareddy, Sai G.; Correa, Margarita; Resto, Oscar; Choi, Youngjin; Cole, Matthew T.; Katiyar, Ram S.; Scott, James F.; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.; Lu, Haidong; Gruverman, Alexei

    2012-04-01

    One-dimensional ferroelectric nanostructures, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and CNT-inorganic oxides have recently been studied due to their potential applications for microelectronics. Here, we report coating of a registered array of aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) grown on silicon substrates by functional ferroelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) which produces structures suitable for commercial prototype memories. Microstructural analysis reveals the crystalline nature of PZT with small nanocrystals aligned in different directions. First-order Raman modes of MWCNT and PZT/MWCNT/n-Si show the high structural quality of CNT before and after PZT deposition at elevated temperature. PZT exists mostly in the monoclinic Cc/Cm phase, which is the origin of the high piezoelectric response in the system. Low-loss square piezoelectric hysteresis obtained for the 3D bottom-up structure confirms the switchability of the device. Current-voltage mapping of the device by conducting atomic force microscopy (c-AFM) indicates very low transient current. Fabrication and functional properties of these hybrid ferroelectric-carbon nanotubes is the first step towards miniaturization for future nanotechnology sensors, actuators, transducers and memory devices.

  15. Review of toxicity studies of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Norihiro; Izumi, Hiroto; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2017-09-28

    We reviewed studies on pulmonary, reproductive, and developmental toxicity caused by carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In paricular, we analyzed how CNT exposure affects the several processes of pulmonary toxicity, including inflammation, injury, fibrosis, and pulmonary tumors. In pulmonary toxicity, there are various processes, including inflammation, injury, fibrosis, respiratory tumor in the lungs, and biopersistence of CNTs and genotoxicity as tumor-related factors, to develop the respiratory tumor. We evaluated the evidence for the carcinogenicity of CNTs in each process. In the fields of reproductive and developmental toxicity, studies of CNTs have been conducted mainly with mice. We summarized the findings of reproductive and developmental toxicity studies of CNTs. In animal studies, exposure to CNTs induced sustained inflammation, fibrosis, lung cancer following long-term inhalation, and gene damage in the lung. CNTs also showed high biopersistence in animal studies. Fetal malformations after intravenous and intraperitoneal injections and intratracheal instillation, fetal loss after intravenous injection, behavioral changes in offsprings after intraperitoneal injection, and a delay in the delivery of the first litter after intratracheal instillation were reported in mice-administered multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) appeared to be embryolethal and teratogenic in mice when given by intravenous injection; moreover, the tubes induced death and growth retardation in chicken embryos. CNTs are considered to have carcinogenicity and can cause lung tumors. However, the carcinogenicity of CNTs may attenuate if the fiber length is shorter. The available data provide initial information on the potential reproductive and developmental toxicity of CNTs.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Paper-Based Electroanalytical Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngmi Koo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report on carbon nanotube paper-based electroanalytical devices. A highly aligned-carbon nanotube (HA-CNT array, grown using chemical vapor deposition (CVD, was processed to form bi-layered paper with an integrated cellulose-based Origami-chip as the electroanalytical device. We used an inverse-ordered fabrication method from a thick carbon nanotube (CNT sheet to a thin CNT sheet. A 200-layered HA-CNT sheet and a 100-layered HA-CNT sheet are explored as a working electrode. The device was fabricated using the following methods: (1 cellulose-based paper was patterned using a wax printer, (2 electrical connection was made using a silver ink-based circuit printer, and (3 three electrodes were stacked on a 2D Origami cell. Electrochemical behavior was evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and cyclic voltammetry (CV. We believe that this platform could attract a great deal of interest for use in various chemical and biomedical applications.

  17. Carbon paste electrode incorporating multi-walled carbon nanotube ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The preparation and electrochemical performance of the carbon nanotube paste electrode modified with ferrocene (FCMCNPE) was investigated for electrocatalytic behaviour toward oxidation of -acetyl--cysteine (NAC) in the presence of tryptophan (Trp) using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry ...

  18. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarillo-Herrero, P.D.

    2005-01-01

    Electronic transport through nanostructures can be very different from trans- port in macroscopic conductors, especially at low temperatures. Carbon na- notubes are tiny cylinders made of carbon atoms. Their remarkable electronic and mechanical properties, together with their small size (a few nm in

  19. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Jones, K.M.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen burns pollution-free and may be produced from renewable energy resources. It is therefore an ideal candidate to replace fossil fuels as an energy carrier. However, the lack of a convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage system greatly impedes the wide-scale use of hydrogen in both domestic and international markets. Although several hydrogen storage options exist, no approach satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. A material consisting exclusively of micropores with molecular dimensions could simultaneously meet all of the requirements for transportation use if the interaction energy for hydrogen was sufficiently strong to cause hydrogen adsorption at ambient temperatures. Small diameter ({approx}1 mm) carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are elongated micropores of molecular dimensions, and materials composed predominantly of SWNTs may prove to be the ideal adsorbent for ambient temperature storage of hydrogen. Last year the authors reported that hydrogen could be adsorbed on arc-generated soots containing 12{Angstrom} diameter nanotubes at temperatures in excess of 285K. In this past year they have learned that such adsorption does not occur on activated carbon materials, and that the cobalt nanoparticles present in their arc-generated soots are not responsible for the hydrogen which is stable at 285 K. These results indicate that enhanced adsorption forces within the internal cavities of the SWNTs are active in stabilizing hydrogen at elevated temperatures. This enhanced stability could lead to effective hydrogen storage under ambient temperature conditions. In the past year the authors have also demonstrated that single-wall carbon nanotubes in arc-generated soots may be selectively opened by oxidation in H{sub 2}O resulting in improved hydrogen adsorption, and they have estimated experimentally that the amount of hydrogen stored is {approximately}10% of the nanotube weight.

  20. Compressive characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube with water interactions investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.H., E-mail: chwong@ntu.edu.sg; Vijayaraghavan, V.

    2014-01-24

    The elastic properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with surrounding water interactions are studied using molecular dynamics simulation technique. The compressive loading characteristic of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a fluidic medium such as water is critical for its role in determining the lifetime and stability of CNT based nano-fluidic devices. In this paper, we conducted a comprehensive analysis on the effect of geometry, chirality and density of encapsulated water on the elastic properties of SWCNT. Our studies show that defect density and distribution can strongly impact the compressive resistance of SWCNTs in water. Further studies were conducted on capped SWCNTs with varying densities of encapsulated water, which is necessary to understand the strength of CNT as a potential drug carrier. The results obtained from this paper will help determining the potential applications of CNTs in the field of nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) such as nano-biological and nano-fluidic devices.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Thermal Conductivity of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, M.; Srivastava, Deepak; Govindan,T. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have very attractive electronic, mechanical. and thermal properties. Recently, measurements of thermal conductivity in single wall CNT mats showed estimated thermal conductivity magnitudes ranging from 17.5 to 58 W/cm-K at room temperature. which are better than bulk graphite. The cylinderical symmetry of CNT leads to large thermal conductivity along the tube axis, additionally, unlike graphite. CNTs can be made into ropes that can be used as heat conducting pipes for nanoscale applications. The thermal conductivity of several single wall carbon nanotubes has been calculated over temperature range from l00 K to 600 K using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics using Tersoff-Brenner potential for C-C interactions. Thermal conductivity of single wall CNTs shows a peaking behavior as a function of temperature. Dependence of the peak position on the chirality and radius of the tube will be discussed and explained in this presentation.

  2. Synthesis of cycloparaphenylenes and related carbon nanorings: a step toward the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omachi, Haruka; Segawa, Yasutomo; Itami, Kenichiro

    2012-08-21

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted significant attention because of their remarkable mechanical, electronic, and optical properties. Structural uniformity of the CNT is critically important because the sidewall structures (armchair, zigzag, and chiral) determine many of the significant properties of CNTs. Ideally researchers would synthesize CNTs with a defined target sidewall structure and diameter, but the current synthetic methods, such as arc discharge and chemical vapor deposition, only provide CNTs as the mixtures of various structures. Purification of these mixtures does not allow researchers to isolate a structurally uniform CNT, which is the bottleneck for fundamental studies and advanced applications of these materials. Therefore, the selective and predictable synthesis of structurally uniform CNTs would represent a critical advance in both nanocarbon science and synthetic chemistry. This Account highlights our efforts toward the bottom-up synthesis of structurally uniform carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We envisioned a bottom-up synthesis of structurally uniform CNTs through a controlled growth process from a short carbon nanoring (template) that corresponds to the target structure of CNTs. Our simple retrosynthetic analysis led to the identification of cycloparaphenylenes (CPPs), acene-inserted CPPs, and cyclacenes as the shortest sidewall segments of armchair, chiral, and zigzag CNTs, respectively. With this overall picture in mind, we initiated our synthetic studies of aromatic rings/belts as an initial step toward structurally uniform CNTs in 2005. This research has led to (i) a general strategy for the synthesis of CPPs and related carbon nanorings using cyclohexane derivatives as a benzene-convertible L-shaped unit, (ii) a modular, size-selective, and scalable synthesis of [n]CPPs (a shortest segment of armchair CNTs), (iii) the X-ray crystal structure analysis of CPPs, (iv) the design and synthesis of acene

  3. Carbon Nanotube Based Devices for Intracellular Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Riju Mohan

    Scientific investigations on individual cells have gained increasing attention in recent years as efforts are being made to understand cellular functioning in complex processes, such as cell division during embryonic development, and owing to realization of heterogeneity amongst a population of a single cell type (for instance, certain individual cancer cells being immune to chemotherapy). Therefore devices enabling electrochemical detection, spectroscopy, optical observations, and separation techniques, along with cell piercing and fluid transfer capabilities at the intra-cellular level, are required. Glass pipettes have conventionally been used for single cell interrogation, however their poor mechanical properties and an intrusive conical geometry have led to limited precision and frequent cell damage or death, justifying research efforts to develop novel, non-intrusive cell probes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are known for their superior physical properties and tunable chemical structure. They possess a high aspect ratio and offer minimally invasive thin carbon walls and tubular geometry. Moreover, possibility of chemical functionalization of CNTs enables multi-functional probes. In this dissertation, novel nanofluidic instruments that have nanostructured carbon tips will be presented along with techniques that utilize the exceptional physical properties of carbon nanotubes, to take miniature biomedical instrumentation to the next level. New methods for fabricating the probes were rigorously developed and their operation was extensively studied. The devices were mechanically robust and were used to inject liquids to a single cell, detect electrochemical signals and enable surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) while inducing minimal harm to the cell. Particular attention was focused on the CVD process-which was used to deposit carbon, fluid flow through the nanotubes, and separation of chemical species (atto-liter chromatography) at the nanometer scale that

  4. Carbon nanotube conditioning part 1—effect of interwall interaction on the electronic band gap of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, M.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.; Barrera, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    Ab initio density functional theory simulations were used to calculate the electronic structure and the total energy of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs). The relaxed configurations studied were uncapped, infinitely-long zigzag@zigzag double-walled carbon nanotubes. The lowest energy configuration was found to correspond to an interwall distance of 0.35 nm, except for the configurations with inner tube chiral indices (5,0), (6,0) and (7,0). The largest binding energies were found to correspond to a 0.35 nm interwall distance for all the DWCNT configurations studied, and increasing with DWCNT average diameter. In terms of the effect of the interwall interaction on the electronic band gap of DWCNTs, four regions of band gap were obtained which were termed: zero band gap, narrow band gap, small band gap, and medium band gap regions. These regions offer the possibility to first tune the electronic band gap to a region with a desired range, and further tune that choice within the region itself by varying the interwall distance. It was also found that zigzag@zigzag DWCNTs with outer tube leading chiral index n = 3k + 1 or n = 3k + 2 (k being an integer) follow, as a general trend, an inversely proportional relation of the electronic band gap with respect to the average diameter.

  5. Mechanical and Electrical Properties of Organogels with Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniruzzaman, Mohammad; Winey, Karen

    2008-03-01

    Organogels are fascinating thermally reversible viscoelastic materials that are comprised of an organic liquid and low concentrations (typically gelators. We have fabricated the first organogel/carbon nanotube composites using 12-hydroxystearic acid (HSA) as the gelator molecule and pristine and carboxylated multi-wall carbon nanotubes as the nanofillers and 1,2-dichlorobenzene as the organic solvent. We have achieved significant improvements in the mechanical and electrical properties of organogels by incorporating these carbon nanotubes. For example, the linear viscoelastic regime of the HSA organogel, an indicator of the strength of the gel, extends by a factor of 4 with the incorporation of 0.2 wt% of the carboxylated nanotubes. Also, the carbon nanotubes (specially the pristine tubes) improve the electrical conductivity of the organogels, e.g. six orders of magnitude enhancement in electrical conductivity with 0.2 wt% of pristine tubes. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments indicate that the nanotubes do not affect the thermoreversibility of the organogels.

  6. Carbon nanotubes in thermotropic low molar mass liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymura, Stefan; Park, Ji Hyun; Dierking, Ingo; Scalia, Giusy

    Carbon nanotubes constitute a highly anisotropic form of carbon with outstanding mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Their dispersion and organization are important but challenging and this chapter describes the advantages of using thermotropic liquid crystals as host for nanotube dispersion and ordering. The self organization of LCs is an attractive way to manipulate nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes or graphene akes. Compared to standard carbon nanotube composites (e.g. with disordered polymer hosts) the introduction of the nanotubes into an LC allows not only the transfer of the outstanding nanotube properties to the oscopic phase, providing strength and conductivity, but these properties also become anisotropic, following the transfer of the orientational order from the LC to the CNTs...

  7. Nonlinear optical response of multiwalled carbon-nanotube dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Sean M.; Hold, Stephanie V.; Brennan, Margaret E.; Cadek, Martin; Drury, Anna; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Blau, Werner J.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental measurements of nonlinear optical extinction of nanosecond laser pulses by a set of conjugated copolymer/multiwalled carbon-nanotube composites dispersed in solution are reported here. The polymer poly(para-phenylenevinylene-co-2,5-dioctyloxy-meta-phenylenevinylene) and multiwalled carbon-nanotube composites were varied according to nanotube mass content. The experiments were performed with an open-aperture Z scan with 6-ns Gaussian pulses at 532 nm from a frequency-doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The nonlinear optical extinction of the incident pulses displays enhanced dissipation of the incident light for lower incident intensities relative to increasing multiwalled carbon-nanotube content. Either the multiwalled carbon nanotubes or the polymer dominates the nonlinear response of the composite depending on the relative mass of polymer to nanotube. Effective optical coefficients with a nonlinear absorption based model are calculated, and their intensity dependence is investigated. Mechanistic implications of the optical dissipation are also discussed.

  8. Methods of Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes by Photooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron-Colon, Marisabel (Inventor); Meador, Michael A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method of photooxidizing carbon nanotubes, such as single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes are purified and dispersed in a solvent, such as n-methyl pyrrolidinone or dimethylformamide. A singlet oxygen sensitizer like Rose Bengal is added to the solution. Oxygen gas is continuously supplied while irradiating the solution while irradiating the solution with ultraviolet light to produce singlet oxygen to oxidize the single-walled carbon nanotubes. Advantageously, the method significantly increases the level of oxidation compared with prior art methods.

  9. Black silicon maskless templates for carbon nanotube forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Boisen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    We present here a proof of concept for a novel fabrication method of vertically aligned carbon nanotube forests, utilizing black silicon nanograss (a forest of silicon nanometer-sized spikes created with reactive ion etching) coated with titanium tungsten diffusion barrier as a template. The method...... allows maskless definition of carbon nanotube forests with control of their density, nanotube diameter and height. Four nanograss reactive ion etching recipes are investigated and their wafer-to-wafer repeatability, wafer uniformity, and density control is discussed. Evaluation of carbon nanotube forests...

  10. Preparation of array of long carbon nanotubes and fibers therefrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arendt, Paul N.; DePaula, Ramond F.; Zhu, Yuntian T.; Usov, Igor O.

    2015-11-19

    An array of carbon nanotubes is prepared by exposing a catalyst structure to a carbon nanotube precursor. Embodiment catalyst structures include one or more trenches, channels, or a combination of trenches and channels. A system for preparing the array includes a heated surface for heating the catalyst structure and a cooling portion that cools gas above the catalyst structure. The system heats the catalyst structure so that the interaction between the precursor and the catalyst structure results in the formation of an array of carbon nanotubes on the catalyst structure, and cools the gas near the catalyst structure and also cools any carbon nanotubes that form on the catalyst structure to prevent or at least minimize the formation of amorphous carbon. Arrays thus formed may be used for spinning fibers of carbon nanotubes.

  11. Controlling the catalyst during carbon nanotube growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J; Hofmann, S; Cantoro, M; Parvez, A; Ducati, C; Zhong, G; Sharma, R; Mattevi, C

    2008-11-01

    We have recently been able to grow single-walled carbon nanotubes by purely thermal chemical vapour deposition (CVD) at temperatures as low as 400 degrees C. This has been achieved by separating the catalyst pre-treatment step from the growth step. In the pre-treatment step, a thin film catalyst is re-arranged into a series of nano-droplets, which are then the active catalysts. Both steps have been studied by in-situ environmental transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We have also studied the catalyst yield, the weight of nanotubes grown per weight of transition metal catalyst. Using very thin layers of Fe on Al2O3 support in a remote plasma-assisted CVD, we have achieved yields of order 100,000. This may be due to control of catalyst poisoning by ensuring an etching path.

  12. Carbon Nanotubes Growth on Graphite Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) were synthesized on graphite fibers by thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). On the fiber surface, iron nanoparticles are coated and act as catalysts for CNT growth. The growth temperature ranges from 550 to 1000 C at an ambient pressure. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane contents of 10% to 100% are used for the CNT synthesis. At high growth temperatures (greater than 800 C), the rapid inter-diffusion of the transition metal iron on the graphite surface results in a rough fiber surface with no CNT grown on the surface. When the growth temperature is relatively low (650 - 800 C), CNT are fabricated on the graphite surface with catalytic particles on the nanotube top ends. Using micro Raman spectroscopy in the breath mode region, single-walled or multi-walled CNT can be determined, depending on methane concentrations.

  13. A carbon nanotube immunosensor for Salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell B. Lerner

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-functionalized carbon nanotube devices have been suggested for use as bacterial detectors for monitoring of food purity in transit from the farm to the kitchen. Here we report progress towards that goal by demonstrating specific detection of Salmonella in complex nutrient broth solutions using nanotube transistors functionalized with covalently-bound anti-Salmonella antibodies. The small size of the active device region makes them compatible with integration in large-scale arrays. We find that the on-state current of the transistor is sensitive specifically to the Salmonella concentration and saturates at low concentration (<1000 cfu/ml. In contrast, the carrier mobility is affected comparably by Salmonella and other bacteria types, with no sign of saturation even at much larger concentrations (108 cfu/ml.

  14. Hydrogen Evolution on Hydrophobic Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Abha; Giri, Jyotsnendu; Daraio, Chiara

    2009-01-01

    We investigate for the first time hydrophobic carbon nanotube-based electrochemical cells as an alternative solution to hydrogen sorting. We show that the electrically conducting surface of the nanotube arrays can be used as a cathode for hydrogen generation and absorption by electrolyzing water. We support our findings with Raman and gas chromatography measurements. These results suggest that carbon nanotube forests, presenting a unique combination of hydrophobicity and conductivity, are sui...

  15. Noncovalently silylated carbon nanotubes decorated with quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Bottini, Massimo; Magrini, Andrea; Dawson, Marcia I.; Rosato, Nicola; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Mustelin, Tomas

    2007-01-01

    A nanoassembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes coated by a thin layer of silica followed by quantum dots was prepared. That the quantum dots retained their photoluminescent properties after deposition onto the silylated carbon nanotubes suggests that the thin layer of silica prevented the quenching of the fluorescence by the nanotubes. This fluorescent nanoassembly represents an excellent building block for photoelectric and optical devices and biological nanoprobes.

  16. Carbon composites composites with carbon fibers, nanofibers, and nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Deborah D L

    2017-01-01

    Carbon Composites: Composites with Carbon Fibers, Nanofibers, and Nanotubes, Second Edition, provides the reader with information on a wide range of carbon fiber composites, including polymer-matrix, metal-matrix, carbon-matrix, ceramic-matrix and cement-matrix composites. In contrast to other books on composites, this work emphasizes materials rather than mechanics. This emphasis reflects the key role of materials science and engineering in the development of composite materials. The applications focus of the book covers both the developing range of structural applications for carbon fiber composites, including military and civil aircraft, automobiles and construction, and non-structural applications, including electromagnetic shielding, sensing/monitoring, vibration damping, energy storage, energy generation, and deicing. In addition to these new application areas, new material in this updated edition includes coverage of cement-matrix composites, carbon nanofibers, carbon matrix precursors, fiber surface ...

  17. A kinetic Monte Carlo analysis for the production of singularly tethered carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilmer, Andrew J; Strano, Michael S [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Nair, Nitish, E-mail: strano@mit.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Nanoparticles that possess a single covalent tether to either another particle or a surface play an increasingly important role in nanotechnology, serving as a foundation for aggregation-based plasmonic sensors, chemically assembled framework structures, and scanning probe tips. Using a theoretical approach, we explore the reaction conditions necessary to maximize singular tethering for several cases of homogeneously dispersed nanoparticles, with a particular focus on single-walled carbon nanotubes. In the limit of particles of monodisperse size and equal site reactivity, the number of tethers versus the reaction conversion is statistically described by the well-known binomial distribution, with a variance that is minimal for the single tether case. However, solutions of nanoparticles often deviate from this ideal, and reaction events can introduce steric hindrance to neighboring sites or alter particle electronic properties, both of which can influence local reactivity. In order to study these cases we use the electron transfer reactions of single-walled carbon nanotubes. We find that the distribution in the number of monofunctional tubes, as a function of conversion, is largely dependent on the distribution of nanotube rate constants, and therefore tube chiralities, in the initial solution. As a contemporary example, we examine the implications of this result on the metallic-semiconductor separation of carbon nanotubes using electron transfer chemistry.

  18. Catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI REN ZHONG

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (2.4 g/g catalyst, with large inner diameters were successfully synthesized through pyrolysis of methane on a Ni–Cu–Al catalyst by adding sodium carbonate into the carbon nanotubes growth system. The inner diameter of the carbon nanotubes prepared by this method is about 20–60 nm, while their outer diameter is about 40–80 nm. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed to investigate the morphology and microstructures of the carbon nanotubes. The analyses showed that these carbon nanotubes have large inner diameters and good graphitization. The addition of sodium carbonate into the reaction system brings about a slight decrease in the methane conversion and the yield of carbon. The experimental results showed that sodium carbonate is a mildly toxic material which influenced the catalytic activity of the Ni–Cu–Al catalyst and resulted in the formation of carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters. The growth mechanism of the carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters is discussed in this paper.

  19. Catalysts for Efficient Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ted X.; Dong, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Several metal alloys have shown promise as improved catalysts for catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Heretofore almost every experiment on the production of carbon nanotubes by this method has involved the use of iron, nickel, or cobalt as the catalyst. However, the catalytic-conversion efficiencies of these metals have been observed to be limited. The identification of better catalysts is part of a continuing program to develop means of mass production of high-quality carbon nanotubes at costs lower than those achieved thus far (as much as $100/g for purified multi-wall CNTs or $1,000/g for single-wall CNTs in year 2002). The main effort thus far in this program has been the design and implementation of a process tailored specifically for high-throughput screening of alloys for catalyzing the growth of CNTs. The process includes an integral combination of (1) formulation of libraries of catalysts, (2) synthesis of CNTs from decomposition of ethylene on powders of the alloys in a pyrolytic chemical-vapor-decomposition reactor, and (3) scanning- electron-microscope screening of the CNTs thus synthesized to evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of the alloys. Information gained in this process is put into a database and analyzed to identify promising alloy compositions, which are to be subjected to further evaluation in a subsequent round of testing. Some of these alloys have been found to catalyze the formation of carbon nano tubes from ethylene at temperatures as low as 350 to 400 C. In contrast, the temperatures typically required for prior catalysts range from 550 to 750 C.

  20. Effect of Topological Defects on Buckling Behavior of Single-walled Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Guoxiu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular dynamic simulation method has been employed to consider the critical buckling force, pressure, and strain of pristine and defected single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT under axial compression. Effects of length, radius, chirality, Stone–Wales (SW defect, and single vacancy (SV defect on buckling behavior of SWCNTs have been studied. Obtained results indicate that axial stability of SWCNT reduces significantly due to topological defects. Critical buckling strain is more susceptible to defects than critical buckling force. Both SW and SV defects decrease the buckling mode of SWCNT. Comparative approach of this study leads to more reliable design of nanostructures.

  1. Polymer-Carbon Nanotube Composites, A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    et thermiques. Ces propriétés extraordinaires découlent de leur unique structure tubulaire; les nanotubes se présentent comme des feuilles de...structure unique. Les nanotubes de carbone sont des allotropes du carbone se présentant comme des feuilles de graphite enroulées en cylindres. Selon

  2. Electrical conductivity of metal–carbon nanotube structures: Effect of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electrical properties of asymmetric metal–carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been studied using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method with Atomistix tool kit. The models with asymmetric metal contacts and carbon nanotube bear resemblance to experimental set-ups. The study ...

  3. Very short functionalized carbon nanotubes for membrane applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonseca, A.; Reijerkerk, Sander; Potreck, Jens; Nijmeijer, Dorothea C.; Mekhalif, Z.; Delhalle, J.

    2010-01-01

    The cutting and functionalization of carbon nanotubes is described, applying a single-step ball-mill based process. Very short carbon nanotubes bearing primary amine functions were produced, characterized and incorporated in polymeric membranes. The gas separation performance of the composite

  4. Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization and catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dommele, S.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen containing Carbon Nanotubes (NCNT) have altered physical- and chemical properties with respect to polarity, conductivity and reactivity as compared to conventional carbon nanotubes (CNT) and have potential for use in electronic applications or catalysis. In this thesis the incorporation of

  5. Cross-linking of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with polymeric amines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Youchun; Broekhuis, A. A.; Stuart, M. C. A.; Landaluce, T. F.; Fausti, D.; Rudolf, P.; Picchioni, F.

    2008-01-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes is considered as an essential step to enable their manipulation and application in potential end-use products. In this paper we introduce a new approach to functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by applying an amidation-type grafting reaction with

  6. Anode Sheath Switching in a Carbon Nanotube Arc Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe Fetterman, Yevgeny Raitses, and Michael Keidar

    2008-04-08

    The anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of anode diameter for a carbon nanotube arc plasma. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters. This result is explained by the formation of a positive anode sheath. The increased ablation rate due to this positive anode sheath could imply greater production rate for carbon nanotubes.

  7. Re-grown aligned carbon nanotubes with improved field emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Xiaodai; Zhu, Yanwu; Varghese, Binni; Gao, Xingyu; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen; Sow, Chorng-Haur

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a simple technique to improve the field emission property of multi-walled carbon nanotubes is presented. Re-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes are grown on the same substrates after the as-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes are transferred to other substrates using polydimethylsiloxane as intermediation. For the duration of the synthesis of the re-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes, similar synthesis parameters used in growing the as-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes are utilized. As a form of possible application, field emission studies show -2.6 times improvement in field enhancement factor and more uniform emission for the re-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes. In addition, the turn-on field is reduced from 2.85 V/microm to 1.40 V/microm. Such significant improvements are attributed to new emission sites comprising of sharp carbonaceous impurities encompassing both tip and upper portion of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes. As such, this technique presents a viable route for the production of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with better field emission quality.

  8. Compositions and methods for cancer treatment using targeted carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Jr., Roger G.; Resasco, Daniel E.; Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    2016-11-29

    Compositions for detecting and/or destroying cancer tumors and/or cancer cells via photodynamic therapy are disclosed, as well as methods of use thereof. The compositions comprise a linking protein or peptide attached to or otherwise physically associated with a carbon nanotube to form a targeted protein-carbon nanotube complex.

  9. Apparatus for the laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin

    2010-02-16

    An RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of carbon nanotubes. Such an apparatus, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently provides a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization.

  10. Kinetics of laser-assisted carbon nanotube growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, Y. van de; Bellouard, Y.; Mandamparambil, R.

    2014-01-01

    Laser-assisted chemical vapour deposition (CVD) growth is an attractive mask-less process for growing locally aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in selected places on temperature sensitive substrates. The nature of the localized process results in fast carbon nanotube growth with high experimental

  11. Activity of catalase adsorbed to carbon nanotubes: effects of carbon nanotube surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengdong; Luo, Shuiming; Chen, Wei

    2013-09-15

    Nanomaterials have been studied widely as the supporting materials for enzyme immobilization. However, the interactions between enzymes and carbon nanotubes (CNT) with different morphologies and surface functionalities may vary, hence influencing activities of the immobilized enzyme. To date how the adsorption mechanisms affect the activities of immobilized enzyme is not well understood. In this study the adsorption of catalase (CAT) on pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (O-SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) was investigated. The adsorbed enzyme activities decreased in the order of O-SWNT>SWNT>MWNT. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichrois (CD) analyses reveal more significant loss of α-helix and β-sheet of MWNT-adsorbed than SWNT-adsorbed CAT. The difference in enzyme activities between MWNT-adsorbed and SWNT-adsorbed CAT indicates that the curvature of surface plays an important role in the activity of immobilized enzyme. Interestingly, an increase of β-sheet content was observed for CAT adsorbed to O-SWNT. This is likely because as opposed to SWNT and MWNT, O-SWNT binds CAT largely via hydrogen bonding and such interaction allows the CAT molecule to maintain the rigidity of enzyme structure and thus the biological function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-09-08

    Measurements and simulations have found that water moves through carbon nanotubes at exceptionally high rates owing to nearly frictionless interfaces. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications including desalination, nano-filtration and energy harvesting, yet the exact mechanisms of water transport inside the nanotubes and at the water-carbon interface continue to be debated because existing theories do not provide a satisfactory explanation for the limited number of experimental results available so far. This lack of experimental results arises because, even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate through individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes, and no slippage in boron nitride nanotubes that are crystallographically similar to carbon nanotubes, but electronically different. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in the atomic-scale details of their solid-liquid interfaces, illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier at which the continuum picture of fluid mechanics meets the atomic nature of matter.

  13. Extraction of (9,8) single-walled carbon nanotubes by fluorene-based polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Rongmei; Wei, Li; Wang, Hong; Su, Dingdian; Mushrif, Samir H; Chen, Yuan

    2014-03-01

    Selective polymer wrapping is a promising approach to obtain high-chiral-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) needed in technical applications and scientific studies. We showed that among three fluorene-based polymers with different side-chain lengths and backbones, poly[(9,9-dihexylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(9,10-anthracene)] (PFH-A) can selectively extract SWCNTs synthesized from the CoSO4 /SiO2 catalyst, which results in enrichment of 78.3 % (9,8) and 12.2 % (9,7) nanotubes among all semiconducting species. These high-chiral-purity SWCNTs may find potential applications in electronics, optoelectronics, and photovoltaics. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the extraction selectivity of PFH-A relates to the bending and alignment of its alkyl chains and the twisting of its two aromatic backbone units (biphenyl and anthracene) relative to SWCNTs. The strong π-π interaction between polymers and SWCNTs would increase the extraction yield, but it is not beneficial for chiral selectivity. Our findings suggest that the matching between the curvature of SWCNTs and the flexibility of the polymer side chains and the aromatic backbone units is essential in designing novel polymers for selective extraction of (n,m) species. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. THz bandwidth optical switching with carbon nanotube metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaenko, Andrey E; Papasimakis, Nikitas; Chipouline, Arkadi; De Angelis, Francesco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2012-03-12

    We provide the first demonstration of exceptional light-with-light optical switching performance of a carbon nanotube metamaterial - a hybrid nanostructure of a plasmonic metamaterial with semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. A modulation depth of 10% in the near-IR with sub-500 fs response time is achieved with a pump fluence of just 10 μJ/cm², which is an order of magnitude lower than in previously reported artificial nanostructures. The improved switching characteristics of the carbon nanotube metamaterial are defined by an excitonic nonlinearity of carbon nanotubes resonantly enhanced by a concentration of local fields in the metamaterial. Since the spectral position of the excitonic response and metamaterial plasmonic resonance can be adjusted by using carbon nanotubes of different diameter and scaling of the metamaterial design, the giant nonlinear response of the hybrid metamaterial - in principle - can be engineered to cover the entire second and third telecom windows, from O- to U-band.

  15. Thermophoretic Motion of Water Nanodroplets confined inside Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2009-01-01

    We study the thermophoretic motion of water nanodroplets confined inside carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the nanodroplets move in the direction opposite the imposed thermal gradient with a terminal velocity that is linearly proportional to the gradient....... The translational motion is associated with a solid body rotation of the water nanodroplet coinciding with the helical symmetry of the carbon nanotube. The thermal diffusion displays a weak dependence on the wetting of the water-carbon nanotube interface. We introduce the use of the Moment Scaling Spectrum (MSS......) in order to determine the characteristics of the motion of the nanoparticles inside the carbon nanotube. The MSS indicates that affinity of the nanodroplet with the walls of the carbon nanotubes is important for the isothermal diffusion, and hence for the Soret coefficient of the system....

  16. Carbon Nanotube Electrode Arrays For Enhanced Chemical and Biological Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie

    2003-01-01

    Applications of carbon nanotubes for ultra-sensitive electrical sensing of chemical and biological species have been a major focus in NASA Ames Center for Nanotechnology. Great progress has been made toward controlled growth and chemical functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays and integration into micro-fabricated chip devices. Carbon nanotube electrode arrays devices have been used for sub-attomole detection of DNA molecules. Interdigitated carbon nanotubes arrays devices have been applied to sub ppb (part per billion) level chemical sensing for many molecules at room temperature. Stability and reliability have also been addressed in our device development. These results show order of magnitude improvement in device performance, size and power consumption as compared to micro devices, promising applications of carbon nanotube electrode arrays for clinical molecular diagnostics, personal medical testing and monitoring, and environmental monitoring.

  17. Measuring carbon nanotube band gaps through leakage current and excitonic transitions of nanotube diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malapanis, Argyrios; Jones, David A; Comfort, Everett; Lee, Ji Ung

    2011-05-11

    The band gap of a semiconductor is one of its most fundamental properties. It is one of the defining parameters for applications, including nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. Measuring the band gap, however, has received little attention for quasi-one-dimensional materials, including single-walled carbon nanotubes. Here we show that the current-voltage characteristics of p-n diodes fabricated with semiconducting carbon nanotubes can be used along with the excitonic transitions of the nanotubes to measure both the fundamental (intrinsic) and renormalized nanotube band-gaps.

  18. Large-scale carbon nanotube synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Kiern J; Dunens, Oscar M; See, Chee H; Harris, Andrew T

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a form of crystalline carbon with extraordinary chemical, physical, electrical and mechanical properties, making them potentially valuable in a broad range of applications. These properties have resulted in an unprecedented level of interest in the development of techniques to manufacture CNTs, and consequently a raft of competing patents have been issued, with universities and commercial entities alike looking to obtain patent protection for their inventions. In this paper we review relevant aspects of international patent law, summarize CNT definitions and discuss patent irregularities, and discuss the implications of the widening gap between nanotechnology practice and the underlying patent law. This is followed by a review of the chemical vapour deposition technique of CNT synthesis, in particular using a fluidised bed, identified as the most promising method to date for the large-scale, low cost production of CNTs. We further examine the carbon nanotube patent space, focusing primarily on patents for CNTs produced via CVD and FBCVD techniques. This patent space is both convoluted and uncertain, and it appears likely that some form of litigation will ensue in future to ultimately determine intellectual property ownership in various regions. We also discuss the likely effect of this 'patent thicket' on the commercialisation of large-scale CNT synthesis processes.

  19. Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity risk of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    Novel materials are often commercialized without a complete assessment of the risks they pose to human health because such assessments are costly and time-consuming; additionally, sometimes the methodology needed for such an assessment does not exist. Carbon nanotubes have the potential for widespread application in engineering, materials science and medicine. However, due to the needle-like shape and high durability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), concerns have been raised that they may induce asbestos-like pathogenicity when inhaled. Indeed, experiments in rodents supported this hypothesis. Notably, the genetic alterations in MWCNT-induced rat malignant mesothelioma were similar to those induced by asbestos. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) cause mitotic disturbances in cultured cells, but thus far, there has been no report that SWCNTs are carcinogenic. This review summarizes the recent noteworthy publications on the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of CNTs and explains the possible molecular mechanisms responsible for this carcinogenicity. The nanoscale size and needle-like rigid structure of CNTs appear to be associated with their pathogenicity in mammalian cells, where carbon atoms are major components in the backbone of many biomolecules. Publishing adverse events associated with novel materials is critically important for alerting people exposed to such materials. CNTs still have a bright future with superb economic and medical merits. However, appropriate regulation of the production, distribution and secondary manufacturing processes is required, at least to protect the workers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Li-Chu; Chung, Felicia Fei-Lei; Tan, Yuen-Fen; Leong, Chee-Onn

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an important class of nanomaterials, which have numerous novel properties that make them useful in technology and industry. Generally, there are two types of CNTs: single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes. SWNTs, in particular, possess unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties, allowing for a wide range of applications in various fields, including the electronic, computer, aerospace, and biomedical industries. However, the use of SWNTs has come under scrutiny, not only due to their peculiar nanotoxicological profile, but also due to the forecasted increase in SWNT production in the near future. As such, the risk of human exposure is likely to be increased substantially. Yet, our understanding of the toxicological risk of SWNTs in human biology remains limited. This review seeks to examine representative data on the nanotoxicity of SWNTs by first considering how SWNTs are absorbed, distributed, accumulated and excreted in a biological system, and how SWNTs induce organ-specific toxicity in the body. The contradictory findings of numerous studies with regards to the potential hazards of SWNT exposure are discussed in this review. The possible mechanisms and molecular pathways associated with SWNT nanotoxicity in target organs and specific cell types are presented. We hope that this review will stimulate further research into the fundamental aspects of CNTs, especially the biological interactions which arise due to the unique intrinsic characteristics of CNTs.

  1. Ultrastrong, Stiff and Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin [North Carolina State University; Yong, Zhenzhong [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics; Li, Qingwen [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics; Bradford, Philip D. [North Carolina State University; Liu, Wei [Donghua University, Shanghai, China; Tucker, Dennis S. [Tucker Technical Solutions; Cai, Wei [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo [North Carolina State University; Zhu, Yuntian [North Carolina State University

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an order of magnitude stronger than any current engineering fiber. However, for the past two decades it has been a challenge to utilize their reinforcement potential in composites. Here we report CNT composites with unprecedented multifunctionalities, including record high strength (3.8 GPa), Young s modulus (293 GPa), electrical conductivity (1230 S cm-1) and thermal conductivity (41 W m-1 K-1). These superior properties are derived from the long length, high volume fraction, good alignment and reduced waviness of the CNTs, which were produced by a novel processing approach that can be easily scaled up for industrial production.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Integration with a CMOS Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Maximiliano S.; Lerner, Betiana; Resasco, Daniel E.; Pareja Obregon, Pablo D.; Julian, Pedro M.; Mandolesi, Pablo S.; Buffa, Fabian A.; Boselli, Alfredo; Lamagna, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    This work shows the integration of a sensor based on carbon nanotubes using CMOS technology. A chip sensor (CS) was designed and manufactured using a 0.30 μm CMOS process, leaving a free window on the passivation layer that allowed the deposition of SWCNTs over the electrodes. We successfully investigated with the CS the effect of humidity and temperature on the electrical transport properties of SWCNTs. The possibility of a large scale integration of SWCNTs with CMOS process opens a new route in the design of more efficient, low cost sensors with high reproducibility in their manufacture. PMID:22319330

  3. Carbon nanotubes for ultrafast fibre lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernysheva Maria

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs possess both remarkable optical properties and high potential for integration in various photonic devices. We overview, here, recent progress in CNT applications in fibre optics putting particular emphasis on fibre lasers. We discuss fabrication and characterisation of different CNTs, development of CNT-based saturable absorbers (CNT-SA, their integration and operation in fibre laser cavities putting emphasis on state-of-the-art fibre lasers, mode locked using CNT-SA. We discuss new design concepts of high-performance ultrafast operation fibre lasers covering ytterbium (Yb, bismuth (Bi, erbium (Er, thulium (Tm and holmium (Ho-doped fibre lasers.

  4. Carbon Nanotubes as Thermally Induced Water Pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oyarzua, Elton; Walther, Jens Honore; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2017-01-01

    Thermal Brownian motors (TBMs) are nanoscale machines that exploit thermal fluctuations to provide useful work. We introduce a TBM-based nanopump which enables continuous water flow through a carbon nanotube (CNT) by imposing an axial thermal gradient along its surface. We impose spatial asymmetry...... along the CNT by immobilizing certain points on its surface. We study the performance of this molecular motor using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. From the MD trajectories, we compute the net water flow and the induced velocity profiles for various imposed thermal gradients. We find that spatial...

  5. An electrothermal carbon nanotube gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Takeshi; Chiamori, Heather C; Suter, Marcel; Zhou, Qin; Sosnowchik, Brian D; Lin, Liwei

    2007-12-01

    We show both gas pressure and species sensing capabilities based on the electrothermal effect of a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT). Upon exposure to gaseous environments, the resistance of a heated MWCNT is found to change following the conductive heat-transfer variances of gas molecules. To realize this mechanism, a suspended MWCNT is constructed by synthesis and assembly in localized chemical vapor deposition that is accomplished within seconds via real-time electrical feedback control. Vacuum pressure sensitivity and gas species differentiability are observed and analyzed. Such MWCNT electrothermal sensors are compact, fast and reversible in responses, and fully integratable with microelectronics.

  6. Metallic Carbon Nanotubes and Ag Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brus, Louis E

    2014-03-04

    The goal of this DOE solar energy research was to understand how visible light interacts with matter, and how to make electric excitations evolve into separated electrons and holes in photovoltaic cells, especially in nanoparticles and nanowires. Our specific experiments focused on A) understanding plasmon enhanced spectroscopy and charge-transfer (metal-to-molecule) photochemistry on the surface of metallic particles and B) the spectroscopy and photochemistry of carbon nanotubes and graphene. I also worked closely with R. Friesner on theoretical studies of photo-excited electrons near surfaces of titanium dioxide nanoparticles; this process is relevant to the Gratzel photovoltaic cell.

  7. Carbon Nanotubes Filled with Ferromagnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissker, Uhland; Hampel, Silke; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Büchner, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) filled with ferromagnetic metals like iron, cobalt or nickel are new and very interesting nanostructured materials with a number of unique properties. In this paper we give an overview about different chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods for their synthesis and discuss the influence of selected growth parameters. In addition we evaluate possible growth mechanisms involved in their formation. Moreover we show their identified structural and magnetic properties. On the basis of these properties we present different application possibilities. Some selected examples reveal the high potential of these materials in the field of medicine and nanotechnology. PMID:28883334

  8. Carbon nanotubes produced from natural cellulosic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodell, Barry; Xie, Xinfeng; Qian, Yuhui; Daniel, Geoffrey; Peterson, Michael; Jellison, Jody

    2008-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were produced from wood fiber using a low temperature process, which included continuous oxidization at 240 degrees C and cyclic oxidation at 400 degrees C. The inside diameter of the CNTs was approximately 4-5 nm and the outside diameter ranged from 10 nm to 20 nm. No CNTs were produced when pure lignin and cellulose were tested indicating that the molecular and spatial arrangement of cell wall plays an important role in CNT formation. The research suggests that the chemical components in the secondary plant cell wall and their differential ablation properties are critical for the formation of CNTs at these comparatively low temperatures.

  9. Carbon nanotube radio-frequency electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Donglai; Zhang, Zhiyong; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2017-05-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered a promising material for radio-frequency (RF) applications, owing to its high carrier mobility and saturated drift velocity, as well as ultra-small intrinsic gate capacitance. Here, we review progress on CNT-based devices and integrated circuits for RF applications, including theoretical projection of RF performance of CNT-based devices, preparation of CNT materials, fabrication, optimization of RF field-effect transistors (FETs) structures, and ambipolar FET-based RF applications, and we outline challenges and prospects of CNT-based RF applications.

  10. Carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo.

  11. Adhesive Behavior of Single Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeno, Yohei; Ishikawa, Atsunori; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2010-06-01

    We examined the adhesion of a carbon nanotube (CNT) tip using a manipulation technique with a transmission electron microscope. In addition, we estimated the maximum normal adhesion possibility of a CNT-based gecko tape. The adhesive behavior of a single isolated CNT to Au solid surfaces has high normal strength (6.84 nN), which has a linear relation to the cross section of a CNT, indicating the mechanism: van der Waals force was inferred from the contact of two flat surfaces. Adhesion measurements conducted on several surface materials verify that the surface chemistry affects adhesive properties of CNT tips.

  12. Carbon Nanotubes Filled with Ferromagnetic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Leonhardt

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNT filled with ferromagnetic metals like iron, cobalt or nickel are new and very interesting nanostructured materials with a number of unique properties. In this paper we give an overview about different chemical vapor deposition (CVD methods for their synthesis and discuss the influence of selected growth parameters. In addition we evaluate possible growth mechanisms involved in their formation. Moreover we show their identified structural and magnetic properties. On the basis of these properties we present different application possibilities. Some selected examples reveal the high potential of these materials in the field of medicine and nanotechnology.

  13. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jaskólski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF. The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system.

  14. Direct pressure sensor using carbon nanotubes nanocomposite

    OpenAIRE

    Dinh, Nghia Trong

    2016-01-01

    Im Gegensatz zu herkömmlichen Dehnungsmessstreifen können Carbon nanotube (CNT)-basierte Komposite zusätzlich eine ausgeprägte Druck-abhängigkeit des Widerstandes aufweisen. Deshalb können Drucksensoren aus CNT-Nanokomposite ohne den Einsatz von Verformungskörpern wie z. B. Biegebalken aufgebaut werden. Die möglichen Anwendungsgebiete für diese direkt messenden Sensoren wurden in der vorliegenden Arbeit bei drei industriellen Anwendungen wie z. B. bei Robotergreifarmen gezeigt. Die Zielstellu...

  15. Superconductivity in single wall carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Yavari

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   By using Greens function method we first show that the effective interaction between two electrons mediated by plasmon exchange can become attractive which in turn can lead to superconductivity at a high critical temperature in a singl wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT. The superconducting transition temperature Tc for the SWCNT (3,3 obtained by this mechanism agrees with the recent experimental result. We also show as the radius of SWCNT increases, plasmon frequency becomes lower and leads to lower Tc.

  16. Aqueous processing of DNA-dispersed carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khripin, Constantine

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a promising material for many nanoscale electronic applications. CNTs are able to carry very high currents, and are very sensitive to the environment around them making them ideal for sensing on a very small scale. However, to date no significant commercial applications have been achieved because of difficulties in sorting the nanotubes by type, placing them on a target site and interfacing them into a device such as a field-effect transistor (FET) that could be used as a sensor. CNTs are well dispersed in water by DNA, and form a stable hybrid structure, DNA-CNT. This hybrid can be sorted according to CNT length and chirality using Ion-Exchange Chromatography (IEC), providing a valuable route to CNT purification. This thesis centers on helping explain how the purification process works and on developing ways to place the DNA-CNT from an aqueous suspension on a target site to be used in a device. Purification is done by IEC, which separates species partly on the basis of their electrostatic properties in solution. ABAQUS(TM) finite-element models of DNA-CNT electrostatics are reported which help explain, for example, how metallic CNTs screen the charge on DNA more than semiconducting ones. Other applications of Poison-Boltzmann solution electrostatics theory, including the electrostatic field near a metal electrode, are also reported. Understanding electrostatic fields near an electrode plays a role in dielectrophoretic placement of CNTs. Experimental results are reported on Meniscus Alignment, a way of placing and orienting DNA-CNT on top of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and kinetics models are developed to help explain the process. Meniscus Alignment is shown to be a versatile technique which can produce finely tuned deposition densities and spatially varying alignment patterns. Finally, a Capillary Electrophoresis (CE) study of the DNA-CNT is reported. This study found that CE has some capacity for sorting DNA-CNT by

  17. Unveiling Stability Criteria of DNA-Carbon Nanotubes Constructs by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Computational Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Kilina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a combined approach that relies on computational simulations and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM measurements to reveal morphological properties and stability criteria of carbon nanotube-DNA (CNT-DNA constructs. Application of STM allows direct observation of very stable CNT-DNA hybrid structures with the well-defined DNA wrapping angle of 63.4° and a coiling period of 3.3 nm. Using force field simulations, we determine how the DNA-CNT binding energy depends on the sequence and binding geometry of a single strand DNA. This dependence allows us to quantitatively characterize the stability of a hybrid structure with an optimal π-stacking between DNA nucleotides and the tube surface and better interpret STM data. Our simulations clearly demonstrate the existence of a very stable DNA binding geometry for (6,5 CNT as evidenced by the presence of a well-defined minimum in the binding energy as a function of an angle between DNA strand and the nanotube chiral vector. This novel approach demonstrates the feasibility of CNT-DNA geometry studies with subnanometer resolution and paves the way towards complete characterization of the structural and electronic properties of drug-delivering systems based on DNA-CNT hybrids as a function of DNA sequence and a nanotube chirality.

  18. Carbon nanotube oscillator surface profiling device and method of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Adrian [Tampa, FL; Woods, Lilia M [Tampa, FL; Bondarev, Igor V [Fuquay Varina, NC

    2011-11-15

    The proposed device is based on a carbon nanotube oscillator consisting of a finite length outer stationary nanotube and a finite length inner oscillating nanotube. Its main function is to measure changes in the characteristics of the motion of the carbon nanotube oscillating near a sample surface, and profile the roughness of this surface. The device operates in a non-contact mode, thus it can be virtually non-wear and non-fatigued system. It is an alternative to the existing atomic force microscope (AFM) tips used to scan surfaces to determine their roughness.

  19. Covalent Crosslinking of Carbon Nanotube Materials for Improved Tensile Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany A.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted much interest in recent years due to their exceptional mechanical properties. Currently, the tensile properties of bulk carbon nanotube-based materials (yarns, sheets, etc.) fall far short of those of the individual nanotube elements. The premature failure in these materials under tensile load has been attributed to inter-tube sliding, which requires far less force than that needed to fracture individual nanotubes.1,2 In order for nanotube materials to achieve their full potential, methods are needed to restrict this tube-tube shear and increase inter-tube forces.Our group is examining covalent crosslinking between the nanotubes as a means to increase the tensile properties of carbon nanotube materials. We are working with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheet and yarn materials obtained from commercial sources. Several routes to functionalize the nanotubes have been examined including nitrene, aryl diazonium, and epoxide chemistries. The functional nanotubes were crosslinked through small molecule or polymeric bridges. Additionally, electron beam irradiation induced crosslinking of the non-functional and functional nanotube materials was conducted. For example, a nanotube sheet material containing approximately 3.5 mol amine functional groups exhibited a tensile strength of 75 MPa and a tensile modulus of 1.16 GPa, compared to 49 MPa and 0.57 GPa, respectively, for the as-received material. Electron beam irradiation (2.2x 1017 ecm2) of the same amine-functional sheet material further increased the tensile strength to 120 MPa and the modulus to 2.61 GPa. This represents approximately a 150 increase in tensile strength and a 360 increase in tensile modulus over the as-received material with only a 25 increase in material mass. Once we have optimized the nanotube crosslinking methods, the performance of these materials in polymer matrix composites will be evaluated.

  20. Carbon Nanotubes Hybrid Hydrogels in Drug Delivery: A Perspective Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Cirillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of biologics, polymers, silicon materials, carbon materials, and metals has been proposed for the preparation of innovative drug delivery devices. One of the most promising materials in this field are the carbon-nanotubes composites and hybrid materials coupling the advantages of polymers (biocompatibility and biodegradability with those of carbon nanotubes (cellular uptake, stability, electromagnatic, and magnetic behavior. The applicability of polymer-carbon nanotubes composites in drug delivery, with particular attention to the controlled release by composites hydrogel, is being extensively investigated in the present review.

  1. Carbon Nanotubes Hybrid Hydrogels in Drug Delivery: A Perspective Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Silke; Spizzirri, Umile Gianfranco; Parisi, Ortensia Ilaria; Picci, Nevio; Iemma, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The use of biologics, polymers, silicon materials, carbon materials, and metals has been proposed for the preparation of innovative drug delivery devices. One of the most promising materials in this field are the carbon-nanotubes composites and hybrid materials coupling the advantages of polymers (biocompatibility and biodegradability) with those of carbon nanotubes (cellular uptake, stability, electromagnatic, and magnetic behavior). The applicability of polymer-carbon nanotubes composites in drug delivery, with particular attention to the controlled release by composites hydrogel, is being extensively investigated in the present review. PMID:24587993

  2. Torsional wave propagation in multiwalled carbon nanotubes using nonlocal elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arda, Mustafa; Aydogdu, Metin

    2016-03-01

    Torsional wave propagation in multiwalled carbon nanotubes is studied in the present work. Governing equation of motion of multiwalled carbon nanotube is obtained using Eringen's nonlocal elasticity theory. The effect of van der Waals interaction coefficient is considered between inner and outer nanotubes. Dispersion relations are obtained and discussed in detail. Effect of nonlocal parameter and van der Waals interaction to the torsional wave propagation behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes is investigated. It is obtained that torsional van der Waals interaction between adjacent tubes can change the rotational direction of multiwalled carbon nanotube as in-phase or anti-phase. The group and escape velocity of the waves converge to a limit value in the nonlocal elasticity approach.

  3. Silicon spectral response extension through single wall carbon nanotubes in hybrid solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Del Gobbo, Silvano

    2013-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices based on single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and n-silicon multiple heterojunctions have been fabricated by a SWCNT film transferring process. We report on the ability of the carbon nanotubes to extend the Si spectral range towards the near ultraviolet (UV) and the near infrared regions. Semiconducting and about metallic SWCNT networks have been studied as a function of the film sheet resistance, Rsh. Optical absorbance and Raman spectroscopy have been used to assign nanotube chirality and electronic character. This gave us hints of evidence of the participation of the metal nanotubes in the photocurrent generation. Moreover, we provide evidence that the external quantum efficiency spectral range can be modulated as a function of the SWCNT network sheet resistance in a hybrid SWCNT/Si solar cell. This result will be very useful to further design/optimize devices with improved performance in spectral regions generally not covered by conventional Si p-n devices. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. A Carbon Nanotube Reporter of miRNA Hybridization Events In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Jackson D.; Jena, Prakrit V.; Baker, Hanan A.; Zerze, Gül H.; Williams, Ryan M.; Galassi, Thomas V.; Roxbury, Daniel; Mittal, Jeetain

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs and other small oligonucleotides in biofluids are promising disease biomarkers, yet conventional assays require complex processing steps that are unsuitable for point-of-care testing or for implantable or wearable sensors. Single-walled carbon nanotubes are an ideal material for implantable sensors, owing to their emission in the near-infrared spectral region, photostability and exquisite sensitivity. Here, we report an engineered carbon-nanotube-based sensor capable of real-time optical quantification of hybridization events of microRNA and other oligonucleotides. The mechanism of the sensor arises from competitive effects between displacement of both oligonucleotide charge groups and water from the nanotube surface, which result in a solvatochromism-like response. The sensor, which allows for detection via single-molecule sensor elements and for multiplexing by using multiple nanotube chiralities, can monitor toehold-based strand-displacement events, which reverse the sensor response and regenerate the sensor complex. We also show that the sensor functions in whole urine and serum, and can non-invasively measure DNA and microRNA after implantation in live mice. PMID:28845337

  5. Topology and zero energy edge states in carbon nanotubes with superconducting pairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumida, W.; Milz, L.; Marganska, M.; Grifoni, M.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the spectrum of finite-length carbon nanotubes in the presence of onsite and nearest-neighbor superconducting pairing terms. A one-dimensional ladder-type lattice model is developed to explore the low-energy spectrum and the nature of the electronic states. We find that zero energy edge states can emerge in zigzag class carbon nanotubes as a combined effect of curvature-induced Dirac point shift and strong superconducting coupling between nearest-neighbor sites. The chiral symmetry of the system is exploited to define a winding number topological invariant. The associated topological phase diagram shows regions with nontrivial winding number in the plane of chemical potential and superconducting nearest-neighbor pair potential (relative to the onsite pair potential). A one-dimensional continuum model reveals the topological origin of the zero energy edge states: a bulk-edge correspondence is proven, which shows that the condition for nontrivial winding number and that for the emergence of edge states are identical. For armchair class nanotubes, the presence of edge states in the superconducting gap depends on the nanotube's boundary shape. For the minimal boundary condition, the emergence of the subgap states can also be deduced from the winding number.

  6. Making Macroscopic Assemblies of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Richard E.; Colbert, Daniel T.; Smith, Ken A.; Walters, Deron A.; Casavant, Michael J.; Qin, Xiaochuan; Yakobson, Boris; Hauge, Robert H.; Saini, Rajesh Kumar; Chiung, Wan-Ting; hide

    2005-01-01

    A method of aligning and assembling single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to fabricate macroscopic structures has been invented. The method entails suspending SWNTs in a fluid, orienting the SWNTs by use of a magnetic and/or electric field, and then removing the aligned SWNTs from suspension in such a way as to assemble them while maintaining the alignment. SWNTs are essentially tubular extensions of fullerene molecules. It is desirable to assemble aligned SWNTs into macroscopic structures because the common alignment of the SWNTs in such a structure makes it possible to exploit, on a macroscopic scale, the unique mechanical, chemical, and electrical properties that individual oriented SWNTs exhibit at the molecular level. Because of their small size and high electrical conductivity, carbon nanotubes, and especially SWNTs, are useful for making electrical connectors in integrated circuits. Carbon nanotubes can be used as antennas at optical frequencies, and as probes in scanning tunneling microscopes, atomic-force microscopes, and the like. Carbon nanotubes can be used with or instead of carbon black in tires. Carbon nanotubes are useful as supports for catalysts. Ropes of SWNTs are metallic and, as such, are potentially useful in some applications in which electrical conductors are needed - for example, they could be used as additives in formulating electrically conductive paints. Finally, macroscopic assemblies of aligned SWNTs can serve as templates for the growth of more and larger structures of the same type. The great variety of tubular fullerene molecules and of the structures that could be formed by assembling them in various ways precludes a complete description of the present method within the limits of this article. It must suffice to present a typical example of the use of one of many possible variants of the method to form a membrane comprising SWNTs aligned substantially parallel to each other in the membrane plane. The apparatus used in this variant

  7. Structure and electronic properties of molybdenum monatomic wires encapsulated in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GarcIa-Fuente, A; Vega, A [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica. Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain); GarcIa-Suarez, V M; Ferrer, J [Departamento de Fisica and CINN, Universidad de Oviedo, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2011-07-06

    Monatomic chains of molybdenum encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of different chiralities are investigated using density functional theory. We determine the optimal size of the CNT for encapsulating a single atomic wire, as well as the most stable atomic arrangement adopted by the wire. We also study the transport properties in the ballistic regime by computing the transmission coefficients and tracing them back to the electronic conduction channels of the wire and the host. We predict that CNTs of appropriate radii encapsulating a Mo wire have metallic behavior, even if both the nanotube and the wire are insulators. Therefore, encapsulation of Mo wires in CNTs is a way to create conductive quasi-one-dimensional hybrid nanostructures.

  8. First principle calculations of the chemisorption of SOx on doped carbon nanotubes and graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sunaidi, Abdullah; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.

    2015-02-01

    We have carried out density-functional calculations to investigate the chemisorption of SO, SO2 and SO3 molecules on Al- and Si-doped carbon nanotubes with chiralities (5,5) and (9,0) and Al-doped graphene. Among several adsorption configurations studied, the most stable ones are those forming Alsbnd O or Sisbnd O bonds. SO2 adsorbs with smaller adsorption energies compared to SO and SO3. The adsorption is also accompanied by a change in the band gap energy; for the Al-doped CNT(9,0), the band gap energy drops by about 50% of its value. The adsorption energies for these gases on Al-doped graphene are comparable to those of the nanotubes.

  9. Carbon nanotubes enhanced the lead toxicity on the freshwater fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D. S. T.; Alves, O. L.; Barbieri, E.

    2013-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes are promising nanostructures for many applications in materials industry and biotechnology. However, it is mandatory to evaluate their toxicity and environmental implications. We evaluated nitric acid treated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (HNO3-MWCNT) toxicity in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and also the lead (Pb) toxicity modulation after the nanotube interaction. Industrial grade multiwalled carbon nanotubes [Ctube 100, CNT Co. Ltd] were treated with 9M HNO3 for 12h at 150°C to generate oxygenated groups on the nanotube surface, to improve water dispersion and heavy metal interaction. The HNO3-treated multiwalled carbon nanotubes were physico-chemically characterized by several techniques [e.g. TEM, FE-SEM, TGA, ζ-potential and Raman spectroscopy]. HNO3-MWCNT did not show toxicity on Nile tilapia when the concentration ranged from 0.1 to 3.0 mg/L, and the maximum exposure time was 96h. After 24, 48, 72 and 96h the LC50 values of Pb were 1.65, 1.32, 1.10 and 0.99 mg/L, respectively. To evaluate the Pb-nanotube interaction influence on the ecotoxicity, we submitted the Nile tilapia to different concentrations of Pb mixed with a non-toxic concentration of HNO3-MWCNT (1.0 mg/L). After 24, 48, 72, 96 h the LC50 values of Pb plus nanotubes were: 0.32, 0.25, 0.20, 0.18 mg/L, respectively. These values showed a synergistic effect after Pb-nanotube interaction since Pb toxicity increased over five times. X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used to confirm lead adsorption on the carbon nanotube oxidized surface. The exposure of Nile tilapia to Pb plus HNO3-MWCNT caused both oxygen consumption and ammonium excretion decrease, when compared to the control. Finally, our results show that carbon nanotubes interact with classical pollutants drawing attention to the environmental implications.

  10. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-06-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal.

  11. Fully printed flexible carbon nanotube photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suoming; Cai, Le; Wang, Tongyu; Miao, Jinshui; Sepúlveda, Nelson; Wang, Chuan

    2017-03-01

    Here, we report fully printed flexible photodetectors based on single-wall carbon nanotubes and the study of their electrical characteristics under laser illumination. Due to the photothermal effect and the use of high purity semiconducting carbon nanotubes, the devices exhibit gate-voltage-dependent photoresponse with the positive photocurrent or semiconductor-like behavior (conductivity increases at elevated temperatures) under positive gate biases and the negative photocurrent or metal-like behavior (conductivity decreases at elevated temperatures) under negative gate biases. Mechanism for such photoresponse is attributed to the different temperature dependencies of carrier concentration and carrier mobility, which are two competing factors that ultimately determine the photothermal effect-based photoresponse. The photodetectors built on the polyimide substrate also exhibit superior mechanical compliance and stable photoresponse after thousands of bending cycles down to a curvature radius as small as 3 mm. Furthermore, due to the low thermal conductivity of the plastic substrate, the devices show up to 6.5 fold improvement in responsivity compared to the devices built on the silicon substrate. The results presented here provide a viable path to low cost and high performance flexible photodetectors fabricated entirely by the printing process.

  12. A cell nanoinjector based on carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xing; Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2007-01-30

    Technologies for introducing molecules into living cells are vital for probing the physical properties and biochemical interactions that govern the cell's behavior. Here we report the development of a nanoscale cell injection system-termed the nanoinjector-that uses carbon nanotubes to deliver cargo into cells. A single multi-walled carbon nanotube attached to an atomic force microscope tip was functionalized with cargo via a disulfide-based linker. Penetration of cell membranes with this 'nanoneedle', followed by reductive cleavage of the disulfide bonds within the cell's interior, resulted in the release of cargo inside the cells. The capability of the nanoinjector was demonstrated by injection of protein-coated quantum dots into live human cells. Single-particle tracking was employed to characterize the diffusion dynamics of injected quantum dots in the cytosol. This new technique causes no discernible membrane or cell damage, and can deliver a discrete number of molecules to the cell's interior without the requirement of a carrier solvent.

  13. Networking Carbon Nanotubes for Integrated Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Herrera, J. M.; Terrones, M.; Terrones, H.; Meunier, V.

    2006-03-01

    The unique electronic and mechanical properties of individual Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted much interest as candidates for molecular electronic devices and reinforced materials. However, their integration in organized architectures remains a major challenge. Recent breakthroughs reported on the Self-Assembly of 1D Nanostructures[1], and on the coalescence mechanism for interconnecting CNTs[2], point to the possibility of designing and obtaining Ordered Networks based on CNTs (ON- CNTs). We propose a set with different complex architectures of ON- CNTs based on --but not limited to-- armchair and zigzag nanotubes. In addition to the study of the energetics of the structures, we have systematically investigated their electronic transport properties in the framework of the Landauer-Buttiker formalism and equilibrium Green functions. To take curvature into account, we employed a semi-empirical Hamiltonian based on 4 orbitals (s,px,py,pz) per carbon atom. Further insight is obtained analyzing the electron pathways from a scattering point of view, which allows a real-space analysis of the wave function from the transmitted electrons across the structure. [1]Whang D etal. Nanoletters,3 (2003). Tao A etal. Nanoletters,3 (2003). [2]Terrones M etal. PRL,89 (2002). Endo M etal. Nanoletters,5 (2005).

  14. Stiff and Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuntian; Wang, Xin; Li, Qingwen; Bradford, Philip; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Tucker, Dennis; Cai, Wei; Wang, Hsin

    2012-02-01

    It has been a challenge for two decades to assemble the extremely strong carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into macroscopic CNT composites that break the strength ceiling of carbon fiber composites. Here we report the fast incorporation of long CNTs into polymer matrix using a novel approach, stretch-winding, to produce composites that are much stronger than any current engineering composite. The CNT composites reach a strength of 3.8 GPa, an excellent electrical conductivity and a high thermal conductivity. These superior properties are primarily derived from the long length, high volume fraction, good alignment and reduced waviness of the CNTs that are produced. The combination of high strength and excellent electrical and thermal conductivities makes CNT composites a promising enabler of new aerospace technologies and adventures.

  15. Crystallization and mechanical properties of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes/polyvinylidene fluoride composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Jing; Iftekharul Haque, Rubaiyet; Larsen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were purified and functionalized by nitric acid and octadecylamine. Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the functionalization of the single-walled carbon nanotubes. Polyvinylidene flouride nanocomposites containing 1 wt......% purified or functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared by solution blending and injection molding. The dispersion of different carbon nanotubes in dimethylformamide and in polyvinylidene flouride has been investigated. Mechanical properties show that adding single-walled carbon nanotubes...

  16. Carbon Nanotube Microarrays Grown on Nanoflake Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Howard K.; Hauge, Robert H.; Pint, Cary; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-01-01

    This innovation consists of a new composition of matter where single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are grown in aligned arrays from nanostructured flakes that are coated in Fe catalyst. This method of growth of aligned SWNTs, which can yield well over 400 percent SWNT mass per unit substrate mass, exceeds current yields for entangled SWNT growth. In addition, processing can be performed with minimal wet etching treatments, leaving aligned SWNTs with superior properties over those that exist in entangled mats. The alignment of the nanotubes is similar to that achieved in vertically aligned nanotubes, which are called "carpets. " Because these flakes are grown in a state where they are airborne in a reactor, these flakes, after growing SWNTs, are termed "flying carpets. " These flakes are created in a roll-to-roll evaporator system, where three subsequent evaporations are performed on a 100-ft (approx. =30-m) roll of Mylar. The first layer is composed of a water-soluble "release layer, " which can be a material such as NaCl. After depositing NaCl, the second layer involves 40 nm of supporting layer material . either Al2O3 or MgO. The thickness of the layer can be tuned to synthesize flakes that are larger or smaller than those obtained with a 40-nm deposition. Finally, the third layer consists of a thin Fe catalyst layer with a thickness of 0.5 nm. The thickness of this layer ultimately determines the diameter of SWNT growth, and a layer that is too thick will result in the growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes instead of single-wall nanotubes. However, between a thickness of 0.5 nm to 1 nm, single-walled carbon nanotubes are known to be the primary constituent. After this three-layer deposition process, the Mylar is rolled through a bath of water, which allows catalyst-coated flakes to detach from the Mylar. The flakes are then collected and dried. The method described here for making such flakes is analogous to that which is used to make birefringent ink that is

  17. Carbon Nanotubes as Active Components for Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-De Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The unique structure of carbon nanotubes endows them with fantastic physical and chemical characteristics. Carbon nanotubes have been widely studied due to their potential applications in many fields including conductive and high-strength composites, energy storage and energy conversion devices, sensors, field emission displays and radiation sources, hydrogen storage media, and nanometer-sized semiconductor devices, probes, and quantum wires. Some of these applications have been realized in products, while others show great potentials. The development of carbon nanotubes-based sensors has attracted intensive interest in the last several years because of their excellent sensing properties such as high selectivity and prompt response. Carbon nanotube-based gas sensors are summarized in this paper. Sensors based on single-walled, multiwalled, and well-aligned carbon nanotubes arrays are introduced. Modification of carbon nanotubes with functional groups, metals, oxides, polymers, or doping carbon nanotubes with other elements to enhance the response and selectivity of the sensors is also discussed.

  18. Light Emission from Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misewich, James

    2004-03-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, research in carbon nanotubes has grown rapidly. Part of this interest is driven by the remarkable electrical and mechanical properties demonstrated by carbon nanotubes which could have significant technological impact (1,2). Recent progress has included demonstrations of interesting opto-electronic properties of carbon nanotubes. In one experiment we have shown that single carbon nanotubes can be a source of infrared optical emission (3). We have also shown how a single carbon nanotube can be used as a photoconductive detector (4). In this talk, we will examine the opto-electronic properties of individual single wall carbon nanotubes. (1) M.S. Dresselhaus, G. Dresselhaus, and Ph. Avouris (eds.), "Carbon Nanotubes", Topics Appl. Phys. 80, (2001). (2) Ph. Avouris, Acct. Chem. Res. 35, 1026 (2002). (3) J.A. Misewich, R. Martel, Ph. Avouris, J. Tsang, S. Heinze, and J. Tersoff, Science 300, 783 (2003). (4) M. Freitag, Y. Martin, J.A. Misewich, R. Martel, and Ph. Avouris, Nanoletters 3, 1067 (2003).

  19. Dephasing and hyperfine interaction in carbon nanotubes double quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynoso, Andres Alejandro; Flensberg, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We study theoretically the return probability experiment, which is used to measure the dephasing time T-2*, in a double quantum dot (DQD) in semiconducting carbon nanotubes with spin-orbit coupling and disorder-induced valley mixing. Dephasing is due to hyperfine interaction with the spins of the C...... with these for DQDs in clean nanotubes, whereas the disorder effect is always relevant when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the nanotube axis....

  20. Ultrasonic Spraying of Carbon Nanotubes using Organic Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Anthony; Davis, Robert; Vanfleet, Richard

    2012-10-01

    Because of their unique electrical and mechanical properties, thin films of carbon nanotubes have several potential applications, especially in the fields of organic electronics and photovoltaics. We present a method for spraying thin films of nanotubes that have been suspended in organic solvents N-methyl Pyrollidone (NMP) and N-Cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone (CHP). The sprayed nanotubes are randomly oriented, and films are transparent, conductive, and mechanically stable.

  1. DFT, NBO and molecular docking studies of the adsorption of fluoxetine into and on the surface of simple and sulfur-doped carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Dana; Tavakol, Hossein

    2017-10-01

    In this study, noncovalent interactions between Fluoxetine (FX) and different carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or sulfur doped carbon nanotubes (SCNTs) were fully considered using DFT, natural bond orbital (NBO) and molecular docking calculations. Two different CNTs (and SCNTs) with 7,7 and 8,8 chiralities were considered as the adsorbents and the adsorption of FX by these adsorbents were studied in two cases: into the nanotubes and on their surfaces. The results of DFT and NBO calculations proposed that the 8,8 nanotubes are more suitable adsorbents for FX because the energies of their adsorptions are minimum. Population: analyses were also proposed that the adsorption of FX by SCNTs lead to more changes in electronic and sensing properties than the adsorption by CNTs. Moreover, the adsorption energies, obtained from molecular docking calculations (using 94 different models), proposed that the adsorption of FX into (versus out of) the nanotubes, adsorption processes by double-walled or triple-walled (versus single-walled) nanotubes and the adsorption by nanotubes with 8,8 chiralities are the most favorable adsorption processes.

  2. Carbon nanotubes on carbon fibers: Synthesis, structures and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuhong

    The interface between carbon fibers (CFs) and the resin matrix in traditional high performance composites is characterized by a large discontinuity in mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties which can cause inefficient energy transfer. Due to the exceptional properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), their growth at the surface of carbon fibers is a promising approach to controlling interfacial interactions and achieving the enhanced bulk properties. However, the reactive conditions used to grow carbon nanotubes also have the potential to introduce defects that can degrade the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber (CF) substrate. In this study, using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, high density multi-wall carbon nanotubes have been successfully synthesized directly on PAN-based CF surface without significantly compromising tensile properties. The influence of CVD growth conditions on the single CF tensile properties and carbon nanotube (CNT) morphology was investigated. The experimental results revealed that under high temperature growth conditions, the tensile strength of CF was greatly decreased at the beginning of CNT growth process with the largest decrease observed for sized CFs. However, the tensile strength of unsized CFs with CNT was approximately the same as the initial CF at lower growth temperature. The interfacial shear strength of CNT coated CF (CNT/CF) in epoxy was studied by means of the single-fiber fragmentation test. Results of the test indicate an improvement in interfacial shear strength with the addition of a CNT coating. This improvement can most likely be attributed to an increase in the interphase yield strength as well as an improvement in interfacial adhesion due to the presence of the nanotubes. CNT/CF also offers promise as stress and strain sensors in CF reinforced composite materials. This study investigates fundamental mechanical and electrical properties of CNT/CF using nanoindentation method by designed

  3. Multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement for advanced epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekyarova, E; Thostenson, E T; Yu, A; Kim, H; Gao, J; Tang, J; Hahn, H T; Chou, T-W; Itkis, M E; Haddon, R C

    2007-03-27

    We report an approach to the development of advanced structural composites based on engineered multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement. Electrophoresis was utilized for the selective deposition of multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on woven carbon fabric. The CNT-coated carbon fabric panels were subsequently infiltrated with epoxy resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to fabricate multiscale hybrid composites in which the nanotubes were completely integrated into the fiber bundles and reinforced the matrix-rich regions. The carbon nanotube/carbon fabric/epoxy composites showed approximately 30% enhancement of the interlaminar shear strength as compared to that of carbon fiber/epoxy composites without carbon nanotubes and demonstrate significantly improved out-of-plane electrical conductivity.

  4. Rotational actuator of motor based on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Fennimore, Adam M.; Yuzvinsky, Thomas D.

    2008-11-18

    A rotational actuator/motor based on rotation of a carbon nanotube is disclosed. The carbon nanotube is provided with a rotor plate attached to an outer wall, which moves relative to an inner wall of the nanotube. After deposit of a nanotube on a silicon chip substrate, the entire structure may be fabricated by lithography using selected techniques adapted from silicon manufacturing technology. The structures to be fabricated may comprise a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT), two in plane stators S1, S2 and a gate stator S3 buried beneath the substrate surface. The MWNT is suspended between two anchor pads and comprises a rotator attached to an outer wall and arranged to move in response to electromagnetic inputs. The substrate is etched away to allow the rotor to freely rotate. Rotation may be either in a reciprocal or fully rotatable manner.

  5. Resonant anti-Stokes Raman scattering in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, Georgy; Jorio, Ado; Kusch, Patryk; Vieira, Bruno G. M.; Flavel, Benjamin; Krupke, Ralph; Barros, Eduardo B.; Reich, Stephanie

    2017-12-01

    The dependence of the anti-Stokes Raman intensity on the excitation laser energy in carbon nanotubes is studied by resonant Raman spectroscopy. The complete resonant anti-Stokes and Stokes Raman profiles of the high-energy longitudinal phonon (G+) are obtained for (8,3), (7,5), (6,4), and (6,5) single chirality enriched samples. A high asymmetry between the intensity of the incoming and outgoing resonance is observed in the resonant Raman profiles. In contrast to Stokes scattering, anti-Stokes scattering is more intense at the outgoing resonance then at the incoming resonance. The resonance profiles are explained by a Raman process that includes the phonon-mediated interactions with the dark excitonic state. The chirality dependence of the Raman profiles is due to the variation in the exciton-phonon matrix elements, in agreement with tight-binding calculations. Based on the asymmetric Raman profiles we present the resonance factors for the Stokes/anti-Stokes ratios in carbon nanotubes.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Electron Emitter for X-ray Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Su Kang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The carbon nanotube field emitter array was grown on silicon substrate through a resist-assisted patterning (RAP process. The shape of the carbon nanotube array is elliptical with 2.0 × 0.5 mm2 for an isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The field emission properties with triode electrodes show a gate turn-on field of 3 V/µm at an anode emission current of 0.1 mA. The author demonstrated the X-ray source with triode electrode structure utilizing the carbon nanotube emitter, and the transmitted X-ray image was of high resolution.

  7. Resistance-based biosensor of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosovas-Machuca, E S; Vera-Reveles, G; Rodríguez-Aranda, M C; Ortiz-Dosal, L C; Segura-Cardenas, Emmanuel; Gonzalez, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWNTs) are a good choice for resistive biosensors due to their great resistance changes when immunoreactions take place, they are also low-cost, more biocompatible than single-walled carbon nanotubes, and resistive measurement equipment is usually not expensive and readily available. In this work a novel resistive biosensor based on the immobilization of an antigen through a silanization process over the surface of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWNTs) is reported. Results show that the biosensor increases its conductivity when adding the antigen and decreases when adding the antibody making them good candidates for disease diagnosis.

  8. Correlation and dimensional effects of trions in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnow, Troels Frimodt; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Cornean, Horia

    2010-01-01

    We study the binding energies of singlet trions, i.e., charged excitons, in carbon nanotubes. The problem is modeled, through the effective-mass model, as a three-particle complex on the surface of a cylinder, which we investigate using both one- and two-dimensional expansions of the wave function...... are used to compute physical binding energies for a wide selection of carbon nanotubes. In addition, the dependence on dielectric screening is examined. Our findings indicate that trions are detectable at room temperature in carbon nanotubes with radius below 8 Å....

  9. Raman spectroscopic characterization of multiwall carbon nanotubes and of composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bokobza

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work Raman spectroscopy was used for extensive characterization of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNTs and of MWCNTs/rubber composites. We have measured the Raman spectra of bundled and dispersed multiwall carbon nanotubes. All the Raman bands of the carbon nanotubes are seen to shift to higher wavenumbers upon debundling on account of less intertube interactions. Effects of laser irradiation were also investigated. Strong effects are observed by changing the wavelength of the laser excitation. On the other hand, at a given excitation wavelength, changes on the Raman bands are observed by changing the laser power density due to sample heating during the measurement procedure.

  10. Transport Properties of Carbon-Nanotube/Cement Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Baoguo; Yang, Zhengxian; Shi, Xianming; Yu, Xun

    2013-01-01

    This paper preliminarily investigates the general transport properties (i.e., water sorptivity, water permeability, and gas permeability) of carbon-nanotube/cement composites. Carboxyl multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are dispersed into cement mortar to fabricate the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) reinforced cement-based composites by applying ultrasonic energy in combination with the use of surfactants (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate and sodium dodecyl sulfate). Experimental results indicate that even at a very small dosage the addition of MWNTs can help decrease water sorptivity coefficient, water permeability coefficient, and gas permeability coefficient of cement mortar, which suggests that CNTs can effectively improve the durability properties of cement-based composites.

  11. Integrating carbon nanotubes into silicon by means of vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingqi

    2014-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been integrated into silicon for use in vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). A unique feature of these devices is that a silicon substrate and a metal contact are used as the source and drain for the vertical transistors, respectively. These CNTFETs show very different characteristics from those fabricated with two metal contacts. Surprisingly, the transfer characteristics of the vertical CNTFETs can be either ambipolar or unipolar (p-type or n-type) depending on the sign of the drain voltage. Furthermore, the p-type/n-type character of the devices is defined by the doping type of the silicon substrate used in the fabrication process. A semiclassical model is used to simulate the performance of these CNTFETs by taking the conductance change of the Si contact under the gate voltage into consideration. The calculation results are consistent with the experimental observations. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  12. Integrating carbon nanotubes into silicon by means of vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingqi; Wang, Qingxiao; Yue, Weisheng; Guo, Zaibing; Li, Liang; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Xianbin; Abutaha, Anas I; Alshareef, H N; Zhang, Yafei; Zhang, X X

    2014-08-07

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been integrated into silicon for use in vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). A unique feature of these devices is that a silicon substrate and a metal contact are used as the source and drain for the vertical transistors, respectively. These CNTFETs show very different characteristics from those fabricated with two metal contacts. Surprisingly, the transfer characteristics of the vertical CNTFETs can be either ambipolar or unipolar (p-type or n-type) depending on the sign of the drain voltage. Furthermore, the p-type/n-type character of the devices is defined by the doping type of the silicon substrate used in the fabrication process. A semiclassical model is used to simulate the performance of these CNTFETs by taking the conductance change of the Si contact under the gate voltage into consideration. The calculation results are consistent with the experimental observations.

  13. A rodlike organogelator: fibrous aggregation of azobenzene derivatives with a syn-chiral carbonate moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamiya, Jun-ichi; Kanie, Kiyoshi; Hiyama, Tamejiro; Ikeda, Tomiki; Kato, Takashi

    2002-09-07

    A chiral azobenzene derivative containing a cyclic syn-carbonate moiety functions as a gelator for various organic solvents; the dipole-dipole interaction drives the fibrous self-assembly of the rodlike gelator.

  14. Filled carbon nanotubes in biomedical imaging and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martincic, Markus; Tobias, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been advocated as promising candidates in the biomedical field in the areas of diagnosis and therapy. In terms of drug delivery, the use of carbon nanotubes can overcome some limitations of 'free' drugs by improving the formulation of poorly water-soluble drugs, allowing targeted delivery and even enabling the co-delivery of two or more drugs for combination therapy. Two different approaches are currently being explored for the delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents by carbon nanotubes, namely attachment of the payload to the external sidewalls or encapsulation into the inner cavities. Although less explored, the latter confers additional stability to the chosen diagnostic or therapeutic agents, and leaves the backbone structure of the nanotubes available for its functionalization with dispersing and targeting moieties. Several drug delivery systems and diagnostic agents have been developed in the last years employing the inner tubular cavities of carbon nanotubes. The research discussed in this review focuses on the use of carbon nanotubes that contain in their interior drug molecules and diagnosis-related compounds. The approaches employed for the development of such nanoscale vehicles along with targeting and releasing strategies are discussed. The encapsulation of both biomedical contrast agents and drugs inside carbon nanotubes is further expanding the possibilities to allow an early diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

  15. Some Observations on Carbon Nanotubes Susceptibility to Cell Phagocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Fraczek-Szczypta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the influence of different types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs on cell phagocytosis. Three kinds of carbon nanotubes: single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, and ultra-long single-walled carbon nanotubes (ULSWCNTs before and after additional chemical functionalization were seeded with macrophage cell culture. Prior to biological testing, the CNTs were subjected to dispersion process with the use of phosphate buffered solution (PBS and PBS containing surfactant (Tween 20 or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO. The results indicate that the cells interaction with an individual nanotube is entirely different as compared to CNTs in the form of aggregate. The presence of the surfactant favors the CNTs dispersion in culture media and facilitates phagocytosis process, while it has disadvantageous influence on cells morphology. The cells phagocytosis is a more effective for MWCNTs and SWCNHs after their chemical functionalization. Moreover, these nanotubes were well dispersed in culture media without using DMSO or surfactant. The functionalized carbon nanotubes were easily dispersed in pure PBS and seeded with cells.

  16. Energy gaps, electronic structures, and x-ray spectroscopies of finite semiconductor single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bin; Jiang, Jun; Wu, ZiYu; Luo, Yi

    2008-02-28

    We report hybrid density functional theory calculations for electronic structures of hydrogen-terminated finite single-walled carbon nanotubes (6,5) and (8,3) up to 100 nm in length. Gap states that are mainly arisen from the hydrogen-terminated edges have been found in (8,3) tubes, but their contributions to the density of states become invisible when the tube is longer than 10 nm. The electronic structures of (6,5) and (8,3) tubes are found to be converged around 20 nm. The calculated band-gap energies of 100 nm long nanotubes are in good agreement with experimental results. The valence band structures of (6,5), (8,3), as well as (5,5) tubes are also investigated by means of ultraviolet photoelectron spectra (UPS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and the resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra theoretically. The UPS, XES and RIXS spectra become converged already at 10 nm. The length-dependent oscillation behavior is found in the RIXS spectra of (5,5) tubes, indicating that the RIXS spectra may be used to determine the size and length of metallic nanotubes. Furthermore, the chiral dependence observed in the simulated RIXS spectra suggests that RIXS spectra could be a useful technique for the determination of chirality of carbon nanotubes.

  17. Multiporous carbon allotropes transformed from symmetry-matched carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxiang Cai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs with homogeneous diameters have been proven to transform into new carbon allotropes under pressure but no studies on the compression of inhomogeneous CNTs have been reported. In this study, we propose to build new carbon allotropes from the bottom-up by applying pressure on symmetry-matched inhomogeneous CNTs. We find that the (3,0 CNT with point group C3v and the (6,0 CNT with point group C6v form an all sp3 hybridized hexagonal 3060-Carbon crystal, but the (4,0 CNT with point group D4h and the (8,0 CNT with point group D8h polymerize into a sp2+sp3 hybridized tetragonal 4080-Carbon structure. Their thermodynamic, mechanical and dynamic stabilities show that they are potential carbon allotropes to be experimentally synthesized. The multiporous structures, excellently mechanical properties and special electronic structures (semiconductive 3060-Carbon and semimetallic 4080-Carbon imply their many potential applications, such as gases purification, hydrogen storage and lightweight semiconductor devices. In addition, we simulate their feature XRD patterns which are helpful for identifying the two carbon crystals in future experimental studies.

  18. Multiporous carbon allotropes transformed from symmetry-matched carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yingxiang, E-mail: yingxiangcai@ncu.edu.cn; Wang, Hao; Xu, Shengliang; Hu, Yujie; Liu, Ning; Xu, Xuechun [Department of Physics, NanChang University, Jiangxi, Nanchang 330031 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with homogeneous diameters have been proven to transform into new carbon allotropes under pressure but no studies on the compression of inhomogeneous CNTs have been reported. In this study, we propose to build new carbon allotropes from the bottom-up by applying pressure on symmetry-matched inhomogeneous CNTs. We find that the (3,0) CNT with point group C{sub 3v} and the (6,0) CNT with point group C{sub 6v} form an all sp{sup 3} hybridized hexagonal 3060-Carbon crystal, but the (4,0) CNT with point group D{sub 4h} and the (8,0) CNT with point group D{sub 8h} polymerize into a sp{sup 2}+sp{sup 3} hybridized tetragonal 4080-Carbon structure. Their thermodynamic, mechanical and dynamic stabilities show that they are potential carbon allotropes to be experimentally synthesized. The multiporous structures, excellently mechanical properties and special electronic structures (semiconductive 3060-Carbon and semimetallic 4080-Carbon) imply their many potential applications, such as gases purification, hydrogen storage and lightweight semiconductor devices. In addition, we simulate their feature XRD patterns which are helpful for identifying the two carbon crystals in future experimental studies.

  19. Schrödinger operators on a periodically broken zigzag carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nanotubes change if they are broken. The aim of this paper is to study spectral properties of Schrödinger operator on a 'broken' carbon nanotube. Carbon nanotubes are graphene sheets with a cylindrical structure and are divided into three classes: zigzag, armchair and chiral. In this paper, we deal with zigzag nanotubes.

  20. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes integrated in microcantilevers for application of tensile strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Søren; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Madsen, D.N.

    2005-01-01

    variations in the response. Using a simple resistor model we estimate the expected conductance-strain response for a multi-walled carbon nanotube, and compare to our results on multi-walled carbon nanotubes as well as measurements by others on single-walled carbon nanotubes. Integration of nanotubes...

  1. Gas Composition Sensing Using Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a lightweight, small sensor for inert gases that consumes a relatively small amount of power and provides measurements that are as accurate as conventional approaches. The sensing approach is based on generating an electrical discharge and measuring the specific gas breakdown voltage associated with each gas present in a sample. An array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a substrate is connected to a variable-pulse voltage source. The CNT tips are spaced appropriately from the second electrode maintained at a constant voltage. A sequence of voltage pulses is applied and a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is estimated for one or more gas components, from an analysis of the current-voltage characteristics. Each estimated pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is compared with known threshold voltages for candidate gas components to estimate whether at least one candidate gas component is present in the gas. The procedure can be repeated at higher pulse voltages to estimate a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage for a second component present in the gas. The CNTs in the gas sensor have a sharp (low radius of curvature) tip; they are preferably multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or carbon nanofibers (CNFs), to generate high-strength electrical fields adjacent to the tips for breakdown of the gas components with lower voltage application and generation of high current. The sensor system can provide a high-sensitivity, low-power-consumption tool that is very specific for identification of one or more gas components. The sensor can be multiplexed to measure current from multiple CNT arrays for simultaneous detection of several gas components.

  2. Scattering of terahertz radiation from oriented carbon nanotube films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichhorn, Finn; Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Schroeder, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Session title: IThC-THz Interactions with Condensed Matter. We report on the use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy to measure scattering from multi-walled carbon nanotubes aligned normal to the film plane. Measurements indicate scattering from the nanotubes is significantly stronger than...

  3. A Computational Experiment on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott; Lonie, David C.; Chen, Jiechen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed and employed in an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Computations were carried out to determine the electronic structure, radial breathing modes, and the influence of the nanotube's diameter on the…

  4. Filled and empty states of carbon nanotubes in water: Dependence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have carried out a series of molecular dynamics simulations of water containing a narrow carbon nanotube as a solute to investigate the filling and emptying of the nanotube and also the modifications of the density and hydrogen bond distributions of water inside and also in the vicinity of the outer surfaces of the ...

  5. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of suspended single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LeRoy, B.J.; Lemay, S.G.; Kong, J.; Dekker, C.

    2004-01-01

    We have performed low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy measurements on single-wall carbon nanotubes that are freely suspended over a trench. The nanotubes were grown by chemical vapor deposition on a Pt substrate with predefined trenches etched into it. Atomic resolution was obtained on the

  6. Submicrosecond-timescale readout of carbon nanotube mechanical motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerwaldt, H.B.; Johnston, S.R.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Steele, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    We report fast readout of the motion of a carbon nanotube mechanical resonator. A close-proximity high electron mobility transistor amplifier is used to increase the bandwidth of the measurement of nanotube displacements from the kHz to the MHz regime. Using an electrical detection scheme with the

  7. Fracture of Carbon Nanotube - Amorphous Carbon Composites: Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for use as reinforcements in next generation structural composite materials because of their extremely high specific stiffness and strength. They cannot, however, be viewed as simple replacements for carbon fibers because there are key differences between these materials in areas such as handling, processing, and matrix design. It is impossible to know for certain that CNT composites will represent a significant advance over carbon fiber composites before these various factors have been optimized, which is an extremely costly and time intensive process. This work attempts to place an upper bound on CNT composite mechanical properties by performing molecular dynamics simulations on idealized model systems with a reactive forcefield that permits modeling of both elastic deformations and fracture. Amorphous carbon (AC) was chosen for the matrix material in this work because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. It is also much stiffer and stronger than typical engineering polymer matrices. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell have been investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. The effect of chemical crosslinking on composite properties is modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC. The balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer is explored by systematically varying the extent of crosslinking. It is, of course, impossible to capture the full range of deformation and fracture processes that occur in real materials with even the largest atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. With this limitation in mind, the simulation results reported here provide a plausible upper limit on

  8. Quantification of Carbon Nanotubes in Different ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been incorporated into numerous consumer products, and have also been employed in various industrial areas because of their extraordinary properties. The large scale production and wide applications of CNTs make their release into the environment a major concern. Therefore, it is crucial to determine the degree of potential CNT contamination in the environment, which requires a sensitive and accurate technique for selectively detecting and quantifying CNTs in environmental matrices. In this study, a simple device based on utilizing heat generated/temperature increase from CNTs under microwave irradiation was built to quantify single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs), multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) and carboxylated CNTs (MWCNT-COOH) in three environmentally relevant matrices (sand, soil and sludge). Linear temperature vs CNT mass relationships were developed for the three environmental matrices spiked with known amounts of different types of CNTs that were then irradiated in a microwave at low energies (70-149 W) for a short time (15-30 s). MWCNTs had a greater microwave response in terms of heat generated/temperature increase than SWCNTs and MWCNT-COOH. An evaluation of microwave behavior of different carbonaceous materials showed that the microwave measurements of CNTs were not affected even with an excess of other organic, inorganic carbon or carbon based nanomaterials (fullerene, granular activated carbon and graphene oxide) mainly because micr

  9. Carbon Nanotube Synthesis Using Coal Pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moothi, Kapil; Simate, Geoffrey S; Falcon, Rosemary; Iyuke, Sunny E; Meyyappan, M

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates carbon nanotube (CNT) production from coal pyrolysis wherein the output gases are used in a chemical vapor deposition reactor. The carbon products are similar to those using commercial coal gas as feedstock, but coal is a relatively cheaper feedstock compared to high purity source gases. A Gibbs minimization model has been developed to predict the volume percentages of product gases from coal pyrolysis. Methane and carbon monoxide were the largest carbon components of the product stream and thus formed the primary source for CNT synthesis. Both the model and the observations showed that increasing the furnace temperature led to a decrease in the absolute quantities of "useful" product gases, with the optimal temperature between 400 and 500 °C. Based on the experimental data, a kinetic rate law for CNT from coal pyrolysis was derived as d[CNT]/dt = K([CO][CH4])(1/2), where K is a function of several equilibrium constants representing various reactions in the CNT formation process.

  10. Flame Synthesis Used to Create Metal-Catalyzed Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWal, Randy L.

    2001-01-01

    Metal-catalyzed carbon nanotubes are highly ordered carbon structures of nanoscale dimensions. They may be thought of as hollow cylinders whose walls are formed by single atomic layers of graphite. Such cylinders may be composed of many nested, concentric atomic layers of carbon or only a single layer, the latter forming a single-walled carbon nanotube. This article reports unique results using a flame for their synthesis. Only recently were carbon nanotubes discovered within an arc discharge and recognized as fullerene derivatives. Today metal-catalyzed carbon nanotubes are of great interest for many reasons. They can be used as supports for the metal catalysts like those found in catalytic converters. Open-ended nanotubes are highly desirable because they can be filled by other elements, metals or gases, for battery and fuel cell applications. Because of their highly crystalline structure, they are significantly stronger than the commercial carbon fibers that are currently available (10 times as strong as steel but possessing one-sixth of the weight). This property makes them highly desirable for strengthening polymer and ceramic composite materials. Current methods of synthesizing carbon nanotubes include thermal pyrolysis of organometallics, laser ablation of metal targets within hydrocarbon atmospheres at high temperatures, and arc discharges. Each of these methods is costly, and it is unclear if they can be scaled for the commercial synthesis of carbon nanotubes. In contrast, flame synthesis is an economical means of bulk synthesis of a variety of aerosol materials such as carbon black. Flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes could potentially realize an economy of scale that would enable their use in common structural materials such as car-body panels. The top figure is a transmission electron micrograph of a multiwalled carbon nanotube. The image shows a cross section of the atomic structure of the nanotube. The dark lines are individual atomic layer planes of

  11. Microtribology of aqueous carbon nanotube dispersions

    KAUST Repository

    Kristiansen, Kai De Lange

    2011-09-23

    The tribological behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in aqueous humic acid (HA) solutions was studied using a surface forces apparatus (SFA) and shows promising lubricant additive properties. Adding CNTs to the solution changes the friction forces between two mica surfaces from "adhesion controlled" to "load controlled" friction. The coefficient of friction with either single-walled (SW) or multi-walled (MW) CNT dispersions is in the range 0.30-0.55 and is independent of the load and sliding velocity. More importantly, lateral sliding promotes a redistribution or accumulation, rather than squeezing out, of nanotubes between the surfaces. This accumulation reduced the adhesion between the surfaces (which generally causes wear/damage of the surfaces), and no wear or damage was observed during continuous shearing experiments that lasted several hours even under high loads (pressures â∼10 MPa). The frictional properties can be understood in terms of the Cobblestone Model where the friction force is related to the fraction of the adhesion energy dissipated during impacts of the nanoparticles. We also develop a simple generic model based on the van der Waals interactions between particles and surfaces to determine the relation between the dimensions of nanoparticles and their tribological properties when used as additives in oil- or water-based lubricants. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Carbon nanotube--poly(3-octylthiophene) composite photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, David L; Czerw, Richard; Harrison, Benjamin

    2006-07-01

    The effects of varying nanotube loading/concentration in carbon nanotube-poly(3-octylthiophene) blends used as thin film photovoltaic cells, have been studied. The network of single walled nanotubes clearly aids in exciton separation and modifies carrier mobility within the active layer as suggested by a bulk heterojunction model. Further, modifications to the metal-polymer interface occur with the addition of nanotubes leading to variations in the observed VOC of the photovoltaic cells. Finally, the "nanocomposite" devices exhibit significant enhancements to external power conversion efficiencies, with the overall efficiency strongly dependent on device design parameters such as the addition of buffer layers.

  13. Locally addressable tunnel barriers within a carbon nanotube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biercuk, M.; Mason, N.; Chow, J.

    2003-01-01

    We report the realization and characterization of independently controllable tunnel barriers within a carbon nanotube. The nanotubes are mechanically bent or kinked using an atomic force microscope, and top gates are subsequently placed near each kink. Transport measurements indicate that the kinks...... form gate-controlled tunnel barriers, and that gates placed away from the kinks have little or no effect on conductance. The overall conductance of the nanotube can be controlled by tuning the transmissions of either the kinks or the metal-nanotube contacts....

  14. Channeling of protons through radial deformed carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borka Jovanović, V.; Borka, D.; Galijaš, S. M. D.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we have presented a theoretical investigation of the channeling of 1 GeV protons with the radial deformed (10, 0) single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). We have calculated channeling potential within the deformed nanotubes. For the first time we presented theoretically obtained spatial and angular distributions of channeled protons with radially deformed SWNT. We used a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation technique. We show that the spatial and angular distributions depend strongly of level of radial deformation of nanotube. These results may be useful for nanotube characterization and production and guiding of nanosized ion beams.

  15. Production and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanotube-Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram; Holmes, William; Gorelik, Olga; Files, Brad; Scott, Carl; Santos, Beatrice; Mayeaux, Brian; Victor, Joe

    1999-01-01

    The Nobel Prize winning discovery of the Buckuball (C60) in 1985 at Rice University by a group including Dr. Richard Smalley led to the whole new class of carbon allotropes including fullerenes and nanotubes. Especially interesting from many viewpoints are single-walled carbon nanotubes, which structurally are like a single graphitic sheet wrapped around a cylinder and capped at the ends. This cylinders have diameter as small as 0.5 - 2 nm (1/100,000th the diameter of a human hair) and are as long as 0.1 - 1 mm. Nanotubes are really individual molecules and believed to be defect-free, leading to high tensile strength despite their low density. Additionally, these fibers exhibit electrical conductivity as high as copper, thermal conductivity as high as diamond, strength 100 times higher than steel at one-sixth the weight, and high strain to failure. Thus it is believed that developments in the field of nanotechnology will lead to stronger and lighter composite materials for next generation spacecraft. Lack of a bulk method of production is the primary reason nanotubes are not used widely today. Toward this goal JSC nanotube team is exploring three distinct production techniques: laser ablation, arc discharge and chemical vapor deposition (CVD, in collaboration with Rice University). In laser ablation technique high-power laser impinges on the piece of carbon containing small amount of catalyst, and nanotubes self-assemble from the resulting carbon vapor. In arc generator similar vapor is created in arc discharge between carbon electrodes with catalyst. In CVD method nanotubes grow at much lower temperature on small catalyst particles from carbon-containing feedstock gas (methane or carbon monoxide). As of now, laser ablation produces cleanest material, but mass yield is rather small. Arc discharge produces grams of material, but purity is low. CVD technique is still in baby steps, but preliminary results look promising, as well as perspective of scaling the process

  16. Fluorescence labeling of carbon nanotubes and visualization of a nanotube-protein hybrid under fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shige H; Khan, Shahbaz; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2011-04-11

    Biological applications of carbon nanotubes have been hampered by the inability to visualize them using conventional optical microscope, which is the most common tool for the observation and measurement of biological processes. Recently, a number of fluorescence labeling methods for biomolecules and various fluorescence probes have been developed and widely utilized in biological fields. Therefore, labeling carbon nanotubes with such fluorophores under physiological conditions will be highly useful in their biological applications. In this Article, we present a method to fluorescently label nanotubes by combining a detergent and a fluorophore commonly used in biological experiments. Fluorophores carrying an amino group (Texas Red hydrazide or BODIPY FL-hydrazide) were covalently attached to the hydroxyl groups of Tween 20 using carbonyldiimidazole. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that nanotubes were efficiently solubilized and labeled by this fluorescently labeled detergent. By using this technique, we also demonstrated multicolor fluorescence imaging of a nanotube-protein hybrid.

  17. Fluorescent single walled carbon nanotube/silica composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satishkumar, B C; Doorn, Stephen K; Baker, Gary A; Dattelbaum, Andrew M

    2008-11-25

    We present a new approach for the preparation of single walled carbon nanotube silica composite materials that retain the intrinsic fluorescence characteristics of the encapsulated nanotubes. Incorporation of isolated nanotubes into optically transparent matrices, such as sol-gel prepared silica, to take advantage of their near-infrared emission properties for applications like sensing has been a challenging task. In general, the alcohol solvents and acidic conditions required for typical sol-gel preparations disrupt the nanotube/surfactant assembly and cause the isolated nanotubes to aggregate leading to degradation of their fluorescence properties. To overcome these issues, we have used a sugar alcohol modified silica precursor molecule, diglycerylsilane, for encapsulation of nanotubes in silica under aqueous conditions and at neutral pH. The silica/nanotube composite materials have been prepared as monoliths, at least 5 mm thick, or as films (characteristics of the silica encapsulated carbon nanotubes by means of redox doping studies as well as demonstrated their potential for biosensing applications. Such nanotube/silica composite systems may allow for new sensing and imaging applications that are not currently achievable.

  18. Carbon nanotubes grown on bulk materials and methods for fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchhofer, Paul A [Clinton, TN; Montgomery, Frederick C [Oak Ridge, TN; Baker, Frederick S [Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-11-08

    Disclosed are structures formed as bulk support media having carbon nanotubes formed therewith. The bulk support media may comprise fibers or particles and the fibers or particles may be formed from such materials as quartz, carbon, or activated carbon. Metal catalyst species are formed adjacent the surfaces of the bulk support material, and carbon nanotubes are grown adjacent the surfaces of the metal catalyst species. Methods employ metal salt solutions that may comprise iron salts such as iron chloride, aluminum salts such as aluminum chloride, or nickel salts such as nickel chloride. Carbon nanotubes may be separated from the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species by using concentrated acids to oxidize the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species.

  19. Application of carbon nanotubes flexible strain sensor in smart textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong CHENG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Smart textiles have not only the necessary functions of daily wear, but also the intelligence. The focus of the current textile materials research is the selection of flexible material. For flexible materials, carbon material is one of the ideal materials for preparing flexible strain gauges. The application of flexible strain sensor prepared by carbon nanotubes as a flexible material in smart textiles is the research content. The research status of carbon nanotubes flexible strain sensor is introduced from the aspects of the structure, properties and application. The characteristics and functions of flexible strain gages prepared with carbon nanotube fibers and carbon nanotube films as flexible materials are discussed in terms of selection, preparation method, performance test and application. At the same time, the advantages and disadvantages of the flexible strain sensor of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from the aspects of preparation difficulty, production cost and practical application effect. High sensitivity with high strain will be a key research direction for carbon nanotube flexible strain sensors.

  20. Biochemical Sensors Using Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Method and system for detecting presence of biomolecules in a selected subset, or in each of several selected subsets, in a fluid. Each of an array of two or more carbon nanotubes ("CNTs") is connected at a first CNT end to one or more electronics devices, each of which senses a selected electrochemical signal that is generated when a target biomolecule in the selected subset becomes attached to a functionalized second end of the CNT, which is covalently bonded with a probe molecule. This approach indicates when target biomolecules in the selected subset are present and indicates presence or absence of target biomolecules in two or more selected subsets. Alternatively, presence of absence of an analyte can be detected.

  1. Carbon Nanotube-Based Chemiresistive Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixian Tang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of simple and low-cost chemical sensors is critically important for improving human life. Many types of chemical sensors have been developed. Among them, the chemiresistive sensors receive particular attention because of their simple structure, the ease of high precise measurement and the low cost. This review mainly focuses on carbon nanotube (CNT-based chemiresistive sensors. We first describe the properties of CNTs and the structure of CNT chemiresistive sensors. Next, the sensing mechanism and the performance parameters of the sensors are discussed. Then, we detail the status of the CNT chemiresistive sensors for detection of different analytes. Lastly, we put forward the remaining challenges for CNT chemiresistive sensors and outlook the possible opportunity for CNT chemiresistive sensors in the future.

  2. Carbon nanotubes dispersed in liquid crystal elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Ji, Yan

    Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs), as the name indicates, unite the anisotropic order of liquid crystals and rubber elasticity of elastomers into polymer networks. One of the most notable features of LCEs is that properly aligned LCEs exhibit dramatic and reversible shape deformation (e.g. elongation-contraction) in response to various stimuli. In recent years, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were introduced into LCEs. Besides enabling remote and spatial control of the actuation via light and electronic field, CNTs are also utilized to align mesogens as well as to improve the mechanical and electronic property of the composites. Some potential applications of CNT-LCE nanocomposites have been demonstrated. This chapter describes the preparation of CNT dispersed LCEs, new physical properties resulted from CNTs, their actuation and their proposed applications.

  3. Fabrication of Microscale Carbon Nanotube Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gengzhi Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have excellent mechanical, chemical, and electronic properties, but realizing these excellences in practical applications needs to assemble individual CNTs into larger-scale products. Recently, CNT fibers demonstrate the potential of retaining CNT's superior properties at macroscale level. High-performance CNT fibers have been widely obtained by several fabrication approaches. Here in this paper, we review several key spinning techniques including surfactant-based coagulation spinning, liquid-crystal-based solution spinning, spinning from vertical-aligned CNT arrays, and spinning from CNT aerogel. The method, principle, limitations, and recent progress of each technique have been addressed, and the fiber properties and their dependences on spinning parameters are also discussed.

  4. Carbon Nanotube-Based Chemiresistive Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ruixian; Shi, Yongji; Hou, Zhongyu; Wei, Liangming

    2017-04-18

    The development of simple and low-cost chemical sensors is critically important for improving human life. Many types of chemical sensors have been developed. Among them, the chemiresistive sensors receive particular attention because of their simple structure, the ease of high precise measurement and the low cost. This review mainly focuses on carbon nanotube (CNT)-based chemiresistive sensors. We first describe the properties of CNTs and the structure of CNT chemiresistive sensors. Next, the sensing mechanism and the performance parameters of the sensors are discussed. Then, we detail the status of the CNT chemiresistive sensors for detection of different analytes. Lastly, we put forward the remaining challenges for CNT chemiresistive sensors and outlook the possible opportunity for CNT chemiresistive sensors in the future.

  5. Sorption of indium (III) onto carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguacil, F J; Lopez, F A; Rodriguez, O; Martinez-Ramirez, S; Garcia-Diaz, I

    2016-08-01

    Indium has numerous applications in different industrial sectors and is not an abundant element. Therefore appropriate technology to recover this element from various process wastes is needed. This research reports high adsorption capacity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for In(III). The effects of pH, kinetics, isotherms and adsorption mechanism of MWCNT on In(III) adsorption were investigated and discussed in detail. The pH increases improves the adsorption capacity for In(III). The Langmuir adsorption model is the best fit with the experimental data. For the kinetic study, the adsorption onto MWCNT could be fitted to pseudo second-order. The adsorption of indium(III) can be described to a mechanism which consists of a film diffusion controlled process. Metal desorption can be achieved with acidic solutions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Molecular dynamics study on resonance frequency change due to axial-strain-induced torsions of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jeong Won, E-mail: jwkang@cjnu.ac.k [Department of Computer Engineering, Chungju National University, Chungju 380-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki-Sub, E-mail: kks1114@cjnu.ac.k [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chungju National University, Chungju 380-702 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Ki Ryang [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ho Jung, E-mail: hjhwang@cau.ac.k [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-21

    We investigated, via the classical MD simulation method based on Tersoff-Brenner potential, the fundamental resonance frequency changes of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) resonators originated from the purely mechanical coupling of the axial-strain-induced torsion (ASIT) response. The fundamental frequency changes were also negligible where the ASIT responses were negligible in achiral SWCNTs whereas those were explicitly found under both compression and tension for the chiral SWCNTs with the obvious ASIT responses. Specially, for SWCNT with the chiral angle of {pi}/12, where the highest ASIT response can be found, the fundamental resonance frequency changes were highest. The fundamental resonance frequencies under the tensioning increased almost linearly with increasing the axial strain whereas they rapidly decreased under compression with increasing the compressive strain. - Research highlights: Frequency changes of nanotube resonators due to the axial-strain-induced torsion. Resonant frequency changes were highest for nanotube with the chiral angle of {pi}/12. Resonant frequencies under tensioning increase linearly with increasing the strain. Resonant frequencies rapidly decrease with increasing the compression.

  7. Carbon nanotubes for interconnects process, design and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dijon, Jean; Maffucci, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference on the use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as interconnect material for horizontal, on-chip and 3D interconnects. The authors demonstrate the uses of bundles of CNTs, as innovative conducting material to fabricate interconnect through-silicon vias (TSVs), in order to improve the performance, reliability and integration of 3D integrated circuits (ICs). This book will be first to provide a coherent overview of exploiting carbon nanotubes for 3D interconnects covering aspects from processing, modeling, simulation, characterization and applications. Coverage also includes a thorough presentation of the application of CNTs as horizontal on-chip interconnects which can potentially revolutionize the nanoelectronics industry. This book is a must-read for anyone interested in the state-of-the-art on exploiting carbon nanotubes for interconnects for both 2D and 3D integrated circuits. Provides a single-source reference on carbon nanotubes for interconnect applications; Includes c...

  8. Carbon nanotubes: properties, synthesis, purification, and medical applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eatemadi, Ali; Daraee, Hadis; Karimkhanloo, Hamzeh; Kouhi, Mohammad; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Abasi, Mozhgan; Hanifehpour, Younes; Joo, Sang Woo

    2014-01-01

    .... Parameters such as structure, surface area, surface charge, size distribution, surface chemistry, and agglomeration state as well as purity of the samples have considerable impact on the reactivity of carbon nanotube...

  9. A novel multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT)-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    walled carbon nanotube (MWNT)-based nanocomposite for PEFC electrodes ... A novel nanocomposite comprising MWNTs and mixed-conducting polymeric components (electronic and ionic) is prepared, characterized and investigated as a ...

  10. Atom Collision-Induced Resistivity of Carbon Nanotubes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hugo E. Romero; Kim Bolton; Arne Rosén; Peter C. Eklund

    2005-01-01

    We report the observation of unusually strong and systematic changes in the electron transport in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes that are undergoing collisions with inert gas atoms or small molecules...

  11. Controlling electrical percolation in multicomponent carbon nanotube dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kyrylyuk, A.V.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269067590; Hermant, M. -C; Schilling, T.; Klumperman, B.; van der Schoot, P. P. A. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/102140618

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube reinforced polymeric composites can have favourable electrical properties, which make them useful for applications such as flat-panel displays and photovoltaic devices. However, using aqueous dispersions to fabricate composites with specific physical properties requires that the

  12. Polymerization Initiated at the Sidewalls of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M.; Hudson, Jared L.

    2011-01-01

    A process has been developed for growing polymer chains via anionic, cationic, or radical polymerization from the side walls of functionalized carbon nanotubes, which will facilitate greater dispersion in polymer matrices, and will greatly enhance reinforcement ability in polymeric material.

  13. Conformal Carbon Nanotubes for Stray Light Suppression Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our objective is to apply CVD and non-CVD carbon nanotubes to complex shapes that numerous scientists have requested for stray light control.  Currently, CVD...

  14. The Application of Carbon Nanotubes in Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raniszewski, Grzegorz; Miaskowski, Arkadiusz; Wiak, Slawomir

    2015-01-01

      The aim of this paper is to present the results of the investigation into the applications of carbon nanotubes with ferromagnetic nanoparticles as nanoheaters for targeted thermal ablation of cancer cells...

  15. High-performance carbon nanotube-reinforced bioplastic

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramontja, J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The inherent properties of poly(lactide), a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer, are concurrently improved by the incorporation of a small amount of surface functionalized carbon nanotubes. A new method has been used to functionalize the CNTs...

  16. High-Conductance Thermal Interfaces Based on Carbon Nanotubes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a novel thermal interface material (TIM) that is based on an array of vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for high heat flux applications. For...

  17. Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cummings, FR

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Owing entirely to their structure, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess some of the most remarkable chemical and physical properties. More specifically, they exhibit exceptional strength and toughness, chemical inertness, magnetism, and electrical...

  18. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Deposition on Model Environmental Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on model environmental surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Deposition behaviors of MWNTs on positively and negatively charged surfaces were in good agreement with Der...

  19. International Assessment of Carbon Nanotube Manufacturing and Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eklund, Peter; Ajayan, Pulickel; Blackmon, Robert; Hart, A. J; Kong, Jing; Pradhan, Bhabendra; Rao, Apparao; Rinzler, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    This WTEC study focuses on the manufacturing and applications of carbon nanotubes "CNTs" to identify recent progress in understanding the commercial potential of CNTs as viewed by academic, industrial...

  20. Carbon nanotube-based separation columns for microchip electrochromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, K. B.; Delacourt, B.; Kutter, Jörg P.

    2015-01-01

    the fabrication and operation protocols for devices with microfabricated carbon nanotube stationary phases for reversephase chromatography. In this protocol, the lithographically defined stationary phase is fabricated in the channel before bonding of a lid, thereby circumventing the difficult packaging procedures...