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Sample records for chinchilla auditory-nerve responses

  1. Suppression Measured from Chinchilla Auditory-Nerve-Fiber Responses Following Noise-Induced Hearing Loss: Adaptive-Tracking and Systems-Identification Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayles, Mark; Walls, Michael K; Heinz, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    The compressive nonlinearity of cochlear signal transduction, reflecting outer-hair-cell function, manifests as suppressive spectral interactions; e.g., two-tone suppression. Moreover, for broadband sounds, there are multiple interactions between frequency components. These frequency-dependent nonlinearities are important for neural coding of complex sounds, such as speech. Acoustic-trauma-induced outer-hair-cell damage is associated with loss of nonlinearity, which auditory prostheses attempt to restore with, e.g., "multi-channel dynamic compression" algorithms.Neurophysiological data on suppression in hearing-impaired (HI) mammals are limited. We present data on firing-rate suppression measured in auditory-nerve-fiber responses in a chinchilla model of noise-induced hearing loss, and in normal-hearing (NH) controls at equal sensation level. Hearing-impaired (HI) animals had elevated single-fiber excitatory thresholds (by ~ 20-40 dB), broadened frequency tuning, and reduced-magnitude distortion-product otoacoustic emissions; consistent with mixed inner- and outer-hair-cell pathology. We characterized suppression using two approaches: adaptive tracking of two-tone-suppression threshold (62 NH, and 35 HI fibers), and Wiener-kernel analyses of responses to broadband noise (91 NH, and 148 HI fibers). Suppression-threshold tuning curves showed sensitive low-side suppression for NH and HI animals. High-side suppression thresholds were elevated in HI animals, to the same extent as excitatory thresholds. We factored second-order Wiener-kernels into excitatory and suppressive sub-kernels to quantify the relative strength of suppression. We found a small decrease in suppression in HI fibers, which correlated with broadened tuning. These data will help guide novel amplification strategies, particularly for complex listening situations (e.g., speech in noise), in which current hearing aids struggle to restore intelligibility. PMID:27080669

  2. Effects on auditory-nerve fibers of opening the otic capsule at the apex of the chinchilla cochlea

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    Recio-Spinoso, Alberto; Temchin, Andrei N.; Ruggero, Mario A.

    2015-12-01

    Vibration responses to clicks measured at the apex of chinchilla cochleae with open otic capsules have onsets much shorter than those of responses of auditory-nerve fibers (ANFs) corrected for synaptic and neural delays. Apical vibration responses to tones in open cochleae also differ in other respects from the responses to tones of ANFs with low characteristic frequency (CF) in normal chinchilla cochleae. To further specify the origin(s) of these differences, we recorded from chinchilla ANFs after delicately opening a small hole in the otic capsule overlying scala vestibuli in the cochlear apex. In those cochleae, the earliest ANF responses to clicks are often evoked by condensation (rather than rarefaction) clicks and responses to tones often exhibit level-dependent phase changes different from those in normal cochleae. These findings are largely consistent with, and seem to account for, apical vibration responses of cochleae with open otic capsules. An unexpected finding is that the tuning curves of ANFs with moderately high CF and normal CF thresholds often had hypersensitive tails.

  3. Modeling auditory-nerve responses to electrical stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Suyash Narendra; Dau, Torsten; Epp, Bastian

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) directly stimulate the auditory nerve (AN), bypassing the mechano-electricaltransduction in the inner ear. Trains of biphasic, charge-balanced pulses (anodic and cathodic) areused as stimuli to avoid damage of the tissue. The pulses of either polarity are capable of producing...... andcathodic stimulation of the AN of cat [4]. The models' responses to the electrical pulses of variousshapes [5] were also analyzed. It was found that, while the models can account for the ring rates inresponse to various biphasic pulse shapes, they fail to correctly describe the timing of AP in response to...... monophasic pulses. Strategies for improving the model performance with respect to correct AP timing are discussed. Eventually, a model that is able to account for correct spike timing in electrichearing will be useful for objective evaluation and improvement of CI stimulation strategies....

  4. Electrically evoked auditory nerve responses in the cochlea with normal outer hair cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Tianying; Guo, Menghe; He, Wenxuan; Miller, Josef M.; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2009-01-01

    As hybrid cochlear implant devices are increasingly used for restoring hearing in patients with residual hearing it is important to understand electrically evoked responses in cochleae having functional hair cells. To test the hypothesis that extracochlear electrical stimulation (EES) from sinusoidal current can provoke an auditory nerve response with normal frequency selectivity, the EES-evoked compound action potential (ECAP) was investigated in this study. Brief sinusoidal electrical curre...

  5. An auditory-periphery model of the effects of acoustic trauma on auditory nerve responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Ian C.; Sachs, Murray B.; Young, Eric D.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic trauma degrades the auditory nerve's tonotopic representation of acoustic stimuli. Recent physiological studies have quantified the degradation in responses to the vowel eh and have investigated amplification schemes designed to restore a more correct tonotopic representation than is achieved with conventional hearing aids. However, it is difficult from the data to quantify how much different aspects of the cochlear pathology contribute to the impaired responses. Furthermore, extensive experimental testing of potential hearing aids is infeasible. Here, both of these concerns are addressed by developing models of the normal and impaired auditory peripheries that are tested against a wide range of physiological data. The effects of both outer and inner hair cell status on model predictions of the vowel data were investigated. The modeling results indicate that impairment of both outer and inner hair cells contribute to degradation in the tonotopic representation of the formant frequencies in the auditory nerve. Additionally, the model is able to predict the effects of frequency-shaping amplification on auditory nerve responses, indicating the model's potential suitability for more rapid development and testing of hearing aid schemes.

  6. Modeling the Anti-masking Effects of the Olivocochlear Reflex in Auditory Nerve Responses to Tones in Sustained Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Chintanpalli, Ananthakrishna; Jennings, Skyler G.; Heinz, Michael G.; Strickland, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) has been hypothesized to provide benefit for listening in noise. Strong physiological support for an anti-masking role for the MOCR has come from the observation that auditory nerve (AN) fibers exhibit reduced firing to sustained noise and increased sensitivity to tones when the MOCR is elicited. The present study extended a well-established computational model for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired AN responses to demonstrate that these anti-masking ef...

  7. Directionality of auditory nerve fiber responses to pure tone stimuli in the grassfrog, Rana temporaria. I. Spike rate responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M B; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J

    1997-01-01

    We studied the directionality of spike rate responses of auditory nerve fibers of the grassfrog, Rana temporaria, to pure tone stimuli. All auditory fibers showed spike rate directionality. The strongest directionality was seen at low frequencies (200-400 Hz), where the spike rate could change by...

  8. Spectral and temporal response patterns of single units in the chinchilla dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbach, J A; Saunders, J C

    1987-05-01

    Spectral and temporal response patterns to pure-tone stimuli were collected from single units in the dorsal cochlear nucleus of anesthetized chinchillas. The spectral response profiles were divisible into groups based on the balance of excitation and inhibition. Temporal responses were characterized in chloralose-anesthetized animals by collecting PST-histograms. There appeared to be no simple one-to-one relationship between a unit's spectral and its temporal response pattern. Excitatory spectral responses were generally sharply tuned areas resembling those of auditory nerve fibers. However, unlike the latter, the majority of these had chopper or pauser/buildup temporal responses. Inhibitory spectral responses were of two distinct types: one included lateral inhibitory areas flanking the tuned excitatory areas which occasionally invaded the latter creating a nonmonotonic excitatory response at the unit's characteristic frequency. The other included sharply tuned inhibitory areas. The characteristic frequencies of these units were found to be in close correspondence with those of sharply tuned excitatory units from the same penetration suggesting that these inhibitory units were tonotopically mapped in the same register as tuned excitatory units. The spectral response patterns were studied with three types of anesthesia: ketamine/xylazine, dial/urethane, and chloralose. In each of these groups the patterns were similar. However, the proportions of units showing inhibition was strongly dependent on the choice of anesthetic agent with chloralose yielding the highest proportions (59%) and ketamine/xylazine yielding the lowest (29%). PMID:3569464

  9. Effects of I(h) and I(KLT) on the response of the auditory nerve to electrical stimulation in a stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negm, Mohamed H; Bruce, Ian C

    2008-01-01

    An accurate model of auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) would help in improving cochlear implant (CI) functionality. Previous studies have shown that the original Hodgkin-Huxley (1952) model (with kinetics adjusted for mammalian body temperature) may be better at describing nodes of Ranvier in ANFs than models for other mammalian axon types. However, the HH model is still unable to explain a number of phenomena observed in auditory nerve responses to CI stimulation such as long-term accommodation, adaptation and the time-course of relative refractoriness. Recent physiological investigations of spiral ganglion cells have shown the presence of a number of ion channel types not considered in the previous modeling studies, including low-threshold potassium (I(KLT)) channels and hyperpolarization-activated cation (I(h)) channels. In this paper we investigate inclusion of these ion channel types in a stochastic HH model. For single biphasic charge-balanced pulse, an increase in spike threshold was typically produced by inclusion of one or both of these channel types. The addition of I(KLT) increases random threshold fluctuations in the stochastic model, particularly for longer pulse widths. Pulse-train responses were investigated for pulse rates of 200, 800, and 2000 pulse/s. Initial results suggests that both the I(KLT) channels and I(h) channels can produce adaptation in the spike rate. However, the adaptation due to I(KLT) is restricted to higher stimulation rates, whereas the adaptation due to I(h) is observed across all stimulation rates. PMID:19163972

  10. Auditory-nerve responses to varied inter-phase gap and phase duration of the electric pulse stimulus as predictors for neuronal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramekers, Dyan; Versnel, Huib; Strahl, Stefan B; Smeets, Emma M; Klis, Sjaak F L; Grolman, Wilko

    2014-04-01

    After severe hair cell loss, secondary degeneration of spiral ganglion cells (SGCs) is observed-a gradual process that spans years in humans but only takes weeks in guinea pigs. Being the target for cochlear implants (CIs), the physiological state of the SGCs is important for the effectiveness of a CI. For assessment of the nerve's state, focus has generally been on its response threshold. Our goal was to add a more detailed characterization of SGC functionality. To this end, the electrically evoked compound action potential (eCAP) was recorded in normal-hearing guinea pigs and guinea pigs that were deafened 2 or 6 weeks prior to the experiments. We evaluated changes in eCAP characteristics when the phase duration (PD) and inter-phase gap (IPG) of a biphasic current pulse were varied. We correlated the magnitude of these changes to quantified histological measures of neurodegeneration (SGC packing density and SGC size). The maximum eCAP amplitude, derived from the input-output function, decreased after deafening, and increased with both PD and IPG. The eCAP threshold did not change after deafening, and decreased with increasing PD and IPG. The dynamic range was wider for the 6-weeks-deaf animals than for the other two groups. Excitability increased with IPG (steeper slope of the input-output function and lower stimulation level at the half-maximum eCAP amplitude), but to a lesser extent for the deafened animals than for normal-hearing controls. The latency was shorter for the 6-weeks-deaf animals than for the other two groups. For several of these eCAP characteristics, the effect size of IPG correlated well with histological measures of degeneration, whereas effect size of PD did not. These correlations depend on the use of high current levels, which could limit clinical application. Nevertheless, their potential of these correlations towards assessment of the condition of the auditory nerve may be of great benefit to clinical diagnostics and prognosis in cochlear

  11. Enhancement and distortion in the temporal representation of sounds in the ventral cochlear nucleus of chinchillas and cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Recio-Spinoso

    Full Text Available A subset of neurons in the cochlear nucleus (CN of the auditory brainstem has the ability to enhance the auditory nerve's temporal representation of stimulating sounds. These neurons reside in the ventral region of the CN (VCN and are usually known as highly synchronized, or high-sync, neurons. Most published reports about the existence and properties of high-sync neurons are based on recordings performed on a VCN output tract--not the VCN itself--of cats. In other species, comprehensive studies detailing the properties of high-sync neurons, or even acknowledging their existence, are missing.Examination of the responses of a population of VCN neurons in chinchillas revealed that a subset of those neurons have temporal properties similar to high-sync neurons in the cat. Phase locking and entrainment--the ability of a neuron to fire action potentials at a certain stimulus phase and at almost every stimulus period, respectively--have similar maximum values in cats and chinchillas. Ranges of characteristic frequencies for high-sync neurons in chinchillas and cats extend up to 600 and 1000 Hz, respectively. Enhancement of temporal processing relative to auditory nerve fibers (ANFs, which has been shown previously in cats using tonal and white-noise stimuli, is also demonstrated here in the responses of VCN neurons to synthetic and spoken vowel sounds.Along with the large amount of phase locking displayed by some VCN neurons there occurs a deterioration in the spectral representation of the stimuli (tones or vowels. High-sync neurons exhibit a greater distortion in their responses to tones or vowels than do other types of VCN neurons and auditory nerve fibers.Standard deviations of first-spike latency measured in responses of high-sync neurons are lower than similar values measured in ANFs' responses. This might indicate a role of high-sync neurons in other tasks beyond sound localization.

  12. Noise-induced hearing loss increases the temporal precision of complex envelope coding by auditory-nerve fibers

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    Michael Gregory Heinz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available While changes in cochlear frequency tuning are thought to play an important role in the perceptual difficulties of people with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL, the possible role of temporal processing deficits remains less clear. Our knowledge of temporal envelope coding in the impaired cochlea is limited to two studies that examined auditory-nerve fiber responses to narrowband amplitude modulated stimuli. In the present study, we used Wiener-kernel analyses of auditory-nerve fiber responses to broadband Gaussian noise in anesthetized chinchillas to quantify changes in temporal envelope coding with noise-induced SNHL. Temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs and temporal windows of sensitivity to acoustic stimulation were computed from 2nd-order Wiener kernels and analyzed to estimate the temporal precision, amplitude, and latency of envelope coding. Noise overexposure was associated with slower (less negative TMTF roll-off with increasing modulation frequency and reduced temporal window duration. The results show that at equal stimulus sensation level, SNHL increases the temporal precision of envelope coding by 20-30%. Furthermore, SNHL increased the amplitude of envelope coding by 50% in fibers with CFs from 1-2 kHz and decreased mean response latency by 0.4 ms. While a previous study of envelope coding demonstrated a similar increase in response amplitude, the present study is the first to show enhanced temporal precision. This new finding may relate to the use of a more complex stimulus with broad frequency bandwidth and a dynamic temporal envelope. Exaggerated neural coding of fast envelope modulations may contribute to perceptual difficulties in people with SNHL by acting as a distraction from more relevant acoustic cues, especially in fluctuating background noise. Finally, the results underscore the value of studying sensory systems with more natural, real-world stimuli.

  13. Tone and call responses of units in the auditory nerve and dorsal medullary nucleus of Xenopus laevis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elliott, Taffeta M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Kelley, Darcy B.

    2007-01-01

    The clawed frog Xenopus laevis produces vocalizations consisting of distinct patterns of clicks. This study provides the first description of spontaneous, pure-tone and communication-signal evoked discharge properties of auditory nerve (n.VIII) fibers and dorsal medullary nucleus (DMN) cells in an...... those in partially terrestrial anurans. Broad tuning exists across characteristic frequencies (CFs). Threshold minima are -101 dB re 1 mm/s at 675 Hz; -87 dB at 1,600 Hz; and -61 dB at 3,000 Hz (-90, -77, and -44 dB re 1 Pa, respectively), paralleling the peak frequency of vocalizations at 1.2-1.6 k...

  14. Stronger efferent suppression of cochlear neural potentials by contralateral acoustic stimulation in awake than in anesthetized chinchilla

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    Cristian eAedo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There are two types of sensory cells in the mammalian cochlea, inner hair cells, which make synaptic contact with auditory-nerve afferent fibers, and outer hair cells that are innervated by crossed and uncrossed medial olivocochlear (MOC efferent fibers. Contralateral acoustic stimulation activates the uncrossed efferent MOC fibers reducing cochlear neural responses, thus modifying the input to the central auditory system. The chinchilla, among all studied mammals, displays the lowest percentage of uncrossed MOC fibers raising questions about the strength and frequency distribution of the contralateral-sound effect in this species. On the other hand, MOC effects on cochlear sensitivity have been mainly studied in anesthetized animals and since the MOC-neuron activity depends on the level of anesthesia, it is important to assess the influence of anesthesia in the strength of efferent effects. Seven adult chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger were chronically implanted with round-window electrodes in both cochleae. We compared the effect of contralateral sound in awake and anesthetized condition. Compound action potentials (CAP and cochlear microphonics (CM were measured in the ipsilateral cochlea in response to tones in absence and presence of contralateral sound. Control measurements performed after middle-ear muscles section in one animal discarded any possible middle-ear reflex activation. Contralateral sound produced CAP amplitude reductions in all chinchillas, with suppression effects greater by about 1-3 dB in awake than in anesthetized animals. In contrast, CM amplitude increases of up to 1.9 dB were found in only three awake chinchillas. In both conditions the strongest efferent effects were produced by contralateral tones at frequencies equal or close to those of ipsilateral tones. Contralateral CAP suppressions for 1-6 kHz ipsilateral tones corresponded to a span of uncrossed MOC fiber innervation reaching at least the central third of the

  15. The auditory nerve overlapped waveform (ANOW): A new objective measure of low-frequency hearing

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    Lichtenhan, Jeffery T.; Salt, Alec N.; Guinan, John J.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most pressing problems today in the mechanics of hearing is to understand the mechanical motions in the apical half of the cochlea. Almost all available measurements from the cochlear apex of basilar membrane or other organ-of-Corti transverse motion have been made from ears where the health, or sensitivity, in the apical half of the cochlea was not known. A key step in understanding the mechanics of the cochlear base was to trust mechanical measurements only when objective measures from auditory-nerve compound action potentials (CAPs) showed good preparation sensitivity. However, such traditional objective measures are not adequate monitors of cochlear health in the very low-frequency regions of the apex that are accessible for mechanical measurements. To address this problem, we developed the Auditory Nerve Overlapped Waveform (ANOW) that originates from auditory nerve output in the apex. When responses from the round window to alternating low-frequency tones are averaged, the cochlear microphonic is canceled and phase-locked neural firing interleaves in time (i.e., overlaps). The result is a waveform that oscillates at twice the probe frequency. We have demonstrated that this Auditory Nerve Overlapped Waveform - called ANOW - originates from auditory nerve fibers in the cochlear apex [8], relates well to single-auditory-nerve-fiber thresholds, and can provide an objective estimate of low-frequency sensitivity [7]. Our new experiments demonstrate that ANOW is a highly sensitive indicator of apical cochlear function. During four different manipulations to the scala media along the cochlear spiral, ANOW amplitude changed when either no, or only small, changes occurred in CAP thresholds. Overall, our results demonstrate that ANOW can be used to monitor cochlear sensitivity of low-frequency regions during experiments that make apical basilar membrane motion measurements.

  16. Aflatoxicosis en chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera)

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Cepeda A; Hansen Murcia G; Gonzalo Diaz G

    2011-01-01

    Objetivo. Determinar los efectos de las aflatoxinas (AF) en chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera) por consumo de dietas contaminadas a diferentes concentraciones. Materiales y métodos. Un total de 20 chinchillas macho se distribuyeron en 5 grupos experimentales de 4 animales cada uno, los cuales recibieron diferentes niveles de aflatoxinas totales en el alimento durante 8 semanas: 0, 25, 50, 100 y 200 ppb. Semanalmente se determinó el consumo de alimento, el peso corporal individual y la mortalid...

  17. Cortical perfusion response to an electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve in profoundly deaf patients: Study with technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime single photon emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Scao, Y.; Robier, A.; Beuter, P. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 37 - Tours (France). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology); Baulieu, J.L.; Pourcelot, L. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 37 - Tours (France). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1992-04-01

    Brain activation procedures associated with single photon emission tomography (SPET) have recently been developed in healthy controls and diseased patients in order to help in their diagnosis and treatment. We investigated the effects of a promontory test (PT) on the cerebral distribution of technetium-99m hexamethyl-propylene amine oxime ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO) in 7 profoundly deaf patients, 6 PT+ and PT-. The count variation in the temporal lobe was calculated on 6 coronal slices using the ratio (R{sub stimulation}-R{sub deprivation})/R{sub deprivation} where R=counts in the temporal lobe was observed in all patients and was higher in all patients with PT+ than in the patient with PT-. The problems of head positioning and resolution of the system were taken into account, and we considered that the maximal count increment was related to the auditory cortex response to the stimulus. Further clinical investigations with high-resolution systems have to be performed in order to validate this presurgery test in cochlear implant assessment. (orig.).

  18. Cortical perfusion response to an electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve in profoundly deaf patients: Study with technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime single photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain activation procedures associated with single photon emission tomography (SPET) have recently been developed in healthy controls and diseased patients in order to help in their diagnosis and treatment. We investigated the effects of a promontory test (PT) on the cerebral distribution of technetium-99m hexamethyl-propylene amine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO) in 7 profoundly deaf patients, 6 PT+ and PT-. The count variation in the temporal lobe was calculated on 6 coronal slices using the ratio (Rstimulation-Rdeprivation)/Rdeprivation where R=counts in the temporal lobe was observed in all patients and was higher in all patients with PT+ than in the patient with PT-. The problems of head positioning and resolution of the system were taken into account, and we considered that the maximal count increment was related to the auditory cortex response to the stimulus. Further clinical investigations with high-resolution systems have to be performed in order to validate this presurgery test in cochlear implant assessment. (orig.)

  19. Contribution of auditory nerve fibers to compound action potential of the auditory nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourien, Jérôme; Tang, Yong; Batrel, Charlène; Huet, Antoine; Lenoir, Marc; Ladrech, Sabine; Desmadryl, Gilles; Nouvian, Régis; Puel, Jean-Luc; Wang, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Sound-evoked compound action potential (CAP), which captures the synchronous activation of the auditory nerve fibers (ANFs), is commonly used to probe deafness in experimental and clinical settings. All ANFs are believed to contribute to CAP threshold and amplitude: low sound pressure levels activate the high-spontaneous rate (SR) fibers, and increasing levels gradually recruit medium- and then low-SR fibers. In this study, we quantitatively analyze the contribution of the ANFs to CAP 6 days after 30-min infusion of ouabain into the round window niche. Anatomic examination showed a progressive ablation of ANFs following increasing concentration of ouabain. CAP amplitude and threshold plotted against loss of ANFs revealed three ANF pools: 1) a highly ouabain-sensitive pool, which does not participate in either CAP threshold or amplitude, 2) a less sensitive pool, which only encoded CAP amplitude, and 3) a ouabain-resistant pool, required for CAP threshold and amplitude. Remarkably, distribution of the three pools was similar to the SR-based ANF distribution (low-, medium-, and high-SR fibers), suggesting that the low-SR fiber loss leaves the CAP unaffected. Single-unit recordings from the auditory nerve confirmed this hypothesis and further showed that it is due to the delayed and broad first spike latency distribution of low-SR fibers. In addition to unraveling the neural mechanisms that encode CAP, our computational simulation of an assembly of guinea pig ANFs generalizes and extends our experimental findings to different species of mammals. Altogether, our data demonstrate that substantial ANF loss can coexist with normal hearing threshold and even unchanged CAP amplitude. PMID:24848461

  20. Effects of Electrical Stimulation of Olivocochlear Fibers in Cochlear Potentials in the Chinchilla

    OpenAIRE

    Elgueda, Diego; Delano, Paul H.; ROBLES, LUIS

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian cochlea has two types of sensory cells; inner hair cells, which receive auditory-nerve afferent innervation, and outer hair cells, innervated by efferent axons of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) system. The role of the MOC system in hearing is still controversial. Recently, by recording cochlear potentials in behaving chinchillas, we suggested that one of the possible functions of the efferent system is to reduce cochlear sensitivity during attention to other sensory modalities (...

  1. Aflatoxicosis en chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Cepeda A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Determinar los efectos de las aflatoxinas (AF en chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera por consumo de dietas contaminadas a diferentes concentraciones. Materiales y métodos. Un total de 20 chinchillas macho se distribuyeron en 5 grupos experimentales de 4 animales cada uno, los cuales recibieron diferentes niveles de aflatoxinas totales en el alimento durante 8 semanas: 0, 25, 50, 100 y 200 ppb. Semanalmente se determinó el consumo de alimento, el peso corporal individual y la mortalidad. Adicionalmente, al finalizar el experimento, se investigó el metabolismo hepático in vitro de la aflatoxina B1 (AFB1 en animales no expuestos al tóxico y se realizó examen histopatológico del hígado en todos los grupos. Resultados. El consumo de dietas contaminadas con aflatoxinas no causó efectos sobre el consumo de alimento ni hubo mortalidad. Solamente se observó disminución significativa (p<0.05 en la ganancia de peso corporal en los animales expuestos a 200 ppb en la dieta. Los niveles de 100 y 200 ppb (ng/g de aflatoxinas indujeron cambios leves a moderados en el hígado. El metabolismo microsomal de la AFB1 demostró la producción del epóxido de la AFB1 como único metabolito. Conclusiones. Los resultados del presente estudio demuestran que la chinchilla es altamente resistente a las aflatoxinas, pudiendo tolerar durante al menos dos meses niveles de aflatoxinas en el alimento que resultarían letales, en apenas unos pocos días, para especies sensibles como el cerdo o el perro.

  2. The Effect of Low Omega-3/Omega-6 Ratio on Auditory Nerve Conduction in Rat Pups.

    OpenAIRE

    Saeid Farahani; Masoud Motasaddi Zarandy; Gholamreza Hassanzadeh; Farzad Shidfar; Shohreh Jalaie; Vida Rahimi

    2015-01-01

    The biological effects of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are determined by their mutual interactions. This interaction extremely affects various functions. Lower consumption of omega-3 during gestation leads to various disorders, even in hearing. We aimed to assess the effect of low omega-3/omega-6 ratios on auditory nerve conduction. In this experimental study, the auditory brainstem response test was performed on 24-day-old rat (n=14). The rats were divided into case (low omega-3/omega-6 r...

  3. Time course of dynamic range adaptation in the auditory nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Bo; Wang, Grace I.; Dean, Isabel; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Auditory adaptation to sound-level statistics occurs as early as in the auditory nerve (AN), the first stage of neural auditory processing. In addition to firing rate adaptation characterized by a rate decrement dependent on previous spike activity, AN fibers show dynamic range adaptation, which is characterized by a shift of the rate-level function or dynamic range toward the most frequently occurring levels in a dynamic stimulus, thereby improving the precision of coding of the most common ...

  4. Stimulation of the human auditory nerve with optical radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Andrew; Winkler, Piotr; Mierzwinski, Jozef; Beuth, Wojciech; Izzo Matic, Agnella; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Teudt, Ingo; Maier, Hannes; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2009-02-01

    A novel, spatially selective method to stimulate cranial nerves has been proposed: contact free stimulation with optical radiation. The radiation source is an infrared pulsed laser. The Case Report is the first report ever that shows that optical stimulation of the auditory nerve is possible in the human. The ethical approach to conduct any measurements or tests in humans requires efficacy and safety studies in animals, which have been conducted in gerbils. This report represents the first step in a translational research project to initiate a paradigm shift in neural interfaces. A patient was selected who required surgical removal of a large meningioma angiomatum WHO I by a planned transcochlear approach. Prior to cochlear ablation by drilling and subsequent tumor resection, the cochlear nerve was stimulated with a pulsed infrared laser at low radiation energies. Stimulation with optical radiation evoked compound action potentials from the human auditory nerve. Stimulation of the auditory nerve with infrared laser pulses is possible in the human inner ear. The finding is an important step for translating results from animal experiments to human and furthers the development of a novel interface that uses optical radiation to stimulate neurons. Additional measurements are required to optimize the stimulation parameters.

  5. Hearing aid gain prescriptions balance restoration of auditory nerve mean-rate and spike-timing representations of speech.

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    Dinath, Faheem; Bruce, Ian C

    2008-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear amplification schemes for hearing aids have thus far been developed and evaluated based on perceptual criteria such as speech intelligibility, sound comfort, and loudness equalization. Finding amplification schemes that optimize all of these perceptual metrics has proven difficult. Using a physiological model, Bruce et al. [1] investigated the effects of single-band gain adjustments to linear amplification prescriptions. Optimal gain adjustments for model auditory-nerve fiber responses to speech sentences from the TIMIT database were dependent on whether the error metric included the spike timing information (i.e., a time-resolution of several microseconds) or the mean firing rates (i.e., a time-resolution of several milliseconds). Results showed that positive gain adjustments are required to optimize the mean firing rate responses, whereas negative gain adjustments tend to optimize spike timing information responses. In this paper we examine the results in more depth using a similar optimization scheme applied to a synthetic vowel /E/. It is found that negative gain adjustments (i.e., below the linear gain prescriptions) minimize the spread of synchrony and deviation of the phase response to vowel formants in responses containing spike-timing information. In contrast, positive gain adjustments (i.e., above the linear gain prescriptions) normalize the distribution of mean discharge rates in the auditory nerve responses. Thus, linear amplification prescriptions appear to find a balance between restoring the spike-timing and mean-rate information in auditory-nerve responses. PMID:19163029

  6. Auditory nerve synapses persist in ventral cochlear nucleus long after loss of acoustic input in mice with early-onset progressive hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Brian; Fiorillo, Benjamin; Ryugo, David K; Lauer, Amanda M

    2015-04-24

    Perceptual performance in persons with hearing loss, especially those using devices to restore hearing, is not fully predicted by traditional audiometric measurements designed to evaluate the status of peripheral function. The integrity of auditory brainstem synapses may vary with different forms of hearing loss, and differential effects on the auditory nerve-brain interface may have particularly profound consequences for the transfer of sound from ear to brain. Loss of auditory nerve synapses in ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) has been reported after acoustic trauma, ablation of the organ of Corti, and administration of ototoxic compounds. The effects of gradually acquired forms deafness on these synapses are less well understood. We investigated VCN gross morphology and auditory nerve synapse integrity in DBA/2J mice with early-onset progressive sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing status was confirmed using auditory brainstem response audiometry and acoustic startle responses. We found no change in VCN volume, number of macroneurons, or number of VGLUT1-positive auditory nerve terminals between young adult and older, deaf DBA/2J. Cell-type specific analysis revealed no difference in the number of VGLUT1 puncta contacting bushy and multipolar cell body profiles, but the terminals were smaller in deaf DBA/2J mice. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of numerous healthy, vesicle-filled auditory nerve synapses in older, deaf DBA/2J mice. The present results suggest that synapses can be preserved over a relatively long time-course in gradually acquired deafness. Elucidating the mechanisms supporting survival of central auditory nerve synapses in models of acquired deafness may reveal new opportunities for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25686750

  7. Otitis media: the chinchilla model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebink, G S

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infection and disease have been modeled in several animal species including infant and adult mice, infant and adult rats, infant Rhesus monkeys, and adolescent and adult chinchillas. Most are models of sepsis arising from intravenous or intraperitoneal inoculation of bacteria, and a few were designed to study disease arising from intranasal infection. Chinchillas provide the only animal model of middle ear pneumococcal infection in which the disease can be produced by very small inocula injected into the middle ear (ME) or intranasally, and in which the disease remains localized to the ME in most cases. This model, developed at the University of Minnesota in 1975, has been used to study pneumococcal pathogenesis at a mucosal site, immunogenicity and efficacy of pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PS) vaccine antigens, and the kinetics and efficacy of antimicrobial drugs. Pathogenesis experiments in the chinchilla model have revealed variation in ME virulence among different pneumococcal serotypes, enhancement of ME infection during concurrent intranasal influenza A virus infections, and natural resolution of pneumococcal otitis media (OM) without intervention. Research has explored the relative contribution of pneumococcal and host products to ME inflammation. Pneumococcal cell wall components and pneumolysin have been studied in the model. Host inflammatory responses studied in the chinchilla ME include polymorphonuclear leukocyte oxidative products, hydrolytic enzymes, cytokine and eicosanoid metabolites, and ME epithelial cell adhesion and mucous glycoprotein production. Both clinical (tympanic membrane appearance) and histopathology (ME, Eustachian tube, inner ear) endpoints can be quantified. Immunologic and inflammatory studies have been facilitated by the production of affinity-purified antichinchilla immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, and secretory IgA polyclonal antibody reagents, and the identification of cross-reactivity between

  8. Assessment and Preservation of Auditory Nerve Integrity in the Deafened Guinea Pig

    OpenAIRE

    Ramekers, D.

    2014-01-01

    Profound hearing loss is often caused by cochlear hair cell loss. Cochlear implants (CIs) essentially replace hair cells by encoding sound and conveying the signal by means of pulsatile electrical stimulation to the spiral ganglion cells (SGCs) which form the auditory nerve. SGCs progressively degenerate following hair cell loss, as a result of lost neurotrophic signaling from the hair cells. Degeneration of the auditory nerve may compromise the ability to hear with a CI. Therefore, the first...

  9. Temporary Neurotrophin Treatment Prevents Deafness-Induced Auditory Nerve Degeneration and Preserves Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramekers, Dyan; Versnel, Huib; Strahl, Stefan B; Klis, Sjaak F L; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-09-01

    After substantial loss of cochlear hair cells, exogenous neurotrophins prevent degeneration of the auditory nerve. Because cochlear implantation, the current therapy for profound sensorineural hearing loss, depends on a functional nerve, application of neurotrophins is being investigated. We addressed two questions important for fundamental insight into the effects of exogenous neurotrophins on a degenerating neural system, and for translation to the clinic. First, does temporary treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) prevent nerve degeneration on the long term? Second, how does a BDNF-treated nerve respond to electrical stimulation? Deafened guinea pigs received a cochlear implant, and their cochleas were infused with BDNF for 4 weeks. Up to 8 weeks after treatment, their cochleas were analyzed histologically. Electrically evoked compound action potentials (eCAPs) were recorded using stimulation paradigms that are informative of neural survival. Spiral ganglion cell (SGC) degeneration was prevented during BDNF treatment, resulting in 1.9 times more SGCs than in deafened untreated cochleas. Importantly, SGC survival was almost complete 8 weeks after treatment cessation, when 2.6 times more SGCs were observed. In four eCAP characteristics (three involving alteration of the interphase gap of the biphasic current pulse and one involving pulse trains), we found large and statistically significant differences between normal-hearing and deaf controls. Importantly, for BDNF-treated animals, these eCAP characteristics were near normal, suggesting healthy responsiveness of BDNF-treated SGCs. In conclusion, clinically practicable short-term neurotrophin treatment is sufficient for long-term survival of SGCs, and it can restore or preserve SGC function well beyond the treatment period. Significance statement: Successful restoration of hearing in deaf subjects by means of a cochlear implant requires a healthy spiral ganglion cell population. Deafness

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging of the auditory nerve in patients with acquired single-sided deafness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vos, Sjoerd; Haakma, Wieke; Versnel, Huib;

    2015-01-01

    following cochlear hair cell loss, and the amount of degeneration may considerably differ between the two ears, also in patients with bilateral deafness. A measure that reflects the nerve's condition would help to assess the best of both nerves and decide accordingly which ear should be implanted for...... DTI metrics from the deaf-sided with the healthy-sided nerves in patients showed no significant differences. There was a small but significant reduction in fractional anisotropy in both auditory nerves in patients compared with normal-hearing controls. These results are the first evidence of possible...... changes in the microstructure of the bilateral auditory nerves as a result of single-sided deafness. Our results also indicate that it is too early to assess the degenerative status of the auditory nerve of a subject-specific basis....

  11. La reproduction du chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera)

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Frédérique

    2002-01-01

    Ce travail s'attache aux diverses particularités de la reproduction du chin- chilla (Chinchilla lanigera). La reproduction est définie comme tout ce qui a trait à la production du nouveau-né. Sont ainsi abordés: la physiologie de la reproduction mâle-femelle (anatomie, fonctionnement hormonal), la saillie, la fécondation, la gestation (développement de l'embryon puis du foetus, développement des annexes embryonnaires comme le placenta), la parturition, ainsi que le développement du jeune jusq...

  12. The Effect of Low Omega-3/Omega-6 Ratio on Auditory Nerve Conduction in Rat Pups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Farahani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are determined by their mutual interactions. This interaction extremely affects various functions. Lower consumption of omega-3 during gestation leads to various disorders, even in hearing. We aimed to assess the effect of low omega-3/omega-6 ratios on auditory nerve conduction. In this experimental study, the auditory brainstem response test was performed on 24-day-old rat (n=14. The rats were divided into case (low omega-3/omega-6 ratio during gestation and lactation and control groups. Variables such as P1, P3, and P4 absolute latency period, interpeaks (P3-P4, P1-P3, and P1-P4, and P4/P1 amplitude ratio were measured. We found an increased P4 omega-3/omega-6 ratio in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P0.05.  Also, no significant difference was observed between the groups with respect to the P1-P3 interpeak latency (IPL periods (P>0.05; while the P1-P4 and P3-P4 IPLs were significantly increased in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.05. The P4/P1 amplitude ratio significantly decreased in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.05. Results confirmed the negative effects of low omega-3/omega-6 ratio on the auditory system and hearing.

  13. Simulating electrical modulation detection thresholds using a biophysical model of the auditory nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Gabrielle E; Imennov, Nikita S; Rubinstein, Jay T

    2016-05-01

    Modulation detection thresholds (MDTs) assess listeners' sensitivity to changes in the temporal envelope of a signal and have been shown to strongly correlate with speech perception in cochlear implant users. MDTs are simulated with a stochastic model of a population of auditory nerve fibers that has been verified to accurately simulate a number of physiologically important temporal response properties. The procedure to estimate detection thresholds has previously been applied to stimulus discrimination tasks. The population model simulates the MDT-stimulus intensity relationship measured in cochlear implant users. The model also recreates the shape of the modulation transfer function and the relationship between MDTs and carrier rate. Discrimination based on fluctuations in synchronous firing activity predicts better performance at low carrier rates, but quantitative measures of modulation coding predict better neural representation of high carrier rate stimuli. Manipulating the number of fibers and a temporal integration parameter, the width of a sliding temporal integration window, varies properties of the MDTs, such as cutoff frequency and peak threshold. These results demonstrate the importance of using a multi-diameter fiber population in modeling the MDTs and demonstrate a wider applicability of this model to simulating behavioral performance in cochlear implant listeners. PMID:27250141

  14. A model of auditory nerve responses to electrical stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Suyash Narendra; Dau, Torsten; Epp, Bastian

    peripheral for the cathodic phase. This results in an average difference of 200 μs in spike latency for AP generated by anodic vs cathodic pulses. It is hypothesized here that this difference is large enough to corrupt the temporal coding in the AN. To quantify effects of pulse polarity on auditory...... as a framework to test various stimulation strategies and to quantify their effect on the performance of CI listeners in psychophysical tasks....

  15. The effects of HCN and KLT ion channels on adaptation and refractoriness in a stochastic auditory nerve model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negm, Mohamed H; Bruce, Ian C

    2014-11-01

    An accurate model of auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) may assist in developing improved cochlear implant (CI) stimulation strategies. Previous studies have shown that the original Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model may be better at describing nodes of Ranvier in ANFs than models for other mammalian axon types. However, the HH model is still unable to explain a number of phenomena observed in auditory nerve responses to CI stimulation such as adaptation to high-rate stimulation and the time course of relative refractoriness. Recent physiological investigations of ANFs have shown the presence of a number of ion channel types not considered in the previous modeling studies, including low-threshold potassium (KLT) channels and hyperpolarization-activated cation (HCN) channels. In this paper, we investigate inclusion of these ion channel types in a stochastic HH model of a single node of Ranvier. Simulation results for pulse trains with rates of 200, 800, and 2000 pulse/s suggests that both the KLT channels and HCN channels can produce adaptation in the spike rate. However, the adaptation due to KLT is restricted to higher stimulation rates, whereas the adaptation due to HCN is observed across all stimulation rates. Additionally, using pulse pairs it was found that KLT increased both the absolute and the relative refractory periods. HCN on its own increased just the relative refractory period, but produced a synergistic increase in the absolute refractory period when combined with KLT. Together these results argue strongly for the need to consider HCN and KLT channels when studying CI stimulation of ANFs. PMID:24893366

  16. A phenomenological model of the synapse between the inner hair cell and auditory nerve: Long-term adaptation with power-law dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Zilany, Muhammad S.A.; Bruce, Ian C.; Nelson, Paul C.; Carney, Laurel H.

    2009-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the dynamics of biological systems that appear to be exponential over short time courses are in some cases better described over the long-term by power-law dynamics. A model of rate adaptation at the synapse between inner hair cells and auditory-nerve (AN) fibers that includes both exponential and power-law dynamics is presented here. Exponentially adapting components with rapid and short-term time constants, which are mainly responsible for shaping onset respon...

  17. Polarity sensitivity of the electrically stimulated auditory nerve at different cochlear sites

    OpenAIRE

    Undurraga Lucero, Jaime; van Wieringen, Astrid; Carlyon, Robert P.; Macherey, Olivier; Wouters, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Commercially available cochlear implants (CIs) stimulate the auditory nerve (AN) using symmetric biphasic current (BP) pulses. However, recent data have shown that the use of asymmetric pulse shapes could be beneficial in terms of reducing power consumption, increasing dynamic range and limiting channel interactions. In these charge-balanced stimuli, the effectiveness of one phase (one polarity) is reduced by making it longer and lower in amplitude than the other. For the design of novel CI s...

  18. Loudness function derives from data on electrical discharge rates in auditory nerve fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Judgements of the loudness of pure-tone sound stimuli yield a loudness function which relates perceived loudness to stimulus amplitude. A loudness function is derived from physical evidence alone without regard to human judgments. The resultant loudness function is L=K(q-q0), where L is loudness, q is effective sound pressure (specifically q0 at the loudness threshold), and K is generally a weak function of the number of stimulated auditory nerve fibers. The predicted function is in agreement with loudness judgment data reported by Warren, which imply that, in the suprathreshold loudness regime, decreasing the sound-pressure level by 6 db results in halving the loudness.

  19. Fast negative feedback enables mammalian auditory nerve fibers to encode a wide dynamic range of sound intensities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ospeck

    Full Text Available Mammalian auditory nerve fibers (ANF are remarkable for being able to encode a 40 dB, or hundred fold, range of sound pressure levels into their firing rate. Most of the fibers are very sensitive and raise their quiescent spike rate by a small amount for a faint sound at auditory threshold. Then as the sound intensity is increased, they slowly increase their spike rate, with some fibers going up as high as ∼300 Hz. In this way mammals are able to combine sensitivity and wide dynamic range. They are also able to discern sounds embedded within background noise. ANF receive efferent feedback, which suggests that the fibers are readjusted according to the background noise in order to maximize the information content of their auditory spike trains. Inner hair cells activate currents in the unmyelinated distal dendrites of ANF where sound intensity is rate-coded into action potentials. We model this spike generator compartment as an attenuator that employs fast negative feedback. Input current induces rapid and proportional leak currents. This way ANF are able to have a linear frequency to input current (f-I curve that has a wide dynamic range. The ANF spike generator remains very sensitive to threshold currents, but efferent feedback is able to lower its gain in response to noise.

  20. Organization of the auditory brainstem in a lizard, Gekko gecko. I. Auditory nerve, cochlear nuclei, and superior olivary nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Y. Z.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Carr, C. E.

    2012-01-01

    We used tract tracing to reveal the connections of the auditory brainstem in the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko). The auditory nerve has two divisions, a rostroventrally directed projection of mid- to high best-frequency fibers to the nucleus angularis (NA) and a more dorsal and caudal projection of low...

  1. Waveform efficiency analysis of auditory nerve fiber stimulation for cochlear implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the electrical stimulation efficiency of various stimulating waveforms is an important issue for efficient neural stimulator design. Concerning the implantable micro devices design, it is also necessary to consider the feasibility of hardware implementation of the desired waveforms. In this paper, the charge, power and energy efficiency of four waveforms (i.e. square, rising ramp, triangular and rising ramp-decaying exponential) in various durations have been simulated and evaluated based on the computational model of the auditory nerve fibers. Moreover, for a fair comparison of their feasibility, a fully integrated current generator circuit has been developed so that the desired stimulating waveforms can be generated. The simulation results show that stimulation with the square waveforms is a proper choice in short and intermediate durations while the rising ramp-decaying exponential or triangular waveforms can be employed for long durations.

  2. Cutaneous sensory nerve as a substitute for auditory nerve in solving deaf-mutes’ hearing problem: an innovation in multi-channel-array skin-hearing technology

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jianwen; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Ma, Weifang; Ma, Xuezong

    2014-01-01

    The current use of hearing aids and artificial cochleas for deaf-mute individuals depends on their auditory nerve. Skin-hearing technology, a patented system developed by our group, uses a cutaneous sensory nerve to substitute for the auditory nerve to help deaf-mutes to hear sound. This paper introduces a new solution, multi-channel-array skin-hearing technology, to solve the problem of speech discrimination. Based on the filtering principle of hair cells, external voice signals at different...

  3. Distribución potencial de la chinchilla de cola corta (Chinchilla chinchilla, Rodentia) en el sudoeste de Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    María Eugenia Copa Alvaro; Geovana Shirley Mendieta; Amy L. Deane

    2014-01-01

    Actualmente, la presencia de la chinchilla de cola corta (Chinchilla chinchilla), abundante en la región andina sudamericana durante el siglo pasado, ha sido fehacientemente documentada en pocas localidades del norte de Chile y Argentina; en Bolivia aunque su presencia es altamente probable, los últimos registros confiables datan de 1939. La cacería con fines peleteros disminuyó significativamente la población silvestre de la especie lo que derivó en un estatus de conservación "En Peligro Crí...

  4. Necrotizing enteritis associated with Clostridium perfringensType B in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo B. Lucena

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Four 3-4 month-old chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera from a commercial flock of 395 chinchillas, were found dead with evidence of previous diarrhea and prolapsed rectum. A fifth 8 month-old chinchilla died 8 hours after being found recumbent, apathetic, diarrheic and with a prolapsed rectum. Two chinchillas were necropsied and observed gross lesions consisted of extensive hemorrhagic enteritis, mild pulmonary edema and enlarged and yellow liver; this latter finding was particularly prominent in the chinchilla presenting longer clinical course. Histologically there was necrotizing enteritis associated with abundant bacterial rods aggregates in the intestinal surface epithelium and within the lamina propria. In the lungs there were small amounts of pink proteinaceous material (edema in the interstitium and marked vacuolar hepatocellullar degeneration (lipidosis in the liver. Anaerobic cultures from the intestinal contents of one of the affected chinchillas yielded Clostridium perfringens. Genotyping of this C. perfringens isolate was achieved by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR as C. perfringenstype B due to detection of alpha, beta and epsilon-toxin genes. These findings suggest C. perfringens type B as an important cause of sudden or acute death in chinchillas.

  5. Gross morphological features of plexus brachialis in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera)

    OpenAIRE

    A. Cevik-Demirkan; Ozdemir, V.; I. Demirkan; I. Turkmenoglu

    2007-01-01

    This study documents the detailed features of the morphological structure and the innervation areas of the plexus brachialis in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera). The animals (5 female and 5 male) were euthanased with ketamine hydrocloride and xylazine hydrocloride combination, 60 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg, respectively. Skin, muscles and nerves were dissected under a stereo-microscope. The brachial plexus of the chinchilla is formed by rami ventrales of C5-C8, T1 and T2, and possesses a single tr...

  6. Evaluation of peripheral compression and auditory nerve fiber intensity coding using auditory steady-state responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Encina Llamas, Gerard; M. Harte, James; Epp, Bastian

    2015-01-01

    . Evaluation of these properties provides information about the health state of the system. It has been shown that a loss of outer hair cells leads to a reduction in peripheral compression. It has also recently been shown in animal studies that noise over-exposure, producing temporary threshold shifts, can......The compressive nonlinearity of the auditory system is assumed to be an epiphenomenon of a healthy cochlea and, particularly, of outer-hair cell function. Another ability of the healthy auditory system is to enable communication in acoustical environments with high-level background noises...

  7. Basic response characteristics of auditory nerve fibers in the grassfrog (Rana temporaria)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Jørgensen, M B; Kanneworff, M

    phasic cells giving one spike per stimulation. Therefore, the mechanism underlying PS is probably different from that underlying adaptation. The sharpening of the neural encoding of temporal parameters and the strong encoding of sound offset as well as onset caused by PS very likely is biologically...

  8. Target-specific regulation of presynaptic release properties at auditory nerve terminals in the avian cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, J; MacLeod, K M

    2016-03-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) acts as a time- and firing rate-dependent filter that mediates the transmission of information across synapses. In the auditory brain stem, the divergent pathways that encode acoustic timing and intensity information express differential STP. To investigate what factors determine the plasticity expressed at different terminals, we tested whether presynaptic release probability differed in the auditory nerve projections to the two divisions of the avian cochlear nucleus, nucleus angularis (NA) and nucleus magnocellularis (NM). Estimates of release probability were made with an open-channel blocker ofN-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Activity-dependent blockade of NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) with application of 20 μM (+)-MK801 maleate was more rapid in NM than in NA, indicating that release probability was significantly higher at terminals in NM. Paired-pulse ratio (PPR) was tightly correlated with the blockade rate at terminals in NA, suggesting that PPR was a reasonable proxy for relative release probability at these synapses. To test whether release probability was similar across convergent inputs onto NA neurons, PPRs of different nerve inputs onto the same postsynaptic NA target neuron were measured. The PPRs, as well as the plasticity during short trains, were tightly correlated across multiple inputs, further suggesting that release probability is coordinated at auditory nerve terminals in a target-specific manner. This highly specific regulation of STP in the auditory brain stem provides evidence that the synaptic dynamics are tuned to differentially transmit the auditory information in nerve activity into parallel ascending pathways. PMID:26719087

  9. Chinchilla lanigera (Molina 1782 and C. chinchilla (Lichtenstein 1830: review of their distribution and new findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valladares, P.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Millions of Chinchilla chinchilla and C. lanigera were killed during the early twentieth century and they were nearly hunted to extinction. In order to establish the current range of distribution of these two wild species and to localize possible new colonies, we used the available scientific literature, technical reports, information from residents, and live trapping methods. Both species are ‘critically endangered’ since their current distribution is highly fragmented and all recognized colonies are small and isolated. We report a small new wild colony of C. lanigera in the Atacama region, Chile.

  10. Electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve: the coding of frequency, the perception of pitch and the development of cochlear implant speech processing strategies for profoundly deaf people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G M

    1996-09-01

    1. The development of speech processing strategies for multiple-channel cochlear implants has depended on encoding sound frequencies and intensities as temporal and spatial patterns of electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve fibres so that speech information of most importance of intelligibility could be transmitted. 2. Initial physiological studies showed that rate encoding of electrical stimulation above 200 pulses/s could not reproduce the normal response patterns in auditory neurons for acoustic stimulation in the speech frequency range above 200 Hz and suggested that place coding was appropriate for the higher frequencies. 3. Rate difference limens in the experimental animal were only similar to those for sound up to 200 Hz. 4. Rate difference limens in implant patients were similar to those obtained in the experimental animal. 5. Satisfactory rate discrimination could be made for durations of 50 and 100 ms, but not 25 ms. This made rate suitable for encoding longer duration suprasegmental speech information, but not segmental information, such as consonants. The rate of stimulation could also be perceived as pitch, discriminated at different electrode sites along the cochlea and discriminated for stimuli across electrodes. 6. Place pitch could be scaled according to the site of stimulation in the cochlea so that a frequency scale was preserved and it also had a different quality from rate pitch and was described as tonality. Place pitch could also be discriminated for the shorter durations (25 ms) required for identifying consonants. 7. The inaugural speech processing strategy encoded the second formant frequencies (concentrations of frequency energy in the mid frequency range of most importance for speech intelligibility) as place of stimulation, the voicing frequency as rate of stimulation and the intensity as current level. Our further speech processing strategies have extracted additional frequency information and coded this as place of stimulation

  11. Mycoflora and Natural Incidence of Selected Mycotoxins in Rabbit and Chinchilla Feeds

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Vanesa Greco; Alejandro Guillermo Pardo; Vanesa Ludemann; Pablo Eduardo Martino; Graciela Noemí Pose

    2012-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by filamentous fungi that cause a toxic response when ingested by animals or man. Demand of natural fur, such as those from rabbit and chinchilla, produced under controlled conditions, has increased worldwide. The toxicogenic mycoflora contaminating feeds for these animals was enumerated and identified. Six of the major mycotoxins implicated in animal mycotoxicosis were detected and quantified. Moulds count ranged from

  12. Seasonal evaluations of urinary androgen metabolites and semen quality in domestic long-tailed chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) under natural photoperiod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominchin, M F; Bianconi, S; Ponzio, M F; Fiol de Cuneo, M F; Ruiz, R D; Busso, J M

    2014-02-01

    Chinchilla spp. is a South American hystricomorph rodent genus currently considered almost extinct in the wild. The high quality of chinchilla fur motivated the harvesting of chinchillas for the fur market. Reproductive biology advances come from studies on commercially exploited animals, especially Chinchilla lanigera. We studied seasonal variation of urinary androgen metabolites, sperm concentration and sperm functional activity in males of domestic Chinchilla lanigera under natural photoperiod. In Córdoba city (31° S-64° W; Argentina), within the same latitudes as those of the historic Andean distribution (tropical deserts; 15°-34° S), domestic males (n=7) were studied in May (autumn), August (winter), November (spring), and February (summer). Urine was seasonally collected (over 24h; once for season, 4 in total) to measure urinary androgen metabolites (RIA), before semen collection by electroejaculation. The results indicated that although testicular volume (relative to body weight) and values of sperm functional activity did not show seasonal changes, a seasonal variation in androgen excretion was detected, with the highest values occurring during "short" light/dark cycles (autumn-winter). In addition, viable spermatozoa with intact acrosome mean values during winter-spring were higher than in autumn or summer. This study provides information that might contribute to the assessment of testicular activity in male chinchilla subjected to genetic selection in the fur industry. In addition, since domestic chinchilla still share some genomic characteristics with their counterparts in the wild, results presented may alsocontribute to ex situ breeding program of endangered chinchilla. In conclusion, natural photoperiod cycle affects testicular activity in domestic chinchilla. PMID:24503344

  13. Morphometry of the alimentary system of the long-tailed chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosława Kulawik

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted on 40 long-tailed chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera (20 females and 20 males. The study measured the length of the internal organs of the digestive system and the measurements of their mass. In order to compare the examined metric traits in the male and the female, the figures were statistically analysed. The results found that the average length of the esophagus, the greater curvature of the stomach and cecum were larger in males. After estimating the mass of internal organs it was found that in the male greater value reached mass of the stomach and duodenum with food contained in it and mass of duodenum cleared of leftover food. Research has also shown that the females were characterized by longer intestines than males. The ratio of the small intestine to the large intestine in females was 1: 1.52, in males 1: 1.58.

  14. Sound pressure transformations by the head and pinnae of the adult Chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera)

    OpenAIRE

    Koka, Kanthaiah; Jones, Heath G.; Thornton, Jennifer L.; Lupo, J. Eric; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    There are three main cues to sound location: the interaural differences in time (ITD) and level (ILD) as well as the monaural spectral shape cues. These cues are generated by the spatial- and frequency-dependent filtering of propagating sound waves by the head and external ears. Although the chinchilla has been used for decades to study the anatomy, physiology, and psychophysics of audition, including binaural and spatial hearing, little is actually known about the sound pressure transformati...

  15. Gross morphological features of plexus brachialis in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cevik-Demirkan

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study documents the detailed features of the morphological structure and the innervation areas of the plexus brachialis in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera. The animals (5 female and 5 male were euthanased with ketamine hydrocloride and xylazine hydrocloride combination, 60 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg, respectively. Skin, muscles and nerves were dissected under a stereo-microscope. The brachial plexus of the chinchilla is formed by rami ventrales of C5-C8, T1 and T2, and possesses a single truncus. The subscapular nerve is formed by the rami of the spinal nerves originating from C6 (one thin ramus and C7 (one thick and 2 thin rami. These nerves innervate the subscapular and teres minor muscles. The long thoracic nerve, before joining with the brachial plexus, obtains branches from C6 and C7 in 5 cadavers (3 male, 2 female, from C7 in 4 cadavers (2 male, 2 female and from C6-C8 in only 1 female cadaver. These nerves disperse in variable combinations to form the extrinsic and intrinstic named, nerves of the thoracic limb. An undefined nerve branch originates from the rami ventrales of C7, C8 and T1 spinal nerves enter the coracobrachial muscle.

  16. Prevalence and analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chinchillas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoyama Naoki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger are popular as pets and are often used as laboratory animals for various studies. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major infectious agent that causes otitis media, pneumonia, septicaemia enteritis, and sudden death in chinchillas. This bacterium is also a leading cause of nosocomial infections in humans. To prevent propagation of P. aeruginosa infection among humans and animals, detailed characteristics of the isolates, including antibiotic susceptibility and genetic features, are needed. In this study, we surveyed P. aeruginosa distribution in chinchillas bred as pets or laboratory animals. We also characterized the isolates from these chinchillas by testing for antibiotic susceptibility and by gene analysis. Results P. aeruginosa was isolated from 41.8% of the 67 chinchillas included in the study. Slide agglutination and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis discriminated 5 serotypes and 7 unique patterns, respectively. For the antibiotic susceptibility test, 40.9% of isolates were susceptible to gentamicin, 77.3% to ciprofloxacin, 77.3% to imipenem, and 72.7% to ceftazidime. DNA analyses confirmed that none of the isolates contained the gene encoding extended-spectrum β-lactamases; however, 2 of the total 23 isolates were found to have a gene similar to the pilL gene that has been identified in the pathogenicity island of a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa. Conclusions P. aeruginosa is widely spread in chinchillas, including strains with reduced susceptibility to the antibiotics and highly virulent strains. The periodic monitoring should be performed to help prevent the propagation of this pathogen and reduce the risk of infection from chinchillas to humans.

  17. BDNF Increases Survival and Neuronal Differentiation of Human Neural Precursor Cells Cotransplanted with a Nanofiber Gel to the Auditory Nerve in a Rat Model of Neuronal Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To study possible nerve regeneration of a damaged auditory nerve by the use of stem cell transplantation. Methods. We transplanted HNPCs to the rat AN trunk by the internal auditory meatus (IAM. Furthermore, we studied if addition of BDNF affects survival and phenotypic differentiation of the grafted HNPCs. A bioactive nanofiber gel (PA gel, in selected groups mixed with BDNF, was applied close to the implanted cells. Before transplantation, all rats had been deafened by a round window niche application of β-bungarotoxin. This neurotoxin causes a selective toxic destruction of the AN while keeping the hair cells intact. Results. Overall, HNPCs survived well for up to six weeks in all groups. However, transplants receiving the BDNF-containing PA gel demonstrated significantly higher numbers of HNPCs and neuronal differentiation. At six weeks, a majority of the HNPCs had migrated into the brain stem and differentiated. Differentiated human cells as well as neurites were observed in the vicinity of the cochlear nucleus. Conclusion. Our results indicate that human neural precursor cells (HNPC integration with host tissue benefits from additional brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF treatment and that these cells appear to be good candidates for further regenerative studies on the auditory nerve (AN.

  18. Fiber diameter distributions in the chinchilla's ampullary nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Larry F.; Honrubia, Vicente

    2002-01-01

    A morphometric study of the chinchilla's ampullary nerves was conducted to produce an unbiased accounting of the diameter distribution of their constituent fibers. Diameter analyses were determined from 1 microm plastic-embedded nerve sections taken at a plane immediately proximal to the sensory epithelium. We found these nerves to be composed of 2094+/-573 fibers, having diameters that ranged from 0.5 to 8 microm. The distributions of diameters were positively skewed, where approximately 75% of the fibers were found to have diameters less than 3.5 microm. An analysis of the spatial distribution of diameters within the nerve section revealed that the lateralmost areas of the nerve contained larger fractions of fibers within the smallest diameter quintiles, and the central area harbored greater proportions of the larger diameter quintiles. However, significant fractions of all quintiles were found in all areas. These data were integrated with available data of Fernandez et al. (1998) to produce diameter estimates of calyx, dimorphic, and bouton morphology subpopulations. In view of a general relationship between diameter, innervation locus, and an afferent's physiologic characteristics, these data provide the basis for developing a perspective for the in situ distribution of afferent response dynamics.

  19. Diagnosis of an outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera) by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornatti Churria, Carlos D; Vigo, Germán B; Origlia, Javier; Campos, Josefina; Caffer, María; Píscopo, Miguel; Herrero Loyola, Miguel; Petruccelli, Miguel; Pichel, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Adult chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera) that had suddenly died in a commercial farm located in La Plata City, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, in July 2012 were macroscopically, histopathologically, and microbiologically examined. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) was isolated from the liver, spleen, heart, lungs, kidneys and intestines from each of the five animals evaluated. The five strains were susceptible to ampicillin, cephalotin, cefotaxime, nalidixic acid, gentamicin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, fosfomycin, nitrofurantoin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and resistant to tetracycline. Each of the five S. Typhimurium isolates was analyzed by XbaI- pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), showing an identical electrophoretic profile with 15 defined bands, which was found to be identical to pattern ARJPXX01.0220 of the PulseNet Argentine National database of Salmonella PFGE patterns. This is the first work describing the postmortem diagnosis of an outbreak of salmonellosis in chinchillas by using molecular methods such as PFGE. PMID:25444129

  20. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database: resource for an otolaryngology disease model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Mary; Smith, Jennifer R.; De Pons, Jeff; Tutaj, Marek; Khampang, Pawjai; Hong, Wenzhou; Erbe, Christy B.; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Kerschner, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    The long-tailed chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) is an established animal model for diseases of the inner and middle ear, among others. In particular, chinchilla is commonly used to study diseases involving viral and bacterial pathogens and polymicrobial infections of the upper respiratory tract and the ear, such as otitis media. The value of the chinchilla as a model for human diseases prompted the sequencing of its genome in 2012 and the more recent development of the Chinchilla Research Resource Database (http://crrd.mcw.edu) to provide investigators with easy access to relevant datasets and software tools to enhance their research. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database contains a complete catalog of genes for chinchilla and, for comparative purposes, human. Chinchilla genes can be viewed in the context of their genomic scaffold positions using the JBrowse genome browser. In contrast to the corresponding records at NCBI, individual gene reports at CRRD include functional annotations for Disease, Gene Ontology (GO) Biological Process, GO Molecular Function, GO Cellular Component and Pathway assigned to chinchilla genes based on annotations from the corresponding human orthologs. Data can be retrieved via keyword and gene-specific searches. Lists of genes with similar functional attributes can be assembled by leveraging the hierarchical structure of the Disease, GO and Pathway vocabularies through the Ontology Search and Browser tool. Such lists can then be further analyzed for commonalities using the Gene Annotator (GA) Tool. All data in the Chinchilla Research Resource Database is freely accessible and downloadable via the CRRD FTP site or using the download functions available in the search and analysis tools. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database is a rich resource for researchers using, or considering the use of, chinchilla as a model for human disease. Database URL: http://crrd.mcw.edu PMID:27173523

  1. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database: resource for an otolaryngology disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Mary; Smith, Jennifer R; De Pons, Jeff; Tutaj, Marek; Khampang, Pawjai; Hong, Wenzhou; Erbe, Christy B; Ehrlich, Garth D; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Kerschner, Joseph E

    2016-01-01

    The long-tailed chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) is an established animal model for diseases of the inner and middle ear, among others. In particular, chinchilla is commonly used to study diseases involving viral and bacterial pathogens and polymicrobial infections of the upper respiratory tract and the ear, such as otitis media. The value of the chinchilla as a model for human diseases prompted the sequencing of its genome in 2012 and the more recent development of the Chinchilla Research Resource Database (http://crrd.mcw.edu) to provide investigators with easy access to relevant datasets and software tools to enhance their research. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database contains a complete catalog of genes for chinchilla and, for comparative purposes, human. Chinchilla genes can be viewed in the context of their genomic scaffold positions using the JBrowse genome browser. In contrast to the corresponding records at NCBI, individual gene reports at CRRD include functional annotations for Disease, Gene Ontology (GO) Biological Process, GO Molecular Function, GO Cellular Component and Pathway assigned to chinchilla genes based on annotations from the corresponding human orthologs. Data can be retrieved via keyword and gene-specific searches. Lists of genes with similar functional attributes can be assembled by leveraging the hierarchical structure of the Disease, GO and Pathway vocabularies through the Ontology Search and Browser tool. Such lists can then be further analyzed for commonalities using the Gene Annotator (GA) Tool. All data in the Chinchilla Research Resource Database is freely accessible and downloadable via the CRRD FTP site or using the download functions available in the search and analysis tools. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database is a rich resource for researchers using, or considering the use of, chinchilla as a model for human disease.Database URL: http://crrd.mcw.edu. PMID:27173523

  2. Modeling auditory evoked brainstem responses to transient stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch; Dau, Torsten; Harte, James;

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative model is presented that describes the formation of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to tone pulses, clicks and rising chirps as a function of stimulation level. The model computes the convolution of the instantaneous discharge rates using the “humanized” nonlinear auditory-nerve ...

  3. 人工耳蜗植入前电刺激听神经复合动作电位检测方法的建立和初步应用%The Establishment and Application of Electrically Evoked Auditory Nerve Compound Action Potential Test Method before Cochlear Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斌; 曹克利; 魏朝刚; 王轶; 路远

    2012-01-01

    cochlear malformation. After the success of anesthesia, all the patients' tympani bands were generally opened and the multi-channel test electrodes were placed into the tympani bands. The electrodes were connected to the Cochlear speech processor and electrical stimulation generator via the computer. By the Custom Sound EP 2.0 software, the stimulation parameters were adjusted and optimized to perform neural response telemetry (NRT) test. The stimulation intensity decreased or increased by 5 CL gradually until to the threshold. The ECAP waveforms and thresholds were automatically recorded when giving electrical stimulation pulses. After cochlear implantation, the NRT was regularly performed to record ECAP waveforms and thresholds. One month later, the T and C values of mapping were tested after switch-on. The correlation between the ECAP thresholds of the two electrodes and the C values of switch-on were statistically analyzed. Results The presences of ECAP by test electrodes and commercial electrodes were both 90% and the average thresholds were (160.50 ± 15.12) CL and (160.00±11.27) CL respectively, showing no significant difference (P>0.05). The thresholds were related to the C values after witch-on (177.40±10.61) (R2=0.844,r=0.919). Conclusion Through this study, an ECAP test method before cochlear implantation has been successfully developed. The ECAP can provide reliable and effective information about the auditory nerve responses in patients with inner ear and /or auditory pathway abnormalities and no residual hearing. This is useful in evaluating the development of auditory system and predicting the postoperative rehabilitation outcome of the patients.

  4. The spinal nerves that constitute the lumbosacral plexus and their distribution in the chinchilla

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Martinez-Pereira; E. M. Rickes

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the spinal nerves that constitute the lumbosacral plexus (plexus lumbosacrales) (LSP) and its distribution in Chinchilla lanigera were investigated. Ten chinchillas (6 males and 4 females) were used in this research. The spinal nerves that constitute the LSP were dissected and the distribution of pelvic limb nerves originating from the plexus was examined. The iliohypogastric nerve arose from L1 and L2,, giving rise to the cranial and caudal nerves, and the ilioinguinal nerve a...

  5. NUEVO REGISTRO DE CHINCHILLA CHINCHILLA (RODENTIA, CHINCHILLIDAE) PARA LA REGIÓN DE ATACAMA, CHILE. IMPLICANCIAS PARA SU ESTADO DE CONSERVACIÓN

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo Valladares F.; Martín Espinosa; Mauricio Torres; Eric Diaz; Nicolai Zeller; Jorge de La Riva; Moisés Grimberg; Ángel Spotorno

    2012-01-01

    Reportamos un nuevo registro de Chinchilla chinchilla para la Región de Atacama, Chile. Se basa en ejemplares fotografiados por cámaras de movimiento en el Parque Nacional Nevado Tres Cruces y sus alrededores y por restos óseos y de fecas encontrados en laderas de cerros, ya sea con pendiente abrupta o con rodados, ambas formaciones con cuevas de mediano tamaño. No existen reportes científicos para esta especie en la Región de Atacama en los últimos cincuenta años. Se analiza el estado de con...

  6. Auditory Cortex Basal Activity Modulates Cochlear Responses in Chinchillas

    OpenAIRE

    León, Alex; Elgueda, Diego; Silva, María A.; Hamamé, Carlos M.; Delano, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The auditory efferent system has unique neuroanatomical pathways that connect the cerebral cortex with sensory receptor cells. Pyramidal neurons located in layers V and VI of the primary auditory cortex constitute descending projections to the thalamus, inferior colliculus, and even directly to the superior olivary complex and to the cochlear nucleus. Efferent pathways are connected to the cochlear receptor by the olivocochlear system, which innervates outer hair cells and auditory...

  7. Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Chinchillas and Degus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Christoph; Jekl, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    Dental disease is among the most common causes for chinchillas and degus to present to veterinarians. Most animals with dental disease present with weight loss, reduced food intake/anorexia, and drooling. Degus commonly present with dyspnea. Dental disease has been primarily referred to as elongation and malocclusion of the cheek teeth. Periodontal disease, caries, and tooth resorption are common diseases in chinchillas, but are missed frequently during routine intraoral examination, even performed under general anesthesia. A diagnostic evaluation, including endoscopy-guided intraoral examination and diagnostic imaging of the skull, is necessary to detect oral disorders and to perform the appropriate therapy. PMID:27497209

  8. Estudio morfológico del oído medio e interno de la Chinchilla laniger Morphological study of the middle and internal ear of Chinchilla laniger

    OpenAIRE

    Loreto Carrasco M; J. Cristóbal Maass O; Luis Dentone S; Gonzalo Miranda G; Manuel Kukuljan P

    2008-01-01

    Introducción: La Chinchilla laniger, roedor originario de la Cordillera de Los Andes, ha sido utilizada como modelo de investigación otológica por más de 40 años. Sin embargo, no existe un estudio anatómico e histológico detallado del oído de este animal. La mayoría de las investigaciones se han desarrollado en neurofisiología de la audición. Objetivos: Describir macroscópica y microscópicamente el oído medio e interno de la Chinchilla laniger. Material y método: Estudio realizado en cinco ch...

  9. The olivocochlear reflex strength and cochlear sensitivity are independently modulated by auditory cortex microstimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragicevic, Constantino D; Aedo, Cristian; León, Alex; Bowen, Macarena; Jara, Natalia; Terreros, Gonzalo; Robles, Luis; Delano, Paul H

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, efferent projections to the cochlear receptor are constituted by olivocochlear (OC) fibers that originate in the superior olivary complex. Medial and lateral OC neurons make synapses with outer hair cells and with auditory nerve fibers, respectively. In addition to the OC system, there are also descending projections from the auditory cortex that are directed towards the thalamus, inferior colliculus, cochlear nucleus, and superior olivary complex. Olivocochlear function can be assessed by measuring a brainstem reflex mediated by auditory nerve fibers, cochlear nucleus neurons, and OC fibers. Although it is known that the OC reflex is activated by contralateral acoustic stimulation and produces a suppression of cochlear responses, the influence of cortical descending pathways in the OC reflex is largely unknown. Here, we used auditory cortex electrical microstimulation in chinchillas to study a possible cortical modulation of cochlear and auditory nerve responses to tones in the absence and presence of contralateral noise. We found that cortical microstimulation produces two different peripheral modulations: (i) changes in cochlear sensitivity evidenced by amplitude modulation of cochlear microphonics and auditory nerve compound action potentials and (ii) enhancement or suppression of the OC reflex strength as measured by auditory nerve responses, which depended on the intersubject variability of the OC reflex. Moreover, both corticofugal effects were not correlated, suggesting the presence of two functionally different efferent pathways. These results demonstrate that auditory cortex electrical microstimulation independently modulates the OC reflex strength and cochlear sensitivity. PMID:25663383

  10. The nutrition of the chinchilla as a companion animal--basic data, influences and dependences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, P; Schröder, A; Wenger, A; Kamphues, J

    2003-04-01

    This contribution is meant to obtain basic data for feeding chinchillas (ingestion behaviour, feed and water intake) kept as companion animals. The chinchillas ingested more than 70% of their total feed intake during the dark phase (highest level of activity between 9:00 pm and 7:00 am). Daily amounts of feed intake varied between 2.5 (fresh grass) or 2.6 (hay) and 5.5 (pelleted complete diet) g of dry matter per 100 g of body weight. An offered mixed feed based on native components led to a selection of individual ingredients (high palatability: carob, beet pulp, sunflower seeds). The chinchillas' daily water intake varied between 30 (mixed feed in briquette form) and 40 ml (alfalfa cubes) and amounted on average between 1.5 and 3 ml/g of dry matter. Compared with rabbits or guinea-pigs, the chinchillas generally showed noticeable differences (rhythm of feed intake, palatability of individual ingredients, capacity for digestion, etc.) which must be considered in order to optimize the nutrition of this species. PMID:14511138

  11. Conjuntivite bacteriana secundária à doença dentária em chinchilas (Chinchilla lanigera Bacterial conjunctivitis secondary to dental disease in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Barbosa Lucena

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available São relatados três casos de conjuntivite bacteriana associada à doença dentária grave em chinchilas. Todas as chinchilas afetadas tinham histórico de emagrecimento, hipersalivação e epífora, que progrediu para exsudação ocular purulenta. Durante a necropsia, foi constatado marcado alongamento da coroa clínica dos incisivos e molares, e crescimento do ápice dentário, causando deformação óssea e compressão do canal lacrimal. Histologicamente, observou-se infiltrado de neutrófilos na conjuntiva e pálpebras. Cultivo microbiológico do exsudato ocular revelou crescimento de Staphylococcus coagulase-positiva . Uma compressão do canal lacrimal pelo crescimento dentário excessivo impediu a drenagem das lágrimas, resultando em epífora. Esse é um importante fator predisponente para infecção bacteriana ocular em chinchilas.Three cases of bacterial conjunctivitis associated with severe dental disease in chinchillas are described. All affected chinchillas had a history of weight loss, ptyalism, and epiphora which progressed to suppurative ocular exsudation. At necropsy incisor and molar teeth revealed marked elongation of the clinical crown and overgrowth of the dental apexes resulting in deformation of the tear ducts. Histologically, there was neutrophilic infiltrate in the conjunctiva and eyelid skin. Microbiological culture carried out in samples from the ocular exsudate yielded Staphylococcus coagulase-positive. Compression of the lacrimal duct by dental overgrowth compromised tear draining and resulting in epiphora. This is a major predisposing factor inducing bacterial ocular infection in chinchillas.

  12. SLEEPING AND RESTING BEHAVIOR, FACTORS AND IMPLICATIONS IN BREEDING TECHNOLOGY OF CHINCHILLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. BOTHA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fallowing many papers, related to different breeding systems of the Chinchilla l., wirenetting floor and bedding cage, which results that there are no significant differencesoverview the growth indices and implicit the forage intake, we where studied thebreed’s behavior to explain all these. Adopting one of the breeding systems involvessmaller or bigger investment, this being the principal aim of this paper. Knowing thatChinchilla has an inactive period of 71,02% from 24 h, they are resting 54,05% and16,97% so-called sleeping in 24 h. From our studies results that most of inactive time(rest and sleeping they are sitting on the dust bath tray, no matter the floor type. Thatexplains there are no significant differences in outputs depending on the adoptedtechnology.

  13. Regeneration of sciatic nerve in chinchilla posterity whose mothers were irradiated before mating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of the sciatic curve regeneration after smooth cutting thereof in 198 young chinchillas whose mothers were subjected to whole-body single irradiation with doses of 0.05, 0.15, 0.5 or 1.5 Gy one week before mating. The statistically important data obtained may be used to estimate the risk from ionizing radiation and ensure the radiation sequrity standards

  14. Histological and morphometric study of the epididymus of Chinchilla lanigera Grey under controlled conditions in captivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramajo-Bühler, M C; Pucci, F J; Sanchez-Toranzo, G

    2016-06-01

    Chinchilla lanigera, native to the Andean Mountains of Perú, Chile, Bolivia and Argentina, is a specimen of great economic importance because of its fur. In mammals, spermatozoa originate in testes and are transported to the epididymis, where they undergo morphological and biochemical modifications known as sperm maturation, a basic step in the acquisition of their fertilizing ability. The aim of this work is the macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the epididymis of Chinchilla lanigera Grey and its sectorization based on a histomorphological study. The epididymis presents a clear segmentation into four regions: initial segment, caput, corpus and cauda. The epithelium lining the seminiferous tubules is pseudostratified, with principal cells with stereocilia and basal, clear, apical, narrow and halo cells. The histological analysis showed that principal and basal cells are the prevailing populations in all regions, also revealing narrow cells and the absence of clear cells in the initial segment. Each segment presents its different histological and morphometric characteristics, which supports the idea of the specific behaviour of each region, giving a segment-specific character to the process of sperm maturation in this species. No significant differences were found in the morphometric measurements or in the histological evaluation of the epididymis of samples collected in April and October. The fact that no differences were found between the samples collected during the two periods when the reproductive ability in nature is different suggests the importance of external factors in the control of the reproductive cycle of Chinchilla lanigera. PMID:27172053

  15. THE ANALYSIS OF THE FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE FERTILITY IN THREE COLOUR TYPES OF CHINCHILLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. SOCHA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to analyse the fertility of females in chinchilla. The number of born and raised animals was analysed in standard, beige and black velvet chinchilla. The analysis of variance considered the influence of the colour type, the year and animal age. The analysis proved statistically significant influence of all the factors on the number of born and raised puppies. The highest fertility characterised standard females, then, beige, and the lowest, black velvet. The mean number of born in one litter was 2.10 in standard and less than 1.50 in black velvet. The mean number of raised was the highest in standard, 1.70. Variability coefficient ranged from 34% to 46% in the number of born and from 46% to 61% in the number of raised, depending on colour type and the year. Phenotypic correlations: high and positive correlations were estimated between the number of born and raised (0.641, which proves that the same females were characterised of both higher number of born and raised puppies. These estimators prove that genetic base had low but significant influence on fertility in chinchilla females.

  16. Estudio morfológico del oído medio e interno de la Chinchilla laniger Morphological study of the middle and internal ear of Chinchilla laniger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Carrasco M

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La Chinchilla laniger, roedor originario de la Cordillera de Los Andes, ha sido utilizada como modelo de investigación otológica por más de 40 años. Sin embargo, no existe un estudio anatómico e histológico detallado del oído de este animal. La mayoría de las investigaciones se han desarrollado en neurofisiología de la audición. Objetivos: Describir macroscópica y microscópicamente el oído medio e interno de la Chinchilla laniger. Material y método: Estudio realizado en cinco chinchillas adultas (previa aprobación del Comité de Bioética sobre la Investigación en Animales. Macroscopía: Se realizó una cirugía vía conducto auditivo externo y se estudió también con una tomografía computada de oído s. Microscopía: Disección, fijación e inclusión en parafina. Tinción con hematoxilina-eosina. Resultados: Vía conducto auditivo externo se realiza un colgajo timpanomeatal similar al de estapedectomía. Se accede a la caja timpánica por el cuadrante posterosuperior Se observa que el martillo presenta un delgado mango unido verticalmente al tímpano. Presenta una cabeza con un gran proceso anterior en vez de ligamento timpanomaleolar anterior. Su cabeza se une al yunque, fusionándose. El proceso lenticular del yunque se une a un delgado estribo, en el cual se observa el vestigio de la arteria estapedial, entre las cruras. El promontorio es visible fácilmente dado su tamaño y prominencia. La ventana oval se encuentra levemente más superoanterior que la ventana redonda. La cóclea da 3 y media vueltas sobre el modiolo. El órgano de Corti, sáculo, utrículo y crista ampularis se identificaron en los cortes histológicos. Conclusiones: El estudio morfológico detallado de un modelo de investigación como la chinchilla es imprescindible para el desarrollo de nuevos estudios en audición.Introduction: Chinchilla laniger is a rodent that has been used as a model of ear research for more than 40 years

  17. Classification of frequency response areas in the inferior colliculus reveals continua not discrete classes

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Alan R; Shackleton, Trevor M.; Sumner, Christian J.; Zobay, Oliver; Rees, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    A differential response to sound frequency is a fundamental property of auditory neurons. Frequency analysis in the cochlea gives rise to V-shaped tuning functions in auditory nerve fibres, but by the level of the inferior colliculus (IC), the midbrain nucleus of the auditory pathway, neuronal receptive fields display diverse shapes that reflect the interplay of excitation and inhibition. The origin and nature of these frequency receptive field types is still open to question. One proposed hy...

  18. Transfection using hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in the inner ear via an intact round window membrane in chinchilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Xuewen; Ding Dalian [Central South University, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The Third Xiangya Hospital (China); Jiang Haiyan [State University of New York at Buffalo, Center for Hearing and Deafness (United States); XingXiaowei [Central South University, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The Third Xiangya Hospital (China); Huang, Suping [Central South University, State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy (China); Liu Hong [Central South University, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The Third Xiangya Hospital (China); Chen Zhedong [Central South University, State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy (China); Sun Hong, E-mail: shjhaj@vip.163.com [Central South University, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Xiangya Hospital (China)

    2012-01-15

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAT) are known to have excellent biocompatibility, and have attracted increasing attention as new candidates of non-viral vectors for gene therapy. In our previous studies, nHAT carrying a therapeutic gene and a reporter gene were successfully transfected into the spiral ganglion neurons in the inner ear of guinea pigs in vivo as well as in the cultured cell lines, although the transfection efficiencies were never higher than 30%. In this study, the surface modification of nHAT with polyethylenimine (PEI) was made (PEI-nHAT, diameter = 73.09 {+-} 27.32 nm) and a recombinant plasmid carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) gene was constructed as pEGFPC2-NT3. The PEI modified nHAT and the recombinant plasmid was then connected to form the nHAT-based vector-gene complex (PEI-nHAT-pEGFPC2-NT3). This complex was then placed onto the intact round window membranes of the chinchillas for inner ear transfection. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) was tested to evaluate auditory function. Green fluorescence of EGFP was observed using confocal microscopy 48 h after administering vector-gene complexes. There was no significant threshold shift in tone burst-evoked ABR at any tested frequency. Abundant, condensed green fluorescence was found in dark cells on both sides of the crista and around the macula of the utricle. Scattered EGFP signals were also detected in vestibular hair cells, some Schwann cells in the cochlear spiral ganglion region, some outer pillar cells in the organ of Corti, and a few cells in the stria vascularis. The density of green fluorescence-marked cells was obviously higher in the vestibular dark cell area than in other areas of the inner ear, suggesting that vestibular dark cells may have the ability to actively engulf the nHAT-based vector-gene complexes. Considering the high transfection efficiency in the vestibular system, PEI-nHAT may be a potential vector for gene therapy of

  19. Transfection using hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in the inner ear via an intact round window membrane in chinchilla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAT) are known to have excellent biocompatibility, and have attracted increasing attention as new candidates of non-viral vectors for gene therapy. In our previous studies, nHAT carrying a therapeutic gene and a reporter gene were successfully transfected into the spiral ganglion neurons in the inner ear of guinea pigs in vivo as well as in the cultured cell lines, although the transfection efficiencies were never higher than 30%. In this study, the surface modification of nHAT with polyethylenimine (PEI) was made (PEI–nHAT, diameter = 73.09 ± 27.32 nm) and a recombinant plasmid carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) gene was constructed as pEGFPC2–NT3. The PEI modified nHAT and the recombinant plasmid was then connected to form the nHAT-based vector–gene complex (PEI–nHAT–pEGFPC2–NT3). This complex was then placed onto the intact round window membranes of the chinchillas for inner ear transfection. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) was tested to evaluate auditory function. Green fluorescence of EGFP was observed using confocal microscopy 48 h after administering vector–gene complexes. There was no significant threshold shift in tone burst-evoked ABR at any tested frequency. Abundant, condensed green fluorescence was found in dark cells on both sides of the crista and around the macula of the utricle. Scattered EGFP signals were also detected in vestibular hair cells, some Schwann cells in the cochlear spiral ganglion region, some outer pillar cells in the organ of Corti, and a few cells in the stria vascularis. The density of green fluorescence-marked cells was obviously higher in the vestibular dark cell area than in other areas of the inner ear, suggesting that vestibular dark cells may have the ability to actively engulf the nHAT-based vector–gene complexes. Considering the high transfection efficiency in the vestibular system, PEI–nHAT may be a potential vector for

  20. Medial olivocochlear efferent inhibition of basilar-membrane responses to clicks: Evidence for two modes of cochlear mechanical excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Guinan, John J.; Cooper, Nigel P.

    2008-01-01

    Conceptualizations of mammalian cochlear mechanics are based on basilar-membrane (BM) traveling waves that scale with frequency along the length of the cochlea, are amplified by outer hair cells (OHCs), and excite inner hair cells and auditory-nerve (AN) fibers in a simple way. However, recent experimental work has shown medial-olivocochlear (MOC) inhibition of AN responses to clicks that do not fit with this picture. To test whether this AN-initial-peak (ANIP) inhibition might result from hi...

  1. Identifying the Threshold of Iron Deficiency in the Central Nervous System of the Rat by the Auditory Brainstem Response

    OpenAIRE

    Greminger, Allison R.; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot

    2015-01-01

    The deleterious effects of anemia on auditory nerve (AN) development have been well investigated; however, we have previously reported that significant functional consequences in the auditory brainstem response (ABR) can also occur as a consequence of marginal iron deficiency (ID). As the ABR has widespread clinical use, we evaluated the ability of this electrophysiological method to characterize the threshold of tissue ID in rats by examining the relationship between markers of tissue ID and...

  2. 基于听觉神经同步振荡网络的时频结构描述方法%Novel Method for Time-frequency Structure Description Based on Synchronized Oscillatory Network of Auditory Nerve Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李允公; 张金萍; 戴丽; 张占一

    2012-01-01

    人类听觉系统具有优良的非平稳信号分析能力,在听觉系统中,由耳蜗基底膜对信号进行类似于带通滤波的时频分解,并由内毛细胞、传入神经和听觉中枢的神经网络对时频分解结果逐步进行特征信息提取和压缩.鉴于此,参照Wang-Brown模型,建立一种可描述信号时频结构特征的听觉模型,该模型包括基底膜、内毛细胞、中级听觉和听觉中枢等子模型,听觉中枢模型由单层听神经振荡网络构成.略去Wang-Brown模型中随机项和侧抑制项,简化内毛细胞模型,设计听神经元的活跃准则和神经元间的联接方式.信号经基底膜、内毛细胞和中级听觉模型处理后,由听神经振荡网络进行信息综合,使得信号中时频结构相似的区域所对应的听神经元进行同步振荡,从而可利用同步振荡神经元的分布情况描述信号的时频结构.进行故障转子升降速试验和风力发电增速机稳速运行试验,试验所得信号的分析结果表明,所建模型能够有效描述信号的时频结构特征及其变化情况,对信号的瞬态变化较为敏感,且数据量相对较小,易于智能识别.%The human auditory system possesses excellent capability to analysis non-stationary signal. In auditory system, before a signal is recognized by the auditory cortex, it is sequentially processed by the basilar membrane, which can be seen as a bandpass filterbank, and other elements in auditory system. Therefore, to describe the structure features of signal in time-frequency space, an auditory model is proposed based on Wang-Brown model and the auditory nerve fiber oscillatory network with single layer. This model consists of basilar membrane, inner hair cells, middle auditory stage and auditory cortex, and the auditory cortex model is a single layer auditory nerve fiber oscillatory network. According to the characteristic of mechanical vibration signal, the random term and lateral inhibitor in Wang

  3. STUDIES REGARDING THE DURATION OF MAINS MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES ON CHINCHILLAS BREAD IN INTENSIV SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. CĂLĂMAR

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was made in 2008 and his purpose was to establish the period of time necessary to execute the main services in a chinchilla farm in order to do the standardisation of work and to establish the payment It has been determined the period of time necessary for giveing the hay, the fodder, the water, checking the animal births, spreading out the sand, etc., wich was 3 hours and 25 minutes. 3 workers participated in this daily program, so wich one of them worked for 3 hours and 8 minutes every day.

  4. Observations on the morphology and chemical analysis of medullary granules in chinchilla hair. Research letters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keogh, H.J. (South African Inst. for Medical Research, Johannesburg); Haylett, T. (Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria (South Africa). National Chemical Research Lab.)

    1983-02-01

    The ultrastructure of the medullary granules of white and grey chinchilla hair was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and chemical analysis in an attempt to clarify their structure and function. Atomic absorption spectroscopy and amino acid analysis showed them to be composed of melanin. The sample preparation for scanning electron microscopy is discussed. The metal content was qualitatively established by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and quantitatively determined on a Varian Techtron model AAs atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Amino acid analysis of the granule, was carried out on a Beckman 121 amino acid analyser. Information is provided on the amino acid composition of the medullary granules as well as its metal content.

  5. Observations on the morphology and chemical analysis of medullary granules in chinchilla hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultrastructure of the medullary granules of white and grey chinchilla hair was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and chemical analysis in an attempt to clarify their structure and function. Atomic absorption spectroscopy and amino acid analysis showed them to be composed of melanin. The sample preparation for scanning electron microscopy is discussed. The metal content was qualitatively established by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and quantitatively determined on a Varian Techtron model AAs atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Amino acid analysis of the granule, was carried out on a Beckman 121 amino acid analyser. Information is provided on the amino acid composition of the medullary granules as well as its metal content

  6. Morpho-histological studies on the male genital apparatus of Chinchilla laniger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calin Daniel Calamar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The histological studies of the male genital apparatus of the Chinchilla Laniger are scares and incomplete. Due to the studies done on the male genital apparatus of Chinchilla Laniger it has been determined that the seminiferous tubes are separated by large conjunctive septum, the seminiferous epithelium varies from one tissue to another, aspect that suggests different stages in the spermatogenesis process. The epididymis channel is made up of pseudo-layered epithelium, a reduced lamina propria and a delicate muscular layer. The deferent channel wall is made up of three tunics: mucous, muscular and adventitia. The muscular tunic is the most developed part and is made up of three super posed layers of even smooth muscle cell. The histological sections done on the pelvic urethra reveals the following components: mucous, vascular layer, muscular and adventitia. The transversal sections done on the free extremity of the penis reveal the presence of the foreskin made up of three layers: tegument or external, parietal or visceral. The vesicular glands (seminal have an intestine shaped aspect and are sustained by their own ligament, richly vascularised. The transversal section reveals a tubular aspect, the wall of these tubes is made up of: mucous, muscular and adventitia. The prostate is made up of an external part and an internal part, and is covered in a thick conjunctive-muscular capsule.

  7. Immunoreactivity of S100β protein in the hippocampus of chinchilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczyk Aleksandra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate S100β protein in astrocytes of CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus proper and the dentate gyrus with the hilus yet undefined in mature males of chinchilla. The presence of S100β was determined using indirect immunohistochemical peroxidase-antiperoxidase method with specific monoclonal antibody against this protein. Most of the S100β-positive cells were detected in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and in the middle part of the hilus. In CA3 area, it was found that the most numerous cells with S100β are in stratum radiatum. In CA1 area, there were single astrocytes expressing this protein. This data demonstrates species differences and a large quantity of S100β immunoreactive cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of chinchilla, which may be associated with structural reorganisation of the hippocampus and with neurogenesis, learning, and memorising process dependent on the hippocampus.

  8. Development of a Chinchilla Model To Allow Direct, Continuous, Biophotonic Imaging of Bioluminescent Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae during Experimental Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Novotny, Laura A.; Mason, Kevin M.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.

    2005-01-01

    We transformed a nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae clinical isolate with a plasmid containing the luxCDABE operon driven by the H. influenzae outer membrane protein P2 promoter. Herein, we demonstrate the ability to detect bioluminescence and to monitor infection within the nasopharynges, eustachian tubes, and middle ears of chinchillas after intranasal and transbullar challenges.

  9. Analysis of Conformation Characters in Chinchillas of Standard and Polish Beige Strains in the Breeding Farm ‘Raba’ in Myślenice

    OpenAIRE

    Stanisław Socha; Dauta Wójcik; Dorota Kołodziejczyk; Aldona Gontarz

    2010-01-01

    The work aimed at the analysis of the influence of colour type on chinchilla utilitarian traits. Research concerns animal size and fur quality traits. The data for the analysis was collected from the breeding farm „Raba” in Myślenice (southern Poland). The data concerns standard and Polish beige chinchillas and covers 3 years. The analysis included the following factors: year of evaluation, animal sex, colour type and interactions of these factors. The analysis of variance proved statisticall...

  10. Reference values for chinchilla (Chinchilla laniger blood cells and serum biochemical parameters Valores de referência para os parâmetros das células e bioquímica sangüínea da chinchila (Chinchilla laniger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tális de Oliveira Silva

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Raising chinchilla (Chinchilla laniger for commercial purpose has increased significantly; however, hematological and serum biochemical reference values have not yet been determined for chinchillas raised in south Brazil. Establishing blood cells and serum biochemistry reference values might be helpful to evaluate health status of chinchillas and might be used as a tool by clinicians. The purpose of this study was to determine the reference values for blood cells and serum biochemistry of Chinchilla laniger. Blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture from 16 adult males, at the time they were killed to remove the fur coat, and from 8 adult males anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine. Blood cell counts and serum biochemistry analysis were performed using standard techniques and the results were expressed as mean ± SEM. Analysis of blood parameters from post-mortem cardiac punctured and from anesthetized chinchillas indicated that blood samples from anesthetized chinchillas had higher PCV, Hemoglobin, MCHC and WBC (P A criação de chinchila (Chinchilla laniger com objetivos comerciais tem crescido muito nos últimos anos. No entanto, os valores de referência para os parâmetros hematológicos e bioquímicos não foram ainda determinados para chinchilas criados no sul do Brasil. O estabelecimento dos valores de referência para esses parâmetros pode servir de auxílio para a avaliação da saúde das chinchilas e servir de auxílio diagnóstico para o clínico. Esse estudo teve como objetivo determinar os valores de referência das células e da bioquímica sangüínea da Chinchilla laniger. As amostras de sangue foram coletadas por meio de punção cardíaca de 16 machos adultos no momento em que os animais foram mortos para remoção da pele, e de 8 machos adultos após anestesia com xylazina e ketamina. A contagem das células sangüíneas e a análise dos parâmetros bioquímicos foram feitas utilizando-se métodos padronizados em

  11. Surface Proteins and Pneumolysin of Encapsulated and Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae Mediate Virulence in a Chinchilla Model of Otitis Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lance E.; Bradshaw, Jessica L.; Pipkins, Haley; McDaniel, Larry S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections result in a range of human diseases and are responsible for almost one million deaths annually. Pneumococcal disease is mediated in part through surface structures and an anti-phagocytic capsule. Recent studies have shown that nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae (NESp) make up a significant portion of the pneumococcal population and are able to cause disease. NESp lack some common surface proteins expressed by encapsulated pneumococci, but express surface proteins unique to NESp. A chinchilla model of otitis media (OM) was used to determine the effect various pneumococcal mutations have on pathogenesis in both NESp and encapsulated pneumococci. Epithelial cell adhesion and invasion assays were used to examine the effects in relation to deletion of intrinsic genes or expression of novel genes. A mouse model of colonization was also utilized for comparison of various pneumococcal mutants. It was determined that pneumococcal surface protein K (PspK) and pneumolysin (Ply) affect NESp middle ear pathogenesis, but only PspK affected epithelial cell adhesion. Experiments in an OM model were done with encapsulated strains testing the importance of native virulence factors and treatment of OM. First, a triple deletion of the common virulence factors PspA, PspC, and Ply, (ΔPAC), from an encapsulated background abolished virulence in an OM model while a PspC mutant had detectable, but reduced amounts of recoverable bacteria compared to wildtype. Next, treatment of OM was effective when starting antibiotic treatment within 24 h with resolution by 48 h post-treatment. Expression of NESp-specific virulence factor PspK in an encapsulated strain has not been previously studied, and we showed significantly increased adhesion and invasion of human epithelial cells by pneumococci. Murine colonization was not significantly increased when an encapsulated strain expressed PspK, but colonization was increased when a capsule mutant expressed PspK. The

  12. SURFACE PROTEINS AND PNEUMOLYSIN OF ENCAPSULATED AND NONENCAPSULATED STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE MEDIATE VIRULENCE IN A CHINCHILLA MODEL OF OTITIS MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance E. Keller

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae infections result in a range of human diseases and are responsible for almost one million deaths annually. Pneumococcal disease is mediated in part through surface structures and an anti-phagocytic capsule. Recent studies have shown that nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae (NESp make up a significant portion of the pneumococcal population and are able to cause disease. NESp lack some common surface proteins expressed by encapsulated pneumococci, but express surface proteins unique to NESp. A chinchilla model of otitis media (OM was used to determine the effect various pneumococcal mutations have on pathogenesis in both NESp and encapsulated pneumococci. Epithelial cell adhesion and invasion assays were used to examine the effects in relation to deletion of intrinsic genes or expression of novel genes. A mouse model of colonization was also utilized for comparison of various pneumococcal mutants. It was determined that pneumococcal surface protein K (PspK and pneumolysin (Ply affect NESp middle ear pathogenesis, but only PspK affected epithelial cell adhesion. Experiments in an OM model were done with encapsulated strains testing the importance of native virulence factors and treatment of OM. First, a triple deletion of the common virulence factors PspA, PspC, and Ply, (ΔPAC, from an encapsulated background abolished virulence in an OM model while a PspC mutant had detectable, but reduced amounts of recoverable bacteria compared to wildtype. Next, treatment of OM was effective when starting antibiotic treatment within 24 hrs with resolution by 48 hrs post treatment. Expression of NESp-specific virulence factor PspK in an encapsulated strain has not been previously studied, and we showed significantly increased adhesion and invasion of human epithelial cells by pneumococci. Murine colonization was not significantly increased when an encapsulated strain expressed PspK, but colonization was increased when a capsule

  13. Surface Proteins and Pneumolysin of Encapsulated and Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae Mediate Virulence in a Chinchilla Model of Otitis Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lance E; Bradshaw, Jessica L; Pipkins, Haley; McDaniel, Larry S

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections result in a range of human diseases and are responsible for almost one million deaths annually. Pneumococcal disease is mediated in part through surface structures and an anti-phagocytic capsule. Recent studies have shown that nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae (NESp) make up a significant portion of the pneumococcal population and are able to cause disease. NESp lack some common surface proteins expressed by encapsulated pneumococci, but express surface proteins unique to NESp. A chinchilla model of otitis media (OM) was used to determine the effect various pneumococcal mutations have on pathogenesis in both NESp and encapsulated pneumococci. Epithelial cell adhesion and invasion assays were used to examine the effects in relation to deletion of intrinsic genes or expression of novel genes. A mouse model of colonization was also utilized for comparison of various pneumococcal mutants. It was determined that pneumococcal surface protein K (PspK) and pneumolysin (Ply) affect NESp middle ear pathogenesis, but only PspK affected epithelial cell adhesion. Experiments in an OM model were done with encapsulated strains testing the importance of native virulence factors and treatment of OM. First, a triple deletion of the common virulence factors PspA, PspC, and Ply, (ΔPAC), from an encapsulated background abolished virulence in an OM model while a PspC mutant had detectable, but reduced amounts of recoverable bacteria compared to wildtype. Next, treatment of OM was effective when starting antibiotic treatment within 24 h with resolution by 48 h post-treatment. Expression of NESp-specific virulence factor PspK in an encapsulated strain has not been previously studied, and we showed significantly increased adhesion and invasion of human epithelial cells by pneumococci. Murine colonization was not significantly increased when an encapsulated strain expressed PspK, but colonization was increased when a capsule mutant expressed PspK. The

  14. Prediction and control of neural responses to pulsatile electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Luke J.; Sly, David James; O'Leary, Stephen John

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims to predict and control the probability of firing of a neuron in response to pulsatile electrical stimulation of the type delivered by neural prostheses such as the cochlear implant, bionic eye or in deep brain stimulation. Using the cochlear implant as a model, we developed an efficient computational model that predicts the responses of auditory nerve fibers to electrical stimulation and evaluated the model's accuracy by comparing the model output with pooled responses from a group of guinea pig auditory nerve fibers. It was found that the model accurately predicted the changes in neural firing probability over time to constant and variable amplitude electrical pulse trains, including speech-derived signals, delivered at rates up to 889 pulses s-1. A simplified version of the model that did not incorporate adaptation was used to adaptively predict, within its limitations, the pulsatile electrical stimulus required to cause a desired response from neurons up to 250 pulses s-1. Future stimulation strategies for cochlear implants and other neural prostheses may be enhanced using similar models that account for the way that neural responses are altered by previous stimulation.

  15. Corticofugal modulation of peripheral auditory responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Hinckley Delano

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The auditory efferent system originates in the auditory cortex and projects to the medial geniculate body, inferior colliculus, cochlear nucleus and superior olivary complex reaching the cochlea through olivocochlear fibers. This unique neuronal network is organized in several afferent-efferent feedback loops including: the (i colliculo-thalamic-cortico-collicular, (ii cortico-(collicular-olivocochlear and (iii cortico-(collicular-cochlear nucleus pathways. Recent experiments demonstrate that blocking ongoing auditory-cortex activity with pharmacological and physical methods modulates the amplitude of cochlear potentials. In addition, auditory-cortex microstimulation independently modulates cochlear sensitivity and the strength of the olivocochlear reflex. In this mini-review, anatomical and physiological evidence supporting the presence of a functional efferent network from the auditory cortex to the cochlear receptor is presented. Special emphasis is given to the corticofugal effects on initial auditory processing, that is, on cochlear nucleus, auditory nerve and cochlear responses. A working model of three parallel pathways from the auditory cortex to the cochlea and auditory nerve is proposed.

  16. Corticofugal modulation of peripheral auditory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terreros, Gonzalo; Delano, Paul H

    2015-01-01

    The auditory efferent system originates in the auditory cortex and projects to the medial geniculate body (MGB), inferior colliculus (IC), cochlear nucleus (CN) and superior olivary complex (SOC) reaching the cochlea through olivocochlear (OC) fibers. This unique neuronal network is organized in several afferent-efferent feedback loops including: the (i) colliculo-thalamic-cortico-collicular; (ii) cortico-(collicular)-OC; and (iii) cortico-(collicular)-CN pathways. Recent experiments demonstrate that blocking ongoing auditory-cortex activity with pharmacological and physical methods modulates the amplitude of cochlear potentials. In addition, auditory-cortex microstimulation independently modulates cochlear sensitivity and the strength of the OC reflex. In this mini-review, anatomical and physiological evidence supporting the presence of a functional efferent network from the auditory cortex to the cochlear receptor is presented. Special emphasis is given to the corticofugal effects on initial auditory processing, that is, on CN, auditory nerve and cochlear responses. A working model of three parallel pathways from the auditory cortex to the cochlea and auditory nerve is proposed. PMID:26483647

  17. Role of Sialic Acid and Complex Carbohydrate Biosynthesis in Biofilm Formation by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in the Chinchilla Middle Ear

    OpenAIRE

    Jurcisek, Joseph; Greiner, Laura; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Zaleski, Anthony; Apicella, Michael A.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.

    2005-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) is an important pathogen in respiratory tract infections, including otitis media (OM). NTHI forms biofilms in vitro as well as in the chinchilla middle ear, suggesting that biofilm formation in vivo might play an important role in the pathogenesis and chronicity of OM. We've previously shown that SiaA, SiaB, and WecA are involved in biofilm production by NTHI in vitro. To investigate whether these gene products were also involved in biofilm production...

  18. Comparison of cochlear delay estimates using otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harte, James; Pigasse, Gilles; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Different attempts have been made to directly measure frequency specific basilar membrane (BM) delays in animals, e.g., laser velocimetry of BM vibrations and auditory nerve fiber recordings. The present study uses otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to estimate B...... synaptic delays. This allows a comparison between individual OAE and BM delays over a large frequency range in the same subjects, and offers support to the theory that OAEs are reflected from a tonotopic place and carried back to the cochlear base via a reverse traveling wave....

  19. The vestibular nerve of the chinchilla. III. Peripheral innervation patterns in the utricular macula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, C.; Goldberg, J. M.; Baird, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    1. Nerve fibers supplying the utricular macula of the chinchilla were labeled by extracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase into the vestibular nerve. The peripheral terminations of individual fibers were reconstructed and related to the regions of the end organ they innervated and to the sizes of their parent axons. 2. The macula is divided into medial and lateral parts by the striola, a narrow zone that runs for almost the entire length of the sensory epithelium. The striola can be distinguished from the extrastriolar regions to either side of it by the wider spacing of its hair cells. Calyx endings in the striola have especially thick walls, and, unlike similar endings in the extrastriola, many of them innervate more than one hair cell. The striola occupies 10% of the sensory epithelium; the lateral extrastriola, 50%; and the medial extrastriola, 40%. 3. The utricular nerve penetrates the bony labyrinth anterior to the end organ. Axons reaching the anterior part of the sensory epithelium run directly through the connective tissue stroma. Those supplying more posterior regions first enter a fiber layer located at the bottom of the stroma. Approximately one-third of the axons bifurcate below the epithelium, usually within 5-20 microns of the basement membrane. Bifurcations are more common in fibers destined for the extrastriola than for the striola. 4. Both calyx and bouton endings were labeled. Calyces can be simple or complex. Simple calyces innervate individual hair cells, whereas complex calyces supply 2-4 adjacent hair cells. Complex endings are more heavily concentrated in the striola than in the extrastriola. Simple calyces and boutons are found in all parts of the epithelium. Calyces emerge from the parent axon or one of its thick branches. Boutons, whether en passant or terminal, are located on thin collaterals. 5. Fibers can be classified into calyx, bouton, or dimorphic categories. The first type only has calyx endings; the second, only bouton

  20. Intraoperative Neural Response Telemetry and Neural Recovery Function: a Comparative Study between Adults and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Bettina; Hamerschmidt, Rogerio; Wiemes, Gislaine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neural response telemetry (NRT) is a method of capturing the action potential of the distal portion of the auditory nerve in cochlear implant (CI) users, using the CI itself to elicit and record the answers. In addition, it can also measure the recovery function of the auditory nerve (REC), that is, the refractory properties of the nerve. It is not clear in the literature whether the responses from adults are the same as those from children. Objective To compare the results of NRT and REC between adults and children undergoing CI surgery. Methods Cross-sectional, descriptive, and retrospective study of the results of NRT and REC for patients undergoing IC at our service. The NRT is assessed by the level of amplitude (microvolts) and REC as a function of three parameters: A (saturation level, in microvolts), t0 (absolute refractory period, in seconds), and tau (curve of the model function), measured in three electrodes (apical, medial, and basal). Results Fifty-two patients were evaluated with intraoperative NRT (26 adults and 26 children), and 24 with REC (12 adults and 12 children). No statistically significant difference was found between intraoperative responses of adults and children for NRT or for REC's three parameters, except for parameter A of the basal electrode. Conclusion The results of intraoperative NRT and REC were not different between adults and children, except for parameter A of the basal electrode. PMID:25992145

  1. COMPARATIVE RESEARCHE REGARDING METABOLIC PROFILE OF THE CALIFORNIAN, NEW ZEALAND WHITE, GRAND CHINCHILLA MEAT RABIT BREEDS AND THE F1 NZCH HYBRIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIELA-MARCELA TOBĂ (GOINA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Precious biological characteristics of rabbits make their breeding a very profitable occupation. The rabbit meat, organoleptically same to the white meat, is rich in proteins, but low in fats. Biological researched done in direction to elucidate the biochemical systems that are the basis for organism physiological processes, have revealed that the level in which this process are develop directly influence the rabbits productivity capacity. 60 rabbit’s heads was used as biological material, distributed in: 15 Californian, 15 New Zeeland White, 15 Grand Chinchilla and 15 F1NZCH hybrids obtained from cross-breeding the New Zeeland White as maternal form and Grand Chinchilla as paternal form. Blood was sampled from the rabbit and was biochemical analyzed. The studied indices were: total protein, albumin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, total bilirubine, cholesterol, triglyceride and glucose. The experimental lot formed from F1 NZCH hybrids registered a concentration of 2.1 mg/dl uric acid, and in the other three lots the concentration was under 2 mg/dl. In all four lots, uric acid value was in normal limits. The determined creatinine registered very low values, under 1 mg/dl, at the low limit of reference values. At hybrids from New Zeeland White as maternal form and Grand Chinchilla as paternal form, in equal environmental conditions, the serum biochemical analysis haven’t registered significant differences compared to pure breeds individuals.

  2. Analysis of responses to noise in the ventral cochlear nucleus using Wiener kernels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Recio-Spinoso, Alberto; van Dijk, Pim

    2006-01-01

    Responses to noise were recorded in ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) neurons of anesthetized chinchillas and cats, then analyzed using Wiener-kernel theory. First-order kernels, which are proportional to reverse-correlation functions, of primary-like (PL) and primary-like with notch (PLN) neurons havi

  3. One-tone suppression in the frog auditory nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Jørgensen, M B

    1996-01-01

    frequencies ranged from 700 to 1200 Hz. Spontaneous activities for the fibers showing one-tone suppression ranged from 3 to 75 spikes/s. Spontaneous activities above 40 spikes/s and the phenomenon of one-tone suppression itself has not been reported previously for frogs. The population of fibers showing one...

  4. Regeneration of the auditory nerve - a cell transplantation study

    OpenAIRE

    Palmgren, Björn

    2011-01-01

    Since in mammals, the hair cells or the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the inner ear do not regenerate, damage to these cells is an irreversible process. Presently the only aid for patients with severe to profound hearing impairment due to damaged hair cells is a cochlear implant (CI). A CI converts sound to electrical signals that stimulate the SGNs via an electrode that is implanted into the cochlea. Hence, for a successful outcome the CI is dependant on the activation ...

  5. Asymmetric textural and structural patterns of a granitic body emplaced at shallow levels: The La Chinchilla pluton, northwestern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchioli Grande, M.; Alasino, P. H.; Rocher, S.; Larrovere, M. A.; Dahlquist, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    New mapping and a detailed structural study of the La Chinchilla stock, Sierra de Velasco, NW Argentina, suggest an asymmetrical shape of the pluton and provide strong evidence for its shallow emplacement depth. The pluton is a Lower Carboniferous monzogranite composed of K-feldspar, quartz, plagioclase and biotite. It exhibits an internal asymmetric textural zoning, defined by porphyritic granite in the southeastern region to equigranular granite in the northwestern region. The presence of subhorizontal dikes in the northwestern area, where the contacts dip shallowly, and subvertical dikes intruding the host rock nearby steep-dipping intrusive contacts in the southeastern region are compatible with an overall asymmetrical shape and internal structure of this pluton. Considering published crystallization ages, a dominant strain field occurring at around 12 Ma is inferred based on magmatic fabrics in the pluton and its host rock (the Huaco pluton), with a principal shortening direction oriented SW-NE, consistent with the general NW-SE strike of the body. Field evidence supports brittle fracturing and block displacement as the dominant emplacement mechanism, suggesting that magmatic stoping dominated during the late stage of the evolution of the magma chamber.

  6. Age-Related Changes in Processing Simultaneous Amplitude Modulated Sounds Assessed Using Envelope Following Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Aravindakshan; Lai, Jesyin; Bartlett, Edward L

    2016-04-01

    Listening conditions in the real world involve segregating the stimuli of interest from competing auditory stimuli that differ in their sound level and spectral content. It is in these conditions of complex spectro-temporal processing that listeners with age-related hearing loss experience the most difficulties. Envelope following responses (EFRs) provide objective neurophysiological measures of auditory processing. EFRs were obtained to two simultaneous sinusoidally amplitude modulated (sAM) tones from young and aged Fischer-344 rats. One was held at a fixed suprathreshold sound level (sAM1FL) while the second varied in sound level (sAM2VL) and carrier frequency. EFR amplitudes to sAM1FL in the young decreased with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and this reduction was more pronounced when the sAM2VL carrier frequency was spectrally separated from sAM1FL. Aged animals showed similar trends, while having decreased overall response amplitudes compared to the young. These results were replicated using an established computational model of the auditory nerve. The trends observed in the EFRs were shown to be due to the contributions of the low-frequency tails of high-frequency neurons, rather than neurons tuned to the sAM1FL carrier frequency. Modeling changes in threshold and neural loss reproduced some of the changes seen with age, but accuracy improved when combined with an additional decrease representing synaptic loss of auditory nerve neurons. Sound segregation in this case derives primarily from peripheral processing, regardless of age. Contributions by more central neural mechanisms are likely to occur only at low SNRs. PMID:26905273

  7. Cochlear Responses and Auditory Brainstem Response Functions in Adults with Auditory Neuropathy/ Dys-Synchrony and Individuals with Normal Hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jafari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Physiologic measures of cochlear and auditory nerve function may be of assis¬tance in distinguishing between hearing disorders due primarily to auditory nerve impairment from those due primarily to cochlear hair cells dysfunction. The goal of present study was to measure of co-chlear responses (otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonics and auditory brainstem response in some adults with auditory neuropathy/ dys-synchrony and subjects with normal hearing. Materials and Methods: Patients were 16 adults (32 ears in age range of 14-30 years with auditory neu¬ropathy/ dys-synchrony and 16 individuals in age range of 16-30 years from both sexes. The results of transient otoacoustic emissions, cochlear microphonics and auditory brainstem response measures were compared in both groups and the effects of age, sex, ear and degree of hearing loss were studied. Results: The pure-tone average was 48.1 dB HL in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony group and the fre¬quency of low tone loss and flat audiograms were higher among other audiogram's shapes. Transient oto¬acoustic emissions were shown in all auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony people except two cases and its average was near in both studied groups. The latency and amplitude of the biggest reversed co-chlear microphonics response were higher in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony patients than control peo¬ple significantly. The correlation between cochlear microphonics amplitude and degree of hearing loss was not significant, and age had significant effect in some cochlear microphonics measures. Audi-tory brainstem response had no response in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony patients even with low stim¬uli rates. Conclusion: In adults with speech understanding worsen than predicted from the degree of hearing loss that suspect to auditory neuropathy/ dys-synchrony, the frequency of low tone loss and flat audiograms are higher. Usually auditory brainstem response is absent in

  8. Correlation between intra-operative high rate neural response telemetry measurements and behaviourally obtained threshold and comfort levels in patients using Nucleus 24 cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, R; Panwar, S S

    2009-06-01

    The correlation between high rate 250 Hz intra-operative threshold neural response telemetry (t-NRT) with behaviourally obtained psychophysical threshold (T) and comfort (C) levels of the most recent and stable maps of 90 consecutive cochlear implantees using Cochlear Implant 24 Mini (CI 24 M) (M: F - 26:19), aged between two and 60 years with a mean age of 9.61 +/-12.07, was studied. The intra-operative t-NRT levels were seen to fall between the T and C levels and a good correlation was found between t-NRT and T and C levels (r = 0.327 at p auditory nerves but can be used in programming the speech processor for young and difficult recipients, as has been previously shown using low rate NRT. PMID:19025887

  9. Virulence phenotypes of low-passage clinical isolates of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae assessed using the chinchilla laniger model of otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogg Justin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi are associated with a spectrum of respiratory mucosal infections including: acute otitis media (AOM; chronic otitis media with effusion (COME; otorrhea; locally invasive diseases such as mastoiditis; as well as a range of systemic disease states, suggesting a wide range of virulence phenotypes. Genomic studies have demonstrated that each clinical strain contains a unique genic distribution from a population-based supragenome, the distributed genome hypothesis. These diverse clinical and genotypic findings suggest that each NTHi strain possesses a unique set of virulence factors that contributes to the course of the disease. Results The local and systemic virulence patterns of ten genomically characterized low-passage clinical NTHi strains (PittAA – PittJJ obtained from children with COME or otorrhea were stratified using the chinchilla model of otitis media (OM. Each isolate was used to bilaterally inoculate six animals and thereafter clinical assessments were carried out daily for 8 days by blinded observers. There was no statistical difference in the time it took for any of the 10 NTHi strains to induce otologic (local disease with respect to any or all of the other strains, however the differences in time to maximal local disease and the severity of local disease were both significant between the strains. Parameters of systemic disease indicated that the strains were not all equivalent: time to development of the systemic disease, maximal systemic scores and mortality were all statistically different among the strains. PittGG induced 100% mortality while PittBB, PittCC, and PittEE produced no mortality. Overall Pitt GG, PittII, and Pitt FF produced the most rapid and most severe local and systemic disease. A post hoc determination of the clinical origins of the 10 NTHi strains revealed that these three strains were of otorrheic origin, whereas the other 7 were from patients

  10. Hair-cell counts and afferent innervation patterns in the cristae ampullares of the squirrel monkey with a comparison to the chinchilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, C.; Lysakowski, A.; Goldberg, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. The numbers of type I and type II hair cells were estimated by dissector techniques applied to semithin, stained sections of the horizontal, superior, and posterior cristae in the squirrel monkey and the chinchilla. 2. The crista in each species was divided into concentrically arranged central, intermediate, and peripheral zones of equal areas. The three zones can be distinguished by the sizes of individual hair cells and calyx endings, by the density of hair cells, and by the relative frequency of calyx endings innervating single or multiple type I hair cells. 3. In the monkey crista, type I hair cells outnumber type II hair cells by a ratio of almost 3:1. The ratio decreases from 4-5:1 in the central and intermediate zones to under 2:1 in the peripheral zone. For the chinchilla, the ratio is near 1:1 for the entire crista and decreases only slightly between the central and peripheral zones. 4. Nerve fibers supplying the cristae in the squirrel monkey were labeled by extracellular injections of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the vestibular nerve. Peripheral terminations of individual fibers were reconstructed and related to the zones of the cristae they innervated and to the sizes of their parent axons. Results were similar for the horizontal, superior, and posterior cristae. 5. Axons seldom bifurcate below the neuroepithelium. Most fibers begin branching shortly after crossing the basement membrane. Their terminal arbors are compact, usually extending no more than 50-100 microns from the parent exon. A small number of long intraepithelial fibers enter the intermediate and peripheral zones of the cristae near its base, then run unbranched for long distances through the neuroepithelium to reach the central zone. 6. There are three classes of afferent fibers innervating the monkey crista. Calyx fibers terminate exclusively on type I hair cells, and bouton fibers end only on type II hair cells. Dimorphic fibers provide a mixed innervation, including calyx

  11. Caracterización litogeoquímica del granito La Chinchilla y su relación con el uranio, siella de Velasco, provincia de La Rioja

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Salvatore

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available El plutón La Chinchilla es un cuerpo granítico de forma subelipsoidal en planta que aflora en el sector central de la sierra de Velasco, provincia de La Rioja, Argentina, cubriendo un área aproximada de 3,75 km2. Intruye en forma neta al granito porfírico Huaco, o bien mediante contactos pegmatoides y en algunos sectores con desarrollo de stockscheider. Fueron definidas tres facies graníticas en base a sus características texturales, composición mineralógica y radioactividad natural. La facies porfírica de mayor extensión areal, la facies equigranular y la facies de borde de grano fino de escasa representación areal, todas correspondientes modalmente a monzogranitos. Los análisis químicos reflejan contenidos elevados en uranio para todas las facies, siendo la equigranular la que muestra los mayores tenores. Asimismo esta facies se encuentra levemente enriquecida en álcalis, elementos incompatibles (F, Rb, Sn y U y relaciones Th/U menores a 0,8 evidenciando un mayor grado de fraccionamiento.

  12. Surface Proteins and Pneumolysin of Encapsulated and Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae Mediate Virulence in a Chinchilla Model of Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Lance E.; Bradshaw, Jessica L.; Pipkins, Haley; McDaniel, Larry S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections result in a range of human diseases and are responsible for almost one million deaths annually. Pneumococcal disease is mediated in part through surface structures and an anti-phagocytic capsule. Recent studies have shown that nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae (NESp) make up a significant portion of the pneumococcal population and are able to cause disease. NESp lack some common surface proteins expressed by encapsulated pneumococci, but express surface protein...

  13. SURFACE PROTEINS AND PNEUMOLYSIN OF ENCAPSULATED AND NONENCAPSULATED STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE MEDIATE VIRULENCE IN A CHINCHILLA MODEL OF OTITIS MEDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Lance E.; Bradshaw, Jessica L.; Haley ePipkins; McDaniel, Larry S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections result in a range of human diseases and are responsible for almost one million deaths annually. Pneumococcal disease is mediated in part through surface structures and an anti-phagocytic capsule. Recent studies have shown that nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae (NESp) make up a significant portion of the pneumococcal population and are able to cause disease. NESp lack some common surface proteins expressed by encapsulated pneumococci, but express surf...

  14. 40 Hz auditory steady state response to linguistic features of stimuli during auditory hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Jun; Yan, Zheng; Gao, Xiao-rong

    2013-10-01

    The auditory steady state response (ASSR) may reflect activity from different regions of the brain, depending on the modulation frequency used. In general, responses induced by low rates (≤40 Hz) emanate mostly from central structures of the brain, and responses from high rates (≥80 Hz) emanate mostly from the peripheral auditory nerve or brainstem structures. Besides, it was reported that the gamma band ASSR (30-90 Hz) played an important role in working memory, speech understanding and recognition. This paper investigated the 40 Hz ASSR evoked by modulated speech and reversed speech. The speech was Chinese phrase voice, and the noise-like reversed speech was obtained by temporally reversing the speech. Both auditory stimuli were modulated with a frequency of 40 Hz. Ten healthy subjects and 5 patients with hallucination symptom participated in the experiment. Results showed reduction in left auditory cortex response when healthy subjects listened to the reversed speech compared with the speech. In contrast, when the patients who experienced auditory hallucinations listened to the reversed speech, the auditory cortex of left hemispheric responded more actively. The ASSR results were consistent with the behavior results of patients. Therefore, the gamma band ASSR is expected to be helpful for rapid and objective diagnosis of hallucination in clinic. PMID:24142731

  15. Variation in response dynamics of regular and irregular vestibular-nerve afferents during sinusoidal head rotations and currents in the chinchilla

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyu-Sung; Minor, Lloyd B.; Della Santina, Charles; Lasker, David M.

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, primary vestibular afferents that innervate only type I hair cells (calyx-only afferents) respond nearly in phase with head acceleration for high-frequency motion, whereas afferents that innervate both type I and type II (dimorphic) or only type II (bouton-only) hair cells respond more in phase with head velocity. Afferents that exhibit irregular background firing rates have a larger phase lead re head velocity than those that fire more regularly. We wanted to examine what is the ...

  16. Electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve: direct current measurement in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C Q; Shepherd, R K; Carter, P M; Seligman, P M; Tabor, B

    1999-04-01

    Neural prostheses use charge recovery mechanisms to ensure the electrical stimulus is charge balanced. Nucleus cochlear implants short all stimulating electrodes between pulses in order to achieve charge balance, resulting in a small residual direct current (DC). In the present study we sought to characterize the variation of this residual DC with different charge recovery mechanisms, stimulation modes, and stimulation parameters, and by modeling, to gain insight into the underlying mechanisms. In an acute study with anaesthetised guinea pigs, DC was measured in four platinum intracochlear electrodes stimulated using a Nucleus C124M cochlear implant at moderate to high pulse rates (1200-14,500 pulses/s) and stimulus intensities (0.2-1.75 mA at 26-200 microseconds/phase). Both monopolar and bipolar stimulation modes were used, and the effects of shorting or combining a capacitor with shorting for charge recovery were investigated. Residual DC increased as a function of stimulus rate, stimulus intensity, and pulse width. DC was lower for monopolar than bipolar stimulation, and lower still with capacitively coupled monopolar stimulation. Our model suggests that residual DC is a consequence of Faradaic reactions which allow charge to leak through the electrode tissue interface. Such reactions and charge leakage are still present when capacitors are used to achieve charge recovery, but anodic and cathodic reactions are balanced in such a way that the net charge leakage is zero. PMID:10217884

  17. [Ultrastructural organization of the auditory nerves of Gryllus bimaculatus and G. campestris crickets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlogorskaia, I D

    1980-01-01

    Electron microscopic observations have been made on transverse sections of the auditory (tympanal) nerve of the crickets at various levels from the tympanal ganglion (close to the ganglion, 150, 250, 1,000, 2,000 and 3,000 mu from the latter). In the vicinity of the ganglion, axons of the auditory receptors are separated from each other by the processes of Schwann cells. Beginning from the level of 150-250 mu, the axons are subdivided and form, with the help of collaterals, a subreceptor plexus which is similar to that found in the auditory system of the locust. Collaterals of an axon pass to the adjacent axons and deeply penetrate into the latter loosing their Schwann sheath, so that axonal membranes form a direct contact. At the site of these contacts, intracellular cleft is equal to 50-80 A. No synaptic vesicles were found in the region of the plexus. At the level of 3,000 mu, the auditory axons again attain a roundlike form and become completely isolated from each other by the processes of Schwann cells. It is suggested that in the region of the subreceptor plexus, electrotonic interaction between the receptors of the crickets takes place, as it is common in the auditory sistem of insects. PMID:7405445

  18. Dynamic Range Adaptation to Sound Level Statistics in the Auditory Nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Bo; Wang, Grace I.; Dean, Isabel; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    The auditory system operates over a vast range of sound pressure levels (100–120 dB) with nearly constant discrimination ability across most of the range, well exceeding the dynamic range of most auditory neurons (20–40 dB). Dean et al. (Nat. Neurosci. 8:1684, 2005) have reported that the dynamic range of midbrain auditory neurons adapts to the distribution of sound levels in a continuous, dynamic stimulus by shifting towards the most frequently occurring level. Here we show that dynamic rang...

  19. Identifying the threshold of iron deficiency in the central nervous system of the rat by the auditory brainstem response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greminger, Allison R; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot

    2015-01-01

    The deleterious effects of anemia on auditory nerve (AN) development have been well investigated; however, we have previously reported that significant functional consequences in the auditory brainstem response (ABR) can also occur as a consequence of marginal iron deficiency (ID). As the ABR has widespread clinical use, we evaluated the ability of this electrophysiological method to characterize the threshold of tissue ID in rats by examining the relationship between markers of tissue ID and severity of ABR latency defects. To generate various levels of ID, female Long-Evans rats were exposed to diets containing sufficient, borderline, or deficient iron (Fe) concentrations throughout gestation and offspring lifetime. We measured hematological indices of whole body iron stores in dams and offspring to assess the degree of ID. Progression of AN ID in the offspring was measured as ferritin protein levels at different times during postnatal development to complement ABR functional measurements. The severity of ABR deficits correlated with the level of Fe restriction in each diet. The sufficient Fe diet did not induce AN ID and consequently did not show an impaired ABR latency response. The borderline Fe diet, which depleted AN Fe stores but did not cause systemic anemia resulted in significantly increased ABR latency isolated to Peak I.The low Fe diet, which induced anemia and growth retardation, significantly increased ABR latencies of Peaks I to IV. Our findings indicate that changes in the ABR could be related to various degrees of ID experienced throughout development. PMID:25732706

  20. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials Suggest a Role for the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus in Tinnitus

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Jianwen Wendy; Herrmann, Barbara S.; Levine, Robert A.; Melcher, Jennifer R.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated elevated spontaneous and sound-evoked brainstem activity in animal models of tinnitus, but data on brainstem function in people with this common clinical condition are sparse. Here, auditory nerve and brainstem function in response to sound was assessed via auditory brainstem responses (ABR) in humans with tinnitus and without. Tinnitus subjects showed reduced wave I amplitude (indicating reduced auditory nerve activity) but enhanced wave V (reflecting eleva...

  1. Responsibilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    ONE day in 1993, a woman named Xing Jun came to the Organization Department of Tianjin’s Municipal Party Committee. She approached the door to the director’s office, opened it, and walked straight into the responsibility for training, examining, recommending and appointing cadres at all levels of the municipal government. Because the office has so much influence over the fate of many cadres, the director’s position commands much respect and awe. However, people see no

  2. Malocclusions in guinea pigs, chinchillas and rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Legendre, Loïc F.J.

    2002-01-01

    The types of malocclusions encountered in rodents and lagomorphs are classified. Diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis are reviewed. Some malocclusions are curable, whereas others can only be controlled. The need to perform a complete oral examination and to find a cause for the condition is stressed, as it will seriously affect the prognosis.

  3. The impact of severity of hypertension on auditory brainstem responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurdev Lal Goyal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Auditory brainstem response is an objective electrophysiological method for assessing the auditory pathways from the auditory nerve to the brainstem. The aim of this study was to correlate and to assess the degree of involvement of peripheral and central regions of brainstem auditory pathways with increasing severity of hypertension, among the patients of essential hypertension. Method: This study was conducted on 50 healthy age and sex matched controls (Group I and 50 hypertensive patients (Group II. Later group was further sub-divided into - Group IIa (Grade 1 hypertension, Group IIb (Grade 2 hypertension, and Group IIc (Grade 3 hypertension, as per WHO guidelines. These responses/potentials were recorded by using electroencephalogram electrodes on a root-mean-square electromyography, EP MARC II (PC-based machine and data were statistically compared between the various groups by way of one-way ANOVA. The parameters used for analysis were the absolute latencies of Waves I through V, interpeak latencies (IPLs and amplitude ratio of Wave V/I. Result: The absolute latency of Wave I was observed to be significantly increased in Group IIa and IIb hypertensives, while Wave V absolute latency was highly significantly prolonged among Group IIb and IIc, as compared to that of normal control group. All the hypertensives, that is, Group IIa, IIb, and IIc patients were found to have highly significant prolonged III-V IPL as compared to that of normal healthy controls. Further, intergroup comparison among hypertensive patients revealed a significant prolongation of Wave V absolute latency and III-V IPL in Group IIb and IIc patients as compared to Group IIa patients. These findings suggest a sensory deficit along with synaptic delays, across the auditory pathways in all the hypertensives, the deficit being more markedly affecting the auditory processing time at pons to midbrain (IPL III-V region of auditory pathways among Grade 2 and 3

  4. Advances in Cochlear Implant Telemetry: Evoked Neural Responses, Electrical Field Imaging, and Technical Integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Mens, Lucas H. M.

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade, cochlear implantation has evolved into a well-established treatment of deafness, predominantly because of many improvements in speech processing and the controlled excitation of the auditory nerve. Cochlear implants now also feature telemetry, which is highly useful to monitor the proper functioning of the implanted electronics and electrode contacts. Telemetry can also support the clinical management in young children and difficult cases where neural unresponsiveness ...

  5. Increased intensity discrimination thresholds in tinnitus subjects with a normal audiogram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epp, Bastian; Hots, J.; Verhey, J. L.;

    2012-01-01

    Recent auditory brain stem response measurements in tinnitus subjects with normal audiograms indicate the presence of hidden hearing loss that manifests as reduced neural output from the cochlea at high sound intensities, and results from mice suggest a link to deafferentation of auditory nerve...... fibers. As deafferentation would lead to deficits in hearing performance, the present study investigates whether tinnitus patients with normal hearing thresholds show impairment in intensity discrimination compared to an audiometrically matched control group. Intensity discrimination thresholds were...... significantly increased in the tinnitus frequency range, consistent with the hypothesis that auditory nerve fiber deafferentation is associated with tinnitus....

  6. Antigen dose and strain variation as factors in the genetic control of the immune response to sperm whale myoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary and secondary immune response to the antigen sperm whale myoglobin was investigated in DBA/2, 129 and B10.BR mice over a dose range of immunization from 10 to 2000 μg. Using an antigen excess technique, the quantity of antibody produced after secondary immunization followed a sigmoidal dose-response curve and the maximal plateau level was found to be different for each strain of mice. Furthermore, the genetic control of the immune response was investigated in twelve different inbred strains of mice following secondary immunization with 500 μg of of myoglobin. A continuous distribution for the mean antibody responses was obtained for the twelve different strains of mice. High responsiveness was associated with H-2 haplotypes d, f and k located on chromosome 17, the non-agouti gene 'a' located on chromosome 2 and the chinchilla gene 'csup(ch)' located on chromosome 7. It is concluded that either a large number of IR-genes to myoglobin are present in many loci located on different chromosomes or the antibody differences could be explained by a cross-tolerance mechanism requiring no IR-genes at all. (author)

  7. Doenças de chinchilas (Chinchilla lanigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo B. Lucena

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available As doenças de chinchilas foram estudadas através da avaliação de laudos de necropsia entre janeiro de 1997 e dezembro de 2011. Em 202 chinchilas necropsiadas, 189 (93,5% tiveram o diagnóstico determinado, e 13 (6,5% tiveram diagnóstico inconclusivo, por ausência de lesões ou autólise acentuada. Dentre as 202 chinchilas computadas, 162 eram fêmeas (80%, 37 eram machos (18%, e em quatro chinchilas (2% o sexo não foi anotado. As chinchilas tinham entre um dia a 12 anos de idade. As doenças foram agrupadas nas seguintes categorias: doenças inflamatórias, doenças causadas por intoxicações, doenças causadas por agentes físicos, doenças metabólicas, doenças parasitárias, doenças degenerativas, distúrbios circulatórios, neoplasmas, distúrbios do desenvolvimento e "outros distúrbios". As doenças inflamatórias foram as mais prevalentes (52 casos [25,7%] e foram representadas por casos de gastrite (10 casos, listeriose (5 casos, septicemia (5 casos, broncopneumonia bacteriana (4 casos, enterite necrosante (4 casos, piometra (4 casos, diarreia com isolamento de Proteus sp. (3 casos, abscessos subcutâneos e em linfonodos (2 casos, endometrite (2 casos, otite (2 casos, pielonefrite (2 casos, abscesso do ligamento redondo do fígado (1 caso, pneumonia fibrinosa (1 caso, pneumonia intersticial (1 caso, hepatite e colecistite com isolamento de Salmonella sp. (1 caso, histiocitose pulmonar (1 caso, miosite linfo-histiocítica (1 caso e um caso de dermatofitose (Trichopyton metagrophytes. O segundo grupo de doenças mais prevalentes foram as intoxicações (22,3%, representado por 45 casos de intoxicação por salinomicina. As doenças causadas por agentes físicos (21 casos [10,4%] incluíam casos de traumas causados por outros animais (8 casos, automutilação após injeção intramuscular (8 casos, prolapso de reto (3 casos e parto distócico (2 casos. A categoria de doenças metabólicas foi representada por 16 casos (7,9% de lipidose hepática. As doenças parasitárias (8 casos [4%] consistiram em infestação por pulga (4 casos, piolho (3 casos e giardíase (1 caso. Doenças degenerativas (4 casos [2,5%] incluíam insuficiência renal crônica (2 casos, necrose aleatória de hepatócitos (1 caso e necrose muscular de origem desconhecida (1 caso. Os distúrbios circulatórios incluíram dois casos (0,99% de insuficiência cardíaca congestiva. Neoplasmas foram representados por dois casos (0,99% de adenocarcinoma gástrico. Um caso de atresia ani, associado a ausência do trato reprodutor, intestino grosso e rins policíticos representou a categoria de distúrbios do desenvolvimento (0,5%. Algumas doenças não se enquadraram nas categorias acima e foram enquadradas em "outros distúrbios" (38 casos [18,8%]. Nesta categoria, doenças dentárias foi o distúrbio mais comum, diagnosticado em 9% (18 de 202 de todas as chinchilas examinadas. Seguido por casos de hipertermia (14 casos, dois casos de anemia, dois casos de metaplasia de células adiposas do córtex da adrenal, e dois casos de mucometra.

  8. Adaptation in the auditory system: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    David ePérez-González; Malmierca, Manuel S.

    2014-01-01

    The early stages of the auditory system need to preserve the timing information of sounds in order to extract the basic features of acoustic stimuli. At the same time, different processes of neuronal adaptation occur at several levels to further process the auditory information. For instance, auditory nerve fiber responses already experience adaptation of their firing rates, a type of response that can be found in many other auditory nuclei and may be useful for emphasizing the onset of the s...

  9. Auditory distraction transmitted by a cochlear implant alters allocation of attentional resources

    OpenAIRE

    Finke, Mareike; Sandmann, Pascale; Kopp, Bruno; Lenarz, Thomas; Büchner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are auditory prostheses which restore hearing via electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. The successful adaptation of auditory cognition to the CI input depends to a substantial degree on individual factors. We pursued an electrophysiological approach toward an analysis of cortical responses that reflect perceptual processing stages and higher-level responses to CI input. Performance and event-related potentials on two cross-modal discrimination-following-distra...

  10. Amplification in the auditory periphery: The effect of coupling tuning mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, K. A.; Silber, M.; Solla, S. A.

    2007-05-01

    A mathematical model describing the coupling between two independent amplification mechanisms in auditory hair cells is proposed and analyzed. Hair cells are cells in the inner ear responsible for translating sound-induced mechanical stimuli into an electrical signal that can then be recorded by the auditory nerve. In nonmammals, two separate mechanisms have been postulated to contribute to the amplification and tuning properties of the hair cells. Models of each of these mechanisms have been shown to be poised near a Hopf bifurcation. Through a weakly nonlinear analysis that assumes weak periodic forcing, weak damping, and weak coupling, the physiologically based models of the two mechanisms are reduced to a system of two coupled amplitude equations describing the resonant response. The predictions that follow from an analysis of the reduced equations, as well as performance benefits due to the coupling of the two mechanisms, are discussed and compared with published experimental auditory nerve data.

  11. Cochlear Implants and Brain Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Fallon, James B.; Irvine, Dexter R. F.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2002-01-01

    Cochlear implants have been implanted in over 110,000 deaf adults and children worldwide and provide these patients with important auditory cues necessary for auditory awareness and speech perception via electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve (AN). In 1942 Woolsey & Walzl presented the first report of cortical responses to localised electrical stimulation of different sectors of the AN in normal hearing cats, and established the cochleotopic organization of the projections to primary au...

  12. On the possibility of a place code for the low pitch of high-frequency complex tones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    on pitch matches, and (3) listeners’ ability to hear out the individual components. No effects of relative component phase or dichotic presentation on pitch matches were found in the tested conditions. Large individual differences were found in listeners’ ability to hear out individual components...... of pitch involving the across-channel summation of information from resolved and/or unresolved harmonics. Simulations of auditory-nerve responses to the stimuli suggest potential benefits to a spatiotemporal mechanism....

  13. A rapid form of activity-dependent recovery from short-term synaptic depression in the intensity pathway of the auditory brainstem

    OpenAIRE

    MacLeod, Katrina M.; Horiuchi, Timothy K.

    2011-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity acts as a time- and firing rate-dependent filter that mediates the transmission of information across synapses. In the avian auditory brainstem, specific forms of plasticity are expressed at different terminals of the same auditory nerve fibers and contribute to the divergence of acoustic timing and intensity information. To identify key differences in the plasticity properties, we made patch-clamp recordings from neurons in the cochlear nucleus responsible for ...

  14. Audibility, speech perception and processing of temporal cues in ribbon synaptic disorders due to OTOF mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarelli, Rosamaria; del Castillo, Ignacio; Cama, Elona; Scimemi, Pietro; Starr, Arnold

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in the OTOF gene encoding otoferlin result in a disrupted function of the ribbon synapses with impairment of the multivesicular glutamate release. Most affected subjects present with congenital hearing loss and abnormal auditory brainstem potentials associated with preserved cochlear hair cell activities (otoacoustic emissions, cochlear microphonics [CMs]). Transtympanic electrocochleography (ECochG) has recently been proposed for defining the details of potentials arising in both the cochlea and auditory nerve in this disorder, and with a view to shedding light on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying auditory dysfunction. We review the audiological and electrophysiological findings in children with congenital profound deafness carrying two mutant alleles of the OTOF gene. We show that cochlear microphonic (CM) amplitude and summating potential (SP) amplitude and latency are normal, consistently with a preserved outer and inner hair cell function. In the majority of OTOF children, the SP component is followed by a markedly prolonged low-amplitude negative potential replacing the compound action potential (CAP) recorded in normally-hearing children. This potential is identified at intensities as low as 90 dB below the behavioral threshold. In some ears, a synchronized CAP is superimposed on the prolonged responses at high intensity. Stimulation at high rates reduces the amplitude and duration of the prolonged potentials, consistently with their neural generation. In some children, however, the ECochG response only consists of the SP, with no prolonged potential. Cochlear implants restore hearing sensitivity, speech perception and neural CAP by electrically stimulating the auditory nerve fibers. These findings indicate that an impaired multivesicular glutamate release in OTOF-related disorders leads to abnormal auditory nerve fiber activation and a consequent impairment of spike generation. The magnitude of these effects seems to vary, ranging from

  15. Responsibility and Responsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Ulrik Becker

    2011-01-01

    responsibility based on a broadly conceived Chalcedonian Christology. This responsive understanding of responsibility serves as the foundation of a third position beyond the futile antagonism of liberalism and communitarianism. Hereby it maintains the reasonableness of a liberal democratic assertion of a common......The debate on the role and identity of Christian social ethics in liberal democracy touches upon the question about the relationship between universality and speci-ficity. Rather than argue for the difference between these approaches, it can be argued that they are to be understood in a...... differentiated unity with each other. This idea can be substantiated by a figurative appropriation of a Chalcedonian Christology, particularly the communicatio idiomatum. The communicative dimension of this concept has been found to be useful for a reinterpretation of the idea of responsibility. By engaging...

  16. Response and Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Clive L. Spash

    2012-01-01

    Why should anyone bother about social or environmental problems beyond responding to the signals in society to behave in an appropriate and caring manner towards others? This is a conundrum which has repeatedly surfaced and continues to resurface in the literature on environmental values and more generally in political theory. That is, what is the responsibility of the individual to society, others, the unborn, non-humans or inanimate Nature?

  17. Corporate Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waddock, Sandra; Rasche, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We define and discuss the concept of corporate responsibility. We suggest that corporate responsibility has some unique characteristics, which makes it different from earlier conceptions of corporate social responsibility. Our discussion further shows commonalities and differences between corporate...... responsibility and related concepts, such as corporate citizenship and business ethics. We also outline some ways in which corporations have implemented corporate responsibility in practice....

  18. Teaching Responsible Conduct Responsibly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Zigmond

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of science requires trust – trust in the literature, in our collaborators, in the data we are handed, and most of all in ourselves. Policies issued by U.S. federal funding agencies (e.g., the National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation have been valuable in prompting institutions to initiate formal mechanisms for providing instruction in the responsible conduct of research (RCR. However, the guidelines vary greatly in scope, detail, and the types of individuals to which they apply. Unfortunately, at many institutions, the provision of RCR instruction has become a bureaucratic exercise aimed at fulfilling a regulatory requirement, instead of an activity optimized for promoting a climate of integrity. We argue that for RCR instruction to be effective it should (1 be provided to everyone involved in the research enterprise, be they students, trainees, faculty, or staff, (2 be infused throughout one’s time at an institution. For graduate students, that would include from orientation to thesis completion, including integration into all “core classes” within their discipline, as well as into discussions at research group meetings. (3 We also advocate that the bulk of the instruction should be provided primarily by active researchers who know the issues and have relevance to, and credibly with, those being taught, and (4 that the instruction actively engages the learners. Not only will we be providing RCR instruction in a much more optimized manner, such an approach also emphasizes through our actions, not just in words, that behaving responsibly is an essential skill for researchers.

  19. Corporate Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2004-01-01

    Appeals to corporate responsibility often simply take for granted that businesses have ethical responsibilities that go beyond just respecting the law. This paper addresses arguments to the effect that businesses have no such responsibilities. The interesting claim is not that businesses have no ethical responsibility at all but that their primal responsibility is to increase their profits. The extent to which there is reason to take such arguments seriously delineates the limits of corporate...

  20. Responsible nations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    In National Responsibility and Global Justice, David Miller defends the view that a member of a nation can be collectively responsible for an outcome despite the fact that: (i) she did not control it; (ii) she actively opposed those of her nation's policies that produced the outcome; and (iii...... cooperative practice model*ground neither synchronic nor diachronic national responsibility, nor apply in the case of nations generally speaking....

  1. Responsible drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... moderation; Alcoholism - responsible drinking References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association, 2013. ...

  2. Competing responsibly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, R.J.M.; Ven, van de B.W.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we examine the effects of different competitive conditions on the determination and evaluation of strategies of corporate social responsibility (CSR). Although the mainstream of current thinking in business ethics recognizes that a firm should invest in social responsibility, the norma

  3. Sustainable responsibilities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    2015-01-01

    This working paper analyzes the conceptions of corporate responsibility for sustainable development in EU policies on CSR. The notion of corporate responsibility has until recently been limited to economical and legal responsibilities. Based on this narrow conception of corporate responsibility.......e. a combination of destruction and construction, this chapter will deconstruct conceptions of responsibility for sustainable development in these EU documents on CSR. A deconstructive conceptual analysis involves destructing dominant interpretations of a text and allowing for constructions of...... a particular concept such as sustainability actually means, but on what the concept says and does not say. A deconstructive analysis of EU policies on CSR, then, pinpoints that such policies are sites of conceptual struggles. This kind of analysis is suitable for studying conceptions of corporate...

  4. Author response

    OpenAIRE

    Hao WU; Williams, John; Nathans, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    eLife digest Sensory neurons carry information from sensory cells in the eyes, ears and other sensory organs to the brain and spinal cord so that they can coordinate the body's response to its environment and various stimuli. The sensory organs responsible for four of the traditional senses—vision, hearing, smell and taste—are relatively small and self-contained: however, the sensory organ responsible for touch is as big as the body itself. Moreover, a variety of many different types of senso...

  5. Defining Responsibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The notion of a“responsible China”was first put forward by former U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Robert Zoellick,when he said in an address in September 2005 that he hoped China would be a“stakeholder”with the United States in the current international system and should take its responsibilities in international affairs.American and Western media picked up on the term and now China also refers to itself as a”responsible big nation." Although both sides speak of“responsibility,”they mean different things by it.In the view of Wu Jianmin,President of the International Bureau of Exhibitions and former Chinese Ambassador to France,China’s “responsibilities”are mainly in the following areas:

  6. Parental Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bain, Katrin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Parental responsibility can be broadly defined as a legal term that specifies rights and responsibilities of parents towards their children. It is usually given initially to the birth mother and the married father, though unmarried fathers can obtain it either with the agreement of the mother or through a court order. In accordance with the provisions in law the court can also transfer parental responsibility to other persons (e.g. adoptive parents or in cases of child abuse or neglect to the state, represented by local authority social services. While the concept of parental responsibility can be found in most countries, the exact terminology varies from one country to another, as well as over time.

  7. Responsible company in responsible surrounding

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Klimkiewicz

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the Corporate Social Responsibility includes long-time view and it is based on the belief that the social and economic interest could be combined. However, the question is, how should the socially-responsible company behave in the situation where the occasional external expectations it is supposed to meet do not harmonize with the long term goals of the company? One can also ask if a responsible company could have a chance to exist in a irresponsible surrounding? This article c...

  8. Corporate responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Klint

    2007-01-01

    a private business; but then again, a private business would appear to be exempted from ethical responsibility. This is what Kenneth Goodpaster has called the stakeholder paradox: either we have ethics without business or we have business without ethics. Through a different route, I reach the same......Is it legitimate for a business to concentrate on profits under respect for the law and ethical custom? On the one hand, there seems to be good reasons for claiming that a corporation has a duty to act for the benefit of all its stakeholders. On the other hand, this seems to dissolve the notion of...... solution to this paradox as Goodpaster, namely that a corporation is the instrument of the shareholders only, but that shareholders still have an obligation to act ethically responsibly. To this, I add discussion of Friedman's claim that this responsibility consists in increasing profits. I show that most...

  9. Mucin gene 19 (MUC19) expression and response to inflammatory cytokines in middle ear epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Kerschner, Joseph E.; Khampang, Pawjai; Erbe, Christy B.; Kolker, Alexander; Cioffi, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Mucin gene 19 (MUC19) has been identified as a major gel-forming mucin in the human middle ear (ME). The objectives of this investigation were to characterize the expression and assess the regulation of MUC19 in the ME cell culture models utilized in the study of otitis media (OM). Findings demonstrate that MUC19 is expressed in both human immortalized cell culture (HMEEC) and chinchilla primary epithelial culture (CMEEC). ME exposure to inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 up-r...

  10. Responsive Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Carsten

    of the firm’s daily operations. Yet, they are rarely asked to provide updated information about critical issues. The present paper seeks to conceptually develop the notion of responsive innovation, by drawing on literary streams concerning collective sensing, strategic issue diagnosis and integra......-tive strategy within a micro foundations perspective. It is posited that companies should root their innovation processes in the collective sensing of frontline-employees and customers that operate around the organizational periphery. This frames the con-cept of responsive innovation, where individuals engaged...

  11. Surtos de intoxicação por salinomicina em chinchilas (Chinchilla lanigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo B. Lucena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quatro surtos de intoxicação por salinomicina são descrito em chinchilas de três municípios do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Uma semana após a ingestão de ração contendo 37 ppm de salinomicina, aproximadamente duas mil chinchilas de quatro fazendas expostas diminuíram o consumo da ração. Quatrocentos e vinte sete chinchilas demonstraram apatia. Dessas, duzentos e setenta e sete desenvolveram decúbito esternal e lateral, dispneia e coma, seguidos de morte. As primeiras mortes ocorreram oito dias após a ingestão da ração. A evolução dos sinais clínicos até a morte ou eutanásia foi de 2-5 dias. Os exames bioquímicos do soro sanguíneo em quatro chinchilas revelaram níveis aumentados da alanina aminotransferase, aspartato transaminase, fosfatase alcalina, creatina cinase, glicose, triglicerídeos e colesterol total. Quarenta e cinco chinchilas foram submetidas à necropsia. Os achados macroscópicos consistiam de marcada lipidose hepática em todas as chinchilas necropsiadas; fetos em estado de decomposição em doze chinchilas que estavam prenhes. Microscopicamente, múltiplas fibras musculares esqueléticas estavam hipereosinofílicas, tumefeitas e com perda das estriações. Nas chinchilas que sobreviveram por mais dias era possível observar segmentos fragmentados de miofibras afetadas (necrose flocular e regeneração de miofibras. No fígado foi observada marcada degeneração gordurosa. Não foram observadas anormalidades microscópicas nos demais órgãos analisados. Análises à procura de aflatoxinas, resíduos de pesticidas e isolamento bacteriano foram negativos. A análise da ração por cromatografia líquida revelou 37ppm de salinomicina na ração. A ração suspeita foi administrada a 12 chinchilas, três das quais (25% morreram apresentando lesões semelhantes às observadas nas chinchilas com a doença natural. O diagnóstico de intoxicação por salinomicina foi baseado na epidemiologia, lesões histológicas características e na presença de salinomicina na ração administrada nas quatro criações envolvidas.

  12. A Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John

    2000-01-01

    Presents John Wilson's response to the articles within this issue of the "Journal of Moral Education". Focuses on broad issues related to the disagreements that surfaced. Explains that one issue concerns the nature of philosophical or conceptual analysis. Addresses aspects of his own work. (CMK)

  13. Authors’ Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrøe, Hugo Fjelsted; Noe, Egon

    2014-01-01

    Upshot: In our response we focus on five questions that point to important common themes in the commentaries: why start in wicked problems, what kind of system is a scientific perspective, what is the nature of second-order research processes, what does this mean for understanding interdisciplinary...

  14. Emociones responsables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdecantos, Antonio

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A properly moral responsibility is currently distinguished from other uses of this concept. It is orthodox to attribute three traits to moral responsibility: the obligation to answer with reasons, the obligation to compensate for the damage, and the withdrawal of such a responsibility once the retrieval has been paid. It is also fraquently assumed that the analysis of so called moral emotions confirms the validity of the orthodox notion. I maintain that the description of indignation (a caracteristically moral emotion strongly attacks the orthodox notion. On my view, indignation implies a distinctive notion of responsibility, excluding the second and third traits of the orthodox conception. Moral responsibility is an anomaly of morals. This form of responsibility is highly akin to the one proposed by the Spanish writer Rafael Sánchez Ferlosio in El alma y la vergüenza (Soul and shame, 2000. My revision of moral responsibility is designed to exemplify a conception of morality itself as a set of «anomalies».

    Es corriente distinguir la responsabilidad propiamente moral de otros usos de este mismo concepto. De ordinario se cree que la responsabilidad moral tiene tres rasgos: la exigencia de responder con razones, la obligación de resarcir por el daño causado y la cancelación de dicha responsabilidad una vez efectuada la reparación. Se supone también que el análisis de las emociones llamadas morales confirma la bondad de esta noción ortodoxa. Sostengo que esto último no es cierto, o que no lo es, al menos, a partir de lo que suele entenderse por indignación (una de las emociones típicamente morales. En realidad, la indignación no exige la responsabilidad moral ortodoxa, sino otra que elimina sus rasgos segundo y tercero. La responsabilidad moral es una anomalía de la moral. Esta forma de responsabilidad es muy semejante a la que ha propuesto Rafael Sánchez Ferlosio en El alma y la vergüenza (2000. La

  15. Neural masking by sub-threshold electric stimuli: animal and computer model results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Charles A; Woo, Jihwan; Abbas, Paul J; Hu, Ning; Robinson, Barbara K

    2011-04-01

    Electric stimuli can prosthetically excite auditory nerve fibers to partially restore sensory function to individuals impaired by profound or severe hearing loss. While basic response properties of electrically stimulated auditory nerve fibers (ANF) are known, responses to complex, time-changing stimuli used clinically are inadequately understood. We report that forward-masker pulse trains can enhance and reduce ANF responsiveness to subsequent stimuli and the novel observation that sub-threshold (nonspike-evoking) electric trains can reduce responsiveness to subsequent pulse-train stimuli. The effect is observed in the responses of cat ANFs and shown by a computational biophysical ANF model that simulates rate adaptation through integration of external potassium cation (K) channels. Both low-threshold (i.e., Klt) and high-threshold (Kht) channels were simulated at each node of Ranvier. Model versions without Klt channels did not produce the sub-threshold effect. These results suggest that some such accumulation mechanism, along with Klt channels, may underlie sub-threshold masking observed in cat ANF responses. As multichannel auditory prostheses typically present sub-threshold stimuli to various ANF subsets, there is clear relevance of these findings to clinical situations. PMID:21080206

  16. Binaural Hearing and Lateralisation: the Perception of Interaural Differences of Amplitude and Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackleton, Trevor Maxwell

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The perception of the direction of a sound source in the horizontal plane is largely dependent upon the relative arrival times of salient points in the waveform and upon the difference in amplitude at the two ears. Other effects such as binaural release from masking are mediated mainly by the percept of lateralisation. In an extensive literature review the major experiments in binaural unmasking, discrimination and lateralisation are introduced and the most influential binaural detection and lateralisation models discussed. It is argued that these models are all cross-correlation mechanisms operating upon the differences between the firing patterns of the two auditory nerves. A study of the response of the binaural system to changes in its input would be a critical test of such models, so an experiment to measure the threshold of a static tone in noise with temporally varying interaural phase was performed. The results suggest that binaural processing is slow. The extent of lateralisation of bandpass (10%) filtered clicks of both low and high frequencies was studied with various interaural time and amplitude differences. A novel feature of the research, apart from the scaling technique used, was that subjects were encouraged to listen for multiple images. These experiments are sensitive to the breakdown of sensory fusion, and so pose a severe test for binaural models. Very similar results at both low- (250 Hz) and high- (8000 Hz) frequencies suggest a common lateralisation mechanism operating primarily upon interaural onset time differences. A binaural model is proposed which extends existing cross-correlation models. Included is an auditory nerve model which adapts and saturates. The other new element is coincidence detectors with significant (1 ms) integration times, which more closely represent the temporal integration properties of real neural networks. The inclusion of the auditory nerve model is very

  17. Emotional Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming; Christensen, Sverre Riis; Lundsteen, Steen;

    2007-01-01

    Recent neurological research has pointed to the importance of fundamental emotional processes for most kinds of human behaviour. Measures of emotional response tendencies towards brands seem to reveal intangible aspects of brand equity, particularly in a marketing context. In this paper a procedure...... for estimating such emotional brand equity is presented and findings from two successive studies of more than 100 brands are reported. It demonstrates how changes that occur between two years are explainable in terms of factors identifiable in the markets, and that the measures otherwise are stable...

  18. Photoparoxysmal responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Muszkat

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Sixty-five outpatients with photoparoxysmal response (PPR during routine EEG were studied. The PPR showed prevalence in women (75.4%. Seizures were found in 66.1% of cases. The rest recordings were abnormal in 41.8% with prevalence of generalized paroxysm. Eight patterns of PPR were observed, being polyspike mixed to slow wave the most frequent (53%. The epileptic group showed a bimodal distribution in the several bands of photic stimulation, near 8 and 20-24 Hz. A sustained paroxysmal abnormality persisting after the photic stimulation was present in 6 epileptic patients.

  19. Marketing responsable

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Elisabet

    2010-01-01

    El presente ensayo aborda las relaciones entre el marketing turístico y el ambiente. El objetivo es analizar críticamente la evolución de productos turísticos que son “innovadores” para los destinos asociados a sol y playa y ofrecer aportes que clarifiquen conceptualmente el marketing responsable Para lo cual se recurre al análisis de la literatura sobre el tema, tomando como unidad de análisis el destino turístico de Mar de las Pampas, perteneciente al Municipio de Villa Gesell....

  20. Individual responsibility.

    OpenAIRE

    Prof. Ph.D. Paul Marinescu

    2005-01-01

    When, and how far, should individuals assume responsibility for their own disadvantages themselves, and when, in contrast to this, is it right for society as a collective body to try to remedy or mitigate disadvantage? Some theorists argue that in so far as disadvantages result from voluntary choices, they should be borne by the agents themselves and do not raise a case of justice for public assistance. This criterion is plausible in some cases but far from self-evident in others. In reality,...

  1. Responsible innovation

    CERN Document Server

    De Woot, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Economic development is rooted in disruption, not in equilibrium. And a powerful engine of economic development is innovation; but is this innovation always for the common good? The dark side of the extraordinary dynamism of innovation lies precisely in its destructive power. If simply left to market forces, it could lead to social chaos and great human suffering. To face the challenges of our time, we must create the proper climate and culture to develop strong entrepreneurial drive. But, more than ever, we must give this entrepreneurial drive its ethical and societal dimensions. Responsible innovation means a more voluntary orientation towards the great problems of the 21st century, e.g. depletion of the planet's resources, rising inequality, and new scientific developments potentially threatening freedom, democracy and human integrity. We need to transform our ceaseless creativity into real progress for humankind. In this respect, the rapid development of social innovation opens the door for new methods an...

  2. Forward masking in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Berrebi, Albert S

    2016-05-01

    Perception of acoustic stimuli is modulated by the temporal and spectral relationship between sound components. Forward masking experiments show that the perception threshold for a probe tone is significantly impaired by a preceding masker stimulus. Forward masking has been systematically studied at the level of the auditory nerve, cochlear nucleus, inferior colliculus and auditory cortex, but not yet in the superior olivary complex. The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB), a principal cell group of the superior olive, plays an essential role in sound localization. The MNTB receives excitatory input from the contralateral cochlear nucleus via the calyces of Held and innervates the ipsilateral lateral and medial superior olives, as well as the superior paraolivary nucleus. Here, we performed single-unit extracellular recordings in the MNTB of rats. Using a forward masking paradigm previously employed in studies of the inferior colliculus and auditory nerve, we determined response thresholds for a 20-ms characteristic frequency pure tone (the probe), and then presented it in conjunction with another tone (the masker) that was varied in intensity, duration, and frequency; we also systematically varied the masker-to-probe delay. Probe response thresholds increased and response magnitudes decreased when a masker was presented. The forward suppression effects were greater when masker level and masker duration were increased, when the masker frequency approached the MNTB unit's characteristic frequency, and as the masker-to-probe delay was shortened. Probe threshold shifts showed an exponential decay as the masker-to-probe delay increased. PMID:25921974

  3. Cultural Studies, Pedagogy, and Response-Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Penelope

    2012-01-01

    A few years ago, in a tutorial in an advanced level undergraduate subject that she teaches--"Emotions, Culture and Community"--the author was a witness and participant in a pedagogical event that moved and provoked the class: It incited response-ability. This article is about that event, the meaning of response-ability, and the window that it…

  4. Demonstration of ipsilateral brain activation by noise in patients profoundly deaf with cochlear implant, or unilaterally deaf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two groups of patients with hearing handicaps have been investigated with PET and F-18-2-FDG. Since these patients were unilaterally deaf or profoundly deaf with a cochlear implant installed, monaural stimulation was possible excluding any effects of bone conduction to the contralateral ear. White noise was used as acoustic stimulus in unilaterally deaf patients. The peripheral auditory nerve of cochlear implant patients was stimulated by electrical impulses which were encoded from music or a 4-tone mixture by an electronic speech processor. The non-music stimuli were chosen to avoid associative cortical reactions. In both groups response to the stimuli by increase of glucose consumption (LCMRglc) was found not only in the contralateral primary auditory cortex as expected from neuroanatomical knowledge, but also in the ipsilateral auditory cortex. Furthermore there was no correlation between the hemisphere showing increased LCMRglc and the side of stimulation or the type of stimulus. The similarity of results obtained in both groups by acoustical and electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve suggests that this kind of measurement might be a tool to predict or check the performance of a cochlear implant in a profoundly deaf patient. The finding of increased LCMRglc in the area of the normal auditory cortex in patients profoundly deaf since birth contradicts the hypothesis of degeneration of this cortical center in such patients. (Author)

  5. Do responsible employers attract responsible employees?

    OpenAIRE

    Nyborg, Karine

    2014-01-01

    Survey and register data indicate that many employees prefer a socially responsible employer and will accept a lower wage to achieve this. Laboratory experiments support the hypothesis that socially responsible groups are more productive than others, partly because they attract cooperative types, partly because initial cooperation is reinforced by group dynamics. Overall, the findings indicate corporate social responsibility may have cost advantages for firms.

  6. Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Celiac Disease › Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease It is estimated that up to 20% of ... continuing to ingest gluten. Causes of Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease Continuing Gluten Ingestion The most common reason for ...

  7. Optimal Responsible Investment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille

    The paper studies retail Socially Responsible Investment and portfolio allocation. It extends conventional portfolio theory by allowing for a personal value based investment decision. When preferences for responsibility enter the framework for mean-variance analysis, it yields an optimal...... responsible investment model. An example of index investing illustrates the theory. Results show that it is crucial for the responsible investor to consider portfolio risk, expected return, and responsibility simultaneously in order to obtain an optimal portfolio. The model enables responsible investors to...

  8. Responsibility and joint production

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Thomas; Faber, Malte

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the relationship between responsibility and joint production. Responsibility mirrors our ability to act freely. We can act freely only if we can assume responsibility for our actions and their consequences; the limits of our responsibility are therefore also the limits of our liberty (part I). Thus, a problem of responsibility arises from our partial ignorance with respect to the consequences which our actions entail. Since this ignorance is at least partly irreducib...

  9. Electrodermal Response in Gaming

    OpenAIRE

    J. Christopher Westland

    2011-01-01

    Steady improvements in technologies that measure human emotional response offer new possibilities for making computer games more immersive. This paper reviews the history of designs a particular branch of affective technologies that acquire electrodermal response readings from human subjects. Electrodermal response meters have gone through continual improvements to better measure these nervous responses, but still fall short of the capabilities of today's technology. Electrodermal response tr...

  10. Environmental Response Management Application (ERMA) Gulf Response

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Environmental Response Management Application (ERMA) (R) is a web-based Geographic Information System (GIS) tool that assists both emergency responders and...

  11. Responsive Decision-Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Carsten Lund; Andersen, Torben Juul

    environmental developments and feeding that information into strategic decisions will enable higher quality outcomes and better adaptive responses for persistent performance. Thus we review relevant parts of the strategic decision making literature to conceptualize the responsive decision making model and...

  12. Consumer rights and responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which included the Consumer Bill of Rights and Responsibilities. The Commission was appointed by President Bill Clinton, ... role in making sure they have rights and responsibilities with regard to health improvement. The Consumer Bill ...

  13. Responsibility for others' emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Rietti, Sophie

    2006-01-01

    Recent philosophical work on responsibility for emotion has tended to focus on what responsibility we can have for our own emotions. Folk psychology suggests we can also be responsible for others’ emotions, and they for ours, and that this can be reason for praise or blame . However, many branches of applied (and popular) psychology, and some schools of philosophy, deny there can be interpersonal responsibility for emotion. I shall be arguing here against this view, and for an account on whic...

  14. Responsible geographies and geographies of response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    This dissertation engages with Danish University geographers at work and their explication of the role of geography in shaping socio-environmental debates in an era of the anthropocene. Situating sustainability concepts in a historygeographical context the dissertation examines responses and...... higher education literature. The methodological framework is based on the social nature approach that tangles these quite distinct epistemological communities by consulting the socio-natures produced. It is concluded that though geographers find sustainability themes important to geography......, sustainability is more often implicit than it is explicit. This produces a number of dilemmas and contradictions since geographers both seek to distance themselves from produced politics while at the same time elucidating them. Geographies of response and responsibilities address the battleground over the...

  15. Responsible geographies and geographies of response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    This dissertation engages with Danish University geographers at work and their explication of the role of geography in shaping socio-environmental debates in an era of the anthropocene. Situating sustainability concepts in a historygeographical context the dissertation examines responses and...... responsibilities concerning academic fights over representing global environmental change. A major part concerns the theoretical basis and draws inspiration from a series of critical geographical work on the marketization of universities, and relates this tincture to the wider education for sustainability in...... reading and writing of global environmental change....

  16. Space race functional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjödin, Henrik; Brännström, Åke; Englund, Göran

    2015-02-22

    We derive functional responses under the assumption that predators and prey are engaged in a space race in which prey avoid patches with many predators and predators avoid patches with few or no prey. The resulting functional response models have a simple structure and include functions describing how the emigration of prey and predators depend on interspecific densities. As such, they provide a link between dispersal behaviours and community dynamics. The derived functional response is general but is here modelled in accordance with empirically documented emigration responses. We find that the prey emigration response to predators has stabilizing effects similar to that of the DeAngelis-Beddington functional response, and that the predator emigration response to prey has destabilizing effects similar to that of the Holling type II response. A stability criterion describing the net effect of the two emigration responses on a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system is presented. The winner of the space race (i.e. whether predators or prey are favoured) is determined by the relationship between the slopes of the species' emigration responses. It is predicted that predators win the space race in poor habitats, where predator and prey densities are low, and that prey are more successful in richer habitats. PMID:25589602

  17. Voiced-speech representation by an analog silicon model of the auditory periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W; Andreou, A G; Goldstein, M H

    1992-01-01

    An analog CMOS integration of a model for the auditory periphery is presented. The model consists of middle ear, basilar membrane, and hair cell/synapse modules which are derived from neurophysiological studies. The circuit realization of each module is discussed, and experimental data of each module's response to sinusoidal excitation are given. The nonlinear speech processing capabilities of the system are demonstrated using the voiced syllable |ba|. The multichannel output of the silicon model corresponds to the time-varying instantaneous firing rates of auditory nerve fibers that have different characteristic frequencies. These outputs are similar to the physiologically obtained responses. The actual implementation uses subthreshold CMOS technology and analog continuous-time circuits, resulting in a real-time, micropower device with potential applications as a preprocessor of auditory stimuli. PMID:18276451

  18. Nertwork Social Responsability

    OpenAIRE

    Antonella Zucchella

    2007-01-01

    The value proposition of the firm to its market is not merely the result of 'value extraction' across the world, by exploiting local resources and capabilities, but for a growing number of firms is a blend of value and values proposition, based on socially responsive behaviour. A values chain shift the emphasis from the practice of corporate social responsibility to the one of network social responsibility. Coordination of the network value chain is not just a matter of improving business per...

  19. Trust Responsiveness and Beliefs.

    OpenAIRE

    Gerardo A. Guerra; Zizzo, Daniel John

    2002-01-01

    Trust responsiveness is the tendency to fulfill trust because you believe that it has been placed on you. The experiment presented in this paper uses two simple trust games to measure directly or indirectly the robustness of trust responsiveness in three conditions: when beliefs are elicited and a summary of these beliefs is transmitted; when beliefs are elicited but not transmitted, when beliefs are not elicited. Insofar as we can tell, trust responsiveness is robust to our belief manipulati...

  20. Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Vaněčková, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Master thesis deals with corporate social responsibility (CSR) as one of the ways of modern management. This concept says that companies should behave responsibly to society, decrese the negative impacts and increase the positive ones. In addition to making profit, the companies should put efforts to enhance society welfare. The aim of this thesis is to describe the concept of corporate social responsibility, the possible strategies and to evaluace the concept with the example of a particular...

  1. Man - engineering - responsibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mankind is growing and growing, but some live poor and some live rich on earth. Responsibility for the future when energy is consumed and fairly distributed is an intention of this article. So responsibility for availability of energy,for resource sustainability, for environment and last not least responsibility for high energy densities will be a difficult global challenge. This is clearly discussed and impressive graphically demonstrated.(GL)

  2. Decoupling Responsible Management Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Gilbert, Dirk Ulrich

    Business schools increasingly aim to embed corporate responsibility, sustainability, and ethics into their curricular and extracurricular activities. This paper examines under what conditions business schools may decouple the structural effects of their engagement in responsible management...... education from organizational practices. We argue that schools may be unable to match rising institutional pressures to publicly commit to responsible management education with their internal capacity for change. Our analysis proposes that decoupling is likely if schools (1) are exposed to resource...

  3. Responsibility and collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Rotter, Julia Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a widely debated concept among academics, practitioners and non-practitioners. By definition, CSR concerns the economic, legal, political, environmental and social responsibilities of a business to its stakeholders and society at large. The conventional view of the role of business in society is to act as a market place and make a profit, in a space where demand meets supply. However, extending the role of CSR to include ethical responsibilities often ...

  4. Neuroendocrine Responses to Hypoglycemia

    OpenAIRE

    Tesfaye, Nolawit; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    The counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia is a complex and well-coordinated process. As blood glucose concentration declines, peripheral and central glucose sensors relay this information to central integrative centers to coordinate neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses and avert the progression of hypoglycemia. Diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, can perturb these counterregulatory responses. Moreover, defective counterregulation in the setting of diabetes can progress to hy...

  5. Decoupling Responsible Management Education

    OpenAIRE

    Rasche, Andreas; Gilbert, Dirk Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Business schools increasingly aim to embed corporate responsibility, sustainability, and ethics into their curricular and extracurricular activities. This paper examines under what conditions business schools may decouple the structural effects of their engagement in responsible management education from organizational practices. We argue that schools may be unable to match rising institutional pressures to publicly commit to responsible management education with their internal capacity for c...

  6. Culturally responsive literacy instruction

    CERN Document Server

    Algozzine, Bob; Obiakor, Festus E

    2008-01-01

    Improve reading achievement for students from diverse backgrounds with research-supported practices and culturally responsive interventions in phonemic awareness, phonics/decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.

  7. Consumer rights and responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health care consumer's rights; Rights of the health care consumer ... In March 1998, the Advisory Commission on Consumer Protection and ... Consumer Bill of Rights and Responsibilities. The Commission ...

  8. Realizing Corporate Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girschik, Verena

    pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk, a company known for its remarkable investments in integrating societal objectives into its business model and promoting new ways of thinking about and doing business. The case inspired the overarching theoretical question how actors construct and legitimize new ideas and......This doctoral dissertation aims to understand how companies realize corporate responsibility - both how they perform corporate responsibility in particular local contexts and how they negotiate understandings of what corporate responsibility means. It builds on an inductive case study of the Danish...... in this dissertation unfold distinct yet interdependent processes of positioning and framing that constitute new ways of performing and understanding corporate responsibility....

  9. Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Created in 2009 as part of NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate's Integrated Systems Research Program, the Environmentally Responsible Aviation...

  10. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  11. Playful hyper responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hanne; Andersen, Niels Åkerstrøm

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 10–15 years, state-funded schools have begun to require parents to assume an undefined and infinite personal responsibility. In this article, we investigate how schools organize responsibility games to respond to this challenge and how these games affect the concept of responsibilit...

  12. Response Surface Methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, Jack P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: This chapter first summarizes Response Surface Methodology (RSM), which started with Box and Wilson’s article in 1951 on RSM for real, non-simulated systems. RSM is a stepwise heuristic that uses first-order polynomials to approximate the response surface locally. An estimated polynomial m

  13. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D' Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  14. Responsibility and Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Schafer, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Argues that scholars must be responsible for the use of their creations and ideas. Examines, through the use of such historical events as the Nazi holocaust and the United States' bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the implications of neglecting responsibility for scientific and scholarly creations. (JDH)

  15. Compliments and Compliment Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏凌霜

    2009-01-01

    Compliments and compliment responses have attracted a lot of attention from both of the fields of intercultural communication and pragmatics. This paper makes a literature review of Chinese and western scholars' research on compliments' functions, linguistic features, content and responses, and finally puts forward its significance.

  16. UN assesses tsunami response

    OpenAIRE

    Marion Couldrey; Tim Morris

    2005-01-01

    A report to the UN’s Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) identifies lessons learned from the humanitarian response. Recommendations stress the need for national ownership and leadership of disaster response and recovery, improved coordination, transparent use of resources, civil society engagement and greater emphasis on risk reduction.

  17. UN assesses tsunami response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Couldrey

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A report to the UN’s Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC identifies lessons learned from the humanitarian response. Recommendations stress the need for national ownership and leadership of disaster response and recovery, improved coordination, transparent use of resources, civil society engagement and greater emphasis on risk reduction.

  18. Optimal Responsible Investment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille

    Numerous institutions are now engaged in Socially Responsible Investment or have signed the "UN Principles for Responsible Investment". Retail investors, however, are still lacking behind. This is peculiar since the sector constitutes key stakeholders in environmental, social and governmental...... new dimension is incorporated into the investment decision....

  19. Introduction to environmental responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Martin

    2009-01-01

    [Book summary] The Environmental Responsibility Reader is a definitive collection of classic and contemporary environmental works that offers a comprehensive overview of the issues involved in environmental responsibility, steering the reader through each development in thought with a unifying and expert editorial voice. This essential text expertly explores seemingly intractable modern-day environmental dilemmas - including climate change, fossil fuel consumption, fresh water qualit...

  20. Indicators of responsible investing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Responsible investment has witnessed significant changes in the past decade. It is estimated that about one fifth of assets under management in the US and about half of all assets under management in the EU are done on the basis of one of the seven responsible investment strategies. This paper discu

  1. Social responsibilities of bioethics

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsen, Albert R.

    2001-01-01

    Urban bioethics can draw on elements of city life and view them under the moral perspective of social responsibility of creating the personal, cultural, social, and economic environment in which persons can be responsible personally as they interpret actions on themselves and creatively respond to them in an ongoing community of agents.

  2. Responsible Hospitality. Prevention Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colthurst, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Responsible Hospitality (RH)--also called Responsible Beverage Service (RBS)--encompasses a variety of strategies for reducing risks associated with the sale and service of alcoholic beverages. RH programs have three goals: (1) to prevent illegal alcohol service to minors; (2) to reduce the likelihood of drinkers becoming intoxicated; and (3) to…

  3. Responsibility and punishment: whose mind? A response.

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver R. Goodenough

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscience is challenging the Anglo-American approach to criminal responsibility. Critiques, in this issue and elsewhere, are pointing out the deeply flawed psychological assumptions underlying the legal tests for mental incapacity. The critiques themselves, however, may be flawed in looking, as the tests do, at the psychology of the offender. Introducing the strategic structure of punishment into the analysis leads us to consider the psychology of the punisher as the critical loc...

  4. Soil site response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of stiff quaternary soil sites to strong earthquake shaking is an important factor in the development of seismic siting criteria for nuclear power plants. Analytical methods for estimating this site response are in common use, but there is need for empirical verification of these modeling techniques. There are two dense 3-D strong motion arrays installed and operating in California to directly measure the response of stiff quaternary soil to earthquake shaking. These are the Hollister Earthquake Observatory and the Borrego Valley Downhole Arrays. Site response measurements from these arrays, along with detailed geotechnical and geophysical site investigations, will provide important calibration and confirmation of site response modeling techniques used for seismic siting criteria development. This paper presents an overview of the two arrays and initial results of the measurements. (orig.)

  5. Neutron response study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron response of the albedo type dosimeter is strongly dependent on the energy of the incident neutrons as well as the moderating material on the backside of the dosimeter. This study characterizes the response of the Hanford dosimeter for a variety of neutron energies for both a water and Rando phantom (a simulated human body consisting of an actual human skeleton with plastic for body muscles and certain organs). The Hanford dosimeter response to neutrons of different energies is typical of albedo type dosimeters. An approximate two orders of magnitude difference in response is observed between neutron energies of 100 keV and 10 MeV. Methods were described to compensate for the difference in dosimeter response between a laboratory neutron spectrum and the different spectra encountered at various facilities in the field. Generally, substantial field support is necessary for accurate neutron dosimetry

  6. On being responsible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael; Glerup, Cecilie; Horst, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Responsible development’ has risen to become a key normative framework for nanotechnology. The technology’s governance landscape is fundamentally structured through a discourse of responsibility, in which political tools such as public engagement, voluntary reporting and soft law are mobilized so...... as to enable innovation. To call for responsibility has, indeed, become somewhat trite. In this essay we take not the normative demand for responsibility, but its operationalisation, as our analytical focus, arguing that it is important not to underestimate the term’s practical flexibility and...... discursive multiplicity. To illustrate this point we consider firstly the range of ways in which ‘responsibility’ is articulated within the literature on higher education and sociology of science; and, secondly, how notions of responsible development are understood, and acted upon, in two different US sites...

  7. Geospatial Information Response Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Emitt C.

    2010-01-01

    Extreme emergency events of national significance that include manmade and natural disasters seem to have become more frequent during the past two decades. The Nation is becoming more resilient to these emergencies through better preparedness, reduced duplication, and establishing better communications so every response and recovery effort saves lives and mitigates the long-term social and economic impacts on the Nation. The National Response Framework (NRF) (http://www.fema.gov/NRF) was developed to provide the guiding principles that enable all response partners to prepare for and provide a unified national response to disasters and emergencies. The NRF provides five key principles for better preparation, coordination, and response: 1) engaged partnerships, 2) a tiered response, 3) scalable, flexible, and adaptable operations, 4) unity of effort, and 5) readiness to act. The NRF also describes how communities, tribes, States, Federal Government, privatesector, and non-governmental partners apply these principles for a coordinated, effective national response. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has adopted the NRF doctrine by establishing several earth-sciences, discipline-level teams to ensure that USGS science, data, and individual expertise are readily available during emergencies. The Geospatial Information Response Team (GIRT) is one of these teams. The USGS established the GIRT to facilitate the effective collection, storage, and dissemination of geospatial data information and products during an emergency. The GIRT ensures that timely geospatial data are available for use by emergency responders, land and resource managers, and for scientific analysis. In an emergency and response capacity, the GIRT is responsible for establishing procedures for geospatial data acquisition, processing, and archiving; discovery, access, and delivery of data; anticipating geospatial needs; and providing coordinated products and services utilizing the USGS' exceptional pool of

  8. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Kosterev, Dmitry; Dai, T.

    2014-12-31

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  9. Medial Cochlear Efferent Function: A Theoretical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain, David C.

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of the cochlear efferent system, many hypotheses have been put forth for its function. These hypotheses for its function range from protecting the cochlea from over stimulation to improving the detection of sounds in noise. It is known that the medial efferent system innervates the outer hair cells and that stimulation of this system reduces basilar membrane and auditory nerve sensitivity which suggests that this system acts to decrease the gain of the cochlear amplifier. Here I present modeling results as well as analysis of published experimental data that suggest that the function of the medial efferent reflex is to decrease the cochlear amplifier gain by just the right amount so that the nonlinearity in the basilar membrane response lines up perfectly with the inner hair cell nonlinear transduction process to produce a hair cell receptor potential that is proportional to the logarithm of the sound pressure level.

  10. Corporate Social Responsibility : whose responsibility is it?

    OpenAIRE

    Venemyr, Henrik; Ericson, Per Johan

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The society is becoming more aware of the importance of corporate social responsibility (CSR) work. CSR has also be-come a competitive tool in order to reach out to potential cus-tomers. There are also many definitions of what CSR actually means. These are things that makes it interesting to find out how multinational corporations, who has a lot of power, per-ceive and work with CSR, as well as what can be done to make corporations work more with CSR. Purpose: The purpose of thi...

  11. Community Response to Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Donald G.

    1997-01-01

    Describes three trends--downsizing, reduction of government funding, and shift of decision making from federal to state and state to local agencies. Suggests that community response to these trends requires leadership, a role for adult educators. (SK)

  12. Responsive design high performance

    CERN Document Server

    Els, Dewald

    2015-01-01

    This book is ideal for developers who have experience in developing websites or possess minor knowledge of how responsive websites work. No experience of high-level website development or performance tweaking is required.

  13. Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    2007-01-01

    Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as having explicit policies and implicit norms situated in cultural systems highlights the connections between institutional and cultural structures of nation states and business' commitment to CSR as reflected in the strategies used to...

  14. Chores and Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention Safety and Prevention Immunizations At Home At Play On The Go All ... Discipline > Chores and Responsibility Family ... on her own without a reminder, completing a special task or doing an unusually ...

  15. OEM Emergency Response Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Office of Emergency Management retains records of all incident responses in which it participates. This data asset includes three major sources of information:...

  16. Social Responsibility Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Mizera

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Responsible business notion is more and more present in Polish economy, however the results of the research carried out in Polish business still shows a low level of CRS idea knowledge, especially in small and medium companies. Although responsible business notion is generally known, its details, ways of preparing strategy, instruments and what is more its benefits are still narrowly spread. Many business people face the lack of knowledge and information, which on one hand make it easier to spread and deepen wrong stereotypes connected with this notion and on the other hand make business people unwilling to implement CRS in their companies. The subjects of this article are examples of instruments which are responsible for realization of social responsibility strategy.

  17. The EEG Photoparoxysmal Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Types of photosensitivity, prevalence and other characteristics of the photoparoxysmal response (PPR, associated seizures, effect of video games, and drug therapy are reviewed by the director of electroencephalography at the University of Illinois, Chicago.

  18. The EEG Photoparoxysmal Response

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-01-01

    Types of photosensitivity, prevalence and other characteristics of the photoparoxysmal response (PPR), associated seizures, effect of video games, and drug therapy are reviewed by the director of electroencephalography at the University of Illinois, Chicago.

  19. Facility Response Plan (FRP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A Facility Response Plan (FRP) demonstrates a facility's preparedness to respond to a worst case oil discharge. Under the Clean Water Act, as amended by the Oil...

  20. Scientific Social Responsibility?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, Cecilie; Horst, Maja

    for the development of competitive knowledge economies. In the present paper, these developments are all understood as moves to increase the social responsibility of science, i.e. efforts to hold science accountable to wider social, economic and ethical values. Despite the widespread political and...... theoretical plea for scientific social responsibility (SSR), however, there is a striking lack of knowledge about how it should be (or indeed is) performed in practice. This paper makes a first step in this direction by mapping different interpretations of what scientific social responsibility might entail...... formed organizations to make science responsible for its social effects. More recently, ideals of increasing the social acceptability of science through engagement, reflexivity and dialogue seems to have found their way into the heart of policy-making, not least as a way of making science a prime motor...

  1. NOAA Emergency Response Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is in response to natural disasters. The aerial photography missions were conducted by the NOAA Remote Sensing Division. The...

  2. Consumer Response to Stockouts.

    OpenAIRE

    Gavan J. Fitzsimons

    2000-01-01

    Consumer responses to stockouts, both in terms of consumer satisfaction with the decision process and in terms of subsequent store choice behavior, are explored. Four laboratory experiments involving stockouts in a consumer choice context are run. The results suggest that consumer response to stockouts is driven in large part by two factors: the effect of a stockout on the difficulty of making a choice from the set and the degree of personal commitment to the out-of-stock alternative. The res...

  3. China's International Responsibility Examined

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    International responsibility falls upon the shoulders of every country. China's growing contributions to world peace and development have surpassed the view of her as a "threat. "Instead, it was, among world mainstream opinion, expected to shoulder a still-bigger burden. Such external expectations, together with internal yearnings for a higher profile abroad, urge a response in terms of Chinese diplomacy. What is to be done? This paper explores the answer.

  4. Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary, Dipendra; Dhakal, Resham; Dhakal, Rajendra; Rayamajhi, Kalyan

    2013-01-01

    Social Responsibility has become positive agenda for many organizations to perform socially responsible business in the community. Organizations have been addressing on CSR issues in their corporate strategy to tackle various local and global issues. Focusing on social and environmental consideration can be profitable for business to proceed on sustainable business. In this context, this project explains on the various factors of CSR implemented by one of the service oriented organization in ...

  5. Corporate social responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Priesterová, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this Diploma thesis is to find out, on the basis of research, how the companies from Czech and Slovak Republic perceive and apply in praxis the concept of corporate social responsibility. The work consists of theoretical and practical part. The theoretical part is included in the first three chapters. The first chapter defines the term CSR and illustrates the historical development of social responsibility. The second chapter presents various theories and approaches in the ar...

  6. Social responsibility company

    OpenAIRE

    Holečková, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    The diploma thesis focuses on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) issue. Initially, there is a definition of CSR determined that could be summarised as a duty of companies to behave ethically and gently to the environment, improve economical growth and relationships between employees. Another attention has been dedicated to three basic areas of social responsibility - economical, social, and environmental which are commonly known as a triple-bottom line. The social area could be extended...

  7. Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Fliegerová, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The diploma thesis “Corporate Social Responsibility“ deals with the present state of social responsibilities of companies with a focus on support for handicapped people in a particular society. Both several levels and the extent of implementing social responsibilities are described not only in general but also specifically in Škoda Auto with a focus on sheltered workshops, where it deals with integration of the handicapped employees. In practice, the sheltered workshops of Škoda Auto are pres...

  8. LIABILITY AND RESPONSIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELENA EMILIA STEFAN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The violation of a social norm establishing a rule of conduct engages the violator’s liability. Responsibility is a social phenomenon and it expresses, in its shortest definition, an act of commitment of the individual in the process of social interaction. This study aims to analyze the concepts of liability and responsibility, but also the relationship between them, starting from their common fundamentals and ending with the main differences between the two notions.

  9. NRC Incident Response Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates civilian nuclear activities to protect the public health and safety and to preserve environmental quality. An Incident Response Plan had been developed and has now been revised to reflect current Commission policy. NUREG-0728, Rev. 2 assigns responsibilities for responding to any potentially threatening incident involving NRC licensed activities and for assuring that the NRC will fulfill it statutory mission. This report has also been reproduced for staff use as NRC Manual Chapter 0502

  10. Social Responsibility Instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Mizera

    2008-01-01

    Responsible business notion is more and more present in Polish economy, however the results of the research carried out in Polish business still shows a low level of CRS idea knowledge, especially in small and medium companies. Although responsible business notion is generally known, its details, ways of preparing strategy, instruments and what is more its benefits are still narrowly spread. Many business people face the lack of knowledge and information, which on one hand make it easier to s...

  11. Advances in Crash Response

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-06-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Richard C. Hunt, Director of CDC's Division of Injury Response, provides an overview on the benefits of using an Advanced Automatic Collision Notification system, or AACN, to help with emergency triage of people injured in vehicle crashes.  Created: 6/29/2009 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Division of Injury Response (DIR).   Date Released: 6/29/2009.

  12. Social Responsibility of Accounting

    OpenAIRE

    JINNAI, Yoshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Historical and theoretical inquiries into the function of accounting have provided fruitful insights into social responsibility of accounting, which is, and should be, based on accounts kept through everyday accounting activities. However, at the current stage of capitalist accounting, keeping accounts is often regarded as merely a preparatory process for creating financial statements at the end of an accounting period. Thus, discussions on the social responsibility of accounting tend to conc...

  13. LIABILITY AND RESPONSIBILITY

    OpenAIRE

    ELENA EMILIA STEFAN

    2012-01-01

    The violation of a social norm establishing a rule of conduct engages the violator’s liability. Responsibility is a social phenomenon and it expresses, in its shortest definition, an act of commitment of the individual in the process of social interaction. This study aims to analyze the concepts of liability and responsibility, but also the relationship between them, starting from their common fundamentals and ending with the main differences between the two notions.

  14. Discord of response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of quantum correlations in a quantum state is related to the state's response to local unitary perturbations. Such a response is quantified by the distance between the unperturbed and perturbed states, minimized with respect to suitably identified sets of local unitary operations. In order to be a bona fide measure of quantum correlations, the distance function must be chosen among those that are contractive under completely positive and trace preserving (CPTP) maps. The most relevant instances of such physically well-behaved metrics include the trace, the Bures, and the Hellinger distance. To each of these metrics one can associate the corresponding discord of response, namely the trace, or Hellinger, or Bures minimum distance from the set of unitarily perturbed states. All these three discords of response satisfy the basic axioms for a proper measure of quantum correlations. In the present work we focus in particular on the Bures distance, which enjoys the unique property of being both Riemannian and contractive under CPTP maps, and admits important operational interpretations in terms of state distinguishability. We compute analytically the Bures discord of response for two-qubit states with maximally mixed marginals and we compare it with the corresponding Bures geometric discord, namely the geometric measure of quantum correlations defined as the Bures distance from the set of classical-quantum states. Finally, we investigate and identify the maximally quantum correlated two-qubit states according to the Bures discord of response. These states exhibit a remarkable nonlinear dependence on the global state purity. (paper)

  15. Auxin response factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, John William

    2016-05-01

    Auxin signalling involves the activation or repression of gene expression by a class of auxin response factor (ARF) proteins that bind to auxin response elements in auxin-responsive gene promoters. The release of ARF repression in the presence of auxin by the degradation of their cognate auxin/indole-3-acetic acid repressors forms a paradigm of transcriptional response to auxin. However, this mechanism only applies to activating ARFs, and further layers of complexity of ARF function and regulation are being revealed, which partly reflect their highly modular domain structure. This review summarizes our knowledge concerning ARF binding site specificity, homodimer and heterodimer multimeric ARF association and cooperative function and how activator ARFs activate target genes via chromatin remodelling and evolutionary information derived from phylogenetic comparisons from ARFs from diverse species. ARFs are regulated in diverse ways, and their importance in non-auxin-regulated pathways is becoming evident. They are also embedded within higher-order transcription factor complexes that integrate signalling pathways from other hormones and in response to the environment. The ways in which new information concerning ARFs on many levels is causing a revision of existing paradigms of auxin response are discussed. PMID:26487015

  16. Quantification of human responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlage, R. C.; Gantner, T. E.; Lim, P. Y. W.

    1992-01-01

    Human perception is a complex phenomenon which is difficult to quantify with instruments. For this reason, large panels of people are often used to elicit and aggregate subjective judgments. Print quality, taste, smell, sound quality of a stereo system, softness, and grading Olympic divers and skaters are some examples of situations where subjective measurements or judgments are paramount. We usually express what is in our mind through language as a medium but languages are limited in available choices of vocabularies, and as a result, our verbalizations are only approximate expressions of what we really have in mind. For lack of better methods to quantify subjective judgments, it is customary to set up a numerical scale such as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 1, 2, 3, ..., 9, 10 for characterizing human responses and subjective judgments with no valid justification except that these scales are easy to understand and convenient to use. But these numerical scales are arbitrary simplifications of the complex human mind; the human mind is not restricted to such simple numerical variations. In fact, human responses and subjective judgments are psychophysical phenomena that are fuzzy entities and therefore difficult to handle by conventional mathematics and probability theory. The fuzzy mathematical approach provides a more realistic insight into understanding and quantifying human responses. This paper presents a method for quantifying human responses and subjective judgments without assuming a pattern of linear or numerical variation for human responses. In particular, quantification and evaluation of linguistic judgments was investigated.

  17. Structural building response review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integrity of a nuclear power plant during a postulated seismic event is required to protect the public against radiation. Therefore, a detailed set of seismic analyses of various structures and equipment is performed while designing a nuclear power plant. This report describes the structural response analysis method, including the structural model, soil-structure interaction as it relates to structural models, methods for seismic structural analysis, numerical integration methods, methods for non-seismic response analysis approaches for various response combinations, structural damping values, nonlinear response, uncertainties in structural properties, and structural response analysis using random properties. The report describes the state-of-the-art in these areas for nuclear power plants. It also details the past studies made at Sargent and Lundy to evaluate different alternatives and the conclusions reached for the specific purposes that those studies were intended. These results were incorporated here because they fall into the general scope of this report. The scope of the present task does not include performing new calculations

  18. Pharmacogenetic Predictors of Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Daniel L; Rae, James M

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics attempts to predict treatment response using a patient's "germline" genome as the biomarker of interest. This chapter on pharmacogenetic predictors of breast cancer response is divided into four sections. The first introduces readers to genetic variation and describes how variation in the germline genome can affect biology or pharmacology. The second section introduces the translational pathway for pharmacogenetic research and discusses the specific challenges to identifying pharmacogenetic predictors of breast cancer response. The third section is divided into three subsections, each of which discusses a distinct category of pharmacogenetic response predictors; pharmacokinetics, cancer cell sensitivity, and effector cell activation. Within each subsection a specific pharmacogenetic association is described in detail; CYP2D6-tamoxifen, BRCA-PARP inhibitors, and FCGRA-trastuzumab, respectively, followed by a general discussion of other less well-established examples or areas for further research. The chapter concludes with a summary of the current status of pharmacogenetic predictors of breast cancer response and a few predictions for the future of this field. PMID:26987536

  19. Photovoltaic spectral responsivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.; Dunlavy, D.; Field, H.; Moriarty, T. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses the various elemental random and nonrandom error sources in typical spectral responsivity measurement systems. The authors focus specifically on the filter and grating monochrometer-based spectral responsivity measurement systems used by the Photovoltaic (PV) performance characterization team at NREL. A variety of subtle measurement errors can occur that arise from a finite photo-current response time, bandwidth of the monochromatic light, waveform of the monochromatic light, and spatial uniformity of the monochromatic and bias lights; the errors depend on the light source, PV technology, and measurement system. The quantum efficiency can be a function of he voltage bias, light bias level, and, for some structures, the spectral content of the bias light or location on the PV device. This paper compares the advantages and problems associated with semiconductor-detector-based calibrations and pyroelectric-detector-based calibrations. Different current-to-voltage conversion and ac photo-current detection strategies employed at NREL are compared and contrasted.

  20. DOE Response to Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    and RaJah Mena, Wendy Pemberton

    2011-06-23

    DOE/NNSA NA-40 was requested to provide support with consequence management activities following the incident at the Fukushima Dai’ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The response involved the deployment of several DOE/NNSA NA-40 assets to provide specialized capabilities analysts, scientists, doctors, nurses, specialized equipment and systems to characterize the deposition for the protection of the public and the environment. General response activities revolved around the concepts of: predictive modeling; monitoring and data collection from the air and on the ground; assessing the collected data and other relevant information; interpreting the data; and coordinating the communication of the interpreted data to the appropriate stakeholders.

  1. Free will and responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahmias, Eddy

    2012-07-01

    Free will is a set of capacities for conscious choice and control of actions and is essential for moral responsibility. While determinism is traditionally discussed as the main potential challenge to free will and responsibility, other potential challenges exist and need to be considered by philosophers and scientists. The cognitive sciences are relevant to free will both to study how people understand free will and potential challenges to it, and to study whether these challenges are supported by relevant scientific evidence. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:439-449. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1181 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26301529

  2. Cochlear traveling-wave amplification, suppression, and beamforming probed using noninvasive calibration of intracochlear distortion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, Christopher A; Guinan, John J

    2007-02-01

    Originally developed to estimate the power gain of the cochlear amplifier, so-called "Allen-Fahey" and related experiments have proved invaluable for probing the mechanisms of wave generation and propagation within the cochlea. The experimental protocol requires simultaneous measurement of intracochlear distortion products (DPs) and ear-canal otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) under tightly controlled conditions. To calibrate the intracochlear response to the DP, Allen-Fahey experiments traditionally employ invasive procedures such as recording from auditory-nerve fibers or measuring basilar-membrane velocity. This paper describes an alternative method that allows the intracochlear distortion source to be calibrated noninvasively. In addition to the standard pair of primary tones used to generate the principal DP the noninvasive method employs a third, fixed tone to create a secondary DPOAE whose amplitude and phase provide a sensitive assay of the intracochlear value of the principal DP near its characteristic place. The method is used to perform noninvasive Allen-Fahey experiments in cat and shown to yield results in quantitative agreement with the original, auditory-nerve-based paradigm performed in the same animal. Data obtained using a suppression-compensated variation of the noninvasive method demonstrate that neither traveling-wave amplification nor two-tone suppression constitutes the controlling influence in DPOAE generation at close frequency ratios. Rather, the dominant factor governing the emission magnitude appears to be the variable directionality of the waves radiated by the distortion-source region, which acts as a distortion beamformer tuned by the primary frequency ratio. PMID:17348523

  3. OTOTOXIC MODEL OF OXALIPLATIN AND PROTECTION FROM NICOTINAMIDE ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Dalian; JIANG Haiyan; FU Yong; LI Yongqi; Richard Salvi; Shinichi Someya; Masaru Tanokura

    2013-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, an anticancer drug commonly used to treat colorectal cancer and other tumors, has a number of serious side effects, most notably neuropathy and ototoxicity. To gain insights into its ototoxic profile, oxaliplatin was applied to rat cochlear organ cultures. Consistent with it neurotoxic propensity, oxaliplatin selectively damaged nerve fibers at a very low dose 1 µM. In contrast, the dose required to damage hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons was 50 fold higher (50 µM). Oxailiplatin-induced cochlear lesions initial-ly increased with dose, but unexpectedly decreased at very high doses. This non-linear dose response could be related to depressed oxaliplatin uptake via active transport mechanisms. Previous studies have demon-strated that axonal degeneration involves biologically active processes which can be greatly attenuated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). To determine if NAD+would protect spiral ganglion axons and the hair cells from oxaliplatin damage, cochlear cultures were treated with oxaliplatin alone at doses of 10 µM or 50 µM respectively as controls or combined with 20 mM NAD+. Treatment with 10 µM oxaliplatin for 48 hours resulted in minor damage to auditory nerve fibers, but spared cochlear hair cells. However, when cochlear cultures were treated with 10 µM oxaliplatin plus 20 mM NAD+, most auditory nerve fibers were intact. 50 µM oxaliplatin destroyed most of spiral ganglion neurons and cochlear hair cells with apop-totic characteristics of cell fragmentations. However, 50 µM oxaliplatin plus 20 mM NAD+treatment great-ly reduced neuronal degenerations and hair cell missing. The results suggested that NAD+provides signifi-cant protection against oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity and ototoxicity, which may be due to its actions of antioxidant, antiapoptosis, and energy supply.

  4. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the Chernobyl accident, it became painfully obvious to the international community that there was an urgent need to establish a system for the coordination of international disaster assistance. It became the task of the United Nations Office for Disaster Relief (UNDRO) to develop such a system. The former UNDRO was subsumed into the Department of Humanitarian Affairs (DHA), established in January 1992 on the basis of UN General Assembly Resolution 46/182 adopted in December 1991, and the disaster relief system presently found in DHA is a further evolution of the system established by UNDRO. One particular importance in relation to nuclear accidents is the fact that UNDRO and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) signed a Memorandum of Understanding defining their respective responsibilities and the need for cooperation in case of accidents involving the unintentional release of nuclear radiation. In essence, the MOU makes it clear that the responsibilities of the IAEA, in connection with accidents at Nuclear Power Plants, related to the technical and radiological aspects, in particular to accident prevention, to the on-site preparedness, and to remedial measures within the 30-km zone outside the NPP. DHA's responsibilities, on the other hand, relate to the general preparedness and the rescue efforts outside the 30 km zone. In this respect, the preparedness and emergency response system is no different from the system employed in any other type of sudden-onset emergency

  5. The desmoplastic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmoplasia, a process in which excessive connective tissue is deposited in a neoplasm, is discussed. To study the process, a human malignant melanoma cell line (UCT-Mel 7) was used, that was established in the laboratory, and when injected into athymic mice, it gave rise to tumours that showed a number of interesting features. The tumour induced a marked desmoplastic response and the desmoplasia was associated in UCT-Mel 7-derived tumours with an unusual phasic pattern of growth. Two possible mechanisms were identified by which UCT-Mel 7 cells could have induced the desmoplastic response. UCT-Mel 7 cells were shown to be chemotactic for mouse macrophages and human foreskin fibroblasts were stimulated, in a dose-dependent manner, to synthesize increased amounts of collagen when co-cultured with mouse peritoneal exudate cells. Tumour cells were also found to act directly. Co-culture of UCT-Mel 7 cells and fibroblasts resulted in increased collagen synthesis by the fibroblasts. DNA synthesis was not required. Dexamethasone, retinoic acid and the tumour promoter, phorbol myristate acetate, had significant primary effects on fibroblast collagen synthesis but did not modify the response to melanoma cells. Recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor did not seem to be involved in the desmoplastic response. A surprising finding was the production of a potent inhibitor of collagen synthesis by superinduced cells of the mouse macrophage cell line, P388D1. This inhibitor has not been fully characterised. 49 figs., 33 tabs., 362 refs

  6. Response to Craig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ben C.; Miller, Susan

    1994-01-01

    This response to Ashley Craig's critique (EC 608 043) of the authors' research (which found no significant differences on measures of anxiety and depression between stutterers and nonstutterers) refutes Craig's claim that results were confounded by subjects' previous treatment, self-diagnosis, and low number. (DB)

  7. Neuronal Response Clamp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avner Wallach

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Responses of individual neurons to ongoing input are highly variable, reflecting complex threshold dynamics. Experimental access to this threshold dynamics is required in order to fully characterize neuronal input-output relationships. The challenge is practically intractable using present day experimental paradigms due to the cumulative, nonlinear interactions involved. Here we introduce the Neuronal Response Clamp, a closed-loop technique enabling control over the instantaneous response probability of the neuron. The potential of the technique is demonstrated by showing direct access to threshold dynamics of cortical neuron in-vitro using extracellular recording and stimulation, over timescales ranging from seconds to many hours. Moreover, the method allowed us to expose the sensitivity of threshold dynamics to spontaneous input from the network in which the neuron is embedded. The Response Clamp technique follows the rationale of the voltage-clamp and dynamic-clamp approaches, extending it to the neuron's spiking behavior. The general framework offered here is applicable in the study of other neural systems, beyond the single neuron level.

  8. Socially Responsible Investing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parisi, Cristiana; Stang, Andreas

    This paper analyzes the Scandinavian market for Socially Responsible Investing (SRI) mutual funds in order to determine the returns from discriminatory investment decision compared to the return from conventional portfolios. The analysis is conducted on 642 Scandinavian equity mutual funds. The...

  9. A Global Responsibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU YUE

    2010-01-01

    @@ By increasing and diversifying its involvement in UN peacekeeping missions,China is fulfilling its obligations as a responsible and peaceful power in the world community.In providing critically needed aid in some of the world's most dangerous places,moreover,Chinese peacekeepers have sown the seeds of peace-but very often at the risk of their own lives.

  10. A Global Responsibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China plays a bigger role in international peacekeeping efforts By increasing and diversifying its involvement in UN peacekeeping I missions, China is fulfilling its obli-gations as a responsible and peaceful power in the world community. In providing critically needed aid in some of the

  11. Luxury organizations and responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montesa, Farah; Rohrbeck, René

    2014-01-01

    In this article, findings from previous research, almost forty examples of responsible practices in luxury firms, were clustered and eight generic tools were revealed to advance sustainability. These tools are posed as questions to assess the luxury firm’s level of sustainability and to plan...

  12. Evaluator Responsiveness to Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Tarek

    2010-01-01

    A simulation study was conducted in an attempt to examine how evaluators modify their evaluation design in response to differing stakeholder groups. In this study, evaluators were provided with a fictitious description of a school-based program. They were then asked to design an evaluation of the program. After the evaluation design decisions were…

  13. Coombs' Type Response Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Roger A.

    This paper provides substantial evidence in favor of the continued use of conventional objective testing procedures in lieu of either the Coombs' cross-out technique or the Dressel and Schmid free-choice response procedure. From the studies presented in this paper, the tendency is for the cross-out and the free choice methods to yield a decrement…

  14. Definitions of social responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Planken, B.C.

    2013-01-01

    The role of Corporate Social Responsibility in the business world has developed from a fig leaf marketing front into an important aspect of corporate behavior over the past several years. Sustainable strategies are valued, desired and deployed more and more by relevant players in many industries all

  15. Experiments on Internet Response

    CERN Document Server

    Johansen, A

    2005-01-01

    This paper suggests a generalized distribution of response times to new information $\\sim t^{-b}$ for human populations in the absence of deadlines. This has important implications for psychological and social studies as well the study of dynamical networks such as the WWW.

  16. Socially Responsible Firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Liang, H.; Ferrell, A.

    2014-01-01

    In the corporate finance tradition starting with Berle & Means (1923), corporations should generally be run so as to maximize shareholder value. The agency view of corporate social responsibility (CSR) generally considers CSR as a managerial agency problem and a waste of corporate resources, since c

  17. Response to Mackenzie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peers, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Chris Peers begins his response to Jim Mackenzie's article, "Peers on Socrates and Plato" by asking "What is the 'masculine imaginary?'" Peers defines the term "imaginary" as it is applied in his article, "Freud, Plato and Irigaray: A Morpho-Logic of Teaching and Learning" (2012) and draws…

  18. USGS Emergency Response Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Every day, emergency responders are confronted with worldwide natural and manmade disasters, including earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, landslides, tsunami, volcanoes, wildfires, terrorist attacks, and accidental oil spills.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is ready to coordinate the provisioning and deployment of USGS staff, equipment, geospatial data, products, and services in support of national emergency response requirements.

  19. DNA damage response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Giglia-Mari (Giuseppina); A. Zotter (Angelika); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractStructural changes to DNA severely affect its functions, such as replication and transcription, and play a major role in age-related diseases and cancer. A complicated and entangled network ofDNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms, including multiple DNA repair pathways, damage tolerance p

  20. Radio-adaptive response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adaptive response to radiation stress was found as a suppressed induction of chromosomal damage including micronuclei and sister chromatid exchanges in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells pre-exposed to very low doses of ionizing radiations. The mechanism underlying this novel chromosomal response, called 'radio-adaptive response (RAR)' has been studied progressively. The following results were obtained in recent experiments. 1. Low doses of β-rays from tritiated water (HTO) as well as tritium-thymidine can cause RAR. 2. Thermal neutrons, a high LET radiation, can not act as tritium β-rays or γ-rays. 3. The RAR expression is suppressed not only by the treatment with an inhibitor of protein synthesis but also by RNA synthesis inhibition. 4. Several proteins are newly synthesized concurrently with the RAR expression after the adapting doses, viewed by two-dimensional electrophoresis of cellular proteins. These results suggests that the RAR might be a cellular stress response to a signal produced preferentially by very low doses of low LET radiation under restricted conditions, accompany the inducible specific gene expression. (author)

  1. Responsibility and School Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ann; Mintrom, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The concept of responsibility is highly relevant to the organization of public schooling. Through public schools, adult citizens allow for the formal nurture and training of children to become full citizens, able to participate in our shared social, economic, and political life. With growing awareness of the importance of effective schooling to…

  2. Decoupling Responsible Management Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Gilbert, Dirk Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    This article examines under what conditions business schools may decouple the structural effects of their engagement in responsible management education from actual organizational practices. We argue that schools may be unable to match rising institutional pressures to publicly commit to responsi......This article examines under what conditions business schools may decouple the structural effects of their engagement in responsible management education from actual organizational practices. We argue that schools may be unable to match rising institutional pressures to publicly commit...... to responsible management education with their limited internal capacity for change. Our analysis proposes that decoupling is likely if schools (a) are exposed to resource stringency, (b) face overt or covert resistance against change processes, (c) are confronted with competing institutional pressures, and (d......) perceive institutional demands as ambiguous. We discuss two implications of this proposition. On one hand, decoupling can cause dissonant legitimacy perceptions, leading to cynicism around responsible management education within business schools. On the other hand, a temporary inconsistency between talk...

  3. JK '98: Acting responsibly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, a paper delivered at the Annual Nuclear Conference was presented by two authors, the CEO of Bayernwerk AG, Dr. Otto Majewski, and the CEO of the Power Generation Division (KWU) of Siemens AG, Adolf Huettl, reflecting the operators' and the vendors' points of view about the present situation of nuclear power use in Germany and the need to maintain its share in the energy mix. The events associated with shipments of casks for radioactive waste have rekindled the debate about the responsibility of the peaceful use of nuclear power in the nuclear opposition camp. That debate needs to be put back on a factual basis. If no consensus could be achieved now about the use of nuclear power as a whole, at least consensus had to be reached about the future approach to spent fuel and waste management. From the outset, the nuclear industry has shown a high degree of responsibility, developing concepts of using uranium as an energy source in an economically viable and responsible way. It is showing responsibility also in making provision for the future. The safe and economically successful operation of today's nuclear power plants is an important reason for developing new reactor concepts. That development of new rector lines depends critically on the preservation and advancement of specialized knowledge. Know-how needs to be preserved and developed further not only for future nuclear power plants but also for the plants existing now, which still have service lives of several decades. Sustainable energy supply requires all sources of energy to be exploited, especially those which do not generate carbon dioxide. All the options currently known must be kept open and preserved, respectively, for coming generations. Acting responsibly means adding to the choices available. (orig.)

  4. Responsible conduct of research

    CERN Document Server

    Shamoo, Adil E

    2015-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, the field of Responsible Conduct of Research has become widely recognized as essential to scientific education, investigation, and training. At present, research institutions with public funding are expected to have some minimal training and education in RCR for their graduate students, fellows and trainees. These institutions also are expected to have a system in place for investigating and reporting misconduct in research or violations of regulations in research with human subjects, or in their applications to federal agencies for funding. Public scrutiny of the conduct of scientific researchers remains high. Media reports of misconduct scandals, biased research, violations of human research ethics rules, and moral controversies in research occur on a weekly basis. Since the 2009 publication of the 2nd edition of Shamoo and Resnik's Responsible Conduct of Research, there has been a vast expansion in the information, knowledge, methods, and diagnosis of problems related to RCR and the ...

  5. Multimodal responsive action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oshima, Sae

    While a first pair part projects a limited set of second pair parts to be provided next, responders select different types and formats for second pair parts to assemble activities (Schegloff 2007). Accordingly, various ways of shaping responses have been extensively studied (e.g. Pomerantz 1984...... of them may mobilize the preference organization, for instance when a stylist verbally and/or nonvocally highlights certain features of the new cut. On the other hand, when clients provide an assessment before completing sufficient self-inspection, stylists withhold an acknowledgement of it, orienting.......g. shifting their gaze to the cut and stepping aside) and verbal orientation to an informed assessment/(dis)agreement (e.g. asking additional questions about the cut). In this manner, both parties manipulate the verbal and embodied components of the responding action so that the response caters to: 1...

  6. Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liempd, Dennis van; Warming-Rasmussen, Bent; Abild-Nielsen, Jens;

    2007-01-01

    Målet med denne artikel er at klargøre, at der findes forskellige teoretiske tilgange til ansvarlig leverandørstyring og Corporate Social Responsibility (i det følgende kaldt CSR). Endvidere er det målet at belyse, at området er i kraftig udvikling og forventes at få øget betydning for revisor i...... ansvarlig leverandørstyring og CSR. I artiklen konkluderes følgende: - at udviklingen i Corporate Social Responsibility indikerer, at etik er den mest betydende faktor (driver); (jf. afsnit 1)- at etik som primær driver vil betyde, at virksomheden vil gå ud over lovens minimumkrav, og stræbe efter de...

  7. Responsive Web Design

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, João Filipe Borges

    2014-01-01

    Este relatório descreve o estágio curricular do aluno na empresa Mediaweb com a aplicação prática na área do Responsive Web Design. Este estágio realizou-se no âmbito do mestrado em Design Gráfico na Escola Superior de Artes e Design, das Caldas da Rainha. O documento divide-se em três partes principais. Inicialmente é caraterizada a entidade acolhedora, seguidamente é feita a contextualização teórica sobre o tema Responsive Web Design, e por último, é realizada uma descrição e análise do ...

  8. Undefined and unpredictable responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bove, Dorthe Gaby; Zakrisson, Ann-Britt; Midtgaard, Julie;

    2016-01-01

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Undefined and unpredictable responsibility: a focus group studyof the experiences of informal caregiver spouses of patients withsevere COPDDorthe Gaby Bove, Ann-Britt Zakrisson, Julie Midtgaard, Kirsten Lomborg and Dorthe OvergaardAims and objectives. To explore how spouses of...... supportive interventions aimed at reducing the caregiverburden.Design. The study had a qualitative exploratory design. The data collection andanalysis were based on framework method. Framework method is a thematicmethodology and consists of five key stages: familiarisation, identifying a thematicframework......, indexing, charting and mapping & interpretation.Methods. Three focus groups were conducted in November 2013 with 22 spousesof patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.Results. Undefined and unpredictable responsibility was found to be the overarch-ing theme describing the informal...

  9. Dynamic alarm response procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dynamic Alarm Response Procedure (DARP) system provides a robust, Web-based alternative to existing hard-copy alarm response procedures. This paperless system improves performance by eliminating time wasted looking up paper procedures by number, looking up plant process values and equipment and component status at graphical display or panels, and maintenance of the procedures. Because it is a Web-based system, it is platform independent. DARP's can be served from any Web server that supports CGI scripting, such as ApacheR, IISR, TclHTTPD, and others. DARP pages can be viewed in any Web browser that supports Javascript and Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG), such as NetscapeR, Microsoft Internet ExplorerR, Mozilla FirefoxR, OperaR, and others. (authors)

  10. Hematologic Response to Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Fernando Bonilla Briceño

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Moderate to intensive physical exercisegenerates different types of response in an individual.These responses depend upon the typeof exercise and the duration of it, and they canbe acute or chronic. Exercise affects differentcorporal system, among those is the hematologicalsystem. Literature describes changes inthe blood volume, changes in the activity andpopulation of white blood cells, as well asmodifications in the humoral and cellularimmunity, and in the count and shape of bloodplatelets. Also and as a result of those changes, ithas been determined too, that exercise modifiesin a negative way the life time of red blood cells,generating an apparent anemia, that has beenwidely discuss and that might be, among manyfactors, associated to hemolysis. This hemolysismight be associated with osmotic mechanismsor oxidative stress. The true is that all thoseevents are strongly related and may cause a lowperformance in the practice of any physicalactivity, including that of sportsmen.

  11. Consumer responses to ecolabels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John; Haugaard, Pernille; Olesen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    proposes an adoption of innovation framework for understanding consumer responses. The framework is applied in a mall-intercept survey of the early adoption of a new ecolabel, the MSC label for sustainable fishery, in Denmark. Findings - Early adopters of a new ecolabel mostly employ a high effort adoption......Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to develop and apply a framework for understanding consumer responses to ecolabelling. Design/methodology/approach - From a consumer perspective, ecolabels are tools for supporting decision making with regard to environmentally significant products. The paper...... process. Starting the adoption process depends on both motivation (intention to buy sustainable fish products) and ability (issue-relevant knowledge). Whether and how quickly the consumer completes the adoption depends on his or her motivation, past experience with using ecolabels, and trust...

  12. Increasing Responsibility towards Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Comanescu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In the international climate of the early millennium, the need for reconciliation between economic and social development, on one hand, and the environment, on the other hand, is essential. Therefore, sustainable development must be promoted, because it integrates economic growth, improved quality of life, health, education, social development and environmental protection.Environmental issues are particularly complex as their causes are interdependent. This requires actions at all levels: local, national, regional as well as at the European Union level, each with its own role in increasing responsibility for the environmental protection.It is widely recognized that to obtain successful results an integrated approach has to be used to manage the environment, by adopting long-term strategies and action plans. It requires a detailed analysis of the links between different policies and responsibilities, including the links between different administrative levels.

  13. Increasing Responsibility towards Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela COMĂNESCU

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In the international climate of the early millennium, the need for reconciliation between economic and social development, on one hand, and the environment, on the other hand, is essential. Therefore, sustainable development must be promoted, because it integrates economic growth, improves quality of life, health, education, social development and environmental protection. Environmental issues are particularly complex as their causes are interdependent. This requires actions at all levels: local, national, regional as well as at the European Union level, each with its own role in increasing responsibility for the environmental protection. It is widely recognized that to obtain successful results an integrated approach has to be used to manage the environment, by adopting long-term strategies and action plans. It requires a detailed analysis of the links between different policies and responsibilities, including the links between different administrative levels.

  14. High energy photon response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examines the response of the Hanford 4-chip and 5-chip dosimeter to high energy photons. The dose response of the Hanford Multipurpose Personnel Diometer (HMPD) to photons with energies greater than 0.65 MeV has been evaluated relative to the dose produced by photons from a 60Co. source. The penetrating dose determined with the HMPD is compared to the 1 cm depth dose in tissue measured with an extrapolation chamber. The results of the study indicate that the HMPD can be used to estimate the 1 cm depth dose in tissue from photons with energies between 0.65 MeV and 3.0 MeV to within an accuracy of 15%. However, the 1 cm depth dose is underestimated by 38% when the dosimeter is irradiated in a beam of very high energy photons produced by bombarding a tungsten target with 25 MeV electrons

  15. Aesthetic responses to music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Istok, Eva; Brattico, Elvira; Jacobsen, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    adjective "touching" was often listed together with "beautiful". In addition, we found music-specific vocabulary as well as adjectives related to emotions and mood states indicating that affective processes are an essential part of aesthetic responses to music. Differences between music experts and laymen......We explored the content and structure of the cognitive, knowledge-based concept underlying aesthetic responses to music. To this aim, we asked 290 Finnish students to verbally associate the aesthetic value of music and to write down a list of appropriate adjectives within a given time limit. No...... music was presented during the task. In addition, information about participants' musical background was collected. A variety of analysis techniques was used to determine the key results of our study. The adjective "beautiful" proved to be the core item of the concept under question. Interestingly, the...

  16. Conceptualising environmental responsibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downstream responsibility is rarely addressed in the academic literature and in corporate sustainability reporting. We conceptualise downstream responsibility for the example of carbon emissions, by establishing a terminology as well as a framework for quantifying downstream carbon footprints. By extracting emissions-intensive sales chains for a number of Australian industry sectors, and comparing these to emissions-intensive supply chains, we demonstrated the ability of input-output analysis to quantify emissions responsibility in both directions. We extend the definition of downstream responsibility beyond the product use and disposal phases, to include what we call 'enabled' emissions. This term implies that whatever is sold downstream enables our customers to operate and emit, irrespective of whether it is our product that is combusted, or that directly combusts fuels, or not. Our structural path analyses and threshold-capture relationships reveal stark differences between industries with regard to the data collection efforts necessary to achieve a reasonably complete footprint assessment. Industries appear to have their own specific carbon footprint profiles, and one cannot design generic relevance tests that tell which data to collect. Moreover we conclude that current completeness standards in carbon reporting cannot be satisfied using relevance thresholds. Input-output analysis and structural path analysis are excellent tools that can help companies undertake screening exercises, which in turn help prioritising and streamlining the collection of data needed to establish a corporate downstream carbon footprint. Compared to conventional manual approaches, hybrid life-cycle assessments assisted by input-output analysis and structural path analysis achieve more complete results, with substantially less staff, money and time. (author)

  17. Corporate social responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Misiak, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Considering environmental protection requirements in business operations may, in the long run, determine if a lasting comparative advantage can be achieved. That is why our textbook, rich in case studies, identifies not only the threats a business may pose to the environment but stresses the ways of reducing its negative impact. It discusses, among other things, the concept of corporate social responsibility, environmental management systems, methods and the importance of eco-labelling goods ...

  18. Coercion, Responsibility, and Discourse

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Coercion and conceptions of legitimate authority intersect with freedom and autonomy at both the individual level and the political level, and are central to two separate discourses in philosophy, namely, to discussions of free will and agency, and to social and political theory. However, with few exceptions, these discussions have gone on independently of one another. Traditionally, theories of agency have analyzed autonomy in terms of responsibility, such that an agent can be regarded as au...

  19. Response time of internauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Anders

    2001-07-01

    A new experiment measuring the dynamical response of the Internet population to a “point-like” perturbation has been performed. The nature of the perturbation was that of an announcement, specifically a web-interview on stock market crashes, which contained the URL to the author's articles on the subject. It was established that the download rate obeys the relation ≈1/ t in qualitative agreement with previously reported results.

  20. Business ethics & collective responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Dempsey, James A.

    2013-01-01

    The idea that ‘business ethics’ picks out a distinct discipline within ethical theory is contentious; in particular, it is unclear why theoretical approaches to moral and political philosophy cannot satisfactorily address ethical concerns in the context of business activity, just as they can in the context of other human activities. In response, I argue that some features of the business environment require more focused analysis than currently available. This environment is characterised by t...

  1. Community response to noise

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Yano; Truls Gjestland; Soogab Lee

    2012-01-01

    Activities from 2008 to 2011 by ICBEN community response to noise team were summarized. That is, individual community-based indexes such as community tolerance Level, Zuricher Fluglarm Index (ZFI) and Frankfurter Fluglarm Index (FFI/FNI) were newly proposed, differences in railway bonus between Europe and Asia were discussed by a Swedish survey, socio-acoustic surveys were reported from developing countries, and annoyance equivalents and dominant source models were proposed as the adequate co...

  2. The Responsive Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Juul; Fredens, Kjeld

    they form a dynamic system that enables individuals to respond effectively to changing conditions. We project this dynamic perspective onto human interaction in organizations where observations and experiential insights gained by employees and operating managers are linked to forward-looking planning...... considerations that take place around the top-management echelons. This identifies the responsive organization that is able to observe and react to frequent and often abrupt environmental changes and thereby adapt organizational activities to the changing reality....

  3. Socially Responsible Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Liang, H; Ferrell, A.

    2014-01-01

    In the corporate finance tradition starting with Berle & Means (1923), corporations should generally be run so as to maximize shareholder value. The agency view of corporate social responsibility (CSR) generally considers CSR as a managerial agency problem and a waste of corporate resources, since corporate insiders do good with other people’s money. We evaluate this agency view using large-scale datasets with global coverage (59 countries) on firm-level corporate engagement and compliance wi...

  4. Marketing social responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Sumitro; Wathieu, Luc

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the marketing strategies of vertically differentiated firms when consumers observe their performance on corporate social responsibility (CSR) and firms simultaneously decide the price, advertising intensity and the investment in CSR. While advertising increases consumers’ perception of product quality, CSR is introduced as “an observable and measurable behavior or output” which adds value for the society and “exceeds levels set by obligatory regulation or standards enforced by law”...

  5. Responsibility for Existence

    OpenAIRE

    Levytskyi, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The author attempts to specify the meaning of the central ontological and metaphysical concepts 'social existence', 'social reality' and 'life world'. He looks into such issues as 'How does social existence arise?', 'What legitimates social reality?', 'How are general intersubjective senses of such reality formed?' and eventually 'Who is responsible for social existence (and probably existence in general)?'From a retrospective journey into the history and theoretical explications the author e...

  6. Structural response synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozisik, H.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    The open loop control technique of predicting a conditioned input signal based on a specified output response for a second order system has been analyzed both analytically and numerically to gain a firm understanding of the method. Differences between this method of control and digital closed loop control using pole cancellation were investigated as a follow up to previous experimental work. Application of the technique to diamond turning using a fast tool is also discussed.

  7. DNA Damage Response

    OpenAIRE

    Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Zotter, Angelika; Vermeulen, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Structural changes to DNA severely affect its functions, such as replication and transcription, and play a major role in age-related diseases and cancer. A complicated and entangled network of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms, including multiple DNA repair pathways, damage tolerance processes, and cell-cycle checkpoints safeguard genomic integrity. Like transcription and replication, DDR is a chromatin-associated process that is generally tightly controlled in time and space. As DNA damag...

  8. Cell response to surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the profound alterations in host immunity that are produced by major surgery as demonstrated by experimental and clinical studies, and to evaluate the benefits of therapeutic strategies aimed at attenuating perioperative immune dysfunction. DATA SOURCES: A review of the English-language literature was conducted, incorporating searches of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane collaboration databases to identify laboratory and clinical studies investigating the cellular response to surgery. STUDY SELECTION: Original articles and case reports describing immune dysfunction secondary to surgical trauma were included. DATA EXTRACTION: The results were compiled to show outcomes of different studies and were compared. DATA SYNTHESIS: Current evidence indicates that the early systemic inflammatory response syndrome observed after major surgery that is characterized by proinflammatory cytokine release, microcirculatory disturbance, and cell-mediated immune dysfunction is followed by a compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome, which predisposes the patient to opportunistic infection, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and death. Because there are currently no effective treatment options for multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, measures to prevent its onset should be initiated at an early stage. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that targeted therapeutic strategies involving immunomodulatory agents such as interferon gamma, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, the prostaglandin E(2) antagonist, indomethacin, and pentoxifylline may be used for the treatment of systemic inflammatory response syndrome to prevent the onset of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical trauma produces profound immunological dysfunction. Therapeutic strategies directed at restoring immune homeostasis should aim to redress the physiological proinflammatory-anti-inflammatory cell imbalance associated with major surgery.

  9. Canada's response to Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant damage occurred to the six units of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station following a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami on March 11, 2011. As a response to this event, the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) had issued a request to all CANDU Utilities to provide a documented summary of our ability to address beyond design basis events, as had the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) to Canadian nuclear facilities. Based on the extent of the event and impact on all aspects of nuclear power plant design basis, safety standards and operating practices, the Senior Executives in CANDU nuclear facilities decided to work on the response to this event in a joint collaborative manner. To achieve this objective, a CANDU Industry Team (CIT) was created to share information and promote industry collaboration. This team has now completed the initial phase of this event response and provided feedback to both WANO and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. This team has now transitioned to a sustaining mode to ensure that defined activities continue to progress and industry collaboration preserved. The following presentation documents the progress to date and provides an overview of the CIT activities, lessons learned and a summary of the short and long term steps being taken to implement enhancements to plant mobile support equipment, emergency measures capability and inter-utility mutual aid protocol.

  10. Magnetic static response functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of a normally non-magnetic material to an external static magnetic field can be monitored by many different magnetic response functions. A general scheme to supply a corresponding theoretical description is presented that is based on the relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green function method of band structure calculations, and for that reason has many appealing features. First of all, it treats all spin as well as orbital contributions to the induced magnetization on the same footing, accounting in particular for all relativistic influences. Furthermore, it is extremely flexible and applicable in principle to any kind of system. Finally, a formulation for any response function can be worked out on this platform in a rather straightforward way. This is demonstrated together with corresponding applications for the magnetic form factor, the magnetic susceptibility and the Knight shift. In addition, a description of the so-called field-induced magnetic circular dichroism in x-ray absorption will be presented. In particular, it is shown that this new magneto-optical effect supplies a rather unique probe, giving information separately on the spin and orbital susceptibility in an element-resolved way

  11. Oil spill response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An outline is given of oil spill contingency planning and response, with examples from Canadian practice. Effective planning and response operations require a method of evaluating effects of oil spills on important coastal resources in order to assign priorities for preventing or minimizing potential damage. Components of such a method would include determination of shoreline sensitivity indices from pre-spill studies. Logistics and operational constraints also have to be considered, notably in Canada where large segments of shorelines are remote or otherwise difficult to access. Environmental constraints may include extreme sea state conditions, ice, and the presence of ecologically sensitive areas or endangered species. Accurate information on shoreline and spill conditions is also necessary, and the Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Team (SCAT) concept developed during the Exxon Valdez and Nestucca spills is described as one such kind of systematic and comprehensive method of data collection. SCAT can serve in a technical support capacity to the spill response organization, provide information and documentation to regulators and landowners or managers, and generate a data base to assist planning and implementation. Finally, techniques for shoreline protection and spill cleanup are described, according to the type of shoreline to be treated. These include the use of booms, onshore ditch/dyke systems, washing, physical removal, bioremediation, and chemical treatment. Environmental impacts of cleanup operations and methods of managing wastes resulting from those operations are included. 22 figs., 10 tabs

  12. Adolescent male reproductive responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, L S

    1983-01-01

    A sample of 100 adolescent males enrolled in 2 high schools in suburban New Jersey completed a 30 item questionnaire in 1980 to explore further the attitudes and intended behavior of white, middle-class adolescent males regarding their reproductive responsibility. Data were sought on attitudes toward sex, contraception, pregnancy, and fatherhood. Also questioned were preferences about contraceptive use as well as anticipated behavior in the event of a partner's pregnancy. The study also was designed to obtain information on responses the subjects anticipated from their paretns on preferred pregnancy outcome. All respondents were white. 94%, based on data on the subjects' fathers, were ranked middle class and higher according to Hollingshead's Two Factor Index of Social Position. Ages ranged from 15-19 with a mean age of 16. 88% were living in households with both parents. Only 4% agreed that there was nothing wrong with telling a girl that you love her (even if you do not) so that she will agree to have sexual relations. This contrasts markedly with 61% of Vadies and Hale's lower-class sample of adolescent males who felt that deception was acceptable to obtain sex. 59% of the study group agreed that contraceptive use "shows concern for the girl," but the percentage dropped slightly to 53% regarding attitude toward using "protection whenever possible." The subjects demonstrated a contrast between attitude and intended behavior with 67% indicating an intention to use contraception when participating in sex regularly. 62% thought that for most of their peers would have sex and count on luck. 54% assumed that the "girl will protect herself." Respondents were more often willing either to help the close girlfriend range an abortion (28%), to marry her (21%), or to help her seek an adoption (20%). They were less likely to do the same for a casual girlfriend except in the case of abortion. A double standard was significantly evident on the basis of several preferred types

  13. Personal Responsibility and Lifestyle Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Martin Marchman; Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2016-10-01

    What does it take for an individual to be personally responsible for behaviors that lead to increased risk of disease? We examine three approaches to responsibility that cover the most important aspects of the discussion of responsibility and spell out what it takes, according to each of them, to be responsible for behaviors leading to increased risk of disease. We show that only what we call the causal approach can adequately accommodate widely shared intuitions to the effect that certain causal influences-such as genetic make-up or certain social circumstances-diminish, or undermine personal responsibility. However, accepting the causal approach most likely makes personal responsibility impossible. We therefore need either to reject these widely shared intuitions about what counts as responsibility-softening or undermining or to accept that personal responsibility for behaviors leading to increased risk of disease rests on premises so shaky that personal responsibility is probably impossible. PMID:27473408

  14. Ontario demand response scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strategies for demand management in Ontario were examined via 2 scenarios for a commercial/institutional building with a normal summertime peak load of 300 kW between 14:00 and 18:00 during a period of high electricity demand and high electricity prices. The first scenario involved the deployment of a 150 kW on-site generator fuelled by either diesel or natural gas. The second scenario involved curtailing load by 60 kW during the same periods. Costs and benefits of both scenarios were evaluated for 3 groups: consumers, system operators and society. Benefits included electricity cost savings, deferred transmission capacity development, lower system prices for electricity, as well as environmental changes, economic development, and a greater sense of corporate social responsibility. It was noted that while significant benefits were observed for all 3 groups, they were not substantial enough to encourage action, as the savings arising from deferred generation capacity development do not accrue to individual players. The largest potential benefit was identified as lower prices, spread across all users of electricity in Ontario. It was recommended that representative bodies cooperate so that the system-wide benefits can be reaped. It was noted that if 10 municipal utilities were able to have 250 commercial or institutional customers engaged in distributed response, then a total peak demand reduction of 375 MW could be achieved, representing more than 25 per cent of Ontario's target for energy conservation. It was concluded that demand response often involves the investment of capital and new on-site procedures, which may affect reactions to various incentives. 78 refs., 10 tabs., 5 figs

  15. Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Jánošová, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Jánošová, S. CSR concept in Synot Gastro Slovakia s.r.o., Slovak republic .Bachelor thesis. Brno: Mendel University in Brno, 2014. The bachelor thesis focused on Corporate Social Responsibility in Synot Gastro Slovakia s.r.o., Slovak Republic. Company is a subsidiary of Synot W. a.s., but is oriented in different type of business. Synot Gastro Slovakia s.r.o.(Hotel Elizabeth)is company, which provides high quality services in a branch of hotel industry. Company provides services including acc...

  16. Levinas and responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Chinnery, Ann; Bai, Heesoon

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to the prevailing modernist conception of ethics, wherein responsibility toward others is seen as the necessary cost one has to bear in exchange for the right to pursue individual self-interest, Levinas calls into question the claim to a natural drive toward self-interest and individual freedom. He argues instead that our basic condition, or “ethical nature,” is a commitment to the rights of the other person. However, in order to understand Levinas’s inversion of the traditional m...

  17. Responsive City Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben Skouboe; Andersen, Hans Jørgen; Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper presents and discusses perspectives extracted from two interviews conducted during the experiments Urban Responsive Lighting. The two experts embody two different fields related to city lighting: architecture & public lighting industry. The representatives were invited to the test......-site, where 15 LED RGB Park lamps, controlled driven by a wind sensor, mobile phone applications or by thermal camera tracking. According to the specialists are the social and aesthetical dimensions more interesting than the energy use cases and efficiency. This motivates an interdisciplinary discussion on...

  18. Responsive Web Design

    OpenAIRE

    Rogatnev, Nikita

    2015-01-01

    Dos computadores aos tablets e smartphones, a noção de ubiquidade, aliada à diversidade de dispositivos disponíveis no mercado, mudou a forma como acedemos e partilhamos informação nos dias de hoje. É cada vez mais importante oferecer experiências de utilização consistente para um crescente número de contextos. O Responsive Web Design oferece um conjunto de ferramentas que permitem criar páginas web que respondem ao tamanho de qualquer ecrã. São utilizadas grids fluidas, imagens flexíveis...

  19. The Responsibilities of Accountants

    OpenAIRE

    Ronald F Duska

    2005-01-01

    An accountant is a good accountant if in practicing his craft he is superb in handling the numbers. But a good accountant in handling the numbers can use that skill to misstate earnings to cover a multitude of problems with a company's books while staying within the law. So, the notion of a moral or ethical accountant is not the same as the notion of a good accountant. Our general principle would be that to be ethical a person has a responsibility to fulfil one's role or roles, as long as tha...

  20. Agency as responsiveness

    OpenAIRE

    ROY, Suryapratim

    2016-01-01

    In this article I seek to de-tether the idea of agency from the epistemic pursuits of philosophers and legal scholars working on adaptive preferences and moral responsibility. What is common to such scholars is a move away from conceptualising agency as individual acts of conscious deliberation. While I support a shift in the way agency is understood, I do not find in their work an account of locating and promoting agency as a primary good. For instance, while findings from various psychologi...

  1. Community response to noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activities from 2008 to 2011 by ICBEN community response to noise team were summarized. That is, individual community-based indexes such as community tolerance Level, Zuricher Fluglarm Index (ZFI and Frankfurter Fluglarm Index (FFI/FNI were newly proposed, differences in railway bonus between Europe and Asia were discussed by a Swedish survey, socio-acoustic surveys were reported from developing countries, and annoyance equivalents and dominant source models were proposed as the adequate combined noise model. Furthermore, not only negative, but also positive aspects of sound were discussed as soundscape studies. Finally, seven items were listed as future team activities.

  2. Corporate social responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Iversen, Geir-Henning; Johansen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Dagens bedrifter måles ikke bare etter deres økonomiske bunnlinje, men også etter hvordan de opptrer i samfunnet. Dette har ført til at foretakenes sosiale ansvar (Corporate Social Responsibility) har kommet mer og mer i fokus de senere årene, og bedriftene ønsker derfor ikke bare å innfri eiernes interesser, men også øvrige interessenters interesser. Mye av litteraturen rundt CSR baserer seg på store foretak. I Norge utgjør slike bedrifter bare 0,5 % av alle bedriftene, noe som innebærer...

  3. Science's social responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil

    2014-01-01

    science address whatever problems there are, whatever conflicts there are, trying to find the deeper meaning of things, and so on which means that science don’t necessarily just solve the problems that kind of spring to you face like curing cancer and stuff like that. It is also about asking deeper...... questions about the nature of things: how does people relate, how does culture work, how does nature work (from the micro to the macro level) and so on and so forth. So a lot of the responsibility for science in society is not just about asking question but about figuring out what questions can be asked and...

  4. Materials response to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of metals, e.g. due to the embrittlement necessitate irradiation experiments with HTR-specific neutron spectra. These experiments help to determine materials behaviour and establish basic data for design and safety testing, especially with a view to the high fluence and temperature loads on absorber cans. The experiments are carried out up to maximum operational fluence (>= 1022nsub(th)/cm2). Results so far have shown the importance of the materials structure for assurance of sufficient residual ductility after irradiation. Secondary experiments, e.g. on He implantation and radiation response of the absorber material B4C, are mentioned. (orig.)

  5. Arabidopsis iba response5 Suppressors Separate Responses to Various Hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Strader, Lucia C.; Monroe-Augustus, Melanie; Rogers, Kristen C.; Lin, Grace L.; Bartel, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    Auxin controls numerous plant growth processes by directing cell division and expansion. Auxin-response mutants, including iba response5 (ibr5), exhibit a long root and decreased lateral root production in response to exogenous auxins. ibr5 also displays resistance to the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). We found that the sar3 suppressor of auxin resistant1 (axr1) mutant does not suppress ibr5 auxin-response defects, suggesting that screening for ibr5 suppressors might reveal new components ...

  6. Role of auxin-responsive genes in biotic stress responses

    OpenAIRE

    Ghanashyam, Challa; Jain, Mukesh

    2009-01-01

    Although the phytohormone auxin has been implicated primarily in developmental processes, some recent studies suggest its involvement in stress/defense responses as well. Recently, we identified auxin-responsive genes and reported their comprehensive transcript profiling during various stages of development and abiotic stress responses in crop plant rice. The analysis revealed tissue-specific and overlapping expression profiles of auxin-responsive genes during various stages of reproductive d...

  7. Responsive Systems: Light and Human Responsive Systems in Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Niqui, Mobasher

    2012-01-01

    This thesis studies the notion of responsiveness in architectural design. It tries to make a framework for understanding the act of response in architectural body. Focusing on Light as a contextual force, it studies the way light affects the built environment and architectural body, in order to introduce a light responsive system. This light responsive system will be used to design a mediatheque in the city of Geneva. Studying a multidisciplinary thematic between architecture and building phy...

  8. Host Responses to Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, C; Fleming, D; Bishop, D; Rumbaugh, K P

    2016-01-01

    From birth to death the human host immune system interacts with bacterial cells. Biofilms are communities of microbes embedded in matrices composed of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), and have been implicated in both the healthy microbiome and disease states. The immune system recognizes many different bacterial patterns, molecules, and antigens, but these components can be camouflaged in the biofilm mode of growth. Instead, immune cells come into contact with components of the EPS matrix, a diverse, hydrated mixture of extracellular DNA (bacterial and host), proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids. As bacterial cells transition from planktonic to biofilm-associated they produce small molecules, which can increase inflammation, induce cell death, and even cause necrosis. To survive, invading bacteria must overcome the epithelial barrier, host microbiome, complement, and a variety of leukocytes. If bacteria can evade these initial cell populations they have an increased chance at surviving and causing ongoing disease in the host. Planktonic cells are readily cleared, but biofilms reduce the effectiveness of both polymorphonuclear neutrophils and macrophages. In addition, in the presence of these cells, biofilm formation is actively enhanced, and components of host immune cells are assimilated into the EPS matrix. While pathogenic biofilms contribute to states of chronic inflammation, probiotic Lactobacillus biofilms cause a negligible immune response and, in states of inflammation, exhibit robust antiinflammatory properties. These probiotic biofilms colonize and protect the gut and vagina, and have been implicated in improved healing of damaged skin. Overall, biofilms stimulate a unique immune response that we are only beginning to understand. PMID:27571696

  9. Automated security response robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccimaro, Dominic A.; Everett, Hobart R.; Gilbreath, Gary A.; Tran, Tien T.

    1999-01-01

    ROBART III is intended as an advance demonstration platform for non-lethal response measures, extending the concepts of reflexive teleoperation into the realm of coordinated weapons control in law enforcement and urban warfare scenarios. A rich mix of ultrasonic and optical proximity and range sensors facilitates remote operation in unstructured and unexplored buildings with minimal operator supervision. Autonomous navigation and mapping of interior spaces is significantly enhanced by an innovative algorithm which exploits the fact that the majority of man-made structures are characterized by parallel and orthogonal walls. Extremely robust intruder detection and assessment capabilities are achieved through intelligent fusion of a multitude of inputs form various onboard motion sensors. Intruder detection is addressed by a 360-degree staring array of passive-IR motion detectors, augmented by a number of positionable head-mounted sensors. Automatic camera tracking of a moving target is accomplished using a video line digitizer. Non-lethal response systems include a six- barrelled pneumatically-powered Gatling gun, high-powered strobe lights, and three ear-piercing 103-decibel sirens.

  10. Human sexual response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basson, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    The human sexual response to sexually arousing stimuli is a motivational incentive-based cycle comprising subjective experience and physiologic changes. Clinical and empirical data support a circular model of overlapping phases of variable order. Brain imaging data of sexual arousal identify areas of cerebral activation and inhibition reflecting a complex network of cognitive, motivational, emotional, and autonomic components. Psychologic and biologic factors influence the brain's appraisal and processing of sexual stimuli to allow or disallow subsequent arousal. The sexual and non-sexual outcomes influence motivation to future sexual intimacy. Variability is marked both between individuals and within a person's sexual life, influenced by multiple factors, including stage of life cycle, mental health, and relationship happiness. Neurologic disease can interrupt the cycle at many points: by limiting motivation, reducing ability to attend to and feel sexual stimuli, and accomplishing the movements needed to stimulate and experience intercourse. Impairments to genital congestion, penile erection, and orgasm may also occur. Disease-associated changes to the interpersonal relationship and self-image plus frequently comorbid depression will tend to lessen motivation and temper the brain's appraisal of sexual stimuli, so precluding arousal. Therapy begins by explaining the sexual response cycle, clarifying the points of interruption in the patient's own cycle so as to guide treatment. PMID:26003236

  11. Energy-responsive timekeeping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    David A. Bechtold

    2008-12-01

    An essential component of energy homeostasis lies in an organism’s ability to coordinate daily patterns in activity, feeding, energy utilization and energy storage across the daily 24-h cycle. Most tissues of the body contain the molecular clock machinery required for circadian oscillation and rhythmic gene expression. Under normal circumstances, behavioural and physiological rhythms are orchestrated and synchronized by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, considered to be the master circadian clock. However, metabolic processes are easily decoupled from the primarily light-driven SCN when food intake is desynchronized from normal diurnal patterns of activity. This dissociation from SCN based timing demonstrates that the circadian system is responsive to changes in energy supply and metabolic status. There has long been evidence for the existence of an anatomically distinct and autonomous food-entrainable oscillator (FEO) that can govern behavioural rhythms, when feeding becomes the dominant entraining stimulus. But now rapidly growing evidence suggests that core circadian clock genes are involved in reciprocal transcriptional feedback with genetic regulators of metabolism, and are directly responsive to cellular energy supply. This close interaction is likely to be critical for normal circadian regulation of metabolism, and may also underlie the disruption of proper metabolic rhythms observed in metabolic disorders, such as obesity and type-II diabetes.

  12. State responses to biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Rebecca C

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews biotechnology legislation in the 50 states for 11 policy areas spanning 1990-2010, an era of immense growth in biotechnology, genetic knowledge, and significant policy development. Policies regarding health insurance, life insurance, long-term care insurance, DNA data bank collection, biotech research protection, biotech promotion and support, employment discrimination, genetic counselor licensing, human cloning, and genetic privacy each represent major policy responses arising from biotechnology and coinciding with key areas of state regulation (insurance, criminal justice, economic development, labor law, health and safety, privacy, and property rights). This analysis seeks to answer three questions regarding biotechnology legislation at the state level: who is acting (policy adoption), when is policy adopted (policy timing), and what is policy doing (policy content). Theoretical concerns examine state ideology (conservative or liberal), policy type (economic or moral), and the role of external events (federal law, news events, etc.) on state policy adoption. Findings suggest ideological patterns in adoption, timing, and content of biotech policy. Findings also suggest economic policies tend to be more uniform in content than moral policies, and findings also document a clear link between federal policy development, external events, and state policy response. PMID:26399943

  13. Exercise Responses after Inactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1986-01-01

    The exercise response after bed rest inactivity is a reduction in the physical work capacity and is manifested by significant decreases in oxygen uptake. The magnitude of decrease in maximal oxygen intake V(dot)O2max is related to the duration of confinement and the pre-bed-rest level of aerobic fitness; these relationships are relatively independent of age and gender. The reduced exercise performance and V(dot)O2max following bed rest are associated with various physiological adaptations including reductions in blood volume, submaximal and maximal stroke volume, maximal cardiac output, sceletal muscle tone and strength, and aerobic enzyme capacities, as well as increases in venous compliance and submaximal and maximal heart rate. This reduction in physiological capacity can be partially restored by specific countermeasures that provide regular muscular activity or orhtostatic stress or both during the bed rest exposure. The understanding of these physiological and physical responses to exercise following bed rest inactivity has important implications for the solution to safety and health problems that arise in clinical medicine, aerospace medicine, sedentary living, and aging.

  14. THE RESPONSIBILITY PRINCIPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena ANGHEL

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available "I'm wishing Law this: all legal obligations sholud be executed with the scrupulosity with which moral obligations are being performed by those people who feel bound by them ...", so beautifully portraited by Nicolae Titulescu`s words1. Life in the society means more than a simple coexistence of human beings, it actually means living together, collaborating and cooperating; that is why I always have to relate to other people and to be aware that only by limiting my freedom of action, the others freedom is feasible. Neminem laedere should be a principle of life for each of us. The individual is a responsible being. But responsibility exceeds legal prescriptions. Romanian Constitution underlines that I have to exercise my rights and freedoms in good faith, without infringing the rights and freedoms of others. The legal norm, developer of the constitutional principles, is endowed with sanction, which grants it exigibility. But I wonder: If I choose to obey the law, is my decision essentially determined only due of the fear of punishment? Is it not because I am a rational being, who developed during its life a conscience towards values, and thus I understand that I have to respect the law and I choose to comply with it?

  15. Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... electrical nerve impulses and send them to the auditory nerve, which connects the inner ear to the ... prefer. Cleaning makes a difference in hearing aid comfort. A perfectly comfortable hearing aid can become pretty ...

  16. A Model for the representation of Speech Signals in Normal and Impaired Ears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    dependent. Impaired hearing was modelled as a combination of outer- and inner hair cell loss. The percentage of dead inner hair cells was calculated based on a new computational method relating auditory nerve fibre thresholds to behavioural thresholds. Finally, a model of the entire auditory nerve fibre......A model of human auditory periphery, ranging from the outer ear to the auditory nerve, was developed. The model consists of the following components: outer ear transfer function, middle ear transfer function, basilar membrane velocity, inner hair cell receptor potential, inner hair cell probability...... of neurotransmitter release and auditory nerve fibre refractoriness. The model builds on previously published models, however, parameters for basilar membrane velocity and inner hair cell probability of neurotransmitter release were successfully fitted to model data from psychophysical and...

  17. Neurofibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but the auditory nerve is maintained, the surgical placement of a cochlear implant (a device placed in ... chromosome 22. As in NF1, the NF2 gene product is a tumor-suppressor protein (called merlin or ...

  18. The surgically induced stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A; Herndon, David N

    2013-09-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes that induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress response, however, varies according to the severity of injury (surgical or traumatic). This spectrum of injuries and insults ranges from small lacerations to severe insults such as large poly-traumatic and burn injuries. Burn injuries provide an extreme model of trauma induced stress responses that can be used to study the long-term effects of a prolonged stress response. Although the stress response to acute trauma evolved to confer improved chances of survival following injury, in modern surgical practice the stress response can be detrimental. PMID:24009246

  19. International Socially Responsible Investment Funds

    OpenAIRE

    Modestas Plakys

    2011-01-01

    The study deals with socially responsible investment funds as the type of investment funds universe. European and USA market for socially responsible investment funds is presented. The dynamics of assets under the management and number of these funds in the market are considered. The approaches for socially responsible investments are studied and reasons for increased interest in such investments are named. The main reasons why the global socially responsible funds become more and more popula...

  20. Corporate Social Responsibility in Oligopoly

    OpenAIRE

    Constantine Manasakis; Evangelos Mitrokostas; Emmanuel Petrakis

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies firms owners' incentives to engage in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities in an oligopolistic market, in a strategic delegation and vertical product differentiation context. Firms' owners have the opportunity to hire "socially responsible" managers and delegate to them CSR effort and market competition decisions. In equilibrium, both owners employ socially responsible managers. The strategic behavior of owners to hire socially responsible managers increases bot...

  1. Radiation response of melanocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation response of melanocytes in resting and growing hair follicles is being studied using black C57B1/6J mice. The mid-dorsum of the posterior one-third of the body was exposed to 60Co gamma-rays, shielding the remainder of the body. Hair from the second growth cycle after irradiation was plucked and scored individually for the greying effect. The percentage of black hairs in a sample reflects the fraction of melanocytes surviving. Single and fractionated dose survival curves are being determined over a dose range of 300-1200 rad. The results are not affected by hair loss. The radiosensitivity of melanocytes in resting and growing phase follicles is being determined. Fractionated regimens using time intervals from 45 minutes to 12 hours are also being given to study the repair kinetics of melanocytes

  2. The Chronic Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Iben M; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the results of a Fairclough-inspired critical discourse analysis aiming to clarify how chronically ill patients are presented in contemporary Danish chronic care policies. Drawing on Fairclough’s three-dimensional framework for analyzing discourse, and using Dean’s concepts...... of governmentality as an interpretative lens, we analyzed and explained six policies published by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority between 2005 and 2013. The analysis revealed that discourses within the policy vision of chronic care consider chronically ill patients’ active role, lifestyle......, and health behavior to be the main factors influencing susceptibility to chronic diseases. We argue that this discursive construction naturalizes a division between people who can actively manage responsible self-care and those who cannot. Such discourses may serve the interests of those patients who...

  3. Responses from the Frontline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caswell, Dorte; Høybye-Mortensen, Matilde

    2015-01-01

    Economic sanctions have gained more political legitimacy and are being more widely used as a tool to improve the willingness of unemployed welfare recipients to participate in activities within the framework of active labour market policy (ALMP). The focus of this article is the use of economic...... sanctions on cash benefit recipients in Denmark. Quantitative analyses show a substantial increase in the use of economic sanctions in Denmark, including sanctions on those who are categorised as having problems in addition to unemployment. In this article we will direct our attention to responses from both...... the organisational and individual level regarding the implementation of sanctions. Empirical material consists of interviews with managers and frontline social workers in municipalities with a high number of sanctions. We argue that organisations matter in shaping street-level behaviour, resulting in...

  4. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton;

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design for the...... acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design was...... simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  5. Technologies, Transformations, and Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Li Zhang

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available

    頁次:18-23

    Technological innovations have played significant roles in improving human conditions in the history of civilization. The quality of life is expected to improve further as a result of the evolving technologies. Libraries have benefited by the many advantages offered through technology. Positive responses to new technological breakthroughs will enable libraries to provide improved and value-added services in our rapidly changing environment.

  6. Organizations` responsibility to consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Dinu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Relationships between organizations and consumers have a contradictory nature, because they are built on a base of imbalance between them, but can become, in a functioning market economy, partnerships, through which to resolve their interests, opposed as tendency, including conflict situations so that everyone ultimately gets what he wants, in the given historical conditions: organizations, the maximum possible profits and consumers, a higher degree of satisfaction of their needs. Market economies have as an existential fundament the competition, but the aspirations of a nation are founded on cooperation, on partnership. An economic system that divides people into winners and losers shouldn’t be promoted. For this reason, organizations must be more sensitive to the needs of society, as they are expressed through the values of the social human being (consumer compared to the values of the economic human being (producer, hence the need to increase their responsibilities to the consumer.

  7. Hanford Emergency Response Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagoner, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures.

  8. Thermal Responsive Envelope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Isak Worre; Pasold, Anke

    2015-01-01

    includes the calculation of bending behaviour, the calculation of perceived temperatures inside the envelope and the evolutionary module, which in a design process advance the composite structure in relation to the thermal environment desired. The research presents the methods used and developed, the way...... composite layers and their relative layer lengths thereby embedding the merged material effect to create a responsive behavioural architectural envelope. Copper and polypropylene are used as base materials for the composite structure due to their high differences in thermal expansion, surface emissivity...... alterations, their respective durability and copper’s architectural (visual and transformative) aesthetic qualities. Through the use of an evolutionary solver, the composite structure of the elements are organised to find the bending behaviour specified by and for the thermal environments. The entire model...

  9. Hanford Emergency Response Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures

  10. PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY AND LIFESTYLE DISEASES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Marchman; Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2015-01-01

    What does it take for an individual to be personally responsible for behaviors that lead to increased risks of diseases? We examine three approaches to responsibility that cover the most important aspects of the discussion of responsibility, and spell out what it takes, according to each of them,...

  11. Can Arousal Modulate Response Inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbach, Noam; Kalanthroff, Eyal; Avnit, Amir; Henik, Avishai

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine if and how arousal can modulate response inhibition. Two competing hypotheses can be drawn from previous literature. One holds that alerting cues that elevate arousal should result in an impulsive response and therefore impair response inhibition. The other suggests that alerting enhances processing of…

  12. Teaching about Heterogeneous Response Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals vary in their responses to incentives and opportunities. For example, additional education will affect one person differently than another. In recent years, econometricians have given increased attention to such heterogeneous responses and to the consequences of such responses for interpreting regression estimates, especially…

  13. Corporate social responsibility in Islam

    OpenAIRE

    Elasrag, Hussein

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the Islamic principles of CSR, and the definition of a structured social corporate responsibility (CSR), and based on this responsibility. And provide a practical through the international financial institutions that can implement CSR policies framework. This study provides the basis of social responsibilities that apply to those derived from divine sources of international financial institutions.

  14. The social costs of responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Steven J. Humphrey; Renner, Elke

    2011-01-01

    We use an experimental lottery choice task and public goods game to examine if responsibility for the financial welfare of others affects decisionmaking behaviour in two different types of decision environments. We find no evidence that responsibility affects individual risk preferences. Responsibility does, however, crowd-out cooperation in a public goods game.

  15. Affective responses to dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Julia F; Pollick, Frank E; Lambrechts, Anna; Gomila, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present work was the characterization of mechanisms by which affective experiences are elicited in observers when watching dance movements. A total of 203 dance stimuli from a normed stimuli library were used in a series of independent experiments. The following measures were obtained: (i) subjective measures of 97 dance-naïve participants' affective responses (Likert scale ratings, interviews); and (ii) objective measures of the physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy, luminance), and of the movements represented in the stimuli (roundedness, impressiveness). Results showed that (i) participants' ratings of felt and perceived affect differed, (ii) felt and perceived valence but not arousal ratings correlated with physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy and luminance), (iii) roundedness in posture shape was related to the experience of more positive emotion than edgy shapes (1 of 3 assessed rounded shapes showed a clear effect on positiveness ratings while a second reached trend level significance), (iv) more impressive movements resulted in more positive affective responses, (v) dance triggered affective experiences through the imagery and autobiographical memories it elicited in some people, and (vi) the physical parameters of the video stimuli correlated only weakly and negatively with the aesthetics ratings of beauty, liking and interest. The novelty of the present approach was twofold; (i) the assessment of multiple affect-inducing mechanisms, and (ii) the use of one single normed stimulus set. The results from this approach lend support to both previous and present findings. Results are discussed with regards to current literature in the field of empirical aesthetics and affective neuroscience. PMID:27235953

  16. Successful oil spill response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A freighter in the process of loading rock for the Quebec Iron and Titanium Mining Company near Havre-St. Pierre on the extreme north shore of the St. Lawrence River, was suddenly tossed against the dock by rough waters on the night of March 23, 1999, and spilled 49 tonnes of bunker fuel oil into the river. This article describes how the crew of the ship, trained by Environmental Accident Protection Inc., based in Petrolia, Ontario, averted disaster by responding to the accident quickly and effectively. Their first action was to notify the appropriate environmental and regulatory authorities and to put in place containment booms which corralled about 17 tonnes of oil. The oil contained by the booms were removed by trained personnel under the guidance of Eastern Canada Response Corporation of Corunna, Ontario, and Response Systems Inc. of Neshanic, New Jersey, in approximately three hours with only minimum disruption to the environment. Further cleanup of the area, often hindered by bad weather, freezing rain, ice, and 100 km/hr winds, was done by the cooperative efforts of governments, industry and the local fishermen's association. The work included scrubbing the shore with wire brushes and scrapers and handbathing some 1000 migratory birds. The cleanup job was completed in about three weeks and the Mingan Archipelago National Park Reserve and other nearby habitats for migrating birds were saved the devastation that would have occurred, except for the quick and knowledgeable intervention of a trained crew and an outstanding example of public-private sector and community cooperation. 2 photos

  17. Cochlear implantation at the ear, nose and throat clinic of the Clinical center of Vojvodina

    OpenAIRE

    Komazec Zoran; Dankuc Dragan; Vlaški Ljiljana; Lemajić-Komazec Slobodanka; Nedeljkov Spomenka; Sokolovac Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. A cochlear implant is a small electronic device that can provide a sense of sound to a person who is profoundly deaf or severely hard-of-hearing. Cochlear implants bypass the damaged hearing systems and directly stimulate the auditory nerve. Signals generated by the implant are sent by way of the auditory nerve to the brain, which recognizes the signals as sound. Hearing through a cochlear implant differs from normal hearing and takes time to learn or relearn. Cochlear implantat...

  18. Inner-Ear Morphology of the New Zealand Kiwi (Apteryx mantelli) Suggests High-Frequency Specialization

    OpenAIRE

    Corfield, Jeremy R.; Kubke, M. Fabiana; Parsons, Stuart; Köppl, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The sensory systems of the New Zealand kiwi appear to be uniquely adapted to occupy a nocturnal ground-dwelling niche. In addition to well-developed tactile and olfactory systems, the auditory system shows specializations of the ear, which are maintained along the central nervous system. Here, we provide a detailed description of the auditory nerve, hair cells, and stereovillar bundle orientation of the hair cells in the North Island brown kiwi. The auditory nerve of the kiwi contained about ...

  19. Response times to conceptual questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Watkins, Jessica; Mazur, Eric; Ibrahim, Ahmed

    2013-09-01

    We measured the time taken by students to respond to individual Force Concept Inventory (FCI) questions. We examine response time differences between correct and incorrect answers, both before and after instruction. We also determine the relation between response time and expressed confidence. Our data reveal three results of interest. First, response times are longer for incorrect answers than for correct ones, indicating that distractors are not automatic choices. Second, response times increase after instruction for both correct and incorrect answers, supporting the notion that instruction changes students' approach to conceptual questions. Third, response times are inversely related to students' expressed confidence; the lower their confidence, the longer it takes to respond.

  20. Social responsibility and SOE restructuring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈志渔; 刘兴国; 周小虎

    2009-01-01

    SOE social responsibility has undergone three stages of evolution.In essence,corporate social responsibility includes social obligations and social expectations.Public attention to SOE social responsibility issues has affected the thinking surrounding SOE restructuring,including the promulgating of objectives and methods.Based on corporate social responsibility,SOE managers must set up a perfect SOE social responsibility system and strengthen supervisory mechanisms;in respect to corporate governance models,SOEs should undertake reform for the corporate citizen governance model.

  1. Treatment response in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Currently, the evaluation of response to therapy in Oncology consists of determination of changes in size of lesions measurable by structural imaging, notably computerized tomography. These criteria, formalized using RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors), are the current standard for evaluation (http://www3.cancer. gov/dip/RECIST.htm). An increasing body of evidence suggests that functional changes in tumors precede structural changes, and that methodologies that measure such changes may be able to evaluate the potential of therapy, allowing for better and earlier selection of these potentially cytotoxic therapies. Nuclear Medicine imaging is distinguished by its ability to determine functional characteristics. These include: 1. Receptor status - for example, the presence of sodium iodide symporters detected by radioiodine or pertechnetate imaging, the presence of somatostatin or norepinephrine receptors by pentetreotide or metaiodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) imaging respectively. Such imaging can help guide appropriate therapies with iodine-131, somatostatin analogues (radiolabeled or otherwise) or iodine-131 labeled mIBG. 2. Metabolic status - for example, glycolytic status (with fluorine-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose); amino acid metabolism (e.g. using carbon-11 labeled methionine), or tumor proliferation (using radiolabeled thymidine or deoxyuridine). These methods have advantages over structural imaging because in the vast majority of tumors, changes in the functional or molecular status of tumors are seen earlier than are structural changes. 3. Overall cellular status - these imaging agents are still in their early development but hold great promise for the determination of cellular viability. Annexin imaging is the archetype of such imaging modalities that predict the overall fate of the cell, in this instance its entry into the apoptotic pathway. This review will highlight the uses of functional imaging using radiotracers in all three

  2. Spill response exercises and lessons learned : a response organization's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past five years, Burrard Clean Operations (BCO) has demonstrated its' oil spill response capabilities through different types of exercises. Such exercises are necessary for certification of Response Organizations in Canada. The exercises can be performed through actual response to spills or through simulated situations. Both can provide an opportunity to practice different levels of response to a range of conditions in various settings. They also provide the opportunity to focus on specific themes that can be part of a response and to identify areas for improvement in response actions. They also make it possible to interface with government agencies, industry and others that participate in spill responses. The exercise program for BCO is aimed at maintaining certification and to assist the Canadian Coast Guard. The exercises broaden the lessons learned and set a course for future enhancement to spill readiness should a real incident occur. The goals of the exercise program are to provide real time drills that show the operational capability of a representative sample of BCO equipment, management and trained spill responders. The response functions of the BCO exercise program are: notification, response organization activation, contractor activation, situation analysis, strategy development for marine oil spill response, site safety, equipment deployment, containment, recovery, shoreline assessment, cleanup, communications, decontamination, logistics, and financial management. The BCO experience has led to the basic conclusions that there is a need to vary the exercise design and format and that there is a need to implement follow-up actions provided during exercise evaluations. 7 refs., 3 tabs

  3. Marine oil spill response organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The obligations under the law relative to the prevention of marine oil spills and the type of emergency plans needed to mitigate any adverse effects caused by a marine oil spill were discussed. The organizational structure, spill response resources and operational management capabilities of Canada's newly created Response Organizations (ROs) were described. The overall range of oil spill response services that the RO provides to the domestic oil handling, oil transportation and the international shipping industries were reviewed. Amendments to the Canada Shipping Act which require that certain ships and oil handling facilities take oil spill preparedness and response measures, including having an arrangement with an RO certified by the Canadian Coast Guard, were outlined. Canadians now benefit from five ROs established to provide coast-to-coast oil spill response coverage. These include the Western Canada Marine Response Corporation, the Canadian Marine Response Management Corporation, the Great Lakes Response Corporation, the Eastern Canada Response Corporation and the Atlantic Emergency Response Team Ltd. ROs have the expertise necessary to organize and manage marine oil spill response services. They can provide equipment, personnel and operational management for the containment, recovery and cleanup of oil spilled on water

  4. Why Pandemic Response is Unique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækkeskov, Erik; Rubin, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    , the case studies of media coverage in the USA and Denmark demonstrate that the response was bureaucratized in the public health agencies (CDC and DMHA, respectively). Hence, while natural disaster responses appear to follow a political logic, the response to pandemics appears to be more strongly...... attention and coverage in two deviant cases, the USA and Denmark. Findings – Theories linking political survival to disaster responses find little empirical support in the substantial cross-country variations of vaccination responses during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Rather than following a political logic...... instituted in the hands of bureaucratic experts. Research limitations/implications – There is an added value of encompassing bureaucratic dynamics in political theories of disaster response; bureaucratized expertise proved to constitute a strong plausible explanation of the 2009 pandemic vaccination response...

  5. Dopa-responsive dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić Gordana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgrround/Aim. Dystonia is considered to be a prolonged involuntary contractions of the muscles leading to twisting, repetitive movements or irregular postures. Etiologically, it could be classified as primary and secondary dystonia. Dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD belongs to a group of primary dystonia. The aim of this study was to detect the presence of gene GCH-I mutation in our population in patients with dopa-responsive dystonic dyskinesia and to analyze clinical specificity of the affected. Methods. Out of the group of patients with dystonia of different distribution four patients were separated whose clinical picture indicated the diagnosis of DRD. Two patients had a positive family anamnesis while the other two were sporadic. Genetic analysis was performed by the use of a standard protocol, which included PCR amplification and DNK sequencing according to the method of Senger and autoradiografy. Results. In the patients from the family DRD-1 new hetaerazygote point mutation 520G→A in 4-m exson gene GCH-I was revealed. First symptoms of the disease showed in the age of seven by the torsion of the left foot, progressively advanced and got into the evolution of numbness in the legs, aggravated gait, tending to worsen in the evening, and the therapy with levodopa (500 mg produced a dramatic effect. The second mutation in the female patient from the family DRD-2 was homozygote deletion in1-m intron gene GCH-I (IVS1-85delA. Unwilling torsion of the foot, feeling of weakness in the lower extremities (that caused falling without loss of the consciousness were clinical demonstrations of the disease. The application of levodopa (300 mg caused regression of the symptoms of the disease. Hetaerazygote deletion of adenine in the position 209 in the first exon (209del A was identificated in the patient DRD-3 with negative family anamnesis, in who in the age of ten the torsion of the foot inside occurred for the first time following by trembling of

  6. Responsible opioid use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Peggy; Weaver, Michael F

    2015-06-01

    Editor's Note The journal is delighted to introduce a new feature in this issue that focuses on the complex and multifaceted issue of managing pain and related symptoms while responsibly attending to minimizing substance abuse. How should the seemingly disparate disciplines of drug abuse and symptom control interact? Should these be two separate fields or should practitioners/investigators in one also be qualified in the other? Is that even feasible? We are honored to have two leading, academically based clinician scientists coordinating this new feature. Peggy Compton is Professor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the School of Nursing & Health Studies, Georgetown University in Washington, DC. Many readers know of Peggy's work from her years on the faculty of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Peggy brings both clinical and scientific addictionology expertise as well as the invaluable perspective of nursing to this arena. Her collaborator is Michael F. Weaver. Mike is Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and Medical Director of the Center for Neurobehavioral Research on Addictions, at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston. Prior to moving to Texas, Dr. Weaver became internationally known for his work in addiction medicine at the Medical College of Virginia. We look forward to detailed explorations of many interacting issues in symptom control and substance abuse in the articles featured in this new journal feature in coming issues. The commentary below, the article by Kanouse and Compton, the Issue Brief issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and my editorial, all of which appear in this journal issue, introduce the new feature, which I am confident will make valuable contributions to the pain management and substance abuse literature. Arthur G. Lipman, Editor ABSTRACT Abusers of prescription opioids represent two distinct populations: those who develop addiction via opioids prescribed

  7. Remune. Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Derhsing; Jones, Taff

    2002-03-01

    The Immune Response Corp (IRC) is developing Remune, a potential HIV therapeutic vaccine. Remune is based on the Salk Immunogen, which is derived from an HIV isolate which has been inactivated by chemical depletion of glycoprotein 120 (gp120). Preliminary data suggested that Remune, in combination with antiviral drug therapy, results in undetectable levels of HIV. Phase III trials commenced in May 1997 and it was initially expected that registration filings would be made in 1999. However, following interim analysis of the 2500-patient, multicenter, double-blind, pivotal phase III study (study 806) in May 1999, an independent panel recommended concluding the clinical endpoint trial and IRC and licensee, Agouron, decided to pursue alternative regulatory strategies, including initiating two additional phase III surrogate marker trials. Despite this, Agouron gave IRC notice of termination of its continued development in July 2001. In August 2001, IRC informed Agouron that, due to the total number of endpoints to date falling short of that previously assumed by Agouron, it did not intend to continue Agouron's Study 202 of Remune. In July 2001, licensee Trinity Medical Group filed an NDA with the governing health authorities in Thailand for Remune. The Thai FDA certified Immune Response's Remune manufacturing facility as being in compliance with GMP standards, following an on site inspection by Thai officials in November 2001 that was performed as a requirement of Trinity's Thai NDA. As a result of this certification, Trinity expected that a "timely determination" could be made by the Thai FDA. Rhĵne-Poulenc Rorer discontinued its part in the development of Remune, with all manufacturing, marketing and distribution rights reverting to IRC. After Agouron returned rights to Remune in July 2001, IRC heldfull rights in the US, Europe and Japan, while collaborating with its partners Trinity Medical Group and Roemmers Laboratory in the Southeast Asian and Latin American

  8. Emergency Response Guideline Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Task 5 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled 'Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor' focuses on operator control and protection system interaction, with particular emphasis on developing emergency response guidelines (ERGs). As in the earlier tasks, we will use the IRIS plant as a specific example of an integrated primary system reactor (IPSR) design. The present state of the IRIS plant design--specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design--precludes establishing detailed emergency procedures at this time. However, we can create a structure for their eventual development. This report summarizes our progress to date. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 compares IPSR ERG development to the recent AP1000 effort, and identifies three key plant differences that affect the ERGs and control room designs. The next three sections investigate these differences in more detail. Section 3 reviews the IRIS Safety-by-Design philosophy and its impact on the ERGs. Section 4 looks at differences between the IRIS and traditional loop PWR I and C Systems, and considers their implications for both control room design and ERG development. Section 5 examines the implications of having one operating staff control multiple reactor units. Section 6 provides sample IRIS emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Section 7 summarizes our conclusions

  9. Vaccines, our shared responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Jain, Rishabh; Suri, Rajinder Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) held its fifteenth annual meeting from October 27-29, 2014, New Delhi, India. The DCVMN, together with the co-organizing institution Panacea Biotec, welcomed over 240 delegates representing high-profile governmental and nongovernmental global health organizations from 36 countries. Over the three-day meeting, attendees exchanged information about their efforts to achieve their shared goal of preventing death and disability from known and emerging infectious diseases. Special praise was extended to all stakeholders involved in the success of polio eradication in South East Asia and highlighted challenges in vaccine supply for measles-rubella immunization over the coming decades. Innovative vaccines and vaccine delivery technologies indicated creative solutions for achieving global immunization goals. Discussions were focused on three major themes including regulatory challenges for developing countries that may be overcome with better communication; global collaborations and partnerships for leveraging investments and enable uninterrupted supply of affordable and suitable vaccines; and leading innovation in vaccines difficult to develop, such as dengue, Chikungunya, typhoid-conjugated and EV71, and needle-free technologies that may speed up vaccine delivery. Moving further into the Decade of Vaccines, participants renewed their commitment to shared responsibility toward a world free of vaccine-preventable diseases. PMID:25749248

  10. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (−20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Cross-linked enzyme powders were prepared in various liquid media. • Insoluble enzymes were magnetized using iron oxides particles. • Magnetic iron oxides particles were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • Magnetic modification was performed under low (freezing) temperature. • Cross-linked powdered trypsin and lipase can be used repeatedly for reaction

  11. Emergency Response Guideline Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary D. Storrick

    2007-09-30

    Task 5 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled “Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor” focuses on operator control and protection system interaction, with particular emphasis on developing emergency response guidelines (ERGs). As in the earlier tasks, we will use the IRIS plant as a specific example of an integrated primary system reactor (IPSR) design. The present state of the IRIS plant design – specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design – precludes establishing detailed emergency procedures at this time. However, we can create a structure for their eventual development. This report summarizes our progress to date. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 compares IPSR ERG development to the recent AP1000 effort, and identifies three key plant differences that affect the ERGs and control room designs. The next three sections investigate these differences in more detail. Section 3 reviews the IRIS Safety-by-Design™ philosophy and its impact on the ERGs. Section 4 looks at differences between the IRIS and traditional loop PWR I&C Systems, and considers their implications for both control room design and ERG development. Section 5 examines the implications of having one operating staff control multiple reactor units. Section 6 provides sample IRIS emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Section 7 summarizes our conclusions.

  12. Response to Glenn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Arons

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Arons responds to what he considers to be Glenn's misrepresentations of the tone and content of Short Route To Chaos. He writes that Glenn "appears to be attempting to construct the book's message into just one more salvo fired in the endless school wars. It is anything but....Reading Glenn's review, one is left with the impression that the book is a Christian-bashing, left-leaning, work of communitarian fuzziness in which a legal scholar unaccountably refuses to confine himself to ... technical explication of existing constitutional doctrine." In his response, Arons affirmatively sets out some of the book's main themes of political /cultural conflict over standardized schooling, corrects some of what he sees as Glenn's misunderstandings, and notes that the book itself invites readers to eschew partisanship and recognize that there are deep structural problems in American public education. In closing, Arons uses an example of Glenn's partisan misunderstanding that leads Arons to recommend to the reader that it would be better to read Short Route to Chaos for oneself.

  13. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna, E-mail: kristyna.pospiskova@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Safarik, Ivo, E-mail: ivosaf@yahoo.com [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Department of Nanobiotechnology, Institute of Nanobiology and Structural Biology of GCRC, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-15

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (−20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Cross-linked enzyme powders were prepared in various liquid media. • Insoluble enzymes were magnetized using iron oxides particles. • Magnetic iron oxides particles were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • Magnetic modification was performed under low (freezing) temperature. • Cross-linked powdered trypsin and lipase can be used repeatedly for reaction.

  14. Management Structure and Work Team Processes; Responsibilities and Responsiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Kuipers, Ben S.; Witte, Marco C. de

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the management structure of the team-based organization. First it provides a theoretical model of structures and processes of work teams. The structure determines the team’s responsibilities in terms of authority and expertise about specific regulation tasks. The responsiveness of teams to these responsibilities are the processes of teamwork, in terms of three dimensions, indicating to what extent teams indeed use the space provided to them. The research question that this...

  15. Responsible or redundant? Engaging the workforce through corporate social responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria Smith; Peter Langford

    2011-01-01

    Increasing attempts are being made to determine whether corporate social responsibility leads to commercial benefits. Research to date has demonstrated that corporate social responsibility is associated with attracting job-seekers and enhancing the engagement of employees. However, much of this research focuses on the impact of corporate social responsibility on employee outcomes independent of the impact of traditional human resource practices (e.g. training, rewards). Using a variation of a...

  16. Social responsibility in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjaša

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Research Question (RQ: What is socially responsible behavior in the Slovenian health care system, where we have three main entities which they are actively involved in so called health care system. Purpose: Through the article, I would like for all three entities in the health sector to present, what is socially responsible behavior, which contributes to improving mutual cooperation for each of them and the wider society. Method: The results I achieved by studying domestic and foreign literature, laws and regulations that define social responsibility to the other two entities in the health care and the integration of literature in practice. Results: Each social responsibility within the organization, starting with superiors or managers, whose activities transferred the positive impact of social responsibility on employees and therefore the wider society. Society: By being aware of our role in society or position in the health system, any individual with a positive socially responsible actions have a positive impact on the wider community and to improve the benefits, at least in theoretical terms. Originality: I have not registered any discussions that would include mutual social responsibility - related conduct that contributes to the overall satisfaction of all. Most are present in one entity in health and his social responsibility in the internal and external environment, where they performance. Limitations/Future Research: Accessibility of data nature, from which it was evident social responsibility to other entities in the health system. The lack of literature covering social responsibility in Slovenia.

  17. Bacterial tactic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, J P

    1999-01-01

    histidine protein kinase, CheA, via a linker protein, CheW. A reduction in an attractant generally leads to the increased autophosphorylation of CheA. CheA passes its phosphate to a small, single domain response regulator, CheY. CheY-P can interact with the flagellar motor to cause it to change rotational direction or stop. Signal termination either via a protein, CheZ, which increases the dephosphorylation rate of CheY-P or via a second CheY which acts as a phosphate sink, allows the cell to swim off again, usually in a new direction. In addition to signal termination the receptor must be reset, and this occurs via methylation of the receptor to return it to a non-signalling conformation. The way in which bacteria use these systems to move to optimum environments and the interaction of the different sensory pathways to produce species-specific behavioural response will be the subject of this review. PMID:10500847

  18. Initiatives of Ecological Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Sergeevich Volodin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of environment is one of the global problems for the mankind. The concept of sustainable development presented at the governmental level in 1987 urged to fix at the interstate level the basic principles of development of humanity in harmony with the nature. The Charter signed in 1991 “Business and sustainable development” proclaimed a new stage of development of world entrepreneurship – business had to become ecologicallyoriented and to form the ecologically-oriented demand. In recent years it is possible to state the huge growth of technologies of effective environmental management, energy saving and energy efficiency. The leading world corporations include reduction of the ecological aspects in priority strategic objectives, as much as possible promoting transition to the use of green technologies. “Green” experience of the Western companies showed that reduction of influence on environment is not only the task of the state, but also the effective instrument to increase competitiveness of the organization. Besides the growth of favorable perception of the company by consumers, it receives considerable decrease in prime cost of the made production or the rendered services due to effective and economical use of natural resources. Russia is among the first countries who accepted the concept of sustainable development at the legislative level, nevertheless, only recently we can note that technologies of rational environmental management, energy saving and energy efficiency became one of priority problems of its development. In the present article the advanced methods of the state and private initiatives in the field of ecological responsibility are considered, and the methods of overcoming the new challenges are offered.

  19. A Mixed Effects Randomized Item Response Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J.-P.; Wyrick, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    The randomized response technique ensures that individual item responses, denoted as true item responses, are randomized before observing them and so-called randomized item responses are observed. A relationship is specified between randomized item response data and true item response data. True item response data are modeled with a (non)linear…

  20. The Surgically Induced Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Celeste C.; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A.; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes which induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress response, however, varies according to the severity of injury (surgical or traumatic). This spectrum of injuries and insults ranges from small lacerations to severe insults such as large poly-traumatic and burn injuries. Although the stress response to acute trauma evolved to improve chances of survival following injury, in modern surgical practice the stress response can be detrimental. PMID:24009246

  1. The Surgically Induced Stress Response

    OpenAIRE

    Finnerty, Celeste C.; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A.; Herndon, David N

    2013-01-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes which induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress respo...

  2. The Power of Relational Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Hoskins, Te Kawehau; Martin, Betsan; Humphries, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Responsibility is elaborated here as an ethic which reaches beyond codified and individualized norms of duty. As a relational ethic responsibility is considered for its power to address the planetary, ecological and human challenges of our time. We draw on philosopher Emmanuel Levinas’s work on relational responsibility, and, as is fitting from our context, on indigenous knowledge. These diverse cultural knowledge systems are both premised on putting the Other before self interest and are rem...

  3. Transport accident emergency response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To comply with the IAEA recommendations for the implementation of an Emergency Response Plan as described in Safety Series 87, Transnucleaire, a company deeply involved in the road and rail transports of the fuel cycle, masters means of Emergency Response in the event of a transport accident. This paper aims at analyzing the solutions adopted for the implementation of an Emergency Response Plan and the development of a technical support and adapted means for the recovery of heavy packagings. (authors)

  4. Corporate Responsibility and Sustainable Development

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Ricotti

    2003-01-01

    Corporate responsibility marks a historical turnaround in corporate culture because it attributes to it a role in which many costs externalised by the company to society and to the planet, but in fact produced directly or indirectly by it. A correct cultural approach and greater familiarity, particularly with the issues of manufacturing processes and products that have no impact on the environment, can make companies truly responsible and conscious of their role. Corporate Responsibility diff...

  5. Individual and Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Bénabou, Roland; Tirole, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Society's demands for individual and corporate social responsibility as an alternative response to market and distributive failures are becoming increasingly prominent. We first draw on recent developments in the 'psychology and economics' of prosocial behavior to shed light on this trend, which reflects a complex interplay of genuine altruism, social or self image concerns, and material incentives. We then link individual concerns to corporate social responsibility, contrasting three possibl...

  6. Singularly perturbed phase response curves

    OpenAIRE

    Sacré, Pierre; Franci, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel geometric method, based on singular perturbations, to approximate isochrones of relaxation oscillators and predict the qualitative shape of their (finite) phase response curve. This approach complements the infinitesimal phase response curve approach to relaxation oscillators and overcomes its limitations near the singular limit. We illustrate the power of the methodology by deriving semi-analytic formula for the (finite) phase response curve of generic planar...

  7. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN UKRAINE

    OpenAIRE

    Polyakova, E.

    2013-01-01

    In the article are considered essence of corporate social responsibility and terms necessary for realization of social activity management subjects. Hikes over are brought to realization of corporate social responsibility, meaningfulness of large and middle business is certain in becoming of social responsibility of enterprises. It is set that exactly midsize business must come forward as a main motor of economic development of Ukraine. Becoming features and modern state of corporate social r...

  8. Property Rights, Restrictions and Responsibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    more to a social, ethical commitment or attitude to environmental sustainability and good husbandry. This paper provides an overall understanding of the concept of land administration systems for dealing with rights, restrictions and responsibilities in future spatially enabled government. Finally the......Land Administration Systems are the basis for conceptualizing rights, restrictions and responsibilities related to people, policies and places. Property rights are normally concerned with ownership and tenure whereas restrictions usually control use and activities on land. Responsibilities relate...

  9. Network Culture, Performance & Corporate Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Silvio M. Brondoni

    2003-01-01

    The growth and sustainability of free market economies highlights the need to define rules more suited to the current condition of market globalisation and also encourages firms to adopt more transparent and accountable corporate responsibility (and corporate social responsibility, namely the relationship between the company, environment and social setting). From a managerial perspective, corporate responsibility is linked to ensure the lasting pursuit of the company mission, seeking increasi...

  10. Demand response in energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improving the ability of energy demand to respond to wholesale prices during critical periods of the spot market can reduce the total costs of reliably meeting demand, and the level and volatility of the prices. This fact has lead to a growing interest in the short-run demand response. There has especially been a growing interest in the electricity market where peak-load periods with high spot prices and occasional local blackouts have recently been seen. Market concentration at the supply side can result in even higher peak-load prices. Demand response by shifting demand from peak to base-load periods can counteract the market power in the peak-load. However, demand response has so far been modest since the current short-term price elasticity seems to be small. This is also the case for related markets, for example, green certificates where the demand is determined as a percentage of the power demand, or for heat and natural gas markets. This raises a number of interesting research issues: 1) Demand response in different energy markets, 2) Estimation of price elasticity and flexibility, 3) Stimulation of demand response, 4) Regulation, policy and modelling aspects, 5) Demand response and market power at the supply side, 6) Energy security of supply, 7) Demand response in forward, spot, ancillary service, balance and capacity markets, 8) Demand response in deviated markets, e.g., emission, futures, and green certificate markets, 9) Value of increased demand response, 10) Flexible households. (BA)

  11. PENGARUH PENGUNGKAPAN CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY TERHADAP EARNING RESPONSE COEFFICIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MI Mitha Dwi Restuti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh negatif pengungkapan Corporate Sosial Responsibility (CSR disclosure terhadap Earning Response Coefficient (ERC. Alat analisis yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini menggunakan metode analisis regresi berganda.Sampel yang digunakan adalah sebanyak 150 perusahaan yang terdaftar pada Bursa Efek Indonesia pada tahun 2010. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian ditemukan bahwa pengungkapan Corporate Social Responsibility tidak berpengaruh terhadap Earning Response Coefficient (ERC. Hal ini dapat dikatakan bahwa investor belum memperhatikan informasi-informasi sosial yang diungkapkan dalam laporan tahunan perusahaan sebagai informasi yang dapat mempengaruhi investor dalam melakukan keputusan investasi. Investor masih mengganggap informasi laba lebih bermanfaat dalam menilai perusahaan dan dianggap lebih mampu memberikan informasi untuk mendapatkan return saham yang diharapkan oleh investor dibandingkan dengan informasi sosial yang diungkapkan oleh perusahaan.The purpose of this study is to determine the negative effect of Corporate Social Responsibility disclosure (CSR disclosure of Earnings Response Coefficient (ERC. Multiple regressions were used to analyze the data. The samples were 150 companies listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange in 2010. Based on the research, the result was the disclosures of Corporate Social Responsibility did not influence Earning Response Coefficient (ECR. It can be said that investors did not pay attention to social information that was disclosed in the company’s annual report as information that could affect investors in making investment decisions. Investor did not consider sosial information; they only consider profit information to assess the company value and their investment return

  12. Improving tumour response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation oncology is in the middle of the most exciting developments in its 100-year history. Progress in treatment planning and delivery, in medical imaging and in basic cancer and normal tissue biology is likely to change the indication for radiotherapy as well as the way it is prescribed and delivered. Technological and conceptual advances, in particular the development of the multi-leaf collimator and the concept of inverse treatment planning, have led to the introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with its capability to plan and deliver non-uniform dose distributions in the clinic. This has forced us to re-think radiation oncology: refining the indication for radiotherapy, optimizing the prescription of dose distributions and considering how, based on clinical evidence, radiation can best be combined with other treatment modalities, surgery, cytotoxic chemotherapy and biologically targeted therapies. The attraction of radiation therapy as an element of multi-modality cancer therapy is that it induces DNA damage that can be modulated in space and time. Progress in basic cancer biology, genomics and proteomics, as well as biological imaging provides novel avenues for individualization of cancer therapy and for biological optimization of radiotherapy. In improving cancer care, it is the therapeutic ratio, rather than tumour control per se, that must be optimised. Interestingly, the two main avenues for improving the effectiveness of radiotherapy currently being actively pursued in the clinic generally aim at different sides of the therapeutic ratio: 3D conformal radiotherapy and IMRT predominantly aim to reduce normal-tissue side effects - and by doing this, open the way for dose escalation that may lead to increased tumour control rates - whereas combined radio-chemotherapy aims to improve tumour response - while keeping the fingers crossed that this will not increase normal-tissue complications to the same extent. In parallel with these

  13. Responsible nanotechnology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    to the nanotoxicology. The establishment of an effective strategy cannot ignore the distinction between different nanoparticles on their use and the type of exposure to which we are subjected. Categorization is essential to orchestrate toxicological rules realistic and effective. The responsible development of nanotechnology means a common effort, by scientists, producers, stakeholders, and public institutions to develop appropriate programs to systematically approach the complex issue of the nanotoxicology.

  14. Responsible nanotechnology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forloni, Gianluigi, E-mail: forloni@marionegri.it [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche ' Mario Negri' , Department of Neuroscience (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    approach to the nanotoxicology. The establishment of an effective strategy cannot ignore the distinction between different nanoparticles on their use and the type of exposure to which we are subjected. Categorization is essential to orchestrate toxicological rules realistic and effective. The responsible development of nanotechnology means a common effort, by scientists, producers, stakeholders, and public institutions to develop appropriate programs to systematically approach the complex issue of the nanotoxicology.

  15. Motivation of chemical industry social responsibility through Responsible Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givel, Michael

    2007-04-01

    Advocates of corporate social responsibility argue corporations should not only meet the needs of shareholders, but other key stakeholders including the community, customers, suppliers, and employees. Since 1988, the chemical industry has engaged in a major self-regulatory "Responsible Care" industry-wide social responsibility campaign to ensure environmental, public health, safety, and security performance among member companies. Contrary to the arguments of advocates of corporate social responsibility that such efforts meet the needs of stakeholders other than shareholders such as the community, the primary goal of the Responsible Care effort has been to change public concerns and opinion about chemical industry environmental and public health practices while also opposing support for stronger and more expensive public health and environmental legislation and regulation of chemical products, even if warranted. PMID:16797774

  16. Complicated responses of stalagmite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG; Xinggong

    2005-01-01

    . J., Kong, X. G., Shao, X. H. et al., Century scale climatic of oscillations during the last glacial maximum record in a stalagmite from Nanjing, Quaternary Sciencs (in Chinese), 2002, 22(3): 243-251[12]Wu, J. Y., Wang, Y. J., Cheng, H. et al., A high-resolution stalag-mite O-C isotope record from Nanjing and its rapid response to climatic events, Chinese Science Bulletin, 2002, 47(2): 139~142.[13]Imbrie, J., Hays, J. D., Martinson, D. G. et al., The orbital theory of Pleistocene climate: Support from a revised chronology of the marine d18O record (ed. Berger, A. L.), Milankovitch and Climate, Part I, Reidel, Dordrecht, 1984, 269-305.[14]Shi, Y. F., Yu, G., Warm humidclimate and transgression in 40-30 ka BP and the potentialmechanisms, Quaternary Sciences, 2003, 23(1): 1-11.[15]Zhou, S., Zou, S. M., Liu, Z. P. et al., Quaternary pollen analysis and paleo-enviromental evolution the northern part of Taihu plain, Jiangsu Acta Micropalaeontologica Sinica (in Chinese), 2001, 18(1): 70-75.[16]Liu, J. L., Uses of pollen profiles to show the last 12000 years of environmental changes in the Yangtse river delta, Acta Paleontologica Sinica (in Chinese), 1996, 2: 137-154.[17]Yu, G., Lai, G. Y., Liu, J. et al., Late MIS3 climate simulation, Quaternary Sciences (in Chinese), 2003, 23(1): 13-24.[18]Kong, X. G., Wang, Y. J., Wu, J. Y. et al., A continuous 3000-year precipitation record of ENSO variability during the LGM, Nanjing China, Chinese Science Bulletin, 2003, 48(5): 478-484.[19]Shao, X. H., Wang, Y. J., Kong, X. G. et al., Approach to the growth rate and the climatic significance of stalagmites in Hulu Cave, Nanjing, Scientia Geographica Sinica (in Chinese), 2003, 23(3): 304-309.[20]Dulinski, M., Rozanski, K., Formation of 13C/12C isotope ratios in speleothems: a semi-dynamic model, Radiocarbon, 1990, 32(1): 7-16.[21]Plagnes, V., Causse, C., Genty, D. et al., A discontinuous climatic record from 187 to 74 ka from a speleothem of the Clamouse Cave (south of France), Earth and

  17. Caregiver Responsiveness to the Family Bereavement Program: What predicts responsiveness? What does responsiveness predict?

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenfelder, Erin N.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Millsap, Roger E.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Berkel, Cady; Ayers, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    The study developed a multi-dimensional measure to assess participant responsiveness to a preventive intervention, and applied this measure to study how participant baseline characteristics predict responsiveness and how responsiveness predicts program outcomes. The study was conducted with caregivers who participated in the parenting-focused component of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP), a prevention program for families that have experienced parental death. The sample consisted of 89 ca...

  18. Data modelling for emergency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dilo, Arta; Zlatanova, Sidi

    2010-01-01

    Emergency response is one of the most demanding phases in disaster management. The fire brigade, paramedics, police and municipality are the organisations involved in the first response to the incident. They coordinate their work based on welldefined policies and procedures, but they also need the m

  19. Timesheet fraud: A nurse's responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCausland, Dermid

    2006-04-01

    A nurse is more important than ever in today's NHS. They not only have more responsibility when it comes to the treatment of patients but a greater say in the administration of wards and departments. With this responsibility comes a duty to protect the NHS from those who try to abuse it. PMID:16669363

  20. Psychophysiological responses to Salsa dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, Laura; Buzzachera, Cosme Franklim; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Meucci, Marco; Saavedra, Francisco; Gallotta, Maria Chiara; Baldari, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Speculation exists whether dance provides physiological stimuli adequate to promote health and fitness benefits. Unfortunately, research to date has not addressed the affective and exertional responses to dance. These responses are of interest as positive affective and exertional responses experienced during physical activity may play an important role in predicting adherence. The present study aims to examine the psychophysiological responses of different Salsa dance styles. Ten pairs of dancers performed two different structured lessons of Salsa dance, including Typical Salsa and Rueda de Casino lessons, and a non-structured Salsa dance at a night club. Physiological responses (i.e., percent of heart rate reserve; %HRR) were continuously assessed and perceived exertion and affective valence were rated every 15 min throughout the trials. %HRR responses differed between the Salsa dance styles (%HRR from 41.3 to 51.9%), and participants were dancing at intensities near their ventilatory threshold. Specifically, Typical Salsa lesson elicited lower %HRR responses than Rueda de Casino lesson (p dance at a night club condition (p > 0.05). Surprisingly, exertional (from 8 to 11) and affective (from +3 to +5) responses were unaffected by Salsa dance styles (p > 0.05). These data support that different Salsa dance styles provide physiological stimuli adequate to promote health and fitness benefits, and perhaps more importantly, produce pleasurable experiences, which in turn might lead to an increase in adherence to Salsa dancing which likely provides exercise-like health benefits. PMID:25860568

  1. Stationary and Transient Response Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Hauge; Krenk, Steen

    1982-01-01

    The covariance functions for the transient response of a linear MDOF-system due to stationary time limited excitation with an arbitrary frequency content are related directly to the covariance functions of the stationary response. For rational spectral density functions closed form expressions fo...

  2. Rorschach Responses of Dyslexic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ann L.; Miles, T. R.

    1985-01-01

    Rorschach responses of 15 dyslexia children (eight-16 years old) were compared with those of 12 suitably matched controls. Dyslexic Ss made considerable use of card shape, but much less use of other determinants (color, texture, etc.). Unlike controls they seldom turned the cards around and the overall number of responses per person was…

  3. Foundations of Responsibility for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillen, Annemie

    2008-01-01

    Children's vulnerability asks for people taking up responsibility for children. In this contribution, three different ways of thinking on foundations of (ethical and spiritual) responsibility for children are discussed, namely, a liberalist, a social-constructivist and a naturalist paradigm. The author argues that cultural and natural elements are…

  4. An Anatomy of Moral Responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braham, M.; van Hees, M.V.B.P.M

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the structure of moral responsibility for outcomes. A central feature of the analysis is a condition that we term the 'avoidance potential', which gives precision to the idea that moral responsibility implies a reasonable demand that an agent should have acted otherwise. We show

  5. Bringing Professional Responsibility Back in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal; Englund, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Research on how higher education institutions work with professional formation indicates that insufficient attention is currently paid to issues of professional responsibility and ethics. In the light of such findings, there is increasing concern about issues related to learning professional responsibility. This article concentrates on different…

  6. Psychophysiological responses to Salsa dance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Guidetti

    Full Text Available Speculation exists whether dance provides physiological stimuli adequate to promote health and fitness benefits. Unfortunately, research to date has not addressed the affective and exertional responses to dance. These responses are of interest as positive affective and exertional responses experienced during physical activity may play an important role in predicting adherence. The present study aims to examine the psychophysiological responses of different Salsa dance styles. Ten pairs of dancers performed two different structured lessons of Salsa dance, including Typical Salsa and Rueda de Casino lessons, and a non-structured Salsa dance at a night club. Physiological responses (i.e., percent of heart rate reserve; %HRR were continuously assessed and perceived exertion and affective valence were rated every 15 min throughout the trials. %HRR responses differed between the Salsa dance styles (%HRR from 41.3 to 51.9%, and participants were dancing at intensities near their ventilatory threshold. Specifically, Typical Salsa lesson elicited lower %HRR responses than Rueda de Casino lesson (p 0.05. Surprisingly, exertional (from 8 to 11 and affective (from +3 to +5 responses were unaffected by Salsa dance styles (p > 0.05. These data support that different Salsa dance styles provide physiological stimuli adequate to promote health and fitness benefits, and perhaps more importantly, produce pleasurable experiences, which in turn might lead to an increase in adherence to Salsa dancing which likely provides exercise-like health benefits.

  7. Gender and international crisis response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eklund, Lisa; Tellier, Siri

    2012-01-01

    For more than a decade the humanitarian community has been mandated to mainstream gender in its response to crises. One element of this mandate is a repeated call for sex-disaggregated data to help guide the response. This study examines available analyses, assessments and academic literature to...

  8. Emotional response towards food packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Lewis Xinwei; Corsi, Armando M.; Chrysochou, Polymeros;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate consumers’ emotional responses to food packaging. More specifically, we use self-report and physiological measures to jointly assess emotional responses to three typical food packaging elements: colours (lowwavelength vs. high-wavelength), images (positive vs. negative......) and typefaces (simple vs. ornate). A sample of 120 participants was exposed to mock package design concepts of chocolate blocks. The results suggest that images generate an emotional response that can be measured by both self-report and physiological measures, whereas colours and typefaces generate emotional...... response that can only be measured by self-report measures. We propose that a joint application of selfreport and physiological measures can lead to richer information and wider interpretation of consumer emotional responses to food packaging elements than using either measure alone....

  9. International Socially Responsible Investment Funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modestas Plakys

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with socially responsible investment funds as the type of investment funds universe. European and USA market for socially responsible investment funds is presented. The dynamics of assets under the management and number of these funds in the market are considered. The approaches for socially responsible investments are studied and reasons for increased interest in such investments are named. The main reasons why the global socially responsible funds become more and more popular are: an increase of interest of community in socially responsible companies, in problems regarding climate and environment changes, in government attitude towards alternative energy and investments of private and public pension funds.Article in Lithuanian

  10. Electric response in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagovets, Tymofiy V.

    2016-05-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the electric response of superfluid helium that arises in the presence of a second sound standing wave. It was found that the signal of the electric response is observed in a narrow range of second sound excitation power. The linear dependence of the signal amplitude has been derived at low excitation power, however, above some critical power, the amplitude of the signal is considerably decreased. It was established that the rapid change of the electric response is not associated with a turbulent regime generated by the second sound wave. A model of the appearance of the electric response as a result of the oscillation of electron bubbles in the normal fluid velocity field in the second sound wave is presented. Possible explanation for the decrease of the electric response are presented.

  11. The responsibilities and rights of dental professionals 2. Professional responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamalik, Nermin

    2006-06-01

    Although dentists have well recognised legal, professional and ethical responsibilities, the definition of their role and the corresponding responsibilities broaden further as the profession evolves, the demands from dentistry increase and the context of professionalism changes. Thus, continuous evaluation of the role and responsibilities of dentists is vital for provision of quality care, improvement of professional standards and maintaining professional status. In addition, efforts must be made to uphold the credibility of the profession and the associated public trust as well as meeting the increasing expectations from the profession and individual dentists. PMID:16826884

  12. Bacterial strategies for chemotaxis response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celani, Antonio; Vergassola, Massimo

    2010-01-26

    Regular environmental conditions allow for the evolution of specifically adapted responses, whereas complex environments usually lead to conflicting requirements upon the organism's response. A relevant instance of these issues is bacterial chemotaxis, where the evolutionary and functional reasons for the experimentally observed response to chemoattractants remain a riddle. Sensing and motility requirements are in fact optimized by different responses, which strongly depend on the chemoattractant environmental profiles. It is not clear then how those conflicting requirements quantitatively combine and compromise in shaping the chemotaxis response. Here we show that the experimental bacterial response corresponds to the maximin strategy that ensures the highest minimum uptake of chemoattractants for any profile of concentration. We show that the maximin response is the unique one that always outcompetes motile but nonchemotactic bacteria. The maximin strategy is adapted to the variable environments experienced by bacteria, and we explicitly show its emergence in simulations of bacterial populations in a chemostat. Finally, we recast the contrast of evolution in regular vs. complex environments in terms of minimax vs. maximin game-theoretical strategies. Our results are generally relevant to biological optimization principles and provide a systematic possibility to get around the need to know precisely the statistics of environmental fluctuations. PMID:20080704

  13. Who is More Responsible? Preparatory Class Students’ Perceptions of Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    CESUR, Kürşat; Ertaş, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

     The main aim of this study is to explore learners’ perceptions of their own responsibility in learning English. The question of whether our learners in Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University (hereafter COMU) Compulsory and Voluntary English Language Prep Classes are responsible enough for their own learning or not is the main focus of this study. Whether some variables like gender, the type of the prep class education (compulsory or voluntary) and the students’ departments will affect their perce...

  14. Is a Responsive Business also a Responsible Business?

    OpenAIRE

    Colin Higgins

    2014-01-01

    While much has been written about corporate responsibility, arguments for transformation in the business & society relationship prevail. In this paper, the dominant normative and business-case perspectives of corporate responsibility are examined in light of their assumptions regarding change. Both rely on modernist, firm-centred assumptions regarding management agency. Change in the business and society relationship may require closer attention being paid to processes of social norm form...

  15. Some considerations regarding the legal responsibility and the social responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Diana Anca ARTENE

    2014-01-01

    The judicial responsibility is acknowledged in the judicial doctrine2, as being ‘the starting point’ of the entire social responsibility, position that continues to have from ancient times until today, thus providing an expression of Law on its most concerted form, which reflect the stage of evolution of the entire social life. Expressing forms and realities of social life, both values and norms are ideal standards of conduct, perceived as individual requirements by each member of society3...

  16. Is a Responsive Business also a Responsible Business?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Higgins

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available While much has been written about corporate responsibility, arguments for transformation in the business & society relationship prevail. In this paper, the dominant normative and business-case perspectives of corporate responsibility are examined in light of their assumptions regarding change. Both rely on modernist, firm-centred assumptions regarding management agency. Change in the business and society relationship may require closer attention being paid to processes of social norm formation.

  17. MAP Kinases in Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongliang Zhang; Chen Dong

    2005-01-01

    MAP kinases are evolutionarily conserved signaling regulators from budding yeast to mammals and play essential roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. There are three main families of MAPKs in mammals. Each of them has its own activators, inactivators, substrates and scaffolds, which altogether form a fine signaling network in response to different extracellular or intracellular stimulation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding of the regulation of MAP kinases and the roles of MAP kinases in innate and adaptive immune responses.

  18. Immediate response to cigarette smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, P.J.; Chowienczyk, P.J.; Clark, T.J.

    1982-06-01

    Using an automated method of calculating airways resistance in the body plethysmograph, we have investigated changes occurring immediately after inhalation of cigarette smoke. Decreases in specific conductance occurred by the time of the first measurement seven or eight seconds after exposure to single inhalations of cigarette smoke in 12 smokers and 12 non-smokers. Less than half of the initial change was present 40 seconds after the inhalation. Initial responses were greater in the non-smokers. Responses recurred with repeated inhalations in smokers and non-smokers. Prior administration of salbutamol and ipratropium bromide significantly inhibited the response and this inhibition appeared to be greater in non-smokers. Sodium cromoglycate inhaled as a dry powder had no effect on the response.

  19. Mapping "Social Responsibility" in Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horst, Maja; Glerup, Cecilie

    The paper investigates the discourse on social responsibility in science as it appears in academic journals. Through database searches a collection of more than 300 papers have been analysed in order to map their answers to the following three questions: - What is the central problem that threatens...... social responsibility of science imply different forms of governance of and within science. The paper employs a Foucaldian discourse analysis to understand how a particular conceptualisation of responsibility implies a political rationality, i.e. a particular form of governance of science. The analysis...... responsibility in science? - What are the central aspects of science or its relation to society that need to be regulated or changed? - What kinds of solutions are imagined and how are these solutions supposed to be put into place? On this basis the paper explores how different interpretations of the notion of...

  20. GBM Response Matrix FITS Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time-dependent detector response matrices for each GBM detector covering the duration of every GBM flare. Needed in the spectral analysis software to relate...

  1. Immune response to H pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Suarez; Victor E Reyes; Ellen J Beswick

    2006-01-01

    The gastric mucosa separates the underlying tissue from the vast array of antigens that traffic through the stomach lumen. While the extreme pH of this environment is essential in aiding the activation of enzymes and food digestion, it also renders the gastric epithelium free from bacterial colonization, with the exception of one important human pathogen, H pylori. This bacterium has developed mechanisms to survive the harsh environment of the stomach, actively move through the mucosal layer,attach to the epithelium, evade immune responses, and achieve persistent colonization. While a hallmark of this infection is a marked inflammatory response with the infiltration of various immune cells into the infected gastric mucosa, the host immune response is unable to clear the infection and may actually contribute to the associated pathogenesis. Here, we review the host responses involved during infection with H pylori and how they are influenced by this bacterium.

  2. Identification of noisy response latency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamborrino, Massimiliano; Ditlevsen, Susanne; Lansky, Petr

    2012-01-01

    In many physical systems there is a time delay before an applied input (stimulation) has an impact on the output (response), and the quantification of this delay is of paramount interest. If the response can only be observed on top of an indistinguishable background signal, the estimation can...... be highly unreliable, unless the background signal is accounted for in the analysis. In fact, if the background signal is ignored, however small it is compared to the response and however large the delay is, the estimate of the time delay will go to zero for any reasonable estimator when increasing...... the number of observations. Here we propose a unified concept of response latency identification in event data corrupted by a background signal. It is done in the context of information transfer within a neural system, more specifically on spike trains from single neurons. The estimators are compared...

  3. Transnational Legal Responsibility: Some Preliminaries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlakos, George

    London: Routledge, 2015 - (Vandenhole, W.), s. 136-157 ISBN 978-1-138-79945-5 Institutional support: RVO:68378122 Keywords : human rights * legal responsibility * state sovereignty Subject RIV: AG - Legal Sciences

  4. Transcompartmental Inflammatory Responses in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plovsing, Ronni R; Berg, Ronan M G; Evans, Kevin A;

    2014-01-01

    measured. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: IV endotoxin elicited a systemic inflammatory response with a time-dependent increase and peak in tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and leukocyte counts (all p < 0.001). Furthermore, a delayed (6-8 hr) increase in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid interleukin-6......-α, interleukin-6, and albumin (all p < 0.001); a systemic inflammatory response was observed after 2-4 hours, with no change in plasma tumor necrosis factor-α. CONCLUSIONS: Acute lung or systemic inflammation in humans is followed by a transcompartmental proinflammatory response, the degree and differential......OBJECTIVES: Transcompartmental signaling during early inflammation may lead to propagation of disease to other organs. The time course and the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. We aimed at comparing acute transcompartmental inflammatory responses in humans following...

  5. Responsive foams for nanoparticle delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Christina; Xiao, Edward; Sinko, Patrick J; Szekely, Zoltan; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2015-09-01

    We have developed responsive foam systems for nanoparticle delivery. The foams are easy to make, stable at room temperature, and can be engineered to break in response to temperature or moisture. Temperature-responsive foams are based on the phase transition of long chain alcohols and could be produced using medical grade nitrous oxide as a propellant. These temperature-sensitive foams could be used for polyacrylic acid (PAA)-based nanoparticle delivery. We also discuss moisture-responsive foams made with soap pump dispensers. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoparticles or PMMA latex nanoparticles were loaded into Tween 20 foams and the particle size was not affected by the foam formulation or foam break. Using biocompatible detergents, we anticipate this will be a versatile and simple approach to producing foams for nanoparticle delivery with many potential pharmaceutical and personal care applications. PMID:26091943

  6. Response to Wang and Luo

    OpenAIRE

    Rehmsmeier Marc

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This article is a response to Wang and Luo. See correspondence article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/10/30 and the original research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/9/24.

  7. Water Soluble Responsive Polymer Brushes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Parnell

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Responsive polymer brushes possess many interesting properties that enable them to control a range of important interfacial behaviours, including adhesion, wettability, surface adsorption, friction, flow and motility. The ability to design a macromolecular response to a wide variety of external stimuli makes polymer brushes an exciting class of functional materials, and has been made possible by advances in modern controlled polymerization techniques. In this review we discuss the physics of polymer brush response along with a summary of the techniques used in their synthesis. We then review the various stimuli that can be used to switch brush conformation; temperature, solvent quality, pH and ionic strength as well as the relatively new area of electric field actuation We discuss examples of devices that utilise brush conformational change, before highlighting other potential applications of responsive brushes in real world devices.

  8. Data modelling for emergency response

    OpenAIRE

    Dilo, Arta; Zlatanova, Sidi

    2010-01-01

    Emergency response is one of the most demanding phases in disaster management. The fire brigade, paramedics, police and municipality are the organisations involved in the first response to the incident. They coordinate their work based on welldefined policies and procedures, but they also need the most complete and up-todate information about the incident, which would allow a reliable decision-making. There is a variety of systems answering the needs of different emergency responders, but the...

  9. NRC Incident-Response Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates civilian nuclear activities to protect the public health and safety and to preserve environmental quality. An Incident Response Plan had been developed and has now been revised to reflect current Commission policy. NUREG-0728, Rev. 1 assigns responsibilities for responding to any potentially threatening incident involving NRC licensed activities and for assuring that the NRC will fulfill its statutory mission. This report has also been reproduced for staff use as NRC Manual Chapter 0502

  10. business ethics and social responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Lačná, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This Bachelor Thesis focuses mainly on the business ethics and social responsibility. It is divided into two parts: theoretical and practical. The theoretical part examines the relationship of business ethics and social responsibility and the ways of their implementation in enterprises in the Czech Republic. The practical part consists of research focuses on the social and ethical environment in particular selected company. It is divided into three sections: the relationship between employees...

  11. Social responsibility in engineering curricula

    OpenAIRE

    Hattum-Janssen, Natascha van; Sánchez-Fernández, María Dolores; Caires, Susana; Khan, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a concept related to the need for companies to be not only competitive but also sustainable and refers to and the relationship of the company with its social and environmental surroundings, including labour issues [1]. CSR is also gaining attention within Higher Education, being related to a wide range of activities taking place at universities, especially the environmental dimension [2]. Apart from the issue of Social Responsibility within the institu...

  12. Responsibilities of a Big Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To present itself to the international community as a responsible country will help China’s peaceful development and promote the construction of a harmonious world.However,overly high expectations and excessive responsibilities will undoubtedly add risks to China’s development efforts. Jiang Yong,Director of Economic Security Research Center of China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations,expounds on this issue in an article in Outlook Weekly.

  13. Hormonal control of inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Leme, J.; Farsky, Sandra P

    1993-01-01

    Almost any stage of inflammatory and immunological responses is affected by hormone actions. This provides the basis for the suggestion that hormones act as modulators of the host reaction against trauma and infection. Specific hormone receptors are detected in the reactive structures in inflamed areas and binding of hormone molecules to such receptors results in the generation of signals that influence cell functions relevant for the development of inflammatory responses. Diversity of hormon...

  14. Water Soluble Responsive Polymer Brushes

    OpenAIRE

    Parnell, Andrew J.; Weir, Michael P

    2011-01-01

    Responsive polymer brushes possess many interesting properties that enable them to control a range of important interfacial behaviours, including adhesion, wettability, surface adsorption, friction, flow and motility. The ability to design a macromolecular response to a wide variety of external stimuli makes polymer brushes an exciting class of functional materials, and has been made possible by advances in modern controlled polymerization techniques. In this review we discuss the physics of ...

  15. Corporate Social Responsibility for Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech Przychodzeń; Justyna Przychodzeń

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to is to provide insights on implementing corporate social responsibility for sustainability (CSRS) concept and show how it differs from basic corporate social responsibility (CSR). Methodology: The paper discusses major issues with references to existing literature and real business cases from S&P500 consumer discretionary sector. Findings: The main fi nding of this paper is that CSRS could provide the company with a competitive advantage as a grow...

  16. The pupillary response of cephalopods

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, R H; Williamson, R.; Wagner, H J

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides the first detailed description of the time courses of light-evoked pupillary constriction for two species of cephalopods, Sepia officinalis (a cuttlefish) and Eledone cirrhosa (an octopus). The responses are much faster than hitherto reported, full contraction in Sepia taking less than 1 s, indicating it is among the most rapid pupillary responses in the animal kingdom. We also describe the dependence of the degree of pupil constriction on the level of ambient illumination...

  17. Trends in facility management responsibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Keum-Jung

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between the topics addressed in FaciJitiesDesign&Managementfrom January 1984 to October 1991 and the responsibilities of facility managers as identified by the International Facility Management Association (IFMA). In addition to the eight IFMA responsibilities't five researcher-developed categories were included. Content analysis of the title and abstract of each feature article (N=413) of the journal was utilized. ...

  18. Design Principles for Responsive Web

    OpenAIRE

    Aryal, Chandra Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this bachelor’s thesis project was to study the responsive design paradigms and development approaches for creating web pages that are optimised for adaptive web design. The additional goals were to analyse the design principles and implement prototype to find out whether it is feasible to achieve responsive design for various screen resolution of devices. The theoretical part of the thesis work explains more details of primary development approaches and design consideratio...

  19. Corporate Social Responsibility - Consumers' perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Rahul

    2008-01-01

    As organizations scale up and stakeholders become increasingly aware of business scenarios, the term corporate social responsibility is more than just a buzzword in business circles. Indeed, to its many advocates, the emergence of corporate social responsibility (CSR) is not only a blueprint for the future, but a new highway to follow for conducting business in an uncertain world that has witnessed the evisceration of many long-accepted norms of conduct (Internal Auditor, 2005). Consider...

  20. LEADERSHIP AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Andreea Simona SÃSEANU; Cristian-Silviu BANACU; Cristina PANA

    2011-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility is a concept that refers to the debt that companies (such as social actors) have to all parties involved in the conduct of their alleged economic activity. The concept refers to all categories of companies, from micro enterprises to multinationals. Debt companies' corporate social responsibility refers to the fact that the company must act with the consequences, positive or negative, on their activities on society, the company having a duty to minimize negative...

  1. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS)

    OpenAIRE

    Balk, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) to describe the complex pathophysiologic response to an insult such as infection, trauma, burns, pancreatitis, or a variety of other injuries came from a 1991 consensus conference charged with the task of developing an easy-to-apply set of clinical parameters to aid in the early identification of potential candidates to enter into clinical trials to evaluate new treatments for sepsis. There was recognition that a diverse group of...

  2. INFLAMMATION AND ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE

    OpenAIRE

    Farah Aziz Khan; Mohd Fareed Khan

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infection takes place by the cooperative cascade of cytokines and leukocytes. Tumor necrosis factor, interlukin-1, and interlukin-6 play important roles as proinflammatory cytokines to mediate local inflammation and activate other inflammatory cells e.g. neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. At least 15 different low molecular weight cytokine are secreted by activated leukocytes and are responsible for triggering acute phase response in the form of fever, leukocytosi...

  3. Risk, responsibility and political action

    OpenAIRE

    Halskov Jensen, Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT. This paper presents an argumentative case study of the discursive representation of risk, responsibility and political action in the Spanish media. The study uses a critical discourse analytical approach combined with theories on risk, agency and political communication in the media. It is argued that an application of the Toulmin model is useful for eliciting systematic overall repre-sentations of responsibility and agency in environmental crises such as the mad cow crisis as well ...

  4. Social Responsibility in Market Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Irlenbusch, Bernd; Saxler, David

    2015-01-01

    A recent debate raises the question whether market interaction erodes social responsibility. In an experiment, we disentangle three major characteristics of market interaction, diffusion of responsibility, social information, and market framing, and provide evidence for how these characteristics influence behavior when trade harms uninvolved parties. We model the negative externalities from trade by reducing donations to a charity that provides meals to needy children. Our results show that d...

  5. Multinationals and corporate social responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Kolk, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper aims to shed some more light on the current debate related to corporate social responsibility (CSR), specifically considering multinational enterprises (MNEs) and the complexities they face when dealing with international issues and a range of stakeholders. It discusses notions of CSR in the context of wider debates, including the question for whom and for what the firm exists, how responsibilities can or should be managed and by whom, and what room there is for managerial discreti...

  6. Responsive design in Windows 8 applications

    OpenAIRE

    Klockare, Sofi

    2013-01-01

    Responsive design is a common expression at the web today. This thesis was about learning about responsive web design in order to apply it to Windows 8 applications created in C# and XAML. The purpose of this thesis was to learn if responsive design can be used in such applications. This was done by first learning about responsive design through a literature study about responsive web design and then specifying responsive application design. How responsive design can be used in applications w...

  7. Supply Response of Sugar Cane in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Noer Soetrisno

    1984-01-01

    The paper investigates the supply response of sugar cane using an extended Nerlovian model, The analysis is separated into sugar mills and farmers’ responses. Output response is decomposed into area response and yield response. An important finding shows farmers to be responsive to price while millers are not, The insignificant results on sugar mills indicate that when they are under strict control, and are no longer profit maximizing, the Nerlovian supply response does not apply.

  8. Design of responsive polymer surfaces with ultrafast response time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzer, Jan; Ozcam, Evren; Willoughby, Julie

    2009-03-01

    Responsive surfaces with tailorable surface-reconstruction kinetics and switching hysteresis were prepared from poly(vinylmethylsiloxane) (PVMS) networks modified with thiol alkanes to provide hydrophobic or hydrophilic surface properties. The cooperative effects of polymer mobility, arising from the high flexibility of the siloxane backbone, and the enthalpic interactions between the contacting medium and the PVMS functionalized surface control the degree of responsiveness. Exposing the modified-elastomer surfaces to water resulted in rearrangement of the hydrophilic alkanes at the surface. The kinetics of reconstruction and reversibility were established by measuring the surface wettability via dynamic contact angle. By controlling the formation of semi-crystalline regions in our substrates we demonstrate either ``sluggish'' kinetics and eventual surface ``freezing'' and stability or stimuli-responsive substrates with a magnitude of change and repeated reversibility unparallel to most polymeric surfaces.

  9. Low dose effects. Adaptive response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate if there are disturbancies in adaptive response when lymphocytes of people living on the polluted with radionuclides area after Chernobyl disaster and liquidators suffered from accident have been investigated. The level of lymphocytes with micronuclei have been scored in Moscow donors and people living in Bryansk region with the degree of contamination 15 - 40 Ci/km. The doses that liquidators have been obtained were not higher then 25 cGy. The mean spontaneous level of MN in control people and people from Chernobyl zones does't differ significantly but the individual variability in the mean value between two populations does not differ significantly too. And in this case it seems that persons of exposed areas. Then another important fact in lymphocytes of people living on polluted areas the chronic low dose irradiation does not induce the adaptive response. In Moscow people in most cases (≅ 59 %) the adaptive response is observed and in some cases the demonstration of adaptive response is not significant (≅1%). In Chernobyl population exposed to chronic low level, low dose rate irradiation there are fewer people here with distinct adaptive response (≅38%). And there appear beings with increased radiosensitivity after conditioned dose. Such population with enhanced radiosensitivity have not observed in Moscow. In liquidators the same types of effects have been registered. These results have been obtained on adults. Adaptive response in children 8 - 14 old population living in Moscow and in Chernobyl zone have been investigated too. In this case the spontaneous level of MN is higher in children living in polluted areas, after the 1.0 Gy irradiation the individual variability is very large. Only 5 % of children have distinct is very large. Only 5 % of children have distinct adaptive response, the enhancement of radiosensitivity after conditioned dose is observed. (authors)

  10. Corporate Social Responsibility and the Economics of Consumer Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Etilé, Fabrice; Teyssier, SABRINA

    2012-01-01

    La diffusion de la Responsabilité sociale des entreprises (CSR) est conditionnée par les comportements d’achat des consommateurs. Nombre d’entre eux déclarent être favorables à la CSR et pourtant, la consommation responsable reste à un niveau faible. Cette revue de la littérature analyse deux barrières principales à la consommation responsable : la disponibilité-à-payer des consommateurs, qui dépend de leurs préférences sociales ; et l’asymétrie d’information entre les entreprises et les cons...

  11. Responsible Quality at Casall : Evaluating Corporate Social Responsibility Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsson, Kim; Klavebäck, Sofia; Nehm, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Much research has been conducted within Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), and it is currently a highly debated topic. Today, CSR is not only pursued in response to public pressure, but is also seen as a source of competitive advantage and differentiation. The problem that this thesis deals with is that many SMEs do not use CSR as a proactive competitive tool in a strategic manner. Therefore, the purpose of this thesis is to develop an evaluation framework for SME‟s CSR projects, and to u...

  12. Response spectra in alluvial soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For aseismic design of structures, the ground motion data is assumed either in the form of ground acceleration as a function of time or indirectly in the form of response spectra. Though the response spectra approach has limitations like not being applicable for nonlinear problems, it is usually used for structures like nuclear power plants. Fifty accelerograms recorded at alluvial sites have been processed. Since different empirical formulas relating acceleration with magnitude and distance give a wide scatter of values, peak ground acceleration alone cannot be the parameter as is assumed by a number of authors. The spectra corresponding to 5% damping have been normalised with respect to three parameters, namely, peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity and a nondimensional quantity ad/v2. Envelopee of maxima and minima as well as average response spectra has been obtained. A comparison with the USAEC spectra has been made. A relation between ground acceleration, ground velocity and ad/v2 has been obtained which would nearly give the same magnification of the response. A design response spectra for alluvial soils has been recommended. (author)

  13. Hormonal control of inflammatory responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Garcia-Leme

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost any stage of inflammatory and immunological responses is affected by hormone actions. This provides the basis for the suggestion that hormones act as modulators of the host reaction against trauma and infection. Specific hormone receptors are detected in the reactive structures in inflamed areas and binding of hormone molecules to such receptors results in the generation of signals that influence cell functions relevant for the development of inflammatory responses. Diversity of hormonal functions accounts for recognized pro- and anti-inflammatory effects exerted by these substances. Most hormone systems are capable of influencing inflammatory events. Insulin and glucocorticoids, however, exert direct regulatory effects at concentrations usually found in plasma. Insulin is endowed with facilitatory actions on vascular reactivity to inflammatory mediators and inflammatory cell functions. Increased concentrations of circulating glucocorticoids at the early stages of inflammation results in downregulation of inflammatory responses. Oestrogens markedly reduce the response to injury in a variety of experimental models. Glucagon and thyroid hormones exert indirect anti-inflammatory effects mediated by the activity of the adrenal cortex. Accordingly, inflammation is not only merely a local response, but a hormone-controlled process.

  14. Heart rate response to breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Pagh, K; Nielsen, J S;

    1987-01-01

    Heart rate responses to stepwise and periodic changes in lung volume were studied in seven young healthy males. Stepwise inspiration and expiration both resulted in an increase in heart rate followed by a rapid decrease in heart rate. The fastest heart rate was reached in 1.6 +/- 0.5 s and in 3.6...... as a measure of vagal function a number of factors have to be taken into consideration and to simplify the analysis of heart rate responses to breathing we recommend, instead, the use of the transient changes in heart rate induced by stepwise changes in lung volume.......Heart rate responses to stepwise and periodic changes in lung volume were studied in seven young healthy males. Stepwise inspiration and expiration both resulted in an increase in heart rate followed by a rapid decrease in heart rate. The fastest heart rate was reached in 1.6 +/- 0.5 s and in 3.......6 +/- 1.4 s in response to inspiration and expiration, respectively (P less than 0.01). The slowest heart rate was reached in 4.8 +/- 1.0 s and in 7.6 +/- 1.9 s in response to inspiration and expiration, respectively (P less than 0.01). Following this biphasic change the heart rate returned to a steady...

  15. Response

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Starting from a brief historical perspective on scientific discovery, this talk will review some of the theory and open problems of deep learning and describe how to design efficient feedforward and recursive deep learning architectures for applications in the natural sciences. In particular, the focus will be on multiple particle problems at different scales: in biology (e.g. prediction of protein structures), chemistry (e.g. prediction of molecular properties and reactions), and high-energy physics (e.g. detection of exotic particles, jet substructure and tagging, "dark matter and dark knowledge")

  16. Response

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Neuromorphic silicon chips have been developed over the last 30 years, inspired by the design of biological nervous systems and offering an alternative paradigm for computation, with real-time massively parallel operation and potentially large power savings with respect to conventional computing architectures. I will present the general principles with a brief investigation of the design choices that have been explored, and I'll discuss how such hardware has been applied to problems such as classification.

  17. Response

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic optimization, among which bio-inspired algorithms, is gaining momentum in areas where more classical optimization algorithms fail to deliver satisfactory results, or simply cannot be directly applied. This presentation will introduce baseline stochastic optimization algorithms, and illustrate their efficiency in different domains, from continuous non-convex problems to combinatorial optimization problem, to problems for which a non-parametric formulation can help exploring unforeseen possible solution spaces.

  18. Response

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    ALICE is the LHC experiment dedicated to the study of Heavy Ion collisions. In particular, the detector features low momentum tracking and vertexing, and comprehensive particle identification capabilities. In a single central heavy ion collision at the LHC, thousands of particles per unit rapidity are produced, making the data volume, track reconstruction and search of rare signals particularly challenging. Data science and machine learning techniques could help to tackle some of the challenges outlined above. In this talk, we will discuss some early attempts to use these techniques for the processing of detector signals and for the physics analysis. We will also highlight the most promising areas for the application of these methods.

  19. Towards accurate emergency response behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear reactor operator emergency response behavior has persisted as a training problem through lack of information. The industry needs an accurate definition of operator behavior in adverse stress conditions, and training methods which will produce the desired behavior. Newly assembled information from fifty years of research into human behavior in both high and low stress provides a more accurate definition of appropriate operator response, and supports training methods which will produce the needed control room behavior. The research indicates that operator response in emergencies is divided into two modes, conditioned behavior and knowledge based behavior. Methods which assure accurate conditioned behavior, and provide for the recovery of knowledge based behavior, are described in detail

  20. Corporate Social Responsibility in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Edwin D.

    2006-01-01

    The dialog within aviation management education regarding ethics is incomplete without a discussion of corporate social responsibility (CSR). CSR research requires discussion involving: (a) the current emphasis on CSR in business in general and aviation specifically; (b) business and educational theory that provide a basis for aviation companies to engage in socially responsible actions; (c) techniques used by aviation and aerospace companies to fulfill this responsibility; and (d) a glimpse of teaching approaches used in university aviation management classes. The summary of this research suggests educators explain CSR theory and practice to students in industry and collegiate aviation management programs. Doing so extends the discussion of ethical behavior and matches the current high level of interest and activity within the aviation industry toward CSR.

  1. A kenotic response to secularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.T. Williams

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The church must be concerned to make the correct response to its increasing impotence and marginalisation in Western society due to secularisation. Past reaction has been to accommodate to the changed worldview, even to identify with it. A more appropriate response is to be Christocentric, so as to reflect the action of God himself in the sending of Christ for salvation. This involved his kenosis . In this case the response of the church is its own kenosis. This is also appropriate as secularisation was possible through the kenosis of God. The kenosis of the church is not an acceptance of defeat, but on the contrary, just as the kenosis of Christ, it aims at a positive result, the transformation of society.

  2. Inflammatory response and extracorporeal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph; Van Aken, Hugo; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Patients undergoing cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation (EC) frequently develop a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Surgical trauma, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, endotoxaemia and blood contact to nonendothelial circuit compounds promote the activation of coagulation pathways, complement factors and a cellular immune response. This review discusses the multiple pathways leading to endothelial cell activation, neutrophil recruitment and production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. All these factors may induce cellular damage and subsequent organ injury. Multiple organ dysfunction after cardiac surgery with EC is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. In addition to the pathogenesis of organ dysfunction after EC, this review deals with different therapeutic interventions aiming to alleviate the inflammatory response and consequently multiple organ dysfunction after cardiac surgery. PMID:26060024

  3. Environment-Responsive Polymeric Hydrogels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhn X. X.; M. Nichifor; Lin H.Y.; D. Avoce

    2004-01-01

    Some polymers may respond by changing their physico-chemical perperties when the environmental conditions such as pH, temperature and ionic strength are varied. For example,thermosensentive polymers can exhibit a sharp change in solubility in a solvent such as water at a certain temperature known as the lower critical solution temperature (LCST). The responsiveness of the polymeric materials has important technological implications since they can be employed for various applications. The responsiveness of such polymers can be varied by means of copolymerization, chemical modification of the polymer, or the addition of reagents into the solutions. It is interesting and important to tune predictably the responsiveness of the polymers for the different applications. The sensitivity towards the external environment can be modulated by the relative hydrophilicity of the copolymers, hence the chemical structure and composition of the comonomers used.

  4. Drought stress responses in crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Arun K; Maheswari, M; Yadav, S K; Desai, S; Bhanu, Divya; Attal, Neha Bajaj; Venkateswarlu, B

    2014-03-01

    Among the effects of impending climate change, drought will have a profound impact on crop productivity in the future. Response to drought stress has been studied widely, and the model plant Arabidopsis has guided the studies on crop plants with genome sequence information viz., rice, wheat, maize and sorghum. Since the value of functions of genes, dynamics of pathways and interaction of networks for drought tolerance in plants can only be judged by evidence from field performance, this mini-review provides a research update focussing on the current developments on the response to drought in crop plants. Studies in Arabidopsis provide the basis for interpreting the available information in a systems biology perspective. In particular, the elucidation of the mechanism of drought stress response in crops is considered from evidence-based outputs emerging from recent omic studies in crops. PMID:24408129

  5. Modeling, simulation and emergency response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) has been developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to provide a national capability in emergency response to radiological accidents. For the past two years the system has been undergoing a complete redesign and upgrade in software and hardware. Communications, geophysical databases, atmospheric transport and diffusion models and experienced staff form the core of this rapid response capability. The ARAC system has been used to support DOE commitments to radiological accidents including the Three Mile Island accident, the COSMOS satellite reentries, the TITAN II missile accident and several others. This paper describes the major components of the ARAC system, presents example calculations and discusses the interactive process of the man-machine environment in an emergency response system.

  6. Designing a Response Scale to Improve Average Group Response Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Randall

    2008-01-01

    Creating surveys is a common task in evaluation research; however, designing a survey instrument to gather average group response data that can be interpreted in a meaningful way over time can be challenging. When surveying groups of people for the purpose of longitudinal analysis, the reliability of the result is often determined by the response…

  7. Step response and frequency response of an air conditioning system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crommelin, R.D.; Jackman, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    A system of induction units of an existing air conditioning system has been analyzed with respect to its dynamic properties. Time constants were calculated and measured by analogue models. Comparison with measurements at the installation itself showed a reasonable agreement. Frequency responses were

  8. Response: Critical Realism--Response to Longhofer and Floersch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briar-Lawson, Katharine

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses key challenges posed by critical realism, proposed by Longhofer and Floersch, as a philosophical underpinning for a science of social work. As a response to Longhofer and Floersch, it is argued that critical realism may be instructive in debates about structural conditions that dictate more inclusive interventions and…

  9. The path to corporate responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadek, Simon

    2004-12-01

    Nike's tagline,"Just do it," is an inspirational call to action for the millions who wear the company's athletic gear. But in terms of corporate responsibility, Nike didn't always follow its own advice. In the 1990s, protesters railed against sweatshop conditions at some of its overseas suppliers and made Nike the global poster child for corporate ethical fecklessness. The intense pressure that activists exerted on the athletic apparel giant forced it to take a long, hard look at corporate responsibility--sooner than it might have otherwise. In this article, Simon Zadek, CEO of the UK-based institute AccountAbility, describes the bumpy route Nike has traveled to get to a better ethical place, one that cultivates and champions responsible business practices. Organizations learn in unique ways, Zadek contends, but they inevitably pass through five stages of corporate responsibility, from defensive ("It's not our fault") to compliance ("We'll do only what we have to") to managerial ("It's the business") to strategic ("It gives us a competitive edge") and, finally, to civil ("We need to make sure everybody does it"). He details Nike's arduous trek through these stages-from the company's initial defensive stance, when accusations about working conditions arose, all the way to its engagement today in the international debate about business's role in society and in public policy. As he outlines this evolution, Zadek offers valuable insights to executives grappling with the challenge of managing responsible business practices. Beyond just getting their own houses in order, the author argues, companies need to stay abreast of the public's evolving ideas about corporate roles and responsibilities. Organizations that do both will engage in what he calls"civil learning". PMID:15605571

  10. Mapping 'Social Responsibility' in Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, Cecilie; Horst, Maja

    2014-01-01

    aims to exclude the social from the scientific production in order to make it objective and thereby responsible; the Reflexivity rationality, which sees it as science's responsibility to let itself be guided by problems in society in choice of research focus and methods; the Contribution rationality...... that all of them address the issue of a boundary (or integration) between science and society. Hence, it is not possible for scientists to avoid ‘a relationship’ with society. The political question is how this relationship is to be defined and regulated....

  11. Responsible Use of Public Lands

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond, Mark

    2012-01-01

    What are your ‘Public Lands?’ How are they used and how does local leadership fit into the administration of these lands? Who is responsible for impacts and what are the mitigation measures necessary for responsible use of our Public Lands? Mark Raymond, County Commissioner, Uintah County, 152 E 100 N, Vernal, UT, 84078, mraymond@uintah. utah.gov Mark Raymond is currently serving as a County Commissioner in Uintah County. He is very passionate about multiple land use issues and is very aggres...

  12. IPCC SRES revisited: a response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article gives details of the response to the criticism of the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES) and of some aspects of IPCC assessments. The criticism claims that market exchange rates (MER) were used instead of purchasing power parities (PPP) and that scenarios using Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth in developing regions were flawed. Points raised in the response included that scenarios of GDP growth are typically expressed as MER, that the IPCC scenarios did include PPP-based scenarios, and that long-term emissions are based on more than just economic growth

  13. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger David John

    2012-01-01

    damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses...... include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review...... the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level....

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY: NIGERIANS HOW FAR?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EGUN, NKONYEASUA KINGSLEY

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses the relationship between the citizens’ actions and responsibility to the environment and the effect on the environment. With some prevalent environmental problems in Nigeria examined as it pertains to citizens’ indiscipline and recommendations on how Nigeria can achieve a healthy and pollution free environment. Examples are the review of existing laws and legislations governing the citizens’ societal behaviour. To reflect the present challenge of environmental responsibility and strengthening of relevant institutions to educate and enforce these laws were made.

  15. Designing a responsive web site

    OpenAIRE

    Fejzić , Diana

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of smartphones and tablet computers design became a crucial part of web design. For a user, responsive web design enables the best user experience, regardless of whether a user is visiting the site via a mobile phone, a tablet or a computer. This thesis covers the process of planning, designing and responsive web site development, for a fictitious company named “Creative Design d.o.o.”, with the help of web technologies. In the initial part of the thesis, w...

  16. Statistical and low dose response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low dose response and the lower limit of detection of the Hanford dosimeter depend upon may factors, including the energy of the radiation, whether the exposure is to be a single radiation or mixed fields, annealing cycles, environmental factors, and how well various batches of TLD materials are matched in the system. A careful statistical study and sensitivity analysis were performed to determine how these factors influence the response of the dosimeter system. Estimates have been included in this study of the standard deviation of calculated dose for various mixed field exposures from 0 to 1000 mrem

  17. Distributed Dynamic Condition Response Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao

    repeated, possibly infinite behavior, 2) finitely specify fine-grained acceptance conditions for (possibly infinite) runs based on the notion of responses and 3) distribute events via roles. We give a graphical notation inspired by related work by van der Aalst et al and formalize the execution semantics......We present distributed dynamic condition response structures as a declarative process model inspired by the workflow language employed by our industrial partner and conservatively generalizing labelled event structures. The model adds to event structures the possibility to 1) finitely specify...

  18. 21 CFR 820.20 - Management responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Quality System Requirements § 820.20 Management responsibility... the quality system to management with executive responsibility for review. (c) Management review. Management with executive responsibility shall review the suitability and effectiveness of the quality......

  19. 7 CFR 3407.4 - Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... indicated: (a) Administrator. The Administrator is responsible for providing leadership, formulating agency... Deputy Administrators are responsible for: (1) Ensuring that eligible institutions under CSREES formula..., and formula projects. (c) Program Managers. CSREES Program Managers are responsible for: (1)...

  20. 7 CFR 621.24 - NRCS responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE WATER RESOURCES RIVER BASIN INVESTIGATIONS AND SURVEYS Floodplain Management Assistance § 621.24 NRCS responsibility. NRCS is responsible for providing leadership for scheduling and implementing...

  1. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Federal Training Center is a safety and emergency response training center that offers...

  2. Chromosomal instability determines taxane response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swanton, C.; Nicke, B.; Schuett, M.;

    2009-01-01

    Microtubule-stabilizing (MTS) agents, such as taxanes, are important chemotherapeutics with a poorly understood mechanism of action. We identified a set of genes repressed in multiple cell lines in response to MTS agents and observed that these genes are overexpressed in tumors exhibiting...

  3. Temperature responsive shape memory hybrids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponyrko, Sergii; Matějka, Libor

    Montpellier: L2C, Université de Montpellier, 2015. Mo-P12. [International workshop on "Structure and dynamics of polymer nanocomposites". 22.06.2015-24.06.2015, Montpellier] Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) M200501203 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : temperature-responsive * shape memory polymer * nanocomposite Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  4. Responsible investing in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viviers, S.; Bosch, J.K.; Smit, vd M E.; Buijs, A.

    2009-01-01

    Given growing interest in the phenomenon of Responsible Investing (RI), both locally and internationally, the purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the RI sector in South Africa. It focuses on the definition and characteristics of RI within the South African context; the size and nature

  5. Outplacement and corporate social responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, R.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a response to the following papers: "Ethical Marketing," by P.E. Murphy, G.R. Laczniak, N.E. Bowie, and T.A. Klein, "Marketing Ethics: Cases and Readings," edited by P.E. Murphy and G.R. Laczniak, "Advertising Ethics" by E.H. Spence and B. van Heekeren, and "Corporate Social Re

  6. Corporate Social Responsibility: Strategic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Abagail McWilliams; Siegel, Donald S.; Patrick M. Wright

    2005-01-01

    We describe a variety of perspectives on corporate social responsibility (CSR), which we use to develop a framework for consideration of the strategic implications of CSR. Based on this framework, we propose an agenda for additional theoretical and empirical research on CSR. We then review the papers in this special issue and relate them to the proposed agenda.

  7. Tensions of Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Robert

    I engaged with the top management team (TMT) and employees of American Cafes Corporation as an action/intervention researcher in the 20 months immediately following the TMT’s decision to formalize the company’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities. This led to the establishment of a...

  8. Mechanical Response of Thermoelectric Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Case, Eldon D. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-05-01

    A sufficient mechanical response of thermoelectric materials (TEMats) to structural loadings is a prerequisite to the exploitation of any candidate TEMat's thermoelectric efficiency. If a TEMat is mechanically damaged or cracks from service-induced stresses, then its thermal and electrical functions can be compromised or even cease. Semiconductor TEMats tend to be quite brittle and have a high coefficient of thermal expansion; therefore, they can be quite susceptible to mechanical failure when subjected to operational thermal gradients. Because of this, sufficient mechanical response (vis-a-vis, mechanical properties) of any candidate TEMat must be achieved and sustained in the context of the service-induced stress state to which it is subjected. This report provides an overview of the mechanical responses of state-of-the-art TEMats; discusses the relevant properties that are associated with those responses and their measurement; and describes important, nonequilibrium phenomena that further complicate their use in thermoelectric devices. For reference purposes, the report also includes several appendixes that list published data on elastic properties and strengths of a variety of TEMats.

  9. Predicting response to epigenetic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treppendahl, Marianne B; Sommer Kristensen, Lasse; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Drugs targeting the epigenome are new promising cancer treatment modalities; however, not all patients receive the same benefit from these drugs. In contrast to conventional chemotherapy, responses may take several months after the initiation of treatment to occur. Accordingly, identification of ......-approved epigenetic drugs....

  10. Corporate Social Responsibility for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Przychodzeń

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to is to provide insights on implementing corporate social responsibility for sustainability (CSRS concept and show how it differs from basic corporate social responsibility (CSR. Methodology: The paper discusses major issues with references to existing literature and real business cases from S&P500 consumer discretionary sector. Findings: The main fi nding of this paper is that CSRS could provide the company with a competitive advantage as a growing number of consumers become more sustainable conscious. It could also help to overcome the increasing consumers’ skepticism towards corporate social responsibility practices. Finally, it can also be seen as a step forward in defi ning what types of corporate activities are associated with desirable social and environmental gains. Research limitations: Our sample was restricted to the U.S. fi rms from the consumer discretionary sector. Therefore, conclusions should not be generalized to other markets. Our study is based on the analysis of environmental and social responsibility statements and assumes that they accurately represent corporate commitment in majority of the cases. Practical implications: CSRS offers corporations the opportunity to use their unique skills, culture, values, resources, and management capabilities to lead social progress by making sustainability part of its internal corporate logic. Originality: The paper raises the importance of the different conditions necessary for making sustainable development concept an important part of corporate strategy.

  11. Preparing Engineers for Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandvoort, H.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I introduce the contributions to a special section of the journal: one devoted to the question of how engineering curricula can or should contribute to the preparation of graduates for socially responsible decision making and conduct. The special section is motivated by the circumstance that, although there is broad agreement that…

  12. Dose response relationship and Alara

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, it will be shown how dose-response relationships allow to give quantitative figures for the detriment of irradiation. At this stage, the detriment is expressed directly as a certain number of health effects, whose valuation is not dealt with here. The present tools for quantifying, their weaknesses and their strenghts, and their scientific basis will be developed

  13. Education for Responsible Citizenship: Conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghid, Yusef

    2009-01-01

    There is an abundance of literature on citizenship education. This essay is an attempt to show how deliberation is used in university classroom pedagogy, to engender in students a commitment to becoming responsible citizens of a post-apartheid South Africa. Firstly, I show that controversy can be attended to through deliberation, with specific…

  14. Partnerships for corporate social responsability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de T.J.N.M. (Theo)

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise the extent to which partnerships with non-governmental organisations (NGOs) are a necessity for successful efforts of businesses in the area of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The main findings are based on an analysis of existing literature on NG

  15. Risk, responsibility and political action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halskov Jensen, Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    is argued that an application of the Toulmin model is useful for eliciting systematic overall repre-sentations of responsibility and agency in environmental crises such as the mad cow crisis as well as for revealing relationships between social domains such as moral, politics, economics and science...

  16. A Shared Responsibility for Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Co-investment between the state, employer, and employee is an intrinsic feature of most vocational and education training systems. The government's strategy is to "profoundly" shift responsibility for funding learning and skills from the state to individuals and businesses. At a time of stringent cuts in publicly-funded further education and the…

  17. Green taxation and individual responsibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballet, Jerome [C3ED Centre of Economics and Ethics for Environment and Development, UVSQ, University of Versailles, Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); Bazin, Damien [EMAFI Macroeconomics and International Finance Research Centre at University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, 28, avenue Valrose, BP 2135, 06103 Nice (France); Lioui, Abraham [Department of Economics, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan (Israel); Touahri, David [LEST Institute of Labor Econmics and Industrial Sociology and Mediterranean University Aix-Marseille II, Marseille (France)

    2007-09-15

    The current article aims at studying the effects of taxation on environmental quality, in an economy where its agents are responsible. Individual responsibility towards nature is modelized by the voluntary effort to which the households have agreed insofar as the improvement of environmental quality is concerned. It is an original way to show that the individuals may feel committed towards the environment and assume obligations towards it as well as towards environmental public policy. Given that, in our model, such effort is taken from one's allocated time for leisure, its opportunity cost is that of the sacrificed time for leisure, and is therefore equal to the individual's wage. We shall highlight that State intervention through the introduction of a (green) tax always crowds out individual responsibility. However, the intensity of this crowding-out depends on the performance of the State. Moreover, State intervention could, depending on the amount of crowding-out, reduce the overall quality of the environment. In a general equilibrium setting, we show that the crowding-out effect is not systematic. This is because there will then be an interaction between effort (or work time) and the cost of that effort (linked to the individual's wage, and therefore to production and finally to work/effort). In this article, we shall discuss the conditions under which public policy crowds out individual responsibility within this context. (author)

  18. Responsive media in HTML5

    CERN Document Server

    Libby, Alex

    2014-01-01

    If you are a web designer with a good understanding of CSS, jQuery, and HTML, but new to creating responsive sites, then this book is for you. The prerequisite is a good understanding of CSS and HTML; the demos will suit those who have some prior knowledge of Less CSS, WordPress, or Bootstrap.

  19. Responsibility and choice in addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    The treatment of patients with substance use disorders requires that providers be aware of their own views on the relative roles of personal responsibility and of forces outside personal control in the onset and progression of and recovery from these disorders. The authors review the role of responsibility for addiction from several viewpoints: biological, psychological, sociocultural, self-help, religious, and forensic. Factors that affect personal responsibility in addictive diseases include awareness of the problem, knowledge of a genetic predisposition, understanding of addictive processes, comorbid psychiatric or medical conditions, adequacy of the support network, nature of the early environment, degree of tolerance of substance abuse in the sociocultural context, and the availability of competent psychiatric, medical, and chemical dependency treatment. Factors that affect societal responsibility include degree of access to illicit drugs, society's level of tolerance of drug use, the courts' approach to deterring substance abuse (punishment versus treatment), individuals' refusal to obtain substance abuse treatment, presence of clear behavioral norms, availability of early assessment and prevention, presence of community education, and degree of access to outpatient and community treatment. PMID:12045307

  20. Globalisation, Responsibility and Virtual Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    The intersection of globalisation and information technology influences ethical positions and notions of responsibility within businesses and in distance education for school students. As the spatial and temporal distance between student and teacher increases, and is mediated by computers, there have been changes to the ways in which individuals…

  1. Speaking of Corporate Social Responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, H.; Marquis, C.; Renneboog, L.D.R.; Li Sun, Sunny

    2014-01-01

    We argue that the language spoken by corporate decision makers influences their firms’ social responsibility and sustainability practices. Linguists suggest that obligatory future-time-reference (FTR) in a language reduces the psychological importance of the future. Prior research has shown that spe

  2. Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, James F.; Maynard, William S.

    1975-01-01

    This study investigated the possible implications of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) for employee expectations and satisfactions. Specifically, interest centered on the question of how perceptions of an organization's involvement in the resolution of current societal problems might relate to members' expectations of equitable job rewards and…

  3. Socially Responsible Educational Technology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Thomas C.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that the growing demand for educational research to be more relevant and increasing concerns about the generalizability and utility of research findings are related to the concept of "socially responsible research." Identifies problems with educational technology research. Outlines major types of educational technology research goals and…

  4. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND MARKETING

    OpenAIRE

    Lect. Flaviu Meghişan Ph.D; Assoc. Prof. Liviu Crăciun Ph.D; Lect. Cătălin Mihail Barbu Ph.D

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we showed that marketing is responsible for serving the interests of the society. Initially, marketing was condemned for instigating to socially adverse behaviors. Nowadays, the reputation of marketing is restored, as public decision-makers discovered the importance of marketing in generating desirable public behaviors. Marketing techniques can be used successfully to produce the intended outcomes

  5. Auxin response under osmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser, Victoria; Shani, Eilon

    2016-08-01

    The phytohormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA) is a small organic molecule that coordinates many of the key processes in plant development and adaptive growth. Plants regulate the auxin response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, transport and perception. One of the most striking aspects of plant plasticity is the modulation of development in response to changing growth environments. In this review, we explore recent findings correlating auxin response-dependent growth and development with osmotic stresses. Studies of water deficit, dehydration, salt, and other osmotic stresses point towards direct and indirect molecular perturbations in the auxin pathway. Osmotic stress stimuli modulate auxin responses by affecting auxin biosynthesis (YUC, TAA1), transport (PIN), perception (TIR/AFB, Aux/IAA), and inactivation/conjugation (GH3, miR167, IAR3) to coordinate growth and patterning. In turn, stress-modulated auxin gradients drive physiological and developmental mechanisms such as stomata aperture, aquaporin and lateral root positioning. We conclude by arguing that auxin-mediated growth inhibition under abiotic stress conditions is one of the developmental and physiological strategies to acclimate to the changing environment. PMID:27052306

  6. Parenting: Responsibilities, Risks and Respect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Professor Carol Vincent gets the 2012 Professorial Lecture series underway with a thought provoking talk drawing on research projects conducted over the last twelve years. The lecture will explore factors identified in current policy, media, and other social and political forums as the risks and responsibilities of contemporary parenting, with a…

  7. Steroid Response in Refractory Asthmatics

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, An-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Inhaled glucocorticosteroids are currently the most effective anti-inflammatory controller medications for treating persistent asthma. The efficacies of glucocorticoids include reducing asthma symptoms, reducing exacerbation frequency, improving quality of life, improving lung function, decreasing airway hyperresponsiveness, controlling airway inflammation, and reducing mortality. However, the treatment response to glucocorticosteroids in asthmatics varies, and certain subtypes of asthma, suc...

  8. Demand Response in Smart Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jacob; Knudsen, Jesper Viese; Annaswamy, Anuradha M.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, moves toward higher integration of Renewable Energy Resources have called for fundamental changes in both the planning and operation of the overall power grid. One such change is the incorporation of Demand Response (DR), the process by which consumers can adjust their demand in...

  9. Multinationals and corporate social responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kolk

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to shed some more light on the current debate related to corporate social responsibility (CSR), specifically considering multinational enterprises (MNEs) and the complexities they face when dealing with international issues and a range of stakeholders. It discusses notions of CSR in

  10. Host response to Eimeria infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, W.J.C.

    2008-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Eimeria is responsible for the disease coccidiosis and has a worldwide distribution. Intestinal Eimeria infections are the dominating class of diseases in poultry causing great economical damage and considerably affecting animal welfare. In the Netherlands in chickens raised f

  11. Hall Viscosity and Electromagnetic Response

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyos, Carlos; Son, Dam Thanh

    2011-01-01

    We show that, for Galilean invariant quantum Hall states, the Hall viscosity appears in the electromagnetic response at finite wave numbers q. In particular, the leading q dependence of the Hall conductivity at small q receives a contribution from the Hall viscosity. The coefficient of the q^2 term in the Hall conductivity is universal in the limit of strong magnetic field.

  12. Corporate Social Responsibility and Competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    tureanu Simona-Luize

    2012-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility helps achieving different social, environmental and economic policy goals, but it can also contribute to competitiveness. This paper concentrates on how CSR could help competitiveness at level of individual enterprises. Moreover the connection between macro-level competitiveness and CSR is presented.

  13. Green taxation and individual responsibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current article aims at studying the effects of taxation on environmental quality, in an economy where its agents are responsible. Individual responsibility towards nature is modelized by the voluntary effort to which the households have agreed insofar as the improvement of environmental quality is concerned. It is an original way to show that the individuals may feel committed towards the environment and assume obligations towards it as well as towards environmental public policy. Given that, in our model, such effort is taken from one's allocated time for leisure, its opportunity cost is that of the sacrificed time for leisure, and is therefore equal to the individual's wage. We shall highlight that State intervention through the introduction of a (green) tax always crowds out individual responsibility. However, the intensity of this crowding-out depends on the performance of the State. Moreover, State intervention could, depending on the amount of crowding-out, reduce the overall quality of the environment. In a general equilibrium setting, we show that the crowding-out effect is not systematic. This is because there will then be an interaction between effort (or work time) and the cost of that effort (linked to the individual's wage, and therefore to production and finally to work/effort). In this article, we shall discuss the conditions under which public policy crowds out individual responsibility within this context. (author)

  14. Elementary School Philosophy: A Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartenberg, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    This article is a response to criticism of my book "Big Ideas for Little Kids." The main topics addressed are: Who is the audience for the book? Can people without formal philosophical training can be good facilitators of elementary school philosophy discussions? Is it important to assess attempts to teach philosophy in elementary school? Should…

  15. Close-loop simulation of the medial olivocochlear anti-masking effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Wen; Yu, Lu-Ming; Wu, Po-Jui

    2015-12-01

    The medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) is known to affect cochlear signal processing via the electromechanical changes it induces in outer hair cells (OHCs). Experiments showed that electrically stimulating the MOC efferents (i.e., open-loop stimulation) suppresses cochlear responses to acoustic noise while enhancing the response to tone bursts if the signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high [5]. However, such experiments did not reveal precisely how MOCR affects cochlear signal processing in a close loop. Presently we have built an integrated computer model for the MOCR pathway; the constituting sub-models include a model for cochlear mechanics with electromotile OHCs [11], a neurotransmitter release model for the synapse between inner hair cells (IHCs) and spiral ganglion cells [16], an electrical model for the T-multipolar (TM) cells in the cochlear nucleus [6], a relay from TM cells to the MOC interneurons, and a convolution kernel describing the change of OHC potassium conductance triggered by the MOC inhibitory post synaptic potentials. Thus, close-loop responses of the entire system can be simulated for arbitrary acoustic stimuli. Both open-loop and close-loop simulations demonstrate a decrease in the auditory nerve fiber (ANF) response to noise but an increase in the response to high-level tone bursts. The present integrated computer model can potentially be used for testing hypotheses regarding the physiological mechanisms for MOC anti-masking effects.

  16. Auditory distraction transmitted by a cochlear implant alters allocation of attentional resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Mareike; Sandmann, Pascale; Kopp, Bruno; Lenarz, Thomas; Büchner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are auditory prostheses which restore hearing via electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. The successful adaptation of auditory cognition to the CI input depends to a substantial degree on individual factors. We pursued an electrophysiological approach toward an analysis of cortical responses that reflect perceptual processing stages and higher-level responses to CI input. Performance and event-related potentials on two cross-modal discrimination-following-distraction (DFD) tasks from CI users and normal-hearing (NH) individuals were compared. The visual-auditory distraction task combined visual distraction with following auditory discrimination performance. Here, we observed similar cortical responses to visual distractors (Novelty-N2) and slowed, less accurate auditory discrimination performance in CI users when compared to NH individuals. Conversely, the auditory-visual distraction task was used to combine auditory distraction with visual discrimination performance. In this task we found attenuated cortical responses to auditory distractors (Novelty-P3), slowed visual discrimination performance, and attenuated cortical P3-responses to visual targets in CI users compared to NH individuals. These results suggest that CI users process auditory distractors differently than NH individuals and that the presence of auditory CI input has an adverse effect on the processing of visual targets and the visual discrimination ability in implanted individuals. We propose that this attenuation of the visual modality occurs through the allocation of neural resources to the CI input. PMID:25798083

  17. Immune responses in space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1998-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to have profound effects on immunological parameters of humans, monkeys and rodents. These studies have been carried out by a number of different laboratories. Among the parameters affected are leukocyte blastogenesis, natural killer cell activity, leukocyte subset distribution, cytokine production - including interferons and interleukins, and macrophage maturation and activity. These changes start to occur only after a few days space flight, and some changes continue throughout long-term space flight. Antibody responses have received only very limited study, and total antibody levels have been shown to be increased after long-term space flight. Several factors could be involved in inducing these changes. These factors could include microgravity, lack of load-bearing, stress, acceleration forces, and radiation. The mechanism(s) for space flight-induced changes in immune responses remain(s) to be established. Certainly, there can be direct effects of microgravity, or other factors, on cells that play a fundamental role in immune responses. However, it is now clear that there are interactions between the immune system and other physiological systems that could play a major role. For example, changes occurring in calcium use in the musculoskeletal system induced by microgravity or lack of use could have great impact on the immune system. Most of the changes in immune responses have been observed using samples taken immediately after return from space flight. However, there have been two recent studies that have used in-flight testing. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to common recall antigens of astronauts and cosmonauts have been shown to be decreased when tested during space flights. Additionally, natural killer cell and blastogenic activities are inhibited in samples taken from rats during space flight. Therefore, it is now clear that events occurring during space flight itself can affect immune responses. The biological

  18. Fast response liquid crystal devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yung-Hsun

    Liquid crystal (LC) has been widely used for displays, spatial light modulators, variable optical attenuators (VOAs) and other tunable photonic devices. The response time of these devices is mainly determined by the employed liquid crystal material. The response time of a LC device depends on the visco-elastic coefficient (gamma1/K11), LC cell gap (d), and applied voltage. Hence, low visco-elastic coefficient LC materials and thinner cell gap are favorable for reducing the response time. However, low visco-elastic coefficient LCs are usually associated with a low birefringence because of shorter molecular conjugation. For display applications, such as LCD TVs, low birefringence (Deltanthick cell gap which, in turn, increases the response time. How to obtain fast response for the LC devices is a fundamentally important and technically challenging task. In this dissertation, we investigate several methods to improve liquid crystal response time, for examples, using dual-frequency liquid crystals, polymer stabilized liquid crystals, and sheared polymer network liquid crystals. We discover a new class of material, denoted as sheared polymer network liquid crystal (SPNLC) which exhibits a submillisecond response time. Moreover, this response time is insensitive to the LC cell gap. This is the first LC device exhibiting such an interesting property. Chapters 1 and 2 describe the motivation and background of this dissertation. From chapter 3 to chapter 6, dual-frequency liquid crystals and polymer network methods are demonstrated as examples for the variable optical attenuators. Variable optical attenuator (VOA) is a key component in optical communications. Especially, the sheared PNLC VOA shows the best result; its dynamic range reaches 43 dB while the response time is in the submillisecond range at 1550 nm wavelength, which is 50 times faster than the commercial LC-based VOA. In Chapter 7, we report a new device called axially-symmetric sheared polymer network liquid

  19. Radiological terrorism and Australia's response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A terrorist attack in Australia involving dispersal of radioactive material is different from conventional terrorist attacks involving explosives. The trauma experienced by victims during an explosive incident includes cuts, broken limbs, burns and shock. When an explosive device involving radioactive materials is involved, there are a number of additional characteristics including the contamination of victims and the surrounding area and the potential requirement for ongoing monitoring and decontamination. Response actions may require additional complex emergency response measures including immediate protective actions to protect those potentially exposed to contamination, mass casualty care, and public and mental health. There are concerns that terrorist organizations are showing increasing interest in acquiring radiological material that could be used with explosive. A dirty bomb or technically known as a radiological dispersal device (RDD) is a device designed to spread radioactive contamination over a wide area and pose a health and safety threat to those within the contaminated area. The radioactive material could be in the form of a large chunk of material, fine powder, a liquid mist, or a gas. The material may also be spread in other ways, such as by simply emptying a container over the desired area. As RDD's do not require large amounts of explosives, there is unlikely to be a large numbers of casualties, however the areas contaminated by the radiological material may cause immediate and long term health risks to those exposed. An RDD is a weapon of Mass Disruption rather than destruction. While the likelihood of RDD's being employed by terrorist in Australia is still considered remote, Australia's emergency response organizations are developing plans to ensure a rapid and comprehensive response occurs should such an event occur in this country, The presentation will outline Australia's response arrangements at the local/state level and the type of federal

  20. Framework of Social Responsibilities of Forestry Enterprises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang; SUI; Weimin; ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Forestry industry plays a key role in regulating climate and promoting sustainable development of society.Environmental responsibility is the key part of social responsibilities of forestry enterprises.Based on the particularity of forestry industry,the framework of social responsibility reports of forestry enterprises is provided,and major topics of social responsibilities followed by forestry enterprises are analyzed.Meanwhile,the core values of social responsibilities of forestry enterprises are pointed out.It is proposed that the social responsibility reports of forestry enterprises should involve the responsibility to shareholders and creditors,the responsibility to suppliers,customers and consumers,the responsibility to employees,the responsibility to the environment,and the responsibility to communities and charity behavior.