WorldWideScience

Sample records for chimeric single-base extension

  1. Typing of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms using ribonuclease cleavage of DNA/RNA chimeric single-base extension primers and detection by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Børsting, Claus;

    2005-01-01

    A novel single-base extension (SBE) assay using cleavable and noncleavable SBE primers in the same reaction mix is described. The cleavable SBE primers consisted of deoxyribonucleotides and one ribonucleotide (hereafter denoted chimeric primers), whereas the noncleavable SBE primers consisted of ...

  2. [Development of single base extension-tags microarray for the detection of food-borne pathogens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Changyong; Shi, Chunlei; Zhang, Chunxiu; Chen, Jing; Shi, Xianming

    2009-04-01

    We developed single base extension-tags (SBE-tags) microarray to detect eight common food-borne pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Enterobacter sakazaki, Shigella, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Campylobacter jejuni. With specific PCR primers identified and integrated for eight food-borne pathogens, target sequences were amplified and purified as template DNA of single base extension-tags reaction. The products were hybridized to microarrays and scanned for fluorescence intensity. The experiment showed a specific and simultaneous detection of eight food-borne pathogens. The system limits is 0.1 pg for a genomic DNA and 5x10(2) CFU/mL for Salmonella typhimurium cultures. The single base extension-tags assay can be used to detect food-borne pathogens rapidly and accurately with a high sensitivity, and provide an efficient way for diagnosis and control of disease caused by food-borne pathogens.

  3. Typing of 49 autosomal SNPs by single base extension and capillary electrophoresis for forensic genetic testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Morling, Niels

    2012-01-01

    We describe a method for simultaneous amplification of 49 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by multiplex PCR and detection of the SNP alleles by single base extension (SBE) and capillary electrophoresis. All the SNPs may be amplified from only 100 pg of genomic DNA and the length o...... victim identifications, where the DNA from the victims may be highly degraded and the victims are identified via investigation of their relatives. The assay was validated according to the ISO 17025 standard and used for routine case work in our laboratory....

  4. Determination of cis/trans phase of variations in the MC1R gene with allele-specific PCR and single base extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Børsting, Claus; Sanchez, Juan J

    2008-01-01

    The MC1R gene encodes a protein with key regulatory functions in the melanin synthesis. A multiplex PCR and a multiplex single base extension protocol were established for genotyping six exonic MC1R variations highly penetrant for red hair (R), four exonic MC1R variations weakly penetrant for red...

  5. Identification of mtDNA lineages of Sus scrofa by multiplex single base extension for the authentication of processed food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asch, Barbara; Silva Santos, Liliana; Carneiro, Joao; Pereira, Filipe; Amorim, Antonio

    2011-07-13

    A genetic method to identify the breed of origin could serve as a useful tool for inspecting the authenticity of the increasing number of monobreed foodstuffs, such as those derived from small local European pig breeds. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is practically the only reliable genomic target for PCR in processed products, and its haploid nature and strict maternal inheritance greatly facilitate genetic analysis. As a result of strategies that sought to improve the production traits of European pigs, most industrial breeds presently show a high frequency of Asian alleles, while the absence or low frequency of such Asian alleles has been observed in small rustic breeds from which highly prized dry-cured and other traditional products are derived. Therefore, the detection of Asian ancestry would indicate nonconformity in Protected Denomination of Origin products. This study presents a single base extension assay based on 15 diagnostic mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms to discriminate between Asian and European Sus scrofa lineages. The test was robust, sensitive and accurate in a wide range of processed foodstuffs and allowed accurate detection of pig genetic material and identification of maternal ancestry. A market survey suggested that nonconformity of products derived from Portuguese breeds is an unusual event at present, but regular surveys both in the local populations and in commercial products would be advisible. Taking into consideration the limitations presented by other methodologies, this mtDNA-based test probably attains the highest resolution for the direct genetic test for population of origin in Sus scrofa food products.

  6. Clinical significance of chimerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, Dianne

    2009-05-15

    Twins have been previously classified as either monozygotic or dizygotic. In recent years, fascinating, non-traditional mechanisms of twinning have been uncovered. We define chimerism versus mosaicism, touch on chimerism in the animal world, and explain timing of chimerism in humans. In addition, we discuss when to suspect chimerism in patients, and how to proceed with diagnostic evaluation and confirmation.

  7. Chimeric enzymes with improved cellulase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Baker, John O; Himmel, Michael E

    2015-03-31

    Nucleic acid molecules encoding chimeric cellulase polypeptides that exhibit improved cellulase activities are disclosed herein. The chimeric cellulase polypeptides encoded by these nucleic acids and methods to produce the cellulases are also described, along with methods of using chimeric cellulases for the conversion of cellulose to sugars such as glucose.

  8. Liver transplantation : chimerism, complications and matrix metalloproteinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, Willem Rogier ten

    2011-01-01

    Chimerism after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the main focus of the studies described in this thesis. The first study showed that chimerism of different cell lineages within the liver graft does occur after OLT. Subsequently, in allogeneic blood stem cell recipients, chimerism was demons

  9. Placental chimerism in early human pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Halder

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background0 : Human chimerism is rare and usually uncovered through investigations of ambiguous genitalia or blood grouping or prenatal diagnosis. Most of the publications on placental chimerism are mainly case reports. There is no systematic search with sensitive techniques for placental chimerism in human. Aim0 : This study was aimed to asses placental chimerism through two sensitive molecular techniques i.e., interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative fluorescent PCR. Material and methods0 : Placental chimerism was analyzed using X & Y dual color fluorescent in-situ hybridization onto 154 placentae from natural conceptions, obtained at termination of pregnancy between 7 to 16 weeks of gestation. Results0 : Three cases of placental sex chromosome chimerism were observed (1.95%. Exclusion of maternal contamination and diagnosis was confirmed later by quantitative fluorescent PCR. Conclusion0 : This finding indicates that placental chimerism in early human pregnancy is not rare.

  10. Generation of chimeric rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Masahito; Sparman, Michelle; Ramsey, Cathy; Ma, Hong; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Penedo, Maria Cecilia T; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2012-01-20

    Totipotent cells in early embryos are progenitors of all stem cells and are capable of developing into a whole organism, including extraembryonic tissues such as placenta. Pluripotent cells in the inner cell mass (ICM) are the descendants of totipotent cells and can differentiate into any cell type of a body except extraembryonic tissues. The ability to contribute to chimeric animals upon reintroduction into host embryos is the key feature of murine totipotent and pluripotent cells. Here, we demonstrate that rhesus monkey embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and isolated ICMs fail to incorporate into host embryos and develop into chimeras. However, chimeric offspring were produced following aggregation of totipotent cells of the four-cell embryos. These results provide insights into the species-specific nature of primate embryos and suggest that a chimera assay using pluripotent cells may not be feasible.

  11. Progress in Chimeric Vector and Chimeric Gene Based Cardiovascular Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Chun-Song; YOON Young-sup; ISNER Jeffrey M.; LOSORDO Douglas W.

    2003-01-01

    Gene therapy for cardiovascular diseases has developed from preliminary animal experiments to clinical trials. However, vectors and target genes used currently in gene therapy are mainly focused on viral, nonviral vector and single target gene or monogene. Each vector system has a series of advantages and limitations. Chimeric vectors which combine the advantages of viral and nonviral vector,chimeric target genes which combine two or more target genes and novel gene delivery modes are being developed. In this article, we summarized the progress in chimeric vectors and chimeric genes based cardiovascular gene therapy, which including proliferative or occlusive vascular diseases such as atheroslerosis and restenosis, hypertonic vascular disease such as hypertension and cardiac diseases such as myocardium ischemia, dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure, even heart transplantation. The development of chimeric vector, chimeric gene and their cardiovascular gene therapy is promising.

  12. Manufacture of diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, T Y; Markert, C L

    1980-01-01

    Tetraploid mouse embryos were produced by cytochalasin B treatment. These embryos usually die before completion of embryonic development and are abnormal morphologically and physiologically. The tetraploid embryos can be rescued to develop to maturity by aggregating them with normal diploid embryos to produce diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice. The diploid/tetraploid chimeric embryos are frequently abnormal: the larger the proportion of tetraploid cells, the greater the abnormality. By karyotyp...

  13. Chimerism and xenotransplantation. New concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzl, T E; Rao, A S; Murase, N; Demetris, A J; Thomson, A; Fung, J J

    1999-02-01

    In both transplant and infectious circumstances, the immune response is governed by migration and localization of the antigen. If the antigenic epitopes of transgenic xenografts are sufficiently altered to avoid evoking the destructive force of innate immunity, the mechanisms of engraftment should be the same as those that permit the chimerism-dependent immunologic confrontation and resolution that is the basis of allograft acceptance. In addition to "humanizing" the epitopes, one of the unanswered questions is whether the species restriction of complement described in 1994 by Valdivia and colleagues also necessitates the introduction of human complement regulatory genes in animal donors. Because the liver is the principal or sole source of most complement components, the complement quickly is transformed to that of the donor after hepatic transplantation. Thus, the need for complementary regulatory transgenes may vary according to the kind of xenograft used. Much evidence shows that physiologically important peptides produced by xenografts (e.g., insulin, clotting factors, and enzymes) are incorporated into the metabolic machinery of the recipient body. To the extent that this is not true, xenotransplantation could result in the production of diseases that are analogous to inborn errors of metabolism. In the climate of pessimism that followed the failures of baboon to human liver xenotransplantation in 1992-1993, it seemed inconceivable that the use of even more discordant donors, such as the pig, could ever be seriously entertained; however, this preceded insight into the xenogeneic and allogeneic barriers that has brought transplantation infectious immunity to common ground. With this new insight and the increasing ease of producing transgenic donors, the goal of clinical xenotransplantation may not be so distant.

  14. Chimerism in health, transplantation and autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Marije; Kremer Hovinga, Idske Cornelia Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The term “chimerism” originates from Greek mythology and refers to the creature Chimaera, whose body was in front a lion, the back a serpent and the midsection a goat. In medicine, the term chimerism refers to an individual, organ or part consisting of tissues of diverse genetic constitution. Pregna

  15. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of a novel chimeric pestivirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Reimann, Ilona

    2007-01-01

    A chimeric pestivirus of border disease virus Gifhorn and bovine viral diarrhea virus CP7 (Meyers et al., 1996) was constructed. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of the chimeric virus were studied in a vaccination–challenge experiment in pigs. The chimeric virus proved to be aviru......A chimeric pestivirus of border disease virus Gifhorn and bovine viral diarrhea virus CP7 (Meyers et al., 1996) was constructed. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of the chimeric virus were studied in a vaccination–challenge experiment in pigs. The chimeric virus proved...... to be avirulent and neither chimeric virus nor viral RNA was detected in serum after vaccination. The safety of the vaccine was tested by horizontal transmission to sentinel pigs, which remained uninfected. The vaccine efficacy was examined by challenge infection with classical swine fever virus (CSFV) Eystrup......' and horizontal transmission of challenge virus to sentinel pigs was not observed. A supplementary figure is available in JGV Online...

  16. Regional atmospheric composition modeling with CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menut, L.; Bessagnet, B.; Khvorostyanov, D.; Beekmann, M.; Colette, A.; Coll, I.; Curci, G.; Foret, G.; Hodzic, A.; Mailler, S.; Meleux, F.; Monge, J.-L.; Pison, I.; Turquety, S.; Valari, M.; Vautard, R.; Vivanco, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources), stagnant meteorological conditions, velocity and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative importance to the pollutants budgets can be quantified within a chemistry-transport models (CTM). The offline CTM CHIMERE model uses meteorological model fields and emissions fluxes and calculates deterministically their behavior in the troposphere. The calculated three-dimensional fields of chemical concentrations can be compared to measurements to analyze past periods or used to make air quality forecasts and CHIMERE has enabled a fine understanding of pollutants transport during numerous measurements campaigns. It is a part of the PREVAIR french national forecast platform, delivering pollutant concentrations up to three days in advance. The model also allows scenario studies and long term simulations for pollution trends. The modelling of photochemical air pollution has reached a good level of maturity, and the latest projects involving CHIMERE now aim at increasing our understanding of pollution impact on health at the urban scale or at the other end of the spectrum for long term air quality and climate change interlinkage studies, quantifying the emissions and transport of pollen, but also, at a larger scale, analyzing the transport of pollutants plumes emitted by volcanic eruptions and forest fires.

  17. Regional atmospheric composition modeling with CHIMERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Menut

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources, stagnant meteorological conditions, velocity and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative importance to the pollutants budgets can be quantified within a chemistry-transport models (CTM. The offline CTM CHIMERE model uses meteorological model fields and emissions fluxes and calculates deterministically their behavior in the troposphere. The calculated three-dimensional fields of chemical concentrations can be compared to measurements to analyze past periods or used to make air quality forecasts and CHIMERE has enabled a fine understanding of pollutants transport during numerous measurements campaigns. It is a part of the PREVAIR french national forecast platform, delivering pollutant concentrations up to three days in advance. The model also allows scenario studies and long term simulations for pollution trends. The modelling of photochemical air pollution has reached a good level of maturity, and the latest projects involving CHIMERE now aim at increasing our understanding of pollution impact on health at the urban scale or at the other end of the spectrum for long term air quality and climate change interlinkage studies, quantifying the emissions and transport of pollen, but also, at a larger scale, analyzing the transport of pollutants plumes emitted by volcanic eruptions and forest fires.

  18. Pregnancy, chimerism and lupus nephritis: a multi-centre study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovinga, I.C. Kremer; Koopmans, M.; Grootscholten, C.; Wal, A.M. van der; Bijl, M. van der; Derksen, R.H.; Voskuyl, A.E.; Heer, E. de; Bruijn, J.A.; Berden, J.H.M.; Bajema, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    Chimerism occurs twice as often in the kidneys of women with lupus nephritis as in normal kidneys and may be involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Pregnancy is considered the most important source of chimerism, but the exact relationship between pregnancy, the persistence of

  19. Pregnancy, chimerism and lupus nephritis : a multi-centre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovinga, I. C. L. Kremer; Koopmans, M.; Grootscholten, C.; van der Wal, A. M.; Bijl, M.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.; Voslcuyl, A. E.; de Heer, E.; Bruijn, J. A.; Berden, J. H. M.; Rajema, I. M.

    2008-01-01

    Chimerism occurs twice as often in the kidneys of women with lupus nephritis as in normal kidneys and may he involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Pregnancy is considered the most important source of chimerism, but the exact relationship between pregnancy, the persistence of

  20. Interspecies Chimerism with Mammalian Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Platero-Luengo, Aida; Sakurai, Masahiro; Sugawara, Atsushi; Gil, Maria Antonia; Yamauchi, Takayoshi; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Bogliotti, Yanina Soledad; Cuello, Cristina; Morales Valencia, Mariana; Okumura, Daiji; Luo, Jingping; Vilariño, Marcela; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Soto, Delia Alba; Martinez, Cristina A; Hishida, Tomoaki; Sánchez-Bautista, Sonia; Martinez-Martinez, M Llanos; Wang, Huili; Nohalez, Alicia; Aizawa, Emi; Martinez-Redondo, Paloma; Ocampo, Alejandro; Reddy, Pradeep; Roca, Jordi; Maga, Elizabeth A; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Berggren, W Travis; Nuñez Delicado, Estrella; Lajara, Jeronimo; Guillen, Isabel; Guillen, Pedro; Campistol, Josep M; Martinez, Emilio A; Ross, Pablo Juan; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-26

    Interspecies blastocyst complementation enables organ-specific enrichment of xenogenic pluripotent stem cell (PSC) derivatives. Here, we establish a versatile blastocyst complementation platform based on CRISPR-Cas9-mediated zygote genome editing and show enrichment of rat PSC-derivatives in several tissues of gene-edited organogenesis-disabled mice. Besides gaining insights into species evolution, embryogenesis, and human disease, interspecies blastocyst complementation might allow human organ generation in animals whose organ size, anatomy, and physiology are closer to humans. To date, however, whether human PSCs (hPSCs) can contribute to chimera formation in non-rodent species remains unknown. We systematically evaluate the chimeric competency of several types of hPSCs using a more diversified clade of mammals, the ungulates. We find that naïve hPSCs robustly engraft in both pig and cattle pre-implantation blastocysts but show limited contribution to post-implantation pig embryos. Instead, an intermediate hPSC type exhibits higher degree of chimerism and is able to generate differentiated progenies in post-implantation pig embryos.

  1. Vectors expressing chimeric Japanese encephalitis dengue 2 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y; Wang, S; Wang, X

    2014-01-01

    Vectors based on self-replicating RNAs (replicons) of flaviviruses are becoming powerful tool for expression of heterologous genes in mammalian cells and development of novel antiviral and anticancer vaccines. We constructed two vectors expressing chimeric viruses consisting of attenuated SA14-14-2 strain of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in which the PrM/M-E genes were replaced fully or partially with those of dengue 2 virus (DENV-2). These vectors, named pJED2 and pJED2-1770 were transfected to BHK-21 cells and produced chimeric viruses JED2V and JED2-1770V, respectively. The chimeric viruses could be passaged in C6/36 but not BHK-21 cells. The chimeric viruses produced in C6/36 cells CPE 4-5 days after infection and RT-PCR, sequencing, immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blot analysis confirmed the chimeric nature of produced viruses. The immunogenicity of chimeric viruses in mice was proved by detecting DENV-2 E protein-specific serum IgG antibodies with neutralization titer of 10. Successful preparation of infectious clones of chimeric JEV-DENV-2 viruses showed that JEV-based expression vectors are fully functional.

  2. chimeraviz: a tool for visualizing chimeric RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lågstad, Stian; Zhao, Sen; Hoff, Andreas M; Johannessen, Bjarne; Lingjærde, Ole Christian; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2017-09-15

    Advances in high-throughput RNA sequencing have enabled more efficient detection of fusion transcripts, but the technology and associated software used for fusion detection from sequencing data often yield a high false discovery rate. Good prioritization of the results is important, and this can be helped by a visualization framework that automatically integrates RNA data with known genomic features. Here we present chimeraviz , a Bioconductor package that automates the creation of chimeric RNA visualizations. The package supports input from nine different fusion-finder tools: deFuse, EricScript, InFusion, JAFFA, FusionCatcher, FusionMap, PRADA, SOAPfuse and STAR-FUSION. chimeraviz is an R package available via Bioconductor ( https://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/chimeraviz.html ) under Artistic-2.0. Source code and support is available at GitHub ( https://github.com/stianlagstad/chimeraviz ). rolf.i.skotheim@rr-research.no. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  3. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of a novel chimeric pestivirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Reimann, Ilona

    2007-01-01

    A chimeric pestivirus of border disease virus Gifhorn and bovine viral diarrhea virus CP7 (Meyers et al., 1996) was constructed. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of the chimeric virus were studied in a vaccination–challenge experiment in pigs. The chimeric virus proved...... to be avirulent and neither chimeric virus nor viral RNA was detected in serum after vaccination. The safety of the vaccine was tested by horizontal transmission to sentinel pigs, which remained uninfected. The vaccine efficacy was examined by challenge infection with classical swine fever virus (CSFV) Eystrup....... In ‘challenge controls’, the viral load of CSFV coincided with the development of pronounced clinical symptoms. In contrast, the vaccinated pigs showed transient and weak clinical signs. Analysis of the viral load in these pigs showed 1000-fold lower viral RNA levels compared to ‘challenge controls...

  4. Chimeric alignment by dynamic programming: Algorithm and biological uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsoulis, G.A.; Waterman, M.S. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    A new nearest-neighbor method for detecting chimeric 16S rRNA artifacts generated during PCR amplification from mixed populations has been developed. The method uses dynamic programming to generate an optimal chimeric alignment, defined as the highest scoring alignment between a query and a concatenation of a 5{prime} and a 3{prime} segment from two separate entries from a database of related sequences. Chimeras are detected by studying the scores and form of the chimeric and global sequence alignments. The chimeric alignment method was found to be marginally more effective than k-tuple based nearest-neighbor methods in simulation studies, but its most effective use is in concert with k-tuple methods. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. T- and B-lymphocyte chimerism in the marmoset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niblack, G.D.; Kateley, J.R.; Gengozian, N.

    1977-01-01

    Marmosets are natural blood chimeras, this condition resulting from the high frequency of fraternal twinning and the consistent development of placental vascular anastomoses between the two embryos. Identification of chimerism by sex-chromosome analysis of cultured blood lymphocytes provided a means of determining the proportion of chimerism among T and B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were enriched for T or B cells by filtration through a nylon column (yields >95% T-cells) or inactivation of T lymphocytes by treatment with a goat anti-marmoset thymocyte antiserum in the presence of complement (yields >95% B cells). Mitogenic stimulation of these separated, enriched cell populations yielded metaphase plates which could be scored for percentage male and female cells. Tests on five different blood chimeras showed the T- and B-lymphocyte chimerism to be the same. Stimulation of blood lymphocytes with cells from another species of marmoset in a mixed lymphocyte culture test revealed the chimeric T-cell response (i.e., host and co-twin cells) to be similar to that obtained with a mitogenic lectin. The demonstration of equivalent T- and B-cell chimerism in these animals suggests derivation of these cells from a common stem cell pool and the response of both T-cell populations to an antigenic stimulus in proportions similar to their percentage chimerism suggests complete immunologic tolerance exists in this species for co-twin histocompatibility antigens.

  6. Chimeric mitochondrial peptides from contiguous regular and swinger RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Seligmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous mass spectrometry analyses described human mitochondrial peptides entirely translated from swinger RNAs, RNAs where polymerization systematically exchanged nucleotides. Exchanges follow one among 23 bijective transformation rules, nine symmetric exchanges (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C and fourteen asymmetric exchanges (X → Y → Z → X, e.g. A → C → G → A, multiplying by 24 DNA's protein coding potential. Abrupt switches from regular to swinger polymerization produce chimeric RNAs. Here, human mitochondrial proteomic analyses assuming abrupt switches between regular and swinger transcriptions, detect chimeric peptides, encoded by part regular, part swinger RNA. Contiguous regular- and swinger-encoded residues within single peptides are stronger evidence for translation of swinger RNA than previously detected, entirely swinger-encoded peptides: regular parts are positive controls matched with contiguous swinger parts, increasing confidence in results. Chimeric peptides are 200× rarer than swinger peptides (3/100,000 versus 6/1000. Among 186 peptides with >8 residues for each regular and swinger parts, regular parts of eleven chimeric peptides correspond to six among the thirteen recognized, mitochondrial protein-coding genes. Chimeric peptides matching partly regular proteins are rarer and less expressed than chimeric peptides matching non-coding sequences, suggesting targeted degradation of misfolded proteins. Present results strengthen hypotheses that the short mitogenome encodes far more proteins than hitherto assumed. Entirely swinger-encoded proteins could exist.

  7. Chimeric mitochondrial peptides from contiguous regular and swinger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Previous mass spectrometry analyses described human mitochondrial peptides entirely translated from swinger RNAs, RNAs where polymerization systematically exchanged nucleotides. Exchanges follow one among 23 bijective transformation rules, nine symmetric exchanges (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C) and fourteen asymmetric exchanges (X → Y → Z → X, e.g. A → C → G → A), multiplying by 24 DNA's protein coding potential. Abrupt switches from regular to swinger polymerization produce chimeric RNAs. Here, human mitochondrial proteomic analyses assuming abrupt switches between regular and swinger transcriptions, detect chimeric peptides, encoded by part regular, part swinger RNA. Contiguous regular- and swinger-encoded residues within single peptides are stronger evidence for translation of swinger RNA than previously detected, entirely swinger-encoded peptides: regular parts are positive controls matched with contiguous swinger parts, increasing confidence in results. Chimeric peptides are 200 × rarer than swinger peptides (3/100,000 versus 6/1000). Among 186 peptides with > 8 residues for each regular and swinger parts, regular parts of eleven chimeric peptides correspond to six among the thirteen recognized, mitochondrial protein-coding genes. Chimeric peptides matching partly regular proteins are rarer and less expressed than chimeric peptides matching non-coding sequences, suggesting targeted degradation of misfolded proteins. Present results strengthen hypotheses that the short mitogenome encodes far more proteins than hitherto assumed. Entirely swinger-encoded proteins could exist.

  8. Quantification of mixed chimerism allows early therapeutic interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jóice Merzoni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the curative option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome; however, it requires a long post-transplantation follow-up. A 53-year-old woman with a diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome underwent related donor allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in July 2006. Three months after transplantation, a comparative short tandem repeat analysis between donor and recipient revealed full chimerism, indicating complete, healthy bone marrow reconstitution. Three years and ten months after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the patient developed leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. Another short tandem repeat analysis was carried out which showed mixed chimerism (52.62%, indicating relapsed disease. A donor lymphocyte infusion was administered. The purpose of donor lymphocyte infusion is to induce a graft-versus-leukemia effect; in fact, this donor's lymphocyte infusion induced full chimerism. Successive short tandem repeat analyses were performed as part of post-transplantation follow-up, and in July 2010, one such analysis again showed mixed chimerism (64.25%. Based on this finding, a second donor lymphocyte infusion was administered, but failed to eradicate the disease. In September 2011, the patient presented with relapsed disease, and a second related donor allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was performed. Subsequent short tandem repeat analyses revealed full chimerism, indicating complete bone marrow reconstitution. We conclude that quantitative detection of mixed chimerism is an important diagnostic tool that can guide early therapeutic intervention.

  9. Generating chimeric zebrafish embryos by transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Hilary A; Carmany-Rampey, Amanda; Moens, Cecilia

    2009-07-17

    One of the most powerful tools used to gain insight into complex developmental processes is the analysis of chimeric embryos. A chimera is defined as an organism that contains cells from more than one animal; mosaics are one type of chimera in which cells from more than one genotype are mixed, usually wild-type and mutant. In the zebrafish, chimeras can be readily made by transplantation of cells from a donor embryo into a host embryo at the appropriate embryonic stage. Labeled donor cells are generated by injection of a lineage marker, such as a fluorescent dye, into the one-cell stage embryo. Labeled donor cells are removed from donor embryos and introduced into unlabeled host embryos using an oil-controlled glass pipette mounted on either a compound or dissecting microscope. Donor cells can in some cases be targeted to a specific region or tissue of the developing blastula or gastrula stage host embryo by choosing a transplantation site in the host embryo based on well-established fate maps.

  10. Transplantation of GFP-expressing blastomeres for live imaging of retinal and brain development in chimeric zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian; Wei, Xiangyun

    2010-07-19

    Cells change extensively in their locations and property during embryogenesis. These changes are regulated by the interactions between the cells and their environment. Chimeric embryos, which are composed of cells of different genetic background, are great tools to study the cell-cell interactions mediated by genes of interest. The embryonic transparency of zebrafish at early developmental stages permits direct visualization of the morphogenesis of tissues and organs at the cellular level. Here, we demonstrate a protocol to generate chimeric retinas and brains in zebrafish embryos and to perform live imaging of the donor cells. The protocol covers the preparation of transplantation needles, the transplantation of GFP-expressing donor blastomeres to GFP-negative hosts, and the examination of donor cell behavior under live confocal microscopy. With slight modifications, this protocol can also be used to study the embryonic development of other tissues and organs in zebrafish. The advantages of using GFP to label donor cells are also discussed.

  11. Mice with chimeric livers are an improved model for human lipoprotein metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa C S Ellis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Rodents are poor model for human hyperlipidemias because total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels are very low on a normal diet. Lipoprotein metabolism is primarily regulated by hepatocytes and we therefore assessed whether chimeric mice extensively repopulated with human cells can model human lipid and bile acid metabolism. DESIGN: FRG [ F ah(-/- R ag2(-/-Il2r g (-/-] mice were repopulated with primary human hepatocytes. Serum lipoprotein lipid composition and distribution (VLDL, LDL, and HDL was analyzed by size exclusion chromatography. Bile was analyzed by LC-MS or by GC-MS. RNA expression levels were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. RESULTS: Chimeric mice displayed increased LDL and VLDL fractions and a lower HDL fraction compared to wild type, thus significantly shifting the ratio of LDL/HDL towards a human profile. Bile acid analysis revealed a human-like pattern with high amounts of cholic acid and deoxycholic acid (DCA. Control mice had only taurine-conjugated bile acids as expcted, but highly repopulated mice had glycine-conjugated cholic acid as found in human bile. RNA levels of human genes involved in bile acid synthesis including CYP7A1, and CYP27A1 were significantly upregulated as compared to human control liver. However, administration of recombinant hFGF19 restored human CYP7A1 levels to normal. CONCLUSION: Humanized-liver mice showed a typical human lipoprotein profile with LDL as the predominant lipoprotein fraction even on a normal diet. The bile acid profile confirmed presence of an intact enterohepatic circulation. Although bile acid synthesis was deregulated in this model, this could be fully normalized by FGF19 administration. Taken together these data indicate that chimeric FRG-mice are a useful new model for human lipoprotein and bile-acid metabolism.

  12. Developmental competence of porcine chimeric embryos produced by aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Juan; Jakobsen, Jannik E.; Xiong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare the developmental competence and blastomere allocation of porcine chimeric embryos formed by micro-well aggregation. Chimeras were created by aggregating either two blastomeres originating from 2-cell embryos or two whole embryos, where embryos were produced...... either by parthenogenetic activation (PA) or handmade cloning (HMC). Results showed that the developmental competence of chimeric embryos, evaluated based on their blastocyst rate and total cell number per blastocyst, was increased when two whole 2-cell stage embryos (PA or HMC) were aggregated....... In comparison, when two blastomeres were aggregated, the developmental competence of the chimeric embryos decreased if the blastomeres were either from PA or from HMC embryos, but not if they were from different sources, i.e. one PA and one HMC blastomere. To evaluate the cell contribution in embryo formation...

  13. Developmental competence of porcine chimeric embryos produced by aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Juan; Jakobsen, Jannik E.; Xiong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare the developmental competence and blastomere allocation of porcine chimeric embryos formed by micro-well aggregation. Chimeras were created by aggregating either two blastomeres originating from 2-cell embryos or two whole embryos, where embryos were produced...... either by parthenogenetic activation (PA) or handmade cloning (HMC). Results showed that the developmental competence of chimeric embryos, evaluated based on their blastocyst rate and total cell number per blastocyst, was increased when two whole 2-cell stage embryos (PA or HMC) were aggregated....... In comparison, when two blastomeres were aggregated, the developmental competence of the chimeric embryos decreased if the blastomeres were either from PA or from HMC embryos, but not if they were from different sources, i.e. one PA and one HMC blastomere. To evaluate the cell contribution in embryo formation...

  14. Systematic evaluation of atmospheric chemistry-transport model CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvorostyanov, Dmitry; Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Siour, Guillaume; Couvidat, Florian; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Turquety, Solene

    2017-04-01

    Regional-scale atmospheric chemistry-transport models (CTM) are used to develop air quality regulatory measures, to support environmentally sensitive decisions in the industry, and to address variety of scientific questions involving the atmospheric composition. Model performance evaluation with measurement data is critical to understand their limits and the degree of confidence in model results. CHIMERE CTM (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/) is a French national tool for operational forecast and decision support and is widely used in the international research community in various areas of atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, and environment (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/CW-articles.php). This work presents the model evaluation framework applied systematically to the new CHIMERE CTM versions in the course of the continuous model development. The framework uses three of the four CTM evaluation types identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS): operational, diagnostic, and dynamic. It allows to compare the overall model performance in subsequent model versions (operational evaluation), identify specific processes and/or model inputs that could be improved (diagnostic evaluation), and test the model sensitivity to the changes in air quality, such as emission reductions and meteorological events (dynamic evaluation). The observation datasets currently used for the evaluation are: EMEP (surface concentrations), AERONET (optical depths), and WOUDC (ozone sounding profiles). The framework is implemented as an automated processing chain and allows interactive exploration of the results via a web interface.

  15. Chimera: construction of chimeric sequences for phylogenetic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leunissen, J.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Chimera allows the construction of chimeric protein or nucleic acid sequence files by concatenating sequences from two or more sequence files in PHYLIP formats. It allows the user to interactively select genes and species from the input files. The concatenated result is stored to one single output

  16. Developmental competence of porcine chimeric embryos produced by aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Juan; Jakobsen, Jannik E.; Xiong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare the developmental competence and blastomere allocation of porcine chimeric embryos formed by micro-well aggregation. Chimeras were created by aggregating either two blastomeres originating from 2-cell embryos or two whole embryos, where embryos were produced...

  17. Blood chimerism in dizygotic monochorionic twins during five years observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Hansen, Morten Høgh; Haedersdal, Sofie

    2017-01-01

    and again at five years. We found an increase in the proportion of allogeneic cells from 63% to 89% in one twin, and a similar increase in autologous cells in the other twin from 57% to 84%. A paradigm for stem cell therapy could be modelled on this case: induction of tolerance and chimerism by antenatal...

  18. CONSTRUCTION AND EXPRESSION OF A HUMAN-MOUSE CHIMERIC ANTIBODY AGAINST HUMAN BLADDER CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白银; 王琰; 周丽君; 俞莉章

    2001-01-01

    To construct and express a human-mouse chimeric antibody against human bladder cancer. Method: The variable region genes of anti-human bladder cancer monoclonal antibody BDI-1 were cloned by RT-PCR. A human-mouse chimeric antibody expression vector was constructed and transfected into CHO cells. The chimeric antibody against bladder cancer was expressed and characterized. Result: Eukaryotic expression vector of the chimeric antibody against human bladder carcinoma was successfully constructed, and was expressed in eukaryotic cells; the expressed chimeric antibody ch-BDI showed same specificity as its parent McAb against human bladder cancer cells. Conclusion: The constructed chimeric antibody was expressed successfully in eukaryotic cells, and the chimeric antibody had desired affinity against human bladder cancer cells.

  19. Assessment of chimeric mice with humanized livers in new drug development: generation of pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity data for selecting the final candidate compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Hidetaka; Ito, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    1. Chimeric mice with humanized livers are expected to be a novel tool for new drug development. This review discusses four applications where these animals can be used efficiently to collect supportive data for selecting the best compound in the final stage of drug discovery. 2. The first application is selection of the final compound based on estimated pharmacokinetic parameters in humans. Since chimeric mouse livers are highly repopulated with human hepatocytes, hepatic clearance values in vivo could be used preferentially to estimate pharmacokinetic profiles for humans. 3. The second is prediction of human-specific or disproportionate metabolites. Chimeric mice reproduce human-specific metabolites of drugs under development to conform to ICH guidance M3(R2), except for compounds that were extensively eliminated by co-existing mouse hepatocytes. 4. The third is identifying metabolites with distinct pharmacokinetic profiles in humans. Slow metabolite elimination specifically in humans increases its exposure level, but if its elimination is faster in laboratory animals, the animal exposure level might not satisfy ICH guidance M3(R2). 5. Finally, two examples of reproducing acute liver toxicity in chimeric mice are introduced. Integrated pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity information are expected to assist pharmaceutical scientists in selecting the best candidate compound in new drug development.

  20. Nonallelic homologous recombination of the FCGR2/3 locus results in copy number variation and novel chimeric FCGR2 genes with aberrant functional expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelkerke, S Q; Tacke, C E; Breunis, W B; Geissler, J; Sins, J W R; Appelhof, B; van den Berg, T K; de Boer, M; Kuijpers, T W

    2015-09-01

    The human FCGR2/3 locus, containing five highly homologous genes encoding the major IgG receptors, shows extensive copy number variation (CNV) associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. Having genotyped >4000 individuals, we show that all CNV at this locus can be explained by nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) of the two paralogous repeats that constitute the majority of the locus, and describe four distinct CNV regions (CNRs) with a highly variable prevalence in the population. Apart from CNV, NAHR events also created several hitherto unidentified chimeric FCGR2 genes. These include an FCGR2A/2C chimeric gene that causes a decreased expression of FcγRIIa on phagocytes, resulting in a decreased production of reactive oxygen species in response to immune complexes, compared with wild-type FCGR2A. Conversely, FCGR2C/2A chimeric genes were identified to lead to an increased expression of FCGR2C. Finally, a rare FCGR2B null-variant allele was found, in which a polymorphic stop codon of FCGR2C is introduced into one FCGR2B gene, resulting in a 50% reduction in protein expression. Our study on CNRs and the chimeric genes is essential for the correct interpretation of association studies on FCGR genes as a determinant for disease susceptibility, and may explain some as yet unidentified extreme phenotypes of immune-mediated disease.

  1. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric detection of multiplex single base extended primers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Børsting, Claus;

    2004-01-01

    One of the most promising techniques for typing of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is detection of single base extension primers (SBE) by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). We present a new MALDI-TOF MS protocol for typing...... triethylamine purification. The biotin-labeled ddNTPs contained linkers with different masses ensuring a clear separation of the alleles even for SBE primers with a mass of 10 300 Da. Furthermore, only 25-350 fmol of SBE primers were necessary in order to obtain reproducible MALDI-TOF spectra. Similar signal......, and the potential use of MALDI-TOF MS for SNP typing is discussed....

  2. High affinity mouse-human chimeric Fab against Hepatitis B surface antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biplab Bose; Navin Khanna; Subrat K Acharya; Subrata Sinha

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Passive immunotherapy using antibody against hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) has been advocated in certain cases of Hepatitis B infection. We had earlier reported on the cloning and expression of a high affinity scFv derived from a mouse monoclonal (5S) against HBsAg. However this mouse antibody cannot be used for therapeutic purposes as it may elicit anti-mouse immune responses. Chimerization by replacing mouse constant domains with human ones can reduce the immunogenicity of this antibody.METHODS: We cloned the VH and VL genes of this mouse antibody; and fused them with CH1 domain of human IgG1 and CL domain of human kappa chain respectively. These chimeric genes were cloned into a phagemid vector. After initial screening using the phage display system, the chimeric Fab was expressed in soluble form in E. Coli.RESULTS: The chimeric Fab was purified from the bacterial periplasmic extract. We characterized the chimeric Fab using several in vitro techniques and it was observed that the chimeric molecule retained the high affinity and specificity of the original mouse monoclonal.This chimeric antibody fragment was further expressed in different strains of E> coli to increase the yield.CONCLUSION: We have generated a mouse-human chimeric Fab against HBsAg without any significant loss in binding and epitope specificity. This chimeric Fab fragment can be further modified to generate a fulllength chimeric antibody for therapeutic uses.

  3. An E2-Substituted Chimeric Pestivirus With DIVA Vaccine Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Nielsen, Jens

    An advantage of the use of chimeric pestiviruses as modified live vaccines against classical swine fever (CSF) resides in their capacity to be manipulated to achieve the characteristics desired for safe and efficacious DIVA vaccines. We have recently generated a new chimeric virus, Riems26_E2gif...... engineered specifically for this purpose. The E2-substituted Riems26_E2gif was derived by homologues recombination of the complete E2 protein encoding genome region from Border disease strain Gifhorn into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) harbouring the genome of the CSFV vaccine strain C......-Riems. The virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of Riems26_E2gif were tested in a vaccine-challenge experiment in pigs. Riems26_E2gif vaccinated pigs could be differentiated from infected pigs using a CSFV-E2 specific ELISA. Following challenge infection with highly virulent CSFV strain Koslov, all...

  4. Blood Chimerism in Dizygotic Monochorionic Twins During 5 Years Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziegiel, M H; Hansen, M H; Haedersdal, S; Barrett, A N; Rieneck, K; Main, K M; Hansen, A T; Clausen, F B

    2017-04-19

    Dizygotic monochorionic twin pregnancies can result in blood chimerism due to in utero twin-to-twin exchange of stem cells. In this case, we examined the proportion of allogeneic red blood cells by flow cytometry and the proportion of allogeneic nucleated cells by digital polymerase chain reaction at 7 months and again at 5 years. We found an increase in the proportion of allogeneic cells from 63% to 89% in one twin, and a similar increase in autologous cells in the other twin from 57% to 84%. A paradigm for stem cell therapy could be modeled on this case: induction of tolerance and chimerism by antenatal transfusion of donor stem cells. The procedure would hold the promise of transplantation and tolerance induction without myeloablative conditioning for inheritable benign hematological diseases such as sickle cell disease and thalassemia. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  5. Birth of two chimeric genes in the Hominidae lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courseaux, A; Nahon, J L

    2001-02-16

    How genes with newly characterized functions originate remains a fundamental question. PMCHL1 and PMCHL2, two chimeric genes derived from the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) gene, offer an opportunity to examine such an issue in the human lineage. Detailed structural, expression, and phylogenetic analysis showed that the PMCHL1 gene was created near 25 million years ago (Ma) by a complex mechanism of exon shuffling through retrotransposition of an antisense MCH messenger RNA coupled to de novo creation of splice sites. PMCHL2 arose 5 to 10 Ma by an event of duplication involving a large chromosomal region encompassing the PMCHL1 locus. The RNA expression patterns of those chimeric genes suggest that they have been submitted to strong regulatory constraints during primate evolution.

  6. Mechanisms of Tolerance Induction by Hematopoietic Chimerism: The Immune Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolcu, Esma S; Shirwan, Haval; Askenasy, Nadir

    2017-03-01

    Hematopoietic chimerism is one of the effective approaches to induce tolerance to donor-derived tissue and organ grafts without administration of life-long immunosuppressive therapy. Although experimental efforts to develop such regimens have been ongoing for decades, substantial cumulative toxicity of combined hematopoietic and tissue transplants precludes wide clinical implementation. Tolerance is an active immunological process that includes both peripheral and central mechanisms of mutual education of coresident donor and host immune systems. The major stages include sequential suppression of early alloreactivity, establishment of hematopoietic chimerism and suppressor cells that sustain the state of tolerance, with significant mechanistic and temporal overlap along the tolerization process. Efforts to devise less toxic transplant strategies by reduction of preparatory conditioning focus on modulation rather than deletion of residual host immunity and early reinstitution of regulatory subsets at the central and peripheral levels. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:700-712.

  7. Single base pair mutation analysis by PNA directed PCR clamping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, H.; Nielsen, P.E.; Egholm, M.

    1993-01-01

    A novel method that allows direct analysis of single base mutation by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is described. The method utilizes the finding that PNAs (peptide nucleic acids) recognize and bind to their complementary nucleic acid sequences with higher thermal stability and specificity...... than the corresponding deoxyribooligonucleotides and that they cannot function as primers for DNA polymerases. We show that a PNA/DNA complex can effectively block the formation of a PCR product when the PNA is targeted against one of the PCR primer sites. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this blockage...... allows selective amplification/suppression of target sequences that differ by only one base pair. Finally we show that PNAs can be designed in such a way that blockage can be accomplished when the PNA target sequence is located between the PCR primers....

  8. Chimeric Amino Acid Rearrangements as Immune Targets in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    minimum of one chimeric transcript containing a coding region breakpoint (range of 1-13). For this class of fusions, translation and proteome alignment...patients and contained a predicted HLA*02:01 restricted epitope. In vitro, we identified T cells from healthy donor peripheral blood that recognizes...low frequency. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Next generation sequencing, T cell immunotherapy, mutations, neoantigens, prostate cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

  9. Novel nanocomposites from spider silk–silica fusion (chimeric) proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Wong Po Foo, Cheryl; Patwardhan, Siddharth V.; Belton, David J.; Kitchel, Brandon; Anastasiades, Daphne; Huang, Jia; Naik, Rajesh R.; Perry, Carole C.; Kaplan, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Silica skeletal architectures in diatoms are characterized by remarkable morphological and nanostructural details. Silk proteins from spiders and silkworms form strong and intricate self-assembling fibrous biomaterials in nature. We combined the features of silk with biosilica through the design, synthesis, and characterization of a novel family of chimeric proteins for subsequent use in model materials forming reactions. The domains from the major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) protein of Neph...

  10. Chimeric creatures in Greek mythology and reflections in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazopoulou-Kyrkanidou, E

    2001-04-15

    "The Chimaera" in Homer's Iliad, "was of divine stock, not of men, in the forepart a lion, in the hinder a serpent, and in the midst a goat, ellipsis Bellerophon slew her, trusting in the signs of the gods." In Hesiod's Theogony it is emphasized that "Chimaera ellipsis had three heads, one of a grim-eyed lion, another of a goat, and another of a snakeellipsis". In addition to this interspecies animal chimera, human/animal chimeras are referred to in Greek mythology, preeminent among them the Centaurs and the Minotaur. The Centaurs, as horse/men, first appear in Geometric and early Archaic art, but in the literature not until early in the fifth century B.C. The bullheaded-man Minotaur, who is not certainly attested in the literary evidence until circa 500 B.C., first appears in art about 650 B.C. Attempts, in the fourth century B.C. and thereafter, to rationalize their mythical appearance were in vain; their chimeric nature retained its fascinating and archetypal form over the centuries. Early in the 1980s, experimental sheep/goat chimeras were produced removing the reproductive barrier between these two animal species. Late in the 1990s, legal, political, ethical, and moral fights loomed over a patent bid on human/animal chimeras. Chimeric technology is recently developed; however, the concept of chimerism has existed in literary and artistic form in ancient mythology. This is yet another example where art and literature precede scientific research and development.

  11. Quadruple-component superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator (SCIP) flap: A chimeric SCIP flap for complex ankle reconstruction of an exposed artificial joint after total ankle arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Saito, Takafumi; Ishiura, Ryohei; Iida, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) is becoming popular in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated ankle joint degeneration. However, ankle wound complications can occur after TAA, which sometimes requires challenging reconstruction due to anatomical complexity of the ankle. Superficial circumflex iliac artery (SCIA) perforator (SCIP) flap has been reported to be useful for various reconstructions, but no case has been reported regarding a chimeric SCIP flap for complex ankle reconstruction. We report a case of complex ankle defect successfully reconstructed with a free quadruple-component chimeric SCIP flap. A 73-year-old female patient with RA underwent TAA, and suffered from an extensive ankle soft tissue defect (13 × 5 cm) with exposure of the implanted artificial joint and the extensor tendons. A chimeric SCIP flap was raised based on the deep branch and the superficial branch of the SCIA, which included chimeric portions of the sartorius muscle, the deep fascia, the inguinal lymph node (ILN), and the skin/fat. The flap was transferred to the recipient ankle. The sartorius muscle was used to cover the artificial joint, the deep fascia to reconstruct the extensor retinaculum, the ILN to prevent postoperative lymphedema, and the adiposal tissue to put around the extensor tendons for prevention of postoperative adhesion. Postoperatively, the patient could walk by herself without persistent leg edema or bowstringing of the extensor tendons, and was satisfied with the concealable donor scar. Although further studies are required to confirm efficacy, multicomponent chimeric SCIP has a potential to be a useful option for complex defects of the ankle.

  12. Rotavirus VP7 epitope chimeric proteins elicit cross-immunoreactivity in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bingxin; Zhao; Xiaoxia; Pan; Yumei; Teng; Wenyue; Xia; Jing; Wang; Yuling; Wen; Yuanding; Chen

    2015-01-01

    VP7 of group A rotavirus(RVA) contains major neutralizing epitopes. Using the antigenic protein VP6 as the vector, chimeric proteins carrying foreign epitopes have been shown to possess good immunoreactivity and immunogenicity. In the present study, using modified VP6 as the vector,three chimeric proteins carrying epitopes derived from VP7 of RVA were constructed. The results showed that the chimeric proteins reacted with anti-VP6 and with SA11 and Wa virus strains.Antibodies from guinea pigs inoculated with the chimeric proteins recognized VP6 and VP7 of RVA and protected mammalian cells from SA11 and Wa infection in vitro. The neutralizing activities of the antibodies against the chimeric proteins were significantly higher than those against the vector protein VP6 F. Thus, development of chimeric vaccines carrying VP7 epitopes using VP6 as a vector could be a promising alternative to enhance immunization against RVAs.

  13. Rotavirus VP7 epitope chimeric proteins elicit cross-immunoreactivity in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bingxin; Pan, Xiaoxia; Teng, Yumei; Xia, Wenyue; Wang, Jing; Wen, Yuling; Chen, Yuanding

    2015-10-01

    VP7 of group A rotavirus (RVA) contains major neutralizing epitopes. Using the antigenic protein VP6 as the vector, chimeric proteins carrying foreign epitopes have been shown to possess good immunoreactivity and immunogenicity. In the present study, using modified VP6 as the vector, three chimeric proteins carrying epitopes derived from VP7 of RVA were constructed. The results showed that the chimeric proteins reacted with anti-VP6 and with SA11 and Wa virus strains. Antibodies from guinea pigs inoculated with the chimeric proteins recognized VP6 and VP7 of RVA and protected mammalian cells from SA11 and Wa infection in vitro. The neutralizing activities of the antibodies against the chimeric proteins were significantly higher than those against the vector protein VP6F. Thus, development of chimeric vaccines carrying VP7 epitopes using VP6 as a vector could be a promising alternative to enhance immunization against RVAs.

  14. Thionin-D4E1 chimeric protein protects plants against bacterial infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stover, Eddie W; Gupta, Goutam; Hao, Guixia

    2017-08-08

    The generation of a chimeric protein containing a first domain encoding either a pro-thionon or thionin, a second domain encoding D4E1 or pro-D4E1, and a third domain encoding a peptide linker located between the first domain and second domain is described. Either the first domain or the second domain is located at the amino terminal of the chimeric protein and the other domain (second domain or first domain, respectively) is located at the carboxyl terminal. The chimeric protein has antibacterial activity. Genetically altered plants and their progeny expressing a polynucleotide encoding the chimeric protein resist diseases caused by bacteria.

  15. Chimeric RNA Oligonucleotides with Triazole and Phosphate Linkages: Synthesis and RNA Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Tomoko; Kogashi, Kanako; Okada, Koudai; Mattarella, Martin; Suzuki, Takeru; Yasumoto, Kenichi; Sogawa, Kazuhiro; Isobe, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Chimeric RNA oligonucleotides with an artificial triazole linker were synthesized using solution-phase click chemistry and solid-phase automated synthesis. Scalable synthesis methods for jointing units for the chimeric structure have been developed, and after click-coupling of the jointing units with triazole linkers, a series of chimeric oligonucleotides was prepared by utilizing the well-established phosphoramidite method for the elongation. The series of chimeric 21-mer oligonucleotides that possessed the triazole linker at different strands and positions allowed for a screening study of the RNA interference to clarify the preference of the triazole modifications in small-interfering RNA molecules.

  16. The butterfly effect in cancer: a single base mutation can remodel the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Jonathan R; Zhang, Yaoyang; Liao, Lujian; Ueno, Lynn; Du, Lisa; Jonkers, Marloes; Yates, John R; Vogt, Peter K

    2015-01-27

    We have compared the proteome, transcriptome, and metabolome of two cell lines: the human breast epithelial line MCF-10A and its mutant descendant MCF-10A-H1047R. These cell lines are derived from the same parental stock and differ by a single amino acid substitution (H1047R) caused by a single nucleotide change in one allele of the PIK3CA gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit p110α of PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase). They are considered isogenic. The H1047R mutation of PIK3CA is one of the most frequently encountered somatic cancer-specific mutations. In MCF-10A, this mutation induces an extensive cellular reorganization that far exceeds the known signaling activities of PI3K. The changes are highly diverse, with examples in structural protein levels, the DNA repair machinery, and sterol synthesis. Gene set enrichment analysis reveals a highly significant concordance of the genes differentially expressed in MCF-10A-H1047R cells and the established protein and RNA signatures of basal breast cancer. No such concordance was found with the specific gene signatures of other histological types of breast cancer. Our data document the power of a single base mutation, inducing an extensive remodeling of the cell toward the phenotype of a specific cancer.

  17. Studies of tolerance induction through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys. Method for detection of chimeric cells and effect of thymic irradiation on induction of tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    To establish the method for the detection of chimerism in cynomologus monkeys, we tested cross reactivity of various anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to cynomolgus monkeys. In 29 mAb we tested, only three monoclonal anti-HLA antibodies crossreacted with lymphocytes of monkeys. With these mAb, chimeric cell can be detected up to 1% by flow cytometric analysis (study 1). Utilizing the method we developed in study 1, we applied the regimen that induces mixed chimerism and skin graft tolerance in mice to renal allotransplantation of cynomolgus monkey. Regimen A includes non-lethal dose of total body irradiation (TBI), administration of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) for 3 days, donor bone marrow infusion and 45 days course of cyclosporine (CYA) administration. We added 7 Gy of thymic irradiation on day-6 in regimen B and on day-1 in regimen C. Although all monkeys in regimen A and B consistently developed chimerism, they rejected kidney allografts soon after stopping CYA. In contrast, 4 monkeys out of 5 failed to develop chimerism in regimen C, but renal allograft tolerance was induced in one monkey who developed chimerism in regimen C. In conclusion, the induction of chimerism is considered necessary but not sufficient for tolerance induction. (author)

  18. Novel nanocomposites from spider silk–silica fusion (chimeric) proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong Po Foo, Cheryl; Patwardhan, Siddharth V.; Belton, David J.; Kitchel, Brandon; Anastasiades, Daphne; Huang, Jia; Naik, Rajesh R.; Perry, Carole C.; Kaplan, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Silica skeletal architectures in diatoms are characterized by remarkable morphological and nanostructural details. Silk proteins from spiders and silkworms form strong and intricate self-assembling fibrous biomaterials in nature. We combined the features of silk with biosilica through the design, synthesis, and characterization of a novel family of chimeric proteins for subsequent use in model materials forming reactions. The domains from the major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) protein of Nephila clavipes spider dragline silk provide control over structural and morphological details because it can be self-assembled through diverse processing methods including film casting and fiber electrospinning. Biosilica nanostructures in diatoms are formed in aqueous ambient conditions at neutral pH and low temperatures. The R5 peptide derived from the silaffin protein of Cylindrotheca fusiformis induces and regulates silica precipitation in the chimeric protein designs under similar ambient conditions. Whereas mineralization reactions performed in the presence of R5 peptide alone form silica particles with a size distribution of 0.5–10 μm in diameter, reactions performed in the presence of the new fusion proteins generate nanocomposite materials containing silica particles with a narrower size distribution of 0.5–2 μm in diameter. Furthermore, we demonstrate that composite morphology and structure could be regulated by controlling processing conditions to produce films and fibers. These results suggest that the chimeric protein provides new options for processing and control over silica particle sizes, important benefits for biomedical and specialty materials, particularly in light of the all aqueous processing and the nanocomposite features of these new materials. PMID:16769898

  19. Immunogenicity of candidate chimeric DNA vaccine against tuberculosis and leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ayan; Kumar, Umesh; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman

    2009-08-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania donovani are important intracellular pathogens, especially in Indian context. In India and other South East Asian countries, both these infections are highly endemic and in about 20% cases co-infection of these pathogens is reported. For both these pathogens cell mediated immunity plays most important role. The available treatment of these infections is either prolonged or cumbersome or it is ineffective in controlling the outbreaks and spread. Therefore, potentiation of a common host defense mechanism can be used to prevent both the infections simultaneously. In this study we have developed a novel chimeric DNA vaccine candidate comprising the esat-6 gene of M. tuberculosis and kinesin motor domain gene of L. donovani. After developing this novel chimera, its immunogenicity was studied in mouse model. The immune response was compared with individual constructs of esat-6 and kinesin motor domain. The results showed that immunization with chimeric DNA vaccine construct resulted in stronger IFN-gamma and IL-2 response against kinesin (3012+/-102 and 367.5+/-8.92pg/ml) and ESAT-6 (1334+/-46.5 and 245.1+/-7.72pg/ml) in comparison to the individual vaccine constructs. The reciprocal immune response (IFN-gamma and IL-2) against individual construct was lower (kinesin motor domain: 1788+/-36.48 and 341.8+/-9.801pg/ml and ESAT-6: 867.0+/-47.23 and 170.8+/-4.578pg/ml, respectively). The results also suggest that using the chimeric construct both proteins yielded a reciprocal adjuvant affect over each other as the IFN-gamma production against chimera vaccination is statistically significant (pleishmaniasis and tuberculosis and have important implication in future vaccine design.

  20. Characterization of chimeric Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3 toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoli; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Shelton, Anthony M; Cheng, Jiaan; Feng, Ming-Guang; Shen, Zhicheng

    2007-02-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vip) are potential alternatives for B. thuringiensis endotoxins that are currently utilized in commercial transgenic insect-resistant crops. Screening a large number of B. thuringiensis isolates resulted in the cloning of vip3Ac1. Vip3Ac1 showed high insecticidal activity against the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda and the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa zea but very low activity against the silkworm Bombyx mori. The host specificity of this Vip3 toxin was altered by sequence swapping with a previously identified toxin, Vip3Aa1. While both Vip3Aa1 and Vip3Ac1 showed no detectable toxicity against the European corn borer Ostrinia nubilalis, the chimeric protein Vip3AcAa, consisting of the N-terminal region of Vip3Ac1 and the C-terminal region of Vip3Aa1, became insecticidal to the European corn borer. In addition, the chimeric Vip3AcAa had increased toxicity to the fall armyworm. Furthermore, both Vip3Ac1 and Vip3AcAa are highly insecticidal to a strain of cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni) that is highly resistant to the B. thuringiensis endotoxin Cry1Ac, thus experimentally showing for the first time the lack of cross-resistance between B. thuringiensis Cry1A proteins and Vip3A toxins. The results in this study demonstrated that vip3Ac1 and its chimeric vip3 genes can be excellent candidates for engineering a new generation of transgenic plants for insect pest control.

  1. Chimeric mitochondrial peptides from contiguous regular and swinger RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Hervé Seligmann

    2016-01-01

    Previous mass spectrometry analyses described human mitochondrial peptides entirely translated from swinger RNAs, RNAs where polymerization systematically exchanged nucleotides. Exchanges follow one among 23 bijective transformation rules, nine symmetric exchanges (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C) and fourteen asymmetric exchanges (X → Y → Z → X, e.g. A → C → G → A), multiplying by 24 DNA's protein coding potential. Abrupt switches from regular to swinger polymerization produce chimeric RNAs. Here, human m...

  2. Chimeric honeybees (Apis mellifera) produced by transplantation of embryonic cells into pre-gastrula stage embryos and detection of chimerism by use of microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergem, M; Norberg, K; Roseth, A; Meuwissen, T; Lien, S; Aamodt, R H

    2006-04-01

    The production of chimeras, by use of cell transplantation, has proved to be highly valuable in studies of development by providing insights into cell fate, differentiation, and developmental potential. So far, chimeric honeybees have been created by nuclear transfer technologies. We have developed protocols to produce chimeric honeybees by use of cell transplantation. Embryonic cells were transplanted between pre-gastrula stage embryos (32-34 hr after oviposition) and hatched larvae were reared in vitro for 4 days. Chimeric individuals were detected by use of microsatellite analysis and a conservative estimation approach. 4.8% of embryos, posteriorly injected with embryonic cells, developed into chimeric honeybee larvae. By injection of cells pre-stained with fluorescent cell tracer dye, we studied the integration of transplanted cells in the developing embryos. Number of injected cells varied from 0 to 50 and cells remained and multiplied mainly in the area of injection.

  3. High-resolution air quality simulation over Europe with the chemistry transport model CHIMERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Terrenoire

    2015-01-01

    The results suggest that future work should focus on the development of national bottom-up emission inventories including a better account for semi-volatile organic compounds and their conversion to SOA, the improvement of the CHIMERE urban parameterization, the introduction into CHIMERE of the coarse nitrate chemistry and an advanced parameterization accounting for windblown dust emissions.

  4. [Neutralizing Monoclonal and Chimeric Antibodies to Human IFN-γ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, M V; Aliev, T K; Solopova, O N; Pozdnyakova, L P; Korobova, S V; Yakimov, S A; Sveshnikov, P G; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2015-01-01

    Autoiminune disorders are chronic diseases characterized by abnormal immune response directed against self-antigens that leads to tissue damage and violation of its normal functioning. Such diseases often result in disability or even death of patients. Nowadays a number of monoclonal antibodies to pro-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors are successfully used for the targeted treatment of autoimmune diseases. One of the perspective targets in autoimmune disease therapy is interferon gamma, a key cytokine in Th1 cells differentiation, activation of macrophages, and inflammation. In the present work, 5 monoclonal antibodies to human IFN-γ were obtained. For the development of potential therapeutic agent, we have performed neutralizing activity and affinity analysis of the antibodies. Based on the data obtained, the monoclonal antibody F1 was selected. This antibody has a dissociation constant 1.7 x 10(-9) M and IC90 = 8.9 ± 2.0 nM measured upon antibody inhibition of the IFN-γ-induced HLA-DR expression on the surface of U937 cells. We have constructed a bicistronic vector for the production of recombinant chimeric Fab fragment F1 chim in E. coli cells. The recombinant chimeric Fab fragment Fl chim neutralizes IFN-γ activity in vitro and has a dissociation constant 1.8 x 10(-9) M.

  5. Chimeric antigen receptor engineered stem cells: a novel HIV therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Anjie; Carrillo, Mayra A; Kitchen, Scott G

    2017-03-01

    Despite the success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for suppressing HIV and improving patients' quality of life, HIV persists in cART-treated patients and remains an incurable disease. Financial burdens and health consequences of lifelong cART treatment call for novel HIV therapies that result in a permanent cure. Cellular immunity is central in controlling HIV replication. However, HIV adopts numerous strategies to evade immune surveillance. Engineered immunity via genetic manipulation could offer a functional cure by generating cells that have enhanced antiviral activity and are resistant to HIV infection. Recently, encouraging reports from several human clinical trials using an anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T-cell therapy for treating B-cell malignancies have provided valuable insights and generated remarkable enthusiasm in engineered T-cell therapy. In this review, we discuss the development of HIV-specific chimeric antigen receptors and the use of stem cell based therapies to generate lifelong anti-HIV immunity.

  6. CHIMERE 2013: a model for regional atmospheric composition modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Menut

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources, stagnant meteorological conditions, kinetics and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative contribution to the pollutants budgets can be quantified with chemistry-transport models. The CHIMERE chemistry-transport model is dedicated to regional atmospheric pollution event studies. Since it has now reached a certain level a maturity, the new stable version, CHIMERE 2013, is described to provide a reference model paper. The successive developments of the model are reviewed on the basis of published investigations that are referenced in order to discuss the scientific choices and to provide an overview of the main results.

  7. Chimeric Antisense Oligonucleotide Conjugated to α-Tocopherol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Nishina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed an efficient system for delivering short interfering RNA (siRNA to the liver by using α-tocopherol conjugation. The α-tocopherol–conjugated siRNA was effective and safe for RNA interference–mediated gene silencing in vivo. In contrast, when the 13-mer LNA (locked nucleic acid-DNA gapmer antisense oligonucleotide (ASO was directly conjugated with α-tocopherol it showed markedly reduced silencing activity in mouse liver. Here, therefore, we tried to extend the 5′-end of the ASO sequence by using 5′-α-tocopherol–conjugated 4- to 7-mers of unlocked nucleic acid (UNA as a “second wing.” Intravenous injection of mice with this α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO achieved more potent silencing than ASO alone in the liver, suggesting increased delivery of the ASO to the liver. Within the cells, the UNA wing was cleaved or degraded and α-tocopherol was released from the 13-mer gapmer ASO, resulting in activation of the gapmer. The α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO showed high efficacy, with hepatic tropism, and was effective and safe for gene silencing in vivo. We have thus identified a new, effective LNA-DNA gapmer structure in which drug delivery system (DDS molecules are bound to ASO with UNA sequences.

  8. Serotype Chimeric Human Adenoviruses for Cancer GeneTherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akseli Hemminki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy consists of numerous approaches where the common denominator is utilization of vectors for achieving therapeutic effect. A particularly potent embodiment of the approach is virotherapy, in which the replication potential of an oncolytic virus is directed towards tumor cells to cause lysis, while normal cells are spared. Importantly, the therapeutic effect of the initial viral load is amplified through viral replication cycles and production of progeny virions. All cancer gene therapy approaches rely on a sufficient level of delivery of the anticancer agent into target cells. Thus,enhancement of delivery to target cells, and reduction of delivery to non-target cells, in an approach called transductional targeting, is attractive. Both genetic and non-genetic retargeting strategies have been utilized. However, in the context of oncolytic viruses, it is beneficial to have the specific modification included in progeny virions and hence genetic modification may be preferable. Serotype chimerism utilizes serotype specific differences in receptor usage, liver tropism and seroprevalence in order to gain enhanced infection of target tissue. This review will focus on serotype chimeric adenoviruses for cancer gene therapy applications.

  9. Chimeric behavior of excited thioxanthone in protic solvents: II. Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai-Constapel, Vidisha; Villnow, Torben; Ryseck, Gerald; Gilch, Peter; Marian, Christel M

    2014-12-18

    The chimeric behavior of thioxanthone in protic solvents has been investigated employing computational chemistry methods. In particular, methanol and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol have been chosen in this study. The solvent environment has been modeled using microsolvation in combination with a conductor-like screening model. The vertical excitation spectrum within the same solvent is seen to depend on the number of specific bonds formed between the chromophore and the solvent molecules. Two different models have been discussed in this work, namely, one and two H-bond models. In particular, the formation of the second H-bond causes the energy gap between the πHπL* and nOπL* states to increase further. Excited-state absorption spectra for the photophysically relevant electronic states have been theoretically determined for comparison with the time-resolved spectra recorded experimentally [Villnow, T.; Ryseck, G.; Rai-Constapel, V.; Marian, C. M.; Gilch, P. J. Phys. Chem. A 2014]. The equilibration of the 1(πHπL*) and 3(nOπL*) states holds responsible for the chimeric behavior. This equilibrium sets in with a calculated time constant of 23 ps in methanol and 14 ps in TFE (5 and 10 ps in experiment, respectively). The radiative decay from the optically bright 1(πHπL*) state is computed to occur with a time constant of 25 ns in both solvents (14–25 ns in experiment).

  10. Identification and analysis of pig chimeric mRNAs using RNA sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Lei

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene fusion is ubiquitous over the course of evolution. It is expected to increase the diversity and complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes through chimeric sequence segments or altered regulation. However, chimeric mRNAs in pigs remain unclear. Here we identified some chimeric mRNAs in pigs and analyzed the expression of them across individuals and breeds using RNA-sequencing data. Results The present study identified 669 putative chimeric mRNAs in pigs, of which 251 chimeric candidates were detected in a set of RNA-sequencing data. The 618 candidates had clear trans-splicing sites, 537 of which obeyed the canonical GU-AG splice rule. Only two putative pig chimera variants whose fusion junction was overlapped with that of a known human chimeric mRNA were found. A set of unique chimeric events were considered middle variances in the expression across individuals and breeds, and revealed non-significant variance between sexes. Furthermore, the genomic region of the 5′ partner gene shares a similar DNA sequence with that of the 3′ partner gene for 458 putative chimeric mRNAs. The 81 of those shared DNA sequences significantly matched the known DNA-binding motifs in the JASPAR CORE database. Four DNA motifs shared in parental genomic regions had significant similarity with known human CTCF binding sites. Conclusions The present study provided detailed information on some pig chimeric mRNAs. We proposed a model that trans-acting factors, such as CTCF, induced the spatial organisation of parental genes to the same transcriptional factory so that parental genes were coordinatively transcribed to give birth to chimeric mRNAs.

  11. Donor chimerism early after reduced-intensity conditioning hematopoietic stem cell transplantation predicts relapse and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T; Nikiforow, Sarah; Milford, Edgar L; Armand, Philippe; Cutler, Corey; Glotzbecker, Brett; Ho, Vincent T; Antin, Joseph H; Soiffer, Robert J; Ritz, Jerome; Alyea, Edwin P

    2014-10-01

    The impact of early donor cell chimerism on outcomes of T cell-replete reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is ill defined. We evaluated day 30 (D30) and 100 (D100) total donor cell chimerism after RIC HSCT undertaken between 2002 and 2010 at our institution, excluding patients who died or relapsed before D30. When available, donor T cell chimerism was also assessed. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), relapse, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). We evaluated 688 patients with hematologic malignancies (48% myeloid and 52% lymphoid) and a median age of 57 years (range, 18 to 74) undergoing RIC HSCT with T cell-replete donor grafts (97% peripheral blood; 92% HLA-matched), with a median follow-up of 58.2 months (range, 12.6 to 120.7). In multivariable analysis, total donor cell and T cell chimerism at D30 and D100 each predicted RIC HSCT outcomes, with D100 total donor cell chimerism most predictive. D100 total donor cell chimerism D100 total donor cell chimerism or T cell chimerism. Low donor chimerism early after RIC HSCT is an independent risk factor for relapse and impaired survival. Donor chimerism assessment early after RIC HSCT can prognosticate for long-term outcomes and help identify high-risk patient cohorts who may benefit from additional therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantitative sequencing of 5-formylcytosine in DNA at single-base resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Michael J.; Marsico, Giovanni; Bachman, Martin; Beraldi, Dario; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the cytosine modifications 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and 5-formylcytosine (5fC) were found to exist in the genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of a wide range of mammalian cell types. It is now important to understand their role in normal biological function and disease. Here we introduce reduced bisulfite sequencing (redBS-Seq), a quantitative method to decode 5fC in DNA at single-base resolution, based on a selective chemical reduction of 5fC to 5hmC followed by bisulfite treatment. After extensive validation on synthetic and genomic DNA, we combined redBS-Seq and oxidative bisulfite sequencing (oxBS-Seq) to generate the first combined genomic map of 5-methylcytosine, 5hmC and 5fC in mouse embryonic stem cells. Our experiments revealed that in certain genomic locations 5fC is present at comparable levels to 5hmC and 5mC. The combination of these chemical methods can quantify and precisely map these three cytosine derivatives in the genome and will help provide insights into their function.

  13. Modeling cognition and disease using human glial chimeric mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Maiken; Windrem, Martha S.

    2015-01-01

    that transplanted hGPCs not only engraft and expand within murine hosts, but dynamically outcompete the resident progenitors so as to ultimately dominate the host brain. The engrafted human progenitor cells proceed to generate parenchymal astrocytes, and when faced with a hypomyelinated environment......, oligodendrocytes as well. As a result, the recipient brains may become inexorably humanized with regards to their resident glial populations, yielding human glial chimeric mouse brains. These brains provide us a fundamentally new tool by which to assess the species-specific attributes of glia in modulating human...... cognition and information processing. In addition, the cellular humanization of these brains permits their use in studying glial infectious and inflammatory disorders unique to humans, and the effects of those disorders on the glial contributions to cognition. Perhaps most intriguingly, by pairing our...

  14. Novel fusion genes and chimeric transcripts in ependymal tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thale Kristin; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    We have previously identified two ALK rearrangements in a subset of ependymal tumors using a combination of cytogenetic data and RNA sequencing. The aim of this study was to perform an unbiased search for fusion transcripts in our entire series of ependymal tumors. Fusion analysis was performed...... using the FusionCatcher algorithm on 12 RNA-sequenced ependymal tumors. Candidate transcripts were prioritized based on the software's filtering and manual visualization using the BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) and BLAT (BLAST-like alignment tool) tools. Genomic and reverse transcriptase PCR...... with subsequent Sanger sequencing was used to validate the potential fusions. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using locus-specific probes was also performed. A total of 841 candidate chimeric transcripts were identified in the 12 tumors, with an average of 49 unique candidate fusions per tumor. After...

  15. Functional analysis of aldehyde oxidase using expressed chimeric enzyme between monkey and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kunio; Asakawa, Tasuku; Hoshino, Kouichi; Adachi, Mayuko; Fukiya, Kensuke; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Yorihisa

    2009-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Each subunit consists of about 20 kDa 2Fe-2S cluster domain storing reducing equivalents, about 40 kDa flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD) domain and about 85 kDa molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) domain containing a substrate binding site. In order to clarify the properties of each domain, especially substrate binding domain, chimeric cDNAs were constructed by mutual exchange of 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains between monkey and rat. Chimeric monkey/rat AO was referred to one with monkey type 2Fe-2S/FAD domains and a rat type MoCo domain. Rat/monkey AO was vice versa. AO-catalyzed 2-oxidation activities of (S)-RS-8359 were measured using the expressed enzyme in Escherichia coli. Substrate inhibition was seen in rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, but not in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, suggesting that the phenomenon might be dependent on the natures of MoCo domain of rat. A biphasic Eadie-Hofstee profile was observed in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, but not rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, indicating that the biphasic profile might be related to the properties of MoCo domain of monkey. Two-fold greater V(max) values were observed in monkey AO than in chimeric rat/monkey AO, and in chimeric monkey/rat AO than in rat AO, suggesting that monkey has the more effective electron transfer system than rat. Thus, the use of chimeric enzymes revealed that 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains affect the velocity and the quantitative profiles of AO-catalyzed (S)-RS-8359 2-oxidation, respectively.

  16. Design and Use of Chimeric Proteins Containing a Collagen-Binding Domain for Wound Healing and Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addi, Cyril; Murschel, Frederic; De Crescenzo, Gregory

    2016-12-12

    Collagen-based biomaterials are widely used in the field of tissue engineering; they can be loaded with biomolecules such as growth factors (GFs) to modulate the biological response of the host and thus improve its potential for regeneration. Recombinant chimeric GFs fused to a collagen-binding domain (CBD) have been reported to improve their bioavailability and the host response, especially when combined with an appropriate collagen-based biomaterial. This review first provides an extensive description of the various CBDs that have been fused to proteins, with a focus on the need for accurate characterization of their interaction with collagen. The second part of the review highlights the benefits of various CBD/GF fusion proteins that have been designed for wound healing and bone regeneration.

  17. Human biofluid concentrations of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in chimeric mice with humanized liver administered with di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Koichiro; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is a reproductive toxicant in male rodents. The aim of the current study was to extrapolate the pharmacokinetics and toxicokinetics of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP, a primary metabolite of DEHP) in humans by using data from oral administration of DEHP to chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. MEHP and its glucuronide were detected in plasma from control mice and chimeric mice after single oral doses of 250mg DEHP/kg body weight. Biphasic plasma concentration-time curves of MEHP and its glucuronide were seen only in control mice. MEHP and its glucuronide were extensively excreted in urine within 24h in mice with humanized liver. In contrast, fecal excretion levels of MEHP glucuronide were high in control mice compared with those with humanized liver. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated urine MEHP concentrations in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. This research illustrates how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics of the primary or secondary metabolites of DEHP.

  18. Detection of a common chimeric transcript between human chromosomes 7 and 16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wenwen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interchromosomal chimeric RNA molecules are often transcription products from genomic rearrangement in cancerous cells. Here we report the computational detection of an interchromosomal RNA fusion between ZC3HAV1L and CHMP1A from RNA-seq data of normal human mammary epithelial cells, and experimental confirmation of the chimeric transcript in multiple human cells and tissues. Our experimental characterization also detected three variants of the ZC3HAV1L-CHMP1A chimeric RNA, suggesting that these genes are involved in complex splicing. The fusion sequence at the novel exon-exon boundary, and the absence of corresponding DNA rearrangement suggest that this chimeric RNA is likely produced by trans-splicing in human cells. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Rory Johnson (nominated by Fyodor Kondrashov; Gal Avital and Itai Yanai

  19. T cells expressing VHH-directed oligoclonal chimeric HER2 antigen receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamnani, Fatemeh Rahimi; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali;

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) originated from antibodies is a promising strategy in cancer immunotherapy. Several unsuccessful trials, however, highlight the need for alternative conventional binding domains and the better combination...

  20. Frequency of chimerism in populations of the kelp Lessonia spicata in central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Chimerism occurs when two genetically distinct conspecific individuals fuse together generating a single entity. Coalescence and chimerism in red seaweeds has been positively related to an increase in body size, and the consequent reduction in susceptibility to mortality factors, thus increasing survival, reproductive potential and tolerance to stress in contrast to genetically homogeneous organisms. In addition, they showed that a particular pattern of post-fusion growth maintains higher genetic diversity and chimerism in the holdfast but homogenous axes. In Chilean kelps (brown seaweeds), intraorganismal genetic heterogeneity (IGH) and holdfast coalescence has been described in previous research, but the extent of chimerism in wild populations and the patterns of distribution of the genetically heterogeneous thallus zone have scarcely been studied. Since kelps are under continuous harvesting, with enormous social, ecological and economic importance, natural chimerism can be considered a priceless in-situ reservoir of natural genetic resources and variability. In this study, we therefore examined the frequency of IGH and chimerism in three harvested populations of Lessonia spicata. We then evaluated whether chimeric wild-type holdfasts show higher genetic diversity than erect axes (stipe and lamina) and explored the impact of this on the traditional estimation of genetic diversity at the population level. We found a high frequency of IGH (60–100%) and chimerism (33.3–86.7%), varying according to the studied population. We evidenced that chimerism occurs mostly in holdfasts, exhibiting heterogeneous tissues, whereas stipes and lamina were more homogeneous, generating a vertical gradient of allele and genotype abundance as well as divergence, constituting the first time “within- plant” genetic patterns have been reported in kelps. This is very different from the chimeric patterns described in land plants and animals. Finally, we evidenced that IGH affected

  1. Frequency of chimerism in populations of the kelp Lessonia spicata in central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Alejandra V; Santelices, Bernabé

    2017-01-01

    Chimerism occurs when two genetically distinct conspecific individuals fuse together generating a single entity. Coalescence and chimerism in red seaweeds has been positively related to an increase in body size, and the consequent reduction in susceptibility to mortality factors, thus increasing survival, reproductive potential and tolerance to stress in contrast to genetically homogeneous organisms. In addition, they showed that a particular pattern of post-fusion growth maintains higher genetic diversity and chimerism in the holdfast but homogenous axes. In Chilean kelps (brown seaweeds), intraorganismal genetic heterogeneity (IGH) and holdfast coalescence has been described in previous research, but the extent of chimerism in wild populations and the patterns of distribution of the genetically heterogeneous thallus zone have scarcely been studied. Since kelps are under continuous harvesting, with enormous social, ecological and economic importance, natural chimerism can be considered a priceless in-situ reservoir of natural genetic resources and variability. In this study, we therefore examined the frequency of IGH and chimerism in three harvested populations of Lessonia spicata. We then evaluated whether chimeric wild-type holdfasts show higher genetic diversity than erect axes (stipe and lamina) and explored the impact of this on the traditional estimation of genetic diversity at the population level. We found a high frequency of IGH (60-100%) and chimerism (33.3-86.7%), varying according to the studied population. We evidenced that chimerism occurs mostly in holdfasts, exhibiting heterogeneous tissues, whereas stipes and lamina were more homogeneous, generating a vertical gradient of allele and genotype abundance as well as divergence, constituting the first time "within- plant" genetic patterns have been reported in kelps. This is very different from the chimeric patterns described in land plants and animals. Finally, we evidenced that IGH affected genetic

  2. Quantitative chimerism kinetics in relapsed leukemia patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Xiao-ying; WANG Jing-zhi; ZHANG Xiao-hui; LI Jin-lan; LI Ling-di; LIU Kai-yan; HUANG Xiao-jun; LI Guo-xuan; QIN Ya-zhen; WANG Yu; WANG Feng-rong; LIU Dai-hong; XU Lan-ping; CHEN Huan; HAN Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background Chimerism analysis is an important tool for the surveillance of post-transplant engraftment.It offers the possibility of identifying impending graft rejection and recurrence of underlying malignant or non-malignant disease.Here we investigated the quantitative chimerism kinetics of 21 relapsed leukemia patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).Methods A panel of 29 selected sequence polymorphism (SP) markers was screened by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to obtain the informative marker for every leukemia patient.Quantitative chimerism analysis of bone marrow (BM) samples of 21 relapsed patients and 20 patients in stable remission was performed longitudinally.The chimerisms of BM and peripheral blood (PB) samples of 14 patients at relapse were compared.Results Twenty-one patients experienced leukemia relapse at a median of 135 days (range,30-720 days) after transplantation.High recipient chimerism in BM was found in all patients at relapse,and increased recipient chimerism in BM samples was observed in 90% (19/21) of patients before relapse.With 0.5% recipient DNA as the cut-off,median time between the detection of increased recipient chimerism and relapse was 45 days (range,0-120 days),with 76% of patients showing increased recipient chimerism at least 1 month prior to relapse.Median percentage of recipient DNA in 20 stable remission patients was 0.28%,0.04%,0.05%,0.05%,0.08%,and 0.05% at 1,2,3,6,9,and 12 months,respectively,after transplantation.This was concordant with other specific fusion transcripts and fluorescent in situ hybridization examination.The recipient chimerisms in BM were significantly higher than those in PB at relapse (P=0.001).Conclusions This SP-based RT-PCR essay is a reliable method for chimerism analysis.Chimerism kinetics in BM can be used as a marker of impending leukemia relapse,especially when no other specific marker is available.Based on our findings

  3. A Biofunctional Molecular Beacon for Detecting Single Base Mutations in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a convenient and sensitive biosensing system to detect specific DNA sequences is an important issue in the field of genetic disease therapy. As a classic DNA detection technique, molecular beacon (MB is often used in the biosensing system. However, it has intrinsic drawbacks, including high assay cost, complicated chemical modification, and operational complexity. In this study, we developed a simple and cost-effective label-free multifunctional MB (LMMB by integrating elements of polymerization primer, template, target recognition, and G-quadruplex into one entity to detect target DNA. The core technique was accomplished by introducing a G-hairpin that features fragments of both G-quadruplex and target DNA recognition in the G-hairpin stem. Hybridization between LMMB and target DNA triggered conformational change between the G-hairpin and the common C-hairpin, resulting in significant SYBR-green signal amplification. The hybridization continues to the isothermal circular strand-displacement polymerization and accumulation of the double-stranded fragments, causing the uninterrupted extension of the LMMB without a need of chemical modification and other assistant DNA sequences. The novel and programmable LMMB could detect target DNA with sensitivity at 250 pmol/l with a linear range from 2 to 100 nmol/l and the relative standard deviation of 7.98%. The LMMB could sense a single base mutation from the normal DNA, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplicons of the mutant-type cell line from the wild-type one. The total time required for preparation and assaying was only 25 minutes. Apparently, the LMMB shows great potential for detecting DNA and its mutations in biosamples, and therefore it opens up a new prospect for genetic disease therapy.

  4. A Biofunctional Molecular Beacon for Detecting Single Base Mutations in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haiyan; Ma, Ji; Wang, Jie; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Sinko, Patrick J; Jia, Lee

    2016-04-05

    The development of a convenient and sensitive biosensing system to detect specific DNA sequences is an important issue in the field of genetic disease therapy. As a classic DNA detection technique, molecular beacon (MB) is often used in the biosensing system. However, it has intrinsic drawbacks, including high assay cost, complicated chemical modification, and operational complexity. In this study, we developed a simple and cost-effective label-free multifunctional MB (LMMB) by integrating elements of polymerization primer, template, target recognition, and G-quadruplex into one entity to detect target DNA. The core technique was accomplished by introducing a G-hairpin that features fragments of both G-quadruplex and target DNA recognition in the G-hairpin stem. Hybridization between LMMB and target DNA triggered conformational change between the G-hairpin and the common C-hairpin, resulting in significant SYBR-green signal amplification. The hybridization continues to the isothermal circular strand-displacement polymerization and accumulation of the double-stranded fragments, causing the uninterrupted extension of the LMMB without a need of chemical modification and other assistant DNA sequences. The novel and programmable LMMB could detect target DNA with sensitivity at 250 pmol/l with a linear range from 2 to 100 nmol/l and the relative standard deviation of 7.98%. The LMMB could sense a single base mutation from the normal DNA, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons of the mutant-type cell line from the wild-type one. The total time required for preparation and assaying was only 25 minutes. Apparently, the LMMB shows great potential for detecting DNA and its mutations in biosamples, and therefore it opens up a new prospect for genetic disease therapy.

  5. Context Dependent Effects of Chimeric Peptide Morpholino Conjugates Contribute to Dystrophin Exon-skipping Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HaiFang Yin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs and novel chimeric peptides containing CPP (referred as B peptide and muscle-targeting peptide (referred as MSP motifs significantly improve the systemic exon-skipping activity of morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomers (PMOs in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In the present study, the general mechanistic significance of the chimeric peptide configuration on the activity and tissue uptake of peptide conjugated PMOs in vivo was investigated. Four additional chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates including newly identified peptide 9 (B-9-PMO and 9-B-PMO and control peptide 3 (B-3-PMO and 3-B-PMO were tested in mdx mice. Immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and western blot results indicated that B-9-PMO induced significantly higher level of exon skipping and dystrophin restoration than its counterpart (9-B-PMO, further corroborating the notion that the activity of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates is dependent on relative position of the tissue-targeting peptide motif within the chimeric peptide with respect to PMOs. Subsequent mechanistic studies showed that enhanced cellular uptake of B-MSP-PMO into muscle cells leads to increased exon-skipping activity in comparison with MSP-B-PMO. Surprisingly, further evidence showed that the uptake of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates of both orientations (B-MSP-PMO and MSP-B-PMO was ATP- and temperature-dependent and also partially mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG, indicating that endocytosis is likely the main uptake pathway for both chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates. Collectively, our data demonstrate that peptide orientation in chimeric peptides is an important parameter that determines cellular uptake and activity when conjugated directly to oligonucleotides. These observations provide insight into the design of improved cell targeting compounds for future therapeutics studies.

  6. Context Dependent Effects of Chimeric Peptide Morpholino Conjugates Contribute to Dystrophin Exon-skipping Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haifang; Boisguerin, Prisca; Moulton, Hong M; Betts, Corinne; Seow, Yiqi; Boutilier, Jordan; Wang, Qingsong; Walsh, Anthony; Lebleu, Bernard; Wood, Matthew Ja

    2013-09-24

    We have recently reported that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and novel chimeric peptides containing CPP (referred as B peptide) and muscle-targeting peptide (referred as MSP) motifs significantly improve the systemic exon-skipping activity of morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomers (PMOs) in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In the present study, the general mechanistic significance of the chimeric peptide configuration on the activity and tissue uptake of peptide conjugated PMOs in vivo was investigated. Four additional chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates including newly identified peptide 9 (B-9-PMO and 9-B-PMO) and control peptide 3 (B-3-PMO and 3-B-PMO) were tested in mdx mice. Immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and western blot results indicated that B-9-PMO induced significantly higher level of exon skipping and dystrophin restoration than its counterpart (9-B-PMO), further corroborating the notion that the activity of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates is dependent on relative position of the tissue-targeting peptide motif within the chimeric peptide with respect to PMOs. Subsequent mechanistic studies showed that enhanced cellular uptake of B-MSP-PMO into muscle cells leads to increased exon-skipping activity in comparison with MSP-B-PMO. Surprisingly, further evidence showed that the uptake of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates of both orientations (B-MSP-PMO and MSP-B-PMO) was ATP- and temperature-dependent and also partially mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), indicating that endocytosis is likely the main uptake pathway for both chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates. Collectively, our data demonstrate that peptide orientation in chimeric peptides is an important parameter that determines cellular uptake and activity when conjugated directly to oligonucleotides. These observations provide insight into the design of improved cell targeting compounds for future therapeutics studies.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e124; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013

  7. Zygotes segregate entire parental genomes in distinct blastomere lineages causing cleavage-stage chimerism and mixoploidy

    OpenAIRE

    Destouni, Aspasia; Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Catteeuw, Maaike; Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Smits, Katrien; Kurg, Ants; Salumets, Andres; Van Soom, Ann; Voet, Thierry; Vermeesch, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Dramatic genome dynamics, such as chromosome instability, contribute to the remarkable genomic heterogeneity among the blastomeres comprising a single embryo during human preimplantation development. This heterogeneity, when compatible with life, manifests as constitutional mosaicism, chimerism, and mixoploidy in live-born individuals. Chimerism and mixoploidy are defined by the presence of cell lineages with different parental genomes or different ploidy states in a single individual, respec...

  8. Crystal Structure of PG16 and Chimeric Dissection with Somatically Related PG9: Structure-Function Analysis of Two Quaternary-Specific Antibodies That Effectively Neutralize HIV-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pancera, Marie; McLellan, Jason S.; Wu, Xueling; Zhu, Jiang; Changela, Anita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Yang, Yongping; Zhou, Tongqing; Phogat, Sanjay; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D. (NIH); (Aids Vaccine)

    2010-11-03

    HIV-1 resists neutralization by most antibodies. Two somatically related human antibodies, PG9 and PG16, however, each neutralize 70 to 80% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. Here we present the structure of the antigen-binding fragment of PG16 in monoclinic and orthorhombic lattices at 2.4 and 4.0 {angstrom}, respectively, and use a combination of structural analysis, paratope dissection, and neutralization assessment to determine the functional relevance of three unusual PG9/PG16 features: N-linked glycosylation, extensive affinity maturation, and a heavy chain-third complementarity-determining region (CDR H3) that is one of the longest observed in human antibodies. Glycosylation extended off the side of the light chain variable domain and was not required for neutralization. The CDR H3 formed an axe-shaped subdomain, which comprised 42% of the CDR surface, with the axe head looming {approx}20 {angstrom} above the other combining loops. Comprehensive sets of chimeric swaps between PG9 and PG16 of light chain, heavy chain, and CDR H3 were employed to decipher structure-function relationships. Chimeric swaps generally complemented functionally, with differences in PG9/PG16 neutralization related primarily to residue differences in CDR H3. Meanwhile, chimeric reversions to genomic V genes showed isolate-dependent effects, with affinity maturation playing a significant role in augmenting neutralization breadth (P = 0.036) and potency (P < 0.0001). The structural and functional details of extraordinary CDR H3 and extensive affinity maturation provide insights into the neutralization mechanism of and the elicitation pathway for broadly neutralizing antibodies like PG9 and PG16.

  9. Mosaic origins of a complex chimeric mitochondrial gene in Silene vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Storchova

    Full Text Available Chimeric genes are significant sources of evolutionary innovation that are normally created when portions of two or more protein coding regions fuse to form a new open reading frame. In plant mitochondria astonishingly high numbers of different novel chimeric genes have been reported, where they are generated through processes of rearrangement and recombination. Nonetheless, because most studies do not find or report nucleotide variation within the same chimeric gene, evolution after the origination of these chimeric genes remains unstudied. Here we identify two alleles of a complex chimera in Silene vulgaris that are divergent in nucleotide sequence, genomic position relative to other mitochondrial genes, and expression patterns. Structural patterns suggest a history partially influenced by gene conversion between the chimeric gene and functional copies of subunit 1 of the mitochondrial ATP synthase gene (atp1. We identified small repeat structures within the chimeras that are likely recombination sites allowing generation of the chimera. These results establish the potential for chimeric gene divergence in different plant mitochondrial lineages within the same species. This result contrasts with the absence of diversity within mitochondrial chimeras found in crop species.

  10. Targeting duplex DNA with chimeric α,β-triplex-forming oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolganova, N. A.; Shchyolkina, A. K.; Chudinov, A. V.; Zasedatelev, A. S.; Florentiev, V. L.; Timofeev, E. N.

    2012-01-01

    Triplex-directed DNA recognition is strictly limited by polypurine sequences. In an attempt to address this problem with synthetic biology tools, we designed a panel of short chimeric α,β-triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and studied their interaction with fluorescently labelled duplex hairpins using various techniques. The hybridization of hairpin with an array of chimeric probes suggests that recognition of double-stranded DNA follows complicated rules combining reversed Hoogsteen and non-canonical homologous hydrogen bonding. In the presence of magnesium ions, chimeric TFOs are able to form highly stable α,β-triplexes, as indicated by native gel-electrophoresis, on-array thermal denaturation and fluorescence-quenching experiments. CD spectra of chimeric triplexes exhibited features typically observed for anti-parallel purine triplexes with a GA or GT third strand. The high potential of chimeric α,β-TFOs in targeting double-stranded DNA was demonstrated in the EcoRI endonuclease protection assay. In this paper, we report, for the first time, the recognition of base pair inversions in a duplex by chimeric TFOs containing α-thymidine and α-deoxyguanosine. PMID:22641847

  11. Study the effect of F17S mutation on the chimeric Bacillus thermocatenulatus lipase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Khaleghinejad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipases (triacylglycerol acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.3 are one of the highest value commercial enzymes as they have potential applications in biotechnology for detergents, food, pharmaceuticals, leather, textiles, cosmetics, and paper industries; and are currently receiving considerable attention because of their potential applications in biotechnology. Bacillus thermocatenulatus Lipase 2 (BTL2 is one of the most important research targets, because of its potential industrial applications. In this study, the effect of substitution Phe17 with Ser in mutated BTL2 lipase, which conserved pentapeptide (112Ala-His-Ser-Gln-Gly116 was replaced with similar sequences (207Gly-Glu-Ser-Ala-Gly211 of Candida rugosa lipase (CLR at the nucleophilic elbow region. Docking results confirmed the mutated lipase to be better than the chimeric lipase. So, cloning was conducted, and the mutated and chimeric btl2 genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and then the enzymes were purified by anion exchange chromatography. The mutation increased lipase lipolytic activity against most of the applied substrates, with the exception of tributyrin when compared with chimeric lipase. Further, the mutated lipase exhibited higher activity than the chimeric lipase at all temperatures. Optimum pH of the mutated lipase was obtained at pH 9.5, which was more than the chimeric one. Enzyme activity of the mutated lipase in the presence of organic solvents, detergents, and metal ions was also improved than the chimeric lipase.

  12. Antistaphylococcal activity of bacteriophage derived chimeric protein P128

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipra Aradhana A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial drug resistance is one of the most significant challenges to human health today. In particular, effective antibacterial agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are urgently needed. A causal relationship between nasal commensal S. aureus and infection has been reported. Accordingly, elimination of nasal S. aureus reduces the risk of infection. Enzymes that degrade bacterial cell walls show promise as antibacterial agents. Bacteriophage-encoded bacterial cell wall-degrading enzymes exhibit intrinsic bactericidal activity. P128 is a chimeric protein that combines the lethal activity of the phage tail-associated muralytic enzyme of Phage K and the staphylococcal cell wall targeting-domain (SH3b of lysostaphin. Here we report results of in vitro studies evaluating the susceptibility of staphylococcal strains to this novel protein. Results Using the broth microdilution method adapted for lysostaphin, we found that P128 is effective against S. aureus clinical strains including MRSA, methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA, and a mupirocin-resistant S. aureus. Minimum bactericidal concentrations and minimum inhibitory concentrations of P128 (1-64 μg/mL were similar across the 32 S. aureus strains tested, demonstrating its bactericidal nature. In time-kill assays, P128 reduced colony-forming units by 99.99% within 1 h and inhibited growth up to 24 h. In an assay simulating topical application of P128 to skin or other biological surfaces, P128 hydrogel was efficacious when layered on cells seeded on solid media. P128 hydrogel was lethal to Staphylococci recovered from nares of healthy people and treated without any processing or culturing steps, indicating its in situ efficacy. This methodology used for in vitro assessment of P128 as an agent for eradicating nasal carriage is unique. Conclusions The novel chimeric protein P128 is a staphylococcal cell wall-degrading enzyme under development for

  13. Estimating the TNT equivalence of a 15-ton single base powder explosion through damaged building profiles analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça-Filho, L G; Bastos-Netto, D; Guirardello, R

    2008-10-30

    Back in 1964 President Vargas Works was the only place in the country which processed single base powder for the Brazilian Armed Forces. Then its industrial activity was quite strong and around 4:45 a.m. of 23rd September an intense decomposition of nearly 15 ton of that material took place in one of the production lines workshops. The consequences of this explosion were the destruction and extensive damage to the workshops around its epicenter. At that time pictures of all affected buildings were taken and their damages fully described. This led to the present work which consists in the evaluation of the TNT equivalent charge of the explosion using the concept of damage category developed by UK engineers based on the WWII damaging bombing data.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of human recombinant thyrotropin (rec-hTSH) with a chimeric {beta}-subunit (rec-hTSH{beta}-CTPE hCG{beta}); Sintese e caracterizacao do hormonio tireotrofico humano recombinante (rec-hTSH) contendo uma subunidade {beta} quimerica (rec-hTSH{beta}-CTPE hCG{beta})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Yoko

    1995-12-31

    Recombinant hTSH is now successfully being used in clinical studies of thyroid cancer. Because of its therapeutic potential, we have constructed a longer acting analog of hTSH by fusing the carboxy terminal extension peptide (CTEP) of hCG{beta} onto hTSH{beta}. When coexpressed either with {alpha}-subunit complementary DNA or {alpha}-minigene in African green monkey (Cos-7) and human embryonic kidney (293) cells, the chimera was fully bioactive in vitro and exhibited enhanced in vivo potency associated with a prolonged plasma half-life. The addition of 29 amino acids with 4 O-linked oligosaccharide chains did not affect the assembly and secretion of chimeric TSH. Wild type (WT) and chimeric hTSH secreted by Cos-7 and 293 cells displayed wide differences in their plasma half-lives, presumably due to the difference in the terminal sialic acid and sulfate of their oligosaccharide chains. Chimeric and WT hTSH secreted by both cell lines demonstrated similar bioactivity in cAMP production, with some differences in [{sup 3} H]-thymidine incorporation. Chimeric hTSH secreted by Cos-7 appears to be more active than that secreted by 293 cells, as judged by growth assay. Cos-7 produced chimeric hTSH showed the maximum increase in half-life, indicating the importance of sialic acid in prolonging half-life and in vivo potency. Sulfation of both subunits, predominantly {beta} and to a lesser extent {alpha}, appears to be responsible, at least in part, for the increased metabolic clearance of WT and chimeric TSH secreted by 293 cells. Apart from its therapeutic potential, chimeric TSH produced in various cell lines can be used as a tool to delineate the roles of sulfate and sialic acid in the in vivo clearance and, thereby in the in vivo bioactivity. (author). 104 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Protective and immunological behavior of chimeric yellow fever dengue vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Scott B; Russell, Philip K

    2016-03-29

    Clinical observations from the third year of the Sanofi Pasteur chimeric yellow fever dengue tetravalent vaccine (CYD) trials document both protection and vaccination-enhanced dengue disease among vaccine recipients. Children who were 5 years-old or younger when vaccinated experienced a DENV disease resulting in hospitalization at 5 times the rate of controls. On closer inspection, hospitalized cases among vaccinated seropositives, those at highest risk to hospitalized disease accompanying a dengue virus (DENV) infection, were greatly reduced by vaccination. But, seronegative individuals of all ages after being vaccinated were only modestly protected from mild to moderate disease throughout the entire observation period despite developing neutralizing antibodies at high rates. Applying a simple epidemiological model to the data, vaccinated seronegative individuals of all ages were at increased risk of developing hospitalized disease during a subsequent wild type DENV infection. The etiology of disease in placebo and vaccinated children resulting in hospitalization during a DENV infection, while clinically similar are of different origin. The implications of the observed mixture of DENV protection and enhanced disease in CYD vaccinees are discussed.

  16. Engineering HIV-Specific Immunity with Chimeric Antigen Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Scott G; Zack, Jerome A

    2016-12-01

    HIV remains a highly important public health and clinical issue despite many recent advances in attempting to develop a cure, which has remained elusive for most people infected with HIV. HIV disease can be controlled with pharmacologic therapies; however, these treatments are expensive, may have severe side effects, and are not curative. Consequently, an improved means to control or eliminate HIV replication is needed. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play a critical role in controlling viral replication and are an important part in the ability of the immune response to eradicate most viral infections. There are considerable efforts to enhance CTL responses in HIV-infected individuals in hopes of providing the immune response with armaments to more effectively control viral replication. In this review, we discuss some of these efforts and focus on the development of a gene therapy-based approach to engineer hematopoietic stem cells with an HIV-1-specific chimeric antigen receptor, which seeks to provide an inexhaustible source of HIV-1-specific immune cells that are MHC unrestricted and superior to natural antiviral T cell responses. These efforts provide the basis for further development of T cell functional enhancement to target and treat chronic HIV infection in hopes of eradicating the virus from the body.

  17. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapies for lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudno, Jennifer N; Kochenderfer, James N

    2017-08-31

    New therapies are needed for patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphomas that are resistant to standard therapies. Indeed, unresponsiveness to standard chemotherapy and relapse after autologous stem-cell transplantation are indicators of an especially poor prognosis. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells are emerging as a novel treatment modality for these patients. Clinical trial data have demonstrated the potent activity of anti-CD19 CAR T cells against multiple subtypes of B-cell lymphoma, including diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma, mantle-cell lymphoma, and marginal-zone lymphoma. Importantly, anti-CD19 CAR T cells have impressive activity against chemotherapy-refractory lymphoma, inducing durable complete remissions lasting >2 years in some patients with refractory DLBCL. CAR-T-cell therapies are, however, associated with potentially fatal toxicities, including cytokine-release syndrome and neurological toxicities. CAR T cells with novel target antigens, including CD20, CD22, and κ-light chain for B-cell lymphomas, and CD30 for Hodgkin and T-cell lymphomas, are currently being investigated in clinical trials. Centrally manufactured CAR T cells are also being tested in industry-sponsored multicentre clinical trials, and will probably soon become a standard therapy. Herein, we review the clinical efficacy and toxicity of CAR-T-cell therapies for lymphoma, and discuss their limitations and future directions with regard to toxicity management, CAR designs and CAR-T-cell phenotypes, conditioning regimens, and combination therapies.

  18. Dosimetry of chimeric TNT in lung tumor patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yangchun; CHEN Shaoliang; JU Dianwen; SHI Hongcheng; YAO Zhifeng

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the absorbed dose of tumor and main critical organs in 131I labeled chimeric tumor necrotic treatment (chTNT). In 9 patients, a single intravenous dose of (29.6±3.7) MBq/kg was administered. Blood samples were drawn at different time intervals, and urine was collected for up to one week. Tissue distribution of 131I -chTNT was followed for up to one week by gamma camera imaging. Absorbed doses to the whole body and to normal organs were computed according to the MIRD scheme using Mirdose-3 software. S-factors for lung tumors were estimated by comparison with lungs of similar mass and position in the body. It was found that mean serum disappearance half time values for 131I-chTNT were (4.93±9.36) h and (61.7±21.2) h for α, β respectively,while that for whole body was(99±10) h. Mean urine biological clearance half time value was (90±10) h. The absorbed dose to tumor was (8.28±2.65) Gy, and the tumor-to-nontumor dose ratio was 3.95±1.55. And the mean effective dose to patients was (1.02±0.29) mSv/MBq.

  19. Chimerical pyrene-based [7]helicenes as twisted polycondensed aromatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchta, Michal; Rybáček, Jiří; Jančařík, Andrej; Kudale, Amit A; Buděšínský, Miloš; Chocholoušová, Jana Vacek; Vacek, Jaroslav; Bednárová, Lucie; Císařová, Ivana; Bodwell, Graham J; Starý, Ivo; Stará, Irena G

    2015-06-01

    Chimerical pyrene-based dibenzo[7]helicene rac-1 and 2H-pyran[7]helicene (M,R,R)-(-)-2, in which two pyrene subunits are fused to the [7]helicene/[7]heterohelicene scaffold, were synthesised by means of Ni(0) - or Co(I) -mediated [2+2+2] cycloisomerisation of dipyrenyl-acetylene-derived triynes. Pyrene-based dibenzo[7]helicene 1 was obtained in enantioenriched form by enantioselective cycloisomerisation under Ni(0) /QUINAP catalysis (57 % ee) or in enantiopure form by racemate resolution by liquid chromatography on a chiral column. 1,3-Allylic-type strain-controlled diastereoselective cycloisomerisation was employed in the synthesis of enantiopure (M,R,R)-(-)-2. Physicochemical properties of 1 and 2 encompassing the helicity assignment, stability to racemisation, X-ray crystal structure, UV/Vis, experimental/calculated electronic circular dichroism and fluorescence spectra were studied. Accordingly, comparison of the X-ray crystal structure of (M,R,R)-(-)-2 with calculated structures (DFT: B3LYP/cc-pVDZ, B97D/cc-pVDZ) indicated that its helical backbone is slightly over-flattened owing to intramolecular dispersion forces between tert-butylated pyrene subunits. Both 1 and 2 are fluorescent (with quantum yields in dichloromethane of ΦF =0.10 and 0.17, respectively) and are suggested to form intramolecular excimer states upon excitation, which are remarkably stabilised and exhibit large Stokes shifts (296 and 203 nm, respectively).

  20. Competitive annealing of multiple DNA origami: formation of chimeric origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majikes, Jacob M.; Nash, Jessica A.; LaBean, Thomas H.

    2016-11-01

    Scaffolded DNA origami are a robust tool for building discrete nanoscale objects at high yield. This strategy ensures, in the design process, that the desired nanostructure is the minimum free energy state for the designed set of DNA sequences. Despite aiming for the minimum free energy structure, the folding process which leads to that conformation is difficult to characterize, although it has been the subject of much research. In order to shed light on the molecular folding pathways, this study intentionally frustrates the folding process of these systems by simultaneously annealing the staple pools for multiple target or parent origami structures, forcing competition. A surprising result of these competitive, simultaneous anneals is the formation of chimeric DNA origami which inherit structural regions from both parent origami. By comparing the regions inherited from the parent origami, relative stability of substructures were compared. This allowed examination of the folding process with typical characterization techniques and materials. Anneal curves were then used as a means to rapidly generate a phase diagram of anticipated behavior as a function of staple excess and parent staple ratio. This initial study shows that competitive anneals provide an exciting way to create diverse new nanostructures and may be used to examine the relative stability of various structural motifs.

  1. Toxicities of chimeric antigen receptor T cells: recognition and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudno, Jennifer N; Kochenderfer, James N

    2016-06-30

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells can produce durable remissions in hematologic malignancies that are not responsive to standard therapies. Yet the use of CAR T cells is limited by potentially severe toxicities. Early case reports of unexpected organ damage and deaths following CAR T-cell therapy first highlighted the possible dangers of this new treatment. CAR T cells can potentially damage normal tissues by specifically targeting a tumor-associated antigen that is also expressed on those tissues. Cytokine release syndrome (CRS), a systemic inflammatory response caused by cytokines released by infused CAR T cells can lead to widespread reversible organ dysfunction. CRS is the most common type of toxicity caused by CAR T cells. Neurologic toxicity due to CAR T cells might in some cases have a different pathophysiology than CRS and requires different management. Aggressive supportive care is necessary for all patients experiencing CAR T-cell toxicities, with early intervention for hypotension and treatment of concurrent infections being essential. Interleukin-6 receptor blockade with tocilizumab remains the mainstay pharmacologic therapy for CRS, though indications for administration vary among centers. Corticosteroids should be reserved for neurologic toxicities and CRS not responsive to tocilizumab. Pharmacologic management is complicated by the risk of immunosuppressive therapy abrogating the antimalignancy activity of the CAR T cells. This review describes the toxicities caused by CAR T cells and reviews the published approaches used to manage toxicities. We present guidelines for treating patients experiencing CRS and other adverse events following CAR T-cell therapy.

  2. Chimeric TALE recombinases with programmable DNA sequence specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Andrew C; Gaj, Thomas; Fuller, Roberta P; Barbas, Carlos F

    2012-11-01

    Site-specific recombinases are powerful tools for genome engineering. Hyperactivated variants of the resolvase/invertase family of serine recombinases function without accessory factors, and thus can be re-targeted to sequences of interest by replacing native DNA-binding domains (DBDs) with engineered zinc-finger proteins (ZFPs). However, imperfect modularity with particular domains, lack of high-affinity binding to all DNA triplets, and difficulty in construction has hindered the widespread adoption of ZFPs in unspecialized laboratories. The discovery of a novel type of DBD in transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins from Xanthomonas provides an alternative to ZFPs. Here we describe chimeric TALE recombinases (TALERs): engineered fusions between a hyperactivated catalytic domain from the DNA invertase Gin and an optimized TALE architecture. We use a library of incrementally truncated TALE variants to identify TALER fusions that modify DNA with efficiency and specificity comparable to zinc-finger recombinases in bacterial cells. We also show that TALERs recombine DNA in mammalian cells. The TALER architecture described herein provides a platform for insertion of customized TALE domains, thus significantly expanding the targeting capacity of engineered recombinases and their potential applications in biotechnology and medicine.

  3. The impact of MM5 and WRF meteorology over complex terrain on CHIMERE model calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. de Meij

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of meteorological input data on calculated gas and aerosol concentrations. We use two different meteorological models (MM5 and WRF together with the chemistry transport model CHIMERE. We focus on the Po valley area (Italy for January and June 2005.

    Firstly we evaluate the meteorological parameters with observations. The analysis shows that the performance of both models is similar, however some small differences are still noticeable.

    Secondly, we analyze the impact of using MM5 and WRF on calculated PM10 and O3 concentrations. In general CHIMERE/MM5 and CHIMERE/WRF underestimate the PM10 concentrations for January. The difference in PM10 concentrations for January between CHIMERE/MM5 and CHIMERE/WRF is around a factor 1.6 (PM10 higher for CHIMERE/MM5. This difference and the larger underestimation in PM10 concentrations by CHIMERE/WRF are related to the differences in heat fluxes and the resulting PBL heights calculated by WRF. In general the PBL height by WRF meteorology is a factor 2.8 higher at noon in January than calculated by MM5. This study showed that the difference in microphysics scheme has an impact on the profile of cloud liquid water (CLW calculated by the meteorological driver and therefore on the production of SO4 aerosol.

    A sensitivity analysis shows that changing the Noah Land Surface Model (LSM for the 5-layer soil temperature model, the calculated monthly mean PM10 concentrations increase by 30%, due to the change in the heat fluxes and the resulting PBL heights.

    For June, PM10 calculated concentrations by CHIMERE/MM5 and CHIMERE/WRF are similar and agree with the observations. Calculated O3 values for June are in general overestimated by a factor 1.3 by CHIMERE/MM5 and CHIMRE/WRF. The reason for this is that daytime NO2

  4. T-regulatory cell treatment prevents chronic rejection of heart allografts in a murine mixed chimerism model

    OpenAIRE

    Pilat, Nina; Farkas, Andreas M.; Mahr, Benedikt; Schwarz, Christoph; Unger, Lukas; Hock, Karin; Oberhuber, Rupert; Aumayr, Klaus; Wrba, Fritz; Wekerle, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background The mixed chimerism approach induces donor-specific tolerance in both pre-clinical models and clinical pilot trials. However, chronic rejection of heart allografts and acute rejection of skin allografts were observed in some chimeric animals despite persistent hematopoietic chimerism and tolerance toward donor antigens in vitro. We tested whether additional cell therapy with regulatory T cells (Tregs) is able to induce full immunologic tolerance and prevent chronic rejection. Metho...

  5. Automated Manufacturing of Potent CD20-Directed Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Clinical Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Dominik; Mockel-Tenbrinck, Nadine; Drechsel, Katharina; Barth, Carola; Mauer, Daniela; Schaser, Thomas; Kolbe, Carolin; Al Rawashdeh, Wael; Brauner, Janina; Hardt, Olaf; Pflug, Natali; Holtick, Udo; Borchmann, Peter; Assenmacher, Mario; Kaiser, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    The clinical success of gene-engineered T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), as manifested in several clinical trials for the treatment of B cell malignancies, warrants the development of a simple and robust manufacturing procedure capable of reducing to a minimum the challenges associated with its complexity. Conventional protocols comprise many open handling steps, are labor intensive, and are difficult to upscale for large numbers of patients. Furthermore, extensive training of personnel is required to avoid operator variations. An automated current Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant process has therefore been developed for the generation of gene-engineered T cells. Upon installation of the closed, single-use tubing set on the CliniMACS Prodigy™, sterile welding of the starting cell product, and sterile connection of the required reagents, T cells are magnetically enriched, stimulated, transduced using lentiviral vectors, expanded, and formulated. Starting from healthy donor (HD) or lymphoma or melanoma patient material (PM), the robustness and reproducibility of the manufacturing of anti-CD20 specific CAR T cells were verified. Independent of the starting material, operator, or device, the process consistently yielded a therapeutic dose of highly viable CAR T cells. Interestingly, the formulated product obtained with PM was comparable to that of HD with respect to cell composition, phenotype, and function, even though the starting material differed significantly. Potent antitumor reactivity of the produced anti-CD20 CAR T cells was shown in vitro as well as in vivo. In summary, the automated T cell transduction process meets the requirements for clinical manufacturing that the authors intend to use in two separate clinical trials for the treatment of melanoma and B cell lymphoma.

  6. Immune Reconstitution Kinetics following Intentionally Induced Mixed Chimerism by Nonmyeloablative Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayoun Kim

    Full Text Available Establishing mixed chimerism is a promising approach for inducing donor-specific transplant tolerance. The establishment and maintenance of mixed chimerism may enable long-term engraftment of organ transplants while minimizing the use of immunosuppressants. Several protocols for inducing mixed chimerism have been reported; however, the exact mechanism underlying the development of immune tolerance remains to be elucidated. Therefore, understanding the kinetics of engraftment during early post-transplant period may provide insight into establishing long-term mixed chimerism and permanent transplant tolerance. In this study, we intentionally induced allogeneic mixed chimerism using a nonmyeloablative regimen by host natural killer (NK cell depletion and T cell-depleted bone marrow (BM grafts in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC-mismatched murine model and analyzed the kinetics of donor (C57BL/6 and recipient (BALB/c engraftment in the weeks following transplantation. Donor BM cells were well engrafted and stabilized without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD as early as one week post-bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Donor-derived thymic T cells were reconstituted four weeks after BMT; however, the emergence of newly developed T cells was more obvious at the periphery as early as two weeks after BMT. Also, the emergence and changes in ratio of recipient- and donor-derived NKT cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs including dendritic cells (DCs and B cells were noted after BMT. Here, we report a longitudinal analysis of the development of donor- and recipient-originated hematopoietic cells in various lymphatic tissues of intentionally induced mixed chimerism mouse model during early post-transplant period. Through the understanding of immune reconstitution at early time points after nonmyeloablative BMT, we suggest guidelines on intentionally inducing durable mixed chimerism.

  7. Application of chimeric glucanase comprising mutanase and dextranase for prevention of dental biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Ryoko; Imai, Susumu; Murata, Takatoshi; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Okamoto, Masaaki; Tsumori, Hideaki; Kakuta, Erika; Hanada, Nobuhiro; Momoi, Yasuko

    2015-01-01

    Water-insoluble glucan (WIG) produced by mutans streptococci, an important cariogenic pathogen, plays an important role in the formation of dental biofilm and adhesion of biofilm to tooth surfaces. Glucanohydrolases, such as mutanase (α-1,3-glucanase) and dextranase (α-1,6-glucanase), are able to hydrolyze WIG. The purposes of this study were to construct bi-functional chimeric glucanase, composed of mutanase and dextranase, and to examine the effects of this chimeric glucanase on the formation and decomposition of biofilm. The mutanase gene from Paenibacillus humicus NA1123 and the dextranase gene from Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were cloned and ligated into a pE-SUMOstar Amp plasmid vector. The resultant his-tagged fusion chimeric glucanase was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and partially purified. The effects of chimeric glucanase on the formation and decomposition of biofilm formed on a glass surface by Streptococcus sobrinus 6715 glucosyltransferases were then examined. This biofilm was fractionated into firmly adherent, loosely adherent, and non-adherent WIG fractions. Amounts of WIG in each fraction were determined by a phenol-sulfuric acid method, and reducing sugars were quantified by the Somogyi-Nelson method. Chimeric glucanase reduced the formation of the total amount of WIG in a dose-dependent manner, and significant reductions of WIG in the adherent fraction were observed. Moreover, the chimeric glucanase was able to decompose biofilm, being 4.1 times more effective at glucan inhibition of biofilm formation than a mixture of dextranase and mutanase. These results suggest that the chimeric glucanase is useful for prevention of dental biofilm formation.

  8. ChimerDB 3.0: an enhanced database for fusion genes from cancer transcriptome and literature data mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myunggyo; Lee, Kyubum; Yu, Namhee; Jang, Insu; Choi, Ikjung; Kim, Pora; Jang, Ye Eun; Kim, Byounggun; Kim, Sunkyu; Lee, Byungwook; Kang, Jaewoo; Lee, Sanghyuk

    2017-01-01

    Fusion gene is an important class of therapeutic targets and prognostic markers in cancer. ChimerDB is a comprehensive database of fusion genes encompassing analysis of deep sequencing data and manual curations. In this update, the database coverage was enhanced considerably by adding two new modules of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) RNA-Seq analysis and PubMed abstract mining. ChimerDB 3.0 is composed of three modules of ChimerKB, ChimerPub and ChimerSeq. ChimerKB represents a knowledgebase including 1066 fusion genes with manual curation that were compiled from public resources of fusion genes with experimental evidences. ChimerPub includes 2767 fusion genes obtained from text mining of PubMed abstracts. ChimerSeq module is designed to archive the fusion candidates from deep sequencing data. Importantly, we have analyzed RNA-Seq data of the TCGA project covering 4569 patients in 23 cancer types using two reliable programs of FusionScan and TopHat-Fusion. The new user interface supports diverse search options and graphic representation of fusion gene structure. ChimerDB 3.0 is available at http://ercsb.ewha.ac.kr/fusiongene/. PMID:27899563

  9. Elutriated lymphocytes for manufacturing chimeric antigen receptor T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroncek, David F; Lee, Daniel W; Ren, Jiaqiang; Sabatino, Marianna; Highfill, Steven; Khuu, Hanh; Shah, Nirali N; Kaplan, Rosandra N; Fry, Terry J; Mackall, Crystal L

    2017-03-16

    Clinical trials of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells manufactured from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) concentrates for the treatment of hematologic malignancies have been promising, but CAR T cell yields have been variable. This variability is due in part to the contamination of the PBMC concentrates with monocytes and granulocytes. Counter-flow elutriation allows for the closed system separation of lymphocytes from monocytes and granulocytes. We investigated the use of PBMC concentrates enriched for lymphocytes using elutriation for manufacturing 8 CD19- and 5 GD2-CAR T cell products. When compared to PBMC concentrates, lymphocyte-enriched elutriation fractions contained greater proportions of CD3+ and CD56+ cells and reduced proportions of CD14+ and CD15+ cells. All 13 CAR T cell products manufactured using the elutriated lymphocytes yielded sufficient quantities of transduced CAR T cells to meet clinical dose criteria. The GD2-CAR T cell products contained significantly more T cells and transduced T cells than the CD19-CAR T cell products. A comparison of the yields of CAR T cells produced from elutriated lymphocytes with the yields of CAR T cells previous produced from cells isolated from PBMC concentrates by anti-CD3/CD28 bead selection or by anti-CD3/CD28 bead selection plus plastic adherence found that greater quantities of GD2-CAR T cells were produced from elutriated lymphocytes, but not CD19-CAR T cells. Enrichment of PBMC concentrates for lymphocytes using elutriation increased the quantity of GD2-CAR T cells produced. These results provide further evidence that CAR T cell expansion is inhibited by monocytes and granulocytes.

  10. Development of a recombinant, chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Jorge E; Partidos, Charalambos D; Wallace, Derek; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2015-12-10

    Dengue is a significant threat to public health worldwide. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines available for dengue. Takeda Vaccines Inc. is developing a live, attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) that consists of an attenuated DENV-2 strain (TDV-2) and three chimeric viruses containing the prM and E protein genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 expressed in the context of the attenuated TDV-2 genome backbone (TDV-1, TDV-3, and TDV-4, respectively). TDV has been shown to be immunogenic and efficacious in nonclinical animal models. In interferon-receptor deficient mice, the vaccine induces humoral neutralizing antibody responses and cellular immune responses that are sufficient to protect from lethal challenge with DENV-1, DENV-2 or DENV-4. In non-human primates, administration of TDV induces innate immune responses as well as long lasting antibody and cellular immunity. In Phase 1 clinical trials, the safety and immunogenicity of two different formulations were assessed after intradermal or subcutaneous administration to healthy, flavivirus-naïve adults. TDV administration was generally well-tolerated independent of dose and route. The vaccine induced neutralizing antibody responses to all four DENV serotypes: after a single administration of the higher formulation, 24-67%% of the subjects seroconverted to all four DENV and >80% seroconverted to three or more viruses. In addition, TDV induced CD8(+) T cell responses to the non-structural NS1, NS3 and NS5 proteins of DENV. TDV has been also shown to be generally well tolerated and immunogenic in a Phase 2 clinical trial in dengue endemic countries in adults and children as young as 18 months. Additional clinical studies are ongoing in preparation for a Phase 3 safety and efficacy study.

  11. Deep RNA sequencing at single base-pair resolution reveals high complexity of the rice transcriptome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guojie; Guo, Guangwu; Hu, Xueda

    2010-01-01

    present the first transcriptome atlas for eight organs of cultivated rice. Using high-throughput paired-end RNA-seq, we unambiguously detected transcripts expressing at an extremely low level, as well as a substantial number of novel transcripts, exons, and untranslated regions. An analysis of alternative...... fusion events are more common than expected. In-depth analysis revealed a multitude of fusion transcripts that might be by-products of alternative splicing. Validation and chimeric transcript structural analysis provided evidence that some of these transcripts are likely to be functional in the cell...

  12. Faith-based perspectives on the use of chimeric organisms for medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeling, Chris; Irvine, Rob; Kerridge, Ian

    2014-04-01

    Efforts to advance our understanding of neurodegenerative diseases involve the creation chimeric organisms from human neural stem cells and primate embryos--known as prenatal chimeras. The existence of potential mentally complex beings with human and non-human neural apparatus raises fundamental questions as to the ethical permissibility of chimeric research and the moral status of the creatures it creates. Even as bioethicists find fewer reasons to be troubled by most types of chimeric organisms, social attitudes towards the non-human world are often influenced by religious beliefs. In this paper scholars representing eight major religious traditions provide a brief commentary on a hypothetical case concerning the development and use of prenatal human-animal chimeric primates in medical research. These commentaries reflect the plurality and complexity within and between religious discourses of our relationships with other species. Views on the moral status and permissibility of research on neural human animal chimeras vary. The authors provide an introduction to those who seek a better understanding of how faith-based perspectives might enter into biomedical ethics and public discourse towards forms of biomedical research that involves chimeric organisms.

  13. Induction of pluripotent protective immunity following immunisation with a chimeric vaccine against human cytomegalovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhong

    Full Text Available Based on the life-time cost to the health care system, the Institute of Medicine has assigned the highest priority for a vaccine to control human cytomegalovirus (HCMV disease in transplant patients and new born babies. In spite of numerous attempts successful licensure of a HCMV vaccine formulation remains elusive. Here we have developed a novel chimeric vaccine strategy based on a replication-deficient adenovirus which encodes the extracellular domain of gB protein and multiple HLA class I & II-restricted CTL epitopes from HCMV as a contiguous polypeptide. Immunisation with this chimeric vaccine consistently generated strong HCMV-specific CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells which co-expressed IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, while the humoral response induced by this vaccine showed strong virus neutralizing capacity. More importantly, immunization with adenoviral chimeric vaccine also afforded protection against challenge with recombinant vaccinia virus encoding HCMV antigens and this protection was associated with the induction of a pluripotent antigen-specific cellular and antibody response. Furthermore, in vitro stimulation with this adenoviral chimeric vaccine rapidly expanded multiple antigen-specific human CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells from healthy virus carriers. These studies demonstrate that the adenovirus chimeric HCMV vaccine provides an excellent platform for reconstituting protective immunity to prevent HCMV diseases in different clinical settings.

  14. Reversible Heat-Induced Inactivation of Chimeric β-Glucuronidase in Transgenic Plants1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almoguera, Concepción; Rojas, Anabel; Jordano, Juan

    2002-01-01

    We compared the expression patterns in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) of two chimeric genes: a translational fusion to β-glucuronidase (GUS) and a transcriptional fusion, both with the same promoter and 5′-flanking sequences of Ha hsp17.7 G4, a small heat shock protein (sHSP) gene from sunflower (Helianthus annuus). We found that immediately after heat shock, the induced expression from the two fusions in seedlings was similar, considering chimeric mRNA or GUS protein accumulation. Surprisingly, we discovered that the chimeric GUS protein encoded by the translational fusion was mostly inactive in such conditions. We also found that this inactivation was fully reversible. Thus, after returning to control temperature, the GUS activity was fully recovered without substantial changes in GUS protein accumulation. In contrast, we did not find differences in the in vitro heat inactivation of the respective GUS proteins. Insolubilization of the chimeric GUS protein correlated with its inactivation, as indicated by immunoprecipitation analyses. The inclusion in another chimeric gene of the 21 amino-terminal amino acids from a different sHSP lead to a comparable reversible inactivation. That effect not only illustrates unexpected post-translational problems, but may also point to sequences involved in interactions specific to sHSPs and in vivo heat stress conditions. PMID:12011363

  15. Endothelial cell chimerism by fluorescence in situ hybridization in gender mismatched renal allograft biopsies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Hong-wei; SHI Bing-yi; QIAN Ye-yong; NA Yan-qun; ZENG Xuan; ZHONG Ding-rong; LU Min; ZOU Wan-zhong; WU Shi-fei

    2007-01-01

    Background The blood vessels of a transplanted organ are the interface between donor and recipient. The endothelium in the blood vessels is thought to be the major target for graft rejection. Endothelial cells of a transplanted organ can be of recipient origin after transplantation. In this study, we tested whether endothelial chimerism correlated with the graft rejection and cold ischemia.Methods We studied the biopsy samples from 34 renal transplants of female recipients who received the kidney from a male donor for the presence of endothelial cells of recipient origin. We examined the tissue sections of renal biopsy samples by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the presence of endothelial cells containing two X chromosomes using a biotinylated Y chromosome probe and digoxigenin labelled X chromosome probe, and then analyzed the relationship between the endothelial cell chimerism and the rejection and cold ischemia.Results Endothelial chimerism was common and irrespective of rejections (P>0.05). The cold ischemic time of chimerism group was longer than no chimerism group ((14.83±4.03) hours vs (11.27±3.87) hours, P<0.05).Conclusions There is no correlation between the percentage of recipient endothelial cells in vascular endothelial cells and the type of graft rejection. The endothelium damaged by ischemic injury might be repaired by the endothelial cells from the recipient.

  16. Targeted transcriptional repression using a chimeric TALE-SRDX repressor protein

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-12-14

    Transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins secreted by Xanthomonas bacteria when they infect plants. TALEs contain a modular DNA binding domain that can be easily engineered to bind any sequence of interest, and have been used to provide user-selected DNA-binding modules to generate chimeric nucleases and transcriptional activators in mammalian cells and plants. Here we report the use of TALEs to generate chimeric sequence-specific transcriptional repressors. The dHax3 TALE was used as a scaffold to provide a DNA-binding module fused to the EAR-repression domain (SRDX) to generate a chimeric repressor that targets the RD29A promoter. The dHax3. SRDX protein efficiently repressed the transcription of the RD29A

  17. Bone marrow cell migration to the heart in a chimeric mouse model of acute chagasic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irion, Camila Iansen; Paredes, Bruno Diaz; Brasil, Guilherme Visconde; da Cunha, Sandro Torrentes; Paula, Luis Felipe; Carvalho, Alysson Roncally; de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos; Carvalho, Adriana Bastos; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chagas disease is a public health problem caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. There is currently no effective therapy for Chagas disease. Although there is some evidence for the beneficial effect of bone marrow-derived cells in chagasic disease, the mechanisms underlying their effects in the heart are unknown. Reports have suggested that bone marrow cells are recruited to the chagasic heart; however, studies using chimeric mouse models of chagasic cardiomyopathy are rare. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to investigate the migration of bone marrow cells to the heart after T. cruzi infection in a model of chagasic disease in chimeric mice. METHODS To obtain chimerical mice, wild-type (WT) C57BL6 mice were exposed to full body irradiation (7 Gy), causing bone marrow ablation. Then, bone marrow cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic mice were infused into the mice. Graft effectiveness was confirmed by flow cytometry. Experimental mice were divided into four groups: (i) infected chimeric (iChim) mice; (ii) infected WT (iWT) mice, both of which received 3 × 104 trypomastigotes of the Brazil strain; (iii) non-infected chimeric (Chim) mice; and (iv) non-infected WT mice. FINDINGS At one-month post-infection, iChim and iWT mice showed first degree atrioventricular block with decreased heart rate and treadmill exercise parameters compared to those in the non-infected groups. MAIN CONCLUSIONS iChim mice showed an increase in parasitaemia, myocarditis, and the presence of amastigote nests in the heart tissue compared to iWT mice. Flow cytometry analysis did not detect haematopoietic progenitor cells in the hearts of infected mice. Furthermore, GFP+ cardiomyocytes were not detected in the tissues of chimeric mice. PMID:28767980

  18. A Chimeric UDP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase Produced by Protein Engineering Exhibits Sensitivity to Allosteric Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías D. Asención Diez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria, glycogen or oligosaccharide accumulation involves glucose-1-phosphate partitioning into either ADP-glucose (ADP-Glc or UDP-Glc. Their respective synthesis is catalyzed by allosterically regulated ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27, ADP-Glc PPase or unregulated UDP-Glc PPase (EC 2.7.7.9. In this work, we characterized the UDP-Glc PPase from Streptococcus mutans. In addition, we constructed a chimeric protein by cutting the C-terminal domain of the ADP-Glc PPase from Escherichia coli and pasting it to the entire S. mutans UDP-Glc PPase. Both proteins were fully active as UDP-Glc PPases and their kinetic parameters were measured. The chimeric enzyme had a slightly higher affinity for substrates than the native S. mutans UDP-Glc PPase, but the maximal activity was four times lower. Interestingly, the chimeric protein was sensitive to regulation by pyruvate, 3-phosphoglyceric acid and fructose-1,6-bis-phosphate, which are known to be effectors of ADP-Glc PPases from different sources. The three compounds activated the chimeric enzyme up to three-fold, and increased the affinity for substrates. This chimeric protein is the first reported UDP-Glc PPase with allosteric regulatory properties. In addition, this is a pioneer work dealing with a chimeric enzyme constructed as a hybrid of two pyrophosphorylases with different specificity toward nucleoside-diphospho-glucose and our results turn to be relevant for a deeper understanding of the evolution of allosterism in this family of enzymes.

  19. Generation and developmental characteristics of porcine tetraploid embryos and tetraploid/diploid chimeric embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenteng; Kong, Qingran; Shi, Yongqian; Xie, Bingteng; Jiao, Mingxia; Huang, Tianqing; Guo, Shimeng; Hu, Kui; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize electrofusion conditions for generating porcine tetraploid (4n) embryos and produce tetraploid/diploid (4n/2n) chimeric embryos. Different electric field intensities were tested and 2 direct current (DC) pulses of 0.9 kV/cm for 30 μs was selected as the optimum condition for electrofusion of 2-cell embryos to produce 4n embryos. The fusion rate of 2-cell embryos and the development rate to blastocyst of presumably 4n embryos, reached 85.4% and 28.5%, respectively. 68.18% of the fused embryos were found to be 4n as demonstrated by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Although the number of blastomeres in 4n blastocysts was significantly lower than in 2n blastocysts (P0.05), suggesting that the blastocyst forming capacity in 4n embryos is similar to those in 2n embryos. Moreover, 4n/2n chimeric embryos were obtained by aggregation of 4n and 2n embryos. We found that the developmental rate and cell number of blastocysts of 4-cell (4n)/4-cell (2n) chimeric embryos were significantly higher than those of 2-cell (4n)/4-cell (2n), 4-cell (4n)/8-cell (2n), 4-cell (4n)/2-cell (2n) chimeric embryos (P<0.05). Consistent with mouse chimeras, the majority of 4n cells contribute to the trophectoderm (TE), while the 2n cells are mainly present in the inner cell mass (ICM) of porcine 4n/2n chimeric embryos. Our study established a feasible and efficient approach to produce porcine 4n embryos and 4n/2n chimeric embryos.

  20. Chimeric Antibody-Binding Vitreoscilla Hemoglobin (VHb Mediates Redox-Catalysis Reaction: New Insight into the Functional Role of VHb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaneenart Suwanwong, Malin Kvist, Chartchalerm Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Natta Tansila, Leif Bulow, Virapong Prachayasittikul

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimentation was initiated to explore insight into the redox-catalysis reaction derived from the heme prosthetic group of chimeric Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb. Two chimeric genes encoding chimeric VHbs harboring one and two consecutive sequences of Fc-binding motif (Z-domain were successfully constructed and expressed in E. coli strain TG1. The chimeric ZVHb and ZZVHb were purified to a high purity of more than 95% using IgG-Sepharose affinity chromatography. From surface plasmon resonance, binding affinity constants of the chimeric ZVHb and ZZVHb to human IgG were 9.7 x 107 and 49.1 x 107 per molar, respectively. More importantly, the chimeric VHbs exhibited a peroxidase-like activity determined by activity staining on native PAGE and dot blotting. Effects of pH, salt, buffer system, level of peroxidase substrate and chromogen substrate were determined in order to maximize the catalytic reaction. From our findings, the chimeric VHbs displayed their maximum peroxidase-like activity at the neutral pH (~7.0 in the presence of high concentration (20-40 mM of hydrogen peroxide. Under such conditions, the detection limit derived from the calibration curve was at 250 ng for the chimeric VHbs, which was approximately 5-fold higher than that of the horseradish peroxidase. These findings reveal the novel functional role of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin indicating a high trend of feasibility for further biotechnological and medical applications.

  1. Silkworms transformed with chimeric silkworm/spider silk genes spin composite silk fibers with improved mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of a spider silk manufacturing process is of great interest. piggyBac vectors were used to create transgenic silkworms encoding chimeric silkworm/spider silk proteins. The silk fibers produced by these animals were composite materials that included chimeric silkworm/spider silk prote...

  2. Design and production in Aspergillus niger of a chimeric protein associating a fungal feruloyl esterase and a clostridial dockerin domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levasseur, A.; Pagès, S.; Fierobe, H.-P.; Navarro, D.; Punt, P.; Belaïch, J.-P.; Asther, M.; Record, E.

    2004-01-01

    A chimeric enzyme associating feruloyl esterase A (FAEA) from Aspergilhis niger and dockerin from Clostridium thermocellum was produced in A. niger. A completely truncated form was produced when the dockerin domain was located downstream of the FAEA (FAEA-Doc), whereas no chimeric protein was produc

  3. Patterns of Amino Acid Evolution in the Drosophila ananassae Chimeric Gene, siren, Parallel Those of Other Adh-Derived Chimeras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hung-Jui; Jones, Corbin D.

    2008-01-01

    siren1 and siren2 are novel alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh)-derived chimeric genes in the Drosophila bipectinata complex. D. ananassae, however, harbors a single homolog of these genes. Like other Adh-derived chimeric genes, siren evolved adaptively shortly after it was formed. These changes likely shifted the catalytic activity of siren. PMID:18780749

  4. The impact of chimerism in DNA-based forensic sex determination analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Renjith; Donald, Preethy Mary; Nagraj, Sumanth Kumbargere; Idiculla, Jose Joy; Hj Ismail, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Sex determination is the most important step in personal identification in forensic investigations. DNA-based sex determination analysis is comparatively more reliable than the other conventional methods of sex determination analysis. Advanced technology like real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) offers accurate and reproducible results and is at the level of legal acceptance. But still there are situations like chimerism where an individual possess both male and female specific factors together in their body. Sex determination analysis in such cases can give erroneous results. This paper discusses the phenomenon of chimerism and its impact on sex determination analysis in forensic investigations.

  5. Interspecies chimeric complementation for the generation of functional human tissues and organs in large animal hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The past decade's rapid progress in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) research has generated hope for meeting the rising demand of organ donation, which remains the only effective cure for end-stage organ failure, a major cause of death worldwide. Despite the potential, generation of transplantable organs from hPSCs using in vitro differentiation is far-fetched. An in vivo interspecies chimeric complementation strategy relying on chimeric-competent hPSCs and zygote genome editing provides an auspicious alternative for providing unlimited organ source for transplantation.

  6. Journal of Agricultural Extension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mission Statement The mission of the "Journal of Agricultural Extension" is to publish ... diffusion and adoption of innovations; extension communication models and ... Socio-Economic Determinants of Cocoyam Farmer's Strategies for Climate ...

  7. Tumor-Triggered Geometrical Shape Switch of Chimeric Peptide for Enhanced in Vivo Tumor Internalization and Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kai; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Weiyun; Wang, Shibo; Xu, Luming; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Xianzheng; Han, Heyou

    2017-03-28

    Geometrical shape of nanoparticles plays an important role in cellular internalization. However, the applicability in tumor selective therapeutics is still scarcely reported. In this article, we designed a tumor extracellular acidity-responsive chimeric peptide with geometrical shape switch for enhanced tumor internalization and photodynamic therapy. This chimeric peptide could self-assemble into spherical nanoparticles at physiological condition. While at tumor extracellular acidic microenvironment, chimeric peptide underwent detachment of acidity-sensitive 2,3-dimethylmaleic anhydride groups. The subsequent recovery of ionic complementarity between chimeric peptides resulted in formation of rod-like nanoparticles. Both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that this acidity-triggered geometrical shape switch endowed chimeric peptide with accelerated internalization in tumor cells, prolonged accumulation in tumor tissue, enhanced photodynamic therapy, and minimal side effects. Our results suggested that fusing tumor microenvironment with geometrical shape switch should be a promising strategy for targeted drug delivery.

  8. Sequencing and characterisation of rearrangements in three S. pastorianus strains reveals the presence of chimeric genes and gives evidence of breakpoint reuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Hewitt

    Full Text Available Gross chromosomal rearrangements have the potential to be evolutionarily advantageous to an adapting organism. The generation of a hybrid species increases opportunity for recombination by bringing together two homologous genomes. We sought to define the location of genomic rearrangements in three strains of Saccharomyces pastorianus, a natural lager-brewing yeast hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces eubayanus, using whole genome shotgun sequencing. Each strain of S. pastorianus has lost species-specific portions of its genome and has undergone extensive recombination, producing chimeric chromosomes. We predicted 30 breakpoints that we confirmed at the single nucleotide level by designing species-specific primers that flank each breakpoint, and then sequencing the PCR product. These rearrangements are the result of recombination between areas of homology between the two subgenomes, rather than repetitive elements such as transposons or tRNAs. Interestingly, 28/30 S. cerevisiae-S. eubayanus recombination breakpoints are located within genic regions, generating chimeric genes. Furthermore we show evidence for the reuse of two breakpoints, located in HSP82 and KEM1, in strains of proposed independent origin.

  9. Exploiting the yeast L-A viral capsid for the in vivo assembly of chimeric VLPs as platform in vaccine development and foreign protein expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Powilleit

    Full Text Available A novel expression system based on engineered variants of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae dsRNA virus L-A was developed allowing the in vivo assembly of chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs as a unique platform for a wide range of applications. We show that polypeptides fused to the viral capsid protein Gag self-assemble into isometric VLP chimeras carrying their cargo inside the capsid, thereby not only effectively preventing proteolytic degradation in the host cell cytosol, but also allowing the expression of a per se cytotoxic protein. Carboxyterminal extension of Gag by T cell epitopes from human cytomegalovirus pp65 resulted in the formation of hybrid VLPs that strongly activated antigen-specific CD8(+ memory T cells ex vivo. Besides being a carrier for polypeptides inducing antigen-specific immune responses in vivo, VLP chimeras were also shown to be effective in the expression and purification of (i a heterologous model protein (GFP, (ii a per se toxic protein (K28 alpha-subunit, and (iii a particle-associated and fully recyclable biotechnologically relevant enzyme (esterase A. Thus, yeast viral Gag represents a unique platform for the in vivo assembly of chimeric VLPs, equally attractive and useful in vaccine development and recombinant protein production.

  10. Single base-resolution methylome of the silkworm reveals a sparse epigenomic map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiang, Hui; Zhu, Jingde; Chen, Quan;

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation in insects may have effects on diverse biological processes. Here we survey the methylome of a model insect, the silkworm Bombyx mori, at single-base resolution using Illumina high-throughput bisulfite sequencing (MethylC-Seq). We conservatively estimate that 0.11% of genomic...

  11. X-ray Diffraction Study of Single-base Propellant Ageing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Ageing of single-base propellants, extending over a storage period of more than 50 years, was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis. X-ray degree of crystallinity and interplanar spacing were determined. Analysed was the effect of nitrogen content, degree of substitution (DOS) and diphenylamine (DPA) content on structural changes in propellants.

  12. Optimization of single-base-pair mismatch discrimination in oligonucleotide microarrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urakawa, H.; Fantroussi, El S.; Smidt, H.; Smoot, J.C.; Tribou, E.H.; Kelly, J.J.; Noble, P.A.; Stahl, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    The discrimination between perfect-match and single-base-pair-mismatched nucleic acid duplexes was investigated by using oligonucleotide DNA microarrays and nonequilibrium dissociation rates (melting profiles). DNA and RNA versions of two synthetic targets corresponding to the 16S rRNA sequences of

  13. Expression of a Chimeric Gene Encoding Insecticidal Crystal Protein Cry1Aabc of Bacillus thuringiensis in Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. Confers Resistance to Gram Pod Borer (Helicoverpa armigera Hubner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Das

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Domain swapping and generation of chimeric insecticidal crystal protein is an emerging area of insect pest management. The lepidopteran insect pest, gram pod borer (Helicoverpa armigera H. wreaks havoc to chickpea crop affecting production. Lepidopteran insects were reported to be controlled by Bt (cryI genes. We designed a plant codon optimized chimeric Bt gene (cry1Aabc using three domains from three different cry1A genes (domains I, II, and III from cry1Aa, cry1Ab, and cry1Ac, respectively and expressed it under the control of a constitutive promoter in chickpea (cv. DCP92-3 to assess its effect on gram pod borer. A total of six transgenic chickpea shoots were established by grafting into mature fertile plants. The in vitro regenerated (organogenetic shoots were selected based on antibiotic kanamycin monosulfate (100 mg/L with transformation efficiency of 0.076%. Three transgenic events were extensively studied based on gene expression pattern and insect mortality across generations. Protein expression in pod walls, immature seeds and leaves (pre- and post-flowering were estimated and expression in pre-flowering stage was found higher than that of post-flowering. Analysis for the stable integration, expression and insect mortality (detached leaf and whole plant bioassay led to identification of efficacious transgenic chickpea lines. The chimeric cry1Aabc expressed in chickpea is effective against gram pod borer and generated events can be utilized in transgenic breeding program.

  14. Expression of a Chimeric Gene Encoding Insecticidal Crystal Protein Cry1Aabc of Bacillus thuringiensis in Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) Confers Resistance to Gram Pod Borer (Helicoverpa armigera Hubner.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Alok; Datta, Subhojit; Thakur, Shallu; Shukla, Alok; Ansari, Jamal; Sujayanand, G K; Chaturvedi, Sushil K; Kumar, P A; Singh, N P

    2017-01-01

    Domain swapping and generation of chimeric insecticidal crystal protein is an emerging area of insect pest management. The lepidopteran insect pest, gram pod borer (Helicoverpa armigera H.) wreaks havoc to chickpea crop affecting production. Lepidopteran insects were reported to be controlled by Bt (cryI) genes. We designed a plant codon optimized chimeric Bt gene (cry1Aabc) using three domains from three different cry1A genes (domains I, II, and III from cry1Aa, cry1Ab, and cry1Ac, respectively) and expressed it under the control of a constitutive promoter in chickpea (cv. DCP92-3) to assess its effect on gram pod borer. A total of six transgenic chickpea shoots were established by grafting into mature fertile plants. The in vitro regenerated (organogenetic) shoots were selected based on antibiotic kanamycin monosulfate (100 mg/L) with transformation efficiency of 0.076%. Three transgenic events were extensively studied based on gene expression pattern and insect mortality across generations. Protein expression in pod walls, immature seeds and leaves (pre- and post-flowering) were estimated and expression in pre-flowering stage was found higher than that of post-flowering. Analysis for the stable integration, expression and insect mortality (detached leaf and whole plant bioassay) led to identification of efficacious transgenic chickpea lines. The chimeric cry1Aabc expressed in chickpea is effective against gram pod borer and generated events can be utilized in transgenic breeding program.

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi Differentiates and Multiplies within Chimeric Parasitophorous Vacuoles in Macrophages Coinfected with Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, Carina Carraro; Ferreira, Éden Ramalho; Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Rabinovitch, Michel; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Real, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The trypanosomatids Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi are excellent models for the study of the cell biology of intracellular protozoan infections. After their uptake by mammalian cells, the parasitic protozoan flagellates L. amazonensis and T. cruzi lodge within acidified parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs). However, whereas L. amazonensis develops in spacious, phagolysosome-like PVs that may enclose numerous parasites, T. cruzi is transiently hosted within smaller vacuoles from which it soon escapes to the host cell cytosol. To investigate if parasite-specific vacuoles are required for the survival and differentiation of T. cruzi, we constructed chimeric vacuoles by infection of L. amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages with T. cruzi epimastigotes (EPIs) or metacyclic trypomastigotes (MTs). These chimeric vacuoles, easily observed by microscopy, allowed the entry and fate of T. cruzi in L. amazonensis PVs to be dynamically recorded by multidimensional imaging of coinfected cells. We found that although T. cruzi EPIs remained motile and conserved their morphology in chimeric vacuoles, T. cruzi MTs differentiated into amastigote-like forms capable of multiplying. These results demonstrate that the large adaptive vacuoles of L. amazonensis are permissive to T. cruzi survival and differentiation and that noninfective EPIs are spared from destruction within the chimeric PVs. We conclude that T. cruzi differentiation can take place in Leishmania-containing vacuoles, suggesting this occurs prior to their escape into the host cell cytosol.

  16. Evidence for transcript networks composed of chimeric RNAs in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Djebali

    Full Text Available The classic organization of a gene structure has followed the Jacob and Monod bacterial gene model proposed more than 50 years ago. Since then, empirical determinations of the complexity of the transcriptomes found in yeast to human has blurred the definition and physical boundaries of genes. Using multiple analysis approaches we have characterized individual gene boundaries mapping on human chromosomes 21 and 22. Analyses of the locations of the 5' and 3' transcriptional termini of 492 protein coding genes revealed that for 85% of these genes the boundaries extend beyond the current annotated termini, most often connecting with exons of transcripts from other well annotated genes. The biological and evolutionary importance of these chimeric transcripts is underscored by (1 the non-random interconnections of genes involved, (2 the greater phylogenetic depth of the genes involved in many chimeric interactions, (3 the coordination of the expression of connected genes and (4 the close in vivo and three dimensional proximity of the genomic regions being transcribed and contributing to parts of the chimeric RNAs. The non-random nature of the connection of the genes involved suggest that chimeric transcripts should not be studied in isolation, but together, as an RNA network.

  17. Engineered Chimeric Peptides as Antimicrobial Surface Coating Agents toward Infection-Free Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Hilal; O'Neill, Mary B; Kacar, Turgay; Wilson, Brandon R; Oren, E Emre; Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tamerler, Candan

    2016-03-02

    Prevention of bacterial colonization and consequent biofilm formation remains a major challenge in implantable medical devices. Implant-associated infections are not only a major cause of implant failures but also their conventional treatment with antibiotics brings further complications due to the escalation in multidrug resistance to a variety of bacterial species. Owing to their unique properties, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have gained significant attention as effective agents to combat colonization of microorganisms. These peptides have been shown to exhibit a wide spectrum of activities with specificity to a target cell while having a low tendency for developing bacterial resistance. Engineering biomaterial surfaces that feature AMP properties, therefore, offer a promising approach to prevent implant infections. Here, we engineered a chimeric peptide with bifunctionality that both forms a robust solid-surface coating while presenting antimicrobial property. The individual domains of the chimeric peptides were evaluated for their solid-binding kinetics to titanium substrate as well as for their antimicrobial properties in solution. The antimicrobial efficacy of the chimeric peptide on the implant material was evaluated in vitro against infection by a variety of bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus. epidermidis, and Escherichia coli, which are commonly found in oral and orthopedic implant related surgeries. Our results demonstrate significant improvement in reducing bacterial colonization onto titanium surfaces below the detectable limit. Engineered chimeric peptides with freely displayed antimicrobial domains could be a potential solution for developing infection-free surfaces by engineering implant interfaces with highly reduced bacterial colonization property.

  18. Versatile bio-ink for covalent immobilization of chimeric avidin on sol-gel substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Jarkko J; Kivimäki, Liisa; Määttä, Juha A E; Mäkelä, Inka; Hakalahti, Leena; Takkinen, Kristiina; Kulomaa, Markku S; Hytönen, Vesa P; Hormi, Osmo E O

    2011-10-15

    A bio-ink for covalent deposition of thermostable, high affinity biotin-binding chimeric avidin onto sol-gel substrates was developed. The bio-ink was prepared from heterobifunctional crosslinker 6-maleimidohexanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide which was first reacted either with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane or 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane to form silane linkers 6-maleimide-N-(3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl)hexanamide or -(ethoxydimethylsilyl)propyl)-hexanamide. C-terminal cysteine genetically engineered to chimeric avidin was reacted with the maleimide group of silane linker in methanol/PBS solution to form a suspension, which was printed on sol-gel modified PMMA film. Different concentrations of chimeric avidin and ratios between silane linkers were tested to find the best properties for the bio-ink to enable gravure or inkjet printing. Bio-ink prepared from 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was found to provide the highest amount of active immobilized chimeric avidin. The developed bio-ink was shown to be valuable for automated fabrication of avidin-functionalized polymer films.

  19. Intravitreal injection of a chimeric phage endolysin Ply187 protects mice from Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: The treatment of endophthalmitis is becoming very challenging due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Hence, the development of novel therapeutic alternatives for ocular use is essential. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of Ply187AN-KSH3b, a chimeric phage endol...

  20. 77 FR 3482 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of T Cell Receptors and Chimeric Antigen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... TCR anchor to the membrane and transmit recognition signals by interacting with other proteins. CARs... domains that signal to activate the CAR-expressing cell. Therapies utilizing these technologies involve... EGFRvIII chimeric antigen (CARs) and methods of using these engineered T cells to treat and/or prevent...

  1. Ligand-mediated negative regulation of a chimeric transmembrane receptor tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desai, D M; Sap, J; Schlessinger, J;

    1993-01-01

    CD45, a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase), is required for TCR signaling. Multiple CD45 isoforms, differing in the extracellular domain, are expressed in a tissue- and activation-specific manner, suggesting an important function for this domain. We report that a chimeric protein...

  2. Exploration of genetically encoded voltage indicators based on a chimeric voltage sensing domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko eMishina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Deciphering how the brain generates cognitive function from patterns of electrical signals is one of the ultimate challenges in neuroscience. To this end, it would be highly desirable to monitor the activities of very large numbers of neurons while an animal engages in complex behaviours. Optical imaging of electrical activity using genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs has the potential to meet this challenge. Currently prevalent GEVIs are based on the voltage-sensitive fluorescent protein (VSFP prototypical design or on the voltage dependent state transitions of microbial opsins.We recently introduced a new VSFP design in which the voltage-sensing domain (VSD is sandwiched between a FRET pair of fluorescent proteins (termed VSFP-Butterflies and also demonstrated a series of chimeric VSD in which portions of the VSD of Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP are substituted by homologous portions of a voltage-gated potassium channel subunit. These chimeric VSD had faster sensing kinetics than that of the native Ci-VSD. Here, we describe a new set of VSFPs that combine chimeric VSD with the Butterfly structure. We show that these chimeric VSFP-Butterflies can report membrane voltage oscillations of up to 200 Hz in cultured cells and report sensory evoked cortical population responses in living mice. This class of GEVIs may be suitable for imaging of brain rhythms in behaving mammalians.

  3. Multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flap for reconstruction of complex defects in head and neck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canhua Jiang

    Full Text Available The anterolateral thigh flap has been the workhouse flap for coverage of soft-tissue defects in head and neck for decades. However, the reconstruction of multiple and complex soft-tissue defects in head and neck with multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps is still a challenge for reconstructive surgeries. Here, a clinical series of 12 cases is reported in which multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps were used for complex soft-tissue defects with several separately anatomic locations in head and neck. Of the 12 cases, 7 patients presented with trismus were diagnosed as advanced buccal cancer with oral submucous fibrosis, 2 tongue cancer cases were found accompanied with multiple oral mucosa lesions or buccal cancer, and 3 were hypopharyngeal cancer with anterior neck skin invaded. All soft-tissue defects were reconstructed by multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps, including 9 tripaddled anterolateral thigh flaps and 3 bipaddled flaps. The mean length of skin paddle was 19.2 (range: 14-23 cm and the mean width was 4.9 (range: 2.5-7 cm. All flaps survived and all donor sites were closed primarily. After a mean follow-up time of 9.1 months, there were no problems with the donor or recipient sites. This study supports that the multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flap is a reliable and good alternative for complex and multiple soft-tissue defects of the head and neck.

  4. A phase II trial of chimeric monoclonal antibody G250 for advanced renal cell carcinoma patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleumer, I.; Knuth, A.; Oosterwijk, E.; Hofmann, R.; Varga, Z.; Lamers, C.B.H.W.; Kruit, W.; Melchior, S.; Mala, C.; Ullrich, S.; Mulder, P.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Beck, J.L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Chimeric monoclonal antibody G250 (WX-G250) binds to a cell surface antigen found on >90% of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). A multicentre phase II study was performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of WX-G250 in metastatic RCC (mRCC) patients. In all, 36 patients with mRCC were included. WX-G250 w

  5. Chimeric plant virus particles administered nasally or orally induce systemic and mucosal immune responses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brennan, F.R.; Bellaby, T.; Helliwell, S.M.;

    1999-01-01

    The humoral immune responses to the D2 peptide of fibronectin-binding protein B (FnBP) of Staphylococcus aureus, expressed on the plant virus cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), were evaluated after mucosal delivery to mice. Intranasal immunization of these chimeric virus particles (CVPs), either alone o...

  6. Alloreactive regulatory T cells allow the generation of mixed chimerism and transplant tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina eRuiz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The induction of donor-specific transplant tolerance is one of the main goals of modern immunology. Establishment of a mixed chimerism state in the transplant recipient has proven to be a suitable strategy for the induction of long-term allograft tolerance; however, current experimental recipient preconditioning protocols have many side effects, and are not feasible for use in future therapies. In order to improve the current mixed chimerism induction protocols, we developed a non-myeloablative bone-marrow transplant protocol using retinoic acid induced alloantigen-specific Tregs, clinically available immunosuppressive drugs and lower doses of irradiation. We demonstrate that retinoic acid induced alloantigen-specific Tregs in addition to a non-myeloablative bone-marrow transplant protocol generates stable mixed chimerism and induce tolerance to allogeneic secondary skin allografts in mice. Therefore, the establishment of mixed chimerism through the use of donor-specific Tregs rather than non-specific immunosuppression could have a potential use in organ transplantation.

  7. Minimal Residual Disease Diagnostics and Chimerism in the Post-Transplant Period in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Bacher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In acute myeloid leukemia (AML, the selection of poor-risk patients for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is associated with rather high post-transplant relapse rates. As immunotherapeutic intervention is considered to be more effective before the cytomorphologic manifestation of relapse, post-transplant monitoring gains increasing attention in stem cell recipients with a previous diagnosis of AML. Different methods for detection of chimerism (e.g., microsatellite analysis or quantitative real-time PCR are available to quantify the ratio of donor and recipient cells in the post-transplant period. Various studies demonstrated the potential use of mixed chimerism kinetics to predict relapse of the AML. CD34+-specific chimerism is associated with a higher specificity of chimerism analysis. Nevertheless, a decrease of donor cells can have other causes as well. Therefore, efforts continue to introduce minimal residual disease (MRD monitoring based on molecular mutations in the post-transplant period. The NPM1 (nucleophosmin mutations can be monitored by sensitive quantitative real-time PCR in subsets of stem cell recipients with AML, but for approximately 20% of patients, suitable molecular mutations for post-transplant MRD monitoring are not available so far. This emphasizes the need for an expansion of the panel of MRD markers in the transplant setting.

  8. Lymphadenectomy prior to rat hind limb allotransplantation prevents graft-versus-host disease in chimeric hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouha, PCR; Perez-Abadia, G; Francois, CG; Laurentin-Perez, LA; Gorantla, [No Value; Vossen, M; Tai, C; Pidwell, D; Anderson, GL; Stadelmann, WK; Hewitt, CW; Kon, M; Barker, JH; Maldonado, C

    2004-01-01

    In previous rat studies, the use of mixed allogeneic chimerism (MAC) to induce host tolerance to hind limb allografts has resulted in severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The purpose of this study was to determine if immunocompetent cells in bone marrow (BM) and/or lymph nodes (LNs) of transplan

  9. SAT Type Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) Chimeric Vaccine Elicits Protection in Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent development of infectious cDNA clone technology for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), Southern African Territories (SAT) viruses has provided a valuable tool for genetic and biological characterization of field and laboratory strains. Recombinant chimeric viruses, containing the capsid-coding...

  10. Low levels of allogeneic but not syngeneic hematopoietic chimerism reverse autoimmune insulitis in prediabetic NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Yaniv, Isaac; Farkas, Daniel L; Stein, Jerry; Askenasy, Nadir

    2009-09-01

    The relative efficiencies of allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow transplantation and the threshold levels of donor chimerism required to control autoimmune insulitis were evaluated in prediabetic NOD mice. Male and female NOD mice were conditioned by radiation and grafted with bone marrow cells from allogeneic and syngeneic sex-mismatched donors. Establishment of full allogeneic chimerism in peripheral blood reversed insulitis and restored glucose tolerance despite persistence of residual host immune cells. By contrast, sublethal total body irradiation (with or without syngeneic transplant) reduced the incidence and delayed the onset of diabetes. The latter pattern was also seen in mice that rejected the bone marrow allografts. Low levels of stable allogeneic hematopoietic chimerism (>1%) were sufficient to prevent the evolution of diabetes following allogeneic transplantation. The data indicate that immunomodulation attained at low levels of allogeneic, but not syngeneic, hematopoietic chimerism is effective in resolution of islet inflammation at even relatively late stages in the evolution of the prediabetic state in a preclinical model. However, our data question the efficacy and rationale behind syngeneic (autologous-like) immuno-hematopoietic reconstitution in type 1 diabetes.

  11. A Chimeric Pneumovirus Fusion Protein Carrying Neutralizing Epitopes of Both MPV and RSV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Wen

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and human metapneumovirus (HMPV are paramyxoviruses that are responsible for substantial human health burden, particularly in children and the elderly. The fusion (F glycoproteins are major targets of the neutralizing antibody response and studies have mapped dominant antigenic sites in F. Here we grafted a major neutralizing site of RSV F, recognized by the prophylactic monoclonal antibody palivizumab, onto HMPV F, generating a chimeric protein displaying epitopes of both viruses. We demonstrate that the resulting chimeric protein (RPM-1 is recognized by both anti-RSV and anti-HMPV F neutralizing antibodies indicating that it can be used to map the epitope specificity of antibodies raised against both viruses. Mice immunized with the RPM-1 chimeric antigen generate robust neutralizing antibody responses to MPV but weak or no cross-reactive recognition of RSV F, suggesting that grafting of the single palivizumab epitope stimulates a comparatively limited antibody response. The RPM-1 protein provides a new tool for characterizing the immune responses resulting from RSV and HMPV infections and provides insights into the requirements for developing a chimeric subunit vaccine that could induce robust and balanced immunity to both virus infections.

  12. A Chimeric Pneumovirus Fusion Protein Carrying Neutralizing Epitopes of Both MPV and RSV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaolin; Pickens, Jennifer; Mousa, Jarrod J.; Leser, George P.; Lamb, Robert A.; Crowe, James E.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) are paramyxoviruses that are responsible for substantial human health burden, particularly in children and the elderly. The fusion (F) glycoproteins are major targets of the neutralizing antibody response and studies have mapped dominant antigenic sites in F. Here we grafted a major neutralizing site of RSV F, recognized by the prophylactic monoclonal antibody palivizumab, onto HMPV F, generating a chimeric protein displaying epitopes of both viruses. We demonstrate that the resulting chimeric protein (RPM-1) is recognized by both anti-RSV and anti-HMPV F neutralizing antibodies indicating that it can be used to map the epitope specificity of antibodies raised against both viruses. Mice immunized with the RPM-1 chimeric antigen generate robust neutralizing antibody responses to MPV but weak or no cross-reactive recognition of RSV F, suggesting that grafting of the single palivizumab epitope stimulates a comparatively limited antibody response. The RPM-1 protein provides a new tool for characterizing the immune responses resulting from RSV and HMPV infections and provides insights into the requirements for developing a chimeric subunit vaccine that could induce robust and balanced immunity to both virus infections. PMID:27224013

  13. Optimized total body irradiation for induction of renal allograft tolerance through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimikawa, Masaaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen can induce mixed chimerism and renal allograft tolerance between MHC-disparate non-human primates. The basic regimen includes anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), total body irradiation (TBI, 300 cGy), thymic irradiation (TI, 700 cGy), splenectomy, donor bone marrow (DBM) infusion, and posttransplant cyclosporine therapy (CYA, discontinued after 4 weeks). To evaluate the importance and to minimize the toxicity of irradiation, kidney allografts were transplanted with various manipulations of the irradiation protocol. Monkeys treated with the basic protocol without TBI and TI did not develop chimerism or long-term allograft survival. In monkeys treated with the full protocol, all six monkeys treated with two fractionated dose of 150 cGy developed chimerism and five monkeys appeared tolerant. In contrast, only two of the four monkeys treated with fractionated doses of 125 cGy developed chimerism and only one monkey survived long term. The degree of lymphocyte depletion in all recipients was proportional to the TBI dose. The fractionated TBI regimen of 150 cGy appears to be the most consistently effective regimen for establishing donor bone marrow cell engraftment and allograft tolerance. (author)

  14. Mixed T Cell Chimerism After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Severe Aplastic Anemia Using an Alemtuzumab-Containing Regimen Is Shaped by Persistence of Recipient CD8 T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Francesco; Potter, Victoria; Perez-Abellan, Pilar; Veluchamy, John P; Atif, Muhammad; Grain, Rosemary; Sen, Monica; Best, Steven; Lea, Nicholas; Rice, Carmel; Pagliuca, Antonio; Mufti, Ghulam J; Marsh, Judith C W; Barber, Linda D

    2017-02-01

    Prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is paramount for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to treat nonmalignant diseases. We previously reported that allogeneic HSCT for severe aplastic anemia (SAA) using the fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and alemtuzumab (Campath-1H) (FCC) regimen is associated with a very low risk of GVHD and excellent clinical outcomes. We now report a single-center study of 45 patients with longer follow-up and investigation of lymphocyte recovery. Overall survival (OS) was 93%, and event-free survival (EFS) was 90.7%. Acute and chronic GVHD each occurred in 6 patients (13.3%), and only 1 case was severe. Mixed T cell chimerism was frequent and persisted after cessation of immunosuppression. T cells were extensively depleted, representing only 11.3% of lymphocytes at day 30 and rising to 43.8% by 1 year, but still significantly below normal levels (67.2%; P = .018), and deficiency persisted after immunosuppressive therapy (IST) withdrawal. Depletion of CD4 T cells was particularly profound, causing inversion of the normal CD4:CD8 T cell ratio. T cell subset composition was also abnormal, with memory and effector T cells predominating for at least 6 months after FCC HSCT. Analysis of T cell subset chimerism showed that CD4 T cells were predominantly donor-derived at 1 year, whereas recipient-derived CD8 T cells shaped mixed chimerism with a notable contribution of recipient effector CD8 T cells. The prolonged mixed T cell chimerism after IST withdrawal and low incidence of GVHD indicates the establishment of mutual tolerance, but the low incidence of viral disease suggests maintenance of antiviral immunity. Our study shows that despite the abnormal T cell profile after allogeneic HSCT for SAA using the FCC regimen, this regimen is conducive to an excellent clinical outcome.

  15. Biochemical characterization and evaluation of cytotoxicity of antistaphylococcal chimeric protein P128

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Shilpa E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic resistant S. aureus infection is a global threat. Newer approaches are required to control this organism in the current scenario. Cell wall degrading enzymes have been proposed as antibacterial agents for human therapy. P128 is a novel antistaphylococcal chimeric protein under development against S. aureus for human use which derives its bacterial cell wall degrading catalytic endopeptidase domain from ORF56, the Phage K tail-structure associated enzyme. Lead therapeutic entities have to be extensively characterized before they are assessed in animals for preclinical safety and toxicity. P128 is effective against antibiotic resistant strains as well as against a panel of isolates of global significance. Its efficacy against S. aureus in vivo has been established in our lab. Against this background, this study describes the characterization of this protein for its biochemical properties and other attributes. Results We evaluated the requirement or effect of divalent cations and the metal ion chelator, EDTA upon biological activity of P128. As the protein is intended for therapeutic use, we tested its activity in presence of body fluids and antibodies specific to P128. For the same reason, we used standard human cell lines to evaluate cytotoxic effects, if any. The divalent cations, calcium and magnesium at upto 25 mM and Zinc upto 2.5 mM neither inhibited nor enhanced P128 activity. Incubation of this protein with EDTA, human serum, plasma and blood also did not alter the antibacterial properties of the molecule. No inhibitory effect was observed in presence of hyper-immune sera raised against the protein. Finally, P128 did not show any cytotoxic effect on HEp2 and Vero cells at the highest concentration (5 mg/mL tested. Conclusions The results presented here throw light on several properties of protein P128. Taken together, these substantiate the potential of P128 for therapeutic use against S. aureus

  16. Molecular characterization of a fully human chimeric T-cell antigen receptor for tumor-associated antigen EpCAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasu, Naoto; Yamada, Hiromi; Shibaguchi, Hirotomo; Kuroki, Motomu; Kuroki, Masahide

    2012-01-01

    The transduction of T cells to express chimeric T-cell antigen receptor (CAR) is an attractive strategy for adaptive immunotherapy for cancer, because the CAR can redirect the recognition specificity of T cells to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) on the surface of target cells, thereby avoiding the limitations of HLA restriction. However, there are considerable problems with the clinical application of CAR, mostly due to its xenogeneic components, which could be immunogenic in humans. Moreover, while extensive studies on the CARs have been performed, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of CAR-grafted T cells remain unclear. In order to eliminate potential immunogenicity and investigate the molecular basis of the CAR-mediated T-cell activation, we constructed a novel CAR (CAR57-28ζ) specific for one of the most important TAAs, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), using only human-derived genes. We revealed that in Jurkat T cells, lentivirally expressed CAR57-28ζ can transmit the T-cell-activating signals sufficient to induce IL-2 production upon EpCAM stimulation. An immunofluorescent analysis clearly showed that the CAR57-28ζ induces the formation of signaling clusters containing endogenous CD3ζ at the CAR/EpCAM interaction interface. These results suggest that this CAR gene may be safely and effectively applied for adaptive T-cell immunotherapy.

  17. Molecular Characterization of a Fully Human Chimeric T-Cell Antigen Receptor for Tumor-Associated Antigen EpCAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Shirasu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transduction of T cells to express chimeric T-cell antigen receptor (CAR is an attractive strategy for adaptive immunotherapy for cancer, because the CAR can redirect the recognition specificity of T cells to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs on the surface of target cells, thereby avoiding the limitations of HLA restriction. However, there are considerable problems with the clinical application of CAR, mostly due to its xenogeneic components, which could be immunogenic in humans. Moreover, while extensive studies on the CARs have been performed, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of CAR-grafted T cells remain unclear. In order to eliminate potential immunogenicity and investigate the molecular basis of the CAR-mediated T-cell activation, we constructed a novel CAR (CAR57-28ζ specific for one of the most important TAAs, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, using only human-derived genes. We revealed that in Jurkat T cells, lentivirally expressed CAR57-28ζ can transmit the T-cell-activating signals sufficient to induce IL-2 production upon EpCAM stimulation. An immunofluorescent analysis clearly showed that the CAR57-28ζ induces the formation of signaling clusters containing endogenous CD3ζ at the CAR/EpCAM interaction interface. These results suggest that this CAR gene may be safely and effectively applied for adaptive T-cell immunotherapy.

  18. Understanding Zika Virus Stability and Developing a Chimeric Vaccine through Functional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuping Xie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Compared with other flaviviruses, Zika virus (ZIKV is uniquely associated with congenital diseases in pregnant women. One recent study reported that (i ZIKV has higher thermostability than dengue virus (DENV [a flavivirus closely related to ZIKV], which might contribute to the disease outcome; (ii the higher thermostability of ZIKV could arise from an extended loop structure in domain III of the viral envelope (E protein and an extra hydrogen-bond interaction between E molecules (V. A. Kostyuchenko, E. X. Y. Lim, S. Zhang, G. Fibriansah, T.-S. Ng, J. S. G. Ooi, J. Shi, and S.-M. Lok, Nature 533:425–428, 2016, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature17994. Here we report the functional analysis of the structural information in the context of complete ZIKV and DENV-2 virions. Swapping the prM-E genes between ZIKV and DENV-2 switched the thermostability of the chimeric viruses, identifying the prM-E proteins as the major determinants for virion thermostability. Shortening the extended loop of the E protein by 1 amino acid was lethal for ZIKV assembly/release. Mutations (Q350I and T351V that abolished the extra hydrogen-bond interaction between the E proteins did not reduce ZIKV thermostability, indicating that the extra interaction does not increase the thermostability. Interestingly, mutant T351V was attenuated in A129 mice defective in type I interferon receptors, even though the virus retained the wild-type thermostability. Furthermore, we found that a chimeric ZIKV with the DENV-2 prM-E and a chimeric DENV-2 with the ZIKV prM-E were highly attenuated in A129 mice; these chimeric viruses were highly immunogenic and protective against DENV-2 and ZIKV challenge, respectively. These results indicate the potential of these chimeric viruses for vaccine development.

  19. Understanding Zika Virus Stability and Developing a Chimeric Vaccine through Functional Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yujiao; Muruato, Antonio E.; Zou, Jing; Shan, Chao; Nunes, Bruno T. D.; Medeiros, Daniele B. A.; Vasconcelos, Pedro F. C.; Weaver, Scott C.; Rossi, Shannan L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Compared with other flaviviruses, Zika virus (ZIKV) is uniquely associated with congenital diseases in pregnant women. One recent study reported that (i) ZIKV has higher thermostability than dengue virus (DENV [a flavivirus closely related to ZIKV]), which might contribute to the disease outcome; (ii) the higher thermostability of ZIKV could arise from an extended loop structure in domain III of the viral envelope (E) protein and an extra hydrogen-bond interaction between E molecules (V. A. Kostyuchenko, E. X. Y. Lim, S. Zhang, G. Fibriansah, T.-S. Ng, J. S. G. Ooi, J. Shi, and S.-M. Lok, Nature 533:425–428, 2016, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature17994). Here we report the functional analysis of the structural information in the context of complete ZIKV and DENV-2 virions. Swapping the prM-E genes between ZIKV and DENV-2 switched the thermostability of the chimeric viruses, identifying the prM-E proteins as the major determinants for virion thermostability. Shortening the extended loop of the E protein by 1 amino acid was lethal for ZIKV assembly/release. Mutations (Q350I and T351V) that abolished the extra hydrogen-bond interaction between the E proteins did not reduce ZIKV thermostability, indicating that the extra interaction does not increase the thermostability. Interestingly, mutant T351V was attenuated in A129 mice defective in type I interferon receptors, even though the virus retained the wild-type thermostability. Furthermore, we found that a chimeric ZIKV with the DENV-2 prM-E and a chimeric DENV-2 with the ZIKV prM-E were highly attenuated in A129 mice; these chimeric viruses were highly immunogenic and protective against DENV-2 and ZIKV challenge, respectively. These results indicate the potential of these chimeric viruses for vaccine development. PMID:28174309

  20. A Novel Chimeric Endolysin with Antibacterial Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Haddad Kashani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine/histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP and amidase are known as catalytic domains of the bacteriophage-derived endolysin LysK and were previously reported to show lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. In the current study, the in silico design and analysis of chimeric CHAP-amidase model was applied to enhance the stability and solubility of protein, which was achieved through improving the properties of primary, secondary and tertiary structures. The coding gene sequence of the chimeric CHAP-amidase was synthesized and subcloned into the pET-22(+ expression vector, and the recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3 strain. Subsequent affinity-based purification yielded ~12 mg soluble protein per liter of E. coli culture. Statistical analysis indicated that concentrations of ≥1 μg/mL of the purified protein have significant antibacterial activity against S. aureus MRSA252 cells. The engineered chimeric CHAP-amidase exhibited 3.2 log reduction of MRSA252 cell counts at the concentration of 10 μg/mL. A synergistic interaction between CHAP-amidase and vancomycin was detected by using checkerboard assay and calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC index. This synergistic effect was shown by 8-fold reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin. The chimeric CHAP-amidase displayed strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and enterococcus. However, it did not indicate any significant antibacterial activity against E. coli and Lactococcus lactis. Taken together, these findings suggest that our chimeric CHAP-amidase might represent potential to be used for the development of efficient antibacterial therapies targeting MRSA and certain Gram-positive bacteria.

  1. Development of a mouse-feline chimeric antibody against feline tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOKI, Tomoyoshi; TAKANO, Tomomi; HOHDATSU, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal inflammatory disease caused by FIP virus infection. Feline tumor necrosis factor (fTNF)-alpha is closely involved in the aggravation of FIP pathology. We previously described the preparation of neutralizing mouse anti-fTNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb 2–4) and clarified its role in the clinical condition of cats with FIP using in vitro systems. However, administration of mouse mAb 2–4 to cat may lead to a production of feline anti-mouse antibodies. In the present study, we prepared a mouse-feline chimeric mAb (chimeric mAb 2–4) by fusing the variable region of mouse mAb 2–4 to the constant region of feline antibody. The chimeric mAb 2–4 was confirmed to have fTNF-alpha neutralization activity. Purified mouse mAb 2–4 and chimeric mAb 2–4 were repeatedly administered to cats, and the changes in the ability to induce feline anti-mouse antibody response were investigated. In the serum of cats treated with mouse mAb 2–4, feline anti-mouse antibody production was induced, and the fTNF-alpha neutralization effect of mouse mAb 2–4 was reduced. In contrast, in cats treated with chimeric mAb 2–4, the feline anti-mouse antibody response was decreased compared to that of mouse mAb 2–4-treated cats. PMID:27264736

  2. Hybridization accompanying FRET event in labeled natural nucleoside-unnatural nucleoside containing chimeric DNA duplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Das, Suman K; Pradhan, Manoj Kumar; Jana, Subhashis

    2016-09-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a highly efficient strategy in illuminating the structures, structural changes and dynamics of DNA, proteins and other biomolecules and thus is being widely utilized in studying such phenomena, in designing molecular/biomolecular probes for monitoring the hybridization event of two single stranded DNA to form duplex, in gene detection and in many other sensory applications in chemistry, biology and material sciences. Moreover, FRET can give information about the positional status of chromophores within the associated biomolecules with much more accuracy than other methods can yield. Toward this end, we want to report here the ability of fluorescent unnatural nucleoside, triazolylphenanthrene ((TPhen)BDo) to show FRET interaction upon hybridization with fluorescently labeled natural nucleosides, (Per)U or (OxoPy)U or (Per)U, forming two stable chimeric DNA duplexes. The pairing selectivity and the thermal duplex stability of the chimeric duplexes are higher than any of the duplexes with natural nucleoside formed. The hybridization results in a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from donor triazolylphenanthrene of (TPhen)BDo to acceptor oxopyrene of (OxoPy)U and/or to perylene chromophore of (Per)U, respectively, in two chimeric DNA duplexes. Therefore, we have established the FRET process in two chimeric DNA duplexes wherein a fluorescently labeled natural nucleoside ((OxoPy)U or (Per)U) paired against an unnatural nucleoside ((TPhen)BDo) without sacrificing the duplex stability and B-DNA conformation. The hybridization accompanying FRET event in these classes of interacting fluorophores is new. Moreover, there is no report of such designed system of chimeric DNA duplex. Our observed phenomenon and the design can potentially be exploited in designing more of such efficient FRET pairs for useful application in the detection and analysis of biomolecular interactions and in material science application. Copyright

  3. Chimeric Peptides as Implant Functionalization Agents for Titanium Alloy Implants with Antimicrobial Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucesoy, Deniz T.; Hnilova, Marketa; Boone, Kyle; Arnold, Paul M.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Tamerler, Candan

    2015-04-01

    Implant-associated infections can have severe effects on the longevity of implant devices and they also represent a major cause of implant failures. Treating these infections associated with implants by antibiotics is not always an effective strategy due to poor penetration rates of antibiotics into biofilms. Additionally, emerging antibiotic resistance poses serious concerns. There is an urge to develop effective antibacterial surfaces that prevent bacterial adhesion and proliferation. A novel class of bacterial therapeutic agents, known as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), are receiving increasing attention as an unconventional option to treat septic infection, partly due to their capacity to stimulate innate immune responses and for the difficulty of microorganisms to develop resistance towards them. While host and bacterial cells compete in determining the ultimate fate of the implant, functionalization of implant surfaces with AMPs can shift the balance and prevent implant infections. In the present study, we developed a novel chimeric peptide to functionalize the implant material surface. The chimeric peptide simultaneously presents two functionalities, with one domain binding to a titanium alloy implant surface through a titanium-binding domain while the other domain displays an antimicrobial property. This approach gains strength through control over the bio-material interfaces, a property built upon molecular recognition and self-assembly through a titanium alloy binding domain in the chimeric peptide. The efficiency of chimeric peptide both in-solution and absorbed onto titanium alloy surface was evaluated in vitro against three common human host infectious bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Escherichia coli. In biological interactions such as occur on implants, it is the surface and the interface that dictate the ultimate outcome. Controlling the implant surface by creating an interface composed chimeric peptides may therefore

  4. Type Safe Extensible Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Wonseok

    2009-10-01

    Software products evolve over time. Sometimes they evolve by adding new features, and sometimes by either fixing bugs or replacing outdated implementations with new ones. When software engineers fail to anticipate such evolution during development, they will eventually be forced to re-architect or re-build from scratch. Therefore, it has been common practice to prepare for changes so that software products are extensible over their lifetimes. However, making software extensible is challenging because it is difficult to anticipate successive changes and to provide adequate abstraction mechanisms over potential changes. Such extensibility mechanisms, furthermore, should not compromise any existing functionality during extension. Software engineers would benefit from a tool that provides a way to add extensions in a reliable way. It is natural to expect programming languages to serve this role. Extensible programming is one effort to address these issues. In this thesis, we present type safe extensible programming using the MLPolyR language. MLPolyR is an ML-like functional language whose type system provides type-safe extensibility mechanisms at several levels. After presenting the language, we will show how these extensibility mechanisms can be put to good use in the context of product line engineering. Product line engineering is an emerging software engineering paradigm that aims to manage variations, which originate from successive changes in software.

  5. Torque-wrench extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Torque-wrench extension makes it easy to install and remove fasteners that are beyond reach of typical wrenches or are located in narrow spaces that prevent full travel of wrench handle. At same time, tool reads applied torque accurately. Wrench drive system, for torques up to 125 inch-pounds, uses 2 standard drive-socket extensions in aluminum frame. Extensions are connected to bevel gear that turns another bevel gear. Gears produce 1:1 turn ratio through 90 degree translation of axis of rotation. Output bevel has short extension that is used to attach 1/4-inch drive socket.

  6. Direct Measurement of Single-Molecule DNA Hybridization Dynamics with Single-Base Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gen; Li, Jie; Ci, Haina; Qi, Chuanmin; Guo, Xuefeng

    2016-07-25

    Herein, we report label-free detection of single-molecule DNA hybridization dynamics with single-base resolution. By using an electronic circuit based on point-decorated silicon nanowires as electrical probes, we directly record the folding/unfolding process of individual hairpin DNAs with sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio and bandwidth. These measurements reveal two-level current oscillations with strong temperature dependence, enabling us to determine the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hairpin DNA hybridization. More importantly, successive, stepwise increases and decreases in device conductance at low temperature on a microsecond timescale are successfully observed, indicating a base-by-base unfolding/folding process. The process demonstrates a kinetic zipper model for DNA hybridization/dehybridization at the single base-pair level. This measurement capability promises a label-free single-molecule approach to probe biomolecular interactions with fast dynamics.

  7. Study on Influence of Functional Composition Distribution on Combustion Performance of a Modified Single Base Propellant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘波; 王琼林; 刘少武; 于慧芳; 李达; 姚月娟; 潘清; 魏伦

    2012-01-01

    The modified single base propellant samples were prepared by impregnating blasting oil into single base grains and deactivating deterrent in water medium. The concentration distribution of functional compositions in this propellant was determined by using FTIR micro-spectroscopy. Its combustion performance was investigated by means of closed-bomb and interior ballistic tests. The results show that the concentration of NG distributes parabolically along the radius and the con- centration of NA decreases from the surface to the centre exponentially. The deeper the NG impregnates, the slower the NA concentration decreases, the stronger the progressive combustion is and the better the interior ballistic performance is. When the depth corresponding to maximum NG concentration is about 1/2 of the web and the NA decreases slowly, the pro- gressive combustion is the strongest and the interior ballistic performance is the best.

  8. Isolation of single-base genome-edited human iPS cells without antibiotic selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Chan, Amanda H; Judge, Luke M; Yoo, Jennie; Huang, Miller; Nguyen, Trieu D; Lizarraga, Paweena P; So, Po-Lin; Conklin, Bruce R

    2014-03-01

    Precise editing of human genomes in pluripotent stem cells by homology-driven repair of targeted nuclease-induced cleavage has been hindered by the difficulty of isolating rare clones. We developed an efficient method to capture rare mutational events, enabling isolation of mutant lines with single-base substitutions without antibiotic selection. This method facilitates efficient induction or reversion of mutations associated with human disease in isogenic human induced pluripotent stem cells.

  9. Kentucky's Urban Extension Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffery; Vavrina, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Defining the success of Urban Extension units is sometimes challenging. For those Extension agents, specialists, administrators, and others who have worked to bring solid, research-based programming to urban communities, it is no surprise that working in these communities brings its own unique and sometimes difficult challenges. Kentucky's Urban…

  10. Algebraic extensions of fields

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Paul J

    1991-01-01

    ""...clear, unsophisticated and direct..."" - MathThis textbook is intended to prepare graduate students for the further study of fields, especially algebraic number theory and class field theory. It presumes some familiarity with topology and a solid background in abstract algebra. Chapter 1 contains the basic results concerning algebraic extensions. In addition to separable and inseparable extensions and normal extensions, there are sections on finite fields, algebraically closed fields, primitive elements, and norms and traces. Chapter 2 is devoted to Galois theory. Besides the fundamenta

  11. The assay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies with human TSH/LH-CG chimeric receptor expressed on chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ka Hee; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    TSH/LH-CG chimera cDNA is transfected to CHO-K1 cell to obtain the chimeric receptor expressed on the cell surface. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurements are determined using chimeric receptors and under these conditions activity of TSAb and TSBAb in the sera of the Graves` patients. The results obtained are compared to those of TSAb assays using FRTL5 cells CHO-TSHR cells which have wild type human TSH receptor. The transfection procedure of chimeric receptor gene to CHO-K1 cells are on going. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurement using chimeric receptor will be determined after success of transfection procedure. If this study is successfully completed, not only the heterogeneity of Graves. IgG but also pathogenesis of Graves` disease will be elucidated. (author). 25 refs.

  12. The assay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies with human TSH/LH-CG chimeric receptor expressed on chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ka Hee; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    TSH/LH-CG chimera cDNA is transfected to CHO-K1 cell to obtain the chimeric receptor expressed on the cell surface. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurements are determined using chimeric receptors and under these conditions activity of TSAb and TSBAb in the sera of the Graves` patients. The results obtained are compared to those of TSAb assays using FRTL5 cells CHO-TSHR cells which have wild type human TSH receptor. The transfection procedure of chimeric receptor gene to CHO-K1 cells are on going. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurement using chimeric receptor will be determined after success of transfection procedure. If this study is successfully completed, not only the heterogeneity of Graves. IgG but also pathogenesis of Graves` disease will be elucidated. (author). 25 refs.

  13. Induction of Chimerism Permits Low-Dose Islet Grafts in the Liver or Pancreas to Reverse Refractory Autoimmune Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chunyan; Wang, Miao; Racine, Jeremy J.; Liu, Hongjun; Lin, Chia-Lei; Nair, Indu; Lau, Joyce; Cao, Yu-An; Todorov, Ivan; Atkinson, Mark; Zeng, Defu

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test whether induction of chimerism lowers the amount of donor islets required for reversal of diabetes and renders the pancreas a suitable site for islet grafts in autoimmune diabetic mice. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The required donor islet dose for reversal of diabetes in late-stage diabetic NOD mice after transplantation into the liver or pancreas was compared under immunosuppression or after induction of chimerism. Recipient mice were monitored for blood glucose levels and ...

  14. Cotorsion Pair Extensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De Xu ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    Assume that S is an almost excellent extension of R. Using functors Hom R(S,-) and -(×)R S, we establish some connections between classes of modules (L)R and (L)S, cotorsion pairs ((A)R, (A)R)and ((A)S, (B)S). If (L)S is a T-extension or (and) H-extension of (L)R, we show that (L)S is a (resp., monomorphic, epimorphic, special) preenveloping class if and only if so is (L)R. If (S, S) is a TH-extension of ((A)R,(B)R), we obtain that ((A)S,(B)S) is complete (resp., of finite type, of cofinite type, hereditary, perfect, n-tilting) if and only if so is ((A)R,(B)R).

  15. Type extension trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    We introduce type extension trees as a formal representation language for complex combinatorial features of relational data. Based on a very simple syntax this language provides a unified framework for expressing features as diverse as embedded subgraphs on the one hand, and marginal counts...... of attribute values on the other. We show by various examples how many existing relational data mining techniques can be expressed as the problem of constructing a type extension tree and a discriminant function....

  16. Type extension trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    We introduce type extension trees as a formal representation language for complex combinatorial features of relational data. Based on a very simple syntax this language provides a unified framework for expressing features as diverse as embedded subgraphs on the one hand, and marginal counts...... of attribute values on the other. We show by various examples how many existing relational data mining techniques can be expressed as the problem of constructing a type extension tree and a discriminant function....

  17. Antigenic and Cryo-Electron Microscopy Structure Analysis of a Chimeric Sapovirus Capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Taylor, David W; Hansman, Grant S; Murata, Kazuyoshi

    2015-12-23

    The capsid protein (VP1) of all caliciviruses forms an icosahedral particle with two principal domains, shell (S) and protruding (P) domains, which are connected via a flexible hinge region. The S domain forms a scaffold surrounding the nucleic acid, while the P domains form a homodimer that interacts with receptors. The P domain is further subdivided into two subdomains, termed P1 and P2. The P2 subdomain is likely an insertion in the P1 subdomain; consequently, the P domain is divided into the P1-1, P2, and P1-2 subdomains. In order to investigate capsid antigenicity, N-terminal (N-term)/S/P1-1 and P2/P1-2 were switched between two sapovirus genotypes GI.1 and GI.5. The chimeric VP1 constructs were expressed in insect cells and were shown to self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) morphologically similar to the parental VLPs. Interestingly, the chimeric VLPs had higher levels of cross-reactivities to heterogeneous antisera than the parental VLPs. In order to better understand the antigenicity from a structural perspective, we determined an intermediate-resolution (8.5-Å) cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of a chimeric VLP and developed a VP1 homology model. The cryo-EM structure revealed that the P domain dimers were raised slightly (∼5 Å) above the S domain. The VP1 homology model allowed us predict the S domain (67-229) and P1-1 (229-280), P2 (281-447), and P1-2 (448-567) subdomains. Our results suggested that the raised P dimers might expose immunoreactive S/P1-1 subdomain epitopes. Consequently, the higher levels of cross-reactivities with the chimeric VLPs resulted from a combination of GI.1 and GI.5 epitopes. We developed sapovirus chimeric VP1 constructs and produced the chimeric VLPs in insect cells. We found that both chimeric VLPs had a higher level of cross-reactivity against heterogeneous VLP antisera than the parental VLPs. The cryo-EM structure of one chimeric VLP (Yokote/Mc114) was solved to 8.5-Å resolution. A homology model

  18. Suicide Gene Therapy to Increase the Safety of Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Casucci, Attilio Bondanza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding motif of a monoclonal antibody (mAb with the signal transduction machinery of the T-cell receptor (TCR. The genetic modification of T lymphocytes with chimeric receptors specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs allows for the redirection towards tumor cells. Clinical experience with CAR-redirected T cells suggests that antitumor efficacy associates with some degree of toxicity, especially when TAA expression is shared with healthy tissues. This situation closely resembles the case of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, wherein allorecognition causes both the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL effect and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Suicide gene therapy, i.e. the genetic induction of a conditional suicide phenotype into donor T cells, enables dissociating the GVL effect from GVHD. Applying suicide gene modification to CAR-redirected T cells may therefore greatly increase their safety profile and facilitate their clinical development.

  19. DIVA vaccine properties of the live chimeric pestivirus strain CP7_E2gif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Rosen, Tanya; Rangelova, Desislava Yordanova; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Live modified vaccines to protect against classical swine fever virus (CSFV), based on chimeric pestiviruses, have been developed to enable serological Differentiation of Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA). In this context, the chimeric virus CP7_E2gif vaccine candidate is unique as it does...... not include any CSFV components. In the present study, the DIVA vaccine properties of CP7_E2gif were evaluated in comparison to the conventional live attenuated Riemser C-strain vaccine. Sera and tonsil samples obtained from pigs immunised with these two vaccines were analysed. No viral RNA was found in serum...... after vaccination with CP7_E2gif, whereas some serum samples from C-strain vaccinated animals were positive. In both vaccinated groups, individual viral RNA-positive tonsil samples were detected in animals euthanised between 7 and 21 days post vaccination. Furthermore, serum samples from these animals...

  20. Spotlight on chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cell research and clinical trials in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Can; Wei, Jianshu; Han, Weidong

    2016-04-01

    T cell mediated adoptive immune response has been characterized as the key to anti-tumor immunity. Scientists around the world including in China, have been trying to harness the power of T cells against tumors for decades. Recently, the biosynthetic chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cell (CAR-T) strategy was developed and exhibited encouraging clinical efficacy, especially in hematological malignancies. Chimeric antigen receptor research reports began in 2009 in China according to our PubMed search results. Clinical trials have been ongoing in China since 2013 according to the trial registrations on clinicaltrials. gov.. After years of assiduous efforts, research and clinical scientists in China have made their own achievements in the CAR-T therapy field. In this review, we aim to highlight CAR-T research and clinical trials in China, to provide an informative reference for colleagues in the field.

  1. Replication-competent chimeric lenti-oncovirus with expanded host cell tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiprich, S; Gundlach, B R; Fleckenstein, B; Uberla, K

    1997-04-01

    Baboon bone marrow was grafted into human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients in the course of recent trials for AIDS treatment. Since the baboon genome harbors multiple copies of an endogenous oncovirus, chimeric lenti-oncoviruses could emerge in the xenotransplant recipient. To analyze the potential replication competence of hybrid viruses between different genera of retroviruses, we replaced most of the env gene of simian immunodeficiency virus with the env gene of an amphotropic murine leukemia virus. The hybrid virus could be propagated in human T-cell lines, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of rhesus macaques, and in CD4- B-cell lines. Because of the expanded cell tropism, the hybrid virus might have a selective advantage in comparison to parental viruses. Therefore, emerging chimeric viruses may be considered a serious risk of xenotransplantation. A note of caution is also suggested for the use of pseudotyped lentiviral vectors for human gene therapy.

  2. [Harvesting technique of chimeric multiple paddles fibular flap for wide oromandibular defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, J-P; Qassemyar, Q; Assouly, N; Temam, S; Kolb, F

    2016-08-01

    Carcinological head and neck reconstruction still remains a challenge due to the volume and varied tissues needed. Large and wide oromandibular defects require, not just the bone but also soft tissues for the pelvilingual reconstruction and therefore, a second free flap may become necessary in addition to a fibular flap. The option of an unique chimeric flap based on the fibular artery and its branches is less known whereas it offers the advantage of a unique flap with bone, muscle and multiple skin paddles, independent of each other. The aim of this technical note is to present step by step the surgical procedure of this chimeric flap and share this method that avoids a second free flap.

  3. Chimerism of allogeneic mesenchymal cells in bone marrow, liver, and spleen after mesenchymal stem cells infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshko, Alexander; Prakharenia, Irina; Kletski, Semen; Isaikina, Yanina

    2013-12-01

    Although an infusion of culture-expanded MSCs is applied in clinic to improve results of HSCs transplantation and for a treatment of musculoskeletal disorders, homing, and engraftment potential of culture-expanded MSC in humans is still obscure. We report two female patients who received allogeneic BM transplantation as a treatment of hematological diseases and a transplantation of MSCs from third-party male donors. Both patients died within one yr of infectious complications. Specimens of paraffin-embedded blocks of tissues from transplanted patients were taken. The aim of the study was to estimate possible homing and engraftment of allogeneic BM-derived MSCs in some tissues/organs of recipient. Sensitive real-time quantitative PCR analysis was applied with SRY gene as a target. MSC chimerism was found in BM, liver, and spleen of both patients. We conclude that sensitive RQ-PCR analysis is acceptable for low-level chimerism evaluation even in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens.

  4. Human glial chimeric mice reveal astrocytic dependence of JC virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondo, Yoichi; Windrem, Martha S; Zou, Lisa;

    2014-01-01

    with humanized white matter by engrafting human glial progenitor cells (GPCs) into neonatal immunodeficient and myelin-deficient mice. Intracerebral delivery of JCV resulted in infection and subsequent demyelination of these chimeric mice. Human GPCs and astrocytes were infected more readily than...... oligodendrocytes, and viral replication was noted primarily in human astrocytes and GPCs rather than oligodendrocytes, which instead expressed early viral T antigens and exhibited apoptotic death. Engraftment of human GPCs in normally myelinated and immunodeficient mice resulted in humanized white matter...... that was chimeric for human astrocytes and GPCs. JCV effectively propagated in these mice, which indicates that astroglial infection is sufficient for JCV spread. Sequencing revealed progressive mutation of the JCV capsid protein VP1 after infection, suggesting that PML may evolve with active infection...

  5. [Chimerism analysis after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Interest of cell sorting: general review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollet, I; Giannoli, C; Rigal, D; Dubois, V

    2012-04-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells transplantation, widely used these last decades, represent the ultimate treatment resource for patients with haematological malignancies. Long range success of this treatment is particularly affected by relapse of the initial disease, graft rejection or graft versus host disease. Chimerism analysis after transplantation had been used since several years to document engraftment, to determine the risk of relapse and to adapt therapy promptly when necessary. Usefulness of this analysis for the outcome of transplanted patients, as well as the impact of using high sensitive techniques coupled with specific cell populations sorted have been demonstrated by retrospective studies. Follow-up of chimerism would allow to operate efficiently before the onset of clinical signs in leukaemic patients with high risk of relapse and to control the expression of minimal residual disease when specific molecular markers could not be monitored. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and effects on serum cholinesterase activities of organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemizu, Hiroshi; Sota, Shigeto; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in foods have potential to impact human health. The aim of the current study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of acephate and chlorpyrifos orally administered at lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Absorbed acephate and its metabolite methamidophos were detected in serum from wild type mice and chimeric mice orally administered 150mg/kg. Approximately 70% inhibition of cholinesterase was evident in plasma of chimeric mice with humanized liver (which have higher serum cholinesterase activities than wild type mice) 1day after oral administrations of acephate. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated plasma concentrations of acephate and chlorpyrifos in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. Acephate cleared similarly in humans and chimeric mice but accidental/incidental overdose levels of chlorpyrifos cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in mice. The data presented here illustrate how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of toxicological potential of organophosphorus pesticides.

  7. Mouse x pig chimeric antibodies expressed in Baculovirus retain the same properties of their parent antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jar, Ana M; Osorio, Fernando A; López, Osvaldo J

    2009-01-01

    The development of hybridoma and recombinant DNA technologies has made it possible to use antibodies against cancer, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases in humans. These advances in therapy, as well as immunoprophylaxis, could also make it possible to use these technologies in agricultural species of economic importance such as pigs. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an arterivirus causing very important economic losses to the industry. Passive transfer of antibodies obtained by biotechnology could be used in the future to complement or replace vaccination against this and other pig pathogens. To this end, we constructed and studied the properties of chimeric mouse x pig anti-PRRSV antibodies. We cloned the constant regions of gamma-1 and gamma-2 heavy chains and the lambda light chain of pig antibodies in frame with the variable regions of heavy and light chains of mouse monoclonal antibody ISU25C1, which has neutralizing activity against PRRSV. The coding regions for chimeric IgG1 and IgG2 were expressed in a baculovirus expression system. Both chimeric antibodies recognized PRRSV in ELISA as well as in a Western-blot format and, more importantly, were able to neutralize PRRSV in the same fashion as the parent mouse monoclonal antibody ISU25C1. In addition, we show that both pig IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies could bind complement component C1q, with IgG2 being more efficient than IgG1 in binding C1q. Expressing chimeric pig antibodies with protective capabilities offers a new alternative strategy for infectious disease control in domestic pigs.

  8. Production and characterisation of a neutralising chimeric antibody against botulinum neurotoxin A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Prigent

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins, produced by Clostridium botulinum bacteria, are the causative agent of botulism. This disease only affects a few hundred people each year, thus ranking it among the orphan diseases. However, botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A is the most potent toxin known to man. Due to their potency and ease of production, these toxins were classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC as Category A biothreat agents. For several biothreat agents, like BoNT/A, passive immunotherapy remains the only possible effective treatment allowing in vivo neutralization, despite possible major side effects. Recently, several mouse monoclonal antibodies directed against a recombinant fragment of BoNT/A were produced in our laboratory and most efficiently neutralised the neurotoxin. In the present work, the most powerful one, TA12, was selected for chimerisation. The variable regions of this antibody were thus cloned and fused with the constant counterparts of human IgG1 (kappa light and gamma 1 heavy chains. Chimeric antibody production was evaluated in mammalian myeloma cells (SP2/0-Ag14 and insect cells (Sf9. After purifying the recombinant antibody by affinity chromatography, the biochemical properties of chimeric and mouse antibody were compared. Both have the same very low affinity constant (close to 10 pM and the chimeric antibody exhibited a similar capacity to its parent counterpart in neutralising the toxin in vivo. Its strong affinity and high neutralising potency make this chimeric antibody interesting for immunotherapy treatment in humans in cases of poisoning, particularly as there is a probable limitation of the immunological side effects observed with classical polyclonal antisera from heterologous species.

  9. Bone marrow chimeric mice reveal a dual role for CD36 in Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febbraio Maria

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adhesion of Plasmodium-infected red blood cells (iRBC to different host cells, ranging from endothelial to red blood cells, is associated to malaria pathology. In vitro studies have shown the relevance of CD36 for adhesion phenotypes of Plasmodium falciparum iRBC such as sequestration, platelet mediated clumping and non-opsonic uptake of iRBC. Different adhesion phenotypes involve different host cells and are associated with different pathological outcomes of disease. Studies with different human populations with CD36 polymorphisms failed to attribute a clear role to CD36 expression in human malaria. Up to the present, no in vivo model has been available to study the relevance of different CD36 adhesion phenotypes to the pathological course of Plasmodium infection. Methods Using CD36-deficient mice and their control littermates, CD36 bone marrow chimeric mice, expressing CD36 exclusively in haematopoietic cells or in non-haematopoietic cells, were generated. Irradiated CD36-/- and wild type mice were also reconstituted with syngeneic cells to control for the effects of irradiation. The reconstituted mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA and analysed for the development of blood parasitaemia and neurological symptoms. Results All mice reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow cells as well as chimeric mice expressing CD36 exclusively in non-haematopoietic cells died from experimental cerebral malaria between day 6 and 12 after infection. A significant proportion of chimeric mice expressing CD36 only in haematopoietic cells did not die from cerebral malaria. Conclusion The analysis of bone marrow chimeric mice reveals a dual role of CD36 in P. berghei ANKA infection. Expression of CD36 in haematopoietic cells, most likely macrophages and dendritic cells, has a beneficial effect that is masked in normal mice by adverse effects of CD36 expression in non-haematopoietic cells, most likely endothelial cells.

  10. Targeted induction of interferon-λ in humanized chimeric mouse liver abrogates hepatotropic virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: The interferon (IFN system plays a critical role in innate antiviral response. We presume that targeted induction of IFN in human liver shows robust antiviral effects on hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV. METHODS: This study used chimeric mice harboring humanized livers and infected with HCV or HBV. This mouse model permitted simultaneous analysis of immune responses by human and mouse hepatocytes in the same liver and exploration of the mechanism of antiviral effect against these viruses. Targeted expression of IFN was induced by treating the animals with a complex comprising a hepatotropic cationic liposome and a synthetic double-stranded RNA analog, pIC (LIC-pIC. Viral replication, IFN gene expression, IFN protein production, and IFN antiviral activity were analyzed (for type I, II and III IFNs in the livers and sera of these humanized chimeric mice. RESULTS: Following treatment with LIC-pIC, the humanized livers of chimeric mice exhibited increased expression (at the mRNA and protein level of human IFN-λs, resulting in strong antiviral effect on HBV and HCV. Similar increases were not seen for human IFN-α or IFN-β in these animals. Strong induction of IFN-λs by LIC-pIC occurred only in human hepatocytes, and not in mouse hepatocytes nor in human cell lines derived from other (non-hepatic tissues. LIC-pIC-induced IFN-λ production was mediated by the immune sensor adaptor molecules mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor molecule-1 (TICAM-1, suggesting dual recognition of LIC-pIC by both sensor adaptor pathways. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that the expression and function of various IFNs differ depending on the animal species and tissues under investigation. Chimeric mice harboring humanized livers demonstrate that IFN-λs play an important role in the defense against human hepatic virus infection.

  11. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-directed adoptive immunotherapy: a new era in targeted cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yamei; Liu, Delong

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the recent advances in molecular immunology, virology, genetics, and cell processing, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-directed cancer therapy has finally arrived for clinical application. CAR-directed adoptive immunotherapy represents a novel form of gene therapy, cellular therapy, and immunotherapy, a combination of three in one. Early phase clinical trial was reported in patients with refractory chronic lymphoid leukemia with 17p deletion. Accompanying the cyto...

  12. High male chimerism in the female breast shows quantitative links with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhimolea, Eugen; Denes, Viktoria; Lakk, Monika; Al-Bazzaz, Sana; Aziz-Zaman, Sonya; Pilichowska, Monika; Geck, Peter

    2013-08-15

    Clinical observations suggest that pregnancy provides protection against cancer. The mechanisms involved, however, remain unclear. Fetal cells are known to enter the mother's circulation during pregnancy and establish microchimerism. We investigated if pregnancy-related embryonic/fetal stem cell integration plays a role in breast cancer. A high-sensitivity Y-chromosome assay was developed to trace male allogeneic cells (from male fetus) in females. Fixed-embedded samples (n = 206) from both normal and breast cancer patients were screened for microchimerism. The results were combined with matching clinicopathological and histological parameters and processed statistically. The results show that in our samples (182 informative) more than half of healthy women (56%) carried male cells in their breast tissue for decades (n = 68), while only one out of five in the cancer sample pool (21%) (n = 114) (odds ratio = 4.75, CI at 95% 2.34-9.69; p = 0.0001). The data support the notion that a biological link may exist between chimerism and tissue-integrity. The correlation, however, is non-linear, since male microchimerism in excess ("hyperchimerism") is also involved in cancer. The data suggest a link between hyperchimerism and HER2-type cancers, while decreased chimerism ("hypochimerism") associates with ER/PR-positive (luminal-type) breast cancers. Chimerism levels that correlate with protection appear to be non-random and share densities with the mammary progenitor components of the stem cell lineage in the breast. The results suggest that protection may involve stem/progenitor level interactions and implicate novel quantitative mechanisms in chimerism biology. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  13. The impact of chimerism in DNA-based forensic sex determination analysis

    OpenAIRE

    George, Renjith; Donald, Preethy Mary; Nagraj, Sumanth Kumbargere; Idiculla, Jose Joy; Hj Ismail, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Sex determination is the most important step in personal identification in forensic investigations. DNA-based sex determination analysis is comparatively more reliable than the other conventional methods of sex determination analysis. Advanced technology like real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) offers accurate and reproducible results and is at the level of legal acceptance. But still there are situations like chimerism where an individual possess both male and female specific factors t...

  14. Generation of cloned and chimeric embryos/offspring using the new methods of animal biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzyszowska, Maria; Karasiewicz, Jolanta; Bednarczyk, Marek; Samiec, Marcin; Smorag, Zdzisław; Waś, Bogusław; Guszkiewicz, Andrzej; Korwin-Kossakowski, Maciej; Górniewska, Maria; Szablisty, Ewa; Modliński, Jacek A; Łakota, Paweł; Wawrzyńska, Magdalena; Sechman, Andrzej; Wojtysiak, Dorota; Hrabia, Anna; Mika, Maria; Lisowski, Mirosław; Czekalski, Przemysław; Rzasa, Janusz; Kapkowska, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    The article summarizes results of studies concerning: 1/ qualitative evaluation of pig nuclear donor cells to somatic cell cloning, 2/ developmental potency of sheep somatic cells to create chimera, 3/ efficient production of chicken chimera. The quality of nuclear donor cells is one of the most important factors to determine the efficiency of somatic cell cloning. Morphological criteria commonly used for qualitative evaluation of somatic cells may be insufficient for practical application in the cloning. Therefore, different types of somatic cells being the source of genomic DNA in the cloning procedure were analyzed on apoptosis with the use of live-DNA or plasma membrane fluorescent markers. It has been found that morphological criteria are a sufficient selection factor for qualitative evaluation of nuclear donor cells to somatic cell cloning. Developmental potencies of sheep somatic cells in embryos and chimeric animals were studied using blastocyst complementation test. Fetal fibroblasts stained with vital fluorescent dye and microsurgically placed in morulae or blastocysts were later identified in embryos cultured in vitro. Transfer of Polish merino blastocysts harbouring Heatherhead fibroblasts to recipient ewes brought about normal births at term. Newly-born animals were of merino appearance with dark patches on their noses, near the mouth and on their clovens. This overt chimerism shows that fetal fibroblasts introduced to sheep morulae/blastocysts revealed full developmental plasticity. To achieve the efficient production of chicken chimeras, the blastodermal cells from embryos of the donor breeds, (Green-legged Partridgelike breed or GPxAraucana) were transferred into the embryos of the recipient breed (White Leghorn), and the effect of chimerism on the selected reproductive and physiological traits of recipients was examined. Using the model which allowed identification of the chimerism at many loci, it has been found that 93.9% of the examined birds

  15. Conformational influence of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl group: crystal structures of DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, M.; Usman, N.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have crystallized three double-helical DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes and determined their structures by X-ray crystallography at resolutions between 2 and 2.25 A. The two self-complementary duplexes [r(G)d(CGTATACGC)]2 and [d(GCGT)r(A)d(TACGC)]2, as well as the Okazaki fragment d(GGGTATACGC).r(GCG)d(TATACCC), were found to adopt A-type conformations. The crystal structures are non-isomorphous, and the crystallographic environments for the three chimeras are different. A number of intramolecular interactions of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl groups contribute to the stabilization of the A-conformation. Hydrogen bonds between 2'-hydroxyls and 5'-oxygens or phosphate oxygens, in addition to the previously observed hydrogen bonds to 1'-oxygens of adjacent riboses and deoxyriboses, are observed in the DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes. The crystalline chimeric duplexes do not show a transition between the DNA A- and B-conformations. CD spectra suggest that the Okazaki fragment assumes an A-conformation in solution as well. In this molecule the three RNA residues may therefore lock the complete decamer in the A-conformation. Crystals of an all-DNA strand with the same sequence as the self-complementary chimeras show a morphology which is different from those of the chimera crystals. Moreover, the oligonucleotide does not match any of the sequence characteristics of DNAs usually adopting the A-conformation in the crystalline state (e.g., octamers with short alternating stretches of purines and pyrimidines). In DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes, it is therefore possible that a single RNA residue can drive the conformational equilibrium toward the A-conformation.

  16. Application of chimeric mice with humanized liver for study of human-specific drug metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Thomas J; Reddy, Vijay G B; Kakuni, Masakazu; Morikawa, Yoshio; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2014-06-01

    Human-specific or disproportionately abundant human metabolites of drug candidates that are not adequately formed and qualified in preclinical safety assessment species pose an important drug development challenge. Furthermore, the overall metabolic profile of drug candidates in humans is an important determinant of their drug-drug interaction susceptibility. These risks can be effectively assessed and/or mitigated if human metabolic profile of the drug candidate could reliably be determined in early development. However, currently available in vitro human models (e.g., liver microsomes, hepatocytes) are often inadequate in this regard. Furthermore, the conduct of definitive radiolabeled human ADME studies is an expensive and time-consuming endeavor that is more suited for later in development when the risk of failure has been reduced. We evaluated a recently developed chimeric mouse model with humanized liver on uPA/SCID background for its ability to predict human disposition of four model drugs (lamotrigine, diclofenac, MRK-A, and propafenone) that are known to exhibit human-specific metabolism. The results from these studies demonstrate that chimeric mice were able to reproduce the human-specific metabolite profile for lamotrigine, diclofenac, and MRK-A. In the case of propafenone, however, the human-specific metabolism was not detected as a predominant pathway, and the metabolite profiles in native and humanized mice were similar; this was attributed to the presence of residual highly active propafenone-metabolizing mouse enzymes in chimeric mice. Overall, the data indicate that the chimeric mice with humanized liver have the potential to be a useful tool for the prediction of human-specific metabolism of xenobiotics and warrant further investigation.

  17. Chimeric mice with a humanized liver as an animal model of troglitazone-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuni, Masakazu; Morita, Mayu; Matsuo, Kentaro; Katoh, Yumiko; Nakajima, Miki; Tateno, Chise; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2012-10-02

    Troglitazone (Tro) is a thiazolidinedione antidiabetic drug that was withdrawn from the market due to its association with idiosyncratic severe liver injury. Tro has never induced liver injury in experimental animals in vivo. It was assumed that the species differences between human and experimental animals in the pharmaco- or toxicokinetics of Tro might be associated with these observations. In this study, we investigated whether a chimeric mouse with a humanized liver that we previously established, whose replacement index with human hepatocytes is up to 92% can reproduce Tro-induced liver injury. When the chimeric mice were orally administered Tro for 14 or 23 days (1000mg/kg/day), serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was significantly increased by 2.1- and 3.6-fold, respectively. Co-administration of l-buthionine sulfoximine (10mM in drinking water), an inhibitor of glutathione (GSH) synthesis, unexpectedly prevented the Tro-dependent increase of ALT, which suggests that the GSH scavenging pathway will not be involved in Tro-induced liver injury. To elucidate the mechanism of the onset of liver injury, hepatic GSH content, the level of oxidative stress markers and phase I and phase II drug metabolizing enzymes were determined. However, these factors were not associated with Tro-induced liver injury. An immune-mediated reaction may be associated with Tro-induced liver toxicity in vivo, because the chimeric mouse is derived from an immunodeficient SCID mouse. In conclusion, we successfully reproduced Tro-induced liver injury using chimeric mice with a humanized liver, which provides a new animal model for studying idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Skin Recurrence of Transformed Mycosis Fungoides Postumbilical Cord Blood Transplant despite Complete Donor Chimerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Pawar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Allogeneic stem cell transplant is the treatment of choice for systemic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL which provides graft-versus-lymphoma effect. Herein we discuss a case of recurrence of CTCL skin lesions after cord blood transplant in a patient who continued to have 100% donor chimerism in bone marrow. Case Presentation. A 48-year-old female with history of mycosis fungoides (MF presented with biopsy proven large cell transformation of MF. PET scan revealed multiple adenopathy in abdomen and chest suspicious for lymphoma and skin biopsy showed large cell transformation. She was treated with multiple cycles of chemotherapy. Posttherapy PET scan showed resolution of lymphadenopathy. Later she underwent ablative preparative regimen followed by single cord blood transplant. Bone marrow chimerism studies at day +60 after transplant showed 100% donor cells without presence of lymphoma. However 5 months after transplant she had recurrence of MF with the same genotype as prior skin lesion. Bone marrow chimerism study continued to show 100% donor cells. Conclusion. A differential graft-versus-lymphoma effect in our case prevented lymphoma recurrence systemically but failed to do so in skin. We hypothesize that this response may be due to presence of other factors in the bone marrow and lymph node microenvironments preventing recurrence in these sites.

  19. Functional rescue of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice by a chimeric peptide-PMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haifang; Moulton, Hong M; Betts, Corinne; Merritt, Thomas; Seow, Yiqi; Ashraf, Shirin; Wang, Qingsong; Boutilier, Jordan; Wood, Matthew Ja

    2010-10-01

    Splice modulation using antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) has been shown to yield targeted exon exclusion to restore the open reading frame and generate truncated but partially functional dystrophin protein. This has been successfully demonstrated in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice and in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. However, DMD is a systemic disease; successful therapeutic exploitation of this approach will therefore depend on effective systemic delivery of AOs to all affected tissues. We have previously shown the potential of a muscle-specific/arginine-rich chimeric peptide-phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PMO) conjugate, but its long-term activity, optimized dosing regimen, capacity for functional correction and safety profile remain to be established. Here, we report the results of this chimeric peptide-PMO conjugate in the mdx mouse using low doses (3 and 6 mg/kg) administered via a 6 biweekly systemic intravenous injection protocol. We show 100% dystrophin-positive fibers and near complete correction of the dystrophin transcript defect in all peripheral muscle groups, with restoration of 50% dystrophin protein over 12 weeks, leading to correction of the DMD pathological phenotype and restoration of muscle function in the absence of detectable toxicity or immune response. Chimeric muscle-specific/cell-penetrating peptides therefore represent highly promising agents for systemic delivery of splice-correcting PMO oligomers for DMD therapy.

  20. Construction of a photo-responsive chimeric histidine kinase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Mayuko; Oka, Shyunsuke; Sugie, Yoshimi; Ohtsuka, Hokuto; Aiba, Hirofumi

    2017-01-31

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS), that are also referred to as His to Asp phosphorelay systems, are involved in widespread cellular responses to diverse signals from bacteria to plants. Previously, we succeeded in reconstructing a cyanobacterial photo-perception system in Escherichia coli by employing a CcaS-CcaR two-component system from Nostoc punctiforme. In this study, we have added a photo-responsive ability to ArcB-ArcA (anoxic redox control) TCS of E. coli by fusing a cyanobacterial photoreceptor domain of CcaS with an intracellular histidine kinase (HK) domain of ArcB. For this, we constructed several chimeric HKs between CcaS and ArcB and found that one chimeric HK, named ArcaS9, has a photo-responsive ability. When ArcaS9 was expressed with an ArcA response regulator in E. coli expressing phycocyanobilin (PCB)-producing enzymes, the expression of sdh, a target gene of ArcB-ArcA TCS was regulated in a light-color-dependent manner. Thus we succeeded in endowing E. coli HK with a photo-responsive ability. This provides an insight into how the sensing ability of HK can be manipulated by a chimeric construct.

  1. Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine candidates generated by chimerization with dengue virus type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromowski, Gregory D; Firestone, Cai-Yen; Hanson, Christopher T; Whitehead, Stephen S

    2014-05-23

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a leading cause of viral encephalitis worldwide and vaccination is one of the most effective ways to prevent disease. A suitable live-attenuated JEV vaccine could be formulated with a live-attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine for the control of these viruses in endemic areas. Toward this goal, we generated chimeric virus vaccine candidates by replacing the precursor membrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein structural genes of recombinant dengue virus type 4 (rDEN4) or attenuated vaccine candidate rDEN4Δ30 with those of wild-type JEV strain India/78. Mutations were engineered in E, NS3 and NS4B protein genes to improve replication in Vero cells. The chimeric viruses were attenuated in mice and some elicited modest but protective levels of immunity after a single dose. One particular chimeric virus, bearing E protein mutation Q264H, replicated to higher titer in tissue culture and was significantly more immunogenic in mice. The results are compared with live-attenuated JEV vaccine strain SA14-14-2. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Confined blood chimerism in a monochorionic dizygotic sex discordant twin pregnancy conceived after induced ovulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeur Le Bras, Anne; Petit, François; Benachi, Alexandra; Bedel, Bettina; Oucherif, Salima; Martinovic, Jelena; Armanet, Narjes; Tosca, Lucie; Gautier, Valérie; Parisot, Frédéric; Labrune, Philippe; Tachdjian, Gérard; Brisset, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Monochorionic twins are generally considered as a monozygotic twin pregnancy. However, several cases of monochorial dizygotic twin pregnancies have been reported. We report on a rare case of monochorionic dizygotic twin pregnancy conceived after induced ovulation in a 32-year-old woman. The diagnosis was made on morphological ultrasound examination at 18+4 weeks of gestation, showing two fetuses with discordant sex. The amniocentesis was declined by the patient. The monochorionic status was confirmed after a histopathalogical study of the placenta. At delivery, both a phenotypically normal boy and a phenotypically normal girl without sexual abnormality were observed. This analysis also revealed the presence of vascular anastomoses between both fetal circulations. Postnatal cytogenetic analyses indicated the presence of a chimerism in peripheral blood lymphocytes. This chimerism was not observed in cells obtained from a buccal swab. Molecular determination of zygosity confirmed the existence of the confined peripheral blood chimerism with the presence of four parental alleles. We report on a case of monochorionic dizygotic twin pregnancy. This observation underlies the need to carefully assess twin pregnancies, especially when obtained after assisted reproductive technology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Human-animal chimeras: ethical issues about farming chimeric animals bearing human organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret, Rodolphe; Martinez, Eric; Vialla, François; Giquel, Chloé; Thonnat-Marin, Aurélie; De Vos, John

    2016-06-29

    Recent advances in stem cells and gene engineering have paved the way for the generation of interspecies chimeras, such as animals bearing an organ from another species. The production of a rat pancreas by a mouse has demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. The next step will be the generation of larger chimeric animals, such as pigs bearing human organs. Because of the dramatic organ shortage for transplantation, the medical needs for such a transgressive practice are indisputable. However, there are serious technical barriers and complex ethical issues that must be discussed and solved before producing human organs in animals. The main ethical issues are the risks of consciousness and of human features in the chimeric animal due to a too high contribution of human cells to the brain, in the first case, or for instance to limbs, in the second. Another critical point concerns the production of human gametes by such chimeric animals. These worst-case scenarios are obviously unacceptable and must be strictly monitored by careful risk assessment, and, if necessary, technically prevented. The public must be associated with this ethical debate. Scientists and physicians have a critical role in explaining the medical needs, the advantages and limits of this potential medical procedure, and the ethical boundaries that must not be trespassed. If these prerequisites are met, acceptance of such a new, borderline medical procedure may prevail, as happened before for in-vitro fertilization or preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

  4. Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

    2006-10-01

    The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

  5. Enzymatic techniques for the isolation of random single-base substitutions in vitro at high frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzúa, P; Marians, K J

    1984-04-01

    A general and efficient method has been developed to generate large numbers of single-base substitution mutations simply and rapidly. A unique f1 phage recombinant DNA cloning vector is described, which contains the phi X174 origin of viral strand DNA synthesis and allows one to direct mutagenesis to any specific segment of DNA. Gapped circular DNA is constructed by annealing viral single-stranded circular DNA [ss(c) DNA] with a mixture of linear duplex DNAs that have had their 3'-OH termini processively digested with Escherichia coli exonuclease III under conditions in which the resulting, newly generated 3'-OH termini present in the various hybrid molecules span the region of interest. Base changes are induced by misincorporation of an alpha-thiodeoxynucleoside triphosphate analog onto this primer-template, followed by DNA repair synthesis. The asymmetric segregation of mutants from wild-type sequences is accomplished by double-stranded replicative form DNA----ss(c) DNA synthesis in vitro, initiated from the phi X174 viral strand origin sequence present on the vector DNA. Mutated ss(c) DNA is screened by the dideoxy chain termination method. In one mutagenesis experiment, 21 independent single-base substitutions were isolated in a 72-nucleotide-long target region. DNA sequence analysis showed that all possible base transversions and transitions were represented.

  6. Comprehensive methylome characterization of Mycoplasma genitalium and Mycoplasma pneumoniae at single-base resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lluch-Senar

    Full Text Available In the bacterial world, methylation is most commonly associated with restriction-modification systems that provide a defense mechanism against invading foreign genomes. In addition, it is known that methylation plays functionally important roles, including timing of DNA replication, chromosome partitioning, DNA repair, and regulation of gene expression. However, full DNA methylome analyses are scarce due to a lack of a simple methodology for rapid and sensitive detection of common epigenetic marks (ie N(6-methyladenine (6 mA and N(4-methylcytosine (4 mC, in these organisms. Here, we use Single-Molecule Real-Time (SMRT sequencing to determine the methylomes of two related human pathogen species, Mycoplasma genitalium G-37 and Mycoplasma pneumoniae M129, with single-base resolution. Our analysis identified two new methylation motifs not previously described in bacteria: a widespread 6 mA methylation motif common to both bacteria (5'-CTAT-3', as well as a more complex Type I m6A sequence motif in M. pneumoniae (5'-GAN(7TAY-3'/3'-CTN(7ATR-5'. We identify the methyltransferase responsible for the common motif and suggest the one involved in M. pneumoniae only. Analysis of the distribution of methylation sites across the genome of M. pneumoniae suggests a potential role for methylation in regulating the cell cycle, as well as in regulation of gene expression. To our knowledge, this is one of the first direct methylome profiling studies with single-base resolution from a bacterial organism.

  7. In silico and experimental characterization of chimeric Bacillus thermocatenulatus lipase with the complete conserved pentapeptide of Candida rugosa lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mostafa; Karkhane, Ali Asghar; Yakhchali, Bagher; Shamsara, Mehdi; Aminzadeh, Saeed; Morshedi, Dena; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Torktaz, Ibrahim; Karimi, Esmat; Safari, Zahra

    2013-02-01

    Lipases are one of the highest value commercial enzymes as they have broad applications in detergent, food, pharmaceutical, and dairy industries. To provide chimeric Bacillus thermocatenulatus lipase (BTL2), the completely conserved pentapeptide (¹¹²Ala-His-Ser-Gln-Gly¹¹⁶) was replaced with similar sequences (²⁰⁷Gly-Glu-Ser-Ala-Gly²¹¹) of Candida rugosa lipase (CLR) at the nucleophilic elbow region. For this purpose, three mutations including A112G, H113E, and Q115A were inserted in the conserved pentapeptide sequence of btl2 gene. Based on the crystal structures of 2W22, the best structure of opened form of the chimeric lipases were garnered using the MODELLER v9.10 software. The native and chimeric lipases were docked to a set of ligands, and a trial version of Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD) software was used to obtain the energy values. Docking results confirmed chimeric lipase to be better than the native lipase. Following the in silico study, cloning experiments were conducted and expression of native and chimeric btl2 gene in Pichia pastoris was performed. The native and chimeric lipases were purified, and the effect of these mutations on characteristics of chimeric lipase studied and then compared with those of native lipase. Chimeric lipase exhibited 1.6-fold higher activity than the native lipase at 55 °C. The highest percentage of both lipases activity was observed at 60 °C and pH of 8.0. The ion Ca²⁺ slightly inhibited the activity of both lipases, whereas the organic solvent enhanced the lipase stability of chimeric lipase as compared with the native lipase. According to the results, the presence of two glycine residues at the conserved pentapeptide region of this chimeric lipase (¹¹²Gly-Glu-Ser-Ala-Gly¹¹⁶) may increase the flexibility of the nucleophilic elbow region and affect the enzyme activity level.

  8. Role of CTCF in Regulating SLC45A3-ELK4 Chimeric RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujun Qin

    Full Text Available The chimeric RNA, SLC45A3-ELK4, was found to be a product of cis-splicing between the two adjacent genes (cis-SAGe. Despite the biological and clinical significance of SLC45A3-ELK4, its generating mechanism has not been elucidated. It was shown in one cell line that the binding of transcription factor CTCF to the insulators located at or near the gene boundaries, inversely correlates with the level of the chimera. To investigate the mechanism of such cis-SAGe events, we sequenced potential regions that may play a role in such transcriptional read-through. We could not detect mutations at the transcription termination site, insulator sites, splicing sites, or within CTCF itself in LNCaP cells, thus suggesting a "soft-wired" mechanism in regulating the cis-SAGe event. To investigate the role CTCF plays in regulating the chimeric RNA expression, we compared the levels of CTCF binding to the insulators in different cell lines, as well as clinical samples. Surprisingly, we did not find an inverse correlation between CTCF level, or its bindings to the insulators and SLC45A3-ELK4 expression among different samples. However, in three prostate cancer cell lines, different environmental factors can cause the expression levels of the chimeric RNA to change, and these changes do inversely correlate with CTCF level, and/or its bindings to the insulators. We thus conclude that CTCF and its bindings to the insulators are not the primary reasons for differential SLC45A3-ELK4 expression in different cell lines, or clinical cases. However, they are the likely mechanism for the same cells to respond to different environmental cues, in order to regulate the expression of SLC45A3-ELK4 chimeric RNA. This response to different environmental cues is not general to other cis-SAGe events, as we only found one out of 16 newly identified chimeric RNAs showing a pattern similar to SLC45A3-ELK4.

  9. EXTENSIVE READING IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    IntroductionMost teachers and students in China are quite familiar with the term‘extensive reading’,but how itshould be taught still remains a problem.This paper covers the aims of extensive reading and the methodsand materials used in the course.Then some practical suggestions will be given to make the course moreinteresting and efficient.According to Dzao(1990).extensive reading is‘the course where other reading skills-speed,predictionand making inference-can be developed,’and‘where there is practice in geting the gist,in summarisingmain ideas,in understanding the author’s purpose and theme...’.So the aims of this course are todevelop general reading skills,the ability,to read quickly and to grasp the main ideas of the text.Toachieve these,students must enlarge their vocabulary,so this is also regarded as one of the aims.

  10. Android Access Control Extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Baláž

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to analyze and extend security model of mobile devices running on Android OS. Provided security extension is a Linux kernel security module that allows the system administrator to restrict program's capabilities with per-program profiles. Profiles can allow capabilities like network access, raw socket access, and the permission to read, write, or execute files on matching paths. Module supplements the traditional Android capability access control model by providing mandatory access control (MAC based on path. This extension increases security of access to system objects in a device and allows creating security sandboxes per application.

  11. Recent extensions to GALPROP

    CERN Document Server

    Strong, A W

    2015-01-01

    Some recent extensions to the GALPROP cosmic-ray propagation package are described. The enhancements include: an accurate solution option, improved convection formulation, alternative spatial boundary conditions, polarized synchrotron emission, new magnetic field models, updated gamma-ray production cross-sections, free-free radio emission and absorption, primary positrons, additional injection spectral breaks, deuterium production by pp fusion, hadronic energy losses, improved HEALPix skymap format, compatibility with latest HEALPix release, and various bug fixes. The Explanatory Supplement has been extensively updated, including details of these enhancements. A compatible plot package GALPLOT for GALPROP output is also provided, as well as other related software.

  12. Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum race 3 by single-base extension method and allele-specific polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed allele specific (AS) SNP primers for rapid detection of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp vasinfectum (FOV) race 3. FOV_BT_SNP_R3 and FOV_BT_AS_R3 primers were designed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms of partial sequence alignment of the ß-tubulin (BT) gene from several FOV races. These ...

  13. Mobile Applications for Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drill, Sabrina L.

    2012-01-01

    Mobile computing devices (smart phones, tablets, etc.) are rapidly becoming the dominant means of communication worldwide and are increasingly being used for scientific investigation. This technology can further our Extension mission by increasing our power for data collection, information dissemination, and informed decision-making. Mobile…

  14. Extensions of tempered representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, E.; Solleveld, M.

    2013-01-01

    Let π, π′ be irreducible tempered representations of an affine Hecke algebra H with positive parameters. We compute the higher extension groups Ext nH(π,π′) explicitly in terms of the representations of analytic R-groups corresponding to π and π′. The result has immediate applications to the computa

  15. Extending Extensive Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    The April 2015 issue of "Reading in a Foreign Language" featured a discussion forum on extensive reading (ER). Most of the authors, recognized authorities on ER, discussed their views of the principles of ER, particularly in establishing and conducting ER programs. The purpose of this discussion is to review developments in the practice…

  16. DNA duplex membrane effect for the electrochemical detection of single-base DNA mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Chunxiong; Mao Yongdong; Ouyang Qi

    2006-01-01

    Here we report a new method to detect DNA point mutations.The method is based on the formation and deformation of double-stranded DNA(dsDNA)membranes on a gold surface.It can encage reporter molecules between the gold surface and the double-stranded DNA or keep them away from the gold surface.In these systems,Fe(CN)63- was used as the reporter.As the temperature increases,a sharp electrochemical signal change in the melting curve of wild-type dsDNA appears.At a special temperature,the and single base mutation target.Thus,the system provides a simple and sensitive method to detect DNA point mutations without labeling targets.

  17. Construction of a Chimeric Secretory IgA and Its Neutralization Activity against Avian Influenza Virus H5N1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cun Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA acts as the first line of defense against respiratory pathogens. In this assay, the variable regions of heavy chain (VH and Light chain (VL genes from a mouse monoclonal antibody against H5N1 were cloned and fused with human IgA constant regions. The full-length chimeric light and heavy chains were inserted into a eukaryotic expressing vector and then transfected into CHO/dhfr-cells. The chimeric monomeric IgA antibody expression was confirmed by using ELISA, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot. In order to obtain a dimeric secretory IgA, another two expressing plasmids, namely, pcDNA4/His A-IgJ and pcDNA4/His A-SC, were cotransfected into the CHO/dhfr-cells. The expression of dimeric SIgA was confirmed by using ELISA assay and native gel electrophoresis. In microneutralization assay on 96-well immunoplate, the chimeric SIgA showed neutralization activity against H5N1 virus on MDCK cells and the titer was determined to be 1 : 64. On preadministrating intranasally, the chimeric SIgA could prevent mice from lethal attack by using A/Vietnam/1194/04 H5N1 with a survival rate of 80%. So we concluded that the constructed recombinant chimeric SIgA has a neutralization capability targeting avian influenza virus H5N1 infection in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Construction and evaluation of a chimeric protein made from Fasciola hepatica leucine aminopeptidase and cathepsin L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Guzmán, K; Sahagún-Ruiz, A; Vallecillo, A J; Cruz-Mendoza, I; Quiroz-Romero, H

    2016-01-01

    Leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and cathepsin L1 (CL1) are important enzymes for the pathogenesis and physiology of Fasciola hepatica. These enzymes were analysed in silico to design a chimeric protein containing the most antigenic sequences of LAP (GenBank; AAV59016.1; amino acids 192-281) and CL1 (GenBank CAC12806.1; amino acids 173-309). The cloned 681-bp chimeric fragment (rFhLAP-CL1) contains 270 bp from LAP and 411 bp from CL1, comprising three epitopes, DGRVVHLKY (amino acids 54-62) from LAP, VTGYYTVHSGSEVELKNLV (amino acids 119-137) and YQSQTCLPF (amino acids 161-169) from CL1. The ~25 kDa rFhLAP-CL1 chimeric protein was expressed from the pET15b plasmid in the Rosetta (DE3) Escherichia coli strain. The chimeric protein rFhLAP-CL1, which showed antigenic and immunogenic properties, was recognized in Western blot assays using F. hepatica-positive bovine sera, and induced strong, specific antibody responses following immunization in rabbits. The newly generated chimeric protein may be used as a diagnostic tool for detection of antibodies against F. hepatica in bovine sera and as an immunogen to induce protection against bovine fasciolosis.

  19. Intra-serotype SAT2 chimeric foot-and-mouth disease vaccine protects cattle against FMDV challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maree, Francois F; Nsamba, Peninah; Mutowembwa, Paidamwoyo; Rotherham, Lia S; Esterhuysen, Jan; Scott, Katherine

    2015-06-09

    The genetic diversity of the three Southern African Territories (SAT) types of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) reflects high antigenic variation, and indications are that vaccines targeting each SAT-specific topotype may be needed. This has serious implications for control of FMD using vaccines as well as the choice of strains to include in regional antigen banks. Here, we investigated an intra-serotype chimeric virus, vSAT2(ZIM14)-SAT2, which was engineered by replacing the surface-exposed capsid-coding region (1B-1D/2A) of a SAT2 genome-length clone, pSAT2, with that of the field isolate, SAT2/ZIM/14/90. The chimeric FMDV produced by this technique was viable, grew to high titres and stably maintained the 1B-1D/2A sequence upon passage. Chemically inactivated, oil adjuvanted vaccines of both the chimeric and parental immunogens were used to vaccinate cattle. The serological response to vaccination showed the production of strong neutralizing antibody titres that correlated with protection against homologous FMDV challenge. We also predicted a good likelihood that cattle vaccinated with an intra-serotype chimeric vaccine would be protected against challenge with viruses that caused recent outbreaks in southern Africa. These results provide support that chimeric vaccines containing the external capsid of field isolates induce protective immune responses in FMD host species similar to the parental vaccine.

  20. Use of CTLA4Ig for induction of mixed chimerism and renal allograft tolerance in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Y; Ochiai, T; Boskovic, S; Nadazdin, O; Oura, T; Schoenfeld, D; Cappetta, K; Smith, R-N; Colvin, R B; Madsen, J C; Sachs, D H; Benichou, G; Cosimi, A B; Kawai, T

    2014-12-01

    We have previously reported successful induction of renal allograft tolerance via a mixed chimerism approach in nonhuman primates. In those studies, we found that costimulatory blockade with anti-CD154 mAb was an effective adjunctive therapy for induction of renal allograft tolerance. However, since anti-CD154 mAb is not clinically available, we have evaluated CTLA4Ig as an alternative agent for effecting costimulation blockade in this treatment protocol. Two CTLA4Igs, abatacept and belatacept, were substituted for anti-CD154 mAb in the conditioning regimen (low dose total body irradiation, thymic irradiation, anti-thymocyte globulin and a 1-month posttransplant course of cyclosporine [CyA]). Three recipients treated with the abatacept regimen failed to develop comparable lymphoid chimerism to that achieved with anti-CD154 mAb treatment and these recipients rejected their kidney allografts early. With the belatacept regimen, four of five recipients developed chimerism and three of these achieved long-term renal allograft survival (>861, >796 and >378 days) without maintenance immunosuppression. Neither chimerism nor long-term allograft survival were achieved in two recipients treated with the belatacept regimen but with a lower, subtherapeutic dose of CyA. This study indicates that CD28/B7 blockade with belatacept can provide a clinically applicable alternative to anti-CD154 mAb for promoting chimerism and renal allograft tolerance.

  1. Modal extension rule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xia; SUN Jigui; LIN Hai; FENG Shasha

    2005-01-01

    Modal logics are good candidates for a formal theory of agents. The efficiency of reasoning method in modal logics is very important, because it determines whether or not the reasoning method can be widely used in systems based on agent. In this paper,we modify the extension rule theorem proving method we presented before, and then apply it to P-logic that is translated from modal logic by functional transformation. At last, we give the proof of its soundness and completeness.

  2. Gene editing by co-transformation of TALEN and chimeric RNA/DNA oligonucleotides on the rice OsEPSPS gene and the inheritance of mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugui Wang

    Full Text Available Although several site-specific nucleases (SSNs, such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas, have emerged as powerful tools for targeted gene editing in many organisms, to date, gene targeting (GT in plants remains a formidable challenge. In the present study, we attempted to substitute a single base in situ on the rice OsEPSPS gene by co-transformation of TALEN with chimeric RNA/DNA oligonucleotides (COs, including different strand composition such as RNA/DNA (C1 or DNA/RNA (C2 but contained the same target base to be substituted. In contrast to zero GT event obtained by the co-transformation of TALEN with homologous recombination plasmid (HRP, we obtained one mutant showing target base substitution although accompanied by undesired deletion of 12 bases downstream the target site from the co-transformation of TALEN and C1. In addition to this typical event, we also obtained 16 mutants with different length of base deletions around the target site among 105 calli lines derived from transformation of TALEN alone (4/19 as well as co-transformation of TELAN with either HRP (5/30 or C1 (2/25 or C2 (5/31. Further analysis demonstrated that the homozygous gene-edited mutants without foreign gene insertion could be obtained in one generation. The induced mutations in transgenic generation were also capable to pass to the next generation stably. However, the genotypes of mutants did not segregate normally in T1 population, probably due to lethal mutations. Phenotypic assessments in T1 generation showed that the heterozygous plants with either one or three bases deletion on target sequence, called d1 and d3, were more sensitive to glyphosate and the heterozygous d1 plants had significantly lower seed-setting rate than wild-type.

  3. Gene editing by co-transformation of TALEN and chimeric RNA/DNA oligonucleotides on the rice OsEPSPS gene and the inheritance of mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mugui; Liu, Yujun; Zhang, Cuicui; Liu, Jianping; Liu, Xin; Wang, Liangchao; Wang, Wenyi; Chen, Hao; Wei, Chuchu; Ye, Xiufen; Li, Xinyuan; Tu, Jumin

    2015-01-01

    Although several site-specific nucleases (SSNs), such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas, have emerged as powerful tools for targeted gene editing in many organisms, to date, gene targeting (GT) in plants remains a formidable challenge. In the present study, we attempted to substitute a single base in situ on the rice OsEPSPS gene by co-transformation of TALEN with chimeric RNA/DNA oligonucleotides (COs), including different strand composition such as RNA/DNA (C1) or DNA/RNA (C2) but contained the same target base to be substituted. In contrast to zero GT event obtained by the co-transformation of TALEN with homologous recombination plasmid (HRP), we obtained one mutant showing target base substitution although accompanied by undesired deletion of 12 bases downstream the target site from the co-transformation of TALEN and C1. In addition to this typical event, we also obtained 16 mutants with different length of base deletions around the target site among 105 calli lines derived from transformation of TALEN alone (4/19) as well as co-transformation of TELAN with either HRP (5/30) or C1 (2/25) or C2 (5/31). Further analysis demonstrated that the homozygous gene-edited mutants without foreign gene insertion could be obtained in one generation. The induced mutations in transgenic generation were also capable to pass to the next generation stably. However, the genotypes of mutants did not segregate normally in T1 population, probably due to lethal mutations. Phenotypic assessments in T1 generation showed that the heterozygous plants with either one or three bases deletion on target sequence, called d1 and d3, were more sensitive to glyphosate and the heterozygous d1 plants had significantly lower seed-setting rate than wild-type.

  4. Prokaryotic expression and renaturation of engineering chimeric Fab antibody against human hepatoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Liang Xing; Xiang-Min Yang; Xi-Ying Yao; Fei Song; Zhi-Nan Chen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To express chimeric Fd (cFd) and chimeric light chain (cL) in E.coli respectively and refold them into chimeric Fab (cFab) antibody.METHODS: cFd and cL genes were respectively inserted into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a to construct recombinant vectors pET32a/cFd and pET32a/cL. Then,the competent E. colicells were transformed by the recombinant vectors and induced by IPTG. Moreover, a large quantity of cFd and cL expression products were prepared and mixed with equal molar to refold into cFab by gradient dialysis. The refolded products were identified and analyzed by sodium SDS-PAGE, Western blotting,ELISA and HPLC.RESULTS: High efficient prokaryotic expressions of both cFd and cL in the form of non-fusion protein were obtained with the expression levels of 28.3% and 32.3% of total bacteria proteins, respectively. Their relative molecular masses were all 24 ku or so, and both of them mainly existed in the form of inclusion bodies. In addition, cFd and cL were successfully refolded into cFab by gradient dialysis, with about 59.45% of recovery when the starting total protein concentration was 100 μg/mL. The renatured cFab could specifically bind to related antigen with high affinity.CONCLUSION: The cFab antibody against human hepatoma was highly and efficiently expressed and refolded, which laid a solid foundation for studying its application in the treatment of hepatoma.

  5. [Protein trans-spliced chimeric human/porcine BDD-FVIII with augmented secretion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fu-xiang; Yang, Shu-de; Liu, Ze-long; Miao, Jing; Qu, Hui-ge; Chi, Xiao-yan

    2010-10-01

    This study is to construct a chimeric human/porcine BDD-FVIII (BDD-hpFVIII) containing the substituted porcine A1 and A3 domains which proved to have a pro-secretory function. By exploring Ssp DnaB intein's protein trans-splicing a dual-vector was adopted to co-transfer the chimeric BDD-hpFVIII gene into cultured COS-7 cell to observe the intracellular BDD-hpFVIII splicing by Western blotting and secretion of spliced chimeric BDD-hp FVIII protein and bio-activity using ELISA and Coatest assay, respectively. The dada showed that an obvious protein band of spliced BDD-hpFVIII can be seen, and the amount of spliced BDD-hpFVIII protein and bio-activity in the supernatant were up to (340 +/- 64) ng x mL(-1) and (2.52 +/- 0.32) u x mL(-1) secreted by co-transfected cells which were significantly higher than that of dual-vector-mediated human BDD-FVIII gene co-transfection cells [(93 +/- 22) ng x mL(-1), (0.72 +/- 0.13) u x mL(-1)]. Furthermore, a spliced BDD-hpFVIII protein and activity can be detected in supernatant from combined cells separately transfected with intein-fused BDD-hpFVIII heavy and light chain genes indicating that intein-mediated BDD-hpFVIII splicing occurs independently of cellular mechanism. It provided evidence for enhancing FVIII secretion in the research of animal models using intein-based dual vector for the delivery of the BDD-hpFVIII gene.

  6. Chimeric SV40 virus-like particles induce specific cytotoxicity and protective immunity against influenza A virus without the need of adjuvants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Masaaki [Department of Allergy and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Morikawa, Katsuma [Department of Biological Information, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Suda, Tatsuya [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Laboratory for Immunopharmacology of Microbial Products, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Ohno, Naohito [Laboratory for Immunopharmacology of Microbial Products, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Matsushita, Sho [Department of Allergy and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Allergy Center, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Akatsuka, Toshitaka [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Handa, Hiroshi, E-mail: handa.h.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Solutions Research Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Matsui, Masanori, E-mail: mmatsui@saitama-med.ac.jp [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan)

    2014-01-05

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are a promising vaccine platform due to the safety and efficiency. However, it is still unclear whether polyomavirus-based VLPs are useful for this purpose. Here, we attempted to evaluate the potential of polyomavirus VLPs for the antiviral vaccine using simian virus 40 (SV40). We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an HLA-A{sup ⁎}02:01-restricted, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope derived from influenza A virus. HLA-A{sup ⁎}02:01-transgenic mice were then immunized with the chimeric SV40-VLPs. The chimeric SV40-VLPs effectively induced influenza-specific CTLs and heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses without the need of adjuvants. Because DNase I treatment of the chimeric SV40-VLPs did not disrupt CTL induction, the intrinsic adjuvant property may not result from DNA contaminants in the VLP preparation. In addition, immunization with the chimeric SV40-VLPs generated long-lasting memory CTLs. We here propose that the chimeric SV40-VLPs harboring an epitope may be a promising CTL-based vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties. - Highlights: • We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an influenza virus-derived CTL epitope. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce influenza-specific CTLs in mice without adjuvants. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce long-lasting memory CTLs. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs is a promising vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties.

  7. Construction of chimeric enzymes out of maize endosperm branching enzymes I and II: activity and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriki, T; Stewart, D C; Preiss, J

    1997-11-14

    Branching enzyme I and II isoforms from maize endosperm (mBE I and mBE II, respectively) have quite different properties, and to elucidate the domain(s) that determines the differences, chimeric genes consisting of part mBE I and part mBE II were constructed. When expressed under the control of the T7 promoter in Escherichia coli, several of the chimeric enzymes were inactive. The only fully active chimeric enzyme was mBE II-I BspHI, in which the carboxyl-terminal part of mBE II was exchanged for that of mBE I at a BspHI restriction site and was purified to homogeneity and characterized. Another chimeric enzyme, mBE I-II HindIII, in which the amino-terminal end of mBE II was replaced with that of mBE I, had very little activity and was only partially characterized. The purified mBE II-I BspHI exhibited higher activity than wild-type mBE I and mBE II when assayed by the phosphorylase a stimulation assay. mBE II-I BspHI had substrate specificity (preference for amylose rather than amylopectin) and catalytic capacity similar to mBE I, despite the fact that only the carboxyl terminus was from mBE I, suggesting that the carboxyl terminus may be involved in determining substrate specificity and catalytic capacity. In chain transfer experiments, mBE II-I BspHI transferred more short chains (with a degree of polymerization of around 6) in a fashion similar to mBE II. In contrast, mBE I-II HindIII transferred more long chains (with a degree of polymerization of around 11-12), similar to mBE I, suggesting that the amino terminus of mBEs may play a role in the size of oligosaccharide chain transferred. This study challenges the notion that the catalytic centers for branching enzymes are exclusively located in the central portion of the enzyme; it suggests instead that the amino and carboxyl termini may also be involved in determining substrate preference, catalytic capacity, and chain length transfer.

  8. Chimerism in a child with severe combined immunodeficiency: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureli, Anna; Piancatelli, Daniela; Monaco, Palmina I; Ozzella, Giuseppina; Canossi, Angelica; Piazza, Antonina; Isacchi, Giancarlo; Caniglia, Maurizio; Adorno, Domenico

    2006-09-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) represents a group of rare, sometimes fatal, congenital disorders in which there is a combined absence of T-lymphocyte and B-lymphocyte function. Children with SCID die within two years of age, if untreated. The effective treatment for SCID is a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). It has been repeatedly described that in peripheral blood of infants with SCID maternal T cells can be found. Here we report a case of blood chimerism in a one-year-old boy with SCID.

  9. Construction of a chimeric hepatitis C virus replicon based on a strain isolated from a chronic hepatitis C patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huang; Zhu, Wandi; Han, Qingxia; Pei, Rongjuan; Chen, Xinwen

    2014-02-01

    Subgenomic replicons of hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been widely used for studying HCV replication. Here, we report a new subgenomic replicon based on a strain isolated from a chronically infected patient. The coding sequence of HCV was recovered from a Chinese chronic hepatitis C patient displaying high serum HCV copy numbers. A consensus sequence designated as CCH strain was constructed based on the sequences of five clones and this was classified by sequence alignment as belonging to genotype 2a. The subgenomic replicon of CCH was replication-deficient in cell culture, due to dysfunctions in NS3 and NS5B. Various JFH1/CCH chimeric replicons were constructed, and specific mutations were introduced. The introduction of mutations could partially restore the replication of chimeric replicons. A replication-competent chimeric construct was finally obtained by the introduction of NS3 from JFH1 into the backbone of the CCH strain.

  10. Pre-clinical evaluation of CD38 chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells for the treatment of multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drent, Esther; Groen, Richard W. J.; Noort, Willy A. Noort

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells is a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. The CD38 molecule, with its high expression on multiple myeloma cells, appears a suitable target for antibody therapy. Prompted by this, we used three different CD38 antibody...... sequences to generate second-generation retroviral CD38- chimeric antigen receptor constructs with which we transduced T cells from healthy donors and multiple myeloma patients. We then evaluated the preclinical efficacy and safety of the transduced T cells. Irrespective of the donor and antibody sequence......, CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells proliferated, produced inflammatory cytokines and effectively lysed malignant cell lines and primary malignant cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and multi-drug resistant multiple myeloma in a cell-dose, and CD38-dependent manner, despite...

  11. Production of Hybrid Chimeric PVX Particles Using a Combination of TMV and PVX-Based Expression Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickmeis, Christina; Honickel, Mareike Michaela Antonia; Fischer, Rainer; Commandeur, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    We have generated hybrid chimeric potato virus X (PVX) particles by coexpression of different PVX coat protein fusions utilizing tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and PVX-based expression vectors. Coinfection was achieved with a modified PVX overcoat vector displaying a fluorescent protein and a TMV vector expressing another PVX fluorescent overcoat fusion protein. Coexpression of the PVX-CP fusions in the same cells was confirmed by epifluorescence microscopy. Labeling with specific antibodies and transmission electron microscopy revealed chimeric particles displaying green fluorescent protein and mCherry on the surface. These data were corroborated by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We used split-mCherry fragments as PVX coat fusions and confirmed an interaction between the split-mCherry fragments in coinfected cells. The presence of assembled split-mCherry on the surface confirmed the hybrid character of the chimeric particles.

  12. Chimerism in wild adult populations of the broadcast spawning coral Acropora millepora on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneour Puill-Stephan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chimeras are organisms containing tissues or cells of two or more genetically distinct individuals, and are known to exist in at least nine phyla of protists, plants, and animals. Although widespread and common in marine invertebrates, the extent of chimerism in wild populations of reef corals is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The extent of chimerism was explored within two populations of a common coral, Acropora millepora, on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, by using up to 12 polymorphic DNA microsatellite loci. At least 2% and 5% of Magnetic Island and Pelorus Island populations of A. millepora, respectively, were found to be chimeras (3% overall, based on conservative estimates. A slightly less conservative estimate indicated that 5% of colonies in each population were chimeras. These values are likely to be vast underestimates of the true extent of chimerism, as our sampling protocol was restricted to a maximum of eight branches per colony, while most colonies consist of hundreds of branches. Genotypes within chimeric corals showed high relatedness, indicating that genetic similarity is a prerequisite for long-term acceptance of non-self genotypes within coral colonies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While some brooding corals have been shown to form genetic chimeras in their early life history stages under experimental conditions, this study provides the first genetic evidence of the occurrence of coral chimeras in the wild and of chimerism in a broadcast spawning species. We hypothesize that chimerism is more widespread in corals than previously thought, and suggest that this has important implications for their resilience, potentially enhancing their capacity to compete for space and respond to stressors such as pathogen infection.

  13. EXTENSIONS OF SOME INEQUALITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By using a simple analytic method the following inequalities are proved:(bx+y-ax+y)/(bx-ax)≥[(x+y)/x][(a+b)/2]y,for 0<a<b,x≥1,y>0,x+y≥2;(bx+y-ax+y)/(bx-ax)<[(x+y)/x][(a+b)/2]y,for0<a<b,0<x<1,y>0,x+y≤2.These inequalities are the extensions of inequalities of Qi Feng, Xu Senlin and Zheng Lin. And a conjection of Qi Feng is proved not true.

  14. Extensive air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, M V S

    1997-01-01

    Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays carry information about their sources and the intervening medium apart from providing a beam of particles for studying certain features of high energy interactions currently inaccessible at man-made accelerators. They can at present be studied only via the extensive air showers (EAS's) they generate while passing through the Earth's atmosphere, since their fluxes are too low for the experiments of limited capability flown in balloons and satellites. The EAS is generated by a series of interactions of the primary cosmic ray and its progeny with the atmospheric nucle

  15. T-cell chimerism is valuable in predicting early mortality in steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease after myeloablative allogeneic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minculescu, Lia; Madsen, Hans O.; Sengeløv, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of early T-cell chimerism status on the incidence and clinical course of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) in allogeneic transplant recipients after myeloablative conditioning. Of 62 patients, 38 (61%) had complete T-cell donor chimerism...

  16. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  17. Optimizing chimerism level through bone marrow transplantation and irradiation to induce long-term tolerance to composite tissue allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jeng-Yee; Tsai, Feng-Chou; Wallace, Christopher Glenn; Huang, Wei-Chao; Wei, Fu-Chan; Liao, Shuen-Kuei

    2012-11-01

    Mixed chimerism with long-term composite tissue allotransplant (CTA) acceptance can be achieved through allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The present study investigated the optimal chimerism level by giving different irradiation dosages to recipients to induce tolerance to CTA. Chimera were prepared using Brown-Norway and Lewis rats with strong major histocompatibility complex incompatibility. The Lewis rats received 5 mg antilymphocyte globulin (day -1 and 10) and 16 mg/kg cyclosporine (day 0-10) and were separated into groups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 according to the day -1 irradiation dosage: 0, 200, 400, 600, and 950 cGy, respectively. The Lewis rats were then reconstituted with 100 × 10(6) T-cell-depleted Brown-Norway bone marrow cells (day 0) and received vascularized Brown-Norway-CTA on day 28. Chimerism was assessed monthly by flow cytometry starting on day 28 after BMT. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was assessed clinically and histologically. Chimerism, 4 weeks after BMT, averaged 0.2%, 9.2%, 30.7%, 58%, and 99.3% in groups 1 to 5, respectively. GVHD occurred as follows: groups 1 and 2, none; group 3, 1 case of GVHD; group 4, 7 cases of GVHD (of which 3 died); and group 5, 10 cases of GVHD (of which 6 died). The percentage of long-term CTA acceptance was 0%, 0%, 90%, 70%, and 40% in groups 1 to 5, respectively. The percentage of regulatory T cells was significantly lower in high-chimerism (≥ 20%, n = 15) than in low-chimerism (<20%, n = 5) rats that accepted CTA long-term . The chimerism level correlated positively with GVHD occurrence and long-term CTA acceptance but correlated negatively with regulatory T-cell levels. Optimal chimerism for CTA acceptance through pre-CTA BMT and irradiation occurs at 20-50% at day 28 after BMT in the rat model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Formation of chimeric genes by copy-number variation as a mutational mechanism in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippey, Caitlin; Walsh, Tom; Gulsuner, Suleyman; Brodsky, Matt; Nord, Alex S; Gasperini, Molly; Pierce, Sarah; Spurrell, Cailyn; Coe, Bradley P; Krumm, Niklas; Lee, Ming K; Sebat, Jonathan; McClellan, Jon M; King, Mary-Claire

    2013-10-03

    Chimeric genes can be caused by structural genomic rearrangements that fuse together portions of two different genes to create a novel gene. We hypothesize that brain-expressed chimeras may contribute to schizophrenia. Individuals with schizophrenia and control individuals were screened genome wide for copy-number variants (CNVs) that disrupted two genes on the same DNA strand. Candidate events were filtered for predicted brain expression and for frequency genes in localization, regulation, or function. Subcellular localizations of DNAJA2-NETO2 and MAP3K3-DDX42 differed from their parent genes. On the basis of the expression profile of the MATK promoter, MATK-ZFR2 is likely to be far more highly expressed in the brain during development than the ZFR2 parent gene. MATK-ZFR2 includes a ZFR2-derived isoform that we demonstrate localizes preferentially to neuronal dendritic branch sites. These results suggest that the formation of chimeric genes is a mechanism by which CNVs contribute to schizophrenia and that, by interfering with parent gene function, chimeras may disrupt critical brain processes, including neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation, and dendritic arborization.

  19. Chimerism representing both paternal alleles detected by HLA typing before kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette; Petersen, Mikkel Steen; Møller, Bjarne Kuno

    2014-01-01

    We select donors and recipients for solid organ transplantations by employing HLA serology and PCR with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). Routinely, patients and donors are typed for HLA-A and B using serological techniques, while HLA-C, HLA-DRB1, and HLA-DQB1 are typed with PCR-SSP. In a 38-y......-year-old female kidney transplantation recipient, the PCR-SSP technique yielded very unusual results, whereas her parents were assigned routinely. The mother had the following HLA types: A3,33(19); B7,39(16); C*07; DQB1*06; DRB1*13; the father A2,11; B27,35; C*01,*04; DQB1*03,*05; DRB1...... trisomy 6p or by chimerism. Flow cytometric analysis, employing antibodies specific for the two paternal HLA-A alleles, clearly showed two distinct populations of cells: 83% expressing HLA-A11 and 12% expressing HLA-A2, suggesting a paternal chimerism. We are studying these cell populations to possibly...

  20. A novel chimeric Newcastle disease virus vectored vaccine against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Paldurai, Anandan; Samal, Siba K

    2017-03-01

    Avian influenza (AI) is an economically-important disease of poultry worldwide. The use of vaccines to control AI has increased because of frequent outbreaks of the disease in endemic countries. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vectored vaccine has shown to be effective in protecting chickens against a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) infection. However, preexisting antibodies to NDV vector might affect protective efficacy of the vaccine in the field. As an alternative strategy, we evaluated vaccine efficacy of a chimeric NDV vectored vaccine in which the ectodomains of F and HN proteins were replaced by those of avian paramyxovirus serotype-2. The chimeric NDV vector stably expressed the HA protein in vivo, did not cross-react with NDV, was attenuated to be used as a safe vaccine, and provided a partial protection of 1-day-old immunized chickens against HPAIV subtype H5N1challenge, indicating its potential use for early protection of chickens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Overcoming the Immunosuppressive Tumor Microenvironment of Hodgkin Lymphoma Using Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruella, Marco; Klichinsky, Michael; Kenderian, Saad S; Shestova, Olga; Ziober, Amy; Kraft, Daniel O; Feldman, Michael; Wasik, Mariusz A; June, Carl H; Gill, Saar

    2017-10-01

    Patients with otherwise treatment-resistant Hodgkin lymphoma could benefit from chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CART) therapy. However, Hodgkin lymphoma lacks CD19 and contains a highly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME). We hypothesized that in Hodgkin lymphoma, CART should target both malignant cells and the TME. We demonstrated CD123 on both Hodgkin lymphoma cells and TME, including tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). In vitro, Hodgkin lymphoma cells convert macrophages toward immunosuppressive TAMs that inhibit T-cell proliferation. In contrast, anti-CD123 CART recognized and killed TAMs, thus overcoming immunosuppression. Finally, we showed in immunodeficient mouse models that CART123 eradicated Hodgkin lymphoma and established long-term immune memory. A novel platform that targets malignant cells and the microenvironment may be needed to successfully treat malignancies with an immunosuppressive milieu.Significance: Anti-CD123 chimeric antigen receptor T cells target both the malignant cells and TAMs in Hodgkin lymphoma, thereby eliminating an important immunosuppressive component of the tumor microenvironment. Cancer Discov; 7(10); 1154-67. ©2017 AACR.This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1047. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Inter-specific coral chimerism: Genetically distinct multicellular structures associated with tissue loss in Montipora capitata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Forsman, Zac H.; Szabo, Zoltan; Lewis, Teresa D.; Aeby, Greta S.; Toonen, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Montipora white syndrome (MWS) results in tissue-loss that is often lethal to Montipora capitata, a major reef building coral that is abundant and dominant in the Hawai'ian Archipelago. Within some MWS-affected colonies in Kane'ohe Bay, Oahu, Hawai'i, we saw unusual motile multicellular structures within gastrovascular canals (hereafter referred to as invasive gastrovascular multicellular structure-IGMS) that were associated with thinning and fragmentation of the basal body wall. IGMS were in significantly greater densities in coral fragments manifesting tissue-loss compared to paired normal fragments. Mesenterial filaments from these colonies yielded typical M. capitata mitochondrial haplotypes (CO1, CR), while IGMS from the same colony consistently yielded distinct haplotypes previously only found in a different Montipora species (Montipora flabellata). Protein profiles showed consistent differences between paired mesenterial filaments and IGMS from the same colonies as did seven microsatellite loci that also exhibited an excess of alleles per locus inconsistent with a single diploid organism. We hypothesize that IGMS are a parasitic cellular lineage resulting from the chimeric fusion between M. capitata and M. flabellata larvae followed by morphological reabsorption of M. flabellata and subsequent formation of cell-lineage parasites. We term this disease Montiporaiasis. Although intra-specific chimerism is common in colonial animals, this is the first suspected inter-specific example and the first associated with tissue loss.

  3. Inter-specific coral chimerism: genetically distinct multicellular structures associated with tissue loss in Montipora capitata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry M Work

    Full Text Available Montipora white syndrome (MWS results in tissue-loss that is often lethal to Montipora capitata, a major reef building coral that is abundant and dominant in the Hawai'ian Archipelago. Within some MWS-affected colonies in Kane'ohe Bay, Oahu, Hawai'i, we saw unusual motile multicellular structures within gastrovascular canals (hereafter referred to as invasive gastrovascular multicellular structure-IGMS that were associated with thinning and fragmentation of the basal body wall. IGMS were in significantly greater densities in coral fragments manifesting tissue-loss compared to paired normal fragments. Mesenterial filaments from these colonies yielded typical M. capitata mitochondrial haplotypes (CO1, CR, while IGMS from the same colony consistently yielded distinct haplotypes previously only found in a different Montipora species (Montipora flabellata. Protein profiles showed consistent differences between paired mesenterial filaments and IGMS from the same colonies as did seven microsatellite loci that also exhibited an excess of alleles per locus inconsistent with a single diploid organism. We hypothesize that IGMS are a parasitic cellular lineage resulting from the chimeric fusion between M. capitata and M. flabellata larvae followed by morphological reabsorption of M. flabellata and subsequent formation of cell-lineage parasites. We term this disease Montiporaiasis. Although intra-specific chimerism is common in colonial animals, this is the first suspected inter-specific example and the first associated with tissue loss.

  4. Immunoreactivity evaluation of a new recombinant chimeric protein against Brucella in the murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Abdollahi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Brucellosis is an important health problem in developing countries and no vaccine is available for the prevention of infection in humans. Because of clinically infectious diseases and their economic consequences in human and animals, designing a proper vaccine against Brucella is desirable. In this study, we evaluated the immune responses induced by a designed recombinant chimera protein in murine model.Materials and Methods: Three immunodominant antigens of Brucella have been characterized as potential immunogenic and protective antigens including: trigger factor (TF, Omp31 and Bp26 were fused together by EAAAK linkers to produce a chimera (structure were designed in silico, which was synthesized, cloned, and expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3. The purification of recombinant protein was performed using Ni-NTA agarose. SDS-PAGE and anti-His antibody was used for confirmation purified protein (Western blot. BALB/c immunization was performed by purified protein and adjuvant, and sera antibody levels were measured by ELISA. otted.Results: SDS-PAGE and Western blotting results indicated the similarity of in silico designing and in vitro experiments. ELISA result proved that the immunized sera of mice contain high levels of antibodies (IgG against recombinant chimeric protein.Conclusion: The recombinant chimeric protein could be a potential antigen candidate for the development of a subunit vaccine against Brucella. Keywords: Brucella, Vaccine, Immunity, Recombinant

  5. Tetravalent neutralizing antibody response against four dengue serotypes by a single chimeric dengue envelope antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apt, Doris; Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Brinkman, Alice; Semyonov, Andrey; Yang, Shumin; Skinner, Craig; Diehl, Lori; Lyons, Richard; Porter, Kevin; Punnonen, Juha

    2006-01-16

    We employed DNA shuffling and screening technologies to develop a single recombinant dengue envelope (E) antigen capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies against all four antigenically distinct dengue serotypes. By DNA shuffling of codon-optimized dengue 1-4 E genes, we created a panel of novel chimeric clones expressing C-terminal truncated E antigens that combined epitopes from all four dengue serotypes. DNA vaccines encoding these novel chimeras induced multivalent T cell and neutralizing antibody responses against all four dengue serotypes in mice. By contrast, a mixture of four unshuffled, parental DNA vaccines failed to produce tetravalent neutralizing antibodies in mice. The neutralizing antibody titers for some of these antigens could be further improved by extending the sequences to express full-length pre-membrane and envelope proteins. The chimeric antigens also protected mice against a lethal dengue-2 virus challenge. These data demonstrate that DNA shuffling and associated screening can lead to the selection of multi-epitope antigens against closely related dengue virus serotypes and suggest a broad utility for these technologies in optimizing vaccine antigens.

  6. EspA-Intimin chimeric protein, a candidate vaccine against Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Sedighian Rad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 is an important enteric pathogen in human causing bloody or nonbloody diarrhea, which may be complicated by hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Cattle are an important reservoir of EHEC. This research aims at vaccination with a divalent chimer protein composed of EspA120 and Intimin 282 and its preventive effect of EHEC O157 colonization in mice rectal epithelium.A divalent recombinant EspA-Intimin (EI protein containing EspA120 and Intimin280 attached with a linker was amplified from a trivalent construct and cloned in pET-28a (+ vector. The immunization was conducted in mice after expression and purification of the recombinant EI (rEI.Mice subcutaneously immunized with rEI, elicited significant rEI specific serum IgG antibodies and showed significantly decreased E.coli O157:H7 shedding compared to the control group.The chimeric recombinant protein induced strong humoral response as well as protection against oral challenges with live E.coli O157:H7.

  7. Report of a chimeric origin of transposable elements in a bovine-coding gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, L M; Amaral, M E J; Silva, I T; Silva, W A; Riggs, P K; Carareto, C M

    2008-02-01

    Despite the wide distribution of transposable elements (TEs) in mammalian genomes, part of their evolutionary significance remains to be discovered. Today there is a substantial amount of evidence showing that TEs are involved in the generation of new exons in different species. In the present study, we searched 22,805 genes and reported the occurrence of TE-cassettes in coding sequences of 542 cow genes using the RepeatMasker program. Despite the significant number (542) of genes with TE insertions in exons only 14 (2.6%) of them were translated into protein, which we characterized as chimeric genes. From these chimeric genes, only the FAST kinase domains 3 (FASTKD3) gene, present on chromosome BTA 20, is a functional gene and showed evidence of the exaptation event. The genome sequence analysis showed that the last exon coding sequence of bovine FASTKD3 is approximately 85% similar to the ART2A retrotransposon sequence. In addition, comparison among FASTKD3 proteins shows that the last exon is very divergent from those of Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes and Canis familiares. We suggest that the gene structure of bovine FASTKD3 gene could have originated by several ectopic recombinations between TE copies. Additionally, the absence of TE sequences in all other species analyzed suggests that the TE insertion is clade-specific, mainly in the ruminant lineage.

  8. Protection of Mice from Lethal Endotoxemia by Chimeric Human BPI-Fcγ1 Gene Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Li; Jing Li; Zhe Lv; Xinghua Guo; Qinghua Chen; Qingli Kong; Yunqing An

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the potentiality of applying gene therapy to endotoxemia in high-risk patients, we investigated the effects of transferring an adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2)-mediated BPI-Fcγ1 gene on protecting mice from challenge of lethal endotoxin. The chimeric BPI-Fcγ1 gene consists of two parts, one encods functional N-terminus (1 to 199 amino acidic residues) of human BPI, which is a bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein,and the other encodes Fc segment of human immunoglobulin G1 (Fcγ1). Our results indicated that the target protein could be expressed and secreted into the serum of the gene-transferred mice. After lethal endotoxin challenge, the levels of endotoxin and TNF-α in the gene-transferred mice were decreased. The survival rate of the BPI-Fcγ1 gene-transferred mice was markedly increased. Our data suggest that AAV2-mediated chimeric BPI-Fcγ1 gene delivery can potentially be used clinically for the protection and treatment of endotoxemia and endotoxic shock in high-risk individuals.

  9. Chimeric rhinoviruses displaying MPER epitopes elicit anti-HIV neutralizing responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Yi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of an effective AIDS vaccine has been a formidable task, but remains a critical necessity. The well conserved membrane-proximal external region (MPER of the HIV-1 gp41 glycoprotein is one of the crucial targets for AIDS vaccine development, as it has the necessary attribute of being able to elicit antibodies capable of neutralizing diverse isolates of HIV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Guided by X-ray crystallography, molecular modeling, combinatorial chemistry, and powerful selection techniques, we designed and produced six combinatorial libraries of chimeric human rhinoviruses (HRV displaying the MPER epitopes corresponding to mAbs 2F5, 4E10, and/or Z13e1, connected to an immunogenic surface loop of HRV via linkers of varying lengths and sequences. Not all libraries led to viable chimeric viruses with the desired sequences, but the combinatorial approach allowed us to examine large numbers of MPER-displaying chimeras. Among the chimeras were five that elicited antibodies capable of significantly neutralizing HIV-1 pseudoviruses from at least three subtypes, in one case leading to neutralization of 10 pseudoviruses from all six subtypes tested. CONCLUSIONS: Optimization of these chimeras or closely related chimeras could conceivably lead to useful components of an effective AIDS vaccine. While the MPER of HIV may not be immunodominant in natural infection by HIV-1, its presence in a vaccine cocktail could provide critical breadth of protection.

  10. HLA Chimerism in allogenic haplo-identical peripheral blood stem cell transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhaya Sonal

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available HLA antigens were used as markers to establish the presence of chimerism (i.e. simultaneous presence of two lymphocyte populations from recipient as well as donor in a patient with chronic granulomatous disease treated with one haplotype matched stem cell transplant. Neutrophil engraftment occurred on Day 6 post peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT. Platelet counts were maintained above 20x10[9]/L. Six months after the allogenic PBSCT, lymphocyte population was chimeric and cells of both donor (father and host HLA type were present. The patient revealed a shift in his HLA antigen profile and there was evidence of donor cell engraftment. The HLA phenotype A26,CwXX,B8,DRB1FNx0103//A32,Cw4,B35,DRB1FNx0116// represented his true phenotype whereas A11,Cw7,B62,DRB1FNx0114 represented donor (father origin.. HLA system as a genetic marker is a useful additional approach to determine engraftment following an allogenic haplo-identical stem cell transplantation.

  11. Mixed chimerism and permanent specific transplantation tolerance induced by a nonlethal preparative regimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharabi, Y.; Sachs, D.H.

    1989-02-01

    The use of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation as a means of inducing donor-specific tolerance across MHC barriers could provide an immunologically specific conditioning regimen for organ transplantation. However, a major limitation to this approach is the toxicity of whole body irradiation as currently used to abrogate host resistance and permit marrow engraftment. The present study describes methodology for abrogating host resistance and permitting marrow engraftment without lethal irradiation. Our preparative protocol involves administration of anti-CD4 and anti-CD8 mAbs in vivo, 300-rad WBI, 700-rad thymic irradiation, and unmanipulated fully MHC-disparate bone marrow. B10 mice prepared by this regimen developed stable mixed lymphohematopoetic chimerism without any clinical evidence of graft-vs.-host disease. Engraftment was accompanied by induction of specific tolerance to donor skin grafts (B10.D2), while third-party skin grafts (B10.BR) were promptly rejected. Mice treated with the complete regimen without bone marrow transplantation appeared healthy and enjoyed long-term survival. This study therefore demonstrates that stable mixed chimerism with donor-specific tolerance can be induced across an MHC barrier after a nonlethal preparative regimen, without clinical GVHD and without the risk of aplasia.

  12. Potato virus X movement in Nicotiana benthamiana: new details revealed by chimeric coat protein variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, Camilla; Lico, Chiara; Maffi, Dario; D'Angeli, Simone; Altamura, Maria Maddalena; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Faoro, Franco; Baschieri, Selene

    2012-02-01

    Potato virus X coat protein is necessary for both cell-to-cell and phloem transfer, but it has not been clarified definitively whether it is needed in both movement phases solely as a component of the assembled particles or also of differently structured ribonucleoprotein complexes. To clarify this issue, we studied the infection progression of a mutant carrying an N-terminal deletion of the coat protein, which was used to construct chimeric virus particles displaying peptides selectively affecting phloem transfer or cell-to-cell movement. Nicotiana benthamiana plants inoculated with expression vectors encoding the wild-type, mutant and chimeric viral genomes were examined by microscopy techniques. These experiments showed that coat protein-peptide fusions promoting cell-to-cell transfer only were not competent for virion assembly, whereas long-distance movement was possible only for coat proteins compatible with virus particle formation. Moreover, the ability of the assembled PVX to enter and persist into developing xylem elements was revealed here for the first time.

  13. Structure-Activity Relationship and Signaling of New Chimeric CXCR4 Agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Christine E; Besserer-Offroy, Élie; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefrançois, Marilou; Boulais, Philip E; Lefebvre, Marie-Reine; Leduc, Richard; Lavigne, Pierre; Heveker, Nikolaus; Marsault, Éric; Escher, Emanuel

    2016-08-25

    The CXCR4 receptor binds with meaningful affinities only CXCL12 and synthetic antagonists/inverse agonists. We recently described high affinity synthetic agonists for this chemokine receptor, obtained by grafting the CXCL12 N-terminus onto the inverse agonist T140. While those chimeric molecules behave as agonists for CXCR4, their binding and activation mode are unknown. The present SAR of those CXCL12-oligopeptide grafts reveals the key determinants involved in CXCR4 activation. Position 3 (Val) controls affinity, whereas position 7 (Tyr) acts as an efficacy switch. Chimeric molecules bearing aromatic residues in position 3 possess high binding affinities for CXCR4 and are Gαi full agonists with robust chemotactic properties. Fine-tuning of electron-poor aromatic rings in position 7 enhances receptor activation. To rationalize these results, a homology model of a receptor-ligand complex was built using the published crystal structures of CXCR4. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal further details accounting for the observed SAR for this series.

  14. Going viral: chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Saar; June, Carl H

    2015-01-01

    On July 1, 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted 'breakthrough therapy' designation to CTL019, the anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy developed at the University of Pennsylvania. This is the first personalized cellular therapy for cancer to be so designated and occurred 25 years after the first publication describing genetic redirection of T cells to a surface antigen of choice. The peer-reviewed literature currently contains the outcomes of more than 100 patients treated on clinical trials of anti-CD19 redirected T cells, and preliminary results on many more patients have been presented. At last count almost 30 clinical trials targeting CD19 were actively recruiting patients in North America, Europe, and Asia. Patients with high-risk B-cell malignancies therefore represent the first beneficiaries of an exciting and potent new treatment modality that harnesses the power of the immune system as never before. A handful of trials are targeting non-CD19 hematological and solid malignancies and represent the vanguard of enormous preclinical efforts to develop CAR T-cell therapy beyond B-cell malignancies. In this review, we explain the concept of chimeric antigen receptor gene-modified T cells, describe the extant results in hematologic malignancies, and share our outlook on where this modality is likely to head in the near future.

  15. Development of GR/MR Chimeric Receptors and Their Response to Steroid Hormones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Qiman; Yang Qunying; Elisabeth Martinez; Guo Sandui

    2000-01-01

    We have established an effective and reliable technique of developing GR/MR chimeric receptors by DNA homologous recombination. To develop the method we transformed several different E. coli strains with a linearized plasmid containing full length of mGR(mouse GR) and hormone binding domain(HBD) of rMR(rat MR), the linear DNA undergoes recombination due to the homology of the mGR and the rMR and recircularize , and propagation in E. coli. PCR was performed to screen correct construction in which fusion between GR and MR took place. The constructs were digested with appropriate restriction endonucleases to test probable fusion sites of GR and HBD of MR. Precise fusion sites of GR and MR for constructs AB1157 # 2 , AB1157 # 18, AB 1157 # 22, AB1157 # 32, CMK603 # 6 were verified by DNA sequencing. Trans fection of COS- 7 cells with the constructs and subsequent treatment of transfected COS-7 cells with steroid hormones were carried out, the results showed that the constructs gave response to tested hormones. The study suggested that the GR/MR chimeric receptors can give rise to fusion proteins and their interactive function between hormone and receptor.

  16. Design of RNA enzymes distinguishing a single base mutation in RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, M; Hayase, Y; Iwai, S; Kamiya, H; Inoue, H; Ohtsuka, E

    1989-09-12

    RNA enzymes (ribozymes) which can cleave RNA by recognizing sequences of 9-15 bases are described. Substrates must contain UX (X = U, C or A). A ribozyme consisting of two oligoribonucleotides (19 mer and 15 mer) was shown to cleave a ribo 11 mer catalytically with Km and kcat values of 0.53 microM and 0.03 min-1, respectively. A non-cleavable substrate-ribozyme complex containing 2'-O-methylnucleoside was prepared and CD spectra were compared at different temperature. In order to obtain an efficient ribozyme, a one-strand RNA with a chain length of 37 was prepared. The ribozyme was shown to distinguish a single base mutation in mRNA's which were prepared by transcription of two synthetic DNA duplexes coding for positions 7-26 of c-Ha-ras protein. The mutant (Val-12) mRNA which had GUU was cleaved but the wild type mRNA which contained GGU was not changed, when treated by the ribozymes in the presence of Mg2+.

  17. The imaging and the fractal metrology of chimeric liposomal Drug Delivery nano Systems: the role of macromolecular architecture of polymeric guest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippa, Natassa; Pispas, Stergios; Demetzos, Costas

    2014-09-01

    The major advance of mixed liposomes (the so-called chimeric systems) is to control the size, structure, and morphology of these nanoassemblies, and therefore, system colloidal properties, with the aid of a large variety of parameters, such as chemical architecture and composition. The goal of this study is to investigate the alterations of the physicochemical and morphological characteristics of chimeric dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes, caused by the incorporation of block and gradient copolymers (different macromolecular architecture) with different chemical compositions (different amounts of hydrophobic component). Light scattering techniques were utilized in order to characterize physicochemically and to delineate the fractal morphology of chimeric liposomes. In this study, we also investigated the structural differences between the prepared chimeric liposomes as are visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It could be concluded that all the chimeric liposomes have regular structure, as SEM images revealed, while their fractal dimensionality was found to be dependent on the macromolecular architecture of the polymeric guest.

  18. Chimeric agents derived from the functionalized amino acid, lacosamide, and the α-aminoamide, safinamide: evaluation of their inhibitory actions on voltage-gated sodium channels, and antiseizure and antinociception activities and comparison with lacosamide and safinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki Duk; Yang, Xiao-Fang; Dustrude, Erik T; Wang, Yuying; Ripsch, Matthew S; White, Fletcher A; Khanna, Rajesh; Kohn, Harold

    2015-02-18

    The functionalized amino acid, lacosamide ((R)-2), and the α-aminoamide, safinamide ((S)-3), are neurological agents that have been extensively investigated and have displayed potent anticonvulsant activities in seizure models. Both compounds have been reported to modulate voltage-gated sodium channel activity. We have prepared a series of chimeric compounds, (R)-7-(R)-10, by merging key structural units in these two clinical agents, and then compared their activities with (R)-2 and (S)-3. Compounds were assessed for their ability to alter sodium channel kinetics for inactivation, frequency (use)-dependence, and steady-state activation and fast inactivation. We report that chimeric compounds (R)-7-(R)-10 in catecholamine A-differentiated (CAD) cells and embryonic rat cortical neurons robustly enhanced sodium channel inactivation at concentrations far lower than those required for (R)-2 and (S)-3, and that (R)-9 and (R)-10, unlike (R)-2 and (S)-3, produce sodium channel frequency (use)-dependence at low micromolar concentrations. We further show that (R)-7-(R)-10 displayed excellent anticonvulsant activities and pain-attenuating properties in the animal formalin model. Of these compounds, only (R)-7 reversed mechanical hypersensitivity in the tibial-nerve injury model for neuropathic pain in rats.

  19. Increased frequency of single base substitutions in a population of transcripts expressed in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianchetti Laurent

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single Base Substitutions (SBS that alter transcripts expressed in cancer originate from somatic mutations. However, recent studies report SBS in transcripts that are not supported by the genomic DNA of tumor cells. Methods We used sequence based whole genome expression profiling, namely Long-SAGE (L-SAGE and Tag-seq (a combination of L-SAGE and deep sequencing, and computational methods to identify transcripts with greater SBS frequencies in cancer. Millions of tags produced by 40 healthy and 47 cancer L-SAGE experiments were compared to 1,959 Reference Tags (RT, i.e. tags matching the human genome exactly once. Similarly, tens of millions of tags produced by 7 healthy and 8 cancer Tag-seq experiments were compared to 8,572 RT. For each transcript, SBS frequencies in healthy and cancer cells were statistically tested for equality. Results In the L-SAGE and Tag-seq experiments, 372 and 4,289 transcripts respectively, showed greater SBS frequencies in cancer. Increased SBS frequencies could not be attributed to known Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP, catalogued somatic mutations or RNA-editing enzymes. Hypothesizing that Single Tags (ST, i.e. tags sequenced only once, were indicators of SBS, we observed that ST proportions were heterogeneously distributed across Embryonic Stem Cells (ESC, healthy differentiated and cancer cells. ESC had the lowest ST proportions, whereas cancer cells had the greatest. Finally, in a series of experiments carried out on a single patient at 1 healthy and 3 consecutive tumor stages, we could show that SBS frequencies increased during cancer progression. Conclusion If the mechanisms generating the base substitutions could be known, increased SBS frequency in transcripts would be a new useful biomarker of cancer. With the reduction of sequencing cost, sequence based whole genome expression profiling could be used to characterize increased SBS frequency in patient’s tumor and aid diagnostic.

  20. [An analysis of chimeric mice obtained by the injection of the inner cell mass into the blastocyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitalipov, Sh M; Fedorov, L M; Strel'chenko, N S

    1993-01-01

    Mouse chimeras were produced using injections of ICM cells into blastocysts. Chimerism of resulting animals was determined by their coat color and spectrum of glucosephosphate isomerase isoenzymes. The use of modifications of the injection method for solving different genetic and embryological problems is discussed.

  1. Production of unnaturally linked chimeric proteins using a combination of sortase-catalyzed transpeptidation and click chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, Martin D.; Theile, Christopher S.; Wu, Tongfei; Guimaraes, Carla P.; Blom, Annet E. M.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    Chimeric proteins, including bispecific antibodies, are biological tools with therapeutic applications. Genetic fusion and ligation methods allow the creation of N-to-C and C-to-N fused recombinant proteins, but not unnaturally linked N-to-N and C-to-C fusion proteins. This protocol describes a

  2. Fiber-chimeric adenoviruses expressing fibers from serotype 16 and 50 improve gene transfer to human pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, K.F.D.; Geer, M.A. van; Bakker, C.T.; Dekker, J.E.M.; Havenga, M.J.E.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Gouma, D.J.; Bosma, P.J.; Wesseling, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Survival of patients with pancreatic cancer is poor. Adenoviral (Ad) gene therapy employing the commonly used serotype 5 reveals limited transduction efficiency due to the low amount of coxsackie-adenovirus receptor on pancreatic cancer cells. To identify fiber-chimeric adenoviruses with improved ge

  3. Fluctuations between multiple EF-G-induced chimeric tRNA states during translocation on the ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adio, Sarah; Senyushkina, Tamara; Peske, Frank; Fischer, Niels; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2015-06-01

    The coupled translocation of transfer RNA and messenger RNA through the ribosome entails large-scale structural rearrangements, including step-wise movements of the tRNAs. Recent structural work has visualized intermediates of translocation induced by elongation factor G (EF-G) with tRNAs trapped in chimeric states with respect to 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. The functional role of the chimeric states is not known. Here we follow the formation of translocation intermediates by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Using EF-G mutants, a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue, and fusidic acid, we interfere with either translocation or EF-G release from the ribosome and identify several rapidly interconverting chimeric tRNA states on the reaction pathway. EF-G engagement prevents backward transitions early in translocation and increases the fraction of ribosomes that rapidly fluctuate between hybrid, chimeric and posttranslocation states. Thus, the engagement of EF-G alters the energetics of translocation towards a flat energy landscape, thereby promoting forward tRNA movement.

  4. Chimerism 47,XY,+21/46,XX in a female infant with anencephaly and other congenital defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle R. Lucon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimerism is rare in humans and is usually discovered accidentally when a 46,XX and 46,XY karyotype is found in a same individual. We describe a malformed female infant with neural tube defect (NTD and a 47,XY,+21[5]/46,XX[30] karyotype.

  5. Chimeric virus-like particles for the delivery of an inserted conserved influenza A-specific CTL epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Reiseger, Jessica; Turner, Stephen John; Boyd, Richard; Netter, Hans-Jürgen

    2009-02-01

    The small hepatitis B virus surface antigens (HBsAg-S) have the ability to self-assemble with host-derived lipids into empty non-infectious virus-like particles (VLPs). HBsAg-S VLPs are the sole component of the licensed hepatitis B vaccine, and they are a useful delivery platform for foreign epitopes. To develop VLPs capable of transporting foreign cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, HBsAg-S specific CTL epitopes at various sites were substituted with a conserved CTL epitope derived from the influenza matrix protein. Depending on the insertion site, the introduction of the MHC class I A2.1-restricted influenza epitope was compatible with the secretion competence of HBsAg-S indicating that chimeric VLPs were assembled. Immunizations of transgenic HHDII mice with chimeric VLPs induced anti-influenza CTL responses proving that the inserted foreign epitope can be correctly processed and cross-presented. Chimeric VLPs in the absence of adjuvant were able to induce memory T cell responses, which could be recalled by influenza virus infections in the mouse model system. The ability of chimeric HBsAg-S VLPs to induce anti-foreign CTL responses and also with the proven ability to induce humoral immune responses constitute a highly versatile platform for the delivery of selected multiple epitopes to target disease associated infectious agents.

  6. Genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed receptors harboring TAG-72-specific camelid single domain antibodies as targeting agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Zahra; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A

    2013-01-01

    Despite the preclinical success of adoptive therapy with T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed antigen receptors (CARs), certain limitations of this therapeutic approach such as the immunogenicity of the antigen binding domain, the emergence of tumor cell escape variants and the blocking capac...... to reverse multiple tumor immune evasion mechanisms, avoid CAR immunogenicity, and overcome problems in cancer gene therapy with engineered nanoconstructs....

  7. Immune response and protective profile elicited by a multi-epitope chimeric protein derived from Leptospira interrogans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis G.V. Fernandes

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Although a complete characterization of the immune response elicited by rChi/adjuvant in hamsters is required, it is believed that the construction of chimeric genes is an important attempt towards the generation of an effective vaccine against leptospirosis.

  8. Induction of partial protection against infection with Toxoplasma gondii genotype II by DNA vaccination with recombinant chimeric tachyzoite antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Carina Agerbo; De Craeye, S.; Jongert, E.

    2009-01-01

    complications. Although several strategies have been suggested for making a vaccine, none is currently available. Here, we investigate the protection conferred by DNA vaccination with two constructs, pcEC2 (MIC2-MIC3-SAG1) and pcEC3 (GRA3-GRA7-M2AP), encoding chimeric proteins containing multiple antigenic...

  9. Hypothesis: Artifacts, Including Spurious Chimeric RNAs with a Short Homologous Sequence, Caused by Consecutive Reverse Transcriptions and Endogenous Random Primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhiyu; Yuan, Chengfu; Zellmer, Lucas; Liu, Siqi; Xu, Ningzhi; Liao, D Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Recent RNA-sequencing technology and associated bioinformatics have led to identification of tens of thousands of putative human chimeric RNAs, i.e. RNAs containing sequences from two different genes, most of which are derived from neighboring genes on the same chromosome. In this essay, we redefine "two neighboring genes" as those producing individual transcripts, and point out two known mechanisms for chimeric RNA formation, i.e. transcription from a fusion gene or trans-splicing of two RNAs. By our definition, most putative RNA chimeras derived from canonically-defined neighboring genes may either be technical artifacts or be cis-splicing products of 5'- or 3'-extended RNA of either partner that is redefined herein as an unannotated gene, whereas trans-splicing events are rare in human cells. Therefore, most authentic chimeric RNAs result from fusion genes, about 1,000 of which have been identified hitherto. We propose a hypothesis of "consecutive reverse transcriptions (RTs)", i.e. another RT reaction following the previous one, for how most spurious chimeric RNAs, especially those containing a short homologous sequence, may be generated during RT, especially in RNA-sequencing wherein RNAs are fragmented. We also point out that RNA samples contain numerous RNA and DNA shreds that can serve as endogenous random primers for RT and ensuing polymerase chain reactions (PCR), creating artifacts in RT-PCR.

  10. The Construction of Chimeric T-Cell Receptor with Spacer Base of Modeling Study of VHH and MUC1 Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Pirooznia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive cell immunotherapy with the use of chimeric receptors leads to the best and most specific response against tumors. Chimeric receptors consist of a signaling fragment, extracellular spacer, costimulating domain, and an antibody. Antibodies cause immunogenicity; therefore, VHH is a good replacement for ScFv in chimeric receptors. Since peptide sequences have an influence on chimeric receptors, the effect of peptide domains on each other's conformation were investigated. CD3Zeta, CD28, VHH and CD8α, and FcgIIα are used as signaling moieties, costimulating domain, antibody, and spacers, respectively. To investigate the influence of the ligation of spacers on the conformational structure of VHH, models of VHH were constructed. Molecular dynamics simulation was run to study the influence of the presence of spacers on the conformational changes in the binding sites of VHH. Root mean square deviation and root mean square fluctuation of critical segments in the binding site showed no noticeable differences with those in the native VHH. Results from molecular docking revealed that the presence of spacer FcgIIα causes an increasing effect on VHH with MUC1 interaction. Each of the constructs was transformed into the Jurkat E6.1. Expression analysis and evaluation of their functions were examined. The results showed good expression and function.

  11. A CssA, CssB and LTB chimeric protein induces protection against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samane Bagheri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC, a major cause of diarrhea in children under 5, is an important agent for traveler's diarrhea. Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT and colonization factors (CFs are two main virulence mechanisms in ETEC. CS6 is one of the most prevalent CFs consisting of two structural subunits viz., CssA, CssB, necessary for attachment to the intestinal cells. METHODS: In the present research, a chimeric trivalent protein composed of CssB, CssA and LTB was constructed. The chimeric gene was synthesized with codon bias of E. coli for enhanced expression of the protein. Recombinant proteins were expressed and purified. Mice were immunized with the recombinant protein. The antibody titer and specificity of the immune sera were analyzed by ELISA and Western blotting. Efficiency of the immune sera against ETEC was evaluated. RESULTS: Antibody induction was followed by immunization of mice with the chimeric protein. Pretreatment of the ETEC cells with immunized animal antisera remarkably decreased their adhesion to Caco-2 cells. DISCUSSION: The results indicate efficacy of the recombinant chimeric protein as an effective immunogen, which induces strong humoral response as well as protection against ETEC adherence and toxicity.

  12. Quotient Semigroups and Extension Semigroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rong Xing; Changguo Wei; Shudong Liu

    2012-08-01

    We discuss properties of quotient semigroup of abelian semigroup from the viewpoint of *-algebra and apply them to a survey of extension semigroups. Certain interrelations among some equivalence relations of extensions are also considered.

  13. Biochemical and functional analysis of Drosophila-sciara chimeric sex-lethal proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fernanda Ruiz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Drosophila SXL protein controls sex determination and dosage compensation. It is a sex-specific factor controlling splicing of its own Sxl pre-mRNA (auto-regulation, tra pre-mRNA (sex determination and msl-2 pre-mRNA plus translation of msl-2 mRNA (dosage compensation. Outside the drosophilids, the same SXL protein has been found in both sexes so that, in the non-drosophilids, SXL does not appear to play the key discriminating role in sex determination and dosage compensation that it plays in Drosophila. Comparison of SXL proteins revealed that its spatial organisation is conserved, with the RNA-binding domains being highly conserved, whereas the N- and C-terminal domains showing significant variation. This manuscript focuses on the evolution of the SXL protein itself and not on regulation of its expression. METHODOLOGY: Drosophila-Sciara chimeric SXL proteins were produced. Sciara SXL represents the non-sex-specific function of ancient SXL in the non-drosophilids from which presumably Drosophila SXL evolved. Two questions were addressed. Did the Drosophila SXL protein have affected their functions when their N- and C-terminal domains were replaced by the corresponding ones of Sciara? Did the Sciara SXL protein acquire Drosophila sex-specific functions when the Drosophila N- and C-terminal domains replaced those of Sciara? The chimeric SXL proteins were analysed in vitro to study their binding affinity and cooperative properties, and in vivo to analyse their effect on sex determination and dosage compensation by producing Drosophila flies that were transgenic for the chimeric SXL proteins. CONCLUSIONS: The sex-specific properties of extant Drosophila SXL protein depend on its global structure rather than on a specific domain. This implies that the modifications, mainly in the N- and C-terminal domains, that occurred in the SXL protein during its evolution within the drosophilid lineage represent co-evolutionary changes that

  14. Adoptive immunotherapy to increase the level of donor hematopoietic chimerism after nonmyeloablative marrow transplantation for severe canine hereditary hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatu, Alessandra; Nash, Richard A; Zaucha, Jan M; Little, Marie-Terese; Georges, George E; Sale, George E; Zellmer, Eustacia; Kuhr, Christian S; Lothrop, Clinton D; Storb, Rainer

    2003-11-01

    Severe hemolytic anemia in Basenji dogs secondary to pyruvate kinase deficiency can be corrected by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) from littermates with normal hematopoiesis after conventional myeloablative or nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens. If the levels of donor chimerism were low (after nonmyeloablative HCT, there was only partial correction of the hemolytic anemia. We next addressed whether allogeneic cell therapy after nonmyeloablative HCT would convert mixed to full hematopoietic chimerism, achieve sustained remission from hemolysis, and prevent progression of marrow fibrosis and liver cirrhosis. Three pyruvate kinase-deficient dogs were given HCT from their respective dog leukocyte antigen-identical littermates after nonmyeloablative conditioning with 200 cGy of total body irradiation. Postgrafting immunosuppression consisted of mycophenolate mofetil and cyclosporine. All 3 dogs engrafted and had mixed hematopoietic chimerism with donor levels ranging from 12% to 55% in bone marrow. In 2 of the 3 dogs, there were decreases in the levels of donor chimerism so that at 25 weeks after nonmyeloablative HCT, hemolysis recurred that was associated with increased reticulocyte counts. All 3 dogs then had 2 serial infusions of donor lymphocytes (DLI) from their respective donors at least 20 weeks apart to convert from mixed to full donor chimerism. Both dogs with recurrence of hemolytic anemia after nonmyeloablative HCT achieved higher levels of donor chimerism, with donor contributions ranging from 47% to 62% in the bone marrow and 50% to 69% and 16% to 25% in the granulocyte and mononuclear cell fractions of the peripheral blood, respectively, and with remission of the hemolytic anemia. One dog responded after the first DLI, and 5 weeks after the second DLI, the other dog converted to full donor chimerism. At last follow-up, all these dogs showed clinical improvement, as determined by increasing hematocrits and normal reticulocyte counts

  15. The BGAN extension programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Juan J.; Trachtman, Eyal; Richharia, Madhavendra

    2005-11-01

    Mobile satellite telecommunications systems have undergone an enormous evolution in the last decades, with the interest in having advanced telecommunications services available on demand, anywhere and at any time, leading to incredible advances. The demand for braodband data is therefore rapidly gathering pace, but current solutions are finding it increasingly difficult to combine large bandwidth with ubiquitous coverage, reliability and portability. The BGAN (Broadband Global Area Network) system, designed to operate with the Inmarsat-4 satellites, provides breakthrough services that meet all of these requirements. It will enable broadband connection on the move, delivering all the key tools of the modern office. Recognising the great impact that Inmarsat's BGAN system will have on the European satellite communications industry, and the benefits that it will bring to a wide range of European industries, in 2003 ESA initiated the "BGAN Extension" project. Its primary goals are to provide the full range of BGAN services to truly mobile platforms, operating in aeronautical, vehicular and maritime environments, and to introduce a multicast service capability. The project is supported by the ARTES Programme which establishes a collaboration agreement between ESA, Inmarsat and a group of key industrial and academic institutions which includes EMS, Logica, Nera and the University of Surrey (UK).

  16. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Isik

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env. An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  17. Immunogenicity and therapeutic effects of Ag85A/B chimeric DNA vaccine in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan; Wu, Xueqiong; Zhang, Junxian; Xiao, Li; Yang, Yourong; Bai, Xuejuan; Yu, Qi; Li, Zhongming; Bi, Lan; Li, Ning; Wu, Xiaoli

    2012-12-01

    The situation of tuberculosis (TB) is very severe in China. New therapeutic agents or regimens to treat TB are urgently needed. In this study, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mice were given immunotherapy intramuscularly with Ag85A/B chimeric DNA or saline, plasmid vector pVAX1, or Mycobacterium vaccae vaccine. The mice treated with Ag85A/B chimeric DNA showed significantly higher numbers of T cells secreting interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), more IFN-γ in splenocyte culture supernatant, more Th1 and Tc1 cells, and higher ratios of Th1/Th2 and Tc1/Tc2 cells in whole blood, indicating a predominant Th1 immune response to treatment. Infected mice treated with doses of 100 μg Ag85A/B chimeric DNA had an extended time until death of 50% of the animals that was markedly longer than the saline and vector control groups, and the death rate at 1 month after the last dose was lower than that in the other groups. Compared with the saline group, 100 μg Ag85A/B chimeric DNA and 100 μg Ag85A DNA reduced the pulmonary bacterial loads by 0.79 and 0.45 logs, and the liver bacterial loads by 0.52 and 0.50 logs, respectively. Pathological changes in the lungs were less, and the lesions were more limited. These results show that Ag85A/B chimeric DNA was effective for the treatment of TB, significantly increasing the cellular immune response and inhibiting the growth of M. tuberculosis.

  18. Chimeric proteins combining phosphatase and cellulose-binding activities: proof-of-concept and application in the hydrolysis of paraoxon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Larissa M; Chaimovich, Hernan; Cuccovia, Iolanda M; Marana, Sandro R

    2014-05-01

    Phosphatases for organophosphate degradation and carbohydrate-binding domains (CBMs) have potential biotechnological applications. As a proof-of-concept, a soluble chimeric protein that combines acid phosphatase (AppA) from Escherichia coli and a CBM from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (AppA-CBM) was produced in E.coli. AppACBM adsorbed in microcrystalline cellulose Avicel PH101 catalyzed the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (PNPP). The binding to microcrystalline cellulose displayed saturation behavior with an apparent binding constant (Kb) of 22 ± 5 mg and a maximum binding (Bmax) of 1.500 ± 0.001 enzyme units. Binding was highest at pH 2.5 and decreased above pH 6.5, as previously observed for family 2 CBMs. The Km values for PNPP of AppA-CBM and native AppA were identical (2.7 mM). To demonstrate that this strategy for protein engineering has practical applications and is largely functional, even for phosphatases exhibiting diverse folds, a chimeric protein combining human paraoxonase 1 (hPON1) and the CBM was produced. Both PON1-CBM and hPON1 had identical Km values for paraoxon (1.3 mM). Additionally, hPON1 bound to microcrystalline cellulose with a Kb of 27 ± 3 mg, the same as that observed for AppA-CBM. These data show that the phosphatase domains are as functional in both of the chimeric proteins as they are in the native enzymes and that the CBM domain maintains the same cellulose affinity. Therefore, the engineering of chimeric proteins combining domains of phosphatases and CBMs is fully feasible, resulting in chimeric enzymes that exhibit potential for OP detoxification.

  19. Application of functional genomics to the chimeric mouse model of HCV infection: optimization of microarray protocols and genomics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Maria W

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many model systems of human viral disease involve human-mouse chimeric tissue. One such system is the recently developed SCID-beige/Alb-uPA mouse model of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection which involves a human-mouse chimeric liver. The use of functional genomics to study HCV infection in these chimeric tissues is complicated by the potential cross-hybridization of mouse mRNA on human oligonucleotide microarrays. To identify genes affected by mouse liver mRNA hybridization, mRNA from identical human liver samples labeled with either Cy3 or Cy5 was compared in the presence and absence of known amounts of mouse liver mRNA labeled in only one dye. Results The results indicate that hybridization of mouse mRNA to the corresponding human gene probe on Agilent Human 22 K oligonucleotide microarray does occur. The number of genes affected by such cross-hybridization was subsequently reduced to approximately 300 genes both by increasing the hybridization temperature and using liver samples which contain at least 80% human tissue. In addition, Real Time quantitative RT-PCR using human specific probes was shown to be a valid method to verify the expression level in human cells of known cross-hybridizing genes. Conclusion The identification of genes affected by cross-hybridization of mouse liver RNA on human oligonucleotide microarrays makes it feasible to use functional genomics approaches to study the chimeric SCID-beige/Alb-uPA mouse model of HCV infection. This approach used to study cross-species hybridization on oligonucleotide microarrays can be adapted to other chimeric systems of viral disease to facilitate selective analysis of human gene expression.

  20. Stem cell potency and the ability to contribute to chimeric organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polejaeva, Irina; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2013-03-01

    Mouse embryonic chimeras are a well-established tool for studying cell lineage commitment and pluripotency. Experimental chimeras were successfully produced by combining two or more preimplantation embryos or by introducing into host embryo cultured pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Chimera production using genetically modified ESCs became the method of choice for the generation of knockout or knockin mice. Although the derivation of ESCs or ESC-like cells has been reported for other species, only mouse and rat pluripotent stem cells have been shown to contribute to germline-competent chimeras, which is the defining feature of ESCs. Herein, we describe different approaches employed for the generation of embryonic chimeras, define chimera-competent cell types, and describe cases of spontaneous chimerism in humans. We also review the current state of derivation of pluripotent stem cells in several species and discuss outcomes of various chimera studies when such cells are used.

  1. Self-assembling chimeric polypeptide-doxorubicin conjugate nanoparticles that abolish tumours after a single injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Mackay, J.; Chen, Mingnan; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Liu, Wenge; Simnick, Andrew J.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2009-12-01

    New strategies to self-assemble biocompatible materials into nanoscale, drug-loaded packages with improved therapeutic efficacy are needed for nanomedicine. To address this need, we developed artificial recombinant chimeric polypeptides (CPs) that spontaneously self-assemble into sub-100-nm-sized, near-monodisperse nanoparticles on conjugation of diverse hydrophobic molecules, including chemotherapeutics. These CPs consist of a biodegradable polypeptide that is attached to a short Cys-rich segment. Covalent modification of the Cys residues with a structurally diverse set of hydrophobic small molecules, including chemotherapeutics, leads to spontaneous formation of nanoparticles over a range of CP compositions and molecular weights. When used to deliver chemotherapeutics to a murine cancer model, CP nanoparticles have a fourfold higher maximum tolerated dose than free drug, and induce nearly complete tumour regression after a single dose. This simple strategy can promote co-assembly of drugs, imaging agents and targeting moieties into multifunctional nanomedicines.

  2. Reducing ulcerogenic potential of biphenyl acetic acid: Design and development of chimeric derivatives with amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneela Dhaneshwar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to minimize the ulcerogenic potential and associated gastro-intestinal toxicity of bioprecursor fenbufen and its active metabolite biphenyl acetic acid, carrier-linked chimeric derivatives of the latter were designed and synthesized using amino acids as the promoities. DCC coupling method was used for the synthesis of these amides. The chimeras were characterized by IR and 1H NMR. Pharmacological investigations were carried out in animal models for analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-arthritic and ulcerogenic activities. The chimeras exhibited high gastro-sparing effect; quick onset and longer duration of analgesia; enhanced/prolonged anti-inflammatory activity and better anti-arthritic effect than fenbufen or biphenyl acetic acid. These derivatives could be useful as a chronotherapy for rheumatoid arthritis due to their prolonged analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects.

  3. Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Engineered T Cells for Immunotherapy of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Cartellieri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes are powerful components of adaptive immunity, which essentially contribute to the elimination of tumors. Due to their cytotoxic capacity, T cells emerged as attractive candidates for specific immunotherapy of cancer. A promising approach is the genetic modification of T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs. First generation CARs consist of a binding moiety specifically recognizing a tumor cell surface antigen and a lymphocyte activating signaling chain. The CAR-mediated recognition induces cytokine production and tumor-directed cytotoxicity of T cells. Second and third generation CARs include signal sequences from various costimulatory molecules resulting in enhanced T-cell persistence and sustained antitumor reaction. Clinical trials revealed that the adoptive transfer of T cells engineered with first generation CARs represents a feasible concept for the induction of clinical responses in some tumor patients. However, further improvement is required, which may be achieved by second or third generation CAR-engrafted T cells.

  4. Authentic display of a cholera toxin epitope by chimeric type 1 fimbriae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentebjerg-Olesen, Bodil; Pallesen, Lars; Jensen, Lars Bogø;

    1997-01-01

    The potential of the major structural protein of type 1 fimbriae as a display system for heterologous sequences was tested. As a reporter-epitope, a heterologous sequence mimicking a neutralizing epitope of the cholera toxin B chain was inserted, in one or two copies, into four different positions...... in the fimA gene. This was carried out by introduction of new restriction sites by PCR-mediated site-directed mutagenesis of fimA in positions predicted to correspond to optimally surface-located regions of the subunit protein. Subsequently, the synthetic cholera-toxin-encoding DNA segment was inserted...... with respect to host background in three different Escherichia coli strains, i.e. an isogenic set of K-12 strains, differing in the presence of an indigenous fim gene cluster, as well as a wild-type isolate. Immunization of rabbits with purified chimeric fimbriae resulted in serum which specifically recognized...

  5. Remote control of therapeutic T cells through a small molecule-gated chimeric receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Roybal, Kole T; Puchner, Elias M; Onuffer, James; Lim, Wendell A

    2015-10-16

    There is growing interest in using engineered cells as therapeutic agents. For example, synthetic chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can redirect T cells to recognize and eliminate tumor cells expressing specific antigens. Despite promising clinical results, these engineered T cells can exhibit excessive activity that is difficult to control and can cause severe toxicity. We designed "ON-switch" CARs that enable small-molecule control over T cell therapeutic functions while still retaining antigen specificity. In these split receptors, antigen-binding and intracellular signaling components assemble only in the presence of a heterodimerizing small molecule. This titratable pharmacologic regulation could allow physicians to precisely control the timing, location, and dosage of T cell activity, thereby mitigating toxicity. This work illustrates the potential of combining cellular engineering with orthogonal chemical tools to yield safer therapeutic cells that tightly integrate cell-autonomous recognition and user control.

  6. Insight into Substrate Preference of Two Chimeric Esterases by Combining Experiment and Molecular Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiao-li; HAN Wei-wei; ZHENG Bai-song; FENG Yan

    2013-01-01

    Better understanding of the relationship between the substrate preference and structural module of esterases is helpful to novel enzyme development.For this purpose,two chimeric esterases AAM7 and PAR,constructed via domain swapping between two ancient thermophilic esterases,were investigated on their molecular simulation(including homology modeling,substrates docking and substrate binding affinity validation) and enzymatic assay(specific activities and activation energies calculating).Our results indicate that the factors contributing to the substrate preference of many enzymes especially the broad-specificity enzymes like esterases are multiple and complicated,the substrate binding domains or binding pockets are important but not the only factor for substrate preference.

  7. Discovery of mitochondrial chimeric-gene associated with cytoplasmic male sterility of HL-rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome libraries of HL-type sterile line(A) and maintainer line(B) have been constructed.Mitochondrial gene, atp6, was used to screen libraries, due to the different Southern and Northern blot results between sterile and maintainer line. Sequencing analysis of positive clones proved that there were two copies of atp6 gene in sterile line and only one in maintainer line. One copy of atpt6 in sterile line was same to that in maintainer line; the other showed different flanking sequence from the 49th nucleotide downstream of the termination codon of atp6 gene. A new chimeric gene, orfH79, was found in the region. OrfH79 had homology to mitochondrial gene coxⅡ and orfl07, and was special to HL-sterile cytoplasm.``

  8. Remote control of therapeutic T cells through a small molecule-gated chimeric receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Roybal, Kole T.; Puchner, Elias M.; Onuffer, James; Lim, Wendell A.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing promise in using engineered cells as therapeutic agents. For example, synthetic Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) can redirect T cells to recognize and eliminate tumor cells expressing specific antigens. Despite promising clinical results, excessive activity and poor control over such engineered T cells can cause severe toxicities. We present the design of “ON-switch” CARs that enable small molecule-control over T cell therapeutic functions, while still retaining antigen specificity. In these split receptors, antigen binding and intracellular signaling components only assemble in the presence of a heterodimerizing small molecule. This titratable pharmacologic regulation could allow physicians to precisely control the timing, location, and dosage of T cell activity, thereby mitigating toxicity. This work illustrates the potential of combining cellular engineering with orthogonal chemical tools to yield safer therapeutic cells that tightly integrate both cell autonomous recognition and user control. PMID:26405231

  9. Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cell Therapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klampatsa, Astero; Haas, Andrew R; Moon, Edmund K; Albelda, Steven M

    2017-09-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has now become a recognized approach to treating cancers. In addition to checkpoint blockade, adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) using chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown impressive clinical outcomes in leukemias and is now being explored in solid tumors. CARs are engineered receptors, stably or transiently transduced into T cells, that aim to enhance T cell effector function by recognizing and binding to a specific tumor-associated antigen. In this review, we provide a summary of CAR T cell preclinical studies and clinical trials for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), a rare, locally invasive pleural cancer with poor prognosis. We list other attractive potential targets for CAR T cell therapy for MPM, and discuss augmentation strategies of CAR T cell therapy with other forms of immunotherapy in this disease.

  10. A recombinant, chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate based on a dengue virus serotype 2 backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Jorge E; Wallace, Derek; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by infection with one of four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV-1-4), necessitating tetravalent dengue vaccines that can induce protection against all four DENV. Takeda's live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) comprises an attenuated DENV-2 strain plus chimeric viruses containing the prM and E genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 cloned into the attenuated DENV-2 'backbone'. In Phase 1 and 2 studies, TDV was well tolerated by children and adults aged 1.5-45 years, irrespective of prior dengue exposure; mild injection-site symptoms were the most common adverse events. TDV induced neutralizing antibody responses and seroconversion to all four DENV as well as cross-reactive T cell-mediated responses that may be necessary for broad protection against dengue fever.

  11. Augmenting the efficacy of anti-cocaine catalytic antibodies through chimeric hapten design and combinatorial vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenthur, Cody J; Cai, Xiaoqing; Ellis, Beverly A; Janda, Kim D

    2017-08-15

    Given the need for further improvements in anti-cocaine vaccination strategies, a chimeric hapten (GNET) was developed that combines chemically-stable structural features from steady-state haptens with the hydrolytic functionality present in transition-state mimetic haptens. Additionally, as a further investigation into the generation of an improved bifunctional antibody pool, sequential vaccination with steady-state and transition-state mimetic haptens was undertaken. While GNET induced the formation of catalytically-active antibodies, it did not improve overall behavioral efficacy. In contrast, the resulting pool of antibodies from GNE/GNT co-administration demonstrated intermediate efficacy as compared to antibodies developed from either hapten alone. Overall, improved antibody catalytic efficiency appears necessary to achieve the synergistic benefits of combining cocaine hydrolysis with peripheral sequestration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Giant trochanteric pressure sore: Use of a pedicled chimeric perforator flap for cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    Pressure sores are increasing in frequency commensurate with an ageing population with multi-system disorders and trauma. Numerous classic options are described for providing stable wound cover. With the burgeoning knowledge on perforator anatomy, recent approaches focus on the use of perforator-based flaps in bedsore surgery. A giant neglected trochanteric pressure sore in a paraplegic is presented. Since conventional options of reconstruction appeared remote, the massive ulcer was successfully managed by a chimeric perforator-based flap. The combined muscle and fasciocutaneous flaps were raised as separate paddles based on the anterolateral thigh perforator branches and provided stable cover without complications. Perforators allow versatility in managing complex wounds without compromising on established principles. PMID:19881035

  13. Giant trochanteric pressure sore: Use of a pedicled chimeric perforator flap for cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrotra Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure sores are increasing in frequency commensurate with an ageing population with multi-system disorders and trauma. Numerous classic options are described for providing stable wound cover. With the burgeoning knowledge on perforator anatomy, recent approaches focus on the use of perforator-based flaps in bedsore surgery. A giant neglected trochanteric pressure sore in a paraplegic is presented. Since conventional options of reconstruction appeared remote, the massive ulcer was successfully managed by a chimeric perforator-based flap. The combined muscle and fasciocutaneous flaps were raised as separate paddles based on the anterolateral thigh perforator branches and provided stable cover without complications. Perforators allow versatility in managing complex wounds without compromising on established principles.

  14. Design of Fab-based chimeric antibodies against Bothrops asper toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M. Haack, Aleksander; B. Hallgren, Malte; U. W. Friis, Rasmus

    Snakebite is one of the world’s most neglected tropical diseases, with an estimated 5 million bites per year, resulting in about 125.000 deaths. The only current treatment for snakebite envenoming is antiserum derived from the blood of immunized mammals(typically horses). These antisera are expen......Snakebite is one of the world’s most neglected tropical diseases, with an estimated 5 million bites per year, resulting in about 125.000 deaths. The only current treatment for snakebite envenoming is antiserum derived from the blood of immunized mammals(typically horses). These antisera...... are expensive to produce and carry a high risk of causing hyper-allergic reactions in human recipients due to their heterologous origin. Here we report the discovery of chimeric scFvs against Bothrops asper toxins....

  15. Chikungunya, Influenza, Nipah, and Semliki Forest Chimeric Viruses with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus: Actions in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Pol, Anthony N; Mao, Guochao; Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; Rose, John K; Davis, John N

    2017-03-15

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based chimeric viruses that include genes from other viruses show promise as vaccines and oncolytic viruses. However, the critical safety concern is the neurotropic nature conveyed by the VSV glycoprotein. VSVs that include the VSV glycoprotein (G) gene, even in most recombinant attenuated strains, can still show substantial adverse or lethal actions in the brain. Here, we test 4 chimeric viruses in the brain, including those in which glycoprotein genes from Nipah, chikungunya (CHIKV), and influenza H5N1 viruses were substituted for the VSV glycoprotein gene. We also test a virus-like vesicle (VLV) in which the VSV glycoprotein gene is expressed from a replicon encoding the nonstructural proteins of Semliki Forest virus. VSVΔG-CHIKV, VSVΔG-H5N1, and VLV were all safe in the adult mouse brain, as were VSVΔG viruses expressing either the Nipah F or G glycoprotein. In contrast, a complementing pair of VSVΔG viruses expressing Nipah G and F glycoproteins were lethal within the brain within a surprisingly short time frame of 2 days. Intranasal inoculation in postnatal day 14 mice with VSVΔG-CHIKV or VLV evoked no adverse response, whereas VSVΔG-H5N1 by this route was lethal in most mice. A key immune mechanism underlying the safety of VSVΔG-CHIKV, VSVΔG-H5N1, and VLV in the adult brain was the type I interferon response; all three viruses were lethal in the brains of adult mice lacking the interferon receptor, suggesting that the viruses can infect and replicate and spread in brain cells if not blocked by interferon-stimulated genes within the brain.IMPORTANCE Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) shows considerable promise both as a vaccine vector and as an oncolytic virus. The greatest limitation of VSV is that it is highly neurotropic and can be lethal within the brain. The neurotropism can be mostly attributed to the VSV G glycoprotein. Here, we test 4 chimeric viruses of VSV with glycoprotein genes from Nipah

  16. DNA methylation analysis of chromosome 21 gene promoters at single base pair and single allele resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Zhang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Differential DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic signal for gene regulation, development, and disease processes. We mapped DNA methylation patterns of 190 gene promoter regions on chromosome 21 using bisulfite conversion and subclone sequencing in five human cell types. A total of 28,626 subclones were sequenced at high accuracy using (long-read Sanger sequencing resulting in the measurement of the DNA methylation state of 580427 CpG sites. Our results show that average DNA methylation levels are distributed bimodally with enrichment of highly methylated and unmethylated sequences, both for amplicons and individual subclones, which represent single alleles from individual cells. Within CpG-rich sequences, DNA methylation was found to be anti-correlated with CpG dinucleotide density and GC content, and methylated CpGs are more likely to be flanked by AT-rich sequences. We observed over-representation of CpG sites in distances of 9, 18, and 27 bps in highly methylated amplicons. However, DNA sequence alone is not sufficient to predict an amplicon's DNA methylation status, since 43% of all amplicons are differentially methylated between the cell types studied here. DNA methylation in promoter regions is strongly correlated with the absence of gene expression and low levels of activating epigenetic marks like H3K4 methylation and H3K9 and K14 acetylation. Utilizing the single base pair and single allele resolution of our data, we found that i amplicons from different parts of a CpG island frequently differ in their DNA methylation level, ii methylation levels of individual cells in one tissue are very similar, and iii methylation patterns follow a relaxed site-specific distribution. Furthermore, iv we identified three cases of allele-specific DNA methylation on chromosome 21. Our data shed new light on the nature of methylation patterns in human cells, the sequence dependence of DNA methylation, and its function as epigenetic signal in gene

  17. A Classification of BPEL Extensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Kopp

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Business Process Execution Language (BPEL has emerged as de-facto standard for business processes implementation. This language is designed to be extensible for including additional valuable features in a standardized manner. There are a number of BPEL extensions available. They are, however, neither classified nor evaluated with respect to their compliance to the BPEL standard. This article fills this gap by providing a framework for classifying BPEL extensions, a classification of existing extensions, and a guideline for designing BPEL extensions.

  18. Effectiveness of Agricultural Extension Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali AL-Sharafat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Jordans agricultural extension service is seriously under-staffed and its effectiveness is consequently compromised. Reservations are being expressed about the performance and capability of the agricultural extension system in Jordan. The performance of this sector has been disappointing and has failed to transfer agricultural technology to the farmers. The main objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of Jordans agricultural extension services. Approach: The effect of extension services on olive productivity in the study area was investigated. A total number of 60 olive producers were selected to be interviewed for this study. This number was enough to achieve the study objectives. The interviewed producers were distributed almost equally within olive production locations in the study area. The sample obtained through the simple random sampling technique. The two groups had been chosen and distributed randomly into an experimental group (30 farmers; 10 for each source of extension service and control group (30 farmers. The experimental group received extension services and the control group received no extension services. Two interview-cum-structured questionnaires were designed and used to collect information and data for this study. The first instrument was designed for farmers who received extension services and the second from farmers who received no extension services. Another questionnaire was designed for administrators of extension organizations concerned with providing extension services to farmers. To find the differences that may exist between two studied groups, One Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA, t-test and LSD test via Statistical Package for Social Sciences software (SPSS were used. The average net profit obtained from an area of one dynamo of olive farm was the main item to be considered in determining the effectiveness of agricultural extension activities. Results and Conclusion: The results of

  19. Repeated evolution of chimeric fusion genes in the β-globin gene family of laurasiatherian mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudry, Michael J; Storz, Jay F; Butts, Gary Tyler; Campbell, Kevin L; Hoffmann, Federico G

    2014-05-09

    The evolutionary fate of chimeric fusion genes may be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin and the nature of functional divergence between the parental genes. In the β-globin gene family of placental mammals, the two postnatally expressed δ- and β-globin genes (HBD and HBB, respectively) have a propensity for recombinational exchange via gene conversion and unequal crossing-over. In the latter case, there are good reasons to expect differences in retention rates for the reciprocal HBB/HBD and HBD/HBB fusion genes due to thalassemia pathologies associated with the HBD/HBB "Lepore" deletion mutant in humans. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the mammalian β-globin gene cluster, which revealed that chimeric HBB/HBD fusion genes originated independently in four separate lineages of laurasiatherian mammals: Eulipotyphlans (shrews, moles, and hedgehogs), carnivores, microchiropteran bats, and cetaceans. In cases where an independently derived "anti-Lepore" duplication mutant has become fixed, the parental HBD and/or HBB genes have typically been inactivated or deleted, so that the newly created HBB/HBD fusion gene is primarily responsible for synthesizing the β-type subunits of adult and fetal hemoglobin (Hb). Contrary to conventional wisdom that the HBD gene is a vestigial relict that is typically inactivated or expressed at negligible levels, we show that HBD-like genes often encode a substantial fraction (20-100%) of β-chain Hbs in laurasiatherian taxa. Our results indicate that the ascendancy or resuscitation of genes with HBD-like coding sequence requires the secondary acquisition of HBB-like promoter sequence via unequal crossing-over or interparalog gene conversion.

  20. Chimeric External Control to Quantify Cell Free DNA in Plasma Samples by Real Time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eini, Maryam; Behzad-Behbahani, Abbas; Takhshid, Mohammad Ali; Ramezani, Amin; Rafiei Dehbidi, Gholam Reza; Okhovat, Mohammad Ali; Farhadi, Ali; Alavi, Parniyan

    2016-01-01

    Background: DNA isolation procedure can significantly influence the quantification of DNA by real time PCR specially when cell free DNA (cfDNA) is the subject. To assess the extraction efficiency, linearity of the extraction yield, presence of co-purified inhibitors and to avoid problems with fragment size relevant to cfDNA, development of appropriate External DNA Control (EDC) is challenging. Using non-human chimeric nucleotide sequences, an EDC was developed for standardization of qPCR for monitoring stability of cfDNA concentration in blood samples over time. Methods: A0 DNA fragment of 167 bp chimeric sequence of parvovirus B19 and pBHA designated as EDC fragment was designed. To determine the impact of different factors during DNA extraction processing on quantification of cfDNA, blood samples were collected from normal subjects and divided into aliquots with and without specific treatment. In time intervals, the plasma samples were isolated. The amplicon of 167 bp EDC fragment in final concentration of 1.1 pg/500 μl was added to each plasma sample and total DNA was extracted by an in house method. Relative and absolute quantification real time PCR was performed to quantify both EDC fragment and cfDNA in extracted samples. Results: Comparison of real time PCR threshold cycle (Ct) for cfDNA fragment in tubes with and without specific treatment indicated a decrease in untreated tubes. In contrast, the threshold cycle was constant for EDC fragment in treated and untreated tubes, indicating the difference in Ct values of the cfDNA is because of specific treatments that were made on them. Conclusions: Spiking of DNA fragment size relevant to cfDNA into the plasma sample can be useful to minimize the bias due to sample preparation and extraction processing. Therefore, it is highly recommended that standard external DNA control be employed for the extraction and quantification of cfDNA for accurate data analysis. PMID:27141267

  1. Emotion processing in chimeric faces: hemispheric asymmetries in expression and recognition of emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indersmitten, Tim; Gur, Ruben C

    2003-05-01

    Since the discovery of facial asymmetries in emotional expressions of humans and other primates, hypotheses have related the greater left-hemiface intensity to right-hemispheric dominance in emotion processing. However, the difficulty of creating true frontal views of facial expressions in two-dimensional photographs has confounded efforts to better understand the phenomenon. We have recently described a method for obtaining three-dimensional photographs of posed and evoked emotional expressions and used these stimuli to investigate both intensity of expression and accuracy of recognizing emotion in chimeric faces constructed from only left- or right-side composites. The participant population included 38 (19 male, 19 female) African-American, Caucasian, and Asian adults. They were presented with chimeric composites generated from faces of eight actors and eight actresses showing four emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, and fear, each in posed and evoked conditions. We replicated the finding that emotions are expressed more intensely in the left hemiface for all emotions and conditions, with the exception of evoked anger, which was expressed more intensely in the right hemiface. In contrast, the results indicated that emotional expressions are recognized more efficiently in the right hemiface, indicating that the right hemiface expresses emotions more accurately. The double dissociation between the laterality of expression intensity and that of recognition efficiency supports the notion that the two kinds of processes may have distinct neural substrates. Evoked anger is uniquely expressed more intensely and accurately on the side of the face that projects to the viewer's right hemisphere, dominant in emotion recognition.

  2. Comparing regional modeling (CHIMERE) and satellite observations of aerosols (PARASOL): Methodology and case study over Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromatas, Stavros

    2010-05-01

    S. Stromatas (1), S. Turquety (1), H. Chepfer (1), L. Menut (1), B. Bessagnet (2), JC Pere (2), D. Tanré (3) . (1) Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, CNRS/IPSL, École Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex, France, (2) INERIS, Institut National de l'Environnement Industriel et des Risques, Parc technologique ALATA, 60550 Verneuil en Halatte, FRANCE, (3) Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique/CNRS Univ. des Sciences et Tech. de Lille, 59650 - Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. Atmospheric suspended particles (aerosols) have significant radiative and environmental impacts, affecting human health, visibility and climate. Therefore, they are regulated by air quality standards worldwide, and monitored by regional observation networks. Satellite observations vastly improve the horizontal and temporal coverage, providing daily distributions. Aerosols are currently estimated using aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals, a quantitative measure of the extinction of solar radiation by aerosol scattering and absorption between the point of observation and the top of the atmosphere. Even though remarkable progresses in aerosol modeling by chemistry-transport models (CTM) and measurement experiments have been made in recent years, there is still a significant divergence between the modeled and observed results. However, AOD retrievals from satellites remains a highly challenging task mostly because it depends on a variety of different parameters such as cloud contamination, surface reflectance contributions and a priori assumptions on aerosol types, each one of them incorporating its own difficulties. Therefore, comparisons between CTM and observations are often difficult to interpret. In this presentation, we will discuss comparisons between regional modeling (CHIMERE CTM) over Mexico and satellite observations obtained by the POLDER instrument embarked on PARASOL micro-satellite. After a comparison of the model AOD with the retrieved L2 AOD, we will present an alternative

  3. Enhanced protective efficacy of a chimeric form of the schistosomiasis vaccine antigen Sm-TSP-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S Pearson

    Full Text Available The large extracellular loop of the Schistosoma mansoni tetraspanin, Sm-TSP-2, when fused to a thioredoxin partner and formulated with Freund's adjuvants, has been shown to be an efficacious vaccine against murine schistosomiasis. Moreover, Sm-TSP-2 is uniquely recognised by IgG(1 and IgG(3 from putatively resistant individuals resident in S. mansoni endemic areas in Brazil. In the present study, we expressed Sm-TSP-2 at high yield and in soluble form in E. coli without the need for a solubility enhancing fusion partner. We also expressed in E. coli a chimera called Sm-TSP-2/5B, which consisted of Sm-TSP-2 fused to the immunogenic 5B region of the hookworm aspartic protease and vaccine antigen, Na-APR-1. Sm-TSP-2 formulated with alum/CpG showed significant reductions in adult worm and liver egg burdens in two separate murine schistosomiasis challenge studies. Sm-TSP-2/5B afforded significantly greater protection than Sm-TSP-2 alone when both antigens were formulated with alum/CpG. The enhanced protection obtained with the chimeric fusion protein was associated with increased production of anti-Sm-TSP-2 antibodies and IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ from spleen cells of vaccinated animals. Sera from 666 individuals from Brazil who were infected with S. mansoni were screened for potentially deleterious IgE responses to Sm-TSP-2. Anti-Sm-TSP-2 IgE to this protein was not detected (also shown previously for Na-APR-1, suggesting that the chimeric antigen Sm-TSP-2/5B could be used to safely and effectively vaccinate people in areas where schistosomes and hookworms are endemic.

  4. Construction of chimeric dual-chain avidin by tandem fusion of the related avidins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihimäki, Tiina A; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Varjonen, Suvi; Hörhä, Jarno; Nyholm, Thomas K M; Kulomaa, Markku S; Hytönen, Vesa P

    2011-01-01

    Avidin is a chicken egg-white protein with high affinity to vitamin H, also known as D-biotin. Many applications in life science research are based on this strong interaction. Avidin is a homotetrameric protein, which promotes its modification to symmetrical entities. Dual-chain avidin, a genetically engineered avidin form, has two circularly permuted chicken avidin monomers that are tandem-fused into one polypeptide chain. This form of avidin enables independent modification of the two domains, including the two biotin-binding pockets; however, decreased yields in protein production, compared to wt avidin, and complicated genetic manipulation of two highly similar DNA sequences in the tandem gene have limited the use of dual-chain avidin in biotechnological applications. To overcome challenges associated with the original dual-chain avidin, we developed chimeric dual-chain avidin, which is a tandem fusion of avidin and avidin-related protein 4 (AVR4), another member of the chicken avidin gene family. We observed an increase in protein production and better thermal stability, compared with the original dual-chain avidin. Additionally, PCR amplification of the hybrid gene was more efficient, thus enabling more convenient and straightforward modification of the dual-chain avidin. When studied closer, the generated chimeric dual-chain avidin showed biphasic biotin dissociation. The improved dual-chain avidin introduced here increases its potential for future applications. This molecule offers a valuable base for developing bi-functional avidin tools for bioseparation, carrier proteins, and nanoscale adapters. Additionally, this strategy could be helpful when generating hetero-oligomers from other oligomeric proteins with high structural similarity.

  5. Construction of chimeric dual-chain avidin by tandem fusion of the related avidins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina A Riihimäki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Avidin is a chicken egg-white protein with high affinity to vitamin H, also known as D-biotin. Many applications in life science research are based on this strong interaction. Avidin is a homotetrameric protein, which promotes its modification to symmetrical entities. Dual-chain avidin, a genetically engineered avidin form, has two circularly permuted chicken avidin monomers that are tandem-fused into one polypeptide chain. This form of avidin enables independent modification of the two domains, including the two biotin-binding pockets; however, decreased yields in protein production, compared to wt avidin, and complicated genetic manipulation of two highly similar DNA sequences in the tandem gene have limited the use of dual-chain avidin in biotechnological applications. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To overcome challenges associated with the original dual-chain avidin, we developed chimeric dual-chain avidin, which is a tandem fusion of avidin and avidin-related protein 4 (AVR4, another member of the chicken avidin gene family. We observed an increase in protein production and better thermal stability, compared with the original dual-chain avidin. Additionally, PCR amplification of the hybrid gene was more efficient, thus enabling more convenient and straightforward modification of the dual-chain avidin. When studied closer, the generated chimeric dual-chain avidin showed biphasic biotin dissociation. SIGNIFICANCE: The improved dual-chain avidin introduced here increases its potential for future applications. This molecule offers a valuable base for developing bi-functional avidin tools for bioseparation, carrier proteins, and nanoscale adapters. Additionally, this strategy could be helpful when generating hetero-oligomers from other oligomeric proteins with high structural similarity.

  6. Fibrinogen interaction of CHO cells expressing chimeric αIIb/αvβ3 integrin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan-juan CHEN; Xiao-yu SU; Xiao-dong XI; Li-ping LIN; Jian DING; He LU

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The molecular mechanisms of the affinity regulation of αvβ3 integrin are important in tumor development, wound repairing, and angiogenesis. It has been established that the cytoplasmic domains of αvβ3 integrin play an important role in integrin-ligand affinity regulation. However, the relationship of structure-func-tion within these domains remains unclear. Methods: The extracellular and trans-membrane domain of αⅡb was fused to the αv integrin cytoplasmic domain, and the chimeric α subunit was coexpressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with the wild-type β3 subunit or with 3 mutant 133 sequences bearing truncations at the positions of T741, Y747, and F754, respectively. The CHO cells expressing these recombinant integrins were tested for soluble fibrinogen binding and the cell adhesion and spreading on immobilized fibrinogen. Results: All 4 types of integrins bound soluble fibrinogen in the absence of agonist stimulation, and only the cells expressing the chimeric α subunit with the wild-type β3 subunit, but not those with truncated β3, could adhere to and spread on immobilized fibrinogen. Conclusion: The substitution αⅡb at the cytoplasmic domain with the ctv cyto-plasmic sequence rendered the extracellular αⅡbβ3 a constitutively activated con-formation for ligands without the need of "inside-out" signals. Our results also indicated that the COOH-terminal sequence of β3 might play a key role in integrin αⅡb/αvβ3-mediated cell adhesion and spreading on immobilized fibrinogen. The cells expressing αⅡb/αvβ3 have enormous potential for facilitating drug screen-ing for antagonists either to αvβ3 intracellular interactions or to αⅡbβ3 receptor functions.

  7. [Research of Human-mouse Chimeric Antibodies Against Ebola Virus Nucleoprotein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rongping; Sun, Lina; Liu, Yang; Wu, Wei; Li, Chuan; Liang, Mifang; Qiu, Peihong

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola virus is highly infectious and can result in death in ≤ 90% of infected subjects. Detection of the Ebola virus and diagnosis of infection are extremely important for epidemic control. Presently, Chinese laboratories detect the nucleic acids of the Ebola virus by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). However, such detection takes a relatively long time and necessitates skilled personnel and expensive equipment. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of serum is simple, easy to operate, and can be used to ascertain if a patient is infected with the Ebola virus as well as the degree of infection. Hence, ELISA can be used in epidemiological investigations and is a strong complement to detection of nucleic acids. Cases of Ebola hemorrhagic fever have not been documented in China, so quality-control material for positive serology is needed. Construction and expression of human-mouse chimeric antibodies against the nucleoprotein of the Ebola virus was carried out. Genes encoding variable heavy (VH) and variable light (VL) chains were extracted and amplified from murine hybridoma cells. Genes encoding the VH and VL chains of monoclonal antibodies were amplified by RT-PCR. According to sequence analyses, a primer was designed to amplify functional sequences relative to VH and VL chain. The eukaryotic expression vector HL51-14 carrying some human antibody heavy chain- and light chain-constant regions was used. IgG antibodies were obtained by transient transfection of 293T cells. Subsequently, immunological detection and immunological identification were identified by ELISA, immunofluorescence assay, and western blotting. These results showed that we constructed and purified two human- mouse chimeric antibodies.

  8. Performance Assessment of a Trypanosoma cruzi Chimeric Antigen in Multiplex Liquid Microarray Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fred Luciano Neves; Celedon, Paola Alejandra Fiorani; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Leitolis, Amanda; Crestani, Sandra; Foti, Leonardo; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2017-10-01

    Diagnosing chronic Chagas disease (CD) requires antibody-antigen detection methods, which are traditionally based on enzymatic assay techniques whose performance depend on the type and quality of antigen used. Previously, 4 recombinant chimeric proteins from the Instituto de Biologia Molecular do Paraná (IBMP-8.1 to 8.4) comprising immuno-dominant regions of diverse Trypanosoma cruzi antigens showed excellent diagnostic performance in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Considering that next-generation platforms offer improved CD diagnostic accuracy with different T. cruzi-specific recombinant antigens, we assessed the performance of these chimeras in liquid microarrays (LMAs). The chimeric proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatography. Sera from 653 chagasic and 680 healthy individuals were used to assess the performance of these chimeras in detecting specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies. Accuracies ranged from 98.1 to 99.3%, and diagnostic odds ratio values were 3,548 for IBMP-8.3, 4,826 for IBMP-8.1, 7,882 for IBMP-8.2, and 25,000 for IBMP-8.4. A separate sera bank (851 samples) was employed to assess cross-reactivity with other tropical diseases. Leishmania, a pathogen with high similarity to T. cruzi, showed cross-reactivity rates ranging from 0 to 2.17%. Inconclusive results were negligible (0 to 0.71%). Bland-Altman and Deming regression analysis based on 200 randomly selected CD-positive and negative samples demonstrated interchangeability with respect to CD diagnostic performance in both singleplex and multiplex assays. Our results suggested that these chimeras can potentially replace antigens currently used in commercially available assay kits. Moreover, the use of multiplex platforms, such as LMA assays employing 2 or more IBMP antigens, would abrogate the need for 2 different testing techniques when diagnosing CD. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Updated SO2 Emission Estimates over China using OMI/Aura Observations and the CHIMERE CTM

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der A, R. J.; Balis, D.; Koukouli, M.; Theys, N.; Ding, J.; Zyrichidou, I.; Mijling, B.

    2016-12-01

    As part of EU FP7 Monitoring and Assessment of Regional air quality in China using space Observations, Project Of Long-term sino-european co-Operation, MarcoPolo, project, http://www.marcopolo.eu/, updated sulphur dioxide, SO2, emissions for the time period 2005 to 2015 inclusive are presented here. Monthly mean OMI/Aura anthropogenic SO2, observations over Eastern China for the domain 102°E to 132°E and from 15°N to 55°N form the basis of the new emission inventory, which is provided on a spatial resolution of 0.25°x0.25°. The 2010 Multi-resolution Emission Inventory for China (MEIC), http://www.meicmodel.org/. SO2 emissions, in Mg/month, form the baseline apriori inventory, coupled with the multi-scale model for air quality forecasting and simulation, CHIMERE, http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/, v2013b, which is providing the SO2 field. The pre-2010 trend in resulting emissions show that these appear to be stable in time, with a slight negative, possibly not significant, trend nonetheless; from the monthly mean aposteriori emissions, for the entire domain, pre-2010, the change appears to be of the order of -0.51±0.38Tg, whereas post-2010, -1.64±0.37Tg. From the seasonal emissions, those estimates remain similar at -0.34±0.49Tg and -1.26±0.33Tg respectively. The largest differences between apriori and aposteriori become vastly significant from year 2014 onwards, confirming similar studies that monitor the decrease in SO2 emissions over China from space.

  10. Expression of a new chimeric protein with a highly repeated sequence in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saumonneau, Amélie; Rottier, Karine; Conrad, Udo; Popineau, Yves; Guéguen, Jacques; Francin-Allami, Mathilde

    2011-07-01

    In wheat, the high-molecular weight (HMW) glutenin subunits are known to contribute to gluten viscoelasticity, and show some similarities to elastomeric animal proteins as elastin. When combining the sequence of a glutenin with that of elastin is a way to create new chimeric functional proteins, which could be expressed in plants. The sequence of a glutenin subunit was modified by the insertion of several hydrophobic and elastic motifs derived from elastin (elastin-like peptide, ELP) into the hydrophilic repetitive domain of the glutenin subunit to create a triblock protein, the objective being to improve the mechanical (elastomeric) properties of this wheat storage protein. In this study, we investigated an expression model system to analyze the expression and trafficking of the wild-type HMW glutenin subunit (GS(W)) and an HMW glutenin subunit mutated by the insertion of elastin motifs (GS(M)-ELP). For this purpose, a series of constructs was made to express wild-type subunits and subunits mutated by insertion of elastin motifs in fusion with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in tobacco BY-2 cells. Our results showed for the first time the expression of HMW glutenin fused with GFP in tobacco protoplasts. We also expressed and localized the chimeric protein composed of plant glutenin and animal elastin-like peptides (ELP) in BY-2 protoplasts, and demonstrated its presence in protein body-like structures in the endoplasmic reticulum. This work, therefore, provides a basis for heterologous production of the glutenin-ELP triblock protein to characterize its mechanical properties.

  11. Synthetic metabolic engineering-a novel, simple technology for designing a chimeric metabolic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Xiaoting

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of biotechnology into chemical manufacturing has been recognized as a key technology to build a sustainable society. However, the practical applications of biocatalytic chemical conversions are often restricted due to their complexities involving the unpredictability of product yield and the troublesome controls in fermentation processes. One of the possible strategies to overcome these limitations is to eliminate the use of living microorganisms and to use only enzymes involved in the metabolic pathway. Use of recombinant mesophiles producing thermophilic enzymes at high temperature results in denaturation of indigenous proteins and elimination of undesired side reactions; consequently, highly selective and stable biocatalytic modules can be readily prepared. By rationally combining those modules together, artificial synthetic pathways specialized for chemical manufacturing could be designed and constructed. Results A chimeric Embden-Meyerhof (EM pathway with balanced consumption and regeneration of ATP and ADP was constructed by using nine recombinant E. coli strains overproducing either one of the seven glycolytic enzymes of Thermus thermophilus, the cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase of Pyrococcus horikoshii, or the non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Thermococcus kodakarensis. By coupling this pathway with the Thermus malate/lactate dehydrogenase, a stoichiometric amount of lactate was produced from glucose with an overall ATP turnover number of 31. Conclusions In this study, a novel and simple technology for flexible design of a bespoke metabolic pathway was developed. The concept has been testified via a non-ATP-forming chimeric EM pathway. We designated this technology as “synthetic metabolic engineering”. Our technology is, in principle, applicable to all thermophilic enzymes as long as they can be functionally expressed in the host, and thus would be

  12. Synthetic metabolic engineering-a novel, simple technology for designing a chimeric metabolic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaoting; Honda, Kohsuke; Sakai, Takaaki; Okano, Kenji; Omasa, Takeshi; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio; Ohtake, Hisao

    2012-09-06

    The integration of biotechnology into chemical manufacturing has been recognized as a key technology to build a sustainable society. However, the practical applications of biocatalytic chemical conversions are often restricted due to their complexities involving the unpredictability of product yield and the troublesome controls in fermentation processes. One of the possible strategies to overcome these limitations is to eliminate the use of living microorganisms and to use only enzymes involved in the metabolic pathway. Use of recombinant mesophiles producing thermophilic enzymes at high temperature results in denaturation of indigenous proteins and elimination of undesired side reactions; consequently, highly selective and stable biocatalytic modules can be readily prepared. By rationally combining those modules together, artificial synthetic pathways specialized for chemical manufacturing could be designed and constructed. A chimeric Embden-Meyerhof (EM) pathway with balanced consumption and regeneration of ATP and ADP was constructed by using nine recombinant E. coli strains overproducing either one of the seven glycolytic enzymes of Thermus thermophilus, the cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase of Pyrococcus horikoshii, or the non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Thermococcus kodakarensis. By coupling this pathway with the Thermus malate/lactate dehydrogenase, a stoichiometric amount of lactate was produced from glucose with an overall ATP turnover number of 31. In this study, a novel and simple technology for flexible design of a bespoke metabolic pathway was developed. The concept has been testified via a non-ATP-forming chimeric EM pathway. We designated this technology as "synthetic metabolic engineering". Our technology is, in principle, applicable to all thermophilic enzymes as long as they can be functionally expressed in the host, and thus would be potentially applicable to the biocatalytic manufacture of any chemicals

  13. Developing Extension Professionals to Develop Extension Programs: A Case Study for the Changing Face of Extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R. Cummings

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Development of Cooperative Extension programs depends upon the skills and abilities of competent Extension professionals. The most effective manner of building program development competencies in these Extension professionals is through professional development. A wide variety of competencies are necessary for Extension professionals to develop programs, including strong interpersonal skills. Differences exist between the professional development efforts of Extension institutions and are highlighted herein. Major challenges to delivery of professional development include time and budget, but these can be overcome through planning and innovation and use of online or hybrid methods. Professional development for program development is essential to furthering Extension’s mission, especially during times of rapid change.

  14. ALGEBRAIC EXTENSION OF *-A OPERATOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左红亮; 左飞

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study various properties of algebraic extension of∗-A operator. Specifically, we show that every algebraic extension of∗-A operator has SVEP and is isoloid. And if T is an algebraic extension of∗-A operator, then Weyl’s theorem holds for f (T ), where f is an analytic functions on some neighborhood of σ(T ) and not constant on each of the components of its domain.

  15. Think - Baltic Extension / Kalle Kask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kask, Kalle

    2002-01-01

    Tallinna TÜ Rehabilitatsiooni tehnoloogia keskus korraldas pressikonverentsi, kus tutvustati osalemist EL V raamprogrammis Think - Baltic Extension, mis on suunatud puuetega inimeste tööhõive tagamisele

  16. Think - Baltic Extension / Kalle Kask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kask, Kalle

    2002-01-01

    Tallinna TÜ Rehabilitatsiooni tehnoloogia keskus korraldas pressikonverentsi, kus tutvustati osalemist EL V raamprogrammis Think - Baltic Extension, mis on suunatud puuetega inimeste tööhõive tagamisele

  17. Multilayer Multidimensional Extension Set Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Shao-zhong; YANG Guo-wei; TU Xu-yan

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the contradiction problem of multilayer multidimensional complex systems, the concepts of extension field and stable field of intersection and union of multilayer multidimensional extension set are given. Then the related operations and properties are discussed. The results of study expand the concepts of intersection and union of extension set to a general situation, and provide the theoretical basis for production of the concepts of intersection and union of multilayer multidimensional matter element system extension set. In this way, it will be possible that matter element system theory is used to creative designs of complex systems.

  18. Influence of Single Base Change in Shine-Dalgarno Sequence on the Stability of B.Subtilis Plasmid PSM604

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    B.Subtilis expression plasmids generally require a stringent Shine-Dalgarno Sequence(SDS). Site-directed-mutagenesis was explored to change the Shine-Dalgarno Sequence from AAAAATGGGG (mutant type) to AAAAAGGGGG (wild type) in recombinant plasmid PSM604. The single base substitution made the plasmid with wild SDS unstable in structure and segregation. The interaction of SDS with subtilisin leader sequence of PSM604 might be responsible for the instability of plasmid.

  19. Mixed chimerism renders residual host dendritic cells incapable of alloimmunization of the marrow donor in the canine model of allogeneic marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Steven L; Graves, Scott S; Higginbotham, Deborah A; Storb, Rainer

    2015-10-02

    This study tested whether an alloimmune response can occur in the marrow donor when infused or injected with leukocytes from their mixed chimeric transplant recipient. Two mixed chimeras were produced after conditioning with three Gray total body irradiation, donor marrow infusion, and post-grafting immunosuppression. The marrow donors were then repeatedly infused and injected with leukocytes from their respective chimeric recipient. A donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) into their mixed chimeras had no effect, even after the experiments were repeated. The presence of blood dendritic cells (DCs) of recipient origin was confirmed in chimeric recipients, as well as the presence of microchimerism in the marrow donors. Donor sensitization did occur following placement of a recipient skin graft that was confirmed following DLI into recipients that changed the mixed chimeras into full donor chimeras. These observations suggest that mixed chimerism renders recipient peripheral blood DCs incapable of inducing a donor T cell response.

  20. Application of near infrared spectroscopy in fast assay of liquid components in single-base propellant intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuai; Yin, Qiushi; Lu, Leiming; Wang, Zhiqiang; Deng, Guodong

    2017-01-01

    The liquid components (including water and residual solvent (RS)) content is an important quality indicator of single-base propellant intermediates. This work presented a quick method for the determination of water and RS content in single-base propellant intermediates employing near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy in place of costly, laborious and time-consuming reference analysis (gas chromatography, GC). The Monte-Carlo uninformative variable elimination (MCUVE) and the backward interval partial least squares (Bi-PLS) were applied for characteristic variable selection during the modeling process. In this case, Bi-PLS algorithm showed the superiority when compared with MCUVE method for multivariate calibration due to sample intrinsic inhomogeneity. The correlation coefficient of the calibration and prediction (Rc, Rp), and the root mean square error of calibration and prediction (RMSEC, RMSEP) of the obtained optimum models by Bi-PLS algorithm were 0.98, 0.99, 0.28%, 0.36% for water, and 0.99, 0.99, 0.34%, 0.42% for RS, respectively. No significant difference existed between the reference and NIR method according to the result of a paired t-test. In addition, the repeatability of the NIR method met the requirement of the reference method. The results indicated that the NIR method built in this work would have a bright prospect in rapid measurement of liquid components content single-base propellant intermediates.

  1. Design and construction of a chimeric drug target of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus%抗耐药性金黄色葡萄球菌嵌合药靶的设计与构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨杰; 饶贤才; 侯瑞; 胡珍; 方昕; 陈志瑾

    2011-01-01

    This paper is aimed to design the drug-resistance related TG-Tpase chimeric gene derived from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by the methods of molecular modeling and molecule three-dimensional structure analysis. TG-Tpase chimeric gene was constructed and expressed in a prokaryotic system, and then the expression products were purified. The multiple sequences alignments of MRSA transglycosylase (Tgase) and transpeptidase (Tpase) active domain were performed by Bioedit and DNAStar software and a TG-Tpase chimeric gene was designed based on the analysis of Tpase and Tgase structural features and activity performance. Two fragments encoding MRSA PBP2a Tpase and PBP2 Tgase domains were respectively amplified by PCR. Then the TG-Tpase chimeric gene was constructed by the method of primer extension and cloned into pMD18-T vector, then subcloned into pET30b. The recombinants of interest were screened out by restriction enzyme analysis and direct DNA sequencing, then transformed into E. Coli strain Rosetta (DE3) plysS. The fusion proteins expressed by the engineering bacteria harboring the chimeric gene were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The designed TG-Tpase gene consists of 1 935 bp, including the Tgase domain and N-terminal hinge region of PBP2 plus the C-terminal hinge region and Tpase domain of PBP2a. The fusion protein encoded by the designed chimeric gene has an isoelectric point (pi) of 7.10 and a molecular weight of 72 000, and can be purified to 90 % homogeneity by one-step Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. In this study, a TP-Tgase chimeric gene was designed and the engineered bacteria carrying the chimeric gene are successful constructed, which may lay a foundation for further screening of inhibitors against MRSA.%设计耐甲氧西林金黄色葡萄球菌(MRSA)耐药相关TG-Tpase嵌合基因,进行分子建模及三维结构观察,并构建了原核表达质粒,进行嵌合基因的表达、纯化,为进一步利用其酶学活

  2. Detection of Salmonella invA by isothermal and chimeric primer-initiated amplification of nucleic acids (ICAN) in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isogai, Emiko; Makungu, Chitwambi; Yabe, John; Sinkala, Patson; Nambota, Andrew; Isogai, Hiroshi; Fukushi, Hideto; Silungwe, Manda; Mubita, Charles; Syakalima, Michelo; Hang'ombe, Bernard Mudenda; Kozaki, Shunji; Yasuda, Jun

    2005-01-01

    The isothermal and chimeric primer-initiated amplification of nucleic acids (ICAN) is a new isothermal DNA amplification method composed of exo Bca DNA polymerase, RNaseH and DNA-RNA chimeric primers. We detected invA of Salmonella from chicken carcasses, egg yolk and cattle fecal samples. Fifty-three of 59 isolates were invA-positive in ICAN-chromatostrip detection. The result was consistent with those obtained by standard PCR. Salmonella invA was detected in 12 of 14 carcass rinses by ICAN, while in 7 of 14 rinses by standard PCR. These results indicate that ICAN is an efficient, sensitive and simple system to detect invA of Salmonella species in developing countries such as Zambia.

  3. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures on a chimeric respiratory syncytial virus protein expressed in insect cell line Sf9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wathen, M.W.; Aeed, P.A.; Elhammer, A.P. (Upjohn Co., Kalamazoo, MI (United States))

    1991-03-19

    The oligosaccharide structures added to a chimeric protein (FG) composed of the extracellular domains of respiratory syncytial virus F and G proteins, expressed in the insect cell line Sf9, were investigated. Cells were labeled in vivo with ({sup 3}H)glucosamine and infected wit a recombinant baculovirus containing the FG gene. The secreted chimeric protein was isolated by immunoprecipitation and subjected to oligosaccharide analysis. The FG protein contains two types of O-linked oligosaccharides: GalNAc and Gal{beta}1-3GalNAc constituting 17 and 66% of the total number of structures respectively. Only one type of N-linked oligosaccharide, constituting the remaining 17% of the structures on FG, was detected: a trimannosyl core structure with a fucose residue linked {alpha}1-6 to the asparagine-linked N-acetylglucosamine.

  4. Chimeric FimH adhesin of type 1 fimbriae: a bacterial surface display system for heterologous sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, L; Poulsen, LK; Christiansen, Gunna;

    1995-01-01

    The FimH adhesin of type 1 fimbriae has been tested as a display system for heterologous protein segments on the surface of Escherichia coli. This was carried out by introduction of restriction site handles (BglII sites) in two different positions in the fimH gene, followed by in-frame insertion...... of heterologous DNA segments encoding two reporter sequences. In the selected positions such insertions did not significantly alter the function of the FimH protein with regard to surface location and adhesive ability. The system seemed to be quite flexible, since chimeric versions of the FimH adhesin containing...... as many as 56 foreign amino acids were transported to the bacterial surface as components of the fimbrial organelles. Furthermore, the foreign protein segments were recognized by insert-specific antibodies when expressed within chimeric proteins on the surface of the bacteria. The results from...

  5. Correlative scanning-transmission electron microscopy reveals that a chimeric flavivirus is released as individual particles in secretory vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaud-Gaillard, Julien; Sellin, Caroline; Georgeault, Sonia; Uzbekov, Rustem; Lebos, Claude; Guillaume, Jean-Marc; Roingeard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular morphogenesis of flaviviruses has been well described, but flavivirus release from the host cell remains poorly documented. We took advantage of the optimized production of an attenuated chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus for vaccine purposes to study this phenomenon by microscopic approaches. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the release of numerous viral particles at the cell surface through a short-lived process. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the intracellular ultrastructure of the small number of cells releasing viral particles at a given time, we developed a new correlative microscopy method: CSEMTEM (for correlative scanning electron microscopy - transmission electron microscopy). CSEMTEM analysis suggested that chimeric flavivirus particles were released as individual particles, in small exocytosis vesicles, via a regulated secretory pathway. Our morphological findings provide new insight into interactions between flaviviruses and cells and demonstrate that CSEMTEM is a useful new method, complementary to SEM observations of biological events by intracellular TEM investigations.

  6. Silkworms transformed with chimeric silkworm/spider silk genes spin composite silk fibers with improved mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulé, Florence; Miao, Yun-Gen; Sohn, Bong-Hee; Kim, Young-Soo; Hull, J Joe; Fraser, Malcolm J; Lewis, Randolph V; Jarvis, Donald L

    2012-01-17

    The development of a spider silk-manufacturing process is of great interest. However, there are serious problems with natural manufacturing through spider farming, and standard recombinant protein production platforms have provided limited progress due to their inability to assemble spider silk proteins into fibers. Thus, we used piggyBac vectors to create transgenic silkworms encoding chimeric silkworm/spider silk proteins. The silk fibers produced by these animals were composite materials that included chimeric silkworm/spider silk proteins integrated in an extremely stable manner. Furthermore, these composite fibers were, on average, tougher than the parental silkworm silk fibers and as tough as native dragline spider silk fibers. These results demonstrate that silkworms can be engineered to manufacture composite silk fibers containing stably integrated spider silk protein sequences, which significantly improve the overall mechanical properties of the parental silkworm silk fibers.

  7. Authentic display of a cholera toxin epitope by chimeric type 1 fimbriae: effects of insert position and host background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentebjerg-Olesen, B; Pallesen, L; Jensen, LB

    1997-01-01

    . Several of the chosen positions seemed amenable even for large foreign inserts; the chimeric proteins were exposed on the bacterial surface and the cholera toxin epitope was authentically displayed, i.e. it was recognized on bacteria by specific antiserum. Display of chimeric fimbriae was tested......The potential of the major structural protein of type 1 fimbriae as a display system for heterologous sequences was tested. As a reporter-epitope, a heterologous sequence mimicking a neutralizing epitope of the cholera toxin B chain was inserted, in one or two copies, into four different positions...... in the fimA gene. This was carried out by introduction of new restriction sites by PCR-mediated site-directed mutagenesis of fimA in positions predicted to correspond to optimally surface-located regions of the subunit protein. Subsequently, the synthetic cholera-toxin-encoding DNA segment was inserted...

  8. Recruitment of SHP-1 protein tyrosine phosphatase and signalling by a chimeric T-cell receptor-killer inhibitory receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M D; Geisler, C

    2000-01-01

    Receptors expressing the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) in their cytoplasmic tail play an important role in the negative regulation of natural killer and B-cell activation. A subpopulation of T cells expresses the ITIM containing killer cell inhibitory receptor (KIR), which...... recognize MHC class I molecules. Following coligation of KIR with an activating receptor, the tyrosine in the ITIM is phosphorylated and the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 is recruited to the ITIM via its SH2 domains. It is still not clear how SHP-1 affects T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling....... In this study, we constructed a chimeric TCR-KIR receptor. We demonstrated that SHP-1 is recruited to the chimeric TCR-KIR receptor following T-cell stimulation with either anti-TCR monoclonal antibody (MoAb) or superantigen. However, in spite of this we could not detect any effect of SHP-1 on TCR signalling...

  9. An Unusual Chimeric Diterpene Synthase from Emericella variecolor and Its Functional Conversion into a Sesterterpene Synthase by Domain Swapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Bin; Matsuda, Yudai; Mori, Takahiro; Okada, Masahiro; Quan, Zhiyang; Mitsuhashi, Takaaki; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Abe, Ikuro

    2016-01-26

    Di- and sesterterpene synthases produce C20 and C25 isoprenoid scaffolds from geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) and geranylfarnesyl pyrophosphate (GFPP), respectively. By genome mining of the fungus Emericella variecolor, we identified a multitasking chimeric terpene synthase, EvVS, which has terpene cyclase (TC) and prenyltransferase (PT) domains. Heterologous gene expression in Aspergillus oryzae led to the isolation of variediene (1), a novel tricyclic diterpene hydrocarbon. Intriguingly, in vitro reaction with the enzyme afforded the new macrocyclic sesterterpene 2 as a minor product from dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP). The TC domain thus produces the diterpene 1 and the sesterterpene 2 from GGPP and GFPP, respectively. Notably, a domain swap of the PT domain of EvVS with that of another chimeric sesterterpene synthase, EvSS, successfully resulted in the production of 2 in vivo as well. Cyclization mechanisms for the production of these two compounds are proposed.

  10. GAP改性单基球形药的表征%Characterization of GAP Modified Single Base Spherical Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴艳光; 罗运军; 葛震

    2012-01-01

    采用内溶法制备了由聚叠氮缩水甘油醚(GAP)改性的单基球形药,用扫描电子显微镜(SEM)、假密度测定器、激光粒度仪和傅里叶变换红外(FT-IR)对GAP改性单基球形药进行表征.结果表明,所制得的GAP改性单基球形药圆球率较高,颗粒间无粘结,流散性好;在驱溶时采取缓慢升高真空度和温度的方法可制得较好的GAP改性单基球形药,驱溶时间从10min增长至60min时,假密度从0.5467 g/cm3增大至0.8315 g/cm3,适宜的驱溶时间为40~50 min;搅拌速度从700 r/min提高至1 500 r/min时,GAP改性单基球形药的中位粒径d50从134.53 μm减小至59.80μm,适宜的搅拌速度为1 000~1 500r/min.%Glycidyl azide polymer(GAP) modified single base spherical powder was prepared by an inside dissolving technique, and characterized by SEM, pseudodensity tester, laser granulometer and FT-IR. The results show that GAP modified single base spherical powder has high roundness rate, no bonding between the particles and excellent fluidity; The better GAP modified single base spherical power can be obtained by slowly increasing vacuum and temperature during the process of taking out solvent. When time of taking out solvent increases from 10 min to 60 min, pseudodensity of modified single base spherical powder increases from 0. 5467g/cm3 to 0. 8315 g/cm3 , and the optimum time of taking out solvent is 40 - 50 min, When stirring speed increases from 700 r/min to 1500r/min, the medium diameter of particles (d50 ) of GAP modified single base spherical powder decreases from 134. 53 μm to 59. 80 μm, and the optimum stiring speed is 1 000 r/min to 1 500 r/min.

  11. Frames and extension problems I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    In this article we present a short survey of frame theory in Hilbert spaces. We discuss Gabor frames and wavelet frames and set the stage for a discussion of various extension principles; this will be presented in the article Frames and extension problems II (joint with H.O. Kim and R.Y. Kim)....

  12. Extension and the Practicing Veterinarian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerholz, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    In order for Extension programs of veterinary medicine to succeed, good relationships are needed among university veterinarians, practicing local veterinarians, county Extension agents and the clientele. This author attempts to define some roles and relationships and offer some suggestions for the improvement of relationships to increase…

  13. An extension of heat hierarchy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Joe S.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a formally completely integrable extension of heat hierarchy based on the space of symmetries isomorphic to the Weyl algebra $\\mathcal{A}_1$. The extended heat hierarchy will be the basic model for the analysis of the extension of KP hierarchy, and other integrable equations.

  14. Extensive Reading Coursebooks in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renandya, Willy A.; Hu, Guangwei; Xiang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a principle-based evaluation of eight dedicated extensive reading coursebooks published in mainland China and used in many universities across the country. The aim is to determine the extent to which these coursebooks reflect a core set of nine second language acquisition and extensive reading principles. Our analysis shows…

  15. Generation and preclinical evaluation of a DENV-1/2 prM+E chimeric live attenuated vaccine candidate with enhanced prM cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelapang, Poonsook; Nitatpattana, Narong; Suphatrakul, Amporn; Punyahathaikul, Surat; Sriburi, Rungtawan; Pulmanausahakul, Rojjanaporn; Pichyangkul, Sathit; Malasit, Prida; Yoksan, Sutee; Sittisombut, Nopporn

    2013-10-17

    In the absence of a vaccine or sustainable vector control measures, illnesses caused by dengue virus infection remain an important public health problem in many tropical countries. During the export of dengue virus particles, furin-mediated cleavage of the prM envelope protein is usually incomplete, thus generating a mixture of immature, partially mature and mature extracellular particles. Variations in the arrangement and conformation of the envelope proteins among these particles may be associated with their different roles in shaping the antibody response. In an attempt to improve upon live, attenuated dengue vaccine approaches, a mutant chimeric virus, with enhanced prM cleavage, was generated by introducing a cleavage-enhancing substitution into a chimeric DENV-1/2 virus genome, encoding the prM+E sequence of a recent DENV-1 isolate under an attenuated DENV-2 genetic background. A modest increase in virus specific infectivity observed in the mutant chimeric virus affected neither the attenuation phenotype, when assessed in the suckling mouse neurovirulence model, nor multiplication in mosquitoes. The two chimeric viruses induced similar levels of anti-DENV-1 neutralizing antibody response in mice and rhesus macaques, but more efficient control of viremia during viral challenge was observed in macaques immunized with the mutant chimeric virus. These results indicate that the DENV-1/2 chimeric virus, with enhanced prM cleavage, could be useful as an alternative live, attenuated vaccine candidate for further tests in humans.

  16. ChiTaRS-3.1—the enhanced chimeric transcripts and RNA-seq database matched with protein–protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorohovski, Alessandro; Tagore, Somnath; Palande, Vikrant; Malka, Assaf; Raviv-Shay, Dorith; Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana

    2017-01-01

    Discovery of chimeric RNAs, which are produced by chromosomal translocations as well as the joining of exons from different genes by trans-splicing, has added a new level of complexity to our study and understanding of the transcriptome. The enhanced ChiTaRS-3.1 database (http://chitars.md.biu.ac.il) is designed to make widely accessible a wealth of mined data on chimeric RNAs, with easy-to-use analytical tools built-in. The database comprises 34 922 chimeric transcripts along with 11 714 cancer breakpoints. In this latest version, we have included multiple cross-references to GeneCards, iHop, PubMed, NCBI, Ensembl, OMIM, RefSeq and the Mitelman collection for every entry in the ‘Full Collection’. In addition, for every chimera, we have added a predicted chimeric protein–protein interaction (ChiPPI) network, which allows for easy visualization of protein partners of both parental and fusion proteins for all human chimeras. The database contains a comprehensive annotation for 34 922 chimeric transcripts from eight organisms, and includes the manual annotation of 200 sense-antiSense (SaS) chimeras. The current improvements in the content and functionality to the ChiTaRS database make it a central resource for the study of chimeric transcripts and fusion proteins. PMID:27899596

  17. Monitoring of hematopoietic chimerism after transplantation for pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome: real-time or conventional short tandem repeat PCR in peripheral blood or bone marrow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willasch, Andre M; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Shayegi, Nona; Rettinger, Eva; Meyer, Vida; Zabel, Marion; Lang, Peter; Kremens, Bernhard; Meisel, Roland; Strahm, Brigitte; Rossig, Claudia; Gruhn, Bernd; Klingebiel, Thomas; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Bader, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has been proposed as a highly sensitive method for monitoring hematopoietic chimerism and may serve as a surrogate marker for the detection of minimal residual disease minimal residual disease in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), until specific methods of detection become available. Because a systematic comparison of the clinical utility of qPCR with the gold standard short tandem repeat (STR)-PCR has not been reported, we retrospectively measured chimerism by qPCR in 54 children transplanted for MDS in a previous study. Results obtained by STR-PCR in the initial study served as comparison. Because the detection limit of qPCR was sufficiently low to detect an autologous background, we defined the sample as mixed chimera if the proportion of recipient-derived cells exceeded .5%. The true positive rates were 100% versus 80% (qPCR versus STR-PCR, not significant), and mixed chimerism in most cases was detected earlier by qPCR than by STR-PCR (median, 31 days) when chimerism was quantified concurrently in peripheral blood and bone marrow. Both methods revealed a substantial rate of false positives (22.7% versus 13.6%, not significant), indicating the importance of serial testing of chimerism to monitor its progression. Finally, we propose criteria for monitoring chimerism in pediatric MDS with regard to the subtypes, specimens, PCR method, and timing of sampling.

  18. Construction and preliminary investigation of a novel dengue serotype 4 chimeric virus using Japanese encephalitis vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as the backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhushi; Yang, Huiqiang; Yang, Jian; Lin, Hua; Wang, Wei; Liu, Lina; Zhao, Yu; Liu, Li; Zeng, Xianwu; Yu, Yongxin; Li, Yuhua

    2014-10-13

    For the purpose of developing a novel dengue vaccine candidate, recombinant plasmids were constructed which contained the full length cDNA clone of Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine strain SA14-14-2 with its premembrane (PreM) and envelope (E) genes replaced by the counterparts of dengue virus type 4 (DENV4). By transfecting the in vitro transcription products of the recombinant plasmids into BHK-21 cells, a chimeric virus JEV/DENV4 was successfully recovered. The chimeric virus was identified by complete genome sequencing, Western blot and immunofluorescent staining. Growth characteristics revealed it was well adapted to primary hamster kidney (PHK) cells. Its genetic stability was investigated and only one unintentional mutation in 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) was found after 20 passages in PHK cells. Neurotropism, neurovirulence and immunogenicity of the chimeric virus were tested in mice. Besides, the influence of JE vaccine pre-immunization on the neutralizing antibody level induced by the chimeric virus was illuminated. To our knowledge, this is the first chimeric virus incorporating the JE vaccine stain SA14-14-2 and DENV4. It is probably a potential candidate to compose a tetravalent dengue chimeric vaccine.

  19. Regulation of expression of two LY-6 family genes by intron retention and transcription induced chimerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallya Meera

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of the expression of particular genes can rely on mechanisms that are different from classical transcriptional and translational control. The LY6G5B and LY6G6D genes encode LY-6 domain proteins, whose expression seems to be regulated in an original fashion, consisting of an intron retention event which generates, through an early premature stop codon, a non-coding transcript, preventing expression in most cell lines and tissues. Results The MHC LY-6 non-coding transcripts have shown to be stable and very abundant in the cell, and not subject to Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD. This retention event appears not to be solely dependent on intron features, because in the case of LY6G5B, when the intron is inserted in the artificial context of a luciferase expression plasmid, it is fully spliced but strongly stabilises the resulting luciferase transcript. In addition, by quantitative PCR we found that the retained and spliced forms are differentially expressed in tissues indicating an active regulation of the non-coding transcript. EST database analysis revealed that these genes have an alternative expression pathway with the formation of Transcription Induced Chimeras (TIC. This data was confirmed by RT-PCR, revealing the presence of different transcripts that would encode the chimeric proteins CSNKβ-LY6G5B and G6F-LY6G6D, in which the LY-6 domain would join to a kinase domain and an Ig-like domain, respectively. Conclusion In conclusion, the LY6G5B and LY6G6D intron-retained transcripts are not subjected to NMD and are more abundant than the properly spliced forms. In addition, these genes form chimeric transcripts with their neighbouring same orientation 5' genes. Of interest is the fact that the 5' genes (CSNKβ or G6F undergo differential splicing only in the context of the chimera (CSNKβ-LY6G5B or G6F-LY6G6C and not on their own.

  20. Chimeric L2-Based Virus-Like Particle (VLP) Vaccines Targeting Cutaneous Human Papillomaviruses (HPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Bettina; Schellenbacher, Christina; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Jindra, Christoph; Christensen, Neil; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Common cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) types induce skin warts, whereas species beta HPV are implicated, together with UV-radiation, in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in immunosuppressed patients. Licensed HPV vaccines contain virus-like particles (VLP) self-assembled from L1 major capsid proteins that provide type-restricted protection against mucosal HPV infections causing cervical and other ano-genital and oro-pharyngeal carcinomas and warts (condylomas), but do not target heterologous HPV. Experimental papillomavirus vaccines have been designed based on L2 minor capsid proteins that contain type-common neutralization epitopes, to broaden protection to heterologous mucosal and cutaneous HPV types. Repetitive display of the HPV16 L2 cross-neutralization epitope RG1 (amino acids (aa) 17-36) on the surface of HPV16 L1 VLP has greatly enhanced immunogenicity of the L2 peptide. To more directly target cutaneous HPV, L1 fusion proteins were designed that incorporate the RG1 homolog of beta HPV17, the beta HPV5 L2 peptide aa53-72, or the common cutaneous HPV4 RG1 homolog, inserted into DE surface loops of HPV1, 5, 16 or 18 L1 VLP scaffolds. Baculovirus expressed chimeric proteins self-assembled into VLP and VLP-raised NZW rabbit immune sera were evaluated by ELISA and L1- and L2-based pseudovirion (PsV) neutralizing assays, including 12 novel beta PsV types. Chimeric VLP displaying the HPV17 RG1 epitope, but not the HPV5L2 aa53-72 epitope, induced cross-neutralizing humoral immune responses to beta HPV. In vivo cross-protection was evaluated by passive serum transfer in a murine PsV challenge model. Immune sera to HPV16L1-17RG1 VLP (cross-) protected against beta HPV5/20/24/38/96/16 (but not type 76), while antisera to HPV5L1-17RG1 VLP cross-protected against HPV20/24/96 only, and sera to HPV1L1-4RG1 VLP cross-protected against HPV4 challenge. In conclusion, RG1-based VLP are promising next generation vaccine candidates to target cutaneous HPV

  1. Alemtuzumab levels impact acute GVHD, mixed chimerism, and lymphocyte recovery following alemtuzumab, fludarabine, and melphalan RIC HCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Rebecca A; Lane, Adam; Mehta, Parinda A; Neumeier, Lisa; Jodele, Sonata; Davies, Stella M; Filipovich, Alexandra H

    2016-01-28

    Reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with alemtuzumab, fludarabine, and melphalan is an effective approach for patients with nonmalignant disorders. Mixed chimerism and graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) remain limitations on success. We hypothesized that higher levels of alemtuzumab at day 0 would result in a low risk of acute GVHD, a higher risk of mixed chimerism, and delayed early lymphocyte recovery and that alemtuzumab level thresholds for increased risks of these outcomes would be definable. We collected data from 105 patients to examine the influence of peritransplant alemtuzumab levels on acute GVHD, mixed chimerism, and lymphocyte recovery. The cumulative incidences of initial grades I-IV, II-IV, and III-IV acute GVHD in patients with alemtuzumab levels ≤0.15 vs ≥0.16 μg/mL were 68% vs 18% (P alemtuzumab level ≤0.15 μg/mL was 21%, vs 42% with levels of 0.16 to 4.35 μg/mL, and 100% with levels >4.35 μg/mL (P = .003). Patients with alemtuzumab levels ≤0.15 or 0.16 to 0.56 μg/mL had higher lymphocyte counts at day +30 and higher T-cell counts at day +100 compared with patients with levels ≥0.57 μg/mL (all P alemtuzumab levels impact acute GVHD, mixed chimerism, and lymphocyte recovery following RIC HCT with alemtuzumab, fludarabine, and melphalan. Precision dosing trials are warranted. We recommend a day 0 therapeutic range of 0.2 to 0.4 μg/mL.

  2. CD19-Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, C L; thor Straten, Per

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) for cancer represents a promising new treatment modality. ACT based on the administration of cytotoxic T cells genetically engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) recognizing CD19 expressed by B cell malignancies has been shown to induce complete lasting......-associated toxicities, which needs attention. Herein we review current data and discuss key aspects of this powerful approach to treat and potentially cure B cell malignancies....

  3. Origin and ascendancy of a chimeric fusion gene: the beta/delta-globin gene of paenungulate mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opazo, Juan C; Sloan, Angela M; Campbell, Kevin L; Storz, Jay F

    2009-07-01

    The delta-globin gene (HBD) of eutherian mammals exhibits a propensity for recombinational exchange with the closely linked beta-globin gene (HBB) and has been independently converted by the HBB gene in multiple lineages. Here we report the presence of a chimeric beta/delta fusion gene in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) that was created by unequal crossing-over between misaligned HBD and HBB paralogs. The recombinant chromosome that harbors the beta/delta fusion gene in elephants is structurally similar to the "anti-Lepore" duplication mutant of humans (the reciprocal exchange product of the hemoglobin Lepore deletion mutant). However, the situation in the African elephant is unique in that the chimeric beta/delta fusion gene supplanted the parental HBB gene and is therefore solely responsible for synthesizing the beta-chain subunits of adult hemoglobin. A phylogenetic survey of beta-like globin genes in afrotherian and xenarthran mammals revealed that the origin of the chimeric beta/delta fusion gene and the concomitant inactivation of the HBB gene predated the radiation of "Paenungulata," a clade of afrotherian mammals that includes three orders: Proboscidea (elephants), Sirenia (dugongs and manatees), and Hyracoidea (hyraxes). The reduced fitness of the human Hb Lepore deletion mutant helps to explain why independently derived beta/delta fusion genes (which occur on an anti-Lepore chromosome) have been fixed in a number of mammalian lineages, whereas the reciprocal delta/beta fusion gene (which occurs on a Lepore chromosome) has yet to be documented in any nonhuman mammal. This illustrates how the evolutionary fates of chimeric fusion genes can be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin.

  4. A tailor-made chimeric thiamine diphosphate dependent enzyme for the direct asymmetric synthesis of (S)-benzoins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Robert; Vogel, Constantin; Schmitz, Carlo; Pleiss, Jürgen; Müller, Michael; Pohl, Martina; Rother, Dörte

    2014-08-25

    Thiamine diphosphate dependent enzymes are well known for catalyzing the asymmetric synthesis of chiral α-hydroxy ketones from simple prochiral substrates. The steric and chemical properties of the enzyme active site define the product spectrum. Enzymes catalyzing the carboligation of aromatic aldehydes to (S)-benzoins have not so far been identified. We were able to close this gap by constructing a chimeric enzyme, which catalyzes the synthesis of various (S)-benzoins with excellent enantiomeric excess (>99%) and very good conversion.

  5. Silkworms transformed with chimeric silkworm/spider silk genes spin composite silk fibers with improved mechanical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Teulé, Florence; Miao, Yun-Gen; Sohn, Bong-Hee; Kim, Young-Soo; Hull, J. Joe; Fraser, Malcolm J; Lewis, Randolph V.; Jarvis, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    The development of a spider silk-manufacturing process is of great interest. However, there are serious problems with natural manufacturing through spider farming, and standard recombinant protein production platforms have provided limited progress due to their inability to assemble spider silk proteins into fibers. Thus, we used piggyBac vectors to create transgenic silkworms encoding chimeric silkworm/spider silk proteins. The silk fibers produced by these animals were composite materials t...

  6. Multiple chimeric antigen receptors successfully target chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 in several different cancer histologies and cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Beard, Rachel E; Zheng, Zhili; Lagisetty, Kiran H.; Burns, William R.; Tran, Eric; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Abate-Daga, Daniel; Rosati, Shannon F.; Fine, Howard A.; Ferrone, Soldano; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The development of immunotherapy has led to significant progress in the treatment of metastatic cancer, including the development of genetic engineering technologies that redirect lymphocytes to recognize and target a wide variety of tumor antigens. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are hybrid proteins combining antibody recognition domains linked to T cell signaling elements. Clinical trials of CAR-transduced peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) have induced remission of both solid ...

  7. Silkworms transformed with chimeric silkworm/spider silk genes spin composite silk fibers with improved mechanical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Teulé, Florence; Miao, Yun-Gen; Sohn, Bong-Hee; Kim, Young-Soo; Hull, J. Joe; Fraser, Malcolm J.; Lewis, Randolph V.; Jarvis, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    The development of a spider silk-manufacturing process is of great interest. However, there are serious problems with natural manufacturing through spider farming, and standard recombinant protein production platforms have provided limited progress due to their inability to assemble spider silk proteins into fibers. Thus, we used piggyBac vectors to create transgenic silkworms encoding chimeric silkworm/spider silk proteins. The silk fibers produced by these animals were composite materials t...

  8. Origin of the nucleus and Ran-dependent transport to safeguard ribosome biogenesis in a chimeric cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jékely, Gáspár

    2008-07-24

    The origin of the nucleus is a central problem about the origin of eukaryotes. The common ancestry of nuclear pore complexes (NPC) and vesicle coating complexes indicates that the nucleus evolved via the modification of a pre-existing endomembrane system. Such an autogenous scenario is cell biologically feasible, but it is not clear what were the selective or neutral mechanisms that had led to the origin of the nuclear compartment. A key selective force during the autogenous origin of the nucleus could have been the need to segregate ribosome factories from the cytoplasm where ribosomal proteins (RPs) of the protomitochondrium were synthesized. After its uptake by an anuclear cell the protomitochondrium transferred several of its RP genes to the host genome. Alphaproteobacterial RPs and archaebacterial-type host ribosomes were consequently synthesized in the same cytoplasm. This could have led to the formation of chimeric ribosomes. I propose that the nucleus evolved when the host cell compartmentalised its ribosome factories and the tightly linked genome to reduce ribosome chimerism. This was achieved in successive stages by first evolving karyopherin and RanGTP dependent chaperoning of RPs, followed by the evolution of a membrane network to serve as a diffusion barrier, and finally a hydrogel sieve to ensure selective permeability at nuclear pores. Computer simulations show that a gradual segregation of cytoplasm and nucleoplasm via these steps can progressively reduce ribosome chimerism. Ribosome chimerism can provide a direct link between the selective forces for and the mechanisms of evolving nuclear transport and compartmentalisation. The detailed molecular scenario presented here provides a solution to the gradual evolution of nuclear compartmentalization from an anuclear stage. This article was reviewed by Eugene V Koonin, Martijn Huynen, Anthony M. Poole and Patrick Forterre.

  9. Origin of the nucleus and Ran-dependent transport to safeguard ribosome biogenesis in a chimeric cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jékely Gáspár

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin of the nucleus is a central problem about the origin of eukaryotes. The common ancestry of nuclear pore complexes (NPC and vesicle coating complexes indicates that the nucleus evolved via the modification of a pre-existing endomembrane system. Such an autogenous scenario is cell biologically feasible, but it is not clear what were the selective or neutral mechanisms that had led to the origin of the nuclear compartment. Results A key selective force during the autogenous origin of the nucleus could have been the need to segregate ribosome factories from the cytoplasm where ribosomal proteins (RPs of the protomitochondrium were synthesized. After its uptake by an anuclear cell the protomitochondrium transferred several of its RP genes to the host genome. Alphaproteobacterial RPs and archaebacterial-type host ribosomes were consequently synthesized in the same cytoplasm. This could have led to the formation of chimeric ribosomes. I propose that the nucleus evolved when the host cell compartmentalised its ribosome factories and the tightly linked genome to reduce ribosome chimerism. This was achieved in successive stages by first evolving karyopherin and RanGTP dependent chaperoning of RPs, followed by the evolution of a membrane network to serve as a diffusion barrier, and finally a hydrogel sieve to ensure selective permeability at nuclear pores. Computer simulations show that a gradual segregation of cytoplasm and nucleoplasm via these steps can progressively reduce ribosome chimerism. Conclusion Ribosome chimerism can provide a direct link between the selective forces for and the mechanisms of evolving nuclear transport and compartmentalisation. The detailed molecular scenario presented here provides a solution to the gradual evolution of nuclear compartmentalization from an anuclear stage. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene V Koonin, Martijn Huynen, Anthony M. Poole and Patrick Forterre.

  10. DPPC/poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-grad-poly(2-phenyl-2-oxazoline) chimeric nanostructures as potential drug nanocarriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pippa, Natassa [Faculty of Pharmacy, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology (Greece); Kaditi, Eleni; Pispas, Stergios [Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation (Greece); Demetzos, Costas, E-mail: demetzos@pharm.uoa.gr [Faculty of Pharmacy, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology (Greece)

    2013-06-15

    In this study, we report on the self assembly behavior and on stability studies of mixed (chimeric) nanosystems consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-grad-poly(2-phenyl-2-oxazoline) (MPOx) gradient copolymer in aqueous media and in fetal bovine serum (FBS). A gamut of light scattering techniques and fluorescence spectroscopy were used in order to extract information on the size and morphological characteristics of the nanoassemblies formed, as a function of gradient block copolymer content, as well as temperature. The hydrodynamic radii (R{sub h}) of nanoassemblies decreased in the process of heating up to 50 Degree-Sign C, while the fractal dimension (d{sub f}) values, also increased. Indomethacin was successfully incorporated into these chimeric nanocarriers. Drug release was depended on the components ratio. The present studies show that there are a number of parameters that can be used in order to alter the properties of chimeric nanosystems, and this is advantageous to the development of 'smart' nanocarriers for drug delivery.

  11. DPPC/poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-grad-poly(2-phenyl-2-oxazoline) chimeric nanostructures as potential drug nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippa, Natassa; Kaditi, Eleni; Pispas, Stergios; Demetzos, Costas

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we report on the self assembly behavior and on stability studies of mixed (chimeric) nanosystems consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-grad-poly(2-phenyl-2-oxazoline) (MPOx) gradient copolymer in aqueous media and in fetal bovine serum (FBS). A gamut of light scattering techniques and fluorescence spectroscopy were used in order to extract information on the size and morphological characteristics of the nanoassemblies formed, as a function of gradient block copolymer content, as well as temperature. The hydrodynamic radii ( R h) of nanoassemblies decreased in the process of heating up to 50 °C, while the fractal dimension ( d f) values, also increased. Indomethacin was successfully incorporated into these chimeric nanocarriers. Drug release was depended on the components ratio. The present studies show that there are a number of parameters that can be used in order to alter the properties of chimeric nanosystems, and this is advantageous to the development of "smart" nanocarriers for drug delivery.

  12. Useful oriented immobilization of antibodies on chimeric magnetic particles: direct correlation of biomacromolecule orientation with biological activity by AFM studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciello, Marzia; Filice, Marco; Olea, David; Velez, Marisela; Guisan, José M; Mateo, Cesar

    2014-12-16

    The preparation and performance of a suitable chimeric biosensor based on antibodies (Abs) immobilized on lipase-coated magnetic particles by means of a standing orienting strategy are presented. This novel system is based on hydrophobic magnetic particles coated with modified lipase molecules able to orient and further immobilize different Abs in a covalent way without any previous site-selective chemical modification of biomacromolecules. Different key parameters attending the process were studied and optimized. The optimal preparation was performed using a controlled loading (1 nmol Ab g(-1) chimeric support) at pH 9 and a short reaction time to recover a biological activity of about 80%. AFM microscopy was used to study and confirm the Abs-oriented immobilization on lipase-coated magnetic particles and the final achievement of a highly active and recyclable chimeric immune sensor. This direct technique was demonstrated to be a powerful alternative to the indirect immunoactivity assay methods for the study of biomacromolecule-oriented immobilizations.

  13. Use of homologous recombination in yeast to create chimeric bovine viral diarrhea virus cDNA clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Arenhart

    Full Text Available Abstract The open reading frame of a Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV strain, IBSP4ncp, was recombined with the untranslated regions of the reference NADL strain by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in chimeric full-length cDNA clones of BVDV (chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#2 and chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#3. The recombinant clones were successfully recovered, resulting in viable viruses, having the kinetics of replication, focus size, and morphology similar to those of the parental virus, IBSP4ncp. In addition, the chimeric viruses remained stable for at least 10 passages in cell culture, maintaining their replication efficiency unaltered. Nucleotide sequencing revealed a few point mutations; nevertheless, the phenotype of the rescued viruses was nearly identical to that of the parental virus in all experiments. Thus, genetic stability of the chimeric clones and their phenotypic similarity to the parental virus confirm the ability of the yeast-based homologous recombination to maintain characteristics of the parental virus from which the recombinant viruses were derived. The data also support possible use of the yeast system for the manipulation of the BVDV genome.

  14. Use of homologous recombination in yeast to create chimeric bovine viral diarrhea virus cDNA clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenhart, Sandra; Silva, José Valter Joaquim; Flores, Eduardo Furtado; Weiblen, Rudi; Gil, Laura Helena Vega Gonzales

    The open reading frame of a Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain, IBSP4ncp, was recombined with the untranslated regions of the reference NADL strain by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in chimeric full-length cDNA clones of BVDV (chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#2 and chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#3). The recombinant clones were successfully recovered, resulting in viable viruses, having the kinetics of replication, focus size, and morphology similar to those of the parental virus, IBSP4ncp. In addition, the chimeric viruses remained stable for at least 10 passages in cell culture, maintaining their replication efficiency unaltered. Nucleotide sequencing revealed a few point mutations; nevertheless, the phenotype of the rescued viruses was nearly identical to that of the parental virus in all experiments. Thus, genetic stability of the chimeric clones and their phenotypic similarity to the parental virus confirm the ability of the yeast-based homologous recombination to maintain characteristics of the parental virus from which the recombinant viruses were derived. The data also support possible use of the yeast system for the manipulation of the BVDV genome. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Nanobody-based chimeric receptor gene integration in Jurkat cells mediated by PhiC31 integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iri-Sofla, Farnoush Jafari [Department of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh, E-mail: rahbarif@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadvand, Davoud [Center of Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology, Department of Pharmaceutics and Analytical Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Rasaee, Mohammad J. [Department of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-01

    The crucial role of T lymphocytes in anti-tumor immunity has led to the development of novel strategies that can target and activate T cells against tumor cells. Recombinant DNA technology has been used to generate non-MHC-restricted chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we constructed a panel of recombinant CAR that harbors the anti-MUC1 nanobody and the signaling and co-signaling moieties (CD3{zeta}/CD28) with different spacer regions derived from human IgG3 with one or two repeats of the hinge sequence or the hinge region of Fc{gamma}RII. The PhiC31 integrase system was employed to investigate if the recombination efficiency could be recruited for high and stable expression of T cell chimeric receptor genes. The effect of nuclear localization signal (NLS) and two different promoters (CMV and CAG) on efficacy of PhiC31 integrase in human T cell lines was evaluated. The presence of integrase in combination with NLS, mediated up to 7.6 and 8.5 fold increases in CAR expression in ZCHN-attB and ZCHHN-attB cassette integrated T cells, respectively. Our results showed that highly efficient and stable transduction of the Jurkat cell line by PhiC31 integrase is a feasible modality for generating anti-cancer chimeric T cells for use in cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Construction of an allogenic chimeric mouse model for the study of the behaviors of donor stem cells in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mo-lin; YAN Jing-bin; XIAO Yan-ping; HUANG Shu-zhen

    2005-01-01

    Background It is essential to establish an animal model for the elucidation of the biological behaviors of stem cells in vivo. We constructed a chimeric animal model by in utero transplantation for investigation of stem cell transplantation.Methods This chimerism was achieved by injecting the stem cells derived from the bone marrow of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-transgenic mice into fetal mice at 13.5 days of gestation. Several methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real-time PCR, fluorescence-assisted cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were used for the observation of donor cells.Results Under a fluorescence microscope, we observed the GFP cells of donor-origin in a recipient. PCR, FACS analysis and FISH indicated chimerism at various intervals. Real-time PCR indicated that some donor cells existed in chimera for more than 6 months.Conclusions Allogenic stem cells may exist in recipients for a long time and this allogenic animal model provides a useful tool for studying the behavior of hematopoietic stem cells and also offers an effective model system for the study of stem cells.

  17. Task demands modulate decision and eye movement responses in the chimeric face test: examining the right hemisphere processing account

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason eCoronel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A large and growing body of work, conducted in both brain-intact and brain-damaged populations, has used the free viewing chimeric face test as a measure of hemispheric dominance for the extraction of emotional information from faces. These studies generally show that normal right-handed individuals tend to perceive chimeric faces as more emotional if the emotional expression is presented on the half of the face to the viewer’s left (left hemiface. However, the mechanisms underlying this lateralized bias remain unclear. Here, we examine the extent to which this bias is driven by right hemisphere processing advantages versus default scanning biases in a unique way -- by changing task demands. In particular, we compare the original task with one in which right-hemisphere-biased processing cannot provide a decision advantage. Our behavioral and eye-movement data are inconsistent with the predictions of a default scanning bias account and support the idea that the left hemiface bias found in the chimeric face test is largely due to strategic use of right hemisphere processing mechanisms.

  18. New concepts for the comparison of tropospheric NO2 column densities derived from car-MAX-DOAS observations, OMI satellite observations and the regional model CHIMERE during two MEGAPOLI campaigns in Paris 2009/10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shaiganfar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We compare tropospheric column densities (vertically integrated concentrations of NO2 from three data sets for the metropolitan area of Paris during two extensive measurement campaigns (25 days in summer 2009 and 29 days in winter 2010 within the European research project MEGAPOLI. The selected data sets comprise a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE as well as two observational data sets: ground based mobile Multi-AXis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (car-MAX-DOAS measurements and satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI. On most days, car-MAX-DOAS measurements were carried out along large circles (diameter ~35 km around Paris. The car-MAX-DOAS results are compared to coincident data from CHIMERE and OMI. All three data sets have their specific strengths and weaknesses, especially with respect to their spatio-temporal resolution and coverage as well as their uncertainties. Thus we compare them in two different ways: first, we simply consider the original data sets. Second, we compare modified versions making synergistic use of the complementary information from different data sets. For example, profile information from the regional model is used to improve the satellite data, observations of the horizontal trace gas distribution are used to adjust the respective spatial patterns of the model simulations, or the model is used as a transfer tool to bridge the spatial scales between car-MAX-DOAS and satellite observations. Using the modified versions of the data sets, the comparison results substantially improve compared to the original versions. In general, good agreement between the data sets is found outside the emission plume, but inside the emission plumes the tropospheric NO2 VCDs are systematically underestimated by the CHIMERE model and the satellite observations (compared to the car-MAX-DOAS observations. One major result from our study is that for satellite validation close to strong emission

  19. Unique chimeric composition of the trehalase gene from brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shin; Nambu, Fumiko; Nambu, Ziro

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the exon/intron structure of the Artemia trehalase gene, four overlapping clones were isolated from a genome library derived from an inbred strain of crustacean Artemia franciscana, and a 49 kb genetic area was re-constructed. The re-constructed area contained eight exons corresponding to the trehalase cDNA sequence that we had previously reported [1]. Comparative analysis of the Artemia trehalase gene with other animal trehalase genes revealed the existence of conserved exon/intron boundaries among different phyla. Comparison of the 5' UTR region of trehalase mRNA obtained by the 5' RACE method with the trehalase genes indicated the existence of a novel exon/intron boundary in the region designated "Exon I". Surprisingly, a part of a mitochondrial ribosomal protein gene (MRP-S33) was found to be inserted in the 5' UTR region of the trehalase gene. This sequence had the same polyadenylation signal that the Artemia MRP-S33 cDNAs did. Using the 3' RACE method, it was demonstrated that the poly (A) additional signal is still functional and that the chimeric mRNAs composed of the 5' UTR of the trehalase mRNA and of the 3' end derived from the MRP-S33 gene are transcribed.

  20. Homogeneized modeling of mineral dust emissions over Europe and Africa using the CHIMERE model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Briant

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the region including Africa and Europe, the main part of mineral dust emissions is observed in Africa. The particles are thus transported towards Europe and constitute a non-negligible part of the surface aerosols measured and controlled in the framework of the European air quality legislation. The modelling of these African dust emissions fluxes and transport is widely studied and complex parameterizations are already used in regional to global model for this Sahara-Sahel region. In a lesser extent, mineral dust emissions occur locally in Europe, mainly over agricultural areas. Their modelling is generally poorly done or just ignored. But in some cases, this contribution may be important and may impact the European air quality budget. In this study, we propose an homogeneized calculations of mineral dust fluxes for Europe and Africa. For that, we extended the CHIMERE dust production model (DPM by using new soil and surface datasets, and the global aeolian roughness length dataset provided by GARLAP from microwave and visible satellite observations. This DPM is detailed along with academic tests case results and simulation on a real case results.

  1. Enhanced cytotoxicity of natural killer cells following the acquisition of chimeric antigen receptors through trogocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Nan Cho

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells have the capacity to target tumors and are ideal candidates for immunotherapy. Viral vectors have been used to genetically modify in vitro expanded NK cells to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs, which confer cytotoxicity against tumors. However, use of viral transduction methods raises the safety concern of viral integration into the NK cell genome. In this study, we used trogocytosis as a non-viral method to modify NK cells for immunotherapy. A K562 cell line expressing high levels of anti-CD19 CARs was generated as a donor cell to transfer the anti-CD19 CARs onto NK cells via trogocytosis. Anti-CD19 CAR expression was observed in expanded NK cells after these cells were co-cultured for one hour with freeze/thaw-treated donor cells expressing anti-CD19 CARs. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the localization of the anti-CD19 CARs on the NK cell surface. Acquisition of anti-CD19 CARs via trogocytosis enhanced NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against the B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL cell lines and primary B-ALL cells derived from patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report that describes the increased cytotoxicity of NK cells following the acquisition of CARs via trogocytosis. This novel strategy could be a potential valuable therapeutic approach for the treatment of B-cell tumors.

  2. Pharmacologic suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Vallina, L; Yañez, R; Blanco, B; Gil, M; Russell, S J

    2000-04-01

    Adoptive therapy with autologous T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (chTCRs) is of potential interest for the treatment of malignancy. To limit possible T-cell-mediated damage to normal tissues that weakly express the targeted tumor antigen (Ag), we have tested a strategy for the suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells. Jurkat T cells were transduced with an anti-hapten chTCR tinder the control of a tetracycline-suppressible promoter and were shown to respond to Ag-positive (hapten-coated) but not to Ag-negative target cells. The engineered T cells were then reacted with hapten-coated target cells at different effector to target cell ratios before and after exposure to tetracycline. When the engineered T cells were treated with tetracycline, expression of the chTCR was greatly decreased and recognition of the hapten-coated target cells was completely suppressed. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells may be a useful strategy to limit the toxicity of the approach to cancer gene therapy.

  3. Construction, Expression and Characterization of a Chimeric Protein Targeting Carcinoembryonic Antigen in Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yang; HUA Shu-cheng; MA Cheng-yuan; YU Zhen-xiang; XU Li-jun; LI Dan; SUN Li-li; LI Xiao; PENG Li-ping

    2011-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen(CEA) is an oncofetal glycoprotein known as an important clinical tumor marker and is overexpressed in several types of tumors, including colorectal and lung carcinomas. We constructed a chimeric protein that exhibits both specific binding and immune stimulating activities, by fusing staphylococcal enterotoxin A(SEA) to the C-terminus of an anti-CEA single-chain disulfide-stabilized Fv(scdsFv) antibody (single-chain-C-terminus/SEA, SC-C/SEA). The SC-C/SEA protein was expressed in Escherichia coli(E. coli), refolded, and purified on an immobilized Ni2+ affinity chromatography column. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis reveal that the target protein was expressed sufficiently. We used immunofluorescence assays to demonstrate that SC-C/SEA could bind specifically to human lung carcinoma cells(A549), but almost human uterine cervix cells(HeLa). We also used the L-lactate dehydrogenase(LDH) release assay to show that SC-C/SEA elicits a strong A549 tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte(CTL) response in vitro. The results suggest that SC-C/SEA shows specific activity against CEA-positive cells and has potential application in CEA-targeted cancer immunotherapy.

  4. Chimeric Mice with Competent Hematopoietic Immunity Reproduce Key Features of Severe Lassa Fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Oestereich

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lassa fever (LASF is a highly severe viral syndrome endemic to West African countries. Despite the annual high morbidity and mortality caused by LASF, very little is known about the pathophysiology of the disease. Basic research on LASF has been precluded due to the lack of relevant small animal models that reproduce the human disease. Immunocompetent laboratory mice are resistant to infection with Lassa virus (LASV and, to date, only immunodeficient mice, or mice expressing human HLA, have shown some degree of susceptibility to experimental infection. Here, transplantation of wild-type bone marrow cells into irradiated type I interferon receptor knockout mice (IFNAR-/- was used to generate chimeric mice that reproduced important features of severe LASF in humans. This included high lethality, liver damage, vascular leakage and systemic virus dissemination. In addition, this model indicated that T cell-mediated immunopathology was an important component of LASF pathogenesis that was directly correlated with vascular leakage. Our strategy allows easy generation of a suitable small animal model to test new vaccines and antivirals and to dissect the basic components of LASF pathophysiology.

  5. Chimeric Mice with Competent Hematopoietic Immunity Reproduce Key Features of Severe Lassa Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestereich, Lisa; Lüdtke, Anja; Ruibal, Paula; Pallasch, Elisa; Kerber, Romy; Rieger, Toni; Wurr, Stephanie; Bockholt, Sabrina; Pérez-Girón, José V; Krasemann, Susanne; Günther, Stephan; Muñoz-Fontela, César

    2016-05-01

    Lassa fever (LASF) is a highly severe viral syndrome endemic to West African countries. Despite the annual high morbidity and mortality caused by LASF, very little is known about the pathophysiology of the disease. Basic research on LASF has been precluded due to the lack of relevant small animal models that reproduce the human disease. Immunocompetent laboratory mice are resistant to infection with Lassa virus (LASV) and, to date, only immunodeficient mice, or mice expressing human HLA, have shown some degree of susceptibility to experimental infection. Here, transplantation of wild-type bone marrow cells into irradiated type I interferon receptor knockout mice (IFNAR-/-) was used to generate chimeric mice that reproduced important features of severe LASF in humans. This included high lethality, liver damage, vascular leakage and systemic virus dissemination. In addition, this model indicated that T cell-mediated immunopathology was an important component of LASF pathogenesis that was directly correlated with vascular leakage. Our strategy allows easy generation of a suitable small animal model to test new vaccines and antivirals and to dissect the basic components of LASF pathophysiology.

  6. Assessment of fetal cell chimerism in transgenic pig lines generated by Sleeping beauty transposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrels, Wiebke; Holler, Stephanie; Taylor, Ulrike; Herrmann, Doris; Niemann, Heiner; Ivics, Zoltan; Kues, Wilfried A

    2014-01-01

    Human cells migrate between mother and fetus during pregnancy and persist in the respective host for long-term after birth. Fetal microchimerism occurs also in twins sharing a common placenta or chorion. Whether microchimerism occurs in multiparous mammals such as the domestic pig, where fetuses have separate placentas and chorions, is not well understood. Here, we assessed cell chimerism in litters of wild-type sows inseminated with semen of transposon transgenic boars. Segregation of three independent monomeric transposons ensured an excess of transgenic over non-transgenic offspring in every litter. Transgenic siblings (n = 35) showed robust ubiquitous expression of the reporter transposon encoding a fluorescent protein, and provided an unique resource to assess a potential cell trafficking to non-transgenic littermates (n = 7) or mothers (n = 4). Sensitive flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, and real-time PCR provided no evidence for microchimerism in porcine littermates, or piglets and their mothers in both blood and solid organs. These data indicate that the epitheliochorial structure of the porcine placenta effectively prevents cellular exchange during gestation.

  7. Assessment of fetal cell chimerism in transgenic pig lines generated by Sleeping beauty transposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Garrels

    Full Text Available Human cells migrate between mother and fetus during pregnancy and persist in the respective host for long-term after birth. Fetal microchimerism occurs also in twins sharing a common placenta or chorion. Whether microchimerism occurs in multiparous mammals such as the domestic pig, where fetuses have separate placentas and chorions, is not well understood. Here, we assessed cell chimerism in litters of wild-type sows inseminated with semen of transposon transgenic boars. Segregation of three independent monomeric transposons ensured an excess of transgenic over non-transgenic offspring in every litter. Transgenic siblings (n = 35 showed robust ubiquitous expression of the reporter transposon encoding a fluorescent protein, and provided an unique resource to assess a potential cell trafficking to non-transgenic littermates (n = 7 or mothers (n = 4. Sensitive flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, and real-time PCR provided no evidence for microchimerism in porcine littermates, or piglets and their mothers in both blood and solid organs. These data indicate that the epitheliochorial structure of the porcine placenta effectively prevents cellular exchange during gestation.

  8. Redirecting T cells with Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Andrea; Magnani, Chiara F; Tettamanti, Sarah; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Biagi, Ettore

    2017-08-23

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Nowadays the survival rate is around 85%. Nevertheless, an urgent clinical need is still represented by primary refractory and relapsed patients who do not significantly benefit from standard approaches, including chemo-radiotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). For this reason, immunotherapy has so far represented a challenging novel treatment opportunity, including, as the most validated therapeutic options, cancer vaccines, donor-lymphocyte infusions and tumor-specific immune effector cells. More recently, unexpected positive clinical results in ALL have been achieved by application of gene-engineered chimeric antigen expressing (CAR) T cells. Several CAR designs across different trials have generated similar response rates, with Complete Response (CR) of 60-90% at 1 month and an Event-Free Survival (EFS) of 70% at 6 months. Relevant challenges anyway remain to be addressed, such as amelioration of technical, cost and feasibility aspects of cell and gene manipulation and the necessity to face the occurrence of relapse mechanisms. This review describes the state of the art of ALL immunotherapies, the novelties in terms of gene manipulation approaches and the problems emerged from early clinical studies. We describe and discuss the process of clinical translation, including the design of a cell manufacturing protocol, vector production and regulatory issues. Multiple antigen targeting and combination of CAR T cells with molecular targeted drugs have also been evaluated as latest strategies to prevail over immune-evasion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Construction of a genetically engineered chimeric apoprotein consisting of sequences derived from lidamycin and neocarzinostatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenguo; Shang, Boyang; Li, Liang; Zhang, Shenghua; Zhen, Yongsu

    2016-01-01

    Neocarzinostatin (NCS) consists of an enediyne chromophore and an apoprotein (NCP). Lidamycin (LDM) is composed of another active enediyne chromophore (AE) and an acidic protein (LDP). Although the structures of NCP and LDP are very similar, LDM has been shown to have an increased tumor-suppressive activity than that of NCS. The aim of this study was to construct a chimeric protein (CMP) that consists of both the terminus residue of NCP and an LDP pocket-forming residue that can bind AE. This CMP will have a structure similar to NCS and an antitumor activity similar to LDM. The assembling efficiency of LDP, CMP, and NCP was 73.9, 1.5, and 1.1%, respectively. The cytotoxicity was consistent with their assembling efficiency of AE in proteins. When CMP-AE and NCP-AE were administered at equivalent AE doses of LDM, the inhibition rate of CMP-AE was the same as LDM and significantly higher than that of NCP-AE. Our study implied that the binding activity between LDP and AE was very specific. The terminus residue of LDP could affect the specifically binding activity. The pocket-forming residue could confer a protective function to the chromophore. Further investigation of its bioactivity might serve as a new drug design strategy and drug-delivery carrier in targeted cancer therapy.

  10. Preclinical evaluation of MORAb-009, a chimeric antibody targeting tumor-associated mesothelin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Raffit; Ebel, Wolfgang; Routhier, Eric L.; Patel, Rina; Kline, J. Bradford; Zhang, Jingli; Chao, Qimin; Jacob, Sara; Turchin, Howard; Gibbs, Lester; Phillips, Martin D.; Mudali, Shiyama; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Moreno, Maria; Pastan, Ira; Sass, Philip M.; Nicolaides, Nicholas C.

    2007-01-01

    Novel therapeutic agents that are safe and effective are needed for the treatment of pancreatic, ovarian, lung adenocarcinomas and mesotheliomas. Mesothelin is a glycosyl-phosphatidyl inositol (GPI)-linked membrane protein of 40 kDa over-expressed in all pancreatic adenocarcinoma and mesothelioma, in >70% of ovarian adenocarcinoma, and in non-small cell lung and colorectal cancers. The biological functions of mesothelin are not known, although it appears to be involved in cell adhesion via its interaction with MUC16. We have recently developed MORAb-009, a mouse-human chimeric IgG1κ monoclonal antibody with an affinity of 1.5 nM for human mesothelin. Here we provide evidence that MORAb-009 prevents adhesion of mesothelin-bearing tumor cells to MUC16 positive cells and can elicit cell-mediated cytotoxicity on mesothelin-bearing tumor cells. Treatment that included MORAb-009 in combination with chemotherapy led to a marked reduction in tumor growth of mesothelin-expressing tumors in nude mice compared to chemotherapy or MORAb-009 treatment alone. No adverse effects of MORAb-009 were noted during toxicology studies conducted in non-human primates. The preclinical data obtained from our studies warrants pursuing clinical testing of MORAb-009. We have in fact initiated a Phase I clinical study enrolling patients with mesothelin-positive pancreatic, mesothelioma, non-small cell lung and ovarian cancers. PMID:18088084

  11. Prospects for adoptive immunotherapy of pancreatic cancer using chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrifai, Doraid; Sarker, Debashis; Maher, John

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) engineered T-cells is emerging as a powerful new approach to cancer immunotherapy. CARs are fusion molecules that couple the antibody-like binding of a native cell surface target to the delivery of a bespoke T-cell activating signal. Recent studies undertaken by several centers have demonstrated highly compelling efficacy in patients with acute and chronic B-cell malignancies. However, comparable therapeutic activity has not been achieved in solid tumors. Modern management of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains ineffective, reflected in the virtual equivalence of annual incidence and mortality statistics for this tumor type. Increasing evidence indicates that these tumors are recognized by the immune system, but deploy powerful evasion strategies that limit natural immune surveillance and render efforts at immunotherapy challenging. Here, we review preclinical and clinical studies that have been initiated or completed in an effort to develop CAR-based immunotherapy for PDAC. We also consider the hurdles to the effective clinical development of this exciting new therapeutic modality.

  12. Genetic engineering of chimeric antigen receptors using lamprey derived variable lymphocyte receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Moot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are used to redirect effector cell specificity to selected cell surface antigens. Using CARs, antitumor activity can be initiated in patients with no prior tumor specific immunity. Although CARs have shown promising clinical results, the technology remains limited by the availability of specific cognate cell target antigens. To increase the repertoire of targetable tumor cell antigens we utilized the immune system of the sea lamprey to generate directed variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs. VLRs serve as membrane bound and soluble immune effectors analogous but not homologous to immunoglobulins. They have a fundamentally different structure than immunoglobulin (Ig-based antibodies while still demonstrating high degrees of specificity and affinity. To test the functionality of VLRs as the antigen recognition domain of CARs, two VLR-CARs were created. One contained a VLR specific for a murine B cell leukemia and the other contained a VLR specific for the human T cell surface antigen, CD5. The CAR design consisted of the VLR sequence, myc-epitope tag, CD28 transmembrane domain, and intracellular CD3ζ signaling domain. We demonstrate proof of concept, including gene transfer, biosynthesis, cell surface localization, and effector cell activation for multiple VLR-CAR designs. Therefore, VLRs provide an alternative means of CAR-based cancer recognition.

  13. Chimeric DNA Vaccines against ErbB2{sup +} Carcinomas: From Mice to Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaglino, Elena; Riccardo, Federica; Macagno, Marco; Bandini, Silvio; Cojoca, Rodica; Ercole, Elisabetta [Molecular Biotechnology Center, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, 10126 Turin (Italy); Amici, Augusto [Department of Molecular Cellular and Animal Biology, University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Italy); Cavallo, Federica, E-mail: federica.cavallo@unito.it [2 Department of Molecular Cellular and Animal Biology, University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Italy)

    2011-08-10

    DNA vaccination exploits a relatively simple and flexible technique to generate an immune response against microbial and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Its effectiveness is enhanced by the application of an electrical shock in the area of plasmid injection (electroporation). In our studies we exploited a sophisticated electroporation device approved for clinical use (Cliniporator, IGEA, Carpi, Italy). As the target antigen is an additional factor that dramatically modulates the efficacy of a vaccine, we selected ErbB2 receptor as a target since it is an ideal oncoantigen. It is overexpressed on the cell membrane by several carcinomas for which it plays an essential role in driving their progression. Most oncoantigens are self-tolerated molecules. To circumvent immune tolerance we generated two plasmids (RHuT and HuRT) coding for chimeric rat/human ErbB2 proteins. Their immunogenicity was compared in wild type mice naturally tolerant for mouse ErbB2, and in transgenic mice that are also tolerant for rat or human ErbB2. In several of these mice, RHuT and HuRT elicited a stronger anti-tumor response than plasmids coding for fully human or fully rat ErbB2. The ability of heterologous moiety to blunt immune tolerance could be exploited to elicit a significant immune response in patients. A clinical trial to delay the recurrence of ErbB2{sup +} carcinomas of the oral cavity, oropharynx and hypopharynx is awaiting the approval of the Italian authorities.

  14. High-throughput screening and rapid inhibitor triage using an infectious chimeric Hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichroski, Michael J; Fang, Jie; Eggers, Betsy J; Rose, Ronald E; Mazzucco, Charles E; Pokornowski, Kevin A; Baldick, Carl J; Anthony, Monique N; Dowling, Craig J; Barber, Lauren E; Leet, John E; Beno, Brett R; Gerritz, Samuel W; Agler, Michele L; Cockett, Mark I; Tenney, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of a Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infectious virus cell culture model system has facilitated the development of whole-virus screening assays which can be used to interrogate the entire virus life cycle. Here, we describe the development of an HCV growth assay capable of identifying inhibitors against all stages of the virus life cycle with assay throughput suitable for rapid screening of large-scale chemical libraries. Novel features include, 1) the use of an efficiently-spreading, full-length, intergenotypic chimeric reporter virus with genotype 1 structural proteins, 2) a homogenous assay format compatible with miniaturization and automated liquid-handling, and 3) flexible assay end-points using either chemiluminescence (high-throughput screening) or Cellomics ArrayScan™ technology (high-content screening). The assay was validated using known HCV antivirals and through a large-scale, high-throughput screening campaign that identified novel and selective entry, replication and late-stage inhibitors. Selection and characterization of resistant viruses provided information regarding inhibitor target and mechanism. Leveraging results from this robust whole-virus assay represents a critical first step towards identifying inhibitors of novel targets to broaden the spectrum of antivirals for the treatment of HCV.

  15. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells: a novel therapy for solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shengnan; Li, Anping; Liu, Qian; Li, Tengfei; Yuan, Xun; Han, Xinwei; Wu, Kongming

    2017-03-29

    The chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy is a newly developed adoptive antitumor treatment. Theoretically, CAR-T cells can specifically localize and eliminate tumor cells by interacting with the tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) expressing on tumor cell surface. Current studies demonstrated that various TAAs could act as target antigens for CAR-T cells, for instance, the type III variant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) was considered as an ideal target for its aberrant expression on the cell surface of several tumor types. CAR-T cell therapy has achieved gratifying breakthrough in hematological malignancies and promising outcome in solid tumor as showed in various clinical trials. The third generation of CAR-T demonstrates increased antitumor cytotoxicity and persistence through modification of CAR structure. In this review, we summarized the preclinical and clinical progress of CAR-T cells targeting EGFR, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and mesothelin (MSLN), as well as the challenges for CAR-T cell therapy.

  16. Chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy in AML: How close are we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Saar

    2016-12-01

    The majority of patients presenting with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially respond to chemotherapy but post-remission therapy is required to consolidate this response and achieve long-term disease-free survival. The most effective form of post-remission therapy relies on T cell immunotherapy in the form of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). However, patients with active disease cannot usually expect to be cured with HCT. This inherent dichotomy implies that traditional T cell-based immunotherapy in the form of allogeneic HCT stops being efficacious somewhere between the measurable residual disease (MRD) and the morphologically obvious range. This is in part because the full power of T cells must be restrained in order to avoid lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and partly because only a sub-population of donor T cells are expected to be able to recognize AML cells via their T cell receptor. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy, most advanced in the treatment of patients with B-cell malignancies, may circumvent some of these limitations. However, major challenges remain to be overcome before CAR T cell therapy can be safely applied to AML.

  17. Chimeric adaptor proteins translocate diverse type VI secretion system effectors in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterweger, Daniel; Kostiuk, Benjamin; Ötjengerdes, Rina; Wilton, Ashley; Diaz-Satizabal, Laura; Pukatzki, Stefan

    2015-08-13

    Vibrio cholerae is a diverse species of Gram-negative bacteria, commonly found in the aquatic environment and the causative agent of the potentially deadly disease cholera. These bacteria employ a type VI secretion system (T6SS) when they encounter prokaryotic and eukaryotic competitors. This contractile puncturing device translocates a set of effector proteins into neighboring cells. Translocated effectors are toxic unless the targeted cell produces immunity proteins that bind and deactivate incoming effectors. Comparison of multiple V. cholerae strains indicates that effectors are encoded in T6SS effector modules on mobile genetic elements. We identified a diverse group of chimeric T6SS adaptor proteins required for the translocation of diverse effectors encoded in modules. An example for a T6SS effector that requires T6SS adaptor protein 1 (Tap-1) is TseL found in pandemic V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains and other clinical isolates. We propose a model in which Tap-1 is required for loading TseL onto the secretion apparatus. After T6SS-mediated TseL export is completed, Tap-1 is retained in the bacterial cell to load other T6SS machines.

  18. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-directed adoptive immunotherapy: a new era in targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yamei; Liu, Delong

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the recent advances in molecular immunology, virology, genetics, and cell processing, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-directed cancer therapy has finally arrived for clinical application. CAR-directed adoptive immunotherapy represents a novel form of gene therapy, cellular therapy, and immunotherapy, a combination of three in one. Early phase clinical trial was reported in patients with refractory chronic lymphoid leukemia with 17p deletion. Accompanying the cytokine storm and tumor lysis syndrome was the shocking disappearance of the leukemia cells refractory to chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. CAR therapy was reproduced in both children and adults with refractory acute lymphoid leukemia. The CAR technology is being explored for solid tumor therapy, such as glioma. Close to 30 clinical trials are underway in the related fields (www.clinicaltrials.gov). Further improvement in gene targeting, cell expansion, delivery constructs (such as using Sleeping Beauty or Piggyback transposons) will undoubtedly enhance clinical utility. It is foreseeable that CAR-engineered T cell therapy will bring targeted cancer therapy into a new era.

  19. Diverging catalytic capacities and selectivity profiles with haloalkane substrates of chimeric alpha class glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtovic, Sanela; Shokeer, Abeer; Mannervik, Bengt

    2008-05-01

    Six homologous Alpha class glutathione transferases of human, bovine, and rat origins were hybridized by means of DNA shuffling. The chimeric mutants were compared with the parental enzymes in their activities with several alkyl iodides. In order to facilitate a multivariate analysis of relationships between substrates and enzyme activities, three descriptors were introduced: 'specific catalytic capacity', 'substrate selectivity', and 'unit-scaled substrate selectivity'. In some cases the purified mutants showed higher specific activity with a certain alkyl iodide than any of the parental enzymes. However, the overriding effect of DNA shuffling was the generation of chimeras with altered substrate selectivity profiles and catalytic capacities. The altered substrate selectivity profiles of some mutants could be rationalized by changes of the substrate-binding residues in the active site of the enzyme. However, in four of the isolated mutants all active-site residues were found identical with those of rat GST A2-2, even though their substrate specificity profiles were significantly different. Clearly, amino acid residues distant from first-sphere interactions with the substrate influence the catalytic activity. These results are relevant both to the understanding how functional properties may develop in natural enzyme evolution and in the tailoring of novel functions in protein engineering.

  20. Air quality high resolution simulations of Italian urban areas with WRF-CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falasca, Serena; Curci, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    The new European Directive on ambient air quality and cleaner air for Europe (2008/50/EC) encourages the use of modeling techniques to support the observations in the assessment and forecasting of air quality. The modelling system based on the combination of the WRF meteorological model and the CHIMERE chemistry-transport model is used to perform simulations at high resolution over the main Italian cities (e.g. Milan, Rome). Three domains covering Europe, Italy and the urban areas are nested with a decreasing grid size up to 1 km. Numerical results are produced for a winter month and a summer month of the year 2010 and are validated using ground-based observations (e.g. from the European air quality database AirBase). A sensitivity study is performed using different physics options, domain resolution and grid ratio; different urban parameterization schemes are tested using also characteristic morphology parameters for the cities considered. A spatial reallocation of anthropogenic emissions derived from international (e.g. EMEP, TNO, HTAP) and national (e.g. CTN-ACE) emissions inventories and based on the land cover datasets (Global Land Cover Facility and GlobCover) and the OpenStreetMap tool is also included. Preliminary results indicate that the introduction of the spatial redistribution at high-resolution allows a more realistic reproduction of the distribution of the emission flows and thus the concentrations of the pollutants, with significant advantages especially for the urban environments.

  1. Functionality of Chimeric E2 Glycoproteins of BVDV and CSFV in Virus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.G.P. van Gennip

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An intriguing difference between the E2 glycoprotein of CSFV and the other groups of pestiviruses (nonCSFV is a lack of two cysteine residues on positions cysteine 751 and 798. Other groups of pestivirus are not restricted to one species as swine, whereas CSFV is restricted to swine and wild boar. We constructed chimeric CSFV/BVDV E2 genes based on a 2D model of E2 proposed by van Rijn et al. (van Rijn et al. 1994, J Virol 68, 3934–42 and confirmed their expression by immunostaining of plasmid-transfected SK6 cells. No equivalents for the antigenic units B/C and A were found on E2 of BVDVII. This indicates major structural differences in E2. However, the immunodominant BVDVII domain A, containing epitopes with essential amino acids between position 760–764, showed to be dependent on the presence of the region defined by amino acids 684 to 796. As for the A domain of CSFV, the BVDVII A-like domain seemed to function as a separate unit. These combined domains in E2 proved to be the only combination which was functional in viral background of CSFV C-strain. The fitness of this virus (vfl c36BVDVII 684–796 seemed to be reduced compared to vfl c9 (with the complete antigenic region of BVDVII.

  2. Chimeric Antigen Receptor- and TCR-Modified T Cells Enter Main Street and Wall Street.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, David M; Grupp, Stephan A; June, Carl H

    2015-08-01

    The field of adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is currently comprised of chimeric Ag receptor (CAR)- and TCR-engineered T cells and has emerged from principles of basic immunology to paradigm-shifting clinical immunotherapy. ACT of T cells engineered to express artificial receptors that target cells of choice is an exciting new approach for cancer, and it holds equal promise for chronic infection and autoimmunity. Using principles of synthetic biology, advances in immunology, and genetic engineering have made it possible to generate human T cells that display desired specificities and enhanced functionalities. Clinical trials in patients with advanced B cell leukemias and lymphomas treated with CD19-specific CAR T cells have induced durable remissions in adults and children. The prospects for the widespread availability of engineered T cells have changed dramatically given the recent entry of the pharmaceutical industry to this arena. In this overview, we discuss some of the challenges and opportunities that face the field of ACT. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Diverse hematological malignancies including hodgkin-like lymphomas develop in chimeric MHC class II transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke H Raffegerst

    Full Text Available A chimeric HLA-DR4-H2-E (DR4 homozygous transgenic mouse line spontaneously develops diverse hematological malignancies with high frequency (70%. The majority of malignancies were distributed equally between T and B cell neoplasms and included lymphoblastic T cell lymphoma (LTCL, lymphoblastic B cell lymphoma (LBCL, diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL, the histiocyte/T cell rich variant of DLBCL (DLBCL-HA/T cell rich DLBCL, splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL, follicular B cell lymphoma (FBL and plasmacytoma (PCT. Most of these neoplasms were highly similar to human diseases. Also, some non-lymphoid malignancies such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML and histiocytic sarcoma were found. Interestingly, composite lymphomas, including Hodgkin-like lymphomas, were also detected that had CD30(+ Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (H/RS-like cells, representing a tumor type not previously described in mice. Analysis of microdissected H/RS-like cells revealed their origin as germinal center B cells bearing somatic hypermutations and, in some instances, crippled mutations, as described for human Hodgkin lymphoma (HL. Transgene integration in an oncogene was excluded as an exclusive driving force of tumorigenesis and age-related lymphoma development suggests a multi-step process. Thus, this DR4 line is a useful model to investigate common molecular mechanisms that may contribute to important neoplastic diseases in man.

  4. Interleukin 18 secretion and its effect in improving Chimeric Antigen Receptors efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Kun

    Clinical trials have shown that chimeric antigen receptor T cells modified to target cancer cells expressing a surface antigen found on immature B-cells. The purpose of this experiment is to take a pro-inflammatory cytokine, and analyze its effect in improving the efficiency of the T cells. IL-18 has been previously shown to recruit T cells to the tumor site and improve their secretion of cytotoxic cytokines. A human model of the proposed armored T cell has been created and has shown success in combating cancer cells in vitro. The next step is to design and produce a murine model to test in vivo in immunocompetent mice. This research project aimed to create two models: one utilizing 2A peptides and another utilizing IRES elements as a multicistronic vector. Both models would require the insertion of the desired genes into SFG backbones. IRES, a DNA element which acts as a binding site for the transcriptional machinery to recognize which part of the DNA to transcribe, commonly found in bicistronic vectors, is large with 500-600 base pairs, and has a lower transgene expression rate. P2A is smaller, only consisting of about 20 amino acids, and typically has a higher transgene expression rate, which may or may not result in higher effectiveness of the model. I would like to thank Dr. Renier Brentjens for being a mentor who cared about giving his interns as much educational value as possible.

  5. Optimizing RNA/ENA chimeric antisense oligonucleotides using in vitro splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Yagi, Mariko; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    A molecular therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) that converts dystrophin mRNA from out-of-frame to in-frame transcripts by inducing exon skipping with antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) is now approaching clinical application. To exploit the broad therapeutic applicability of exon skipping therapy, it is necessary to identify AOs that are able to induce efficient and specific exon skipping. To optimize AOs, we have established an in vitro splicing system using cultured DMD myocytes. Here, we describe the process of identifying the best AO.Cultured DMD myocytes are established from a biopsy sample and the target exon is chosen. A series of AOs are designed to cover the whole target exon sequence. As AOs, we use 15-20-mer chimeric oligonucleotides consisting of 2'-O-methyl RNA and modified nucleic acid (2'-O, 4'-C-ethylene-bridged nucleic acid). Each AO is transfected individually into cultured DMD myocytes, and the resulting mRNA is analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. The ability of each AO to induce exon skipping is examined by comparing the amount of cDNA with and without exon skipping. If necessary, having roughly localized the target region, another set of AOs are designed and the exon skipping abilities of the new AOs are examined. Finally, one AO is determined as the best for the molecular therapy.Our simple and reliable methods using an in vitro splicing system have enabled us to identify optimized AOs against many exons of the DMD gene.

  6. Elimination of progressive mammary cancer by repeated administrations of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globerson-Levin, Anat; Waks, Tova; Eshhar, Zelig

    2014-05-01

    Continuous oncogenic processes that generate cancer require an on-going treatment approach to eliminate the transformed cells, and prevent their further development. Here, we studied the ability of T cells expressing a chimeric antibody-based receptor (CAR) to offer a therapeutic benefit for breast cancer induced by erbB-2. We tested CAR-modified T cells (T-bodies) specific to erbB-2 for their antitumor potential in a mouse model overexpressing a human erbB-2 transgene that develops mammary tumors. Comparing the antitumor reactivity of CAR-modified T cells under various therapeutic settings, either prophylactic, prior to tumor development, or therapeutically. We found that repeated administration of CAR-modified T cells is required to eliminate spontaneously developing mammary cancer. Systemic, as well as intratumoral administered CAR-modified T cells accumulated at tumor sites and eventually eliminated the malignant cells. Interestingly, within a few weeks after a single CAR T cells' administration, and rejection of primary lesion, tumors usually relapsed both in treated mammary gland and at remote sites; however, repeated injections of CAR-modified T cells were able to control the secondary tumors. Since spontaneous tumors can arise repeatedly, especially in the case of syndromes characterized by specific susceptibility to cancer, multiple administrations of CAR-modified T cells can serve to control relapsing disease.

  7. Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Modified T Cells for Solid Tumors: Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelei Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have highlighted the successes of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T- (CART- cell-based therapy for B-cell malignancies, and early phase clinical trials have been launched in recent years. The few published clinical studies of CART cells in solid tumors have addressed safety and feasibility, but the clinical outcome data are limited. Although antitumor effects were confirmed in vitro and in animal models, CART-cell-based therapy still faces several challenges when directed towards solid tumors, and it has been difficult to achieve the desired outcomes in clinical practice. Many studies have struggled to improve the clinical responses to and benefits of CART-cell treatment of solid tumors. In this review, the status quo of CART cells and their clinical applications for solid tumors will be summarized first. Importantly, we will suggest improvements that could increase the therapeutic effectiveness of CART cells for solid tumors and their future clinical applications. These interventions will make treatment with CART cells an effective and routine therapy for solid tumors.

  8. Modification of chimeric (2S, 3S)-butanediol dehydrogenase based on structural information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimegi, Tomohito; Mochizuki, Kaito; Oyama, Takuji; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Kusunoki, Masami; Ui, Sadaharu

    2014-01-01

    A chimeric (2S, 3S)-butanediol dehydrogenase (cLBDH) was engineered to have the strict (S)-configuration specificity of the (2S, 3S)-BDH (BsLBDH) derived from Brevibacterium saccharolyticum as well as the enzymatic stability of the (2R, 3S)-BDH (KpMBDH) from Klebsiella pneumonia by swapping the domains of two native BDHs. However, while cLBDH possesses the stability, it lacks the specificity. In order to assist in the design a BDH having strict substrate specificity, an X-ray structural analysis of a cLBDH crystal was conducted at 1.58 Å. The results obtained show some readily apparent differences around the active sites of cLBDH and BsLBDH. Based on this structural information, a novel (2S, 3S)-BDH having a preferred specificity was developed by introducing a V254L mutation into cLBDH. The influence of this mutation on the stability of cLBDH was not evaluated. Nevertheless, the technique described herein is an effective method for the production of a tailor-made BDH.

  9. Rapid recombination among transfected plasmids, chimeric episome formation and trans gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadekoppala, M; Cheresh, P; Catron, D; Ji, D D; Deitsch, K; Wellems, T E; Seifert, H S; Haldar, K

    2001-02-01

    Although recombination is known to be important to generating diversity in the human malaria parasite P. falciparum, the low efficiencies of transfection and the fact that integration of transfected DNA into chromosomes is observed only after long periods (typically 12 weeks or more) have made it difficult to genetically manipulate the blood stages of this major human pathogen. Here we show that co-transfection of a P. falciparum line with two plasmids, one expressing a green fluorescent protein (gfp) reporter and the other expressing a drug resistance marker (Tgdhfr-ts M23), allowed selection of a population in which about approximately 30% of the parasites produce GFP. In these GFP-producing parasites, the transfected plasmids had recombined into chimeric episomes as large as 20 kb and could be maintained under drug pressure for at least 16 weeks. Our data suggest that chimera formation occurs early (detected by 7--14 days) and that it involves homologous recombination favored by presence of the same P. falciparum 5'hrp3 UTR promoting transcription from each plasmid. This indicates the presence of high levels of homologous recombination activity in blood stage parasites that can be used to drive rapid recombination of newly introduced DNA, study mechanisms of recombination, and introduce genes for trans expression in P. falciparum.

  10. The developmental fate of green fluorescent mouse embryonic germ cells in chimeric embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUXIN; SUMIOSUGANO; 等

    1999-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs),as precursors of mammalian germ lineage,have been gaining more attention as a new resource of pluripotent stem cells,which bring a great possibility to study developmental events of germ cell in vitro and at animal level.EG4 cells derived from 10.5 days post coitum (dpc) PGCs of 129/svJ strain mouse were established and maintained in an undifferentiated state.With an attempt to study the differentiation capability of EG4 cells with a reporter protein:green fluorescence protein,and the possible application of EG4 cells in the research of germ cell development,we have generated several EG4-GFP cell lines expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) and still maintaining typical characteristics of pluripotent stem cells.Then,the differentiation of EG4-GFP cells in vitro as well as their developmental fate in chimeric embryos which were produced by aggregating EG4-GFP cells to 8-cell stage embryos were studied.The results showed that EG4 cells carrying green fluorescence have a potential use in the research of germ cell development and other related studies.

  11. Immunogenicity and efficacy of chimeric dengue vaccine (DENVax) formulations in interferon-deficient AG129 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewoo, Joseph N; Kinney, Richard M; Powell, Tim D; Arguello, John J; Silengo, Shawn J; Partidos, Charalambos D; Huang, Claire Y-H; Stinchcomb, Dan T; Osorio, Jorge E

    2012-02-14

    Formulations of chimeric dengue vaccine (DENVax) viruses containing the pre-membrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes of serotypes 1-4 expressed in the context of the attenuated DENV-2 PDK-53 genome were tested for safety, immunogenicity and efficacy in interferon receptor knock-out mice (AG129). Monovalent formulations were safe and elicited robust neutralizing antibody responses to the homologous virus and only limited cross-reactivity to other serotypes. A single dose of monovalent DENVax-1, -2, or -3 vaccine provided eighty or greater percent protection against both wild-type (wt) DENV-1 (Mochizuki strain) and DENV-2 (New Guinea C strain) challenge viruses. A single dose of monovalent DENVax-4 also provided complete protection against wt DENV-1 challenge and significantly increased the survival times after challenge with wt DENV-2. In studies using tetravalent mixtures, DENVax ratios were identified that: (i) caused limited viremia, (ii) induced serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies to all four DENV serotypes with different hierarchies, and (iii) conferred full protection against clinical signs of disease following challenge with either wt DENV-1 or DENV-2 viruses. Overall, these data highlight the immunogenic profile of DENVax, a novel candidate tetravalent dengue vaccine and the advantage of sharing a common attenuated genomic backbone among the DENVax monovalent vaccines that confer protection against homologous or heterologous virus challenge.

  12. Chimeric monoclonal antibody to tumor necrosis factor alpha (infliximab in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insights into the pathogenesis of psoriasis have provided opportunities to target key steps in the disease process. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a being crucial to the pathogenesis of psoriasis, monoclonal antibodies against this cytokine have proved useful in its treatment. Aim: To study the efficacy of chimeric monoclonal antibody to TNF-a (infliximab in Indian patients with recalcitrant psoriasis vulgaris. Materials and Methods: Three patients with recalcitrant psoriasis vulgaris were studied. Baseline haemogram, biochemical parameters, chest radiograph and Mantoux skin test were performed. A loading dose regimen of 5 mg/kg infliximab was administered at weeks 0, 2 and 6. PASI assessment, adverse drug event monitoring and laboratory assessments were carried out at 2-week intervals until week 10. Patients were followed up until week 22 for relapse. Results: Infliximab was well tolerated. The mean PASI was 25.4 at presentation and declined to 5.5 at 10 weeks. PASI 75 was attained at a mean of 9.6 weeks. Relapse occurred at a mean of 18.6 weeks after the first infusion. Conclusions: This study on Indian patients brings out the importance of cytokine-based therapies in psoriasis. Indigenous production could make these therapies a viable therapeutic option for psoriasis patients in the near future.

  13. Current status and regulatory perspective of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cell therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Kim, Dongyoon; Suh, Soo-Kyung; Park, Zewon; Choi, Min Joung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2016-04-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells (CAR-T) have emerged as a new modality for cancer immunotherapy due to their potent efficacy against terminal cancers. CAR-Ts are reported to exert higher efficacy than monoclonal antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates, and act via mechanisms distinct from T cell receptor-engineered T cells. These cells are constructed by transducing genes encoding fusion proteins of cancer antigen-recognizing single-chain Fv linked to intracellular signaling domains of T cell receptors. CAR-Ts are classified as first-, second- and third-generation, depending on the intracellular signaling domain number of T cell receptors. This review covers the current status of CAR-T research, including basic proof-of-concept investigations at the cell and animal levels. Currently ongoing clinical trials of CAR-T worldwide are additionally discussed. Owing to the lack of existing approved products, several unresolved concerns remain with regard to safety, efficacy and manufacturing of CAR-T, as well as quality control issues. In particular, the cytokine release syndrome is the major side-effect impeding the successful development of CAR-T in clinical trials. Here, we have addressed the challenges and regulatory perspectives of CAR-T therapy.

  14. Horizontal transfer of an adaptive chimeric photoreceptor from bryophytes to ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fay-Wei; Villarreal, Juan Carlos; Kelly, Steven; Rothfels, Carl J; Melkonian, Michael; Frangedakis, Eftychios; Ruhsam, Markus; Sigel, Erin M; Der, Joshua P; Pittermann, Jarmila; Burge, Dylan O; Pokorny, Lisa; Larsson, Anders; Chen, Tao; Weststrand, Stina; Thomas, Philip; Carpenter, Eric; Zhang, Yong; Tian, Zhijian; Chen, Li; Yan, Zhixiang; Zhu, Ying; Sun, Xiao; Wang, Jun; Stevenson, Dennis W; Crandall-Stotler, Barbara J; Shaw, A Jonathan; Deyholos, Michael K; Soltis, Douglas E; Graham, Sean W; Windham, Michael D; Langdale, Jane A; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Mathews, Sarah; Pryer, Kathleen M

    2014-05-06

    Ferns are well known for their shade-dwelling habits. Their ability to thrive under low-light conditions has been linked to the evolution of a novel chimeric photoreceptor--neochrome--that fuses red-sensing phytochrome and blue-sensing phototropin modules into a single gene, thereby optimizing phototropic responses. Despite being implicated in facilitating the diversification of modern ferns, the origin of neochrome has remained a mystery. We present evidence for neochrome in hornworts (a bryophyte lineage) and demonstrate that ferns acquired neochrome from hornworts via horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Fern neochromes are nested within hornwort neochromes in our large-scale phylogenetic reconstructions of phototropin and phytochrome gene families. Divergence date estimates further support the HGT hypothesis, with fern and hornwort neochromes diverging 179 Mya, long after the split between the two plant lineages (at least 400 Mya). By analyzing the draft genome of the hornwort Anthoceros punctatus, we also discovered a previously unidentified phototropin gene that likely represents the ancestral lineage of the neochrome phototropin module. Thus, a neochrome originating in hornworts was transferred horizontally to ferns, where it may have played a significant role in the diversification of modern ferns.

  15. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing Using a Chimeric Single-Guide RNA Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Butt, Haroon

    2017-08-24

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied in diverse eukaryotic organisms for targeted mutagenesis. However, targeted gene editing is inefficient and requires the simultaneous delivery of a DNA template for homology-directed repair (HDR). Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9 to generate targeted double-strand breaks and to deliver an RNA repair template for HDR in rice (Oryza sativa). We used chimeric single-guide RNA (cgRNA) molecules carrying both sequences for target site specificity (to generate the double-strand breaks) and repair template sequences (to direct HDR), flanked by regions of homology to the target. Gene editing was more efficient in rice protoplasts using repair templates complementary to the non-target DNA strand, rather than the target strand. We applied this cgRNA repair method to generate herbicide resistance in rice, which showed that this cgRNA repair method can be used for targeted gene editing in plants. Our findings will facilitate applications in functional genomics and targeted improvement of crop traits.

  16. Learning Joomla! 3 extension development

    CERN Document Server

    Plummer, Tim

    2013-01-01

    A practical guide with step-by-step examples that build on each other so you can learn by doing and get hands-on knowledge about creating your plugins, modules, and components in Joomla.""Learning Joomla! 3 Extension Development, Third Edition"" is for developers who want to create their own Joomla extensions. It is assumed you will have some basic PHP, HTML, and CSS knowledge, but you don't need any prior Joomla programming experience. This book will also be useful to people who just want to make minor customizations to existing Joomla extensions and build on the work of others in the open so

  17. Programming Reactive Extensions and LINQ

    CERN Document Server

    Liberty, Jesse

    2011-01-01

    Pro Reactive Extensions and LINQ is a deep dive into the next important technology for .NET developers: Reactive Extensions. This in-depth tutorial goes beyond what is available anywhere else to teach how to write WPF, Silverlight, and Windows Phone applications using the Reactive Extensions (Rx) to handle events and asynchronous method calls. Reactive programming allows you to turn those aspects of your code that are currently imperative into something much more event-driven and flexible. For this reason, it's sometimes referred to as LINQ for Events. Reactive programming hinges on the concep

  18. Prevention of birch pollen-related food allergy by mucosal treatment with multi-allergen-chimers in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Hoflehner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among birch pollen allergic patients up to 70% develop allergic reactions to Bet v 1-homologue food allergens such as Api g 1 (celery or Dau c 1 (carrot, termed as birch pollen-related food allergy. In most cases, specific immunotherapy with birch pollen extracts does not reduce allergic symptoms to the homologue food allergens. We therefore genetically engineered a multi-allergen chimer and tested if mucosal treatment with this construct could represent a novel approach for prevention of birch pollen-related food allergy. METHODOLOGY: BALB/c mice were poly-sensitized with a mixture of Bet v 1, Api g 1 and Dau c 1 followed by a sublingual challenge with carrot, celery and birch pollen extracts. For prevention of allergy sensitization an allergen chimer composed of immunodominant T cell epitopes of Api g 1 and Dau c 1 linked to the whole Bet v 1 allergen, was intranasally applied prior to sensitization. RESULTS: Intranasal pretreatment with the allergen chimer led to significantly decreased antigen-specific IgE-dependent β-hexosaminidase release, but enhanced allergen-specific IgG2a and IgA antibodies. Accordingly, IL-4 levels in spleen cell cultures and IL-5 levels in restimulated spleen and cervical lymph node cell cultures were markedly reduced, while IFN-γ levels were increased. Immunomodulation was associated with increased IL-10, TGF-β and Foxp3 mRNA levels in NALT and Foxp3 in oral mucosal tissues. Treatment with anti-TGF-β, anti-IL10R or anti-CD25 antibodies abrogated the suppression of allergic responses induced by the chimer. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that mucosal application of the allergen chimer led to decreased Th2 immune responses against Bet v 1 and its homologue food allergens Api g 1 and Dau c 1 by regulatory and Th1-biased immune responses. These data suggest that mucosal treatment with a multi-allergen vaccine could be a promising treatment strategy to prevent birch pollen-related food allergy.

  19. Generation of Novel Chimeric Mice with Humanized Livers by Using Hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chise Tateno

    Full Text Available We have used homozygous albumin enhancer/promoter-driven urokinase-type plasminogen activator/severe combined immunodeficient (uPA/SCID mice as hosts for chimeric mice with humanized livers. However, uPA/SCID mice show four disadvantages: the human hepatocytes (h-heps replacement index in mouse liver is decreased due to deletion of uPA transgene by homologous recombination, kidney disorders are likely to develop, body size is small, and hemizygotes cannot be used as hosts as more frequent homologous recombination than homozygotes. To solve these disadvantages, we have established a novel host strain that has a transgene containing albumin promoter/enhancer and urokinase-type plasminogen activator cDNA and has a SCID background (cDNA-uPA/SCID. We applied the embryonic stem cell technique to simultaneously generate a number of transgenic lines, and found the line with the most appropriate levels of uPA expression-not detrimental but with a sufficiently damaged liver. We transplanted h-heps into homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice via the spleen, and monitored their human albumin (h-alb levels and body weight. Blood h-alb levels and body weight gradually increased in the hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice and were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. By contrast, blood h-alb levels and body weight in uPA/SCID chimeric mice decreased from 16 weeks of age onwards. A similar decrease in body weight was observed in the homozygous cDNA-uPA/SCID genotype, but h-alb levels were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. Microarray analyses revealed identical h-heps gene expression profiles in homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice were identical to that observed in the uPA/SCID mice. Furthermore, like uPA/SCID chimeric mice, homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID chimeric mice were successfully infected with hepatitis B virus and C virus. These results indicate that hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice may be novel and

  20. Extension agents and conflict narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bond, Jennifer Lauren

    2016-01-01

    conflict. Originality: This work contributes to a growing body of literature interested in the role of extension agents in conflict management. By applying Q methodology, this work has shown that while extension agents are involved in conflict management, their perceptions of these conflicts are subjective......Purpose: This work investigated the narratives of development extensionists in relation to natural resource conflict, in order to understand the competing discourses surrounding the wicked problems of natural resource management in Laikipia County, Kenya. Methodology: Q methodology was used...... to elicit the conflict narratives present among extension professionals. A concourse of 221 statements were devised from interviews and group discussions with key informants and a final sample of 49 statements was used for the sorting. Thirteen Q-sorts were undertaken with among rural extension...

  1. Decentralizing Agricultural Extension: Alternative Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, William M.

    1997-01-01

    Examines government strategies for decentralizing agricultural extension, concluding that such changes are largely determined by the country's constitutional status. Reviews decentralization guidelines for structural and fiscal reforms and participatory management systems. (SK)

  2. HNA and ANA high-affinity arrays for detections of DNA and RNA single-base mismatches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Mikhail; Schepers, Guy; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Van Hummelen, Paul; Herdewijn, Piet

    2008-06-15

    DNA microarrays and sensors have become essential tools in the functional analysis of sequence information. Recently we reported that chimeric hexitol (HNA) and altritol (ANA) nucleotide monomers with an anhydrohexitol sugar moiety are easily available and proved their chemistry to be compatible with DNA and RNA synthesis. In this communication we describe a novel analytical platform based on HNA and ANA units to be used as synthetic oligonucleotide arrays on a glass solid support for match/mismatch detection of DNA and RNA targets. Arrays were fabricated by immobilization of diene-modified oligonucleotides on maleimido-activated glass slides. To demonstrate the selectivity and sensitivity of the HNA/ANA arrays and to compare their properties with regular DNA arrays, sequences in the reverse transcriptase gene (codon 74) and the protease gene of HIV-1 (codon 10) were selected. Both, the relative intensity of the signal and match/mismatch discrimination increased up to fivefold for DNA targets and up to 3-3.5-fold for RNA targets applying HNA or ANA arrays (ANA>HNA>DNA). Certainly in the new field of miRNA detection, ANA arrays could prove very beneficial and their properties should be investigated in more detail.

  3. Frames and extension problems II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole; Kim, Hong Oh; Kim, Rae Young

    2014-01-01

    This article is a follow-up on the article Frames and Extension Problems I. Here we will go into more recent progress on the topic and also present some open problems.......This article is a follow-up on the article Frames and Extension Problems I. Here we will go into more recent progress on the topic and also present some open problems....

  4. COCLEFT EXTENSIONS OF HOPF ALGEBRAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝家贵

    2006-01-01

    Let B and H be finitely generated projective Hopf algebras over a commutative ring R,with B cocommutative and H commutative. In this paper we investigate cocleft extensions of Hopf algebras, and prove that the isomorphism classes of cocleft Hopf algebras extensions of B by H are determined uniquely by the group C(B, H) = ZC(B, H)/d(B, H) .

  5. Preferred extensions as stable models

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Given an argumentation framework AF, we introduce a mapping function that constructs a disjunctive logic program P, such that the preferred extensions of AF correspond to the stable models of P, after intersecting each stable model with the relevant atoms. The given mapping function is of polynomial size w.r.t. AF. In particular, we identify that there is a direct relationship between the minimal models of a propositional formula and the preferred extensions of an argumentation framework by w...

  6. Boiler-turbine life extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natzkov, S. [TOTEMA, Ltd., Sofia (Bulgaria); Nikolov, M. [CERB, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1995-12-01

    The design life of the main power equipment-boilers and turbines is about 105 working hours. The possibilities for life extension are after normatively regulated control tests. The diagnostics and methodology for Boilers and Turbines Elements Remaining Life Assessment using up to date computer programs, destructive and nondestructive control of metal of key elements of units equipment, metal creep and low cycle fatigue calculations. As well as data for most common damages and some technical decisions for elements life extension are presented.

  7. COMPATIBLE EXTENSIONS OF FUZZY RELATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Irina GEORGESCU

    2003-01-01

    In 1930 Szpilrajn proved that any strict partial order can be embedded in a strict linear order.This theorem was later refined by Dushnik and Miller (1941), Hansson (1968), Suzumura (1976),Donaldson and Weymark (1998), Bossert (1999). Particularly Suzumura introduced the important concept of compatible extension of a (crisp) relation. These extension theorems have an important role in welfare economics. In particular Szpilrajn theorem is the main tool for proving a known theorem of Richter that establishes the equivalence between rational and congruous consumers. In 1999 Duggan proved a general extension theorem that contains all these results. In this paper we introduce the notion of compatible extension of a fuzzy relation and we prove an extension theorem for fuzzy relations. Our result generalizes to fuzzy set theory the main part of Duggan's theorem. As applications we obtain fuzzy versions of the theorems of Szpilrajn, Hansson and Suzumura. We also prove that an asymmetric and transitive fuzzy relation has a compatible extension that is total, asymmetric and transitive.Our results can be useful in the theory of fuzzy consumers. We can prove that any rational fuzzyconsumer is congruous, extending to a fuzzy context a part of Richter's theorem. To prove that acongruous fuzzy consumer is rational remains an open problem. A proof of this result can somehowuse a fuzzy version of Szpilrajn theorem.

  8. The Y-Family DNA Polymerase Dpo4 Uses a Template Slippage Mechanism To Create Single-Base Deletions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Wu; R Wilson; J Pata

    2011-12-31

    The Y-family polymerases help cells tolerate DNA damage by performing translesion synthesis, yet they also can be highly error prone. One distinctive feature of the DinB class of Y-family polymerases is that they make single-base deletion errors at high frequencies in repetitive sequences, especially those that contain two or more identical pyrimidines with a 5? flanking guanosine. Intriguingly, different deletion mechanisms have been proposed, even for two archaeal DinB polymerases that share 54% sequence identity and originate from two strains of Sulfolobus. To reconcile these apparent differences, we have characterized Dpo4 from Sulfolobus solfataricus using the same biochemical and crystallographic approaches that we have used previously to characterize Dbh from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. In contrast to previous suggestions that Dpo4 uses a deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP)-stabilized misalignment mechanism when creating single-base deletions, we find that Dpo4 predominantly uses a template slippage deletion mechanism when replicating repetitive DNA sequences, as was previously shown for Dbh. Dpo4 stabilizes the skipped template base in an extrahelical conformation between the polymerase and the little-finger domains of the enzyme. This contrasts with Dbh, in which the extrahelical base is stabilized against the surface of the little-finger domain alone. Thus, despite sharing a common deletion mechanism, these closely related polymerases use different contacts with the substrate to accomplish the same result.

  9. Extensive fitness and human cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hateren, J H

    2015-12-01

    Evolution depends on the fitness of organisms, the expected rate of reproducing. Directly getting offspring is the most basic form of fitness, but fitness can also be increased indirectly by helping genetically related individuals (such as kin) to increase their fitness. The combined effect is known as inclusive fitness. Here it is argued that a further elaboration of fitness has evolved, particularly in humans. It is called extensive fitness and it incorporates producing organisms that are merely similar in phenotype. The evolvability of this mechanism is illustrated by computations on a simple model combining heredity and behaviour. Phenotypes are driven into the direction of high fitness through a mechanism that involves an internal estimate of fitness, implicitly made within the organism itself. This mechanism has recently been conjectured to be responsible for producing agency and goals. In the model, inclusive and extensive fitness are both implemented by letting fitness increase nonlinearly with the size of subpopulations of similar heredity (for the indirect part of inclusive fitness) and of similar phenotype (for the phenotypic part of extensive fitness). Populations implementing extensive fitness outcompete populations implementing mere inclusive fitness. This occurs because groups with similar phenotype tend to be larger than groups with similar heredity, and fitness increases more when groups are larger. Extensive fitness has two components, a direct component where individuals compete in inducing others to become like them and an indirect component where individuals cooperate and help others who are already similar to them.

  10. Algorithms for joint optimization of stability and diversity in planning combinatorial libraries of chimeric proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Friedman, Alan M; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2009-08-01

    In engineering protein variants by constructing and screening combinatorial libraries of chimeric proteins, two complementary and competing goals are desired: the new proteins must be similar enough to the evolutionarily-selected wild-type proteins to be stably folded, and they must be different enough to display functional variation. We present here the first method, Staversity, to simultaneously optimize stability and diversity in selecting sets of breakpoint locations for site-directed recombination. Our goal is to uncover all "undominated" breakpoint sets, for which no other breakpoint set is better in both factors. Our first algorithm finds the undominated sets serving as the vertices of the lower envelope of the two-dimensional (stability and diversity) convex hull containing all possible breakpoint sets. Our second algorithm identifies additional breakpoint sets in the concavities that are either undominated or dominated only by undiscovered breakpoint sets within a distance bound computed by the algorithm. Both algorithms are efficient, requiring only time polynomial in the numbers of residues and breakpoints, while characterizing a space defined by an exponential number of possible breakpoint sets. We applied Staversity to identify 2-10 breakpoint plans for different sets of parent proteins taken from the purE family, as well as for parent proteins TEM-1 and PSE-4 from the beta-lactamase family. The average normalized distance between our plans and the lower bound for optimal plans is around 2%. Our plans dominate most (60-90% on average for each parent set) of the plans found by other possible approaches, random sampling or explicit optimization for stability with implicit optimization for diversity. The identified breakpoint sets provide a compact representation of good plans, enabling a protein engineer to understand and account for the trade-offs between two key considerations in combinatorial chimeragenesis.

  11. RNA-guided Transcriptional Regulation in Plants via dCas9 Chimeric Proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Baazim, Hatoon

    2014-05-01

    Developing targeted genome regulation approaches holds much promise for accelerating trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs)/CRISPR associated (Cas) system provides bacteria and archaea with an adaptive molecular immunity mechanism against invading nucleic acids through phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing purposes across a variety of cell types and organisms. Recently, the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide RNAs (gRNAs) were used as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate the expression patterns in bacterial, yeast and human cells. Here, we employed this DNA-targeting system for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based activators and repressors. For example, we fused to the C-terminus of dCas9 with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors, respectively, to generate transcriptional activators, and the SRDX repression domain to generate transcriptional repressor. Our data demonstrate that the dCas9:EDLL and dCas9:TAD activators, guided by gRNAs complementary to promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on episomal targets in plant cells. Moreover, our data suggest that the dCas9:SRDX repressor and the dCas9:EDLL and dCas9:TAD activators are capable of markedly repressing or activating, respectively, the transcription of an endogenous genomic target. Our data indicate that the CRISPR/dCas9:TFs DNA targeting system can be used in plants as a functional genomic tool and for biotechnological applications.

  12. Preubiquitinated chimeric ErbB2 is constitutively endocytosed and subsequently degraded in lysosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuong, Tram Thu [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Berger, Christian [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, P.O. Box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Bertelsen, Vibeke; Rødland, Marianne Skeie [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Stang, Espen [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, P.O. Box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Madshus, Inger Helene, E-mail: i.h.madshus@medisin.uio.no [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, P.O. Box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway)

    2013-02-01

    The oncoprotein ErbB2 is endocytosis-deficient, probably due to its interaction with Heat shock protein 90. We previously demonstrated that clathrin-dependent endocytosis of ErbB2 is induced upon incubation of cells with Ansamycin derivatives, such as geldanamycin and its derivative 17-AAG. Furthermore, we have previously demonstrated that a preubiquitinated chimeric EGFR (EGFR-Ub{sub 4}) is constitutively endocytosed in a clathrin-dependent manner. We now demonstrate that also an ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} chimera is endocytosed constitutively and clathrin-dependently. Upon expression, the ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} was further ubiquitinated, and by Western blotting, we demonstrated the formation of both Lys48-linked and Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains. ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} was constitutively internalized and eventually sorted to late endosomes and lysosomes where the fusion protein was degraded. ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} was not cleaved prior to internalization. Interestingly, over-expression of Ubiquitin Interaction Motif-containing dominant negative fragments of the clathrin adaptor proteins epsin1 and Eps15 negatively affected endocytosis of ErbB2. Altogether, this argues that ubiquitination is sufficient to induce clathrin-mediated endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of the otherwise plasma membrane localized ErbB2. Also, it appears that C-terminal cleavage is not required for endocytosis. -- Highlights: ► A chimera containing ErbB2 and a tetra-Ubiquitin chain internalizes constitutively. ► Receptor fragmentation is not required for endocytosis of ErbB2. ► Ubiquitination is sufficient to induce endocytosis and degradation of ErbB2. ► ErbB2-Ub4 is internalized clathrin-dependently.

  13. Calcium-stimulated autophosphorylation site of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Siems, W. F.; Jones, J. P.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    The existence of two molecular switches regulating plant chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), namely the C-terminal visinin-like domain acting as Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switch and calmodulin binding domain acting as Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch, has been described (Sathyanarayanan, P. V., Cremo, C. R., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422). Here we report the identification of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site of CCaMK by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry. Thr(267) was confirmed as the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site by post-source decay experiments and by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified T267A mutant form of CCaMK did not show Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation, autophosphorylation-dependent variable calmodulin affinity, or Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulation of kinase activity. Sequence comparison of CCaMK from monocotyledonous plant (lily) and dicotyledonous plant (tobacco) suggests that the autophosphorylation site is conserved. This is the first identification of a phosphorylation site specifically responding to activation by second messenger system (Ca(2+) messenger system) in plants. Homology modeling of the kinase and calmodulin binding domain of CCaMK with the crystal structure of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 suggests that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site is located on the surface of the kinase and far from the catalytic site. Analysis of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation with increasing concentration of CCaMK indicates the possibility that the Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular mechanism.

  14. Autophosphorylation-dependent inactivation of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by the presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain unlike other known calmodulin- dependent kinases. Ca(2+)-Binding to the visinin-like domain leads to autophosphorylation and changes in the affinity for calmodulin [Sathyanarayanan P.V., Cremo C.R. & Poovaiah B.W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422]. Here, we report that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK results in time-dependent loss of enzyme activity. This time-dependent loss of activity or self-inactivation due to autophosphorylation is also dependent on reaction pH and ATP concentration. Inactivation of the enzyme resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme due to self-association. Specifically, autophosphorylation in the presence of 200 microm ATP at pH 7.5 resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme with a 33% loss in enzyme activity. Under similar conditions at pH 6.5, the enzyme lost 67% of its activity and at pH 8.5, 84% enzyme activity was lost. Furthermore, autophosphorylation at either acidic or alkaline reaction pH lead to the formation of a sedimentable enzyme. Transmission electron microscopic studies on autophosphorylated kinase revealed particles that clustered into branched complexes. The autophosphorylation of wild-type kinase in the presence of AMP-PNP (an unhydrolyzable ATP analog) or the autophosphorylation-site mutant, T267A, did not show formation of branched complexes under the electron microscope. Autophosphorylation- dependent self-inactivation may be a mechanism of modulating the signal transduction pathway mediated by CCaMK.

  15. Identification of chimeric antigen receptors that mediate constitutive or inducible proliferation of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigault, Matthew J; Lee, Jihyun; Basil, Maria Ciocca; Carpenito, Carmine; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Scholler, John; Kawalekar, Omkar U; Guedan, Sonia; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Ang, Sonny; Cooper, Laurence J N; Platt, Jesse M; Johnson, F Brad; Paulos, Chrystal M; Zhao, Yangbing; Kalos, Michael; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2015-04-01

    This study compared second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) encoding signaling domains composed of CD28, ICOS, and 4-1BB (TNFRSF9). Here, we report that certain CARs endow T cells with the ability to undergo long-term autonomous proliferation. Transduction of primary human T cells with lentiviral vectors encoding some of the CARs resulted in sustained proliferation for up to 3 months following a single stimulation through the T-cell receptor (TCR). Sustained numeric expansion was independent of cognate antigen and did not require the addition of exogenous cytokines or feeder cells after a single stimulation of the TCR and CD28. Results from gene array and functional assays linked sustained cytokine secretion and expression of T-bet (TBX21), EOMES, and GATA-3 to the effect. Sustained expression of the endogenous IL2 locus has not been reported in primary T cells. Sustained proliferation was dependent on CAR structure and high expression, the latter of which was necessary but not sufficient. The mechanism involves constitutive signaling through NF-κB, AKT, ERK, and NFAT. The propagated CAR T cells retained a diverse TCR repertoire, and cellular transformation was not observed. The CARs with a constitutive growth phenotype displayed inferior antitumor effects and engraftment in vivo. Therefore, the design of CARs that have a nonconstitutive growth phenotype may be a strategy to improve efficacy and engraftment of CAR T cells. The identification of CARs that confer constitutive or nonconstitutive growth patterns may explain observations that CAR T cells have differential survival patterns in clinical trials.

  16. Porcine Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived from IVF Embryos Contribute to Chimeric Development In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Binghua; Li, Yan; He, Yilong; Wei, Renyue; Sun, Ruizhen; Yin, Zhi; Bou, Gerelchimeg; Liu, Zhonghua

    2016-01-01

    Although the pig is considered an important model of human disease and an ideal animal for the preclinical testing of cell transplantation, the utility of this model has been hampered by a lack of genuine porcine embryonic stem cells. Here, we derived a porcine pluripotent stem cell (pPSC) line from day 5.5 blastocysts in a newly developed culture system based on MXV medium and a 5% oxygen atmosphere. The pPSCs had been passaged more than 75 times over two years, and the morphology of the colony was similar to that of human embryonic stem cells. Characterization and assessment showed that the pPSCs were alkaline phosphatase (AKP) positive, possessed normal karyotypes and expressed classic pluripotent markers, including OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG. In vitro differentiation through embryonic body formation and in vivo differentiation via teratoma formation in nude mice demonstrated that the pPSCs could differentiate into cells of the three germ layers. The pPSCs transfected with fuw-DsRed (pPSC-FDs) could be passaged with a stable expression of both DsRed and pluripotent markers. Notably, when pPSC-FDs were used as donor cells for somatic nuclear transfer, 11.52% of the reconstructed embryos developed into blastocysts, which was not significantly different from that of the reconstructed embryos derived from porcine embryonic fibroblasts. When pPSC-FDs were injected into day 4.5 blastocysts, they became involved in the in vitro embryonic development and contributed to the viscera of foetuses at day 50 of pregnancy as well as the developed placenta after the chimeric blastocysts were transferred into recipients. These findings indicated that the pPSCs were porcine pluripotent cells; that this would be a useful cell line for porcine genetic engineering and a valuable cell line for clarifying the molecular mechanism of pluripotency regulation in pigs. PMID:26991423

  17. Evidence of a chimeric genome in the cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Debashish

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is a vexing fact of life for microbial phylogeneticists. Given the substantial rates of HGT observed in modern-day bacterial chromosomes, it is envisaged that ancient prokaryotic genomes must have been similarly chimeric. But where can one find an ancient prokaryotic genome that has maintained its ancestral condition to address this issue? An excellent candidate is the cyanobacterial endosymbiont that was harnessed over a billion years ago by a heterotrophic protist, giving rise to the plastid. Genetic remnants of the endosymbiont are still preserved in plastids as a highly reduced chromosome encoding 54 – 264 genes. These data provide an ideal target to assess genome chimericism in an ancient cyanobacterial lineage. Results Here we demonstrate that the origin of the plastid-encoded gene cluster for menaquinone/phylloquinone biosynthesis in the extremophilic red algae Cyanidiales contradicts a cyanobacterial genealogy. These genes are relics of an ancestral cluster related to homologs in Chlorobi/Gammaproteobacteria that we hypothesize was established by HGT in the progenitor of plastids, thus providing a 'footprint' of genome chimericism in ancient cyanobacteria. In addition to menB, four components of the original gene cluster (menF, menD, menC, and menH are now encoded in the nuclear genome of the majority of non-Cyanidiales algae and plants as the unique tetra-gene fusion named PHYLLO. These genes are monophyletic in Plantae and chromalveolates, indicating that loci introduced by HGT into the ancestral cyanobacterium were moved over time into the host nucleus. Conclusion Our study provides unambiguous evidence for the existence of genome chimericism in ancient cyanobacteria. In addition we show genes that originated via HGT in the cyanobacterial ancestor of the plastid made their way to the host nucleus via endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT.

  18. Dual Regulation of a Chimeric Plant Serine/Threonine Kinase by Calcium and Calcium/Calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, D.; Ramachandiran, S.; Paranjape, V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    A chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene characterized by a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain was recently cloned from plants. The Escherichia coli-expressed CCaMK phosphorylates various protein and peptide substrates in a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent manner. The calmodulin-binding region of CCAMK has similarity to the calmodulin-binding region of the alpha-subunit of multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII). CCaMK exhibits basal autophosphorylation at the threonine residue(s) (0.098 mol of P-32/mol) that is stimulated 3.4-fold by Ca(2+) (0.339 mol of P-32/mol), while calmodulin inhibits Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation to the basal level. A deletion mutant lacking the visinin-like domain did not show Ca(2+)-simulated autophosphorylation activity but retained Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity at a reduced level. Ca(2+)-dependent mobility shift assays using E.coli-expressed protein from residues 358-520 revealed that Ca(2+) binds to the visinin-like domain. Studies with site-directed mutants of the visinin-like domain indicated that EF-hands II and III are crucial for Ca(2+)-induced conformational changes in the visinin-like domain. Autophosphorylation of CCaMK increases Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity by about 5-fold, whereas it did not affect its C(2+)-independent activity. This report provides evidence for the existence of a protein kinase in plants that is modulated by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain in CCaMK adds an additional Ca(2+)-sensing mechanism not previously known to exist in the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling cascade in plants.

  19. 嵌合抗体研究进展%Research advances in chimeric antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雪

    2012-01-01

    单克隆抗体在疾病的诊断、治疗和预防中发挥着重要作用,但是在临床治疗中人抗鼠抗体反应的出现使鼠源性单克隆抗体的应用受到了很大限制.随着分子生物学、分子免疫学技术的飞速发展,抗体技术已发展到第三代抗体——基因工程抗体阶段,可利用基因工程技术对鼠源性抗体进行改造,保留或增强天然抗体的特异性和主要生物学活性,同时减少鼠源成分,以避免鼠源性单克隆抗体在临床应用方面的缺陷.此文就基因工程抗体中的重要组成部分嵌合抗体的研究进展做一综述.%Monoclonal antibodies play an important role in diagnosis,treatment and prevention of diseases,but the clinical utility of murine monoclonal antibodies has been greatly limited by human anti-mouse antibody responses.With the rapid development of molecular biology and molecular immunology,antibody techniques run to the third generation-genetic engineering antibody.Murine antibodies are reconstructed with genetic engineering techniques,which reserve or increase the specificity and biological activity of natural antibodies,decrease murine components,getting rid of defects of murine monoclonal antibody in clinical application.In this review,research advancement in chimeric antibody which is one of the important constituents of genetic engineering antibodies is described.

  20. Automated manufacturing of chimeric antigen receptor T cells for adoptive immunotherapy using CliniMACS prodigy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Ulrike; Nickolay, Lauren; Philip, Brian; Cheung, Gordon Weng-Kit; Zhan, Hong; Johnston, Ian C D; Kaiser, Andrew D; Peggs, Karl; Pule, Martin; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-08-01

    Novel cell therapies derived from human T lymphocytes are exhibiting enormous potential in early-phase clinical trials in patients with hematologic malignancies. Ex vivo modification of T cells is currently limited to a small number of centers with the required infrastructure and expertise. The process requires isolation, activation, transduction, expansion and cryopreservation steps. To simplify procedures and widen applicability for clinical therapies, automation of these procedures is being developed. The CliniMACS Prodigy (Miltenyi Biotec) has recently been adapted for lentiviral transduction of T cells and here we analyse the feasibility of a clinically compliant T-cell engineering process for the manufacture of T cells encoding chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for CD19 (CAR19), a widely targeted antigen in B-cell malignancies. Using a closed, single-use tubing set we processed mononuclear cells from fresh or frozen leukapheresis harvests collected from healthy volunteer donors. Cells were phenotyped and subjected to automated processing and activation using TransAct, a polymeric nanomatrix activation reagent incorporating CD3/CD28-specific antibodies. Cells were then transduced and expanded in the CentriCult-Unit of the tubing set, under stabilized culture conditions with automated feeding and media exchange. The process was continuously monitored to determine kinetics of expansion, transduction efficiency and phenotype of the engineered cells in comparison with small-scale transductions run in parallel. We found that transduction efficiencies, phenotype and function of CAR19 T cells were comparable with existing procedures and overall T-cell yields sufficient for anticipated therapeutic dosing. The automation of closed-system T-cell engineering should improve dissemination of emerging immunotherapies and greatly widen applicability.

  1. Adoptive immunotherapy for acute leukemia:New insights in chimeric antigen receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma?l; Heiblig; Mohamed; Elhamri; Mauricette; Michallet; Xavier; Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Relapses remain a major concern in acute leukemia. It is well known that leukemia stem cells(LSCs) hide in hematopoietic niches and escape to the immune system surveillance through the outgrowth of poorly immunogenic tumor-cell variants and the suppression of the active immune response. Despitethe introduction of new reagents and new therapeutic approaches, no treatment strategies have been able to definitively eradicate LSCs. However, recent adoptive immunotherapy in cancer is expected to revolutionize our way to fight against this disease, by redirecting the immune system in order to eliminate relapse issues. Initially described at the onset of the 90’s, chimeric antigen receptors(CARs) are recombinant receptors transferred in various T cell subsets, providing specific antigens binding in a non-major histocompatibility complex restricted manner, and effective on a large variety of human leukocyte antigen-divers cell populations. Once transferred, engineered T cells act like an expanding "living drug" specifically targeting the tumor-associated antigen, and ensure long-term antitumor memory. Over the last decades, substantial improvements have been made in CARs design. CAR T cells have finally reached the clinical practice and first clinical trials have shown promising results. In acute lymphoblastic leukemia, high rate of complete and prolonged clinical responses have been observed after anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy, with specific but manageable adverse events. In this review, our goal was to describe CAR structures and functions, and to summarize recent data regarding pre-clinical studies and clinical trials in acute leukemia.

  2. Porcine Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived from IVF Embryos Contribute to Chimeric Development In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binghua Xue

    Full Text Available Although the pig is considered an important model of human disease and an ideal animal for the preclinical testing of cell transplantation, the utility of this model has been hampered by a lack of genuine porcine embryonic stem cells. Here, we derived a porcine pluripotent stem cell (pPSC line from day 5.5 blastocysts in a newly developed culture system based on MXV medium and a 5% oxygen atmosphere. The pPSCs had been passaged more than 75 times over two years, and the morphology of the colony was similar to that of human embryonic stem cells. Characterization and assessment showed that the pPSCs were alkaline phosphatase (AKP positive, possessed normal karyotypes and expressed classic pluripotent markers, including OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG. In vitro differentiation through embryonic body formation and in vivo differentiation via teratoma formation in nude mice demonstrated that the pPSCs could differentiate into cells of the three germ layers. The pPSCs transfected with fuw-DsRed (pPSC-FDs could be passaged with a stable expression of both DsRed and pluripotent markers. Notably, when pPSC-FDs were used as donor cells for somatic nuclear transfer, 11.52% of the reconstructed embryos developed into blastocysts, which was not significantly different from that of the reconstructed embryos derived from porcine embryonic fibroblasts. When pPSC-FDs were injected into day 4.5 blastocysts, they became involved in the in vitro embryonic development and contributed to the viscera of foetuses at day 50 of pregnancy as well as the developed placenta after the chimeric blastocysts were transferred into recipients. These findings indicated that the pPSCs were porcine pluripotent cells; that this would be a useful cell line for porcine genetic engineering and a valuable cell line for clarifying the molecular mechanism of pluripotency regulation in pigs.

  3. Calcium-stimulated autophosphorylation site of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Siems, W. F.; Jones, J. P.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    The existence of two molecular switches regulating plant chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), namely the C-terminal visinin-like domain acting as Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switch and calmodulin binding domain acting as Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch, has been described (Sathyanarayanan, P. V., Cremo, C. R., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422). Here we report the identification of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site of CCaMK by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry. Thr(267) was confirmed as the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site by post-source decay experiments and by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified T267A mutant form of CCaMK did not show Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation, autophosphorylation-dependent variable calmodulin affinity, or Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulation of kinase activity. Sequence comparison of CCaMK from monocotyledonous plant (lily) and dicotyledonous plant (tobacco) suggests that the autophosphorylation site is conserved. This is the first identification of a phosphorylation site specifically responding to activation by second messenger system (Ca(2+) messenger system) in plants. Homology modeling of the kinase and calmodulin binding domain of CCaMK with the crystal structure of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 suggests that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site is located on the surface of the kinase and far from the catalytic site. Analysis of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation with increasing concentration of CCaMK indicates the possibility that the Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular mechanism.

  4. Studies on mu and delta opioid receptor selectivity utilizing chimeric and site-mutagenized receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W W; Shahrestanifar, M; Jin, J; Howells, R D

    1995-01-01

    Opioid receptors are members of the guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor family. Three types of opioid receptors have been cloned and characterized and are referred to as the delta, kappa and mu types. Analysis of receptor chimeras and site-directed mutant receptors has provided a great deal of information about functionally important amino acid side chains that constitute the ligand-binding domains and G-protein-coupling domains of G-protein-coupled receptors. We have constructed delta/mu opioid receptor chimeras that were express in human embryonic kidney 293 cells in order to define receptor domains that are responsible for receptor type selectivity. All chimeric receptors and wild-type delta and mu opioid receptors displayed high-affinity binding of etorphine (an agonist), naloxone (an antagonist), and bremazocine (a mixed agonist/antagonist). In contrast, chimeras that lacked the putative first extracellular loop of the mu receptor did not bind the mu-selective peptide [D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly5-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO). Chimeras that lacked the putative third extracellular loop of the delta receptor did not bind the delta-selective peptide, [D-Ser2,D-Leu5]enkephalin-Thr (DSLET). Point mutations in the putative third extracellular loop of the wild-type delta receptor that converted vicinal arginine residues to glutamine abolished DSLET binding while not affecting bremazocine, etorphine, and naltrindole binding. We conclude that amino acids in the putative first extracellular loop of the mu receptor are critical for high-affinity DAMGO binding and that arginine residues in the putative third extracellular loop of the delta receptor are important for high-affinity DSLET binding. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8618916

  5. Uncertainty characterization and quantification in air pollution models. Application to the CHIMERE model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debry, Edouard; Mallet, Vivien; Garaud, Damien; Malherbe, Laure; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Rouïl, Laurence

    2010-05-01

    Prev'Air is the French operational system for air pollution forecasting. It is developed and maintained by INERIS with financial support from the French Ministry for Environment. On a daily basis it delivers forecasts up to three days ahead for ozone, nitrogene dioxide and particles over France and Europe. Maps of concentration peaks and daily averages are freely available to the general public. More accurate data can be provided to customers and modelers. Prev'Air forecasts are based on the Chemical Transport Model CHIMERE. French authorities rely more and more on this platform to alert the general public in case of high pollution events and to assess the efficiency of regulation measures when such events occur. For example the road speed limit may be reduced in given areas when the ozone level exceeds one regulatory threshold. These operational applications require INERIS to assess the quality of its forecasts and to sensitize end users about the confidence level. Indeed concentrations always remain an approximation of the true concentrations because of the high uncertainty on input data, such as meteorological fields and emissions, because of incomplete or inaccurate representation of physical processes, and because of efficiencies in numerical integration [1]. We would like to present in this communication the uncertainty analysis of the CHIMERE model led in the framework of an INERIS research project aiming, on the one hand, to assess the uncertainty of several deterministic models and, on the other hand, to propose relevant indicators describing air quality forecast and their uncertainty. There exist several methods to assess the uncertainty of one model. Under given assumptions the model may be differentiated into an adjoint model which directly provides the concentrations sensitivity to given parameters. But so far Monte Carlo methods seem to be the most widely and oftenly used [2,3] as they are relatively easy to implement. In this framework one

  6. Preferred extensions as stable models

    CERN Document Server

    Nieves, Juan Carlos; Cortés, Ulises

    2008-01-01

    Given an argumentation framework AF, we introduce a mapping function that constructs a disjunctive logic program P, such that the preferred extensions of AF correspond to the stable models of P, after intersecting each stable model with the relevant atoms. The given mapping function is of polynomial size w.r.t. AF. In particular, we identify that there is a direct relationship between the minimal models of a propositional formula and the preferred extensions of an argumentation framework by working on representing the defeated arguments. Then we show how to infer the preferred extensions of an argumentation framework by using UNSAT algorithms and disjunctive stable model solvers. The relevance of this result is that we define a direct relationship between one of the most satisfactory argumentation semantics and one of the most successful approach of non-monotonic reasoning i.e., logic programming with the stable model semantics.

  7. Fish Culture Economics and Extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.N. Ogamba

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fish culture economics and extension was reviewed to enable fish culturist plan effectively before involved in fish culture and practices. The cost and benefits of fish culture need be known before participation in the business. There is need for cross-link between research and the fishing community. Prior to introduction of any new innovation in fisheries extension and evaluation of such programmers, the agency responsible for such exercise should have full knowledge of the existing farming practice/techniques and the reasons behind them. In assessing or evaluating the impact of any new techniques or programmers, consideration should be given to such factors as natural conditions, local infrastructures, socio cultural setting, farmers’ production aims and labor economics. The study reviews the types of feasibility study, a typical feasibility study and report on a fish farm project and detail analysis of culture extension to enable fish culturist plan effectively before involved in fish culture and practices.

  8. On extensions of Leibniz algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhimov, I. S.; Said Husain, Sh. K.; Mohammed, M. A.

    2017-09-01

    This paper is dedicated to the study extensions of Leibniz algebras using the annihilator approach. The extensions methods have been used earlier to classify certain classes of algebras. In the paper we first review and adjust theoretical background of the method for Leibniz algebras then apply it to classify four-dimensional Leibniz algebras over a field K. We obtain complete classification of four-dimensional nilpotent Leibniz algebras. The main idea of the method is to transfer the “base change” action to an action of automorphism group of the algebras of smaller dimension on cocycles constructed by the annihilator extensions. The method can be used to classify low-dimensional Leibniz algebras over other finite fields as well.

  9. On Nilpotent Extensions of Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adam W. Marczak; Jerzy Plonka

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate essentially n-ary term operations of nilpotent extensions of algebras. We detect the connection between term operations of an original algebra and its nilpotent extensions. This structural point of view easily leads to the conclusion that the number of distinct essentially n-ary term operations of a proper algebraic nilpotent extension (ひ) of an algebra (ワ) is given by the formula pn(ひ)={pn(ワ)+1 for n=1,{pn(ワ) otherwise. We show that in general the converse theorem is not true. However, we suppose that if a variety V is uniquely determined by its pn-sequences, the converse theorem is also satisfied. In the second part of the paper, we characterize generics of nilpotent shifts of varieties and describe cardinalities of minimal generics. We give a number of examples and pose some problems.

  10. Chimerism Analysis of Cell-Free DNA in Patients Treated with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation May Predict Early Relapse in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Aljurf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We studied DNA chimerism in cell-free DNA (cfDNA in patients treated with HSCT. Methods. Chimerism analysis was performed on CD3+ cells, polymorphonuclear (PMN cells, and cfDNA using 16 small tandem repeat loci. The resulting labeled PCR-products were size-fractionated and quantified. Results. Analyzing samples from 191 patients treated with HSCT for nonneoplastic hematologic disorders demonstrated that the cfDNA chimerism is comparable to that seen in PMN cells. Analyzing leukemia patients (N = 126 showed that, of 84 patients with 100% donor DNA in PMN, 16 (19% had evidence of clinical relapse and >10% recipient DNA in the plasma. Additional 16 patients of the 84 (19% showed >10% recipient DNA in plasma, but without evidence of relapse. Eight patients had mixed chimerism in granulocytes, lymphocytes, and plasma, but three of these patients had >10% recipient DNA in plasma compared to PMN cells and these three patients had clinical evidence of relapse. The remaining 34 patients showed 100% donor DNA in both PMN and lymphocytes, but cfDNA showed various levels of chimerism. Of these patients 14 (41% showed laboratory or clinical evidence of relapse and all had >10% recipient DNA in cfDNA. Conclusion. Monitoring patients after HSCT using cfDNA might be more reliable than cellular DNA in predicting early relapse.

  11. Use of ubiquitous, highly heterozygous copy number variants and digital droplet polymerase chain reaction to monitor chimerism after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlam, John B; Ling, Ling; Swain, Michael; Harrington, Tom; Mirochnik, Oksana; Brooks, Ian; Cronin, Sara; Challis, Jackie; Petrovic, Vida; Bruno, Damien L; Mechinaud, Francoise; Conyers, Rachel; Slater, Howard

    2017-01-29

    Chimerism analysis has an important role in the management of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It informs response to disease relapse, graft rejection, and graft-versus-host disease. We have developed a method for chimerism analysis using ubiquitous copy number variation (CNV), which has the benefit of a "negative background" against which multiple independent informative markers are quantified using digital droplet polymerase chain reaction. A panel of up to 38 CNV markers with homozygous deletion frequencies of approximately 0.4-0.6 were used. Sensitivity, precision, reproducibility, and informativity were assessed. CNV chimerism results were compared against established fluorescence in situ hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism, and short tandem repeat-based methods with excellent correlation. Using 30 ng of input DNA per well, the limit of detection was 0.05% chimerism and the limit of quantification was 0.5% chimerism. High informativity was seen with a median of four informative markers detectable per individual in 39 recipients and 43 donor genomes studied. The strength of this approach was exemplified in a multiple donor case involving four genomes (three related). The precision, sensitivity, and informativity of this approach recommend it for use in clinical practice.

  12. Application of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 for radioimmunoscintigraphy of pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Hiroomi [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal diseases and its prognosis is still poor. To improve the survival rate, it is essential to develop new technologies for early and definitive diagnosis. In this study, chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 were successfully radio-labeled with {sup 99m}Tc, preventing depression of the antigen-binding activity. {sup 99m}Tc-labeled monoclonal antibody A7, {sup 99m}Tc-labeled chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7, {sup 99m}Tc-labeled normal mouse IgG and {sup 99m}Tc-labeled Fab fragments of normal mouse IgG were injected intravenously into nude mice bearing human pancreatic cancer xenografts and the radioactivity was subsequently measured. The tumor accumulation was significantly higher with labeled monoclonal antibody A7 than with normal mouse IgG, and higher with chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 than with Fab fragments of normal mouse IgG. The tumor/blood ratio of radioactivity increased rapidly over time with chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7. These results suggest that chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 may be useful for diagnosing pancreatic cancer by means of radioimmunoscintigraphy. (author)

  13. In vivo anti-tumor activity of marine hematopoietic stem cells expressing a p185HER2-specific chimeric T-cell receptor gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN MIN YANG; MICHAEL S FRIEDMAN; MARIANNE T HUBEN; JENNIFER FULLER; QIAO LI; ALFRED E CHANG; JAMES J MULE; KEVIN T MCDONAGH

    2006-01-01

    We have confirmed efficient anti-tumor activities of the peripheral lymphocytes transduced with a p185HER2-specific chimeric T-cell receptor gene both in murine and in human in our previous studies. To further test the feasibility of chimeric T-cell receptor in a bone marrow transplantation model, we first, made two murine tumor cell lines: MT901 and MCA-205, to express human p185HER2by retroviral gene transduction. Murine bone marrow cells were retrovirally transduced to express the chimeric T-cell receptor and gene-modified bone marrow cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mouse. Six months post transplantation, p185HER2-positive tumor cells: MT-901/HER2 or MCA-205/HER2 was subcutaneously or intravenously injected to make mouse models simulating primary breast cancer or pulmonary metastasis. The in vivo anti-tumor effects were monitored by the size of the subcutaneous tumor or counting the tumor nodules in the lungs after India ink staining. The size of the subcutaneous tumor was significantly inhibited and the number of pulmonary nodules were significantly decreased in mouse recipients transplanted with chimeric T-cell receptor modified bone marrow cells compared with the control group. Our results suggest the efficient in vivo anti-tumor activities of chimeric T-cell receptor gene modified bone marrow cells.

  14. Stable extensions by line bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Teixidor-i-Bigas, M

    1997-01-01

    Let C be an algebraic curve of genus g. Consider extensions E of a vector bundle F'' of rank n'' by a vector bundle F' of rank n'. The following statement was conjectured by Lange: If 0extensions like this with E stable. We prove this result for the generic curve when F' is a line bundle. Our method uses a degeneration argument to a reducible curve.

  15. Expression Products of Chimeric BMP2 and BMP7 Induce Osteoblast Differentiation%BMP2与BMP7嵌合表达产物可诱导成骨细胞分化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡丽玲; 李晓霞; 张镜宇; 王宝利

    2009-01-01

    目的:构建骨形态发生蛋白(BMP)2与BMP7嵌合表达的分泌型基因载体pcDNA3-BMP2/7,检测表达产物的成骨诱导活性.方法:聚合酶链反应(PCR)扩增BMP2与BMP7的成熟肽编码基因,利用重叠延伸PCR以柔性肽(Gly_4Ser)_3编码序列使两者嵌合并克隆到质粒pcDNA3/sec上,转染CHO-K1细胞筛选得到稳定克隆,以其条件培养基处理鼠胚胎成纤维细胞C3H10T1/2,通过RT-PCR研究BMP2/7嵌合表达产物的活性.结果:BMP2/7嵌合表达产物可以明显提高C3H10T1/2细胞碱性磷酸酶(Alkaline phosphatase,ALP)、骨钙素(Osteocalcin,Oc)成骨细胞表型基因以及特异性转录因子Runx2 (runt-related transcription factor 2)mRNA的表达(P < 0.01).结论:制备的BMP2/7嵌合表达产物能够形成异源二聚体,诱导非骨源性细胞向成骨细胞分化.%Objective: To study the osteoinductive activity of chimeric molecule of bone morphogenetic protein(BMP)2 and BMP7 expressed in mammalian cells. Methods: Sequences encoding mature peptides of BMP2 and BMP7 were separately amplified by PCR and then linked by overlap-extension PCR with a DNA sequence encoding a flexible peptide (Gly_4Ser)_3 between them. The chimeric DNA sequence was cloned into secretory expression plasmid pcDNA3/sec and then the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3 -BMP2/7 was transfected into CHO-K1 cells. In the presence of G418,cells that stably expressed BMP2/7 were screened out. Thereafter, the conditioned culture medium of the transfected cells was collected and used to treat C3H10T1/2 cells. RT-PCR was employed to study the activity of the recombinant product in inducing osteoblast differentiation. Results: The expression products of chimeric BMP2/7 significantly enhanced the mRNA expression levels of osteoblast phenotype genes, such as alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and osteoblast specific transcription factor runt-related transcription factor 2 in C3H10T1/2 cells(P < 0.01). Conclusion: The chimeric expression products of BMP2

  16. Characterization of NoV P particle-based chimeric protein vaccines developed from two different expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lu; Jin, Hao; Yu, Yongjiao; Yu, Bin; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Jiaxin; Yin, Yuhe; Yu, Xianghui; Wu, Hui; Kong, Wei

    2017-02-01

    The Norovirus (NoV) P domain, with three surface loops for foreign antigen insertion, has been demonstrated as an excellent platform for antigen presentation and novel vaccine development. The P domain alone can self-assemble into a P dimer, 12-mer small particle or 24-mer P particle, and vaccines based on those particles may elicit different levels of immunogenicity. Currently, P particles are generally produced in soluble expression systems in Escherichia coli, mainly in the 24-mer form. However, the low yield of the soluble protein has hindered further clinical applications of P particle-based protein vaccines. In this study, we inserted the Alzheimer's disease (AD) immunogen Aβ1-6 into the three loops of the P particle to generate an AD protein vaccine. To increase the yield of this chimeric protein, we tested the generation of proteins in a soluble expression system and an inclusion body expression system separately in E. coli. The result showed that the inclusion body expression system could greatly enhance the product yield of the chimeric protein compared with the soluble expression system. The refolded protein from the inclusion bodies was mainly in the 12-mer form, while the protein generated from the soluble supernatant was mainly in the 24-mer form. Moreover, the immunogenicity of soluble proteins was significantly stronger than that of the refolded proteins. Thus, comparisons between the two expression methods suggested that the soluble expression system generated chimeric P particles with better immunogenicity, while inclusion body expression system yielded more P particle proteins.

  17. Evaluation of a chimeric multi-epitope-based DNA vaccine against subgroup J avian leukosis virus in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingqing; Cui, Ning; Ma, Xingjiang; Wang, Fangkun; Li, Hongmei; Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Xiaomin

    2016-07-19

    The prokaryotic expressed recombinant chimeric multi-epitope protein X (rCMEPX) had been evaluated with good immunogenicity and protective efficacy against subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) in our previous study. In the present research, we cloned the chimeric multi-epitope gene X into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 to evaluate its potency as a DNA vaccine. The purified recombinant gp85 protein and rCMEPX were used as positive controls and a DNA prime-protein boost strategy was also studied. Six experimental groups of 7-day-old chickens (20 per group) were immunized intramuscularly three times at 2weeks interval with PBS, gp85, rCMEPX, pVAX1, pVAX-X and pVAX-X+rCMEPX respectively. The antibody titers and cellular immune responses were assayed after immunization. The efficacy of immunoprotection against the challenge of ALV-J NX0101 strain was also examined. The results showed that the DNA vaccine could elicit both neutralizing antibodies and cellular responses. Immune-challenge experiments showed good protection efficacy against ALV-J infection. Particularly, the regimen involving one priming pVAX-X and twice recombinant rCMEPX boosting, induced the highest antibody titers in all immunized groups. Our results suggest that the constructed chimeric multi-epitope DNA has potential for a candidate vaccine against ALV-J when used in proper prime-boost combinations. The data presented here may provide an alternative strategy for vaccine design in chicken ALV-J prevention.

  18. Expression of the leukemia-associated CBF{beta}/SMMHC chimeric gene causes transformation of 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajra, A.; Liu, P.; Collins, E.S. [National Center for Human Genome Research, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A pericentric inversion of chromosome 16 (inv(16)(p13;q22)) is consistently seen in acute myeloid leukemia of the M4Eo subtype. This inversion fuses almost the entire coding region of the gene encoding of the {beta} subunit of the heterodimeric transcription factor CBF/PEBP2 to the region of the MYH11 gene encoding the rod domain for the smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SMMHC). To investigate the biological properties of the CBF{beta}/SMMHC fusion protein, we have generated 3T3 cell lines that stably express the CBF{beta}/SMMHC chimeric cDNA or the normal, nonchimeric CBF{beta} and SMMHC cDNAs. 3T3 cells expressing CBF{beta}/SMMHC acquire a transformed phenotype, as indicated by altered cell morphology, formation of foci, and growth in soft agar. Cells constitutively overexpressing the normal CBF{beta} cDNA or the rod region of SMMHC remain nontransformed. Western blot analysis using antibodies to CBF{beta} and the SMMHC rod demonstrates that stably transfected cells express the appropriate chimeric or normal protein. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays reveal that cells transformed by the chimeric cDNA do not have a CBF-DNA complex of the expected mobility, but instead contain a large complex with CBF DNA-binding activity that fails to migrate out of the gel wells. In order to define the regions of CBF{beta}/SMMHC necessary for 3T3 transformation, we have stably transfected cells with mutant CBF{beta}/SMMHC cDNAs containing various deletions of the coding region. Analysis of these cell lines indicates that the transformation property of CBF{beta}/SMMHC requires regions of CBF{beta} known to be necessary for association with the DNA-binding CBF{alpha} subunit, and also requires an intact SMMHC carboxyl terminus, which is necessary for formation of the coiled coil domain of the myosin rod.

  19. Modifications of Visual Field Asymmetries for Face Categorization in Early Deaf Adults: A Study With Chimeric Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dole, Marjorie; Méary, David; Pascalis, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Right hemisphere lateralization for face processing is well documented in typical populations. At the behavioral level, this right hemisphere bias is often related to a left visual field (LVF) bias. A conventional mean to study this phenomenon consists of using chimeric faces that are composed of the left and right parts of two faces. In this paradigm, participants generally use the left part of the chimeric face, mostly processed through the right optic tract, to determine its identity, gender or age. To assess the impact of early auditory deprivation on face processing abilities, we tested the LVF bias in a group of early deaf participants and hearing controls. In two experiments, deaf and hearing participants performed a gender categorization task with chimeric and normal average faces. Over the two experiments the results confirmed the presence of a LVF bias in participants, which was less frequent in deaf participants. This result suggested modifications of hemispheric lateralization for face processing in deaf participants. In Experiment 2 we also recorded eye movements to examine whether the LVF bias could be related to face scanning behavior. In this second study, participants performed a similar task while we recorded eye movements using an eye tracking system. Using areas of interest analysis we observed that the proportion of fixations on the mouth relatively to the other areas was increased in deaf participants in comparison with the hearing group. This was associated with a decrease of the proportion of fixations on the eyes. In addition these measures were correlated to the LVF bias suggesting a relationship between the LVF bias and the patterns of facial exploration. Taken together, these results suggest that early auditory deprivation results in plasticity phenomenon affecting the perception of static faces through modifications of hemispheric lateralization and of gaze behavior. PMID:28163692

  20. Performance Improvement of Modified Single Base Propellant with a Special Compound%添加某种化合物提高改性单基药性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘波; 王琼林; 刘少武; 于慧芳; 魏伦; 李达; 王锋; 张远波

    2010-01-01

    @@ The modified single base propellant is generally prepared from single base propellant grains by impregnation with a blasting oil nitroglycerine (NG), following by deterring with a polyester (NA). In our recent research, the performances of the propellant were improved significantly through adding a special compound at the second step. Samples without and with the compound was denoted as IDC-1 and IDC-2, respectively. The performances of the propellant IDC-2 and IDC-1 was compared as following.

  1. Minor Contribution of Chimeric Host-HIV Readthrough Transcripts to the Level of HIV Cell-Associated gag RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Alexander O; DeMaster, Laura K; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Reiss, Peter; O'Doherty, Una; Berkhout, Ben

    2015-11-11

    Cell-associated HIV unspliced RNA is an important marker of the viral reservoir. HIV gag RNA-specific assays are frequently used to monitor reservoir activation. Because HIV preferentially integrates into actively transcribed genes, some of the transcripts detected by these assays may not represent genuine HIV RNA but rather chimeric host-HIV readthrough transcripts. Here, we demonstrate that in HIV-infected patients on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy, such host-derived transcripts do not significantly contribute to the HIV gag RNA level.

  2. Growth enhancement in transgenic Atlantic salmon by the use of an "all fish" chimeric growth hormone gene construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, S J; Gong, Z Y; Fletcher, G L; Shears, M A; King, M J; Idler, D R; Hew, C L

    1992-02-01

    We have developed an "all fish" growth hormone (GH) chimeric gene construct by using an antifreeze protein gene (AFP) promoter from ocean pout linked to a chinook salmon GH cDNA clone. After microinjection into fertilized, nonactivated Atlantic salmon eggs via the micropyle, transgenic Atlantic salmon were generated. The presence of the transgene was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific oligonucleotide primers. A number of these transgenic fish showed dramatic increases in their growth rate. At one year old, the average increase of the transgenic fish was 2 to 6 fold and the largest transgenic fish was 13 times that of the average non-transgenic control.

  3. Paranoid males have reduced lateralisation for processing of negative emotions: an investigation using the chimeric faces test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Victoria J; McKay, Ryan T

    2014-01-01

    Reduced strength of lateralisation in patients with schizophrenia has been reported in a number of studies. However the exact nature of this relationship remains unclear. In this study, lateralisation for processing emotional faces was measured using the chimeric faces test and examined in relation to paranoia in a non-clinical sample. For males only, those with higher scores on a paranoia questionnaire had reduced lateralisation for processing negative facial emotion. For females there were no significant relationships. These findings suggest that atypical patterns of lateralisation for processing emotional stimuli may be implicated in, or associated with, increased levels of paranoia.

  4. Chimeric antibody with human constant regions and mouse variable regions directed against carcinoma-associated antigen 17-1A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, L.K.; Curtis, P.; Rakowicz-Szulczynska, E.; Ghrayeb, J.; Chang, N.; Morrison, S.L.; Koprowski, H.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have cloned the genomic DNA fragments encoding the heavy and light chain variable regions of monoclonal antibody 17-1A, and they have inserted them into mammalian expression vectors containing genomic DNA segments encoding human ..gamma..3 and kappa constant regions. The transfer of these expression vectors containing mouse-human chimeric immunoglobulin genes into Sp2/0 mouse myeloma cells resulted in the production of functional IgG that retained the specific binding to the surface antigen 17-1A expressed on colorectal carcinoma cells.

  5. Chimeric hepatitis B virus core particles with parts or copies of the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshikawa, A.; Tanaka, T; Hoshi, Y.; Kato, N; K. Tachibana; Iizuka, H; Machida, A; Okamoto, H; Yamasaki, M.; Miyakawa, Y

    1993-01-01

    Either parts or multiple copies of the core gene of hepatitis C virus (HCV) were fused to the 3' terminus of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core gene with 34 codons removed. As many as four copies of HCV core protein (720 amino acids) were fused to the carboxy terminus of truncated HBV core protein (149 amino acids) without preventing the assembly of HBV core particles. Chimeric core particles were sandwiched between monoclonal antibody to HBV core and that to HCV core, thereby indicating that a...

  6. Chimeric hepatitis B virus core particles with parts or copies of the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshikawa, A.; Tanaka, T; Hoshi, Y.; Kato, N.; Tachibana, K; Iizuka, H.; Machida, A; Okamoto, H; Yamasaki, M.; Miyakawa, Y

    1993-01-01

    Either parts or multiple copies of the core gene of hepatitis C virus (HCV) were fused to the 3' terminus of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core gene with 34 codons removed. As many as four copies of HCV core protein (720 amino acids) were fused to the carboxy terminus of truncated HBV core protein (149 amino acids) without preventing the assembly of HBV core particles. Chimeric core particles were sandwiched between monoclonal antibody to HBV core and that to HCV core, thereby indicating that a...

  7. Extension Resources for International Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Susan D.

    2016-01-01

    With the opening of additional trade partnerships, the reduction of global transportation and communication costs, and the increase in demand for U.S. agricultural products and services, international trade is an area of great importance to more and more Extension clients and stakeholders. This article provides information about the primary…

  8. Unramified extensions of quadratic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Li; Dong Yang; Xianke Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Let K be a global quadratic field, then every unramified abelian extension of K is proved to be absolutely Galois when K is a number field or under some natural conditions when K is a function field. The absolute Galois group is also determined explicitly.

  9. Equivalence Relations of -Algebra Extensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Changguo Wei

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we consider equivalence relations of *-algebra extensions and describe the relationship between the isomorphism equivalence and the unitary equivalence. We also show that a certain group homomorphism is the obstruction for these equivalence relations to be the same.

  10. EXTENSIONS OF EULER HARMONIC SUMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djurdje Cvijović

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Three new closed-form summation formulae involving harmonic numbers are established using simple arguments and they are very general extensions of Euler’s famous harmonic sum identity. Some illustrative special cases as well as immediate consequences of the main results are also considered.

  11. Longest Common Extensions in Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gawrychowski, Pawel; Gørtz, Inge Li;

    2015-01-01

    The longest common extension (LCE) of two indices in a string is the length of the longest identical substrings starting at these two indices. The LCE problem asks to preprocess a string into a compact data structure that supports fast LCE queries. In this paper we generalize the LCE problem to t...

  12. Protective coatings on extensible biofibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Fantner, Georg E.; Hohlbauch, Sophia; Waite, J. Herbert; Zok, Frank W.

    2007-09-01

    Formulating effective coatings for use in nano- and biotechnology poses considerable technical challenges. If they are to provide abrasion resistance, coatings must be hard and adhere well to the underlying substrate. High hardness, however, comes at the expense of extensibility. This property trade-off makes the design of coatings for even moderately compliant substrates problematic, because substrate deformation easily exceeds the strain limit of the coating. Although the highest strain capacity of synthetic fibre coatings is less than 10%, deformable coatings are ubiquitous in biological systems. With an eye to heeding the lessons of nature, the cuticular coatings of byssal threads from two species of marine mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Perna canaliculus, have been investigated. Consistent with their function to protect collagenous fibres in the byssal-thread core, these coatings show hardness and stiffness comparable to those of engineering plastics and yet are surprisingly extensible; the tensile failure strain of P. canaliculus cuticle is about 30% and that of M. galloprovincialis is a remarkable 70%. The difference in extensibility is attributable to the presence of deformable microphase-separated granules within the cuticle of M. galloprovincialis. The results have important implications in the design of bio-inspired extensible coatings.

  13. NACRE Update and Extension Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Masayuki; Arai, Koji; Arnould, Marcel; Takahashi, Kohji; Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    2006-04-01

    NACRE, the `nuclear astrophysics compilation of reaction rates', has been widely utilized in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies since its publication in 1999. We describe here the current status of a Konan-Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) joint project that aims at its update and extension.

  14. Selections, Extensions and Collectionwise Normality

    CERN Document Server

    Gutev, Valentin

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that the classical Michael's selection theorem for l.s.c. mappings with a collectionwise normal domain can be reduced only to compact-valued mappings modulo the Dowker's extension theorem for such spaces. The technique developed to achieve this result is applied to construct selections for set-valued mappings whose point images are in completely metrizable absolute retracts.

  15. Homomorphisms between $C^*$-Algebra Extensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Changguo Wei

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we consider the question when a homomorphism between two extension algebras preserves the essential ideal in the corresponding extension. Some conditions of two essential extensions being isomorphic are given. We also describe the relationship between the induced extensions and the Kasparov products and give the completely positive liftings of the induced extensions.

  16. A novel single-base deletion mutation of the RUNX2 gene in a Chinese family with cleidocranial dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, C Y; Xue, J J; Tan, L; Jiang, C H; Gao, Q P; Liang, D S; Wu, L Q

    2011-12-14

    We identified a disease-causing mutation of the RUNX2 gene in a four-generation Chinese family affected with cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD). For mutation analysis, the coding region of RUNX2 was sequenced with DNA from two patients and three unaffected family members. The RUNX2 mutation was investigated in 50 normal controls by denaturing high pressure liquid chromatography. A heterozygous single-base deletion (c.549delC) of RUNX2, which predicts a termination site at the 185th codon and leads to a stop in the runt domain of RUNX2 protein, was detected in both patients but not in the three unaffected members of the family. This mutation was also not found in 50 controls and has not been reported previously. We demonstrated that a novel mutation (c.549delC) of RUNX2 is associated with CCD in a Chinese family, adding to the repertoire of RUNX2 mutations related to CCD.

  17. Thermal Stability and Underwater Energy of Water Gel Explosive Using Expired Single-Base Propellants as Ingredients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wei, Xiao-An; He, Weidong

    2014-05-01

    A water gel explosive using expired single-base propellant grains as the ingredient was prepared by a simple process coupled with a new gelling system. The thermal stability and output energy of the explosive were studied using an accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) and underwater blast test, respectively. The effects of oxygen balance, shape and size of the propellant, and storage time on the output energy of the explosive were investigated. It is shown that the initial decomposition temperature of the explosive was 418.24 K under adiabatic conditions. The underwater output energy increased with the increase in the oxygen balance of the explosive. The mass fraction and specific surface area of the propellant had effects on the output energy of the explosive. In addition, this water gel explosive was proven to have a stable storage performance after it had been stored for 6 months.

  18. Label-free detection of DNA single-base mismatches using a simple reflectance-based optical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, G; Ceccarello, E; Giavazzi, F; Salina, M; Damin, F; Chiari, M; Buscaglia, M; Bellini, T; Zanchetta, G

    2016-05-21

    Rapid and quantitative detection of the binding of nucleic acids to surface-immobilized probes remains a challenge in many biomedical applications. We investigated the hybridization of a set of fully complementary and defected 12-base long DNA oligomers by using the Reflective Phantom Interface (RPI), a recently developed multiplexed label-free detection technique. Based on the simple measurement of reflected light intensity, this technology enables to quantify the hybridization directly as it occurs on the surface with a sensitivity of 10 pg mm(-2). We found a strong effect of single-base mismatches and of their location on hybridization kinetics and equilibrium binding. In line with previous studies, we found that DNA-DNA binding is weaker on a surface than in the bulk. Our data indicate that this effect is a consequence of weak nonspecific binding of the probes to the surface.

  19. Mapping of single-base differences between two DNA strands in a single molecule using holliday junction nanomechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Brème

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work is to demonstrate a novel single-molecule DNA sequence comparison assay that is purely based on DNA mechanics. METHODS: A molecular construct that contained the two homologous but non-identical DNA sequences that were to be compared was prepared such that a four-way (Holliday junction could be formed by the formation of heteroduplexes through the inter-recombination of the strands. Magnetic tweezers were used to manipulate the force and the winding applied to this construct for inducing both the formation and the migration of a Holliday junction. The end-to-end distance of the construct was measured as a function of the winding and was used to monitor the behavior of the Holliday junction in different regions of the intra-molecular recombination. MAIN RESULTS: In the appropriate buffer, the magnet rotation induces the migration of the Holliday junction in the regions where there is no sequence difference between the recombining sequences. In contrast, even a single-base difference between the recombining sequences leads to a long-lasting blockage of the migration in the same buffer; this effect was obtained when the junction was positioned near this locus (the site of the single-base difference and forced toward the formation of heteroduplexes that comprise the locus. The migration blockages were detected through the identification of the formation of plectonemes. The detection of the presence of sequence differences and their respective mappings were obtained from the series of blockages that were detected. SIGNIFICANCE: This work presents a novel single-molecule sequence comparison assay that is based on the use of a Holliday junction as an ultra-sensitive nanomechanism; the mismatches act as blocking grains of sand in the Holliday "DNA gearbox". This approach will potentially have future applications in biotechnology.

  20. Chimerization at the AQP2–AQP3 locus is the genetic basis of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in clinical Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice E. Graf

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aquaglyceroporin-2 is a known determinant of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in Trypanosoma brucei brucei laboratory strains. Recently, chimerization at the AQP2–AQP3 tandem locus was described from melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistant Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates from sleeping sickness patients in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Here, we demonstrate that reintroduction of wild-type AQP2 into one of these isolates fully restores drug susceptibility while expression of the chimeric AQP2/3 gene in aqp2–aqp3 null T. b. brucei does not. This proves that AQP2–AQP3 chimerization is the cause of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in the T. b. gambiense isolates.

  1. Chimerization at the AQP2-AQP3 locus is the genetic basis of melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance in clinical Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Fabrice E; Baker, Nicola; Munday, Jane C; de Koning, Harry P; Horn, David; Mäser, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    Aquaglyceroporin-2 is a known determinant of melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance in Trypanosoma brucei brucei laboratory strains. Recently, chimerization at the AQP2-AQP3 tandem locus was described from melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistant Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates from sleeping sickness patients in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Here, we demonstrate that reintroduction of wild-type AQP2 into one of these isolates fully restores drug susceptibility while expression of the chimeric AQP2/3 gene in aqp2-aqp3 null T. b. brucei does not. This proves that AQP2-AQP3 chimerization is the cause of melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance in the T. b. gambiense isolates.

  2. Mixed T Lymphocyte Chimerism after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Transplantation Is Predictive for Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hans C; Saliba, Rima M; Rondon, Gabriela; Chen, Julianne; Charafeddine, Yasmeen; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Alatrash, Gheath; Andersson, Borje S; Popat, Uday; Kebriaei, Partow; Ciurea, Stefan; Oran, Betul; Shpall, Elizabeth; Champlin, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Chimerism testing after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represents a promising tool for predicting disease relapse, although its precise role in this setting remains unclear. We investigated the predictive value of T lymphocyte chimerism analysis at 90 to 120 days after allo-HSCT in 378 patients with AML/MDS who underwent busulfan/fludarabine-based myeloablative preparative regimens. Of 265 (70%) patients with available T lymphocyte chimerism data, 43% of patients in first or second complete remission (CR1/CR2) at the time of transplantation had complete (100%) donor T lymphocytes at day +90 to +120 compared with 60% of patients in the non-CR1/CR2 cohort (P = .005). In CR1/CR2 patients, donor T lymphocyte chimerism ≤ 85% at day +90 to +120 was associated with a higher frequency of 3-year disease progression (29%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 18% to 46% versus 15%; 95% CI, 9% to 23%; hazard ratio [HR], 2.1; P = .04). However, in the more advanced, non-CR1/CR2 cohort, mixed T lymphocyte chimerism was not associated with relapse (37%; 95% CI, 20% to 66% versus 34%; 95% CI, 25% to 47%; HR, 1.3; P = .60). These findings demonstrate that early T lymphocyte chimerism testing at day +90 to +120 is a useful approach for predicting AML/MDS disease recurrence in patients in CR1/CR2 at the time of transplantation.

  3. Lentiviral Gag assembly analyzed through the functional characterization of chimeric simian immunodeficiency viruses expressing different domains of the feline immunodeficiency virus capsid protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María J Esteva

    Full Text Available To gain insight into the functional relationship between the capsid (CA domains of the Gag polyproteins of simian and feline immunodeficiency viruses (SIV and FIV, respectively, we constructed chimeric SIVs in which the CA-coding region was partially or totally replaced by the equivalent region of the FIV CA. The phenotypic characterization of the chimeras allowed us to group them into three categories: the chimeric viruses that, while being assembly-competent, exhibit a virion-associated unstable FIV CA; a second group represented only by the chimeric SIV carrying the N-terminal domain (NTD of the FIV CA which proved to be assembly-defective; and a third group constituted by the chimeric viruses that produce virions exhibiting a mature and stable FIV CA protein, and which incorporate the envelope glycoprotein and contain wild-type levels of viral genome RNA and reverse transcriptase. Further analysis of the latter group of chimeric SIVs demonstrated that they are non-infectious due to a post-entry impairment, such as uncoating of the viral core, reverse transcription or nuclear import of the preintegration complex. Furthermore, we show here that the carboxyl-terminus domain (CTD of the FIV CA has an intrinsic ability to dimerize in vitro and form high-molecular-weight oligomers, which, together with our finding that the FIV CA-CTD is sufficient to confer assembly competence to the resulting chimeric SIV Gag polyprotein, provides evidence that the CA-CTD exhibits more functional plasticity than the CA-NTD. Taken together, our results provide relevant information on the biological relationship between the CA proteins of primate and nonprimate lentiviruses.

  4. Comparisons of native Shiga toxins (Stxs type 1 and 2 with chimeric toxins indicate that the source of the binding subunit dictates degree of toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Russo

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx-producing E. coli (STEC cause food-borne outbreaks of hemorrhagic colitis. The main virulence factor expressed by STEC, Stx, is an AB5 toxin that has two antigenically distinct forms, Stx1a and Stx2a. Although Stx1a and Stx2a bind to the same receptor, globotriaosylceramide (Gb3, Stx2a is more potent than Stx1a in mice, whereas Stx1a is more cytotoxic than Stx2a in cell culture. In this study, we used chimeric toxins to ask what the relative contribution of individual Stx subunits is to the differential toxicity of Stx1a and Stx2a in vitro and in vivo. Chimeric stx1/stx2 operons were generated by PCR such that the coding regions for the A2 and B subunits of one toxin were combined with the coding region for the A1 subunit of the heterologous toxin. The toxicities of purified Stx1a, Stx2a, and the chimeric Stxs were determined on Vero and HCT-8 cell lines, while polarized HCT-8 cell monolayers grown on permeable supports were used to follow toxin translocation. In all in vitro assays, the activity of the chimeric toxin correlated with that of the parental toxin from which the B subunit originated. The origin of the native B subunit also dictated the 50% lethal dose of toxin after intraperitoneal intoxication of mice; however, the chimeric Stxs exhibited reduced oral toxicity and pH stability compared to Stx1a and Stx2a. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that the differential toxicity of the chimeric toxins for cells and mice is determined by the origin of the B subunit.

  5. Chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillerdal, Victoria; Essand, Magnus

    2015-04-01

    Cancer immunotherapy was selected as the Breakthrough of the Year 2013 by the editors of Science, in part because of the successful treatment of refractory hematological malignancies with adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells. Effective treatment of B cell leukemia may pave the road to future treatment of solid tumors, using similar approaches. The prostate expresses many unique proteins and, since the prostate gland is a dispensable organ, CAR T cells can potentially be used to target these tissue-specific antigens. However, the location and composition of prostate cancer metastases complicate the task of treating these tumors. It is therefore likely that more sophisticated CAR T cell approaches are going to be required for prostate metastasis than for B cell malignancies. Two main challenges that need to be resolved are how to increase the migration and infiltration of CAR T cells into prostate cancer bone metastases and how to counteract the immunosuppressive microenvironment found in bone lesions. Inclusion of homing (chemokine) receptors in CAR T cells may improve their recruitment to bone metastases, as may antibody-based combination therapies to normalize the tumor vasculature. Optimal activation of CAR T cells through the introduction of multiple costimulatory domains would help to overcome inhibitory signals from the tumor microenvironment. Likewise, combination therapy with checkpoint inhibitors that can reduce tumor immunosuppression may help improve efficacy. Other elegant approaches such as induced expression of immune stimulatory cytokines upon target recognition may also help to recruit other effector immune cells to metastatic sites. Although toxicities are difficult to predict in prostate cancer, severe on-target/off-tumor toxicities have been observed in clinical trials with use of CAR T cells against hematological malignancies; therefore, the choice of the target antigen is going to be crucial. This review

  6. Comparative insecticidal properties of two nucleopolyhedrovirus vectors encoding a similar toxin gene chimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treacy, M F; Rensner, P E; All, J N

    2000-08-01

    Laboratory, greenhouse and field studies were conducted to characterize the insecticidal properties of genetically altered forms of Autographa californica (Speyer) nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcNPV) and Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) NPV (HzNPV) against selected heliothine species. The altered viruses each contained a chimeric 0.8-kb fragment encoding the insect-specific, sodium channel neurotoxin from the Algerian scorpion Androctonus australis Hector (AaIT, hence recombinant viruses designated Ac-AaIT and Hz-AaIT). Based on LD50 values, results from diet-overlay bioassays showed Ac-AaIT and Hz-AaIT to be equally virulent against larval tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens (F.), but Hz-AaIT averaged 1,335-fold greater bioactivity than Ac-AaIT against larval cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie). Hz-AaIT killed larvae of both heliothine species at rates significantly faster than those imparted by HzNPV (viral LT50 values averaged 2.5 and 5.6 d, respectively). In greenhouse studies, foliar sprays of Ac-AaIT and Hz-AaIT were equally effective in controlling H. virescens on cotton; however, Hz-AaIT provided control of H. zea on cotton at a level superior to that of Ac-AaIT. For example, after three weekly sessions of foliar application and H. zea artificial infestation, cotton treated with Ac-AaIT or Hz-AaIT at 10 x 10(11) occulsion bodies (OB)/ha averaged 2.5 and 16.2 nondamaged flower buds per plant, respectively. Another greenhouse study conducted against heliothine species on cotton showed that the quicker killing speed exhibited by Hz-AaIT led to improved plant protection versus HzNPV. Finally, results from three field trials demonstrated that Hz-AaIT at 5-12 x 10(11) OB/ha provided control of the heliothine complex in cotton at levels slightly better than Bacillus thuringiensis, equal to the macrolide, spinosad, and only slightly less than that of selected pyrethroid and carbamate insecticides. Overall, results from these studies indicate that, because of host range

  7. Building an Extension Network in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussard, H.

    1999-01-01

    Agricultural extension in Vietnam is in transition as the economy moves to a market orientation. The national extension service created in 1993 is constrained by lack of funding, staff, and access to current extension knowledge. (SK)

  8. Role of minimal residual disease and chimerism after reduced-intensity and myeloablative allo-transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Teresa; Diez-Campelo, María; Godoy, Vicky; Rojas, Silvia; Colado, Enrique; Alcoceba, Miguel; González, Marcos; Vidriales, Belén; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín M; López-Corral, Lucía; Luño, Elisa; del Cañizo, Consuelo

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the impact of detection of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry (FCMRD) and CD3 chimerism in relapse in a cohort of 87 patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing stem cell transplantation. Patients with a positive FCMRD at day +100 after transplantation showed higher relapse rates and worse overall survival. In multivariate analysis, a positive FCMRD after transplantation was a significant predictor of relapse. Mixed chimerism showed a trend to statistical signification. We conclude that FCMRD at day 100 after SCT is the best predictor of relapse after SCT in patients with aggressive myeloid malignancies.

  9. An intermediate alemtuzumab schedule reduces the incidence of mixed chimerism following reduced-intensity conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Rebecca A; Kim, Mi-Ok; Liu, Chunyan; Bellman, Denise; Hart, Laura; Grimley, Michael; Kumar, Ashish; Jodele, Sonata; Myers, Kasiani C; Chandra, Sharat; Leemhuis, Tom; Mehta, Parinda A; Bleesing, Jack J; Davies, Stella M; Jordan, Michael B; Filipovich, Alexandra H

    2013-11-01

    Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) improves the outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). Proximal (ie, close to graft infusion) dosing of alemtuzumab is associated with a high incidence of mixed chimerism, whereas distal (ie, distant from graft infusion) dosing is associated with less mixed chimerism but more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The alemtuzumab dose per kilogram of body weight also influences these outcomes. We hypothesized that an intermediate alemtuzumab dosing schedule would reduce mixed chimerism and maintain a low incidence of acute GVHD. In this study, 24 consecutive HCTs were performed in patients with HLH or a related disorder using a novel intermediate alemtuzumab schedule of 1 mg/kg starting on day -14. The cumulative incidences (CIs) of mixed chimerism, upfront acute GVHD grades II-IV, and receipt of additional hematopoietic cell products after HCT were compared in patients treated with a distal alemtuzumab schedule (n = 15) and those treated with a proximal alemtuzumab schedule (n = 33). All patients received fludarabine and melphalan. The CI of mixed chimerism was 31% in the intermediate group, 72% in the proximal group (P alemtuzumab (P = .03). The CI of acute GVHD grades II-IV before the development of mixed chimerism was 4% in the intermediate group, 0% in the proximal group, and 13% in the distal group (P = .04, proximal versus distal). The 1-year CI of administration of additional hematopoietic cell products for mixed chimerism (donor lymphocyte infusion ± hematopoietic stem cell boost ± repeat HCT) was 14% in the intermediate group, 53% in the proximal group (P = .01), and 38% in the distal ≥2 mg/kg alemtuzumab group (P = .02). Our findings indicate that intermediate RIC reduces the incidence of mixed chimerism, is associated with a low incidence of upfront acute GVHD, and decreases the need for additional hematopoietic cell

  10. Chimeric Yellow Fever/Dengue Virus as a Candidate Dengue Vaccine: Quantitation of the Dengue Virus-Specific CD8 T-Cell Response

    OpenAIRE

    van der Most, Robbert G.; Murali-Krishna, Kaja; Ahmed, Rafi; Strauss, James H.

    2000-01-01

    We have constructed a chimeric yellow fever/dengue (YF/DEN) virus, which expresses the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes from DEN type 2 (DEN-2) virus in a YF virus (YFV-17D) genetic background. Immunization of BALB/c mice with this chimeric virus induced a CD8 T-cell response specific for the DEN-2 virus prM and E proteins. This response protected YF/DEN virus-immunized mice against lethal dengue encephalitis. Control mice immunized with the parental YFV-17D were not protected against...

  11. Fialuridine induces acute liver failure in chimeric TK-NOG mice: a model for detecting hepatic drug toxicity prior to human testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Xu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Seven of 15 clinical trial participants treated with a nucleoside analogue (fialuridine [FIAU] developed acute liver failure. Five treated participants died, and two required a liver transplant. Preclinical toxicology studies in mice, rats, dogs, and primates did not provide any indication that FIAU would be hepatotoxic in humans. Therefore, we investigated whether FIAU-induced liver toxicity could be detected in chimeric TK-NOG mice with humanized livers. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Control and chimeric TK-NOG mice with humanized livers were treated orally with FIAU 400, 100, 25, or 2.5 mg/kg/d. The response to drug treatment was evaluated by measuring plasma lactate and liver enzymes, by assessing liver histology, and by electron microscopy. After treatment with FIAU 400 mg/kg/d for 4 d, chimeric mice developed clinical and serologic evidence of liver failure and lactic acidosis. Analysis of liver tissue revealed steatosis in regions with human, but not mouse, hepatocytes. Electron micrographs revealed lipid and mitochondrial abnormalities in the human hepatocytes in FIAU-treated chimeric mice. Dose-dependent liver toxicity was detected in chimeric mice treated with FIAU 100, 25, or 2.5 mg/kg/d for 14 d. Liver toxicity did not develop in control mice that were treated with the same FIAU doses for 14 d. In contrast, treatment with another nucleotide analogue (sofosbuvir 440 or 44 mg/kg/d po for 14 d, which did not cause liver toxicity in human trial participants, did not cause liver toxicity in mice with humanized livers. CONCLUSIONS: FIAU-induced liver toxicity could be readily detected using chimeric TK-NOG mice with humanized livers, even when the mice were treated with a FIAU dose that was only 10-fold above the dose used in human participants. The clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, liver histology, and ultra-structural changes observed in FIAU-treated chimeric mice mirrored those of FIAU-treated human participants. The use

  12. NURBS curve blending using extension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-jin LIU; Rong-qi QIU; Xiao-hui LIANG

    2009-01-01

    Curve and surface blending is an important operation in CAD systems, in which a non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) has been used as the de facto standard. In local comer blending, two curves intersecting at that comer are first made disjoint, and then the third blending curve is added-in to smoothly join the two curves with G1-or G2-continuity. In this paper we present a study to solve the joint problem based on curve extension. The following nice properties of this extension algorithm are exploited in depth: (1) The parameterization of the original shapes does not change; (2) No additional fragments are created.Various examples are presented to demonstrate that our solution is simple and efficient.

  13. Linear programming foundations and extensions

    CERN Document Server

    Vanderbei, Robert J

    2001-01-01

    Linear Programming: Foundations and Extensions is an introduction to the field of optimization. The book emphasizes constrained optimization, beginning with a substantial treatment of linear programming, and proceeding to convex analysis, network flows, integer programming, quadratic programming, and convex optimization. The book is carefully written. Specific examples and concrete algorithms precede more abstract topics. Topics are clearly developed with a large number of numerical examples worked out in detail. Moreover, Linear Programming: Foundations and Extensions underscores the purpose of optimization: to solve practical problems on a computer. Accordingly, the book is coordinated with free efficient C programs that implement the major algorithms studied: -The two-phase simplex method; -The primal-dual simplex method; -The path-following interior-point method; -The homogeneous self-dual methods. In addition, there are online JAVA applets that illustrate various pivot rules and variants of the simplex m...

  14. Mosaic: Policy Homomorphic Network Extension

    CERN Document Server

    Li, L Erran; Yang, Y R

    2010-01-01

    With the advent of large-scale cloud computing infrastructure, network extension and migration has emerged as a major challenge in the management of modern enterprise networks. Many enterprises are considering extending or relocating their network components, in whole or in part, to remote, private and public data centers, in order to attain scalability, failure resilience, and cost savings for their network applications. In this paper, we conduct a first rigorous study on the extension and migration of an enterprise network while preserving its performance and security requirements, such as layer 2/layer 3 reachability, and middle-box traversal through load balancer, intrusion detection and ACLs. We formulate this increasingly important problem, present preliminary designs, and conduct experiments to validate the feasibility of our designs.

  15. Crystal structure of an FIV/HIV chimeric protease complexed with the broad-based inhibitor, TL-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder John H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have obtained the 1.7 Å crystal structure of FIV protease (PR in which 12 critical residues around the active site have been substituted with the structurally equivalent residues of HIV PR (12X FIV PR. The chimeric PR was crystallized in complex with the broad-based inhibitor TL-3, which inhibits wild type FIV and HIV PRs, as well as 12X FIV PR and several drug-resistant HIV mutants 1234. Biochemical analyses have demonstrated that TL-3 inhibits these PRs in the order HIV PR > 12X FIV PR > FIV PR, with Ki values of 1.5 nM, 10 nM, and 41 nM, respectively 234. Comparison of the crystal structures of the TL-3 complexes of 12X FIV and wild-typeFIV PR revealed theformation of additinal van der Waals interactions between the enzyme inhibitor in the mutant PR. The 12X FIV PR retained the hydrogen bonding interactions between residues in the flap regions and active site involving the enzyme and the TL-3 inhibitor in comparison to both FIV PR and HIV PR. However, the flap regions of the 12X FIV PR more closely resemble those of HIV PR, having gained several stabilizing intra-flap interactions not present in wild type FIV PR. These findings offer a structural explanation for the observed inhibitor/substrate binding properties of the chimeric PR.

  16. {sup 99m}Tc-labeled chimeric anti-NCA 95 antigranulocyte monoclonal antibody for bone marrow imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarwar, M.; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1998-09-01

    Chimeric mouse-human antigranulocyte monoclonal antibody (ch MAb) against non-specific cross-reacting antigen (NCA-95) was labeled with {sup 99m}Tc (using a direct method) and {sup 125}I (using the chloramine T method), and its binding to human granulocytes and LS-180 colorectal carcinoma cells expressing carcinoembryonic antigen on their surfaces, cross-reactive with anti-NCA-95 chimeric monoclonal antibody, increased in proportion to the number of cells added and reached more than 80% and 90%, respectively. In biodistribution studies, {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 125}I-labeled ch anti-NCA-95 MAb revealed high tumor uptake, and the tumor-to-blood ratio was 2.9 after 24 hours. The tumor-to-normal-organ ratio was also more than 3.0 in all organs except for the tumor-to-kidney ratio. Scintigrams of athymic nude mice confirmed the results of biodistribution studies that showed higher radioactivity in tumor and kidney of the mice administered with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled ch MAb. A normal volunteer injected with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled ch anti-NCA-95 antigranulocyte MAb showed clear bone marrow images, and a patient with aplastic anemia revealed irregular uptake in his lumbar spine, suggesting its utility for bone marrow scintigraphy and for the detection of hematological disorders, infections, and bone metastasis. (author)

  17. Temporary Ectopic Implantation of a Single Finger Using a Perforator as a Feeding Vessel, and Subsequent Prefabricated Chimeric Flap Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takumi, Yamamoto; Hisako, Hara; Yusuke, Yamamoto; Azusa, Oshima; Kazuki, Kikuchi; Harunosuke, Kato; Kumiko, Sata; Kentaro, Doi; Takeshi, Todokoro; Jun, Araki; Makoto, Mihara; Takuya, Higashino; Takuya, Iida; Isao, Koshima

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Ectopic implantation was first reported by Godina in 1986. We herein present 2 cases in which amputated fingers were salvaged and reconstructed by means of temporary ectopic implantation utilizing perforator anastomoses and chimeric flaps. Methods: Case 1. A 30-year-old man injured his right hand. All of the fingers were completely crushed with the exception of the little finger. We performed an ectopic implantation by using the superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator. Three months later, the little finger was transplanted with the superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator flap, vascularized nerve, and the 2nd metacarpal bone. Case 2. A 29-year-old man suffered a degloving injury of the index finger. The digital artery was anastomosed to deep inferior epigastric artery perforator. One month later, a deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap containing the ectopically transplanted index finger was transplanted, but the index fingertip became pale and necrotized. After debridement, a hemipulp transplantation was performed. Results/Conclusions: As the diameter of perforators is similar to that of digital arteries, and perforators are capable of supplying large areas of tissue, they can be used as recipient vessels for ectopic implantation in finger salvage procedures. Another advantage of perforators as feeding vessels in ectopic implantation is the possibility of forming an ectopic chimera; the finger can be incorporated as a part of the chimeric reconstructive flap. With respect to these advantages, the perforator can be used as a feeder in an ectopic implantation of single finger. PMID:27648114

  18. Bioactivity and structural properties of chimeric analogs of the starfish SALMFamide neuropeptides S1 and S2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher E; Otara, Claire B; Younan, Nadine D; Viles, John H; Elphick, Maurice R

    2014-10-01

    The starfish SALMFamide neuropeptides S1 (GFNSALMFamide) and S2 (SGPYSFNSGLTFamide) are the prototypical members of a family of neuropeptides that act as muscle relaxants in echinoderms. Comparison of the bioactivity of S1 and S2 as muscle relaxants has revealed that S2 is ten times more potent than S1. Here we investigated a structural basis for this difference in potency by comparing the bioactivity and solution conformations (using NMR and CD spectroscopy) of S1 and S2 with three chimeric analogs of these peptides. A peptide comprising S1 with the addition of S2's N-terminal tetrapeptide (Long S1 or LS1; SGPYGFNSALMFamide) was not significantly different to S1 in its bioactivity and did not exhibit concentration-dependent structuring seen with S2. An analog of S1 with its penultimate residue substituted from S2 (S1(T); GFNSALTFamide) exhibited S1-like bioactivity and structure. However, an analog of S2 with its penultimate residue substituted from S1 (S2(M); SGPYSFNSGLMFamide) exhibited loss of S2-type bioactivity and structural properties. Collectively, our data indicate that the C-terminal regions of S1 and S2 are the key determinants of their differing bioactivity. However, the N-terminal region of S2 may influence its bioactivity by conferring structural stability in solution. Thus, analysis of chimeric SALMFamides has revealed how neuropeptide bioactivity is determined by a complex interplay of sequence and conformation.

  19. Integrated Safety Assessment of 2'-O-Methoxyethyl Chimeric Antisense Oligonucleotides in NonHuman Primates and Healthy Human Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Stanley T; Baker, Brenda F; Kwoh, T Jesse; Cheng, Wei; Schulz, Dan J; Xia, Shuting; Salgado, Nelson; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Hart, Christopher E; Burel, Sebastien A; Younis, Husam S; Geary, Richard S; Henry, Scott P; Bhanot, Sanjay

    2016-10-01

    The common chemical and biological properties of antisense oligonucleotides provide the opportunity to identify and characterize chemical class effects across species. The chemical class that has proven to be the most versatile and best characterized is the 2'-O-methoxyethyl chimeric antisense oligonucleotides. In this report we present an integrated safety assessment of data obtained from controlled dose-ranging studies in nonhuman primates (macaques) and healthy human volunteers for 12 unique 2'-O-methoxyethyl chimeric antisense oligonucleotides. Safety was assessed by the incidence of safety signals in standardized laboratory tests for kidney and liver function, hematology, and complement activation; as well as by the mean test results as a function of dose level over time. At high doses a number of toxicities were observed in nonhuman primates. However, no class safety effects were identified in healthy human volunteers from this integrated data analysis. Effects on complement in nonhuman primates were not observed in humans. Nonhuman primates predicted safe doses in humans, but over predicted risk of complement activation and effects on platelets. Although limited to a single chemical class, comparisons from this analysis are considered valid and accurate based on the carefully controlled setting for the specified study populations and within the total exposures studied.

  20. Novel in-ovo chimeric recombinant Newcastle disease vaccine protects against both Newcastle disease and infectious bursal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jinying; Wang, Xijun; Tian, Meijie; Wen, Zhiyuan; Feng, Qiulin; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Honglei; Wang, Xiaomei; Bu, Zhigao

    2014-03-14

    Development of a safe and efficient in-ovo vaccine against Newcastle disease (NDV) and very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) is of great importance. In this study, a chimeric NDV LaSota virus with the L gene of Clone-30 (rLaC30L) was used to generate a recombinant chimeric virus expressing the VP2 protein of vvIBDV (rLaC30L-VP2). The safety and efficacy of rLaC30L-VP2 in-ovo vaccination was then evaluated in 18-day-old special pathogen free (SPF) chicken embryos and commercial broiler embryos for prevention of NDV and vvIBDV. Hatchability and global survival rate of the hatched birds was not affected by in-ovo rLaC30L-VP2 vaccination. However, rLaC30L-VP2 in-ovo vaccination induced significant anti-IBDV and anti-NDV antibodies in SPF birds and commercial broilers, and 100% of vaccinated chickens were protected against a lethal NDV challenge. In-ovo rLaC30L-VP2 vaccination also provided resistance against vvIBDV challenge in a significant amount of animals. These results suggest that rLaC30L-VP2 is a safe and efficient bivalent live in-ovo vaccine against NDV and vvIBDV.

  1. Systemically Transplanted Bone Marrow-derived Cells Contribute to Dental Pulp Regeneration in a Chimeric Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenan; Jiang, Shan; Chen, Qiuyue; Ye, Yanyan; Chen, Jiajing; Heng, Boon Chin; Jiang, Qianli; Wu, Buling; Ding, Zihai; Zhang, Chengfei

    2016-02-01

    Migratory cells via blood circulation or cells adjacent to the root apex may potentially participate in dental pulp tissue regeneration or renewal. This study investigated whether systemically transplanted bone marrow cells can contribute to pulp regeneration in a chimeric mouse model. A chimeric mouse model was created through the injection of bone marrow cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic C57BL/6 mice into the tail veins of recipient wild-type C57BL/6 mice that had been irradiated with a lethal dose of 8.5 Gy from a high-frequency linear accelerator. These mice were subjected to pulpectomy and pulp revascularization. At 1, 4, and 8 weeks after surgery, in vivo animal imaging and histologic analyses were conducted. In vivo animal imaging showed that the green biofluorescence signal from the transplanted GFP+ cells increased significantly and was maintained at a high level during the first 4 weeks after surgery. Immunofluorescence analyses of tooth specimens collected at 8 weeks postsurgery showed the presence of nestin+/GFP+, α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)/GFP+, and NeuN/GFP+ cells within the regenerated pulplike tissue. These data confirm that transplanted bone marrow-derived cells can contribute to dental pulp regeneration. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Detection of mixed lymphoid chimerism after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: demonstration by interphase cytogenetics in paraffin-embedded tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, T; Ott, G; Kalla, J; Helbig, W; Schwenke, H; Kubel, M; Pönisch, W; Feyer, P; Friedrich, A

    1994-01-01

    In bone marrow transplantation (BMT) the detection of residual host lymphoid or haematopoietic cells surviving conditioning therapy is because of its association to graft-versus-host disease, graft-versus-leukemia reaction, and relapse of leukemia a matter of great interest. We studied the occurrence of this mixed lymphoid chimerism (MC) in the formol-fixed lymphatic tissue of lymph nodes and spleen from 21 autopsies after allogeneic sex-mismatched BMT (5 females, 16 males, survival 5 to 1140 days after BMT). In situ hybridisation with biotinylated centromer-specific anti-X- and anti-Y-chromosome probes was performed on pepsin-digested paraffin sections. The number of double X-, single X-, and Y-chromosome bearing cells was analysed microscopically. Because of artefacts only 14 cases remained for valid investigation. MC was detected in 6 cases (5 out of 11 males 5 days to 840 days and 1 out of 3 females 76 days after BMT). MC occurred after whole body irradiation with 10 Gy (n = 5) and 7 Gy (n = 1). In 1 autopsy relapse of leukemia caused host cell infiltration. Cases with MC did not express histological signs of acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease, but 5 out of 8 with complete lymphoid chimerism did. The sensitivity of interphase cytogenetics on paraffin embedded tissue is low.

  3. Cytoplasmic male sterility-associated chimeric open reading frames identified by mitochondrial genome sequencing of four Cajanus genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Reetu; Saxena, Rachit K; Davila, Jaime; Shah, Trushar; Chen, Wenbin; Xiao, Yong-Li; Fan, Guangyi; Saxena, K B; Alverson, Andrew J; Spillane, Charles; Town, Christopher; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2013-10-01

    The hybrid pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) breeding technology based on cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is currently unique among legumes and displays major potential for yield increase. CMS is defined as a condition in which a plant is unable to produce functional pollen grains. The novel chimeric open reading frames (ORFs) produced as a results of mitochondrial genome rearrangements are considered to be the main cause of CMS. To identify these CMS-related ORFs in pigeonpea, we sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of three C. cajan lines (the male-sterile line ICPA 2039, the maintainer line ICPB 2039, and the hybrid line ICPH 2433) and of the wild relative (Cajanus cajanifolius ICPW 29). A single, circular-mapping molecule of length 545.7 kb was assembled and annotated for the ICPA 2039 line. Sequence annotation predicted 51 genes, including 34 protein-coding and 17 RNA genes. Comparison of the mitochondrial genomes from different Cajanus genotypes identified 31 ORFs, which differ between lines within which CMS is present or absent. Among these chimeric ORFs, 13 were identified by comparison of the related male-sterile and maintainer lines. These ORFs display features that are known to trigger CMS in other plant species and to represent the most promising candidates for CMS-related mitochondrial rearrangements in pigeonpea.

  4. Exchanging murine and human immunoglobulin constant chains affects the kinetics and thermodynamics of antigen binding and chimeric antibody autoreactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Torres

    Full Text Available Mouse-human chimeric antibodies composed of murine variable (V and human (C chains are useful therapeutic reagents. Consequently, we investigated whether heterologous C-regions from mice and humans affected specificity and affinity, and determined the contribution of C(H glycosylation to antigen binding. The interaction of a 12-mer peptide mimetic with monoclonal antibody (mAb 18B7 to Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan, and its chimeric (ch and deglycosylated forms were studied by surface plasmon resonance. The equilibrium and rate association constants for the chAb were higher than for mAb 18B7. V region affinity was not affected by C(H region glycosylation whereas heterologous C region of the same isotype altered the Ab binding affinity and the specificity for self-antigens. Structural models displayed local differences that implied changes on the connectivity of residues. These findings suggest that V region conformational changes can be dictated by the C(H domains through an allosteric effect involving networks of highly connected amino acids.

  5. In silico analysis and modeling of ACP-MIP–PilQ chimeric antigen from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Mehrdad; Salimi Chirani, Alireza; Moshiri, Mona; Sedighi, Mansour; Pournajaf, Abazar; Tohidfar, Masoud; Irajian, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neisseria meningitidis, a life-threatening human pathogen with the potential to cause large epidemics, can be isolated from the nasopharynx of 5–15% of adults. The aim of the current study was to evaluate biophysical and biochemical properties and immunological aspects of chimeric acyl-carrier protein-macrophage infectivity potentiator protein-type IV pilus biogenesis protein antigen (ACP-MIP-PilQ) from N. meningitidis serogroup B strain. Methods: Biochemical properties and multiple alignments were predicted by appropriate web servers. Secondary molecular structures were predicted based on Chou and Fasman, Garnier-Osguthorpe-Robson, and Neural Network methods. Tertiary modeling elucidated conformational properties of the chimeric protein. Proteasome cleavage and transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) binding sites, and T- and B-cell antigenic epitopes, were predicted using bioinformatic web servers. Results: Based on our in silico and immunoinformatics analyses, the ACP-MIP-PilQ protein (AMP) can induce high-level cross-strain bactericidal activity. In addition, several immune proteasomal cleavage sites were detected. The 22 epitopes associated with MHC class I and class II (DR) alleles were confirmed in the AMP. Thirty linear B-cell epitopes as antigenic regions were predicted from the full-length protein. Conclusion: All predicted properties of the AMP indicate it could be a good candidate for further immunological in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:26989750

  6. Structure-based approach to rationally design a chimeric protein for an effective vaccine against Group B Streptococcus infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Cozzi, Roberta; Gourlay, Louise J.; Donnarumma, Danilo; Necchi, Francesca; Norais, Nathalie; Telford, John L.; Rappuoli, Rino; Bolognesi, Martino; Maione, Domenico; Grandi, Guido; Rinaudo, C. Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Structural vaccinology is an emerging strategy for the rational design of vaccine candidates. We successfully applied structural vaccinology to design a fully synthetic protein with multivalent protection activity. In Group B Streptococcus, cell-surface pili have aroused great interest because of their direct roles in virulence and importance as protective antigens. The backbone subunit of type 2a pilus (BP-2a) is present in six immunogenically different but structurally similar variants. We determined the 3D structure of one of the variants, and experimentally demonstrated that protective antibodies specifically recognize one of the four domains that comprise the protein. We therefore constructed a synthetic protein constituted by the protective domain of each one of the six variants and showed that the chimeric protein protects mice against the challenge with all of the type 2a pilus-carrying strains. This work demonstrates the power of structural vaccinology and will facilitate the development of an optimized, broadly protective pilus-based vaccine against Group B Streptococcus by combining the uniquely generated chimeric protein with protective pilin subunits from two other previously identified pilus types. In addition, this work describes a template procedure that can be followed to develop vaccines against other bacterial pathogens. PMID:21593422

  7. PD-1- and CTLA-4-based inhibitory chimeric antigen receptors (iCARs) divert off-target immunotherapy responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Victor D; Themeli, Maria; Sadelain, Michel

    2013-12-11

    T cell therapies have demonstrated long-term efficacy and curative potential for the treatment of some cancers. However, their use is limited by damage to bystander tissues, as seen in graft-versus-host disease after donor lymphocyte infusion, or "on-target, off-tumor" toxicities incurred in some engineered T cell therapies. Nonspecific immunosuppression and irreversible T cell elimination are currently the only means to control such deleterious responses, but at the cost of abrogating therapeutic benefits or causing secondary complications. On the basis of the physiological paradigm of immune inhibitory receptors, we designed antigen-specific inhibitory chimeric antigen receptors (iCARs) to preemptively constrain T cell responses. We demonstrate that CTLA-4- or PD-1-based iCARs can selectively limit cytokine secretion, cytotoxicity, and proliferation induced through the endogenous T cell receptor or an activating chimeric receptor. The initial effect of the iCAR is temporary, thus enabling T cells to function upon a subsequent encounter with the antigen recognized by their activating receptor. iCARs thus provide a dynamic, self-regulating safety switch to prevent, rather than treat, the consequences of inadequate T cell specificity.

  8. Chimeric molecules facilitate the degradation of androgen receptors and repress the growth of LNCaP cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Qing Tang; Bang-Min Han; Xin-Quan Yao; Yan Hong; Yan Wang; Fu-Jun Zhao; Sheng-Qiang Yu; Xiao-Wen Sun; Shu-Jie Xia

    2009-01-01

    Post-translational degradation of protein plays an important role in cell life.We employed chimeric molecules (dihydrotestosterone-based proteolysis-targeting chimeric molecule [DHT-PROTAC]) to facilitate androgen receptor (AR) degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) and to investigate the role of AR in cell proliferation and viability in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells.Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were applied to analyse AR levels in LNCaP cells after DHT-PROTAC treatment.Cell counting and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell viability assay were used to evaluate cell proliferation and viability after AR elimination in both LNCaP and PC-3 cells.AR was tagged for elimination via the UPP by DHT-PROTAC,and this could be blocked by proteasome inhibitors.Degradation of AR depended on DHT-PROTAC concentration,and either DHT or an ALAPYIP-(arg)s peptide could compete with DHT-PROTAC.Inhibition of cell proliferation and decreased viability were observed in LNCaP cells,but not in PC-3 or 786-O cells after DHT-PROTAC treatment.These data indicate that AR elimination is facilitated via the UPP by DHT-PROTAC,and that the growth of LNCaP cells is repressed after AR degradation.

  9. A Novel Contraceptive Vaccine:Design and Synthesis of the Chimeric Peptide Containing Multivalent Sperm-Specific Epitopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何畏; 梁志清; 史常旭; 李玉清

    2001-01-01

    Objective To develop a novel multivalent chimeric peptide vaccine for bisexual fertility regulation Materials & Methods On the basis of the amino acid sequence of the two peptides respectively selected from the mouse sperm/testis-specific proteins SP17 and Cyritestin, and one T cell epitope in bovine ribonuclease (RNase), a novel chimeric peptide consisting of 35 amino acid was designed and subsequently synthesized on the 430A peptide synthesizer. After being emulified with the equivalence Freund's adjuvant, the peptide with 35 amino acid residues was used to immunogenity the female BALB/c mice to investigate its immunity.Results The peptide was successfully synthesized, after being purified in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), its purity reached 95%. The specific antisera collected from the immunogenity mice could identify the corresponding proteins of testis tissues of mice, rats and human. The highest specific IgG titer in serum was 1:6 000, while the IgA titer in the washing of vaginal mucous membrane was 1:300.Conclusion The antibodies from the peptide with specific amino acid sequence can identify the original antigens, and stimulate powerful specific humoral immunity in mice. It provides a experimental bases for polyvalent contraceptive vaccine study.

  10. Exploiting chimeric human antibodies to characterize a protective epitope of Neisseria adhesin A, one of the Bexsero vaccine components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, Isabella; Faleri, Agnese; Galli, Barbara; Lo Surdo, Paola; Liguori, Alessia; Norais, Nathalie; Santini, Laura; Masignani, Vega; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Giuliani, Marzia Monica

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA) is one of the antigens of Bexsero, the recently licensed multicomponent vaccine against serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB). NadA belongs to the class of oligomeric coiled-coil adhesins and is able to mediate adhesion and invasion of human epithelial cells. As a vaccine antigen, NadA has been shown to induce high levels of bactericidal antibodies; however, the domains important for protective response are still unknown. In order to further investigate its immunogenic properties, we have characterized the murine IgG1 mAb (6E3) that was able to recognize the 2 main antigenic variants of NadA on the surface of MenB strains. The epitope targeted by mAb 6E3 was mapped by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and shown to be located on the coiled-coil stalk region of NadA (aa 206-249). Although no serum bactericidal activity was observed for murine IgG1 mAb 6E3, functional activity was restored when using chimeric antibodies in which the variable regions of the murine mAb 6E3 were fused to human IgG3 constant regions, thus confirming the protective nature of the mAb 6E3 epitope. The use of chimeric antibody molecules will enable future investigations of complement-mediated antibody functionality independently of the Fc-mediated differences in complement activation.

  11. Virus-Like Particles of Chimeric Recombinant Porcine Circovirus Type 2 as Antigen Vehicle Carrying Foreign Epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Virus-like particles (VLPs of chimeric porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 were generated by replacing the nuclear localization signal (NLS; at 1–39 aa of PCV2 capsid protein (Cap with classical swine fever virus (CSFV T-cell epitope (1446–1460 aa, CSFV B-cell epitope (693–716 aa and CSFV T-cell epitope conjugated with B-cell epitope. The recombinant proteins were expressed using the baculovirus expression system and detected by immunoblotting and indirect immunofluorescence assay. The abilities to form PCV2 VLPs were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Immunogenicities of the three recombinant proteins were evaluated in mice. Our Results indicated that Cap protein NLS deletion or substitution with CSFV epitopes did not affect the VLPs assembly. Three chimeric Cap proteins could form VLPs and induce efficient humoral and cellular immunity against PCV2 and CSFV in mice. Results show that PCV2 VLPs can be used as an efficient antigen carrier for delivery of foreign epitopes, and a potential novel vaccine.

  12. Process of Petri Nets Extension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To describe the dynamic semantics for the network computing, the concept on process is presented based on the semantic model with variable, resource and relation. Accordingly, the formal definition of process and the mapping rules from the specification of Petri nets extension to process are discussed in detail respectively. Based on the collective concepts of process, the specification of dynamic semantics also is constructed as a net system. Finally, to illustrate process intuitively, an example is specified completely.

  13. Mechanical heterogeneities and lithospheric extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duretz, Thibault; Petri, Benoit; Mohn, Geoffroy; Schenker, Filippo L.; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Detailed geological and geophysical studies of passive margins have highlighted the multi-stage and depth-dependent aspect of lithospheric thinning. Lithospheric thinning involves a variety of structures (normal faults, low angle detachments, extensional shear zones, extraction faults) and leads to a complex architecture of passive margins (with e.g. necking zone, mantle exhumation, continental allochthons). The processes controlling the generation and evolution of these structures as well as the impact of pre-rift inheritance are so far incompletely understood. In this study, we investigate the impact of pre-rift inheritance on the development of rifted margins using two-dimensional thermo-mechanical models of lithospheric thinning. To first order, we represent the pre-rift mechanical heterogeneities with lithological layering. The rheologies are kept simple (visco-plastic) and do not involve any strain softening mechanism. Our models show that mechanical layering causes multi-stage and depth-dependent extension. In the initial rifting phase, lithospheric extension is decoupled: as the crust undergoes thinning by brittle (frictional-plastic) faults, the lithospheric mantle accommodates extension by symmetric ductile necking. In a second rifting phase, deformation in the crust and lithospheric mantle is coupled and marks the beginning of an asymmetric extension stage. Low angle extensional shear zones develop across the lithosphere and exhume subcontinental mantle. Furthemore, crustal allochthons and adjacent basins develop coevally. We describe as well the thermal evolution predicted by the numerical models and discuss the first-order implications of our results in the context of the Alpine geological history.

  14. Extension of the Schrodinger equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somsikov, Vyacheslav

    2017-03-01

    Extension of the Schrodinger equation is submitted by removing its limitations appearing due to the limitations of the formalism of Hamilton, based on which this equation was obtained. For this purpose the problems of quantum mechanics arising from the limitations of classical mechanics are discussed. These limitations, in particular, preclude the use of the Schrodinger equation to describe the time symmetry violation. The extension of the Schrodinger equation is realized based on the principle of duality symmetry. According to this principle the dynamics of the systems is determined by the symmetry of the system and by the symmetry of the space. The extension of the Schrodinger equation was obtained from the dual expression of energy, represented in operator form. For this purpose the independent micro - and macro-variables that determine respectively the dynamics of quantum particle system relative to its center of mass and the movement of the center of mass in space are used. The solution of the extended Schrodinger equation for the system near equilibrium is submitted. The main advantage of the extended Schrodinger equation is that it is applicable to describe the interaction and evolution of quantum systems in inhomogeneous field of external forces.

  15. Organelle Extensions in Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaideep Mathur; Alena Mammone; Kiah A.Barton

    2012-01-01

    Cell walls lock each cell in a specific position within the supraorganization of a plant.Despite its fixed location,each cell must be able to sense alterations in its immediate environment and respond rapidly to ensure the optimal functioning,continued growth and development,and eventual long-term survival of the plant.The ultra-structural detail that underlies our present understanding of the plant cell has largely been acquired from fixed and processed material that does not allow an appreciation of the dynamic nature of sub-cellular events in the cell.In recent years,fluorescent proteinaided imaging of living plant cells has added to our understanding of the dynamic nature of the plant cell.One of the major outcomes of live imaging of plant cells is the growing appreciation that organelle shapes are not fixed,and many organelles extend their surface transiently in rapid response to environmental stimuli.In many cases,the extensions appear as tubules extending from the main organelle.Specific terms such as stromules from plastids,matrixules from mitochondria,and peroxules from peroxisomes have been coined to describe the extensions.Here,we review our present understanding of organelle extensions and discuss how they may play potential roles in maintaining cellular homeostasis in plant cells.

  16. The construction and expression of chimeric urokinase-type plasminogen activator genes containing kringle domains of human plasminogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutaud, A; Castellino, F J

    1993-06-01

    A series of chimeric urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) genes, which contain combinations of kringle domains of human plasminogen (HPg) in place of the uPA kringle (KuPA), has been constructed and expressed. Some of the resulting recombinant (r) variant uPA chimeras contain modules that potentially mediate the macroscopic binding of HPg to its activation effectors, fibrin(ogen) and 6-aminohexanoic acid (EACA). Such binding sites are not possessed by KuPA, but are present in certain of the HPg kringles, viz., kringle 1 (K1HPg), kringle 4 (K4HPg), and kringle 5 (K5HPg). The recombinant (r) chimeras constructed included molecules with replacements of KuPA with K1HPg (r-[KuPA-->K1HPg]uPA), and with KuPA replaced by double kringle combinations of K1HPgK4HPg (r-[KuPA-->K1HPgK4HPg]uPA), K2HPgK3HPg (r-[KuPA-->K2HPgK3HPg]uPA), and K4HPgK5HPg (r-[KuPA-->K4HPgK5HPg]uPA). All of these variant genes, along with their wild-type (wt) r-uPA counterparts, were expressed in human kidney 293 cells. In cases wherein EACA-binding kringles from HPg have been placed in uPA, this property has been retained in the chimeric molecule and employed as an essential part of the purification procedures for the variants. The steady state amidolytic activity of two-chain (tc) wtr-uPA toward the chromogenic substrate, H-D-pyroglutamyl-Gly-L-Arg-p-nitroanilide (S2444), is characterized by a kcat/KM (pH 7.4, 37 degrees C) of 120 s-1 mM-1. This value ranges from 92 s-1 mM-1 (tcr-[KuPA-->K1HPg]uPA) to 166 s-1 mM-1 (tcr-[KuPA-->K1HPgK4HPg]uPA) for each of the variants, demonstrating that the catalytic efficiency of the active site is altered only in a small way by changes in the noncatalytic domain of uPA. Small differences are also observed in the abilities of these tcr variants to interact with the fast-acting plasma inhibitor of uPA, viz., plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). The second-order rate constant for the interaction of PAI-1 with tcr-uPA, 0.46 x 10(7) M-1s-1 (pH 7.4, 10 degrees

  17. Coal Combustion Products Extension Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarunjit S. Butalia; William E. Wolfe

    2003-12-31

    The primary objective of the CCP Extension Program is to promote the responsible uses of Ohio CCPs that are technically sound, environmentally safe, and commercially competitive. A secondary objective is to assist other CCP generating states (particularly neighboring states) in establishing CCP use programs within their states. The goal of the CCP extension program at OSU is to work with CCP stakeholders to increase the overall CCP state utilization rate to more than 30% by the year 2005. The program aims to increase FGD utilization for Ohio to more than 20% by the year 2005. The increased utilization rates are expected to be achieved through increased use of CCPs for highway, mine reclamation, agricultural, manufacturing, and other civil engineering uses. In order to accomplish these objectives and goals, the highly successful CCP pilot extension program previously in place at the university has been expanded and adopted by the university as a part of its outreach and engagement mission. The extension program is an innovative technology transfer program with multiple sponsors. The program is a collaborative effort between The Ohio State University (College of Engineering and University Extension Service), United States Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Ohio Department of Development's Coal Development Office, and trade associations such as the American Coal Ash Association as well as the Midwest Coal Ash Association. Industry co-sponsors include American Electric Power, Dravo Lime Company, and ISG Resources. Implementation of the proposed project results in both direct and indirect as well as societal benefits. These benefits include (1) increased utilization of CCPs instead of landfilling, (2) development of proper construction and installation procedures, (3) education of regulators, specification-writers, designers, construction contractors, and the public, (4) emphasis on recycling and decrease in the need for landfill

  18. The Geometric Invariants of Group Extensions Part I: Finite Extensions

    CERN Document Server

    Koban, Nic

    2011-01-01

    In this note, we compute the {\\Sigma}^1(G) invariant when 1 {\\to} H {\\to} G {\\to} K {\\to} 1 is a short exact sequence of finitely generated groups with K finite. As an application, we construct a group F semidirect Z_2 where F is the R. Thompson's group F and show that F semidirect Z_2 has the R-infinity property while F is not characteristic. Furthermore, we construct a finite extension G with finitely generated commutator subgroup G' but has a finite index normal subgroup H with infinitely generated H'.

  19. High Rate of Chimeric Gene Origination by Retroposition in Plant Genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wen; Zheng, Hongkung; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2006-01-01

    and a reported long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon-mediated mechanism of retroposing cellular genes in maize (Zea mays). We show extensive retropositions in the rice (Oryza sativa) genome, with 1235 identified primary retrogenes. We identified 27 of these primary retrogenes within LTR retrotransposons...

  20. 48 CFR 570.405 - Lease extensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lease extensions. 570.405... Requirements 570.405 Lease extensions. (a) This section applies to extension of the term of a lease to provide for continued occupancy on a short-term basis. (b) If the value of a lease extension will exceed...