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Sample records for chimeric antibodies expressed

  1. [Construction of the lentiviral expression vector for anti-p185(erbB2) mouse/human chimeric antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Li, Li; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Qi

    2013-04-01

    This research was to construct the lentiviral expression vector for anti- p185(erbB2) mouse/human chimeric antibody and to determine the expression of the chimeric antibody gene in 293T cells transfected with this vector. The genes (vL and vH) coding light and heavy chain of variable regions of anti-p185(erbB2) mAb and the constant regions of human IgG1 (kappa and gamma1) were cloned with PCR method. The target genes were assembled by three-primers PCR method to obtain the chimeric light chain (L) and the chimeric heavy chain (H). Both chains inserted into the down stream and upper stream of IRES gene of the plasmid pVAX1/IRES respectively. We digested the plasmid pVAX1/ H-IRES-L with endoenzyme and subcloned H-IRES-L into the lentiviral vector pWPI. The enzyme digestion and sequence analysis showed that the lentiviral expression vector pWPI/H-IRES-L was constructed correctly. Then, it was transfected into 293T cells and after 48h, GFP protein expression in 293T cells were detected by fluorescent microscope and the chimeric antibody expression was detected by RT-PCR and direct ELISA. The results showed that after 293T cells were transfected with recombination plasmid, both light and heavy chains of the chimeric antibody genes could express together. The chimeric antibody expressed could bind to p185(erbB2) specifically. This research may lay a sound foundation for further study of anti-p185(erbB2) engineered antibody.

  2. Construction and expression of a functional monoclonal antibody SZ-51 specific for GMP-140 chimeric fab fragment in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Jianming; Zhang Xiaomin; Xia Lijun; Wan Haiying; Liu Yue; Li Peixia; Ruan Changgeng

    1996-04-01

    The variable region cDNAs of a monoclonal antibody SZ-51 specific for α-granule membrane protein (GMP-140) on the surface of activated human platelets were spliced with the constant region cDNA of the heavy chain CH1 and light chain k of human Ig G by means of the gene recombination techniques. The above recombinant gene was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The expression vector of phage plasmid pHEN1 SZ-51 Fab/Hu was constructed. The pHEN1-51 Fab/Hu was introduced into non-suppressor E. coli HB2151. The amount of expression of SZ-51 chimeric Fab/Hu measured by quantitative ELISA was about 500 μg/L. Western blot demonstrated that the SZ-51 chimeric Fab fragment could specifically bind to GMP-140. (2 figs.)

  3. The assay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies with human TSH/LH-CG chimeric receptor expressed on chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Ka Hee; Kim, Chang Min

    1996-12-01

    TSH/LH-CG chimera cDNA is transfected to CHO-K1 cell to obtain the chimeric receptor expressed on the cell surface. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurements are determined using chimeric receptors and under these conditions activity of TSAb and TSBAb in the sera of the Graves' patients. The results obtained are compared to those of TSAb assays using FRTL5 cells CHO-TSHR cells which have wild type human TSH receptor. The transfection procedure of chimeric receptor gene to CHO-K1 cells are on going. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurement using chimeric receptor will be determined after success of transfection procedure. If this study is successfully completed, not only the heterogeneity of Graves. IgG but also pathogenesis of Graves' disease will be elucidated. (author). 25 refs

  4. The assay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies with human TSH/LH-CG chimeric receptor expressed on chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ka Hee; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    TSH/LH-CG chimera cDNA is transfected to CHO-K1 cell to obtain the chimeric receptor expressed on the cell surface. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurements are determined using chimeric receptors and under these conditions activity of TSAb and TSBAb in the sera of the Graves` patients. The results obtained are compared to those of TSAb assays using FRTL5 cells CHO-TSHR cells which have wild type human TSH receptor. The transfection procedure of chimeric receptor gene to CHO-K1 cells are on going. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurement using chimeric receptor will be determined after success of transfection procedure. If this study is successfully completed, not only the heterogeneity of Graves. IgG but also pathogenesis of Graves` disease will be elucidated. (author). 25 refs.

  5. Vectors expressing chimeric Japanese encephalitis dengue 2 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y; Wang, S; Wang, X

    2014-01-01

    Vectors based on self-replicating RNAs (replicons) of flaviviruses are becoming powerful tool for expression of heterologous genes in mammalian cells and development of novel antiviral and anticancer vaccines. We constructed two vectors expressing chimeric viruses consisting of attenuated SA14-14-2 strain of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in which the PrM/M-E genes were replaced fully or partially with those of dengue 2 virus (DENV-2). These vectors, named pJED2 and pJED2-1770 were transfected to BHK-21 cells and produced chimeric viruses JED2V and JED2-1770V, respectively. The chimeric viruses could be passaged in C6/36 but not BHK-21 cells. The chimeric viruses produced in C6/36 cells CPE 4-5 days after infection and RT-PCR, sequencing, immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blot analysis confirmed the chimeric nature of produced viruses. The immunogenicity of chimeric viruses in mice was proved by detecting DENV-2 E protein-specific serum IgG antibodies with neutralization titer of 10. Successful preparation of infectious clones of chimeric JEV-DENV-2 viruses showed that JEV-based expression vectors are fully functional.

  6. Quantitative PET of EGFR expression in xenograft-bearing mice using {sup 64}Cu-labeled cetuximab, a chimeric anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Weibo; Chen, Kai; He, Lina; Cao, Qizhen; Chen, Xiaoyuan [Stanford University School of Medicine, The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA (United States); Koong, Albert [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on the surface of cancer cells, was approved by the FDA to treat patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. It is currently also in advanced-stage development for the treatment of several other solid tumors. Here we report for the first time the quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of EGFR expression in xenograft-bearing mice using {sup 64}Cu-labeled cetuximab. We conjugated cetuximab with macrocyclic chelating agent 1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), labeled with {sup 64}Cu, and tested the resulting {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-cetuximab in seven xenograft tumor models. The tracer uptake measured by PET was correlated with the EGFR expression quantified by western blotting. The estimated human dosimetry based on the PET data in Sprague-Dawley rats was also calculated. MicroPET imaging showed that {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-cetuximab had increasing tumor activity accumulation over time in EGFR-positive tumors but relatively low uptake in EGFR-negative tumors at all times examined (<5%ID/g). There was a good correlation (R {sup 2} = 0.80) between the tracer uptake (measured by PET) and the EGFR expression level (measured by western blotting). Human dosimetry estimation indicated that the tracer may be safely administered to human patients for tumor diagnosis, with the dose-limiting organ being the liver. The success of EGFR-positive tumor imaging using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-cetuximab can be translated into the clinic to characterize the pharmacokinetics, to select the right population of patients for EGFR-targeted therapy, to monitor the therapeutic efficacy of anti-EGFR treatment, and to optimize the dosage of either cetuximab alone or cetuximab in combination with other therapeutic agents. (orig.)

  7. Quantitative PET of EGFR expression in xenograft-bearing mice using 64Cu-labeled cetuximab, a chimeric anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Weibo; Chen, Kai; He, Lina; Cao, Qizhen; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Koong, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on the surface of cancer cells, was approved by the FDA to treat patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. It is currently also in advanced-stage development for the treatment of several other solid tumors. Here we report for the first time the quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of EGFR expression in xenograft-bearing mice using 64 Cu-labeled cetuximab. We conjugated cetuximab with macrocyclic chelating agent 1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), labeled with 64 Cu, and tested the resulting 64 Cu-DOTA-cetuximab in seven xenograft tumor models. The tracer uptake measured by PET was correlated with the EGFR expression quantified by western blotting. The estimated human dosimetry based on the PET data in Sprague-Dawley rats was also calculated. MicroPET imaging showed that 64 Cu-DOTA-cetuximab had increasing tumor activity accumulation over time in EGFR-positive tumors but relatively low uptake in EGFR-negative tumors at all times examined ( 2 0.80) between the tracer uptake (measured by PET) and the EGFR expression level (measured by western blotting). Human dosimetry estimation indicated that the tracer may be safely administered to human patients for tumor diagnosis, with the dose-limiting organ being the liver. The success of EGFR-positive tumor imaging using 64 Cu-DOTA-cetuximab can be translated into the clinic to characterize the pharmacokinetics, to select the right population of patients for EGFR-targeted therapy, to monitor the therapeutic efficacy of anti-EGFR treatment, and to optimize the dosage of either cetuximab alone or cetuximab in combination with other therapeutic agents. (orig.)

  8. T cells expressing VHH-directed oligoclonal chimeric HER2 antigen receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamnani, Fatemeh Rahimi; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) originated from antibodies is a promising strategy in cancer immunotherapy. Several unsuccessful trials, however, highlight the need for alternative conventional binding domains and the better combination...

  9. [Biological characteristics of a chimeric rabies virus expressing canine parvovirus VP2 protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xue-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Sun, Zhao-Jin; Shi, He-He; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Bido; Sun, Jing-Chen; Guo, Xiao-Feng

    2009-09-01

    To obtain a bivalence vaccine against canine rabies virus and canine parvovirus, a chimeric rabies virus expressing canine parvovirus VP2 protein was generated by the technique of reverse genetics. It was shown that the chimeric virus designated as HEP-Flury (VP2) grew well on BHK-21 cells and the VP2 gene could still be stably expressed after ten passages on BHK-21 cells. Experiments on the mice immunized with the chimeric virus HEP-Flury (VP2) demonstrated that specific antibodies against rabies virus and canine parvovirus were induced in immunized mice after vaccination with the live chimeric virus.

  10. Chimeric recombinant antibody fragments in cardiac troponin I immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyytiä, Heidi; Heikkilä, Taina; Brockmann, Eeva-Christine; Kekki, Henna; Hedberg, Pirjo; Puolakanaho, Tarja; Lövgren, Timo; Pettersson, Kim

    2015-03-01

    To introduce a novel nanoparticle-based immunoassay for cardiac troponin I (cTnI) utilizing chimeric antibody fragments and to demonstrate that removal of antibody Fc-part and antibody chimerization decrease matrix related interferences. A sandwich-type immunoassay for cTnI based on recombinant chimeric (mouse variable/human constant) antigen binding (cFab) antibodies and intrinsically fluorescent nanoparticles was developed. To test whether using chimeric antibody fragments helps to avoid matrix related interferences, samples (n=39) with known amounts of triglycerides, bilirubin, rheumatoid factor (RF) or human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMAs) were measured with the novel assay, along with a previously published nanoparticle-based research assay with the same antibody epitopes. The limit of detection (LoD) was 3.30ng/L. Within-laboratory precision for 29ng/L and 2819ng/L cTnI were 13.7% and 15.9%, respectively. Regression analysis with Siemens ADVIA Centaur® yielded a slope (95% confidence intervals) of 0.18 (0.17-1.19) and a y-intercept of 1.94 (-1.28-3.91) ng/L. When compared to a previously published nanoparticle-based assay, the novel assay showed substantially reduced interference in the tested interference prone samples, 15.4 vs. 51.3%. A rheumatoid factor containing sample was decreased from 241ng/L to

  11. Chimeric bispecific OC/TR monoclonal antibody mediates lysis of tumor cells expressing the folate-binding protein (MOv18) and displays decreased immunogenicity in patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, R. M.; Warnaar, S. O.; Sanborn, D.; Lamers, C. H.; Bolhuis, R. L.; Litvinov, S. V.; Zurawski, V. R.; Coney, L. R.

    1997-01-01

    The bispecific OC/TR monoclonal antibody (mAb) cross-links the CD3 molecule on T cells with the human folate-binding protein (FBP), which is highly expressed on nonmucinous ovarian carcinomas. Clinical trials of patients with ovarian carcinoma with the OC/TR mAb have shown some complete and partial

  12. A human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 for tumor radioimmunoimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Miyuki; Hinoda, Yuji; Sasaki, Shigeru; Tsujisaki, Masayuki; Imai, Kohzoh; Oriuchi, Noboru; Endo, Keigo.

    1996-01-01

    A mouse-human chimeric antibody for intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was established by using heavy chain loss mouse mutant hybridoma and human immunoglobulin expression vector. The HA58 hybridoma secreted anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (IgG1,κ). The gene of the mouse variable region of heavy chain was amplified and cloned by the polymerase chain reaction technique directly from the HA58 hybridoma RNA. The variable region of heavy chain was joined with an expression vector which contains human γ1 constant gene. The expression vector was transfected into heavy chain loss mutant cells HA58-7, which produced only murine immunoglobulin light chains. The resultant chimeric MoAb HA58, chHA58, retained full-binding reactivity to ICAM-1 compared with murine HA58 parental antibody. The chimeric MoAb chHA58 showed little antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxic activity against cultured tumor cells. Biodistribution studies with 99m Tc-labeled chHA58 in nude mice bearing human gastric carcinoma JRST cells, demonstrated that the tumor-blood ratio was 1.55 at 18 h after injection, when the tumors were clearly visible in gamma scintigraphy. These data suggest that chHA58 may be of practical use for radioimmunoimaging of a wide variety of tumors. (author)

  13. In vitro and in vivo properties of human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody specific for common acute lymphocytic leukemia antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saga, T.; Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Konishi, J.; Ueda, R.; Nishimura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Watanabe, T.

    1990-01-01

    A human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody specific for a common acute lymphocytic leukemia antigen was efficiently obtained by ligating human heavy-chain enhancer element to the chimeric heavy- and light-chain genes. Cell binding and competitive inhibition assays of both radioiodine and indium-111- (111In) labeled chimeric antibodies demonstrated in vitro immunoreactivity identical with that of the parental murine monoclonal antibodies. The biodistribution of the radiolabeled chimeric antibody in tumor-bearing nude mice was similar to that of the parental murine antibody. Tumor accumulation of radioiodinated parental and chimeric antibodies was lower than that of 111 In-labeled antibodies, probably because of dehalogenation of the radioiodinated antibodies. Indium-111-labeled chimeric antibody clearly visualized xenografted tumor. These results suggest that a human/mouse chimeric antibody can be labeled with 111 In and radioiodine without the loss of its immunoreactivity, and that chimeric antibody localizes in vivo in the same way as the parental murine antibody

  14. Fluorescently labeled chimeric anti-CEA antibody improves detection and resection of human colon cancer in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metildi, Cristina A; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A; Talamini, Mark A; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a new fluorescently labeled chimeric anti-CEA antibody for improved detection and resection of colon cancer. Frozen tumor and normal human tissue samples were stained with chimeric and mouse antibody-fluorophore conjugates for comparison. Mice with patient-derived orthotopic xenografts (PDOX) of colon cancer underwent fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) or bright-light surgery (BLS) 24 hr after tail vein injection of fluorophore-conjugated chimeric anti-CEA antibody. Resection completeness was assessed using postoperative images. Mice were followed for 6 months for recurrence. The fluorophore conjugation efficiency (dye/mole ratio) improved from 3-4 to >5.5 with the chimeric CEA antibody compared to mouse anti-CEA antibody. CEA-expressing tumors labeled with chimeric CEA antibody provided a brighter fluorescence signal on frozen human tumor tissues (P = 0.046) and demonstrated consistently lower fluorescence signals in normal human tissues compared to mouse antibody. Chimeric CEA antibody accurately labeled PDOX colon cancer in nude mice, enabling improved detection of tumor margins for more effective FGS. The R0 resection rate increased from 86% to 96% with FGS compared to BLS. Improved conjugating efficiency and labeling with chimeric fluorophore-conjugated antibody resulted in better detection and resection of human colon cancer in an orthotopic mouse model. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Preparation and characterization of chimeric CD19 monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zola, H.; Macardle, P.J.; Bradford, T.; Weedon, H.; Yasui, H.; Kurosawa, Y.

    1991-01-01

    CD19 antibodies have been suggested as candidates for immunological attack on leukemic and lymphoma cells of the B lineage because the antigen is restricted to the B lineage. With the potential use of FMC63 in immunotherapy in mind a mouse-human chimera was produced in which the genes coding for the VDJ region of the heavy chain and the VJ region of the light chain derive from the FMC63 mouse hybridoma, while the C region genes code for human IgG1. The genes have been transfected back into a mouse myeloma line, which secretes low levels of immunoglobulin. (Ig). This Ig was purified and biotinylated in order to determine the specificity of the antibody. The chimeric antibody has a reaction profile concordant with the original FMC63 antibody, but has the properties of a human IgG1, including the ability to fix human complement. However, the antibody is not cytotoxic in vitro in the presence of complement or cells capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Possible reasons for this and ways of using the antibody are discussed. 47 refs., 7 figs

  16. Enhanced antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis by chimeric monoclonal antibodies with tandemly repeated Fc domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hiroaki; Ootsubo, Michiko; Fukazawa, Mizuki; Motoi, Sotaro; Konakahara, Shu; Masuho, Yasuhiko

    2011-04-01

    We previously reported that chimeric monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with tandemly repeated Fc domains, which were developed by introducing tandem repeats of Fc domains downstream of 2 Fab domains, augmented binding avidities for all Fcγ receptors, resulting in enhanced antibody (Ab)-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Here we investigated regarding Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) mediated by these chimeric mAbs, which is considered one of the most important mechanisms that kills tumor cells, using two-color flow cytometric methods. ADCP mediated by T3-Ab, a chimeric mAb with 3 tandemly repeated Fc domains, was 5 times more potent than that by native anti-CD20 M-Ab (M-Ab hereafter). Furthermore, T3-Ab-mediated ADCP was resistant to competitive inhibition by intravenous Ig (IVIG), although M-Ab-mediated ADCP decreased in the presence of IVIG. An Fcγ receptor-blocking study demonstrated that T3-Ab mediated ADCP via both FcγRIA and FcγRIIA, whereas M-Ab mediated ADCP exclusively via FcγRIA. These results suggest that chimeric mAbs with tandemly repeated Fc domains enhance ADCP as well as ADCC, and that Fc multimerization may significantly enhance the efficacy of therapeutic Abs. Copyright © 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of cetuximab by a chimeric protein encompassing interleukin-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Maria Carmen; Minute, Luna; López, Ascensión; Pérez-Ruiz, Elisabeth; Gomar, Celia; Vasquez, Marcos; Inoges, Susana; Etxeberria, Iñaki; Rodriguez, Inmaculada; Garasa, Saray; Mayer, Jan-Peter Andreas; Wirtz, Peter; Melero, Ignacio; Berraondo, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    Enhancement of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) may potentiate the antitumor efficacy of tumor-targeted monoclonal antibodies. Increasing the numbers and antitumor activity of NK cells is a promising strategy to maximize the ADCC of standard-of-care tumor-targeted antibodies. For this purpose, we have preclinically tested a recombinant chimeric protein encompassing the sushi domain of the IL15Rα, IL-15, and apolipoprotein A-I (Sushi-IL15-Apo) as produced in CHO cells. The size-exclusion purified monomeric fraction of this chimeric protein was stable and retained the IL-15 and the sushi domain bioactivity as measured by CTLL-2 and Mo-7e cell proliferation and STAT5 phosphorylation in freshly isolated human NK and CD8 + T cells. On cell cultures, Sushi-IL15-Apo increases NK cell proliferation and survival as well as spontaneous and antibody-mediated cytotoxicity. Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1) is the receptor for ApoA-I and is expressed on the surface of tumor cells. SR-B1 can adsorb the chimeric protein on tumor cells and can transpresent IL-15 to NK and CD8 + T cells. A transient NK-humanized murine model was developed to test the increase of ADCC attained by the chimeric protein in vivo . The EGFR + human colon cancer cell line HT-29 was intraperitoneally inoculated in immune-deficient Rag2 -/- γc -/- mice that were reconstituted with freshly isolated PBMCs and treated with the anti-EGFR mAb cetuximab. The combination of the Sushi-IL15-Apo protein and cetuximab reduced the number of remaining tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity and delayed tumor engraftment in the peritoneum. Furthermore, Sushi-IL15-Apo increased the anti-tumor effect of a murine anti-EGFR mAb in Rag1 -/- mice bearing subcutaneous MC38 colon cancer transfected to express EGFR. Thus, Sushi-IL15-Apo is a potent tool to increase the number and the activation of NK cells to promote the ADCC activity of antibodies targeting tumor antigens.

  18. LAMP-1-chimeric DNA vaccines enhance the antibody response in Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondón-Barragán, Iang; Nozaki, Reiko; Hirono, Ikuo; Kondo, Hidehiro

    2017-08-01

    DNA vaccination is one method to protect farmed fish from viral and bacterial diseases. Chimeric antigens encoded by DNA vaccines have been shown to increase the resistance to viral diseases. Here, we sequenced the gene encoding lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 from Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, (JfLAMP-1) and assessed its use in a chimeric DNA vaccine fused with the major capsule protein (MCP) from red seabream iridovirus (RSIV). JfLAMP-1 cDNA has a length of 1248 bp encoding 415 aa, which contains transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. JfLAMP-1 is constitutively expressed in several tissues and its expression in spleen was upregulated following injection of formalin-killed cells (FKC) of Edwardsiella tarda. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that JfLAMP-1 is distributed in the small and large granules in the cytoplasm and groups close to the nucleus. The DNA encoding the luminal domain of JfLAMP-1 was replaced with the gene for the RSIV MCP, and the construct was cloned in an expression vector (pCIneo). Fish vaccinated with pCLAMP-MCP had significantly higher antibody levels than fish vaccinated with pCIneo vector harboring the MCP gene (p day 30 post-vaccination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chimeric anti-tenascin antibody 81C6: Increased tumor localization compared with its murine parent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalutsky, Michael R.; Archer, Gary E.; Garg, Pradeep K.; Batra, Surinder K.; Bigner, Darell D.

    1996-01-01

    When labeled using the Iodogen method, a chimeric antibody composed of the human IgG 2 constant region and the variable regions of murine anti-tenascin 81C6 exhibited superior uptake in human glioma xenografts compared with its murine parent. In the current study, three paired-label experiments were performed in athymic mice with subcutaneous D-54 MG human glioma xenografts to evaluate further the properties of radioiodinated chimeric 81C6. These studies demonstrated that (a) the enhanced tumor uptake of chimeric 81C6 is specific; (b) when labeling was performed using N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate, chimeric 81C6 again showed preferential accumulation in tumor compared with murine 81C6; and (c) the tumor uptake advantage observed previously with murine 81C6 for N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate compared with Iodogen labeling did not occur with chimeric 81C6

  20. The expression and genetic immunization of chimeric fragment of Hantaan virus M and S segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fanglin; Wu Xingan; Luo Wen; Bai Wentao; Liu Yong; Yan Yan; Wang Haitao; Xu Zhikai

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is characterized by severe symptoms and high mortality, is caused by hantavirus. There are still no effective prophylactic vaccines directed to HFRS until now. In this research, we fused expressed G2 fragment of M segment and 0.7 kb fragment of S segment. We expect it could be a candidate vaccine. Chimeric gene G2S0.7 was first expressed in prokaryotic expression system pGEX-4T. After inducing expressed fusion proteins, GST-G2S0.7 was induced and its molecular weight was about 100 kDa. Meanwhile, the fusion protein kept the activity of its parental proteins. Further, BALB/c mice were vaccinated by the chimeric gene. ELISA, cell microculture neutralization test in vitro were used to detect the humoral immune response in immunized BALB/c mice. Lymphocyte proliferation assay was used to detect the cellular immune response. The results showed that the chimeric gene could simultaneously evoke specific antibody against nucleocapsid protein (NP) and glycoprotein (GP). And the immunized mice of every group elicited neutralizing antibodies with different titers. But the titers were low. Lymphocyte proliferation assay results showed that the stimulation indexes of splenocytes of chimeric gene to NP and GP were significantly higher than that of control. It suggested that the chimeric gene of Hantaan virus containing G2 fragment of M segment and 0.7 kb fragment of S segment could directly elicit specific anti-Hantaan virus humoral and cellular immune response in BALB/c mice

  1. The biological characteristics of anti-CD71 mouse/human chimeric antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuo; Jiang Lin; Lei Ping; Zhu Huifen; Shen Guanxin; Cui Wuren; Wang Yanggong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the biological characteristics of an anti-CD71 mouse/human chimeric antibody (D2C). Methods: Analysis of the chimeric Ab production in culture supernatant was made by the standard concentration curve method with ELISA. The antibody was purified by DEAE-Sephredax-A50 ion-exchange chromatography and was confirmed by SDS-PAGE. The competition inhibition studies for binding to the same epitope on CD71 were performed between the chimeric Ab(D2C) in the culture supernatant was about 0.5-5 μg/ml in 5-day cultures when seeded at 1 x 10 5 cells/5ml compared with 12.5-25 μg/ml in the supernatant from their parental monoclonal Ab(7579). The purified chimeric Ab(D2C) from mouse ascetics was 1-2 mg/ml. The SDS-PAGE analysis of purified chimeric Ab(D2C) with discontinuous system confirmed two protein bands of 55 kDa and 25 kDa. It was clear that both chimeric Ab(D2C) and murine monoclonal Ab (7579) compete effectively to join the same epitope of CD71 each other. The chimeric antibody's affinity constant (Ka), quantitated by Scatchard analysis, is about 9.34-9.62 x 10 9 L/mol. Conclusion: The chimeric Ab(D2C) produced from the transfectomas is stable. The binding capacity of the chimeric Ab(D2C) to the antigen (CD71) was retained

  2. Characterization of hemopoietic stem cell chimerism in antibody-facilitated bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francescutti, L.H.; Gambel, P.; Wegmann, T.G.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have previously described a model for bone marrow transplantation that involves preparation of the host with monoclonal antibody against class I or class II antigens instead of irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. This allows engraftment and subsequent repopulation of the host by donor tissue. They have previously reported on chimerism in the peripheral blood of P1----(P1 X P2)F1 animals. In this report, the authors describe the examination of the bone marrow and spleen stem cell chimerism of these antibody-facilitated (AF) chimeras, by determining, with an isozyme assay, the phenotype of methylcellulose colonies grown from stem cells. They have found a correlation between peripheral blood chimerism and the stem cell constitution of both spleen and bone marrow. The peripheral blood chimerism also correlates with the level of chimerism in macrophages derived from peritoneal exudate cells. These findings indicate that assaying the peripheral blood of such chimeras provides an excellent indication of the degree of chimerism at the stem cell level and stands in sharp contrast to the level of chimerism in certain lymphoid compartments

  3. Expression of chimeric HCV peptide in transgenic tobacco plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression of chimeric HCV peptide in transgenic tobacco plants infected with recombinant alfalfa mosaic virus for development of a plant-derived vaccine against HCV. AK El Attar, AM Shamloul, AA Shalaby, BY Riad, A Saad, HM Mazyad, JM Keith ...

  4. Development of a mouse-feline chimeric antibody against feline tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOKI, Tomoyoshi; TAKANO, Tomomi; HOHDATSU, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal inflammatory disease caused by FIP virus infection. Feline tumor necrosis factor (fTNF)-alpha is closely involved in the aggravation of FIP pathology. We previously described the preparation of neutralizing mouse anti-fTNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb 2–4) and clarified its role in the clinical condition of cats with FIP using in vitro systems. However, administration of mouse mAb 2–4 to cat may lead to a production of feline anti-mouse antibodies. In the present study, we prepared a mouse-feline chimeric mAb (chimeric mAb 2–4) by fusing the variable region of mouse mAb 2–4 to the constant region of feline antibody. The chimeric mAb 2–4 was confirmed to have fTNF-alpha neutralization activity. Purified mouse mAb 2–4 and chimeric mAb 2–4 were repeatedly administered to cats, and the changes in the ability to induce feline anti-mouse antibody response were investigated. In the serum of cats treated with mouse mAb 2–4, feline anti-mouse antibody production was induced, and the fTNF-alpha neutralization effect of mouse mAb 2–4 was reduced. In contrast, in cats treated with chimeric mAb 2–4, the feline anti-mouse antibody response was decreased compared to that of mouse mAb 2–4-treated cats. PMID:27264736

  5. Rituximab chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody treatment for adult refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braendstrup, Peter; Bjerrum, Ole W; Nielsen, Ove J

    2005-01-01

    . Recent studies have shown that rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, is useful in the treatment of these patients, with overall response rates of about 50%. Most published reports have included a small number patients including case reports. The present study reports the results...

  6. Endothelial chimerism and vascular sequestration protect pancreatic islet grafts from antibody-mediated rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chia; Pouliquen, Eric; Broisat, Alexis; Andreata, Francesco; Racapé, Maud; Bruneval, Patrick; Kessler, Laurence; Ahmadi, Mitra; Bacot, Sandrine; Saison-Delaplace, Carole; Marcaud, Marina; Van Huyen, Jean-Paul Duong; Loupy, Alexandre; Villard, Jean; Demuylder-Mischler, Sandrine; Morelon, Emmanuel; Tsai, Meng-Kun; Kolopp-Sarda, Marie-Nathalie; Koenig, Alice; Mathias, Virginie; Ghezzi, Catherine; Dubois, Valerie; Defrance, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Humoral rejection is the most common cause of solid organ transplant failure. Here, we evaluated a cohort of 49 patients who were successfully grafted with allogenic islets and determined that the appearance of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) did not accelerate the rate of islet graft attrition, suggesting resistance to humoral rejection. Murine DSAs bound to allogeneic targets expressed by islet cells and induced their destruction in vitro; however, passive transfer of the same DSAs did not affect islet graft survival in murine models. Live imaging revealed that DSAs were sequestrated in the circulation of the recipients and failed to reach the endocrine cells of grafted islets. We used murine heart transplantation models to confirm that endothelial cells were the only accessible targets for DSAs, which induced the development of typical microvascular lesions in allogeneic transplants. In contrast, the vasculature of DSA-exposed allogeneic islet grafts was devoid of lesions because sprouting of recipient capillaries reestablished blood flow in grafted islets. Thus, we conclude that endothelial chimerism combined with vascular sequestration of DSAs protects islet grafts from humoral rejection. The reduced immunoglobulin concentrations in the interstitial tissue, confirmed in patients, may have important implications for biotherapies such as vaccines and monoclonal antibodies. PMID:29202467

  7. Production and characterisation of a neutralising chimeric antibody against botulinum neurotoxin A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Prigent

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins, produced by Clostridium botulinum bacteria, are the causative agent of botulism. This disease only affects a few hundred people each year, thus ranking it among the orphan diseases. However, botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A is the most potent toxin known to man. Due to their potency and ease of production, these toxins were classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC as Category A biothreat agents. For several biothreat agents, like BoNT/A, passive immunotherapy remains the only possible effective treatment allowing in vivo neutralization, despite possible major side effects. Recently, several mouse monoclonal antibodies directed against a recombinant fragment of BoNT/A were produced in our laboratory and most efficiently neutralised the neurotoxin. In the present work, the most powerful one, TA12, was selected for chimerisation. The variable regions of this antibody were thus cloned and fused with the constant counterparts of human IgG1 (kappa light and gamma 1 heavy chains. Chimeric antibody production was evaluated in mammalian myeloma cells (SP2/0-Ag14 and insect cells (Sf9. After purifying the recombinant antibody by affinity chromatography, the biochemical properties of chimeric and mouse antibody were compared. Both have the same very low affinity constant (close to 10 pM and the chimeric antibody exhibited a similar capacity to its parent counterpart in neutralising the toxin in vivo. Its strong affinity and high neutralising potency make this chimeric antibody interesting for immunotherapy treatment in humans in cases of poisoning, particularly as there is a probable limitation of the immunological side effects observed with classical polyclonal antisera from heterologous species.

  8. Anti-Bovine Programmed Death-1 Rat–Bovine Chimeric Antibody for Immunotherapy of Bovine Leukemia Virus Infection in Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Okagawa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Blockade of immunoinhibitory molecules, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1/PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1, is a promising strategy for reinvigorating exhausted T cells and preventing disease progression in a variety of chronic infections. Application of this therapeutic strategy to cattle requires bovinized chimeric antibody targeting immunoinhibitory molecules. In this study, anti-bovine PD-1 rat–bovine chimeric monoclonal antibody 5D2 (Boch5D2 was constructed with mammalian expression systems, and its biochemical function and antiviral effect were characterized in vitro and in vivo using cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus (BLV. Purified Boch5D2 was capable of detecting bovine PD-1 molecules expressed on cell membranes in flow cytometric analysis. In particular, Biacore analysis determined that the binding affinity of Boch5D2 to bovine PD-1 protein was similar to that of the original anti-bovine PD-1 rat monoclonal antibody 5D2. Boch5D2 was also capable of blocking PD-1/PD-L1 binding at the same level as 5D2. The immunomodulatory and therapeutic effects of Boch5D2 were evaluated by in vivo administration of the antibody to a BLV-infected calf. Inoculated Boch5D2 was sustained in the serum for a longer period. Boch5D2 inoculation resulted in activation of the proliferation of BLV-specific CD4+ T cells and decrease in the proviral load of BLV in the peripheral blood. This study demonstrates that Boch5D2 retains an equivalent biochemical function to that of the original antibody 5D2 and is a candidate therapeutic agent for regulating antiviral immune response in vivo. Clinical efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade awaits further experimentation with a large number of animals.

  9. Engineering chimeric human and mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I tetramers for the production of T-cell receptor (TCR) mimic antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Carol; Yates, Jenna; Salimi, Maryam; Greig, Jenny; Wiblin, Sarah; Hassanali, Tasneem; Banham, Alison H.

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting cell surface or secreted antigens are among the most effective classes of novel immunotherapies. However, the majority of human proteins and established cancer biomarkers are intracellular. Peptides derived from these intracellular proteins are presented on the cell surface by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and can be targeted by a novel class of T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm) antibodies that recognise similar epitopes to T-cell receptors. Humoural immune responses to MHC-I tetramers rarely generate TCRm antibodies and many antibodies recognise the α3 domain of MHC-I and β2 microglobulin (β2m) that are not directly involved in presenting the target peptide. Here we describe the production of functional chimeric human-murine HLA-A2-H2Dd tetramers and modifications that increase their bacterial expression and refolding efficiency. These chimeric tetramers were successfully used to generate TCRm antibodies against two epitopes derived from wild type tumour suppressor p53 (RMPEAAPPV and GLAPPQHLIRV) that have been used in vaccination studies. Immunisation with chimeric tetramers yielded no antibodies recognising the human α3 domain and β2m and generated TCRm antibodies capable of specifically recognising the target peptide/MHC-I complex in fully human tetramers and on the cell surface of peptide pulsed T2 cells. Chimeric tetramers represent novel immunogens for TCRm antibody production and may also improve the yield of tetramers for groups using these reagents to monitor CD8 T-cell immune responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mouse models of immunotherapy. PMID:28448627

  10. Expression and purification of toxic anti-breast cancer p28-NRC chimeric protein

    OpenAIRE

    Soleimani, Meysam; Mirmohammad-Sadeghi, Hamid; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chimeric proteins consisting of a targeting moiety and a cytotoxic moiety are now under intense research focus for targeted therapy of cancer. Here, we report cloning, expression, and purification of such a targeted chimeric protein made up of p28 peptide as both targeting and anticancer moiety fused to NRC peptide as a cytotoxic moiety. However, since the antimicrobial activity of the NRC peptide would intervene expression of the chimeric protein in Escherichia coli, we evaluated...

  11. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Kyeom Kim

    Full Text Available Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17 were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  12. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pan Kyeom; Keum, Sun Ju; Osinubi, Modupe O V; Franka, Richard; Shin, Ji Young; Park, Sang Tae; Kim, Man Su; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Soo Young; Carson, William; Greenberg, Lauren; Yu, Pengcheng; Tao, Xiaoyan; Lihua, Wang; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guodong; Shampur, Madhusdana; Rupprecht, Charles E; Chang, Shin Jae

    2017-01-01

    Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG) have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17) were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  13. Application of 99mTc-labeled chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 for radioimmunoscintigraphy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Hiroomi

    1999-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal diseases and its prognosis is still poor. To improve the survival rate, it is essential to develop new technologies for early and definitive diagnosis. In this study, chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 were successfully radio-labeled with 99m Tc, preventing depression of the antigen-binding activity. 99m Tc-labeled monoclonal antibody A7, 99m Tc-labeled chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7, 99m Tc-labeled normal mouse IgG and 99m Tc-labeled Fab fragments of normal mouse IgG were injected intravenously into nude mice bearing human pancreatic cancer xenografts and the radioactivity was subsequently measured. The tumor accumulation was significantly higher with labeled monoclonal antibody A7 than with normal mouse IgG, and higher with chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 than with Fab fragments of normal mouse IgG. The tumor/blood ratio of radioactivity increased rapidly over time with chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7. These results suggest that chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 may be useful for diagnosing pancreatic cancer by means of radioimmunoscintigraphy. (author)

  14. {sup 99m}Tc-labeled chimeric anti-NCA 95 antigranulocyte monoclonal antibody for bone marrow imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarwar, M.; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1998-09-01

    Chimeric mouse-human antigranulocyte monoclonal antibody (ch MAb) against non-specific cross-reacting antigen (NCA-95) was labeled with {sup 99m}Tc (using a direct method) and {sup 125}I (using the chloramine T method), and its binding to human granulocytes and LS-180 colorectal carcinoma cells expressing carcinoembryonic antigen on their surfaces, cross-reactive with anti-NCA-95 chimeric monoclonal antibody, increased in proportion to the number of cells added and reached more than 80% and 90%, respectively. In biodistribution studies, {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 125}I-labeled ch anti-NCA-95 MAb revealed high tumor uptake, and the tumor-to-blood ratio was 2.9 after 24 hours. The tumor-to-normal-organ ratio was also more than 3.0 in all organs except for the tumor-to-kidney ratio. Scintigrams of athymic nude mice confirmed the results of biodistribution studies that showed higher radioactivity in tumor and kidney of the mice administered with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled ch MAb. A normal volunteer injected with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled ch anti-NCA-95 antigranulocyte MAb showed clear bone marrow images, and a patient with aplastic anemia revealed irregular uptake in his lumbar spine, suggesting its utility for bone marrow scintigraphy and for the detection of hematological disorders, infections, and bone metastasis. (author)

  15. Expression of recombinant Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André eFrenzel

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with human-like post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  16. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Alonso-Camino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs. The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR. We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2 bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR and the selection context (cell synapse, which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells.

  17. Bioactivity assays and application of 125I labeled human mouse chimeric anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody SM03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Pingping; Meng Zhiyun; Dou Guifang; Wu Yingliang; Wang Minwei

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the bioactivity and application of 125 I labeled human mouse chimeric monoclonal SM03, SM03 was labeled with 125 I using Indogen method. The labeled mixture was purified by Sephacryl S-300 HR separation chromospectry. The purity and concentration of separated fractions were determined by HPLC and Protein Assay Kit, respectively. Competitive binding method and ELISA method were used for bioactivity assays. 125 I-SM03 was applied to screen cell lines which express the most abundant CD22 antigen. The purity and recovery of 125 I-SM03 were >99% and >47%, respectively. The bioactivity of 125 I- SM03 and SM03 hasn't significant difference in statistics. Ramos cell line had the strongest special radioactivity when 125 I-SM03 bound with in Raji, Daudi and Ramos cell lines. Indogen method is a good way to label Human mouse chimeric anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody SM03 and the label will not affect the activity of SM03. The 125 I-SM03 not only can be used for detect agent, but also may be put into market for NHL therapy. (authors)

  18. ChLpMab-23: Cancer-Specific Human-Mouse Chimeric Anti-Podoplanin Antibody Exhibits Antitumor Activity via Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mika K; Nakamura, Takuro; Kunita, Akiko; Fukayama, Masashi; Abe, Shinji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Yamada, Shinji; Yanaka, Miyuki; Saidoh, Noriko; Yoshida, Kanae; Fujii, Yuki; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-06-01

    Podoplanin is expressed in many cancers, including oral cancers and brain tumors. The interaction between podoplanin and its receptor C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) has been reported to be involved in cancer metastasis and tumor malignancy. We previously established many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human podoplanin using the cancer-specific mAb (CasMab) technology. LpMab-23 (IgG 1 , kappa), one of the mouse anti-podoplanin mAbs, was shown to be a CasMab. However, we have not shown the usefulness of LpMab-23 for antibody therapy against podoplanin-expressing cancers. In this study, we first determined the minimum epitope of LpMab-23 and revealed that Gly54-Leu64 peptide, especially Gly54, Thr55, Ser56, Glu57, Asp58, Arg59, Tyr60, and Leu64 of podoplanin, is a critical epitope of LpMab-23. We further produced human-mouse chimeric LpMab-23 (chLpMab-23) and investigated whether chLpMab-23 exerts antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antitumor activity. In flow cytometry, chLpMab-23 showed high sensitivity against a podoplanin-expressing glioblastoma cell line, LN319, and an oral cancer cell line, HSC-2. chLpMab-23 also showed ADCC activity against podoplanin-expressing CHO cells (CHO/podoplanin). In xenograft models with HSC-2 and CHO/podoplanin, chLpMab-23 exerts antitumor activity using human natural killer cells, indicating that chLpMab-23 could be useful for antibody therapy against podoplanin-expressing cancers.

  19. Induction of HIV neutralizing antibodies against the MPER of the HIV envelope protein by HA/gp41 chimeric protein-based DNA and VLP vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Ye

    Full Text Available Several conserved neutralizing epitopes have been identified in the HIV Env protein and among these, the MPER of gp41 has received great attention and is widely recognized as a promising target. However, little success has been achieved in eliciting MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies by a number of different vaccine strategies. We investigated the ability of HA/gp41 chimeric protein-based vaccines, which were designed to enhance the exposure of the MPER in its native conformation, to induce MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies. In characterization of the HA/gp41 chimeric protein, we found that by mutating an unpaired Cys residue (Cys-14 in its HA1 subunit to a Ser residue, the modified chimeric protein HA-C14S/gp41 showed increased reactivity to a conformation-sensitive monoclonal antibody against HA and formed more stable trimers in VLPs. On the other hand, HA-C14S/gp41 and HA/gp41 chimeric proteins expressed on the cell surfaces exhibited similar reactivity to monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Immunization of guinea pigs using the HA-C14S/gp41 DNA or VLP vaccines induced antibodies against the HIV gp41 as well as to a peptide corresponding to a segment of MPER at higher levels than immunization by standard HIV VLPs. Further, sera from vaccinated guinea pigs were found to exhibit HIV neutralizing activities. Moreover, sera from guinea pigs vaccinated by HA-C14S/gp41 DNA and VLP vaccines but not the standard HIV VLPs, were found to neutralize HIV pseudovirions containing a SIV-4E10 chimeric Env protein. The virus neutralization could be blocked by a MPER-specific peptide, thus demonstrating induction of MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies by this novel vaccine strategy. These results show that induction of MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies can be achieved through a rationally designed vaccine strategy.

  20. Preoperative clinical radioimmunodetection of pancreatic cancer by 111In-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibody Nd2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tetsuji; Nishihara, Tamahiro; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    1999-01-01

    The present study was carried out with the purpose of evaluating the clinical usefulness of radioimmunodetection (RAID) with 111 In-labeled murine/human chimeric monoclonal antibody, Nd2 (c-Nd2) in patients with pancreatic cancer. Nineteen patients suspected to have pancreatic cancer were administered intravenously 74 MBq/2 mg 111 In-labeled c-Nd2 in 100 ml of saline containing 2% albumin over 30 min. A scintigram was obtained on the 3rd day after infusion by using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Of the 14 patients finally diagnosed as having pancreatic cancer on the basis of surgical specimens or progress of disease, specific focal uptake at the site of the tumor was detected in 12 (true positive cases), representing a sensitivity of 85.7% (12/14), and liver metastasis was found in one case with metastasis. Of the 5 patients diagnosed with tumor-forming pancreatitis (TFP), 4 patients demonstrated true negative imaging, but one patient whose tumor demonstrated interesting findings in histology and immunostaining, showed false positive imaging. Of patients investigated for human anti-chimeric antibody (HACA) response, none showed HACA response, and no allergic reaction was seen in any of the patients administered c-Nd2. These results suggest that RAID with 111 In-labeled c-Nd2 is useful for differential preoperative diagnosis between invasive pancreatic cancer and TFP. (author)

  1. Generation and characterization of a human-mouse chimeric high-affinity antibody that detects the DYKDDDDK FLAG peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Koki; Koga, Tomoaki; Sasaki, Fumiyuki; Ueno, Ayumi; Saeki, Kazuko; Okuno, Toshiaki; Yokomizo, Takehiko

    2017-05-13

    DYKDDDDK peptide (FLAG) is a useful tool for investigating the function and localization of proteins whose antibodies (Abs) are not available. We recently established a high-affinity monoclonal antibody (mAb) for FLAG (clone 2H8). The 2H8 Ab is highly sensitive for detecting FLAG-tagged proteins by flowcytometry and immunoprecipitation, but it can yield nonspecific signals in immunohistochemistry of mouse tissues because it is of mouse origin. In this study, we reduced nonspecific signals by generating a chimeric 2H8 Ab with Fc fragments derived from human immunoglobulin. We fused a 5' terminal cDNA fragments for the Fab region of 2H8 mAb with 3' terminal cDNA fragments for Fc region of human IgG1. We transfected both chimeric plasmids and purified the resulting human-mouse chimeric 2H8. The chimeric 2H8 Ab successfully detected FLAG-tagged proteins in flowcytometry with anti-human IgG secondary Ab with comparable sensitivity to 2H8 mAb. Importantly, chimeric 2H8 detected specific FLAG peptide signals without nonspecific signals in immunohistochemical analysis with mouse tissues. This human-mouse chimeric high-affinity anti-FLAG Ab will prove useful for future immunohistochemical analysis of mouse tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Antitumor activity of chLpMab-2, a human-mouse chimeric cancer-specific antihuman podoplanin antibody, via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mika K; Yamada, Shinji; Nakamura, Takuro; Abe, Shinji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Kunita, Akiko; Fukayama, Masashi; Fujii, Yuki; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-04-01

    Human podoplanin (hPDPN), a platelet aggregation-inducing transmembrane glycoprotein, is expressed in different types of tumors, and it binds to C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). The overexpression of hPDPN is involved in invasion and metastasis. Anti-hPDPN monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as NZ-1 have shown antitumor and antimetastatic activities by binding to the platelet aggregation-stimulating (PLAG) domain of hPDPN. Recently, we developed a novel mouse anti-hPDPN mAb, LpMab-2, using the cancer-specific mAb (CasMab) technology. In this study we developed chLpMab-2, a human-mouse chimeric anti-hPDPN antibody, derived from LpMab-2. chLpMab-2 was produced using fucosyltransferase 8-knockout (KO) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-S cell lines. By flow cytometry, chLpMab-2 reacted with hPDPN-expressing cancer cell lines including glioblastomas, mesotheliomas, and lung cancers. However, it showed low reaction with normal cell lines such as lymphatic endothelial and renal epithelial cells. Moreover, chLpMab-2 exhibited high antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against PDPN-expressing cells, despite its low complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Furthermore, treatment with chLpMab-2 abolished tumor growth in xenograft models of CHO/hPDPN, indicating that chLpMab-2 suppressed tumor development via ADCC. In conclusion, chLpMab-2 could be useful as a novel antibody-based therapy against hPDPN-expressing tumors. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Therapeutically targeting glypican-2 via single-domain antibody-based chimeric antigen receptors and immunotoxins in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Fu, Haiying; Hewitt, Stephen M; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Ho, Mitchell

    2017-08-08

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer that is fatal in almost half of patients despite intense multimodality treatment. This cancer is derived from neuroendocrine tissue located in the sympathetic nervous system. Glypican-2 (GPC2) is a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is important for neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth. In this study, we find that GPC2 protein is highly expressed in about half of neuroblastoma cases and that high GPC2 expression correlates with poor overall survival compared with patients with low GPC2 expression. We demonstrate that silencing of GPC2 by CRISPR-Cas9 or siRNA results in the inhibition of neuroblastoma tumor cell growth. GPC2 silencing inactivates Wnt/β-catenin signaling and reduces the expression of the target gene N-Myc, an oncogenic driver of neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. We have isolated human single-domain antibodies specific for GPC2 by phage display technology and found that the single-domain antibodies can inhibit active β-catenin signaling by disrupting the interaction of GPC2 and Wnt3a. To explore GPC2 as a potential target in neuroblastoma, we have developed two forms of antibody therapeutics, immunotoxins and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. Immunotoxin treatment was demonstrated to inhibit neuroblastoma growth in mice. CAR T cells targeting GPC2 eliminated tumors in a disseminated neuroblastoma mouse model where tumor metastasis had spread to multiple clinically relevant sites, including spine, skull, legs, and pelvis. This study suggests GPC2 as a promising therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

  4. Development of mPMab-1, a Mouse-Rat Chimeric Antibody Against Mouse Podoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Nakamura, Takuro; Ichii, Osamu; Konnai, Satoru; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-04-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), the ligand of C-type lectin-like receptor-2, is used as a lymphatic endothelial marker. We previously established clone PMab-1 of rat IgG 2a as a specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) against mouse PDPN. PMab-1 is also very sensitive in immunohistochemical analysis; however, rat mAbs seem to be unfavorable for pathologists because anti-mouse IgG and anti-rabbit IgG are usually used as secondary antibodies in commercially available kits for immunohistochemical analysis. In this study, we develop a mouse-rat chimeric antibody, mPMab-1 of mouse IgG 2a , which was derived from rat PMab-1 mAb. Immunohistochemical analysis shows that mPMab-1 detects podocytes of the kidney, lymphatic endothelial cells of the colon, and type I alveolar cells of the lung. Importantly, mPMab-1 is more sensitive than PMab-1. This conversion strategy from rat mAb to mouse mAb could be applicable to other mAbs.

  5. MINOR HUMAN-ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO A MOUSE AND CHIMERIC MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY AFTER A SINGLE IV INFUSION IN OVARIAN-CARCINOMA PATIENTS - A COMPARISON OF 5 ASSAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUIST, MR; KENEMANS, P; VANKAMP, GJ; Haisma, Hidde

    The human anti-(mouse Ig) antibody (HAMA) response was measured in serum of 52 patients suspected of having ovarian carcinoma who had received an i.v. injection of either the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) OV-TL 3 F(ab')(2) (n = 28, 1 mg) or the chimeric mouse/human mAb MOv18 (cMOv18; n = 24, 3

  6. Minor human antibody response to a mouse and chimeric monoclonal antibody after a single i.v. infusion in ovarian carcinoma patients: a comparison of five assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, M. R.; Kenemans, P.; van Kamp, G. J.; Haisma, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    The human anti-(mouse Ig) antibody (HAMA) response was measured in serum of 52 patients suspected of having ovarian carcinoma who had received an i.v. injection of either the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) OV-TL 3 F(ab')2 (n = 28, 1 mg) or the chimeric mouse/human mAb MOv18 (cMOv18; n = 24, 3 mg).

  7. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Luciano Neves Santos

    Full Text Available The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6, demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies.

  8. Functional analysis of aldehyde oxidase using expressed chimeric enzyme between monkey and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kunio; Asakawa, Tasuku; Hoshino, Kouichi; Adachi, Mayuko; Fukiya, Kensuke; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Yorihisa

    2009-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Each subunit consists of about 20 kDa 2Fe-2S cluster domain storing reducing equivalents, about 40 kDa flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD) domain and about 85 kDa molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) domain containing a substrate binding site. In order to clarify the properties of each domain, especially substrate binding domain, chimeric cDNAs were constructed by mutual exchange of 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains between monkey and rat. Chimeric monkey/rat AO was referred to one with monkey type 2Fe-2S/FAD domains and a rat type MoCo domain. Rat/monkey AO was vice versa. AO-catalyzed 2-oxidation activities of (S)-RS-8359 were measured using the expressed enzyme in Escherichia coli. Substrate inhibition was seen in rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, but not in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, suggesting that the phenomenon might be dependent on the natures of MoCo domain of rat. A biphasic Eadie-Hofstee profile was observed in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, but not rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, indicating that the biphasic profile might be related to the properties of MoCo domain of monkey. Two-fold greater V(max) values were observed in monkey AO than in chimeric rat/monkey AO, and in chimeric monkey/rat AO than in rat AO, suggesting that monkey has the more effective electron transfer system than rat. Thus, the use of chimeric enzymes revealed that 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains affect the velocity and the quantitative profiles of AO-catalyzed (S)-RS-8359 2-oxidation, respectively.

  9. Clinical usefulness of human-mouse chimeric Fab monoclonal antibody A7 for radioimmunoguided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhito

    1999-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the clinical usefulness of radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) using the human-mouse chimeric Fab monoclonal antibody A7 (chA7Fab) for colorectal cancer patients. Whole murine monoclonal antibody A7 (whole A7) and chA7Fab were labelled with 125 I and 131 I, and their biodistributions were investigated experimentally and clinically. Radioactivities of the antibodies in the tissues were measured by a portable gamma detecting probe (GDP) purchased from Neoprobe Corp.. Of the four labelled antibodies used in a mouse model, 125 I-chA7Fab revealed the highest tumor/surrounding tissue ratio and all values were greater than 2.0. All tumor/surrounding tissue ratios of 131 I-chA7Fab were greater than 1.5, but the values were lower than those of 125 I-chA7Fab. Due to the limited clinical use of 125 I in Japan, 131 I was used as a radio-tracer for chA7Fab in the clinical trial. RIGS using 131 I-chA7Fab was performed on ten colorectal cancer patients. Tumor localization was intraoperatively determined in four of ten patients using the GDP. Liver metastasis and lymph node metastasis were identified in two patients and one patient, respectively. The GDP revealed tumor/surrounding tissue ratios of 1.5 or greater in eight of the ten resected tumors. Although radioimmunoguided surgery using chA7Fab is a promising tool to intraoperatively determine the tumor localization of colorectal cancer, 125 I and not 131 I should be used as a tracer for radioimmunoguided surgery to increase the accuracy of chA7Fab. (author)

  10. Chimeric monoclonal antibody to tumor necrosis factor alpha (infliximab in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insights into the pathogenesis of psoriasis have provided opportunities to target key steps in the disease process. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a being crucial to the pathogenesis of psoriasis, monoclonal antibodies against this cytokine have proved useful in its treatment. Aim: To study the efficacy of chimeric monoclonal antibody to TNF-a (infliximab in Indian patients with recalcitrant psoriasis vulgaris. Materials and Methods: Three patients with recalcitrant psoriasis vulgaris were studied. Baseline haemogram, biochemical parameters, chest radiograph and Mantoux skin test were performed. A loading dose regimen of 5 mg/kg infliximab was administered at weeks 0, 2 and 6. PASI assessment, adverse drug event monitoring and laboratory assessments were carried out at 2-week intervals until week 10. Patients were followed up until week 22 for relapse. Results: Infliximab was well tolerated. The mean PASI was 25.4 at presentation and declined to 5.5 at 10 weeks. PASI 75 was attained at a mean of 9.6 weeks. Relapse occurred at a mean of 18.6 weeks after the first infusion. Conclusions: This study on Indian patients brings out the importance of cytokine-based therapies in psoriasis. Indigenous production could make these therapies a viable therapeutic option for psoriasis patients in the near future.

  11. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipulendu Jena

    Full Text Available Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63. We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  12. An MHC-restricted antibody-based chimeric antigen receptor requires TCR-like affinity to maintain antigen specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela V Maus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are synthetic receptors that usually redirect T cells to surface antigens independent of human leukocyte antigen (HLA. Here, we investigated a T cell receptor-like CAR based on an antibody that recognizes HLA-A*0201 presenting a peptide epitope derived from the cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1. We hypothesized that this CAR would efficiently redirect transduced T cells in an HLA-restricted, antigen-specific manner. However, we found that despite the specificity of the soluble Fab, the same antibody in the form of a CAR caused moderate lysis of HLA-A2 expressing targets independent of antigen owing to T cell avidity. We hypothesized that lowering the affinity of the CAR for HLA-A2 would improve its specificity. We undertook a rational approach of mutating residues that, in the crystal structure, were predicted to stabilize binding to HLA-A2. We found that one mutation (DN lowered the affinity of the Fab to T cell receptor-range and restored the epitope specificity of the CAR. DN CAR T cells lysed native tumor targets in vitro, and, in a xenogeneic mouse model implanted with two human melanoma lines (A2+/NYESO+ and A2+/NYESO−, DN CAR T cells specifically migrated to, and delayed progression of, only the HLA-A2+/NY-ESO-1+ melanoma. Thus, although maintaining MHC-restricted antigen specificity required T cell receptor-like affinity that decreased potency, there is exciting potential for CARs to expand their repertoire to include a broad range of intracellular antigens.

  13. Chimeric Anti-Human Podoplanin Antibody NZ-12 of Lambda Light Chain Exerts Higher Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity and Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity Compared with NZ-8 of Kappa Light Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mika K; Abe, Shinji; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Fujii, Yuki; Yamada, Shinji; Murata, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroaki; Tahara, Hideaki; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-02-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), a type I transmembrane 36-kDa glycoprotein, is expressed not only in normal cells, such as renal epithelial cells (podocytes), lymphatic endothelial cells, and pulmonary type I alveolar cells, but also in cancer cells, including brain tumors and lung squamous cell carcinomas. Podoplanin activates platelet aggregation by binding to C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) on platelets, and the podoplanin/CLEC-2 interaction facilitates blood/lymphatic vessel separation. We previously produced neutralizing anti-human podoplanin monoclonal antibody (mAb), clone NZ-1 (rat IgG 2a , lambda), which neutralizes the podoplanin/CLEC-2 interaction and inhibits platelet aggregation and cancer metastasis. Human-rat chimeric antibody, NZ-8, was previously developed using variable regions of NZ-1 and human constant regions of heavy chain (IgG 1 ) and light chain (kappa chain). Although NZ-8 showed high antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) against human podoplanin-expressing cancer cells, the binding affinity of NZ-8 was lower than that of NZ-1. Herein, we produced a novel human-rat chimeric antibody, NZ-12, the constant regions of which consist of IgG 1 heavy chain and lambda light chain. Using flow cytometry, we demonstrated that the binding affinity of NZ-12 was much higher than that of NZ-8. Furthermore, ADCC and CDC activities of NZ-12 were significantly increased against glioblastoma cell lines (LN319 and D397) and lung cancer cell line (PC-10). These results suggested that NZ-12 could become a promising therapeutic antibody against podoplanin-expressing brain tumors and lung cancers.

  14. A transgenic plant cell-suspension system for expression of epitopes on chimeric Bamboo mosaic virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthamilselvan, Thangarasu; Lee, Chin-Wei; Cho, Yu-Hsin; Wu, Feng-Chao; Hu, Chung-Chi; Liang, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Na-Sheng; Hsu, Yau-Heiu

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel strategy to produce vaccine antigens using a plant cell-suspension culture system in lieu of the conventional bacterial or animal cell-culture systems. We generated transgenic cell-suspension cultures from Nicotiana benthamiana leaves carrying wild-type or chimeric Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) expression constructs encoding the viral protein 1 (VP1) epitope of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Antigens accumulated to high levels in BdT38 and BdT19 transgenic cell lines co-expressing silencing suppressor protein P38 or P19. BaMV chimeric virus particles (CVPs) were subsequently purified from the respective cell lines (1.5 and 2.1 mg CVPs/20 g fresh weight of suspended biomass, respectively), and the resulting CVPs displayed VP1 epitope on the surfaces. Guinea pigs vaccinated with purified CVPs produced humoral antibodies. This study represents an important advance in the large-scale production of immunopeptide vaccines in a cost-effective manner using a plant cell-suspension culture system. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Enhanced acquired antibodies to a chimeric Plasmodium falciparum antigen; UB05-09 is associated with protective immunity against malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinga, J N; Gamua, S D; Titanji, V P K

    2017-08-01

    It has been shown that covalently linking two antigens could enhance the immunogenicity of the chimeric construct. To prioritize such a chimera for malaria vaccine development, it is necessary to demonstrate that naturally acquired antibodies against the chimera are associated with protection from malaria. Here, we probe the ability of a chimeric construct of UB05 and UB09 antigens (UB05-09) to better differentiate between acquired immune protection and susceptibility to malaria. In a cross-sectional study, recombinant UB05-09 chimera and the constituent antigens were used to probe for specific antibodies in the plasma from children and adults resident in a malaria-endemic zone, using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Anti-UB05-09 antibody levels doubled that of its constituent antigens, UB09 and UB05, and this correlated with protection against malaria. The presence of enhanced UB05-09-specific antibody correlated with the absence of fever and parasitaemia, which are the main symptoms of malaria infection. The chimera is more effective in detecting and distinguishing acquired protective immunity against malaria than any of its constituents taken alone. Online B-cell epitope prediction tools confirmed the presence of B-cell epitopes in the study antigens. UB05-09 chimera is a marker of protective immunity against malaria that needs to be studied further. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Construction of a hepatitis B virus neutralizing chimeric monoclonal antibody recognizing escape mutants of the viral surface antigen (HBsAg).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Farid, Samira; Bahadori, Motahareh; Bohne, Felix; Altstetter, Sebastian; Wolff, Lisa; Kazemi, Tohid; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Chudy, Michael; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Protzer, Ulrike; Shokri, Fazel

    2017-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global burden on the health-care system and is considered as the tenth leading cause of death in the world. Over 248 million patients are currently suffering from chronic HBV infection worldwide and annual mortality rate of this infection is 686000. The "a" determinant is a hydrophilic region present in all antigenic subtypes of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), and antibodies against this region can neutralize the virus and are protective against all subtypes. We have recently generated a murine anti-HBs monoclonal antibody (4G4), which can neutralize HBV infection in HepaRG cells and recognize most of the escape mutant forms of HBsAg. Here, we describe the production and characterization of the chimeric human-murine antibody 4G4 (c-4G4). Variable region genes of heavy and light chains of the m-4G4 were cloned and fused to constant regions of human kappa and IgG1 by splice overlap extension (SOE) PCR. The chimeric antibody was expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO)-K1 cells and purified from culture supernatant. Competition ELISA proved that both antibodies bind the same epitope within HBsAg. Antigen-binding studies using ELISA and Western blot showed that c-4G4 has retained the affinity and specificity of the parental murine antibody, and displayed a similar pattern of reactivity to 13 escape mutant forms of HBsAg. Both, the parental and c-4G4 showed a comparably high HBV neutralization capacity in cell culture even at the lowest concentration (0.6μg/ml). Due to the ability of c-4G4 to recognize most of the sub-genotypes and escape mutants of HBsAg, this antibody either alone or in combination with other anti-HBs antibodies could be considered as a potent alternative for Hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) as an HBV infection prophylactic or for passive immunotherapy against HBV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Design of chimeric expression elements that confer high-level gene activity in chromoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroca, Rodrigo; Howell, Katharine A; Hasse, Claudia; Ruf, Stephanie; Bock, Ralph

    2013-02-01

    Non-green plastids, such as chromoplasts, generally have much lower activity of gene expression than chloroplasts in photosynthetically active tissues. Suppression of plastid genes in non-green tissues occurs through a complex interplay of transcriptional and translational control, with the contribution of regulation of transcript abundance versus translational activity being highly variable between genes. Here, we have investigated whether the low expression of the plastid genome in chromoplasts results from inherent limitations in gene expression capacity, or can be overcome by designing appropriate combinations of promoters and translation initiation signals in the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR). We constructed chimeric expression elements that combine promoters and 5'-UTRs from plastid genes, which are suppressed during chloroplast-to-chromoplast conversion in Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit ripening, either just at the translational level or just at the level of mRNA accumulation. These chimeric expression elements were introduced into the tomato plastid genome by stable chloroplast transformation. We report the identification of promoter-UTR combinations that confer high-level gene expression in chromoplasts of ripe tomato fruits, resulting in the accumulation of reporter protein GFP to up to 1% of total cellular protein. Our work demonstrates that non-green plastids are capable of expressing genes to high levels. Moreover, the chimeric cis-elements for chromoplasts developed here are widely applicable in basic and applied research using transplastomic methods. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Minor displacements in the insertion site provoke major differences in the induction of antibody responses by chimeric parvovirus-like particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rueda, P.; Hurtado, A.; del Barrio, M.

    1999-01-01

    inserted into these positions was well recognized by the specific monoclonal antibody C3 by immunoelectron microscopy. BALB/c mice immunized with these chimeric C3:B CPV:VLPs were able to elicit an strong neutralizing antibody response (>3 log(10) units) against poliovirus type 1 (Mahoney strain...

  19. Useful oriented immobilization of antibodies on chimeric magnetic particles: direct correlation of biomacromolecule orientation with biological activity by AFM studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciello, Marzia; Filice, Marco; Olea, David; Velez, Marisela; Guisan, José M; Mateo, Cesar

    2014-12-16

    The preparation and performance of a suitable chimeric biosensor based on antibodies (Abs) immobilized on lipase-coated magnetic particles by means of a standing orienting strategy are presented. This novel system is based on hydrophobic magnetic particles coated with modified lipase molecules able to orient and further immobilize different Abs in a covalent way without any previous site-selective chemical modification of biomacromolecules. Different key parameters attending the process were studied and optimized. The optimal preparation was performed using a controlled loading (1 nmol Ab g(-1) chimeric support) at pH 9 and a short reaction time to recover a biological activity of about 80%. AFM microscopy was used to study and confirm the Abs-oriented immobilization on lipase-coated magnetic particles and the final achievement of a highly active and recyclable chimeric immune sensor. This direct technique was demonstrated to be a powerful alternative to the indirect immunoactivity assay methods for the study of biomacromolecule-oriented immobilizations.

  20. Generation of chimeric bispecific G250/anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, a tool to combat renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, R. M.; Coney, L. R.; Fleuren, G. J.; Warnaar, S. O.; Litvinov, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (MAb) G250 binds to a tumour-associated antigen, expressed in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), which has been demonstrated to be a suitable target for antibody-mediated immunotherapy. A bispecific antibody having both G250 and anti-CD3 specificity can cross-link G250

  1. Chimeric anti-staphylococcal enterotoxin B antibodies and lovastatin act synergistically to provide in vivo protection against lethal doses of SEB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulualem E Tilahun

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB is one of a family of toxins secreted by Staphylococcus aureus that act as superantigens, activating a large fraction of the T-cell population and inducing production of high levels of inflammatory cytokines that can cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS and death. Extracellular engagement of the TCR of T-cells and class II MHC of antigen presenting cells by SEB triggers the activation of many intracellular signaling processes. We engineered chimeric antibodies to block the extracellular engagement of cellular receptors by SEB and used a statin to inhibit intracellular signaling. Chimeric human-mouse antibodies directed against different neutralizing epitopes of SEB synergistically inhibited its activation of human T-cells in vitro. In the in vivo model of lethal toxic shock syndrome (TSS in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice, two of these antibodies conferred significant partial protection when administered individually, but offered complete protection in a synergistic manner when given together. Similarly, in vivo, lovastatin alone conferred only partial protection from TSS similar to single anti-SEB antibodies. However, used in combination with one chimeric neutralizing anti-SEB antibody, lovastatin provided complete protection against lethal TSS in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. These experiments demonstrate that in vivo protection against lethal doses of SEB can be achieved by a statin of proven clinical safety and chimeric human-mouse antibodies, agents now widely used and known to be of low immunogenicity in human hosts.

  2. Vaccinia virus recombinants expressing chimeric proteins of human immunodeficiency virus and gamma interferon are attenuated for nude mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Giavedoni, L D; Jones, L; Gardner, M B; Gibson, H L; Ng, C T; Barr, P J; Yilma, T

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a method for attenuating vaccinia virus recombinants by expressing a fusion protein of a lymphokine and an immunogen. Chimeric genes were constructed that coded for gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and structural proteins of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In this study, we describe the biological and immunological properties of vaccinia virus recombinants expressing chimeric genes of murine or human IFN-gamma with glycoprotein gp120, gag, and a fragment of gp41...

  3. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells secreting anti-PD-L1 antibodies more effectively regress renal cell carcinoma in a humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Eloah Rabello; Chang, De Kuan; Sun, Jiusong; Sui, Jianhua; Freeman, Gordon J; Signoretti, Sabina; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A

    2016-06-07

    Advances in the treatment of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) have led to improved progression-free survival of many patients; however the therapies are toxic, rarely achieve durable long-term complete responses and are not curative. Herein we used a single bicistronic lentiviral vector to develop a new combination immunotherapy that consists of human anti-carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX)-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells engineered to secrete human anti-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) antibodies at the tumor site. The local antibody delivery led to marked immune checkpoint blockade. Tumor growth diminished 5 times and tumor weight reduced 50-80% when compared with the anti-CAIX CAR T cells alone in a humanized mice model of ccRCC. The expression of PD-L1 and Ki67 in the tumors decreased and an increase in granzyme B levels was found in CAR T cells. The anti-PD-L1 IgG1 isotype, which is capable of mediating ADCC, was also able to recruit human NK cells to the tumor site in vivo. These armed second-generation CAR T cells empowered to secrete human anti-PD-L1 antibodies in the ccRCC milieu to combat T cell exhaustion is an innovation in this field that should provide renewed potential for CAR T cell immunotherapy of solid tumors where limited efficacy is currently seen.

  4. CCR 20th anniversary commentary: a chimeric antibody, C225, inhibits EGFR activation and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, John; Prewett, Marie; Rockwell, Patricia; Goldstein, Neil I

    2015-01-15

    Murine mAb 225 was effective against the EGFR tyrosine kinase and inhibited tumor growth in preclinical studies. A phase I trial showed safety, tumor localization, and satisfactory pharmacokinetics. Human:murine chimeric C225 retained biologic activity, which was essential for the conduct of subsequent combination therapy trials and eventual regulatory approval. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. A recombinant chimeric La Crosse virus expressing the surface glycoproteins of Jamestown Canyon virus is immunogenic and protective against challenge with either parental virus in mice or monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, R S; Gresko, A K; Nelson, J T; Murphy, B R; Whitehead, S S

    2012-01-01

    La Crosse virus (LACV) and Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV), family Bunyaviridae, are mosquito-borne viruses that are endemic in North America and recognized as etiologic agents of encephalitis in humans. Both viruses belong to the California encephalitis virus serogroup, which causes 70 to 100 cases of encephalitis a year. As a first step in creating live attenuated viral vaccine candidates for this serogroup, we have generated a recombinant LACV expressing the attachment/fusion glycoproteins of JCV. The JCV/LACV chimeric virus contains full-length S and L segments derived from LACV. For the M segment, the open reading frame (ORF) of LACV is replaced with that derived from JCV and is flanked by the untranslated regions of LACV. The resulting chimeric virus retained the same robust growth kinetics in tissue culture as observed for either parent virus, and the virus remains highly infectious and immunogenic in mice. Although both LACV and JCV are highly neurovirulent in 21 day-old mice, with 50% lethal dose (LD₅₀) values of 0.1 and 0.5 log₁₀ PFU, respectively, chimeric JCV/LACV is highly attenuated and does not cause disease even after intracerebral inoculation of 10³ PFU. Parenteral vaccination of mice with 10¹ or 10³ PFU of JCV/LACV protected against lethal challenge with LACV, JCV, and Tahyna virus (TAHV). The chimeric virus was infectious and immunogenic in rhesus monkeys and induced neutralizing antibodies to JCV, LACV, and TAHV. When vaccinated monkeys were challenged with JCV, they were protected against the development of viremia. Generation of highly attenuated yet immunogenic chimeric bunyaviruses could be an efficient general method for development of vaccines effective against these pathogenic viruses.

  6. Mammalian Cell Culture Clarification: A Case Study Using Chimeric Anti-CEA Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Abol Hassan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular expression of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs in mammalian cell culture provides both opportunities and restrictions for the design of robust harvest and clarification operations. With advances in cell culture media and cell lines, it is now possible to achieve high titers of over 5 g/l for mAbs. However, Mammalian cells are sensitive to breakage due to shear stress that can result in release of proteases and other host cell proteins (HCPs which eventually affects product stability and purity. There is larger number of mAbs undergoing clinical development and it has placed significant importance on platform technologies of process development. Generally, Centrifugation and microfiltration are the primary harvest techniques used in the industry and depth filtration is also used as a step operation on clarification. This study compares the unit operations; centrifugation, microfiltration and depth filtration for maximum recovery of monoclonal antibodies. The results have shown that the depth filtration as more suitable operation for mammalian cell culture clarification since it gives 96% recovery of mAbs in comparison to centrifugation and microfiltration. ABSTRAK: Pengungkapan luar sel dari antibodi monoklon (monoclonal antibodies ((mAbs dalam kultur sel mamalia memberi ruang dan batasan terhadap reka bentuk penuaian yang cekap dan penerangan operasi. Dengan kemajuan dalam media sel kultur dan cell lines (produk yang berupa sel kekal yang digunakan untuk tujuan kajian biologi, kini adalah berkemungkinan untuk memperolehi titer tinggi melebihi 5g/l untuk mAbs [2]. Walaupun begitu, sel mamalia sensitif terhadap retakan disebabkan tegasan ricih yang menyebabkan pengeluaran protease dan hos sel protein yang lain, (host cell proteins (HCPs akhirnya mempengaruhi kestabilan dan keaslian produk. Terdapat mAbs dalam jumlah besar yang masih menjalani pembangunan klinikal dan sesungguhnya ini penting sebagai satu landasan teknologi dalam

  7. Expression and purification of chimeric peptide comprising EGFR B-cell epitope and measles virus fusion protein T-cell epitope in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meizhi; Zhao, Lin; Zhu, Lei; Chen, Zhange; Li, Huangjin

    2013-03-01

    Chimeric peptide MVF-EGFR(237-267), comprising a B-cell epitope from the dimerization interface of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and a promiscuous T-cell epitope from measles virus fusion protein (MVF), is a promising candidate antigen peptide for therapeutic vaccine. To establish a high-efficiency preparation process of this small peptide, the coding sequence was cloned into pET-21b and pET-32a respectively, to be expressed alone or in the form of fusion protein with thioredoxin (Trx) and His(6)-tag in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The chimeric peptide failed to be expressed alone, but over-expressed in the fusion form, which presented as soluble protein and took up more than 30% of total proteins of host cells. The fusion protein was seriously degraded during the cell disruption, in which endogenous metalloproteinase played a key role. Degradation of target peptide was inhibited by combined application of EDTA in the cell disruption buffer and a step of Source 30Q anion exchange chromatography (AEC) before metal-chelating chromatography (MCAC) for purifying His(6)-tagged fusion protein. The chimeric peptide was recovered from the purified fusion protein by enterokinase digestion at a yield of 3.0 mg/L bacteria culture with a purity of more than 95%. Immunogenicity analysis showed that the recombinant chimeric peptide was able to arouse more than 1×10(4) titers of specific antibody in BALB/c mice. Present work laid a solid foundation for the development of therapeutic peptide vaccine targeting EGFR dimerization and provided a convenient and low-cost preparation method for small peptides. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Expression of kenaf mitochondrial chimeric genes HM184 causes male sterility in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanhong; Liao, Xiaofang; Huang, Zhipeng; Chen, Peng; Zhou, Bujin; Liu, Dongmei; Kong, Xiangjun; Zhou, Ruiyang

    2015-08-01

    Chimeric genes resulting from the rearrangement of a mitochondrial genome were generally thought to be a causal factor in the occurrence of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS). In the study, earlier we reported that identifying a 47 bp deletion at 3'- flanking of atp9 that was linked to male sterile cytoplasm in kenaf. The truncated fragment was fused with atp9, a mitochondrial transit signal (MTS) and/or GFP, comprised two chimeric genes MTS-HM184-GFP and MTS-HM184. The plant expression vector pBI121 containing chimeric genes were then introduced to tobacco plants by Agrobacterium-mediated T-DNA transformation. The result showed that certain transgenic plants were male sterility or semi-sterility, while some were not. The expression analysis further demonstrated that higher level of expression were showed in the sterility plants, while no expression or less expression in fertility plants, the levels of expression of semi-sterility were in between. And the sterile plant (containing MTS-HM184-GFP) had abnormal anther produced malformed/shriveled pollen grains stained negative that failed to germinate (0%), the corresponding fruits was shrunken, the semi-sterile plants having normal anther shape produced about 10-50% normal pollen grains, the corresponding fruits were not full, and the germination rate was 58%. Meanwhile these transgenic plants which altered on fertility were further analyzed in phenotype. As a result, the metamorphosis leaves were observed in the seedling stage, the plant height of transgenic plants was shorter than wild type. The growth duration of transgenic tobacco was delayed 30-45 days compared to the wild type. The copy numbers of target genes of transgenic tobacco were analyzed using the real-time quantitative method. The results showed that these transgenic plants targeting-expression in mitochondrial containing MTS-HM184-GFP had 1 copy and 2 copies, the other two plants containing MTS-HM184 both had 3 copies, but 0 copy in wild type. In

  9. Radiotoxicity of systemically administered 211At-labeled human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody: a long-term survival study with histologic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLendon, Roger E.; Archer, Gary E.; Larsen, Roy H.; Akabani, Gamal; Bigner, Darell D.; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The antitenascin human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody labeled with the α-particle-emitting radionuclide 211 At is of interest as an endo radiotherapeutic agent for the treatment of brain tumors. To facilitate the investigation of 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 in patients, the long-term radiotoxicity of this radiopharmaceutical has been evaluated. Methods and Materials: Antibody labeling was performed using N-succinimidyl 3-[ 211 At]astato-benzoate. After an initial dose-finding experiment, a second toxicity study was carried out at 4 dose levels in groups of 30 non thyroid blocked B6C3F 1 mice per group (15 males, 15 females). Male mice received either saline or 15-81 kBq/g and females received either saline or 16-83 kBq/g of 211 At-labeled antibody. Ten animals (5 males, 5 females) were followed for 6 months and the remainder for 1 year. Results: The lethal dose in 10% of animals (LD 10 ) for 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 was 46 kBq/g in females and 102 kBq/g in males. Toxic effects--perivascular fibrosis of the intraventricular septum of the heart, bone marrow suppression, splenic white pulp atrophy, and spermatic maturational delay--generally were confined to a few animals receiving the highest doses of labeled antibody. Conclusions: The LD 10 of 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 in this mouse strain was about half that of [ 211 At]astatide. These results establish the preclinical maximum tolerated dose of 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 and define in the mouse the target organs for toxicity. These studies will be useful for determining starting doses for clinical studies with 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6

  10. Homologous recombination in hybridoma cells: heavy chain chimeric antibody produced by gene targeting.

    OpenAIRE

    Fell, H P; Yarnold, S; Hellström, I; Hellström, K E; Folger, K R

    1989-01-01

    We demonstrate that murine myeloma cells can efficiently mediate homologous recombination. The murine myeloma cell line J558L was shown to appropriately recombine two transfected DNA molecules in approximately 30% of cells that received and integrated intact copies of both molecules. This activity was then exploited to direct major reconstructions of an endogenous locus within a hybridoma cell line. Production of antigen-specific chimeric heavy chain was achieved by targeting the human IgG1 h...

  11. Chimeric opioid peptides: Tools for identifying opioid receptor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, G.; Miyajima, A.; Yokota, T.; Arai, K.; Goldstein, A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors synthesized several chimeric [125J-labelled] peptides in which the N-terminal nine residues of dynorphin-32, a peptide selective for the κ opioid receptor, were replaced by opioid peptides selective for other opioid receptor types. Each chimeric peptide retained the high affinity and type selectivity characteristic of its N-terminal sequence. The common C-terminal two-thirds of the chimeric peptides served as an epitope recognized by the same monoclonal antibody. When bound to receptors on a cell surface or membrane preparation, these peptides could still bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody. These chimeric peptides should be useful for isolating μ, δ, and κ opioid receptors and for identifying opioid receptors on transfected cells in expression cloning procedures. The general approach using chimeric peptides should be applicable to other peptide receptors

  12. Kinetics and tissue distribution of the radiolabeled chimeric monoclonal antibody MOv18 IgG and F(ab')2 fragments in ovarian carcinoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, M. R.; Kenemans, P.; den Hollander, W.; Vermorken, J. B.; Molthoff, C. J.; Burger, C. W.; Helmerhorst, T. J.; Baak, J. P.; Roos, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-four patients suspected of having ovarian carcinoma received i.v. injection with a combination of radiolabeled intact IgG (1 mg) and F(ab')2 fragments (1 mg) of the chimeric monoclonal antibody MOv18, each form labeled with 1.85 MBq 131I or 125I. Laparotomy was performed either 2 or 6 days

  13. Experimental and clinical analysis of the characteristics of a chimeric monoclonal antibody, MOv18, reactive with an ovarian cancer-associated antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molthoff, C. F.; Buist, M. R.; Kenemans, P.; Pinedo, H. M.; Boven, E.

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (Mab) MOv18 preferentially reacts with gynecological carcinomas. We have analyzed the characteristics of murine MOv18 (m-MOv18) and chimeric MOv18 (c-MOv18). We found no differences in affinity and binding to IGROV1 cells between c-MOv18 as IgG and F(ab')2 fragments and m-MOv18.

  14. Pharmacokinetics and tumor targeting of 131I-labeled F(ab')2 fragments of the chimeric monoclonal antibody G250: preclinical and clinical pilot studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, A.H.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Oosterwijk, E.; Buijs, W.C.A.M.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Clinical and animal studies of chimeric monoclonal antibody G250 (moAb cG250) for the targeting of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), to date, have been with the intact IgG form. To determine whether F(ab')2 fragments are more suited for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) than intact IgG,

  15. Chimeric antigen receptors with human scFvs preferentially induce T cell anti-tumor activity against tumors with high B7H6 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacerez, Albert T; Hua, Casey K; Ackerman, Margaret E; Sentman, Charles L

    2018-05-01

    B7H6 is emerging as a promising tumor antigen that is known to be expressed on a wide array of tumors and is reported to stimulate anti-tumor responses from the immune system. As such, B7H6 presents a good target for tumor-specific immunotherapies. B7H6-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) based on a murine antibody showed successful targeting and elimination of tumors expressing B7H6. However, mouse single chain variable fragments (scFvs) have the potential to induce host anti-CAR responses that may limit efficacy, so human scFvs specific for B7H6 were selected by yeast surface display. In this study, we validate the functionality of these human scFvs when formatted into chimeric antigen receptors. The data indicate that T cells expressing these B7H6-specific human scFvs as CARs induced potent anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo against tumors expressing high amounts of B7H6. Importantly, these human scFv-based CARs are sensitive to changes in B7H6 expression which may potentially spare non-tumor cells that express B7H6 and provides the foundation for future clinical development.

  16. Development of β-lactoglobulin-specific chimeric human IgEκ monoclonal antibodies for in vitro safety assessment of whey hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipping, Karen; Simons, Peter J; Buelens-Sleumer, Laura S; Cox, Linda; den Hartog, Marcel; de Jong, Niels; Teshima, Reiko; Garssen, Johan; Boon, Louis; Knippels, Léon M J

    2014-01-01

    Cow's milk-derived whey hydrolysates are nutritional substitutes for allergic infants. Safety or residual allergenicity assessment of these whey hydrolysates is crucial. Currently, rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells expressing the human IgE receptor α-chain (huFcεRIα-RBL-2H3), sensitized with serum IgE from cow's milk allergic children, are being employed to assess in vitro residual allergenicity of these whey hydrolysates. However, limited availability and inter-lot variation of these allergic sera impede standardization of whey hydrolysate safety testing in degranulation assays. An oligoclonal pool of chimeric human (chu)IgE antibodies against bovine β-lactoglobulin (a major allergen in whey) was generated to increase sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of existing degranulation assays. Mice were immunized with bovine β-lactoglobulin, and subsequently the variable domains of dissimilar anti-β-lactoglobulin mouse IgG antibodies were cloned and sequenced. Six chimeric antibodies were generated comprising mouse variable domains and human constant IgE/κ domains. After sensitization with this pool of anti-β-lactoglobulin chuIgEs, huFcεRIα-expressing RBL-2H3 cells demonstrated degranulation upon cross-linking with whey, native 18 kDa β-lactoglobulin, and 5-10 kDa whey hydrolysates, whereas a 3 kDa whey hydrolysate and cow's milk powder (mainly casein) showed no degranulation. In parallel, allergic serum IgEs were less sensitive. In addition, our pool anti-β-lactoglobulin chuIgEs recognized multiple allergenic immunodominant regions on β-lactoglobulin, which were also recognized by serum IgEs from cow's milk allergic children. Usage of our 'unlimited' source and well-defined pool of β-lactoglobulin-specific recombinant chuIgEs to sensitize huFcεRIα on RBL-2H3 cells showed to be a relevant and sensitive alternative for serum IgEs from cow's milk allergic patients to assess safety of whey-based non-allergic hydrolyzed formula.

  17. High-level expression and characterization of a chimeric lipase from Rhizopus oryzae for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Wei; Sha, Chong; Guo, Yong-Liang; Xiao, Rong; Xu, Yan

    2013-02-21

    Production of biodiesel from non-edible oils is receiving increasing attention. Tung oil, called "China wood oil" is one kind of promising non-edible biodiesel oil in China. To our knowledge, tung oil has not been used to produce biodiesel by enzymatic method. The enzymatic production of biodiesel has been investigated extensively by using Rhizopus oryzae lipase as catalyst. However, the high cost of R. oryzae lipase remains a barrier for its industrial applications. Through different heterologous expression strategies and fermentation techniques, the highest expression level of the lipase from R. oryzae reached 1334 U/mL in Pichia pastoris, which is still not optimistic for industry applications. The prosequence of lipases from Rhizopus sp. is very important for the folding and secretion of an active lipase. A chimeric lipase from R. oryzae was constructed by replacing the prosequence with that from the R. chinensis lipase and expressed in P. pastoris. The maximum activity of the chimera reached 4050 U/mL, which was 11 fold higher than that of the parent. The properties of the chimera were studied. The immobilized chimera was used successfully for biodiesel production from tung oil, which achieved higher FAME yield compared with the free chimeric lipase, non-chimeric lipase and mature lipase. By response surface methodology, three variables, water content, methanol to tung oil molar ratio and enzyme dosage were proved to be crucial parameters for biosynthesis of FAME and the FAME yield reached 91.9±2.5% at the optimized conditions by adding 5.66 wt.% of the initial water based on oil weight, 3.88 of methanol to tung oil molar ratio and 13.24 wt.% of enzyme concentration based on oil weight at 40°C. This is the first report on improving the expression level of the lipase from R. oryzae by replacing prosequences. The immobilized chimera was used successfully for biodiesel production from tung oil. Using tung oil as non-edible raw material and a chimeric lipase

  18. The antibody response against human and chimeric anti-TNF therapeutic antibodies primarily targets the TNF binding region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, K. A.; Hart, M. H.; de Groot, E. R.; Kruithof, S.; Aarden, L. A.; Wolbink, G. J.; Rispens, T.

    2015-01-01

    In a subset of patients, anti tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapeutic antibodies are immunogenic, resulting in the formation of antidrug antibodies (ADAs). Neutralising ADAs compete with TNF for its binding site and reduces the effective serum concentration, causing clinical non-response. It is

  19. Analytical characterization of ch14.18: a mouse-human chimeric disialoganglioside-specific therapeutic antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, Gopalan; Kallarakal, Abraham T; Michiel, Dennis; Yang, Xiaoyi; Saptharish, Nirmala; Jiang, Hengguang; Giardina, Steve; Gilly, John; Mitra, George

    2012-01-01

    Ch14.18 is a mouse-human chimeric monoclonal antibody to the disialoganglioside (GD2) glycolipid. In the clinic, this antibody has been shown to be effective in the treatment of children with high-risk neuroblastoma, either alone or in combination therapy. Extensive product characterization is a prerequisite to addressing the potential issues of product variability associated with process changes and manufacturing scale-up. Charge heterogeneity, glycosylation profile, molecular state and aggregation, interaction (affinity) with Fcγ receptors and functional or biological activities are a few of the critical characterization assays for assessing product comparability for this antibody. In this article, we describe the in-house development and qualification of imaged capillary isoelectric focusing to assess charge heterogeneity, analytical size exclusion chromatography with online static and dynamic light scattering (DLS), batch mode DLS for aggregate detection, biosensor (surface plasmon resonance)-based Fcγ receptor antibody interaction kinetics, N-glycoprofiling with PNGase F digestion, 2-aminobenzoic acid labeling and high performance liquid chromatography and N-glycan analysis using capillary electrophoresis. In addition, we studied selected biological activity assays, such as complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The consistency and reproducibility of the assays are established by comparing the intra-day and inter-day assay results. Applications of the methodologies to address stability or changes in product characteristics are also reported. The study results reveal that the ch14.18 clinical product formulated in phosphate-buffered saline at a concentration of 5 mg/ml and stored at 2-8°C is stable for more than five years.

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Novel ELISA for Detection of Antibodies against HTLV-I Using Chimeric Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosadeghi, Parvin; Heydari-Zarnagh, Hafez

    2018-04-01

    We aimed to develope a peptide-based indirect ELISA to detect antibodies against Human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). Two chimeric peptides (CP-1 and CP-2) were designed using linear immunodominant epitopes of gp-46-I, and gp21-I proteins, according to the sequence from Uniprot database. These peptides were studied initially in the ELISA using infected sera. The most promising peptideCP-1, was used to develop a peptide ELISA for detection of HTLV-I infected sera. The optimal conditions for CP-1ELISA were: the optimum coating buffer was 100mM NaHCO3, pH 9.6; coating peptide concentration was 10 µg/mL; the optimal blocking buffer was5% fetal bovine serum (FBS); the secondary antibody concentration was 1:2000; and serum dilution was 1:20. 20serum samples from HTLV-I infected patients were evaluated by ELISA developed. CP-1 showed high antigenicity while lacking any cross-reactivity with normal human sera. The results of evaluations indicated that in comparison with commercial ELISA, CP-1 ELISA showed good sensitivity and specificity. With further validation, CP-1as described in the present study could be introduced as novel reliable and cost-effective candidates for the high-specific screening of HTLV-I/-II infections in endemic regions.

  1. Once for All: A Novel Robust System for Co-expression of Multiple Chimeric Fluorescent Fusion Proteins in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guitao Zhong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric fluorescent fusion proteins have been employed as a powerful tool to reveal the subcellular localizations and dynamics of proteins in living cells. Co-expression of a fluorescent fusion protein with well-known organelle markers in the same cell is especially useful in revealing its spatial and temporal functions of the protein in question. However, the conventional methods for co-expressing multiple fluorescent tagged proteins in plants have the drawbacks of low expression efficiency, variations in the expression level and time-consuming genetic crossing. Here, we have developed a novel robust system that allows for high-efficient co-expression of multiple chimeric fluorescent fusion proteins in plants in a time-saving fashion. This system takes advantage of employing a single expression vector which consists of multiple semi-independent expressing cassettes for the protein co-expression thereby overcoming the limitations of using multiple independent expressing plasmids. In addition, it is a highly manipulable DNA assembly system, in which modification and recombination of DNA molecules are easily achieved through an optimized one-step assembly reaction. By employing this effective system, we demonstrated that co-expression of two chimeric fluorescent fusion reporter proteins of vacuolar sorting receptor and secretory carrier membrane protein gave rise to their perspective subcellular localizations in plants via both transient expression and stable transformation. Thus, we believed that this technical advance represents a promising approach for multi-color-protein co-expression in plant cells.

  2. Characterization and biodistribution of recombinant and recombinant/chimeric constructs of monoclonal antibody B72.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colcher, D.; Milenic, D.; Roselli, M.

    1989-01-01

    Radiolabeled B72.3 has been administered both i.v. and i.p. in patients with colorectal and ovarian cancer as well as other carcinomas and has been shown to selectively bind to approximately 70-80% of metastatic lesions. Greater than 50% of the patients that have been treated with B72.3 have developed an immunological response to murine IgG after a single injection. In an attempt to minimize the immune response of these patients to the administered murine monoclonal antibody, we developed a recombinant form of the murine B72.3 as well as a recombinant/chimeric antibody, using the variable regions of the murine B72.3 and human heavy chain (gamma 4) and light chain (kappa) constant regions. We report here that both the recombinant B72.3 [rB72.3] and the recombinant/chimeric B72.3 [cB72.3(gamma 4)] IgGs maintain the tissue binding and idiotypic specificity of the native murine IgG. The native B72.3, rB72.3, and cB72.3(gamma 4) IgGs were radiolabeled and the biodistribution of these IgGs was studied in athymic mice bearing human colon carcinoma xenografts (LS-174T). Differences were observed between the cB72.3(gamma 4) and the native B72.3 in the percentage of injected dose/g that localized in the tumor. The somewhat lower absolute amounts of the cB72.3(gamma 4) in the tumor are mostly likely due to the observed more rapid clearance from the blood and body of the mouse as compared to the native B72.3 and rB72.3. All three forms [native B72.3, rB72.3, and cB72.3(gamma 4)] of the IgG, however, were able to localize the colon tumor with similar radiolocalization indices [percentage of injected dose/g in tumor divided by the percentage of injected dose/g in normal tissue

  3. Adoptitive immunotherapy with genetically engineered T lymphocytes modified to express chimeric antigen receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. А. Pavlova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant mortality due to oncological diseases as a whole, and oncohematological diseases in particular, motivates scientific and medical community to develop new treatment methods. One of the newest methods is adoptive cell therapy using patient’s own T-cells modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR to tumor-specific antigens. Despite high cost and side effects of treatment, promising clinical trials even in patients with advanced disease allow to anticipate successful use of this method in clinical practice.The article includes a review of the main principles of this technique, published results of clinical studies of CAR T-cells with a focus on CD19 gene targeting, complications of this therapy, mechanisms of tumor resistance to CAR T-cells, and potential ways to overcome it.

  4. Regulation of expression of two LY-6 family genes by intron retention and transcription induced chimerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallya Meera

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of the expression of particular genes can rely on mechanisms that are different from classical transcriptional and translational control. The LY6G5B and LY6G6D genes encode LY-6 domain proteins, whose expression seems to be regulated in an original fashion, consisting of an intron retention event which generates, through an early premature stop codon, a non-coding transcript, preventing expression in most cell lines and tissues. Results The MHC LY-6 non-coding transcripts have shown to be stable and very abundant in the cell, and not subject to Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD. This retention event appears not to be solely dependent on intron features, because in the case of LY6G5B, when the intron is inserted in the artificial context of a luciferase expression plasmid, it is fully spliced but strongly stabilises the resulting luciferase transcript. In addition, by quantitative PCR we found that the retained and spliced forms are differentially expressed in tissues indicating an active regulation of the non-coding transcript. EST database analysis revealed that these genes have an alternative expression pathway with the formation of Transcription Induced Chimeras (TIC. This data was confirmed by RT-PCR, revealing the presence of different transcripts that would encode the chimeric proteins CSNKβ-LY6G5B and G6F-LY6G6D, in which the LY-6 domain would join to a kinase domain and an Ig-like domain, respectively. Conclusion In conclusion, the LY6G5B and LY6G6D intron-retained transcripts are not subjected to NMD and are more abundant than the properly spliced forms. In addition, these genes form chimeric transcripts with their neighbouring same orientation 5' genes. Of interest is the fact that the 5' genes (CSNKβ or G6F undergo differential splicing only in the context of the chimera (CSNKβ-LY6G5B or G6F-LY6G6C and not on their own.

  5. Pharmacologic suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Vallina, L; Yañez, R; Blanco, B; Gil, M; Russell, S J

    2000-04-01

    Adoptive therapy with autologous T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (chTCRs) is of potential interest for the treatment of malignancy. To limit possible T-cell-mediated damage to normal tissues that weakly express the targeted tumor antigen (Ag), we have tested a strategy for the suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells. Jurkat T cells were transduced with an anti-hapten chTCR tinder the control of a tetracycline-suppressible promoter and were shown to respond to Ag-positive (hapten-coated) but not to Ag-negative target cells. The engineered T cells were then reacted with hapten-coated target cells at different effector to target cell ratios before and after exposure to tetracycline. When the engineered T cells were treated with tetracycline, expression of the chTCR was greatly decreased and recognition of the hapten-coated target cells was completely suppressed. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells may be a useful strategy to limit the toxicity of the approach to cancer gene therapy.

  6. Evidence for Anger Saliency during the Recognition of Chimeric Facial Expressions of Emotions in Underage Ebola Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Ardizzi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the crucial features defining basic emotions and their prototypical facial expressions is their value for survival. Childhood traumatic experiences affect the effective recognition of facial expressions of negative emotions, normally allowing the recruitment of adequate behavioral responses to environmental threats. Specifically, anger becomes an extraordinarily salient stimulus unbalancing victims’ recognition of negative emotions. Despite the plethora of studies on this topic, to date, it is not clear whether this phenomenon reflects an overall response tendency toward anger recognition or a selective proneness to the salience of specific facial expressive cues of anger after trauma exposure. To address this issue, a group of underage Sierra Leonean Ebola virus disease survivors (mean age 15.40 years, SE 0.35; years of schooling 8.8 years, SE 0.46; 14 males and a control group (mean age 14.55, SE 0.30; years of schooling 8.07 years, SE 0.30, 15 males performed a forced-choice chimeric facial expressions recognition task. The chimeric facial expressions were obtained pairing upper and lower half faces of two different negative emotions (selected from anger, fear and sadness for a total of six different combinations. Overall, results showed that upper facial expressive cues were more salient than lower facial expressive cues. This priority was lost among Ebola virus disease survivors for the chimeric facial expressions of anger. In this case, differently from controls, Ebola virus disease survivors recognized anger regardless of the upper or lower position of the facial expressive cues of this emotion. The present results demonstrate that victims’ performance in the recognition of the facial expression of anger does not reflect an overall response tendency toward anger recognition, but rather the specific greater salience of facial expressive cues of anger. Furthermore, the present results show that traumatic experiences deeply modify

  7. Dystrophin Expressing Chimeric (DEC) Human Cells Provide a Potential Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemionow, Maria; Cwykiel, Joanna; Heydemann, Ahlke; Garcia, Jesus; Marchese, Enza; Siemionow, Krzysztof; Szilagyi, Erzsebet

    2018-06-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive and lethal disease caused by mutations of the dystrophin gene. Currently no cure exists. Stem cell therapies targeting DMD are challenged by limited engraftment and rejection despite the use of immunosuppression. There is an urgent need to introduce new stem cell-based therapies that exhibit low allogenic profiles and improved cell engraftment. In this proof-of-concept study, we develop and test a new human stem cell-based approach to increase engraftment, limit rejection, and restore dystrophin expression in the mdx/scid mouse model of DMD. We introduce two Dystrophin Expressing Chimeric (DEC) cell lines created by ex vivo fusion of human myoblasts (MB) derived from two normal donors (MB N1 /MB N2 ), and normal and DMD donors (MB N /MB DMD ). The efficacy of fusion was confirmed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy based on donor cell fluorescent labeling (PKH26/PKH67). In vitro, DEC displayed phenotype and genotype of donor parent cells, expressed dystrophin, and maintained proliferation and myogenic differentiation. In vivo, local delivery of both DEC lines (0.5 × 10 6 ) restored dystrophin expression (17.27%±8.05-MB N1 /MB N2 and 23.79%±3.82-MB N /MB DMD ) which correlated with significant improvement of muscle force, contraction and tolerance to fatigue at 90 days after DEC transplant to the gastrocnemius muscles (GM) of dystrophin-deficient mdx/scid mice. This study establishes DEC as a potential therapy for DMD and other types of muscular dystrophies.

  8. Chimeric rabbit/human Fab antibodies against the hepatitis Be-antigen and their potential applications in assays, characterization, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaolei; Watts, Norman R; Palmer, Ira W; Kaufman, Joshua D; Dearborn, Altaira D; Trenbeath, Joni L; Eren, Elif; Steven, Alasdair C; Rader, Christoph; Wingfield, Paul T

    2017-10-06

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection afflicts millions worldwide, causing cirrhosis and liver cancer. HBV e-antigen (HBeAg), a clinical marker for disease severity, is a soluble variant of the viral capsid protein. HBeAg is not required for viral replication but is implicated in establishing immune tolerance and chronic infection. The structure of recombinant e-antigen (rHBeAg) was recently determined, yet to date, the exact nature and quantitation of HBeAg still remain uncertain. Here, to further characterize HBeAg, we used phage display to produce a panel of chimeric rabbit/human monoclonal antibody fragments (both Fab and scFv) against rHBeAg. Several of the Fab/scFv, expressed in Escherichia coli , had unprecedentedly high binding affinities ( K d ∼10 -12 m) and high specificity. We used Fab/scFv in the context of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for HBeAg quantification, which we compared with commercially available kits and verified with seroconversion panels, the WHO HBeAg standard, rHBeAg, and patient plasma samples. We found that the specificity and sensitivity are superior to those of existing commercial assays. To identify potential fine differences between rHBeAg and HBeAg, we used these Fabs in microscale immunoaffinity chromatography to purify HBeAg from individual patient plasmas. Western blotting and MS results indicated that rHBeAg and HBeAg are essentially structurally identical, although HBeAg from different patients exhibits minor carboxyl-terminal heterogeneity. We discuss several potential applications for the humanized Fab/scFv.

  9. Radiolabeling and biotinylation of internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96: Potential use of extracorporeal immunoadsorption with enhanced tumor radioactivity retention of Iodine, Indium and Rhenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, JianQing.

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis, methodology of radiolabeling and simultaneous biotinylation for internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96 have been investigated by using three element groups of potential therapeutic radionuclides iodine, indium and rhenium, and their different labeling methods. The biodistribution and kinetics of biotinylated and radiolabeled chiBR96 have been studied in colon carcinoma isografted rats. The potential use of ECIA, based on the biotin-avidin concept, has been evaluated and compared with the approach of avidin 'chase' in the same animal tumor model with respect to an enhancement of tumor-to-normal tissue (T/N) activity ratio. 131 refs

  10. Radiolabeling and biotinylation of internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96: Potential use of extracorporeal immunoadsorption with enhanced tumor radioactivity retention of Iodine, Indium and Rhenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, JianQing

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis, methodology of radiolabeling and simultaneous biotinylation for internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96 have been investigated by using three element groups of potential therapeutic radionuclides iodine, indium and rhenium, and their different labeling methods. The biodistribution and kinetics of biotinylated and radiolabeled chiBR96 have been studied in colon carcinoma isografted rats. The potential use of ECIA, based on the biotin-avidin concept, has been evaluated and compared with the approach of avidin `chase` in the same animal tumor model with respect to an enhancement of tumor-to-normal tissue (T/N) activity ratio. 131 refs.

  11. Regression of established renal cell carcinoma in nude mice using lentivirus-transduced human T cells expressing a human anti-CAIX chimeric antigen receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Shuk-Yee Lo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX is a tumor-associated antigen and marker of hypoxia that is overexpressed on > 90% of clear-cell type renal cell carcinoma (RCC but not on neighboring normal kidney tissue. Here, we report on the construction of two chimeric antigen receptors (CARs that utilize a carbonic anhydrase (CA domain mapped, human single chain antibody (scFv G36 as a targeting moiety but differ in their capacity to provide costimulatory signaling for optimal T cell proliferation and tumor cell killing. The resulting anti-CAIX CARs were expressed on human primary T cells via lentivirus transduction. CAR-transduced T cells (CART cells expressing second-generation G36-CD28-TCRζ exhibited more potent in vitro antitumor effects on CAIX+ RCC cells than first-generation G36-CD8-TCRζ including cytotoxicity, cytokine secretion, proliferation, and clonal expansion. Adoptive G36-CD28-TCRζ CART cell therapy combined with high-dose interleukin (IL-2 injection also lead to superior regression of established RCC in nude mice with evidence of tumor cell apoptosis and tissue necrosis. These results suggest that the fully human G36-CD28-TCRζ CARs should provide substantial improvements over first-generation mouse anti-CAIX CARs in clinical use through reduced human anti-mouse antibody responses against the targeting scFv and administration of lower doses of T cells during CART cell therapy of CAIX+ RCC.

  12. Radiolabeling and animal experimental studies of anti-breast cancer McAb 6C6 and mouse-human chimeric antibody 6C6CHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhi; Hu Xiaoqian; Li Erqiu

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study bio-distribution and tumor absorption of anti breast cancer monoclonal antibody 6C6 and its chimeric antibody 6C6-CHI. The modified Schwartz method was employed to label 6C6 and 6C6CHI with 99 Tc m . The labeled antibody was injected to mouse via tail vein and the blood clearance and whole body clearance were observed. Nude mice bearing breast cancer MCF7 were injected with 99 Tc m -labeled antibody and the bio-distribution was studied and imaged with γ-ray camera. The yield of the two labeled antibodies was more than 90% and their immunoactivities were more than 80%. The whole body eliminated half-time of 99 Tc m -6C6 was 4.1h, and the half-times in blood were T α =0.55h and T β =12.42h respectively. The whole body half-time of 99 Tc m -6C6CHI was 4.28h and the half-times in blood were T α =0.98h and T β =12.42h respectively. The bio-distribution of nude mice bearing breast cancer MCF7 cells was as follows: the ID%/g of tumor and blood was (7.42±0.85) and (5.67±1.44) respectively at 23h after injection of 99 Tc m -6C6. The T/NT (tumor to non tumor) ratios were all more than 1.0 except kidney and the ID%/g of tumor and blood was (4.23±0.64) and (6.97±0.23) respectively at 23 h after injection of 99 Tc m -6C6CHI. The T/NT (tumor to non tumor) ratios were all more than 1.0 except blood and kidney. The γ imaging results showed that the tumor was imaged clearly at 24h after injection of radiolabeled antibodies and the other organs did not concentrate the antibodies except kidney. Anti-breast cancer monoclonal antibody 6C6 can be well located in tumor. Although ID%/g of tumor of the chimeric antibody 6C6CHI was slightly lower than that of 6C6 antibody, and ID%/g of blood was higher than that of 6C6, the tumor imaging of 6C6-CHI was also clear

  13. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures on a chimeric respiratory syncytial virus protein expressed in insect cell line Sf9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wathen, M.W.; Aeed, P.A.; Elhammer, A.P.

    1991-01-01

    The oligosaccharide structures added to a chimeric protein (FG) composed of the extracellular domains of respiratory syncytial virus F and G proteins, expressed in the insect cell line Sf9, were investigated. Cells were labeled in vivo with [ 3 H]glucosamine and infected wit a recombinant baculovirus containing the FG gene. The secreted chimeric protein was isolated by immunoprecipitation and subjected to oligosaccharide analysis. The FG protein contains two types of O-linked oligosaccharides: GalNAc and Galβ1-3GalNAc constituting 17 and 66% of the total number of structures respectively. Only one type of N-linked oligosaccharide, constituting the remaining 17% of the structures on FG, was detected: a trimannosyl core structure with a fucose residue linked α1-6 to the asparagine-linked N-acetylglucosamine

  14. Selective Inhibition of Tumor Growth by Clonal NK Cells Expressing an ErbB2/HER2-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeld, Kurt; Sahm, Christiane; Zhang, Congcong; Naundorf, Sonja; Brendel, Christian; Odendahl, Marcus; Nowakowska, Paulina; Bönig, Halvard; Köhl, Ulrike; Kloess, Stephan; Köhler, Sylvia; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Jauch, Anna; Schmidt, Manfred; Schubert, Ralf; Kühlcke, Klaus; Seifried, Erhard; Klingemann, Hans G; Rieger, Michael A; Tonn, Torsten; Grez, Manuel; Wels, Winfried S

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an important effector cell type for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. Similar to T cells, NK cells can be modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) to enhance antitumor activity, but experience with CAR-engineered NK cells and their clinical development is still limited. Here, we redirected continuously expanding and clinically usable established human NK-92 cells to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2) antigen. Following GMP-compliant procedures, we generated a stable clonal cell line expressing a humanized CAR based on ErbB2-specific antibody FRP5 harboring CD28 and CD3ζ signaling domains (CAR 5.28.z). These NK-92/5.28.z cells efficiently lysed ErbB2-expressing tumor cells in vitro and exhibited serial target cell killing. Specific recognition of tumor cells and antitumor activity were retained in vivo, resulting in selective enrichment of NK-92/5.28.z cells in orthotopic breast carcinoma xenografts, and reduction of pulmonary metastasis in a renal cell carcinoma model, respectively. γ-irradiation as a potential safety measure for clinical application prevented NK cell replication, while antitumor activity was preserved. Our data demonstrate that it is feasible to engineer CAR-expressing NK cells as a clonal, molecularly and functionally well-defined and continuously expandable cell therapeutic agent, and suggest NK-92/5.28.z cells as a promising candidate for use in adoptive cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25373520

  15. Chimerism representing both paternal alleles detected by HLA typing before kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette; Petersen, Mikkel Steen; Møller, Bjarne Kuno

    2014-01-01

    trisomy 6p or by chimerism. Flow cytometric analysis, employing antibodies specific for the two paternal HLA-A alleles, clearly showed two distinct populations of cells: 83% expressing HLA-A11 and 12% expressing HLA-A2, suggesting a paternal chimerism. We are studying these cell populations to possibly...... identify the mechanism behind this rather unusual paternally derived chimerism. This exceptional case illustrates that careful scrutiny of HLA-typing results may produce atypical conclusions. Clinically, the father is considered the best donor based on immunogenetics....

  16. Comparison of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated with visible or near-infrared fluorescent dyes for imaging pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a set of visible and near-infrared dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific chimeric antibody for high-resolution tumor imaging in orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer was orthotopically implanted into pancreata of nude mice. Mice received a single intravenous injection of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated to one of the following fluorophores: 488-nm group (Alexa Fluor 488 or DyLight 488); 550-nm group (Alexa Fluor 555 or DyLight 550); 650-nm group (Alexa Fluor 660 or DyLight 650), or the 750-nm group (Alexa Fluor 750 or DyLight 755). After 24 h, the Olympus OV100 small-animal imaging system was used for noninvasive and intravital fluorescence imaging of mice. Dyes were compared with respect to depth of imaging, resolution, tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), photobleaching, and hemoglobin quenching. The longer wavelength dyes had increased depth of penetration and ability to detect the smallest tumor deposits and provided the highest TBRs, resistance to hemoglobin quenching, and specificity. The shorter wavelength dyes were more photostable. This study showed unique advantages of each dye for specific cancer imaging in a clinically relevant orthotopic model.

  17. Genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed receptors harboring TAG-72-specific camelid single domain antibodies as targeting agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Zahra; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A

    2013-01-01

    Despite the preclinical success of adoptive therapy with T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed antigen receptors (CARs), certain limitations of this therapeutic approach such as the immunogenicity of the antigen binding domain, the emergence of tumor cell escape variants and the blocking...

  18. Adoptive transfer of murine T cells expressing a chimeric-PD1-Dap10 receptor as an immunotherapy for lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Adam; Hawk, William; Nylen, Emily; Ober, Sean; Autin, Pierre; Barber, Amorette

    2017-11-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells is a promising cancer therapy and expression of chimeric antigen receptors can enhance tumour recognition and T-cell effector functions. The programmed death protein 1 (PD1) receptor is a prospective target for a chimeric antigen receptor because PD1 ligands are expressed on many cancer types, including lymphoma. Therefore, we developed a murine chimeric PD1 receptor (chPD1) consisting of the PD1 extracellular domain fused to the cytoplasmic domain of CD3ζ. Additionally, chimeric antigen receptor therapies use various co-stimulatory domains to enhance efficacy. Hence, the inclusion of a Dap10 or CD28 co-stimulatory domain in the chPD1 receptor was compared to determine which domain induced optimal anti-tumour immunity in a mouse model of lymphoma. The chPD1 T cells secreted pro-inflammatory cytokines and lysed RMA lymphoma cells. Adoptive transfer of chPD1 T cells significantly reduced established tumours and led to tumour-free survival in lymphoma-bearing mice. When comparing chPD1 receptors containing a Dap10 or CD28 domain, both receptors induced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines; however, chPD1-CD28 T cells also secreted anti-inflammatory cytokines whereas chPD1-Dap10 T cells did not. Additionally, chPD1-Dap10 induced a central memory T-cell phenotype compared with chPD1-CD28, which induced an effector memory phenotype. The chPD1-Dap10 T cells also had enhanced in vivo persistence and anti-tumour efficacy compared with chPD1-CD28 T cells. Therefore, adoptive transfer of chPD1 T cells could be a novel therapy for lymphoma and inclusion of the Dap10 co-stimulatory domain in chimeric antigen receptors may induce a preferential cytokine profile and T-cell differentiation phenotype for anti-tumour therapies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Expression and secretion of fungal endoglucanase II and chimeric cellobiohydrolase I in the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Knoshaug, Eric P; Wang, Wei; Alahuhta, Markus; Baker, John O; Yang, Shihui; Vander Wall, Todd; Decker, Stephen R; Himmel, Michael E; Zhang, Min; Wei, Hui

    2017-07-24

    Lipomyces starkeyi is one of the leading lipid-producing microorganisms reported to date; its genetic transformation was only recently reported. Our aim is to engineer L. starkeyi to serve in consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) to produce lipid or fatty acid-related biofuels directly from abundant and low-cost lignocellulosic substrates. To evaluate L. starkeyi in this role, we first conducted a genome analysis, which revealed the absence of key endo- and exocellulases in this yeast, prompting us to select and screen four signal peptides for their suitability for the overexpression and secretion of cellulase genes. To compensate for the cellulase deficiency, we chose two prominent cellulases, Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase II (EG II) and a chimeric cellobiohydrolase I (TeTrCBH I) formed by fusion of the catalytic domain from Talaromyces emersonii CBH I with the linker peptide and cellulose-binding domain from T. reesei CBH I. The systematically tested signal peptides included three peptides from native L. starkeyi and one from Yarrowia lipolytica. We found that all four signal peptides permitted secretion of active EG II. We also determined that three of these signal peptides worked for expression of the chimeric CBH I; suggesting that our design criteria for selecting these signal peptides was effective. Encouragingly, the Y. lipolytica signal peptide was able to efficiently guide secretion of the chimeric TeTrCBH I protein from L. starkeyi. The purified chimeric TeTrCBH I showed high activity against the cellulose in pretreated corn stover and the purified EG II showed high endocellulase activity measured by the CELLG3 (Megazyme) method. Our results suggest that L. starkeyi is capable of expressing and secreting core fungal cellulases. Moreover, the purified EG II and chimeric TeTrCBH I displayed significant and potentially useful enzymatic activities, demonstrating that engineered L. starkeyi has the potential to function as an oleaginous CBP strain for biofuel

  20. Expression of c-kit receptor in human cholangiocarcinoma and in vivo treatment with imatinib mesilate in chimeric mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenz, Thomas; Caca, Karel; Blüthner, Thilo; Tannapfel, Andrea; Mössner, Joachim; Wiedmann, Marcus

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the c-kit expression in biliary tract cancer cell lines and histological sections from patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CC) and to evaluate the efficacy of in vitro and in vitro treatment with imatinib mesilate. METHODS: The protein expression of c-kit in the human biliary tract cancer cell lines Mz-ChA-2 and EGI-1 and histological sections from 19 patients with extrahepatic CC was assessed by immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, and immunohistochemistry. The anti-proliferative effect of imatinib mesilate on biliary tract cancer cell lines Mz-ChA-2 and EGI-1 was studied in vitro by automated cell counting. In addition, immunodeficient NMRI mice (TaconicTM) were subcutaneously injected with 5 x 106 cells of cell lines MzChA-2 and EGI-1. After having reached a tumour volume of 200 mm3, daily treatment was started intraperitoneally with imatinib mesilate at a dose of 50 mg/kg or normal saline (NS). Tumor volume was calculated with a Vernier caliper. After 14 d, mice were sacrificed with tumors excised and tumor mass determined. RESULTS: Immunoblotting revealed presence of c-kit in Mz-ChA-2 and absence in EGI-1 cells. Immunocytochemistry with c-kit antibodies displayed a cytoplasmatic and membraneous localization of receptor protein in Mz-ChA-2 cells and absence of c-kit in EGI-1 cells. c-kit was expressed in 7 of 19 (37%) extrahepatic human CC tissue samples, 2 showed a moderate and 5 a rather weak immunostaining. Imatinib mesilate at a low concentration of 5 µmol/L caused a significant growth inhibition in the c-kit positive cell line Mz-ChA-2 (31%), but not in the c-kit negative cell line EGI-1 (0%) (P < 0.05). Imatinib mesilate at an intermediate concentration of 10 µmol/L inhibited cellular growth of both cell lines (51% vs 57%). Imatinib mesilate at a higher concentration of 20 µmol/L seemed to have a general toxic effect on both cell lines. The IC50 values were 9.7 µmol/L and 11 µmol/L, respectively. After 14 d of in vitro

  1. Cloning, bacterial expression and crystallization of Fv antibody fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    E´, Jean-Luc; Boulot, Ginette; Chitarra, V´ronique; Riottot, Marie-Madeleine; Souchon, H´le`ne; Houdusse, Anne; Bentley, Graham A.; Narayana Bhat, T.; Spinelli, Silvia; Poljak, Roberto J.

    1992-08-01

    The variable Fv fragments of antibodies, cloned in recombinant plasmids, can be expressed in bacteria as functional proteins having immunochemical properties which are very similar or identical with those of the corresponding parts of the parent eukaryotic antibodies. They offer new possibilities for the study of antibody-antigen interactions since the crystals of Fv fragments and of their complexes with antigen reported here diffract X-rays to a higher resolution that those obtained with the cognate Fab fragments. The Fv approach should facilitate the structural study of the combining site of antibodies and the further characterization of antigen-antibody interactions by site-directed mutagenesis experiments.

  2. Highly efficient gene transfer using a retroviral vector into murine T cells for preclinical chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusabuka, Hotaka; Fujiwara, Kento; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Hirobe, Sachiko; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Okada, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T (CAR-T) cells has attracted attention as an efficacious strategy for cancer treatment. To prove the efficacy and safety of CAR-T cell therapy, the elucidation of immunological mechanisms underlying it in mice is required. Although a retroviral vector (Rv) is mainly used for the introduction of CAR to murine T cells, gene transduction efficiency is generally less than 50%. The low transduction efficiency causes poor precision in the functional analysis of CAR-T cells. We attempted to improve the Rv gene transduction protocol to more efficiently generate functional CAR-T cells by optimizing the period of pre-cultivation and antibody stimulation. In the improved protocol, gene transduction efficiency to murine T cells was more than 90%. In addition, almost all of the prepared murine T cells expressed CAR after puromycin selection. These CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity and secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. We believe that our optimized gene transduction protocol for murine T cells contributes to the advancement of T cell biology and development of immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells. - Highlights: • We established highly efficient gene transduction protocols for murine T cells. • CD8"+ CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity. • CD4"+ CAR-T cells secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. • This finding can contribute to the development of T-cell biology and immunotherapy.

  3. Supraphysiologic control over HIV-1 replication mediated by CD8 T cells expressing a re-engineered CD4-based chimeric antigen receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel S Leibman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available HIV is adept at avoiding naturally generated T cell responses; therefore, there is a need to develop HIV-specific T cells with greater potency for use in HIV cure strategies. Starting with a CD4-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR that was previously used without toxicity in clinical trials, we optimized the vector backbone, promoter, HIV targeting moiety, and transmembrane and signaling domains to determine which components augmented the ability of T cells to control HIV replication. This re-engineered CAR was at least 50-fold more potent in vitro at controlling HIV replication than the original CD4 CAR, or a TCR-based approach, and substantially better than broadly neutralizing antibody-based CARs. A humanized mouse model of HIV infection demonstrated that T cells expressing optimized CARs were superior at expanding in response to antigen, protecting CD4 T cells from infection, and reducing viral loads compared to T cells expressing the original, clinical trial CAR. Moreover, in a humanized mouse model of HIV treatment, CD4 CAR T cells containing the 4-1BB costimulatory domain controlled HIV spread after ART removal better than analogous CAR T cells containing the CD28 costimulatory domain. Together, these data indicate that potent HIV-specific T cells can be generated using improved CAR design and that CAR T cells could be important components of an HIV cure strategy.

  4. Highly efficient gene transfer using a retroviral vector into murine T cells for preclinical chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cell therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusabuka, Hotaka; Fujiwara, Kento; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Hirobe, Sachiko; Nakagawa, Shinsaku, E-mail: nakagawa@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp; Okada, Naoki, E-mail: okada@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2016-04-22

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T (CAR-T) cells has attracted attention as an efficacious strategy for cancer treatment. To prove the efficacy and safety of CAR-T cell therapy, the elucidation of immunological mechanisms underlying it in mice is required. Although a retroviral vector (Rv) is mainly used for the introduction of CAR to murine T cells, gene transduction efficiency is generally less than 50%. The low transduction efficiency causes poor precision in the functional analysis of CAR-T cells. We attempted to improve the Rv gene transduction protocol to more efficiently generate functional CAR-T cells by optimizing the period of pre-cultivation and antibody stimulation. In the improved protocol, gene transduction efficiency to murine T cells was more than 90%. In addition, almost all of the prepared murine T cells expressed CAR after puromycin selection. These CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity and secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. We believe that our optimized gene transduction protocol for murine T cells contributes to the advancement of T cell biology and development of immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells. - Highlights: • We established highly efficient gene transduction protocols for murine T cells. • CD8{sup +} CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity. • CD4{sup +} CAR-T cells secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. • This finding can contribute to the development of T-cell biology and immunotherapy.

  5. Antigenic properties of a transport-competent influenza HA/HIV Env chimeric protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Ling; Sun Yuliang; Lin Jianguo; Bu Zhigao; Wu Qingyang; Jiang, Shibo; Steinhauer, David A.; Compans, Richard W.; Yang Chinglai

    2006-01-01

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the HIV Env glycoprotein contains conserved neutralizing epitopes which are not well-exposed in wild-type HIV Env proteins. To enhance the exposure of these epitopes, a chimeric protein, HA/gp41, in which the gp41 of HIV-1 89.6 envelope protein was fused to the C-terminus of the HA1 subunit of the influenza HA protein, was constructed. Characterization of protein expression showed that the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins were expressed on cell surfaces and formed trimeric oligomers, as found in the HIV Env as well as influenza HA proteins. In addition, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein expressed on the cell surface can also be cleaved into 2 subunits by trypsin treatment, similar to the influenza HA. Moreover, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein was found to maintain a pre-fusion conformation. Interestingly, the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins on cell surfaces exhibited increased reactivity to monoclonal antibodies against the HIV Env gp41 subunit compared with the HIV-1 envelope protein, including the two broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine expressing the HA/gp41 chimeric protein induced antibodies against the HIV gp41 protein and these antibodies exhibit neutralizing activity against infection by an HIV SF162 pseudovirus. These results demonstrate that the construction of such chimeric proteins can provide enhanced exposure of conserved epitopes in the HIV Env gp41 and may represent a novel vaccine design strategy for inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV

  6. Development of a chimeric Plasmodium berghei strain expressing the repeat region of the P. vivax circumsporozoite protein for in vivo evaluation of vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Diego A; Yadava, Anjali; Angov, Evelina; Maurizio, Paul L; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Zavala, Fidel

    2013-08-01

    The development of vaccine candidates against Plasmodium vivax-the most geographically widespread human malaria species-is challenged by technical difficulties, such as the lack of in vitro culture systems and availability of animal models. Chimeric rodent Plasmodium parasites are safe and useful tools for the preclinical evaluation of new vaccine formulations. We report the successful development and characterization of chimeric Plasmodium berghei parasites bearing the type I repeat region of P. vivax circumsporozoite protein (CSP). The P. berghei-P. vivax chimeric strain develops normally in mosquitoes and produces highly infectious sporozoites that produce patent infection in mice that are exposed to the bites of as few as 3 P. berghei-P. vivax-infected mosquitoes. Using this transgenic parasite, we demonstrate that monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against P. vivax CSP strongly inhibit parasite infection and thus support the notion that these antibodies play an important role in protective immunity. The chimeric parasites we developed represent a robust model for evaluating protective immune responses against P. vivax vaccines based on CSP.

  7. Redirecting Specificity of T cells Using the Sleeping Beauty System to Express Chimeric Antigen Receptors by Mix-and-Matching of VL and VH Domains Targeting CD123+ Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Thokala

    Full Text Available Adoptive immunotherapy infusing T cells with engineered specificity for CD19 expressed on B- cell malignancies is generating enthusiasm to extend this approach to other hematological malignancies, such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. CD123, or interleukin 3 receptor alpha, is overexpressed on most AML and some lymphoid malignancies, such as acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL, and has been an effective target for T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs. The prototypical CAR encodes a VH and VL from one monoclonal antibody (mAb, coupled to a transmembrane domain and one or more cytoplasmic signaling domains. Previous studies showed that treatment of an experimental AML model with CD123-specific CAR T cells was therapeutic, but at the cost of impaired myelopoiesis, highlighting the need for systems to define the antigen threshold for CAR recognition. Here, we show that CARs can be engineered using VH and VL chains derived from different CD123-specific mAbs to generate a panel of CAR+ T cells. While all CARs exhibited specificity to CD123, one VH and VL combination had reduced lysis of normal hematopoietic stem cells. This CAR's in vivo anti-tumor activity was similar whether signaling occurred via chimeric CD28 or CD137, prolonging survival in both AML and ALL models. Co-expression of inducible caspase 9 eliminated CAR+ T cells. These data help support the use of CD123-specific CARs for treatment of CD123+ hematologic malignancies.

  8. Impaired virus control and severe CD8+ T-cell-mediated immunopathology in chimeric mice deficient in gamma interferon receptor expression on both parenchymal and hematopoietic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Pernille; Bartholdy, Christina; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2005-01-01

    be capable of responding to IFN-gamma, but expression of the relevant receptor on non-T cells could be experimentally controlled. Only when the IFN-gamma receptor is absent on both radioresistant parenchymal and bone marrow-derived cells will chimeric mice challenged with a highly invasive, noncytolytic...

  9. In vitro and in vivo antivirus activity of an anti-programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1 rat-bovine chimeric antibody against bovine leukemia virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asami Nishimori

    Full Text Available Programmed death-1 (PD-1, an immunoinhibitory receptor on T cells, is known to be involved in immune evasion through its binding to PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1 in many chronic diseases. We previously found that PD-L1 expression was upregulated in cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus (BLV and that an antibody that blocked the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction reactivated T-cell function in vitro. Therefore, this study assessed its antivirus activities in vivo. First, we inoculated the anti-bovine PD-L1 rat monoclonal antibody 4G12 into a BLV-infected cow. However, this did not induce T-cell proliferation or reduction of BLV provirus loads during the test period, and only bound to circulating IgM+ B cells until one week post-inoculation. We hypothesized that this lack of in vivo effects was due to its lower stability in cattle and so established an anti-PD-L1 rat-bovine chimeric antibody (Boch4G12. Boch4G12 was able to bind specifically with bovine PD-L1, interrupt the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction, and activate the immune response in both healthy and BLV-infected cattle in vitro. Therefore, we experimentally infected a healthy calf with BLV and inoculated it intravenously with 1 mg/kg of Boch4G12 once it reached the aleukemic (AL stage. Cultivation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs isolated from the tested calf indicated that the proliferation of CD4+ T cells was increased by Boch4G12 inoculation, while BLV provirus loads were significantly reduced, clearly demonstrating that this treatment induced antivirus activities. Therefore, further studies using a large number of animals are required to support its efficacy for clinical application.

  10. Variation in N-linked carbohydrate chains in different batches of two chimeric monoclonal IgG1 antibodies produced by different murine SP2/0 transfectoma cell subclones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergwerff, A A; Stroop, C J; Murray, B; Holtorf, A P; Pluschke, G; Van Oostrum, J; Kamerling, J P; Vliegenthart, J F

    1995-06-01

    Two chimeric human/murine monoclonal antibodies were constructed by substitution of the murine constant regions with human gamma 1 and kappa constant regions for heavy and light chains, respectively. The chimeric human/murine molecules are anti-idiotypic antibodies, meaning that they were directed against the antigen binding site in the variable region of another antibody. Antibody batches were produced under identical production conditions, using two selected SP2/0 myeloma cell subclones, which produce chimeric antibodies with different variable regions, but identical constant regions. Several samples were collected during the production of the antibodies in hollow-fibre reactors. The heavy chain, but not the light chain, of the two different chimeric IgG1 antibodies is glycosylated. Structural analysis of the enzymically released N-linked carbohydrate chains by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, as well as by chromatographic profiling, demonstrated that the collection of N-glycans comprises a small amount of monoantennary, and for the greater part diantennary structures. The N-glycans are completely (alpha 1-->6)-fucosylated at the innermost GlcNAc residue. The antennae of the neutral diantennary N-glycans are built up from GlcNAc beta 1-->2, Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->2 or Gal alpha 1-->3G alpha 1 beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->2 elements, whereas the antennae of the neutral monoantennary carbohydrate chains have only (beta 1-->2)-linked GlcNAc residues. Galactosylation of the GlcNAc beta 1-->2Man alpha 1-->6 branch occurs four times more frequently than that of the GlcNAc beta 1-->2Man alpha 1-->3 branch, independently of the production batch. A small amount of the diantennary N-glycans are mono- or disialylated, carrying N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) or N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), exclusively (alpha 2-->6)-linked to beta Gal. Analysis of the different production batches demonstrates that the structures of the N-linked carbohydrate chains are identical in the two

  11. Targeting Multiple Tumors Using T-Cells Engineered to Express a Natural Cytotoxicity Receptor 2-Based Chimeric Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl Eisenberg

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in cancer treatment are demonstrating the increasing and powerful potential of immunotherapeutic strategies. In this regard, the adoptive transfer of tumor-specific T-lymphocytes approaches can lead to tumor regression in cancer patients. More recently, the use of T-cells genetically engineered to express cancer-specific receptors such as the anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR continues to show promise for the treatment of hematological malignancies. Still, there is a crucial need to develop efficient CAR-T cell approaches for the treatment of solid tumors. It has been shown that other lymphocytes such as natural killer (NK cells can demonstrate potent antitumor function—nonetheless, their use in immunotherapy is rather limited due to difficulties in expanding these cells to therapeutically relevant numbers and to suppression by endogenous inhibitory mechanisms. Cancer recognition by NK cells is partly mediated by molecules termed natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs. In the present study, we hypothesize that it is possible to endow T-cells with an NK recognition pattern, providing them with a mean to recognize tumor cells, in a non-MHC restricted way. To test this, we genetically modified human T-cells with different chimeric receptors based on the human NCR2 molecule and then assessed their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that expression in primary lymphocytes of an NCR2-derived CAR, termed s4428z, confers T-cells with the ability to specifically recognize heterogeneous tumors and to mediate tumor cytotoxicity in a mouse model. This study demonstrates the benefit of combining tumor recognition capability of NK cells with T cell effectiveness to improve cancer immunotherapy.

  12. Creation of Dystrophin Expressing Chimeric Cells of Myoblast Origin as a Novel Stem Cell Based Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemionow, M; Cwykiel, J; Heydemann, A; Garcia-Martinez, J; Siemionow, K; Szilagyi, E

    2018-04-01

    Over the past decade different stem cell (SC) based approaches were tested to treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a lethal X-linked disorder caused by mutations in dystrophin gene. Despite research efforts, there is no curative therapy for DMD. Allogeneic SC therapies aim to restore dystrophin in the affected muscles; however, they are challenged by rejection and limited engraftment. Thus, there is a need to develop new more efficacious SC therapies. Chimeric Cells (CC), created via ex vivo fusion of donor and recipient cells, represent a promising therapeutic option for tissue regeneration and Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (VCA) due to tolerogenic properties that eliminate the need for lifelong immunosuppression. This proof of concept study tested feasibility of myoblast fusion for Dystrophin Expressing. Chimeric Cell (DEC) therapy through in vitro characterization and in vivo assessment of engraftment, survival, and efficacy in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Murine DEC were created via ex vivo fusion of normal (snj) and dystrophin-deficient (mdx) myoblasts using polyethylene glycol. Efficacy of myoblast fusion was confirmed by flow cytometry and dystrophin immunostaining, while proliferative and myogenic differentiation capacity of DEC were assessed in vitro. Therapeutic effect after DEC transplant (0.5 × 10 6 ) into the gastrocnemius muscle (GM) of mdx mice was assessed by muscle functional tests. At 30 days post-transplant dystrophin expression in GM of injected mdx mice increased to 37.27 ± 12.1% and correlated with improvement of muscle strength and function. Our study confirmed feasibility and efficacy of DEC therapy and represents a novel SC based approach for treatment of muscular dystrophies.

  13. A Chimeric NaV1.8 Channel Expression System Based on HEK293T Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the nine voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV subtypes, NaV1.8 is an attractive therapeutic target for pain. The heterologous expression of recombinant NaV1.8 currents is of particular importance for its electrophysiological and pharmacological studies. However, NaV1.8 expresses no or low-level functional currents when transiently transfected into non-neuronal cell lines. The present study aims to explore the molecular determinants limiting its functional expression and accordingly establish a functional NaV1.8 expression system. We conducted screening analysis of the NaV1.8 intracellular loops by constructing NaV chimeric channels and confirmed that the NaV1.8 C-terminus was the only limiting factor. Replacing this sequence with that of NaV1.4, NaV1.5, or NaV1.7 constructed functional channels (NaV1.8/1.4L5, NaV1.8/1.5L5, and NaV1.8/1.7L5, respectively, which expressed high-level NaV1.8-like currents in HEK293T cells. The chimeric channel NaV1.8/1.7L5 displayed much faster inactivation of its macroscopic currents than NaV1.8/1.4L5 and NaV1.8/1.5L5, and it was the most similar to wild-type NaV1.8 expressed in ND7/23 cells. Its currents were very stable during repetitive depolarizations, while its repriming kinetic was different from wild-type NaV1.8. Most importantly, NaV1.8/1.7L5 pharmacologically resembled wild-type NaV1.8 as revealed by testing their susceptibility to two NaV1.8 selective antagonists, APETx-2 and MrVIB. NaV chimeras study showed that at least the domain 2 and domain 4 of NaV1.8 were involved in binding with APETx-2. Our study provided new insights into the function of NaV1.8 intracellular loops, as well as a reliable and convenient expression system which could be useful in NaV1.8 studies.

  14. Anti-DNA antibodies: Sequencing, cloning, and expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    To gain some insight into the mechanism of systemic lupus erythematosus, and the interactions involved in proteins binding to DNA four anti-DNA antibodies have been investigated. Two of the antibodies, Hed 10 and Jel 242, have previously been prepared from female NZB/NZW mice which develop an autoimmune disease resembling human SLE. The remaining two antibodies, Jel 72 and Jel 318, have previously been produced via immunization of C57BL/6 mice. The isotypes of the four antibodies investigated in this thesis were determined by an enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay. All four antibodies contained [kappa] light chains and [gamma]2a heavy chains except Jel 318 which contains a [gamma]2b heavy chain. The complete variable regions of the heavy and light chains of these four antibodies were sequenced from their respective mRNAs. The gene segments and variable gene families expressed in each antibody were identified. Analysis of the genes used in the autoimmune anti-DNA antibodies and those produced by immunization indicated no obvious differences to account for their different origins. Examination of the amino acid residues present in the complementary-determining regions of these four antibodies indicates a preference for aromatic amino acids. Jel 72 and Jel 242 contain three arginine residues in the third complementary-determining region. A single-chain Fv and the variable region of the heavy chain of Hed 10 were expressed in Escherichia coli. Expression resulted in the production of a 26,000 M[sub r] protein and a 15,000 M[sub r] protein. An immunoblot indicated that the 26,000 M[sub r] protein was the Fv for Hed 10, while the 15,000 M[sub r] protein was shown to bind poly (dT). The contribution of the heavy chain to DNA binding was assessed.

  15. Pichia pastoris-Expressed Bivalent Virus-Like Particulate Vaccine Induces Domain III-Focused Bivalent Neutralizing Antibodies without Antibody-Dependent Enhancement in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Shukla

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue, a significant public health problem in several countries around the world, is caused by four different serotypes of mosquito-borne dengue viruses (DENV-1, -2, -3, and -4. Antibodies to any one DENV serotype which can protect against homotypic re-infection, do not offer heterotypic cross-protection. In fact, cross-reactive antibodies may augment heterotypic DENV infection through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE. A recently launched live attenuated vaccine (LAV for dengue, which consists of a mixture of four chimeric yellow-fever/dengue vaccine viruses, may be linked to the induction of disease-enhancing antibodies. This is likely related to viral interference among the replicating viral strains, resulting in an unbalanced immune response, as well as to the fact that the LAV encodes prM, a DENV protein documented to elicit ADE-mediating antibodies. This makes it imperative to explore the feasibility of alternate ADE risk-free vaccine candidates. Our quest for a non-replicating vaccine centered on the DENV envelope (E protein which mediates virus entry into the host cell and serves as an important target of the immune response. Serotype-specific neutralizing epitopes and the host receptor recognition function map to E domain III (EDIII. Recently, we found that Pichia pastoris-expressed DENV E protein, of all four serotypes, self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs in the absence of prM. Significantly, these VLPs displayed EDIII and elicited EDIII-focused DENV-neutralizing antibodies in mice. We now report the creation and characterization of a novel non-replicating recombinant particulate vaccine candidate, produced by co-expressing the E proteins of DENV-1 and DENV-2 in P. pastoris. The two E proteins co-assembled into bivalent mosaic VLPs (mVLPs designated as mE1E2bv VLPs. The mVLP, which preserved the serotype-specific antigenic integrity of its two component proteins, elicited predominantly EDIII-focused homotypic virus

  16. Blockade of CD7 expression in T cells for effective chimeric antigen receptor targeting of T-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, Yi Tian; Vinanica, Natasha; Kamiya, Takahiro; Shimasaki, Noriko; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Campana, Dario

    2017-11-28

    Effective immunotherapies for T-cell malignancies are lacking. We devised a novel approach based on chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T lymphocytes. We selected CD7 as a target because of its consistent expression in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), including the most aggressive subtype, early T-cell precursor (ETP)-ALL. In 49 diagnostic T-ALL samples (including 14 ETP-ALL samples), median CD7 expression was >99%; CD7 expression remained high at relapse (n = 14), and during chemotherapy (n = 54). We targeted CD7 with a second-generation CAR (anti-CD7-41BB-CD3ζ), but CAR expression in T lymphocytes caused fratricide due to the presence of CD7 in the T cells themselves. To downregulate CD7 and control fratricide, we applied a new method (protein expression blocker [PEBL]), based on an anti-CD7 single-chain variable fragment coupled with an intracellular retention domain. Transduction of anti-CD7 PEBL resulted in virtually instantaneous abrogation of surface CD7 expression in all transduced T cells; 2.0% ± 1.7% were CD7 + vs 98.1% ± 1.5% of mock-transduced T cells (n = 5; P < .0001). PEBL expression did not impair T-cell proliferation, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α secretion, or cytotoxicity, and eliminated CAR-mediated fratricide. PEBL-CAR T cells were highly cytotoxic against CD7 + leukemic cells in vitro and were consistently more potent than CD7 + T cells spared by fratricide. They also showed strong anti-leukemic activity in cell line- and patient-derived T-ALL xenografts. The strategy described in this study fits well with existing clinical-grade cell manufacturing processes and can be rapidly implemented for the treatment of patients with high-risk T-cell malignancies.

  17. Chimeric Antigen Receptor Expressing Natural Killer Cells for the Immunotherapy of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohtesh S. Mehta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive cell therapy has emerged as a powerful treatment for advanced cancers resistant to conventional agents. Most notable are the remarkable responses seen in patients receiving autologous CD19-redirected chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells for the treatment of B lymphoid malignancies; however, the generation of autologous products for each patient is logistically cumbersome and has restricted widespread clinical use. A banked allogeneic product has the potential to overcome these limitations, yet allogeneic T-cells (even if human leukocyte antigen-matched carry a major risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Natural killer (NK cells are bone marrow-derived innate lymphocytes that can eliminate tumors directly, with their activity governed by the integration of signals from activating and inhibitory receptors and from cytokines including IL-15, IL-12, and IL-18. NK cells do not cause GVHD or other alloimmune or autoimmune toxicities and thus, can provide a potential source of allogeneic “off-the-shelf” cellular therapy, mediating major anti-tumor effects without inducing potentially lethal alloreactivity such as GVHD. Given the multiple unique advantages of NK cells, researchers are now exploring the use of CAR-engineered NK cells for the treatment of various hematological and non-hematological malignancies. Herein, we review preclinical data on the development of CAR-NK cells, advantages, disadvantages, and current obstacles to their clinical use.

  18. Imaging of alpha(v)beta(3) expression by a bifunctional chimeric RGD peptide not cross-reacting with alpha(v)beta(5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannetti, Antonella; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Iommelli, Francesca; Del Gatto, Annarita; De Luca, Stefania; Zaccaro, Laura; Papaccioli, Angela; Sommella, Jvana; Panico, Mariarosaria; Speranza, Antonio; Grieco, Paolo; Novellino, Ettore; Saviano, Michele; Pedone, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2009-08-15

    To test whether a novel bifunctional chimeric peptide comprising a cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp pentapeptide covalently bound to an echistatin domain can discriminate alpha(v)beta(3) from alpha(v)beta(5) integrin, thus allowing the in vivo selective visualization of alpha(v)beta(3) expression by single-photon and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The chimeric peptide was preliminarily tested for inhibition of alpha(v)beta(3)-dependent cell adhesion and competition of 125I-echistatin binding to membrane of stably transfected K562 cells expressing alpha(v)beta(3) (Kalpha(v)beta(3)) or alpha(v)beta(5) (Kalpha(v)beta(5)) integrin. The chimeric peptide was then conjugated with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and labeled with 111In for single-photon imaging, whereas a one-step procedure was used for labeling the full-length peptide and a truncated derivative, lacking the last five C-terminal amino acids, with 18F for PET imaging. Nude mice bearing tumors from Kalpha(v)beta(3), Kalpha(v)beta(5), U87MG human glioblastoma, and A431 human epidermoid cells were subjected to single-photon and PET imaging. Adhesion and competitive binding assays showed that the novel chimeric peptide selectively binds to alpha(v)beta(3) integrin and does not cross-react with alpha(v)beta(5). In agreement with in vitro findings, single-photon and PET imaging studies showed that the radiolabeled chimeric peptide selectively localizes in tumor xenografts expressing alphavbeta3 and fails to accumulate in those expressing alpha(v)beta(5) integrin. When 18F-labeled truncated derivative was used for PET imaging, alphavbeta3- and alpha(v)beta(5)-expressing tumors were visualized, indicating that the five C-terminal amino acids are required to differentially bind the two integrins. Our findings indicate that the novel chimeric Arg-Gly-Asp peptide, having no cross-reaction with alphavbeta5 integrin, allows highly selective alphavbeta3 expression imaging and monitoring.

  19. In vitro evaluation of the astatinated chimeric monoclonal antibody U36, a potential candidate for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestor, M.; Anniko, M. [Uppsala University, Unit of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Persson, M. [Uppsala University, Unit of Urology, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala University, Unit of Biomedical Radiation Science, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala (Sweden); Dongen, G.A.M.S. van [Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jensen, H.J. [Righshospitalet, PET and Cyclotron Unit, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Copenhagen (Denmark); Lundqvist, H.; Tolmachev, V. [Uppsala University, Unit of Biomedical Radiation Science, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the properties of the astatinated chimeric MAb (cMAb) U36 as a conjugate to selectively target and eradicate head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). cMAb U36 was labelled with {sup 211}At via the linker N-succinimidyl 4-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate (SPMB). The quality of the conjugate was extensively evaluated for binding and internalisation capacity, and compared with {sup 125}I-SPMB-cMAb U36. The cellular toxicity of the astatinated conjugate was assessed in two types of in vitro growth assay and compared with {sup 131}I-labelled cMAb U36 (directly labelled). Comparisons between {sup 211}At-cMAb U36 and {sup 125}I-cMAb U36 demonstrated an optimal functional capacity of the labelled products. Immunoreactivity and affinity assays showed high immunoreactive fractions (>93%), and an affinity in good agreement between the astatinated and iodinated antibodies. For both conjugates, specific binding to HNSCC cells could be demonstrated, as well as some internalisation. Retention of the astatinated conjugate was just slightly lower than for the iodinated conjugate and still reasonable for therapeutic use (31{+-}2% vs 42.6{+-}1.0% at 22 h), demonstrating no adverse effects from astatination of the antibody. Studies on cellular toxicity demonstrated a dose-dependent and antigen-specific cellular toxicity for {sup 211}At-cMAb U36, with about 10% cell survival at 50 decays per cell. The {sup 131}I-labelled conjugate was not as efficient, with a surviving cell fraction of about 50% at 55 decays per cell. (orig.)

  20. In vitro evaluation of the astatinated chimeric monoclonal antibody U36, a potential candidate for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestor, M.; Anniko, M.; Persson, M.; Dongen, G.A.M.S. van; Jensen, H.J.; Lundqvist, H.; Tolmachev, V.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the properties of the astatinated chimeric MAb (cMAb) U36 as a conjugate to selectively target and eradicate head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). cMAb U36 was labelled with 211 At via the linker N-succinimidyl 4-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate (SPMB). The quality of the conjugate was extensively evaluated for binding and internalisation capacity, and compared with 125 I-SPMB-cMAb U36. The cellular toxicity of the astatinated conjugate was assessed in two types of in vitro growth assay and compared with 131 I-labelled cMAb U36 (directly labelled). Comparisons between 211 At-cMAb U36 and 125 I-cMAb U36 demonstrated an optimal functional capacity of the labelled products. Immunoreactivity and affinity assays showed high immunoreactive fractions (>93%), and an affinity in good agreement between the astatinated and iodinated antibodies. For both conjugates, specific binding to HNSCC cells could be demonstrated, as well as some internalisation. Retention of the astatinated conjugate was just slightly lower than for the iodinated conjugate and still reasonable for therapeutic use (31±2% vs 42.6±1.0% at 22 h), demonstrating no adverse effects from astatination of the antibody. Studies on cellular toxicity demonstrated a dose-dependent and antigen-specific cellular toxicity for 211 At-cMAb U36, with about 10% cell survival at 50 decays per cell. The 131 I-labelled conjugate was not as efficient, with a surviving cell fraction of about 50% at 55 decays per cell. (orig.)

  1. A chimeric receptor of the insulin-like growth factor receptor type 1 (IGFR1) and a single chain antibody specific to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein activates the IGF1R signalling cascade in CG4 oligodendrocyte progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenkov, Alexander; Rigby, Anne; Amor, Sandra; Zhou, Dun; Yousaf, Nasim; Hemmer, Bernhard; Chernajovsky, Yuti

    2011-08-01

    In order to generate neural stem cells with increased ability to survive after transplantation in brain parenchyma we developed a chimeric receptor (ChR) that binds to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) via its ectodomain and activates the insulin-like growth factor receptor type 1 ‎‎(IGF1R) signalling cascade. Activation of this pro-survival pathway in response to ligand broadly available in the brain might increase neuroregenerative potential of transplanted precursors. The ChR was produced by fusing a MOG-specific single ‎chain antibody with the extracellular boundary of the IGF1R transmembrane segment. The ChR is expressed on the cellular surface, predominantly as a monomer, and is not N-glycosylated. To show MOG-dependent functionality of the ChR, neuroblastoma cells B104 expressing this ChR were stimulated with monolayers of cells expressing recombinant MOG. The ChR undergoes MOG-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation and homodimerisation. It promotes insulin and IGF-independent growth of the oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line CG4. The proposed mode of the ChR activation is by MOG-induced dimerisation which promotes kinase domain transphosphorylation, by-passing the requirement of conformation changes known to be important for IGF1R activation. Another ChR, which contains a segment of the β-chain ectodomain, was produced in an attempt to recapitulate some of these conformational changes, but proved non-functional. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. In vitro characterization of 177Lu-radiolabelled chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and a preliminary dosimetry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrer, Flavio; Mueller-Brand, Jan; Chen, Jianhua; Fani, Melpomeni; Powell, Pia; Maecke, Helmut R.; Lohri, Andreas; Moldenhauer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    131 I- and 90 Y-labelled anti-CD20 antibodies have been shown to be effective in the treatment of low-grade, B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). However, the most appropriate radionuclide in terms of high efficiency and low toxicity has not yet been established. In this study we evaluated an immunoconjugate formed by the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab and the chelator DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid). DOTA-rituximab was prepared as a kit formulation and can be labelled in a short time ( 177 Lu or 90 Y. Immunoconjugates with different numbers of DOTA molecules per rituximab were prepared using p-SCN-Bz-DOTA. In vitro immunoreactivity and stability were tested and preliminary dosimetric results were acquired in two patients. The immunological binding properties of DOTA-rituximab to the CD20 antigen were found to be retained after conjugation with up to four chelators. The labelled product was stable against a 10 5 times excess of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA, 37 C, 7 days). Two patients with relapsed NHL were treated with 740 MBq/m 2 body surface 177 Lu-DOTA-rituximab. Scintigraphic images showed specific uptake at tumour sites and acceptable dosimetric results. The mean whole-body dose was found to be 314 mGy. The administration of 177 Lu-DOTA-rituximab was tolerated well. Our results show that DOTA-rituximab (4:1) can be labelled with 177 Lu with sufficient stability while the immunoconjugate retains its immunoreactivity. 177 Lu-DOTA-rituximab is an interesting, well-tolerated radiolabelled antibody with clinical activity in a low dose range, and provides an approach to the efficient treatment with few side effects for patients with relapsed NHL. (orig.)

  3. Development of an Indirect ELISA Based on a Recombinant Chimeric Protein for the Detection of Antibodies against Bovine Babesiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo Ortiz, José Manuel; Montenegro, Valeria Noely; de la Fournière, Sofía Ana María; Sarmiento, Néstor Fabián; Farber, Marisa Diana; Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth

    2018-01-23

    The current method for Babesia spp. serodiagnosis based on a crude merozoite antigen is a complex and time-consuming procedure. An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) based on a recombinant multi-antigen of Babesia bovis (rMABbO) was developed for detection of antibodies in bovines suspected of infection with this parasite. The multi-antigen comprises gene fragments of three previously characterized B. bovis antigens: MSA-2c, RAP-1 and the Heat Shock protein 20 that are well-conserved among geographically distant strains. The cutoff value for the new rMABbo-iELISA was determined using 75 known-positive and 300 known-negative bovine sera previously tested for antibodies to B. bovis by the gold-standard ELISA which uses a merozoite lysate. A cutoff value of ≥35% was determined in these samples by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, showing a sensitivity of 95.9% and a specificity of 94.3%. The rMABbo-iELISA was further tested in a blind trial using an additional set of 263 field bovine sera from enzootic and tick-free regions of Argentina. Results showed a good agreement with the gold standard test with a Cohen's kappa value of 0.76. Finally, the prevalence of bovine babesiosis in different tick enzootic regions of Argentina was analyzed where seropositivity values among 68-80% were obtained. A certain level of cross reaction was observed when samples from B. bigemina infected cattle were analyzed with the new test, which can be attributed to shared epitopes between 2 of the 3 antigens. This new rMABbo-iELISA could be considered a simpler alternative to detect anti Babesia spp. antibodies and appears to be well suited to perform epidemiological surveys at the herd level in regions where ticks are present.

  4. Multiple injections of electroporated autologous T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor mediate regression of human disseminated tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yangbing; Moon, Edmund; Carpenito, Carmine; Paulos, Chrystal M; Liu, Xiaojun; Brennan, Andrea L; Chew, Anne; Carroll, Richard G; Scholler, John; Levine, Bruce L; Albelda, Steven M; June, Carl H

    2010-11-15

    Redirecting T lymphocyte antigen specificity by gene transfer can provide large numbers of tumor-reactive T lymphocytes for adoptive immunotherapy. However, safety concerns associated with viral vector production have limited clinical application of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR). T lymphocytes can be gene modified by RNA electroporation without integration-associated safety concerns. To establish a safe platform for adoptive immunotherapy, we first optimized the vector backbone for RNA in vitro transcription to achieve high-level transgene expression. CAR expression and function of RNA-electroporated T cells could be detected up to a week after electroporation. Multiple injections of RNA CAR-electroporated T cells mediated regression of large vascularized flank mesothelioma tumors in NOD/scid/γc(-/-) mice. Dramatic tumor reduction also occurred when the preexisting intraperitoneal human-derived tumors, which had been growing in vivo for >50 days, were treated by multiple injections of autologous human T cells electroporated with anti-mesothelin CAR mRNA. This is the first report using matched patient tumor and lymphocytes showing that autologous T cells from cancer patients can be engineered to provide an effective therapy for a disseminated tumor in a robust preclinical model. Multiple injections of RNA-engineered T cells are a novel approach for adoptive cell transfer, providing flexible platform for the treatment of cancer that may complement the use of retroviral and lentiviral engineered T cells. This approach may increase the therapeutic index of T cells engineered to express powerful activation domains without the associated safety concerns of integrating viral vectors. Copyright © 2010 AACR.

  5. A new microcolumn-type microchip for examining the expression of chimeric fusion genes using a nucleic acid sandwich hybridization technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Michihiro; Sasaki, Naoyuki; Kishimoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Hidetoshi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Mizutani, Shuki; Kishii, Noriyuki; Yasuda, Akio

    2014-11-01

    We report a new type of microcolumn installed in a microchip. The architecture allows use of a nucleic acid sandwich hybridization technique to detect a messenger RNA (mRNA) chain as a target. Data are presented that demonstrate that the expression of a chimeric fusion gene can be detected. The microcolumn was filled with semi-transparent microbeads made of agarose gel that acted as carriers, allowing increased efficiency of the optical detection of fluorescence from the microcolumn. The hybrid between the target trapped on the microbeads and a probe DNA labeled with a fluorescent dye was detected by measuring the intensity of the fluorescence from the microcolumn directly. These results demonstrate an easy and simple method for determining the expression of chimeric fusion genes with no preamplification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) mediated by a chimeric promoter in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinxia; Hu, Zhangli; Wang, Chaogang; Li, Shuangfei; Lei, Anping

    2008-08-01

    To improve the expression efficiency of exogenous genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a high efficient expression vector was constructed. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was expressed in C. reinhardtii under the control of promoters: RBCS2 and HSP70A-RBCS2. Efficiency of transformation and expression were compared between two transgenic algae: RBCS2 mediated strain Tran-I and HSP70A-RBCS2 mediated strain Tran-II. Results show that HSP70A-RBCS2 could improve greatly the transformation efficiency by approximately eightfold of RBCS2, and the expression efficiency of GFP in Tran-II was at least double of that in Tran-I. In addition, a threefold increase of GFP in Tran-II was induced by heat shock at 40°C. All of the results demonstrated that HSP70A-RBCS2 was more efficient than RBCS2 in expressing exogenous gene in C. reinhardtii.

  7. Chimeric Monoclonal Antibody Cetuximab Targeting Epidermal Growth Factor-Receptor in Advanced Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, Uwe; Tchernev, Georgi; Lotti, Torello

    2018-01-25

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common malignancy in humans. Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibody cetuximab is an option in case of advanced tumor or metastasis. We present and update of the use of cetuximab in NMSC searching PUBMED 2011-2017. The monoclonal antibody cetuximab against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been investigated for its use in NMSC during the years 2011 to 2017 by a PUBMED research using the following items: "Non-melanoma skin cancer AND cetuximab," "cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma AND cetuximab," and "basal cell carcinoma AND cetuximab", and "cetuximab AND skin toxicity". Available data were analyzed including case reports. Current evidence of cetuximab efficacy in NMSC was mainly obtained in cutaneous SCC and to a lesser extend in BCC. Response rates vary for neoadjuvant, adjuvant, mono- and combined therapy with cetuximab. Management of cutaneous toxicities is necessary. Guidelines are available. Cetuximab is an option for recurrent or advanced NMSC of the skin. It seems to be justified particularly in very high-risk tumors. There is a need for phase III trials.

  8. Tumor-Targeted Human T Cells Expressing CD28-Based Chimeric Antigen Receptors Circumvent CTLA-4 Inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud Condomines

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy represents a promising treatment for cancer. Human T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR recognize and kill tumor cells in a MHC-unrestricted manner and persist in vivo when the CAR includes a CD28 costimulatory domain. However, the intensity of the CAR-mediated CD28 activation signal and its regulation by the CTLA-4 checkpoint are unknown. We investigated whether T cells expressing an anti-CD19, CD3 zeta and CD28-based CAR (19-28z displayed the same proliferation and anti-tumor abilities than T cells expressing a CD3 zeta-based CAR (19z1 costimulated through the CD80/CD28, ligand/receptor pathway. Repeated in vitro antigen-specific stimulations indicated that 19-28z+ T cells secreted higher levels of Th1 cytokines and showed enhanced proliferation compared to those of 19z1+ or 19z1-CD80+ T cells. In an aggressive pre-B cell leukemia model, mice treated with 19-28z+ T cells had 10-fold reduced tumor progression compared to those treated with 19z1+ or 19z1-CD80+ T cells. shRNA-mediated CTLA-4 down-regulation in 19z1-CD80+ T cells significantly increased their in vivo expansion and anti-tumor properties, but had no effect in 19-28z+ T cells. Our results establish that CTLA-4 down-regulation may benefit human adoptive T cell therapy and demonstrate that CAR design can elude negative checkpoints to better sustain T cell function.

  9. Co-expression of interleukin 12 enhances antitumor effects of a novel chimeric promoter-mediated suicide gene therapy in an immunocompetent mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yu, E-mail: xuyu1001@gmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Liu, Zhengchun, E-mail: l135027@126.com [Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Kong, Haiyan, E-mail: suppleant@163.com [Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Sun, Wenjie, E-mail: wendy11240325@163.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Liao, Zhengkai, E-mail: fastbeta@gmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhou, Fuxiang, E-mail: happyzhoufx@sina.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Xie, Conghua, E-mail: chxie_65@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); and others

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} A novel chimeric promoter consisting of CArG element and hTERT promoter was developed. {yields} The promoter was characterized with radiation-inducibility and tumor-specificity. {yields} Suicide gene system driven by the promoter showed remarkable cytotoxicity in vitro. {yields} Co-expression of IL12 enhanced the promoter mediated suicide gene therapy in vivo. -- Abstract: The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter has been widely used in target gene therapy of cancer. However, low transcriptional activity limited its clinical application. Here, we designed a novel dual radiation-inducible and tumor-specific promoter system consisting of CArG elements and the hTERT promoter, resulting in increased expression of reporter genes after gamma-irradiation. Therapeutic and side effects of adenovirus-mediated horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/indole-3-acetic (IAA) system downstream of the chimeric promoter were evaluated in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma, combining with or without adenovirus-mediated interleukin 12 (IL12) gene driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter. The combination treatment showed more effective suppression of tumor growth than those with single agent alone, being associated with pronounced intratumoral T-lymphocyte infiltration and minor side effects. Our results suggest that the combination treatment with HRP/IAA system driven by the novel chimeric promoter and the co-expression of IL12 might be an effective and safe target gene therapy strategy of cancer.

  10. Efficient delivery and stable gene expression in a hematopoietic cell line using a chimeric serotype 35 fiber pseudotyped helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balamotis, Michael Andrew; Huang, Katie; Mitani, Kohnosuke

    2004-01-01

    Certain human cell populations have remained difficult to infect with human adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 because of their lack of coxsackievirus B-adenovirus receptor (CAR). Native adenovirus fiber compositions, although diverse, cannot infect all tissue types. Recently, a chimeric Ad5/35 fiber was created, which displays an altered tropism from Ad5. We incorporated this chimeric fiber into a helper-dependent (HD) adenovirus vector system and compared HD to E1-deleted (E1Δ) vectors by transgene expression, cell transduction efficiency, and cytotoxicity. K562 cells were infected ∼50 times more efficiently with the chimeric Ad5/35 fiber compared with the Ad5 fiber. Short-term transgene expression was sustained longer from HD Ad5/35 than E1Δ Ad5/35 vector after in vitro infection of actively dividing K562 cells. Rapid loss of transgene expression from E1Δ Ad5/35 infection was not due to the loss of vector genomes, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR), or cytotoxicity, but rather through a putative silencing mechanism

  11. Co-expression of interleukin 12 enhances antitumor effects of a novel chimeric promoter-mediated suicide gene therapy in an immunocompetent mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yu; Liu, Zhengchun; Kong, Haiyan; Sun, Wenjie; Liao, Zhengkai; Zhou, Fuxiang; Xie, Conghua

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A novel chimeric promoter consisting of CArG element and hTERT promoter was developed. → The promoter was characterized with radiation-inducibility and tumor-specificity. → Suicide gene system driven by the promoter showed remarkable cytotoxicity in vitro. → Co-expression of IL12 enhanced the promoter mediated suicide gene therapy in vivo. -- Abstract: The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter has been widely used in target gene therapy of cancer. However, low transcriptional activity limited its clinical application. Here, we designed a novel dual radiation-inducible and tumor-specific promoter system consisting of CArG elements and the hTERT promoter, resulting in increased expression of reporter genes after gamma-irradiation. Therapeutic and side effects of adenovirus-mediated horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/indole-3-acetic (IAA) system downstream of the chimeric promoter were evaluated in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma, combining with or without adenovirus-mediated interleukin 12 (IL12) gene driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter. The combination treatment showed more effective suppression of tumor growth than those with single agent alone, being associated with pronounced intratumoral T-lymphocyte infiltration and minor side effects. Our results suggest that the combination treatment with HRP/IAA system driven by the novel chimeric promoter and the co-expression of IL12 might be an effective and safe target gene therapy strategy of cancer.

  12. Pre-clinical evaluation of CD38 chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells for the treatment of multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drent, Esther; Groen, Richard W. J.; Noort, Willy A. Noort

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells is a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. The CD38 molecule, with its high expression on multiple myeloma cells, appears a suitable target for antibody therapy. Prompted by this, we used three different CD38 antibody...... sequences to generate second-generation retroviral CD38- chimeric antigen receptor constructs with which we transduced T cells from healthy donors and multiple myeloma patients. We then evaluated the preclinical efficacy and safety of the transduced T cells. Irrespective of the donor and antibody sequence......, CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells proliferated, produced inflammatory cytokines and effectively lysed malignant cell lines and primary malignant cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and multi-drug resistant multiple myeloma in a cell-dose, and CD38-dependent manner, despite...

  13. Comparative study of the diagnostic and prognostic value of antibodies against chimeric citrullinated synthetic peptides and CCP3/CCP3.1 assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómara, María J; Rodríguez, Javier; Bleda, María J; Salvador, Juan P; Sanmartí, Raimon; Haro, Isabel

    2018-01-26

    The objective of the study was to compare the diagnostic yield of home-made ELISA tests based on synthetic chimeric fibrin/filaggrin citrullinated peptides (CFFCPs) with CCP3 and CCP3.1 commercial tests to detect anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPAs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. The prognostic value is also studied in a cohort of patients with early RA. Moreover, we transfer immunological assays from microtiter plates to microarray formats to allow the simultaneous analysis of several peptide sequences and reduce the volume of serum from patients. The diagnostic study includes: 100 RA patients who fulfilled the 1987 ACR criteria; 100 healthy blood donors; 35 patients with SLE according ACR criteria; 35 patients with PsA fulfilling the Wright and Moll criteria and 30 patients with HCV infection. The prognostic value study includes 50 patients with early RA with follow-up data available. All samples are from outpatients attending the Rheumatology Department of the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona. Similar sensitivity, specificity and predictive values for the diagnosis of RA of CCFCPs compared to CCP3/CCP3.1 were obtained. Although a high concordance is observed between anti-CFFCPs and anti-CCP3/CCP3.1 in the early patients that rendered Larsen radiographic progression, CFFCPs could be a better marker of radiographic outcome. Strong correlations between the microarray and ELISA results were found for individual CFFCPs peptides. The development of multiplexing techniques combining a different spectrum of markers in a single analysis, including CFFCP peptides, could allow a more detailed analysis of the autoantibodies reactivity found in the sera of patients suffering of this heterogeneous disease.

  14. A canine chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting PD-L1 and its clinical efficacy in canine oral malignant melanoma or undifferentiated sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Takagi, Satoshi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Izumi, Yusuke; Deguchi, Tatsuya; Nakajima, Chie; Kato, Yukinari; Yamamoto, Keiichi; Uemura, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-08-21

    Immunotherapy targeting immune checkpoint molecules, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1), using therapeutic antibodies has been widely used for some human malignancies in the last 5 years. A costimulatory receptor, PD-1, is expressed on T cells and suppresses effector functions when it binds to its ligand, PD-L1. Aberrant PD-L1 expression is reported in various human cancers and is considered an immune escape mechanism. Antibodies blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 axis induce antitumour responses in patients with malignant melanoma and other cancers. In dogs, no such clinical studies have been performed to date because of the lack of therapeutic antibodies that can be used in dogs. In this study, the immunomodulatory effects of c4G12, a canine-chimerised anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody, were evaluated in vitro, demonstrating significantly enhanced cytokine production and proliferation of dog peripheral blood mononuclear cells. A pilot clinical study was performed on seven dogs with oral malignant melanoma (OMM) and two with undifferentiated sarcoma. Objective antitumour responses were observed in one dog with OMM (14.3%, 1/7) and one with undifferentiated sarcoma (50.0%, 1/2) when c4G12 was given at 2 or 5 mg/kg, every 2 weeks. c4G12 could be a safe and effective treatment option for canine cancers.

  15. High-Level Systemic Expression of Conserved Influenza Epitope in Plants on the Surface of Rod-Shaped Chimeric Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Petukhova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant viruses based on the cDNA copy of the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV genome carrying different versions of the conserved M2e epitope from influenza virus A cloned into the coat protein (CP gene were obtained and partially characterized by our group previously; cysteines in the human consensus M2e sequence were changed to serine residues. This work intends to show some biological properties of these viruses following plant infections. Agroinfiltration experiments on Nicotiana benthamiana confirmed the efficient systemic expression of M2e peptides, and two point amino acid substitutions in recombinant CPs significantly influenced the symptoms and development of viral infections. Joint expression of RNA interference suppressor protein p19 from tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV did not affect the accumulation of CP-M2e-ser recombinant protein in non-inoculated leaves. RT-PCR analysis of RNA isolated from either infected leaves or purified TMV-M2e particles proved the genetic stability of TMV‑based viral vectors. Immunoelectron microscopy of crude plant extracts demonstrated that foreign epitopes are located on the surface of chimeric virions. The rod‑shaped geometry of plant-produced M2e epitopes is different from the icosahedral or helical filamentous arrangement of M2e antigens on the carrier virus-like particles (VLP described earlier. Thereby, we created a simple and efficient system that employs agrobacteria and plant viral vectors in order to produce a candidate broad-spectrum flu vaccine.

  16. Downregulation of transferrin receptor surface expression by intracellular antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jilin; Wu Sha; Zhao Xiaoping; Wang Min; Li Wenhan; Shen Xin; Liu Jing; Lei Ping; Zhu Huifen; Shen Guanxin

    2007-01-01

    To deplete cellular iron uptake, and consequently inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells, we attempt to block surface expression of transferrin receptor (TfR) by intracellular antibody technology. We constructed two expression plasmids (scFv-HAK and scFv-HA) coding for intracellular single-chain antibody against TfR with or without endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal, respectively. Then they were transfected tumor cells MCF-7 by liposome. Applying RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscope experiments, we insure that scFv-HAK intrabody was successfully expressed and retained in ER contrasted to the secreted expression of scFv-HA. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed that the TfR surface expression was markedly decreased approximately 83.4 ± 2.5% in scFv-HAK transfected cells, while there was not significantly decrease in scFv-HA transfected cells. Further cell growth and apoptosis characteristics were evaluated by cell cycle analysis, nuclei staining and MTT assay. Results indicated that expression of scFv-HAK can dramatically induce cell cycle G1 phase arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells, and consequently significantly suppress proliferation of tumor cells compared with other control groups. For First time this study demonstrates the potential usage of anti-TfR scFv-intrabody as a growth inhibitor of TfR overexpressing tumors

  17. High-dose myeloablative versus conventional low-dose radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) with the chimeric anti-CD20 antibody C2B8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, T.M.; Gotthardt, M.; Schipperm, M.L.; Gratz, S.; Behe, M.P.; Brittinger, G.; Woermann, B.; Becker, W.

    2002-01-01

    CD20 has been used as target molecule for low-dose as well as high-dose, myeloablative RIT of B-cell NHL. MCL is an especially aggressive, prognostically unfavorable form of B-cell NHL. The aim of this study was to investigate whether high-dose, myeloablative RIT with the 131 I-labeled chimeric anti-CD20 antibody C2B8 (rituxan, Mabthera, Roche) may be therapeutically more effective than conventional low-dose therapy in MCL. A total of twelve patients with chemorefractory or relapsed mantle cell lymphoma were studied so far (all of them having relapsed after high-dose chemotherapy, seven of them combined with 12 Gy TBI). A diagnostic-dosimetric study was performed with 10 mCi of 131 I-C2B8 at a protein dose of 2.5 mg/kg. In case of splenic pooling, the protein dose was increased until a more 'favorable' biodistribution was obtained. Therapy was performed with conventional (30-75 mCi; n=4) or myeloablative activities (261-515 mCi; n=8) of 131 I-C2B8 at the previously optimized protein dose, aiming at whole-body doses of ≤ 0.8 Gy (for low-dose RIT) or lung doses of ≤ 27 Gy (for high-dose RIT). Clinical follow-up was obtained for up to 42 months. Overall, in 11 patients the 2.5 mg/kg protein dose was used, whereas in one patient with marked splenomegaly, 10 mg/kg were necessary to overcome the splenic antigenic sink. In the high-dose patients, non-hematologic toxicity was restricted to mild to moderate nausea, fever, transient bilirubin or liver enzyme elevations. Despite thyroid blocking, 6/8 high-dose (in contrast to 0/4 low-dose) patients developed hypothyroidism, requiring thyroxine substitution at 6-18 months after RIT. The response rate in the low-dose arm was only 1(PR)/4, whereas 7/8 high-dose patients experienced complete and the remainder a partial remission. 6 high-dose patients are still in CR (one of them relapsed locally at 3 months, one systemically at 26 months after RIT), and 7 are still alive for up to 42+ months. In contrast to low-dose therapy

  18. Labelling of anti-human bladder tumor chimeric antibody with 99Tcm and radioimmunoimaging of bladder carcinoma xenograft in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunli; Wang Rongfu; Fu Zhanli; Bai Yin; Ding Yi; Yu Lizhang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the in vitro immunoreactivity and in vivo tissue distribution, tumor targeting property of anti-human bladder tumor human-murine chimeric antibody (ch-BDI) labeled with 99 Tc m and to investigate its possibility for being used in guiding diagnosis and guiding therapy of bladder cancer. Methods: The ch-BDI was labeled with 99 Tc m by improved Schwarz method and the labeled antibody was purified by Sephadex G-50. Labeling yield and radiochemical purity were measured by paper chromatography. The immunoreactive fraction and association constant (K a ) were measured by Lindmo method and Scatchard analysis, respectively. 11.1 MBq (30 μg) 99 Tc m -ch-BDI was intravenously injected into nude mice bearing human bladder cancer xenografts in the right thigh and radioimmunoimaging (RII) was performed 2, 6, 20 and 24 h postinjection. The images were processed by region of interest (ROI) method to acquire the counts of whole body and the tumor and the counts ratios of tumor to contralateral normal tissue or to tissues of other non-tumor bearing organs. The mice were killed after 24 h postinjection imaging and tissue distribution was measured. %ID/g and target to nontarget (T/NT) ratios were calculated. Results: The labeling yield and radiochemical purity of 99 Tc m -ch-BDI were (66.5±7.3)% and >90%, respectively. The immunoreactive fraction was 76% and K a was 3.56 x 10 9 L/mol. RII showed that the tumor was clearly visualized 6 h postinjection and becoming clearer along with time prolonging. The radioactivity of whole body decreased rapidly with time, whereas the radioactivity of the tumor decreased slowly. The T/NT ratios was increased with time. Biodistribution results showed that tumor uptake was 17.4%ID/g 24 h postinjection. T/NT ratios were very high except for the kidney. T/NT ratios for brain, muscle, intestinal wall, bone and heart wall were 136.0, 55.1, 39.3, 29.7 and 27.9, respectively. Conclusion: 99 Tc m -ch-BDI exhibits excellent

  19. Neurophysiological evidence (ERPs) for hemispheric processing of facial expressions of emotions: Evidence from whole face and chimeric face stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaskinou, Nikoleta; Watling, Dawn

    2018-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the patterns of electrophysiological responses of early emotional processing at frontocentral sites in adults and to explore whether adults' activation patterns show hemispheric lateralization for facial emotion processing. Thirty-five adults viewed full face and chimeric face stimuli. After viewing two faces, sequentially, participants were asked to decide which of the two faces was more emotive. The findings from the standard faces and the chimeric faces suggest that emotion processing is present during the early phases of face processing in the frontocentral sites. In particular, sad emotional faces are processed differently than neutral and happy (including happy chimeras) faces in these early phases of processing. Further, there were differences in the electrode amplitudes over the left and right hemisphere, particularly in the early temporal window. This research provides supporting evidence that the chimeric face test is a test of emotion processing that elicits right hemispheric processing.

  20. Cell surface expression system for the display of heterologous gene products using chimeric flagellin fusions of bacillus halodurans isolate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available system for the display of heterologous gene products using chimeric flagellin fusions of a Bacillus halodurans isolate Slide 2 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za Bacillus halodurans Alk 36 xrhombus Ability to over-produce cell... for functionality of the His-tag for metal binding. Slide 13 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za PAGE gel showing over-production of chimeric poly-His flagellin proteins 66.2 kDa 45.0 kDa 31.0 kDa 1. LMW ladder 2. NC3 3. NHisC3 4. NC6 5...

  1. Fiber-chimeric adenoviruses expressing fibers from serotype 16 and 50 improve gene transfer to human pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, K.F.D.; Geer, M.A. van; Bakker, C.T.; Dekker, J.E.M.; Havenga, M.J.E.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Gouma, D.J.; Bosma, P.J.; Wesseling, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Survival of patients with pancreatic cancer is poor. Adenoviral (Ad) gene therapy employing the commonly used serotype 5 reveals limited transduction efficiency due to the low amount of coxsackie-adenovirus receptor on pancreatic cancer cells. To identify fiber-chimeric adenoviruses with improved

  2. A novel HPV 16 L1-based chimeric virus-like particle containing E6 and E7 seroreactive epitopes permits highly specific detection of antibodies in patients with CIN 1 and HPV-16 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago-Osorio Edelmiro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of IgG antibodies to HPV-16 L1-virus like particles (VLPs in serum has been reported as a result of persistent exposure to the virus and as a marker of disease progression. However, detection of VLP-specific antibodies in sera does not always indicate a malignant lesion as positive results may also be due to a nonmalignant viral infection. Furthermore, malignant lesions are associated with an increased antibody titer for E6 and E7 proteins. The aim of this study was to develop an ELISA using a novel chimeric virus-like particle (cVLP encoding an L1 protein fused with a string of HPV-16 E6 and E7 seroreactive epitopes to its C-terminus to be used for detection of HPV-16 specific antibodies in patients with cervical intraepithelial lesion grade 1 (CIN 1. Results The sera of 30 patients with CIN 1 who also tested positive for HPV-16 DNA and of 30 age-matched normal donors negative for HPV infection were tested for the presence of IgG antibodies specific for either VLP-L1 (HPV-16 L1, gVLP (derived from Gardasil, or cVLP by ELISA. The cVLP-reactive sera yielded two distinct groups of results: (H reactivity levels that presented very strong cVLP-specific titers, and (L reactivity levels with significantly lower titers similar to those obtained with VLP-L1 and gVLP antigens. Additionally, the sera that presented the higher cVLP titers closely matched those that had significantly stronger reactivity to E6 and E7 epitopes. Interestingly, the samples with the highest titers corresponded to patients with the higher numbers of sexual partners and pregnancies. On the other hand only 4 out of the 12 sera that harbored antibodies with VLP neutralizing ability corresponded to the group with high cVLP antibody titers. Conclusion We report for the first time that chimeric particles containing HPV-16 L1 protein fused with E6 and E7 seroreactive epitopes enable much better detection of IgG antibodies in the sera of CIN 1 patients

  3. A Chimeric Antibody against ACKR3/CXCR7 in Combination with TMZ Activates Immune Responses and Extends Survival in Mouse GBM Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Nicole; Carlson, Jeffrey C; Huang, Kexin; Zheng, Yayue; Oderup, Cecilia; Gross, Julia; Jang, Andrew D; Burke, Thomas M; Lewén, Susanna; Scholz, Alexander; Huang, Serina; Nease, Leona; Kosek, Jon; Mittelbronn, Michel; Butcher, Eugene C; Tu, Hua; Zabel, Brian A

    2018-05-02

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the least treatable type of brain tumor, afflicting over 15,000 people per year in the United States. Patients have a median survival of 16 months, and over 95% die within 5 years. The chemokine receptor ACKR3 is selectively expressed on both GBM cells and tumor-associated blood vessels. High tumor expression of ACKR3 correlates with poor prognosis and potential treatment resistance, making it an attractive therapeutic target. We engineered a single chain FV-human FC-immunoglobulin G1 (IgG 1 ) antibody, X7Ab, to target ACKR3 in human and mouse GBM cells. We used hydrodynamic gene transfer to overexpress the antibody, with efficacy in vivo. X7Ab kills GBM tumor cells and ACKR3-expressing vascular endothelial cells by engaging the cytotoxic activity of natural killer (NK) cells and complement and the phagocytic activity of macrophages. Combining X7Ab with TMZ allows the TMZ dosage to be lowered, without compromising therapeutic efficacy. Mice treated with X7Ab and in combination with TMZ showed significant tumor reduction by MRI and longer survival overall. Brain-tumor-infiltrating leukocyte analysis revealed that X7Ab enhances the activation of M1 macrophages to support anti-tumor immune response in vivo. Targeting ACKR3 with immunotherapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in combination with standard of care therapies may prove effective in treating GBM. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploiting the yeast L-A viral capsid for the in vivo assembly of chimeric VLPs as platform in vaccine development and foreign protein expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Powilleit

    Full Text Available A novel expression system based on engineered variants of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae dsRNA virus L-A was developed allowing the in vivo assembly of chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs as a unique platform for a wide range of applications. We show that polypeptides fused to the viral capsid protein Gag self-assemble into isometric VLP chimeras carrying their cargo inside the capsid, thereby not only effectively preventing proteolytic degradation in the host cell cytosol, but also allowing the expression of a per se cytotoxic protein. Carboxyterminal extension of Gag by T cell epitopes from human cytomegalovirus pp65 resulted in the formation of hybrid VLPs that strongly activated antigen-specific CD8(+ memory T cells ex vivo. Besides being a carrier for polypeptides inducing antigen-specific immune responses in vivo, VLP chimeras were also shown to be effective in the expression and purification of (i a heterologous model protein (GFP, (ii a per se toxic protein (K28 alpha-subunit, and (iii a particle-associated and fully recyclable biotechnologically relevant enzyme (esterase A. Thus, yeast viral Gag represents a unique platform for the in vivo assembly of chimeric VLPs, equally attractive and useful in vaccine development and recombinant protein production.

  5. In-silico design, expression, and purification of novel chimeric Escherichia coli O157:H7 OmpA fused to LTB protein in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytak Novinrooz

    Full Text Available E. coli O157:H7, one of the major EHEC serotypes, is capable of developing bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis (HC, and fatal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS and is accompanied by high annual economic loss worldwide. Due to the increased risk of HC and HUS development following antibiotic therapy, the prevention of infections caused by this pathogen is considered to be one of the most effective ways of avoiding the consequences of this infection. The main aim of the present study was to design, express, and purify a novel chimeric protein to develope human vaccine candidate against E. coli O157:H7 containing loop 2-4 of E. coli O157:H7, outer membrane protein A (OmpA, and B subunit of E. coli heat labile enterotoxin (LTB which are connected by a flexible peptide linker. Several online databases and bioinformatics software were utilized to choose the peptide linker among 537 analyzed linkers, design the chimeric protein, and optimize the codon of the relative gene encoding this protein. Subsequently, the recombinant gene encoding OmpA-LTB was synthesized and cloned into pET-24a (+ expression vector and transferred to E. coli BL21(DE3 cells. The expression of OmpA-LTB chimeric protein was then carried out by induction of cultured E. coli Bl21 (DE3 cells with 1mM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG. The purification of OmpA-LTB was then performed by nickel affinity chromatography. Expression and purification were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulphate poly acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Moreover, the identity of the expressed protein was analyzed by western blotting. SDS-PAGE and western immunoblotting confirmed the successful expression of a 27 KDa recombinant protein after 24 hours at 37°C post-IPTG induction. OmpA-LTB was then successfully purified, using nickel affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. The yield of purification was 12 mg per liter of culture media. Ultimately, we constructed the successful design and efficient

  6. Chimeric Lyssavirus Glycoproteins with Increased Immunological Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallet, Corinne; Jacob, Yves; Bahloul, Chokri; Drings, Astrid; Desmezieres, Emmanuel; Tordo, Noël; Perrin, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    The rabies virus glycoprotein molecule (G) can be divided into two parts separated by a flexible hinge: the NH2 half (site II part) containing antigenic site II up to the linear region (amino acids [aa] 253 to 275 encompassing epitope VI [aa 264]) and the COOH half (site III part) containing antigenic site III and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. The structural and immunological roles of each part were investigated by cell transfection and mouse DNA-based immunization with homogeneous and chimeric G genes formed by fusion of the site II part of one genotype (GT) with the site III part of the same or another GT. Various site II-site III combinations between G genes of PV (Pasteur virus strain) rabies (GT1), Mokola (GT3), and EBL1 (European bat lyssavirus 1 [GT5]) viruses were tested. Plasmids pGPV-PV, pGMok-Mok, pGMok-PV, and pGEBL1-PV induced transient expression of correctly transported and folded antigens in neuroblastoma cells and virus-neutralizing antibodies against parental viruses in mice, whereas, pG-PVIII (site III part only) and pGPV-Mok did not. The site III part of PV (GT1) was a strong inducer of T helper cells and was very effective at presenting the site II part of various GTs. Both parts are required for correct folding and transport of chimeric G proteins which have a strong potential value for immunological studies and development of multivalent vaccines. Chimeric plasmid pGEBL1-PV broadens the spectrum of protection against European lyssavirus genotypes (GT1, GT5, and GT6). PMID:9847325

  7. Flow cytometric assay detecting cytotoxicity against human endogenous retrovirus antigens expressed on cultured multiple sclerosis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Larsen, A; Brudek, T; Petersen, T

    2013-01-01

    on their surface. Polyclonal antibodies against defined peptides in the Env- and Gag-regions of the HERVs were raised in rabbits and used in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) -assays. Rituximab® (Roche), a chimeric monoclonal antibody against CD20 expressed primarily on B cells, was used...

  8. An E2-Substituted Chimeric Pestivirus With DIVA Vaccine Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Nielsen, Jens

    An advantage of the use of chimeric pestiviruses as modified live vaccines against classical swine fever (CSF) resides in their capacity to be manipulated to achieve the characteristics desired for safe and efficacious DIVA vaccines. We have recently generated a new chimeric virus, Riems26_E2gif...... vaccinated pigs were protected. This new chimeric pestivirus represents a C-strain based DIVA vaccine candidate that can be differentiated based on CSFV E2 specific antibodies....

  9. Chimeric opioid peptides: tools for identifying opioid receptor types.

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, G X; Miyajima, A; Yokota, T; Arai, K; Goldstein, A

    1990-01-01

    We synthesized several chimeric peptides in which the N-terminal nine residues of dynorphin-32, a peptide selective for the kappa opioid receptor, were replaced by opioid peptides selective for other opioid receptor types. Each chimeric peptide retained the high affinity and type selectivity characteristic of its N-terminal sequence. The common C-terminal two-thirds of the chimeric peptides served as an epitope recognized by the same monoclonal antibody. When bound to receptors on a cell surf...

  10. Chimeric FimH adhesin of type 1 fimbriae: a bacterial surface display system for heterologous sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, L; Poulsen, LK; Christiansen, Gunna

    1995-01-01

    of heterologous DNA segments encoding two reporter sequences. In the selected positions such insertions did not significantly alter the function of the FimH protein with regard to surface location and adhesive ability. The system seemed to be quite flexible, since chimeric versions of the FimH adhesin containing...... as many as 56 foreign amino acids were transported to the bacterial surface as components of the fimbrial organelles. Furthermore, the foreign protein segments were recognized by insert-specific antibodies when expressed within chimeric proteins on the surface of the bacteria. The results from...

  11. The Construction of Chimeric T-Cell Receptor with Spacer Base of Modeling Study of VHH and MUC1 Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Pirooznia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive cell immunotherapy with the use of chimeric receptors leads to the best and most specific response against tumors. Chimeric receptors consist of a signaling fragment, extracellular spacer, costimulating domain, and an antibody. Antibodies cause immunogenicity; therefore, VHH is a good replacement for ScFv in chimeric receptors. Since peptide sequences have an influence on chimeric receptors, the effect of peptide domains on each other's conformation were investigated. CD3Zeta, CD28, VHH and CD8α, and FcgIIα are used as signaling moieties, costimulating domain, antibody, and spacers, respectively. To investigate the influence of the ligation of spacers on the conformational structure of VHH, models of VHH were constructed. Molecular dynamics simulation was run to study the influence of the presence of spacers on the conformational changes in the binding sites of VHH. Root mean square deviation and root mean square fluctuation of critical segments in the binding site showed no noticeable differences with those in the native VHH. Results from molecular docking revealed that the presence of spacer FcgIIα causes an increasing effect on VHH with MUC1 interaction. Each of the constructs was transformed into the Jurkat E6.1. Expression analysis and evaluation of their functions were examined. The results showed good expression and function.

  12. Cell surface expression of single chain antibodies with applications to imaging of gene expression in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northrop, Jeffrey P.; Bednarski, Mark; Li, King C.; Barbieri, Susan O.; Lu, Amy T.; Nguyen, Dee; Varadarajan, John; Osen, Maureen; Star-Lack, Josh

    2003-01-01

    Imaging of gene expression in vivo has many potential uses for biomedical research and drug discovery, ranging from the study of gene regulation and cancer to the non-invasive assessment of gene therapies. To streamline the development of imaging marker gene technologies for nuclear medicine, we propose a new approach to the design of reporter/probe pairs wherein the reporter is a cell surface-expressed single chain antibody variable fragment that has been raised against a low molecular weight imaging probe with optimized pharmacokinetic properties. Proof of concept of the approach was achieved using a single chain antibody variable fragment that binds with high affinity to fluorescein and an imaging probe consisting of fluorescein isothiocyanate coupled to the chelator diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid labeled with the gamma-emitter 111 In. We demonstrate specific high-affinity binding of this probe to the cell surface-expressed reporter in vitro and assess the in vivo biodistribution of the probe both in wild-type mice and in mice harboring tumor xenografts expressing the reporter. Specific uptake of the probe by, and in vivo imaging of, tumors expressing the reporter are shown. Since ScFvs with high affinities can be raised to almost any protein or small molecule, the proposed methodology may offer a new flexibility in the design of imaging tracer/reporter pairs wherein both probe pharmacokinetics and binding affinities can be readily optimized. (orig.)

  13. Capture ELISA for IgM antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum glutamate rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, M; Borre, Mette; Petersen, E

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a novel mu chain capture ELISA for the detection of IgM antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen. A fragment of the 220 kDa P. falciparum glutamate rich protein containing amino acid residues 489-1271 was expressed in E. coli as a recombinant chimeric beta-galactos......This report describes a novel mu chain capture ELISA for the detection of IgM antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen. A fragment of the 220 kDa P. falciparum glutamate rich protein containing amino acid residues 489-1271 was expressed in E. coli as a recombinant chimeric beta...

  14. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells for acute lymphoid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupp, Stephan A; Kalos, Michael; Barrett, David; Aplenc, Richard; Porter, David L; Rheingold, Susan R; Teachey, David T; Chew, Anne; Hauck, Bernd; Wright, J Fraser; Milone, Michael C; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H

    2013-04-18

    Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells with specificity for CD19 have shown promise in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). It remains to be established whether chimeric antigen receptor T cells have clinical activity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Two children with relapsed and refractory pre-B-cell ALL received infusions of T cells transduced with anti-CD19 antibody and a T-cell signaling molecule (CTL019 chimeric antigen receptor T cells), at a dose of 1.4×10(6) to 1.2×10(7) CTL019 cells per kilogram of body weight. In both patients, CTL019 T cells expanded to a level that was more than 1000 times as high as the initial engraftment level, and the cells were identified in bone marrow. In addition, the chimeric antigen receptor T cells were observed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), where they persisted at high levels for at least 6 months. Eight grade 3 or 4 adverse events were noted. The cytokine-release syndrome and B-cell aplasia developed in both patients. In one child, the cytokine-release syndrome was severe; cytokine blockade with etanercept and tocilizumab was effective in reversing the syndrome and did not prevent expansion of chimeric antigen receptor T cells or reduce antileukemic efficacy. Complete remission was observed in both patients and is ongoing in one patient at 11 months after treatment. The other patient had a relapse, with blast cells that no longer expressed CD19, approximately 2 months after treatment. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells are capable of killing even aggressive, treatment-refractory acute leukemia cells in vivo. The emergence of tumor cells that no longer express the target indicates a need to target other molecules in addition to CD19 in some patients with ALL.

  15. Enhanced Expression of Anti-CD19 Chimeric Antigen Receptor in piggyBac Transposon-Engineered T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Morita

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-modified T cells is a promising cancer immunotherapy. We previously developed a non-viral method of gene transfer into T cells using a piggyBac transposon system to improve the cost-effectiveness of CAR-T cell therapy. Here, we have further improved our technology by a novel culture strategy to increase the transfection efficiency and to reduce the time of T cell manufacturing. Using a CH2CH3-free CD19-specific CAR transposon vector and combining irradiated activated T cells (ATCs as feeder cells and virus-specific T cell receptor (TCR stimulation, we achieved 51.4% ± 14% CAR+ T cells and 2.8-fold expansion after 14 culture days. Expanded CD19.CAR-T cells maintained a significant fraction of CD45RA+CCR7+ T cells and demonstrated potent antitumor activity against CD19+ leukemic cells both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, piggyBac-based gene transfer may provide an alternative to viral gene transfer for CAR-T cell therapy.

  16. Manufacture of clinical-grade CD19-specific T cells stably expressing chimeric antigen receptor using Sleeping Beauty system and artificial antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harjeet Singh

    Full Text Available Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28 that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC in the presence of interleukin (IL-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT. We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼10(10 T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion.

  17. Expression of a Chimeric Gene Encoding Insecticidal Crystal Protein Cry1Aabc of Bacillus thuringiensis in Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) Confers Resistance to Gram Pod Borer (Helicoverpa armigera Hubner.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Alok; Datta, Subhojit; Thakur, Shallu; Shukla, Alok; Ansari, Jamal; Sujayanand, G K; Chaturvedi, Sushil K; Kumar, P A; Singh, N P

    2017-01-01

    Domain swapping and generation of chimeric insecticidal crystal protein is an emerging area of insect pest management. The lepidopteran insect pest, gram pod borer ( Helicoverpa armigera H.) wreaks havoc to chickpea crop affecting production. Lepidopteran insects were reported to be controlled by Bt ( cryI ) genes. We designed a plant codon optimized chimeric Bt gene ( cry1Aabc ) using three domains from three different cry1A genes (domains I, II, and III from cry1Aa , cry1Ab , and cry1Ac , respectively) and expressed it under the control of a constitutive promoter in chickpea ( cv . DCP92-3) to assess its effect on gram pod borer. A total of six transgenic chickpea shoots were established by grafting into mature fertile plants. The in vitro regenerated (organogenetic) shoots were selected based on antibiotic kanamycin monosulfate (100 mg/L) with transformation efficiency of 0.076%. Three transgenic events were extensively studied based on gene expression pattern and insect mortality across generations. Protein expression in pod walls, immature seeds and leaves (pre- and post-flowering) were estimated and expression in pre-flowering stage was found higher than that of post-flowering. Analysis for the stable integration, expression and insect mortality (detached leaf and whole plant bioassay) led to identification of efficacious transgenic chickpea lines. The chimeric cry1Aabc expressed in chickpea is effective against gram pod borer and generated events can be utilized in transgenic breeding program.

  18. Expression of a Chimeric Gene Encoding Insecticidal Crystal Protein Cry1Aabc of Bacillus thuringiensis in Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. Confers Resistance to Gram Pod Borer (Helicoverpa armigera Hubner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Das

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Domain swapping and generation of chimeric insecticidal crystal protein is an emerging area of insect pest management. The lepidopteran insect pest, gram pod borer (Helicoverpa armigera H. wreaks havoc to chickpea crop affecting production. Lepidopteran insects were reported to be controlled by Bt (cryI genes. We designed a plant codon optimized chimeric Bt gene (cry1Aabc using three domains from three different cry1A genes (domains I, II, and III from cry1Aa, cry1Ab, and cry1Ac, respectively and expressed it under the control of a constitutive promoter in chickpea (cv. DCP92-3 to assess its effect on gram pod borer. A total of six transgenic chickpea shoots were established by grafting into mature fertile plants. The in vitro regenerated (organogenetic shoots were selected based on antibiotic kanamycin monosulfate (100 mg/L with transformation efficiency of 0.076%. Three transgenic events were extensively studied based on gene expression pattern and insect mortality across generations. Protein expression in pod walls, immature seeds and leaves (pre- and post-flowering were estimated and expression in pre-flowering stage was found higher than that of post-flowering. Analysis for the stable integration, expression and insect mortality (detached leaf and whole plant bioassay led to identification of efficacious transgenic chickpea lines. The chimeric cry1Aabc expressed in chickpea is effective against gram pod borer and generated events can be utilized in transgenic breeding program.

  19. Synthetic ciguatoxins selectively activate Nav1.8-derived chimeric sodium channels expressed in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Kaoru; Inoue, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Keisuke; Hirama, Masahiro; Kondo, Chie; Kinoshita, Eiji; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Seyama, Issei

    2009-03-20

    The synthetic ciguatoxin CTX3C has been shown to activate tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive sodium channels (Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.4, and Na(v)1.5) by accelerating activation kinetics and shifting the activation curve toward hyperpolarization (Yamaoka, K., Inoue, M., Miyahara, H., Miyazaki, K., and Hirama, M. (2004) Br. J. Pharmacol. 142, 879-889). In this study, we further explored the effects of CTX3C on the TTX-resistant sodium channel Na(v)1.8. TTX-resistant channels have been shown to be involved in transducing pain and related sensations (Akopian, A. N., Sivilotti, L., and Wood, J. N. (1996) Nature 379, 257-262). Thus, we hypothesized that ciguatoxin-induced activation of the Na(v)1.8 current would account for the neurological symptoms of ciguatera poisoning. We found that 0.1 mum CTX3C preferentially affected the activation process of the Na(v)1.8 channel compared with those of the Na(v)1.2 and Na(v)1.4 channels. Importantly, without stimulation, 0.1 mum CTX3C induced a large leakage current (I (L)). The conductance of the I (L) calculated relative to the maximum conductance (G (max)) was 10 times larger than that of Na(v)1.2 or Na(v)1.4. To determine the molecular domain of Na(v)1.8 responsible for conferring higher sensitivity to CTX3C, we made two chimeric constructs from Na(v)1.4 and Na(v)1.8. Chimeras containing the N-terminal half of Na(v)1.8 exhibited a large response similar to wild-type Na(v)1.8, indicating that the region conferring high sensitivity to ciguatoxin action is located in the D1 or D2 domains.

  20. Synthetic Ciguatoxins Selectively Activate Nav1.8-derived Chimeric Sodium Channels Expressed in HEK293 Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Kaoru; Inoue, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Keisuke; Hirama, Masahiro; Kondo, Chie; Kinoshita, Eiji; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Seyama, Issei

    2009-01-01

    The synthetic ciguatoxin CTX3C has been shown to activate tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive sodium channels (Nav1.2, Nav1.4, and Nav1.5) by accelerating activation kinetics and shifting the activation curve toward hyperpolarization (Yamaoka, K., Inoue, M., Miyahara, H., Miyazaki, K., and Hirama, M. (2004) Br. J. Pharmacol. 142, 879–889). In this study, we further explored the effects of CTX3C on the TTX-resistant sodium channel Nav1.8. TTX-resistant channels have been shown to be involved in transducing pain and related sensations (Akopian, A. N., Sivilotti, L., and Wood, J. N. (1996) Nature 379, 257–262). Thus, we hypothesized that ciguatoxin-induced activation of the Nav1.8 current would account for the neurological symptoms of ciguatera poisoning. We found that 0.1 μm CTX3C preferentially affected the activation process of the Nav1.8 channel compared with those of the Nav1.2 and Nav1.4 channels. Importantly, without stimulation, 0.1 μm CTX3C induced a large leakage current (IL). The conductance of the IL calculated relative to the maximum conductance (Gmax) was 10 times larger than that of Nav1.2 or Nav1.4. To determine the molecular domain of Nav1.8 responsible for conferring higher sensitivity to CTX3C, we made two chimeric constructs from Nav1.4 and Nav1.8. Chimeras containing the N-terminal half of Nav1.8 exhibited a large response similar to wild-type Nav1.8, indicating that the region conferring high sensitivity to ciguatoxin action is located in the D1 or D2 domains. PMID:19164297

  1. Structural defect linked to nonrandom mutations in the matrix gene of Biden strain subacute sclerosing panencephalitis virus defined by cDNA cloning and expression of chimeric genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayata, M.; Hirano, A.; Wong, T.C.

    1989-01-01

    Biken strain, a nonproductive measles viruslike agent isolated from a subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) patient, contains a posttranscriptional defect affecting matrix (M) protein. A putative M protein was translated in vitro with RNA from Biken strain-infected cells. A similar protein was detected in vivo by an antiserum against a peptide synthesized from the cloned M gene of Edmonston strain measles virus. By using a novel method, full-length cDNAs of the Biken M gene were selectively cloned. The cloned Biken M gene contained an open reading frame which encoded 8 extra carboxy-terminal amino acid residues and 20 amino acid substitutions predicted to affect both the hydrophobicity and secondary structure of the gene product. The cloned gene was expressed in vitro and in vivo into a 37,500 M r protein electrophoretically and antigenically distinct from the M protein of Edmonston strain but identical to the M protein in Biken strain-infected cells. Chimeric M proteins synthesized in vitro and in vivo showed that the mutations in the carboxy-proximal region altered the local antigenicity and those in the amino region affected the overall protein conformation. The protein expressed from the Biken M gene was unstable in vivo. Instability was attributed to multiple mutations. These results offer insights into the basis of the defect in Biken strain and pose intriguing questions about the evolutionary origins of SSPE viruses in general

  2. Expression of a Chimeric Antigen Receptor Specific for Donor HLA Class I Enhances the Potency of Human Regulatory T Cells in Preventing Human Skin Transplant Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, D A; Philippeos, C; Fruhwirth, G O; Ibrahim, M A A; Hannen, R F; Cooper, D; Marelli-Berg, F M; Watt, F M; Lechler, R I; Maher, J; Smyth, L A; Lombardi, G

    2017-04-01

    Regulatory T cell (Treg) therapy using recipient-derived Tregs expanded ex vivo is currently being investigated clinically by us and others as a means of reducing allograft rejection following organ transplantation. Data from animal models has demonstrated that adoptive transfer of allospecific Tregs offers greater protection from graft rejection compared to polyclonal Tregs. Chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) are clinically translatable synthetic fusion proteins that can redirect the specificity of T cells toward designated antigens. We used CAR technology to redirect human polyclonal Tregs toward donor-MHC class I molecules, which are ubiquitously expressed in allografts. Two novel HLA-A2-specific CARs were engineered: one comprising a CD28-CD3ζ signaling domain (CAR) and one lacking an intracellular signaling domain (ΔCAR). CAR Tregs were specifically activated and significantly more suppressive than polyclonal or ΔCAR Tregs in the presence of HLA-A2, without eliciting cytotoxic activity. Furthermore, CAR and ΔCAR Tregs preferentially transmigrated across HLA-A2-expressing endothelial cell monolayers. In a human skin xenograft transplant model, adoptive transfer of CAR Tregs alleviated the alloimmune-mediated skin injury caused by transferring allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells more effectively than polyclonal Tregs. Our results demonstrated that the use of CAR technology is a clinically applicable refinement of Treg therapy for organ transplantation. © 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  3. INCREASING OF THE EXPRESSION OF RECOMBINANT scFv-ANTIBODIES EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Galkin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining single-chain variable fragments (scFv of recombinant antibodies in E. coli cells is often associated with numerous problems causing low yields or inactive conformation of the product. The aim of this work was to study the influence of staphylococcal protein A fragment fused with scFv antibodies (SpA-tag on the efficiency of expression of final product. Examination of scFv antibodies of different origin and specificity has shown that in similar expression systems fused scFv is synthesized in much higher quantities than free scFv. Furthermore, the scFv antibodies in fused form retained their antigen-binding properties and the SpA fragment the ability to bind other immunoglobulins. Thus, the proposed strategy can be considered effective in improving the efficiency of scFv-antibodies production in E. coli cells.

  4. Antibody expressing pea seeds as fodder for prevention of gastrointestinal parasitic infections in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macek Jeanette

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coccidiosis caused by protozoans of genus Eimeria is a chicken parasitic disease of great economical importance. Conventional disease control strategies depend on vaccination and prophylactic use of anticoccidial drugs. Alternative solution to prevent and treat coccidiosis could be provided by passive immunization using orally delivered neutralizing antibodies. We investigated the possibility to mitigate the parasitic infection by feeding poultry with antibody expressing transgenic crop seeds. Results Using the phage display antibody library, we generated a panel of anti-Eimeria scFv antibody fragments with high sporozoite-neutralizing activity. These antibodies were expressed either transiently in agrobacteria-infiltrated tobacco leaves or stably in seeds of transgenic pea plants. Comparison of the scFv antibodies purified either from tobacco leaves or from the pea seeds demonstrated no difference in their antigen-binding activity and molecular form compositions. Force-feeding experiments demonstrated that oral delivery of flour prepared from the transgenic pea seeds had higher parasite neutralizing activity in vivo than the purified antibody fragments isolated from tobacco. The pea seed content was found to protect antibodies against degradation by gastrointestinal proteases (>100-fold gain in stability. Ad libitum feeding of chickens demonstrated that the transgenic seeds were well consumed and not shunned. Furthermore, feeding poultry with shred prepared from the antibody expressing pea seeds led to significant mitigation of infection caused both by high and low challenge doses of Eimeria oocysts. Conclusion The results suggest that our strategy offers a general approach to control parasitic infections in production animals using cost-effective antibody expression in crop seeds affordable for the animal health market.

  5. Immunological circumvention of multiple organ metastases of multidrug resistant human small cell lung cancer cells by mouse-human chimeric anti-ganglioside GM2 antibody KM966.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanibuchi, M; Yano, S; Nishioka, Y; Yanagawa, H; Miki, T; Sone, S

    2000-01-01

    serum against SBC-3/DOX cells to a similar extent compared with parental SBC-3 cells. Pretreatment of human effector cells with various cytokines induced further enhancement of the KM966-dependent ADCC against SBC-3/DOX cells. Intravenous injection of SBC-3 or SBC-3/DOX cells into natural killer (NK) cell-depleted severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice developed metastases in multiple organs (liver, kidneys and lymph nodes). Interestingly, SBC-3/DOX cells produced metastases more rapidly than SBC-3 cells, suggesting more aggressive phenotype of SBC-3/DOX cells than their parental cells in vivo. Systemic treatment with KM966, given on days 2 and 7, drastically inhibited the formation of multiple-organ metastases produced by both SBC-3 and SBC-3/DOX cells, indicating that KM966 can eradicate metastasis by SCLC cells irrespective of MDR phenotype. These findings suggest that the mouse-human chimeric KM966 targets the GM2 antigen, and might be useful for the immunological circumvention of multiple-organ metastases of refractory SCLC.

  6. Expression of Rabies antibodies in tobacco and maize

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zungu, N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Rabies, an important disease in Asia and Africa, is an acute viral disease of the central nervous system that affects humans and other mammals. Upon bites or contact with rabid animals patients are immediately immunized with antibodies followed...

  7. Lentivirus display: stable expression of human antibodies on the surface of human cells and virus particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Taube

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Isolation of human antibodies using current display technologies can be limited by constraints on protein expression, folding and post-translational modifications. Here we describe a discovery platform that utilizes self-inactivating (SIN lentiviral vectors for the surface display of high-affinity single-chain variable region (scFv antibody fragments on human cells and lentivirus particles. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bivalent scFvFc human antibodies were fused in frame with different transmembrane (TM anchoring moieties to allow efficient high-level expression on human cells and the optimal TM was identified. The addition of an eight amino acid HIV-1 gp41 envelope incorporation motif further increased scFvFc expression on human cells and incorporation into lentiviral particles. Both antibody-displaying human cells and virus particles bound antigen specifically. Sulfation of CDR tyrosine residues, a property recently shown to broaden antibody binding affinity and antigen recognition was also demonstrated. High level scFvFc expression and stable integration was achieved in human cells following transduction with IRES containing bicistronic SIN lentivectors encoding ZsGreen when scFvFc fusion proteins were expressed from the first cassette. Up to 10(6-fold enrichment of antibody expressing cells was achieved with one round of antigen coupled magnetic bead pre-selection followed by FACS sorting. Finally, the scFvFc displaying human cells could be used directly in functional biological screens with remarkable sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This antibody display platform will complement existing technologies by virtue of providing properties unique to lentiviruses and antibody expression in human cells, which, in turn, may aid the discovery of novel therapeutic human mAbs.

  8. 77 FR 62520 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Anti-CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptors...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... Exclusive License: The Development of Anti- CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) for the Treatment of B... ``Anti-CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptors'' [HHS Ref. E-265-2011/0-US-01], and (b) U.S. Patent Application... CD22 on their cell surface using chimeric antigen receptors which contain the HA22 or BL22 antibody...

  9. [Prokaryotic expression and immunogenicity analysis of the chimeric HBcAg containing APP beta cleavage site peptide and Aβ(1-15);].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Gai-feng; Wang, Jun-yang; Jin, Hui; Wang, Wei-xi; Qian, Yi-hua; Yang, Wei-na; Wang, Quan-ying; Yang, Guang-xiao

    2011-11-01

    To construct the recombinant prokaryotic expression plasmid pET/c-ABCSP-Aβ(15-c);, and evaluate the immunogenicity of the fusion protein expressed in E.coli. The gene fragment HBc88-144 was amplified by PCR and subcloned to pUC19. The APP beta cleavage site peptide(ABCSP) and Aβ(1-15); gene(ABCSP-Aβ(15);) was amplified by PCR and inserted downstream of HBc1-71 in pGEMEX/c1-71. After restriction enzyme digestion, c1-17-ABCSP-Aβ(15); were connected with HBc88-144, yielding the recombinant gene c-ABCSP-Aβ(15-c);. c-ABCSP-Aβ(15-c); gene was subcloned into pET-28a(+).The fusion protein expressed in transformed E.coli BL21 was induced with IPTG and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The virus-like particles (VLP) formed by fusion protein was observed with Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). 4 Kunming (KM) mice received intraperitoneal injection (i.p) of fusion protein VLP. The antibody was detected by indirect ELISA. The recombinant gene was confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing. After IPTG induction, fusion protein was expressed and mainly existed in the sediment of the bacterial lysate. The expression level was 40% of all the proteins in the sediment. The fusion protein could form VLP. After 5 times of immunization, the titer of anti-ABCSP and anti-Aβantibody in sera of KM mice reached up to 1:5 000 and 1:10 000 respectively, while the anti-HBc antibody was undetectable. Recombinant c-ABCSP-Aβ(15-c); gene can be expressed in E.coli. The expressed protein could form VLP and has a strong immunogenicity. This study lays the foundation for the study of AD genetic engineering vaccine.

  10. Comprehensive Approach for Identifying the T Cell Subset Origin of CD3 and CD28 Antibody-Activated Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Modified T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmueck-Henneresse, Michael; Omer, Bilal; Shum, Thomas; Tashiro, Haruko; Mamonkin, Maksim; Lapteva, Natalia; Sharma, Sandhya; Rollins, Lisa; Dotti, Gianpietro; Reinke, Petra; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Rooney, Cliona M

    2017-07-01

    The outcome of therapy with chimeric Ag receptor (CAR)-modified T cells is strongly influenced by the subset origin of the infused T cells. However, because polyclonally activated T cells acquire a largely CD45RO + CCR7 - effector memory phenotype after expansion, regardless of subset origin, it is impossible to know which subsets contribute to the final T cell product. To determine the contribution of naive T cell, memory stem T cell, central memory T cell, effector memory T cell, and terminally differentiated effector T cell populations to the CD3 and CD28-activated CAR-modified T cells that we use for therapy, we followed the fate and function of individually sorted CAR-modified T cell subsets after activation with CD3 and CD28 Abs (CD3/28), transduction and culture alone, or after reconstitution into the relevant subset-depleted population. We show that all subsets are sensitive to CAR transduction, and each developed a distinct T cell functional profile during culture. Naive-derived T cells showed the greatest rate of proliferation but had more limited effector functions and reduced killing compared with memory-derived populations. When cultured in the presence of memory T cells, naive-derived T cells show increased differentiation, reduced effector cytokine production, and a reduced reproliferative response to CAR stimulation. CD3/28-activated T cells expanded in IL-7 and IL-15 produced greater expansion of memory stem T cells and central memory T cell-derived T cells compared with IL-2. Our strategy provides a powerful tool to elucidate the characteristics of CAR-modified T cells, regardless of the protocol used for expansion, reveals the functional properties of each expanded T cell subset, and paves the way for a more detailed evaluation of the effects of manufacturing changes on the subset contribution to in vitro-expanded T cells. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Ureaplasma antigenic variation beyond MBA phase variation: DNA inversions generating chimeric structures and switching in expression of the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Carl-Ulrich R; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-02-01

    Phase variation of the major ureaplasma surface membrane protein, the multiple-banded antigen (MBA), with its counterpart, the UU376 protein, was recently discussed as a result of DNA inversion occurring at specific inverted repeats. Two similar inverted repeats to the ones within the mba locus were found in the genome of Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3; one within the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172 and another in the adjacent intergenic spacer region. In this report, we demonstrate on both genomic and protein level that DNA inversion at these inverted repeats leads to alternating expression between UU172 and the neighbouring conserved hypothetical ORF UU171. Sequence analysis of this phase-variable 'UU172 element' from both U. parvum and U. urealyticum strains revealed that it is highly conserved among both species and that it also includes the orthologue of UU144. A third inverted repeat region in UU144 is proposed to serve as an additional potential inversion site from which chimeric genes can evolve. Our results indicate that site-specific recombination events in the genome of U. parvum serovar 3 are dynamic and frequent, leading to a broad spectrum of antigenic variation by which the organism may evade host immune responses. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Ureaplasma antigenic variation beyond MBA phase variation: DNA inversions generating chimeric structures and switching in expression of the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Carl-Ulrich R; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Phase variation of the major ureaplasma surface membrane protein, the multiple-banded antigen (MBA), with its counterpart, the UU376 protein, was recently discussed as a result of DNA inversion occurring at specific inverted repeats. Two similar inverted repeats to the ones within the mba locus were found in the genome of Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3; one within the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172 and another in the adjacent intergenic spacer region. In this report, we demonstrate on both genomic and protein level that DNA inversion at these inverted repeats leads to alternating expression between UU172 and the neighbouring conserved hypothetical ORF UU171. Sequence analysis of this phase-variable ‘UU172 element’ from both U. parvum and U. urealyticum strains revealed that it is highly conserved among both species and that it also includes the orthologue of UU144. A third inverted repeat region in UU144 is proposed to serve as an additional potential inversion site from which chimeric genes can evolve. Our results indicate that site-specific recombination events in the genome of U. parvum serovar 3 are dynamic and frequent, leading to a broad spectrum of antigenic variation by which the organism may evade host immune responses. PMID:21255110

  13. Human placenta: relative content of antibodies of different classes and subclasses (IgG1-IgG4) containing lambda- and kappa-light chains and chimeric lambda-kappa-immunoglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekchnov, Evgenii A; Sedykh, Sergey E; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2015-06-01

    The specific organ placenta is much more than a filter: it is an organ that protects, feeds and regulates the growth of the embryo. Affinity chromatography, ELISA, SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry were used. Using 10 intact human placentas deprived of blood, a quantitative analysis of average relative content [% of total immunoglobulins (Igs)] was carried out for the first time: (92.7), IgA (2.4), IgM (2.5), kappa-antibodies (51.4), lambda-antibodies (48.6), IgG1 (47.0), IgG2 (39.5), IgG3 (8.8) and IgG4 (4.3). It was shown for the first time that placenta contains sIgA (2.5%). In the classic paradigm, Igs represent products of clonal B-cell populations, each producing antibodies recognizing a single antigen. There is a common belief that IgGs in mammalian biological fluids are monovalent molecules having stable structures and two identical antigen-binding sites. However, similarly to human milk Igs, placenta antibodies undergo extensive half-molecule exchange and the IgG pool consists of 43.5 ± 15.0% kappa-kappa-IgGs and 41.6 ± 17.0% lambda-lambda-IgGs, while 15.0 ± 4.0% of the IgGs contained both kappa- and lambda-light chains. Kappa-kappa-IgGs and lambda-lambda-IgGs contained, respectively (%): IgG1 (47.7 and 34.4), IgG2 (36.3 and 44.5), IgG3 (7.4 and 11.8) and IgG4 (7.5 and 9.1), while chimeric kappa-lambda-IgGs consisted of (%): 43.5 IgG1, 41.0 IgG2, 5.6 IgG3 and 7.9 IgG4. Our data are indicative of the possibility of half-molecule exchange between placenta IgGs of various subclasses, raised against different antigens, which explains a very well-known polyspecificity and cross-reactivity of different human IgGs. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Expression and production of llama variable heavy-chain antibody fragments (VHHs) by Aspergillus awamori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, V.; Gouka, R.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Verrips, C.T.; Lokman, B.C.

    2005-01-01

    We report the expression and production of llama variable heavy-chain antibody fragments (VHHs) by Aspergillus awamori. Fragments encoding VHHs were cloned in a suitable Aspergillus expression vector and transformants secreting VHH fragments were analysed for integrated gene copy-numbers, mRNA

  15. Ex-vivo expanded human NK cells express activating receptors that mediate cytotoxicity of allogeneic and autologous cancer cell lines by direct recognition and antibody directed cellular cytotoxicity

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    Campana Dario

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The possibility that autologous NK cells could serve as an effective treatment modality for solid tumors has long been considered. However, implementation is hampered by (i the small number of NK cells in peripheral blood, (ii the difficulties associated with large-scale production of GMP compliant cytolytic NK cells, (iii the need to activate the NK cells in order to induce NK cell mediated killing and (iv the constraints imposed by autologous inhibitory receptor-ligand interactions. To address these issues, we determined (i if large numbers of NK cells could be expanded from PBMC and GMP compliant cell fractions derived by elutriation, (ii their ability to kill allogeneic and autologous tumor targets by direct cytotoxitiy and by antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity and (iii defined NK cell specific receptor-ligand interactions that mediate tumor target cell killing. Methods Human NK cells were expanded during 14 days. Expansion efficiency, NK receptor repertoire before and after expansion, expression of NK specific ligands, cytolytic activity against allogeneic and autologous tumor targets, with and without the addition of chimeric EGFR monoclonal antibody, were investigated. Results Cell expansion shifted the NK cell receptor repertoire towards activation and resulted in cytotoxicity against various allogeneic tumor cell lines and autologous gastric cancer cells, while sparing normal PBMC. Blocking studies confirmed that autologous cytotoxicity is established through multiple activating receptor-ligand interactions. Importantly, expanded NK cells also mediated ADCC in an autologous and allogeneic setting by antibodies that are currently being used to treat patients with select solid tumors. Conclusion These data demonstrate that large numbers of cytolytic NK cells can be generated from PBMC and lymphocyte-enriched fractions obtained by GMP compliant counter current elutriation from PBMC, establishing the preclinical

  16. Suicide Gene Therapy to Increase the Safety of Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Casucci, Attilio Bondanza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding motif of a monoclonal antibody (mAb with the signal transduction machinery of the T-cell receptor (TCR. The genetic modification of T lymphocytes with chimeric receptors specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs allows for the redirection towards tumor cells. Clinical experience with CAR-redirected T cells suggests that antitumor efficacy associates with some degree of toxicity, especially when TAA expression is shared with healthy tissues. This situation closely resembles the case of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, wherein allorecognition causes both the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL effect and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Suicide gene therapy, i.e. the genetic induction of a conditional suicide phenotype into donor T cells, enables dissociating the GVL effect from GVHD. Applying suicide gene modification to CAR-redirected T cells may therefore greatly increase their safety profile and facilitate their clinical development.

  17. Expression, purification and characterization of the recombinant chimeric IgE Fc-fragment opossum-human-opossum (OSO), an active immunotherapeutic vaccine component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingze; Lundgren, Mats; Magnusson, Ann-Christine; Fuentes, Alexis

    2010-11-01

    The active vaccine component recombinant chimeric IgE Fc-fragment opossum-human-opossum (OSO) has been expressed in CHO-K1 cells. It contains two identical polypeptide chains with 338 amino acid residues in each chain connected by two disulfide bridges. The cell lines were adapted to suspension culture in a serum-free medium. An expression level of 60 mg/L was obtained after 8 days in a shaking flask at a temperature of 31.5 degrees C. The OSO protein has been purified to homogeneity by a combination of three chromatographic steps. Virus inactivation and reduction by solvent detergent treatment and nano-filtration were included in the process. The residual host cell protein content was less than 50 ng/mg OSO as analyzed by ELISA. Purity was analyzed by SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions and was estimated by densitometry to be above 99.0%. The dimer content was less than 0.1% as estimated by analytical size exclusion chromatography. The molecular mass, as estimated by SDS-PAGE, is 90 kDa. A value of around 74 kDa was calculated from its amino acid composition. This indicates that the protein is heavily glycosylated containing around 18% carbohydrate. Isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gel disclosed a ladder type band pattern with pI values in the pH-range 7.0-8.3, indicating a variation in the sialic acid content. The OSO protein is not stable at temperatures above 40 degrees C and at pH values below 4 indicating that virus inactivation by incubating the protein solution at higher temperature or at lower pH is not possible. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Function-blocking antibodies to human vascular adhesion protein-1: a potential anti-inflammatory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirton, Christopher M; Laukkanen, Marja-Leena; Nieminen, Antti; Merinen, Marika; Stolen, Craig M; Armour, Kathryn; Smith, David J; Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Clark, Michael R

    2005-11-01

    Human vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a homodimeric 170-kDa sialoglycoprotein that is expressed on the surface of endothelial cells and functions as a semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase and as an adhesion molecule. Blockade of VAP-1 has been shown to reduce leukocyte adhesion and transmigration in in vivo and in vitro models, suggesting that VAP-1 is a potential target for anti-inflammatory therapy. In this study we have constructed mouse-human chimeric antibodies by genetic engineering in order to circumvent the potential problems involved in using murine antibodies in man. Our chimeric anti-VAP-1 antibodies, which were designed to lack Fc-dependent effector functions, bound specifically to cell surface-expressed recombinant human VAP-1 and recognized VAP-1 in different cell types in tonsil. Furthermore, the chimeric antibodies prevented leukocyte adhesion and transmigration in vitro and in vivo. Hence, these chimeric antibodies have the potential to be used as a new anti-inflammatory therapy.

  19. In vitro characterization of {sup 177}Lu-radiolabelled chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and a preliminary dosimetry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrer, Flavio; Mueller-Brand, Jan [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Chen, Jianhua; Fani, Melpomeni; Powell, Pia; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Basel (Switzerland); Lohri, Andreas [Basel University Medical Clinic, Liestal (Switzerland); Moldenhauer, Gerhard [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Molecular Immunology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    {sup 131}I- and {sup 90}Y-labelled anti-CD20 antibodies have been shown to be effective in the treatment of low-grade, B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). However, the most appropriate radionuclide in terms of high efficiency and low toxicity has not yet been established. In this study we evaluated an immunoconjugate formed by the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab and the chelator DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid). DOTA-rituximab was prepared as a kit formulation and can be labelled in a short time (<20 min) with either {sup 177}Lu or {sup 90}Y. Immunoconjugates with different numbers of DOTA molecules per rituximab were prepared using p-SCN-Bz-DOTA. In vitro immunoreactivity and stability were tested and preliminary dosimetric results were acquired in two patients. The immunological binding properties of DOTA-rituximab to the CD20 antigen were found to be retained after conjugation with up to four chelators. The labelled product was stable against a 10{sup 5} times excess of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA, 37 C, 7 days). Two patients with relapsed NHL were treated with 740 MBq/m{sup 2} body surface {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-rituximab. Scintigraphic images showed specific uptake at tumour sites and acceptable dosimetric results. The mean whole-body dose was found to be 314 mGy. The administration of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-rituximab was tolerated well. Our results show that DOTA-rituximab (4:1) can be labelled with {sup 177}Lu with sufficient stability while the immunoconjugate retains its immunoreactivity. {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-rituximab is an interesting, well-tolerated radiolabelled antibody with clinical activity in a low dose range, and provides an approach to the efficient treatment with few side effects for patients with relapsed NHL. (orig.)

  20. Isolation and expression of recombinant antibody fragments to the biological warfare pathogen Brucella melitensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayhurst, Andrew; Happe, Scott; Mabry, Robert; Koch, Zephyr; Iverson, Brent L; Georgiou, George

    2003-05-01

    Brucella melitensis is a highly infectious animal pathogen able to cause a recurring debilitating disease in humans and is therefore high on the list of biological warfare agents. Immunoglobulin genes from mice immunized with gamma-irradiated B. melitensis strain 16M were used to construct a library that was screened by phage display against similarly prepared bacteria. The selected phage particles afforded a strong enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) signal against gamma-irradiated B. melitensis cells. However, extensive efforts to express the respective single chain antibody variable region fragment (scFv) in soluble form failed due to: (i) poor solubility and (ii) in vivo degradation of the c-myc tag used for the detection of the recombinant antibodies. Both problems could be addressed by: (i) fusing a human kappa light chain constant domain (Ck) chain to the scFv to generate single chain antibody fragment (scAb) antibody fragments and (ii) by co-expression of the periplasmic chaperone Skp. While soluble, functional antibodies could be produced in this manner, phage-displaying scFvs or scAbs were still found to be superior ELISA reagents for immunoassays, due to the large signal amplification afforded by anti-phage antibodies. The isolated phage antibodies were shown to be highly specific to B. melitensis and did not recognize Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in contrast to the existing diagnostic monoclonal YST 9.2.1.

  1. Expression of human mag-1 gene in E. coli and preparation of its antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Huiyun; Xu Yuanji; Wang Yan; Chen Huihua; Du Zhiyan; Tan Xiaogang; Lu Yinglin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To further investigate the new metastasis associated gene, mag-1 expressed in E. coli and its anti-body was prepared in rabbit. Methods: mag-1 was amplified by PCR from pcDNA3-mag-1 and directly cloned into pET-28a vector. The fusion protein was expressed in BL21 and identified by Western blot using anti-His monoclonal antibody. Rabbit was immunized with partially purified fusion protein subcutaneously. Results: Sequence analysis revealed identity of the sequence obtained to the previous report. The recombinant His-mag-1 could be expressed in E. coli as a fusion protein of 18 x 10 3 . The recombinant protein was mostly expressed in the inclusion bodies on the induction by 0.1 mmol/L IPTG at 37 degree C for 6 hours. Western blot analysis showed that the recombinant protein could be recognized by His monoclonal anti-body. The titer of polyclonal antibody against mag-1 was 1:160000. Conclusion: The mag-1 gene is expressed in E. coli highly and its antibody is prepared successfully. (authors)

  2. [Prokaryotic expression of Nanog gene and preparation of anti-Nanog antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Wang, Xiao-min; Dou, Zhong-ying; Li, Yong

    2012-07-01

    To express Nanog fusion protein in Escherichia coli ( E.coli), and to prepare rabbit anti-mouse polyclonal antibodies to the Nanog fusion protein. Mouse Nanog gene was amplified from the pNA992 recombinant plasmid and inserted into pET-32a vector to construct a recombinant expression vector pET-32a-Nanog. The recombinant vector was transfected into E.coli BL21 and induced by IPTG to express in them. The acquired Nanog fusion protein was purified with HisTrap affinity column and injected as an antigen into rabbits for preparing polyclonal antibodies. At last, the titer and specificity of the polyclonal antibodies were analyzed with indirect ELISA, Western blotting and immunocytochemical staining, respectively. The recombinant expression vector pET-32a-Nanog was successfully prepared, transfected and induced to obtain the high expression of the Nanog fusion protein in a form of inclusion bodies in E.coli. After purification, its purity was up to 97%. The titer of anti-Nanog antibodies was 1:32 000 in the immunized rabbit serum, and exhibited a high specificity to Nanog protein. The rabbit anti-mouse polyclonal antibodies have been prepared successfully with a high titer and specificity to the Nanog fusion protein.

  3. Simultaneous silencing of multiple genes in the apple scab fungus, Venturia inaequalis, by expression of RNA with chimeric inverted repeats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fitzgerald, A.; Kan, van J.A.L.; Plummer, K.M.

    2004-01-01

    RNA-mediated gene silencing has been demonstrated in plants, animals, and more recently in filamentous fungi. Here, we report high frequency, RNA-mediated gene silencing in the apple scab fungus, Venturia inaequalis. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene was silenced in a GFP-expressing

  4. Dissociation between peripheral blood chimerism and tolerance to hindlimb composite tissue transplants: preferential localization of chimerism in donor bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahhal, Dina N; Xu, Hong; Huang, Wei-Chao; Wu, Shengli; Wen, Yujie; Huang, Yiming; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2009-09-27

    Mixed chimerism induces donor-specific tolerance to composite tissue allotransplants (CTAs). In the present studies, we used a nonmyeloablative conditioning approach to establish chimerism and promote CTA acceptance. Wistar Furth (RT1A(u)) rats were conditioned with 600 to 300 cGy total body irradiation (TBI, day-1), and 100 x 10(6) T-cell-depleted ACI (RT1A(abl)) bone marrow cells were transplanted on day 0, followed by a 11-day course of tacrolimus and one dose of antilymphocyte serum (day 10). Heterotopic osteomyocutaneous flap transplantation was performed 4 to 6 weeks after bone marrow transplantation. Mixed chimerism was initially achieved in almost all recipients, but long-term acceptance of CTA was only achieved in rats treated with 600 cGy TBI. When anti-alphabeta-T-cell receptor (TCR) monoclonal antibody (mAb) (day-3) was added into the regimens, donor chimerism was similar to recipients preconditioned without anti-alphabeta-TCR mAb. However, the long-term CTA survival was significantly improved in chimeras receiving more than or equal to 300 cGy TBI plus anti-alphabeta-TCR mAb. Higher levels of donor chimerism were associated with CTA acceptance. The majority of flap acceptors lost peripheral blood chimerism within 6 months. However, donor chimerism persisted in the transplanted bone at significantly higher levels compared with other hematopoietic compartments. The compartment donor chimerism may be responsible for the maintenance of tolerance to CTA. Long-term acceptors were tolerant to a donor skin graft challenge even in the absence of peripheral blood chimerism. Mixed chimerism established by nonmyeloablative conditioning induces long-term acceptance of CTA, which is associated with persistent chimerism preferentially in the transplanted donor bone.

  5. A plasmid toolkit for cloning chimeric cDNAs encoding customized fusion proteins into any Gateway destination expression vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Valuable clone collections encoding the complete ORFeomes for some model organisms have been constructed following the completion of their genome sequencing projects. These libraries are based on Gateway cloning technology, which facilitates the study of protein function by simplifying the subcloning of open reading frames (ORF) into any suitable destination vector. The expression of proteins of interest as fusions with functional modules is a frequent approach in their initial functional characterization. A limited number of Gateway destination expression vectors allow the construction of fusion proteins from ORFeome-derived sequences, but they are restricted to the possibilities offered by their inbuilt functional modules and their pre-defined model organism-specificity. Thus, the availability of cloning systems that overcome these limitations would be highly advantageous. Results We present a versatile cloning toolkit for constructing fully-customizable three-part fusion proteins based on the MultiSite Gateway cloning system. The fusion protein components are encoded in the three plasmids integral to the kit. These can recombine with any purposely-engineered destination vector that uses a heterologous promoter external to the Gateway cassette, leading to the in-frame cloning of an ORF of interest flanked by two functional modules. In contrast to previous systems, a third part becomes available for peptide-encoding as it no longer needs to contain a promoter, resulting in an increased number of possible fusion combinations. We have constructed the kit’s component plasmids and demonstrate its functionality by providing proof-of-principle data on the expression of prototype fluorescent fusions in transiently-transfected cells. Conclusions We have developed a toolkit for creating fusion proteins with customized N- and C-term modules from Gateway entry clones encoding ORFs of interest. Importantly, our method allows entry clones obtained from ORFeome

  6. Enhancing production and cytotoxic activity of polymeric soluble FasL-based chimeric proteins by concomitant expression of soluble FasL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Morello

    Full Text Available Membrane FasL is the natural trigger of Fas-mediated apoptosis. A soluble homotrimeric counterpart (sFasL also exists which is very weakly active, and needs oligomerization beyond its trimeric state to induce apoptosis. We recently generated a soluble FasL chimera by fusing the immunoglobulin-like domain of the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor gp190 to the extracellular region of human FasL, which enabled spontaneous dodecameric homotypic polymerization of FasL. This polymeric soluble human FasL (pFasL displayed anti-tumoral activity in vitro and in vivo without systemic cytotoxicity in mouse. In the present work, we focused on the improvement of pFasL, with two complementary objectives. First, we developed more complex pFasL-based chimeras that contained a cell-targeting module. Secondly, we attempted to improve the production and/or the specific activity of pFasL and of the cell-targeting chimeras. We designed two chimeras by fusing to pFasL the extracellular portions of the HLA-A2 molecule or of a human gamma-delta TCR, and analyzed the consequences of co-expressing these molecules or pFasL together with sFasL on their heterotopic cell production. This strategy significantly enhanced the production of pFasL and of the two chimeras, as well as the cytotoxic activity of the two chimeras but not of pFasL. These results provide the proof of concept for an optimization of FasL-based chimeric proteins for a therapeutic use.

  7. Lentiviral Gag assembly analyzed through the functional characterization of chimeric simian immunodeficiency viruses expressing different domains of the feline immunodeficiency virus capsid protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María J Esteva

    Full Text Available To gain insight into the functional relationship between the capsid (CA domains of the Gag polyproteins of simian and feline immunodeficiency viruses (SIV and FIV, respectively, we constructed chimeric SIVs in which the CA-coding region was partially or totally replaced by the equivalent region of the FIV CA. The phenotypic characterization of the chimeras allowed us to group them into three categories: the chimeric viruses that, while being assembly-competent, exhibit a virion-associated unstable FIV CA; a second group represented only by the chimeric SIV carrying the N-terminal domain (NTD of the FIV CA which proved to be assembly-defective; and a third group constituted by the chimeric viruses that produce virions exhibiting a mature and stable FIV CA protein, and which incorporate the envelope glycoprotein and contain wild-type levels of viral genome RNA and reverse transcriptase. Further analysis of the latter group of chimeric SIVs demonstrated that they are non-infectious due to a post-entry impairment, such as uncoating of the viral core, reverse transcription or nuclear import of the preintegration complex. Furthermore, we show here that the carboxyl-terminus domain (CTD of the FIV CA has an intrinsic ability to dimerize in vitro and form high-molecular-weight oligomers, which, together with our finding that the FIV CA-CTD is sufficient to confer assembly competence to the resulting chimeric SIV Gag polyprotein, provides evidence that the CA-CTD exhibits more functional plasticity than the CA-NTD. Taken together, our results provide relevant information on the biological relationship between the CA proteins of primate and nonprimate lentiviruses.

  8. High-level expression, purification, polyclonal antibody preparation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OprD is a specific porin which can binds imipenem and carbapenems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. OprD loss plays a central role in mediating carbapenem resistance. Therefore, purification of oprD protein lays a pavement for the study in vivo and in vitro. In our study, the oprD gene was cloned into pQE30 expression ...

  9. Caveolin-1 Expression in Thyroid Neoplasia Spectrum: Comparison of Two Commercial Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Janković

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated caveolin-1 expression in the human thyroid neoplasia spectrum with the aim of examining differences in expression as detected by two anti-caveolin-1 antibodies, and secondly, to investigate the association of caveolin-1 expression levels with aggressive papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC. Immunohistochemical staining using sc894 or AV09019 antibodies revealed that caveolin-1 was generally overexpressed in the PTC group as a whole (classical and follicular variant when compared to peritumoral tissue (PT, while it was not detected in about half of follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC and majority of follicular adenomas (FTA. Caveolin-1 expression decreased in the following order: clPTC, fvPTC, FTC, PT and FTA. The diagnostic accuracy of AV09019 was better than that of sc894 for discriminating: FTA from FTC, FTA or FTC from the follicular variant of PTC, total PTC from nonmalignant tissue, and malignant tumors from nonmalignant tissue. Spearman's analysis revealed positive correlations of caveolin-1 expression and extrathyroidal invasion (p < 0.05 in PTC for both antibodies. Additionally, AV09019 antibody correlated caveolin-1 upregulation with pathological T status.

  10. Expression of recombinant multi-coloured fluorescent antibodies in gor -/trxB- E. coli cytoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markiv Anatoliy

    2011-11-01

    trafficking studies. Assembling the single chain antibody with monomeric fluorescent protein linker facilitates optimal variable domain pairing and alters the isoelectric point of the recombinant 4D5-8 protein conferring solubility at physiological pH 7.4. The efficient intracellular expression of these functional molecules opens up the possibility of developing an alternative approach for tagging intracellular targets with fluorescent proteins for a range of molecular cell biology imaging studies.

  11. Fab is the most efficient format to express functional antibodies by yeast surface display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivelle, Coline; Sierocki, Raphaël; Ferreira-Pinto, Kelly; Simon, Stéphanie; Maillere, Bernard; Nozach, Hervé

    2018-04-30

    Multiple formats are available for engineering of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) by yeast surface display, but they do not all lead to efficient expression of functional molecules. We therefore expressed four anti-tumor necrosis factor and two anti-IpaD mAbs as single-chain variable fragment (scFv), antigen-binding fragment (Fab) or single-chain Fabs and compared their expression levels and antigen-binding efficiency. Although the scFv and scFab formats are widely used in the literature, 2 of 6 antibodies were either not or weakly expressed. In contrast, all 6 antibodies expressed as Fab revealed strong binding and high affinity, comparable to that of the soluble form. We also demonstrated that the variations in expression did not affect Fab functionality and were due to variations in light chain display and not to misfolded dimers. Our results suggest that Fab is the most versatile format for the engineering of mAbs.

  12. Extracellular Expression in Aspergillus niger of an Antibody Fused to Leishmania sp. Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña-Ortíz, Denis; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2018-01-01

    Nucleoside hydrolase and sterol 24-c-methyltransferase, two antigenic proteins of Leishmania sp., were expressed in Aspergillus niger. Genetic transformation of conidia was achieved using underwater shock waves. scFv antibody addressed to DEC205, a receptor of dendritic cells, was fused to two proteins of Leishmania sp. Receptor 205 has a relevant role in the immune system in mammals; it can modulate T cell response to different antigens. Extracellular expression strategy of recombinant antibody was achieved using a fragment of native glucoamylase A (514 aa) as a carrier. Fermentations in shake flasks showed that the recombinant protein (104 kDa) was expressed and secreted only when maltose was used as carbon source; on the contrary, the expression was highly repressed in presence of xylose. Noteworthy, recombinant protein was secreted without glucoamylase-carrier and accumulation at intracellular level was not observed. The results presented here demonstrate the high value of Aspergillus niger as biotechnological platform for recombinant antibodies against Leishmania sp. at low cost. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report about the recombinant expression of antigenic proteins of Leishmania sp. in filamentous fungi. The protein obtained can be used to explore novel strategies to induce immunity against Leishmania sp. or it can be employed in diagnostic kits to detect this neglected disease.

  13. Production of Polyclonal Antibody against Grapevine fanleaf virus Movement Protein Expressed in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoud Koolivand

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The genomic region of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV encoding the movement protein (MP was cloned into pET21a and transformed into Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3 to express the protein. Induction was made with a wide range of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG concentrations (1, 1.5, and 2 mM each for duration of 4, 6, or 16 h. However, the highest expression level was achieved with 1 mM IPTG for 4 h. Identity of the expressed protein was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE followed by Western blotting. The expressed 41 kDa protein was purified under denaturing condition by affinity chromatography, reconfirmed by Western blotting and plate-trapped antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PTA-ELISA before being used as a recombinant antigen to raise polyclonal antibodies in rabbits. Purified anti-GFLV MP immunoglobulines (IgGs and conjugated IgGs detected the expressed MP and GFLV virions in infected grapevines when used in PTA-ELISA, double antibody sandwich-ELISA, and Western blotting. This is the first report on the production of anti-GFLV MP polyclonal antibodies and application for the virus detection.

  14. Upregulation of HLA Class I Expression on Tumor Cells by the Anti-EGFR Antibody Nimotuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Garrido

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Defining how epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeting therapies influence the immune response is essential to increase their clinical efficacy. A growing emphasis is being placed on immune regulator genes that govern tumor – T cell interactions. Previous studies showed an increase in HLA class I cell surface expression in tumor cell lines treated with anti-EGFR agents. In particular, earlier studies of the anti-EGFR blocking antibody cetuximab, have suggested that increased tumor expression of HLA class I is associated with positive clinical response. We investigated the effect of another commercially available anti-EGFR antibody nimotuzumab on HLA class I expression in tumor cell lines. We observed, for the first time, that nimotuzumab increases HLA class I expression and its effect is associated with a coordinated increase in mRNA levels of the principal antigen processing and presentation components. Moreover, using 7A7 (a specific surrogate antibody against murine EGFR, we obtained results suggesting the importance of the increased MHC-I expression induced by EGFR-targeted therapies display higher in antitumor immune response. 7A7 therapy induced upregulation of tumor MHC-I expression in vivo and tumors treated with this antibody display higher susceptibility to CD8+ T cells-mediated lysis. Our results represent the first evidence suggesting the importance of the adaptive immunity in nimotuzumab-mediated antitumor activity. More experiments should be conducted in order to elucidate the relevance of this mechanism in cancer patients. This novel immune-related antitumor mechanism mediated by nimotuzumab opens new perspectives for its combination with various immunotherapeutic agents and cancer vaccines.

  15. Production and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies against RAI3 and its expression in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jörißen, Hannah; Klockenbring, Torsten; Bektas, Nuran; Dahl, Edgar; Hartmann, Arndt; Haaf, Anette ten; Di Fiore, Stefano; Kiefer, Hans; Thess, Andreas; Barth, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    RAI3 is an orphan G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that has been associated with malignancy and may play a role in the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Although its exact function in normal and malignant cells remains unclear and evidence supporting its role in oncogenesis is controversial, its abundant expression on the surface of cancer cells would make it an interesting target for the development of antibody-based therapeutics. To investigate the link with cancer and provide more evidence for its role, we carried out a systematic analysis of RAI3 expression in a large set of human breast cancer specimens. We expressed recombinant human RAI3 in bacteria and reconstituted the purified protein in liposomes to raise monoclonal antibodies using classical hybridoma techniques. The specific binding activity of the antibodies was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), western blot and immunocytochemistry. We carried out a systematic immunohistochemical analysis of RAI3 expression in human invasive breast carcinomas (n = 147) and normal breast tissues (n = 44) using a tissue microarray. In addition, a cDNA dot blot hybridisation assay was used to investigate a set of matched normal and cancerous breast tissue specimens (n = 50) as well as lymph node metastases (n = 3) for RAI3 mRNA expression. The anti-RAI3 monoclonal antibodies bound to recombinant human RAI3 protein with high specificity and affinity, as shown by ELISA, western blot and ICC. The cDNA dot blot and immunohistochemical experiments showed that both RAI3 mRNA and RAI3 protein were abundantly expressed in human breast carcinoma. However, there was no association between RAI3 protein expression and prognosis based on overall and recurrence-free survival. We have generated a novel, highly-specific monoclonal antibody that detects RAI3 in formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. This is the first study to report a systematic analysis of RAI3 expression in normal and cancerous human

  16. Efficient production of Trastuzumab Fab antibody fragments in Brevibacillus choshinensis expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Makoto; Onishi, Hiromasa; Hanagata, Hiroshi; Miyauchi, Akira; Ito, Yuji; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2018-10-01

    The Brevibacillus expression system has been successfully employed for the efficient productions of a variety of recombinant proteins, including enzymes, cytokines, antigens and antibody fragments. Here, we succeeded in secretory expression of Trastuzumab Fab antibody fragments using B. choshinensis/BIC (Brevibacillus in vivocloning) expression system. In the fed-batch high-density cell culture, recombinant Trastuzumab Fab with amino-terminal His-tag (His-BcFab) was secreted at high level, 1.25 g/liter, and Fab without His-tag (BcFab) at ∼145 mg/L of culture supernatant. His-BcFab and BcFab were purified to homogeneity using combination of conventional column chromatographies with a yield of 10-13%. This BcFab preparation exhibited native structure and functions evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, surface plasmon resonance, circular dichroism measurements and size exclusion chromatography. To our knowledge, this is the highest production of Fab antibody fragments in gram-positive bacterial expression/secretion systems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical significance of changes of expression of anti-dsDNA antibody in serum in patients with SLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xingguo; Zhang Xiaoli; Liu Chunyan; Cao Jiwei; Du Tongxing; Wang Zizheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the significance of anti-dsDNA antibody in diagnosis and treatment of SLE through measurement of changes of serum anti-dsDNA antibody expression in patients with SLE. Methods: Serum anti-dsDNA antibody was detected with radioisotope method in 60 patients with SLE and 33 controls (consisted of patients with other collagen diseases including Sjogren syndrome, systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, polymyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, ankylosing spondylitis). Clinical manifestation and laboratory findings in the SLE patients were studied in detail. Results: (1) Serum anti-dsDNA antibody was positive in 39 of the 60 SLE patients with only two false positive cases in the 33 controls: a sensitivity of 65% and specificity of 93. 3%. (2) In SLE patients, positivity of anti-dsDNA antibody was not correlated with positivity of anti-Sm antibody (P>0.05), but was correlated with positivity of anti-SSA antibody (P<0.05). (3) Incidences of alopecia, skin rashes, oral mucosal ulcer, proteinuria were significantly higher in SLE patients with positive anti-dsDNA antibody than those in SLE patients with negative anti-dsDNA antibody (P<0.05). (4) Incidences of leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were also significantly higher in SLE patients with positive anti-dsDNA antibody (P<0.05). Conclusion: Anti-dsDNA antibody could be taken as a specific marker of SLE and the serum expression were positively correlated with the activity and severity of the disease. (authors)

  18. Chimeric Pestivirus Experimental Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Ilona; Blome, Sandra; Beer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric pestiviruses have shown great potential as marker vaccine candidates against pestiviral infections. Exemplarily, we describe here the construction and testing of the most promising classical swine fever vaccine candidate "CP7_E2alf" in detail. The description is focused on classical cloning technologies in combination with reverse genetics.

  19. Generation of Gene-Engineered Chimeric DNA Molecules for Specific Therapy of Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesheva, Vera; Szekeres, Zsuzsanna; Mihaylova, Nikolina; Dimitrova, Iliyana; Nikolova, Maria; Erdei, Anna; Prechl, Jozsef

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the development of self-reactive B and T cells and autoantibody production. In particular, double-stranded DNA-specific B cells play an important role in lupus progression, and their selective elimination is a reasonable approach for effective therapy of SLE. DNA-based vaccines aim at the induction of immune response against the vector-encoded antigen. Here, we are exploring, as a new DNA-based therapy of SLE, a chimeric DNA molecule encoding a DNA-mimotope peptide, and the Fv but not the immunogenic Fc fragment of an FcγRIIb-specific monoclonal antibody. This DNA construct was inserted in the expression vector pNut and used as a naked DNA vaccine in a mouse model of lupus. The chimeric DNA molecule can be expressed in eukaryotic cells and cross-links cell surface receptors on DNA-specific B cells, delivering an inhibitory intracellular signal. Intramuscular administration of the recombinant DNA molecule to lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice prevented increase in IgG anti-DNA antibodies and was associated with a low degree of proteinuria, modulation of cytokine profile, and suppression of lupus nephritis. PMID:23075110

  20. 78 FR 13691 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of m971 and m972 Chimeric Antigen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... Exclusive License: The Development of m971 and m972 Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) for the Treatment of B... ``M971 Chimeric Antigen Receptors'' [HHS Ref. E-291-2012/0-US-01], and (b) U.S. Patent Application 61/042... malignancies that express CD22 on their cell surface using chimeric antigen receptors which contain the m971 or...

  1. Expression of cytokeratins in odontogenic jaw cysts: monoclonal antibodies reveal distinct variation between different cyst types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormia, M; Ylipaavalniemi, P; Nagle, R B; Virtanen, I

    1987-08-01

    Immunostaining with monoclonal antibodies was used to study and compare the cytokeratin content of odontogenic cysts and normal gingival epithelium. Two monoclonal antibodies, PKK2 and KA1, stained the whole epithelium in all cyst samples. In gingiva, PKK2 gave a suprabasal staining and KA1 reacted with all epithelial cell layers. Antibodies PKK1, KM 4.62 and KS 8.12 gave a heterogeneous staining in follicular and radicular cysts. In keratocysts and in gingiva PKK1 and KM 4.62 reacted mainly with basal cells and KS 8.12 gave a suprabasal staining. Antibodies reacting with the simple epithelial cytokeratin polypeptide No. 18 (PKK3, KS 18.18) recognized in gingiva only solitary cells compatible with Merkel cells. In a case of follicular ameloblastoma a distinct staining of tumor epithelium was revealed with these antibodies. In 2 follicular cysts, but not in other cyst types, a layer of cytokeratin 18-positive cells was revealed. KA5 and KK 8.60 antibodies, reacting exclusively with keratinizing epithelia, including normal gingiva, gave no reaction in radicular cysts, keratocysts and ameloblastoma. Two of the follicular cysts, were negative for PKK3 and KS 18.18, but reacted strongly with KA5 and KK 8.60. The present results show that odontogenic jaw cysts have distinct differences in their cytokeratin content. With the exception of some follicular cysts, they lack signs of keratinizing epithelial differentiation. Only follicular cysts appear to share with some types of ameloblastoma the expression of cytokeratin polypeptide No. 18.

  2. A chimeric receptor of the insulin-like growth factor receptor type 1 (IGFR1) and a single chain antibody specific to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein activates the IGF1R signalling cascade in CG4 oligodendrocyte progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annenkov, A.; Rigby, A.; Amor, S.; Zhou, D.M.; Yousaf, N.; Hemmer, B.; Chernajovsky, Y.

    2011-01-01

    In order to generate neural stem cells with increased ability to survive after transplantation in brain parenchyma we developed a chimeric receptor (ChR) that binds to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) via its ectodomain and activates the insulin-like growth factor receptor type 1 (IGF1R)

  3. HYDROXYCHLOROQUINE REDUCES BINDING OF ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODIES TO SYNCYTIOTROPHOBLASTS AND RESTORES ANNEXIN A5 EXPRESSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Xuan; Guller, Seth; Rand, Jacob H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Antibody-mediated disruption of the annexin A5 (AnxA5) anticoagulant shield has been posited to be a thrombogenic mechanism in the antiphospholipid syndrome. We recently showed that the antimalarial drug, hydroxychloroquine, dissociates antiphospholipid immune complexes and restores AnxA5 binding to planar phospholipid bilayer. Using quantitative immunoassays, we demonstrated similar effects on BeWo trophoblasts. We therefore investigated the effects of the drug on localization of AnxA5 in primary cultures of human placental syncytiotrophoblasts (SCTs). Study Laser confocal microscopy with computer-based morphometric analysis was used to localize AnxA5 and antiphospholipid antibodies on SCTs exposed to polyclonal and monoclonal antiphospholipid and control IgGs. Results Hydroxychloroquine reversed the effects of the antiphospholipid antibodies on the SCTs by markedly reducing IgG binding and restoring AnxA5 expression. Conclusions These results provide the first morphologic evidence for this effect of hydroxychloroquine on human placental SCTs and support the possibility of novel treatments that target antiphospholipid antibody binding. PMID:21871597

  4. Site-specific proteolytic degradation of IgG monoclonal antibodies expressed in tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehle, Verena K; Lombardi, Raffaele; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Paul, Mathew J; Di Micco, Patrizio; Morea, Veronica; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello; Ma, Julian K-C

    2015-02-01

    Plants are promising hosts for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). However, proteolytic degradation of antibodies produced both in stable transgenic plants and using transient expression systems is still a major issue for efficient high-yield recombinant protein accumulation. In this work, we have performed a detailed study of the degradation profiles of two human IgG1 mAbs produced in plants: an anti-HIV mAb 2G12 and a tumour-targeting mAb H10. Even though they use different light chains (κ and λ, respectively), the fragmentation pattern of both antibodies was similar. The majority of Ig fragments result from proteolytic degradation, but there are only a limited number of plant proteolytic cleavage events in the immunoglobulin light and heavy chains. All of the cleavage sites identified were in the proximity of interdomain regions and occurred at each interdomain site, with the exception of the VL /CL interface in mAb H10 λ light chain. Cleavage site sequences were analysed, and residue patterns characteristic of proteolytic enzymes substrates were identified. The results of this work help to define common degradation events in plant-produced mAbs and raise the possibility of predicting antibody degradation patterns 'a priori' and designing novel stabilization strategies by site-specific mutagenesis. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Chimeric infectious DNA clones, chimeric porcine circoviruses and uses thereof

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to infectious DNA clones, infectious chimeric DNA clones of porcine circovirus (PCV), vaccines and means of protecting pigs against viral infection or postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) caused by PCV2. The new chimeric infectious DNA clone and its derived, avirulent chimeric virus are constructed from the nonpathogenic PCV1 in which the immunogenic ORF gene of the pathogenic PCV2 replaces a gene of the nonpathogenic PCV1, preferably in the same pos...

  6. Genetic Passive Immunization with Adenoviral Vector Expressing Chimeric Nanobody-Fc Molecules as Therapy for Genital Infection Caused by Mycoplasma hominis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria A Burmistrova

    Full Text Available Developing pathogen-specific recombinant antibody fragments (especially nanobodies is a very promising strategy for the treatment of infectious disease. Nanobodies have great potential for gene therapy application due to their single-gene nature. Historically, Mycoplasma hominis has not been considered pathogenic bacteria due to the lack of acute infection and partially due to multiple studies demonstrating high frequency of isolation of M. hominis samples from asymptomatic patients. However, recent studies on the role of latent M. hominis infection in oncologic transformation, especially prostate cancer, and reports that M. hominis infects Trichomonas and confers antibiotic resistance to Trichomonas, have generated new interest in this field. In the present study we have generated specific nanobody against M. hominis (aMh, for which the identified target is the ABC-transporter substrate-binding protein. aMh exhibits specific antibacterial action against M. hominis. In an attempt to improve the therapeutic properties, we have developed the adenoviral vector-based gene therapy approach for passive immunization with nanobodies against M. hominis. For better penetration into the mucous layer of the genital tract, we fused aMh with the Fc-fragment of IgG. Application of this comprehensive approach with a single systemic administration of recombinant adenovirus expressing aMh-Fc demonstrated both prophylactic and therapeutic effects in a mouse model of genital M. hominis infection.

  7. The transferrin receptor of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae: Quantitation of expression and structural characterization using a peptide-specific monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøg, Yang S.; Andresen, Lars Ole; Bastholm, L.

    2001-01-01

    transferrin. This complex was studied using a monoclonal antibody (Mab 1.48) raised against a synthetic peptide corresponding to a hydrophilic domain of Tbp2 common to several A. pp serotypes. The antibody reacted specifically with a 60-70 kDa Tbp2-antigen found in all serotypes of A. pp obtained from iron...... expressing Tbp2 and in wild type A. pp grown under iron restricted conditions. The subcellular location of Tbp2 in A. pp was studied by immunoelectron microscopy using the Mab 1.48. Interestingly, all antibody binding was found inside the A. pp cells, while Tbp2 expressed in recombinant E. coli was found...

  8. Studies of tolerance induction through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys. Method for detection of chimeric cells and effect of thymic irradiation on induction of tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo

    1996-01-01

    To establish the method for the detection of chimerism in cynomologus monkeys, we tested cross reactivity of various anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to cynomolgus monkeys. In 29 mAb we tested, only three monoclonal anti-HLA antibodies crossreacted with lymphocytes of monkeys. With these mAb, chimeric cell can be detected up to 1% by flow cytometric analysis (study 1). Utilizing the method we developed in study 1, we applied the regimen that induces mixed chimerism and skin graft tolerance in mice to renal allotransplantation of cynomolgus monkey. Regimen A includes non-lethal dose of total body irradiation (TBI), administration of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) for 3 days, donor bone marrow infusion and 45 days course of cyclosporine (CYA) administration. We added 7 Gy of thymic irradiation on day-6 in regimen B and on day-1 in regimen C. Although all monkeys in regimen A and B consistently developed chimerism, they rejected kidney allografts soon after stopping CYA. In contrast, 4 monkeys out of 5 failed to develop chimerism in regimen C, but renal allograft tolerance was induced in one monkey who developed chimerism in regimen C. In conclusion, the induction of chimerism is considered necessary but not sufficient for tolerance induction. (author)

  9. Studies of tolerance induction through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys. Method for detection of chimeric cells and effect of thymic irradiation on induction of tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    To establish the method for the detection of chimerism in cynomologus monkeys, we tested cross reactivity of various anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to cynomolgus monkeys. In 29 mAb we tested, only three monoclonal anti-HLA antibodies crossreacted with lymphocytes of monkeys. With these mAb, chimeric cell can be detected up to 1% by flow cytometric analysis (study 1). Utilizing the method we developed in study 1, we applied the regimen that induces mixed chimerism and skin graft tolerance in mice to renal allotransplantation of cynomolgus monkey. Regimen A includes non-lethal dose of total body irradiation (TBI), administration of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) for 3 days, donor bone marrow infusion and 45 days course of cyclosporine (CYA) administration. We added 7 Gy of thymic irradiation on day-6 in regimen B and on day-1 in regimen C. Although all monkeys in regimen A and B consistently developed chimerism, they rejected kidney allografts soon after stopping CYA. In contrast, 4 monkeys out of 5 failed to develop chimerism in regimen C, but renal allograft tolerance was induced in one monkey who developed chimerism in regimen C. In conclusion, the induction of chimerism is considered necessary but not sufficient for tolerance induction. (author)

  10. Polyclonal antibodies against the recombinantly expressed coat protein of the Citrus psorosis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda Salem

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Psorosis is a damaging disease of citrus that is widespread in many parts of the world. Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV, the type species of the genus Ophiovirus, is the putative causal agent of psorosis. Detection of CPsV by laboratory methods, serology in particular is a primary requirement for large-scale surveys but their production has been impaired by the difficulty of obtaining sufficient clean antigen for immunization. Specific PAbs against coat protein were produced in E. coli using recombinant DNA approach. The full length CP gene fragment was amplified by RT-PCR using total RNA extracted from CPsV infected citrus leaves and CP specific primers. The obtained product (1320bp was cloned, sequenced and sub-cloned into pET-30(+ expression vector. Expression was induced and screened in different bacterial clones by the presence of the expressed protein (48kDa and optimized in one clone. Expressed CP was purified using batch chromatography under denaturing conditions. Specificity of expressed protein was demonstrated by ELISA before used as antigen for raising PAbs in mice. Specificity of the raised PAbs to CPsV was verified by ELISA and western blotting. The raised PAbs were showed highly effectiveness in screening by ELISA comparing with the commercial antibodies purchased from Agritest, Valanzano, Italy.The expression of CPsV CP gene in E. coli, production of PAbs using recombinant protein as an antigen, the suitability of these antibodies for use in immunodiagnostics against the CPsV Egyptian isolate have been accomplished in this work. Keywords: CPsV, CP, PAbs, RT-PCR, ELISA, Western blotting

  11. Intracellular reprogramming of expression, glycosylation, and function of a plant-derived antiviral therapeutic monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hwan Lee

    Full Text Available Plant genetic engineering, which has led to the production of plant-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAb(Ps, provides a safe and economically effective alternative to conventional antibody expression methods. In this study, the expression levels and biological properties of the anti-rabies virus mAb(P SO57 with or without an endoplasmic reticulum (ER-retention peptide signal (Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu; KDEL in transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum were analyzed. The expression levels of mAb(P SO57 with KDEL (mAb(PK were significantly higher than those of mAb(P SO57 without KDEL (mAb(P regardless of the transcription level. The Fc domains of both purified mAb(P and mAb(PK and hybridoma-derived mAb (mAb(H had similar levels of binding activity to the FcγRI receptor (CD64. The mAb(PK had glycan profiles of both oligomannose (OM type (91.7% and Golgi type (8.3%, whereas the mAb(P had mainly Golgi type glycans (96.8% similar to those seen with mAb(H. Confocal analysis showed that the mAb(PK was co-localized to ER-tracker signal and cellular areas surrounding the nucleus indicating accumulation of the mAb(P with KDEL in the ER. Both mAb(P and mAb(PK disappeared with similar trends to mAb(H in BALB/c mice. In addition, mAb(PK was as effective as mAb(H at neutralizing the activity of the rabies virus CVS-11. These results suggest that the ER localization of the recombinant mAb(P by KDEL reprograms OM glycosylation and enhances the production of the functional antivirus therapeutic antibody in the plant.

  12. Rationally designed chimeric peptide of met-enkephalin and FMRFa-[D-Ala2,p-Cl-Phe4]YFa induce multiple opioid receptors mediated antinociception and up-regulate their expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, Ishwar Dutt; Chaudhary, Snehlata; Sharma, Ahuti; Nath, Mahendra; Pasha, Santosh

    2010-07-25

    The physiological role of NPFF/FMRFa family of peptides appears to be complex and exact mechanism of action of these peptides is not yet completely understood. In same line of scrutiny, another analog of YGGFMKKKFMRFamide (YFa), a chimeric peptide of met-enkephalin and FMRFamide, was rationally designed and synthesized which contain D-alanine and p-Cl-phenylalanine residues at 2nd and 4th positions, respectively i.e., Y-(D-Ala)-G-(p-Cl-Phe)-MKKKFMRFamide ([D-Ala(2), p-Cl-Phe(4)]YFa) in order to achieve improved bioavailability and blood brain barrier penetration. Therefore, present study investigates the possible antinociceptive effect of [D-Ala(2), p-Cl-Phe(4)]YFa on intra-peritoneal (i.p.) administration using tail-flick test in rats followed by its opioid receptor(s) specificity using mu, delta and kappa receptor antagonists. Further, its antinociceptive effect was examined during 6 days of chronic i.p. treatment and assessed effect of this treatment on differential expression of opioid receptors. [D-Ala(2), p-Cl-Phe(4)]YFa in comparison to parent peptide YFa, induce significantly higher dose dependent antinociception in rats which was mediated by all three opioid receptors (mu, delta and kappa). Importantly, it induced comparable antinociception in rats throughout the chronic i.p. treatment and significantly up-regulated the overall expression (mRNA and protein) of mu, delta and kappa opioid receptors. Therefore, pharmacological and molecular behavior of [D-Ala(2), p-Cl-Phe(4)]YFa demonstrate that incorporation of D-alanine and p-Cl-phenylalanine residues at appropriate positions in chimeric peptide leads to altered opioid receptor selectivity and enhanced antinociceptive potency, relative to parent peptide. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparative antibody analysis of Pannexin1 expression in four rat brain regions reveals varying subcellular localizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela C Cone

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pannexin1 (Panx1 channels release cytosolic ATP in response to signaling pathways. Panx1 is highly expressed in the central nervous system. We used four antibodies with different Panx1 anti-peptide epitopes to analyze four regions of rat brain. These antibodies labeled the same bands in Western blots and had highly similar patterns of immunofluorescence in tissue culture cells expressing Panx1, but Western blots of brain lysates from Panx1 knockout and control mice showed different banding patterns. Localizations of Panx1 in brain slices were generated using automated wide-field mosaic confocal microscopy for imaging large regions of interest while retaining maximum resolution for examining cell populations and compartments. We compared Panx1 expression over the cerebellum, hippocampus with adjacent cortex, thalamus and olfactory bulb. While Panx1 localizes to the same neuronal cell types, subcellular localizations differ. Two antibodies with epitopes against the intracellular loop and one against the carboxy terminus preferentially labeled cell bodies, while an antibody raised against an N-terminal peptide highlighted neuronal processes more than cell bodies. These labeling patterns may be a reflection of different cellular and subcellular localizations of full-length and/or modified Panx1 channels where each antibody is highlighting unique or differentially accessible Panx1 populations. However, we cannot rule out that one or more of these antibodies have specificity issues. All data associated with experiments from these four antibodies are presented in a manner that allows them to be compared and our claims thoroughly evaluated, rather than eliminating results that were questionable. Each antibody is given a unique identifier through the NIF Antibody Registry that can be used to track usage of individual antibodies across papers and all image and metadata are made available in the public repository, the Cell Centered Database, for on

  14. A single-domain antibody-linked Fab bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab has potent cytotoxicity against Her2-expressing tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aifen; Xing, Jieyu; Li, Li; Zhou, Changhua; Dong, Bin; He, Ping; Li, Qing; Wang, Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Her2, which is frequently overexpressed in breast cancer, is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer therapy. Anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, has achieved significant clinical benefits in metastatic breast cancer. In this study, we describe a novel bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab targeting Her2 by linking a single domain anti-CD16 VHH to the trastuzumab Fab. The Her2-S-Fab antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, and drive potent cancer cell killing in HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. In xenograft model, the Her2-S-Fab suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our results suggest that the bispecific Her2-S-Fab may provide a valid alternative to Her2 positive cancer therapy.

  15. Expression of POTE protein in human testis detected by novel monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ise, Tomoko; Das, Sudipto; Nagata, Satoshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Lee, Yoomi; Onda, Masanori; Anver, Miriam R.; Bera, Tapan K.; Pastan, Ira

    2008-01-01

    The POTE gene family is composed of 13 highly homologous paralogs preferentially expressed in prostate, ovary, testis, and placenta. We produced 10 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against three representative POTE paralogs: POTE-21, POTE-2γC, and POTE-22. One reacted with all three paralogs, six MAbs reacted with POTE-2γC and POTE-22, and three MAbs were specific to POTE-21. Epitopes of all 10 MAbs were located in the cysteine-rich repeats (CRRs) motifs located at the N-terminus of each POTE paralog. Testing the reactivity of each MAb with 12 different CRRs revealed slight differences among the antigenic determinants, which accounts for differences in cross-reactivity. Using MAbs HP8 and PG5 we were able to detect a POTE-actin fusion protein in human testis by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blotting. By immunohistochemistry we demonstrated that the POTE protein is expressed in primary spermatocytes, implying a role in spermatogenesis

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujak, Emil; Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-01-01

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujak, Emil [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah [Philochem AG, Libernstrasse 3, CH-8112 Otelfingen (Switzerland); Neri, Dario, E-mail: neri@pharma.ethz.ch [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  18. Chimeras taking shape: Potential functions of proteins encoded by chimeric RNA transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Lacroix, Vincent; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Levin, Yishai; Gabashvili, Alexandra; Prilusky, Jaime; del Pozo, Angela; Tress, Michael; Johnson, Rory; Guigo, Roderic; Valencia, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Chimeric RNAs comprise exons from two or more different genes and have the potential to encode novel proteins that alter cellular phenotypes. To date, numerous putative chimeric transcripts have been identified among the ESTs isolated from several organisms and using high throughput RNA sequencing. The few corresponding protein products that have been characterized mostly result from chromosomal translocations and are associated with cancer. Here, we systematically establish that some of the putative chimeric transcripts are genuinely expressed in human cells. Using high throughput RNA sequencing, mass spectrometry experimental data, and functional annotation, we studied 7424 putative human chimeric RNAs. We confirmed the expression of 175 chimeric RNAs in 16 human tissues, with an abundance varying from 0.06 to 17 RPKM (Reads Per Kilobase per Million mapped reads). We show that these chimeric RNAs are significantly more tissue-specific than non-chimeric transcripts. Moreover, we present evidence that chimeras tend to incorporate highly expressed genes. Despite the low expression level of most chimeric RNAs, we show that 12 novel chimeras are translated into proteins detectable in multiple shotgun mass spectrometry experiments. Furthermore, we confirm the expression of three novel chimeric proteins using targeted mass spectrometry. Finally, based on our functional annotation of exon organization and preserved domains, we discuss the potential features of chimeric proteins with illustrative examples and suggest that chimeras significantly exploit signal peptides and transmembrane domains, which can alter the cellular localization of cognate proteins. Taken together, these findings establish that some chimeric RNAs are translated into potentially functional proteins in humans. PMID:22588898

  19. Thionin-D4E1 chimeric protein protects plants against bacterial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Eddie W; Gupta, Goutam; Hao, Guixia

    2017-08-08

    The generation of a chimeric protein containing a first domain encoding either a pro-thionon or thionin, a second domain encoding D4E1 or pro-D4E1, and a third domain encoding a peptide linker located between the first domain and second domain is described. Either the first domain or the second domain is located at the amino terminal of the chimeric protein and the other domain (second domain or first domain, respectively) is located at the carboxyl terminal. The chimeric protein has antibacterial activity. Genetically altered plants and their progeny expressing a polynucleotide encoding the chimeric protein resist diseases caused by bacteria.

  20. Chimeric mitochondrial peptides from contiguous regular and swinger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Previous mass spectrometry analyses described human mitochondrial peptides entirely translated from swinger RNAs, RNAs where polymerization systematically exchanged nucleotides. Exchanges follow one among 23 bijective transformation rules, nine symmetric exchanges (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C) and fourteen asymmetric exchanges (X → Y → Z → X, e.g. A → C → G → A), multiplying by 24 DNA's protein coding potential. Abrupt switches from regular to swinger polymerization produce chimeric RNAs. Here, human mitochondrial proteomic analyses assuming abrupt switches between regular and swinger transcriptions, detect chimeric peptides, encoded by part regular, part swinger RNA. Contiguous regular- and swinger-encoded residues within single peptides are stronger evidence for translation of swinger RNA than previously detected, entirely swinger-encoded peptides: regular parts are positive controls matched with contiguous swinger parts, increasing confidence in results. Chimeric peptides are 200 × rarer than swinger peptides (3/100,000 versus 6/1000). Among 186 peptides with > 8 residues for each regular and swinger parts, regular parts of eleven chimeric peptides correspond to six among the thirteen recognized, mitochondrial protein-coding genes. Chimeric peptides matching partly regular proteins are rarer and less expressed than chimeric peptides matching non-coding sequences, suggesting targeted degradation of misfolded proteins. Present results strengthen hypotheses that the short mitogenome encodes far more proteins than hitherto assumed. Entirely swinger-encoded proteins could exist.

  1. Naturally occurring anti-glycan antibodies binding to Globo H-expressing cells identify ovarian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochechueva, Tatiana; Alam, Shahidul; Schötzau, Andreas; Chinarev, Alexander; Bovin, Nicolai V; Hacker, Neville F; Jacob, Francis; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2017-02-10

    Glycosphingolipids are important compounds of the plasma membrane of mammalian cells and a number of them have been associated with malignant transformation and progression, reinforcing tumour aggressiveness and metastasis. Here we investigated the levels of naturally occurring anti-glycan antibodies to Globo H in blood plasma obtained from high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients (SOC) and women without gynaecological malignancies (control) using suspension glycan array technology employing chemically synthesized glycans as antibody targets. We found that anti-human Globo H IgG antibodies were able to significantly discriminate SOC from controls (P anti-Globo H antibodies highly correlated (r = 0.992). The incubation of plasma-derived anti-glycan antibodies with chemically synthesized (presented on fluorescence microspheres) and native Globo H (expressed on Globo H-positive cell lines) revealed strong reactivity of naturally occurring human anti-Globo H antibodies towards its antigen expressed on ovarian cancer cells. Our data demonstrate that human plasma-derived antibodies to Globo H as well as the presence of the antigen might be considered as therapeutic option in ovarian cancer.

  2. Characterization and expression of the human T cell receptor-T3 complex by monoclonal antibody F101.01

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Plesner, T; Pallesen, G

    1988-01-01

    demonstrated co-expression of the antigen defined by F101.01 and the pan-T cell antigens defined by CD2, CD3, CD5, and CD7 antibodies. Cells stained with CD4 and CD8 antibodies were both included in the F101.01-positive population, whereas CD16-positive natural killer cells (NK), B cells (CD19 and CD20...

  3. Enhanced expression and purification of camelid single domain VHH antibodies from classical inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Maristella; Scotti, Claudia

    2017-08-01

    Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) are small antigen-binding domains derived from naturally occurring, heavy chain-only immunoglobulins isolated from camelid and sharks. They maintain the same binding capability of full-length IgGs but with improved thermal stability and permeability, which justifies their scientific, medical and industrial interest. Several described recombinant forms of sdAbs have been produced in different hosts and with different strategies. Here we present an optimized method for a time-saving, high yield production and extraction of a poly-histidine-tagged sdAb from Escherichia coli classical inclusion bodies. Protein expression and extraction were attempted using 4 different methods (e.g. autoinducing or IPTG-induced soluble expression, non-classical and classical inclusion bodies). The best method resulted to be expression in classical inclusion bodies and urea-mediated protein extraction which yielded 60-70 mg/l bacterial culture. The method we here describe can be of general interest for an enhanced and efficient heterologous expression of sdAbs for research and industrial purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Built-in adjuvanticity of genetically and protein-engineered chimeric molecules for targeting of influenza A peptide epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerekov, Nikola S; Ivanova, Iva I; Mihaylova, Nikolina M; Nikolova, Maria; Prechl, Jozsef; Tchorbanov, Andrey I

    2014-10-01

    Highly purified, subunit, or synthetic viral antigens are known to be weakly immunogenic and potentate only the antibody, rather than cell-mediated immune responses. An alternative approach for inducing protective immunity with small viral peptides would be the direct targeting of viral epitopes to the immunocompetent cells by DNA vaccines encoding antibody fragments specific to activating cell surface co-receptor molecules. Here, we are exploring as a new genetic vaccine, a DNA chimeric molecule encoding a T and B cell epitope-containing influenza A virus hemagglutinin peptide joined to sequences encoding a single-chain variable fragment antibody fragment specific for the costimulatory B cell complement receptors 1 and 2. This recombinant DNA molecule was inserted into eukaryotic expression vector and used as a naked DNA vaccine in WT and CR1/2 KO mice. The intramuscular administration of the DNA construct resulted in the in vivo expression of an immunogenic chimeric protein, which cross-links cell surface receptors on influenza-specific B cells. The DNA vaccination was followed by prime-boosting with the protein-engineered replica of the DNA construct, thus delivering an activation intracellular signal. Immunization with an expression vector containing the described construct and boosting with the protein chimera induced a strong anti-influenza cytotoxic response, modulation of cytokine profile, and a weak antibody response in Balb/c mice. The same immunization scheme did not result in generation of influenza-specific response in mice lacking the target receptor, underlining the molecular adjuvant effect of receptor targeting.

  5. Virulence of a chimeric recombinant infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus expressing the spring viraemia of carp virus glycoprotein in salmonid and cyprinid fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmenegger, Eveline; Biacchesi, Stéphane; Mérour, Emilie; Glenn, Jolene. A; Palmer, Alexander D.; Brémont, Michel; Kurath, Gael

    2018-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and spring viraemia of carp virus (SVCV) are both rhabdoviruses of fish, listed as notifiable disease agents by the World Organization for Animal Health. Recombinant rhabdoviruses with heterologous gene substitutions have been engineered to study genetic determinants and assess the potential of these recombinant viruses for vaccine development. A recombinant IHNV (rIHNV), containing the full-length genome of a European IHNV strain, was modified by deleting the glycoprotein (G) gene and replacing it with a European SVCV G-gene to make the rIHNV-Gsvcv. The chimeric rIHNV-Gsvcv level of virulence in rainbow trout, common carp and koi was assessed, and its ability to induce a protective immune response in surviving koi against wild-type SVCV infection was tested. The rIHNV-Gsvcv infection of trout led to high mortality, ranging from 78% to 92.5%, after immersion. In contrast, no deaths occurred in juvenile common carp after infection with rIHNV-Gsvcv by either immersion or intraperitoneal (IP) injection. Similarly, koi infected with rIHNV-Gsvcv via IP injection had little to no mortality (≤9%). Koi that survived initial infection with a high dose of recombinant virus rIHNV-Gsvcv were protected against a virulent SVCV challenge resulting in a high relative per cent survival of 82.5%.

  6. In Vitro and In Vivo Antitumor Effect of Anti-CD33 Chimeric Receptor-Expressing EBV-CTL against CD33+ Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dutour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic engineering of T cells with chimeric T-cell receptors (CARs is an attractive strategy to treat malignancies. It extends the range of antigens for adoptive T-cell immunotherapy, and major mechanisms of tumor escape are bypassed. With this strategy we redirected immune responses towards the CD33 antigen to target acute myeloid leukemia. To improve in vivo T-cell persistence, we modified human Epstein Barr Virus-(EBV- specific cytotoxic T cells with an anti-CD33.CAR. Genetically modified T cells displayed EBV and HLA-unrestricted CD33 bispecificity in vitro. In addition, though showing a myeloablative activity, they did not irreversibly impair the clonogenic potential of normal CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors. Moreover, after intravenous administration into CD33+ human acute myeloid leukemia-bearing NOD-SCID mice, anti-CD33-EBV-specific T cells reached the tumor sites exerting antitumor activity in vivo. In conclusion, targeting CD33 by CAR-modified EBV-specific T cells may provide additional therapeutic benefit to AML patients as compared to conventional chemotherapy or transplantation regimens alone.

  7. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral replicon as a non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Wu, Rui; Li, Robert W; Li, Ling; Xiong, Zhongliang; Zhao, Haizhong; Guo, Deyin; Pan, Zishu

    2012-04-01

    A trans-complemented chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The CSFV E2 gene was deleted, and a fragment containing the region encoding a truncated envelope protein (tE, amino acid 292-402, domain III) of JE virus (JEV) was inserted into the resultant plasmid, pA187delE2, to generate the recombinant cDNA clone pA187delE2/JEV-tE. Porcine kidney 15 (PK15) cells that constitutively express the CSFV E2p7 proteins were then transfected with in vitro-transcribed RNA from pA187delE2/JEV-tE. As a result, the chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon particle (VRP), rv187delE2/JEV-tE, was rescued. In a mouse model, immunization with the chimeric CSF-JE VRP induced strong production of JEV-specific antibody and conferred protection against a lethal JEV challenge. Pigs immunized with CSF-JE VRP displayed strong anti-CSFV and anti-JEV antibody responses and protection against CSFV and JEV challenge infections. Our evidence suggests that E2-complemented CSF-JE VRP not only has potential as a live-attenuated non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE but also serves as a potential DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine for CSF in pigs. Together, our data suggest that the non-transmissible chimeric VRP expressing foreign antigenic proteins may represent a promising strategy for bivalent DIVA vaccine design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. FX knockout CHO hosts can express desired ratios of fucosylated or afucosylated antibodies with high titers and comparable product quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Salina; Haley, Benjamin; Marshall, Brett; Heidersbach, Amy; Yim, Mandy; Brozynski, Martina; Tang, Danming; Lam, Cynthia; Petryniak, Bronislawa; Shaw, David; Shim, Jeongsup; Miller, Aaron; Lowe, John B; Snedecor, Brad; Misaghi, Shahram

    2017-03-01

    During antibody dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) the target cells are killed by monocytes and natural killer cells. ADCC is enhanced when the antibody heavy chain's core N-linked glycan lacks the fucose molecule(s). Several strategies have been utilized to generate fully afucosylated antibodies. A commonly used and efficient approach has been knocking out the FUT8 gene of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) host cells, which results in expression of antibody molecules with fully afucosylated glycans. However, a major drawback of the FUT8-KO host is the requirement for undertaking two separate cell line development (CLD) efforts in order to obtain both primarily fucosylated and fully afucosylated antibody species for comparative studies in vitro and in vivo. Even more challenging is obtaining primarily fucosylated and FUT8-KO clones with similar enough product quality attributes to ensure that any observed ADCC advantage(s) can be strictly attributed to afucosylation. Here, we report generation and use of a FX knockout (FXKO) CHO host cell line that is capable of expressing antibody molecules with either primarily fucosylated or fully afucosylated glycan profiles with otherwise similar product quality attributes, depending on addition of fucose to the cell culture media. Hence, the FXKO host not only obviates the requirement for undertaking two separate CLD efforts, but it also averts the need for screening many colonies to identify clones with comparable product qualities. Finally, FXKO clones can express antibodies with the desired ratio of primarily fucosylated to afucosylated glycans when fucose is titrated into the production media, to allow achieving intended levels of FcγRIII-binding and ADCC for an antibody. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 632-644. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Expression of basal cell marker revealed by RAM11 antibody during epithelial regeneration in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Cichocki

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available RAM11 is a mouse monoclonal anti-rabbit macrophage antibody recognizing connective tissue and vascular macrophages. Our previous report showed that RAM11 reacted with basal cells of stratified squamous epithelia of rabbit skin, oral mucosa and esophagus. The aim of the present study was to follow the appearance of RAM11 immunoreactivity in basal cells of regenerating oral epithelium in rabbits. No RAM11 immunostaining was observed in the regenerating epithelium examined on days 1 and 3 of wound healing. A weak immunofluorescence first appeared on day 7 in single basal cells and 32% of RAM11- positive basal cells were observed on day 14. These findings indicate that expression of the antigen recognized by RAM11 antibody is a transient event in the differentiation of oral keratinocytes which not always occurs during epithelial repair, although it is a constant feature of epithelial turnover in mature epithelium. Therefore this antigen can be regarded as basal cell marker only in mature stratified squamous epithelia.

  10. A novel self-replicating chimeric lentivirus-like particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, Christy K; Young, Kelly R; Madden, Victoria J; Johnson, Philip R; Johnston, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Successful live attenuated vaccines mimic natural exposure to pathogens without causing disease and have been successful against several viruses. However, safety concerns prevent the development of attenuated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a vaccine candidate. If a safe, replicating virus vaccine could be developed, it might have the potential to offer significant protection against HIV infection and disease. Described here is the development of a novel self-replicating chimeric virus vaccine candidate that is designed to provide natural exposure to a lentivirus-like particle and to incorporate the properties of a live attenuated virus vaccine without the inherent safety issues associated with attenuated lentiviruses. The genome from the alphavirus Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) was modified to express SHIV89.6P genes encoding the structural proteins Gag and Env. Expression of Gag and Env from VEE RNA in primate cells led to the assembly of particles that morphologically and functionally resembled lentivirus virions and that incorporated alphavirus RNA. Infection of CD4⁺ cells with chimeric lentivirus-like particles was specific and productive, resulting in RNA replication, expression of Gag and Env, and generation of progeny chimeric particles. Further genome modifications designed to enhance encapsidation of the chimeric virus genome and to express an attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) protease for particle maturation improved the ability of chimeric lentivirus-like particles to propagate in cell culture. This study provides proof of concept for the feasibility of creating chimeric virus genomes that express lentivirus structural proteins and assemble into infectious particles for presentation of lentivirus immunogens in their native and functional conformation.

  11. [Expression, purification and antibody preparation of recombinat SARS-CoV X5 protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Na; Kong, Jian-Qiang; Zhu, Ping; Du, Guan-Hua; Wang, Wei; Cheng, Ke-Di

    2008-11-01

    X5 protein is one of the putative unknown proteins of SARS-CoV. The recombinant protein has been successfully expressed in E. coli in the form of insoluble inclusion body. The inclusion body was dissolved in high concentration of urea. Affinity Chromatography was preformed to purify the denatured protein, and then the product was refolded in a series of gradient solutions of urea. The purified protein was obtained with the purity of > 95% and the yield of 93.3 mg x L(-1). Polyclonal antibody of this protein was obtained, and Western blotting assay indicated that the X5 protein has the strong property of antigen. Sixty-eight percent of the recombinant protein sequence was confirmed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis.

  12. Secretory signal peptide modification for optimized antibody-fragment expression-secretion in Leishmania tarentolae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klatt Stephan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secretory signal peptides (SPs are well-known sequence motifs targeting proteins for translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. After passing through the secretory pathway, most proteins are secreted to the environment. Here, we describe the modification of an expression vector containing the SP from secreted acid phosphatase 1 (SAP1 of Leishmania mexicana for optimized protein expression-secretion in the eukaryotic parasite Leishmania tarentolae with regard to recombinant antibody fragments. For experimental design the online tool SignalP was used, which predicts the presence and location of SPs and their cleavage sites in polypeptides. To evaluate the signal peptide cleavage site as well as changes of expression, SPs were N-terminally linked to single-chain Fragment variables (scFv’s. The ability of L. tarentolae to express complex eukaryotic proteins with highly diverse post-translational modifications and its easy bacteria-like handling, makes the parasite a promising expression system for secretory proteins. Results We generated four vectors with different SP-sequence modifications based on in-silico analyses with SignalP in respect to cleavage probability and location, named pLTEX-2 to pLTEX-5. To evaluate their functionality, we cloned four individual scFv-fragments into the vectors and transfected all 16 constructs into L. tarentolae. Independently from the expressed scFv, pLTEX-5 derived constructs showed the highest expression rate, followed by pLTEX-4 and pLTEX-2, whereas only low amounts of protein could be obtained from pLTEX-3 clones, indicating dysfunction of the SP. Next, we analysed the SP cleavage sites by Edman degradation. For pLTEX-2, -4, and -5 derived scFv’s, the results corresponded to in-silico predictions, whereas pLTEX-3 derived scFv’s contained one additional amino-acid (AA. Conclusions The obtained results demonstrate the importance of SP-sequence optimization for efficient

  13. Monoclonal antibody DS6 detects a tumor-associated sialoglycotope expressed on human serous ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearse, K P; Smith, N L; Semer, D A; Eagles, L; Finley, J L; Kazmierczak, S; Kovacs, C J; Rodriguez, A A; Kellogg-Wennerberg, A E

    2000-12-15

    A newly developed murine monoclonal antibody, DS6, immunohistochemically reacts with an antigen, CA6, that is expressed by human serous ovarian carcinomas but not by normal ovarian surface epithelium or mesothelium. CA6 has a limited distribution in normal adult tissues and is most characteristically detected in fallopian tube epithelium, inner urothelium and type 2 pneumocytes. Pre-treatment of tissue sections with either periodic acid or neuraminidase from Vibrio cholerae abolishes immunoreactivity with DS6, indicating that CA6 is a neuraminidase-sensitive and periodic acid-sensitive sialic acid glycoconjugate ("sialoglycotope"). SDS-PAGE of OVCAR5 cell lysates has revealed that the CA6 epitope is expressed on an 80 kDa non-disulfide-linked glycoprotein containing N-linked oligosaccharides. Two-dimensional non-equilibrium pH gradient gel electrophoresis indicates an isoelectric point of approximately 6.2 to 6.5. Comparison of the immunohistochemical distribution of CA6 in human serous ovarian adenocarcinomas has revealed similarities to that of CA125; however, distinct differences and some complementarity of antigen expression were revealed by double-label, 2-color immunohistochemical studies. The DS6-detected CA6 antigen appears to be distinct from other well-characterized tumor-associated antigens, including MUC1, CA125 and the histo-blood group-related antigens sLea, sLex and sTn. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Analysis of monoclonal antibodies reactive with molecules upregulated or expressed only on activated lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W C; Naessens, J; Brown, W C; Ellis, J A; Hamilton, M J; Cantor, G H; Barbosa, J I; Ferens, W; Bohach, G A

    1996-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies potentially specific for antigens expressed or upregulated on activated leukocytes were selected for further analysis from the panel submitted to the third international workshop on ruminant leukocyte antigens. The kinetics of expression of these activation antigens on resting peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC) and PBMC stimulated with concanavalin A or staphylococcal superantigen SECI for 4, 24 or 96 h were compared, as well as their appearance on various subsets of cells. For some of them, a molecular mass could be determined after immunoprecipitation from radio-labeled, lectin-stimulated cells. Based on the results from the clustering, kinetic studies and biochemical data, evidence was gathered for assigning two additional mAbs to cluster BoCD25 (IL-2 receptor) and two mAbs to cluster BoCD71 (transferrin receptor). Four mAbs recognized an early activation antigen predominantly expressed on gamma delta T cells in short-term cultures. A number of other activation antigens were further characterized.

  15. Superficial Dsg2 Expression Limits Epidermal Blister Formation Mediated by Pemphigus Foliaceus Antibodies and Exfoliative Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Brennan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-cell adhesion mediated by desmosomes is crucial for maintaining proper epidermal structure and function, as evidenced by several severe and potentially fatal skin disorders involving impairment of desmosomal proteins. Pemphigus foliaceus (PF and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS are subcorneal blistering diseases resulting from loss of function of the desmosomal cadherin, desmoglein 1 (Dsg1. To further study the pathomechanism of these diseases and to assess the adhesive properties of Dsg2, we employed a recently established transgenic (Tg mouse model expressing Dsg2 in the superficial epidermis. Neonatal Tg and wild type (WT mice were injected with purified ETA or PF Ig. We showed that ectopic expression of Dsg2 reduced the extent of blister formation in response to both ETA and PF Ig. In response to PF Ig, we observed either a dramatic loss or a reorganization of Dsg1-α, Dsg1-β, and, to a lesser extent, Dsg1-γ, in WT mice. The Inv-Dsg2 Tg mice showed enhanced retention of Dsg1 at the cell-cell border. Collectively, our data support the role for Dsg2 in cell adhesion and suggest that ectopic superficial expression of Dsg2 can increase membrane preservation of Dsg1 and limit epidermal blister formation mediated by PF antibodies and exfoliative toxins.

  16. Influence of protein expression system on elicitation of IgE antibody responses: experience with lactoferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Rachael J; Flanagan, Brian F; Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2012-11-15

    With increased interest in genetically modified (GM) crop plants there is an important need to understand the properties that contribute to the ability of such novel proteins to provoke immune and/or allergic responses. One characteristic that may be relevant is glycosylation, particularly as novel expression systems (e.g. bacterial to plant) will impact on the protein glycoprofile. The allergenicity (IgE inducing) and immunogenicity (IgG inducing) properties of wild type native human lactoferrin (NLF) from human milk (hm) and neutrophil granules (n) and a recombinant molecule produced in rice (RLF) have been assessed. These forms of lactoferrin have identical amino acid sequences, but different glycosylation patterns: hmNLF and nNLF have complex glycoprofiles including Lewis (Le)(x) structures, with particularly high levels of Le(x) expressed by nNLF, whereas RLF is simpler and rich in mannose residues. Antibody responses induced in BALB/c strain mice by intraperitoneal exposure to the different forms of lactoferrin were characterised. Immunisation with both forms of NLF stimulated substantial IgG and IgE antibody responses. In contrast, the recombinant molecule was considerably less immunogenic and failed to stimulate detectable IgE, irrespective of endotoxin and iron content. The glycans did not contribute to epitope formation, with equivalent IgE and IgG binding recorded for high titre anti-NLF antisera regardless of whether the immunising NLF or the recombinant molecule were used substrates in the analyses. These data demonstrate that differential glycosylation profiles can have a profound impact on protein allergenicity and immunogenicity, with mannose and Le(x) exhibiting opposing effects. These results have clear relevance for characterising the allergenic hazards of novel proteins in GM crops. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficient production of antibody Fab fragment by transient gene expression in insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Keita; Hamada, Hirotsugu; Ogawa, Takafumi; Ohmuro-Matsuyama, Yuki; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2017-08-01

    Transient gene expression allows a rapid production of diverse recombinant proteins in early-stage preclinical and clinical developments of biologics. Insect cells have proven to be an excellent platform for the production of functional recombinant proteins. In the present study, the production of an antibody Fab fragment by transient gene expression in lepidopteran insect cells was investigated. The DNA fragments encoding heavy-chain (Hc; Fd fragment) and light-chain (Lc) genes of an Fab fragment were individually cloned into the plasmid vector pIHAneo, which contained the Bombyx mori actin promoter downstream of the B. mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) IE-1 transactivator and the BmNPV HR3 enhancer for high-level expression. Trichoplusia ni BTI-TN-5B1-4 (High Five) cells were co-transfected with the resultant plasmid vectors using linear polyethyleneimine. When the transfection efficiency was evaluated, a plasmid vector encoding an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene was also co-transfected. Transfection and culture conditions were optimized based on both the flow cytometry of the EGFP expression in transfected cells and the yield of the secreted Fab fragments determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Under optimal conditions, a yield of approximately 120 mg/L of Fab fragments was achieved in 5 days in a shake-flask culture. Transient gene expression in insect cells may offer a promising approach to the high-throughput production of recombinant proteins. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Posttransplant chimeric antigen receptor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melody; Zakrzewski, Johannes; James, Scott; Sadelain, Michel

    2018-03-08

    Therapeutic T-cell engineering is emerging as a powerful approach to treat refractory hematological malignancies. Its most successful embodiment to date is based on the use of second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19, a cell surface molecule found in most B-cell leukemias and lymphomas. Remarkable complete remissions have been obtained with autologous T cells expressing CD19 CARs in patients with relapsed, chemo-refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Allogeneic CAR T cells may also be harnessed to treat relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, the use of donor T cells poses unique challenges owing to potential alloreactivity. We review different approaches to mitigate the risk of causing or aggravating graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), including CAR therapies based on donor leukocyte infusion, virus-specific T cells, T-cell receptor-deficient T cells, lymphoid progenitor cells, and regulatory T cells. Advances in CAR design, T-cell selection and gene editing are poised to enable the safe use of allogeneic CAR T cells without incurring GVHD. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  19. Expression cloning and production of human heavy-chain-only antibodies from murine transgenic plasma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.D. Drabek (Dubravka); R. Janssens (Rick); Boer, E. (Ernie de); Rademaker, R. (Rik); Kloess, J. (Johannes); J.J. Skehel (John ); Grosveld, F. (Frank)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractSeveral technologies have been developed to isolate human antibodies against different target antigens as a source of potential therapeutics, including hybridoma technology, phage and yeast display systems. For conventional antibodies, this involves either random pairing of VH and

  20. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  1. Anti-proliferative effects of T cells expressing a ligand-based chimeric antigen receptor against CD116 on CD34+ cells of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yozo Nakazawa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML is a fatal, myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm of early childhood. Patients with JMML have mutually exclusive genetic abnormalities in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF receptor (GMR, CD116 signaling pathway. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is currently the only curative treatment option for JMML; however, disease recurrence is a major cause of treatment failure. We investigated adoptive immunotherapy using GMR-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR for JMML. Methods We constructed a novel CAR capable of binding to GMR via its ligand, GM-CSF, and generated piggyBac transposon-based GMR CAR-modified T cells from three healthy donors and two patients with JMML. We further evaluated the anti-proliferative potential of GMR CAR T cells on leukemic CD34+ cells from six patients with JMML (two NRAS mutations, three PTPN11 mutations, and one monosomy 7, and normal CD34+ cells. Results GMR CAR T cells from healthy donors suppressed the cytokine-dependent growth of MO7e cells, but not the growth of K562 and Daudi cells. Co-culture of healthy GMR CAR T cells with CD34+ cells of five patients with JMML at effector to target ratios of 1:1 and 1:4 for 2 days significantly decreased total colony growth, regardless of genetic abnormality. Furthermore, GMR CAR T cells from a non-transplanted patient and a transplanted patient inhibited the proliferation of respective JMML CD34+ cells at onset to a degree comparable to healthy GMR CAR T cells. Seven-day co-culture of GMR CAR T cells resulted in a marked suppression of JMML CD34+ cell proliferation, particularly CD34+CD38− cell proliferation stimulated with stem cell factor and thrombopoietin on AGM-S3 cells. Meanwhile, GMR CAR T cells exerted no effects on normal CD34+ cell colony growth. Conclusions Ligand-based GMR CAR T cells may have anti-proliferative effects on stem and progenitor cells in JMML.

  2. Stimulation of chymosin secretion by simultaneous expression with chymosin-binding llama single-domain antibody fragments in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, M.M.; Smits, C.B.; Geus, de B.

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effect of coexpression of chymosin and chymosin-binding llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) on the secretion of chymosin by Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. A VHH expression library containing chymosin-specific VHHs was obtained by immunization of a llama and coexpressed with

  3. Construction and expression of a recombinant antibody-targeted plasminogen activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnee, J.M.; Runge, M.S.; Matsueda, G.A.; Hudson, N.W.; Seidman, J.G.; Haber, E.; Quertermous, T.

    1987-01-01

    Covalent linkage of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) to a monoclonal antibody specific for the fibrin β chain (anti-fibrin 59D8) results in a thrombolytic agent that is more specific and more potent that t-PA alone. To provide a ready source of this hybrid molecule and to allow tailoring of the active moieties for optimal activity, the authors have engineered a recombinant version of the 59D8-t-PA conjugate. The rearranged 59D8 heavy chain gene was cloned and combined in the expression vector pSV2gpt with sequence coding for a portion of the γ2b constant region and the catalytic β chain of t-PA. This construct was transfected into heavy chain loss variant cells derived form the 59D8 hybridoma. Recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography and analyzed with electrophoretic transfer blots and radioimmunoassay. These revealed a 65-kDa heavy chain-t-PA fusion protein that is secreted in association with the 59D8 light chain in the form of a 170-kDa disulfide-linked dimer. Chromogenic substrate assays showed the fusion protein to have 70% of the peptidolytic activity of native t-PA and to activate plasminogen as efficiently as t-PA. IN a competitive binding assay, reconstituted antibody was shown to have a binding profile similar to that of native 59D8. Thus, by recombinant techniques, they have produced a hybrid protein capable of high affinity fibrin binding and plasminogen activation

  4. Monoclonal antibodies reveal multiple forms of expression of human microsomal epoxide hydrolase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hongying; Takagi, Akira [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Kayano, Hidekazu [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Koyama, Isamu [Department of Digestive and General Surgery, Saitama International Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, 1397-1 Yamane, Hidaka, Saitama 350-1298 (Japan); Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D. [Department of Entomology and Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616-8584 (United States); Akatsuka, Toshitaka, E-mail: akatsuka@saitama-med.ac.jp [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    In a previous study, we developed five kinds of monoclonal antibodies against different portions of human mEH: three, anti-N-terminal; one, anti-C-terminal; one, anti-conformational epitope. Using them, we stained the intact and the permeabilized human cells of various kinds and performed flow cytometric analysis. Primary hepatocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) showed remarkable differences. On the surface, hepatocytes exhibited 4 out of 5 epitopes whereas PBMC did not show any of the epitopes. mEH was detected inside both cell types, but the most prominent expression was observed for the conformational epitope in the hepatocytes and the two N-terminal epitopes in PBMC. These differences were also observed between hepatocyte-derived cell lines and mononuclear cell-derived cell lines. In addition, among each group, there were several differences which may be related to the cultivation, the degree of differentiation, or the original cell subsets. We also noted that two glioblastoma cell lines reveal marked expression of the conformational epitope on the surface which seemed to correlate with the brain tumor-associated antigen reported elsewhere. Several cell lines also underwent selective permeabilization before flow cytometric analysis, and we noticed that the topological orientation of mEH on the ER membrane in those cells was in accordance with the previous report. However, the orientation on the cell surface was inconsistent with the report and had a great variation between the cells. These findings show the multiple mode of expression of mEH which may be possibly related to the multiple roles that mEH plays in different cells. -- Highlights: ► We examine expression of five mEH epitopes in human cells. ► Remarkable differences exist between hepatocytes and PBMC. ► mEH expression in cell lines differs depending on several factors. ► Some glioblastoma cell lines reveal marked surface expression of mEH. ► Topology of mEH on the cell

  5. Vesicular stomatitis virus expressing a chimeric Sindbis glycoprotein containing an Fc antibody binding domain targets to Her2/neu overexpressing breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, Ira; Whitaker-Dowling, Patricia; Gao Yanhua; Griffin, Judith A.; Watkins, Simon C.

    2003-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a candidate for development for cancer therapy. It is an oncolytic virus that is safe in humans. Recombinant virus can be made directly from plasmid components. We attempted to create a virus that targeted specifically to breast cancer cells. Nonreplicating and replicating pseudotype VSV were created whose only surface glycoprotein (gp) was a Sindbis gp, called Sindbis-ZZ, modified to severely reduce its native binding function and to contain the Fc-binding domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein A. When titered on Her2/neu overexpressing SKBR3 human breast cancer cells, pseudotype VSV coated with Sindbis-ZZ had 5 /ml. This work demonstrates the ability to easily create, directly from plasmid components, an oncolytic replicating VSV with a restricted host cell range

  6. Rapid High-Level Production of Functional HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies in Transient Plant Expression Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Yvonne; Sack, Markus; Montefiori, David; Forthal, Donald; Mao, Lingjun; -Abanto, Segundo Hernandez; Urban, Lori; Landucci, Gary; Fischer, Rainer; Jiang, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy using anti-HIV broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has shown promise as an HIV treatment, reducing mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) in non-human primates and decreasing viral rebound in patients who ceased receiving anti-viral drugs. In addition, a cocktail of potent mAbs may be useful as mucosal microbicides and provide an effective therapy for post-exposure prophylaxis. However, even highly neutralizing HIV mAbs used today may lose their effectiveness if resistance occurs, requiring the rapid production of new or engineered mAbs on an ongoing basis in order to counteract the viral resistance or the spread of a certain HIV-1 clade in a particular region or patient. Plant-based expression systems are fast, inexpensive and scalable and are becoming increasingly popular for the production of proteins and monoclonal antibodies. In the present study, Agrobacterium-mediated transient transfection of plants, utilizing two species of Nicotiana, have been tested to rapidly produce high levels of an HIV 89.6PΔ140env and several well-studied anti-HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (b12, 2G12, 2F5, 4E10, m43, VRC01) or a single chain antibody construct (m9), for evaluation in cell-based viral inhibition assays. The protein-A purified plant-derived antibodies were intact, efficiently bound HIV envelope, and were equivalent to, or in one case better than, their counterparts produced in mammalian CHO or HEK-293 cells in both neutralization and antibody dependent viral inhibition assays. These data indicate that transient plant-based transient expression systems are very adaptable and could rapidly generate high levels of newly identified functional recombinant HIV neutralizing antibodies when required. In addition, they warrant detailed cost-benefit analysis of prolonged incubation in plants to further increase mAb production. PMID:23533588

  7. Rapid high-level production of functional HIV broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies in transient plant expression systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Rosenberg

    Full Text Available Passive immunotherapy using anti-HIV broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs has shown promise as an HIV treatment, reducing mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV in non-human primates and decreasing viral rebound in patients who ceased receiving anti-viral drugs. In addition, a cocktail of potent mAbs may be useful as mucosal microbicides and provide an effective therapy for post-exposure prophylaxis. However, even highly neutralizing HIV mAbs used today may lose their effectiveness if resistance occurs, requiring the rapid production of new or engineered mAbs on an ongoing basis in order to counteract the viral resistance or the spread of a certain HIV-1 clade in a particular region or patient. Plant-based expression systems are fast, inexpensive and scalable and are becoming increasingly popular for the production of proteins and monoclonal antibodies. In the present study, Agrobacterium-mediated transient transfection of plants, utilizing two species of Nicotiana, have been tested to rapidly produce high levels of an HIV 89.6PΔ140env and several well-studied anti-HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (b12, 2G12, 2F5, 4E10, m43, VRC01 or a single chain antibody construct (m9, for evaluation in cell-based viral inhibition assays. The protein-A purified plant-derived antibodies were intact, efficiently bound HIV envelope, and were equivalent to, or in one case better than, their counterparts produced in mammalian CHO or HEK-293 cells in both neutralization and antibody dependent viral inhibition assays. These data indicate that transient plant-based transient expression systems are very adaptable and could rapidly generate high levels of newly identified functional recombinant HIV neutralizing antibodies when required. In addition, they warrant detailed cost-benefit analysis of prolonged incubation in plants to further increase mAb production.

  8. Direct observation of hematopoietic progenitor chimerism in fetal freemartin cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taponen Juhani

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cattle twins are well known as blood chimeras. However, chimerism in the actual hematopoietic progenitor compartment has not been directly investigated. Here, we analyzed fetal liver of chimeric freemartin cattle by combining a new anti-bovine CD34 antibody and Y-chromosome specific in situ hybridization. Results Bull-derived CD34+ cells were detected in the liver of the female sibling (freemartin at 60 days gestation. The level of bull-derived CD34+ cells was lower in the freemartin than in its male siblings. Bull (Y+ and cow hematopoietic cells often occurred in separate clusters. Around clusters of Y+CD34+ cells, Y+CD34- cells were typically observed. The thymi were also strongly chimeric at 60 days of gestation. Conclusion The fetal freemartin liver contains clusters of bull-derived hematopoietic progenitors, suggesting clonal expansion and differentiation. Even the roots of the hematopoietic system in cattle twins are thus strongly chimeric from the early stages of fetal development. However, the hematopoietic seeding of fetal liver apparently started already before the onset of functional vascular anastomosis.

  9. Radiation-induced pulmonary gene expression changes are attenuated by the CTGF antibody Pamrevlumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternlicht, Mark D; Wirkner, Ute; Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Lopez Perez, Ramon; Tietz, Alexandra; Lipson, Kenneth E; Seeley, Todd W; Huber, Peter E

    2018-01-18

    Fibrosis is a delayed side effect of radiation therapy (RT). Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) promotes the development of fibrosis in multiple settings, including pulmonary radiation injury. To better understand the cellular interactions involved in RT-induced lung injury and the role of CTGF in these responses, microarray expression profiling was performed on lungs of irradiated and non-irradiated mice, including mice treated with the anti-CTGF antibody pamrevlumab (FG-3019). Between group comparisons (Welch's t-tests) and principal components analyses were performed in Genespring. At the mRNA level, the ability of pamrevlumab to prolong survival and ameliorate RT-induced radiologic, histologic and functional lung deficits was correlated with the reversal of a clear enrichment in mast cell, macrophage, dendritic cell and mesenchymal gene signatures. Cytokine, growth factor and matrix remodeling genes that are likely to contribute to RT pneumonitis and fibrosis were elevated by RT and attenuated by pamrevlumab, and likely contribute to the cross-talk between enriched cell-types in injured lung. CTGF inhibition had a normalizing effect on select cell-types, including immune cells not typically regarded as being regulated by CTGF. These results suggest that interactions between RT-recruited cell-types are critical to maintaining the injured state; that CTGF plays a key role in this process; and that pamrevlumab can ameliorate RT-induced lung injury in mice and may provide therapeutic benefit in other immune and fibrotic disorders.

  10. Variability in surface antigen expression on neuroblastoma cells as revealed by monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malpas, J.S.; Kemshead, J.T.; Pritchard, J.; Greaves, M.F.

    1982-01-01

    In treatment programmes for neuroblastoma involving autologous bone marrow transplantation, a problem exists in the identification of small numbers of metastatic tumour cells present in the marrow aspirates. Reinfusion of tumour cells along with normal bone marrow may reseed the tumour within a patient who has received high dose chemotherapy. Formalin-induced fluorescence in neuroblastoma is a possible diagnostic aid, but this method has no therapeutic potential. Other methods of detecting tumour relying on gross physiological changes in the patient are not suitable for diagnosis of minimal metastatic disease. As an immunological approach to the problem, rabbit antisera to neuroblastoma have been raised but these reagents suffer from low titre after absorption to make them specific. The authors have used the technique of somatic cell hybridisation to raise monoclonal antibodies which bind to neuroblastoma cells and not to normal haemopoietic progenitors. A panel of such reagents to demonstrate heterogeneity in antigen expression amongst metastatic neuroblastoma cells was employed in a radioimmunoassay as diagnostic aid for this problem. (Auth.)

  11. Chimeric ZHHH neuroglobin acts as a cell membrane-penetrating inducer of neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Nozomu; Onozuka, Wataru; Watanabe, Seiji; Wakasugi, Keisuke

    2017-09-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a heme protein expressed in the vertebrate brain. We previously engineered a chimeric Ngb protein, in which module M1 of human Ngb is replaced by that of zebrafish Ngb, and showed that the chimeric ZHHH Ngb has a cell membrane-penetrating activity similar to that of zebrafish Ngb and also rescues cells from death caused by hypoxia/reoxygenation as does human Ngb. Recently, it was reported that overexpression of mammalian Ngb in neuronal cells induces neurite outgrowth. In this study, we performed neurite outgrowth assays of chimeric Ngb using rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Addition of chimeric Ngb, but not human or zebrafish Ngb, exogenously to the cell medium induces neurite outgrowth. On the other hand, the K7A/K9Q chimeric Ngb double mutant, which cannot translocate into cells, did not induce neurite outgrowth, suggesting that the cell membrane-penetrating activity of the chimeric Ngb is crucial for its neurite outgrowth-promoting activity. We also prepared several site-directed chimeric Ngb mutants and demonstrated that residues crucial for neurite outgrowth-inducing activity of the chimeric Ngb are not exactly the same as those for its neuroprotective activity.

  12. Identification and analysis of pig chimeric mRNAs using RNA sequencing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene fusion is ubiquitous over the course of evolution. It is expected to increase the diversity and complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes through chimeric sequence segments or altered regulation. However, chimeric mRNAs in pigs remain unclear. Here we identified some chimeric mRNAs in pigs and analyzed the expression of them across individuals and breeds using RNA-sequencing data. Results The present study identified 669 putative chimeric mRNAs in pigs, of which 251 chimeric candidates were detected in a set of RNA-sequencing data. The 618 candidates had clear trans-splicing sites, 537 of which obeyed the canonical GU-AG splice rule. Only two putative pig chimera variants whose fusion junction was overlapped with that of a known human chimeric mRNA were found. A set of unique chimeric events were considered middle variances in the expression across individuals and breeds, and revealed non-significant variance between sexes. Furthermore, the genomic region of the 5′ partner gene shares a similar DNA sequence with that of the 3′ partner gene for 458 putative chimeric mRNAs. The 81 of those shared DNA sequences significantly matched the known DNA-binding motifs in the JASPAR CORE database. Four DNA motifs shared in parental genomic regions had significant similarity with known human CTCF binding sites. Conclusions The present study provided detailed information on some pig chimeric mRNAs. We proposed a model that trans-acting factors, such as CTCF, induced the spatial organisation of parental genes to the same transcriptional factory so that parental genes were coordinatively transcribed to give birth to chimeric mRNAs. PMID:22925561

  13. Identification and analysis of pig chimeric mRNAs using RNA sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Lei

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene fusion is ubiquitous over the course of evolution. It is expected to increase the diversity and complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes through chimeric sequence segments or altered regulation. However, chimeric mRNAs in pigs remain unclear. Here we identified some chimeric mRNAs in pigs and analyzed the expression of them across individuals and breeds using RNA-sequencing data. Results The present study identified 669 putative chimeric mRNAs in pigs, of which 251 chimeric candidates were detected in a set of RNA-sequencing data. The 618 candidates had clear trans-splicing sites, 537 of which obeyed the canonical GU-AG splice rule. Only two putative pig chimera variants whose fusion junction was overlapped with that of a known human chimeric mRNA were found. A set of unique chimeric events were considered middle variances in the expression across individuals and breeds, and revealed non-significant variance between sexes. Furthermore, the genomic region of the 5′ partner gene shares a similar DNA sequence with that of the 3′ partner gene for 458 putative chimeric mRNAs. The 81 of those shared DNA sequences significantly matched the known DNA-binding motifs in the JASPAR CORE database. Four DNA motifs shared in parental genomic regions had significant similarity with known human CTCF binding sites. Conclusions The present study provided detailed information on some pig chimeric mRNAs. We proposed a model that trans-acting factors, such as CTCF, induced the spatial organisation of parental genes to the same transcriptional factory so that parental genes were coordinatively transcribed to give birth to chimeric mRNAs.

  14. Obtaining a citric tristeza virus p65 protein antibody and preliminary results of p65 in vivo expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanneth Torres

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The citric tristeza virus (CTV belongs to the Closteroviridae family which indudes the only vegetal viruses possessing genes homologous to HSP70 thermal cellular shock proteins in their genome. Such is the case of the gene encoding for the CTV p65 protein which presents high homology with the HSP70 protein family. It has been shown recently that HSP70h viral proteins (such as CTV p65 are involved both in viral assembly, as a microtubule binding protein, and in cell-cell movement. Since CTV is the most deleterious citrus pathogen, understanding this protein's role in the pathogenesis process is important. Rabbits were immunised with four synthetic peptides (corresponding to CTV p65 thermal shock protein's carboxyl-terminal region to obtain polyclonal antibodies. All the peptides used were immunogenic, even though two of them showed greater response. Whilst none of the antibodies obtained reacted to non-infected plant extract, the p65 proteins was detected in extracts taken from citric plants infected with CTV Based on the antibody's reaction to two Colombian isolates having different serological characteristics, the p65 antibody's immunological behaviour appeared to be independent of the symptomatic severity of the CTV isolates. It was shown that the ORF encoded for the HSP70 homologue in CTV was expressed in vivo, even though the p65 antibody was only detected in concentrated protein extracts taken from infected plants, supporting reports from other studies that the concentration of this protein in plants infected with CTV is low. This is the first time that a polyclonal CTV antibody has been obtained in Colombia against p65 (a protein intervening in viral assembly and movement. Adapting a technique for obtaining p65 antibodies by using synthetic peptides as immunogens could be useful in the future for detecting or diagnosing p65 proteins present in different Colombian CTV isolates, especially in developing studies contributing towards greater

  15. Protein expression profiling by antibody array analysis with use of dried blood spot samples on filter paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weidong; Mao, Ying Qing; Huang, Ruochun; Duan, Chaohui; Xi, Yun; Yang, Kai; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2014-01-31

    Dried blood spot samples (DBSS) on filter paper offer several advantages compared to conventional serum/plasma samples: they do not require any phlebotomy or separation of blood by centrifugation; they are less invasive; they allow sample stability and shipment at room temperature; and they pose a negligible risk of infection with blood-borne viruses, such as HIV, HBV and HCV, to those who handle them. Therefore dried blood spot samples (DBSS) on filter paper can be a quick, convenient and inexpensive means of obtaining blood samples for biomarker discovery, disease screening, diagnosis and treatment monitoring in non-hospitalized, public health settings. In this study, we investigated for the first time the potential application of dried blood spot samples (DBSS) in protein expression profiling using antibody array technology. First, optimal conditions for array assay performance using dried blood spot samples (DBSS) was established, including sample elution buffer, elution time, elution temperature and assay blocking buffer. Second, we analyzed dried blood spot samples (DBSS) using three distinct antibody array platforms, including sandwich-based antibody arrays, quantitative antibody arrays and biotin-label-based antibody arrays. In comparison with paired serum samples, detection of circulating proteins in dried blood spot samples (DBSS) correlated well for both low- and high-abundance proteins on all three antibody array platforms. In conclusion, our study strongly indicates the novel application of multiplex antibody array platforms to analyze dried blood spot samples (DBSS) on filter paper represents a viable, cost-effective method for protein profiling, biomarker discovery and disease screening in a large, population-based survey. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chimeric enzymes with improved cellulase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Baker, John O; Himmel, Michael E

    2015-03-31

    Nucleic acid molecules encoding chimeric cellulase polypeptides that exhibit improved cellulase activities are disclosed herein. The chimeric cellulase polypeptides encoded by these nucleic acids and methods to produce the cellulases are also described, along with methods of using chimeric cellulases for the conversion of cellulose to sugars such as glucose.

  17. Liver transplantation : chimerism, complications and matrix metalloproteinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, Willem Rogier ten

    2011-01-01

    Chimerism after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the main focus of the studies described in this thesis. The first study showed that chimerism of different cell lineages within the liver graft does occur after OLT. Subsequently, in allogeneic blood stem cell recipients, chimerism was

  18. Performance Assessment of a Trypanosoma cruzi Chimeric Antigen in Multiplex Liquid Microarray Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fred Luciano Neves; Celedon, Paola Alejandra Fiorani; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Leitolis, Amanda; Crestani, Sandra; Foti, Leonardo; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2017-10-01

    Diagnosing chronic Chagas disease (CD) requires antibody-antigen detection methods, which are traditionally based on enzymatic assay techniques whose performance depend on the type and quality of antigen used. Previously, 4 recombinant chimeric proteins from the Instituto de Biologia Molecular do Paraná (IBMP-8.1 to 8.4) comprising immuno-dominant regions of diverse Trypanosoma cruzi antigens showed excellent diagnostic performance in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Considering that next-generation platforms offer improved CD diagnostic accuracy with different T. cruzi -specific recombinant antigens, we assessed the performance of these chimeras in liquid microarrays (LMAs). The chimeric proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatography. Sera from 653 chagasic and 680 healthy individuals were used to assess the performance of these chimeras in detecting specific anti- T. cruzi antibodies. Accuracies ranged from 98.1 to 99.3%, and diagnostic odds ratio values were 3,548 for IBMP-8.3, 4,826 for IBMP-8.1, 7,882 for IBMP-8.2, and 25,000 for IBMP-8.4. A separate sera bank (851 samples) was employed to assess cross-reactivity with other tropical diseases. Leishmania , a pathogen with high similarity to T. cruzi , showed cross-reactivity rates ranging from 0 to 2.17%. Inconclusive results were negligible (0 to 0.71%). Bland-Altman and Deming regression analysis based on 200 randomly selected CD-positive and negative samples demonstrated interchangeability with respect to CD diagnostic performance in both singleplex and multiplex assays. Our results suggested that these chimeras can potentially replace antigens currently used in commercially available assay kits. Moreover, the use of multiplex platforms, such as LMA assays employing 2 or more IBMP antigens, would abrogate the need for 2 different testing techniques when diagnosing CD. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and cytokine/chemokine secretion by KHYG-1 cells stably expressing FcγRIIIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eiji; Motoi, Sotaro; Sugiura, Masahito; Kajikawa, Masunori; Kojima, Shuji; Kohroki, Junya; Masuho, Yasuhiko

    2014-09-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by natural killer (NK) cells is a major mechanism of tumor therapy with antibodies. NK cells not only manifest cytotoxicity but also secrete a variety of cytokines/chemokines that regulate immune responses. Using a retroviral vector, in this study we established a KHYG-1 cell line that stably expresses FcγRIIIA (CD16A). The KHYG-1/FcγRIIIA cells exerted potent antibody concentration-dependent ADCC, whereas parental KHYG-1 cells did not. In contrast, without antibody, the natural killer activity of KHYG-1/FcγRIIIA cells was less potent than that of parental KHYG-1 cells. During the course of ADCC, KHYG-1/FcγRIIIA cells secreted IFN-γ and MIP-1α dependent upon antibody concentration, but parental KHYG-1 cells did not. These results suggest that KHYG-1/FcγRIIIA cells would be useful in studies to elucidate the function of NK cells and the mechanism of ADCC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mycoplasma infection of cell lines can simulate the expression of Fc receptors by binding of the carbohydrate moiety of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, H; Krausse, R; Lorenzen, J; Havsteen, B

    1985-05-01

    During the production of Fc receptor (FcR)-bearing hybridomas it was observed with a particular monoclonal anti-sheep red blood cell antibody (anti-SRBC 1/5, IgG1) that the contamination with Mycoplasma arginini of in vitro cultured cell lines leads to an apparent FcR activity. This property did not correspond with the serological typing since other antibodies of the same isotype could not support FcR rosette formation. Another mycoplasma strain M. orale lacked this property. Analysis of the binding reaction revealed that M. arginini contains a lectin which binds the carbohydrate moiety of the anti-SRBC 1/5 antibody, i.e. anti-SRBC 1/5 synthesized under the influence of tunicamycin or deglycosylated by NaIO4 oxidation did not support rosette formation. These data suggest that binding of antibodies to certain mycoplasma strains may be a pathogenic factor during mycoplasma infections by masking the microorganisms with the host's own defense molecules. The experiments with M. arginini-infected cell lines gain immunological importance since we obtained identical results with staphylococcal protein A, as another bacteriological FcR, and cell lines expressing intrinsic membrane FcR. Although it is an open question whether the glycoconjugates are directly bound by the FcR or else by influencing the three-dimensional structure of the antibodies, it seems possible that FcR in general may be lectins.

  1. Petunia AGAMOUS enhancer-derived chimeric promoters specify a carpel-, stamen- and petal-specific expression pattern sufficient for engineering male and female sterility in tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that the AtAGIP promoter derived from the Arabidopsis AGAMOUS (AG) second intron/enhancer specifies a carpel- and stamen-specific pattern of expression in its native host species but not in heterologous species, such as tobacco which restricts its application in the engin...

  2. Comparison of immunoglobulin E measurements on IMMULITE and ImmunoCAP in samples consisting of allergen-specific mouse-human chimeric monoclonal antibodies towards allergen extracts and four recombinant allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szecsi, Pal B; Stender, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody in vitro tests are performed on enzyme immunoassay systems. Poor agreement among systems has been reported and comparisons have been made exclusively with allergen extracts - not with recombinant allergens. Here we compare the ImmunoCAP and the IMMULITE sy...

  3. Tubular and endothelial chimerism in renal allografts using fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization (FISH, CISH) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Zsuzsanna; Gaspert, Ariana; Behnke, Silvia; von Teichman, Adriana; Fritzsche, Florian; Fehr, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    The role of endothelial and tubular chimerism in renal allograft adaptation and rejection varies in different studies. We addressed the correlation between different clinico-pathological settings and sex-chromosomal endothelial and/or tubular chimerism in renal allografts. We examined the presence or absence of the X and Y chromosomes by fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization (FISH, CISH) methodology on paraffin embedded kidney biopsies in 16 gender mismatched renal transplants (1 to 12 years post-transplantation). Twelve patients were male, four female. Four groups were selected: (i) Vascular calcineurin inhibitor toxicity without rejection; (ii) T-cell mediated vascular rejection; (iii) antibody mediated rejection; and (iv) C4d-positivity in AB0-incompatible transplants with or without rejection. Twelve non-transplant kidney biopsies (8 female, 4 male) were used as controls. Tubular chimerism was detected more frequently (69%) than endothelial chimerism (12%) in renal transplants. One of 12 control patients had tubular and endothelial chimeric cells (8%). The Y chromosome occurred in 8/12 male recipients (67%) in tubular epithelial cells and in 5/12 male recipients (42%) in endothelial cells. Double X chromosomes were detected in 3/4 female recipients in tubular epithelium. Tubular chimerism occurred more often with endothelial chimerism and capillaritis without correlation with other parameters, such as rejection. Combined Y chromosomal tubular and lymphatic endothelial chimerism correlated with T-cell mediated vascular rejection in two out of three patients (66%). Combined Y chromosomal tubular and peritubular capillary chimerism correlated with antibody mediated C4d+ rejection in one out of two patients (50%). Tubular and/or endothelial chimerism occur frequently in gender mismatched renal allografts and, when combined, this is associated with T-cell mediated rejection. © 2012 The Authors. Pathology International © 2012 Japanese Society of

  4. Development of new versions of anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies with potentially reduced immunogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Weizhu; Wang Ling; Li Bohua; Wang Hao; Hou Sheng; Hong Xueyu; Zhang Dapeng; Guo Yajun

    2008-01-01

    Despite the widespread clinical use of CD34 antibodies for the purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, all the current anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are murine, which have the potential to elicit human antimouse antibody (HAMA) immune response. In the present study, we developed three new mouse anti-human CD34 mAbs which, respectively, belonged to class I, class II and class III CD34 epitope antibodies. In an attempt to reduce the immunogenicity of these three murine mAbs, their chimeric antibodies, which consisted of mouse antibody variable regions fused genetically to human antibody constant regions, were constructed and characterized. The anti-CD34 chimeric antibodies were shown to possess affinity and specificity similar to that of their respective parental murine antibodies. Due to the potentially better safety profiles, these chimeric antibodies might become alternatives to mouse anti-CD34 antibodies routinely used for clinical application

  5. Activation/proliferation and apoptosis of bystander goat lymphocytes induced by a macrophage-tropic chimeric caprine arthritis encephalitis virus expressing SIV Nef

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzar, Baya Amel; Rea, Angela; Hoc-Villet, Stephanie; Garnier, Celine; Guiguen, Francois; Jin Yuhuai; Narayan, Opendra; Chebloune, Yahia

    2007-01-01

    Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) is the natural lentivirus of goats, well known for its tropism for macrophages and its inability to cause infection in lymphocytes. The viral genome lacks nef, tat, vpu and vpx coding sequences. To test the hypothesis that when nef is expressed by the viral genome, the virus became toxic for lymphocytes during replication in macrophages, we inserted the SIVsmm PBj14 nef coding sequences into the genome of CAEV thereby generating CAEV-nef. This recombinant virus is not infectious for lymphocytes but is fully replication competent in goat macrophages in which it constitutively expresses the SIV Nef. We found that goat lymphocytes cocultured with CAEV-nef-infected macrophages became activated, showing increased expression of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R). Activation correlated with increased proliferation of the cells. Interestingly, a dual effect in terms of apoptosis regulation was observed in exposed goat lymphocytes. Nef was found first to induce a protection of lymphocytes from apoptosis during the first few days following exposure to infected macrophages, but later it induced increased apoptosis in the activated lymphocytes. This new recombinant virus provides a model to study the functions of Nef in the context of infection of macrophages, but in absence of infection of T lymphocytes and brings new insights into the biological effects of Nef on lymphocytes

  6. Characterization of the neutralization determinants of equine arteritis virus using recombinant chimeric viruses and site-specific mutagenesis of an infectious cDNA clone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasuriya, Udeni B.R.; Dobbe, Jessika C.; Heidner, Hans W.; Smalley, Victoria L.; Navarrette, Andrea; Snijder, Eric J.; MacLachlan, N. James

    2004-01-01

    We have used an infectious cDNA clone of equine arteritis virus (EAV) and reverse genetics technology to further characterize the neutralization determinants in the GP5 envelope glycoprotein of the virus. We generated a panel of 20 recombinant viruses, including 10 chimeric viruses that each contained the ORF5 (which encodes GP5) of different laboratory, field, and vaccine strains of EAV, a chimeric virus containing the N-terminal ectodomain of GP5 of a European strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and 9 mutant viruses with site-specific substitutions in their GP5 proteins. The neutralization phenotype of each recombinant chimeric/mutant strain of EAV was determined with EAV-specific monoclonal antibodies and EAV strain-specific polyclonal equine antisera and compared to that of their parental viruses from which the substituted ORF5 was derived. The data unequivocally confirm that the GP5 ectodomain contains critical determinants of EAV neutralization. Furthermore, individual neutralization sites are conformationally interactive, and the interaction of GP5 with the unglycosylated membrane protein M is likely critical to expression of individual epitopes in neutralizing conformation. Substitution of individual amino acids within the GP5 ectodomain usually resulted in differences in neutralization phenotype of the recombinant viruses, analogous to differences in the neutralization phenotype of field strains of EAV and variants generated during persistent infection of EAV carrier stallions

  7. A rat monoclonal antibody that recognizes pro- and active MMP-7 indicates polarized expression in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fingleton, Barbara; Powell, William C; Crawford, Howard C

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of enzymes named for their ability to degrade proteins of the extracellular matrix. Here we describe the characterization of a rat monoclonal antibody specifically recognizing one member of this enzyme family, MMP-7. This antibody has been tested...... for its use in multiple assay types and was shown to be useful for direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, immunocytochemistry, and immunohistochemistry of frozen or paraffin-embedded tissues. The antibody has been evaluated for its usefulness with tissues from several...

  8. A chimeric antigen receptor for TRAIL-receptor 1 induces apoptosis in various types of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eiji; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Hamana, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Hidetoshi; Jin, Aishun; Lin, Zhezhu; Muraguchi, Atsushi

    2014-10-31

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its associated receptors (TRAIL-R/TR) are attractive targets for cancer therapy because TRAIL induces apoptosis in tumor cells through TR while having little cytotoxicity on normal cells. Therefore, many agonistic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for TR have been produced, and these induce apoptosis in multiple tumor cell types. However, some TR-expressing tumor cells are resistant to TR-specific mAb-induced apoptosis. In this study, we constructed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) of a TRAIL-receptor 1 (TR1)-specific single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody (TR1-scFv-CAR) and expressed it on a Jurkat T cell line, the KHYG-1 NK cell line, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). We found that the TR1-scFv-CAR-expressing Jurkat cells killed target cells via TR1-mediated apoptosis, whereas TR1-scFv-CAR-expressing KHYG-1 cells and PBLs killed target cells not only via TR1-mediated apoptosis but also via CAR signal-induced cytolysis, resulting in cytotoxicity on a broader range if target cells than with TR1-scFv-CAR-expressing Jurkat cells. The results suggest that TR1-scFv-CAR could be a new candidate for cancer gene therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sonoporation delivery of monoclonal antibodies against human papillomavirus 16 E6 restores p53 expression in transformed cervical keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Togtema

    Full Text Available High-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV, such as HPV16, have been found in nearly all cases of cervical cancer. Therapies targeted at blocking the HPV16 E6 protein and its deleterious effects on the tumour suppressor pathways of the cell can reverse the malignant phenotype of affected keratinocytes while sparing uninfected cells. Through a strong interdisciplinary collaboration between engineering and biology, a novel, non-invasive intracellular delivery method for the HPV16 E6 antibody, F127-6G6, was developed. The method employs high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU in combination with microbubbles, in a process known as sonoporation. In this proof of principle study, it was first demonstrated that sonoporation antibody delivery into the HPV16 positive cervical carcinoma derived cell lines CaSki and SiHa was possible, using chemical transfection as a baseline for comparison. Delivery of the E6 antibody using sonoporation significantly restored p53 expression in these cells, indicating the antibody is able to enter the cells and remains active. This delivery method is targeted, non-cytotoxic, and non-invasive, making it more easily translatable for in vivo experiments than other transfection methods.

  10. Characterization and expression of the human T cell receptor-T3 complex by monoclonal antibody F101.01

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Plesner, T; Pallesen, G

    1988-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) F101.01 reacting with the T cell receptor (TCR)-T3 complex is presented. Immunohistological studies showed that F101.01 specifically stains T-zone lymphocytes in lymph nodes, tonsils, and splenic tissue. Two-colour immunofluorescence and flow cytometry...... demonstrated co-expression of the antigen defined by F101.01 and the pan-T cell antigens defined by CD2, CD3, CD5, and CD7 antibodies. Cells stained with CD4 and CD8 antibodies were both included in the F101.01-positive population, whereas CD16-positive natural killer cells (NK), B cells (CD19 and CD20......), and myeloid cells (CD13 and CD33) were excluded. The target antigen of F101.01 co-modulated with the CD3-defined antigen (T3) and the TCR recognized by the MoAb WT-31. CD3 antibody and WT-31 both blocked binding of F101.01. F101.01 precipitated the TCR-T3 complex from lysates of 125I-labelled peripheral blood...

  11. Enhanced protective efficacy of a chimeric form of the schistosomiasis vaccine antigen Sm-TSP-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S Pearson

    Full Text Available The large extracellular loop of the Schistosoma mansoni tetraspanin, Sm-TSP-2, when fused to a thioredoxin partner and formulated with Freund's adjuvants, has been shown to be an efficacious vaccine against murine schistosomiasis. Moreover, Sm-TSP-2 is uniquely recognised by IgG(1 and IgG(3 from putatively resistant individuals resident in S. mansoni endemic areas in Brazil. In the present study, we expressed Sm-TSP-2 at high yield and in soluble form in E. coli without the need for a solubility enhancing fusion partner. We also expressed in E. coli a chimera called Sm-TSP-2/5B, which consisted of Sm-TSP-2 fused to the immunogenic 5B region of the hookworm aspartic protease and vaccine antigen, Na-APR-1. Sm-TSP-2 formulated with alum/CpG showed significant reductions in adult worm and liver egg burdens in two separate murine schistosomiasis challenge studies. Sm-TSP-2/5B afforded significantly greater protection than Sm-TSP-2 alone when both antigens were formulated with alum/CpG. The enhanced protection obtained with the chimeric fusion protein was associated with increased production of anti-Sm-TSP-2 antibodies and IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ from spleen cells of vaccinated animals. Sera from 666 individuals from Brazil who were infected with S. mansoni were screened for potentially deleterious IgE responses to Sm-TSP-2. Anti-Sm-TSP-2 IgE to this protein was not detected (also shown previously for Na-APR-1, suggesting that the chimeric antigen Sm-TSP-2/5B could be used to safely and effectively vaccinate people in areas where schistosomes and hookworms are endemic.

  12. Recurrent chimeric RNAs enriched in human prostate cancer identified by deep sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Kalpana; Wang, Liguo; Wang, Jianghua; Ittmann, Michael M.; Li, Wei; Yen, Laising

    2011-01-01

    Transcription-induced chimeric RNAs, possessing sequences from different genes, are expected to increase the proteomic diversity through chimeric proteins or altered regulation. Despite their importance, few studies have focused on chimeric RNAs especially regarding their presence/roles in human cancers. By deep sequencing the transcriptome of 20 human prostate cancer and 10 matched benign prostate tissues, we obtained 1.3 billion sequence reads, which led to the identification of 2,369 chimeric RNA candidates. Chimeric RNAs occurred in significantly higher frequency in cancer than in matched benign samples. Experimental investigation of a selected 46 set led to the confirmation of 32 chimeric RNAs, of which 27 were highly recurrent and previously undescribed in prostate cancer. Importantly, a subset of these chimeras was present in prostate cancer cell lines, but not detectable in primary human prostate epithelium cells, implying their associations with cancer. These chimeras contain discernable 5′ and 3′ splice sites at the RNA junction, indicating that their formation is mediated by splicing. Their presence is also largely independent of the expression of parental genes, suggesting that other factors are involved in their production and regulation. One chimera, TMEM79-SMG5, is highly differentially expressed in human cancer samples and therefore a potential biomarker. The prevalence of chimeric RNAs may allow the limited number of human genes to encode a substantially larger number of RNAs and proteins, forming an additional layer of cellular complexity. Together, our results suggest that chimeric RNAs are widespread, and increased chimeric RNA events could represent a unique class of molecular alteration in cancer. PMID:21571633

  13. Study of cancer-specific chimeric promoters induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Jie; Zhou Yunfeng; Sun Wenjie; Wang Weifeng; Liao Zhengkai; Zhou Fuxiang; Xie Conghua

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To combine the radio-inducible CArG element with cancer-specific human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene promoter, and to construct the novel chimeric promoters. Methods: The synthetic hTERT promoters containing different number of radio-inducible CArG elements were constructed, and the activities of the promoters in the cancer cells (HeLa, A549, and MHCC97 cells) and nomal cells (hEL cells) were detected by using luciferase-reporter assays after the treatment of irradiation (a single or fractionated irradiation dose). Results: Synthetic promoter containing 6 repeated CArG units was better in radio-inducibility than any other promoters containing different number of CArG units, and nearly maximum levels obtained at 4-6 Gy. The very low activities of the chimeric promoters could be detected in normal hEL cells. A similar level of reporter gene expression was observed after 3 fractionated doses of 2 Gy compared with a single dose of 6 Gy in cancer cells. Conclusions: The cancer-specific chimeric promoter containing 6 CArG elements showes the best radio-response, and the chimeric promoter system has the potential in cancer gene therapy. (authors)

  14. Chimeric RNAs as potential biomarkers for tumor diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhou

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancers claim millions of lives each year. Early detection thatcan enable a higher chance of cure is of paramount importanceto cancer patients. However, diagnostic tools for many forms oftumors have been lacking. Over the last few years, studies ofchimeric RNAs as biomarkers have emerged. Numerous reportsusing bioinformatics and screening methodologies havedescribed more than 30,000 expressed sequence tags (EST orcDNA sequences as putative chimeric RNAs. While cancer cellshave been well known to contain fusion genes derived fromchromosomal translocations, rearrangements or deletions, recentstudies suggest that trans-splicing in cells may be another sourceof chimeric RNA production. Unlike cis-splicing, trans-splicingtakes place between two pre-mRNA molecules, which are inmost cases derived from two different genes, generating achimeric non-co-linear RNA. It is possible that trans-splicingoccurs in normal cells at high frequencies but the resultingchimeric RNAs exist only at low levels. However the levels ofcertain RNA chimeras may be elevated in cancers, leading to theformation of fusion genes. In light of the fact that chimeric RNAshave been shown to be overrepresented in various tumors,studies of the mechanisms that produce chimeric RNAs andidentification of signature RNA chimeras as biomarkers presentan opportunity for the development of diagnoses for early tumordetection. (BMB reports 2012; 45(3: 133-140

  15. Protein chimerism: novel source of protein diversity in humans adds complexity to bottom-up proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado-Vela, Juan; Lacal, Juan Carlos; Elortza, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Three main molecular mechanisms are considered to contribute expanding the repertoire and diversity of proteins present in living organisms: first, at DNA level (gene polymorphisms and single nucleotide polymorphisms); second, at messenger RNA (pre-mRNA and mRNA) level including alternative splicing (also termed differential splicing or cis-splicing); finally, at the protein level mainly driven through PTM and specific proteolytic cleavages. Chimeric mRNAs constitute an alternative source of protein diversity, which can be generated either by chromosomal translocations or by trans-splicing events. The occurrence of chimeric mRNAs and proteins is a frequent event in cells from the immune system and cancer cells, mainly as a consequence of gene rearrangements. Recent reports support that chimeric proteins may also be expressed at low levels under normal physiological circumstances, thus, representing a novel source of protein diversity. Notably, recent publications demonstrate that chimeric protein products can be successfully identified through bottom-up proteomic analyses. Several questions remain unsolved, such as the physiological role and impact of such chimeric proteins or the potential occurrence of chimeric proteins in higher eukaryotic organisms different from humans. The occurrence of chimeric proteins certainly seems to be another unforeseen source of complexity for the proteome. It may be a process to take in mind not only when performing bottom-up proteomic analyses in cancer studies but also in general bottom-up proteomics experiments. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. A novel chimeric protein composed of recombinant Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens as a vaccine candidate evaluated in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Natasha Rodrigues; Jorge, Sérgio; Gomes, Charles Klazer; Rizzi, Caroline; Pacce, Violetta Dias; Collares, Thais Farias; Monte, Leonardo Garcia; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio

    2017-03-01

    Enzootic Pneumonia (EP) is caused by the Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae pathogenic bacteria, and it represents a significant respiratory disease that is responsible for major economic losses within the pig industry throughout the world. The bacterins that are currently commercially available have been proven to offer only partial protection against M. hyopneumoniae, and the development of more efficient vaccines is required. Several recombinant antigens have been evaluated via different immunization strategies and have been found to be highly immunogenic. This work describes the construction and immunological characterization of a multi-antigen chimera composed of four M. hyopneumoniae antigens: P97R1, P46, P95, and P42. Immunogenic regions of each antigen were selected and combined to encode a single polypeptide. The gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the chimeric protein was recognized by specific antibodies against each subunit, as well as by convalescent pig sera. The immunogenic properties of the chimera were then evaluated in a mice model through two recombinant vaccines that were formulated as follows: (1) purified chimeric protein plus adjuvant or (2) recombinant Escherichia coli bacterin. The immune response induced in BALB/c mice immunized with each formulation was characterized in terms of total IgG levels, IgG1, and IgG2a isotypes against each antigen present in the chimera. The results of the study indicated that novel chimeric protein is a potential candidate for the future development of a more effective vaccine against EP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. B7h-expressing dendritic cells and plasma B cells mediate distinct outcomes of ICOS costimulation in T cell-dependent antibody responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larimore Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ICOS-B7h costimulatory receptor-ligand pair is required for germinal center formation, the production of isotype-switched antibodies, and antibody affinity maturation in response to T cell-dependent antigens. However, the potentially distinct roles of regulated B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in T cell-dependent antibody responses have not been defined. Results We generated transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression to assess the cell-type specific roles of B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in regulating T cell-dependent antibody responses. Our results show that endogenous B7h expression is reduced on B cells after activation in vitro and is also reduced in vivo on antibody-secreting plasma B cells in comparison to both naïve and germinal center B cells from which they are derived. Increasing the level of B7h expression on activated and plasma B cells in B-B7hTg mice led to an increase in the number of antibody-secreting plasma cells generated after immunization and a corresponding increase in the concentration of antigen-specific high affinity serum IgG antibodies of all isotypes, without affecting the number of responding germinal center B cells. In contrast, ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells in DC-B7hTg mice contributed to germinal center formation and selectively increased IgG2a production without affecting the overall magnitude of antibody responses. Conclusions Using transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression, we have revealed distinct roles of ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells and B cells in the regulation of T cell-dependent antibody responses.

  18. Expression of deleted, atoxic atypical recombinant beta2 toxin in a baculovirus system and production of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serroni, Anna; Magistrali, Chiara Francesca; Pezzotti, Giovanni; Bano, Luca; Pellegrini, Martina; Severi, Giulio; Di Pancrazio, Chiara; Luciani, Mirella; Tittarelli, Manuela; Tofani, Silvia; De Giuseppe, Antonio

    2017-05-25

    Clostridium perfringens is an important animal and human pathogen that can produce more than 16 different major and minor toxins. The beta-2 minor toxin (CPB2), comprising atypical and consensus variants, appears to be involved in both human and animal enterotoxaemia syndrome. The exact role of CPB2 in pathogenesis is poorly investigated, and its mechanism of action at the molecular level is still unknown because of the lack of specific reagents such as monoclonal antibodies against the CPB2 protein and/or the availability of a highly purified antigen. Previous studies have reported that purified wild-type or recombinant CPB2 toxin, expressed in a heterologous system, presented cytotoxic effects on human intestinal cell lines. Undoubtedly, for this reason, to date, these purified proteins have not yet been used for the production of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Recently, monoclonal antibodies against CPB2 were generated using peptides designed on predicted antigenic epitopes of this toxin. In this paper we report, for the first time, the expression in a baculovirus system of a deleted recombinant C-terminal 6xHis-tagged atypical CPB2 toxin (rCPB2 Δ1-25 -His 6 ) lacking the 25 amino acids (aa) of the N-terminal putative signal sequence. A high level of purified recombinant rCPB2 Δ1-25 -His 6 was obtained after purification by Ni 2+ affinity chromatography. The purified product showed no in vitro and in vivo toxicity. Polyclonal antibodies and twenty hybridoma-secreting Mabs were generated using purified rCPB2 Δ1-25 -His 6 . Finally, the reactivity and specificity of the new antibodies were tested against both recombinant and wild-type CPB2 toxins. The high-throughput of purified atoxic recombinant CPB2 produced in insect cells, allowed to obtain monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. The availability of these molecules could contribute to develop immunoenzymatic methods and/or to perform studies about the biological activity of CPB2 toxin.

  19. Circulating microRNA expression pattern separates patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis from healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skoglund, C.; Carlsen, A.; Weiner, M.

    2015-01-01

    patients from healthy subjects as well as from renal transplant recipients. Loadings plots indicated similar contribution of the same miRNAs in both cohorts to the PCA. Renal engagement was important for miRNA expression but consistent correlations between estimated glomerular filtration rate and mi......Objective. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV) has an unpredictable course and better biomarkers are needed. Micro-RNAs in body fluids are protected from degradation and might be used as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis, here we explore the potential in AAV...... individual miRNAs were differently expressed compared to controls in both cohorts; miR-29a, -34a, -142-3p and -383 were up-regulated and miR-20a, -92a and -221 were down-regulated. Cluster analysis as well as principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that patterns of miRNA expression differentiate AAV...

  20. Expression of Recombinant Potato leafroll virus Structural and Non-structural Proteins for Antibody Production

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plchová, Helena; Moravec, Tomáš; Dědič, P.; Čeřovská, Noemi

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 159, č. 2 (2011), s. 130-132 ISSN 0931-1785 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M06030; GA MZe QH71123 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Potato leafroll virus * recombinant viral antigen * antibody production Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.791, year: 2011

  1. Antibodies Expressed by Intratumoral B Cells as the Basis for a Diagnostic Test for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    including stromal, endothelial, and immune cells (20,21). Tumors can be infiltrated with many types of lymphocytes, some that may foster and others that may...reactive and less clonally expanded anti-hemagglutinin antibodies than influenza vaccination. PLoS One 6, e25797 32. Chen, Z. J., Wheeler , C. J., Shi, W

  2. Detection of cytokine expression patterns in the peripheral blood of patients with acute leukemia by antibody microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Li, Mei; Wu, Yao-hui; Zhu, Xiao-jian; Zeng, Chen; Zou, Ping; Chen, Zhi-chao

    2014-04-01

    The cytokines of acute leukemia (AL) patients have certain expression patterns, forming a complex network involved in diagnosis, progression, and prognosis. We collected the serum of different AL patients before and after complete remission (CR) for detection of cytokines by using an antibody chip. The expression patterns of cytokines were determined by using bioinformatics computational analysis. The results showed that there were significant differences in the cytokine expression patterns between AL patients and normal controls, as well as between acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In confirmatory test, ELISA revealed the expression of uPAR in AL. Moreover, the bioinformatic analysis showed that the differentially expressed cytokines among the AL groups were involved in different biological behaviors and were closely related with the development of the disease. It was concluded that the cytokine expression pattern of AL patients is significantly different from that of healthy volunteers. Also, differences of cytokine expression patterns exist between AML and ALL, and between before and after CR in the same subtype of AL, which holds important clinical significance for revealing disease progression.

  3. Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response in mice is primarily dependent on the Ah phenotype of lymphoid tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silkworth, J.B.; Antrim, L.A.; Sack, G.

    1986-01-01

    Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons act through the aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor in mice to produce a series of toxic effects of the immune system. The receptor protein is a product of the Ah gene locus. Ah responsive (Ahb/Ahb) mice express a high affinity receptor in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues whereas nonresponsive Ahd/Ahd mice express a poor affinity receptor. To determine the role of the Ah receptor of lymphoid tissue relative to that of nonlymphoid tissue in the induction of immune impairment, bone marrow was used to reconstitute lethally irradiated mice of the same or opposite Ah phenotype. All mice were given 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (35 and 350 mumol/kg) ip 2 days before immunization with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). The immune response to this T dependent antigen and organ weights were determined 5 or 7 days later in normal or chimeric mice, respectively. Monoclonal Lyt 1.1 and Lyt 1.2 antibodies were used to establish the origin of the cells which repopulated the chimeric thymuses. The immune responses of both BALB/cBy (Ahb/Ahb) and the BALB/cBy X DBA/2 hybrid, CByD2F1 (Ahb/Ahd), were significantly suppressed but DBA/2 mice were unaffected. The immune responses of chimeric BALB/cBy----BALB/cBy and BALB/cBy----DBA/2 (donor----recipient) mice were also significantly suppressed and thymic atrophy was observed in both cases. The serum anti-SRBC antibody titers of DBA/2----BALB/cBy chimeras were also significantly decreased although not to the same extent as in BALB/cBy----DBA/2 mice. Chimeric DBA/2----DBA/2 mice were not affected. These results indicate that the sensitivity to Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response is primarily determined by the Ah phenotype of the lymphoid tissue

  4. Detection of high PD-L1 expression in oral cancers by a novel monoclonal antibody L1Mab-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Yamada

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1, which is a ligand of programmed cell death-1 (PD-1, is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein that is expressed on antigen-presenting cells and several tumor cells, including melanoma and lung cancer cells. There is a strong correlation between human PD-L1 (hPD-L1 expression on tumor cells and negative prognosis in cancer patients. In this study, we produced a novel anti-hPD-L1 monoclonal antibody (mAb, L1Mab-4 (IgG2b, kappa, using cell-based immunization and screening (CBIS method and investigated hPD-L1 expression in oral cancers. L1Mab-4 reacted with oral cancer cell lines (Ca9-22, HO-1-u-1, SAS, HSC-2, HSC-3, and HSC-4 in flow cytometry and stained oral cancers in a membrane-staining pattern. L1Mab-4 stained 106/150 (70.7% of oral squamous cell carcinomas, indicating the very high sensitivity of L1Mab-4. These results indicate that L1Mab-4 could be useful for investigating the function of hPD-L1 in oral cancers. Keywords: Programmed cell death-ligand 1, Monoclonal antibody, Oral cancer

  5. [Immunoreactivity of chimeric proteins carrying poliovirus epitopes on the VP6 of rotavirus as a vector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, X-X; Zhao, B-X; Teng, Y-M; Xia, W-Y; Wang, J; Li, X-F; Liao, G-Y; Yang, С; Chen, Y-D

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus and poliovirus continue to present significant risks and burden of disease to children in developing countries. Developing a combined vaccine may effectively prevent both illnesses and may be advantageous in terms of maximizing compliance and vaccine coverage at the same visit. Recently, we sought to generate a vaccine vector by incorporating multiple epitopes into the rotavirus group antigenic protein, VP6. In the present study, a foreign epitope presenting a system using VP6 as a vector was created with six sites on the outer surface of the vector that could be used for insertion of foreign epitopes, and three VP6-based PV1 epitope chimeric proteins were constructed. The chimeric proteins were confirmed by immunoblot, immunofluorescence assay, and injected into guinea pigs to analyze the epitope-specific humoral response. Results showed that these chimeric proteins reacted with anti-VP6F and -PV1 antibodies, and elicited antibodies against both proteins in guinea pigs. Antibodies against the chimeric proteins carrying PV1 epitopes neutralized rotavirus Wa and PV1 infection in vitro. Our study contributes to a better understanding of the use of VP6-based vectors as multiple-epitope delivery vehicles and the epitopes displayed in this form could be considered for development of epitope-based vaccines against rotavirus and poliovirus.

  6. Chimeric avian paramyxovirus-based vector immunization against highly pathogenic avian influenza followed by conventional Newcastle disease vaccination eliminates lack of protection from virulent ND virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Steglich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we described a chimeric, hemagglutinin of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV H5 expressing Newcastle disease virus (NDV-based vector vaccine (chNDVFHNPMV8H5 in which NDV envelope glycoproteins were replaced by those of avian paramyxovirus-8 (APMV-8. This chimeric vaccine induced solid protection against lethal HPAIV H5N1 even in chickens with maternal antibodies against NDV (MDA+. However, due to the absence of the major NDV immunogens it failed to induce protection against Newcastle disease (ND. Here, we report on protection of MDA+ chickens against HPAI H5N1 and ND, by vaccination with chNDVFHNPMV8H5 either on day 1 or day seven after hatch, and subsequent immunization with live attenuated NDV seven days later. Vaccination was well tolerated and three weeks after immunization, challenge infections with highly pathogenic NDV as well as HPAIV H5N1 were carried out. All animals remained healthy without exhibiting any clinical signs, whereas non-vaccinated animals showed morbidity and mortality. Therefore, vaccination with chNDVFHNPMV8H5 can be followed by NDV vaccination to protect chickens from HPAIV as well as NDV, indicating that the antibody response against chNDVFHNPMV8H5 does not interfere with live ND vaccination.

  7. Improved decision making for prioritizing tumor targeting antibodies in human xenografts: Utility of fluorescence imaging to verify tumor target expression, antibody binding and optimization of dosage and application schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, Michael; Haupt, Ute; Scheuer, Werner

    2017-01-01

    Preclinical efficacy studies of antibodies targeting a tumor-associated antigen are only justified when the expression of the relevant antigen has been demonstrated. Conventionally, antigen expression level is examined by immunohistochemistry of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue section. This method represents the diagnostic "gold standard" for tumor target evaluation, but is affected by a number of factors, such as epitope masking and insufficient antigen retrieval. As a consequence, variances and discrepancies in histological staining results can occur, which may influence decision-making and therapeutic outcome. To overcome these problems, we have used different fluorescence-labeled therapeutic antibodies targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family members and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) in combination with fluorescence imaging modalities to determine tumor antigen expression, drug-target interaction, and biodistribution and tumor saturation kinetics in non-small cell lung cancer xenografts. For this, whole-body fluorescence intensities of labeled antibodies, applied as a single compound or antibody mixture, were measured in Calu-1 and Calu-3 tumor-bearing mice, then ex vivo multispectral tumor tissue analysis at microscopic resolution was performed. With the aid of this simple and fast imaging method, we were able to analyze the tumor cell receptor status of HER1-3 and IGF1R, monitor the antibody-target interaction and evaluate the receptor binding sites of anti-HER2-targeting antibodies. Based on this, the most suitable tumor model, best therapeutic antibody, and optimal treatment dosage and application schedule was selected. Predictions drawn from obtained imaging data were in excellent concordance with outcome of conducted preclinical efficacy studies. Our results clearly demonstrate the great potential of combined in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging for the preclinical development and characterization of

  8. A novel method to generate T-cell receptor-deficient chimeric antigen receptor T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Takahiro; Wong, Desmond; Png, Yi Tian; Campana, Dario

    2018-03-13

    Practical methods are needed to increase the applicability and efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies. Using donor-derived CAR-T cells is attractive, but expression of endogenous T-cell receptors (TCRs) carries the risk for graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). To remove surface TCRαβ, we combined an antibody-derived single-chain variable fragment specific for CD3ε with 21 different amino acid sequences predicted to retain it intracellularly. After transduction in T cells, several of these protein expression blockers (PEBLs) colocalized intracellularly with CD3ε, blocking surface CD3 and TCRαβ expression. In 25 experiments, median TCRαβ expression in T lymphocytes was reduced from 95.7% to 25.0%; CD3/TCRαβ cell depletion yielded virtually pure TCRαβ-negative T cells. Anti-CD3ε PEBLs abrogated TCRαβ-mediated signaling, without affecting immunophenotype or proliferation. In anti-CD3ε PEBL-T cells, expression of an anti-CD19-41BB-CD3ζ CAR induced cytokine secretion, long-term proliferation, and CD19 + leukemia cell killing, at rates meeting or exceeding those of CAR-T cells with normal CD3/TCRαβ expression. In immunodeficient mice, anti-CD3ε PEBL-T cells had markedly reduced GVHD potential; when transduced with anti-CD19 CAR, these T cells killed engrafted leukemic cells. PEBL blockade of surface CD3/TCRαβ expression is an effective tool to prepare allogeneic CAR-T cells. Combined PEBL and CAR expression can be achieved in a single-step procedure, is easily adaptable to current cell manufacturing protocols, and can be used to target other T-cell molecules to further enhance CAR-T-cell therapies. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. Targeting Malignant Brain Tumors with Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Razpotnik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies have been shown to be a potent therapeutic tool. However, their use for targeting brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers, has been limited, particularly because the blood–brain barrier (BBB makes brain tissue hard to access by conventional antibody-targeting strategies. In this review, we summarize new antibody therapeutic approaches to target brain tumors, especially malignant gliomas, as well as their potential drawbacks. Many different brain delivery platforms for antibodies have been studied such as liposomes, nanoparticle-based systems, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs, and cell-based approaches. We have already shown the successful delivery of single-chain fragment variable (scFv with CPP as a linker between two variable domains in the brain. Antibodies normally face poor penetration through the BBB, with some variants sufficiently passing the barrier on their own. A “Trojan horse” method allows passage of biomolecules, such as antibodies, through the BBB by receptor-mediated transcytosis (RMT. Such examples of therapeutic antibodies are the bispecific antibodies where one binding specificity recognizes and binds a BBB receptor, enabling RMT and where a second binding specificity recognizes an antigen as a therapeutic target. On the other hand, cell-based systems such as stem cells (SCs are a promising delivery system because of their tumor tropism and ability to cross the BBB. Genetically engineered SCs can be used in gene therapy, where they express anti-tumor drugs, including antibodies. Different types and sources of SCs have been studied for the delivery of therapeutics to the brain; both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and neural stem cells (NSCs show great potential. Following the success in treatment of leukemias and lymphomas, the adoptive T-cell therapies, especially the chimeric antigen receptor-T cells (CAR-Ts, are making their way into glioma treatment as another type of cell

  10. Epitopes of MUC1 Tandem Repeats in Cancer as Revealed by Antibody Crystallography: Toward Glycopeptide Signature-Guided Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapeng Zhou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Abnormally O-glycosylated MUC1 tandem repeat glycopeptide epitopes expressed by multiple types of cancer have long been attractive targets for therapy in the race against genetic mutations of tumor cells. Glycopeptide signature-guided therapy might be a more promising avenue than mutation signature-guided therapy. Three O-glycosylated peptide motifs, PDTR, GSTA, and GVTS, exist in a tandem repeat HGVTSAPDTRPAPGSTAPPA, containing five O-glycosylation sites. The exact peptide and sugar residues involved in antibody binding are poorly defined. Co-crystal structures of glycopeptides and respective monoclonal antibodies are very few. Here we review 3 groups of monoclonal antibodies: antibodies which only bind to peptide portion, antibodies which only bind to sugar portion, and antibodies which bind to both peptide and sugar portions. The antigenicity of peptide and sugar portions of glyco-MUC1 tandem repeat were analyzed according to available biochemical and structural data, especially the GSTA and GVTS motifs independent from the most studied PDTR. Tn is focused as a peptide-modifying residue in vaccine design, to induce glycopeptide-binding antibodies with cross reactivity to Tn-related tumor glycans, but not glycans of healthy cells. The unique requirement for the designs of antibody in antibody-drug conjugate, bi-specific antibodies, and chimeric antigen receptors are also discussed.

  11. ImmunoPET of tissue factor expression in triple-negative breast cancer with a radiolabeled antibody Fab fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Sixiang; Hong, Hao; Orbay, Hakan; Yang, Yunan; Ohman, Jakob D.; Graves, Stephen A.; Nickles, Robert J.; Liu, Bai; Wong, Hing C.; Cai, Weibo

    2015-01-01

    To date, there is no effective therapy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which has a dismal clinical outcome. Upregulation of tissue factor (TF) expression leads to increased patient morbidity and mortality in many solid tumor types, including TNBC. Our goal was to employ the Fab fragment of ALT-836, a chimeric anti-human TF mAb, for PET imaging of TNBC, which can be used to guide future TNBC therapy. ALT-836-Fab was generated by enzymatic papain digestion. SDS-PAGE and FACS studies were performed to evaluate the integrity and TF binding affinity of ALT-836-Fab before NOTA conjugation and 64 Cu-labeling. Serial PET imaging and biodistribution studies were carried out to evaluate the tumor targeting efficacy and pharmacokinetics in the MDA-MB-231 TNBC model, which expresses high levels of TF on the tumor cells. Blocking studies, histological assessment, as well as RT-PCR were performed to confirm TF specificity of 64 Cu-NOTA-ALT-836-Fab. ALT-836-Fab was produced with high purity, which exhibited superb TF binding affinity and specificity. Serial PET imaging revealed rapid and persistent tumor uptake of 64 Cu-NOTA-ALT-836-Fab (5.1 ± 0.5 %ID/g at 24 h post-injection; n = 4) and high tumor/muscle ratio (7.0 ± 1.2 at 24 h post-injection; n = 4), several-fold higher than that of the blocking group and tumor models that do not express significant level of TF, which was confirmed by biodistribution studies. TF specificity of the tracer was also validated by histology and RT-PCR. 64 Cu-NOTA-ALT-836-Fab exhibited prominent tissue factor targeting efficiency in MDA-MB-231 TNBC model. The use of a Fab fragment led to fast tumor uptake and good tissue/muscle ratio, which may be translated into same-day immunoPET imaging in the clinical setting to improve TNBC patient management. (orig.)

  12. ImmunoPET of tissue factor expression in triple-negative breast cancer with a radiolabeled antibody Fab fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sixiang; Hong, Hao; Orbay, Hakan; Graves, Stephen A; Yang, Yunan; Ohman, Jakob D; Liu, Bai; Nickles, Robert J; Wong, Hing C; Cai, Weibo

    2015-07-01

    To date, there is no effective therapy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which has a dismal clinical outcome. Upregulation of tissue factor (TF) expression leads to increased patient morbidity and mortality in many solid tumor types, including TNBC. Our goal was to employ the Fab fragment of ALT-836, a chimeric anti-human TF mAb, for PET imaging of TNBC, which can be used to guide future TNBC therapy. ALT-836-Fab was generated by enzymatic papain digestion. SDS-PAGE and FACS studies were performed to evaluate the integrity and TF binding affinity of ALT-836-Fab before NOTA conjugation and (64)Cu-labeling. Serial PET imaging and biodistribution studies were carried out to evaluate the tumor targeting efficacy and pharmacokinetics in the MDA-MB-231 TNBC model, which expresses high levels of TF on the tumor cells. Blocking studies, histological assessment, as well as RT-PCR were performed to confirm TF specificity of (64)Cu-NOTA-ALT-836-Fab. ALT-836-Fab was produced with high purity, which exhibited superb TF binding affinity and specificity. Serial PET imaging revealed rapid and persistent tumor uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-ALT-836-Fab (5.1 ± 0.5 %ID/g at 24 h post-injection; n = 4) and high tumor/muscle ratio (7.0 ± 1.2 at 24 h post-injection; n = 4), several-fold higher than that of the blocking group and tumor models that do not express significant level of TF, which was confirmed by biodistribution studies. TF specificity of the tracer was also validated by histology and RT-PCR. (64)Cu-NOTA-ALT-836-Fab exhibited prominent tissue factor targeting efficiency in MDA-MB-231 TNBC model. The use of a Fab fragment led to fast tumor uptake and good tissue/muscle ratio, which may be translated into same-day immunoPET imaging in the clinical setting to improve TNBC patient management.

  13. ImmunoPET of tissue factor expression in triple-negative breast cancer with a radiolabeled antibody Fab fragment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Sixiang [University of Wisconsin, Materials Science Program, Madison, WI (United States); Hong, Hao; Orbay, Hakan; Yang, Yunan; Ohman, Jakob D. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Graves, Stephen A.; Nickles, Robert J. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Liu, Bai; Wong, Hing C. [Altor BioScience, Miramar, FL (United States); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin, Materials Science Program, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-07-15

    To date, there is no effective therapy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which has a dismal clinical outcome. Upregulation of tissue factor (TF) expression leads to increased patient morbidity and mortality in many solid tumor types, including TNBC. Our goal was to employ the Fab fragment of ALT-836, a chimeric anti-human TF mAb, for PET imaging of TNBC, which can be used to guide future TNBC therapy. ALT-836-Fab was generated by enzymatic papain digestion. SDS-PAGE and FACS studies were performed to evaluate the integrity and TF binding affinity of ALT-836-Fab before NOTA conjugation and {sup 64}Cu-labeling. Serial PET imaging and biodistribution studies were carried out to evaluate the tumor targeting efficacy and pharmacokinetics in the MDA-MB-231 TNBC model, which expresses high levels of TF on the tumor cells. Blocking studies, histological assessment, as well as RT-PCR were performed to confirm TF specificity of {sup 64}Cu-NOTA-ALT-836-Fab. ALT-836-Fab was produced with high purity, which exhibited superb TF binding affinity and specificity. Serial PET imaging revealed rapid and persistent tumor uptake of {sup 64}Cu-NOTA-ALT-836-Fab (5.1 ± 0.5 %ID/g at 24 h post-injection; n = 4) and high tumor/muscle ratio (7.0 ± 1.2 at 24 h post-injection; n = 4), several-fold higher than that of the blocking group and tumor models that do not express significant level of TF, which was confirmed by biodistribution studies. TF specificity of the tracer was also validated by histology and RT-PCR. {sup 64}Cu-NOTA-ALT-836-Fab exhibited prominent tissue factor targeting efficiency in MDA-MB-231 TNBC model. The use of a Fab fragment led to fast tumor uptake and good tissue/muscle ratio, which may be translated into same-day immunoPET imaging in the clinical setting to improve TNBC patient management. (orig.)

  14. Expression of human protein S100A7 (psoriasin, preparation of antibody and application to human larynx squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri Manuela R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up-regulation of S100A7 (Psoriasin, a small calcium-binding protein, is associated with the development of several types of carcinomas, but its function and possibility to serve as a diagnostic or prognostic marker have not been fully defined. In order to prepare antibodies to the protein for immunohistochemical studies we produced the recombinant S100A7 protein in E. coli. mRNA extracted from human tracheal tumor tissue which was amplified by RT-PCR to provide the region coding for the S100A7 gene. The amplified fragment was cloned in the vector pCR2.1-TOPO and sub-cloned in the expression vector pAE. The protein rS100A7 (His-tag was expressed in E. coli BL21::DE3, purified by affinity chromatography on an Ni-NTA column, recovered in the 2.0 to 3.5 mg/mL range in culture medium, and used to produce a rabbit polyclonal antibody anti-rS100A7 protein. The profile of this polyclonal antibody was evaluated in a tissue microarray. Results The rS100A7 (His-tag protein was homogeneous by SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry and was used to produce an anti-recombinant S100A7 (His-tag rabbit serum (polyclonal antibody anti-rS100A7. The molecular weight of rS100A7 (His-tag protein determined by linear MALDI-TOF-MS was 12,655.91 Da. The theoretical mass calculated for the nonapeptide attached to the amino terminus is 12,653.26 Da (delta 2.65 Da. Immunostaining with the polyclonal anti-rS100A7 protein generated showed reactivity with little or no background staining in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells, detecting S100A7 both in nucleus and cytoplasm. Lower levels of S100A7 were detected in non-neoplastic tissue. Conclusions The polyclonal anti-rS100A7 antibody generated here yielded a good signal-to-noise contrast and should be useful for immunohistochemical detection of S100A7 protein. Its potential use for other epithelial lesions besides human larynx squamous cell carcinoma and non-neoplastic larynx should be explored in future.

  15. Production and immunogenicity of chimeric virus-like particles containing the spike glycoprotein of infectious bronchitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lishan; Li, Xiaoming; Liu, Genmei; Li, Ran; Liu, Qiliang; Shen, Huifang; Wang, Wei; Xue, Chunyi; Cao, Yongchang

    2014-01-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) poses a severe threat to the poultry industry and causes heavy economic losses worldwide. Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing infection and controlling the spread of IBV, but currently available inactivated and attenuated virus vaccines have some disadvantages. We developed a chimeric virus-like particle (VLP)-based candidate vaccine for IBV protection. The chimeric VLP was composed of matrix 1 protein from avian influenza H5N1 virus and a fusion protein neuraminidase (NA)/spike 1 (S1) that was generated by fusing IBV S1 protein to the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of NA protein of avian influenza H5N1 virus. The chimeric VLPs elicited significantly higher S1-specific antibody responses in intramuscularly immunized mice and chickens than inactivated IBV viruses. Furthermore, the chimeric VLPs induced significantly higher neutralization antibody levels than inactivated H120 virus in SPF chickens. Finally, the chimeric VLPs induced significantly higher IL-4 production in mice. These results demonstrate that chimeric VLPs have the potential for use in vaccines against IBV infection.

  16. Perforator chimerism for the reconstruction of complex defects: A new chimeric free flap classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Youn Hwan; Ghanem, Ali M

    2015-11-01

    Complex defects present structural and functional challenges to reconstructive surgeons. When compared to multiple free flaps or staged reconstruction, the use of chimeric flaps to reconstruct such defects have many advantages such as reduced number of operative procedures and donor site morbidity as well as preservation of recipient vessels. With increased popularity of perforator flaps, chimeric flaps' harvest and design has benefited from 'perforator concept' towards more versatile and better reconstruction solutions. This article discusses perforator based chimeric flaps and presents a practice based classification system that incorporates the perforator flap concept into "Perforator Chimerism". The authors analyzed a variety of chimeric patterns used in 31 consecutive cases to present illustrative case series and their new classification system. Accordingly, chimeric flaps are classified into four types. Type I: Classical Chimerism, Type II: Anastomotic Chimerism, Type III: Perforator Chimerism and Type IV Mixed Chimerism. Types I on specific source vessel anatomy whilst Type II requires microvascular anastomosis to create the chimeric reconstructive solution. Type III chimeric flaps utilizes the perforator concept to raise two components of tissues without microvascular anastomosis between them. Type IV chimeric flaps are mixed type flaps comprising any combination of Types I to III. Incorporation of the perforator concept in planning and designing chimeric flaps has allowed safe, effective and aesthetically superior reconstruction of complex defects. The new classification system aids reconstructive surgeons and trainees to understand chimeric flaps design, facilitating effective incorporation of this important reconstructive technique into the armamentarium of the reconstruction toolbox. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Target antigens for Hs-14 monoclonal antibody and their various expression in normozoospermic and asthenozoospermic men

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapková, Jana; Margaryan, Hasmik; Kubátová, Alena; Novák, Petr; Pěknicová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 11 (2015) ISSN 2051-4190 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/12/1834; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : acrosome * human spermatozoa * monoclonal antibody * asthenozoospermia * transitional endoplasmic reticulum ATPase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s12610-015-0025-0

  18. Antibody Microarray Analyses of Signal Transduction Protein Expression and Phosphorylation during Porcine Oocyte Maturation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelech, S.; Jelínková, Lucie; Šušor, Andrej; Zhang, H.; Shi, X.; Pavlok, Antonín; Kubelka, Michal; Kovářová, Hana

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 7 (2008), s. 2860-2871 ISSN 1535-3893 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/06/1297 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500450568 Program:1Q Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : antibody microarray * pig * frog Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.684, year: 2008

  19. Novel polyclonal antibodies as a useful tool for expression studies in amphioxus embryos

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bozzo, M.; Pergner, Jiří; Kozmik, Zbyněk; Kozmiková, Iryna

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 10-12 (2017), s. 793-800 ISSN 0214-6282 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC15-21285J; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062; GA MŠk LO1419 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Branchiostoma * amphioxus * antibody * espression pattern Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biology (theoretical, mathematical, thermal, cryobiology, biological rhythm), Evolutionary biology Impact factor: 1.981, year: 2016

  20. The monoclonal antibody SM5-1 recognizes a fibronectin variant which is widely expressed in melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yajun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we have generated the monoclonal antibody SM5-1 by using a subtractive immunization protocol of human melanoma. This antibody exhibits a high sensitivity for primary melanomas of 99% (248/250 tested and for metastatic melanoma of 96% (146/151 tested in paraffin embedded sections. This reactivity is superior to the one obtained by HMB-45, anti-MelanA or anti-Tyrosinase and is comparable to anti-S100. However, as compared to anti-S100, the antibody SM5-1 is highly specific for melanocytic lesions since 40 different neoplasms were found to be negative for SM5-1 by immunohistochemistry. The antigen recognized by SM5-1 is unknown. Methods In order to characterize the antigen recognized by mAb SM5-1, a cDNA library was constructed from the metastatic human melanoma cell line SMMUpos in the Uni-ZAP lambda phage and screened by mAb SM5-1. The cDNA clones identified by this approach were then sequenced and subsequently analyzed. Results Sequence analysis of nine independent overlapping clones (length 3100–5600 bp represent fibronectin cDNA including the ED-A, but not the ED-B region which are produced by alternative splicing. The 89aa splicing variant of the IIICS region was found in 8/9 clones and the 120aa splicing variant in 1/9 clones, both of which are included in the CS1 region of fibronectin being involved in melanoma cell adhesion and spreading. Conclusion The molecule recognized by SM5-1 is a melanoma associated FN variant expressed by virtually all primary and metastatic melanomas and may play an important role in melanoma formation and progression. This antibody is therefore not only of value in immunohistochemistry, but potentially also for diagnostic imaging and immunotherapy.

  1. Pichia pastoris-Expressed Bivalent Virus-Like Particulate Vaccine Induces Domain III-Focused Bivalent Neutralizing Antibodies without Antibody-Dependent Enhancement in Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul Shukla; Ravi K. Rajpoot; Upasana Arora; Ankur Poddar; Sathyamangalam Swaminathan; Navin Khanna; Navin Khanna; Navin Khanna

    2018-01-01

    Dengue, a significant public health problem in several countries around the world, is caused by four different serotypes of mosquito-borne dengue viruses (DENV-1, -2, -3, and -4). Antibodies to any one DENV serotype which can protect against homotypic re-infection, do not offer heterotypic cross-protection. In fact, cross-reactive antibodies may augment heterotypic DENV infection through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). A recently launched live attenuated vaccine (LAV) for dengue, which ...

  2. Antigen-specific T cell activation independently of the MHC: chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinrich eAbken

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy has recently shown powerful in initiating a lasting anti-tumor response with spectacular therapeutic success in some cases. Specific T cell therapy, however, is limited since a number of cancer cells are not recognized by T cells due to various mechanisms including the limited availability of tumor-specific T cells and deficiencies in antigen processing or major histocompatibility complex (MHC expression of cancer cells. To make adoptive cell therapy applicable for the broad variety of cancer entities, patient's T cells are engineered ex vivo with pre-defined specificity by a recombinant chimeric antigen receptor (CAR which consists in the extracellular part of an antibody-derived domain for binding with a tumor-associated antigen and in the intracellular part of a TCR-derived signaling moiety for T cell activation. The specificity of CAR mediated T cell recognition is defined by the antibody domain, is independent of MHC presentation and can be extended to any target for which an antibody is available. We discuss the advantages and limitations of MHC-independent T cell targeting by an engineered CAR and review most significant progress recently made in early stage clinical trials to treat cancer.

  3. Expression of Tissue factor in Adenocarcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: Implications for immunotherapy with hI-con1, a factor VII-IgGFc chimeric protein targeting tissue factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocco, Emiliano; Azodi, Masoud; Schwartz, Peter E; Rutherford, Thomas J; Pecorelli, Sergio; Lockwood, Charles J; Santin, Alessandro D; Varughese, Joyce; Buza, Natalia; Bellone, Stefania; Glasgow, Michelle; Bellone, Marta; Todeschini, Paola; Carrara, Luisa; Silasi, Dan-Arin

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer continues to be an important worldwide health problem for women. Up to 35% of patients who are diagnosed with and appropriately treated for cervical cancer will recur and treatment results are poor for recurrent disease. Given these sobering statistics, development of novel therapies for cervical cancer remains a high priority. We evaluated the expression of Tissue Factor (TF) in cervical cancer and the potential of hI-con1, an antibody-like-molecule targeted against TF, as a novel form of immunotherapy against multiple primary cervical carcinoma cell lines with squamous- and adenocarcinoma histology. Because TF is a transmembrane receptor for coagulation factor VII/VIIa (fVII), in this study we evaluated the in vitro expression of TF in cervical carcinoma cell lines by immunohistochemistry (IHC), real time-PCR (qRT-PCR) and flow cytometry. Sensitivity to hI-con1-dependent cell-mediated-cytotoxicity (IDCC) was evaluated in 5-hrs- 51 chromium-release-assays against cervical cancer cell lines in vitro. Cytoplasmic and/or membrane TF expression was observed in 8 out of 8 (100%) of the tumor tissues tested by IHC and in 100% (11 out of 11) of the cervical carcinoma cell lines tested by real-time-PCR and flow cytometry but not in normal cervical keratinocytes (p = 0.0023 qRT-PCR; p = 0.0042 flow cytometry). All primary cervical cancer cell lines tested overexpressing TF, regardless of their histology, were highly sensitive to IDCC (mean killing ± SD, 56.2% ± 15.9%, range, 32.4%-76.9%, p < 0.001), while negligible cytotoxicity was seen in the absence of hI-con1 or in the presence of rituximab-control-antibody. Low doses of interleukin-2 further increased the cytotoxic effect induced by hI-con1 (p = 0.025) while human serum did not significantly decrease IDCC against cervical cancer cell lines (p = 0.597). TF is highly expressed in squamous and adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix. hI-con1 induces strong cytotoxicity against primary cervical cancer cell

  4. Specific Detection of Dog Podoplanin Expressed in Renal Glomerulus by a Novel Monoclonal Antibody PMab-38 in Immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Ryusuke; Kaneko, Mika K; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Fujii, Yuki; Konnai, Satoru; Takagi, Michiaki; Kato, Yukinari

    2016-08-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN) is expressed in several normal tissues including podocytes of renal glomerulus, lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), and type I alveolar cells of lung. PDPN activates platelet aggregation by binding to C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) on platelets. Many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human PDPN, mouse PDPN, rat PDPN, rabbit PDPN, and bovine PDPN have been established; antidog PDPN (dPDPN) mAbs have not been developed. Herein, we immunized mice with the recombinant proteins of dPDPN and developed anti-dPDPN mAbs. One of the clones, PMab-38, is useful for detecting podocytes in immunohistochemical analysis; in contrast, it did not react with LECs or type I alveolar cells. PMab-38 also detected dPDPN specifically in flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. PMab-38 is expected to be useful for investigating the function of dPDPN, which is expressed in podocytes.

  5. Hap2, a novel gene in Babesia bigemina is expressed in tick stages, and specific antibodies block zygote formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minerva Camacho-Nuez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine babesiosis is a tick-borne disease caused by the protozoan parasites of the genus Babesia. In their host vector, Babesia spp. undergo sexual reproduction. Therefore, the development of sexual stages and the subsequent formation of the zygote are essential for the parasite to invade the intestinal cells of the vector tick and continue its life-cycle. HAP2/GCS1 is a protein identified in plants, protozoan parasites and other organisms that has an important role during membrane fusion in fertilization processes. The identification and characterization of HAP-2 protein in Babesia would be very significant to understand the biology of the parasite and to develop a transmission-blocking vaccine in the future. Results To isolate and sequence the hap2 gene DNA from an infected bovine with Babesia bigemina was purified. The hap2 gene was amplified, cloned and sequenced. The sequences of hap2 from four geographically different strains showed high conservation at the amino acid level, including the typical structure with a signal peptide and the HAP2/GSC domain. Antisera anti-HAP2 against the conserved extracellular region of the HAP2 amino acid sequence were obtained from rabbits. The expression of hap2 in the host and vector tissues was analyzed by using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and the protein was examined by western blot and immunofluorescence. Based on the RT-PCR and WB results, HAP2 is expressed in both, sexual stages induced in vitro, and in infected ticks as well. We did not detect any expression in asexual erythrocytic stages of B. bigemina, relevantly anti-HAP2 specific antibodies were able to block zygotes formation in vitro. Conclusion Babesia bigemina HAP2 is expressed only in tick-infecting stages, and specific antibodies block zygote formation. Further studies regarding the function of HAP2 during tick infection may provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of sexual reproduction of the parasite.

  6. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A; Byrne, Barry J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 μg) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 μg rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 μg per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A single point in protein trafficking by Plasmodium falciparum determines the expression of major antigens on the surface of infected erythrocytes targeted by human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jo-Anne; Howell, Katherine B; Langer, Christine; Maier, Alexander G; Hasang, Wina; Rogerson, Stephen J; Petter, Michaela; Chesson, Joanne; Stanisic, Danielle I; Duffy, Michael F; Cooke, Brian M; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Bull, Peter C; Marsh, Kevin; Fowkes, Freya J I; Beeson, James G

    2016-11-01

    Antibodies to blood-stage antigens of Plasmodium falciparum play a pivotal role in human immunity to malaria. During parasite development, multiple proteins are trafficked from the intracellular parasite to the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs). However, the relative importance of different proteins as targets of acquired antibodies, and key pathways involved in trafficking major antigens remain to be clearly defined. We quantified antibodies to surface antigens among children, adults, and pregnant women from different malaria-exposed regions. We quantified the importance of antigens as antibody targets using genetically engineered P. falciparum with modified surface antigen expression. Genetic deletion of the trafficking protein skeleton-binding protein-1 (SBP1), which is involved in trafficking the surface antigen PfEMP1, led to a dramatic reduction in antibody recognition of IEs and the ability of human antibodies to promote opsonic phagocytosis of IEs, a key mechanism of parasite clearance. The great majority of antibody epitopes on the IE surface were SBP1-dependent. This was demonstrated using parasite isolates with different genetic or phenotypic backgrounds, and among antibodies from children, adults, and pregnant women in different populations. Comparisons of antibody reactivity to parasite isolates with SBP1 deletion or inhibited PfEMP1 expression suggest that PfEMP1 is the dominant target of acquired human antibodies, and that other P. falciparum IE surface proteins are minor targets. These results establish SBP1 as part of a critical pathway for the trafficking of major surface antigens targeted by human immunity, and have key implications for vaccine development, and quantifying immunity in populations.

  8. Evaluation of the expression of sperm proteins in normozoospermic and asthenozoospermic men using monoclonal antibodies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapková, Jana; Kubátová, Alena; Děd, Lukáš; Teplá, O.; Pěknicová, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2016), s. 108-113 ISSN 1008-682X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/12/1834 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : asthenozoospermia * flow cytometry * fluorescence microscopy * monoclonal antibodies * sperm proteins Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.996, year: 2016 http://www.ajandrology.com/article.asp?issn=1008-682X;year=2016;volume=18;issue=1;spage=108;epage=113;aulast=Capkova

  9. DNA vaccines expressing soluble CD4-envelope proteins fused to C3d elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, Joseph F.; Green, Thomas D.; Ross, Ted M.

    2004-01-01

    DNA vaccines expressing the envelope (Env) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been relatively ineffective at generating high-titer, long-lasting, neutralizing antibodies in a variety of animal models. In this study, DNA vaccines were constructed to express a fusion protein of the soluble human CD4 (sCD4) and the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope. To enhance the immunogenicity of the expressed fusion protein, three copies of the murine C3d (mC3d 3 ) were added to the carboxyl terminus of the complex. Monoclonal antibodies that recognize CD4-induced epitopes on gp120 efficiently bound to sCD4-gp120 or sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 . In addition, both sCD4-gp120 and sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 bound to cells expressing appropriate coreceptors in the absence of cell surface hCD4. Mice (BALB/c) vaccinated with DNA vaccines expressing either gp120-mC3d 3 or sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 elicited antibodies that neutralized homologous virus infection. However, the use of sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 -DNA elicited the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies that persisted after depletion of anti-hCD4 antibodies. Interestingly, only mice vaccinated with DNA expressing sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 had antibodies that elicited cross-protective neutralizing antibodies. The fusion of sCD4 to the HIV-1 envelope exposes neutralizing epitopes that elicit broad protective immunity when the fusion complex is coupled with the molecular adjuvant, C3d

  10. Expression of class 5 antigens by meningococcal strains obtained from patients in Brazil and evaluation of two new monoclonal antibodies

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    Elizabeth N. De Gaspari

    Full Text Available Determining the profile of antigen expression among meningococci is important for epidemiologic surveillance and vaccine development. To this end, two new mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have been derived against Neisseria meningitidis proteins (class 5. The MAbs were reactive against outer membrane antigens and were bactericidal. Selected anti-class 5 MAbs [(5.1-3E6-2; (5.3-3BH4-C7; (5.4-1BG11-C7; (5.5-3DH-F5G9 also 5F1F4-T3(5.c], and the two new monoclonal antibodies C14F10Br2 (5.8 and 7F11B5Br3 (5.9, were then tested against different meningococcal strains, (63 strains of serogroup A, 60 strains of serogroup C (from 1972 to 1974; and 136 strains of serogroup B (from 1992 meningococci. Our results demonstrated that the expression of class 5 proteins in the N. meningitidis B Brazilian strains studied is highly heterogeneous. The serotypes and subtypes of B:4:P1.15, B:4:P1.9, B:4:P1.7, B:4:P1.3, B:4:P1.14, B:4:P1.16, B:4:NT, and B:NT:NT were detected in N. meningitidis B serogroups.The strains C:2a:P1.2 and A:4.21:P1.9 were dominant in the C and A serogroups, respectively. Serogroup B organisms expressed the class 5 epitopes 5.4 (18%, 5.5 (22%, 5.8 (3.6%, 5.9 (8.0% and 5c (38%. Serogroup C expressed class 5 epitopes 5.1 (81%, 5.4 (35%, 5.5 (33% and 5.9 (5.0%; and serogroup A showed reactivity directed at the class 5 protein 5c (47%; and reactivity was present with the new monoclonal antibody, 5.9 (5.5%. We conclude that the two new MAbs are useful in detecting important group B, class 5 antigens, and that a broad selection of serogroup B, class 5 proteins would be required for an effective vaccine based on the class 5 proteins.

  11. Human parvovirus B19 antibodies induce altered membrane protein expression and apoptosis of BeWo trophoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzang, Bor-Show; Chiang, Szu-Yi; Chan, Hsu-Chin; Liu, Chung-Hsien; Hsu, Tsai-Ching

    2016-11-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is harmful during pregnancy since it can be vertically transmitted to the developing fetus. In addition, the anti‑B19 antibodies induced by B19 infection are believed to have a cytopathic role in B19 transmission; however, knowledge regarding the effects of anti‑B19 antibodies during pregnancy is limited. To investigate the possible roles of anti‑B19 antibodies during pregnancy, the present study examined the effects of anti‑B19‑VP1 unique region (VP1u), anti‑B19‑VP2 and anti‑B19‑nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies on BeWo trophoblasts. Briefly, BeWo trophoblasts were incubated with purified IgG against B19‑VP1u, B19‑VP2 and B19‑NS1. Subsequently, the expression of surface proteins and apoptotic molecules were assessed in BeWo trophoblasts using flow cytometry, ELISA and western blotting. The expression levels of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)‑G were significantly increased on BeWo trophoblasts treated with rabbit anti‑B19‑VP1u IgG, and were unchanged in those treated with rabbit anti‑B19‑NS1 and anti‑B19‑VP2 IgG, as compared with the control group. Furthermore, the expression levels of globoside (P blood group antigen) and cluster of differentiation (CD)29 (β1 integrin) were significantly increased in BeWo trophoblasts treated with rabbit anti‑B19‑NS1 and anti‑B19‑VP2 IgG, whereas only CD29 was also significantly increased in cells treated with anti‑B19‑VP1u IgG. In addition, the number of cells at sub‑G1 phase; caspase‑3 activity; and the expression of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic molecules, including Fas‑associated death domain protein, activated caspase‑8, activated caspase‑3, B‑cell lymphoma 2‑associated X protein, cytochrome c, apoptotic peptidase activating factor 1 and activated caspase‑9, were significantly increased in BeWo trophoblasts treated with anti‑B19‑VP1u and anti‑B19‑NS1 IgG. In conclusion, the present

  12. Redirecting T cells to eradicate B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: bispecific T-cell engagers and chimeric antigen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoss, I; Bargou, R C; Nagorsen, D; Friberg, G R; Baeuerle, P A; Forman, S J

    2017-04-01

    Recent advances in antibody technology to harness T cells for cancer immunotherapy, particularly in the difficult-to-treat setting of relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (r/r ALL), have led to innovative methods for directing cytotoxic T cells to specific surface antigens on cancer cells. One approach involves administration of soluble bispecific (or dual-affinity) antibody-based constructs that temporarily bridge T cells and cancer cells. Another approach infuses ex vivo-engineered T cells that express a surface plasma membrane-inserted antibody construct called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Both bispecific antibodies and CARs circumvent natural target cell recognition by creating a physical connection between cytotoxic T cells and target cancer cells to activate a cytolysis signaling pathway; this connection allows essentially all cytotoxic T cells in a patient to be engaged because typical tumor cell resistance mechanisms (such as T-cell receptor specificity, antigen processing and presentation, and major histocompatibility complex context) are bypassed. Both the bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE) antibody construct blinatumomab and CD19-CARs are immunotherapies that have yielded encouraging remission rates in CD19-positive r/r ALL, suggesting that they might serve as definitive treatments or bridging therapies to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. With the introduction of these immunotherapies, new challenges arise related to unique toxicities and distinctive pathways of resistance. An increasing body of knowledge is being accumulated on how to predict, prevent, and manage such toxicities, which will help to better stratify patient risk and tailor treatments to minimize severe adverse events. A deeper understanding of the precise mechanisms of action and immune resistance, interaction with other novel agents in potential combinations, and optimization in the manufacturing process will help to advance immunotherapy outcomes in the r

  13. Oral Vaccination with the Porcine Rotavirus VP4 Outer Capsid Protein Expressed by Lactococcus lactis Induces Specific Antibody Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-jing Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study to design a delivery system resistant to the gastrointestinal environment for oral vaccine against porcine rotavirus. Lactococcus lactis NZ9000 was transformed with segments of vP4 of the porcine rotavirus inserted into the pNZ8112 surface-expression vector, and a recombinant L. lactis expressing VP4 protein was constructed. An approximately 27 kDa VP4 protein was confirmed by SDS-PAGE , Western blot and immunostaining analysis. BALB/c mice were immunized orally with VP4-expression recombinant L. lactis and cellular, mucosal and systemic humoral immune responses were examined. Specific anti-VP4 secretory IgA and IgG were found in feces, ophthalmic and vaginal washes and in serum. The induced antibodies demonstrated neutralizing effects on porcine rotavirus infection on MA104 cells. Our findings suggest that oral immunization with VP4-expressing L. lactis induced both specific local and systemic humoral and cellular immune responses in mice.

  14. Mosaic origins of a complex chimeric mitochondrial gene in Silene vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Storchova

    Full Text Available Chimeric genes are significant sources of evolutionary innovation that are normally created when portions of two or more protein coding regions fuse to form a new open reading frame. In plant mitochondria astonishingly high numbers of different novel chimeric genes have been reported, where they are generated through processes of rearrangement and recombination. Nonetheless, because most studies do not find or report nucleotide variation within the same chimeric gene, evolution after the origination of these chimeric genes remains unstudied. Here we identify two alleles of a complex chimera in Silene vulgaris that are divergent in nucleotide sequence, genomic position relative to other mitochondrial genes, and expression patterns. Structural patterns suggest a history partially influenced by gene conversion between the chimeric gene and functional copies of subunit 1 of the mitochondrial ATP synthase gene (atp1. We identified small repeat structures within the chimeras that are likely recombination sites allowing generation of the chimera. These results establish the potential for chimeric gene divergence in different plant mitochondrial lineages within the same species. This result contrasts with the absence of diversity within mitochondrial chimeras found in crop species.

  15. Study the effect of F17S mutation on the chimeric Bacillus thermocatenulatus lipase

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    Seyed Hossein Khaleghinejad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipases (triacylglycerol acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.3 are one of the highest value commercial enzymes as they have potential applications in biotechnology for detergents, food, pharmaceuticals, leather, textiles, cosmetics, and paper industries; and are currently receiving considerable attention because of their potential applications in biotechnology. Bacillus thermocatenulatus Lipase 2 (BTL2 is one of the most important research targets, because of its potential industrial applications. In this study, the effect of substitution Phe17 with Ser in mutated BTL2 lipase, which conserved pentapeptide (112Ala-His-Ser-Gln-Gly116 was replaced with similar sequences (207Gly-Glu-Ser-Ala-Gly211 of Candida rugosa lipase (CLR at the nucleophilic elbow region. Docking results confirmed the mutated lipase to be better than the chimeric lipase. So, cloning was conducted, and the mutated and chimeric btl2 genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and then the enzymes were purified by anion exchange chromatography. The mutation increased lipase lipolytic activity against most of the applied substrates, with the exception of tributyrin when compared with chimeric lipase. Further, the mutated lipase exhibited higher activity than the chimeric lipase at all temperatures. Optimum pH of the mutated lipase was obtained at pH 9.5, which was more than the chimeric one. Enzyme activity of the mutated lipase in the presence of organic solvents, detergents, and metal ions was also improved than the chimeric lipase.

  16. Experimental and in silico modelling analyses of the gene expression pathway for recombinant antibody and by-product production in NS0 cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Emma J; Chiverton, Lesley M; Spurgeon, Sarah K; Martin, Elaine B; Montague, Gary A; Smales, C Mark; von der Haar, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are commercially important, high value biotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of a variety of diseases. These complex molecules consist of two heavy chain and two light chain polypeptides covalently linked by disulphide bonds. They are usually expressed as recombinant proteins from cultured mammalian cells, which are capable of correctly modifying, folding and assembling the polypeptide chains into the native quaternary structure. Such recombinant cell lines often vary in the amounts of product produced and in the heterogeneity of the secreted products. The biological mechanisms of this variation are not fully defined. Here we have utilised experimental and modelling strategies to characterise and define the biology underpinning product heterogeneity in cell lines exhibiting varying antibody expression levels, and then experimentally validated these models. In undertaking these studies we applied and validated biochemical (rate-constant based) and engineering (nonlinear) models of antibody expression to experimental data from four NS0 cell lines with different IgG4 secretion rates. The models predict that export of the full antibody and its fragments are intrinsically linked, and cannot therefore be manipulated individually at the level of the secretory machinery. Instead, the models highlight strategies for the manipulation at the precursor species level to increase recombinant protein yields in both high and low producing cell lines. The models also highlight cell line specific limitations in the antibody expression pathway.

  17. A baby with congenital hypothyroidism born to a hypothyroid mother who expressed undiagnosed thyroid stimulation blocking antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mock Ryeon Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In adults, hypothyroidism caused by thyroid stimulation blocking antibody (TSB Ab is rare, and confirmed cases are even fewer, as TSB Ab levels are rarely assayed. However, this may create problems in babies, as the transplacental passage of maternal TSB Ab can cause a rare type of hypothyroidism in the infant. Prompt levothyroxine replacement for the baby starting immediately after birth is important. We describe a congenital hypothyroid baby born to a hypothyroid mother who was not aware of the cause of her hypothyroid condition, which turned out to be associated with the expression of TSB Ab. This cause was confirmed in both the infant and mother using a series of thyroid function tests and measurements of autoantibody levels, including TSB Ab. During periodic follow-up, the TSB Ab and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibody titers became negative in the baby at 8 months of age, but remained positive in the mother. Evaluation of hypothyroidism and its cause in mothers during pregnancy is important for both maternal and child health.

  18. Intramuscular Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Expression of Monoclonal Antibodies Provides 100% Protection Against Ebola Virus Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lieshout, Laura P; Soule, Geoff; Sorensen, Debra; Frost, Kathy L; He, Shihua; Tierney, Kevin; Safronetz, David; Booth, Stephanie A; Kobinger, Gary P; Qiu, Xiangguo; Wootton, Sarah K

    2018-03-05

    The 2013-2016 West Africa outbreak demonstrated the epidemic potential of Ebola virus and highlighted the need for counter strategies. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based therapies hold promise as treatment options for Ebola virus infections. However, production of clinical-grade mAbs is labor intensive, and immunity is short lived. Conversely, adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated mAb gene transfer provides the host with a genetic blueprint to manufacture mAbs in vivo, leading to steady release of antibody over many months. Here we demonstrate that AAV-mediated expression of nonneutralizing mAb 5D2 or 7C9 confers 100% protection against mouse-adapted Ebola virus infection, while neutralizing mAb 2G4 was 83% protective. A 2-component cocktail, AAV-2G4/AAV-5D2, provided complete protection when administered 7 days prior to challenge and was partially protective with a 3-day lead time. Finally, AAV-mAb therapies provided sustained protection from challenge 5 months following AAV administration. AAV-mAb may be a viable alternative strategy for vaccination against emerging infectious diseases.

  19. Expression and regulation of two idiotype families and subsets within an idiotype family among BALB/c antibodies against p-azophenylarsonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    The expression and regulation of the two different iodiotype (id) families associated with the anti-p-azophenylarsonate (Ar) antibodies of BALB/c mice examined. Both families (5AF6 and 3C6) represented cross-reactive idiotypes (CRI) expressed in the anti-Ar of most individual BALB/c mice. In response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin-Ar, an average of about 28% of BALB/c anti-Ar had 5AF6 family idiotopes, while 3C6 family was expressed on about 16% of BALBc anti-Ar antibodies. Suppression induced by anti-idiotype treatment against one family did not suppress the expression of the other family suggesting that the two families were regulated independently. However, the relative expression of one family could influence the expression of the other, because depression of the 5AF6 family tended to increase the expression of the 3C6 family of anti-Ar. Analysis of the 5AF6 family showed that a majority of BALB/c mice produced antibodies heating most or all of the idiotopes associated with the family, but that a subset of about 35% of the antibodies synthesized lacked idiotopes associated with a monoclonal anti-Ar member of this family, 2.4. Treatment of mice with anti-idiotypes prepared against two different monoclonal anti-Ar of the 5AF6 family produced different effects: one enhanced while the other suppressed idiotype expression, suggesting that there are differences in the idiotopes associated with these two regulatory pathways. Additionally, results indicated that subsets of antibodies within the 5AF6 idiotype family could be regulated independently of each other

  20. Effect of bovine pellucid zone 3 monoclonal antibodies on B cell lymphoma 2 expressions of granulosa cell and mice (Mus musculus follicle diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heti Ira Ayue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effects of pellucid zone 3 monoclonal antibodies against B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2 expression and mice follicle diameter at various time periods.Methods: The animal model of this study was 36 Balb/c mice (Mus musculus. A true experimental design was used with a post-test only control group approach. BCL-2 expression was observed using immunohistochemistry, while the follicle diameter was observed by haematoxylin-eosin staining. The data was analyzed using nested ANOVA to compare the results of the mean expression of BCL-2 on the 5th and 20th day of observation in the pre-antral and antral follicle between the control and treatment groups.Results: No significant differences were found in BCL-2 gene expression. There were also no significant differences in BCL-2 expression on the 10th day of pre-antral follicle analysis. Moreover, there were no significant differences between the mean follicle diameter on the 5th, 10th, and 20th day of pre-antral and antral follicle development between the control and treatment groups. The addition of bovine pellucid zone 3 (bZP3 monoclonal antibodies on the 5th and 20th day of observation did not decrease the expression of BCL-2 gene in the pre-antral and antral follicle of mice. Administering bZP3 monoclonal antibodies on the 10th day of observation did not affect BCL-2 expression in the pre-antral follicle but did decrease BCL-2 expression in the antral follicle. Supplying bZP3 monoclonal antibodies on the 5th, 10th and 20th day did not affect the diameter of pre-antral and antral follicles of the mice.Conclusion: The monoclonal antibodies bovine zona pelusida 3 has the potential to be developed as a safe immunocontraception preparation.

  1. Detection of high CD44 expression in oral cancers using the novel monoclonal antibody, C44Mab-5

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    Shinji Yamada

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available CD44 is a transmembrane glycoprotein that regulates a variety of genes related to cell-adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. A large number of alternative splicing isoforms of CD44, containing various combinations of alternative exons, have been reported. CD44 standard (CD44s, which lacks variant exons, is widely expressed on the surface of most tissues and all hematopoietic cells. In contrast, CD44 variant isoforms show tissue-specific expression patterns and have been extensively studied as both prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in cancer and other diseases. In this study, we immunized mice with CHO-K1 cell lines overexpressing CD44v3-10 to obtain novel anti-CD44 mAbs. One of the clones, C44Mab-5 (IgG1, kappa, recognized both CD44s and CD44v3-10. C44Mab-5 also reacted with oral cancer cells such as Ca9-22, HO-1-u-1, SAS, HSC-2, HSC-3, and HSC-4 using flow cytometry. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that C44Mab-5 detected 166/182 (91.2% of oral cancers. These results suggest that the C44Mab-5 antibody may be useful for investigating the expression and function of CD44 in various cancers.

  2. Detection of high PD-L1 expression in oral cancers by a novel monoclonal antibody L1Mab-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinji; Itai, Shunsuke; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari

    2018-03-01

    Programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), which is a ligand of programmed cell death-1 (PD-1), is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein that is expressed on antigen-presenting cells and several tumor cells, including melanoma and lung cancer cells. There is a strong correlation between human PD-L1 (hPD-L1) expression on tumor cells and negative prognosis in cancer patients. In this study, we produced a novel anti-hPD-L1 monoclonal antibody (mAb), L 1 Mab-4 (IgG 2b , kappa), using cell-based immunization and screening (CBIS) method and investigated hPD-L1 expression in oral cancers. L 1 Mab-4 reacted with oral cancer cell lines (Ca9-22, HO-1-u-1, SAS, HSC-2, HSC-3, and HSC-4) in flow cytometry and stained oral cancers in a membrane-staining pattern. L 1 Mab-4 stained 106/150 (70.7%) of oral squamous cell carcinomas, indicating the very high sensitivity of L 1 Mab-4. These results indicate that L 1 Mab-4 could be useful for investigating the function of hPD-L1 in oral cancers.

  3. Detection of high CD44 expression in oral cancers using the novel monoclonal antibody, C44Mab-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinji; Itai, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Takuro; Yanaka, Miyuki; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari

    2018-07-01

    CD44 is a transmembrane glycoprotein that regulates a variety of genes related to cell-adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. A large number of alternative splicing isoforms of CD44, containing various combinations of alternative exons, have been reported. CD44 standard (CD44s), which lacks variant exons, is widely expressed on the surface of most tissues and all hematopoietic cells. In contrast, CD44 variant isoforms show tissue-specific expression patterns and have been extensively studied as both prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in cancer and other diseases. In this study, we immunized mice with CHO-K1 cell lines overexpressing CD44v3-10 to obtain novel anti-CD44 mAbs. One of the clones, C 44 Mab-5 (IgG 1 , kappa), recognized both CD44s and CD44v3-10. C 44 Mab-5 also reacted with oral cancer cells such as Ca9-22, HO-1-u-1, SAS, HSC-2, HSC-3, and HSC-4 using flow cytometry. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that C 44 Mab-5 detected 166/182 (91.2%) of oral cancers. These results suggest that the C 44 Mab-5 antibody may be useful for investigating the expression and function of CD44 in various cancers.

  4. Production of unnaturally linked chimeric proteins using a combination of sortase-catalyzed transpeptidation and click chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, Martin D.; Theile, Christopher S.; Wu, Tongfei; Guimaraes, Carla P.; Blom, Annet E. M.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    Chimeric proteins, including bispecific antibodies, are biological tools with therapeutic applications. Genetic fusion and ligation methods allow the creation of N-to-C and C-to-N fused recombinant proteins, but not unnaturally linked N-to-N and C-to-C fusion proteins. This protocol describes a

  5. 细粒棘球绦虫AgB8/1-AgB8/2重组嵌合抗原表达系统的构建%Establishment of Echinococcus granulosus AgB8/1-AgB8/2 chimeric recombinant protein expression system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    古力帕丽·麦曼提依明; 马海梅; 吾拉木·马木提; 陈洁; 陈璐; 丁剑冰; 马秀敏; 温浩

    2011-01-01

    目的 构建pET32a-AgB8/1-AgB8/2原核表达载体,并对其重组蛋白进行原核细胞表达.方法 从细粒棘球绦虫原头蚴中提取总RNA,反转录生成cDNA,以此cDNA为模板,用基因特异性引物分别扩增EgAgB8/1和EgAgB8/2基因编码其分泌型多肽的片段,经测序后,以此两条基因片段为依据,人工合成EgAgB8/1-EgAgB8/2嵌合抗原编码核酸序列,将其克隆至pUCm-T载体,测序鉴定其正确性.通过对pUCm-T/AgB8/1-AgB8/2重组质粒进行双酶切,将获得的AgB8/1-AgB8/2嵌合抗原编码核酸序列用定向克隆技术克隆至原核表达质粒pET32a上,测序鉴定插入片段正确后,转化至E.coli BL21(DE3)Lys S,IPTG初步诱导表达pET32a-AgB8/1-AgB8/2重组嵌合蛋白.用SDS-PAGE电泳分析鉴定重组蛋白的表达水平.结果 测序表明,AgB8/1-AgB8/2嵌合抗原编码核酸序列正方向插入至pET32a质粒.SDS-PAGE电泳分析显示,IPTG诱导后重组嵌合蛋白得到成功表达,在相对分子量约38 kD处有表达条带.结论 成功构建了pET32a-AgB8/1-AgB8/2原核表达质粒,并初步诱导表达出AgB8/1-AgB8/2嵌合重组蛋白,为进一步研究其免疫学特性奠定了基础.%In order to construct the pET32a-AgB8/1-AgB8/2 chimeric antigen prokaryotic expression recombinant plasmid and the expression of its recombinant protein, the total RNA was extracted from protoscoleces of Echinococcus granulosus,and reverse transcribed into cDNA, the cDNA encoding mature form of EgAgB8/land EgAgB8/2 antigen were amplified by PCR using gene specific primers.Based on the both gene fragments, a nucleotide sequence encoding EgAgB8/1-EgAgB8/2 chimeric antigen were artificially synthesized after sequence confirmation.The synthesized nucleotide sequence encoding EgAgB8/1-EgAgB8/2 chimeric antigen were conformed by sequencing after cloning into pUCm-T vector, then the target sequence was directionally ligated into pET32a plasmid after double digestion with restriction enzymes for prokaryotic

  6. Kidney Versus Islet Allograft Survival After Induction of Mixed Chimerism With Combined Donor Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, Tetsu; Ko, Dicken S C; Boskovic, Svjetlan; O'Neil, John J; Chipashvili, Vaja; Koulmanda, Maria; Hotta, Kiyohiko; Kawai, Kento; Nadazdin, Ognjenka; Smith, R Neal; Cosimi, A B; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported successful induction of transient mixed chimerism and long-term acceptance of renal allografts in MHC mismatched nonhuman primates. In this study, we attempted to extend this tolerance induction approach to islet allografts. A total of eight recipients underwent MHC mismatched combined islet and bone marrow (BM) transplantation after induction of diabetes by streptozotocin. Three recipients were treated after a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen that included low-dose total body and thymic irradiation, horse Atgam (ATG), six doses of anti-CD154 monoclonal antibody (mAb), and a 1-month course of cyclosporine (CyA) (Islet A). In Islet B, anti-CD8 mAb was administered in place of CyA. In Islet C, two recipients were treated with Islet B, but without ATG. The results were compared with previously reported results of eight cynomolgus monkeys that received combined kidney and BM transplantation (Kidney A) following the same conditioning regimen used in Islet A. The majority of kidney/BM recipients achieved long-term renal allograft survival after induction of transient chimerism. However, prolonged islet survival was not achieved in similarly conditioned islet/BM recipients (Islet A), despite induction of comparable levels of chimerism. In order to rule out islet allograft loss due to CyA toxicity, three recipients were treated with anti-CD8 mAb in place of CyA. Although these recipients developed significantly superior mixed chimerism and more prolonged islet allograft survival (61, 103, and 113 days), islet function was lost soon after the disappearance of chimerism. In Islet C recipients, neither prolonged chimerism nor islet survival was observed (30 and 40 days). Significant improvement of mixed chimerism induction and islet allograft survival were achieved with a CyA-free regimen that included anti-CD8 mAb. However, unlike the kidney allograft, islet allograft tolerance was not induced with transient chimerism. Induction of more

  7. Immunization Elicits Antigen-Specific Antibody Sequestration in Dorsal Root Ganglia Sensory Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekaran, Manojkumar; Chatterjee, Prodyot K.; Shih, Andrew; Imperato, Gavin H.; Addorisio, Meghan; Kumar, Gopal; Lee, Annette; Graf, John F.; Meyer, Dan; Marino, Michael; Puleo, Christopher; Ashe, Jeffrey; Cox, Maureen A.; Mak, Tak W.; Bouton, Chad; Sherry, Barbara; Diamond, Betty; Andersson, Ulf; Coleman, Thomas R.; Metz, Christine N.; Tracey, Kevin J.; Chavan, Sangeeta S.

    2018-01-01

    The immune and nervous systems are two major organ systems responsible for host defense and memory. Both systems achieve memory and learning that can be retained, retrieved, and utilized for decades. Here, we report the surprising discovery that peripheral sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of immunized mice contain antigen-specific antibodies. Using a combination of rigorous molecular genetic analyses, transgenic mice, and adoptive transfer experiments, we demonstrate that DRGs do not synthesize these antigen-specific antibodies, but rather sequester primarily IgG1 subtype antibodies. As revealed by RNA-seq and targeted quantitative PCR (qPCR), dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons harvested from either naïve or immunized mice lack enzymes (i.e., RAG1, RAG2, AID, or UNG) required for generating antibody diversity and, therefore, cannot make antibodies. Additionally, transgenic mice that express a reporter fluorescent protein under the control of Igγ1 constant region fail to express Ighg1 transcripts in DRG sensory neurons. Furthermore, neural sequestration of antibodies occurs in mice rendered deficient in neuronal Rag2, but antibody sequestration is not observed in DRG sensory neurons isolated from mice that lack mature B cells [e.g., Rag1 knock out (KO) or μMT mice]. Finally, adoptive transfer of Rag1-deficient bone marrow (BM) into wild-type (WT) mice or WT BM into Rag1 KO mice revealed that antibody sequestration was observed in DRG sensory neurons of chimeric mice with WT BM but not with Rag1-deficient BM. Together, these results indicate that DRG sensory neurons sequester and retain antigen-specific antibodies released by antibody-secreting plasma cells. Coupling this work with previous studies implicating DRG sensory neurons in regulating antigen trafficking during immunization raises the interesting possibility that the nervous system collaborates with the immune system to regulate antigen-mediated responses. PMID:29755449

  8. Immunization Elicits Antigen-Specific Antibody Sequestration in Dorsal Root Ganglia Sensory Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manojkumar Gunasekaran

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The immune and nervous systems are two major organ systems responsible for host defense and memory. Both systems achieve memory and learning that can be retained, retrieved, and utilized for decades. Here, we report the surprising discovery that peripheral sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs of immunized mice contain antigen-specific antibodies. Using a combination of rigorous molecular genetic analyses, transgenic mice, and adoptive transfer experiments, we demonstrate that DRGs do not synthesize these antigen-specific antibodies, but rather sequester primarily IgG1 subtype antibodies. As revealed by RNA-seq and targeted quantitative PCR (qPCR, dorsal root ganglion (DRG sensory neurons harvested from either naïve or immunized mice lack enzymes (i.e., RAG1, RAG2, AID, or UNG required for generating antibody diversity and, therefore, cannot make antibodies. Additionally, transgenic mice that express a reporter fluorescent protein under the control of Igγ1 constant region fail to express Ighg1 transcripts in DRG sensory neurons. Furthermore, neural sequestration of antibodies occurs in mice rendered deficient in neuronal Rag2, but antibody sequestration is not observed in DRG sensory neurons isolated from mice that lack mature B cells [e.g., Rag1 knock out (KO or μMT mice]. Finally, adoptive transfer of Rag1-deficient bone marrow (BM into wild-type (WT mice or WT BM into Rag1 KO mice revealed that antibody sequestration was observed in DRG sensory neurons of chimeric mice with WT BM but not with Rag1-deficient BM. Together, these results indicate that DRG sensory neurons sequester and retain antigen-specific antibodies released by antibody-secreting plasma cells. Coupling this work with previous studies implicating DRG sensory neurons in regulating antigen trafficking during immunization raises the interesting possibility that the nervous system collaborates with the immune system to regulate antigen-mediated responses.

  9. Analysis of the diversity of murine antibodies to dextran B1355. II. Demonstration of multiple idiotypes with variable expression in several strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansburg, D.; Briles, D.E.; Davie, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    We have developed radioimmunoassays that detect idiotypic (variable region) differences among the α(1 → 3) dextran-binding myeloma proteins U102, J558, and M104 as well as an assay that detects variable region determinants common to all three proteins. Using these assays, we have examined 7S and 19S anti-α(1 → 3) dextran antibodies induced in five murine strains of the a 1 I/sub g/C/sub H/ linkage group and the recombinant strain BAB/14. All idiotypes were expressed in both 19S and 7S antibodies from all strains, but with considerable strain-specific variability in penetrance. In two strains, one additional type of antibody, which lacked all four idiotypic determinants, generally constituted the bulk of total anti-α(1 → 3) dextran antibodies

  10. Yeast expressed recombinant Hemagglutinin protein of Novel H1N1 elicits neutralising antibodies in rabbits and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athmaram TN

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently available vaccines for the pandemic Influenza A (H1N1 2009 produced in chicken eggs have serious impediments viz limited availability, risk of allergic reactions and the possible selection of sub-populations differing from the naturally occurring virus, whereas the cell culture derived vaccines are time consuming and may not meet the demands of rapid global vaccination required to combat the present/future pandemic. Hemagglutinin (HA based subunit vaccine for H1N1 requires the HA protein in glycosylated form, which is impossible with the commonly used bacterial expression platform. Additionally, bacterial derived protein requires extensive purification and refolding steps for vaccine applications. For these reasons an alternative heterologous system for rapid, easy and economical production of Hemagglutinin protein in its glycosylated form is required. The HA gene of novel H1N1 A/California/04/2009 was engineered for expression in Pichia pastoris as a soluble secreted protein. The full length HA- synthetic gene having α-secretory tag was integrated into P. pastoris genome through homologous recombination. The resultant Pichia clones having multiple copy integrants of the transgene expressed full length HA protein in the culture supernatant. The Recombinant yeast derived H1N1 HA protein elicited neutralising antibodies both in mice and rabbits. The sera from immunised animals also exhibited Hemagglutination Inhibition (HI activity. Considering the safety, reliability and also economic potential of Pichia expression platform, our preliminary data indicates the feasibility of using this system as an alternative for large-scale production of recombinant influenza HA protein in the face of influenza pandemic threat.

  11. Performance-enhancing drugs: design and production of redirected chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, B L

    2015-03-01

    Performance enhancement of the immune system can now be generated through ex vivo gene modification of T cells in order to redirect native specificity to target tumor antigens. This approach combines the specificity of antibody therapy, the expanded response of cellular therapy and the memory activity of vaccine therapy. Recent clinical trials of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells directed toward CD19 as a stand-alone therapy have shown sustained complete responses in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. As these drug products are individually derived from a patient's own cells, a different manufacturing approach is required for this kind of personalized therapy compared with conventional drugs. Key steps in the CAR T-cell manufacturing process include the selection and activation of isolated T cells, transduction of T cells to express CARs, ex vivo expansion of modified T cells and cryopreservation in infusible media. In this review, the steps involved in isolating, genetically modifying and scaling-out the CAR T cells for use in a clinical setting are described in the context of in-process and release testing and regulatory standards.

  12. Reversible Heat-Induced Inactivation of Chimeric β-Glucuronidase in Transgenic Plants1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almoguera, Concepción; Rojas, Anabel; Jordano, Juan

    2002-01-01

    We compared the expression patterns in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) of two chimeric genes: a translational fusion to β-glucuronidase (GUS) and a transcriptional fusion, both with the same promoter and 5′-flanking sequences of Ha hsp17.7 G4, a small heat shock protein (sHSP) gene from sunflower (Helianthus annuus). We found that immediately after heat shock, the induced expression from the two fusions in seedlings was similar, considering chimeric mRNA or GUS protein accumulation. Surprisingly, we discovered that the chimeric GUS protein encoded by the translational fusion was mostly inactive in such conditions. We also found that this inactivation was fully reversible. Thus, after returning to control temperature, the GUS activity was fully recovered without substantial changes in GUS protein accumulation. In contrast, we did not find differences in the in vitro heat inactivation of the respective GUS proteins. Insolubilization of the chimeric GUS protein correlated with its inactivation, as indicated by immunoprecipitation analyses. The inclusion in another chimeric gene of the 21 amino-terminal amino acids from a different sHSP lead to a comparable reversible inactivation. That effect not only illustrates unexpected post-translational problems, but may also point to sequences involved in interactions specific to sHSPs and in vivo heat stress conditions. PMID:12011363

  13. Anti-Ma2 antibody related paraneoplastic limbic/brain stem encephalitis associated with breast cancer expressing Ma1, Ma2, and Ma3 mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahashi, K; Sakai, K; Mano, K; Hirose, G

    2003-09-01

    A 69 year old woman presented with cognitive impairment and supranuclear gaze palsy caused by paraneoplastic limbic/brain stem encephalitis associated with atypical medullary breast carcinoma. The cerebrospinal fluid from the patient harboured an anti-neuronal cell antibody against Ma2 antigen, but not against Ma1 or Ma3 antigen. Despite the antibody being restricted to the Ma2 antigen, the patient's cancer tissue expressed Ma1, Ma2, and Ma3 mRNAs. These results, and the expression of Ma2 mRNA in an atypical medullar breast carcinoma in another patient without paraneoplastic encephalitis, indicate that the induction of anti-Ma2 antibody depends on host immunoreponsiveness and not on the presence of the antigen itself in the cancer.

  14. Close-up of the alpha-1,3-Gal epitope as defined by a monoclonal chimeric IgE and human serum using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Melanie; Michel, Yvonne; Wallach, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    of an alpha-Gal-specific murine IgM antibody was employed to construct chimeric IgE and IgG antibodies. Reactivity and specificity of the resulting antibodies were assessed by means of ELISA and receptor binding studies. Using defined carbohydrates, interaction of the IgE and human serum was assessed...... by mediator release assays, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and STD NMR analyses. The alpha-Gal-specific chimeric IgE and IgG antibodies were proven functional regarding interaction with antigen and Fc receptors. SPR measurements demonstrated affinities in the micromolar range. In contrast to a reference...

  15. A global RNA-seq-driven analysis of CHO host and production cell lines reveals distinct differential expression patterns of genes contributing to recombinant antibody glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könitzer, Jennifer D; Müller, Markus M; Leparc, Germán; Pauers, Martin; Bechmann, Jan; Schulz, Patrick; Schaub, Jochen; Enenkel, Barbara; Hildebrandt, Tobias; Hampel, Martin; Tolstrup, Anne B

    2015-09-01

    Boehringer Ingelheim uses two CHO-DG44 lines for manufacturing biotherapeutics, BI-HEX-1 and BI-HEX-2, which produce distinct cell type-specific antibody glycosylation patterns. A recently established CHO-K1 descended host, BI-HEX-K1, generates antibodies with glycosylation profiles differing from CHO-DG44. Manufacturing process development is significantly influenced by these unique profiles. To investigate the underlying glycosylation related gene expression, we leveraged our CHO host and production cell RNA-seqtranscriptomics and product quality database together with the CHO-K1 genome. We observed that each BI-HEX host and antibody producing cell line has a unique gene expression fingerprint. CHO-DG44 cells only transcribe Fut10, Gfpt2 and ST8Sia6 when expressing antibodies. BI-HEX-K1 cells express ST8Sia6 at host cell level. We detected a link between BI-HEX-1/BI-HEX-2 antibody galactosylation and mannosylation and the gene expression of the B4galt gene family and genes controlling mannose processing. Furthermore, we found major differences between the CHO-DG44 and CHO-K1 lineages in the expression of sialyl transferases and enzymes synthesizing sialic acid precursors, providing a rationale for the lack of immunogenic NeuGc/NGNA synthesis in CHO. Our study highlights the value of systems biotechnology to understand glycoprotein synthesis and product glycoprofiles. Such data improve future production clone selection and process development strategies for better steering of biotherapeutic product quality. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Immunohistochemical Analysis Using Antipodocalyxin Monoclonal Antibody PcMab-47 Demonstrates Podocalyxin Expression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itai, Shunsuke; Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-10-01

    Podocalyxin is a CD34-related type I transmembrane protein that is highly glycosylated with N-glycan, O-glycan, and keratan sulfate. Podocalyxin was originally found in the podocytes of rat kidney and is reportedly expressed in many types of tumors, including brain tumors, colorectal cancers, and breast cancers. Overexpression of podocalyxin is an independent predictor of progression, metastasis, and poor outcome. We recently immunized mice with recombinant human podocalyxin, which was produced using LN229 glioblastoma cells, and produced a novel antipodocalyxin monoclonal antibody (mAb), PcMab-47, which reacts with endogenous podocalyxin-expressing cancer cell lines and normal cell lines independent of glycosylation in Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical analyses. In this study, we performed immunohistochemical analysis against oral cancers using PcMab-47. PcMab-47-stained oral squamous cell carcinoma cells in a cytoplasmic pattern and detected 26/38 (68.4%) of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells on tissue microarrays. These results indicate that PcMab-47 is useful in detecting podocalyxin of oral cancers for immunohistochemical analysis.

  17. Enhancement of mucosal immune responses by chimeric influenza HA/SHIV virus-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Lizheng; Lu Xiaoyan; Kang, S.-M.; Chen Changyi; Compans, Richard W.; Yao Qizhi

    2003-01-01

    To enhance mucosal immune responses using simian/human immunodeficiency virus-like particles (SHIV VLPs), we have produced novel phenotypically mixed chimeric influenza HA/SHIV VLPs and used them to immunize C57BL/6J mice intranasally. Antibody and cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses as well as cytokine production in both systemic and mucosal sites were compared after immunization with SHIV VLPs or chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. By using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the levels of serum IgG and mucosal IgA to the HIV envelope protein (Env) were found to be highest in the group immunized with chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. Furthermore, the highest titer of serum neutralizing antibody against HIV Env was found with the group immunized with chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. Analysis of the IgG1/IgG2a ratio indicated that a T H 1-oriented immune response resulted from these VLP immunizations. HA/SHIV VLP-immunized mice also showed significantly higher CTL responses than those observed in SHIV VLP-immunized mice. Moreover, a MHC class I restricted T-cell activation ELISPOT assay showed a mixed type of T H 1/T H 2 cytokines in the HA/SHIV VLP-immunized mice, indicating that the chimeric VLPs can enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses to the HIV Env protein at multiple mucosal and systemic sites. The results indicate that incorporation of influenza HA into heterotypic VLPs may be highly effective for targeting vaccines to mucosal surfaces

  18. Decreased Fc receptor expression on innate immune cells is associated with impaired antibody-mediated cellular phagocytic activity in chronically HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Tonelli, Andrew; Berger, Christoph T; Ackerman, Margaret E; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Liu, Qingquan; Sips, Magdalena; Toth, Ildiko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Ghebremichael, Musie; Alter, Galit

    2011-07-05

    In addition to neutralization, antibodies mediate other antiviral activities including antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), as well as complement deposition. While it is established that progressive HIV infection is associated with reduced ADCC and ADCP, the underlying mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. Here we report considerable changes in FcR expression over the course of HIV infection on both mDCs and monocytes, including elevated FcγRI expression in acute HIV infection and reduced expression of FcγRII and FcγRIIIa in chronic HIV infection. Furthermore, selective blockade of FcγRII alone was associated with a loss in ADCP activity, suggesting that FcγRII plays a central role in modulating ADCP. Overall, HIV infection is associated with a number of changes in FcR expression on phagocytic cells that are associated with changes in their ability to respond to antibody-opsonized targets, potentially contributing to a failure in viral clearance in progressive HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Decreased Fc-Receptor expression on innate immune cells is associated with impaired antibody mediated cellular phagocytic activity in chronically HIV-1 infected individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Tonelli, Andrew; Berger, Christoph T.; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Liu, Qingquan; Sips, Magdalena; Toth, Ildiko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Ghebremichael, Musie; Alter, Galit

    2011-01-01

    In addition to neutralization, antibodies mediate other antiviral activities including antibody-dependent cellular-phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC), as well as complement deposition. While it is established that progressive HIV infection is associated with reduced ADCC and ADCP, the underlying mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. Here we report considerable changes in FcR expression over the course of HIV infection on both mDCs and monocytes, including elevated FcγRI expression in acute HIV infection and reduced expression of FcγRII and FcγRIIIa in chronic HIV infection. Furthermore, selective blockade of FcγRII alone was associated with a loss in ADCP activity, suggesting that FcγRII plays a central role in modulating ADCP. Overall, HIV infection is associated with a number of changes in FcR expression on phagocytic cells that are associated with changes in their ability to respond to antibody-opsonized targets, potentially contributing to a failure in viral clearance in progressive HIV-1 infection. PMID:21565376

  20. Model-directed engineering of "difficult-to-express" monoclonal antibody production by Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pybus, Leon P; Dean, Greg; West, Nathan R; Smith, Andrew; Daramola, Olalekan; Field, Ray; Wilkinson, Stephen J; James, David C

    2014-02-01

    Despite improvements in volumetric titer for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production processes using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, some "difficult-to-express" (DTE) MAbs inexplicably reach much lower process titers. These DTE MAbs require intensive cell line and process development activity, rendering them more costly or even unsuitable to manufacture. To rapidly and rationally identify an optimal strategy to improve production of DTE MAbs, we have developed an engineering design platform combining high-yielding transient production, empirical modeling of MAb synthesis incorporating an unfolded protein response (UPR) regulatory loop with directed expression and cell engineering approaches. Utilizing a panel of eight IgG1 λ MAbs varying >4-fold in volumetric titer, we showed that MAb-specific limitations on folding and assembly rate functioned to induce a proportionate UPR in host CHO cells with a corresponding reduction in cell growth rate. Derived from comparative empirical modeling of cellular constraints on the production of each MAb we employed two strategies to increase production of DTE MAbs designed to avoid UPR induction through an improvement in the rate/cellular capacity for MAb folding and assembly reactions. Firstly, we altered the transfected LC:HC gene ratio and secondly, we co-expressed a variety of molecular chaperones, foldases or UPR transactivators (BiP, CypB, PDI, and active forms of ATF6 and XBP1) with recombinant MAbs. DTE MAb production was significantly improved by both strategies, although the mode of action was dependent upon the approach employed. Increased LC:HC ratio or CypB co-expression improved cell growth with no effect on qP. In contrast, BiP, ATF6c and XBP1s co-expression increased qP and reduced cell growth. This study demonstrates that expression-engineering strategies to improve production of DTE proteins in mammalian cells should be product specific, and based on rapid predictive tools to assess the relative impact of

  1. Construction, purification, and characterization of a chimeric TH1 antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier-González Luís

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TH1 immune response antagonism is a desirable approach to mitigate some autoimmune and inflammatory reactions during the course of several diseases where IL-2 and IFN-γ are two central players. Therefore, the neutralization of both cytokines could provide beneficial effects in patients suffering from autoimmune or inflammatory illnesses. Results A chimeric antagonist that can antagonize the action of TH1 immunity mediators, IFN-γ and IL-2, was designed, engineered, expressed in E. coli, purified and evaluated for its in vitro biological activities. The TH1 antagonist molecule consists of the extracellular region for the human IFNγ receptor chain 1 fused by a four-aminoacid linker peptide to human 60 N-terminal aminoacid residues of IL-2. The corresponding gene fragments were isolated by RT-PCR and cloned in the pTPV-1 vector. E. coli (W3110 strain was transformed with this vector. The chimeric protein was expressed at high level as inclusion bodies. The protein was partially purified by pelleting and washing. It was then solubilized with strong denaturant and finally refolded by gel filtration. In vitro biological activity of chimera was demonstrated by inhibition of IFN-γ-dependent HLA-DR expression in Colo 205 cells, inhibition of IFN-γ antiproliferative effect on HEp-2 cells, and by a bidirectional effect in assays for IL-2 T-cell dependent proliferation: agonism in the absence versus inhibition in the presence of IL-2. Conclusion TH1 antagonist is a chimeric protein that inhibits the in vitro biological activities of human IFN-γ, and is a partial agonist/antagonist of human IL-2. With these attributes, the chimera has the potential to offer a new opportunity for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  2. IgE recognition of chimeric isoforms of the honeybee (Apis mellifera) venom allergen Api m 10 evaluated by protein array technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vaerenbergh, Matthias; De Smet, Lina; Rafei-Shamsabadi, David; Blank, Simon; Spillner, Edzard; Ebo, Didier G; Devreese, Bart; Jakob, Thilo; de Graaf, Dirk C

    2015-02-01

    Api m 10 has recently been established as novel major allergen that is recognized by more than 60% of honeybee venom (HBV) allergic patients. Previous studies suggest Api m 10 protein heterogeneity which may have implications for diagnosis and immunotherapy of HBV allergy. In the present study, RT-PCR revealed the expression of at least nine additional Api m 10 transcript isoforms by the venom glands. Two distinct mechanisms are responsible for the generation of these isoforms: while the previously known variant 2 is produced by an alternative splicing event, novel identified isoforms are intragenic chimeric transcripts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the identification of chimeric transcripts generated by the honeybee. By a retrospective proteomic analysis we found evidence for the presence of several of these isoforms in the venom proteome. Additionally, we analyzed IgE reactivity to different isoforms by protein array technology using sera from HBV allergic patients, which revealed that IgE recognition of Api m 10 is both isoform- and patient-specific. While it was previously demonstrated that the majority of HBV allergic patients display IgE reactivity to variant 2, our study also shows that some patients lacking IgE antibodies for variant 2 display IgE reactivity to two of the novel identified Api m 10 variants, i.e. variants 3 and 4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression and purification of a major allergen, Pla a 1, from Platanus acerifolia pollen and the preparation of its monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Wei-Wei; Huang, Wen; Wu, De-Qin; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Ji, Chun-Mei; Cao, Meng-Da; Guo, Miao; Sun, Jin-Lu; Wei, Ji-Fu

    2017-09-01

    Platanus acerifolia pollen is considered an important source of airborne allergens in numerous cities. Pla a 1 is a major allergen from P. acerifolia pollen. The present study aimed to express and purify Pla a 1, and to prepare its monoclonal antibody. In the present study, the Pla a 1 gene was subcloned into a pET‑28a vector and transformed into the ArcticExpress™ (DE3) RP Escherichia coli host strain. The purified Pla a 1 was then used to immunize BALB/c mice. When serum detection was positive, spleen cells were isolated from the mice and fused with SP2/0 myeloma cells at a ratio of 10:1. Hybridoma cells were screened by indirect ELISA and limiting dilution. Positive cells were used to induce the formation of antibody‑containing ascites fluid, and the antibodies were purified using protein A‑agarose. The results of the present study demonstrated that recombinant Pla a 1 was successfully expressed and purified, and exhibited positive immunoglobulin E‑binding to serum from patients allergic to P. acerifolia. A total of 11 hybridomas that steadily secreted anti‑Pla a 1 antibody were obtained and an immunoblotting analysis indicated that all of these monoclonal antibodies specifically recognized the Pla a 1 protein. These results suggested that specific anti‑Pla a 1 antibodies may be obtained, which can be used for the rapid detection of Pla a 1 allergens and in the preparation of vaccines against P. acerifolia pollen.

  4. Labeling an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with 90Y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera Pintado, Alejandro; Leyva Montaña, René; Prats Capote, Anaís; Góngora Bravo, Magdiel; Alberti Ramírez, Alejandro; León, Mariela; Hernández González, Ignacio; Dorvignit, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomas are among the 10 leading causes of death, both in Cuba and in the world, with an increasing incidence in recent years. Follicular lymphoma low-grade (indolent) is one of the most common in the Western world, representing 1/3 of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). More than 90% of patients present with disseminated disease at diagnosis and generally have a slow evolution and good response to conventional treatment; but radically changed its forecast to relapse, resistance to therapeutic and histologic transformation can occur. The monoclonal antibody therapy has been a promising therapeutic. In this respect CD20 antigen it has been considered one of the most attractive targets in the therapy of follicular B cell lymphoma This is expressed in more than 90% of cases, while not present in stem cells and lines progenitors. Despite the success of immunotherapy, the relapse rate is still considerable. In order to increase the cytotoxic potential of immunotherapy, marked with beta emitting radionuclides alpha particles or monoclonal antibodies are used today. Despite encouraging results in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas refractory to other treatments, the extremely high costs of these commercial radiopharmaceuticals have greatly limited its application, even in the first world. A sustainable alternative is the marking of other anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, so researchers from several countries have concentrated their efforts on rituximaby other similar antibodies labeled with therapeutic radionuclides, as a possible cost-effectively to more problem. Today in Cuba it has an electrolytic generator 90 Sr- 90 Y Isotope Center, which ensures the availability of the radionuclide. In addition, the chimeric MAb rituximab is applied as part of the therapy of NHL in its health system and, recently, the Center for Molecular Immunology has obtained a chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody biosimilar rituximab, which is in phase clinical trial; which opens prospects for

  5. Baculovirus-mediated gene transfer in butterfly wings in vivo: an efficient expression system with an anti-gp64 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungel, Bidur; Ohno, Yoshikazu; Matayoshi, Rie; Otaki, Joji M

    2013-03-25

    Candidate genes for color pattern formation in butterfly wings have been known based on gene expression patterns since the 1990s, but their functions remain elusive due to a lack of a functional assay. Several methods of transferring and expressing a foreign gene in butterfly wings have been reported, but they have suffered from low success rates or low expression levels. Here, we developed a simple, practical method to efficiently deliver and express a foreign gene using baculovirus-mediated gene transfer in butterfly wings in vivo. A recombinant baculovirus containing a gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP) was injected into pupae of the blue pansy butterfly Junonia orithya (Nymphalidae). GFP fluorescence was detected in the pupal wings and other body parts of the injected individuals three to five days post-injection at various degrees of fluorescence. We obtained a high GFP expression rate at relatively high virus titers, but it was associated with pupal death before color pattern formation in wings. To reduce the high mortality rate caused by the baculovirus treatment, we administered an anti-gp64 antibody, which was raised against baculovirus coat protein gp64, to infected pupae after the baculovirus injection. This treatment greatly reduced the mortality rate of the infected pupae. GFP fluorescence was observed in pupal and adult wings and other body parts of the antibody-treated individuals at various degrees of fluorescence. Importantly, we obtained completely developed wings with a normal color pattern, in which fluorescent signals originated directly from scales or the basal membrane after the removal of scales. GFP fluorescence in wing tissues spatially coincided with anti-GFP antibody staining, confirming that the fluorescent signals originated from the expressed GFP molecules. Our baculovirus-mediated gene transfer system with an anti-gp64 antibody is reasonably efficient, and it can be an invaluable tool to transfer, express, and functionally

  6. A shark antibody heavy chain encoded by a nonsomatically rearranged VDJ is preferentially expressed in early development and is convergent with mammalian IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumfelt, L L; Avila, D; Diaz, M; Bartl, S; McKinney, E C; Flajnik, M F

    2001-02-13

    In most vertebrate embryos and neonates studied to date unique antigen receptors (antibodies and T cell receptors) are expressed that possess a limited immune repertoire. We have isolated a subclass of IgM, IgM(1gj), from the nurse shark Ginglymostoma cirratum that is preferentially expressed in neonates. The variable (V) region gene encoding the heavy (H) chain underwent V-D-J rearrangement in germ cells ("germline-joined"). Such H chain V genes were discovered over 10 years ago in sharks but until now were not shown to be expressed at appreciable levels; we find expression of H(1gj) in primary and secondary lymphoid tissues early in life, but in adults only in primary lymphoid tissue, which is identified in this work as the epigonal organ. H(1gj) chain associates covalently with light (L) chains and is most similar in sequence to IgM H chains, but like mammalian IgG has three rather than the four IgM constant domains; deletion of the ancestral IgM C2 domain thus defines both IgG and IgM(1gj). Because sharks are the members of the oldest vertebrate class known to possess antibodies, unique or specialized antibodies expressed early in ontogeny in sharks and other vertebrates were likely present at the inception of the adaptive immune system.

  7. Chimeric plant virus particles administered nasally or orally induce systemic and mucosal immune responses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brennan, F.R.; Bellaby, T.; Helliwell, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The humoral immune responses to the D2 peptide of fibronectin-binding protein B (FnBP) of Staphylococcus aureus, expressed on the plant virus cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), were evaluated after mucosal delivery to mice. Intranasal immunization of these chimeric virus particles (CVPs), either alone...

  8. Ligand-mediated negative regulation of a chimeric transmembrane receptor tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desai, D M; Sap, J; Schlessinger, J

    1993-01-01

    CD45, a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase), is required for TCR signaling. Multiple CD45 isoforms, differing in the extracellular domain, are expressed in a tissue- and activation-specific manner, suggesting an important function for this domain. We report that a chimeric protein...... that ligand-mediated regulation of receptor-PTPases may have mechanistic similarities with receptor tyrosine kinases....

  9. Replacement of the V3 domain in the surface subunit of the feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein with the equivalent region of a T cell-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 results in a chimeric surface protein that efficiently binds to CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Silvia A; Falcón, Juan I; Affranchino, José L

    2014-03-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and the T cell-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) share the use of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for cell entry. To study this process further we developed a cell surface binding assay based on the expression of a soluble version of the FIV SU C-terminally tagged with the influenza virus hemagglutinin epitope (HA). The specificity of the assay was demonstrated by the following evidence: (1) the SU-HA protein bound to HeLa cells that express CXCR4 but not to MDCK cells that lack this chemokine receptor; and (2) binding of the SU-HA to HeLa cells was blocked by incubation with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 as well as with the anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) 12G5. Deletion of the V3 region from the FIV SU glycoprotein abolished its ability to bind CXCR4-expressing cells. Remarkably, substitution of the V3 domain of the FIV SU by the equivalent region of the HIV-1 NL4-3 isolate resulted in efficient cell surface binding of the chimeric SU protein to CXCR4. Moreover, transfection of MDCK cells with a plasmid encoding human CXCR4 allowed the association of the chimeric SU-HA glycoprotein to the transfected cells. Interestingly, while cell binding of the chimeric FIV-HIV SU was inhibited by an anti-HIV-1 V3 MAb, its association with CXCR4 was found to be resistant to AMD3100. Of note, the chimeric FIV-HIV Env glycoprotein was capable of promoting CXCR4-dependent cell-to-cell fusion.

  10. HER2 expression in breast cancer cells is downregulated upon active targeting by antibody-engineered multifunctional nanoparticles in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Fabio; Fiandra, Luisa; De Palma, Clara; Colombo, Miriam; Mazzucchelli, Serena; Verderio, Paolo; Allevi, Raffaele; Tosoni, Antonella; Nebuloni, Manuela; Clementi, Emilio; Prosperi, Davide

    2011-08-23

    Subcellular destiny of targeted nanoparticles in cancer cells within living organisms is still an open matter of debate. By in vivo and ex vivo experiments on tumor-bearing mice treated with antibody-engineered magnetofluorescent nanocrystals, in which we combined fluorescence imaging, magnetic relaxation, and trasmission electron microscopy approaches, we provide evidence that nanoparticles are effectively delivered to the tumor by active targeting. These nanocrystals were demonstrated to enable contrast enhancement of the tumor in magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, we were able to discriminate between the fate of the organic corona and the metallic core upon cell internalization. Accurate immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that hybrid nanoparticle endocytosis is mediated by the complex formation with HER2 receptor, leading to a substantial downregulation of HER2 protein expression on the cell surface. These results provide a direct insight into the pathway of internalization and degradation of targeted hybrid nanoparticles in cancer cells in vivo and suggest a potential application of this immunotheranostic nanoagent in neoadjuvant therapy of cancer. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  11. Antibody-Based Immunotoxins for the Treatment of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nurit Becker; Itai Benhar

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-based immunotoxins comprise an important group in targeted cancer therapeutics. These chimeric proteins are a form of biological guided missiles that combine a targeting moiety with a potent effector molecule. The targeting moiety is mostly a monoclonal antibody (MAb) or a recombinant antibody-based fragment that confers target specificity to the immunotoxin. The effector domain is a potent protein toxin of bacterial or plant origin, which, following binding to the target cells, unde...

  12. Current status of prediction of drug disposition and toxicity in humans using chimeric mice with humanized liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Sugihara, Kazumi

    2014-01-01

    1. Human-chimeric mice with humanized liver have been constructed by transplantation of human hepatocytes into several types of mice having genetic modifications that injure endogenous liver cells. Here, we focus on liver urokinase-type plasminogen activator-transgenic severe combined immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) mice, which are the most widely used human-chimeric mice. Studies so far indicate that drug metabolism, drug transport, pharmacological effects and toxicological action in these mice are broadly similar to those in humans. 2. Expression of various drug-metabolizing enzymes is known to be different between humans and rodents. However, the expression pattern of cytochrome P450, aldehyde oxidase and phase II enzymes in the liver of human-chimeric mice resembles that in humans, not that in the host mice. 3. Metabolism of various drugs, including S-warfarin, zaleplon, ibuprofen, naproxen, coumarin, troglitazone and midazolam, in human-chimeric mice is mediated by human drug-metabolizing enzymes, not by host mouse enzymes, and thus resembles that in humans. 4. Pharmacological and toxicological effects of various drugs in human-chimeric mice are also similar to those in humans. 5. The current consensus is that chimeric mice with humanized liver are useful to predict drug metabolism catalyzed by cytochrome P450, aldehyde oxidase and phase II enzymes in humans in vivo and in vitro. Some remaining issues are discussed in this review.

  13. IGHV1-69-Encoded Antibodies Expressed in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia React with Malondialdehyde-Acetaldehyde Adduct, an Immunodominant Oxidation-Specific Epitope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Que, Xuchu; Widhopf Ii, George F; Amir, Shahzada

    2013-01-01

    The immunoglobulins expressed by chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells are highly restricted, suggesting they are selected for binding either self or foreign antigen. Of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable (IGHV) genes expressed in CLL, IGHV1-69 is the most common, and often is expressed...... are products of enhanced lipid peroxidation and a major target of innate natural antibodies. Specifically, CLL69C bound immunodominant OSE adducts termed MAA (malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde-adducts), which are found on apoptotic cells, inflammatory tissues, and atherosclerotic lesions. It also reacted...

  14. Species-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies to Escherichia coli-Expressed p36 Cytosolic Protein of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, J.; Sawyer, N.; Moumen, B. Ben Abdel; Bouh, K. Cheikh Saad; Dea, S.

    2000-01-01

    The p36 protein of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a cytosolic protein carrying species-specific antigenic determinants. Based on the genomic sequence of the reference strain ATCC 25934, primers were designed for PCR amplification of the p36-encoding gene (948 bp). These primers were shown to be specific to M. hyopneumoniae since no DNA amplicons could be obtained with other mycoplasma species and pathogenic bacteria that commonly colonize the porcine respiratory tract. The amplified p36 gene was subcloned into the pGEX-4T-1 vector to be expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (GST). The GST-p36 recombinant fusion protein was purified by affinity chromatography and cut by thrombin, and the enriched p36 protein was used to immunize female BALB/c mice for the production of anti-p36 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The polypeptide specificity of the nine MAbs obtained was confirmed by Western immunoblotting with cell lysates prepared from the homologous strain. Cross-reactivity studies of the anti-p36 MAbs towards two other M. hyopneumoniae reference strains (ATCC 25095 and J strains) and Quebec field strains that had been isolated in culture suggested that these anti-p36 MAbs were directed against a highly conserved epitope, or closely located epitopes, of the p36 protein. No reactivity was demonstrated against other mycoplasma species tested. Clinical signs and lesions suggestive of enzootic pneumonia were reproduced in specific-pathogen-free pigs infected experimentally with a virulent Quebec field strain (IAF-DM9827) of M. hyopneumoniae. The bacteria could be recovered from lung homogenates of pigs that were killed after the 3-week observation period by both PCR and cultivation procedures. Furthermore, the anti-p36 MAbs permitted effective detection by indirect immunofluorescence of M. hyopneumoniae in frozen lung sections from experimentally infected pigs. However, attempts to use the recombinant p36 protein as an antigen in an

  15. Biological, immunological and functional properties of two novel multi-variant chimeric recombinant proteins of CSP antigens for vaccine development against Plasmodium vivax infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Samaneh H; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Salmanian, Ali H; Amani, Jafar; Mehrizi, Akram A; Snounou, Georges; Nosten, François; Andolina, Chiara; Mourtazavi, Yousef; Djadid, Navid D

    2017-10-01

    The circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of the malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax is a major pre-erythrocyte vaccine candidate. The protein has a central repeat region that belongs to one of repeat families (VK210, VK247, and the P. vivax-like). In the present study, computer modelling was employed to select chimeric proteins, comprising the conserved regions and different arrangements of the repeat elements (VK210 and VK247), whose structure is similar to that of the native counterparts. DNA encoding the selected chimeras (named CS127 and CS712) were synthetically constructed based on E. coli codons, then cloned and expressed. Mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs; anti-Pv-210-CDC and -Pv-247-CDC), recognized the chimeric antigens in ELISA, indicating correct conformation and accessibility of the B-cell epitopes. ELISA using IgG from plasma samples collected from 221 Iranian patients with acute P. vivax showed that only 49.32% of the samples reacted to both CS127 and CS712 proteins. The dominant subclass for the two chimeras was IgG1 (48% of the positive responders, OD 492 =0.777±0.420 for CS127; 48.41% of the positive responders, OD 492 =0.862±0.423 for CS712, with no statistically significant difference P>0.05; Wilcoxon signed ranks test). Binding assays showed that both chimeric proteins bound to immobilized heparan sulphate and HepG2 hepatocyte cells in a concentration-dependent manner, saturable at 80μg/mL. Additionally, anti-CS127 and -CS712 antibodies raised in mice recognized the native protein on the surface of P. vivax sporozoite with high intensity, confirming the presence of common epitopes between the recombinant forms and the native proteins. In summary, despite structural differences at the molecular level, the expression levels of both chimeras were satisfactory, and their conformational structure retained biological function, thus supporting their potential for use in the development of vivax-based vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  16. Anomalous expression of Thy1 (CD90) in B-cell lymphoma cells and proliferation inhibition by anti-Thy1 antibody treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiura, Yoshihito; Kotani, Norihiro; Yamashita, Ryusuke; Yamamoto, Harumi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Honke, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (Ab) rituximab is accepted to be an effective therapeutic Ab for malignant B-cell lymphoma; however, discovery of other cell surface antigens is required for the option of antibody medicine. Considering that many tumor-associated antigens are glycans, we have searched glycoconjugates for the candidate antigens that therapeutic Abs target. To this end, we first focused on the difference in the glycogenes expression in terms of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, Akata. Using DNA array, flow cytometry and Western blotting, we found that Thy1 was highly expressed in EBV-positive Akata cells. Subsequently, Thy1 was found to be expressed in other B-cell lymphoma cell lines: BJAB, MutuI, and MutuIII, irrespective of EBV infection. Treatment of these cells with an anti-Thy1 monoclonal antibody inhibited proliferation more strongly than the therapeutic Ab rituximab. The B-cell lymphoma cell lines were classified based on the extent of the proliferation inhibition, which was not correlated with the expression level of Thy1. It is suggested that stable residence of receptor tyrosine kinases in lipid rafts sustains cell growth in B-cell lymphoma cells.

  17. Anomalous expression of Thy1 (CD90) in B-cell lymphoma cells and proliferation inhibition by anti-Thy1 antibody treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiura, Yoshihito [Department of Biochemistry, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kotani, Norihiro, E-mail: kotani@kochi-u.ac.jp [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kochi System Glycobiology Center, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); Yamashita, Ryusuke [Department of Biochemistry, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Yamamoto, Harumi [Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida Shimo-Adachi, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kozutsumi, Yasunori [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida Shimo-Adachi, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Honke, Koichi [Department of Biochemistry, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kochi System Glycobiology Center, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan)

    2010-05-28

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (Ab) rituximab is accepted to be an effective therapeutic Ab for malignant B-cell lymphoma; however, discovery of other cell surface antigens is required for the option of antibody medicine. Considering that many tumor-associated antigens are glycans, we have searched glycoconjugates for the candidate antigens that therapeutic Abs target. To this end, we first focused on the difference in the glycogenes expression in terms of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, Akata. Using DNA array, flow cytometry and Western blotting, we found that Thy1 was highly expressed in EBV-positive Akata cells. Subsequently, Thy1 was found to be expressed in other B-cell lymphoma cell lines: BJAB, MutuI, and MutuIII, irrespective of EBV infection. Treatment of these cells with an anti-Thy1 monoclonal antibody inhibited proliferation more strongly than the therapeutic Ab rituximab. The B-cell lymphoma cell lines were classified based on the extent of the proliferation inhibition, which was not correlated with the expression level of Thy1. It is suggested that stable residence of receptor tyrosine kinases in lipid rafts sustains cell growth in B-cell lymphoma cells.

  18. High-yield production of canine parvovirus virus-like particles in a baculovirus expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hongli; Xia, Xiaohong; Liu, Bing; Fu, Yu; Chen, Xianping; Wang, Huihui; Xia, Zhenqiang

    2016-03-01

    An optimized VP2 gene from the current prevalent CPV strain (new CPV-2a) in China was expressed in a baculovirus expression system. It was found that the VP2 proteins assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) with antigenic properties similar to those of natural CPV and with an especially high hemagglutination (HA) titer (1:2(20)). Dogs intramuscularly or orally immunized with VLPs produced antibodies against CPV with >1:80 hemagglutination inhibition (HI) units for at least 3 months. The CPV VLPs could be considered for use as a vaccine against CPV or as a platform for research on chimeric VLP vaccines against other diseases.

  19. Production process reproducibility and product quality consistency of transient gene expression in HEK293 cells with anti-PD1 antibody as the model protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kai; Han, Lei; Zong, Huifang; Chen, Junsheng; Zhang, Baohong; Zhu, Jianwei

    2017-03-01

    Demonstration of reproducibility and consistency of process and product quality is one of the most crucial issues in using transient gene expression (TGE) technology for biopharmaceutical development. In this study, we challenged the production consistency of TGE by expressing nine batches of recombinant IgG antibody in human embryonic kidney 293 cells to evaluate reproducibility including viable cell density, viability, apoptotic status, and antibody yield in cell culture supernatant. Product quality including isoelectric point, binding affinity, secondary structure, and thermal stability was assessed as well. In addition, major glycan forms of antibody from different batches of production were compared to demonstrate glycosylation consistency. Glycan compositions of the antibody harvested at different time periods were also measured to illustrate N-glycan distribution over the culture time. From the results, it has been demonstrated that different TGE batches are reproducible from lot to lot in overall cell growth, product yield, and product qualities including isoelectric point, binding affinity, secondary structure, and thermal stability. Furthermore, major N-glycan compositions are consistent among different TGE batches and conserved during cell culture time.

  20. Generation of human scFvs antibodies recognizing a prion protein epitope expressed on the surface of human lymphoblastoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imperiale Valentina

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A hallmark of prion disease is the transformation of normal cellular prion protein (PrPc into an infectious disease-associated isoform, (PrPsc. Anti-prion protein monoclonal antibodies are invaluable for structure-function studies of PrP molecules. Furthermore recent in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that anti-PrP monoclonal antibodies can prevent the incorporation of PrPc into propagating prions. In the present article, we show two new human phage antibodies, isolated on recombinant hamster prion protein (rHaPrP. Results We adopted an antibody phage display strategy to isolate specific human antibodies directed towards rHaPrP which has been used as a bait for panning the synthetic ETH-2 antibody phage library. Two phage antibodies clones named MA3.B4 and MA3.G3 were isolated and characterized under genetic biochemical and immunocytochemical aspects. The clones were found to recognize the prion protein in ELISA studies. In flow-cytometry studies, these human single chain Fragment variable (scFv phage-antibodies show a well defined pattern of reactivity on human lymphoblastoid and myeloid cells. Conclusion Sequence analysis of the gene encoding for the antibody fragments and antigen recognition patterns determined by flow-cytometry analysis indicate that the isolated scFvs recognize novel epitopes in the PrPc molecule. These new anti PrPc human antibodies are unique reagents for prion protein detection and may represent a biologic platform to develop new reagents to treat PrPsc associated disease.

  1. Chimeric vaccine composed of viral peptide and mammalian heat-shock protein 60 peptide protects against West Nile virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershoni-Yahalom, Orly; Landes, Shimon; Kleiman-Shoval, Smadar; Ben-Nathan, David; Kam, Michal; Lachmi, Bat-El; Khinich, Yevgeny; Simanov, Michael; Samina, Itzhak; Eitan, Anat; Cohen, Irun R; Rager-Zisman, Bracha; Porgador, Angel

    2010-08-01

    The protective efficacy and immunogenicity of a chimeric peptide against West Nile virus (WNV) was evaluated. This virus is the aetiological agent of West Nile fever, which has recently emerged in the western hemisphere. The rapid spread of WNV throughout North America, as well as the constantly changing epidemiology and transmission of the virus by blood transfusion and transplantation, have raised major public-health concerns. Currently, there are no effective treatments for WNV or vaccine for human use. We previously identified a novel, continuous B-cell epitope from domain III of the WNV envelope protein, termed Ep15. To test whether this epitope can protect against WNV infection, we synthesized a linear chimeric peptide composed of Ep15 and the heat-shock protein 60 peptide, p458. The p458 peptide is an effective carrier peptide for subunit vaccines against other infectious agents. We now report that mice immunized with the chimeric peptide, p458-Ep15, were resistant to lethal challenges with three different WNV strains. Moreover, their brains were free of viral genome and infectious virus. Mice immunized with Ep15 alone or with p431-Ep15, a control conjugate, were not protected. The chimeric p458-Ep15 peptide induced WNV-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies that neutralized the virus and induced the secretion of interferon-gammain vitro. Challenge of chimeric peptide-immunized mice considerably enhanced WNV-specific neutralizing antibodies. We conclude that this chimeric peptide can be used for formulation of a human vaccine against WNV.

  2. Accuracy of chimeric proteins in the serological diagnosis of chronic chagas disease - a Phase II study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Luciano Neves Santos

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The performance of current serologic tests for diagnosing chronic Chagas disease (CD is highly variable. The search for new diagnostic markers has been a constant challenge for improving accuracy and reducing the number of inconclusive results.Here, four chimeric proteins (IBMP-8.1 to -8.4 comprising immunodominant regions of different Trypanosoma cruzi antigens were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The proteins were used to detect specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies in the sera of 857 chagasic and 689 non-chagasic individuals to evaluate their accuracy for chronic CD diagnosis. The antigens were recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. The sensitivity and specificity values ranged from 94.3% to 99.3% and 99.4% to 100%, respectively. The diagnostic odds ratio (DOR values were 6,462 for IBMP-8.1, 3,807 for IBMP-8.2, 32,095 for IBMP-8.3, and 283,714 for IBMP-8.4. These chimeric antigens presented DORs that were higher than the commercial test Pathozyme Chagas. The antigens IBMP-8.3 and -8.4 also showed DORs higher than the Gold ELISA Chagas test. Mixtures with equimolar concentrations were tested in order to improve the diagnosis accuracy of negative samples with high signal and positive samples with low signal. However, no gain in accuracy was observed relative to the individual antigens. A total of 1,079 additional sera were used to test cross-reactivity to unrelated diseases. The cross-reactivity rates ranged from 0.37% to 0.74% even for Leishmania spp., a pathogen showing relatively high genome sequence identity to T. cruzi. Imprecision analyses showed that IBMP chimeras are very stable and the results are highly reproducible.Our findings indicate that the IBMP-8.4 antigen can be safely used in serological tests for T. cruzi screening in blood banks and for chronic CD laboratory diagnosis.

  3. Chimeric polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wogulis, Mark; Sweeney, Matthew; Heu, Tia

    2017-06-14

    The present invention relates to chimeric GH61 polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the chimeric GH61 polypeptides; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the chimeric GH61 polypeptides.

  4. Novel MeCP2 isoform-specific antibody reveals the endogenous MeCP2E1 expression in murine brain, primary neurons and astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robby M Zachariah

    Full Text Available Rett Syndrome (RTT is a severe neurological disorder in young females, and is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene. MECP2/Mecp2 gene encodes for two protein isoforms; MeCP2E1 and MeCP2E2 that are identical except for the N-terminus region of the protein. In brain, MECP2E1 transcripts are 10X higher, and MeCP2E1 is suggested to be the relevant isoform for RTT. However, due to the unavailability of MeCP2 isoform-specific antibodies, the endogenous expression pattern of MeCP2E1 is unknown. To gain insight into the expression of MeCP2E1 in brain, we have developed an anti-MeCP2E1 antibody and validated its specificity in cells exogenously expressing individual MeCP2 isoforms. This antibody does not show any cross-reactivity with MeCP2E2 and detects endogenous MeCP2E1 in mice brain, with no signal in Mecp2(tm1.1Bird y/- null mice. Additionally, we show the endogenous MeCP2E1 expression throughout different brain regions in adult mice, and demonstrate its highest expression in the brain cortex. Our results also indicate that MeCP2E1 is highly expressed in primary neurons, as compared to primary astrocytes. This is the first report of the endogenous MeCP2E1 expression at the protein levels, providing novel avenues for understanding different aspects of MeCP2 function.

  5. Lym-1 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Exhibit Potent Anti-Tumor Effects against B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Zheng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs recognizing CD19 epitopes have produced remarkable anti-tumor effects in patients with B-cell malignancies. However, cancer cells lacking recognized epitopes can emerge, leading to relapse and death. Thus, CAR T cells targeting different epitopes on different antigens could improve immunotherapy. The Lym-1 antibody targets a conformational epitope of Human Leukocyte Antigen-antigen D Related (HLA-DR on the surface of human B-cell lymphomas. Lym-1 CAR T cells were thus generated for evaluation of cytotoxic activity towards lymphoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Human T cells from healthy donors were transduced to express a Lym-1 CAR, and assessed for epitope-driven function in culture and towards Raji xenografts in NOD-scidIL2Rgammanull (NSG mice. Lym-1 CAR T cells exhibited epitope-driven activation and lytic function against human B-cell lymphoma cell lines in culture and mediated complete regression of Raji/Luciferase-Green fluorescent protein (Raji/Luc-GFP in NSG mice with similar or better reactivity than CD19 CAR T cells. Lym-1 CAR transduction of T cells is a promising immunotherapy for patients with Lym-1 epitope positive B-cell malignancies.

  6. The Influence of Sub-Unit Composition and Expression System on the Functional Antibody Response in the Development of a VAR2CSA Based Plasmodium falciparum Placental Malaria Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten A; dos Santos Marques Resende, Mafalda; de Jongh, Willem A

    2015-01-01

    -functional antibodies, and furthermore influence the folding, stability and yield of expression. Candidate antigens from the pre-clinical development expressed in High-Five insect cells using the baculovirus expression vector system were transitioned into the Drosophila Schneider-2 cell (S2) expression-system compliant...... with clinical development. The functional capacity of antibodies against antigens expressed in High-Five cells or in S2 cells was equivalent. This enabled an extensive down-selection of S2 insect cell-expressed antigens primarily encompassing the minimal CSA-binding region of VAR2CSA. In general, we found...

  7. The use of chimeric vimentin citrullinated peptides for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakoutikhah, Morteza; Gómara, María J; Gómez-Puerta, José A; Sanmartí, Raimon; Haro, Isabel

    2011-11-10

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease that causes inflammation and, in many cases, destruction of the joints. To prevent progressive and irreversible structural damage, early diagnosis of RA is of paramount importance. The present study addresses the search of new RA citrullinated antigens that could supplement or complement diagnostic/prognostic existing tests. With this aim, the epitope anticitrullinated vimentin antibody response was mapped using synthetic peptides. To improve the sensitivity/specificity balance, a vimentin peptide that was selected, and its cyclic analogue, were combined with fibrin- and filaggrin-related peptides to render chimeric peptides. Our findings highlight the putative application of these chimeric peptides for the design of RA diagnosis systems and imply that more than one serological test is required to classify RA patients based on the presence or absence of ACPAs. Each of the target molecules reported here (fibrin, vimentin, filaggrin) has a specific utility in the identification of a particular subset of RA patients.

  8. Recombinant AAV-mediated in vivo long-term expression and antitumour activity of an anti-ganglioside GM3(Neu5Gc) antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperno, G M; López-Requena, A; Predonzani, A; Dorvignit, D; Labrada, M; Zentilin, L; Burrone, O R; Cesco-Gaspere, M

    2015-12-01

    The ganglioside GM3(Neu5Gc) has gained increasing attention as therapeutic target because of its selective expression in various human tumours, such as melanoma, breast and lung cancer. 14F7 is a mouse IgG1 with specific reactivity to GM3(Neu5Gc)-positive tumours. The therapeutic activity of 14F7 has also been demonstrated in vivo, through its repetitive passive administration in tumour-bearing animals. In this work we used an alternative strategy to deliver recombinant 14F7 in vivo and analysed the therapeutic efficacy of this approach. We engineered a recombinant adeno-associated vector to direct the expression of secretable recombinant 14F7 in BALB/c animals. A single administration of the rAAV induced efficient production and secretion of the antibody in the bloodstream, with an expression level reaching plateau at ∼3 weeks after injection and persisting for almost a year. Strikingly, upon challenge with GM3(Neu5Gc)-positive X63-AG8.653 myeloma cells, tumour development was significantly delayed in animals treated with rAAV-14F7 with respect to animals treated with a control rAAV codifying for an irrelevant antibody. Finally, no significant differences in survival proportion were detected in animals injected with rAAV-14F7 or treated by standard administration of repetitive doses of purified monoclonal antibody 14F7.

  9. An avirulent chimeric Pestivirus with altered cell tropism protects pigs against lethal infection with classical swine fever virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimann, Ilona; Depner, Klaus; Trapp, Sascha; Beer, Martin

    2004-01-01

    A chimeric Pestivirus was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) [J. Virol. 70 (1996) 8606]. After deletion of the envelope protein E2-encoding region, the respective sequence of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strain Alfort 187 was inserted in-frame resulting in plasmid pA/CP7 E 2alf. After transfection of in vitro-transcribed CP7 E 2alf RNA, autonomous replication of chimeric RNA in bovine and porcine cell cultures was observed. Efficient growth of chimeric CP7 E 2alf virus, however, could only be demonstrated on porcine cells, and in contrast to the parental BVDV strain CP7, CP7 E 2alf only inefficiently infected and propagated in bovine cells. The virulence, immunogenicity, and 'marker vaccine' properties of the generated chimeric CP7 E 2alf virus were determined in an animal experiment using 27 pigs. After intramuscular inoculation of 1 x 10 7 TCID 50 , CP7 E 2alf proved to be completely avirulent, and neither viremia nor virus transmission to contact animals was observed; however, CSFV-specific neutralizing antibodies were detected from day 11 after inoculation. In addition, sera from all animals reacted positive in an E2-specific CSFV-antibody ELISA, but were negative for CSFV-E RNS -specific antibodies as determined with a CSFV marker ELISA. After challenge infection with highly virulent CSFV strain Eystrup, pigs immunized with CP7 E 2alf were fully protected against clinical signs of CSFV infection, viremia, and shedding of challenge virus, and almost all animals scored positive in a CSFV marker ELISA. From our results, we conclude that chimeric CP7 E 2alf may not only serve as a tool for a better understanding of Pestivirus attachment, entry, and assembly, but also represents an innocuous and efficacious modified live CSFV 'marker vaccine'

  10. CD19-Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, C L; thor Straten, Per

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) for cancer represents a promising new treatment modality. ACT based on the administration of cytotoxic T cells genetically engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) recognizing CD19 expressed by B cell malignancies has been shown to induce complete lasting...

  11. Isolation of chicken embryonic stem cell and preparation of chicken chimeric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yani; Yang, Haiyan; Zhang, Zhentao; Shi, Qingqing; Wang, Dan; Zheng, Mengmeng; Li, Bichun; Song, Jiuzhou

    2013-03-01

    Chicken embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were separated from blastoderms at stage-X and cultured in vitro. Alkaline phosphatase activity and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 staining was conducted to detect ESCs. Then, chicken ESCs were transfected with linearized plasmid pEGFP-N1 in order to produce chimeric chicken. Firstly, the optimal electrotransfection condition was compared; the results showed the highest transfection efficiency was obtained when the field strength and pulse duration was 280 V and 75 μs, respectively. Secondly, the hatchability of shedding methods, drilling a window at the blunt end of egg and drilling a window at the lateral shell of egg was compared, the results showed that the hatchability was the highest for drilling a window at the lateral shell of egg. Thirdly, the hatchability of microinjection (ESCs was microinjected into chick embryo cavity) was compared too, the results showed there were significant difference between the injection group transfected with ESCs and that of other two groups. In addition, five chimeric chickens were obtained in this study and EGFP gene was expressed in some organs, but only two chimeric chicken expressed EGFP gene in the gonad, indicating that the chimeric chicken could be obtained through chick embryo cavity injection by drilling a window at the lateral shell of egg.

  12. Preparation and Characterization of a Novel Chimeric Protein VEGI-CTT in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiping Cai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial cell growth inhibitor (VEGI is a recently identified antiangiogenic cytokine that belongs to the TNF superfamily, and could effectively inhibit endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Synthetic peptide CTT (CTTHWGFTLC has been found to suppress invasion and migration of both tumor and endothelial cells by potent and selective inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9. To prepare chimeric protein VEGI-CTT for more potent antitumor therapy, the recombinant expression vector pET-VEGI-CTT was constructed. This fusion protein was expressed in inclusion bodies in E. coli BL21 (DE3, and was refolded and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography using His-tag. Purified VEGI-CTT protein was characterized by proliferation assays of the endothelial cells and casein degradation assay in vitro. The results demonstrated that chimeric protein VEGI-CTT had a potent activity of antiangiogenesis through inhibiting the proliferation of endothelial cells, and could effectively reduce the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. The preliminarily in vivo study demonstrated that chimeric protein VEGI-CTT had more potent antitumor activity than VEGI and/or CTT peptide against CA46 human lymphoma xenografts in nude mice. Thus, these facts that are derived from the present study suggest that the chimeric protein VEGI-CTT may be used for tumor therapy in the future.

  13. Chimerism in health, transplantation and autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Marije; Kremer Hovinga, Idske Cornelia Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The term “chimerism” originates from Greek mythology and refers to the creature Chimaera, whose body was in front a lion, the back a serpent and the midsection a goat. In medicine, the term chimerism refers to an individual, organ or part consisting of tissues of diverse genetic constitution.

  14. Increased expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 in liver from NZB/W F1 mice received antibody against human parvovirus B19 VP1 unique region protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Gwo-Jong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human parvovirus B19 infection has been postulated to the anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS in autoimmunity. However, the influence of anti-B19-VP1u antibody in autoimmune diseases is still obscure. Methods To elucidate the effect of anti-B19-VP1u antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, passive transfer of rabbit anti-B19-VP1u IgG was injected intravenously into NZB/W F1 mice. Results Significant reduction of platelet count and prolonged thrombocytopenia time were detected in anti-B19-VP1u IgG group as compared to other groups, whereas significant increases of anti-B19-VP1u, anti-phospholipid (APhL, and anti-double strand DNA (dsDNA antibody binding activity were detected in anti-B19-VP1u group. Additionally, significant increases of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9 activity and protein expression were detected in B19-VP1u IgG group. Notably, phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate kinase (PI3K and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK proteins were involved in the induction of MMP9. Conclusion These experimental results firstly demonstrated the aggravated effects of anti-B19-VP1u antibody in disease activity of SLE.

  15. Detection of NP, N3 and N7 antibodies to avian influenza virus by indirect ELISA using yeast-expressed antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammayappan Arun

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avian influenza viruses, belonging to the family Orthomyxoviridae, possess distinct combinations of hemagglutinin (H and the neuraminidase (N surface glycoproteins. Typing of both H and N antigens is essential for the epidemiological and surveillance studies. Therefore, it is important to find a rapid, sensitive, and specific method for their assay, and ELISA can be useful for this purpose, by using recombinant proteins. Results The nucleoprotein (NP and truncated neuraminidase subtype 3 and 7 of avian influenza virus (AIV were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used to develop an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for antibody detection. The developed assays were evaluated with a panel of 64 chicken serum samples. The performance of NP-ELISA was compared with the commercially available ProFlok® AIV ELISA kit. The results showed comparable agreement and sensitivity between the two tests, indicating that NP-ELISA assay can be used for screening the influenza type A antibody in AIV infected birds. The N3 and N7- ELISAs also reacted specifically to their type specific sera and did not exhibit any cross-reaction with heterologous neuraminidase subtype specific sera. Conclusion The study demonstrates the expression of the NP, N3, and N7 proteins of AIV in yeast (S. cerevisiae and their application in developing an indirect ELISA for detecting NP, N3 and N7 antibodies from AIV-infected chicken sera. The described indirect ELISAs are rapid, sensitive, specific and can be used as promising tests during serological surveillance.

  16. Affinity Purification of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Expressed in Raji Cells by Produced scFv Antibody Coupled CNBr-Activated Sepharose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Majidi Zolbanin, Jafar; Nouri, Mohammad; Baradaran, Behzad; Movassaghpour, AliAkbar; Farajnia, Safar; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Recombinant tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) has been utilized as an antineoplastic agent for the treatment of patients with melanoma and sarcoma. It targets tumor cell antigens by impressing tumor-associated vessels. Protein purification with affinity chromatography has been widely used in the downstream processing of pharmaceutical-grade proteins. Methods:In this study, we examined the potential of our produced anti-TNF-α scFv fragments for purification of TNF-α produced by Raji cells. The Raji cells were induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) to express TNF-α. Western blotting and Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) flow cytometry analyses were used to evaluate the TNF-α expression. The anti-TNF-α scFv selected from antibody phage display library was coupled to CNBr-activated sepharose 4B beads used for affinity purification of expressed TNF-α and the purity of the protein was assessed by SDS-PAGE. Results: Western blot and FACS flow cytometry analyses showed the successful expression of TNF-α with Raji cells. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the performance of scFv for purification of TNF-α protein with purity over 95%. Conclusion: These findings confirm not only the potential of the produced scFv antibody fragments but also this highly pure recombinant TNF-α protein can be applied for various in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:24312807

  17. Intermediate monocytes in ANCA vasculitis: increased surface expression of ANCA autoantigens and IL-1β secretion in response to anti-MPO antibodies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Eóin C

    2015-01-01

    ANCA vasculitis encompasses several autoimmune conditions characterised by destruction of small vessels, inflammation of the respiratory tract and glomerulonephritis. Most patients harbour autoantibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3). Clinical and experimental data suggest that pathogenesis is driven by ANCA-mediated activation of neutrophils and monocytes. We investigated a potential role for distinct monocyte subsets. We found that the relative proportion of intermediate monocytes is increased in patients versus control individuals, and both MPO and PR3 are preferentially expressed on these cells. We demonstrate that MPO and PR3 are expressed independently of each other on monocytes and that PR3 is not associated with CD177. MPO expression correlates with that of Fc receptor CD16 on intermediate monocytes. Monocyte subsets respond differently to antibodies directed against MPO and PR3, with anti-MPO but not anti-PR3 leading to increased IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 production. In concordance with the observed higher surface expression of MPO on intermediate monocytes, this subset produces the highest quantity of IL-1β in response to anti-MPO stimulation. These data suggest that monocytes, specifically, the intermediate subset, may play a role in ANCA vasculitis, and also indicate that substantial differences exist between the effect of anti-MPO and anti-PR3 antibodies on these cells.

  18. Affinity Purification of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Expressed in Raji Cells by Produced scFv Antibody Coupled CNBr-Activated Sepharose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safar Farajnia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Recombinant tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α has been utilized as an antineoplastic agent for the treatment of patients with melanoma and sarcoma. It targets tumor cell antigens by impressing tumor-associated vessels. Protein purification with affinity chromatography has been widely used in the downstream processing of pharmaceutical-grade proteins. Methods: In this study, we examined the potential of our produced anti-TNF-scFv fragments for purification of TNF-α produced by Raji cells. he Raji cells were induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS to express TNF-α. Western blotting and Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS flow cytometry analyses were used to evaluate the TNF-α expression. The anti-TNF-α scFv selected from antibody phage display library was coupled to CNBr-activated sepharose 4B beads used for affinity purification of expressed TNF-α and the purity of the protein was assessed by SDS-PAGE. Results: Western blot and FACS flow cytometry analyses showed the successful expression of TNF-α with Raji cells. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the performance of scFv for purification of TNF-α protein with purity over 95%. Conclusion: These findings confirm not only the potential of the produced scFv antibody fragments but also this highly pure recombinant TNF-α protein can be applied for various in vitro and in vivo applications.

  19. DIVA vaccine properties of the live chimeric pestivirus strain CP7_E2gif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rosen, Tanya; Rangelova, Desislava; Nielsen, Jens; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse

    2014-06-04

    Live modified vaccines to protect against classical swine fever virus (CSFV), based on chimeric pestiviruses, have been developed to enable serological Differentiation of Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA). In this context, the chimeric virus CP7_E2gif vaccine candidate is unique as it does not include any CSFV components. In the present study, the DIVA vaccine properties of CP7_E2gif were evaluated in comparison to the conventional live attenuated Riemser C-strain vaccine. Sera and tonsil samples obtained from pigs immunised with these two vaccines were analysed. No viral RNA was found in serum after vaccination with CP7_E2gif, whereas some serum samples from C-strain vaccinated animals were positive. In both vaccinated groups, individual viral RNA-positive tonsil samples were detected in animals euthanised between 7 and 21 days post vaccination. Furthermore, serum samples from these animals, together with archival samples from pigs vaccinated with CP7_E2gif and subsequently CSFV challenged, were analysed for specific antibodies using ELISAs and for homologous neutralising antibodies. In animals vaccinated with CP7_E2gif, neutralising antibodies were detected from day 10. However, the sera remained negative for anti-CSFV E2-specific antibodies whereas pigs vaccinated with C-strain seroconverted against CSFV by 14 days after vaccination, as determined by a CSFV-E2 specific blocking ELISA. One week after subsequent CSFV challenge, a strong anti-CSFV E2 reaction was detected in CP7_E2gif vaccinated pigs and anti-E(rns) antibodies were detected from 10 days after infection. In conclusion, CP7_E2gif has the potential to be used as a DIVA vaccine in combination with detection of anti-CSFV E2-specific antibodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of radiation on the expression of tumor-associated antigens of human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Immunological study using monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hareyama, Masato

    1988-12-01

    We studied the effects of irradiation on the expression of a tumor-associated antigen (YH206 antigen) of cultured human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry. YH206 antigen is preferentially expressed on adenocarcinoma cells. Irradiation of A549 cells remarkably increased the expression of YH206 antigen on the cell surface and the level of the antigen in the culture supernatant as well as in the cell lysate, whereas it significantly affected the expression of HLA (MHC-class I) antigen on the same cells. The expression of HLA antigen on the cell was also increased after treatment of the cells with interferon-..gamma... In an additional experiment, cells were stained simultaneously for surface antigens (fluorescein coupled antibodies) and for DNA content (propidium iodide), and then dual parameter measurements were performed by flow cytometry to analyse the relationship between antigen levels and the cell cycle. YH206 antigen and HLA antigen increased more in the S and G/sub 2//M phases of the cell cycle than in G/sub 0//G/sub 1/. The expression of YH206 antigen was enhanced in the S and G/sub 2//M phases by irradiation, whereas the expression of HLA antigen was enhanced in each phase of the cell cycle with irradiation or IFN. These results suggest that irradiation plays a key role in the change of the expression of certain tumor-associated antigens.

  1. The Influence of Sub-Unit Composition and Expression System on the Functional Antibody Response in the Development of a VAR2CSA Based Plasmodium falciparum Placental Malaria Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten A Nielsen

    Full Text Available The disease caused by Plasmodium falciparum (Pf involves different clinical manifestations that, cumulatively, kill hundreds of thousands every year. Placental malaria (PM is one such manifestation in which Pf infected erythrocytes (IE bind to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA through expression of VAR2CSA, a parasite-derived antigen. Protection against PM is mediated by antibodies that inhibit binding of IE in the placental intervillous space. VAR2CSA is a large antigen incompatible with large scale recombinant protein expression. Vaccines based on sub-units encompassing the functionally constrained receptor-binding domains may, theoretically, circumvent polymorphisms, reduce the risk of escape-mutants and induce cross-reactive antibodies. However, the sub-unit composition and small differences in the borders, may lead to exposure of novel immuno-dominant antibody epitopes that lead to non-functional antibodies, and furthermore influence the folding, stability and yield of expression. Candidate antigens from the pre-clinical development expressed in High-Five insect cells using the baculovirus expression vector system were transitioned into the Drosophila Schneider-2 cell (S2 expression-system compliant with clinical development. The functional capacity of antibodies against antigens expressed in High-Five cells or in S2 cells was equivalent. This enabled an extensive down-selection of S2 insect cell-expressed antigens primarily encompassing the minimal CSA-binding region of VAR2CSA. In general, we found differential potency of inhibitory antibodies against antigens with the same borders but of different var2csa sequences. Likewise, we found that subtle size differences in antigens of the same sequence gave varying levels of inhibitory antibodies. The study shows that induction of a functional response against recombinant subunits of the VAR2CSA antigen is unpredictable, demonstrating the need for large-scale screening in order to identify antigens

  2. Sensitivity of HER-2/neu antibodies in archival tissue samples: potential source of error in immunohistochemical studies of oncogene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, M F; Hung, G; Godolphin, W; Slamon, D J

    1994-05-15

    HER-2/neu oncogene amplification and overexpression of breast cancer tissue has been correlated with poor prognosis in women with both node-positive and node-negative disease. However, several studies have not confirmed this association. Review of these studies reveals the presence of considerable methodological variability including differences in study size, follow-up time, techniques and reagents. The majority of papers with clinical follow-up information are immunohistochemical studies using archival, paraffin-embedded breast cancers, and a variety of HER-2/neu antibodies have been used in these studies. Very little information, however, is available about the ability of the antibodies to detect overexpression following tissue processing for paraffin-embedding. Therefore, a series of antibodies, reported in the literature or commercially available, were evaluated to assess their sensitivity and specificity as immunohistochemical reagents. Paraffin-embedded samples of 187 breast cancers, previously characterized as frozen specimens for HER-2/neu amplification by Southern blot and for overexpression by Northern blot, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry, were used. Two multitumor paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were prepared from the previously analyzed breast cancers as a panel of cases to test a series of previously studied and/or commercially available anti-HER-2/neu antibodies. Immunohistochemical staining results obtained with 7 polyclonal and 21 monoclonal antibodies in sections from paraffin-embedded blocks of these breast cancers were compared. The ability of these antibodies to detect overexpression was extremely variable, providing an important explantation for the variable overexpression rate reported in the literature.

  3. A Novel Chimeric Endolysin with Antibacterial Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad Kashani, Hamed; Fahimi, Hossein; Dasteh Goli, Yasaman; Moniri, Rezvan

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine/histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) and amidase are known as catalytic domains of the bacteriophage-derived endolysin LysK and were previously reported to show lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In the current study, the in silico design and analysis of chimeric CHAP-amidase model was applied to enhance the stability and solubility of protein, which was achieved through improving the properties of primary, secondary and tertiary structures. The coding gene sequence of the chimeric CHAP-amidase was synthesized and subcloned into the pET-22(+) expression vector, and the recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) strain. Subsequent affinity-based purification yielded ~12 mg soluble protein per liter of E. coli culture. Statistical analysis indicated that concentrations of ≥1 μg/mL of the purified protein have significant antibacterial activity against S. aureus MRSA 252 cells. The engineered chimeric CHAP-amidase exhibited 3.2 log reduction of MRSA 252 cell counts at the concentration of 10 μg/mL. A synergistic interaction between CHAP-amidase and vancomycin was detected by using checkerboard assay and calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index. This synergistic effect was shown by 8-fold reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin. The chimeric CHAP-amidase displayed strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, S. epidermidis , and enterococcus . However, it did not indicate any significant antibacterial activity against E. coli and Lactococcus lactis . Taken together, these findings suggest that our chimeric CHAP-amidase might represent potential to be used for the development of efficient antibacterial therapies targeting MRSA and certain Gram-positive bacteria.

  4. Recombinant human adenovirus-5 expressing capsid proteins of Indian vaccine strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus elicits effective antibody response in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasa, B P; Mohapatra, J K; Pauszek, S J; Koster, M; Dhanya, V C; Tamil Selvan, R P; Hosamani, M; Saravanan, P; Basagoudanavar, Suresh H; de Los Santos, T; Venkataramanan, R; Rodriguez, L L; Grubman, M J

    2017-05-01

    Recombinant adenovirus-5 vectored foot-and-mouth disease constructs (Ad5- FMD) were made for three Indian vaccine virus serotypes O, A and Asia 1. Constructs co-expressing foot-and- mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid and viral 3C protease sequences, were evaluated for their ability to induce a neutralizing antibody response in indigenous cattle (Bos indicus). Purified Ad5-FMD viruses were inoculated in cattle as monovalent (5×10 9 pfu/animal) or trivalent (5×10 9 pfu/animal per serotype) vaccines. Animals vaccinated with monovalent Ad5-FMD vaccines were boosted 63days later with the same dose. After primary immunization, virus neutralization tests (VNT) showed seroconversion in 83, 67 and 33% of animals vaccinated with Ad5-FMD O, A and Asia 1, respectively. Booster immunization elicited seroconversion in all of the animals (100%) in the monovalent groups. When used in a trivalent form, the Ad5-FMD vaccine induced neutralizing antibodies in only 33, 50 and 16% of animals against serotypes O, A and Asia 1, respectively on primo-vaccination, and titers were significantly lower than when the same vectors were used in monovalent form. Neutralizing antibody titers differed by serotype for both Ad5-FMD monovalent and trivalent vaccines, with Asia 1 serotype inducing the lowest titers. Antibody response to Ad5 vector in immunized cattle was also assessed by VNT. It appeared that the vector immunity did not impact the recall responses to expressed FMDV antigens on booster immunization. In summary, the study suggested that the recombinant Ad5-FMD vaccine has a potential use in monovalent form, while its application in multivalent form is not currently encouraging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chimeric Hemagglutinin Constructs Induce Broad Protection against Influenza B Virus Challenge in the Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermler, Megan E; Kirkpatrick, Ericka; Sun, Weina; Hai, Rong; Amanat, Fatima; Chromikova, Veronika; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian

    2017-06-15

    Seasonal influenza virus epidemics represent a significant public health burden. Approximately 25% of all influenza virus infections are caused by type B viruses, and these infections can be severe, especially in children. Current influenza virus vaccines are an effective prophylaxis against infection but are impacted by rapid antigenic drift, which can lead to mismatches between vaccine strains and circulating strains. Here, we describe a broadly protective vaccine candidate based on chimeric hemagglutinins, consisting of globular head domains from exotic influenza A viruses and stalk domains from influenza B viruses. Sequential vaccination with these constructs in mice leads to the induction of broadly reactive antibodies that bind to the conserved stalk domain of influenza B virus hemagglutinin. Vaccinated mice are protected from lethal challenge with diverse influenza B viruses. Results from serum transfer experiments and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays indicate that this protection is antibody mediated and based on Fc effector functions. The present data suggest that chimeric hemagglutinin-based vaccination is a viable strategy to broadly protect against influenza B virus infection. IMPORTANCE While current influenza virus vaccines are effective, they are affected by mismatches between vaccine strains and circulating strains. Furthermore, the antiviral drug oseltamivir is less effective for treating influenza B virus infections than for treating influenza A virus infections. A vaccine that induces broad and long-lasting protection against influenza B viruses is therefore urgently needed. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. In silico prediction of monovalent and chimeric tetravalent vaccines for prevention and treatment of dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Subramaniyan; Ramesh, Venkatachalam; Prabhu, Srinivasan; Manogar, Palani

    2017-11-01

    Reverse vaccinology method was used to predict the monovalent peptide vaccine candidate to produce antibodies for therapeutic purpose and to predict tetravalent vaccine candidate to act as a common vaccine to cover all the fever dengue virus serotypes. Envelope (E)-proteins of DENV-1-4 serotypes were used for vaccine prediction using NCBI, Uniprot/Swissprot, Swiss-prot viewer, VaxiJen V2.0, TMHMM, BCPREDS, Propred-1, Propred and MHC Pred,. E-proteins of DENV-1-4 serotypes were identified as antigen from which T cell epitopes, through B cell epitopes, were predicted to act as peptide vaccine candidates. Each selected T cell epitope of E-protein was confirmed to act as vaccine and to induce complementary antibody against particular serotype of dengue virus. Chimeric tetravalent vaccine was formed by the conjugation of four vaccines, each from four dengue serotypes to act as a common vaccine candidate for all the four dengue serotypes. It can be justifiably concluded that the monovalent 9-mer T cell epitope for each DENV serotypes can be used to produce specific antibody agaomst dengue virus and a chimeric common tetravalent vaccine candidate to yield a comparative vaccine to cover any of the four dengue virus serotype. This vaccine is expected to act as highly immunogenic against preventing dengue fever.

  7. Origination of an X-linked testes chimeric gene by illegitimate recombination in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Roman Arguello

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The formation of chimeric gene structures provides important routes by which novel proteins and functions are introduced into genomes. Signatures of these events have been identified in organisms from wide phylogenic distributions. However, the ability to characterize the early phases of these evolutionary processes has been difficult due to the ancient age of the genes or to the limitations of strictly computational approaches. While examples involving retrotransposition exist, our understanding of chimeric genes originating via illegitimate recombination is limited to speculations based on ancient genes or transfection experiments. Here we report a case of a young chimeric gene that has originated by illegitimate recombination in Drosophila. This gene was created within the last 2-3 million years, prior to the speciation of Drosophila simulans, Drosophila sechellia, and Drosophila mauritiana. The duplication, which involved the Bällchen gene on Chromosome 3R, was partial, removing substantial 3' coding sequence. Subsequent to the duplication onto the X chromosome, intergenic sequence was recruited into the protein-coding region creating a chimeric peptide with approximately 33 new amino acid residues. In addition, a novel intron-containing 5' UTR and novel 3' UTR evolved. We further found that this new X-linked gene has evolved testes-specific expression. Following speciation of the D. simulans complex, this novel gene evolved lineage-specifically with evidence for positive selection acting along the D. simulans branch.

  8. Effective single chain antibody (scFv) concentrations in vivo via adenoviral vector mediated expression of secretory scFv

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arafat, WO; Gomez-Navarro, J; Buchsbaum, DJ; Xiang, J; Casado, E; Barker, SD; Mahasreshti, PJ; Haisma, HJ; Barnes, MN; Siegal, GP; Alvarez, RD; Hemminki, A; Nettelbeck, DM; Curiel, DT

    Single chain antibodies (scFv) represent powerful interventional agents for the achievement of targeted therapeutics. The practical utility of these agents have been limited, however, by difficulties related to production of recombinant scFv and the achievement of effective and sustained levels of

  9. Differential expression of IgE and IgG4 specific antibody responses in asymptomatic and chronic human filariasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurniawan, A.; Yazdanbakhsh, M.; van Ree, R.; Aalberse, R.; Selkirk, M. E.; Partono, F.; Maizels, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    A population of 164 adult individuals resident in an area endemic for Brugia malayi lymphatic filariasis has been studied for humoral immune responses to filarial parasites. Antibody levels to Ag extracted from adult worms were determined for each of the IgG subclasses, for IgM and for IgE. The

  10. Mining Naïve Rabbit Antibody Repertoires by Phage Display for Monoclonal Antibodies of Therapeutic Utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haiyong; Nerreter, Thomas; Chang, Jing; Qi, Junpeng; Li, Xiuling; Karunadharma, Pabalu; Martinez, Gustavo J; Fallahi, Mohammad; Soden, Jo; Freeth, Jim; Beerli, Roger R; Grawunder, Ulf; Hudecek, Michael; Rader, Christoph

    2017-09-15

    Owing to their high affinities and specificities, rabbit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have demonstrated value and potential primarily as basic research and diagnostic reagents, but, in some cases, also as therapeutics. To accelerate access to rabbit mAbs bypassing immunization, we generated a large naïve rabbit antibody repertoire represented by a phage display library encompassing >10 billion independent antibodies in chimeric rabbit/human Fab format and validated it by next-generation sequencing. Panels of rabbit mAbs selected from this library against two emerging cancer targets, ROR1 and ROR2, revealed high diversity, affinity, and specificity. Moreover, ROR1- and ROR2-targeting rabbit mAbs demonstrated therapeutic utility as components of chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells, further corroborating the value of the naïve rabbit antibody library as a rich and virtually unlimited source of rabbit mAbs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transient expression of HPV16 E7 peptide (aa 44-60) and HPV16 L2 peptide (aa 108-120) on chimeric potyvirus-like particles using Potato virus X-based vector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čeřovská, Noemi; Hoffmeisterová, Hana; Pečenková, Tamara; Moravec, Tomáš; Synková, Helena; Plchová, Helena; Velemínský, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2008), s. 154-161 ISSN 1046-5928 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/06/0973 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : epitopes expression * Human papillomavirus * transient expression * potyvirus-like particles * synergistic infection Subject RIV: EB - Gen etics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.621, year: 2008

  12. Development of Murine Cyp3a Knockout Chimeric Mice with Humanized Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kota; Ohbuchi, Masato; Hamamura, Satoko; Ohshita, Hiroki; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Sato, Koya; Nakada, Naoyuki; Kawamura, Akio; Usui, Takashi; Kamimura, Hidetaka; Tateno, Chise

    2015-08-01

    We developed murine CYP3A knockout ko chimeric mice with humanized liver expressing human P450S similar to those in humans and whose livers and small intestines do not express murine CYP3A this: approach may overcome effects of residual mouse metabolic enzymes like Cyp3a in conventional chimeric mice with humanized liver, such as PXB-mice [urokinase plasminogen activator/severe combined immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) mice repopulated with over 70% human hepatocytes] to improve the prediction of drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics in humans. After human hepatocytes were transplanted into Cyp3a KO/uPA/SCID host mice, human albumin levels logarithmically increased until approximately 60 days after transplantation, findings similar to those in PXB-mice. Quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that hepatic human P450s, UGTs, SULTs, and transporters mRNA expression levels in Cyp3a KO chimeric mice were also similar to those in PXB-mice and confirmed the absence of Cyp3a11 mRNA expression in mouse liver and intestine. Findings for midazolam and triazolam metabolic activities in liver microsomes were comparable between Cyp3a KO chimeric mice and PXB-mice. In contrast, these activities in the intestine of Cyp3a KO chimeric mice were attenuated compared with PXB-mice. Owing to the knockout of murine Cyp3a, hepatic Cyp2b10 and 2c55 mRNA levels in Cyp3a KO/uPA/SCID mice (without hepatocyte transplants) were 8.4- and 61-fold upregulated compared with PXB-mice, respectively. However, human hepatocyte transplantation successfully restored Cyp2b10 level nearly fully and Cyp2c55 level partly (still 13-fold upregulated) compared with those in PXB-mice. Intestinal Cyp2b10 and 2c55 were also repressed by human hepatocyte transplantation in Cyp3a KO chimeric mice. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. Antimitochondrial antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003529.htm Antimitochondrial antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. ...

  14. Chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes as a model for prediction of human drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru

    2014-03-01

    Preclinical studies in animal models are used routinely during drug development, but species differences of pharmacokinetics (PK) between animals and humans have to be taken into account in interpreting the results. Human hepatocytes are also widely used to examine metabolic activities mediated by cytochrome P450 (P450) and other enzymes, but such in vitro metabolic studies also have limitations. Recently, chimeric mice with humanized liver (h-chimeric mice), generated by transplantation of human donor hepatocytes, have been developed as a model for the prediction of metabolism and PK in humans, using both in vitro and in vivo approaches. The expression of human-specific metabolic enzymes and metabolic activities was confirmed in humanized liver of h-chimeric mice with high replacement ratios, and several reports indicate that the profiles of P450 and non-P450 metabolism in these mice adequately reflect those in humans. Further, the combined use of h-chimeric mice and r-chimeric mice, in which endogenous hepatocytes are replaced with rat hepatocytes, is a promising approach for evaluation of species differences in drug metabolism. Recent work has shown that data obtained in h-chimeric mice enable the semi-quantitative prediction of not only metabolites, but also PK parameters, such as hepatic clearance, of drug candidates in humans, although some limitations remain because of differences in the metabolic activities, hepatic blood flow and liver structure between humans and mice. In addition, fresh h-hepatocytes can be isolated reproducibly from h-chimeric mice for metabolic studies. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Modified cytokeratins expressed on the surface of carcinoma cells undergo endocytosis upon binding of human monoclonal antibody and its recombinant Fab fragment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, H J; Garrigues, U; Andersen, C B

    1997-01-01

    display selection and the human Fab fragment was expressed in bacteria. Analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that COU-1 bound in a uniform punctate pattern to the surface of viable carcinoma cells stained at 4 degrees C, and binding increased significantly when cells were cultured...... was significantly reduced. Similar results were obtained using intact IgM COU-1 and the recombinant Fab fragment. Immunohistological studies indicated that COU-1, in contrast to murine monoclonal antibodies against normal cytokeratin 8 and 18, could differentiate between malignant and normal colon epithelia...

  16. Chimeric rabies glycoprotein with a transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail from Newcastle disease virus fusion protein incorporates into the Newcastle disease virion at reduced levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gui Mei; Zu, Shu Long; Zhou, Wei Wei; Wang, Xi Jun; Shuai, Lei; Wang, Xue Lian; Ge, Jin Ying; Bu, Zhi Gao

    2017-08-31

    Rabies remains an important worldwide health problem. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was developed as a vaccine vector in animals by using a reverse genetics approach. Previously, our group generated a recombinant NDV (LaSota strain) expressing the complete rabies virus G protein (RVG), named rL-RVG. In this study, we constructed the variant rL-RVGTM, which expresses a chimeric rabies virus G protein (RVGTM) containing the ectodomain of RVG and the transmembrane domain (TM) and a cytoplasmic tail (CT) from the NDV fusion glycoprotein to study the function of RVG's TM and CT. The RVGTM did not detectably incorporate into NDV virions, though it was abundantly expressed at the surface of infected BHK-21 cells. Both rL-RVG and rL-RVGTM induced similar levels of NDV virus-neutralizing antibody (VNA) after initial and secondary vaccination in mice, whereas rabies VNA induction by rL-RVGTM was markedly lower than that induced by rL-RVG. Though rL-RVG could spread from cell to cell like that in rabies virus, rL-RVGTM lost this ability and spread in a manner similar to the parental NDV. Our data suggest that the TM and CT of RVG are essential for its incorporation into NDV virions and for spreading of the recombinant virus from the initially infected cells to surrounding cells.

  17. Targeted induction of interferon-λ in humanized chimeric mouse liver abrogates hepatotropic virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Shin-ichiro; Hirata, Yuichi; Kameyama, Takeshi; Tokunaga, Yuko; Nishito, Yasumasa; Hirabayashi, Kazuko; Yano, Junichi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Tateno, Chise; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizokami, Masashi; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Inoue, Kazuaki; Yoshiba, Makoto; Takaoka, Akinori; Kohara, Michinori

    2013-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) system plays a critical role in innate antiviral response. We presume that targeted induction of IFN in human liver shows robust antiviral effects on hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). This study used chimeric mice harboring humanized livers and infected with HCV or HBV. This mouse model permitted simultaneous analysis of immune responses by human and mouse hepatocytes in the same liver and exploration of the mechanism of antiviral effect against these viruses. Targeted expression of IFN was induced by treating the animals with a complex comprising a hepatotropic cationic liposome and a synthetic double-stranded RNA analog, pIC (LIC-pIC). Viral replication, IFN gene expression, IFN protein production, and IFN antiviral activity were analyzed (for type I, II and III IFNs) in the livers and sera of these humanized chimeric mice. Following treatment with LIC-pIC, the humanized livers of chimeric mice exhibited increased expression (at the mRNA and protein level) of human IFN-λs, resulting in strong antiviral effect on HBV and HCV. Similar increases were not seen for human IFN-α or IFN-β in these animals. Strong induction of IFN-λs by LIC-pIC occurred only in human hepatocytes, and not in mouse hepatocytes nor in human cell lines derived from other (non-hepatic) tissues. LIC-pIC-induced IFN-λ production was mediated by the immune sensor adaptor molecules mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor molecule-1 (TICAM-1), suggesting dual recognition of LIC-pIC by both sensor adaptor pathways. These findings demonstrate that the expression and function of various IFNs differ depending on the animal species and tissues under investigation. Chimeric mice harboring humanized livers demonstrate that IFN-λs play an important role in the defense against human hepatic virus infection.

  18. Targeted induction of interferon-λ in humanized chimeric mouse liver abrogates hepatotropic virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: The interferon (IFN system plays a critical role in innate antiviral response. We presume that targeted induction of IFN in human liver shows robust antiviral effects on hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV. METHODS: This study used chimeric mice harboring humanized livers and infected with HCV or HBV. This mouse model permitted simultaneous analysis of immune responses by human and mouse hepatocytes in the same liver and exploration of the mechanism of antiviral effect against these viruses. Targeted expression of IFN was induced by treating the animals with a complex comprising a hepatotropic cationic liposome and a synthetic double-stranded RNA analog, pIC (LIC-pIC. Viral replication, IFN gene expression, IFN protein production, and IFN antiviral activity were analyzed (for type I, II and III IFNs in the livers and sera of these humanized chimeric mice. RESULTS: Following treatment with LIC-pIC, the humanized livers of chimeric mice exhibited increased expression (at the mRNA and protein level of human IFN-λs, resulting in strong antiviral effect on HBV and HCV. Similar increases were not seen for human IFN-α or IFN-β in these animals. Strong induction of IFN-λs by LIC-pIC occurred only in human hepatocytes, and not in mouse hepatocytes nor in human cell lines derived from other (non-hepatic tissues. LIC-pIC-induced IFN-λ production was mediated by the immune sensor adaptor molecules mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor molecule-1 (TICAM-1, suggesting dual recognition of LIC-pIC by both sensor adaptor pathways. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that the expression and function of various IFNs differ depending on the animal species and tissues under investigation. Chimeric mice harboring humanized livers demonstrate that IFN-λs play an important role in the defense against human hepatic virus infection.

  19. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of a novel chimeric pestivirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Reimann, Ilona

    2007-01-01

    A chimeric pestivirus of border disease virus Gifhorn and bovine viral diarrhea virus CP7 (Meyers et al., 1996) was constructed. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of the chimeric virus were studied in a vaccination–challenge experiment in pigs. The chimeric virus proved...... to be avirulent and neither chimeric virus nor viral RNA was detected in serum after vaccination. The safety of the vaccine was tested by horizontal transmission to sentinel pigs, which remained uninfected. The vaccine efficacy was examined by challenge infection with classical swine fever virus (CSFV) Eystrup...

  20. Modulation of immune response to Lol p I by pretreatment with anti-idiotypic antibody is not restricted to the idiotypic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Y; Hébert, J

    1994-05-01

    To study the role of anti-idiotypic antibodies in the regulation of the immune response to Lol p I (the major allergenic component of rye grass pollen), we have recently generated a panel of three MoAbs directed against distinct epitopes of Lolp I and an anti-idiotypic MoAb directed against the idiotype borne by one of the anti-Lol p I MoAbs (290A-167). The effects of pretreatment with this anti-idiotypic MoAb in BALB/c mice before immunization with the antigen have been examined. The anti-idiotypic MoAb or unrelated MoAb were given weekly for 8 weeks intraperitoneally. Mice then received the antigen (2 micrograms) adsorbed with alum (2 mg) at weeks 9, 11 and 13. Serum anti-Lol p I antibodies (IgG or IgE) and specific idiotypic responses were measured. Anti-Lol p I IgG antibodies could be detected before immunization with Lol p I only in mice pretreated with anti-idiotypic MoAb. Immunization with Lol p I induced an anti-Lol p I IgG response in both groups, but this response was higher in mice that received anti-idiotypic MoAb. Similar profiles were seen for specific IgE antibodies and idiotypic responses. Surprisingly, idiotypes borne by other anti-Lol p I MoAbs (539A-6 and 348A-6) had also been enhanced after pretreatment with the anti-290A-167 MoAb. These observations suggested that the pretreatment with this anti-idiotypic MoAb modulates not only the expression of the respective idiotype, but also affects other idiotype responses.

  1. Induction of protective immunity in swine by recombinant bamboo mosaic virus expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Na-Sheng

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant viruses can be employed as versatile vectors for the production of vaccines by expressing immunogenic epitopes on the surface of chimeric viral particles. Although several viruses, including tobacco mosaic virus, potato virus X and cowpea mosaic virus, have been developed as vectors, we aimed to develop a new viral vaccine delivery system, a bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV, that would carry larger transgene loads, and generate better immunity in the target animals with fewer adverse environmental effects. Methods We engineered the BaMV as a vaccine vector expressing the antigenic epitope(s of the capsid protein VP1 of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV. The recombinant BaMV plasmid (pBVP1 was constructed by replacing DNA encoding the 35 N-terminal amino acid residues of the BaMV coat protein with that encoding 37 amino acid residues (T128-N164 of FMDV VP1. Results The pBVP1 was able to infect host plants and to generate a chimeric virion BVP1 expressing VP1 epitopes in its coat protein. Inoculation of swine with BVP1 virions resulted in the production of anti-FMDV neutralizing antibodies. Real-time PCR analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the BVP1-immunized swine revealed that they produced VP1-specific IFN-γ. Furthermore, all BVP1-immunized swine were protected against FMDV challenge. Conclusion Chimeric BaMV virions that express partial sequence of FMDV VP1 can effectively induce not only humoral and cell-mediated immune responses but also full protection against FMDV in target animals. This BaMV-based vector technology may be applied to other vaccines that require correct expression of antigens on chimeric viral particles.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanale, Michelle A; Younes, Anas

    2007-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutic approaches have had a significant impact in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab's development as an anti-CD20 antibody heralded a new era in treatment approaches for NHL. While rituximab was first shown to be effective in the treatment of relapsed follicular lymphoma, it is now standard monotherapy for front-line treatment of follicular lymphoma, and is also used in conjunction with chemotherapy for other indolent, intermediate and aggressive B-cell lymphomas. The development of rituximab has led to intense interest in this type of therapeutic approach and to development and approval of the radioimmunoconjugates of rituximab, (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan and (131)I-tositumomab, which have added to the repertoire of treatments for relapsed follicular lymphoma and increased interest in developing other conjugated antibodies. Since rituximab is a chimeric antibody, there is a need to develop fully humanised antibodies, such as IMMU-106 (hA20), in order to minimise infusion reactions and eliminate the development of human antibodies against the drug. Further clinical evaluation of antibodies has been based largely on our knowledge of antigen expression on the surface of lymphoma cells and has led to the development of antibodies against CD22 (unconjugated epratuzumab and calicheamicin conjugated CMC-544 [inotuzumab ozogamicin]), CD80 (galiximab), CD52 (alemtuzumab), CD2 (MEDI-507 [siplizumab]), CD30 (SGN-30 and MDX-060 [iratumumab]), and CD40 (SGN-40). Furthermore, the VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitor bevacizumab, which was first approved for the treatment of colon cancer is currently under investigation in NHL, and agonists rather than antibodies to TRAIL (tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) [rApo2L/TRAIL, HGS-ETR1{mapatumumab}, HGS-ETR2] are currently being investigated as treatments for both advanced solid tumours and NHL. Knowledge of the ability of cancer cells to become

  3. Nuclear oncology with monoclonal antibodies and peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosono, Makoto

    1998-01-01

    Imaging and therapy using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies have proved useful in many clinical studies. However, immunogenicity of mouse antibodies to human and insufficient tumor-to-normal tissue ratios remained to be solved. Chimerization and humanization by genetic engineering, and multistep targeting techniques have enabled lower immunogenicity and higher tumor-to-normal tissue contrast. Peptides like somatostatin-analogs have been reportedly useful in imaging tumors, which are either somatostatin receptor positive or negative. Elevated normal tissue accumulation of radiolabeled peptides is a drawback in aiming internal radiation therapy. (author). 51 refs

  4. Protective and immunological behavior of chimeric yellow fever dengue vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Scott B; Russell, Philip K

    2016-03-29

    Clinical observations from the third year of the Sanofi Pasteur chimeric yellow fever dengue tetravalent vaccine (CYD) trials document both protection and vaccination-enhanced dengue disease among vaccine recipients. Children who were 5 years-old or younger when vaccinated experienced a DENV disease resulting in hospitalization at 5 times the rate of controls. On closer inspection, hospitalized cases among vaccinated seropositives, those at highest risk to hospitalized disease accompanying a dengue virus (DENV) infection, were greatly reduced by vaccination. But, seronegative individuals of all ages after being vaccinated were only modestly protected from mild to moderate disease throughout the entire observation period despite developing neutralizing antibodies at high rates. Applying a simple epidemiological model to the data, vaccinated seronegative individuals of all ages were at increased risk of developing hospitalized disease during a subsequent wild type DENV infection. The etiology of disease in placebo and vaccinated children resulting in hospitalization during a DENV infection, while clinically similar are of different origin. The implications of the observed mixture of DENV protection and enhanced disease in CYD vaccinees are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel chimeric virus-like particles vaccine displaying MERS-CoV receptor-binding domain induce specific humoral and cellular immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Zheng, Xuexing; Gai, Weiwei; Wong, Gary; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zhang, Weijiao; Li, Nan; Zhao, Guoxing; Li, Junfu; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, Yuwei; Hu, Guixue; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2017-04-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has continued spreading since its emergence in 2012 with a mortality rate of 35.6%, and is a potential pandemic threat. Prophylactics and therapies are urgently needed to address this public health problem. We report here the efficacy of a vaccine consisting of chimeric virus-like particles (VLP) expressing the receptor binding domain (RBD) of MERS-CoV. In this study, a fusion of the canine parvovirus (CPV) VP2 structural protein gene with the RBD of MERS-CoV can self-assemble into chimeric, spherical VLP (sVLP). sVLP retained certain parvovirus characteristics, such as the ability to agglutinate pig erythrocytes, and structural morphology similar to CPV virions. Immunization with sVLP induced RBD-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice. sVLP-specific antisera from these animals were able to prevent pseudotyped MERS-CoV entry into susceptible cells, with neutralizing antibody titers reaching 1: 320. IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-2 secreting cells induced by the RBD were detected in the splenocytes of vaccinated mice by ELISpot. Furthermore, mice inoculated with sVLP or an adjuvanted sVLP vaccine elicited T-helper 1 (Th1) and T-helper 2 (Th2) cell-mediated immunity. Our study demonstrates that sVLP displaying the RBD of MERS-CoV are promising prophylactic candidates against MERS-CoV in a potential outbreak situation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Chimeric Recombinant Human Metapneumoviruses with the Nucleoprotein or Phosphoprotein Open Reading Frame Replaced by That of Avian Metapneumovirus Exhibit Improved Growth In Vitro and Attenuation In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Quynh N.; Biacchesi, Stéphane; Skiadopoulos, Mario H.; Murphy, Brian R.; Collins, Peter L.; Buchholz, Ursula J.

    2005-01-01

    Chimeric versions of recombinant human metapneumovirus (HMPV) were generated by replacing the nucleoprotein (N) or phosphoprotein (P) open reading frame with its counterpart from the closely related avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) subgroup C. In Vero cells, AMPV replicated to an approximately 100-fold-higher titer than HMPV. Surprisingly, the N and P chimeric viruses replicated to a peak titer that was 11- and 25-fold higher, respectively, than that of parental HMPV. The basis for this effect is not known but was not due to obvious changes in the efficiency of gene expression. AMPV and the N and P chimeras were evaluated for replication, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in hamsters. AMPV was attenuated compared to HMPV in this mammalian host on day 5 postinfection, but not on day 3, and only in the nasal turbinates. In contrast, the N and P chimeras were reduced approximately 100-fold in both the upper and lower respiratory tract on day 3 postinfection, although there was little difference by day 5. The N and P chimeras induced a high level of neutralizing serum antibodies and protective efficacy against HMPV; AMPV was only weakly immunogenic and protective against HMPV challenge, reflecting antigenic differences. In African green monkeys immunized intranasally and intratracheally, the mean peak titer of the P chimera was reduced 100- and 1,000-fold in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, whereas the N chimera was reduced only 10-fold in the lower respiratory tract. Both chimeras were comparable to wild-type HMPV in immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Thus, the P chimera is a promising live HMPV vaccine candidate that paradoxically combines improved growth in vitro with attenuation in vivo. PMID:16306583

  7. Construction, expression, purification and biotin labeling of a single recombinant multi-epitope antigen for double-antigen sandwich ELISA to detect hepatitis C virus antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jing; Xiu, Bingshui; Wang, Guohua; Chen, Kun; Feng, Xiaoyan; Song, Xiaoguo; Zhu, Cuixia; Yang, Xiqin; Bai, Guanzhong; Ling, Shigan; Zhang, Heqiu

    2011-08-01

    Based on B cell epitope predictions, a recombinant antigen with multiple epitopes from four Hepatitis C Virus fragments (C, NS3, NS4 and NS5) were engineered. The recombinant gene was then highly expressed in E. coli. The non-modified and C-terminal-modified recombinant proteins were used for coating and biotin labeling, respectively, to establish the double-antigen sandwich ELISA. Ten positive reference samples confirmed by the CHIRON RIBA HCV 3.0 SIA kit were detected positive, Forty one plasma samples were positive among samples from 441 volunteers, which indicated that the recombinant antigen could readily react well with plasma HCV antibody. As critical reagents of double-antigen sandwich ELISA, the recombinant multi-epitope antigen and the C-terminal-modified and biotin-conjugated antigen show good antigenicity. In this study, we provide a simple approach to produce multiple epitopes within one recombinant protein in order to avoid the costly expression of less-effective pools of multiple proteins, which is the conventional strategy of diagnostic antigen production for HCV antibody detection.

  8. Incidence of Lettuce mosaic virus in lettuce and its detection by polyclonal antibodies produced against recombinant coat protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prachi; Sharma, Susheel; Singh, Jasvir; Saha, Swati; Baranwal, V K

    2016-04-01

    Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus of family Potyviridae, causes mosaic disease in lettuce has recently been identified in India. The virus is seed borne and secondary infection occurs through aphids. To ensure virus freedom in seeds it is important to develop diagnostic tools, for serological methods the production of polyclonal antibodies is a prerequisite. The coat protein (CP) gene of LMV was amplified, cloned and expressed using pET-28a vector in Escherichia coli BL21DE3 competent cells. The LMV CP was expressed as a fusion protein containing a fragment of the E. coli His tag. The LMV CP/His protein reacted positively with a commercial antiserum against LMV in an immunoblot assay. Polyclonal antibodies purified from serum of rabbits immunized with the fusion protein gave positive results when LMV infected lettuce (Lactuca sativa) was tested at 1:1000 dilution in PTA-ELISA. These were used for specific detection of LMV in screening lettuce accessions. The efficacy of the raised polyclonal antiserum was high and it can be utilized in quarantine and clean seed production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies against muscle actin isoforms: epitope identification and analysis of isoform expression by immunoblot and immunostaining in normal and regenerating skeletal muscle [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Chaponnier

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher vertebrates (mammals and birds express six different highly conserved actin isoforms that can be classified in three subgroups: 1 sarcomeric actins, α-skeletal (α-SKA and α-cardiac (α-CAA, 2 smooth muscle actins (SMAs, α-SMA and γ-SMA, and 3 cytoplasmic actins (CYAs, β-CYA and γ-CYA. The variations among isoactins, in each subgroup, are due to 3-4 amino acid differences located in their acetylated N-decapeptide sequence. The first monoclonal antibody (mAb against an actin isoform (α-SMA was produced and characterized in our laboratory in 1986 (Skalli  et al., 1986 . We have further obtained mAbs against the 5 other isoforms. In this report, we focus on the mAbs anti-α-SKA and anti-α-CAA obtained after immunization of mice with the respective acetylated N-terminal decapeptides using the Repetitive Immunizations at Multiple Sites Strategy (RIMMS. In addition to the identification of their epitope by immunoblotting, we describe the expression of the 2 sarcomeric actins in mature skeletal muscle and during muscle repair after micro-lesions. In particular, we analyze the expression of α-CAA, α-SKA and α-SMA by co-immunostaining in a time course frame during the muscle repair process. Our results indicate that a restricted myocyte population expresses α-CAA and suggest a high capacity of self-regeneration in muscle cells. These antibodies may represent a helpful tool for the follow-up of muscle regeneration and pathological changes.

  10. Synergistic gene and drug tumor therapy using a chimeric peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kai; Chen, Si; Chen, Wei-Hai; Lei, Qi; Liu, Yun; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2013-06-01

    Co-delivery of gene and drug for synergistic therapy has provided a promising strategy to cure devastating diseases. Here, an amphiphilic chimeric peptide (Fmoc)2KH7-TAT with pH-responsibility for gene and drug delivery was designed and fabricated. As a drug carrier, the micelles self-assembled from the peptide exhibited a much faster doxorubicin (DOX) release rate at pH 5.0 than that at pH 7.4. As a non-viral gene vector, (Fmoc)(2)KH(7)-TAT peptide could satisfactorily mediate transfection of pGL-3 reporter plasmid with or without the existence of serum in both 293T and HeLa cell-lines. Besides, the endosome escape capability of peptide/DNA complexes was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). To evaluate the co-delivery efficiency and the synergistic anti-tumor effect of gene and drug, p53 plasmid and DOX were simultaneously loaded in the peptide micelles to form micelleplexes during the self-assembly of the peptide. Cellular uptake and intracellular delivery of gene and drug were studied by CLSM and flow cytometry respectively. And p53 protein expression was determined via Western blot analysis. The in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo tumor inhibition effect were also studied. Results suggest that the co-delivery of gene and drug from peptide micelles resulted in effective cell growth inhibition in vitro and significant tumor growth restraining in vivo. The chimeric peptide-based gene and drug co-delivery system will find great potential for tumor therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Construction and screening of phage antibody libraries against epidermal growth factor receptor and soluble expression of single chain Fv].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Wei-Jin; Miao, Qing-Fang; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an important target for cancer therapy. The present study prepared single chain Fv (scFv) directed against EGFR. Balb/c mice were immunized by human carcinoma A431 cells, and total RNA of the splenic cells was extracted. VH and VL gene fragments were amplified by RT-PCR and further joined into scFv gene with a linker, then scFv gene fragments were ligated into the phagemid vector pCANTAB 5E. The phagemid containing scFv were transformed into electro-competent E. coli TG1 cells. The recombinant phage antibody library was constructed through rescuing the transformed cells with help phage M13K07. The specified recombinant phages were enriched through 5 rounds of affinity panning and the anti-EGFR phage scFv clones were screened and identified with ELISA. A total of 48 clones from the library were selected randomly and 45 clones were identified positive. After infecting E. coli HB2151 cells with one positive clone, soluble recombinant antibodies about 27 kD were produced and located in the periplasm and the supernatant. The result of sequencing showed that the scFv gene was 768 bp, which encoded 256 amino acid residues. VH and VL including 3 CDRs and 4 FRs, respectively, were all homologous to mouse Ig. The soluble scFv showed the specific binding activity to purified EGFR and EGFR located in carcinoma cell membrane. The successful preparation of anti-EGFR scFv will provide an EGFR targeted molecule for the development of antibody-based drugs and biological therapy of cancer.

  12. Differentiation of infection from vaccination in foot-and-mouth disease by the detection of antibodies to the non-structural proteins 3D, 3AB and 3ABC in ELISA using antigens expressed in baculovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.J.; Madsen, K.G.; Madsen, E.S.

    1998-01-01

    The baculovirus expression system was found to be efficient at expressing the 3D, the 3AB and the 3ABC non-structural proteins (NSP) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) as antigens recognised by immune sera in ELISA. ELISA's using 3D, 3AB and 3ABC detected antibodies from day 8 and 10 after...... experimental infection of susceptible cattle and sheep and cattle remained seropositive for more than 395 days. The ELISA's detected antibodies against any of the seven serotypes of FMDV. The 3D ELISA was specific and precise and as sensitive as established ELISA's which measure antibody to structural proteins....... The assay may be used as a resource saving alternative to established ELISA's for the detection of antibodies against any of the seven serotypes. The 3AB and the 3ABC ELISA were also specific and precise. FMDV infected cattle could be differentiated from those that had been merely vaccinated as they gave...

  13. Antibodies from plants for bionanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Edgue, G.; Twyman, R.M.; Beiss, V.; Fischer, R.; Sack, M.

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies are produced as part of the vertebrate adaptive immune response and are not naturally made by plants. However, antibody DNA sequences can be introduced into plants, and together with laboratory technologies that allow the design of antibodies recognizing any conceivable molecular structure, plants can be used as green factories' to produce any antibody at all. The advent of plant-based transient expression systems in particular allows the rapid, convenient, and safe production of a...

  14. Role of cytochrome P450 IA2 in acetanilide 4-hydroxylation as determined with cDNA expression and monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G; Gelboin, H V; Myers, M J

    1991-02-01

    The role of P450 IA2 in the hydroxylation of acetanilide was examined using an inhibitory monoclonal antibody (MAb) 1-7-1 and vaccinia cDNA expression producing murine P450 IA1 (mIA1), murine P450 IA2 (mIA2), or human P450 IA2 (hIA2). Acetanilide hydroxylase (AcOH) activity was measured using an HPLC method with more than 500-fold greater sensitivity than previously described procedures. This method, which does not require the use of radioactive acetanilide, was achieved by optimizing both the gradient system and the amount of enzyme needed to achieve detection by uv light. MAb 1-7-1 inhibits up to 80% of the AcOH activity in both rat liver microsomes and cDNA expressed mouse and human P450 IA2. MAb 1-7-1, which recognizes both P450 IA1 and P450 IA2, completely inhibits the aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity of cDNA expressed in IA1. The inhibition of only 80% of the AHH activity present in MC liver microsomes by MAb 1-7-1 suggests that additional P450 forms are contributing to the overall AHH activity present in methylcholanthrene (MC)-liver microsomes as MAb 1-7-1 almost completely inhibits the AHH activity of expressed mIA1. Maximal inhibition of IA2 by 1-7-1 results in an 80% decrease in acetanilide hydroxylase activity in both liver microsomes and expressed mouse and human IA2. The capacity of MAb 1-7-1 to produce identical levels of inhibition of acetanilide hydroxylase activity in rat MC microsomes (80%) and in expressed mouse (81%) and human P450 IA2 (80%) strongly suggests that P450 IA2 is the major and perhaps the only enzyme responsible for the metabolism of acetanilide. These results demonstrate the complementary utility of monoclonal antibodies and cDNA expression for defining the contribution of specific P450 enzymes to the metabolism of a given substrate. This complementary approach allows for a more precise determination of the inhibitory capacity of MAb with respect to the metabolic capacity of the target P450.

  15. Chimeric rhinoviruses displaying MPER epitopes elicit anti-HIV neutralizing responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Yi

    Full Text Available The development of an effective AIDS vaccine has been a formidable task, but remains a critical necessity. The well conserved membrane-proximal external region (MPER of the HIV-1 gp41 glycoprotein is one of the crucial targets for AIDS vaccine development, as it has the necessary attribute of being able to elicit antibodies capable of neutralizing diverse isolates of HIV.Guided by X-ray crystallography, molecular modeling, combinatorial chemistry, and powerful selection techniques, we designed and produced six combinatorial libraries of chimeric human rhinoviruses (HRV displaying the MPER epitopes corresponding to mAbs 2F5, 4E10, and/or Z13e1, connected to an immunogenic surface loop of HRV via linkers of varying lengths and sequences. Not all libraries led to viable chimeric viruses with the desired sequences, but the combinatorial approach allowed us to examine large numbers of MPER-displaying chimeras. Among the chimeras were five that elicited antibodies capable of significantly neutralizing HIV-1 pseudoviruses from at least three subtypes, in one case leading to neutralization of 10 pseudoviruses from all six subtypes tested.Optimization of these chimeras or closely related chimeras could conceivably lead to useful components of an effective AIDS vaccine. While the MPER of HIV may not be immunodominant in natural infection by HIV-1, its presence in a vaccine cocktail could provide critical breadth of protection.

  16. [International classification of various types of monoclonal antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J

    2009-01-01

    Significant advances in the development of monoclonal antibodies ("mabs") have been acknowledged during the last two decades. Successive developments led to the marketing of murine antibodies ("o-mab" first, followed by chimeric antibodies ("xi-mab"), humanised antibodies ("zu-mab") and, finally, human monoclonal antibodies ("u-mab"). In order to facilitate the distinction between the various monoclonal antibodies used in clinical practice, an international nomenclature has been proposed with the use of a specific suffix corresponding to the origine/source of "mabs" preceded by an infix referring to the medicine's target. The efforts in developing new types of monoclonal antibodies aimed at improving their pharmacokinetics (longer half-life), pharmacodynamics (better efficacy because of stronger affinity to human receptor), and safety profile (less antigenic and immunogenic reactions). These progresses could be obtained thanks to the remarkable development of molecular biotechnology.

  17. Brain delivery of AAV9 expressing an anti-PrP monovalent antibody delays prion disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Fabio; Vimercati, Chiara; Campagnani, Ilaria; Ruggerone, Margherita; Giaccone, Giorgio; Morbin, Michela; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Zucca, Ileana; Legname, Giuseppe; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Prion diseases are caused by a conformational modification of the cellular prion protein (PrP (C)) into disease-specific forms, termed PrP (Sc), that have the ability to interact with PrP (C) promoting its conversion to PrP (Sc). In vitro studies demonstrated that anti-PrP antibodies inhibit this process. In particular, the single chain variable fragment D18 antibody (scFvD18) showed high efficiency in curing chronically prion-infected cells. This molecule binds the PrP (C) region involved in the interaction with PrP (Sc) thus halting further prion formation. These findings prompted us to test the efficiency of scFvD18 in vivo. A recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral vector serotype 9 was used to deliver scFvD18 to the brain of mice that were subsequently infected by intraperitoneal route with the mouse-adapted scrapie strain RML. We found that the treatment was safe, prolonged the incubation time of scrapie-infected animals and decreased the burden of total proteinase-resistant PrP (Sc) in the brain, suggesting that scFvD18 interferes with prion replication in vivo. This approach is relevant for designing new therapeutic strategies for prion diseases and other disorders characterized by protein misfolding.

  18. Induction of feline immunodeficiency virus specific antibodies in cats with an attenuated Salmonella strain expressing the Gag protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Tijhaar (Edwin); C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); J.A. Karlas (Jos); M.C. Burger; F.R. Mooi (Frits); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractSalmonella typhimurium aroA strains (SL3261), expressing high levels of the Gag protein of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) fused with maltose binding protein (SL3261-MFG), were constructed using an invertible promoter system that allows the stable expression of heterologous antigens

  19. Chimeric Amino Acid Rearrangements as Immune Targets in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Chimeric Amino Acid Rearrangements as Immune Targets in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...that result from gene rearrangements given their high frequency relative to somatic point mutations. Gene rearrangements can yield novel chimeric

  20. A novel monoclonal antibody, C41, reveals IL-13Ralpha1 expression by murine germinal center B cells and follicular dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudrier, J; Graber, P; Herren, S; Berney, C; Gretener, D; Kosco-Vilbois, M H; Gauchat, J F

    2000-11-01

    Responsiveness to IL-13 involves at least two chains, IL-4Ralpha and IL-13Ralpha1. Although mouse B cells express IL-4Ralpha, little is known about their expression of IL-13Ralpha chains. To investigate this topic further, we have generated a monoclonal antibody (C41) specific for murine IL-13Ralpha1. Using C41, IL-13Ralpha1 expression was detected on germinal center (GC) B cells by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. In addition, IL-13Ralpha1 was observed on follicular dendritic cells, but not interdigitating dendritic cells in the T cell areas. Furthermore, resting B cells also expressed IL-13Ralpha1, and in the presence of IL-13 produced increased amounts of IgM in response to in vitro CD40 stimulation. However, C41 was unable to neutralize this bioactivity. The distribution of IL-13Ralpha1 on murine B cells and during GC reactions suggests a role for IL-13 during B cell differentiation.

  1. Purification and refolding of anti-T-antigen single chain antibodies (scFvs) expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Noriyuki; Koyama, Tsubasa; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2014-02-01

    T-antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAcα-1-Ser/Thr) is an oncofetal antigen that is commonly expressed as a carbohydrate determinant in many adenocarcinomas. Since it is associated with tumor progression and metastasis, production of recombinant antibodies specific for T-antigen could lead to the development of cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Previously, we isolated and characterized 11 anti-T-antigen phage clones from a phage library displaying human single-chain antibodies (scFvs) and purified one scFv protein, 1G11. More recently, we purified and characterized 1E8 scFv protein using a Drosophila S2 expression system. In the current study, four anti-T-antigen scFv genes belonging to Groups 1-4 were purified from inclusion bodies expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Inclusion bodies isolated from E. coli cells were denatured in 3.5 M Gdn-HCl. Solubilized His-tagged scFv proteins were purified using Ni(2+)-Sepharose column chromatography in the presence of 3.5 M Gdn-HCl. Purified scFv proteins were refolded according to a previously published method of step-wise dialysis. Two anti-T-antigen scFv proteins, 1E6 and 1E8 that belong to Groups 1 and 2, respectively, were produced in sufficient amounts, thus allowing further characterization of their binding activity with T-antigen. Specificity and affinity constants determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), respectively, provided evidence that both 1E8 and 1E6 scFv proteins are T-antigen specific and suggested that 1E8 scFv protein has a higher affinity for T-antigen than 1E6 scFv protein.

  2. Designing a HER2/neu promoter to drive α1,3galactosyltransferase expression for targeted anti-αGal antibody-mediated tumor cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanteri, Marion; Ollier, Laurence; Giordanengo, Valérie; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    Our goal was to specifically render tumor cells susceptible to natural cytolytic anti-αGal antibodies by using a murine α1,3galactosyltransferase (mαGalT) transgene driven by a designed form of HER2/neu promoter (pNeu), the transcription of which is frequently observed to be above basal in breast tumors. Indeed, the αGalT activity that promotes Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc-R (αGal) epitope expression has been mutationally disrupted during the course of evolution, starting from Old World primates, and this has led to the counter-production of large amounts of cytotoxic anti-αGal antibodies in recent primates, including man. Expression of the endogenous c-erbB-2 gene was investigated in various cell lines by northern blotting. A mαGalT cDNA was constructed into pcDNA3 vector downstream of the original CMV promoter (pCMV/mαGalT) and various forms of pNeu were prepared by PCR amplification and inserted in the pCMV/mαGalT construct upstream of the mαGalT cDNA, in the place of the CMV promoter. These constructs were transferred into HEK-293 control and breast tumor cell lines. Stably transfected cells were analyzed by northern blotting for their expression of αGalT and c-erbB-2, and by flow cytometry for their binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated Griffonia simplicifolia/isolectin B4. We show that expression of the mαGalT was up- or down-modulated according to the level of endogenous pNeu activity and the particular form of constructed pNeu. Among several constructs, two particular forms of the promoter, pNeu250 containing the CCAAT box and the PEA3 motif adjacent to the TATAA box, and pNeu664, which has three additional PEA3 motifs upstream of the CCAAT box, were found to promote differential αGalT expression. Our results strengthen current concepts about the crucial role played by the proximal PEA3 motif of pNeu, and may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the development of targeted transgene expression

  3. Chimeric peptide containing both B and T cells epitope of tumor-associated antigen L6 enhances anti-tumor effects in HLA-A2 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Su-I; Huang, Ming-Hsi; Chang, Yu-Wen; Chen, I-Hua; Roffler, Steve; Chen, Bing-Mae; Sher, Yuh-Pyng; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2016-07-28

    Synthetic peptides are attractive for cancer immunotherapy because of their safety and flexibility. In this report, we identified a new B cell epitope of tumor-associated antigen L6 (TAL6) that could induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vivo. We incorporated the B cell epitope with a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and a helper T (Th) epitope to form a chimeric long peptide. We formulated the chimeric peptide with different adjuvants to immunize HLA-A2 transgenic mice and evaluate their immunogenicity. The chimeric peptide formulated with an emulsion type nanoparticle (PELC) adjuvant and a toll-like receptor 9 agonist (CpG ODN) (PELC/CpG) induced the greatest ADCC and CTL responses. The induced anti-tumor immunity inhibited the growth of TAL6-positive cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that immunization with the chimeric peptide inhibited cancer cell migration in vitro and metastasis in vivo. These data suggest that a chimeric peptide containing both B and T cell epitopes of TAL6 formulated with PELC/CpG adjuvant is feasible for cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. ADCC employing an NK cell line (haNK) expressing the high affinity CD16 allele with avelumab, an anti-PD-L1 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochems, Caroline; Hodge, James W; Fantini, Massimo; Tsang, Kwong Y; Vandeveer, Amanda J; Gulley, James L; Schlom, Jeffrey

    2017-08-01

    NK-92 cells, and their derivative, designated aNK, were obtained from a patient with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Prior clinical studies employing adoptively transferred irradiated aNK cells have provided evidence of clinical benefit and an acceptable safety profile. aNK cells have now been engineered to express IL-2 and the high affinity (ha) CD16 allele (designated haNK). Avelumab is a human IgG1 anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody, which has shown evidence of clinical activity in a range of human tumors. Prior in vitro studies have shown that avelumab has the ability to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of human tumor cells when combined with NK cells. In the studies reported here, the ability of avelumab to enhance the lysis of a range of human carcinoma cells by irradiated haNK cells via the ADCC mechanism is demonstrated; this ADCC is shown to be inhibited by anti-CD16 blocking antibody and by concanamycin A, indicating the use of the granzyme/perforin pathway in tumor cell lysis. Studies also show that while NK cells have the ability to lyse aNK or haNK cells, the addition of NK cells to irradiated haNK cells does not inhibit haNK-mediated lysis of human tumor cells, with or without the addition of avelumab. Avelumab-mediated lysis of tumor cells by irradiated haNK cells is also shown to be similar to that of NK cells bearing the V/V Fc receptor high affinity allele. These studies thus provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of the combined use of avelumab with that of irradiated adoptively transferred haNK cells. © 2017 UICC.

  5. Chimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins with Potent Intrinsic Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed EnvGM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized EnvGM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric EnvGM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins. PMID:23565193

  6. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Isik

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env. An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  7. Chimerism and tolerance without GVHD or engraftment syndrome in HLA-mismatched combined kidney and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Joseph; Abecassis, Michael; Miller, Joshua; Gallon, Lorenzo; Ravindra, Kadiyala; Tollerud, David J; King, Bradley; Elliott, Mary Jane; Herzig, Geoffrey; Herzig, Roger; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2012-03-07

    The toxicity of chronic immunosuppressive agents required for organ transplant maintenance has prompted investigators to pursue approaches to induce immune tolerance. We developed an approach using a bioengineered mobilized cellular product enriched for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and tolerogenic graft facilitating cells (FCs) combined with nonmyeloablative conditioning; this approach resulted in engraftment, durable chimerism, and tolerance induction in recipients with highly mismatched related and unrelated donors. Eight recipients of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched kidney and FC/HSC transplants underwent conditioning with fludarabine, 200-centigray total body irradiation, and cyclophosphamide followed by posttransplant immunosuppression with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. Subjects ranged in age from 29 to 56 years. HLA match ranged from five of six loci with related donors to one of six loci with unrelated donors. The absolute neutrophil counts reached a nadir about 1 week after transplant, with recovery by 2 weeks. Multilineage chimerism at 1 month ranged from 6 to 100%. The conditioning was well tolerated, with outpatient management after postoperative day 2. Two subjects exhibited transient chimerism and were maintained on low-dose tacrolimus monotherapy. One subject developed viral sepsis 2 months after transplant and experienced renal artery thrombosis. Five subjects experienced durable chimerism, demonstrated immunocompetence and donor-specific tolerance by in vitro proliferative assays, and were successfully weaned off all immunosuppression 1 year after transplant. None of the recipients produced anti-donor antibody or exhibited engraftment syndrome or graft-versus-host disease. These results suggest that manipulation of a mobilized stem cell graft and nonmyeloablative conditioning represents a safe, practical, and reproducible means of inducing durable chimerism and donor-specific tolerance in solid organ transplant recipients.

  8. [A study on the expression of anti-mitochondrial antibody in the brain of patients with MELAS syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Kun; Yao, Sheng; Wang, Hai-Yan; Piao, Yue-Shan; Lu, De-Hong; Yuan, Yun

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the pathological changes and pathogenesis of the MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalopathy lactic acidosis stroke-like episodes) by using the method of immunohistochemical staining in the brain biopsy specimens with anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA). We performed immunohistochemical staining in 3 confirmed MELAS patients' paraffin-imbued brain biopsy specimens. Small vessel proliferation and the uneven thickness of the wall were found in the 3 MELAS patients. A lot of brown deposits was shown in the wall of small vessels and also noted in neurons. The main pathological change in the MELAS brain biopsy immunohistochemical staining with AMA was the small vessel proliferation, indicating that abnormal mitochondria accumulated in the vascular smooth muscle, endothelial cell and neurons of the lesion sites. This finding was consistent with the electron microscopic discovery and valuable for the diagnosis of MELAS.

  9. Antibody-Based Detection of ERG Rearrangement-Positive Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Park

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions occur in 50% of prostate cancers and result in the overexpression of a chimeric fusion transcript that encodes a truncated ERG product. Previous attempts to detect truncated ERG products have been hindered by a lack of specific antibodies. Here, we characterize a rabbit anti-ERG monoclonal antibody (clone EPR 3864; Epitomics, Burlingame, CA using immunoblot analysis on prostate cancer cell lines, synthetic TMPRSS2-ERG constructs, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence. We correlated ERG protein expression with the presence of ERG gene rearrangements in prostate cancertissues using a combined immunohistochemistry(IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis. We independently evaluated two patient cohorts and observed ERG expression confined to prostate cancer cells and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial reoplasia associated with ERG-positive cancer, as well as vessels and lymphocytes (where ERG has a known biologic role. Image analysis of 131 cases demonstrated nearly 100% sensitivity for detecting ERG rearrangement prostate cancer, with only 2 (1.5% of 131 cases demonstrating strong ERG protein expression without any known ERG gene fusion. The combired pathology evaluation of 207 patient tumors for ERG protein expression had 95.7% sensitivity and 96.5% specificity for determining ERG rearrangement prostate cancer. Ir conclusion, this study qualifies a specific anti-ERG antibody and demonstrates exquisite association between ERG gene rearrangement and truncated ERG protein product expression. Giver the ease of performing IHC versus FISH, ERG protein expression may be useful for molecularly subtypirg prostate cancer based or ERG rearrangement status and suggests clinical utility it prostate needle biopsy evaluation.

  10. Generation and characterization of rat and mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for MeCP2 and their use in X-inactivation studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Laurence Jost

    Full Text Available Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2 binds DNA, and has a preference for methylated CpGs and, hence, in cells, it accumulates in heterochromatin. Even though it is expressed ubiquitously MeCP2 is particularly important during neuronal maturation. This is underscored by the fact that in Rett syndrome, a neurological disease, 80% of patients carry a mutation in the MECP2 gene. Since the MECP2 gene lies on the X chromosome and is subjected to X chromosome inactivation, affected patients are usually chimeric for wild type and mutant MeCP2. Here, we present the generation and characterization of the first rat monoclonal MeCP2 specific antibodies as well as mouse monoclonal antibodies and a rabbit polyclonal antibody. We demonstrate that our antibodies are suitable for immunoblotting, (chromatin immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence of endogenous and ectopically expressed MeCP2. Epitope mapping revealed that most of the MeCP2 monoclonal antibodies recognize the C-terminal domain and one the N-terminal domain of MeCP2. Using slot blot analysis, we determined a high sensitivity of all antibodies, detecting amounts as low as 1 ng of MeCP2 protein. Moreover, the antibodies recognize MeCP2 from different species, including human, mouse, rat and pig. Lastly, we have validated their use by analyzing and quantifying X chromosome inactivation skewing using brain tissue of MeCP2 heterozygous null female mice. The new MeCP2 specific monoclonal antibodies described here perform well in a large variety of immunological applications making them a very valuable set of tools for studies of MeCP2 pathophysiology in situ and in vitro.

  11. RECOMBINANT ANTI-TENASCIN ANTIBODY CONTRUCTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZALUTSKY, MICHAEL R.

    2006-01-01

    The general objective of this research is to combine genetically derived molecular constructs reactive with tenascin, with appropriate radionuclides and labeling methods in order to generate more effective diagnostic and therapeutic reagents for oncologic nuclear medicine. Tenascin, a polymorphic extracellular matrix glycoprotein, is of interest because of its high expression on glioma, melanoma, as well as prostate and breast carcinoma. Recently, we have also documented high levels of tenascin in lymphomas, particularly those of higher grade, making the potential clinical impact of tenascin-specific radiodiagnostics and therapeutics even greater. An essential feature of our work plan is the ability to exploit our extensive clinical experience in order to design second-generation constructs with properties which could improve clinical efficacy. To date, we have treated over 150 brain tumor patients with 131I-labeled murine 81C6, an antibody which binds specifically to the alternatively spliced fibronectin type III repeats CD of the tenascin molecule. During the current grant period, we have made several observations which form the basis for our proposed specific aims. First, tissue distribution and catabolism experiments in animal models have demonstrated enhanced stability for a chimeric construct composed of murine variable regions and human IgG2 constant domains. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic studies in patients with 131I-labeled chimeric 81C6 have shown significantly longer retention in glioma tumor resection cavities compared with its murine parent. Second, we have initiated the first clinical trial of an endoradiotherapeutic labeled with the 7.2-hr ?-particle emitter 211At. Twelve glioma patients have received 211At-labeled chimeric 81C6 directly into their brain tumor resection cavity, and very encouraging results have been obtained. Now that the feasibility of human studies with 211At, has been demonstrated, the development and evaluation of anti

  12. Recombinant anti-tenascin antibody constructs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZALUTSKY, MICHAEL R

    2006-08-29

    The general objective of this research is to combine genetically derived molecular constructs reactive with tenascin, with appropriate radionuclides and labeling methods in order to generate more effective diagnostic and therapeutic reagents for oncologic nuclear medicine. Tenascin, a polymorphic extracellular matrix glycoprotein, is of interest because of its high expression on glioma, melanoma, as well as prostate and breast carcinoma. Recently, we have also documented high levels of tenascin in lymphomas, particularly those of higher grade, making the potential clinical impact of tenascin-specific radiodiagnostics and therapeutics even greater. An essential feature of our work plan is the ability to exploit our extensive clinical experience in order to design second-generation constructs with properties which could improve clinical efficacy. To date, we have treated over 150 brain tumor patients with 131I-labeled murine 81C6, an antibody which binds specifically to the alternatively spliced fibronectin type III repeats CD of the tenascin molecule. During the current grant period, we have made several observations which form the basis for our proposed specific aims. First, tissue distribution and catabolism experiments in animal models have demonstrated enhanced stability for a chimeric construct composed of murine variable regions and human IgG2 constant domains. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic studies in patients with 131I-labeled chimeric 81C6 have shown significantly longer retention in glioma tumor resection cavities compared with its murine parent. Second, we have initiated the first clinical trial of an endoradiotherapeutic labeled with the 7.2-hr -particle emitter 211At. Twelve glioma patients have received 211At-labeled chimeric 81C6 directly into their brain tumor resection cavity, and very encouraging results have been obtained. Now that the feasibility of human studies with 211At, has been demonstrated, the development and evaluation of anti

  13. Effective combination treatment of GD2-expressing neuroblastoma and Ewing's sarcoma using anti-GD2 ch14.18/CHO antibody with Vγ9Vδ2+ γδT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jonathan P H; Flutter, Barry; Wesemann, Florian; Frosch, Jennifer; Rossig, Claudia; Gustafsson, Kenth; Anderson, John

    Gamma delta T lymphocytes (γδT cells) have pleiotropic properties including innate cytotoxicity, which make them attractive effectors for cancer immunotherapy. Combination treatment with zoledronic acid and IL-2 can activate and expand the most common subset of blood γδT, which express the Vγ9Vδ2 T cell receptor (TCR) (Vδ2 T cells). Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are equipped for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) through expression of the low-affinity FcγR CD16. GD2 is a highly ranked tumor associated antigen for immunotherapy due to bright expression on the cell surface, absent expression on normal tissues and availability of therapeutic antibodies with known efficacy in neuroblastoma. To explore the hypothesis that zoledronic acid, IL-2 and anti-GD2 antibodies will synergize in a therapeutic combination, we evaluated in vitro cytotoxicity and tumor growth inhibition in the GD2 expressing cancers neuroblastoma and Ewing's sarcoma. Vδ2 T cells exert ADCC against GD2-expressing Ewing's sarcoma and neuroblastoma cell lines, an effect which correlates with the brightness of GD2 expression. In an immunodeficient mouse model of small established GD2-expressing Ewing's sarcoma or neuroblastoma tumors, the combination of adoptively transferred Vδ2+ T cells, expanded in vitro with zoledronic acid and IL-2, with anti-GD2 antibody ch14.18/CHO, and with systemic zoledronic acid, significantly suppressed tumor growth compared to antibody or γδT cell-free controls. Combination treatment using ch14.18/CHO, zoledronic acid and IL-2 is more effective than their use in isolation. The already-established safety profiles of these agents make testing of the combination in GD2 positive cancers such as neuroblastoma or Ewing's sarcoma both rational and feasible.

  14. Chemotherapeutic Effect of CD147 Antibody-labeled Micelles Encapsulating Doxorubicin Conjugate Targeting CD147-Expressing Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Masayuki; Shiraishi, Koichi; Aoki, Katsuhiko; Ohkawa, Kiyoshi

    2018-03-01

    CD147 (basigin/emmprin) is expressed on the surface of carcinoma cells. For studying the efficacy of CD147-targeting medicine on CD147-expressing cells, we studied the effect of anti-CD147-labeled polymeric micelles (CD147ab micelles) that encapsulated a conjugate of doxorubicin with glutathione (GSH-DXR), with specific accumulation and cytotoxicity against CD147-expressing A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells, Ishikawa human endometrial adenocarcinoma cells, and PC3 human prostate carcinoma cells. By treatment of each cell type with CD147ab micelles for 1 h, a specific accumulation of CD147ab micelles in CD147-expressing cells was observed. In addition, the cytotoxicity of GSH-DXR-encapsulated micelles against each cell type was measured by treatment of the micelles for 1 h. The cytotoxic effect of CD147ab micelles carrying GSH-DXR was 3- to 10-fold higher for these cells than that of micelles without GSH-DXR. These results suggest that GSH-DXR-encapsulated CD147ab micelles could serve as an effective drug delivery system to CD147-expressing carcinoma cells. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. In vivo imaging and specific targeting of P-glycoprotein expression in multidrug resistant nude mice xenografts with [125I]MRK-16 monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Andrew M.; Rosa, Eddie; Mehta, Bippin M.; Divgi, Chaitanya R.; Finn, Ronald D.; Biedler, June L.; Tsuruo, Takashi; Kalaigian, Hovannes; Larson, Steven M.

    1995-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumors is associated with P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expression. In vivo quantitation of Pgp may allow MDR to be evaluated noninvasively prior to treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to radiolabel MRK-16, a monoclonal antibody that targets an external epitope of P-glycoprotein, and perform in vivo quantitation of P-glycoprotein in a MDR xenograft nude mouse model. MRK-16 was labeled with 125 I by the iodogen method, with subsequent purification by size exclusion chromatography. Groups of 10 Balb/c mice were each xenografted with colchicine-resistant or -sensitive neuroblastoma cell lines, respectively. Whole body clearance and tumor uptake over time was quantitated by gamma camera imaging, and biodistribution studies were performed with [ 125 ]MRK-16 and an isotype matched control antibody, A33. Quantitative autoradiography and immunohistochemistry analysis of tumors was also evaluated to confirm specific targeting of [ 125 I]MRK-16. Peak tumor uptake was at 2-3 days post-injection, and was significantly greater in resistance compared to sensitive tumors (mean % injected dose/g ± SD) (18.76 ± 2.94 vs 10.93 ± 0.96; p 125 I]MRK-16 was confirmed by comparison to [ 131 I]A33 in biodistribution studies, and localized to cellular components of tissue stroma by comparison of histologic and autoradiographic sections of sensitive and resistant tumors. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated a 4.5-fold difference in P-glycoprotein expression between sensitive and resistant cell lines without colchicine selective pressure. We conclude that in vivo quantitation of P-glycoprotein in MDR tumors can be performed with [ 125 I]MRK-16. These findings suggest a potential clinical application for radiolabeled MRK-16 in the in vivo evaluation of multidrug resistance in tumors

  16. Antibody biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... Another milestone in the history of antibodies was the work of Porter and Edelman ... transgenic animals (Lonberg et al., 1994; Green et al.,. 1994) or .... create and to screen human recombinant antibodies libraries, that is ...

  17. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  18. Isolation of a monoclonal antibody from a phage display library binding the rhesus macaque MHC class I allomorph Mamu-A1*001.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Holman

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA are useful tools for HLA-typing, tracking donor-recipient chimerisms after bone marrow transplants, and characterizing specific major histocompatibility complexes (MHC on cell surfaces. Unfortunately, equivalent reagents are not available for rhesus macaques, which are commonly used animal as models in organ transplant and infectious disease research. To address this deficiency, we isolated an antibody that recognizes the common Indian rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule, Mamu-A1*001. We induced Mamu-A1*001-binding antibodies by alloimmunizing a female Mamu-A1*001-negative rhesus macaque with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from a male Mamu-A1*001-positive donor. A Fab phage display library was constructed with PBMC from the alloimmunized macaque and panned to isolate an antibody that binds to Mamu-A1*001 but not to other common rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules. The isolated antibody distinguishes PBMC from Mamu-A1*001-positive and -negative macaques. Additionally, the Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody binds the cynomolgus macaque MHC class I ortholog Mafa-A1*001:01 but not variants Mafa-A1*001:02/03, indicating a high degree of binding specificity. The Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody will be useful for identifying Mamu-A1*001-positive rhesus macaques, for detecting Mamu-A1*001-positive cells in populations of Mamu-A1*001-negative cells, and for examining disease processes that alter expression of Mamu-A1*001 on cell surfaces. Moreover, the alloimmunization process we describe will be useful for isolating additional MHC allomorph-specific monoclonal antibodies or antibodies against other polymorphic host proteins which are difficult to isolate with traditional technologies.

  19. Radioimmunotherapy with an antibody to HPV16 E6 oncoprotein is effective in experimental cervical tumor expressing low levels of E6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zewei; Wang, Xing Guo; Einstein, Mark H; Goldberg, Gary L; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose HPV16 is associated with ∼50% of all cervical cancers worldwide. The E6 and E7 genes of oncogenic HPV types, such as HPV16, are necessary for the HPV transforming function and tumorogenesis making them ideal targets for novel treatments. Radioimmunotherapy employs systemically administered radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to tumor-associated antigens. Previously we demonstrated in mice that radioimmunotherapy targeting viral antigens with mAb to HPV16 E6 suppressed CasKi cervical tumors expressing high levels of E6 (∼600 copies of HPV per cell). However, that study opened the question whether radioimmunotherapy can suppress the growth of cervical tumors with low E6 and E7 expression, such as may be seen in patients. Experimental Design We evaluated the expression of E6 in patients' tumors and in the SiHa cell line expressing low levels of E6 and E7 (1–2 copies of HPV per cell) and found them comparable. We initiated SiHa tumors in nude mice, radiolabeled C1P5 mAb to E6 with a beta-emitter 188-Rhenium (188Re) and treated tumor-bearing mice with: (1) 200 µCi 188Re-C1P5 alone; (2) proteasome inhibitor MG132 alone; (3) MG132 followed by 200 µCi 188Re-C1P5; (4) unlabeled C1P5; (5) 200 µCi 188Re-18B7 (isotype-matching control mAb); (6) no treatment. 188Re-C1P5 alone and in combination with MG-132 significantly retarded tumor growth compared to all control groups. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the possibility to suppress tumor growth by targeting viral antigens even in cervical tumors with low E6 expression and provide additional evidence for the potential usefulness of radioimmunotherapy targeting HPV-related antigens in the clinic. PMID:20861673

  20. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PF4 Antibody Hepatitis A Testing Hepatitis B Testing Hepatitis C Testing HER2/neu Herpes Testing High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic HIV Viral Load HLA Testing HLA- ...

  1. Oral Administration of Recombinant Saccharomyces boulardii Expressing Ovalbumin-CPE Fusion Protein Induces Antibody Response in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherpour, Ghasem; Ghasemi, Hosnie; Zand, Bahare; Zarei, Najmeh; Roohvand, Farzin; Ardakani, Esmat M; Azizi, Mohammad; Khalaj, Vahid

    2018-01-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii , a subspecies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae , is a well-known eukaryotic probiotic with many benefits for human health. In the present study, a recombinant strain of S. boulardii was prepared to use as a potential oral vaccine delivery vehicle. In this sense, a ura3 auxotroph strain of S. boulardii CNCM I-745 (known as S. cerevisiae HANSEN CBS 5926, Yomogi ® ) was generated using CRISPR/Cas9 methodology. Then a gene construct encoding a highly immunogenic protein, ovalbumin (OVA), was prepared and transformed into the ura3 - S. boulardii . To facilitate the transport of the recombinant immunogen across the intestinal barrier, a claudin-targeting sequence from Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) was added to the C-terminus of the expression cassette. The recombinant S. boulardii strain expressing the OVA-CPE fusion protein was then administered orally to a group of mice, and serum IgG and fecal IgA levels were evaluated by ELISA. Our results demonstrated that anti-OVA IgG in serum significantly increased in test group ( P boulardii or PBS), and the fecal IgA titer was significantly higher in test group ( P boulardii strain expressing the similar construct lacking C-terminal CPE was also administered orally. The result showed an increased level of serum IgG in group receiving yeasts expressing the CPE negative construct compared to control groups; however, the fecal IgA levels did not increase significantly. In conclusion, our findings indicated that the yeast S. boulardii , as a delivery vehicle with possible immunomodulatory effects, and c-CPE, as a targeting tag, synergistically assist to stimulate systemic and local immunity. This proposed recombinant S. boulardii system might be useful in the expression of other antigenic peptides, making it as a promising tool for oral delivery of vaccines or therapeutic proteins.

  2. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies stimulate release of neutrophil microparticles.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hong, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) may contribute to the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis are not well understood. In this study, both polyclonal ANCAs isolated from patients and chimeric proteinase 3-ANCA induced the release of neutrophil microparticles from primed neutrophils. These microparticles expressed a variety of markers, including the ANCA autoantigens proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase. They bound endothelial cells via a CD18-mediated mechanism and induced an increase in endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression, production of endothelial reactive oxygen species, and release of endothelial IL-6 and IL-8. Removal of the neutrophil microparticles by filtration or inhibition of reactive oxygen species production with antioxidants abolished microparticle-mediated endothelial activation. In addition, these microparticles promoted the generation of thrombin. In vivo, we detected more neutrophil microparticles in the plasma of children with ANCA-associated vasculitis compared with that in healthy controls or those with inactive vasculitis. Taken together, these results support a role for neutrophil microparticles in the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis, potentially providing a target for future therapeutics.

  3. Novel chimeric peptide with enhanced cell specificity and anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Nam-Hong; Lee, Jong-Wan; Jang, Jin-Sun; Park, Yung-Hoon; Park, Seong-Cheol; Jang, Mi-Kyeong

    2015-07-31

    An antimicrobial peptide (AMP), Hn-Mc, was designed by combining the N-terminus of HPA3NT3 and the C-terminus of melittin. This chimeric AMP exhibited potent antibacterial activity with low minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), ranging from 1 to 2 μM against four drug-susceptible bacteria and ten drug-resistant bacteria. Moreover, the hemolysis and cytotoxicity was reduced significantly compared to those of the parent peptides, highlighting its high cell selectivity. The morphological changes in the giant unilamellar vesicles and bacterial cell surfaces caused by the Hn-Mc peptide suggested that it killed the microbial cells by damaging the membrane envelope. An in vivo study also demonstrated the antibacterial activity of the Hn-Mc peptide in a mouse model infected with drug-resistant bacteria. In addition, the chimeric peptide inhibited the expression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokines in RAW 264.7 cells by preventing the interaction between LPS and Toll-like receptors. These results suggest that this chimeric peptide is an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory candidate as a pharmaceutic agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

    2006-10-01

    The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

  5. Generation of Chimeric RNAs by cis-splicing of adjacent genes (cis-SAGe) in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jian-Shu; Jing, Xiao-Yan; Du, Xin; Yang, Xiu-Qin

    2018-02-20

    Chimeric RNA molecules, possessing exons from two or more independent genes, are traditionally believed to be produced by chromosome rearrangement. However, recent studies revealed that cis-splicing of adjacent genes (cis- SAGe) is one of the major mechanisms underlying the formation of chimeric RNAs. cis-SAGe refers to intergenic splicing of directly adjacent genes with the same transcriptional orientation, resulting in read-through transcripts, termed chimeric RNAs, which contain sequences from two or more parental genes. cis-SAGe was first identified in tumor cells, since then its potential in carcinogenesis has attracted extensive attention. More and more scientists are focusing on it. With the development of research, cis-SAGe was found to be ubiquitous in various normal tissues, and might make a crucial contribution to the formation of novel genes in the evolution of genomes. In this review, we summarize the splicing pattern, expression characteristics, possible mechanisms, and significance of cis-SAGe in mammals. This review will be helpful for general understanding of the current status and development tendency of cis-SAGe.

  6. Chimeric Plastics : a new class of thermoplastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenschein, Mark

    A new class of thermoplastics (dubbed ``Chimerics'') is described that exhibits a high temperature glass transition followed by high performance elastomer properties, prior to melting. These transparent materials are comprised of co-continuous phase-separated block copolymers. One block is an amorphous glass with a high glass transition temperature, and the second is a higher temperature phase transition block creating virtual thermoreversible crosslinks. The material properties are highly influenced by phase separation on the order of 10-30 nanometers. At lower temperatures the polymer reflects the sum of the block copolymer properties. As the amorphous phase glass transition is exceeded, the virtual crosslinks of the higher temperature second phase dominate the plastic properties, resulting in rubber-like elasticity.

  7. A Novel Anti-Beta2-Microglobulin Antibody Inhibition of Androgen Receptor Expression, Survival, and Progression in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    mineral density in men with genetic hemochromatosis and HFE gene mutation. Osteoporos Int 2005; 16:1809–14. b2-Microglobulin Confers EMT and Cancer...In this project, we evaluate the molecular mechanism of AR gene expression at the transcriptional level regulated by β2M during prostate cancer...SREBP-1 targeted gene and has been shown to be a metabolic oncogene, cytoplasm), NADH oxidase 5 (Nox5, a SREBP-1 targeted gene and is a key enzyme for

  8. Oral Administration of Recombinant Saccharomyces boulardii Expressing Ovalbumin-CPE Fusion Protein Induces Antibody Response in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Bagherpour

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces boulardii, a subspecies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a well-known eukaryotic probiotic with many benefits for human health. In the present study, a recombinant strain of S. boulardii was prepared to use as a potential oral vaccine delivery vehicle. In this sense, a ura3 auxotroph strain of S. boulardii CNCM I-745 (known as S. cerevisiae HANSEN CBS 5926, Yomogi® was generated using CRISPR/Cas9 methodology. Then a gene construct encoding a highly immunogenic protein, ovalbumin (OVA, was prepared and transformed into the ura3- S. boulardii. To facilitate the transport of the recombinant immunogen across the intestinal barrier, a claudin-targeting sequence from Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE was added to the C-terminus of the expression cassette. The recombinant S. boulardii strain expressing the OVA-CPE fusion protein was then administered orally to a group of mice, and serum IgG and fecal IgA levels were evaluated by ELISA. Our results demonstrated that anti-OVA IgG in serum significantly increased in test group (P < 0.001 compared to control groups (receiving wild type S. boulardii or PBS, and the fecal IgA titer was significantly higher in test group (P < 0.05 than control groups. In parallel, a recombinant S. boulardii strain expressing the similar construct lacking C-terminal CPE was also administered orally. The result showed an increased level of serum IgG in group receiving yeasts expressing the CPE negative construct compared to control groups; however, the fecal IgA levels did not increase significantly. In conclusion, our findings indicated that the yeast S. boulardii, as a delivery vehicle with possible immunomodulatory effects, and c-CPE, as a targeting tag, synergistically assist to stimulate systemic and local immunity. This proposed recombinant S. boulardii system might be useful in the expression of other antigenic peptides, making it as a promising tool for oral delivery of vaccines or therapeutic

  9. Antitumor effect of novel anti-podoplanin antibody NZ-12 against malignant pleural mesothelioma in an orthotopic xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika Kato; Tsuchihashi, Yuki; Izumi, Toshihiro; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Okada, Naoto; Sato, Chiemi; Tobiume, Makoto; Otsuka, Kenji; Miyamoto, Licht; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Kato, Yukinari; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2016-09-01

    Podoplanin (aggrus) is highly expressed in several types of cancers, including malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Previously, we developed a rat anti-human podoplanin mAb, NZ-1, and a rat-human chimeric anti-human podoplanin antibody, NZ-8, derived from NZ-1, which induced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity against podoplanin-positive MPM cell lines. In this study, we showed the antitumor effect of NZ-1, NZ-8, and NZ-12, a novel rat-human chimeric anti-human podoplanin antibody derived from NZ-1, in an MPM orthotopic xenograft SCID mouse model. Treatment with NZ-1 and rat NK (CD161a(+) ) cells inhibited the growth of tumors and the production of pleural effusion in NCI-H290/PDPN or NCI-H226 orthotopic xenograft mouse models. NZ-8 and human natural killer (NK) (CD56(+) ) cells also inhibited tumor growth and pleural effusion in MPM orthotopic xenograft mice. Furthermore, NZ-12 induced potent ADCC mediated by human MNC, compared with either NZ-1 or NZ-8. Antitumor effects were observed following treatment with NZ-12 and human NK (CD56(+) ) cells in MPM orthotopic xenograft mice. In addition, combined immunotherapy using the ADCC activity of NZ-12 mediated by human NK (CD56(+) ) cells with pemetrexed, led to enhanced antitumor effects in MPM orthotopic xenograft mice. These results strongly suggest that combination therapy with podoplanin-targeting immunotherapy using both NZ-12 and pemetrexed might provide an efficacious therapeutic strategy for the treatment of MPM. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. Ectopic expression of human mTOR increases viability, robustness, cell size, proliferation, and antibody production of chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreesen, Imke A J; Fussenegger, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Engineering of mammalian production cell lines to improve titer and quality of biopharmaceuticals is a top priority of the biopharmaceutical manufacturing industry providing protein therapeutics to patients worldwide. While many engineering strategies have been successful in the past decade they were often based on the over-expression of a single transgene and therefore limited to addressing a single bottleneck in the cell's production capacity. We provide evidence that ectopic expression of the global metabolic sensor and processing protein mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), simultaneously improves key bioprocess-relevant characteristics of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell-derived production cell lines such as cell growth (increased cell size and protein content), proliferation (increased cell-cycle progression), viability (decreased apoptosis), robustness (decreased sensitivity to sub-optimal growth factor and oxygen supplies) and specific productivity of secreted human glycoproteins. Cultivation of mTOR-transgenic CHO-derived cell lines engineered for secretion of a therapeutic IgG resulted in antibody titers of up to 50 pg/cell/day, which represents a four-fold increase compared to the parental production cell line. mTOR-based engineering of mammalian production cell lines may therefore have a promising future in biopharmaceutical manufacturing of human therapeutic proteins. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Multiplex serology of paraneoplastic antineuronal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Maat (Peter); E. Brouwer (Eric); E. Hulsenboom (Esther); M.M. van Duijn (Martijn); M.W.J. Schreurs (Marco); H. Hooijkaas (Herbert); P.A. Smitt (Peter)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractParaneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) are devastating neurological disorders secondary to cancer, associated with onconeural autoantibodies. Such antibodies are directed against neuronal antigens aberrantly expressed by the tumor. The detection of onconeural antibodies in a patient

  12. Immune gene expression profiling of Proliferative Kidney Disease in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reveals a dominance of anti-inflammatory, antibody and T helper cell-like activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgoglione, Bartolomeo; Wang, Tiehui; Secombes, Christopher J; Holland, Jason W

    2013-07-16

    The myxozoan Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is the causative agent of Proliferative Kidney Disease (PKD) targeting primarily the kidney of infected fish where it causes a chronic lymphoid immunopathology. Although known to be associated with suppression of some cellular aspects of innate immunity and a prominent lymphocytic hyperplasia, there remains a considerable knowledge gap in our understanding of the underlying immune mechanisms driving PKD pathogenesis. To provide further insights, the expression profiles of a panel of innate/inflammatory and adaptive immune molecules were examined in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss following a natural exposure to the parasite. Relative to controls, fish with early to advanced stages of kidney pathology exhibited up-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-11, although remaining refractory towards genes indicative of macrophage activity. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and anti-inflammatory markers, including cathelicidin (CATH) and IL-10 were markedly up-regulated during clinical disease. Up-regulation of adaptive immune molecules, including cell markers and antibody genes reflect the lymphocytic dominance of this disease and the likely importance of lymphocyte subsets in PKD pathogenesis. Up-regulation of T helper (TH) cell-like response genes and transcription factors implies that T. bryosalmonae may elicit a complex interplay between TH cell subsets. This work, for the first time in the study of fish-myxozoan interactions, suggests that PKD pathogenesis is shaped by an anti-inflammatory phenotype, a profound B cell/antibody response and dysregulated TH cell-like activities. A better understanding of the functional roles of fish immune cells and molecules in PKD pathogenesis may facilitate future development of control measures against this disease.

  13. Immune gene expression profiling of Proliferative Kidney Disease in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reveals a dominance of anti-inflammatory, antibody and T helper cell-like activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The myxozoan Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is the causative agent of Proliferative Kidney Disease (PKD) targeting primarily the kidney of infected fish where it causes a chronic lymphoid immunopathology. Although known to be associated with suppression of some cellular aspects of innate immunity and a prominent lymphocytic hyperplasia, there remains a considerable knowledge gap in our understanding of the underlying immune mechanisms driving PKD pathogenesis. To provide further insights, the expression profiles of a panel of innate / inflammatory and adaptive immune molecules were examined in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss following a natural exposure to the parasite. Relative to controls, fish with early to advanced stages of kidney pathology exhibited up-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-11, although remaining refractory towards genes indicative of macrophage activity. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and anti-inflammatory markers, including cathelicidin (CATH) and IL-10 were markedly up-regulated during clinical disease. Up-regulation of adaptive immune molecules, including cell markers and antibody genes reflect the lymphocytic dominance of this disease and the likely importance of lymphocyte subsets in PKD pathogenesis. Up-regulation of T helper (TH) cell-like response genes and transcription factors implies that T. bryosalmonae may elicit a complex interplay between TH cell subsets. This work, for the first time in the study of fish-myxozoan interactions, suggests that PKD pathogenesis is shaped by an anti-inflammatory phenotype, a profound B cell /