WorldWideScience

Sample records for chimeric anti-cd20 monoclonal

  1. Rituximab chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody treatment for adult refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braendstrup, Peter; Bjerrum, Ole W; Nielsen, Ove J

    2005-01-01

    . Recent studies have shown that rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, is useful in the treatment of these patients, with overall response rates of about 50%. Most published reports have included a small number patients including case reports. The present study reports the results...

  2. In vitro characterization of 177Lu-radiolabelled chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and a preliminary dosimetry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrer, Flavio; Mueller-Brand, Jan; Chen, Jianhua; Fani, Melpomeni; Powell, Pia; Maecke, Helmut R.; Lohri, Andreas; Moldenhauer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    131 I- and 90 Y-labelled anti-CD20 antibodies have been shown to be effective in the treatment of low-grade, B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). However, the most appropriate radionuclide in terms of high efficiency and low toxicity has not yet been established. In this study we evaluated an immunoconjugate formed by the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab and the chelator DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid). DOTA-rituximab was prepared as a kit formulation and can be labelled in a short time ( 177 Lu or 90 Y. Immunoconjugates with different numbers of DOTA molecules per rituximab were prepared using p-SCN-Bz-DOTA. In vitro immunoreactivity and stability were tested and preliminary dosimetric results were acquired in two patients. The immunological binding properties of DOTA-rituximab to the CD20 antigen were found to be retained after conjugation with up to four chelators. The labelled product was stable against a 10 5 times excess of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA, 37 C, 7 days). Two patients with relapsed NHL were treated with 740 MBq/m 2 body surface 177 Lu-DOTA-rituximab. Scintigraphic images showed specific uptake at tumour sites and acceptable dosimetric results. The mean whole-body dose was found to be 314 mGy. The administration of 177 Lu-DOTA-rituximab was tolerated well. Our results show that DOTA-rituximab (4:1) can be labelled with 177 Lu with sufficient stability while the immunoconjugate retains its immunoreactivity. 177 Lu-DOTA-rituximab is an interesting, well-tolerated radiolabelled antibody with clinical activity in a low dose range, and provides an approach to the efficient treatment with few side effects for patients with relapsed NHL. (orig.)

  3. In vitro characterization of {sup 177}Lu-radiolabelled chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and a preliminary dosimetry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrer, Flavio; Mueller-Brand, Jan [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Chen, Jianhua; Fani, Melpomeni; Powell, Pia; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Basel (Switzerland); Lohri, Andreas [Basel University Medical Clinic, Liestal (Switzerland); Moldenhauer, Gerhard [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Molecular Immunology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    {sup 131}I- and {sup 90}Y-labelled anti-CD20 antibodies have been shown to be effective in the treatment of low-grade, B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). However, the most appropriate radionuclide in terms of high efficiency and low toxicity has not yet been established. In this study we evaluated an immunoconjugate formed by the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab and the chelator DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid). DOTA-rituximab was prepared as a kit formulation and can be labelled in a short time (<20 min) with either {sup 177}Lu or {sup 90}Y. Immunoconjugates with different numbers of DOTA molecules per rituximab were prepared using p-SCN-Bz-DOTA. In vitro immunoreactivity and stability were tested and preliminary dosimetric results were acquired in two patients. The immunological binding properties of DOTA-rituximab to the CD20 antigen were found to be retained after conjugation with up to four chelators. The labelled product was stable against a 10{sup 5} times excess of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA, 37 C, 7 days). Two patients with relapsed NHL were treated with 740 MBq/m{sup 2} body surface {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-rituximab. Scintigraphic images showed specific uptake at tumour sites and acceptable dosimetric results. The mean whole-body dose was found to be 314 mGy. The administration of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-rituximab was tolerated well. Our results show that DOTA-rituximab (4:1) can be labelled with {sup 177}Lu with sufficient stability while the immunoconjugate retains its immunoreactivity. {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-rituximab is an interesting, well-tolerated radiolabelled antibody with clinical activity in a low dose range, and provides an approach to the efficient treatment with few side effects for patients with relapsed NHL. (orig.)

  4. Labeling an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with 90Y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera Pintado, Alejandro; Leyva Montaña, René; Prats Capote, Anaís; Góngora Bravo, Magdiel; Alberti Ramírez, Alejandro; León, Mariela; Hernández González, Ignacio; Dorvignit, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomas are among the 10 leading causes of death, both in Cuba and in the world, with an increasing incidence in recent years. Follicular lymphoma low-grade (indolent) is one of the most common in the Western world, representing 1/3 of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). More than 90% of patients present with disseminated disease at diagnosis and generally have a slow evolution and good response to conventional treatment; but radically changed its forecast to relapse, resistance to therapeutic and histologic transformation can occur. The monoclonal antibody therapy has been a promising therapeutic. In this respect CD20 antigen it has been considered one of the most attractive targets in the therapy of follicular B cell lymphoma This is expressed in more than 90% of cases, while not present in stem cells and lines progenitors. Despite the success of immunotherapy, the relapse rate is still considerable. In order to increase the cytotoxic potential of immunotherapy, marked with beta emitting radionuclides alpha particles or monoclonal antibodies are used today. Despite encouraging results in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas refractory to other treatments, the extremely high costs of these commercial radiopharmaceuticals have greatly limited its application, even in the first world. A sustainable alternative is the marking of other anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, so researchers from several countries have concentrated their efforts on rituximaby other similar antibodies labeled with therapeutic radionuclides, as a possible cost-effectively to more problem. Today in Cuba it has an electrolytic generator 90 Sr- 90 Y Isotope Center, which ensures the availability of the radionuclide. In addition, the chimeric MAb rituximab is applied as part of the therapy of NHL in its health system and, recently, the Center for Molecular Immunology has obtained a chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody biosimilar rituximab, which is in phase clinical trial; which opens prospects for

  5. Safety and efficacy of ofatumumab, a fully human monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, in patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coiffier, Bertrand; Lepretre, Stéphane; Pedersen, Lars Møller

    2008-01-01

    Safety and efficacy of the fully human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, ofatumumab, was analyzed in a multicenter dose-escalating study including 33 patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Three cohorts of 3 (A), 3 (B), and 27 (C) patients received 4, once weekly, infusio...

  6. Antigenic modulation limits the effector cell mechanisms employed by type I anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Thomas R W; Roghanian, Ali; Oldham, Robert J; Carter, Matthew J; Cox, Kerry L; Mockridge, C Ian; French, Ruth R; Dahal, Lekh N; Duriez, Patrick J; Hargreaves, Philip G; Cragg, Mark S; Beers, Stephen A

    2015-03-19

    Following the success of rituximab, 2 other anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), ofatumumab and obinutuzumab, have entered clinical use. Ofatumumab has enhanced capacity for complement-dependent cytotoxicity, whereas obinutuzumab, a type II mAb, lacks the ability to redistribute into lipid rafts and is glycoengineered for augmented antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We previously showed that type I mAbs such as rituximab have a propensity to undergo enhanced antigenic modulation compared with type II. Here we assessed the key effector mechanisms affected, comparing type I and II antibodies of various isotypes in ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular-phagocytosis (ADCP) assays. Rituximab and ofatumumab depleted both normal and leukemic human CD20-expressing B cells in the mouse less effectively than glycoengineered and wild-type forms of obinutuzumab, particularly when human immunoglobulin G1 (hIgG1) mAbs were compared. In contrast to mouse IgG2a, hIgG1 mAbs were ineffective in ADCC assays with murine natural killer cells as effectors, whereas ADCP was equivalent for mouse IgG2a and hIgG1. However, rituximab's ability to elicit both ADCC and ADCP was reduced by antigenic modulation, whereas type II antibodies remained unaffected. These data demonstrate that ADCP and ADCC are impaired by antigenic modulation and that ADCP is the main effector function employed in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Cloning and molecular characterization of the cDNAs encoding the variable regions of an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanehbandi, Dariush; Majidi, Jafar; Kazemi, Tohid; Baradaran, Behzad; Aghebati-Maleki, Leili

    2017-01-01

    CD20-based targeting of B-cells in hematologic malignancies and autoimmune disorders is associated with outstanding clinical outcomes. Isolation and characterization of VH and VL cDNAs encoding the variable regions of the heavy and light chains of monoclonal antibodies (MAb) is necessary to produce next generation MAbs and their derivatives such as bispecific antibodies (bsAb) and single-chain variable fragments (scFv). This study was aimed at cloning and characterization of the VH and VL cDNAs from a hybridoma cell line producing an anti-CD20 MAb. VH and VL fragments were amplified, cloned and characterized. Furthermore, amino acid sequences of VH, VL and corresponding complementarity-determining regions (CDR) were determined and compared with those of four approved MAbs including Rituximab (RTX), Ibritumomab tiuxetan, Ofatumumab and GA101. The cloned VH and VL cDNAs were found to be functional and follow a consensus pattern. Amino acid sequences corresponding to the VH and VL fragments also indicated noticeable homologies to those of RTX and Ibritumomab. Furthermore, amino acid sequences of the relating CDRs had remarkable similarities to their counterparts in RTX and Ibritumomab. Successful recovery of VH and VL fragments encourages the development of novel CD20 targeting bsAbs, scFvs, antibody conjugates and T-cells armed with chimeric antigen receptors.

  8. Standardization of methodology to derivatization and radiolabeling of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody from bifunctional chelator DOTA-NHS-Ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massicano, Adriana V.F.; Akanji, Akinkunmi G.; Santos, Josefina S.; Pujatti, Priscilla B.; Couto, Renata M.; Massicano, Felipe; Araujo, Elaine Bortoleti de

    2009-01-01

    Lymphomas are cancers of the lymphatic system, being the most common the non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The Radioimmunotherapy (RIT), that increase the cytotoxic effect of monoclonal antibodies (mAb), therefore labeling these Mab with different radioisotopes. RIT combines the specificity of the antibody and the toxicity of the radionuclides. The mAb anti-CD20 is used for treatment of relapse or refractory NHL. The labeling of anti- CD20 with 177 Lu, requires a bifunctional chelating agent that is designed to make a 'connect bridge' between the mAb and the radionuclide. The incorporation of the chelating group in mAb structure is called derivatization. The aim of this work is to study the derivatization of anti-CD20 antibody with DOTA-NHS-ester chelating group and labeling parameters to produce 177 Lu-DOTA-Anti CD20. Five milligrams of anti-CD20 were purified by dialysis against phosphate buffer pH 8.0 and derivatized with DOTA-NHS-ester in 1:250, 1:500 and 1:1000 molar ratios. The reaction was conducted for 1 hour in gently mixing at room temperature and remained under refrigeration for 48 hours. The reaction mixture was purified in gel column Sephadex G-50 ; the aliquots that presented greater protein concentration, were mixed and concentrated. The purified antibody conjugated was added to 111-185MBq (3-5mCi) of 177 LuCl3 diluted in 0.4 M acetate buffer pH 5.5. Radiochemical purity was less than 95% in all the molar ratios, indicating necessity of the purification after the labeling. The mAb derivatized showed stable when stored for to 1 month to 4 deg C and 4 days at -20 deg C. (author)

  9. Evaluation of dry blood spot technique for quantification of an Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody drug in human blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong-Qing; Zhang, Yilu; Li, Connie; Li, Louis; Zhang, Kelley; Li, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the dried blood spot (DBS) technique in ELISA quantification of larger biomolecular drugs, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody drug was used as an example. A method for the quantification of the anti-CD20 drug in human DBS was developed and validated. The drug standard and quality control samples prepared in fresh human blood were spotted on DBS cards and then extracted. A luminescent ELISA was used for quantification of the drug from DBS samples. The assay range of the anti-CD20 drug standards in DBS was 100-2500ng/mL. The intra-assay precision (%CV) ranged from 0.4% to 10.1%, and the accuracy (%Recovery) ranged from 77.9% to 113.9%. The inter assay precision (%CV) ranged from 5.9% to 17.4%, and the accuracy ranged from 81.5% to 110.5%. The DBS samples diluted 500 and 50-fold yielded recovery of 88.7% and 90.7%, respectively. The preparation of DBS in higher and lower hematocrit (53% and 35%) conditions did not affect the recovery of the drug. Furthermore, the storage stability of the anti-CD20 drug on DBS cards was tested at various conditions. It was found that the anti-CD20 drug was stable for one week in DBS stored at room temperature. However, it was determined that the stability was compro]mised in DBS stored at high humidity, high temperature (55°C), and exposed to direct daylight for a week, as well as for samples stored at room temperature and high humidity conditions for a month. Stability did not change significantly in samples that underwent 3 freeze/thaw cycles. Our results demonstrated a successful use of DBS technique in ELISA quantification of an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody drug in human blood. The stability data provides information regarding sample storage and shipping for future clinical studies. It is, therefore, concluded that the DBS technique is applicable in the quantification of other large biomolecule drugs or biomarkers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [{sup 177}Lu]DOTA-anti-CD20: Labeling and pre-clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audicio, Paola F., E-mail: paudicio@cin.edu.u [Departamento de Radiofarmacia, Centro de Investigaciones Nucleares, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Mataojo 2055, 11400 Montevideo (Uruguay); Castellano, Gustavo, E-mail: gcas@famaf.unc.edu.a [FaMAF, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5016 Cordoba (Argentina); Tassano, Marcos R.; Rezzano, Maria E.; Fernandez, Marcelo [Departamento de Radiofarmacia, Centro de Investigaciones Nucleares, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Mataojo 2055, 11400 Montevideo (Uruguay); Riva, Eloisa [Clinica Hematologica ' Prof. Dra. L. Diaz' , Hospital de Clinicas. Av. Italia. sn, Montevideo (Uruguay); Robles, Ana; Cabral, Pablo; Balter, Henia; Oliver, Patricia [Departamento de Radiofarmacia, Centro de Investigaciones Nucleares, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Mataojo 2055, 11400 Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2011-07-15

    Anti-CD20 (Rituximab), a specific chimeric monoclonal antibody used in CD20-positive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, was conjugated to a bifunctional quelate (DOTA) and radiolabeled with {sup 177}Lu through a simple method. [{sup 177}Lu]-DOTA-anti-CD20 was obtained with a radiochemical purity higher than 97%, and showed good chemical and biological stability, maintaining its biospecificity to CD20 antigens. Monte Carlo simulation showed high doses deposited on a spheroid tumor mass model. This method seems to be an appropriate alternative for the production of [{sup 177}Lu]-DOTA-anti-CD20 as therapeutic radiopharmaceutical.

  11. The study of labeling with Iodine-131 of monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 used for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akanji, Akinkunmi Ganiyu

    2006-01-01

    Lymphomas are malignancies of the lymphatic system, described by Thomas Hodgkin in 1932. Traditionally, lymphomas are classified in two basic groups: Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patients with NHL were earlier treated with radiotherapy alone or in combination with immunotherapy using monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 (ex., Rituximab-Mabthera, Roche). However, Radioimmunotherapy is a new modality of treatment for patients with NHL, in which cytotoxic radiation from therapeutic radioisotopes is delivered to tumors through monoclonal antibodies. This study focused on labeling conditions of monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 (Rituximab-Mabthera, Roche) with iodine-131, by direct radioiodination method using Chloramine-T as oxidizing agent. Labeling parameters investigated were: Radiochemical purity (RP), method of purification, incubation time, antibody mass, oxidative agent mass, stability in vitro, stability in vivo, immunoreactivity and biological distribution performed in normal Swiss mouse. Product of high radiochemical purity was obtained with no notable difference between the methods applied. No clear evidence of direct influence of incubation time on radiochemical purity of the labeled antibody was observed. Whereas, a clear evidence of direct influence of activity on radiochemical purity of the labeled antibody was observed when antibody mass was varied. After purification, the labeled product presented radiochemical purity of approximately 100 %. Product of superior radiochemical yield was observed when standard condition of labeling was used. The labeled product presented variation in radiochemical purity using five different stabilizer conditions. The condition in which gentisic acid was combined with freeze appears more suitable and capable of minimizing autoradiolysis of the antibody labeled with high therapeutic activity of iodine-131. The labeled product presented low immunoreactivity when compared to the literature. Biological distribution in

  12. The study of labeling with iodine-131 of monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 used for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akanji, Akinkunmi Ganiyu

    2006-01-01

    Lymphomas are malignancies of the lymphatic system, described by Thomas Hodgkin in 1932. Traditionally, lymphomas are classified in two basic groups: Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patients with NHL were earlier treated with radiotherapy alone or in combination with immunotherapy using monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 (ex., Rituximab-Mabthera, Roche). However, Radioimmunotherapy is a new modality of treatment for patients with NHL, in which cytotoxic radiation from therapeutic radioisotopes is delivered to tumors through monoclonal antibodies. This study focused on labeling conditions of monoclonal anti-CD20 (ex., Rituximab-Mabthera, Roche) with iodine-131, by direct radioiodination method using Chloramine-T as oxidizing agent. Labeling parameters investigated were: Radiochemical purity (RP), method of purification, incubation time, antibody mass, oxidative agent mass, stability in vitro, immunoreactivity and biological distribution performed in normal Swiss mouse. Product of high radiochemical purity was obtained with no notable difference between the methods applied. No clear evidence of direct influence of incubation time on radiochemical purity of the labeled antibody was observed. Whereas, a clear evidence of direct influence of activity on radiochemical purity of the labeled antibody was varied. After purification the labeled product presented radiochemical purity of approximately 100 %. Product of superior radiochemical yield was observed when standard condition of labeling was used. The labeled product presented variation in radiochemical purity using five different stabilizer conditions. The condition in which gentisic acid combined with freeze appears more suitable and capable of minimizing autoradiolysis of the antibody labeled with freeze appears more suitable and capable of minimizing autoradiolysis of the antibody labeled with high therapeutic activity of iodine-131. The labeled product presented low immunoreactivity when compared to the

  13. Mass-Production and Characterization of Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody in Peritoneum of Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili Aghebati

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are important tools are used in basic research as well as, in diagnosis, imaging and treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, infections and cancers. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD20 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and lymphomas disorders. Methods: Hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD20 were administered into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously been primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After twelve days, approximately 7 ml ascetic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. Evaluation of mAb titration was assessed by ELISA method. In the present study, we describe a protocol for large scale production of MAbs. Results: We prepared monoclonal antibodies (mAbs with high specificity and sensitivity against human CD20 by hybridoma method and characterized them by ELISA. The subclass of antibody was IgG2a and its light chain was kappa. Ascetic fluid was purified by Protein-A Sepharose affinity chromatography and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with FITC and Immunofluorescence was done for confirming the specific binding. Conclusion: The conjugated monoclonal antibody could have application in diagnosis B-cell lymphomas, hairy cell leukemia, B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and melanoma cancer stem cells.

  14. Mass-Production and Characterization of Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody in Peritoneum of Balb/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sineh sepehr, Koushan; Baradaran, Behzad; Majidi, Jafar; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Aghebati, leili; Zare Shahneh, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are important tools are used in basic research as well as, in diagnosis, imaging and treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, infections and cancers. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD20 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and lymphomas disorders. Methods: Hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD20 were administered into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously been primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After twelve days, approximately 7 ml ascetic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. Evaluation of mAb titration was assessed by ELISA method. In the present study, we describe a protocol for large scale production of MAbs. Results: We prepared monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with high specificity and sensitivity against human CD20 by hybridoma method and characterized them by ELISA. The subclass of antibody was IgG2a and its light chain was kappa. Ascetic fluid was purified by Protein-A Sepharose affinity chromatography and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with FITC and Immunofluorescence was done for confirming the specific binding. Conclusion: The conjugated monoclonal antibody could have application in diagnosis B-cell lymphomas, hairy cell leukemia, B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and melanoma cancer stem cells. PMID:24312821

  15. High-dose myeloablative versus conventional low-dose radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) with the chimeric anti-CD20 antibody C2B8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, T.M.; Gotthardt, M.; Schipperm, M.L.; Gratz, S.; Behe, M.P.; Brittinger, G.; Woermann, B.; Becker, W.

    2002-01-01

    CD20 has been used as target molecule for low-dose as well as high-dose, myeloablative RIT of B-cell NHL. MCL is an especially aggressive, prognostically unfavorable form of B-cell NHL. The aim of this study was to investigate whether high-dose, myeloablative RIT with the 131 I-labeled chimeric anti-CD20 antibody C2B8 (rituxan, Mabthera, Roche) may be therapeutically more effective than conventional low-dose therapy in MCL. A total of twelve patients with chemorefractory or relapsed mantle cell lymphoma were studied so far (all of them having relapsed after high-dose chemotherapy, seven of them combined with 12 Gy TBI). A diagnostic-dosimetric study was performed with 10 mCi of 131 I-C2B8 at a protein dose of 2.5 mg/kg. In case of splenic pooling, the protein dose was increased until a more 'favorable' biodistribution was obtained. Therapy was performed with conventional (30-75 mCi; n=4) or myeloablative activities (261-515 mCi; n=8) of 131 I-C2B8 at the previously optimized protein dose, aiming at whole-body doses of ≤ 0.8 Gy (for low-dose RIT) or lung doses of ≤ 27 Gy (for high-dose RIT). Clinical follow-up was obtained for up to 42 months. Overall, in 11 patients the 2.5 mg/kg protein dose was used, whereas in one patient with marked splenomegaly, 10 mg/kg were necessary to overcome the splenic antigenic sink. In the high-dose patients, non-hematologic toxicity was restricted to mild to moderate nausea, fever, transient bilirubin or liver enzyme elevations. Despite thyroid blocking, 6/8 high-dose (in contrast to 0/4 low-dose) patients developed hypothyroidism, requiring thyroxine substitution at 6-18 months after RIT. The response rate in the low-dose arm was only 1(PR)/4, whereas 7/8 high-dose patients experienced complete and the remainder a partial remission. 6 high-dose patients are still in CR (one of them relapsed locally at 3 months, one systemically at 26 months after RIT), and 7 are still alive for up to 42+ months. In contrast to low-dose therapy

  16. Enhanced efficacy of gemcitabine in combination with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody against CD20+ non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines in vitro and in scid mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Fang

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite exciting new targeted therapeutics against non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, chemotherapy remains a cornerstone of therapy. While purine nucleoside analogs have significant activity in low grade NHL, the pyrimidine nucleoside analog gemcitabine has been less extensively studied, but has important activity. Use of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab in combination with chemotherapy for B-NHL is becoming prevalent in clinical practice, but has not been extensively studied in pre-clinical models. Methods We have tested the activity of gemcitabine ± rituximab in vitro and in scid/human NHL xenograft models. We used two t(14;18+, CD20+ follicular B cell NHL cell lines, DoHH2 a transformed NHL line and WSU-FSCCL isolated from pleural fluid of a patient with indolent NHL. Results Gemcitabine is cytotoxic to DoHH2 and WSU-FSCCL cells in vitro, and the IC50 is 2–3 fold lower in the presence of rituximab. Apoptosis is also enhanced in the presence of rituximab. Clearance of NHL cells from ascites in scid mice is prolonged by the combination, as compared with either agent alone. Most importantly, survival of scid mice bearing human NHL cells is significantly prolonged by the combination of gemcitabine + rituximab. Conclusion Based on our pre-clinical data showing prolonged survival of mice bearing human lymphoma cell line xenografts after treatment with gemcitabine + anti-CD20 antibody, this combination, expected to have non-overlapping toxicity profiles, should be explored in clinical trials.

  17. Increased T cell proliferative responses to islet antigens identify clinical responders to anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) therapy in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Kevan C; Pescovitz, Mark D; McGee, Paula; Krause-Steinrauf, Heidi; Spain, Lisa M; Bourcier, Kasia; Asare, Adam; Liu, Zhugong; Lachin, John M; Dosch, H Michael

    2011-08-15

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is believed to be due to the autoimmune destruction of β-cells by T lymphocytes, but a single course of rituximab, a monoclonal anti-CD20 B lymphocyte Ab, can attenuate C-peptide loss over the first year of disease. The effects of B cell depletion on disease-associated T cell responses have not been studied. We compare changes in lymphocyte subsets, T cell proliferative responses to disease-associated target Ags, and C-peptide levels of participants who did (responders) or did not (nonresponders) show signs of β-cell preservation 1 y after rituximab therapy in a placebo-controlled TrialNet trial. Rituximab decreased B lymphocyte levels after four weekly doses of mAb. T cell proliferative responses to diabetes-associated Ags were present at baseline in 75% of anti-CD20- and 82% of placebo-treated subjects and were not different over time. However, in rituximab-treated subjects with significant C-peptide preservation at 6 mo (58%), the proliferative responses to diabetes-associated total (p = 0.032), islet-specific (p = 0.048), and neuronal autoantigens (p = 0.005) increased over the 12-mo observation period. This relationship was not seen in placebo-treated patients. We conclude that in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, anti-B cell mAb causes increased proliferative responses to diabetes Ags and attenuated β-cell loss. The way in which these responses affect the disease course remains unknown.

  18. Radioimmunotherapy in refractory b-cell nonhodgkins lymphoma with I-131-labeled chimeric anti cd-20 c2b8 (I-131 rituximab): preliminary result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hye Jin; Park, Yeon Hee; Kim, Sung Eun and others

    2005-01-01

    Recently, the native chimeric human-mouse anti CD-20 antibody IDEC-C2B8 (Rituximab) has been widely applied in NHL. This ongoing phase study was to evaluate whether radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with I-131 rituximab is effective in refractory B-cell NHL. Inclusion criteria were as follows: B-cell NHL with relapsed or refractory to primary standard therapy, measurable disease, adequate hematologic, renal, and hepatic function, informed consent. The rituximab (Mabthera, Roach) was radiolabeled with iodine-131(I-131) using a modified chloramine T method with high radiochemical purity (95%) and preservation of immuno-reactivity. All patients received loading doses of unlabeled rituximab (median, 40 mg: range, 20∼70 mg) immediately prior to administration of therapeutic dose (51.4∼152.2 MBq/kg), and then underwent gamma camera scan. 11 patients were enrolled (4 low-grade B-cell NHL, 7 DLBCL, median age 63 years). Patients had received a median of three prior chemotherapy regimens. The objective response rate was 36.4% (1 CR, 3 PRs). These all responses were observed in low-grade B-cell NHL, except one with DLBCL. Adverse events were primarily hematologic toxicities; the incidence of grade 3/4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia was 27.3%, 45.5%, and 18.2%, respectively. The treatment-related mortality was observed in one patient, who had been previously treated with high-dose chemotherapy plus TBI with autologous stem cell transplantation. RIT with I-131 rituximab seems to be effective tolerable in refractory low-grade B-cell NHL, although modest activity in refractory DLBCL. Further studies to define the efficacy of I-131 rituximab in DLBCL are warranted

  19. Radioimmunotherapy in refractory b-cell nonhodgkins lymphoma with I-131-labeled chimeric anti cd-20 c2b8 (I-131 rituximab): preliminary result

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hye Jin; Park, Yeon Hee; Kim, Sung Eun and others [Korea University Medical School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Recently, the native chimeric human-mouse anti CD-20 antibody IDEC-C2B8 (Rituximab) has been widely applied in NHL. This ongoing phase study was to evaluate whether radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with I-131 rituximab is effective in refractory B-cell NHL. Inclusion criteria were as follows: B-cell NHL with relapsed or refractory to primary standard therapy, measurable disease, adequate hematologic, renal, and hepatic function, informed consent. The rituximab (Mabthera, Roach) was radiolabeled with iodine-131(I-131) using a modified chloramine T method with high radiochemical purity (95%) and preservation of immuno-reactivity. All patients received loading doses of unlabeled rituximab (median, 40 mg: range, 20{approx}70 mg) immediately prior to administration of therapeutic dose (51.4{approx}152.2 MBq/kg), and then underwent gamma camera scan. 11 patients were enrolled (4 low-grade B-cell NHL, 7 DLBCL, median age 63 years). Patients had received a median of three prior chemotherapy regimens. The objective response rate was 36.4% (1 CR, 3 PRs). These all responses were observed in low-grade B-cell NHL, except one with DLBCL. Adverse events were primarily hematologic toxicities; the incidence of grade 3/4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia was 27.3%, 45.5%, and 18.2%, respectively. The treatment-related mortality was observed in one patient, who had been previously treated with high-dose chemotherapy plus TBI with autologous stem cell transplantation. RIT with I-131 rituximab seems to be effective tolerable in refractory low-grade B-cell NHL, although modest activity in refractory DLBCL. Further studies to define the efficacy of I-131 rituximab in DLBCL are warranted.

  20. The study of conjugation of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody for labeling with metallic or lanthanides radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akanji, Akinkunmi Ganiyu

    2012-01-01

    Lymphomas are malignancies or cancers that start from the malign transformation of a lymphocyte in the lymphatic system. Generally, lymphomas start from the lymph nodes or from the agglomeration of the lymphatic tissues, organs like stomach, intestines, in some cases it can involve the bone marrow and the blood, it can also disseminate to other organs. Lymphomas are divided in two major categories: Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patient with NHL are generally treated with radiotherapy alone or combined with immunotherapy using monoclonal antibody rituximab (MabThera®). Currently, monoclonal antibodies (Acm) conjugated with bifunctional chelate agents and radiolabeled with metallic or lanthanides radionuclides are a treatment reality for patients with NHL by the principle of radioimmunotherapy (RIT). This study focused on the conditions of conjugation of Acm rituximab (MabThera®) with bifunctional chelating agents DOTA and DTPA. Various parameters were studied: method of Acm purification, conditions of Acm conjugation, the method for determination of number of chelate agent coupled to the Acm, method for purification of the conjugated antibody Acm, conditions of labeling of the conjugated antibody with lutetium-177, method of purification of the radiolabeled immuno conjugate, method of radiochemical purity (RP), specific binding in vitro Raji cells (Human Burkitt) and biological distribution performed in normal Balb-c mouse. The three methodologies employed in pre-purification of Acm (dialysis, size exclusion chromatograph and dial filtration) demonstrated to be efficient; they provided sample recovery exceeding 90%. However, the methodology of dial filtration presents minimal sample loss, and gave the final recovery of the sample in micro liters; thereby facilitating sample use in subsequent experiments. Numbers of chelators attached to the Acm molecule was proportional to the molar ratio studied. When we evaluated the influence of different

  1. B cell-targeted therapy with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in a mouse model of Graves' hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, I; Abiru, N; Kobayashi, M; Nakahara, M; Ichikawa, T; Eguchi, K; Nagayama, Y

    2011-03-01

    Graves' disease is a B cell-mediated and T cell-dependent autoimmune disease of the thyroid which is characterized by overproduction of thyroid hormones and thyroid enlargement by agonistic anti-thyrotrophin receptor (TSHR) autoantibody. In addition to antibody secretion, B cells have recently been recognized to function as antigen-presenting/immune-modulatory cells. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of B cell depletion by anti-mouse (m) CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) on Graves' hyperthyroidism in a mouse model involving repeated injection of adenovirus expressing TSHR A-subunit (Ad-TSHR289). We observe that a single injection of 250 µg/mouse anti-mCD20 mAb eliminated B cells efficiently from the periphery and spleen and to a lesser extent from the peritoneum for more than 3 weeks. B cell depletion before immunization suppressed an increase in serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels, TSHR-specific splenocyte secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ, anti-TSHR antibody production and development of hyperthyroidism. B cell depletion 2 weeks after the first immunization, a time-point at which T cells were primed but antibody production was not observed, was still effective at inhibiting antibody production and disease development without inhibiting splenocyte secretion of IFN-γ. By contrast, B cell depletion in hyperthyroid mice was therapeutically ineffective. Together, these data demonstrate that B cells are critical not only as antibody-producing cells but also as antigen-presenting/immune-modulatory cells in the early phase of the induction of experimental Graves' hyperthyroidism and, although therapeutically less effective, B cell depletion is highly efficient for preventing disease development. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for Immunology.

  2. B cell-targeted therapy with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in a mouse model of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, I; Abiru, N; Kobayashi, M; Nakahara, M; Ichikawa, T; Eguchi, K; Nagayama, Y

    2011-01-01

    Graves' disease is a B cell-mediated and T cell-dependent autoimmune disease of the thyroid which is characterized by overproduction of thyroid hormones and thyroid enlargement by agonistic anti-thyrotrophin receptor (TSHR) autoantibody. In addition to antibody secretion, B cells have recently been recognized to function as antigen-presenting/immune-modulatory cells. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of B cell depletion by anti-mouse (m) CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) on Graves' hyperthyroidism in a mouse model involving repeated injection of adenovirus expressing TSHR A-subunit (Ad-TSHR289). We observe that a single injection of 250 µg/mouse anti-mCD20 mAb eliminated B cells efficiently from the periphery and spleen and to a lesser extent from the peritoneum for more than 3 weeks. B cell depletion before immunization suppressed an increase in serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels, TSHR-specific splenocyte secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ, anti-TSHR antibody production and development of hyperthyroidism. B cell depletion 2 weeks after the first immunization, a time-point at which T cells were primed but antibody production was not observed, was still effective at inhibiting antibody production and disease development without inhibiting splenocyte secretion of IFN-γ. By contrast, B cell depletion in hyperthyroid mice was therapeutically ineffective. Together, these data demonstrate that B cells are critical not only as antibody-producing cells but also as antigen-presenting/immune-modulatory cells in the early phase of the induction of experimental Graves' hyperthyroidism and, although therapeutically less effective, B cell depletion is highly efficient for preventing disease development. PMID:21235532

  3. The challenge of treating hepatitis C virus-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis in the era of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and direct antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccatello, Dario; Sciascia, Savino; Rossi, Daniela; Solfietti, Laura; Fenoglio, Roberta; Menegatti, Elisa; Baldovino, Simone

    2017-06-20

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome (MC) is a systemic vasculitis involving kidneys, joints, skin, and peripheral nerves. While many autoimmune, lymphoproliferative, and neoplastic disorders have been associated with this disorder, hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to be the etiologic agent in the majority of patients. Therefore, clinical research has focused on anti-viral drugs and, more recently, on the new, highly potent Direct-acting Antiviral Agents (DAAs). These drugs assure sustained virologic response (SVR) rates >90%. Nevertheless, data on their efficacy in patients with HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis are disappointing, possibly due to the inability of the drugs to suppress the immune-mediated process once it has been triggered.Despite the potential risk of exacerbation of the infection, immunosuppression has traditionally been regarded as the first-line intervention in cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, especially if renal involvement is severe. Biologic agents have raised hopes for more manageable therapeutic approaches, and Rituximab (RTX), an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, is the most widely used biologic drug. It has proved to be safer than conventional immunosuppressants, thus substantially changing the natural history of HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis by providing long-term remission, especially with intensive regimens.The present review focuses on the new therapeutic opportunities offered by the combination of biological drugs, mainly Rituximab, with DAAs.

  4. The study of conjugation of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody for labeling with metallic or lanthanides radionuclides; Estudo de conjugacao do anticorpo anti-CD20 para marcacao com radionuclideos metalicos ou lantanideos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akanji, Akinkunmi Ganiyu

    2012-07-01

    Lymphomas are malignancies or cancers that start from the malign transformation of a lymphocyte in the lymphatic system. Generally, lymphomas start from the lymph nodes or from the agglomeration of the lymphatic tissues, organs like stomach, intestines, in some cases it can involve the bone marrow and the blood, it can also disseminate to other organs. Lymphomas are divided in two major categories: Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patient with NHL are generally treated with radiotherapy alone or combined with immunotherapy using monoclonal antibody rituximab (MabThera Registered-Sign ). Currently, monoclonal antibodies (Acm) conjugated with bifunctional chelate agents and radiolabeled with metallic or lanthanides radionuclides are a treatment reality for patients with NHL by the principle of radioimmunotherapy (RIT). This study focused on the conditions of conjugation of Acm rituximab (MabThera Registered-Sign ) with bifunctional chelating agents DOTA and DTPA. Various parameters were studied: method of Acm purification, conditions of Acm conjugation, the method for determination of number of chelate agent coupled to the Acm, method for purification of the conjugated antibody Acm, conditions of labeling of the conjugated antibody with lutetium-177, method of purification of the radiolabeled immuno conjugate, method of radiochemical purity (RP), specific binding in vitro Raji cells (Human Burkitt) and biological distribution performed in normal Balb-c mouse. The three methodologies employed in pre-purification of Acm (dialysis, size exclusion chromatograph and dial filtration) demonstrated to be efficient; they provided sample recovery exceeding 90%. However, the methodology of dial filtration presents minimal sample loss, and gave the final recovery of the sample in micro liters; thereby facilitating sample use in subsequent experiments. Numbers of chelators attached to the Acm molecule was proportional to the molar ratio studied. When we evaluated

  5. Ofatumumab, a human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with an inadequate response to one or more disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase I/II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Baslund, Bo; Rigby, William

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the safety and efficacy of ofatumumab, a novel human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb), in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) whose disease did not respond to > or = 1 disease-modifying antirheumatic drug....

  6. Dosimetric studies of anti-CD20 labeled with therapeutic radionuclides at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, G.; Dias, C.R.B.R.; Osso Junior, J.A., E-mail: gracielabarrio@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) makes use of monoclonal antibodies (MAb) labeled with alpha/beta radionuclides for therapeutical purposes, leading to tumor irradiation and destruction, preserving the normal organs on the radiation excess. The therapeutic activity to be injected in a specific patient is based on information obtained in dosimetric studies. Beta emitting radionuclides such as {sup 131}I, {sup 188}Re, {sup 90}Y, {sup 177}Lu and {sup 166}Ho are useful for the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Anti-CD20 (Rituximab) is a chimeric MAb directed against antigen surface CD20 on B-lymphocytes, used in non-Hodgkin lymphoma treatment (NHL). The association with beta radionuclides have shown greater therapeutic efficacy. Currently, two radiopharmaceuticals with Anti-CD20 for radioimmunotherapy have FDA approval for NHL treatment: {sup 131}I-AntiCD20 (Bexar) and {sup 90}Y-AntiCD20 (Zevalin). Techniques for the radiolabeling of {sup 188}Re-antiCD20 have been recently developed by IPEN-CNEN/SP in order to evaluate the clinical use of this radionuclide in particular. The use of {sup 188}Re (T{sub 1/2} 17h) produced by the decay of {sup 188}W (T{sub 1/2} 69d), from an {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator system, has represented an alternative to RIT. Beyond high energy beta emission for therapy, {sup 188}Re also emits gamma rays (155keV) suitable for image. The aim of this new project is to compare the labeling of anti-CD20 with {sup 188}Re with the same MAb labeled with {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 90}Y and even {sup 99m}Tc. The first step in this project is the review of the published data available concerning the labeling of this MAb with different radionuclides, along with data obtained at IPEN, taking into account labeling procedures, labeling yields, reaction time, level and kind of impurities and biodistribution studies. The pharmacokinetic code will be developed in Visual Studio.NET platform through VB.NET and C{sup ++} for biodistribution and dosimetric

  7. Target Antigen Density Governs the Efficacy of Anti-CD20-CD28-CD3 zeta Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Modified Effector CD8(+) T Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watanabe, Keisuke; Terakura, Seitaro; Martens, Anton C.; van Meerten, Tom; Uchiyama, Susumu; Imai, Misa; Sakemura, Reona; Goto, Tatsunori; Hanajiri, Ryo; Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Tomita, Akihiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Nishida, Tetsuya; Naoe, Tomoki; Murata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of chimeric Ag receptor (CAR)-transduced T (CAR-T) cells has been attributed to supraphysiological signaling through CARs. Second-and later-generation CARs simultaneously transmit costimulatory signals with CD3 zeta signals upon ligation, but may lead to severe adverse effects

  8. Development of a lyophilized formulation for preparing the radiopharmaceutical 177Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano E, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    The radiolabeled proteins are molecules of interest in nuclear medicine for their diagnostic and therapeutic application in cancer. Antibodies, such as chimeric monoclonal antibody Anti-CD20 rituximab, have established themselves as suitable vectors of radionuclides (e.g. 177 Lu) , introducing high affinity by the surface antigens over- expressed and widely distributed in cells involved in certain diseases. The aim of this work was to design, optimize and document the production process of radiopharmaceutical 177 Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 for sanitary registration request to the Comision Federal para la Proteccion contra Riesgos Sanitarios (COFEPRIS). First, a raw material analysis using the Ft-Mir technique and gamma spectrometry was performed. Then, was carried out the development of the lyophilized formulation for the preparation of 177 Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20, in which an ANOVA was performed where the dependent variable was the radiochemical purity. The optimal pharmaceutical formulation was: 5 mg DOTA-CD20 and 80 mg Mannitol to be reconstituted with 1 m L of acetate buffer 0.25 M, ph 7, with an incubation time of 15 min at 37 degrees Celsius in a dry bath. Once completed the development of the lyophilized formulation, we proceeded to the optimization of the production process, development and validation of the analytical method. Three batches were prepared under protocols of Good Manufacturing Practice, which met pre-established specifications as sterile and endotoxin-free of bacterial formulations, with greater that 95% of radiochemical purity. Currently, is conducting the study of shelf stability. Upon completion of the stability studies, the legal record of 177 Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 will be integrated with documented evidence of the quality and stability of the formulation of this radiopharmaceutical. (Author)

  9. First clinical use of ofatumumab, a novel fully human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagenbeek, Anton; Gadeberg, Ole Vestergaard; Johnson, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Ofatumumab is a unique monoclonal antibody that targets a distinct small loop epitope on the CD20 molecule. Preclinical data show that ofatumumab is active against B-cell lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with low CD20-antigen density and high expression of complement inhibitory molecules...

  10. A phase I study of PRO131921, a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in patients with relapsed/refractory CD20+ indolent NHL: correlation between clinical responses and AUC pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casulo, Carla; Vose, Julie M; Ho, William Y; Kahl, Brad; Brunvand, Mark; Goy, Andre; Kasamon, Yvette; Cheson, Bruce; Friedberg, Jonathan W

    2014-09-01

    PRO131921 is a third-generation, humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with increased antibody-dependent cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity compared to rituximab. In this phase I study, PRO131921 was administered as a single agent to patients with CD20+, relapsed or refractory, indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) who had been treated with a prior rituximab-containing regimen. The primary aim of this study was safety and tolerability of PRO131921. The secondary aim of the study, and focus of this report, was to determine the pharmacokinetics (PK) profile of PRO131921 and establish a correlation between drug exposure and clinical efficacy. Patients were treated with PRO131921 by intravenous infusion weekly for 4 weeks and the dose was escalated based on safety in a 3+3 design. Twenty-four patients were treated with PRO131921 at doses from 25mg/m(2) to 800 mg/m(2). Analysis of PK data demonstrated a correlation between higher normalized drug exposure (normalized AUC) and tumor shrinkage (p = .0035). Also, normalized AUC levels were higher among responders and subjects displaying tumor shrinkage versus subjects progressing or showing no regression (p = 0.030). In conclusion, PRO131921 demonstrated clinical activity in rituximab-relapsed and refractory indolent NHL patients. The observation that higher normalized AUC may be associated with improved clinical responses has potential implications in future trials of monoclonal antibody-based therapies, and emphasizes the importance of early PK studies to optimize antibody efficacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Radioimmunotherapy of indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with Yttrium-90 labeled anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy does not preclude subsequent chemotherapy or autologous hematologic stem cell transplantation therapy in most patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiseman, G.A.; Witzig, T.E.; Ansell, S.M.; Ristow, K.M.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Yttrium-90 (Y-90) labeled anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (ibritumomab tiuxetan or Zevalin TM ) is a novel therapy for patients with relapsed CD20+ B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Patients treated with Zevalin radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are limited from higher doses due to transient and reversible platelet and neutrophil suppression. Patients with indolent NHL who relapse or are refractory to chemotherapy have a 70-80% overall response rate and a 20-30% complete response rate when treated with Zevalin RIT. Therefore additional treatment is required in a minority of patients shortly after Zevalin therapy and in many others at relapse. Relapsed patients are generally treated with chemotherapy alone or high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous transplantation. We wanted to evaluate the ability of patients to tolerate subsequent therapy given at relapse following Zevalin RIT. Methods: We had 58 patients who relapsed after receiving Zevalin RIT and later received additional therapy. The clinical records and lab results were reviewed and compared with a matched control group of patients treated prior to Zevalin availability who received chemotherapy without prior Zevalin RIT. Results: The toxicity in 58 patients treated with Zevalin RIT and subsequent therapy was not significantly different from the control group who did not receive Zevalin RIT. Patients had a median of two subsequent therapies (range, 1-7) after Zevalin. Twenty eight percent required blood cell growth factor support with subsequent chemotherapy and 2 patients required reductions from the standard chemotherapy doses due to prolonged myelosuppression. Eight patients subsequently had successful autologous hematologic stem cell transplant with cells collected after Zevalin. Thirteen of the 58 patients (28%) treated with standard dose chemotherapy were hospitalized for neutropenic fever or thrombocytopenia. Conclusions: Chemotherapy or high dose chemotherapy with autologous transplantation

  12. Development of a lyophilized formulation for preparing the radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20; Desarrollo de una formulacion liofilizada para la preparacion del radiofarmaco {sup 177}-DOTA-Anti-CD20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano E, L. A.

    2015-07-01

    The radiolabeled proteins are molecules of interest in nuclear medicine for their diagnostic and therapeutic application in cancer. Antibodies, such as chimeric monoclonal antibody Anti-CD20 rituximab, have established themselves as suitable vectors of radionuclides (e.g. {sup 177}Lu) , introducing high affinity by the surface antigens over- expressed and widely distributed in cells involved in certain diseases. The aim of this work was to design, optimize and document the production process of radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 for sanitary registration request to the Comision Federal para la Proteccion contra Riesgos Sanitarios (COFEPRIS). First, a raw material analysis using the Ft-Mir technique and gamma spectrometry was performed. Then, was carried out the development of the lyophilized formulation for the preparation of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20, in which an ANOVA was performed where the dependent variable was the radiochemical purity. The optimal pharmaceutical formulation was: 5 mg DOTA-CD20 and 80 mg Mannitol to be reconstituted with 1 m L of acetate buffer 0.25 M, ph 7, with an incubation time of 15 min at 37 degrees Celsius in a dry bath. Once completed the development of the lyophilized formulation, we proceeded to the optimization of the production process, development and validation of the analytical method. Three batches were prepared under protocols of Good Manufacturing Practice, which met pre-established specifications as sterile and endotoxin-free of bacterial formulations, with greater that 95% of radiochemical purity. Currently, is conducting the study of shelf stability. Upon completion of the stability studies, the legal record of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 will be integrated with documented evidence of the quality and stability of the formulation of this radiopharmaceutical. (Author)

  13. Change of CD20 Expression in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated with Rituximab, an Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody: A Study of the Osaka Lymphoma Study Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Wada

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Change of CD20 expression was examined in cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. CD20 expression after treatment with anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab, Rx for DLBCL was examined in 23 cases who received serial biopsy by immunohistochemistry (IHC and flow cytometry (FCM. CD20– by IHC and/or FCM was defined as CD20–. Four cases were CD20– at initial biopsy but became CD20+ after chemotherapy with Rx (CH-R (group A. Recurrent tumors in three group A cases became resistant to CH-R. Initial and recurrent tumors were CD20+ before and after CH-R in 17 cases (group B. Tumors before CH-R were CD20– in two cases (group C and continued to be CD20– in one and turned CD20+ in the other with survival time after the relapse of 8 and 23 months, respectively. Evaluation of CD20 expression with immunohistochemical and flow cytometric methods is used for the prediction of responsiveness of relapsed DLBCL for CH-R.

  14. Characterization of a Novel Humanized Anti-CD20 Antibody with Potent Anti-Tumor Activity against Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rituximab, a mouse Fab and human Fc chimeric antibody, has been widely used to treat Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL. However, only 48% of patients respond to the treatment and complete response rate is below 10%. Also, immunogenicity was reported in 17-20% patients receiving the treatment, making it unsuitable for long term diseases such as autoimmune disorders. It has been a hot research field to “humanize” rituximab toward improved efficacy and reduced immunogenicity. Methods: In this study, an advanced antibody humanization technology was applied to the sequence of the anti-CD20 antibody 2B8, its sequence of which was based on the original murine monoclonal antibody of rituximab in Roche. The complementarity-determining regions (CDRs of the humanized antibodies were further optimized through computer-aided molecular dock. Results: Five novel humanized anti-CD20 antibodies 1-5(1635, 1534, 3637, 1634 and 1536 were generated and their immunogenicity was significantly decreased when compared to rituximab. The novel humanized anti-CD20 antibodies 1-5 retained the binding activity of their murine counterpart, as demonstrated by the fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis (FACS. When compared to rituximab, the humanized antibodies still have the similar properties on both complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC. Furthermore, its anti-tumor efficacy in xenograft model is comparable to that of rituximab. Conclusion: The humanized anti-CD20 antibodies 1-5 have lower immunogenicity than rituximab. And at the same time, they still retain the anti-tumor effect both in vitro and vivo.

  15. Radiolabeling of anti-CD20 with Re0-188: liquid kit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Carla Roberta; Osso Junior, Joao Alberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: carlarobertab@yahoo.com.br; jaosso@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Radioimmunotherapy uses the targeting features of monoclonal antibody to deliver radiation from an attached radionuclide. The radionuclide {sup 188}Re is currently produced from the father nuclide {sup 188}W through a transportable generator system. Because of its easy availability and suitable nuclear properties (E{sub {beta}}{sub MAX} =2.1 MeV, t{sub 1/2}=16.9 h, E{sub {gamma}}=155 keV), this radionuclide is considered an attractive candidate for application as therapeutic agents and could be conveniently utilized for imaging and dosimetric purposes. The objective of this work is the optimization of radiolabeling of anti-CD20 with {sup 188}Re using a liquid formulation. Anti-CD20 was reduced by incubation with 2-ME and purified over a PD-10 column. The number of resulting free SH was assayed with Ellman's reagent. Optimization of radiolabeling was achieved by varying parameters: antibody mass, reducing agent, reaction time and {sup 188}Re volume in the liquid kit. Radiochemical purity of {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 was evaluated. An average of 12 SH groups per mol in the reductions was found. The best labeling efficiency (> 93%) was achieved in the following conditions: 1 mg anti-CD20; 82.8 mg sodium tartrate; 1 mg SnCl{sub 2}; 0.25 mg gentisic acid, 1 mL {sup 188}Re and reaction time of 1 hour at room temperature. (author)

  16. Radiolabeling of anti-CD20 with Re0-188: liquid kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Carla Roberta; Osso Junior, Joao Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy uses the targeting features of monoclonal antibody to deliver radiation from an attached radionuclide. The radionuclide 188 Re is currently produced from the father nuclide 188 W through a transportable generator system. Because of its easy availability and suitable nuclear properties (E βMAX =2.1 MeV, t 1/2 =16.9 h, E γ =155 keV), this radionuclide is considered an attractive candidate for application as therapeutic agents and could be conveniently utilized for imaging and dosimetric purposes. The objective of this work is the optimization of radiolabeling of anti-CD20 with 188 Re using a liquid formulation. Anti-CD20 was reduced by incubation with 2-ME and purified over a PD-10 column. The number of resulting free SH was assayed with Ellman's reagent. Optimization of radiolabeling was achieved by varying parameters: antibody mass, reducing agent, reaction time and 188 Re volume in the liquid kit. Radiochemical purity of 188 Re-anti-CD20 was evaluated. An average of 12 SH groups per mol in the reductions was found. The best labeling efficiency (> 93%) was achieved in the following conditions: 1 mg anti-CD20; 82.8 mg sodium tartrate; 1 mg SnCl 2 ; 0.25 mg gentisic acid, 1 mL 188 Re and reaction time of 1 hour at room temperature. (author)

  17. Enhanced antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis by chimeric monoclonal antibodies with tandemly repeated Fc domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hiroaki; Ootsubo, Michiko; Fukazawa, Mizuki; Motoi, Sotaro; Konakahara, Shu; Masuho, Yasuhiko

    2011-04-01

    We previously reported that chimeric monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with tandemly repeated Fc domains, which were developed by introducing tandem repeats of Fc domains downstream of 2 Fab domains, augmented binding avidities for all Fcγ receptors, resulting in enhanced antibody (Ab)-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Here we investigated regarding Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) mediated by these chimeric mAbs, which is considered one of the most important mechanisms that kills tumor cells, using two-color flow cytometric methods. ADCP mediated by T3-Ab, a chimeric mAb with 3 tandemly repeated Fc domains, was 5 times more potent than that by native anti-CD20 M-Ab (M-Ab hereafter). Furthermore, T3-Ab-mediated ADCP was resistant to competitive inhibition by intravenous Ig (IVIG), although M-Ab-mediated ADCP decreased in the presence of IVIG. An Fcγ receptor-blocking study demonstrated that T3-Ab mediated ADCP via both FcγRIA and FcγRIIA, whereas M-Ab mediated ADCP exclusively via FcγRIA. These results suggest that chimeric mAbs with tandemly repeated Fc domains enhance ADCP as well as ADCC, and that Fc multimerization may significantly enhance the efficacy of therapeutic Abs. Copyright © 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Interactions between ibrutinib and anti-CD20 antibodies; competing effects on the outcome of combination therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarzynski, Martin; Niemann, Carsten U; Lee, Yuh Shan; Martyr, Sabrina; Maric, Irina; Salem, Dalia; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Marti, Gerald E; Calvo, Katherine R; Yuan, Constance; Valdez, Janet; Soto, Susan; Farooqui, Mohammed Z.H.; Herman, Sarah E.M.; Wiestner, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clinical trials of ibrutinib combined with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) report encouraging results. Paradoxically, in pre-clinical studies in vitro ibrutinib was reported to decrease CD20 expression and inhibits cellular effector mechanisms. We therefore set out to investigate effects of in vivo ibrutinib treatment that could explain this paradox. Experimental Design Patients received single agent ibrutinib (420mg daily) on an investigator-initiated phase 2 trial. Serial blood samples were collected pre-treatment and during treatment for ex vivo functional assays to examine the effects on CLL cell susceptibility to anti-CD20 mAbs. Results We demonstrate that CD20 expression on ibrutinib was rapidly and persistently down-regulated (median reduction 74%, day 28, Pibrutinib were less susceptible to anti-CD20 mAb-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity than pre-treatment cells (median reduction 75%, Pibrutinib, providing a likely mechanism for the preserved C3d opsonization. Additionally, ibrutinib significantly inhibited trogocytosis, a major contributor to antigen loss and tumor escape during mAb therapy. Conclusions Our data indicate that ibrutinib promotes both positive and negative interactions with anti-CD20 mAbs, suggesting that successfully harnessing maximal anti-tumor effects of such combinations requires further investigation. PMID:26283682

  19. Interactions between Ibrutinib and Anti-CD20 Antibodies: Competing Effects on the Outcome of Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarzynski, Martin; Niemann, Carsten U; Lee, Yuh Shan; Martyr, Sabrina; Maric, Irina; Salem, Dalia; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Marti, Gerald E; Calvo, Katherine R; Yuan, Constance; Valdez, Janet; Soto, Susan; Farooqui, Mohammed Z H; Herman, Sarah E M; Wiestner, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials of ibrutinib combined with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) report encouraging results. Paradoxically, in preclinical studies, in vitro ibrutinib was reported to decrease CD20 expression and inhibit cellular effector mechanisms. We therefore set out to investigate effects of in vivo ibrutinib treatment that could explain this paradox. Patients received single-agent ibrutinib (420 mg daily) on an investigator-initiated phase II trial. Serial blood samples were collected pretreatment and during treatment for ex vivo functional assays to examine the effects on CLL cell susceptibility to anti-CD20 mAbs. We demonstrate that CD20 expression on ibrutinib was rapidly and persistently downregulated (median reduction 74%, day 28, P ibrutinib were less susceptible to anti-CD20 mAb-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity than pretreatment cells (median reduction 75%, P ibrutinib, providing a likely mechanism for the preserved C3d opsonization. In addition, ibrutinib significantly inhibited trogocytosis, a major contributor to antigen loss and tumor escape during mAb therapy. Our data indicate that ibrutinib promotes both positive and negative interactions with anti-CD20 mAbs, suggesting that successfully harnessing maximal antitumor effects of such combinations requires further investigation. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Radiolabeling and Preclinical Evaluation of 131I-anti-CD20 for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kullaprawittaya, Usa; Khongpetch, Pranom; Ngamprayad, Tippanan; Nuanchuen, Suphatphong

    2007-08-01

    Full text: In this study, a monoclonal anti-CD20 was developed for radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma by reacting anti-CD20 with iodine-131 using iodogen procedure. It was found that radiochemical yield was > 95 % independently of incubation time and the antibody could be conjugated with iodine-131 up to 10 mCi/mg. The radiolabeled antibody exhibited excellent retention of immunoreactivity with radio incorporations >95% for 6 hr at 4 o C. In vitro stability tests showed minimal loss of iodine-131 from the conjugate in the presence of cysteine and in human serum at 37 o C. Biodistribution study in normal ICR mice showed higher uptake by the liver, kidney and intestines but lower thyroid uptake compared to 131 I -MIBG. Biodistribution studies confirmed the in vitro stability of 131 I -anti-CD20. In particular, excellent in vivo retention of iodine-131 was demonstrated by lower thyroid accumulation over 48 hr. A favorable biological distribution of 131 I -anti-CD20 suggests this radiopharmaceutical may be effectively used in the therapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

  1. Preparation of the radiopharmaceutical 131I-Anti-CD20 for the treatment of lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantoja H, I.E.

    2004-01-01

    At the present time they are considered to the lymphomas like a problem of first magnitude since has happened it is necessary to be the fifth cancer cause in the world. Different treatments focused to the lymphoma like the chemotherapy and the radiotherapy, have been employees to counteract the No-Hodgkin lymphoma, without these they don't exclude the healthy tissue of the toxicity. It is for it that is taking a new direction with the employment of the directed radioimmunotherapy since this it allows to kill wicked cells selectively with radiation dose joined to the apoptosis and cytotoxicity induced by the own one bio molecule. The radioimmunotherapy with radiolabelled antibodies directed to the surface antigen CD20 represents a new modality for the treatment of No-Hodgkin lymphoma and potentially other illnesses. In this work the parameters of optimization are presented for the preparation, control of quality and evaluation of the stability in vitro and in vivo of the monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 labelled with 131 I for the treatment of No-Hodgkin lymphoma. The anti-CD20 labelled by the chloramine-T method with high radiochemical purity (>98%), it is stable in solution for but of a half life of the radionuclide (8.04 days) The 131 I-anti-CD20 doesn't present dehalogenation in vitro (human serum) during 24 h of incubation at 37 C. According to the tests carried out to establish the immunoreactivity, a percentage of union to cells was obtained (B lymphocytes) bigger to 30%. The biodistribution in mice balb/c one hour after their administration, it shows that there is not high reception in mucous neither kidneys, what indicates that the complex is stable in vivo. In conclusion, the radiopharmaceutical 131 I-anti-CD20 was obtained in sterile injectable solution and free of pyrogens with a radiochemical purity bigger to 98% and a specific activity of 296 MBq. The radiolabelled molecule maintains its biological recognition for the receiving CD20 highly expressed in

  2. Dosimetry and microdosimetry of 188 Re-anti-CD20 and 131 I-anti-CD20 for the treatment of No Hodgkin lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres G, E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to prepare 131 I-anti-CD20 and 188 Re-anti-CD20 and to estimate the radiation absorbed dose at macro- and micro- level during a NHL treatment. The work was divided in 4 general objectives: 1) preparation of 131 I-anti-CD20 and 188 Re-anti-CD20, 2) application in patients to obtain biokinetic parameters and estimate the organ absorbed doses 3) estimation of the cellular dosimetry using the MIRD methodology and the MCNP4C2 code and 4) estimation of the cellular microdosimetry using the NOREC code. 188 Re-anti-CD20 was prepared by a direct labelling method using sodium tartrate as a weak ligand. To evaluate the biological recognition a comparative study of the in vitro binding of 188 Re-anti-CD20, 125 I-anti-CD20 (positive control) and 188 Re-anti-CEA (negative control) to normal B Iymphocytes was performed. Biodistribution studies in normal mice were accomplished to assess the in vivo Re-anti-CD20 complex stability. The binding of ' Re-anti-CD20 to cells was in the same range as '251-anti-CD20 (>80%) considered as the positive control. 188 Re-anti-CD20 and '3'1-anti-CD20 prepared were administered in patients diagnosed with B cell NHL at the Centro Medico Siglo XXI (IMSS). The protocol was approved by the hospital's Medical Ethics Committee. AJI patients signed a consent form after receiving detailed information on the aims of the study. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM software to calculate the radiation absorbed dose to organs and whole body. Dosimetric studies indicate that after administration of 6.4 GBq and 4.87 to 8.75 GBq of '3'1-anti-CD20 and 188 Re-anti-CD20 respectively, the absorbed dose to total body would be 0.75 Gy which corresponds to the recommended dose for NHL therapies. The calculated organ absorbed doses indicate that 188 Re-anti-CD20 may be used in radioimmunotherapy without the risk of toxicity to red marrow or healthy organs. The absorbed dose (D) into cellular nucleus was calculated by two

  3. Dosimetry and microdosimetry of {sup 188} Re-anti-CD20 and {sup 131} I-anti-CD20 for the treatment of No Hodgkin lymphomas; Dosimetria y microdosimetria del {sup 188} Re-anti-CD20 y {sup 131} I-anti-CD20 para el tratamiento de linfomas No Hodgkin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres G, E

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to prepare {sup 131}I-anti-CD20 and {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 and to estimate the radiation absorbed dose at macro- and micro- level during a NHL treatment. The work was divided in 4 general objectives: 1) preparation of {sup 131}I-anti-CD20 and {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20, 2) application in patients to obtain biokinetic parameters and estimate the organ absorbed doses 3) estimation of the cellular dosimetry using the MIRD methodology and the MCNP4C2 code and 4) estimation of the cellular microdosimetry using the NOREC code. {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 was prepared by a direct labelling method using sodium tartrate as a weak ligand. To evaluate the biological recognition a comparative study of the in vitro binding of {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20, {sup 125}I-anti-CD20 (positive control) and {sup 188}Re-anti-CEA (negative control) to normal B Iymphocytes was performed. Biodistribution studies in normal mice were accomplished to assess the in vivo Re-anti-CD20 complex stability. The binding of ' Re-anti-CD20 to cells was in the same range as '251-anti-CD20 (>80%) considered as the positive control. {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 and '3'1-anti-CD20 prepared were administered in patients diagnosed with B cell NHL at the Centro Medico Siglo XXI (IMSS). The protocol was approved by the hospital's Medical Ethics Committee. AJI patients signed a consent form after receiving detailed information on the aims of the study. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM software to calculate the radiation absorbed dose to organs and whole body. Dosimetric studies indicate that after administration of 6.4 GBq and 4.87 to 8.75 GBq of '3'1-anti-CD20 and {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 respectively, the absorbed dose to total body would be 0.75 Gy which corresponds to the recommended dose for NHL therapies. The calculated organ absorbed doses indicate that {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 may be used in radioimmunotherapy without the risk of toxicity to red marrow or

  4. Dosimetry and microdosimetry of {sup 188} Re-anti-CD20 and {sup 131} I-anti-CD20 for the treatment of No Hodgkin lymphomas; Dosimetria y microdosimetria del {sup 188} Re-anti-CD20 y {sup 131} I-anti-CD20 para el tratamiento de linfomas No Hodgkin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres G, E

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to prepare {sup 131}I-anti-CD20 and {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 and to estimate the radiation absorbed dose at macro- and micro- level during a NHL treatment. The work was divided in 4 general objectives: 1) preparation of {sup 131}I-anti-CD20 and {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20, 2) application in patients to obtain biokinetic parameters and estimate the organ absorbed doses 3) estimation of the cellular dosimetry using the MIRD methodology and the MCNP4C2 code and 4) estimation of the cellular microdosimetry using the NOREC code. {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 was prepared by a direct labelling method using sodium tartrate as a weak ligand. To evaluate the biological recognition a comparative study of the in vitro binding of {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20, {sup 125}I-anti-CD20 (positive control) and {sup 188}Re-anti-CEA (negative control) to normal B Iymphocytes was performed. Biodistribution studies in normal mice were accomplished to assess the in vivo Re-anti-CD20 complex stability. The binding of ' Re-anti-CD20 to cells was in the same range as '251-anti-CD20 (>80%) considered as the positive control. {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 and '3'1-anti-CD20 prepared were administered in patients diagnosed with B cell NHL at the Centro Medico Siglo XXI (IMSS). The protocol was approved by the hospital's Medical Ethics Committee. AJI patients signed a consent form after receiving detailed information on the aims of the study. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM software to calculate the radiation absorbed dose to organs and whole body. Dosimetric studies indicate that after administration of 6.4 GBq and 4.87 to 8.75 GBq of '3'1-anti-CD20 and {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 respectively, the absorbed dose to total body would be 0.75 Gy which corresponds to the recommended dose for NHL therapies. The calculated organ absorbed doses indicate that {sup 188}Re-anti-CD20 may be used in radioimmunotherapy without the risk of toxicity to red marrow or healthy organs. The absorbed dose

  5. Sensitive Detection of the Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity of Anti-CD20 Antibodies and Its Impairment by B-Cell Receptor Pathway Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floyd Hassenrück

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs rituximab and obinutuzumab against the cell line Raji and isolated CLL cells and its potential impairment by kinase inhibitors (KI was determined via lactate dehydrogenase release or calcein retention, respectively, using genetically modified NK92 cells expressing CD16-176V as effector cells. Compared to peripheral blood mononuclear cells, recombinant effector cell lines showed substantial alloreactivity-related cytotoxicity without addition of mAbs but afforded determination of ADCC with reduced interassay variability. The cytotoxicity owing to alloreactivity was less susceptible to interference by KI than the ADCC of anti-CD20 mAbs, which was markedly diminished by ibrutinib, but not by idelalisib. Compared to rituximab, the ADCC of obinutuzumab against primary CLL cells showed approximately 30% higher efficacy and less interference with KI. Irreversible BTK inhibitors at a clinically relevant concentration of 1 μM only weakly impaired the ADCC of anti-CD20 mAbs, with less influence in combinations with obinutuzumab than with rituximab and by acalabrutinib than by ibrutinib or tirabrutinib. In summary, NK cell line-based assays permitted the sensitive detection of ADCC of therapeutic anti-CD20 mAbs against CLL cells and of the interference of KI with this important killing mechanism.

  6. Radiolabeling of anti-CD20 with Re-188 for treatment of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: radiochemical control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, C.R.; Osso Junior, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) uses target-specific monoclonal antibodies or fragments labeled with a radioactive isotope to combine humoral and radiolytic functions and has the advantage of targeting not only the cell to which the antibody is bound but also the surrounding tumor cells and microenvironment. The most successful clinical studies of RIT in patients with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) have targeted CD20+ Bcell tumors. Antibody therapy directed against the CD20 antigen on the surface of B-cells is considered one of the first successful target-specific therapies in oncology. The radionuclide rhenium-188 ( 188 Re) is currently produced from the father nuclide 188 W through a transportable generator system. Because of its easy availability and suitable nuclear properties (E βMAX = 2.1 MeV, t1/2 = 16.9 h, E γ = 155 keV), this radionuclide is considered an attractive candidate for application as therapeutic agent and could be conveniently utilized for imaging and dosimetric purposes. The objective of this work is the optimization of direct radiolabeling method of anti-CD20 with 188 Re using a liquid formulation. Anti-CD20 was reduced by incubation with 2-mercaptoethanol at room temperature. The number of resulting free sulphydryl groups was assayed with Ellman's reagent. Optimization of radiolabeling was achieved by varying parameters: antibody mass, reducing agent mass, tartrate mass, stability and reaction time, 188 Re volume and activity. Radiochemical purity of 188 Re-anti-CD20 was evaluated using instant thin layer chromatography-silica gel (ITLC-SG). Quality control methods for evaluation of radiochemical purity showed good labeling yield of the antibody but further studies will be carried out in order to improve the labeling yields and consequently the specific activity of the product. (author)

  7. Preparation of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 131}I-Anti-CD20 for the treatment of lymphomas; Preparacion del radiofarmaco {sup 131}I-Anti-CD20 para el tratamiento de linfomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja H, I.E

    2004-07-01

    At the present time they are considered to the lymphomas like a problem of first magnitude since has happened it is necessary to be the fifth cancer cause in the world. Different treatments focused to the lymphoma like the chemotherapy and the radiotherapy, have been employees to counteract the No-Hodgkin lymphoma, without these they don't exclude the healthy tissue of the toxicity. It is for it that is taking a new direction with the employment of the directed radioimmunotherapy since this it allows to kill wicked cells selectively with radiation dose joined to the apoptosis and cytotoxicity induced by the own one bio molecule. The radioimmunotherapy with radiolabelled antibodies directed to the surface antigen CD20 represents a new modality for the treatment of No-Hodgkin lymphoma and potentially other illnesses. In this work the parameters of optimization are presented for the preparation, control of quality and evaluation of the stability in vitro and in vivo of the monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 labelled with {sup 131} I for the treatment of No-Hodgkin lymphoma. The anti-CD20 labelled by the chloramine-T method with high radiochemical purity (>98%), it is stable in solution for but of a half life of the radionuclide (8.04 days) The {sup 131} I-anti-CD20 doesn't present dehalogenation in vitro (human serum) during 24 h of incubation at 37 C. According to the tests carried out to establish the immunoreactivity, a percentage of union to cells was obtained (B lymphocytes) bigger to 30%. The biodistribution in mice balb/c one hour after their administration, it shows that there is not high reception in mucous neither kidneys, what indicates that the complex is stable in vivo. In conclusion, the radiopharmaceutical {sup 131} I-anti-CD20 was obtained in sterile injectable solution and free of pyrogens with a radiochemical purity bigger to 98% and a specific activity of 296 MBq. The radiolabelled molecule maintains its biological recognition for the receiving

  8. Preparation of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 131}I-Anti-CD20 for the treatment of lymphomas; Preparacion del radiofarmaco {sup 131}I-Anti-CD20 para el tratamiento de linfomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja H, I E

    2004-07-01

    At the present time they are considered to the lymphomas like a problem of first magnitude since has happened it is necessary to be the fifth cancer cause in the world. Different treatments focused to the lymphoma like the chemotherapy and the radiotherapy, have been employees to counteract the No-Hodgkin lymphoma, without these they don't exclude the healthy tissue of the toxicity. It is for it that is taking a new direction with the employment of the directed radioimmunotherapy since this it allows to kill wicked cells selectively with radiation dose joined to the apoptosis and cytotoxicity induced by the own one bio molecule. The radioimmunotherapy with radiolabelled antibodies directed to the surface antigen CD20 represents a new modality for the treatment of No-Hodgkin lymphoma and potentially other illnesses. In this work the parameters of optimization are presented for the preparation, control of quality and evaluation of the stability in vitro and in vivo of the monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 labelled with {sup 131} I for the treatment of No-Hodgkin lymphoma. The anti-CD20 labelled by the chloramine-T method with high radiochemical purity (>98%), it is stable in solution for but of a half life of the radionuclide (8.04 days) The {sup 131} I-anti-CD20 doesn't present dehalogenation in vitro (human serum) during 24 h of incubation at 37 C. According to the tests carried out to establish the immunoreactivity, a percentage of union to cells was obtained (B lymphocytes) bigger to 30%. The biodistribution in mice balb/c one hour after their administration, it shows that there is not high reception in mucous neither kidneys, what indicates that the complex is stable in vivo. In conclusion, the radiopharmaceutical {sup 131} I-anti-CD20 was obtained in sterile injectable solution and free of pyrogens with a radiochemical purity bigger to 98% and a specific activity of 296 MBq. The radiolabelled molecule maintains its biological recognition for the receiving CD20

  9. HPMA copolymer conjugates with reduced anti-CD20 antibody for cell-specific drug targeting. I. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of binding efficacy and cytostatic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Etrych, Tomáš; Strohalm, Jiří; Kovář, Lubomír; Kabešová, Martina; Říhová, Blanka; Ulbrich, Karel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 140, č. 1 (2009), s. 18-26 ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0505; GA AV ČR IAAX00500803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : HPMA copolymers * drug delivery systems * doxorubicin * monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody * drug targeting Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.949, year: 2009

  10. Compartmental and dosimetric studies of anti-CD20 labelled with {sup 188}Re; Estudo compartimental e dosimetrico do Anti-CD20 marcado com {sup 188}Re

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, Graciela Barrio

    2016-10-01

    The radioimmunotherapy (RIT) uses MAbs conjugated to radionuclides α or β{sup -} emitters, both for therapy. Your treatment is based on the irradiation and tumor destruction, preserving the normal organs as the excess radiation. Radionuclides β{sup -} emitters as {sup 131}I, {sup 90}Y, {sup 188}Re {sup 177}Lu and are useful for the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals and, when coupled with MAb and Anti-CD20 it is important mainly for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). {sup 188}Re (E{sub β} = 2.12 MeV; E{sub γ} = 155 keV; t1/2 = 16.9 h) is an attractive radionuclide for RIT. However, {sup 188}Re can be obtained from a radionuclide generator of {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re, commercially available, making it convenient for use in research and for clinical routine. The CR of IPEN has a project aimed at the production of radiopharmaceutical {sup 188}Re-Anti-CD20, where the radionuclide can be obtained from a generator system {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re. With this proposed a study to assess the efficiency of this labeling technique for treatment in accordance compartmental and dosimetry. The objective of this study was to compare the marking of anti-CD20 MAb with {sup 188}Re with the marking of the antibody with {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu and {sup 99m}Tc (for their similar chemical characteristics) and {sup 211}At, {sup 213}Bi, {sup 223}Ra and {sup 225}Ac); through the study of labeling techniques reported in literature, the proposal of a compartmental model to evaluate its pharmacokinetic and dosimetric studies, high interest for therapy. The result of the study shows a favorable kinetics for {sup 188}Re, by their physical and chemical characteristics compared to the other evaluated radionuclides. The compartment proposed study describes the metabolism of {sup 188}Reanti- CD20 through a compartment mammillary model, which by their pharmacokinetic analysis, performed compared to products emitters β{sup -131}I-labeled anti CD20, {sup 177

  11. Compartmental and dosimetric studies of anti-CD20 labelled with 188Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Graciela Barrio

    2016-01-01

    The radioimmunotherapy (RIT) uses MAbs conjugated to radionuclides α or β - emitters, both for therapy. Your treatment is based on the irradiation and tumor destruction, preserving the normal organs as the excess radiation. Radionuclides β - emitters as 131 I, 90 Y, 188 Re 177 Lu and are useful for the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals and, when coupled with MAb and Anti-CD20 it is important mainly for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). 188 Re (E β = 2.12 MeV; E γ = 155 keV; t1/2 = 16.9 h) is an attractive radionuclide for RIT. However, 188 Re can be obtained from a radionuclide generator of 188 W/ 188 Re, commercially available, making it convenient for use in research and for clinical routine. The CR of IPEN has a project aimed at the production of radiopharmaceutical 188 Re-Anti-CD20, where the radionuclide can be obtained from a generator system 188 W/ 188 Re. With this proposed a study to assess the efficiency of this labeling technique for treatment in accordance compartmental and dosimetry. The objective of this study was to compare the marking of anti-CD20 MAb with 188 Re with the marking of the antibody with 90 Y, 131 I, 177 Lu and 99m Tc (for their similar chemical characteristics) and 211 At, 213 Bi, 223 Ra and 225 Ac); through the study of labeling techniques reported in literature, the proposal of a compartmental model to evaluate its pharmacokinetic and dosimetric studies, high interest for therapy. The result of the study shows a favorable kinetics for 188 Re, by their physical and chemical characteristics compared to the other evaluated radionuclides. The compartment proposed study describes the metabolism of 188 Reanti- CD20 through a compartment mammillary model, which by their pharmacokinetic analysis, performed compared to products emitters β -131 I-labeled anti CD20, 177 Luanti- CD20, the γ emitter 99m Tc-Anti-CD20 and α emitter 211 At-Anti-CD20 presented a elimination constant of approximately 0.05 hours

  12. Anti-CD20 B-cell depletion enhances monocyte reactivity in neuroimmunological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hohlfeld Reinhard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trials evaluating anti-CD20-mediated B-cell depletion in multiple sclerosis (MS and neuromyelitis optica (NMO generated encouraging results. Our recent studies in the MS model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE attributed clinical benefit to extinction of activated B-cells, but cautioned that depletion of naïve B-cells may be undesirable. We elucidated the regulatory role of un-activated B-cells in EAE and investigated whether anti-CD20 may collaterally diminish regulatory B-cell properties in treatment of neuroimmunological disorders. Methods Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG peptide-immunized C57Bl/6 mice were depleted of B-cells. Functional consequences for regulatory T-cells (Treg and cytokine production of CD11b+ antigen presenting cells (APC were assessed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 22 patients receiving anti-CD20 and 23 untreated neuroimmunological patients were evaluated for frequencies of B-cells, T-cells and monocytes; monocytic reactivity was determined by TNF-production and expression of signalling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM. Results We observed that EAE-exacerbation upon depletion of un-activated B-cells closely correlated with an enhanced production of pro-inflammatory TNF by CD11b+ APC. Paralleling this pre-clinical finding, anti-CD20 treatment of human neuroimmunological disorders increased the relative frequency of monocytes and accentuated pro-inflammatory monocyte function; when reactivated ex vivo, a higher frequency of monocytes from B-cell depleted patients produced TNF and expressed the activation marker SLAM. Conclusions These data suggest that in neuroimmunological disorders, pro-inflammatory APC activity is controlled by a subset of B-cells which is eliminated concomitantly upon anti-CD20 treatment. While this observation does not conflict with the general concept of B-cell depletion in human autoimmunity, it implies that its safety and

  13. Comparative studies of antibody anti-CD20 labeled with 188Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Carla Roberta de Barros Rodrigues

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine is an unique and important modality in oncology and the development of new tumor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals for both diagnosis and therapy is an area of interest for researchers. Rituximab (RTX) is a quimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) (IgG 1) that specifically binds to CD20 antigen with high affinity and has been successfully used for the treatment of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) of cell B. The CD20 antigen is expressed over more than 90% of cell B NHL. Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc) and rhenium-188 ( 188 Re) are an attractive radionuclide pair for clinical use due to their favorable decay properties for diagnosis ( 99m Tc: T 1/2 = 6 h, γ radiation = 140 keV) and therapy ( 188 Re: T 1/2 = 17 h, maximum β energy = 2.12 MeV) and to their availability in the form of 99 Mo/ 99 mTc and 188 W/ 188 Re generators. The radionuclides can be conjugated to mAb using similar chemical procedures. The aim of this work was to study the labeling of anti-CD20 mAb (RTX) with 188 Re using two techniques: the direct labeling method [ 188 Re(V)] and the labeling method via the carbonyl nucleus [ 188 Re(I)]. Besides the quality control, the radiolabeled mAb was submitted to in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo biological studies. For the direct labeling, RTX was reducing by incubation with 2-mercaptoethanol for generating sulphydryl groups (-SH) and further labeled with 188 Re(V), in a study of several parameters in order to reach an optimized formulation. The labeling via the carbonyl nucleus both 99 mTc and 188 Re were employed through 2 different procedures: (1) labeling of intact RTX with 99 mTc(I) and (2) reduced RTX (RTX red ) labeled with 99 mTc(I)/ 188 Re(I). Also a parameter study was performed to obtain an optimized formulation. The quality control method for evaluating the radiochemical purity showed a good labeling yield (93%) for the direct method. The labeling method via carbonyl group, the results showed that the - SH groups of RTX red are a possible way of labeling

  14. Construction and characterization of an anti-CD20 mAb nanocomb with exceptionally excellent lymphoma-suppressing activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li H

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hua-Fei Li,1–3,* Cong Wu,4,* Ting Chen,5,* Ge Zhang,1 He Zhao,1 Chang-Hong Ke,1 Zheng Xu21International Joint Cancer Institute, Translation Medicine Institute, 2Planning Division, Scientific Research Department, 3Tumor Immunology and Gene Therapy Center, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, 4Department of Laboratory Diagnosis, Changhai Hospital, 5Department of Cardiology, Changhai Hospital, the Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The CD20-directed monoclonal antibody rituximab (RTX established a new era in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL; however, suboptimal response and/or resistance to RTX still limit its clinical merits. Although four effector mechanisms are validated to participate in CD20-based immunotherapy, including complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, caspase-dependent apoptosis, and lysosome-mediated programmed cell death (PCD, they could hardly be synchronously activated by any anti-CD20 mAb or mAb derivative until now. Herein, a novel mAb nanocomb (polyethylenimine polymer–RTX–tositumomab [PPRT nanocomb] was firstly constructed through mass arming two different anti-CD20 mAbs (RTX and tositumomab to one polymer by nanotechnology. Comparing with free mAbs, PPRT nanocomb possesses a comparable binding ability and reduced “off-rate” to surface CD20 of NHL cells. When treated by PPRT nanocomb, the caspase-dependent apoptosis was remarkably enhanced except for concurrently eliciting complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and lysosome-mediated PCD. Besides, “cross-cell link”-assisted homotypic adhesion by PPRT nanocomb further enhanced the susceptibility to PCD of lymphoma cells. Pharmacokinetic assays revealed that PPRT nanocomb experienced a relatively reduced clearance from peripheral blood compared with free antibodies. With

  15. Radiolabeling of anti-CD20 with Re-188 for treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: radiochemical control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Carla R.; Osso Junior, Joao A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of tumor-selective radiopharmaceuticals is clinically desirable as a means of detecting or confirming the presence and location of primary and metastatic lesions and monitoring tumor response to (chemo)therapy. In addition, the application of targeted radiotherapeutics provides a unique and effective modality for direct tumor treatment. In this manner the radioimmunotherapy (RIT) uses the targeting features of monoclonal antibody to deliver radiation from an attached radionuclide. Antibody therapy directed against the CD20 antigen on the surface of B-cells is considered one of the first successful target-specific therapies in oncology. The radionuclide rhenium-188 ( 188 Re) is currently produced from the father nuclide tungsten-188 ( 188 W) through a transportable generator system. Because of its easy availability and suitable nuclear properties (EβMAX = 2.1 MeV, t 1/2 = 16.9 h, Eγ = 155 keV), this radionuclide is considered an attractive candidate for application as therapeutic agent and could be conveniently utilized for imaging and dosimetric purposes. The purpose of this work is to show the radiochemical control of the optimized formulation (solution) and lyophilized formulation (kit) of labeled rituximab (anti-CD20) with 188 Re. Rituximab was reduced by incubation with 2-mercaptoethanol at room temperature. The number of resulting free sulfhydryl groups was assayed with Ellman's reagent. Radiochemical purity of 188 Re-rituximab was evaluated using instant thin layer chromatography-silica gel (ITLC-SG). Quality control methods for evaluation of radiochemical purity showed good labeling yield of the antibody. (author)

  16. Dosimetric evaluation of anti-CD20 labelled with 188Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrio, Graciela; Osso Junior, Joao A.

    2011-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy has the potential to deliver lethal radiation energy directly to malignant cells via targeting of radioisotope-conjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to specific antigens. B-cell lymphoma is a particularly good candidate for radioimmunotherapy because the disease is inherently radiosensitive, malignant cells in the blood, bone marrow, spleen and lymphonodes are accessible, and MAbs have been developed to B-cell surface antigens that do not shed or modulate. Rituximab (RTX), the human IgG1-type chimeric form of the parent murine antibody ibritumomab, is specifically targeted against CD20, a surface antigen expressed by pre-B and mature human B lymphocytes. The use of rhenium-188 from a 188 W/ 188 Re generator system represents an attractive alternative radionuclide for therapy. 188 Re is produced from beta decay of the 188 W parent. In addition to the emission of high-energy electrons (Eβ= 2118 keV), 188 Re also decays with emission of a gamma photon with an energy of 155 keV in 15% abundance. Besides the therapeutic usefulness of 188 Re, the emission of gamma photon is an added advantage since the biodistribution of 188 Re-labeled antibodies can be evaluated in vivo with a gamma camera. Also, rhenium has chemical properties similar to technetium. Thus, both can be conjugated to antibodies using similar chemistry methods. The objective of this work is to prove the usefulness of this radiopharmaceutical based on dosimetric studies, that are also required by the Brazilian Regulatory Agency (ANVISA). (author)

  17. Dosimetric evaluation of anti-CD20 labelled with {sup 188}Re

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, Graciela; Osso Junior, Joao A., E-mail: gracielabarrio@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Radioimmunotherapy has the potential to deliver lethal radiation energy directly to malignant cells via targeting of radioisotope-conjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to specific antigens. B-cell lymphoma is a particularly good candidate for radioimmunotherapy because the disease is inherently radiosensitive, malignant cells in the blood, bone marrow, spleen and lymphonodes are accessible, and MAbs have been developed to B-cell surface antigens that do not shed or modulate. Rituximab (RTX), the human IgG1-type chimeric form of the parent murine antibody ibritumomab, is specifically targeted against CD20, a surface antigen expressed by pre-B and mature human B lymphocytes. The use of rhenium-188 from a {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator system represents an attractive alternative radionuclide for therapy. {sup 188}Re is produced from beta decay of the {sup 188}W parent. In addition to the emission of high-energy electrons (E{beta}= 2118 keV), {sup 188}Re also decays with emission of a gamma photon with an energy of 155 keV in 15% abundance. Besides the therapeutic usefulness of {sup 188}Re, the emission of gamma photon is an added advantage since the biodistribution of {sup 188}Re-labeled antibodies can be evaluated in vivo with a gamma camera. Also, rhenium has chemical properties similar to technetium. Thus, both can be conjugated to antibodies using similar chemistry methods. The objective of this work is to prove the usefulness of this radiopharmaceutical based on dosimetric studies, that are also required by the Brazilian Regulatory Agency (ANVISA). (author)

  18. Anti-CD20 Immunoglobulin G Radiolabeling with a 99mTc-Tricarbonyl Core: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Carpenet

    Full Text Available In recent years, the diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radioisotopes have shown significant progress. Immunoglobulin (Ig appears to be a promising tracer, particularly due to its ability to target selected antigens. The main objective of this study is to optimize and assess an Ig radiolabeling method with Technetium 99m (99mTc, an attractive radioelement used widely for diagnostic imaging. Monoclonal anti-CD20 IgG was retained to study in vitro and in vivo radiolabeling impact. After IgG derivatization with 2-iminothiolane, IgG-SH was radiolabeled by an indirect method, using a 99mTc-tricarbonyl core. Radiolabeling stability was evaluated over 24h by thin-layer chromatography. IgG integrity was checked by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coupled with Western blot and autoradiography. The radiolabeled Ig's immunoaffinity was assessed in vitro by a radioimmunoassay method and binding experiments with cells (EL4-hCD20 and EL4-WT. Biodistribution studies were performed in normal BALB/c mice. Tumor uptake was assessed in mice bearing EL4-hCD20 and EL4-WT subcutaneous xenografts. With optimized method, high radiolabeling yields were obtained (95.9 ± 3.5%. 99mTc-IgG-SH was stable in phosphate-buffered saline (4°C and 25°C and in serum (37°C, even if important sensitivity to transchelation was observed. IgG was not degraded by derivatization and radiolabeling, as shown by Western blot and autoradiography results. 99mTc-anti-CD20 IgG-SH immunoaffinity was estimated with Kd = 35 nM by both methods. In vivo biodistribution studies for 48h showed significant accumulation of radioactivity in plasma, liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys. Planar scintigraphy of mice bearing tumors showed a significant uptake of 99mTc-anti-CD20 IgG-SH in CD20+ tumor versus CD20- tumor. Radiolabeling of derivatized IgG with 99mTc-tricarbonyl was effective, stable and required few antibody amounts. This attractive radiolabeling method is "antibody safe

  19. In vitro and in vivo properties of human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody specific for common acute lymphocytic leukemia antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saga, T.; Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Konishi, J.; Ueda, R.; Nishimura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Watanabe, T.

    1990-01-01

    A human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody specific for a common acute lymphocytic leukemia antigen was efficiently obtained by ligating human heavy-chain enhancer element to the chimeric heavy- and light-chain genes. Cell binding and competitive inhibition assays of both radioiodine and indium-111- (111In) labeled chimeric antibodies demonstrated in vitro immunoreactivity identical with that of the parental murine monoclonal antibodies. The biodistribution of the radiolabeled chimeric antibody in tumor-bearing nude mice was similar to that of the parental murine antibody. Tumor accumulation of radioiodinated parental and chimeric antibodies was lower than that of 111 In-labeled antibodies, probably because of dehalogenation of the radioiodinated antibodies. Indium-111-labeled chimeric antibody clearly visualized xenografted tumor. These results suggest that a human/mouse chimeric antibody can be labeled with 111 In and radioiodine without the loss of its immunoreactivity, and that chimeric antibody localizes in vivo in the same way as the parental murine antibody

  20. Development of 177Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 for radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan Yousefnia; Amir Reza Jalilian; Ali Bahrami-Samani; Simindokht Shirvani-Arani; Mohammad Ghannadi-Maragheh; Azim Arbabi; Edalat Radfar

    2011-01-01

    Rituximab was successively labeled with 177 Lu-lutetium chloride. 177 Lu chloride was obtained by thermal neutron flux (4 x 1013 n cm -2 s -1 ) of natural Lu 2 O 3 sample with a specific activity of 2.6-3 GBq/mg. The macrocyclic bifunctional chelating agent, N-succinimidyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA-NHS) was prepared at 25 deg C using DOTA, N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) in CH 2 Cl 2 . DOTA-rituximab was obtained by the addition of 1 mL of a rituximab pharmaceutical solution (5 mg/mL, in phosphate buffer, pH 7.8) to a glass tube pre-coated with DOTA-NHS (0.01-0.1 mg) at 25 deg C with continuous mild stirring for 15 h. Radiolabeling was performed at 37 deg C in 24 h. Radio-thin layer chromatography showed an overall radiochemical purity of >98% at optimized conditions (specific activity = 444 MBq/mg, labeling efficacy; 82%). The final isotonic 177 Lu-DOTA-rituximab complex was checked by gel electrophoresis for structure integrity control. Radio-TLC was performed to ensure that only one species was present after filtration through a 0.22 μm filter. Preliminary biodistribution studies in normal rats were carried out to determine complex distribution of the radioimmunoconjugate up to 168 h. The biodistribution data were in accordance with other antiCD20 radioimmunoconjugates already reported. (author)

  1. Application of 99mTc-labeled chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 for radioimmunoscintigraphy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Hiroomi

    1999-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal diseases and its prognosis is still poor. To improve the survival rate, it is essential to develop new technologies for early and definitive diagnosis. In this study, chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 were successfully radio-labeled with 99m Tc, preventing depression of the antigen-binding activity. 99m Tc-labeled monoclonal antibody A7, 99m Tc-labeled chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7, 99m Tc-labeled normal mouse IgG and 99m Tc-labeled Fab fragments of normal mouse IgG were injected intravenously into nude mice bearing human pancreatic cancer xenografts and the radioactivity was subsequently measured. The tumor accumulation was significantly higher with labeled monoclonal antibody A7 than with normal mouse IgG, and higher with chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 than with Fab fragments of normal mouse IgG. The tumor/blood ratio of radioactivity increased rapidly over time with chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7. These results suggest that chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 may be useful for diagnosing pancreatic cancer by means of radioimmunoscintigraphy. (author)

  2. Effectiveness and side effects of anti-CD20 therapy for autoantibody-mediated blistering skin diseases: A comprehensive survey of 71 consecutive patients from the Initial use to 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D Peterson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer D Peterson1, Lawrence S Chan2,3,41Department of Dermatology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center at Lubbock, Lubbock, TX, USA; 2Department of Dermatology; 3Department of Microbiology/Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 4Medicine Service, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: In order to examine the efficacy and side effects of the monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 (rituximab on autoimmune blistering skin diseases, we performed a comprehensive survey of 71 consecutive patients from initial use up to 2007, using the PubMed database. A heterogeneous group of patients, including 51 patients with pemphigus vulgaris, one with pemphigus vegetans, nine with pemphigus foliaceus, five with paraneoplastic pemphigus, four with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, and one with both bullous pemphigoid and graft vs host disease was included in this survey. Overall the monoclonal antibody seems to be effective in that 69% of patients showed complete response, 25% of patients showed partial response, whereas 6% of patients showed progressive disease. Six deaths occurred in association with the treatment, with four of these deaths in patients with paraneoplastic pemphigus, a disease characteristically resistant to conventional medication and with a high mortality rate. Of note, 11 patients who received combined rituximab and intravenous immune globulin treatments had the best outcome: complete response without any serious side effects. Therefore further investigation on rituximab with controlled clinical trial is a worthy pursuit.Keywords: blistering diseases, skin, anti-CD20, pemphigus, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita

  3. Targeted tumor imaging of anti-CD20-polymeric nanoparticles developed for the diagnosis of B-cell malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capolla S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sara Capolla,1 Chiara Garrovo,2 Sonia Zorzet,1 Andrea Lorenzon,3 Enrico Rampazzo,4 Ruben Spretz,5 Gabriele Pozzato,6 Luis Núñez,7 Claudio Tripodo,8 Paolo Macor,1,9 Stefania Biffi2 1Department of Life Sciences, University of Trieste, 2Institute for Maternal and Child Health – IRCCS “Burlo Garofolo”, Trieste, 3Animal Care Unit, Cluster in Biomedicine (CBM scrl, Trieste, Italy; 4Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician”, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; 5LNK Chemsolutions LLC, Lincoln, NE, USA; 6Department of Medical, Surgery and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy; 7Bio-Target, Inc., University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 8Department of Human Pathology, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 9Callerio Foundation Onlus, Institutes of Biological Researches, Trieste, Italy Abstract: The expectations of nanoparticle (NP-based targeted drug delivery systems in cancer, when compared with convectional therapeutic methods, are greater efficacy and reduced drug side effects due to specific cellular-level interactions. However, there are conflicting literature reports on enhanced tumor accumulation of targeted NPs, which is essential for translating their applications as improved drug-delivery systems and contrast agents in cancer imaging. In this study, we characterized biodegradable NPs conjugated with an anti-CD20 antibody for in vivo imaging and drug delivery onto tumor cells. NPs’ binding specificity mediated by anti-CD20 antibody was evaluated on MEC1 cells and chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients’ cells. The whole-body distribution of untargeted NPs and anti-CD20 NPs were compared by time-domain optical imaging in a localized human/mouse model of B-cell malignancy. These studies provided evidence that NPs’ functionalization by an anti-CD20 antibody improves tumor pharmacokinetic profiles in vivo after systemic administration and increases in vivo imaging of tumor mass compared to non-targeted NPs. Together

  4. Preparation and characterization of chimeric CD19 monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zola, H.; Macardle, P.J.; Bradford, T.; Weedon, H.; Yasui, H.; Kurosawa, Y.

    1991-01-01

    CD19 antibodies have been suggested as candidates for immunological attack on leukemic and lymphoma cells of the B lineage because the antigen is restricted to the B lineage. With the potential use of FMC63 in immunotherapy in mind a mouse-human chimera was produced in which the genes coding for the VDJ region of the heavy chain and the VJ region of the light chain derive from the FMC63 mouse hybridoma, while the C region genes code for human IgG1. The genes have been transfected back into a mouse myeloma line, which secretes low levels of immunoglobulin. (Ig). This Ig was purified and biotinylated in order to determine the specificity of the antibody. The chimeric antibody has a reaction profile concordant with the original FMC63 antibody, but has the properties of a human IgG1, including the ability to fix human complement. However, the antibody is not cytotoxic in vitro in the presence of complement or cells capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Possible reasons for this and ways of using the antibody are discussed. 47 refs., 7 figs

  5. Anti-CD20 Cell Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis—A Fixed Dosing Schedule for Ocrelizumab is Overkill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannadha Avasarala

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Anti-CD 20 therapies have found significant uses in multiple sclerosis (MS. Based singularly on the accumulated evidence with the use of rituximab (RTX; Rituxan, Genentech, and Biogen in neuroimmunological diseases, ocrelizumab (OCR; Ocrevus, Genentech was developed as a treatment option for MS and selectively targets CD20 B cells, a cell surface antigen found on pre-B cells, mature, and memory B cells, but not on lymphoid stem cells and plasma cells. On the basis of indirect evidence, elimination of the antigen-presenting capabilities and antigen nonspecific immune functions of B cells appear to be central to the therapeutic efficacy of anti-CD20 B-cell therapies. An important question is this—Why does the drug need to be dosed at fixed intervals and not based on a measurable endpoint, such as tracking peripheral CD20 cell counts? There is minimal scientific validity in infusing the drug every 6 months particularly if CD20 cell counts are negligible in the peripheral blood. In this analysis, a case is made for following CD19 cell populations as a surrogate for CD20 cells on a monthly basis to guide OCR redosing parameters and does not follow a scheduled dosing parameter.

  6. The different clinical effects of anti-BLyS, anti-APRIL and anti-CD20 antibodies point at a critical pathogenic role of γ-herpesvirus infected B cells in the marmoset EAE model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar Jagessar, S; Fagrouch, Zahra; Heijmans, Nicole; Bauer, Jan; Laman, Jon D; Oh, Luke; Migone, Thi; Verschoor, Ernst J; 't Hart, Bert A

    2013-06-01

    The robust and rapid clinical effect of depleting anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in multiple sclerosis (MS) demonstrates a critical pathogenic contribution of B cells. The clinical effect of anti-CD20 mAb has been replicated in a relevant preclinical MS model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus). By contrast, treatment with mAbs against two essential cytokines in B cell activation growth and survival, i.e. BlyS/BAFF and APRIL, was only partially effective. All three mAbs induced depletion of CD20+ B cells from the circulation, albeit with different kinetics and based on distinct mechanisms of action. In the current study we analyzed whether the different clinical effect of anti-CD20 mAb or the anti-BLyS and anti-APRIL mAbs is due to different depletion of B cells infected with the EBV of marmosets, CalHV3. Employing a novel PCR-based assay, half of the colony of group-housed marmosets was tested positive for CalHV3 DNA in secondary lymphoid organs. The same prevalence was observed in placebo-treated monkeys. In marmosets treated with anti-CD20 mAb the load of CalHV3 DNA in lymphoid organs was substantially reduced, while this was not observed in the monkeys treated with anti-BLyS or anti-APRIL mAbs. To examine the pathogenic role of virus-transformed B cells, we infused EBV-transformed B lymphoblastic cell (BLC) lines presenting the immunodominant MOG34-56 peptide. We observed in the recipients of MOG34-56 pulsed BLC, but not in their fraternal siblings infused with non-pulsed BLC, activation of anti-MOG34-56 T cells and meningeal inflammation. Collectively, the data show that among CD20+ B cells, the herpesvirus-transformed subset has a particularly important pathogenic role in the marmoset EAE model.

  7. Compartmental and dosimetric studies of anti-CD20 labeled with 188Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrio Kuramoto Graciela; Mie Nakamura Matsuda Margareth; Osso Joao Jr, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy has the potential to deliver lethal radiation energy directly to malignant cells via targeting of radioisotope-conjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to specific antigens. Rituximab (RTX) is specifically targeted against CD20, a surface antigen expressed by B-lymphocytes. The use of 188 Re from a 188 W/ 188 Re generator system represents an alternative radionuclide for therapy. Rhenium has chemical properties similar to technetium and both can be conjugated to antibodies using similar chemistry methods. The objective of this work is to prove the usefulness of this radiopharmaceutical based on dosimetric and pharmacokinetic studies that are also required by the Brazilian Regulatory Agency. (author)

  8. Evaluation of cell cycle changes activated by the administration of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-antiCD20; Evaluacion de cambios en el ciclo celular activados por la administracion de {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-antiCD20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos B, J. C.

    2016-07-01

    In the present project, cytometric evaluation of cell cycle changes induced by the {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-antiCD20 thermostatic radiopharmaceutical was performed, in which a cell culture of Raji cells from Burkitts lymphoma were used, which are CD20+; for flow cytometry different parameters were measured in which the cells were synchronized in G0/G1 and G2/M, to calculate the dose to nucleus that were given to the cells the Monte Carlo method was used at a dose interval from 1 to 5 Gy. The purpose of this work is to be able to observe by flow cytometry the arrest in the cell cycle with a lower dose interval than the one applied in other papers. (Author)

  9. Evaluation of cell cycle changes activated by the administration of "1"7"7Lu-DOTA-antiCD20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos B, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    In the present project, cytometric evaluation of cell cycle changes induced by the "1"7"7Lu-DOTA-antiCD20 thermostatic radiopharmaceutical was performed, in which a cell culture of Raji cells from Burkitts lymphoma were used, which are CD20+; for flow cytometry different parameters were measured in which the cells were synchronized in G0/G1 and G2/M, to calculate the dose to nucleus that were given to the cells the Monte Carlo method was used at a dose interval from 1 to 5 Gy. The purpose of this work is to be able to observe by flow cytometry the arrest in the cell cycle with a lower dose interval than the one applied in other papers. (Author)

  10. Clinical impact of B-cell depletion with the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in chronic fatigue syndrome: a preliminary case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mella Olav

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a disease of unknown aetiology. A patient with CFS had unexpected, marked recovery of CFS symptoms lasting for five months during and after cytotoxic chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. We reasoned that the transient CFS recovery was related to methotrexate treatment, which induces immunomodulation in part through B-cell depletion. Methods In a case series, this patient and two additional CFS patients were B-cell depleted by infusion of the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab. Results All three had improvement of all CFS symptoms. Patients 1 and 2 had major amelioration from 6 weeks after intervention, patient 3 slight improvement from the same time, but then improved markedly from 26 weeks after intervention. The symptomatic effect lasted until weeks 16, 18 and 44, respectively. At relapse, all were retreated with a single (patient 1 or double rituximab infusion (patients 2 and 3. Again, all three had marked symptom improvement, mimicking their first response. After new symptom recurrence, patients 1 and 2 were given weekly oral methotrexate, patient 1 having effect also from this agent. Patients 1 and 2 were again treated for a third rituximab infusion after new relapse, again with a marked clinical benefit. No unexpected toxicity was seen. Conclusion These observations suggest that B-lymphocytes are involved in CFS pathogenesis for a subset of patients. Benefit for all CFS symptoms, the delayed symptom relief following B-cell depletion, the kinetics of relapses, and the effect also from methotrexate treatment, provide suggestive evidence that B-cells play a significant role in the ongoing clinical features, and that CFS may be amenable to therapeutic interventions aimed at modifying B-cell number and function. More systematic investigations of this therapeutic strategy, and of its biological basis, are now needed.

  11. A human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 for tumor radioimmunoimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Miyuki; Hinoda, Yuji; Sasaki, Shigeru; Tsujisaki, Masayuki; Imai, Kohzoh; Oriuchi, Noboru; Endo, Keigo.

    1996-01-01

    A mouse-human chimeric antibody for intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was established by using heavy chain loss mouse mutant hybridoma and human immunoglobulin expression vector. The HA58 hybridoma secreted anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (IgG1,κ). The gene of the mouse variable region of heavy chain was amplified and cloned by the polymerase chain reaction technique directly from the HA58 hybridoma RNA. The variable region of heavy chain was joined with an expression vector which contains human γ1 constant gene. The expression vector was transfected into heavy chain loss mutant cells HA58-7, which produced only murine immunoglobulin light chains. The resultant chimeric MoAb HA58, chHA58, retained full-binding reactivity to ICAM-1 compared with murine HA58 parental antibody. The chimeric MoAb chHA58 showed little antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxic activity against cultured tumor cells. Biodistribution studies with 99m Tc-labeled chHA58 in nude mice bearing human gastric carcinoma JRST cells, demonstrated that the tumor-blood ratio was 1.55 at 18 h after injection, when the tumors were clearly visible in gamma scintigraphy. These data suggest that chHA58 may be of practical use for radioimmunoimaging of a wide variety of tumors. (author)

  12. A Preclinical Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Anti-CD20/CD3 T-Cell-Dependent Bispecific Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Gregory Z; Reyes, Arthur; Sun, Liping L; Cheu, Melissa; Oldendorp, Amy; Ramanujan, Saroja; Stefanich, Eric G

    2018-05-01

    CD20 is a cell-surface receptor expressed by healthy and neoplastic B cells and is a well-established target for biologics used to treat B-cell malignancies. Pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data for the anti-CD20/CD3 T-cell-dependent bispecific antibody BTCT4465A were collected in transgenic mouse and nonhuman primate (NHP) studies. Pronounced nonlinearity in drug elimination was observed in the murine studies, and time-varying, nonlinear PK was observed in NHPs, where three empirical drug elimination terms were identified using a mixed-effects modeling approach: i) a constant nonsaturable linear clearance term (7 mL/day/kg); ii) a rapidly decaying time-varying, linear clearance term (t ½  = 1.6 h); and iii) a slowly decaying time-varying, nonlinear clearance term (t ½  = 4.8 days). The two time-varying drug elimination terms approximately track with time scales of B-cell depletion and T-cell migration/expansion within the central blood compartment. The mixed-effects NHP model was scaled to human and prospective clinical simulations were generated. © 2018 The Authors. Clinical and Translational Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  13. Preoperative clinical radioimmunodetection of pancreatic cancer by 111In-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibody Nd2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tetsuji; Nishihara, Tamahiro; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    1999-01-01

    The present study was carried out with the purpose of evaluating the clinical usefulness of radioimmunodetection (RAID) with 111 In-labeled murine/human chimeric monoclonal antibody, Nd2 (c-Nd2) in patients with pancreatic cancer. Nineteen patients suspected to have pancreatic cancer were administered intravenously 74 MBq/2 mg 111 In-labeled c-Nd2 in 100 ml of saline containing 2% albumin over 30 min. A scintigram was obtained on the 3rd day after infusion by using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Of the 14 patients finally diagnosed as having pancreatic cancer on the basis of surgical specimens or progress of disease, specific focal uptake at the site of the tumor was detected in 12 (true positive cases), representing a sensitivity of 85.7% (12/14), and liver metastasis was found in one case with metastasis. Of the 5 patients diagnosed with tumor-forming pancreatitis (TFP), 4 patients demonstrated true negative imaging, but one patient whose tumor demonstrated interesting findings in histology and immunostaining, showed false positive imaging. Of patients investigated for human anti-chimeric antibody (HACA) response, none showed HACA response, and no allergic reaction was seen in any of the patients administered c-Nd2. These results suggest that RAID with 111 In-labeled c-Nd2 is useful for differential preoperative diagnosis between invasive pancreatic cancer and TFP. (author)

  14. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Kyeom Kim

    Full Text Available Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17 were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  15. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pan Kyeom; Keum, Sun Ju; Osinubi, Modupe O V; Franka, Richard; Shin, Ji Young; Park, Sang Tae; Kim, Man Su; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Soo Young; Carson, William; Greenberg, Lauren; Yu, Pengcheng; Tao, Xiaoyan; Lihua, Wang; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guodong; Shampur, Madhusdana; Rupprecht, Charles E; Chang, Shin Jae

    2017-01-01

    Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG) have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17) were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  16. Multivalent system for therapy of non-Hod king lymphomas based on Anti-CD20 conjugated to gold nanoparticles; Sistema multivalente para terapia de linfomas no-Hodking basado en Anti-CD20 conjugado a nanoparticulas de oro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda O, R. M.

    2014-07-01

    In recent publications has been reported that gold nanoparticles have an effect in reducing the expression of the oncogene Bcl -2 and have a high biocompatibility , this is the importance for using gold nanoparticles for this work. The antibody CD20 is an antibody that specifically binds to that over expressed CD20 antigen on the cell membrane of B lymphoma cell non- Hodgkin (cell line Raji) behold the importance of combining this bio molecule to gold nanoparticles since they have a high specificity with CD20 positive cells , also to carry out the antigen- antibody immunological reactions triggered mediating cell lysis, possibly by cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Therefore, this system must have characteristics of both components to eliminate B cell non- Hodgkin lymphoma.In this work it was studied a multivalent system composed of gold nanoparticles and anti-CD20 antibody, the term multi valency refers to the number of biomolecules attached to the surface of the gold nanoparticle. The synthesis and characterization of the gold nanoparticles and the multivalent system was performed and the effect of the multivalent system on the expression of oncogene Bcl-2 (group of proteins associated with the apoptotic pathway) was evaluated. Characterization of raw materials and the multivalent system was performed using spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, this to verify structural changes in raw materials and thus confirm the formation of CD20 binding to the surface of the nanoparticle gold by the bond between gold and sulfur in the cysteines of CD20. Taking advantage that the metal nanoparticles have the optical property of surface plasmon resonance, the absorption of gold nanoparticles was measured on the UV-Vis as it is affected by the surface molecules bind to it, showing a bathochromic displacement effected. The hydrodynamic diameter of the gold nanoparticles was measured to verify that the antibody is bound to the surface; this evidence was complemented by micrographs

  17. Chimeric monoclonal antibody to tumor necrosis factor alpha (infliximab in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insights into the pathogenesis of psoriasis have provided opportunities to target key steps in the disease process. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a being crucial to the pathogenesis of psoriasis, monoclonal antibodies against this cytokine have proved useful in its treatment. Aim: To study the efficacy of chimeric monoclonal antibody to TNF-a (infliximab in Indian patients with recalcitrant psoriasis vulgaris. Materials and Methods: Three patients with recalcitrant psoriasis vulgaris were studied. Baseline haemogram, biochemical parameters, chest radiograph and Mantoux skin test were performed. A loading dose regimen of 5 mg/kg infliximab was administered at weeks 0, 2 and 6. PASI assessment, adverse drug event monitoring and laboratory assessments were carried out at 2-week intervals until week 10. Patients were followed up until week 22 for relapse. Results: Infliximab was well tolerated. The mean PASI was 25.4 at presentation and declined to 5.5 at 10 weeks. PASI 75 was attained at a mean of 9.6 weeks. Relapse occurred at a mean of 18.6 weeks after the first infusion. Conclusions: This study on Indian patients brings out the importance of cytokine-based therapies in psoriasis. Indigenous production could make these therapies a viable therapeutic option for psoriasis patients in the near future.

  18. Multivalent system for therapy of non-Hod king lymphomas based on Anti-CD20 conjugated to gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda O, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    In recent publications has been reported that gold nanoparticles have an effect in reducing the expression of the oncogene Bcl -2 and have a high biocompatibility , this is the importance for using gold nanoparticles for this work. The antibody CD20 is an antibody that specifically binds to that over expressed CD20 antigen on the cell membrane of B lymphoma cell non- Hodgkin (cell line Raji) behold the importance of combining this bio molecule to gold nanoparticles since they have a high specificity with CD20 positive cells , also to carry out the antigen- antibody immunological reactions triggered mediating cell lysis, possibly by cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Therefore, this system must have characteristics of both components to eliminate B cell non- Hodgkin lymphoma.In this work it was studied a multivalent system composed of gold nanoparticles and anti-CD20 antibody, the term multi valency refers to the number of biomolecules attached to the surface of the gold nanoparticle. The synthesis and characterization of the gold nanoparticles and the multivalent system was performed and the effect of the multivalent system on the expression of oncogene Bcl-2 (group of proteins associated with the apoptotic pathway) was evaluated. Characterization of raw materials and the multivalent system was performed using spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, this to verify structural changes in raw materials and thus confirm the formation of CD20 binding to the surface of the nanoparticle gold by the bond between gold and sulfur in the cysteines of CD20. Taking advantage that the metal nanoparticles have the optical property of surface plasmon resonance, the absorption of gold nanoparticles was measured on the UV-Vis as it is affected by the surface molecules bind to it, showing a bathochromic displacement effected. The hydrodynamic diameter of the gold nanoparticles was measured to verify that the antibody is bound to the surface; this evidence was complemented by micrographs

  19. Clinical usefulness of human-mouse chimeric Fab monoclonal antibody A7 for radioimmunoguided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhito

    1999-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the clinical usefulness of radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) using the human-mouse chimeric Fab monoclonal antibody A7 (chA7Fab) for colorectal cancer patients. Whole murine monoclonal antibody A7 (whole A7) and chA7Fab were labelled with 125 I and 131 I, and their biodistributions were investigated experimentally and clinically. Radioactivities of the antibodies in the tissues were measured by a portable gamma detecting probe (GDP) purchased from Neoprobe Corp.. Of the four labelled antibodies used in a mouse model, 125 I-chA7Fab revealed the highest tumor/surrounding tissue ratio and all values were greater than 2.0. All tumor/surrounding tissue ratios of 131 I-chA7Fab were greater than 1.5, but the values were lower than those of 125 I-chA7Fab. Due to the limited clinical use of 125 I in Japan, 131 I was used as a radio-tracer for chA7Fab in the clinical trial. RIGS using 131 I-chA7Fab was performed on ten colorectal cancer patients. Tumor localization was intraoperatively determined in four of ten patients using the GDP. Liver metastasis and lymph node metastasis were identified in two patients and one patient, respectively. The GDP revealed tumor/surrounding tissue ratios of 1.5 or greater in eight of the ten resected tumors. Although radioimmunoguided surgery using chA7Fab is a promising tool to intraoperatively determine the tumor localization of colorectal cancer, 125 I and not 131 I should be used as a tracer for radioimmunoguided surgery to increase the accuracy of chA7Fab. (author)

  20. Evaluation of the cell death mechanisms activated by the radiopharmaceutical 177Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 in a dose range of 1 to 5 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin V, E.P.; Rojas C, E. L.; Martinez V, B. E.; Ramos B, J. C.; Jimenez M, N. P.; Ferro F, G.

    2016-10-01

    The radio immunotherapy with anti-CD20 antibodies significantly increases the remission rate of patients with B-cell lymphomas over expressing the CD20. The radiolabeled antibodies directed to surface antigens allow delivering scaled doses of radiation to specific targets thus limiting the dose to healthy tissue. The anti-CD20 causes cell death by two major pathways; activating the immune system to destroy malignant cells and inducing the activation of cell death pathways. The 177 Lu is a beta particle emitter (max. 0.497 MeV) with a maximum reach on soft tissue of 0.7 mm and a half-life of 6.7 days. Several clinical studies have established a maximum tolerated dose (45 m Ci/m 2 ) for 177 Lu-DOTA-rituximab, which shows a favorable clinical response without hematological toxicity. However, the molecular mechanisms of action by synergistic effect of anti-CD20 and radionuclide have not been studied. In this work was evaluated; by flow cytometry, the activation kinetics of the cell death mechanisms induced by the treatment with 177 Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 in non-Hodgkin (Raji) lymphoma cells. The absorbed radiation dose delivered to the cell nucleus was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, considering the contribution of the beta emissions of the radiopharmaceutical present in the cell membrane and surrounding environment, as well as crossfire. This work shows that the application of radiation doses of 1 to 5 Gy of the radiopharmaceutical 177 Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20, are sufficient to induce cell death by apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle. The combination of these factors (continuous delivery of radiation, activation of repair mechanisms and increased radio sensitivity) causes the acute activation of the apoptotic program resulting in significant cell death after 96 h of treatment. The temporal analysis of cell death suggests the early activation of apoptosis that is counteracted by the activation of repair processes caused by sustained irradiation, which leads to cell

  1. Construction and expression of a functional monoclonal antibody SZ-51 specific for GMP-140 chimeric fab fragment in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Jianming; Zhang Xiaomin; Xia Lijun; Wan Haiying; Liu Yue; Li Peixia; Ruan Changgeng

    1996-04-01

    The variable region cDNAs of a monoclonal antibody SZ-51 specific for α-granule membrane protein (GMP-140) on the surface of activated human platelets were spliced with the constant region cDNA of the heavy chain CH1 and light chain k of human Ig G by means of the gene recombination techniques. The above recombinant gene was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The expression vector of phage plasmid pHEN1 SZ-51 Fab/Hu was constructed. The pHEN1-51 Fab/Hu was introduced into non-suppressor E. coli HB2151. The amount of expression of SZ-51 chimeric Fab/Hu measured by quantitative ELISA was about 500 μg/L. Western blot demonstrated that the SZ-51 chimeric Fab fragment could specifically bind to GMP-140. (2 figs.)

  2. Specific Conjugation of the Hinge Region for Homogeneous Preparation of Antibody Fragment-Drug Conjugate: A Case Study for Doxorubicin-PEG-anti-CD20 Fab' Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhan; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2016-01-20

    Conventional preparation strategies for antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) result in heterogeneous products with various molecular sizes and species. In this study, we developed a homogeneous preparation strategy by site-specific conjugation of the anticancer drug with an antibody fragment. The model drug doxorubicin (DOX) was coupled to the Fab' fragment of anti-CD20 IgG at its permissive sites through a heterotelechelic PEG linker, generating an antibody fragment-drug conjugate (AFDC). Anti-CD20 IgG was digested and reduced specifically with β-mercaptoethylamine to generate the Fab' fragment with two free mercapto groups in its hinge region. Meanwhile, DOX was conjugated with α-succinimidylsuccinate ω-maleimide polyethylene glycol (NHS-PEG-MAL) to form MAL-PEG-DOX, which was subsequently linked to the free mercapto containing Fab' fragment to form a Fab'-PEG-DOX conjugate. The dual site-specific bioconjugation was achieved through the combination of highly selective reduction of IgG and introduction of heterotelechelic PEG linker. The resulting AFDC provides an utterly homogeneous product, with a definite ratio of one fragment to two drugs. Laser confocal microscopy and cell ELISA revealed that the AFDC could accumulate in the antigen-positive Daudi tumor cell. In addition, the Fab'-PEG-DOX retained appreciable targeting ability and improved antitumor activity, demonstrating an excellent therapeutic effect on the lymphoma mice model for better cure rate and significantly reduced side effects.

  3. Bioactivity assays and application of 125I labeled human mouse chimeric anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody SM03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Pingping; Meng Zhiyun; Dou Guifang; Wu Yingliang; Wang Minwei

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the bioactivity and application of 125 I labeled human mouse chimeric monoclonal SM03, SM03 was labeled with 125 I using Indogen method. The labeled mixture was purified by Sephacryl S-300 HR separation chromospectry. The purity and concentration of separated fractions were determined by HPLC and Protein Assay Kit, respectively. Competitive binding method and ELISA method were used for bioactivity assays. 125 I-SM03 was applied to screen cell lines which express the most abundant CD22 antigen. The purity and recovery of 125 I-SM03 were >99% and >47%, respectively. The bioactivity of 125 I- SM03 and SM03 hasn't significant difference in statistics. Ramos cell line had the strongest special radioactivity when 125 I-SM03 bound with in Raji, Daudi and Ramos cell lines. Indogen method is a good way to label Human mouse chimeric anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody SM03 and the label will not affect the activity of SM03. The 125 I-SM03 not only can be used for detect agent, but also may be put into market for NHL therapy. (authors)

  4. {sup 99m}Tc-labeled chimeric anti-NCA 95 antigranulocyte monoclonal antibody for bone marrow imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarwar, M.; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1998-09-01

    Chimeric mouse-human antigranulocyte monoclonal antibody (ch MAb) against non-specific cross-reacting antigen (NCA-95) was labeled with {sup 99m}Tc (using a direct method) and {sup 125}I (using the chloramine T method), and its binding to human granulocytes and LS-180 colorectal carcinoma cells expressing carcinoembryonic antigen on their surfaces, cross-reactive with anti-NCA-95 chimeric monoclonal antibody, increased in proportion to the number of cells added and reached more than 80% and 90%, respectively. In biodistribution studies, {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 125}I-labeled ch anti-NCA-95 MAb revealed high tumor uptake, and the tumor-to-blood ratio was 2.9 after 24 hours. The tumor-to-normal-organ ratio was also more than 3.0 in all organs except for the tumor-to-kidney ratio. Scintigrams of athymic nude mice confirmed the results of biodistribution studies that showed higher radioactivity in tumor and kidney of the mice administered with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled ch MAb. A normal volunteer injected with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled ch anti-NCA-95 antigranulocyte MAb showed clear bone marrow images, and a patient with aplastic anemia revealed irregular uptake in his lumbar spine, suggesting its utility for bone marrow scintigraphy and for the detection of hematological disorders, infections, and bone metastasis. (author)

  5. Evaluation of cell death mechanisms activated by the administration of the theranostics radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 in a dose range of 1-5 Gy; Evaluacion de los mecanismos de muerte celular activados por la administracion del radiofarmaco teranostico {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 en un rango de dosis de 1-5 Gy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez V, B. E.

    2016-07-01

    Radio-immunotherapy with anti-CD20 antibodies significantly increases the rate of remission in patients with CD20 over expressing B-cell lymphomas. Radio-labeled antibodies directed to surface antigens allow delivering scaled doses of radiation to specific targets thus limiting the dose to healthy tissue. Anti-CD20 causes cell death by two major pathways; activating the immune system to destroy malignant cells and inducing the activation of cell death pathways. The {sup 177}Lu is a beta particle emitter (max. 0.497 MeV) with a maximum soft tissue reach of 0.7 mm and a half-life of 6.7 days. Several clinical studies have established a maximum tolerated dose (45m Ci/m{sup 2}) for {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-rituximab, which shows a favorable clinical response without hematological toxicity. However, the molecular mechanisms of synergistic activation of anti-CD20 and radionuclide have not been studied. In this work we evaluated by flow cytometry, the activation kinetics of the cell death mechanisms induced by the treatment with {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 from non-Hod king lymphoma cells (Raji). The absorbed radiation dose delivered to the cell nucleus was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, considering the contribution of the beta emissions of the radiopharmaceutical present in the cell membrane and surrounding environment, as well as crossfire. This work shows that the application of radiation doses of 1 to 5 Gy of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 are sufficient to induce cell death by apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle. The combination of these factors (continuous delivery of radiation activation of repair mechanisms and increased radio-sensitivity) causes acute activation of the apoptotic program resulting in significant cell death after 96 h of treatment. The temporal analysis of cell death suggests the early activation of apoptosis that is counteracted by the activation of repair processes caused by sustained irradiation, which leads to cell arrest

  6. Evaluation of the cell death mechanisms activated by the radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 in a dose range of 1 to 5 Gy; Evaluacion de los mecanismos de muerte celular activados por el radiofarmaco {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 en un intervalo de dosis de 1 a 5 Gy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azorin V, E.P.; Rojas C, E. L.; Martinez V, B. E.; Ramos B, J. C.; Jimenez M, N. P.; Ferro F, G., E-mail: erica.azorin@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    The radio immunotherapy with anti-CD20 antibodies significantly increases the remission rate of patients with B-cell lymphomas over expressing the CD20. The radiolabeled antibodies directed to surface antigens allow delivering scaled doses of radiation to specific targets thus limiting the dose to healthy tissue. The anti-CD20 causes cell death by two major pathways; activating the immune system to destroy malignant cells and inducing the activation of cell death pathways. The {sup 177}Lu is a beta particle emitter (max. 0.497 MeV) with a maximum reach on soft tissue of 0.7 mm and a half-life of 6.7 days. Several clinical studies have established a maximum tolerated dose (45 m Ci/m{sup 2}) for {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-rituximab, which shows a favorable clinical response without hematological toxicity. However, the molecular mechanisms of action by synergistic effect of anti-CD20 and radionuclide have not been studied. In this work was evaluated; by flow cytometry, the activation kinetics of the cell death mechanisms induced by the treatment with {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 in non-Hodgkin (Raji) lymphoma cells. The absorbed radiation dose delivered to the cell nucleus was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, considering the contribution of the beta emissions of the radiopharmaceutical present in the cell membrane and surrounding environment, as well as crossfire. This work shows that the application of radiation doses of 1 to 5 Gy of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20, are sufficient to induce cell death by apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle. The combination of these factors (continuous delivery of radiation, activation of repair mechanisms and increased radio sensitivity) causes the acute activation of the apoptotic program resulting in significant cell death after 96 h of treatment. The temporal analysis of cell death suggests the early activation of apoptosis that is counteracted by the activation of repair processes caused by sustained irradiation

  7. Kinetics and tissue distribution of the radiolabeled chimeric monoclonal antibody MOv18 IgG and F(ab')2 fragments in ovarian carcinoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, M. R.; Kenemans, P.; den Hollander, W.; Vermorken, J. B.; Molthoff, C. J.; Burger, C. W.; Helmerhorst, T. J.; Baak, J. P.; Roos, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-four patients suspected of having ovarian carcinoma received i.v. injection with a combination of radiolabeled intact IgG (1 mg) and F(ab')2 fragments (1 mg) of the chimeric monoclonal antibody MOv18, each form labeled with 1.85 MBq 131I or 125I. Laparotomy was performed either 2 or 6 days

  8. Experimental and clinical analysis of the characteristics of a chimeric monoclonal antibody, MOv18, reactive with an ovarian cancer-associated antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molthoff, C. F.; Buist, M. R.; Kenemans, P.; Pinedo, H. M.; Boven, E.

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (Mab) MOv18 preferentially reacts with gynecological carcinomas. We have analyzed the characteristics of murine MOv18 (m-MOv18) and chimeric MOv18 (c-MOv18). We found no differences in affinity and binding to IGROV1 cells between c-MOv18 as IgG and F(ab')2 fragments and m-MOv18.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and tumor targeting of 131I-labeled F(ab')2 fragments of the chimeric monoclonal antibody G250: preclinical and clinical pilot studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, A.H.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Oosterwijk, E.; Buijs, W.C.A.M.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Clinical and animal studies of chimeric monoclonal antibody G250 (moAb cG250) for the targeting of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), to date, have been with the intact IgG form. To determine whether F(ab')2 fragments are more suited for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) than intact IgG,

  10. Subcutaneous injections of low-dose veltuzumab (humanized anti-CD20 antibody) are safe and active in patients with indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrea, George O; Elstrom, Rebecca; Allen, Steven L; Rai, Kanti R; Abbasi, Rashid M; Farber, Charles M; Teoh, Nick; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A; Goldenberg, David M

    2011-04-01

    Subcutaneous injections of anti-CD20 antibodies may offer benefits to both patients and the healthcare system for treatment of B-cell malignancies. A pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the potential for subcutaneous dosing with 2(nd) generation anti-CD20 antibody veltuzumab in patients with CD20(+) indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Patients with previously untreated or relapsed disease received 4 doses of 80, 160, or 320 mg veltuzumab injected subcutaneously every two weeks. Responses were assessed by computed tomography scans, with other evaluations including adverse events, safety laboratories, B-cell blood levels, serum veltuzumab levels, and human anti-veltuzumab antibody (HAHA) titers. Seventeen patients (14 follicular lymphoma; 13 stage III or IV disease; 5 treatment-naive) completed treatment with only occasional, mild-moderate, transient injection reactions and no other safety issues. Subcutaneous veltuzumab demonstrated a slow release pattern over several days, achieving a mean Cmax of 19, 25 and 63 μg/mL at 80, 160, and 320 mg doses for a total of 4 administrations, respectively. Depletion of circulating B cells occurred after the first injection. The objective response rate (partial responses plus complete responses plus complete responses unconfirmed) was 47% (8/17) with a complete response/complete response unconfirmed rate of 24% (4/17); 4 of 8 objective responses continued for 60 weeks or more. All serum samples evaluated for human anti-veltuzumab antibody were negative. Subcutaneous injections of low-dose veltuzumab are convenient, well tolerated, and capable of achieving sustained serum levels, B-cell depletion, and durable objective responses in indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00546793).

  11. Subcutaneous injections of low-dose veltuzumab (humanized anti-CD20 antibody) are safe and active in patients with indolent non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrea, George O.; Elstrom, Rebecca; Allen, Steven L.; Rai, Kanti R.; Abbasi, Rashid M.; Farber, Charles M.; Teoh, Nick; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A.; Goldenberg, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous injections of anti-CD20 antibodies may offer benefits to both patients and the healthcare system for treatment of B-cell malignancies. Design and Methods A pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the potential for subcutaneous dosing with 2nd generation anti-CD20 antibody veltuzumab in patients with CD20+ indolent non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Patients with previously untreated or relapsed disease received 4 doses of 80, 160, or 320 mg veltuzumab injected subcutaneously every two weeks. Responses were assessed by computed tomography scans, with other evaluations including adverse events, safety laboratories, B-cell blood levels, serum veltuzumab levels, and human anti-veltuzumab antibody (HAHA) titers. Results Seventeen patients (14 follicular lymphoma; 13 stage III or IV disease; 5 treatment-naive) completed treatment with only occasional, mild-moderate, transient injection reactions and no other safety issues. Subcutaneous veltuzumab demonstrated a slow release pattern over several days, achieving a mean Cmax of 19, 25 and 63 μg/mL at 80, 160, and 320 mg doses for a total of 4 administrations, respectively. Depletion of circulating B cells occurred after the first injection. The objective response rate (partial responses plus complete responses plus complete responses unconfirmed) was 47% (8/17) with a complete response/complete response unconfirmed rate of 24% (4/17); 4 of 8 objective responses continued for 60 weeks or more. All serum samples evaluated for human anti-veltuzumab antibody were negative. Conclusions Subcutaneous injections of low-dose veltuzumab are convenient, well tolerated, and capable of achieving sustained serum levels, B-cell depletion, and durable objective responses in indolent non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00546793) PMID:21173095

  12. N-glycan engineering of a plant-produced anti-CD20-hIL-2 immunocytokine significantly enhances its effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusic, Carla; Pioli, Claudio; Stelter, Szymon; Novelli, Flavia; Lonoce, Chiara; Morrocchi, Elena; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Donini, Marcello

    2018-03-01

    Anti-CD20 recombinant antibodies are among the most promising therapeutics for the treatment of B-cell malignancies such as non-Hodgkin lymphomas. We recently demonstrated that an immunocytokine (2B8-Fc-hIL2), obtained by fusing an anti-CD20 scFv-Fc antibody derived from C2B8 mAb (rituximab) to the human interleukin 2 (hIL-2), can be efficiently produced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. The purified immunocytokine (IC) bearing a typical plant protein N-glycosylation profile showed a CD20 binding activity comparable to that of rituximab and was efficient in eliciting antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of human PBMC against Daudi cells, indicating its fuctional integrity. In this work, the immunocytokine devoid of the typical xylose/fucose N-glycosylation plant signature (IC-ΔXF) and the corresponding scFv-Fc-ΔXF antibody not fused to the cytokine, were obtained in a glyco-engineered ΔXylT/FucT N. benthamiana line. Purification yields from agroinfiltrated plants amounted to 20-35 mg/kg of leaf fresh weight. When assayed for interaction with FcγRI and FcγRIIIa, IC-ΔXF exhibited significantly enhanced binding affinities if compared to the counterpart bearing the typical plant protein N-glycosylation profile (IC) and to rituximab. The glyco-engineered recombinant molecules also exhibited a strongly improved ADCC and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). Notably, our results demonstrate a reduced C1q binding of xylose/fucose carrying IC and scFv-Fc compared to versions that lack these sugar moieties. These results demonstrate that specific N-glycosylation alterations in recombinant products can dramatically affect the effector functions of the immunocytokine, resulting in an overall improvement of the biological functions and consequently of the therapeutic potential. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The rationale for B lymphocyte depletion in Graves' disease. Monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody therapy as a novel treatment option

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fassi, Daniel; Nielsen, Claus H; Hasselbalch, Hans K

    2006-01-01

    We have reviewed the immunology of thyroid autoimmunity with special reference to the importance of B lymphocytes (B cells) in thyroidal and extrathyroidal Graves' disease (GD), thus providing a framework for the hypothesis that B cell depletion may be beneficial in GD. Additionally, after...

  14. Safety of Repeated Open-Label Treatment Courses of Intravenous Ofatumumab, a Human Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody, in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quattrocchi, Emilia; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Taylor, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the safety of ofatumumab retreatment in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods Patients with active rheumatoid arthritis participating in two phase III trials (OFA110635 and OFA110634) and a phase II extension trial (OFA111752) received individualised open-label ofatumumab retrea...

  15. Anti-lymphoma efficacy comparison of anti-Cd20 monoclonal antibody-targeted and non-targeted star-shaped polymer-prodrug conjugates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lidický, Ondřej; Janoušková, Olga; Strohalm, Jiří; Alam, M.; Klener, P.; Etrych, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 11 (2015), s. 19849-19864 ISSN 1420-3049 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02986S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : HPMA copolymers * drug delivery systems * doxorubicin Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.465, year: 2015

  16. The rationale for B lymphocyte depletion in Graves' disease. Monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody therapy as a novel treatment option

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fassi, Daniel; Nielsen, Claus H; Hasselbalch, Hans K

    2006-01-01

    We have reviewed the immunology of thyroid autoimmunity with special reference to the importance of B lymphocytes (B cells) in thyroidal and extrathyroidal Graves' disease (GD), thus providing a framework for the hypothesis that B cell depletion may be beneficial in GD. Additionally, after...... reviewing the efficacy and safety in other autoimmune diseases, we propose that treatment with the B cell-depleting agent Rituximab may become a clinically relevant treatment option in selected cases of GD, particularly when complicated with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy....

  17. MINOR HUMAN-ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO A MOUSE AND CHIMERIC MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY AFTER A SINGLE IV INFUSION IN OVARIAN-CARCINOMA PATIENTS - A COMPARISON OF 5 ASSAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUIST, MR; KENEMANS, P; VANKAMP, GJ; Haisma, Hidde

    The human anti-(mouse Ig) antibody (HAMA) response was measured in serum of 52 patients suspected of having ovarian carcinoma who had received an i.v. injection of either the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) OV-TL 3 F(ab')(2) (n = 28, 1 mg) or the chimeric mouse/human mAb MOv18 (cMOv18; n = 24, 3

  18. Minor human antibody response to a mouse and chimeric monoclonal antibody after a single i.v. infusion in ovarian carcinoma patients: a comparison of five assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, M. R.; Kenemans, P.; van Kamp, G. J.; Haisma, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    The human anti-(mouse Ig) antibody (HAMA) response was measured in serum of 52 patients suspected of having ovarian carcinoma who had received an i.v. injection of either the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) OV-TL 3 F(ab')2 (n = 28, 1 mg) or the chimeric mouse/human mAb MOv18 (cMOv18; n = 24, 3 mg).

  19. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipulendu Jena

    Full Text Available Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63. We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  20. Follow-up of relapsed B-cell lymphoma patients treated with iodine-131-labeled anti-CD20 antibody and autologous stem-cell rescue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, S Y.; Eary, Janet F.; Petersdorf, S H.; Martin, P J.; Maloney, D G.; Applebaum, F. R.; Matthews, D. C.; Bush, S A.; Durack, L. D.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gooley, T A.; Bernstein, I. D.; Press, O. W.

    1997-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising treatment approach for B-cell lymphomas. This is our first opportunity to report long-term follow-up data and late toxicities in 29 patients treated with myeloablative doses of iodine-131-anti-CD20 antibody (anti-B1) and autologous stem-cell rescue. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Trace-labeled biodistribution studies first determined the ability to deliver higher absorbed radiation doses to tumor sites than to lung, liver, or kidney at varying amounts of anti-B1 protein (0.35, 1.7, or 7 mg/kg). Twenty- nine patients received therapeutic infusions of single-agent (131)I- anti-B1, given at the protein dose found optimal in the biodistribution study, labeled with amounts of (131)I (280 to 785 mCi[10.4 to 29.0 GBq]) calculated to deliver specific absorbed radiation doses to the normal organs, followed by autologous stem-cell support. RESULTS: Major responses occurred in 25 patients (86%), with 23 complete responses (CRs; 79%). The nonhematopoietic do se-limiting toxicity was reversible cardiopulmonary insufficiency, which occurred in two patients at RIT doses that delivered > or = 27 Gy to the lungs. With a median follow-up time of 42 months, the estimated overall and progression-free survival rates are 68% and 42%, respectively. Currently, 14 of 29 patients remain in unmaintained remissions that range from 27+ to 87+ months after RIT. Late toxicities have been uncommon except for elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels found in approximately 60% of the subjects. Two patients developed second malignancies, but none have developed myelodysplasia (MDS). CONCLUSION: Myeloablative (131)I-anti- B1 RIT is relatively well tolerated when given with autologous stem- cell support and often results in prolonged remission durations with few late toxicities

  1. Mammalian Cell Culture Clarification: A Case Study Using Chimeric Anti-CEA Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Abol Hassan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular expression of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs in mammalian cell culture provides both opportunities and restrictions for the design of robust harvest and clarification operations. With advances in cell culture media and cell lines, it is now possible to achieve high titers of over 5 g/l for mAbs. However, Mammalian cells are sensitive to breakage due to shear stress that can result in release of proteases and other host cell proteins (HCPs which eventually affects product stability and purity. There is larger number of mAbs undergoing clinical development and it has placed significant importance on platform technologies of process development. Generally, Centrifugation and microfiltration are the primary harvest techniques used in the industry and depth filtration is also used as a step operation on clarification. This study compares the unit operations; centrifugation, microfiltration and depth filtration for maximum recovery of monoclonal antibodies. The results have shown that the depth filtration as more suitable operation for mammalian cell culture clarification since it gives 96% recovery of mAbs in comparison to centrifugation and microfiltration. ABSTRAK: Pengungkapan luar sel dari antibodi monoklon (monoclonal antibodies ((mAbs dalam kultur sel mamalia memberi ruang dan batasan terhadap reka bentuk penuaian yang cekap dan penerangan operasi. Dengan kemajuan dalam media sel kultur dan cell lines (produk yang berupa sel kekal yang digunakan untuk tujuan kajian biologi, kini adalah berkemungkinan untuk memperolehi titer tinggi melebihi 5g/l untuk mAbs [2]. Walaupun begitu, sel mamalia sensitif terhadap retakan disebabkan tegasan ricih yang menyebabkan pengeluaran protease dan hos sel protein yang lain, (host cell proteins (HCPs akhirnya mempengaruhi kestabilan dan keaslian produk. Terdapat mAbs dalam jumlah besar yang masih menjalani pembangunan klinikal dan sesungguhnya ini penting sebagai satu landasan teknologi dalam

  2. Characterization and biodistribution of recombinant and recombinant/chimeric constructs of monoclonal antibody B72.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colcher, D.; Milenic, D.; Roselli, M.

    1989-01-01

    Radiolabeled B72.3 has been administered both i.v. and i.p. in patients with colorectal and ovarian cancer as well as other carcinomas and has been shown to selectively bind to approximately 70-80% of metastatic lesions. Greater than 50% of the patients that have been treated with B72.3 have developed an immunological response to murine IgG after a single injection. In an attempt to minimize the immune response of these patients to the administered murine monoclonal antibody, we developed a recombinant form of the murine B72.3 as well as a recombinant/chimeric antibody, using the variable regions of the murine B72.3 and human heavy chain (gamma 4) and light chain (kappa) constant regions. We report here that both the recombinant B72.3 [rB72.3] and the recombinant/chimeric B72.3 [cB72.3(gamma 4)] IgGs maintain the tissue binding and idiotypic specificity of the native murine IgG. The native B72.3, rB72.3, and cB72.3(gamma 4) IgGs were radiolabeled and the biodistribution of these IgGs was studied in athymic mice bearing human colon carcinoma xenografts (LS-174T). Differences were observed between the cB72.3(gamma 4) and the native B72.3 in the percentage of injected dose/g that localized in the tumor. The somewhat lower absolute amounts of the cB72.3(gamma 4) in the tumor are mostly likely due to the observed more rapid clearance from the blood and body of the mouse as compared to the native B72.3 and rB72.3. All three forms [native B72.3, rB72.3, and cB72.3(gamma 4)] of the IgG, however, were able to localize the colon tumor with similar radiolocalization indices [percentage of injected dose/g in tumor divided by the percentage of injected dose/g in normal tissue

  3. Radiotoxicity of systemically administered 211At-labeled human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody: a long-term survival study with histologic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLendon, Roger E.; Archer, Gary E.; Larsen, Roy H.; Akabani, Gamal; Bigner, Darell D.; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The antitenascin human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody labeled with the α-particle-emitting radionuclide 211 At is of interest as an endo radiotherapeutic agent for the treatment of brain tumors. To facilitate the investigation of 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 in patients, the long-term radiotoxicity of this radiopharmaceutical has been evaluated. Methods and Materials: Antibody labeling was performed using N-succinimidyl 3-[ 211 At]astato-benzoate. After an initial dose-finding experiment, a second toxicity study was carried out at 4 dose levels in groups of 30 non thyroid blocked B6C3F 1 mice per group (15 males, 15 females). Male mice received either saline or 15-81 kBq/g and females received either saline or 16-83 kBq/g of 211 At-labeled antibody. Ten animals (5 males, 5 females) were followed for 6 months and the remainder for 1 year. Results: The lethal dose in 10% of animals (LD 10 ) for 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 was 46 kBq/g in females and 102 kBq/g in males. Toxic effects--perivascular fibrosis of the intraventricular septum of the heart, bone marrow suppression, splenic white pulp atrophy, and spermatic maturational delay--generally were confined to a few animals receiving the highest doses of labeled antibody. Conclusions: The LD 10 of 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 in this mouse strain was about half that of [ 211 At]astatide. These results establish the preclinical maximum tolerated dose of 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 and define in the mouse the target organs for toxicity. These studies will be useful for determining starting doses for clinical studies with 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6

  4. Intraläsionale Therapie niedrig maligner primär kutaner B-Zell-Lymphome mit Anti-CD20-Antikörper: Nebenwirkungen korrelieren mit gutem klinischen Ansprechen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Franziska C; Holstein, Julia; Scheu, Alexander; Fend, Falko; Yazdi, Amir S

    2017-03-01

    Die intraläsionale Gabe von Anti-CD20-Antikörpern (Rituximab) wurde als effektive Therapieoption für Patienten mit niedrig malignen primär kutanen B-Zell-Lymphomen beschrieben. Bis heute wurden allerdings keine Parameter identifiziert, welche reproduzierbar ein gutes klinisches Ansprechen dieser Therapie vorhersagen. Ziel dieser Studie ist, sowohl das klinische Ansprechen und die unerwünschten Nebenwirkungen als auch die Patientenwahrnehmung hinsichtlich intraläsionaler Injektionen von anti-CD20-Antikörpern zur Behandlung indolenter primär kutaner B-Zell-Lymphome im Vergleich mit anderen Therapien zu evaluieren. Elf Patienten mit einem primär kutanen B-Zell-Lymphom, namentlich primär kutanes Keimzentrumslymphom (n = 9) und primär kutanes Marginalzonenlymphom (n = 2), welche mittels intraläsionalem Anti-CD20-Antikörper behandelt wurden, wurden retrospektiv evaluiert hinsichtlich der Ansprechrate und unerwünschter Nebenwirkungen sowie in Bezug auf deren Selbsteinschätzung dieser und anderer Therapien des primär kutanen B-Zell-Lymphoms. Patienten, deren primär kutanes B-Zell-Lymphom mittels intraläsionaler Gabe von Anti-CD20-Antikörper behandelt wurde, zeigten ein komplettes oder partielles Ansprechen in 45 % beziehungsweise 27 % aller Patienten. Speziell Patienten mit grippeähnlichen Symptomen nach erfolgter Injektion zeigten ein gutes Ansprechen. Die Mehrheit der Patienten empfand die Therapie mit Rituximab als die beste Therapie im Vergleich zu anderen Therapien wie beispielsweise chirurgische Exzision oder Radiotherapie. Intraläsionales Rituximab ist eine effektive Therapie mit hoher Patientenzufriedenheit. Starke therapiebedingte Nebenwirkungen wie Fieber, Schüttelfrost und Kopfschmerzen nach Gabe von Rituximab könnten als Indikator für gute Wirksamkeit dienen. © 2017 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Benefit from B-lymphocyte depletion using the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in chronic fatigue syndrome. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øystein Fluge

    Full Text Available Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a disease of unknown aetiology. Major CFS symptom relief during cancer chemotherapy in a patient with synchronous CFS and lymphoma spurred a pilot study of B-lymphocyte depletion using the anti-CD20 antibody Rituximab, which demonstrated significant clinical response in three CFS patients.In this double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study (NCT00848692, 30 CFS patients were randomised to either Rituximab 500 mg/m(2 or saline, given twice two weeks apart, with follow-up for 12 months. Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was not detected in any of the patients. The responses generally affected all CFS symptoms. Major or moderate overall response, defined as lasting improvements in self-reported Fatigue score during follow-up, was seen in 10 out of 15 patients (67% in the Rituximab group and in two out of 15 patients (13% in the Placebo group (p = 0.003. Mean response duration within the follow-up period for the 10 responders to Rituximab was 25 weeks (range 8-44. Four Rituximab patients had clinical response durations past the study period. General linear models for repeated measures of Fatigue scores during follow-up showed a significant interaction between time and intervention group (p = 0.018 for self-reported, and p = 0.024 for physician-assessed, with differences between the Rituximab and Placebo groups between 6-10 months after intervention. The primary end-point, defined as effect on self-reported Fatigue score 3 months after intervention, was negative. There were no serious adverse events. Two patients in the Rituximab group with pre-existing psoriasis experienced moderate psoriasis worsening.The delayed responses starting from 2-7 months after Rituximab treatment, in spite of rapid B-cell depletion, suggests that CFS is an autoimmune disease and may be consistent with the gradual elimination of autoantibodies preceding clinical responses. The present findings will impact

  6. Evaluation of cell death mechanisms activated by the administration of the theranostics radiopharmaceutical "1"7"7Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 in a dose range of 1-5 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez V, B. E.

    2016-01-01

    Radio-immunotherapy with anti-CD20 antibodies significantly increases the rate of remission in patients with CD20 over expressing B-cell lymphomas. Radio-labeled antibodies directed to surface antigens allow delivering scaled doses of radiation to specific targets thus limiting the dose to healthy tissue. Anti-CD20 causes cell death by two major pathways; activating the immune system to destroy malignant cells and inducing the activation of cell death pathways. The "1"7"7Lu is a beta particle emitter (max. 0.497 MeV) with a maximum soft tissue reach of 0.7 mm and a half-life of 6.7 days. Several clinical studies have established a maximum tolerated dose (45m Ci/m"2) for "1"7"7Lu-DOTA-rituximab, which shows a favorable clinical response without hematological toxicity. However, the molecular mechanisms of synergistic activation of anti-CD20 and radionuclide have not been studied. In this work we evaluated by flow cytometry, the activation kinetics of the cell death mechanisms induced by the treatment with "1"7"7Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 from non-Hod king lymphoma cells (Raji). The absorbed radiation dose delivered to the cell nucleus was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, considering the contribution of the beta emissions of the radiopharmaceutical present in the cell membrane and surrounding environment, as well as crossfire. This work shows that the application of radiation doses of 1 to 5 Gy of the radiopharmaceutical "1"7"7Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 are sufficient to induce cell death by apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle. The combination of these factors (continuous delivery of radiation activation of repair mechanisms and increased radio-sensitivity) causes acute activation of the apoptotic program resulting in significant cell death after 96 h of treatment. The temporal analysis of cell death suggests the early activation of apoptosis that is counteracted by the activation of repair processes caused by sustained irradiation, which leads to cell arrest and increases

  7. Radiolabeling and biotinylation of internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96: Potential use of extracorporeal immunoadsorption with enhanced tumor radioactivity retention of Iodine, Indium and Rhenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, JianQing.

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis, methodology of radiolabeling and simultaneous biotinylation for internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96 have been investigated by using three element groups of potential therapeutic radionuclides iodine, indium and rhenium, and their different labeling methods. The biodistribution and kinetics of biotinylated and radiolabeled chiBR96 have been studied in colon carcinoma isografted rats. The potential use of ECIA, based on the biotin-avidin concept, has been evaluated and compared with the approach of avidin 'chase' in the same animal tumor model with respect to an enhancement of tumor-to-normal tissue (T/N) activity ratio. 131 refs

  8. Radiolabeling and biotinylation of internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96: Potential use of extracorporeal immunoadsorption with enhanced tumor radioactivity retention of Iodine, Indium and Rhenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, JianQing

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis, methodology of radiolabeling and simultaneous biotinylation for internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96 have been investigated by using three element groups of potential therapeutic radionuclides iodine, indium and rhenium, and their different labeling methods. The biodistribution and kinetics of biotinylated and radiolabeled chiBR96 have been studied in colon carcinoma isografted rats. The potential use of ECIA, based on the biotin-avidin concept, has been evaluated and compared with the approach of avidin `chase` in the same animal tumor model with respect to an enhancement of tumor-to-normal tissue (T/N) activity ratio. 131 refs.

  9. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Conti, F. [Rheumatology Unit, I Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Chianelli, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Regina apostolorum Hospital, Albano, Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Signore, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-{alpha}, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 111}In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for

  10. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A.; Conti, F.; Chianelli, M.; Scopinaro, F.; Signore, A.

    2010-01-01

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-α, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with 99m Tc or 111 In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for therapy decision-making and

  11. Development of [{sup 62}Zn/{sup 62}Cu]-DOTA-rituximab as a possible novel in vivo PET generator for anti-CD20 antigen imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholipour, Nazila [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Radiopharmacy; Jalilian, Amir R.; Fazaeli, Yousef; Moradkhani, Sedigheh; Bolourinovin, Fateme [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sabzevari, Omid [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Toxicology and Pharmacology; Khalaj, Ali [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Medical Chemistry

    2014-07-01

    In this study, zinc-62 was prepared at radiopharmaceutical grade (for {sup 62}Zn/{sup 62}Cu generator production) using {sup nat}Cu(p, xn) reaction with the production yield of 5.9 mCi/μAh at 30 MeV proton energy (radiochemical separation yield >95%, radionuclidic purity >99% and radiochemical purity >99%). In the next step, rituximab was successively labeled with [{sup 62}Zn]-ZnCl{sub 2} after conjugation with p-SCN-Bz-DOTA followed by molecular filtration and determination of the average number of DOTA conjugated per mAb (6:1) by spectrophotometric method. Radiochemical purity (>97%, measured by ITLC and HPLC), integrity of protein after radiolabeling (gel electrophoresis) and stability of [{sup 62}Zn]-DOTA-rituximab (in final formulation, and human serum) were determined 1-8 h as well as biodistribution studies in wild-type rats followed by coincidence imaging for 6 h. However, the accumulation of the radiolabeled antibody was not consistent with the former reported rituximab conjugates. [{sup 62}Zn]-labeled monoclonal antibodies and fragments can be prepared as potential in vivo PET generators for molecular imaging however, the search for application of stable zinc complexes must be continued.

  12. Generation of chimeric bispecific G250/anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, a tool to combat renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, R. M.; Coney, L. R.; Fleuren, G. J.; Warnaar, S. O.; Litvinov, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (MAb) G250 binds to a tumour-associated antigen, expressed in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), which has been demonstrated to be a suitable target for antibody-mediated immunotherapy. A bispecific antibody having both G250 and anti-CD3 specificity can cross-link G250

  13. Chimeric Monoclonal Antibody Cetuximab Targeting Epidermal Growth Factor-Receptor in Advanced Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, Uwe; Tchernev, Georgi; Lotti, Torello

    2018-01-25

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common malignancy in humans. Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibody cetuximab is an option in case of advanced tumor or metastasis. We present and update of the use of cetuximab in NMSC searching PUBMED 2011-2017. The monoclonal antibody cetuximab against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been investigated for its use in NMSC during the years 2011 to 2017 by a PUBMED research using the following items: "Non-melanoma skin cancer AND cetuximab," "cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma AND cetuximab," and "basal cell carcinoma AND cetuximab", and "cetuximab AND skin toxicity". Available data were analyzed including case reports. Current evidence of cetuximab efficacy in NMSC was mainly obtained in cutaneous SCC and to a lesser extend in BCC. Response rates vary for neoadjuvant, adjuvant, mono- and combined therapy with cetuximab. Management of cutaneous toxicities is necessary. Guidelines are available. Cetuximab is an option for recurrent or advanced NMSC of the skin. It seems to be justified particularly in very high-risk tumors. There is a need for phase III trials.

  14. Construction of a hepatitis B virus neutralizing chimeric monoclonal antibody recognizing escape mutants of the viral surface antigen (HBsAg).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Farid, Samira; Bahadori, Motahareh; Bohne, Felix; Altstetter, Sebastian; Wolff, Lisa; Kazemi, Tohid; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Chudy, Michael; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Protzer, Ulrike; Shokri, Fazel

    2017-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global burden on the health-care system and is considered as the tenth leading cause of death in the world. Over 248 million patients are currently suffering from chronic HBV infection worldwide and annual mortality rate of this infection is 686000. The "a" determinant is a hydrophilic region present in all antigenic subtypes of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), and antibodies against this region can neutralize the virus and are protective against all subtypes. We have recently generated a murine anti-HBs monoclonal antibody (4G4), which can neutralize HBV infection in HepaRG cells and recognize most of the escape mutant forms of HBsAg. Here, we describe the production and characterization of the chimeric human-murine antibody 4G4 (c-4G4). Variable region genes of heavy and light chains of the m-4G4 were cloned and fused to constant regions of human kappa and IgG1 by splice overlap extension (SOE) PCR. The chimeric antibody was expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO)-K1 cells and purified from culture supernatant. Competition ELISA proved that both antibodies bind the same epitope within HBsAg. Antigen-binding studies using ELISA and Western blot showed that c-4G4 has retained the affinity and specificity of the parental murine antibody, and displayed a similar pattern of reactivity to 13 escape mutant forms of HBsAg. Both, the parental and c-4G4 showed a comparably high HBV neutralization capacity in cell culture even at the lowest concentration (0.6μg/ml). Due to the ability of c-4G4 to recognize most of the sub-genotypes and escape mutants of HBsAg, this antibody either alone or in combination with other anti-HBs antibodies could be considered as a potent alternative for Hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) as an HBV infection prophylactic or for passive immunotherapy against HBV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative PET of EGFR expression in xenograft-bearing mice using {sup 64}Cu-labeled cetuximab, a chimeric anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Weibo; Chen, Kai; He, Lina; Cao, Qizhen; Chen, Xiaoyuan [Stanford University School of Medicine, The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA (United States); Koong, Albert [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on the surface of cancer cells, was approved by the FDA to treat patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. It is currently also in advanced-stage development for the treatment of several other solid tumors. Here we report for the first time the quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of EGFR expression in xenograft-bearing mice using {sup 64}Cu-labeled cetuximab. We conjugated cetuximab with macrocyclic chelating agent 1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), labeled with {sup 64}Cu, and tested the resulting {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-cetuximab in seven xenograft tumor models. The tracer uptake measured by PET was correlated with the EGFR expression quantified by western blotting. The estimated human dosimetry based on the PET data in Sprague-Dawley rats was also calculated. MicroPET imaging showed that {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-cetuximab had increasing tumor activity accumulation over time in EGFR-positive tumors but relatively low uptake in EGFR-negative tumors at all times examined (<5%ID/g). There was a good correlation (R {sup 2} = 0.80) between the tracer uptake (measured by PET) and the EGFR expression level (measured by western blotting). Human dosimetry estimation indicated that the tracer may be safely administered to human patients for tumor diagnosis, with the dose-limiting organ being the liver. The success of EGFR-positive tumor imaging using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-cetuximab can be translated into the clinic to characterize the pharmacokinetics, to select the right population of patients for EGFR-targeted therapy, to monitor the therapeutic efficacy of anti-EGFR treatment, and to optimize the dosage of either cetuximab alone or cetuximab in combination with other therapeutic agents. (orig.)

  16. Quantitative PET of EGFR expression in xenograft-bearing mice using 64Cu-labeled cetuximab, a chimeric anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Weibo; Chen, Kai; He, Lina; Cao, Qizhen; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Koong, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on the surface of cancer cells, was approved by the FDA to treat patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. It is currently also in advanced-stage development for the treatment of several other solid tumors. Here we report for the first time the quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of EGFR expression in xenograft-bearing mice using 64 Cu-labeled cetuximab. We conjugated cetuximab with macrocyclic chelating agent 1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), labeled with 64 Cu, and tested the resulting 64 Cu-DOTA-cetuximab in seven xenograft tumor models. The tracer uptake measured by PET was correlated with the EGFR expression quantified by western blotting. The estimated human dosimetry based on the PET data in Sprague-Dawley rats was also calculated. MicroPET imaging showed that 64 Cu-DOTA-cetuximab had increasing tumor activity accumulation over time in EGFR-positive tumors but relatively low uptake in EGFR-negative tumors at all times examined ( 2 0.80) between the tracer uptake (measured by PET) and the EGFR expression level (measured by western blotting). Human dosimetry estimation indicated that the tracer may be safely administered to human patients for tumor diagnosis, with the dose-limiting organ being the liver. The success of EGFR-positive tumor imaging using 64 Cu-DOTA-cetuximab can be translated into the clinic to characterize the pharmacokinetics, to select the right population of patients for EGFR-targeted therapy, to monitor the therapeutic efficacy of anti-EGFR treatment, and to optimize the dosage of either cetuximab alone or cetuximab in combination with other therapeutic agents. (orig.)

  17. Variation in N-linked carbohydrate chains in different batches of two chimeric monoclonal IgG1 antibodies produced by different murine SP2/0 transfectoma cell subclones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergwerff, A A; Stroop, C J; Murray, B; Holtorf, A P; Pluschke, G; Van Oostrum, J; Kamerling, J P; Vliegenthart, J F

    1995-06-01

    Two chimeric human/murine monoclonal antibodies were constructed by substitution of the murine constant regions with human gamma 1 and kappa constant regions for heavy and light chains, respectively. The chimeric human/murine molecules are anti-idiotypic antibodies, meaning that they were directed against the antigen binding site in the variable region of another antibody. Antibody batches were produced under identical production conditions, using two selected SP2/0 myeloma cell subclones, which produce chimeric antibodies with different variable regions, but identical constant regions. Several samples were collected during the production of the antibodies in hollow-fibre reactors. The heavy chain, but not the light chain, of the two different chimeric IgG1 antibodies is glycosylated. Structural analysis of the enzymically released N-linked carbohydrate chains by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, as well as by chromatographic profiling, demonstrated that the collection of N-glycans comprises a small amount of monoantennary, and for the greater part diantennary structures. The N-glycans are completely (alpha 1-->6)-fucosylated at the innermost GlcNAc residue. The antennae of the neutral diantennary N-glycans are built up from GlcNAc beta 1-->2, Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->2 or Gal alpha 1-->3G alpha 1 beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->2 elements, whereas the antennae of the neutral monoantennary carbohydrate chains have only (beta 1-->2)-linked GlcNAc residues. Galactosylation of the GlcNAc beta 1-->2Man alpha 1-->6 branch occurs four times more frequently than that of the GlcNAc beta 1-->2Man alpha 1-->3 branch, independently of the production batch. A small amount of the diantennary N-glycans are mono- or disialylated, carrying N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) or N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), exclusively (alpha 2-->6)-linked to beta Gal. Analysis of the different production batches demonstrates that the structures of the N-linked carbohydrate chains are identical in the two

  18. Chimeric bispecific OC/TR monoclonal antibody mediates lysis of tumor cells expressing the folate-binding protein (MOv18) and displays decreased immunogenicity in patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, R. M.; Warnaar, S. O.; Sanborn, D.; Lamers, C. H.; Bolhuis, R. L.; Litvinov, S. V.; Zurawski, V. R.; Coney, L. R.

    1997-01-01

    The bispecific OC/TR monoclonal antibody (mAb) cross-links the CD3 molecule on T cells with the human folate-binding protein (FBP), which is highly expressed on nonmucinous ovarian carcinomas. Clinical trials of patients with ovarian carcinoma with the OC/TR mAb have shown some complete and partial

  19. Development of β-lactoglobulin-specific chimeric human IgEκ monoclonal antibodies for in vitro safety assessment of whey hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipping, Karen; Simons, Peter J; Buelens-Sleumer, Laura S; Cox, Linda; den Hartog, Marcel; de Jong, Niels; Teshima, Reiko; Garssen, Johan; Boon, Louis; Knippels, Léon M J

    2014-01-01

    Cow's milk-derived whey hydrolysates are nutritional substitutes for allergic infants. Safety or residual allergenicity assessment of these whey hydrolysates is crucial. Currently, rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells expressing the human IgE receptor α-chain (huFcεRIα-RBL-2H3), sensitized with serum IgE from cow's milk allergic children, are being employed to assess in vitro residual allergenicity of these whey hydrolysates. However, limited availability and inter-lot variation of these allergic sera impede standardization of whey hydrolysate safety testing in degranulation assays. An oligoclonal pool of chimeric human (chu)IgE antibodies against bovine β-lactoglobulin (a major allergen in whey) was generated to increase sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of existing degranulation assays. Mice were immunized with bovine β-lactoglobulin, and subsequently the variable domains of dissimilar anti-β-lactoglobulin mouse IgG antibodies were cloned and sequenced. Six chimeric antibodies were generated comprising mouse variable domains and human constant IgE/κ domains. After sensitization with this pool of anti-β-lactoglobulin chuIgEs, huFcεRIα-expressing RBL-2H3 cells demonstrated degranulation upon cross-linking with whey, native 18 kDa β-lactoglobulin, and 5-10 kDa whey hydrolysates, whereas a 3 kDa whey hydrolysate and cow's milk powder (mainly casein) showed no degranulation. In parallel, allergic serum IgEs were less sensitive. In addition, our pool anti-β-lactoglobulin chuIgEs recognized multiple allergenic immunodominant regions on β-lactoglobulin, which were also recognized by serum IgEs from cow's milk allergic children. Usage of our 'unlimited' source and well-defined pool of β-lactoglobulin-specific recombinant chuIgEs to sensitize huFcεRIα on RBL-2H3 cells showed to be a relevant and sensitive alternative for serum IgEs from cow's milk allergic patients to assess safety of whey-based non-allergic hydrolyzed formula.

  20. In vitro evaluation of the astatinated chimeric monoclonal antibody U36, a potential candidate for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestor, M.; Anniko, M. [Uppsala University, Unit of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Persson, M. [Uppsala University, Unit of Urology, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala University, Unit of Biomedical Radiation Science, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala (Sweden); Dongen, G.A.M.S. van [Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jensen, H.J. [Righshospitalet, PET and Cyclotron Unit, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Copenhagen (Denmark); Lundqvist, H.; Tolmachev, V. [Uppsala University, Unit of Biomedical Radiation Science, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the properties of the astatinated chimeric MAb (cMAb) U36 as a conjugate to selectively target and eradicate head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). cMAb U36 was labelled with {sup 211}At via the linker N-succinimidyl 4-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate (SPMB). The quality of the conjugate was extensively evaluated for binding and internalisation capacity, and compared with {sup 125}I-SPMB-cMAb U36. The cellular toxicity of the astatinated conjugate was assessed in two types of in vitro growth assay and compared with {sup 131}I-labelled cMAb U36 (directly labelled). Comparisons between {sup 211}At-cMAb U36 and {sup 125}I-cMAb U36 demonstrated an optimal functional capacity of the labelled products. Immunoreactivity and affinity assays showed high immunoreactive fractions (>93%), and an affinity in good agreement between the astatinated and iodinated antibodies. For both conjugates, specific binding to HNSCC cells could be demonstrated, as well as some internalisation. Retention of the astatinated conjugate was just slightly lower than for the iodinated conjugate and still reasonable for therapeutic use (31{+-}2% vs 42.6{+-}1.0% at 22 h), demonstrating no adverse effects from astatination of the antibody. Studies on cellular toxicity demonstrated a dose-dependent and antigen-specific cellular toxicity for {sup 211}At-cMAb U36, with about 10% cell survival at 50 decays per cell. The {sup 131}I-labelled conjugate was not as efficient, with a surviving cell fraction of about 50% at 55 decays per cell. (orig.)

  1. In vitro evaluation of the astatinated chimeric monoclonal antibody U36, a potential candidate for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestor, M.; Anniko, M.; Persson, M.; Dongen, G.A.M.S. van; Jensen, H.J.; Lundqvist, H.; Tolmachev, V.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the properties of the astatinated chimeric MAb (cMAb) U36 as a conjugate to selectively target and eradicate head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). cMAb U36 was labelled with 211 At via the linker N-succinimidyl 4-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate (SPMB). The quality of the conjugate was extensively evaluated for binding and internalisation capacity, and compared with 125 I-SPMB-cMAb U36. The cellular toxicity of the astatinated conjugate was assessed in two types of in vitro growth assay and compared with 131 I-labelled cMAb U36 (directly labelled). Comparisons between 211 At-cMAb U36 and 125 I-cMAb U36 demonstrated an optimal functional capacity of the labelled products. Immunoreactivity and affinity assays showed high immunoreactive fractions (>93%), and an affinity in good agreement between the astatinated and iodinated antibodies. For both conjugates, specific binding to HNSCC cells could be demonstrated, as well as some internalisation. Retention of the astatinated conjugate was just slightly lower than for the iodinated conjugate and still reasonable for therapeutic use (31±2% vs 42.6±1.0% at 22 h), demonstrating no adverse effects from astatination of the antibody. Studies on cellular toxicity demonstrated a dose-dependent and antigen-specific cellular toxicity for 211 At-cMAb U36, with about 10% cell survival at 50 decays per cell. The 131 I-labelled conjugate was not as efficient, with a surviving cell fraction of about 50% at 55 decays per cell. (orig.)

  2. A canine chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting PD-L1 and its clinical efficacy in canine oral malignant melanoma or undifferentiated sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Takagi, Satoshi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Izumi, Yusuke; Deguchi, Tatsuya; Nakajima, Chie; Kato, Yukinari; Yamamoto, Keiichi; Uemura, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-08-21

    Immunotherapy targeting immune checkpoint molecules, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1), using therapeutic antibodies has been widely used for some human malignancies in the last 5 years. A costimulatory receptor, PD-1, is expressed on T cells and suppresses effector functions when it binds to its ligand, PD-L1. Aberrant PD-L1 expression is reported in various human cancers and is considered an immune escape mechanism. Antibodies blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 axis induce antitumour responses in patients with malignant melanoma and other cancers. In dogs, no such clinical studies have been performed to date because of the lack of therapeutic antibodies that can be used in dogs. In this study, the immunomodulatory effects of c4G12, a canine-chimerised anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody, were evaluated in vitro, demonstrating significantly enhanced cytokine production and proliferation of dog peripheral blood mononuclear cells. A pilot clinical study was performed on seven dogs with oral malignant melanoma (OMM) and two with undifferentiated sarcoma. Objective antitumour responses were observed in one dog with OMM (14.3%, 1/7) and one with undifferentiated sarcoma (50.0%, 1/2) when c4G12 was given at 2 or 5 mg/kg, every 2 weeks. c4G12 could be a safe and effective treatment option for canine cancers.

  3. Chimeric opioid peptides: tools for identifying opioid receptor types.

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, G X; Miyajima, A; Yokota, T; Arai, K; Goldstein, A

    1990-01-01

    We synthesized several chimeric peptides in which the N-terminal nine residues of dynorphin-32, a peptide selective for the kappa opioid receptor, were replaced by opioid peptides selective for other opioid receptor types. Each chimeric peptide retained the high affinity and type selectivity characteristic of its N-terminal sequence. The common C-terminal two-thirds of the chimeric peptides served as an epitope recognized by the same monoclonal antibody. When bound to receptors on a cell surf...

  4. Chimeric opioid peptides: Tools for identifying opioid receptor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, G.; Miyajima, A.; Yokota, T.; Arai, K.; Goldstein, A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors synthesized several chimeric [125J-labelled] peptides in which the N-terminal nine residues of dynorphin-32, a peptide selective for the κ opioid receptor, were replaced by opioid peptides selective for other opioid receptor types. Each chimeric peptide retained the high affinity and type selectivity characteristic of its N-terminal sequence. The common C-terminal two-thirds of the chimeric peptides served as an epitope recognized by the same monoclonal antibody. When bound to receptors on a cell surface or membrane preparation, these peptides could still bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody. These chimeric peptides should be useful for isolating μ, δ, and κ opioid receptors and for identifying opioid receptors on transfected cells in expression cloning procedures. The general approach using chimeric peptides should be applicable to other peptide receptors

  5. Automated Manufacturing of Potent CD20-Directed Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Clinical Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Dominik; Mockel-Tenbrinck, Nadine; Drechsel, Katharina; Barth, Carola; Mauer, Daniela; Schaser, Thomas; Kolbe, Carolin; Al Rawashdeh, Wael; Brauner, Janina; Hardt, Olaf; Pflug, Natali; Holtick, Udo; Borchmann, Peter; Assenmacher, Mario; Kaiser, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    The clinical success of gene-engineered T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), as manifested in several clinical trials for the treatment of B cell malignancies, warrants the development of a simple and robust manufacturing procedure capable of reducing to a minimum the challenges associated with its complexity. Conventional protocols comprise many open handling steps, are labor intensive, and are difficult to upscale for large numbers of patients. Furthermore, extensive training of personnel is required to avoid operator variations. An automated current Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant process has therefore been developed for the generation of gene-engineered T cells. Upon installation of the closed, single-use tubing set on the CliniMACS Prodigy™, sterile welding of the starting cell product, and sterile connection of the required reagents, T cells are magnetically enriched, stimulated, transduced using lentiviral vectors, expanded, and formulated. Starting from healthy donor (HD) or lymphoma or melanoma patient material (PM), the robustness and reproducibility of the manufacturing of anti-CD20 specific CAR T cells were verified. Independent of the starting material, operator, or device, the process consistently yielded a therapeutic dose of highly viable CAR T cells. Interestingly, the formulated product obtained with PM was comparable to that of HD with respect to cell composition, phenotype, and function, even though the starting material differed significantly. Potent antitumor reactivity of the produced anti-CD20 CAR T cells was shown in vitro as well as in vivo. In summary, the automated T cell transduction process meets the requirements for clinical manufacturing that the authors intend to use in two separate clinical trials for the treatment of melanoma and B cell lymphoma.

  6. Rituximab-induced interstitial lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naqibullah, Matiuallah; Shaker, Saher B; Bach, Karen S

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX), a mouse/human chimeric anti-CD20 IgG1 monoclonal antibody has been effectively used as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy regimen to treat lymphoma since 1997. In addition, it has been used to treat idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, systemic lupus erythematous...

  7. A phase III randomized trial comparing glucocorticoid monotherapy versus glucocorticoid and rituximab in patients with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birgens, Henrik Sverre; Frederiksen, Henrik; Hasselbalch, Hans C

    2013-01-01

    The impact of first-line treatment with the anti-CD 20 chimeric monoclonal antibody rituximab in patients with warm-antibody reactive autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (WAIHA) is unknown. We report the first randomized study of 64 patients with newly diagnosed WAIHA who received prednisolone and ritu...

  8. Close-up of the alpha-1,3-Gal epitope as defined by a monoclonal chimeric IgE and human serum using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Melanie; Michel, Yvonne; Wallach, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    of an alpha-Gal-specific murine IgM antibody was employed to construct chimeric IgE and IgG antibodies. Reactivity and specificity of the resulting antibodies were assessed by means of ELISA and receptor binding studies. Using defined carbohydrates, interaction of the IgE and human serum was assessed...... by mediator release assays, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and STD NMR analyses. The alpha-Gal-specific chimeric IgE and IgG antibodies were proven functional regarding interaction with antigen and Fc receptors. SPR measurements demonstrated affinities in the micromolar range. In contrast to a reference...

  9. Dissociation between peripheral blood chimerism and tolerance to hindlimb composite tissue transplants: preferential localization of chimerism in donor bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahhal, Dina N; Xu, Hong; Huang, Wei-Chao; Wu, Shengli; Wen, Yujie; Huang, Yiming; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2009-09-27

    Mixed chimerism induces donor-specific tolerance to composite tissue allotransplants (CTAs). In the present studies, we used a nonmyeloablative conditioning approach to establish chimerism and promote CTA acceptance. Wistar Furth (RT1A(u)) rats were conditioned with 600 to 300 cGy total body irradiation (TBI, day-1), and 100 x 10(6) T-cell-depleted ACI (RT1A(abl)) bone marrow cells were transplanted on day 0, followed by a 11-day course of tacrolimus and one dose of antilymphocyte serum (day 10). Heterotopic osteomyocutaneous flap transplantation was performed 4 to 6 weeks after bone marrow transplantation. Mixed chimerism was initially achieved in almost all recipients, but long-term acceptance of CTA was only achieved in rats treated with 600 cGy TBI. When anti-alphabeta-T-cell receptor (TCR) monoclonal antibody (mAb) (day-3) was added into the regimens, donor chimerism was similar to recipients preconditioned without anti-alphabeta-TCR mAb. However, the long-term CTA survival was significantly improved in chimeras receiving more than or equal to 300 cGy TBI plus anti-alphabeta-TCR mAb. Higher levels of donor chimerism were associated with CTA acceptance. The majority of flap acceptors lost peripheral blood chimerism within 6 months. However, donor chimerism persisted in the transplanted bone at significantly higher levels compared with other hematopoietic compartments. The compartment donor chimerism may be responsible for the maintenance of tolerance to CTA. Long-term acceptors were tolerant to a donor skin graft challenge even in the absence of peripheral blood chimerism. Mixed chimerism established by nonmyeloablative conditioning induces long-term acceptance of CTA, which is associated with persistent chimerism preferentially in the transplanted donor bone.

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: State of the Art and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Motta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies have been the most successful therapeutics ever brought to cancer treatment by immune technologies. The use of monoclonal antibodies in B-cell Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL represents the greatest example of these advances, as the introduction of the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab has had a dramatic impact on how we treat this group of diseases today. Despite this success, several questions about how to optimize the use of monoclonal antibodies in NHL remain open. The best administration schedules, as well as the optimal duration of rituximab treatment, have yet to be determined. A deeper knowledge of the mechanisms underlying resistance to rituximab is also necessary in order to improve the activity of this and of similar therapeutics. Finally, new antibodies and biological agents are entering the scene and their advantages over rituximab will have to be assessed. We will discuss these issues and present an overview of the most significant clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies for NHL treatment carried out to date.

  11. Human Monoclonal antibodies - A dual advantaged weapon to tackle cancer and viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurosawa G

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs are powerful tools as pharmaceutical agents to tackle cancer and infectious diseases. Antibodies (Abs are present in blood at the concentration of 10 mg/ml and play a vital role in humoral immunity. Many therapeutic Abs have been reported since early 1980s. Human mAb technology was not available at that time and only the hybridoma technology for making mouse mAbs had been well established. In order to avoid various potential problems associated with use of mouse proteins, two different technologies to make human/mouse chimeric Ab as well as humanized Ab were developed crossing the various hurdles for almost twenty years and mAb based drugs such as rituximab, anti-CD20 Ab, and trastuzumab, anti-HER2 Ab, have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer in 1997 and 1998, respectively. These drugs are well recognized and accepted by clinicians for treatment of patients. The clinical outcome of the treatment with mAb has strongly encouraged the researchers to develop much more refined mAbs. In addition to chimeric Ab and humanized Ab, now human mAbs can be produced by two technologies. The first is transgenic mice that produce human Abs and the second is human Ab libraries using phage-display system. Until now, several hundreds of mAbs against several tens of antigens (Ags have been developed and subjected to clinical examinations. While many Abs have been approved as therapeutic agents against hematological malignancies, the successful mAbs against solid tumors are still limited. However, many researchers have suggested that developing potential mAbs agents should be possible and incurable cancers may become curable within another decade. Though it is hard to say explicitly that this prediction is correct, a passion for this development should be worth supporting to lead to a successful outcome which will lead to patient benefits. Our institute

  12. Monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamada, Hiyoshimaru

    1987-01-01

    Some aspects of monoclonal antibodies are described, centering on studies made by the author and those presented at the Second International Conference on Monoclonal Antibody Immunoconjugates for Cancer held in March this year (1987). The history of immuno-nuclear medicine and procedures for producing monoclonal antibodies are briefly outlined. Monoclonal antibodies are immunoglobulins. Here, the structure of IgG, which is used most frequently, is described. An IgG is composed of two antigen binding fragments (Fab) and one crystallizable fragment (Fc). The end portion of a Fab reacts with an antigen. One of the major applications of immuno-nuclear medicine is the diagnosis of cancer. As label nucleides, 131 I and 111 I were selected in most cases in the past while 123 I and 99m Tc are currently used more often. Advantages and disadvantages of this diagnosis method is discussed citing studies presented at the First (1986) and Second (1987) International Conference on Monoclonal Antibody Immunoconjugates for Cancer. The present status of the application of monoclonal antibodies to treatment of cancer is also described. (Nogami, K.)

  13. Studies of tolerance induction through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys. Method for detection of chimeric cells and effect of thymic irradiation on induction of tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo

    1996-01-01

    To establish the method for the detection of chimerism in cynomologus monkeys, we tested cross reactivity of various anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to cynomolgus monkeys. In 29 mAb we tested, only three monoclonal anti-HLA antibodies crossreacted with lymphocytes of monkeys. With these mAb, chimeric cell can be detected up to 1% by flow cytometric analysis (study 1). Utilizing the method we developed in study 1, we applied the regimen that induces mixed chimerism and skin graft tolerance in mice to renal allotransplantation of cynomolgus monkey. Regimen A includes non-lethal dose of total body irradiation (TBI), administration of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) for 3 days, donor bone marrow infusion and 45 days course of cyclosporine (CYA) administration. We added 7 Gy of thymic irradiation on day-6 in regimen B and on day-1 in regimen C. Although all monkeys in regimen A and B consistently developed chimerism, they rejected kidney allografts soon after stopping CYA. In contrast, 4 monkeys out of 5 failed to develop chimerism in regimen C, but renal allograft tolerance was induced in one monkey who developed chimerism in regimen C. In conclusion, the induction of chimerism is considered necessary but not sufficient for tolerance induction. (author)

  14. Studies of tolerance induction through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys. Method for detection of chimeric cells and effect of thymic irradiation on induction of tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    To establish the method for the detection of chimerism in cynomologus monkeys, we tested cross reactivity of various anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to cynomolgus monkeys. In 29 mAb we tested, only three monoclonal anti-HLA antibodies crossreacted with lymphocytes of monkeys. With these mAb, chimeric cell can be detected up to 1% by flow cytometric analysis (study 1). Utilizing the method we developed in study 1, we applied the regimen that induces mixed chimerism and skin graft tolerance in mice to renal allotransplantation of cynomolgus monkey. Regimen A includes non-lethal dose of total body irradiation (TBI), administration of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) for 3 days, donor bone marrow infusion and 45 days course of cyclosporine (CYA) administration. We added 7 Gy of thymic irradiation on day-6 in regimen B and on day-1 in regimen C. Although all monkeys in regimen A and B consistently developed chimerism, they rejected kidney allografts soon after stopping CYA. In contrast, 4 monkeys out of 5 failed to develop chimerism in regimen C, but renal allograft tolerance was induced in one monkey who developed chimerism in regimen C. In conclusion, the induction of chimerism is considered necessary but not sufficient for tolerance induction. (author)

  15. Chimeric Pestivirus Experimental Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Ilona; Blome, Sandra; Beer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric pestiviruses have shown great potential as marker vaccine candidates against pestiviral infections. Exemplarily, we describe here the construction and testing of the most promising classical swine fever vaccine candidate "CP7_E2alf" in detail. The description is focused on classical cloning technologies in combination with reverse genetics.

  16. The biological characteristics of anti-CD71 mouse/human chimeric antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuo; Jiang Lin; Lei Ping; Zhu Huifen; Shen Guanxin; Cui Wuren; Wang Yanggong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the biological characteristics of an anti-CD71 mouse/human chimeric antibody (D2C). Methods: Analysis of the chimeric Ab production in culture supernatant was made by the standard concentration curve method with ELISA. The antibody was purified by DEAE-Sephredax-A50 ion-exchange chromatography and was confirmed by SDS-PAGE. The competition inhibition studies for binding to the same epitope on CD71 were performed between the chimeric Ab(D2C) in the culture supernatant was about 0.5-5 μg/ml in 5-day cultures when seeded at 1 x 10 5 cells/5ml compared with 12.5-25 μg/ml in the supernatant from their parental monoclonal Ab(7579). The purified chimeric Ab(D2C) from mouse ascetics was 1-2 mg/ml. The SDS-PAGE analysis of purified chimeric Ab(D2C) with discontinuous system confirmed two protein bands of 55 kDa and 25 kDa. It was clear that both chimeric Ab(D2C) and murine monoclonal Ab (7579) compete effectively to join the same epitope of CD71 each other. The chimeric antibody's affinity constant (Ka), quantitated by Scatchard analysis, is about 9.34-9.62 x 10 9 L/mol. Conclusion: The chimeric Ab(D2C) produced from the transfectomas is stable. The binding capacity of the chimeric Ab(D2C) to the antigen (CD71) was retained

  17. Chimeric infectious DNA clones, chimeric porcine circoviruses and uses thereof

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to infectious DNA clones, infectious chimeric DNA clones of porcine circovirus (PCV), vaccines and means of protecting pigs against viral infection or postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) caused by PCV2. The new chimeric infectious DNA clone and its derived, avirulent chimeric virus are constructed from the nonpathogenic PCV1 in which the immunogenic ORF gene of the pathogenic PCV2 replaces a gene of the nonpathogenic PCV1, preferably in the same pos...

  18. Targeted treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical potential of obinutuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolej L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lukáš Smolej 4th Department of Internal Medicine – Hematology, University Hospital Hradec Králové and Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Králové, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic Abstract: Introduction of targeted agents revolutionized the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL in the past decade. Addition of chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab to chemotherapy significantly improved efficacy including overall survival (OS in untreated fit patients; humanized anti-CD52 antibody alemtuzumab and fully human anti-CD20 antibody ofatumumab lead to improvement in refractory disease. Novel small molecule inhibitors such as ibrutinib and idelalisib demonstrated excellent activity and were very recently licensed in relapsed/refractory CLL. Obinutuzumab (GA101 is the newest monoclonal antibody approved for the treatment of CLL. This novel, glycoengineered, type II humanized anti-CD20 antibody is characterized by enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and direct induction of cell death compared to type I antibodies. Combination of obinutuzumab and chlorambucil yielded significantly better OS in comparison to chlorambucil monotherapy in untreated comorbid patients. These results led to approval of obinuzutumab for the treatment of CLL. Numerous clinical trials combining obinutuzumab with other cytotoxic drugs and novel small molecules are currently under way. This review focuses on the role of obinutuzumab in the treatment of CLL. Keywords: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, anti-CD20 antibodies, chlorambucil, rituximab, ofatumumab, obinutuzumab, overall survival

  19. Characterization of hemopoietic stem cell chimerism in antibody-facilitated bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francescutti, L.H.; Gambel, P.; Wegmann, T.G.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have previously described a model for bone marrow transplantation that involves preparation of the host with monoclonal antibody against class I or class II antigens instead of irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. This allows engraftment and subsequent repopulation of the host by donor tissue. They have previously reported on chimerism in the peripheral blood of P1----(P1 X P2)F1 animals. In this report, the authors describe the examination of the bone marrow and spleen stem cell chimerism of these antibody-facilitated (AF) chimeras, by determining, with an isozyme assay, the phenotype of methylcellulose colonies grown from stem cells. They have found a correlation between peripheral blood chimerism and the stem cell constitution of both spleen and bone marrow. The peripheral blood chimerism also correlates with the level of chimerism in macrophages derived from peritoneal exudate cells. These findings indicate that assaying the peripheral blood of such chimeras provides an excellent indication of the degree of chimerism at the stem cell level and stands in sharp contrast to the level of chimerism in certain lymphoid compartments

  20. Nuclear oncology with monoclonal antibodies and peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosono, Makoto

    1998-01-01

    Imaging and therapy using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies have proved useful in many clinical studies. However, immunogenicity of mouse antibodies to human and insufficient tumor-to-normal tissue ratios remained to be solved. Chimerization and humanization by genetic engineering, and multistep targeting techniques have enabled lower immunogenicity and higher tumor-to-normal tissue contrast. Peptides like somatostatin-analogs have been reportedly useful in imaging tumors, which are either somatostatin receptor positive or negative. Elevated normal tissue accumulation of radiolabeled peptides is a drawback in aiming internal radiation therapy. (author). 51 refs

  1. [International classification of various types of monoclonal antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J

    2009-01-01

    Significant advances in the development of monoclonal antibodies ("mabs") have been acknowledged during the last two decades. Successive developments led to the marketing of murine antibodies ("o-mab" first, followed by chimeric antibodies ("xi-mab"), humanised antibodies ("zu-mab") and, finally, human monoclonal antibodies ("u-mab"). In order to facilitate the distinction between the various monoclonal antibodies used in clinical practice, an international nomenclature has been proposed with the use of a specific suffix corresponding to the origine/source of "mabs" preceded by an infix referring to the medicine's target. The efforts in developing new types of monoclonal antibodies aimed at improving their pharmacokinetics (longer half-life), pharmacodynamics (better efficacy because of stronger affinity to human receptor), and safety profile (less antigenic and immunogenic reactions). These progresses could be obtained thanks to the remarkable development of molecular biotechnology.

  2. Extracorporeal adsorption therapy: A Method to improve targeted radiation delivered by radiometal-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemecek, Eneida R.; Green, Damian J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Pagal, John M.; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, A. K.; Durack, Lawrence D.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Wilbur, D. S.; Nilsson, Rune; Sandberg, Bengt; Press, Oliver W.

    2008-01-01

    Many investigators have demonstrated the ability to treat hematologic malignancies with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting hematopoietic antigens such as anti-CD20 and anti-CD45. [1-5] Although the remission rates achieved with radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are relatively high, many patients subsequently relapse presumably due to suboptimal delivery of enough radiation to eradicate the malignancy. The dose-response of leukemia and lymphoma to radiation has been proven. Substantial amounts of radiation can be delivered by RIT if followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation to rescue the bone marrow from myeloablation.[ref] However, the maximum dose of RIT that can be used is still limited by toxicity to normal tissues affected by nonspecific delivery of radiation. Efforts to improve RIT focus on improving the therapeutic ratios of radiation in target versus non-target tissues by removing the fraction of radioisotope that fails to bind to target tissues and circulates freely in the bloodstream perfusing non-target tissues. Our group and others have explored several alternatives for removal of unbound circulating antibody. [refs] One such method, extracorporeal adsorption therapy (ECAT) consists of removing unbound antibody by a method similar to plasmapheresis after critical circulation time and distribution of antibody into target tissues have been achieved. Preclinical studies of ECAT in murine xenograft models demonstrated significant improvement in therapeutic ratios of radioactivity. Chen and colleagues demonstrated that a 2-hour ECAT procedure could remove 40 to 70% of the radioactivity from liver, lung and spleen. [ref] Although isotope concentration in the tumor was initially unaffected, a 50% decrease was noted approximately 36 hours after the procedure. This approach was also evaluated in a limited phase I pilot study of patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. [ref] After radiographic confirmation of tumor localization of a test dose of anti-CD20

  3. Tetravalent anti-CD20/CD3 bispecific antibody for the treatment of B cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chia-Yen; Chen, Gregory J.; Tai, Pei-Han; Yang, Yu-Chen [Institute of Biologics, Development Center for Biotechnology, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Yu-Shen, E-mail: yshsu@advagene.com.tw [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, Advagene Biopharma, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Mingi, E-mail: mingi.chang@advagene.com.tw [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, Advagene Biopharma, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chuan-Lung, E-mail: fabio@dcb.org.tw [Institute of Biologics, Development Center for Biotechnology, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2016-05-13

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) are second generation antibodies for therapeutic application in immunotherapy. One of the major strategies of the bsAb platform is the recruitment of immune effector T cells by incorporating an anti-CD3 domain. A bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE), with one end having an affinity for CD3 and the other end with affinity for CD19, has been approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, due to their small size and lack of Fc region, these single-chain variable fragment (scFv) bsAbs have short half-lives in vivo. Additionally, poor solubility, structural instability, and low production yields have also become major challenges in the bulk production process. To overcome these challenges, we have engineered a tetravalent bsAb with bivalent binding specificity for the CD20 and CD3 antigen in an immunoglobulin G (IgG) format. The fusion of the anti-CD3 scFvs to the CD20 antibody via a linker-hinge domain (LHD) results in improved antibody stabilization and properties. Here we demonstrate this antibody's highly efficient cancer cell elimination in a dose-dependent manner in a CD20-expressing B lymphoblastoid cell line in vitro. Our data suggest the potential clinical application of this bsAb for the treatment of CD20-expressing B cell malignancies. - Highlights: • A bispecific antibody (bsAb) can increase immunotherapeutic efficacy. • A tetravalent bsAb with binding specificity for the CD20 and CD3 antigens is proposed. • A linker-hinge domain (LHD) within the bsAb results in improved antibody properties.

  4. Antigenic properties of a transport-competent influenza HA/HIV Env chimeric protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Ling; Sun Yuliang; Lin Jianguo; Bu Zhigao; Wu Qingyang; Jiang, Shibo; Steinhauer, David A.; Compans, Richard W.; Yang Chinglai

    2006-01-01

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the HIV Env glycoprotein contains conserved neutralizing epitopes which are not well-exposed in wild-type HIV Env proteins. To enhance the exposure of these epitopes, a chimeric protein, HA/gp41, in which the gp41 of HIV-1 89.6 envelope protein was fused to the C-terminus of the HA1 subunit of the influenza HA protein, was constructed. Characterization of protein expression showed that the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins were expressed on cell surfaces and formed trimeric oligomers, as found in the HIV Env as well as influenza HA proteins. In addition, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein expressed on the cell surface can also be cleaved into 2 subunits by trypsin treatment, similar to the influenza HA. Moreover, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein was found to maintain a pre-fusion conformation. Interestingly, the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins on cell surfaces exhibited increased reactivity to monoclonal antibodies against the HIV Env gp41 subunit compared with the HIV-1 envelope protein, including the two broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine expressing the HA/gp41 chimeric protein induced antibodies against the HIV gp41 protein and these antibodies exhibit neutralizing activity against infection by an HIV SF162 pseudovirus. These results demonstrate that the construction of such chimeric proteins can provide enhanced exposure of conserved epitopes in the HIV Env gp41 and may represent a novel vaccine design strategy for inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV

  5. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirick, G R; Bradt, B M; Denardo, S J; Denardo, G L

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ((90)yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ((131)I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) anti-CD20 MAbs for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, assays were developed to determine HAGA (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to ''humanize'' MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  6. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L.

    2004-01-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ( 9 0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ( 1 31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades

  7. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L. [Calfornia Univ., Sacramento (United States). Davis Medical Center

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ({sup 9}0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ({sup 1}31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  8. Chimeric enzymes with improved cellulase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Baker, John O; Himmel, Michael E

    2015-03-31

    Nucleic acid molecules encoding chimeric cellulase polypeptides that exhibit improved cellulase activities are disclosed herein. The chimeric cellulase polypeptides encoded by these nucleic acids and methods to produce the cellulases are also described, along with methods of using chimeric cellulases for the conversion of cellulose to sugars such as glucose.

  9. Liver transplantation : chimerism, complications and matrix metalloproteinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, Willem Rogier ten

    2011-01-01

    Chimerism after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the main focus of the studies described in this thesis. The first study showed that chimerism of different cell lineages within the liver graft does occur after OLT. Subsequently, in allogeneic blood stem cell recipients, chimerism was

  10. Prognosis in monoclonal proteinaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaar, Cornelis Gerardus

    2006-01-01

    Monoclonal proteinaemia (M-proteinemia) is associated with multiple myeloma (MM) or other hematological malignancies. In the absence of these diseases the term MGUS (Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance) is used. During 1991-1993 1464 patients with newly diagnosed M-proteinemia in the

  11. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  12. Nuclear medicine: Monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, K.; Sakahara, H.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Torizuka, K.; Yokoyama, A.

    1986-01-01

    Antitumor monoclonal antibody was successfully labeled with Tc-99m by using dithiosemicarbazone (DTS) as a bifunctional chelating agent. In the first step, DTS was coupled to antibody without loss of immunoreactivity; the compound then efficiently formed a neutral 1:1 chelate with pentavalent or tetravalent Tc-99m. Imaging with Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody to human osteosarcoma (OST-7) clearly displayed a small tumor in nude mice at 6 and 24 hours after intravenous administration. The tumor-to-blood ratio of the Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody was higher than that of a radioiodinated antibody and similar to that of an In-111-labeled antibody. Thus, conjugation of DTS to monoclonal antibody followed by radiometalation is a simple and efficient method of preparing Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody

  13. Minor displacements in the insertion site provoke major differences in the induction of antibody responses by chimeric parvovirus-like particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rueda, P.; Hurtado, A.; del Barrio, M.

    1999-01-01

    inserted into these positions was well recognized by the specific monoclonal antibody C3 by immunoelectron microscopy. BALB/c mice immunized with these chimeric C3:B CPV:VLPs were able to elicit an strong neutralizing antibody response (>3 log(10) units) against poliovirus type 1 (Mahoney strain...

  14. Generation and characterization of a human-mouse chimeric high-affinity antibody that detects the DYKDDDDK FLAG peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Koki; Koga, Tomoaki; Sasaki, Fumiyuki; Ueno, Ayumi; Saeki, Kazuko; Okuno, Toshiaki; Yokomizo, Takehiko

    2017-05-13

    DYKDDDDK peptide (FLAG) is a useful tool for investigating the function and localization of proteins whose antibodies (Abs) are not available. We recently established a high-affinity monoclonal antibody (mAb) for FLAG (clone 2H8). The 2H8 Ab is highly sensitive for detecting FLAG-tagged proteins by flowcytometry and immunoprecipitation, but it can yield nonspecific signals in immunohistochemistry of mouse tissues because it is of mouse origin. In this study, we reduced nonspecific signals by generating a chimeric 2H8 Ab with Fc fragments derived from human immunoglobulin. We fused a 5' terminal cDNA fragments for the Fab region of 2H8 mAb with 3' terminal cDNA fragments for Fc region of human IgG1. We transfected both chimeric plasmids and purified the resulting human-mouse chimeric 2H8. The chimeric 2H8 Ab successfully detected FLAG-tagged proteins in flowcytometry with anti-human IgG secondary Ab with comparable sensitivity to 2H8 mAb. Importantly, chimeric 2H8 detected specific FLAG peptide signals without nonspecific signals in immunohistochemical analysis with mouse tissues. This human-mouse chimeric high-affinity anti-FLAG Ab will prove useful for future immunohistochemical analysis of mouse tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Study of conjugation and radiolabeling of monoclonal antibody rituximab for use in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massicano, Adriana Vidal Fernandes

    2011-01-01

    Lymphomas are tumors originated from the transformation of a lymphocyte in the lymphatic system. The most common lymphoma is the Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). Advances in immunology and molecular biology have been improving NHL's detection and treatment strategies development, such as Radioimmunotherapy (RIT). Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody used as immunotherapeutic to treat refractory or relapsed NHL. The goal of the present work was to conjugate this antibody to DOTA-NHS-ester bifunctional chelator and to radiolabel it with 177 Lu radioisotope in order to develop a radio immunotherapeutic agent for NHL's treatment. Different rituximab to DOTA molar ratios (1:5, 1:10, 1:20, 1:50, 1:250, 1:500 and 1:1000) were evaluated in order to determine the best condition for obtaining the highest radiochemical purity of radio immunotherapeutic. The stability of the unlabeled immuno conjugated was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for up to 240 days in different storage conditions. The stability of the labeled preparations was evaluated either after storing at 2-8 degree C or incubation in human serum at 37 degree C. The binding to serum proteins was also determined. In vivo studies were performed in healthy Swiss mice, in order to characterize the biological properties of labeled conjugate. Finally, preliminary studies of radio immuno conjugated competitive binding to CD20 positive Raji cells were carried out in order to analyze if the process of conjugation and radiolabeling compromises the immunoreactivity of the antibody. The conjugation applying lower antibody to chelator molar ratios (1:5, 1:10 and 1:20) showed high stability when stored for up to 240 days in different conditions. The HPLC analysis showed that the monoclonal antibody conjugated in molar ratio 1:50 was labeled with higher radiochemical purity (> 95%) when purified in PD-10 column. This conjugate showed reasonable stability at 2-8 degree C. The analysis of the

  16. Kidney Versus Islet Allograft Survival After Induction of Mixed Chimerism With Combined Donor Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, Tetsu; Ko, Dicken S C; Boskovic, Svjetlan; O'Neil, John J; Chipashvili, Vaja; Koulmanda, Maria; Hotta, Kiyohiko; Kawai, Kento; Nadazdin, Ognjenka; Smith, R Neal; Cosimi, A B; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported successful induction of transient mixed chimerism and long-term acceptance of renal allografts in MHC mismatched nonhuman primates. In this study, we attempted to extend this tolerance induction approach to islet allografts. A total of eight recipients underwent MHC mismatched combined islet and bone marrow (BM) transplantation after induction of diabetes by streptozotocin. Three recipients were treated after a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen that included low-dose total body and thymic irradiation, horse Atgam (ATG), six doses of anti-CD154 monoclonal antibody (mAb), and a 1-month course of cyclosporine (CyA) (Islet A). In Islet B, anti-CD8 mAb was administered in place of CyA. In Islet C, two recipients were treated with Islet B, but without ATG. The results were compared with previously reported results of eight cynomolgus monkeys that received combined kidney and BM transplantation (Kidney A) following the same conditioning regimen used in Islet A. The majority of kidney/BM recipients achieved long-term renal allograft survival after induction of transient chimerism. However, prolonged islet survival was not achieved in similarly conditioned islet/BM recipients (Islet A), despite induction of comparable levels of chimerism. In order to rule out islet allograft loss due to CyA toxicity, three recipients were treated with anti-CD8 mAb in place of CyA. Although these recipients developed significantly superior mixed chimerism and more prolonged islet allograft survival (61, 103, and 113 days), islet function was lost soon after the disappearance of chimerism. In Islet C recipients, neither prolonged chimerism nor islet survival was observed (30 and 40 days). Significant improvement of mixed chimerism induction and islet allograft survival were achieved with a CyA-free regimen that included anti-CD8 mAb. However, unlike the kidney allograft, islet allograft tolerance was not induced with transient chimerism. Induction of more

  17. Perforator chimerism for the reconstruction of complex defects: A new chimeric free flap classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Youn Hwan; Ghanem, Ali M

    2015-11-01

    Complex defects present structural and functional challenges to reconstructive surgeons. When compared to multiple free flaps or staged reconstruction, the use of chimeric flaps to reconstruct such defects have many advantages such as reduced number of operative procedures and donor site morbidity as well as preservation of recipient vessels. With increased popularity of perforator flaps, chimeric flaps' harvest and design has benefited from 'perforator concept' towards more versatile and better reconstruction solutions. This article discusses perforator based chimeric flaps and presents a practice based classification system that incorporates the perforator flap concept into "Perforator Chimerism". The authors analyzed a variety of chimeric patterns used in 31 consecutive cases to present illustrative case series and their new classification system. Accordingly, chimeric flaps are classified into four types. Type I: Classical Chimerism, Type II: Anastomotic Chimerism, Type III: Perforator Chimerism and Type IV Mixed Chimerism. Types I on specific source vessel anatomy whilst Type II requires microvascular anastomosis to create the chimeric reconstructive solution. Type III chimeric flaps utilizes the perforator concept to raise two components of tissues without microvascular anastomosis between them. Type IV chimeric flaps are mixed type flaps comprising any combination of Types I to III. Incorporation of the perforator concept in planning and designing chimeric flaps has allowed safe, effective and aesthetically superior reconstruction of complex defects. The new classification system aids reconstructive surgeons and trainees to understand chimeric flaps design, facilitating effective incorporation of this important reconstructive technique into the armamentarium of the reconstruction toolbox. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111 In, 67 Ga and 131 I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  19. Development of new versions of anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies with potentially reduced immunogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Weizhu; Wang Ling; Li Bohua; Wang Hao; Hou Sheng; Hong Xueyu; Zhang Dapeng; Guo Yajun

    2008-01-01

    Despite the widespread clinical use of CD34 antibodies for the purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, all the current anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are murine, which have the potential to elicit human antimouse antibody (HAMA) immune response. In the present study, we developed three new mouse anti-human CD34 mAbs which, respectively, belonged to class I, class II and class III CD34 epitope antibodies. In an attempt to reduce the immunogenicity of these three murine mAbs, their chimeric antibodies, which consisted of mouse antibody variable regions fused genetically to human antibody constant regions, were constructed and characterized. The anti-CD34 chimeric antibodies were shown to possess affinity and specificity similar to that of their respective parental murine antibodies. Due to the potentially better safety profiles, these chimeric antibodies might become alternatives to mouse anti-CD34 antibodies routinely used for clinical application

  20. EXPERIENCE OF TREATMENT WITH RITUXIMAB IN PATIENT WITH JUVENILE POLYARTERITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Alexeeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case report of severe course of nodular polyarteritis. The disease was highly active, aggressive, and refractory to treatment with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide combined with plasmapheresis and drugs for microcirculation improvement. The treatment with chimerical anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies — rituximab — was successful. Symptoms of intoxication and tromboangiatic syndrome decreased in 4 weeks. Disease was stopped up to 16th week. The case report demonstrates high efficacy of rituximab: patient with severe nodular polyarteritis remains clinical and laboratory remission during 52 weeks.Key words: children, nodular polyarteritis, rituximab.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (2: 193–200

  1. Suicide Gene Therapy to Increase the Safety of Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Casucci, Attilio Bondanza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding motif of a monoclonal antibody (mAb with the signal transduction machinery of the T-cell receptor (TCR. The genetic modification of T lymphocytes with chimeric receptors specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs allows for the redirection towards tumor cells. Clinical experience with CAR-redirected T cells suggests that antitumor efficacy associates with some degree of toxicity, especially when TAA expression is shared with healthy tissues. This situation closely resembles the case of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, wherein allorecognition causes both the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL effect and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Suicide gene therapy, i.e. the genetic induction of a conditional suicide phenotype into donor T cells, enables dissociating the GVL effect from GVHD. Applying suicide gene modification to CAR-redirected T cells may therefore greatly increase their safety profile and facilitate their clinical development.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.Y.T.; Sikora, K.

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MCAs) can be used to differentiate between normal and neoplastic cells and thus exploited for diagnostic and, ultimately, therapeutic gain. The evidence for the existence of human tumour antigens is reviewed. Several areas of diagnosis are already benefiting from the application of the monoclonal technology. Immunohistology can help the pathologist with difficult diagnostic problems. New classifications of lymphoma and leukaemia can be based on specific surface molecules. Similarly, the detection of shed tumour antigens is already established as part of the routine assessment of many patients with common solid tumours. Isotopically labeled monoclonal antibodies have been used to localise primary and metastatic tumours. The use of antibodies in this way is not only a promising diagnostic tool but also the first step in studying the possibility of arming antibodies to provide therapeutic agents. Such trials are currently in progress. (Auth.)

  3. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanale, Michelle A; Younes, Anas

    2007-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutic approaches have had a significant impact in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab's development as an anti-CD20 antibody heralded a new era in treatment approaches for NHL. While rituximab was first shown to be effective in the treatment of relapsed follicular lymphoma, it is now standard monotherapy for front-line treatment of follicular lymphoma, and is also used in conjunction with chemotherapy for other indolent, intermediate and aggressive B-cell lymphomas. The development of rituximab has led to intense interest in this type of therapeutic approach and to development and approval of the radioimmunoconjugates of rituximab, (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan and (131)I-tositumomab, which have added to the repertoire of treatments for relapsed follicular lymphoma and increased interest in developing other conjugated antibodies. Since rituximab is a chimeric antibody, there is a need to develop fully humanised antibodies, such as IMMU-106 (hA20), in order to minimise infusion reactions and eliminate the development of human antibodies against the drug. Further clinical evaluation of antibodies has been based largely on our knowledge of antigen expression on the surface of lymphoma cells and has led to the development of antibodies against CD22 (unconjugated epratuzumab and calicheamicin conjugated CMC-544 [inotuzumab ozogamicin]), CD80 (galiximab), CD52 (alemtuzumab), CD2 (MEDI-507 [siplizumab]), CD30 (SGN-30 and MDX-060 [iratumumab]), and CD40 (SGN-40). Furthermore, the VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitor bevacizumab, which was first approved for the treatment of colon cancer is currently under investigation in NHL, and agonists rather than antibodies to TRAIL (tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) [rApo2L/TRAIL, HGS-ETR1{mapatumumab}, HGS-ETR2] are currently being investigated as treatments for both advanced solid tumours and NHL. Knowledge of the ability of cancer cells to become

  4. Combination of two anti-CD5 monoclonal antibodies synergistically induces complement-dependent cytotoxicity of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitgaard, Josephine L; Koefoed, Klaus; Geisler, Christian; Gadeberg, Ole V; Frank, David A; Petersen, Jørgen; Jurlander, Jesper; Pedersen, Mikkel W

    2013-10-01

    The treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) has been improved by introduction of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that exert their effect through secondary effector mechanisms. CLL cells are characterized by expression of CD5 and CD23 along with CD19 and CD20, hence anti-CD5 Abs that engage secondary effector functions represent an attractive opportunity for CLL treatment. Here, a repertoire of mAbs against human CD5 was generated and tested for ability to induce complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) both as single mAbs and combinations of two mAbs against non-overlapping epitopes on human CD5. The results demonstrated that combinations of two mAbs significantly increased the level of CDC compared to the single mAbs, while no enhancement of ADCC was seen with anti-CD5 mAb combinations. High levels of CDC and ADCC correlated with low levels of Ab-induced CD5 internalization and degradation. Importantly, an anti-CD5 mAb combination enhanced CDC of CLL cells when combined with the anti-CD20 mAbs rituximab and ofatumumab as well as with the anti-CD52 mAb alemtuzumab. These results suggest that an anti-CD5 mAb combination inducing CDC and ADCC may be effective alone, in combination with mAbs against other targets or combined with chemotherapy for CLL and other CD5-expressing haematological or lymphoid malignancies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  6. Development of a mouse-feline chimeric antibody against feline tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOKI, Tomoyoshi; TAKANO, Tomomi; HOHDATSU, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal inflammatory disease caused by FIP virus infection. Feline tumor necrosis factor (fTNF)-alpha is closely involved in the aggravation of FIP pathology. We previously described the preparation of neutralizing mouse anti-fTNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb 2–4) and clarified its role in the clinical condition of cats with FIP using in vitro systems. However, administration of mouse mAb 2–4 to cat may lead to a production of feline anti-mouse antibodies. In the present study, we prepared a mouse-feline chimeric mAb (chimeric mAb 2–4) by fusing the variable region of mouse mAb 2–4 to the constant region of feline antibody. The chimeric mAb 2–4 was confirmed to have fTNF-alpha neutralization activity. Purified mouse mAb 2–4 and chimeric mAb 2–4 were repeatedly administered to cats, and the changes in the ability to induce feline anti-mouse antibody response were investigated. In the serum of cats treated with mouse mAb 2–4, feline anti-mouse antibody production was induced, and the fTNF-alpha neutralization effect of mouse mAb 2–4 was reduced. In contrast, in cats treated with chimeric mAb 2–4, the feline anti-mouse antibody response was decreased compared to that of mouse mAb 2–4-treated cats. PMID:27264736

  7. Is Efficacy of the Anti-Cd20 Antibody Rituximab Preventing Hemolysis Due to Passenger Lymphocyte Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Kazuma; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2017-02-01

    Passenger lymphocyte syndrome (PLS) often occurs after ABO-mismatched solid organ and/or bone marrow transplantation between a donor and recipient. Viable donor B-lymphocytes transferred during organ transplantation produce antibodies against recipient red cell antigens, leading to hemolysis. The incidence of PLS has been reported to be around 9% after renal transplantation. A previous report showed that rituximab (Rit) was useful for treatment of PLS in allogeneic stem cell transplantation, bowel transplant and severe cases of hemolysis. However, the effectiveness of Rit in preventing PLS after renal transplantation has not yet been evaluated. The participants in this study were 85 patients who had undergone ABO-mismatched renal transplantation from January 2005 to April 2013. Rit was administered to these patients before transplantation. None of the patients that received Rit treatment developed PLS. Thus administration of Rit before transplantation effectively controlled the production of antibodies by B-lymphocytes, which probably prevented the development of PLS. © 2016 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  8. Development of an analytical method to assess the occupational health risk of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies using LC-HRMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, Lars M H; Klassen, Martin D; Jaeger, Martin; Teutenberg, Thorsten; Tuerk, Jochen

    2018-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are a group of commonly used therapeutics, whose occupational health risk is still discussed controversially. The long-term low-dose exposure side effects are insufficiently evaluated; hence, discussions are often based on a theoretical level or extrapolating side effects from therapeutic dosages. While some research groups recommend applying the precautionary principle for monoclonal antibodies, others consider the exposure risk too low for measures taken towards occupational health and safety. However, both groups agree that airborne monoclonal antibodies have the biggest risk potential. Therefore, we developed a peptide-based analytical method for occupational exposure monitoring of airborne monoclonal antibodies. The method will allow collecting data about the occupational exposure to monoclonal antibodies. Thus, the mean daily intake for personnel in pharmacies and the pharmaceutical industry can be determined for the first time and will help to substantiate the risk assessment by relevant data. The introduced monitoring method includes air sampling, sample preparation and detection by liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry of individual monoclonal antibodies as well as sum parameter. For method development and validation, a chimeric (rituximab), humanised (trastuzumab) and a fully humanised (daratumumab) monoclonal antibody are used. A limit of detection between 1 μg per sample for daratumumab and 25 μg per sample for the collective peptide is achieved. Graphical abstract Demonstration of the analytical workflow, from the release of monoclonal antibodies to the detection as single substances as well as sum parameter.

  9. Posttransplant chimeric antigen receptor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melody; Zakrzewski, Johannes; James, Scott; Sadelain, Michel

    2018-03-08

    Therapeutic T-cell engineering is emerging as a powerful approach to treat refractory hematological malignancies. Its most successful embodiment to date is based on the use of second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19, a cell surface molecule found in most B-cell leukemias and lymphomas. Remarkable complete remissions have been obtained with autologous T cells expressing CD19 CARs in patients with relapsed, chemo-refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Allogeneic CAR T cells may also be harnessed to treat relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, the use of donor T cells poses unique challenges owing to potential alloreactivity. We review different approaches to mitigate the risk of causing or aggravating graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), including CAR therapies based on donor leukocyte infusion, virus-specific T cells, T-cell receptor-deficient T cells, lymphoid progenitor cells, and regulatory T cells. Advances in CAR design, T-cell selection and gene editing are poised to enable the safe use of allogeneic CAR T cells without incurring GVHD. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Production and characterisation of a neutralising chimeric antibody against botulinum neurotoxin A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Prigent

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins, produced by Clostridium botulinum bacteria, are the causative agent of botulism. This disease only affects a few hundred people each year, thus ranking it among the orphan diseases. However, botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A is the most potent toxin known to man. Due to their potency and ease of production, these toxins were classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC as Category A biothreat agents. For several biothreat agents, like BoNT/A, passive immunotherapy remains the only possible effective treatment allowing in vivo neutralization, despite possible major side effects. Recently, several mouse monoclonal antibodies directed against a recombinant fragment of BoNT/A were produced in our laboratory and most efficiently neutralised the neurotoxin. In the present work, the most powerful one, TA12, was selected for chimerisation. The variable regions of this antibody were thus cloned and fused with the constant counterparts of human IgG1 (kappa light and gamma 1 heavy chains. Chimeric antibody production was evaluated in mammalian myeloma cells (SP2/0-Ag14 and insect cells (Sf9. After purifying the recombinant antibody by affinity chromatography, the biochemical properties of chimeric and mouse antibody were compared. Both have the same very low affinity constant (close to 10 pM and the chimeric antibody exhibited a similar capacity to its parent counterpart in neutralising the toxin in vivo. Its strong affinity and high neutralising potency make this chimeric antibody interesting for immunotherapy treatment in humans in cases of poisoning, particularly as there is a probable limitation of the immunological side effects observed with classical polyclonal antisera from heterologous species.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Halpern, J L; Lundgren, B

    1989-01-01

    To increase understanding of the antigenic structure of Pneumocystis carinii, we developed monoclonal antibodies to rat and human P. carinii. The specificity of the antibodies was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and immunoblot studies. Only one of five monoclonal antibodies to rat P. carinii r...

  12. Chimeric polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wogulis, Mark; Sweeney, Matthew; Heu, Tia

    2017-06-14

    The present invention relates to chimeric GH61 polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the chimeric GH61 polypeptides; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the chimeric GH61 polypeptides.

  13. Chimerism in health, transplantation and autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Marije; Kremer Hovinga, Idske Cornelia Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The term “chimerism” originates from Greek mythology and refers to the creature Chimaera, whose body was in front a lion, the back a serpent and the midsection a goat. In medicine, the term chimerism refers to an individual, organ or part consisting of tissues of diverse genetic constitution.

  14. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  15. Generation of Gene-Engineered Chimeric DNA Molecules for Specific Therapy of Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesheva, Vera; Szekeres, Zsuzsanna; Mihaylova, Nikolina; Dimitrova, Iliyana; Nikolova, Maria; Erdei, Anna; Prechl, Jozsef

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the development of self-reactive B and T cells and autoantibody production. In particular, double-stranded DNA-specific B cells play an important role in lupus progression, and their selective elimination is a reasonable approach for effective therapy of SLE. DNA-based vaccines aim at the induction of immune response against the vector-encoded antigen. Here, we are exploring, as a new DNA-based therapy of SLE, a chimeric DNA molecule encoding a DNA-mimotope peptide, and the Fv but not the immunogenic Fc fragment of an FcγRIIb-specific monoclonal antibody. This DNA construct was inserted in the expression vector pNut and used as a naked DNA vaccine in a mouse model of lupus. The chimeric DNA molecule can be expressed in eukaryotic cells and cross-links cell surface receptors on DNA-specific B cells, delivering an inhibitory intracellular signal. Intramuscular administration of the recombinant DNA molecule to lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice prevented increase in IgG anti-DNA antibodies and was associated with a low degree of proteinuria, modulation of cytokine profile, and suppression of lupus nephritis. PMID:23075110

  16. Immunization with a novel chimeric peptide representing B and T cell epitopes from HER2 extracellular domain (HER2 ECD) for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Manijeh; Keyhanfar, Mehrnaz; Jafarian, Abbas; Mohabatkar, Hassan; Rabbani, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    Because of direct stimulating immune system against disease, vaccination or active immunotherapy is preferable compared to passive immunotherapy. For this purpose, a newly designed chimeric peptide containing epitopes for both B and T cells from HER2 ECD subdomain III was proposed. To evaluate the effects of the active immunization, a discontinuous B cell epitope peptide was selected based on average antigenicity by bioinformatics analysis. The selected peptide was collinearly synthesized as a chimera with a T helper epitope from the protein sequence of measles virus fusion (208-302) using the GPSL linker. Three mice were immunized with the chimeric peptide. Reactive antibodies with HER2 protein in ELISA and immunofluorescence assays with no cross-reactivity were generated. The 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay indicated that the anti-peptide sera had inhibitory effects on proliferation of SK-BR-3 cells. Hence, the newly designed, discontinuous chimeric peptide representing B and T cell epitopes from subdomain III of HER2-ECD can form the basis for future vaccines design, where these data can be applied for monoclonal antibody production targeting the distinct epitope of HER2 receptor compared to the two broadly used anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies, Herceptin and pertuzumab.

  17. An E2-Substituted Chimeric Pestivirus With DIVA Vaccine Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Nielsen, Jens

    An advantage of the use of chimeric pestiviruses as modified live vaccines against classical swine fever (CSF) resides in their capacity to be manipulated to achieve the characteristics desired for safe and efficacious DIVA vaccines. We have recently generated a new chimeric virus, Riems26_E2gif...... vaccinated pigs were protected. This new chimeric pestivirus represents a C-strain based DIVA vaccine candidate that can be differentiated based on CSFV E2 specific antibodies....

  18. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of a novel chimeric pestivirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Reimann, Ilona

    2007-01-01

    A chimeric pestivirus of border disease virus Gifhorn and bovine viral diarrhea virus CP7 (Meyers et al., 1996) was constructed. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of the chimeric virus were studied in a vaccination–challenge experiment in pigs. The chimeric virus proved...... to be avirulent and neither chimeric virus nor viral RNA was detected in serum after vaccination. The safety of the vaccine was tested by horizontal transmission to sentinel pigs, which remained uninfected. The vaccine efficacy was examined by challenge infection with classical swine fever virus (CSFV) Eystrup...

  19. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  20. Development of a chimeric Plasmodium berghei strain expressing the repeat region of the P. vivax circumsporozoite protein for in vivo evaluation of vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Diego A; Yadava, Anjali; Angov, Evelina; Maurizio, Paul L; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Zavala, Fidel

    2013-08-01

    The development of vaccine candidates against Plasmodium vivax-the most geographically widespread human malaria species-is challenged by technical difficulties, such as the lack of in vitro culture systems and availability of animal models. Chimeric rodent Plasmodium parasites are safe and useful tools for the preclinical evaluation of new vaccine formulations. We report the successful development and characterization of chimeric Plasmodium berghei parasites bearing the type I repeat region of P. vivax circumsporozoite protein (CSP). The P. berghei-P. vivax chimeric strain develops normally in mosquitoes and produces highly infectious sporozoites that produce patent infection in mice that are exposed to the bites of as few as 3 P. berghei-P. vivax-infected mosquitoes. Using this transgenic parasite, we demonstrate that monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against P. vivax CSP strongly inhibit parasite infection and thus support the notion that these antibodies play an important role in protective immunity. The chimeric parasites we developed represent a robust model for evaluating protective immune responses against P. vivax vaccines based on CSP.

  1. Dgroup: DG02629 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ritumomab tiuxetan (genetical recombination) (JAN) ... ATC code: V10XX02 Antineoplastic, Radioactive agent, Anti-CD20 antibody... Monoclonal antibody CD20 [HSA:931] [KO:K06466] ... Genomic biomarker: CD20 [HSA:931

  2. Tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.; Hilgers, J.

    1987-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens have been identified, but so far none of these are tumor specific. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been used for imaging of a wide variety of tumors with success. Radiolabeling of antibody is usually done with iodine isotopes of which 123 I is the best candidate for radioimmunodetection purposes. The labeling of antibodies through chelates makes it possible to use metal radioisotopes like 111 In, which is the best radioisotope for imaging with monoclonal antibodies due to its favorable half-life of 2.5 days. Usually imaging cannot be performed within 24 h after injection, but clearance of antibody can be increased by using F(ab) 2 of Fab. Another approach is to clear non-bound antibody by a second antibody, directed against the first. The detection limit of immunoimaging is about 2 cm, but will be improved by tomography or SPECT. There is still a high false positive and false negative rate, which makes it impossible to use radioimmunodetection as the only technique for diagnosis of tumors. In combination with other detection techniques, tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies can improve diagnosis. 44 refs.; 3 tabs

  3. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1990-05-01

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author) [pt

  4. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of cetuximab by a chimeric protein encompassing interleukin-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Maria Carmen; Minute, Luna; López, Ascensión; Pérez-Ruiz, Elisabeth; Gomar, Celia; Vasquez, Marcos; Inoges, Susana; Etxeberria, Iñaki; Rodriguez, Inmaculada; Garasa, Saray; Mayer, Jan-Peter Andreas; Wirtz, Peter; Melero, Ignacio; Berraondo, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    Enhancement of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) may potentiate the antitumor efficacy of tumor-targeted monoclonal antibodies. Increasing the numbers and antitumor activity of NK cells is a promising strategy to maximize the ADCC of standard-of-care tumor-targeted antibodies. For this purpose, we have preclinically tested a recombinant chimeric protein encompassing the sushi domain of the IL15Rα, IL-15, and apolipoprotein A-I (Sushi-IL15-Apo) as produced in CHO cells. The size-exclusion purified monomeric fraction of this chimeric protein was stable and retained the IL-15 and the sushi domain bioactivity as measured by CTLL-2 and Mo-7e cell proliferation and STAT5 phosphorylation in freshly isolated human NK and CD8 + T cells. On cell cultures, Sushi-IL15-Apo increases NK cell proliferation and survival as well as spontaneous and antibody-mediated cytotoxicity. Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1) is the receptor for ApoA-I and is expressed on the surface of tumor cells. SR-B1 can adsorb the chimeric protein on tumor cells and can transpresent IL-15 to NK and CD8 + T cells. A transient NK-humanized murine model was developed to test the increase of ADCC attained by the chimeric protein in vivo . The EGFR + human colon cancer cell line HT-29 was intraperitoneally inoculated in immune-deficient Rag2 -/- γc -/- mice that were reconstituted with freshly isolated PBMCs and treated with the anti-EGFR mAb cetuximab. The combination of the Sushi-IL15-Apo protein and cetuximab reduced the number of remaining tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity and delayed tumor engraftment in the peritoneum. Furthermore, Sushi-IL15-Apo increased the anti-tumor effect of a murine anti-EGFR mAb in Rag1 -/- mice bearing subcutaneous MC38 colon cancer transfected to express EGFR. Thus, Sushi-IL15-Apo is a potent tool to increase the number and the activation of NK cells to promote the ADCC activity of antibodies targeting tumor antigens.

  5. Chimeric Lyssavirus Glycoproteins with Increased Immunological Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallet, Corinne; Jacob, Yves; Bahloul, Chokri; Drings, Astrid; Desmezieres, Emmanuel; Tordo, Noël; Perrin, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    The rabies virus glycoprotein molecule (G) can be divided into two parts separated by a flexible hinge: the NH2 half (site II part) containing antigenic site II up to the linear region (amino acids [aa] 253 to 275 encompassing epitope VI [aa 264]) and the COOH half (site III part) containing antigenic site III and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. The structural and immunological roles of each part were investigated by cell transfection and mouse DNA-based immunization with homogeneous and chimeric G genes formed by fusion of the site II part of one genotype (GT) with the site III part of the same or another GT. Various site II-site III combinations between G genes of PV (Pasteur virus strain) rabies (GT1), Mokola (GT3), and EBL1 (European bat lyssavirus 1 [GT5]) viruses were tested. Plasmids pGPV-PV, pGMok-Mok, pGMok-PV, and pGEBL1-PV induced transient expression of correctly transported and folded antigens in neuroblastoma cells and virus-neutralizing antibodies against parental viruses in mice, whereas, pG-PVIII (site III part only) and pGPV-Mok did not. The site III part of PV (GT1) was a strong inducer of T helper cells and was very effective at presenting the site II part of various GTs. Both parts are required for correct folding and transport of chimeric G proteins which have a strong potential value for immunological studies and development of multivalent vaccines. Chimeric plasmid pGEBL1-PV broadens the spectrum of protection against European lyssavirus genotypes (GT1, GT5, and GT6). PMID:9847325

  6. Mining Naïve Rabbit Antibody Repertoires by Phage Display for Monoclonal Antibodies of Therapeutic Utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haiyong; Nerreter, Thomas; Chang, Jing; Qi, Junpeng; Li, Xiuling; Karunadharma, Pabalu; Martinez, Gustavo J; Fallahi, Mohammad; Soden, Jo; Freeth, Jim; Beerli, Roger R; Grawunder, Ulf; Hudecek, Michael; Rader, Christoph

    2017-09-15

    Owing to their high affinities and specificities, rabbit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have demonstrated value and potential primarily as basic research and diagnostic reagents, but, in some cases, also as therapeutics. To accelerate access to rabbit mAbs bypassing immunization, we generated a large naïve rabbit antibody repertoire represented by a phage display library encompassing >10 billion independent antibodies in chimeric rabbit/human Fab format and validated it by next-generation sequencing. Panels of rabbit mAbs selected from this library against two emerging cancer targets, ROR1 and ROR2, revealed high diversity, affinity, and specificity. Moreover, ROR1- and ROR2-targeting rabbit mAbs demonstrated therapeutic utility as components of chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells, further corroborating the value of the naïve rabbit antibody library as a rich and virtually unlimited source of rabbit mAbs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Chimeric Amino Acid Rearrangements as Immune Targets in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Chimeric Amino Acid Rearrangements as Immune Targets in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...that result from gene rearrangements given their high frequency relative to somatic point mutations. Gene rearrangements can yield novel chimeric

  8. Monoclonal antibodies technology. Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevado Castro, B.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Immunization. The first step in preparing useful monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is to immunize an animal (Balb/c for example) with an appropriate antigen. Methods (only for soluble antigen): Solubilize selected antigen in Phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.2-7.4, ideally at a final concentration per animal between 10 to 50 μg/ml. It is recommended that the antigen under consideration be incorporated into the emulsion adjuvants in 1:1 volumetric relation. We commonly use Frend's adjuvant (FA) to prepared immunized solution. The first immunization should be prepared with complete FA, and the another could be prepared with incomplete FA. It is recommended to inject mice with 0.2 ml intraperitoneal (ip) or subcutaneous (sc). Our experience suggests the sc route is the preferred route. A minimum protocol for immunizing mice to generate cells for preparing hybridomas is s follows: immunize sc on day 0, boost sc on day 21, take a trial bleeding on day 26; if antibody titters are satisfactory, boost ip on day 35 with antigen only, and remove the spleen to obtain cells for fusion on day 38. Fusion protocol. The myeloma cell line we are using is X63 Ag8.653. At the moment of fusion myeloma cells need a good viability (at least a 95%). 1. Remove the spleen cells from immunized mice using sterile conditions. An immune spleen should yield between 7 a 10x10 7 nucleated cells. 2. Place the spleen in 20 ml of serum-free RPMI 1640 in a Petri dish. Using a needle and syringe, inject the spleen with medium to distend and disrupt the spleen stroma and free the nucleated cells. 3. Flush the cell suspension with a Pasteur pipet to disperse clumps of cells. 4. Centrifuge the spleen cell suspension at 250g for 10 min. Resuspend the pellet in serum-free RPMI 1640. Determine cell concentration using Neuhabuer chamber. 5. Mix the myeloma cells and spleen cells in a conical 50-ml tube in serum-free RPMI 1640, 1 x10 7 spleen cells to 1x10 6 myeloma cells (ratio 10:1). Centrifuge

  9. Vectors expressing chimeric Japanese encephalitis dengue 2 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y; Wang, S; Wang, X

    2014-01-01

    Vectors based on self-replicating RNAs (replicons) of flaviviruses are becoming powerful tool for expression of heterologous genes in mammalian cells and development of novel antiviral and anticancer vaccines. We constructed two vectors expressing chimeric viruses consisting of attenuated SA14-14-2 strain of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in which the PrM/M-E genes were replaced fully or partially with those of dengue 2 virus (DENV-2). These vectors, named pJED2 and pJED2-1770 were transfected to BHK-21 cells and produced chimeric viruses JED2V and JED2-1770V, respectively. The chimeric viruses could be passaged in C6/36 but not BHK-21 cells. The chimeric viruses produced in C6/36 cells CPE 4-5 days after infection and RT-PCR, sequencing, immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blot analysis confirmed the chimeric nature of produced viruses. The immunogenicity of chimeric viruses in mice was proved by detecting DENV-2 E protein-specific serum IgG antibodies with neutralization titer of 10. Successful preparation of infectious clones of chimeric JEV-DENV-2 viruses showed that JEV-based expression vectors are fully functional.

  10. Isolation of monoclonal antibodies with predetermined conformational epitope specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton M Sholukh

    Full Text Available Existing technologies allow isolating antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs from B cells. We devised a direct approach to isolate mAbs with predetermined conformational epitope specificity, using epitope mimetics (mimotopes that reflect the three-dimensional structure of given antigen subdomains. We performed differential biopanning using bacteriophages encoding random peptide libraries and polyclonal antibodies (Abs that had been affinity-purified with either native or denatured antigen. This strategy yielded conformational mimotopes. We then generated mimotope-fluorescent protein fusions, which were used as baits to isolate single memory B cells from rhesus monkeys (RMs. To amplify RM immunoglobulin variable regions, we developed RM-specific PCR primers and generated chimeric simian-human mAbs with predicted epitope specificity. We established proof-of-concept of our strategy by isolating mAbs targeting the conformational V3 loop crown of HIV Env; the new mAbs cross-neutralized viruses of different clades. The novel technology allows isolating mAbs from RMs or other hosts given experimental immunogens or infectious agents.

  11. Chimeric Plastics : a new class of thermoplastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenschein, Mark

    A new class of thermoplastics (dubbed ``Chimerics'') is described that exhibits a high temperature glass transition followed by high performance elastomer properties, prior to melting. These transparent materials are comprised of co-continuous phase-separated block copolymers. One block is an amorphous glass with a high glass transition temperature, and the second is a higher temperature phase transition block creating virtual thermoreversible crosslinks. The material properties are highly influenced by phase separation on the order of 10-30 nanometers. At lower temperatures the polymer reflects the sum of the block copolymer properties. As the amorphous phase glass transition is exceeded, the virtual crosslinks of the higher temperature second phase dominate the plastic properties, resulting in rubber-like elasticity.

  12. Production of Monoclonal Antibodies specific for Progesterone

    OpenAIRE

    YÜCEL, Fatıma

    2014-01-01

    Progesterone levels in milk and serum are indicators of pregnancy in cattle. The progesterone level reaches a peak on the 21 st and 22 nd days of pregnancy. Monoclonal antibodies specific to progesterone could be used for the immunodetection of milk and serum progesterone levels. We report here the development of hybrid cells prdoducing monoclonal antibodies specific for progesterone using hybridoma technology. Hybridoma cells secreting monoclonal antibodies against progesterone (MAM 2H1...

  13. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  14. Monoclonal antibody-based immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, P; Reischl, U

    1998-01-01

    An immunoassay may be defined as an assay that employs an immunological reagent, usually an antibody, to confer specificity for the ligand being measured. As a corollary to this, the discovery, and subsequent development, of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) has greatly expanded the application and use of immunoassays. Polyclonal reagents, with their associated problems of specificity and quality control, have now been largely replaced by readily available MAbs of potential immortality and well-defined specificity and affinity. This has resulted, in the last two decades, in a great expansion in the range of immunoassays available and also a significant improvement in their reproducibility and reliability.

  15. Chimeric mitochondrial peptides from contiguous regular and swinger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Previous mass spectrometry analyses described human mitochondrial peptides entirely translated from swinger RNAs, RNAs where polymerization systematically exchanged nucleotides. Exchanges follow one among 23 bijective transformation rules, nine symmetric exchanges (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C) and fourteen asymmetric exchanges (X → Y → Z → X, e.g. A → C → G → A), multiplying by 24 DNA's protein coding potential. Abrupt switches from regular to swinger polymerization produce chimeric RNAs. Here, human mitochondrial proteomic analyses assuming abrupt switches between regular and swinger transcriptions, detect chimeric peptides, encoded by part regular, part swinger RNA. Contiguous regular- and swinger-encoded residues within single peptides are stronger evidence for translation of swinger RNA than previously detected, entirely swinger-encoded peptides: regular parts are positive controls matched with contiguous swinger parts, increasing confidence in results. Chimeric peptides are 200 × rarer than swinger peptides (3/100,000 versus 6/1000). Among 186 peptides with > 8 residues for each regular and swinger parts, regular parts of eleven chimeric peptides correspond to six among the thirteen recognized, mitochondrial protein-coding genes. Chimeric peptides matching partly regular proteins are rarer and less expressed than chimeric peptides matching non-coding sequences, suggesting targeted degradation of misfolded proteins. Present results strengthen hypotheses that the short mitogenome encodes far more proteins than hitherto assumed. Entirely swinger-encoded proteins could exist.

  16. Anti-Bovine Programmed Death-1 Rat–Bovine Chimeric Antibody for Immunotherapy of Bovine Leukemia Virus Infection in Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Okagawa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Blockade of immunoinhibitory molecules, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1/PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1, is a promising strategy for reinvigorating exhausted T cells and preventing disease progression in a variety of chronic infections. Application of this therapeutic strategy to cattle requires bovinized chimeric antibody targeting immunoinhibitory molecules. In this study, anti-bovine PD-1 rat–bovine chimeric monoclonal antibody 5D2 (Boch5D2 was constructed with mammalian expression systems, and its biochemical function and antiviral effect were characterized in vitro and in vivo using cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus (BLV. Purified Boch5D2 was capable of detecting bovine PD-1 molecules expressed on cell membranes in flow cytometric analysis. In particular, Biacore analysis determined that the binding affinity of Boch5D2 to bovine PD-1 protein was similar to that of the original anti-bovine PD-1 rat monoclonal antibody 5D2. Boch5D2 was also capable of blocking PD-1/PD-L1 binding at the same level as 5D2. The immunomodulatory and therapeutic effects of Boch5D2 were evaluated by in vivo administration of the antibody to a BLV-infected calf. Inoculated Boch5D2 was sustained in the serum for a longer period. Boch5D2 inoculation resulted in activation of the proliferation of BLV-specific CD4+ T cells and decrease in the proviral load of BLV in the peripheral blood. This study demonstrates that Boch5D2 retains an equivalent biochemical function to that of the original antibody 5D2 and is a candidate therapeutic agent for regulating antiviral immune response in vivo. Clinical efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade awaits further experimentation with a large number of animals.

  17. Bone marrow dosimetry using blood-based models for 131i-anti-cd20 rituximab radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, J. H.; Kim, H. G.; Choi, T. H.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate estimations of radiation absorbed dose are essential part of evaluating the risks and benefits associated with radiotherapy. Determination of red marrow dose is important because myelotoxicity is often dose limiting in radioimmunotherapy. The aim of this study is to set up the procedures of dosimetry with activities in the blood and whole-body and to estimate the dose of patients according to MIRD schema. Therapy activities of 131I (136, 185, 200 mCi) were administrated to patients (n=3). Blood activity concentrations and whole-body images by gamma camera were collected from patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (5min, 6h, 24h, 48h, 72h, 2week). Two kinds of patient specific approaches based on Sgouros bone marrow dosimetry methodology were considered to estimate bone marrow dose. The mean effective half-life in blood and whole-body were 25.2h and 27.1h respectively and the mean absorbed dose to bone marrow was 0.48Gy (0.22∼0.93Gy). The dominant contribution of dose was found to be from bone marrow self-dose (over 60%). The procedures of dosimetry with blood and gamma camera image were established. These enable to estimate the radioimmunotherapy patient's dose retrospectively. Some parts of the procedures need to be elaborated to obtain more accurate dose in the near future

  18. Desensitization with plasmapheresis and anti-Cd20 for ABO incompatible kidney transplantation from living donor: experience of a single center in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, C; Furian, L; Marson, P; Tison, T; Valente, M; Marchini, F; Rossi, B; Bonfante, L; Valerio, F; Cozzi, E; Rigotti, P

    2014-09-01

    Blood group incompatibility in kidney transplants from a living donor can be successfully overcome by using various desensitization protocols: intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis (PP), immunoadsorption, and double filtration PP. From July 2010 to October 2013, we performed 10 ABO incompatible kidney transplantation (KT) procedures from a living donor. The desensitization protocol was based on rituximab and PP+cytomegalovirus immune globulin. All patients received induction with basiliximab, except 1 case treated with Thymoglobuline® (ATG) for the simultaneous presence of donor-specific antibody. Tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil were initiated at the time of desensitization and continued after the transplant. After a mean follow-up of 11.6±10.4 months, all patients are alive with a functioning graft. The mean serum creatinine concentration at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year was 1.48±0.29, 1.47±0.18, 1.47±0.27, and 1.5±0.27 mg/dl. Three episodes of acute cellular rejection occurred in 2 patients. There was only 1 case of BK virus infection, treated with reduction of immunosuppressive therapy. The protocol biopsy specimens at 1, 3, and 6 months were C4d positive in the absence of acute rejection. Desensitization with rituximab, PP, and anti-cytomegalovirus immune globulin allowed us to perform transplants from living donors to ABO incompatible recipients with excellent results and reduced costs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-CD20 Radioimmunotherapy Before Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk B-Cell Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-13

    Burkitt Lymphoma; CD20-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  20. Monoclonal antibody hapten radiopharmaceutical delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, D.A.; McTigue, M.

    1986-01-01

    One hundred μg of monoclonal antibody (MoAb) CHA255 with a binding constant Kb of 4 x 10 9 was complexed with indium-111 labelled BLEDTA II, BLEDTA IV, benzyl EDTA, and an EDTA conjugate of Fab. The 24-h tumour and organ distribution of BALB/c mice bearing KHJJ tumours was studied for each compound alone, the antibody complex, and 3 h following a chelate chase of the antibody complex. Whole body biological half-life was measured for 7 days with and without a chelate chase for each antibody complex. The 24-h whole body counts dropped 20 to 60% and blood concentration fell over 89% within 3 h of administering the chelate chase. Theoretical equivalent human organ doses were calculated from the 24-h organ concentrations, effective half-life, and MIRD 11 S values (absorbed dose per cumulated activity). Liver and spleen were the target organs, with the dose ranging from 0.50 to 3.91 rads mCi -1 . The reduction in organ radiation dose varied up to 95% following the chelate chase. Rapid selective renal clearance of chelate labelled radiopharmaceuticals by competitive inhibition (chelate chase) of their reversible binding to monoclonal antibodies enhances tumour imaging and improves the radiation dosimetry. (author)

  1. Progress in immunotherapy Rituximab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Habbash, Manal M.; Alwindi, Abukris M.

    2007-01-01

    Rituximab is an anti-CD-20 chimeric monoclonal antibody that has shown substantial activity. Since its discovery, rituximab has been used with great success in a variety of hematological malignancies. Its success in the management of aggressive lymphomas led to expansion of its use in other conditions such as stem cell transplantation, post- transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, and other non-malignant conditions where B cell activation is thought to be important, such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and rheumatoid arthritis. The side effects have been remarkably few, particularly, infection is not more common that chemotherapy alone. This article reviews the structure, mechanism of action and uses of rituximab as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy. (author)

  2. Rituximab and chemotherapy in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonet, Anne; Bosly, André

    2009-06-01

    Rituximab is an anti-CD20 chimeric monoclonal antibody with activity in nearly all subtypes of B-cell lymphomas. Association of rituximab with chemotherapy (mostly the cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone [CHOP] regimen) in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents an extraordinary revolution in the prognosis of DLBCL, and is the new standard of therapy in elderly and young, low-risk patients. Despite the lack of randomized, clinical trials in younger patients with high risk, rituximab is also a standard of care in these patients in clinical practice, at least in North America. The practice is based on observational trials (e.g., the British Columbia Registry) and the missing logic in classifying patients as 'younger' or 'older': 60 years old or 65 years old. In Europe, trials are ongoing to establish the best treatment for young, high-risk patients. Association of rituximab and chemotherapy deeply modifies prognostic factors defined before the rituximab era.

  3. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2018-04-10

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  4. Characterization of the neutralization determinants of equine arteritis virus using recombinant chimeric viruses and site-specific mutagenesis of an infectious cDNA clone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasuriya, Udeni B.R.; Dobbe, Jessika C.; Heidner, Hans W.; Smalley, Victoria L.; Navarrette, Andrea; Snijder, Eric J.; MacLachlan, N. James

    2004-01-01

    We have used an infectious cDNA clone of equine arteritis virus (EAV) and reverse genetics technology to further characterize the neutralization determinants in the GP5 envelope glycoprotein of the virus. We generated a panel of 20 recombinant viruses, including 10 chimeric viruses that each contained the ORF5 (which encodes GP5) of different laboratory, field, and vaccine strains of EAV, a chimeric virus containing the N-terminal ectodomain of GP5 of a European strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and 9 mutant viruses with site-specific substitutions in their GP5 proteins. The neutralization phenotype of each recombinant chimeric/mutant strain of EAV was determined with EAV-specific monoclonal antibodies and EAV strain-specific polyclonal equine antisera and compared to that of their parental viruses from which the substituted ORF5 was derived. The data unequivocally confirm that the GP5 ectodomain contains critical determinants of EAV neutralization. Furthermore, individual neutralization sites are conformationally interactive, and the interaction of GP5 with the unglycosylated membrane protein M is likely critical to expression of individual epitopes in neutralizing conformation. Substitution of individual amino acids within the GP5 ectodomain usually resulted in differences in neutralization phenotype of the recombinant viruses, analogous to differences in the neutralization phenotype of field strains of EAV and variants generated during persistent infection of EAV carrier stallions

  5. Induction of HIV neutralizing antibodies against the MPER of the HIV envelope protein by HA/gp41 chimeric protein-based DNA and VLP vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Ye

    Full Text Available Several conserved neutralizing epitopes have been identified in the HIV Env protein and among these, the MPER of gp41 has received great attention and is widely recognized as a promising target. However, little success has been achieved in eliciting MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies by a number of different vaccine strategies. We investigated the ability of HA/gp41 chimeric protein-based vaccines, which were designed to enhance the exposure of the MPER in its native conformation, to induce MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies. In characterization of the HA/gp41 chimeric protein, we found that by mutating an unpaired Cys residue (Cys-14 in its HA1 subunit to a Ser residue, the modified chimeric protein HA-C14S/gp41 showed increased reactivity to a conformation-sensitive monoclonal antibody against HA and formed more stable trimers in VLPs. On the other hand, HA-C14S/gp41 and HA/gp41 chimeric proteins expressed on the cell surfaces exhibited similar reactivity to monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Immunization of guinea pigs using the HA-C14S/gp41 DNA or VLP vaccines induced antibodies against the HIV gp41 as well as to a peptide corresponding to a segment of MPER at higher levels than immunization by standard HIV VLPs. Further, sera from vaccinated guinea pigs were found to exhibit HIV neutralizing activities. Moreover, sera from guinea pigs vaccinated by HA-C14S/gp41 DNA and VLP vaccines but not the standard HIV VLPs, were found to neutralize HIV pseudovirions containing a SIV-4E10 chimeric Env protein. The virus neutralization could be blocked by a MPER-specific peptide, thus demonstrating induction of MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies by this novel vaccine strategy. These results show that induction of MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies can be achieved through a rationally designed vaccine strategy.

  6. chimeraviz: a tool for visualizing chimeric RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lågstad, Stian; Zhao, Sen; Hoff, Andreas M; Johannessen, Bjarne; Lingjærde, Ole Christian; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2017-09-15

    Advances in high-throughput RNA sequencing have enabled more efficient detection of fusion transcripts, but the technology and associated software used for fusion detection from sequencing data often yield a high false discovery rate. Good prioritization of the results is important, and this can be helped by a visualization framework that automatically integrates RNA data with known genomic features. Here we present chimeraviz , a Bioconductor package that automates the creation of chimeric RNA visualizations. The package supports input from nine different fusion-finder tools: deFuse, EricScript, InFusion, JAFFA, FusionCatcher, FusionMap, PRADA, SOAPfuse and STAR-FUSION. chimeraviz is an R package available via Bioconductor ( https://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/chimeraviz.html ) under Artistic-2.0. Source code and support is available at GitHub ( https://github.com/stianlagstad/chimeraviz ). rolf.i.skotheim@rr-research.no. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies in pediatric allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Licari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs involving human-mouse hybrid cells was first described in 1970s, but these biologics are now used for a variety of diseases including cancers, autoimmune disorders and allergic diseases. The aim of this article is to review current and future applications of mAbs, in particular focusing on anti-IgE therapy, in the field of pediatric allergy. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  8. Development of mPMab-1, a Mouse-Rat Chimeric Antibody Against Mouse Podoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Nakamura, Takuro; Ichii, Osamu; Konnai, Satoru; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-04-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), the ligand of C-type lectin-like receptor-2, is used as a lymphatic endothelial marker. We previously established clone PMab-1 of rat IgG 2a as a specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) against mouse PDPN. PMab-1 is also very sensitive in immunohistochemical analysis; however, rat mAbs seem to be unfavorable for pathologists because anti-mouse IgG and anti-rabbit IgG are usually used as secondary antibodies in commercially available kits for immunohistochemical analysis. In this study, we develop a mouse-rat chimeric antibody, mPMab-1 of mouse IgG 2a , which was derived from rat PMab-1 mAb. Immunohistochemical analysis shows that mPMab-1 detects podocytes of the kidney, lymphatic endothelial cells of the colon, and type I alveolar cells of the lung. Importantly, mPMab-1 is more sensitive than PMab-1. This conversion strategy from rat mAb to mouse mAb could be applicable to other mAbs.

  9. Endothelial chimerism and vascular sequestration protect pancreatic islet grafts from antibody-mediated rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chia; Pouliquen, Eric; Broisat, Alexis; Andreata, Francesco; Racapé, Maud; Bruneval, Patrick; Kessler, Laurence; Ahmadi, Mitra; Bacot, Sandrine; Saison-Delaplace, Carole; Marcaud, Marina; Van Huyen, Jean-Paul Duong; Loupy, Alexandre; Villard, Jean; Demuylder-Mischler, Sandrine; Morelon, Emmanuel; Tsai, Meng-Kun; Kolopp-Sarda, Marie-Nathalie; Koenig, Alice; Mathias, Virginie; Ghezzi, Catherine; Dubois, Valerie; Defrance, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Humoral rejection is the most common cause of solid organ transplant failure. Here, we evaluated a cohort of 49 patients who were successfully grafted with allogenic islets and determined that the appearance of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) did not accelerate the rate of islet graft attrition, suggesting resistance to humoral rejection. Murine DSAs bound to allogeneic targets expressed by islet cells and induced their destruction in vitro; however, passive transfer of the same DSAs did not affect islet graft survival in murine models. Live imaging revealed that DSAs were sequestrated in the circulation of the recipients and failed to reach the endocrine cells of grafted islets. We used murine heart transplantation models to confirm that endothelial cells were the only accessible targets for DSAs, which induced the development of typical microvascular lesions in allogeneic transplants. In contrast, the vasculature of DSA-exposed allogeneic islet grafts was devoid of lesions because sprouting of recipient capillaries reestablished blood flow in grafted islets. Thus, we conclude that endothelial chimerism combined with vascular sequestration of DSAs protects islet grafts from humoral rejection. The reduced immunoglobulin concentrations in the interstitial tissue, confirmed in patients, may have important implications for biotherapies such as vaccines and monoclonal antibodies. PMID:29202467

  10. Chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs for skin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Cathy Ann; Tam, Joshua; Steiglitz, Barry M; Bauer, Rebecca L; Peters, Noel R; Wang, Ying; Anderson, R Rox; Allen-Hoffmann, B Lynn

    2014-08-01

    The ideal treatment for severe cutaneous injuries would eliminate the need for autografts and promote fully functional, aesthetically pleasing autologous skin regeneration. NIKS progenitor cell-based skin tissues have been developed to promote healing by providing barrier function and delivering wound healing factors. Independently, a device has recently been created to "copy" skin by harvesting full-thickness microscopic tissue columns (MTCs) in lieu of autografts traditionally harvested as sheets. We evaluated the feasibility of combining these two technologies by embedding MTCs in NIKS-based skin tissues to generate chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs. Chimeric constructs have the potential to provide immediate wound coverage, eliminate painful donor site wounds, and promote restoration of a pigmented skin tissue possessing hair follicles, sweat glands, and sebaceous glands. After MTC insertion, chimeric constructs and controls were reintroduced into air-interface culture and maintained in vitro for several weeks. Tissue viability, proliferative capacity, and morphology were evaluated after long-term culture. Our results confirmed successful MTC insertion and integration, and demonstrated the feasibility of generating chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs that preserved the viability, proliferative capacity, and structure of autologous pigmented skin. These feasibility studies established the proof-of-principle necessary to further develop chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs for the treatment of complex skin defects. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. Porcine induced pluripotent stem cells produce chimeric offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Franklin D; Terlouw, Steve L; Kwon, Dae Jin; Mumaw, Jennifer L; Dhara, Sujoy K; Hasneen, Kowser; Dobrinsky, John R; Stice, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Ethical and moral issues rule out the use of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in chimera studies that would determine the full extent of their reprogrammed state, instead relying on less rigorous assays such as teratoma formation and differentiated cell types. To date, only mouse iPSC lines are known to be truly pluripotent. However, initial mouse iPSC lines failed to form chimeric offspring, but did generate teratomas and differentiated embryoid bodies, and thus these specific iPSC lines were not completely reprogrammed or truly pluripotent. Therefore, there is a need to address whether the reprogramming factors and process used eventually to generate chimeric mice are universal and sufficient to generate reprogrammed iPSC that contribute to chimeric offspring in additional species. Here we show that porcine mesenchymal stem cells transduced with 6 human reprogramming factors (POU5F1, SOX2, NANOG, KLF4, LIN28, and C-MYC) injected into preimplantation-stage embryos contributed to multiple tissue types spanning all 3 germ layers in 8 of 10 fetuses. The chimerism rate was high, 85.3% or 29 of 34 live offspring were chimeras based on skin and tail biopsies harvested from 2- to 5-day-old pigs. The creation of pluripotent porcine iPSCs capable of generating chimeric offspring introduces numerous opportunities to study the facets significantly affecting cell therapies, genetic engineering, and other aspects of stem cell and developmental biology.

  12. Engineering chimeric human and mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I tetramers for the production of T-cell receptor (TCR) mimic antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Carol; Yates, Jenna; Salimi, Maryam; Greig, Jenny; Wiblin, Sarah; Hassanali, Tasneem; Banham, Alison H.

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting cell surface or secreted antigens are among the most effective classes of novel immunotherapies. However, the majority of human proteins and established cancer biomarkers are intracellular. Peptides derived from these intracellular proteins are presented on the cell surface by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and can be targeted by a novel class of T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm) antibodies that recognise similar epitopes to T-cell receptors. Humoural immune responses to MHC-I tetramers rarely generate TCRm antibodies and many antibodies recognise the α3 domain of MHC-I and β2 microglobulin (β2m) that are not directly involved in presenting the target peptide. Here we describe the production of functional chimeric human-murine HLA-A2-H2Dd tetramers and modifications that increase their bacterial expression and refolding efficiency. These chimeric tetramers were successfully used to generate TCRm antibodies against two epitopes derived from wild type tumour suppressor p53 (RMPEAAPPV and GLAPPQHLIRV) that have been used in vaccination studies. Immunisation with chimeric tetramers yielded no antibodies recognising the human α3 domain and β2m and generated TCRm antibodies capable of specifically recognising the target peptide/MHC-I complex in fully human tetramers and on the cell surface of peptide pulsed T2 cells. Chimeric tetramers represent novel immunogens for TCRm antibody production and may also improve the yield of tetramers for groups using these reagents to monitor CD8 T-cell immune responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mouse models of immunotherapy. PMID:28448627

  13. Developmental competence of porcine chimeric embryos produced by aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Juan; Jakobsen, Jannik E.; Xiong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare the developmental competence and blastomere allocation of porcine chimeric embryos formed by micro-well aggregation. Chimeras were created by aggregating either two blastomeres originating from 2-cell embryos or two whole embryos, where embryos were produced...... either by parthenogenetic activation (PA) or handmade cloning (HMC). Results showed that the developmental competence of chimeric embryos, evaluated based on their blastocyst rate and total cell number per blastocyst, was increased when two whole 2-cell stage embryos (PA or HMC) were aggregated....... In comparison, when two blastomeres were aggregated, the developmental competence of the chimeric embryos decreased if the blastomeres were either from PA or from HMC embryos, but not if they were from different sources, i.e. one PA and one HMC blastomere. To evaluate the cell contribution in embryo formation...

  14. Monoclonal gammopathy in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Chen, Long; Jia, Yuan; Liu, Yang; Wen, Lei; Liang, Yaoxian; An, Yuan; Chen, Shi; Su, Yin; Li, Zhanguo

    2018-07-01

    To analyze the clinical spectrum, laboratory characteristics, and outcomes of monoclonal gammopathy (MG) in patients with rheumatic diseases. Screening for the presence of MG was performed in 872 inpatients with rheumatic diseases from January 2010 to July 2017. A total of 41 patients were enrolled. Their clinical and biological features in addition to outcomes were described. For each patient with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS), 2 age- and sex-matched pSS patients without MG were selected as controls. Risk factors for the presence of MG and malignant hematological neoplasias were assessed. MG was observed in patients with SS, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, polymyositis, hypomyopathic dermatomyositis, psoriatic arthritis, ANCA-associated vasculitis, polyarteritis nodosa, and polymyalgia rheumatic, with SS the most frequent type. Serum M protein was detected in 37 patients. The monoclonal bands identified in serum were 16 IgG (5 κ, 11 λ), 11 IgA (6 κ, 5 λ), 6 IgM (5 κ, 1 λ), and 4 free λ chains. M components were observed in urine in the other 4 patients. High ESR, albumin/globulin inversion, rheumatoid factor positivity, hypergammaglobulinemia, and hypocomplementemia were common features, presented in more than half of the 41 patients. Patients with pSS, when complicated with MG, showed a higher rate of abnormal urine NAG (71.4 vs 15.8%, P = 0.025), higher levels of ESR [55.0 (53.5) mm/h vs 21.0 (31.8) mm/h, P = 0.001], ESSDAI [26.0 (25.0) vs 12.0 (9.0), P = 0.006], and ClinESSDAI scores [24.0 (25.0) vs 10.5 (10.0), P = 0.011]. Multivariate analysis revealed that the disease activity, assessed by either ESSDAI [adjusted OR 1.127 (95%CI 1.015-1.251), P = 0.025] or ClinESSDAI [adjusted OR 1.121 (95%CI 1.011-1.242), P = 0.030], was the only independent risk factor for the presence of MG. During the follow-up, 2 patients had transient serum M protein, 2 had isotype

  15. A novel self-replicating chimeric lentivirus-like particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, Christy K; Young, Kelly R; Madden, Victoria J; Johnson, Philip R; Johnston, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Successful live attenuated vaccines mimic natural exposure to pathogens without causing disease and have been successful against several viruses. However, safety concerns prevent the development of attenuated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a vaccine candidate. If a safe, replicating virus vaccine could be developed, it might have the potential to offer significant protection against HIV infection and disease. Described here is the development of a novel self-replicating chimeric virus vaccine candidate that is designed to provide natural exposure to a lentivirus-like particle and to incorporate the properties of a live attenuated virus vaccine without the inherent safety issues associated with attenuated lentiviruses. The genome from the alphavirus Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) was modified to express SHIV89.6P genes encoding the structural proteins Gag and Env. Expression of Gag and Env from VEE RNA in primate cells led to the assembly of particles that morphologically and functionally resembled lentivirus virions and that incorporated alphavirus RNA. Infection of CD4⁺ cells with chimeric lentivirus-like particles was specific and productive, resulting in RNA replication, expression of Gag and Env, and generation of progeny chimeric particles. Further genome modifications designed to enhance encapsidation of the chimeric virus genome and to express an attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) protease for particle maturation improved the ability of chimeric lentivirus-like particles to propagate in cell culture. This study provides proof of concept for the feasibility of creating chimeric virus genomes that express lentivirus structural proteins and assemble into infectious particles for presentation of lentivirus immunogens in their native and functional conformation.

  16. 77 FR 3482 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of T Cell Receptors and Chimeric Antigen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... Exclusive License: Development of T Cell Receptors and Chimeric Antigen Receptors Into Therapeutics for.... 61/473,409 entitled ``Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor variant III chimeric antigen receptors... EGFRvIII chimeric antigen (CARs) and methods of using these engineered T cells to treat and/or prevent...

  17. 78 FR 16505 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Chimeric West Nile/Dengue Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... Grant of Exclusive License: Chimeric West Nile/Dengue Viruses AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and.... Provisional Application 61/049,342, filed 4/30/2008, entitled ``Engineered, Chimeric West Nile/Dengue Viruses;'' PCT Application PCT/US2009/041824, filed 4/27/2009, entitled ``Engineered, Chimeric WN/Flavivirus as...

  18. Relationship between hyperthyroidism and monoclonal gammapathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canas, Carlos Alberto

    2007-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and monoclonal gammapathy associated to it of uncertain significance (MGUS). A possible pathogenic relationship between HPTP and MGUS is analyzed. Interleukin 6 could play a pivotal role.

  19. Monoclonal antibody therapy of inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deventer, S. J.; Camoglio, L.

    1997-01-01

    Animal models of inflammatory bowel disease have provided insight in the regulation of mucosal inflammation. This has resulted in novel therapeutic approaches that specifically target a single inflammatory mediator. Monoclonal antibody therapy has been used in steroid refractory Crohn's disease

  20. Novel fusion genes and chimeric transcripts in ependymal tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thale Kristin; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    with subsequent Sanger sequencing was used to validate the potential fusions. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using locus-specific probes was also performed. A total of 841 candidate chimeric transcripts were identified in the 12 tumors, with an average of 49 unique candidate fusions per tumor. After...... infratentorial anaplastic ependymoma. Our previously reported ALK rearrangements and the RELA and YAP1 fusions found in supratentorial ependymomas were until now the only known fusion genes present in ependymal tumors. The chimeric transcripts presented here are the first to be reported in infratentorial...

  1. Modeling cognition and disease using human glial chimeric mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Maiken; Windrem, Martha S.

    2015-01-01

    , oligodendrocytes as well. As a result, the recipient brains may become inexorably humanized with regards to their resident glial populations, yielding human glial chimeric mouse brains. These brains provide us a fundamentally new tool by which to assess the species-specific attributes of glia in modulating human...... for studying the human-specific contributions of glia to psychopathology, as well as to higher cognition. As such, the assessment of human glial chimeric mice may provide us new insight into the species-specific contributions of glia to human cognitive evolution, as well as to the pathogenesis of human...

  2. Monoclonal for cancer detection and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, R.W.; Byers, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 18 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Monoclonal Antibodies to Breast Cancer and Their Application; Clinical Applications of Radioimmunolocalisation; Localisation of Cancer of the Ovary and Metastases Using 123 I-labelled Monoclonal Antibody HMFG-2 Compared to Surgical Findings; Interest of Globotriaosylceramide Membrane Antigen as Target for Immunotoxins; and Analysis, Results and Future Prospective of the Therapeutic Use of Radiolabeled Antibody in Cancer Therapy

  3. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology.

  4. Systemic radiotherapy with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L.; Matzku, S.; Bihl, H.

    1993-01-01

    In this experimental study, feasibility and efficiency of systematic radiotherapy with the I-131 labelled monoclonal antibody BW575/9 (radioimmunotherapy) are investigated using human SK-N-SH neuroblastoma transplated into nude mice. Series of six nude mice were treated with intravenous application of 400 μCi (group 1), 700 μCi (group 2) of the I-131 labelled and of the unlabelled MAb (group 3). An untreated group (group 4) served as control. Tumors of group (3) and (4) showed an identical growth. In group (1), tumor growth was arrested for seven days. In group (2), the tumor showed complete regression after eight days which lasted for 55 days. Thereafter, the tumor started to regrow. This growth characteristics are correlated with the doses achieved in the tumor using a medical radiation dose (MIRD) formulation. The biodistribution data necessary for MIRD calculation were obtained by previously performed experiments with the I-125 labelled MAb. The doses assessed in the tumor turned out to be five to ten times greater than those in normal tissues (liver, bone, etc.) These results confirm feasibility, selectivity and efficiency of radioimmunotherapy in the above described model. Moreover, this in vivo model seems suitable for further investigations concerning fundamental issues of radioimunotherapy. (orig.) [de

  5. Radioimmunotherapy (I): development of radioimmunoconjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Tea Hyun; Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    Monoclonal antibodies are designed to bind specifically to certain antigen, give therapeutic effect to the target and to be produced in large scale with homogeneity. The monoclonal conjugated with radionuclide can deliver therapeutic irradiation to the target, and showed successful results in certain malignancies, which is known as radioimmunotherapy. The target-to-background ratio depends on the antigen expression in the target and normal tissues, which is related to the therapeutic efficacy and toxicity in radioimmunotherapy. For the solid tumor beta-ray energy should be high, but lower beta energy is better for the hematological malignancies. I-131 is widely used in thyroid cancer with low cost and high availability. Labeling monoclonal antibody with I-131 is relatively simple and reproducible. Some preclinical data for the I-131 labeled monoclonal antibodies including acute toxicity and efficacy are available from already published literatures. In KIRAMS, physician sponsored clinical trial protocols using Rituximab, KFDA approved anti-CD20 chimeric monoclonal antibody and I-131 were approved by KFDA and currently are ongoing.

  6. Therapeutic use of chimeric bacteriophage (phage) lysins in staphylococcal endophthalmitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Phage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases that are produced at the end of the phage lytic cycle to digest the host bacterial cell wall, facilitating the release of mature phage progeny. The aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of chimeric phage lysins against cli...

  7. Study of cancer-specific chimeric promoters induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Jie; Zhou Yunfeng; Sun Wenjie; Wang Weifeng; Liao Zhengkai; Zhou Fuxiang; Xie Conghua

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To combine the radio-inducible CArG element with cancer-specific human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene promoter, and to construct the novel chimeric promoters. Methods: The synthetic hTERT promoters containing different number of radio-inducible CArG elements were constructed, and the activities of the promoters in the cancer cells (HeLa, A549, and MHCC97 cells) and nomal cells (hEL cells) were detected by using luciferase-reporter assays after the treatment of irradiation (a single or fractionated irradiation dose). Results: Synthetic promoter containing 6 repeated CArG units was better in radio-inducibility than any other promoters containing different number of CArG units, and nearly maximum levels obtained at 4-6 Gy. The very low activities of the chimeric promoters could be detected in normal hEL cells. A similar level of reporter gene expression was observed after 3 fractionated doses of 2 Gy compared with a single dose of 6 Gy in cancer cells. Conclusions: The cancer-specific chimeric promoter containing 6 CArG elements showes the best radio-response, and the chimeric promoter system has the potential in cancer gene therapy. (authors)

  8. Direct observation of hematopoietic progenitor chimerism in fetal freemartin cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taponen Juhani

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cattle twins are well known as blood chimeras. However, chimerism in the actual hematopoietic progenitor compartment has not been directly investigated. Here, we analyzed fetal liver of chimeric freemartin cattle by combining a new anti-bovine CD34 antibody and Y-chromosome specific in situ hybridization. Results Bull-derived CD34+ cells were detected in the liver of the female sibling (freemartin at 60 days gestation. The level of bull-derived CD34+ cells was lower in the freemartin than in its male siblings. Bull (Y+ and cow hematopoietic cells often occurred in separate clusters. Around clusters of Y+CD34+ cells, Y+CD34- cells were typically observed. The thymi were also strongly chimeric at 60 days of gestation. Conclusion The fetal freemartin liver contains clusters of bull-derived hematopoietic progenitors, suggesting clonal expansion and differentiation. Even the roots of the hematopoietic system in cattle twins are thus strongly chimeric from the early stages of fetal development. However, the hematopoietic seeding of fetal liver apparently started already before the onset of functional vascular anastomosis.

  9. Chimera: construction of chimeric sequences for phylogenetic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leunissen, J.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Chimera allows the construction of chimeric protein or nucleic acid sequence files by concatenating sequences from two or more sequence files in PHYLIP formats. It allows the user to interactively select genes and species from the input files. The concatenated result is stored to one single output

  10. Chimeric RNAs as potential biomarkers for tumor diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhou

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancers claim millions of lives each year. Early detection thatcan enable a higher chance of cure is of paramount importanceto cancer patients. However, diagnostic tools for many forms oftumors have been lacking. Over the last few years, studies ofchimeric RNAs as biomarkers have emerged. Numerous reportsusing bioinformatics and screening methodologies havedescribed more than 30,000 expressed sequence tags (EST orcDNA sequences as putative chimeric RNAs. While cancer cellshave been well known to contain fusion genes derived fromchromosomal translocations, rearrangements or deletions, recentstudies suggest that trans-splicing in cells may be another sourceof chimeric RNA production. Unlike cis-splicing, trans-splicingtakes place between two pre-mRNA molecules, which are inmost cases derived from two different genes, generating achimeric non-co-linear RNA. It is possible that trans-splicingoccurs in normal cells at high frequencies but the resultingchimeric RNAs exist only at low levels. However the levels ofcertain RNA chimeras may be elevated in cancers, leading to theformation of fusion genes. In light of the fact that chimeric RNAshave been shown to be overrepresented in various tumors,studies of the mechanisms that produce chimeric RNAs andidentification of signature RNA chimeras as biomarkers presentan opportunity for the development of diagnoses for early tumordetection. (BMB reports 2012; 45(3: 133-140

  11. Study of allosteric communications in chimeric two-domain proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boušová, Kristýna

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 26, S1 (2017), s. 74 ISSN 0961-8368. [Annual Symposium of the Protein Society /31./. 24.07.2017-27.07.2017, Montreal] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : protein domains * chimeric structures Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  12. (dust, PM10 , and BC) using CHIMERE chemistry tra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of a European chemistry transport model,. 'CHIMERE' driven by ..... tive days in May 2008 (12–16 May) to simulate the dust storm ...... Regional Office for Europe, Copenhagen. Zender C, Bian ...

  13. Expression of chimeric HCV peptide in transgenic tobacco plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression of chimeric HCV peptide in transgenic tobacco plants infected with recombinant alfalfa mosaic virus for development of a plant-derived vaccine against HCV. AK El Attar, AM Shamloul, AA Shalaby, BY Riad, A Saad, HM Mazyad, JM Keith ...

  14. FCγ Chimeric Receptor-Engineered T Cells: Methodology, Advantages, Limitations, and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Sconocchia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For many years, disappointing results have been generated by many investigations, which have utilized a variety of immunologic strategies to enhance the ability of a patient’s immune system to recognize and eliminate malignant cells. However, in recent years, immunotherapy has been used successfully for the treatment of hematologic and solid malignancies. The impressive clinical responses observed in many types of cancer have convinced even the most skeptical clinical oncologists that a patient’s immune system can recognize and reject his tumor if appropriate strategies are implemented. The success immunotherapy is due to the development of at least three therapeutic strategies. They include tumor-associated antigen (TAA-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, T cell checkpoint blockade, and TAA-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs T cell-based immunotherapy. However, the full realization of the therapeutic potential of these approaches requires the development of strategies to counteract and overcome some limitations. They include off-target toxicity and mechanisms of cancer immune evasion, which obstacle the successful clinical application of mAbs and CAR T cell-based immunotherapies. Thus, we and others have developed the Fc gamma chimeric receptors (Fcγ-CRs-based strategy. Like CARs, Fcγ-CRs are composed of an intracellular tail resulting from the fusion of a co-stimulatory molecule with the T cell receptor ζ chain. In contrast, the extracellular CAR single-chain variable fragment (scFv, which recognizes the targeted TAA, has been replaced with the extracellular portion of the FcγRIIIA (CD16. Fcγ-CR T cells have a few intriguing features. First, given in combination with mAbs, Fcγ-CR T cells mediate anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo by an antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity mechanism. Second, CD16-CR T cells can target multiple cancer types provided that TAA-specific mAbs with the appropriate specificity are available

  15. Monoclonal antibodies in oncology. Review article

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, S Y.T.; Sikora, K

    1986-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MCAs) can be used to differentiate between normal and neoplastic cells and thus exploited for diagnostic and, ultimately, therapeutic gain. The evidence for the existence of human tumour antigens is reviewed. Several areas of diagnosis are already benefiting from the application of the monoclonal technology. Immunohistology can help the pathologist with difficult diagnostic problems. New classifications of lymphoma and leukaemia can be based on specific surface molecules. Similarly, the detection of shed tumour antigens is already established as part of the routine assessment of many patients with common solid tumours. Isotopically labeled monoclonal antibodies have been used to localise primary and metastatic tumours. The use of antibodies in this way is not only a promising diagnostic tool but also the first step in studying the possibility of arming antibodies to provide therapeutic agents. Such trials are currently in progress. 69 refs.; 7 figs.; 3 tabs.

  16. Tumor detection using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldofsky, P.J.; Powe, J.; Hammond, N.D.

    1987-01-01

    Radioisotope conjugated to monoclonal antibody products has been used for imaging tumors targeted by the antibody. As imaging progresses, new sets of procedural and technical questions arise. In this chapter, we discuss several current problems in imaging tumor with radiolabeled monoclonal antibody. These include (1) methods for selection of specific antibody and, once the particular antibody is selected, which fragment form is to be used; (2) imaging procedures: what are the optimum imaging parameters, such as optimum time for imaging after administration of tracer and considerations regarding background subtraction; and (3) noninvasive quantitative techniques: quantitation of localization of antibody indirectly from quantitative information in the images.100 references

  17. An audit of hospital based outpatient infusions and a pilot program of community-based monoclonal antibody infusions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doran, J-P

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody to tumour necrosis factor alpha, is administered as an intravenous infusion requiring a costly hospital day case or inpatient admission. METHODS: An audit of all current therapies given by intravenous infusions in an outpatient setting in St Vincent\\'s University Hospital (SVUH) was undertaken. Furthermore, in conjunction with TCP homecare, we established in a general practise health clinic, the first Irish community infusion centre for the administration of infliximab in August 2006. RESULTS: All outpatient departments indicated that they would favour a centralized hospital infusion unit. There were no adverse events and the mean global satisfaction improved in the community infliximab infusion pilot programme of seven patients. CONCLUSION: This study suggests efficiencies in providing centralized infusion facilities, while the community based infusion of infliximab is feasible and safe in this small cohort and identifies the community infusion unit as a viable and cost efficient alternative for administration of infliximab.

  18. Generation of a Monoclonal Antibody against Mycoplasma spp. following Accidental Contamination during Production of a Monoclonal Antibody against Lawsonia intracellularis

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Jeong-Min; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Jung-Yong

    2012-01-01

    This report describes Mycoplasma contamination of Lawsonia intracellularis cultures that led to the unintended acquisition of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. during the attempted generation of a monoclonal antibody against L. intracellularis.

  19. Chimeric recombinant antibody fragments in cardiac troponin I immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyytiä, Heidi; Heikkilä, Taina; Brockmann, Eeva-Christine; Kekki, Henna; Hedberg, Pirjo; Puolakanaho, Tarja; Lövgren, Timo; Pettersson, Kim

    2015-03-01

    To introduce a novel nanoparticle-based immunoassay for cardiac troponin I (cTnI) utilizing chimeric antibody fragments and to demonstrate that removal of antibody Fc-part and antibody chimerization decrease matrix related interferences. A sandwich-type immunoassay for cTnI based on recombinant chimeric (mouse variable/human constant) antigen binding (cFab) antibodies and intrinsically fluorescent nanoparticles was developed. To test whether using chimeric antibody fragments helps to avoid matrix related interferences, samples (n=39) with known amounts of triglycerides, bilirubin, rheumatoid factor (RF) or human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMAs) were measured with the novel assay, along with a previously published nanoparticle-based research assay with the same antibody epitopes. The limit of detection (LoD) was 3.30ng/L. Within-laboratory precision for 29ng/L and 2819ng/L cTnI were 13.7% and 15.9%, respectively. Regression analysis with Siemens ADVIA Centaur® yielded a slope (95% confidence intervals) of 0.18 (0.17-1.19) and a y-intercept of 1.94 (-1.28-3.91) ng/L. When compared to a previously published nanoparticle-based assay, the novel assay showed substantially reduced interference in the tested interference prone samples, 15.4 vs. 51.3%. A rheumatoid factor containing sample was decreased from 241ng/L to

  20. Elutriated lymphocytes for manufacturing chimeric antigen receptor T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stroncek, David F.; Lee, Daniel W.; Ren, Jiaqiang; Sabatino, Marianna; Highfill, Steven; Khuu, Hanh; Shah, Nirali N.; Kaplan, Rosandra N.; Fry, Terry J.; Mackall, Crystal L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinical trials of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells manufactured from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) concentrates for the treatment of hematologic malignancies have been promising, but CAR T cell yields have been variable. This variability is due in part to the contamination of the PBMC concentrates with monocytes and granulocytes. Methods Counter-flow elutriation allows for the closed system separation of lymphocytes from monocytes and granulocytes. We ...

  1. Strain differentiation of polioviruses with monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A.L. van Wezel; A.J.H. Stegmann; J.A.A.M. van Asten (Jack)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractPanels of monoclonal antibodies raised against different poliovirus type 1, 2 and 3 strains, were tested in a micro-neutralization test and in a micro-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay against a large number of poliovirus strains. The results were compared with those obtained with the

  2. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  3. Monoclonal antibody technologies and rapid detection assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel methodologies and screening strategies will be outlined on the use of hybridoma technology for the selection of antigen specific monoclonal antibodies. The development of immunoassays used for diagnostic detection of prions and bacterial toxins will be discussed and examples provided demonstr...

  4. Monoclonal antibody therapy of inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deventer, S. J.; Camoglio, L.

    1996-01-01

    Several anti-inflammatory drugs have therapeutic efficacy in inflammatory bowel disease, but their targets remain incompletely characterized. The development of monoclonal antibodies that either recognize epitopes on immune-competent cells, or neutralize pro-inflammatory cytokines, has helped to

  5. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  6. Chimeric microbial rhodopsins for optical activation of Gs-proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazuho; Yamashita, Takahiro; Sasaki, Kengo; Inoue, Keiichi; Shichida, Yoshinori; Kandori, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    We previously showed that the chimeric proteins of microbial rhodopsins, such as light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and Gloeobacter rhodopsin (GR) that contain cytoplasmic loops of bovine rhodopsin, are able to activate Gt protein upon light absorption. These facts suggest similar protein structural changes in both the light-driven proton pump and animal rhodopsin. Here we report two trials to engineer chimeric rhodopsins, one for the inserted loop, and another for the microbial rhodopsin template. For the former, we successfully activated Gs protein by light through the incorporation of the cytoplasmic loop of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR). For the latter, we did not observe any G-protein activation for the light-driven sodium pump from Indibacter alkaliphilus (IndiR2) or a light-driven chloride pump halorhodopsin from Natronomonas pharaonis (NpHR), whereas the light-driven proton pump GR showed light-dependent G-protein activation. This fact suggests that a helix opening motion is common to G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and GR, but not to IndiR2 and NpHR. Light-induced difference FTIR spectroscopy revealed similar structural changes between WT and the third loop chimera for each light-driven pump. A helical structural perturbation, which was largest for GR, was further enhanced in the chimera. We conclude that similar structural dynamics that occur on the cytoplasmic side of GPCR are needed to design chimeric microbial rhodopsins. PMID:29362703

  7. Cord Blood Chimerism And Relapse After Haplo-Cord Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Besien, Koen; Koshy, Nebu; Gergis, Usama; Mayer, Sebastian; Cushing, Melissa; Rennert, Hannah; Slotky, Ronit; Mark, Tomer; Pearse, Roger; Rossi, Adriana; Phillips, Adrienne; Vasovic, Liljana; Ferrante, Rosanna; Hsu, Michael; Shore, Tsiporah

    2018-01-01

    Haplo-cord stem cell transplantation combines the infusion of CD34 selected hematopoietic progenitors from a haplo-identical donor with an umbilical cord blood graft from an unrelated donor and allows faster count recovery, with low rates of disease recurrence and chronic GVHD. But the contribution of the umbilical cord blood graft to long-term transplant outcome remains unclear. We analyzed 39 recipients of haplo-cord transplants with AML and MDS, engrafted and in remission at 2 months. Median age was 66 (18-72) and all had intermediate, high, or very high risk disease. Less than 20% UCB chimerism in the CD33 lineage was associated with an increased rate of disease recurrence (54% vs 11% Pdisease recurrence (46% vs 12%, P=0.007) Persistent haplo-chimerism in the CD3 lineage was associated with an increased rate of disease recurrence (40% vs 15%, P=0.009) Chimerism did not predict for treatment related mortality. The cumulative incidence of acute GVHD by day 100 was 43%. The cumulative incidence of moderate/severe chronic GVHD was only 5%. Engraftment of the umbilical cord blood grafts provides powerful GVL effects which protect against disease recurrence and is associated with low risk of chronic GVHD. Engraftment of CD34 selected haplo-identical cells can lead to rapid development of circulating T-cells, but when these cells dominate, GVL-effects are limited and rates of disease recurrence are high. PMID:27333804

  8. Advantage of dose fractionation in monoclonal antibody-targeted radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlom, J.; Molinolo, A.; Simpson, J.F.; Siler, K.; Roselli, M.; Hinkle, G.; Houchens, D.P.; Colcher, D.

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) B72.3 IgG was radiolabeled with 131I and administered to female athymic NCr-nu mice bearing the LS-174T human colon adenocarcinoma xenograft to determine if fractionation of MAb dose had any advantage in tumor therapy. In the LS-174T xenograft, only approximately 30%-60% of tumor cells express the B72.3-reactive TAG-72 antigen. The LS-174T xenograft was used to reflect the heterogeneity of the TAG-72 antigen often seen in biopsy specimens from patients. In contrast to a single 600-muCi dose of 131I-B72.3 IgG where 60% of the animals died from toxic effects, two 300-muCi doses of 131I-B72.3 IgG reduced or eliminated tumor growth in 90% of mice, with only 10% of the animals dying from toxic effects. Dose fractionation even permitted escalation of the dose to three doses of 300 muCi of 131I-B72.3 IgG, resulting in even more extensive tumor reduction or elimination and minimal toxic effects. The use of an isotype-matched control MAb revealed a nonspecific component to tumor growth retardation, but the use of the specific B72.3 IgG demonstrated a much greater therapeutic effect. Tumors that had escaped MAb therapy were analyzed for expression of the B72.3-reactive TAG-72 antigen with the use of the immunoperoxidase method; they were shown to have the same antigenic phenotype as the untreated tumors. We verified tumor elimination by killing the test animals after a 7-week observation period and performing histologic examination of tumor sites. We also monitored toxic effects by histologic examination of numerous organs. These studies thus demonstrate the advantage of dose fractionation of a radiolabeled MAb for tumor therapy. We anticipate that the concept of dose fractionation can be practically applied in radioimmunotherapeutic clinical trials with the development and use of recombinant-chimeric MAbs and modified constructs

  9. Expression and purification of toxic anti-breast cancer p28-NRC chimeric protein

    OpenAIRE

    Soleimani, Meysam; Mirmohammad-Sadeghi, Hamid; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chimeric proteins consisting of a targeting moiety and a cytotoxic moiety are now under intense research focus for targeted therapy of cancer. Here, we report cloning, expression, and purification of such a targeted chimeric protein made up of p28 peptide as both targeting and anticancer moiety fused to NRC peptide as a cytotoxic moiety. However, since the antimicrobial activity of the NRC peptide would intervene expression of the chimeric protein in Escherichia coli, we evaluated...

  10. Chimeric OspA genes, proteins and methods of use thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Brian A.; Livey, Ian; O'Rourke, Maria; Schwendinger, Michael; Dunn, John J.; Luft, Benjamin J.

    2018-02-20

    The invention relates to the development of chimeric OspA molecules for use in a new Lyme vaccine. More specifically, the chimeric OspA molecules comprise the proximal portion from one OspA serotype, together with the distal portion from another OspA serotype, while retaining antigenic properties of both of the parent polypeptides. The chimeric OspA molecules are delivered alone or in combination to provide protection against a variety of Borrelia genospecies. The invention also provides methods for administering the chimeric OspA molecules to a subject in the prevention and treatment of Lyme disease or borreliosis.

  11. Thionin-D4E1 chimeric protein protects plants against bacterial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Eddie W; Gupta, Goutam; Hao, Guixia

    2017-08-08

    The generation of a chimeric protein containing a first domain encoding either a pro-thionon or thionin, a second domain encoding D4E1 or pro-D4E1, and a third domain encoding a peptide linker located between the first domain and second domain is described. Either the first domain or the second domain is located at the amino terminal of the chimeric protein and the other domain (second domain or first domain, respectively) is located at the carboxyl terminal. The chimeric protein has antibacterial activity. Genetically altered plants and their progeny expressing a polynucleotide encoding the chimeric protein resist diseases caused by bacteria.

  12. Bone marrow chimerism as a strategy to produce tolerance in solid organ allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; Alexander, Stephen I; Yi, Shounan

    2016-12-01

    Clinical transplant tolerance has been most successfully achieved combining hematopoietic chimerism with kidney transplantation. This review outlines this strategy in animal models and human transplantation, and possible clinical challenges. Kidney transplant tolerance has been achieved through chimerism in several centers beginning with Massachusetts General Hospital's success with mixed chimerism in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched patients and the Stanford group with HLA-matched patients, and the more recent success of the Northwestern protocol achieving full chimerism. This has challenged the original view that stable mixed chimerism is necessary for organ graft tolerance. However, among the HLA-mismatched kidney transplant-tolerant patients, loss of mixed chimerism does not lead to renal-graft rejection, and the development of host Foxp3+ regulatory T cells has been observed. Recent animal models suggest that graft tolerance through bone marrow chimerism occurs through both clonal deletion and regulatory immune cells. Further, Tregs have been shown to improve chimerism in animal models. Animal studies continue to suggest ways to improve our current clinical strategies. Advances in chimerism protocols suggest that tolerance may be clinically achievable with relative safety for HLA-mismatched kidney transplants.

  13. [Biological characteristics of a chimeric rabies virus expressing canine parvovirus VP2 protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xue-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Sun, Zhao-Jin; Shi, He-He; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Bido; Sun, Jing-Chen; Guo, Xiao-Feng

    2009-09-01

    To obtain a bivalence vaccine against canine rabies virus and canine parvovirus, a chimeric rabies virus expressing canine parvovirus VP2 protein was generated by the technique of reverse genetics. It was shown that the chimeric virus designated as HEP-Flury (VP2) grew well on BHK-21 cells and the VP2 gene could still be stably expressed after ten passages on BHK-21 cells. Experiments on the mice immunized with the chimeric virus HEP-Flury (VP2) demonstrated that specific antibodies against rabies virus and canine parvovirus were induced in immunized mice after vaccination with the live chimeric virus.

  14. A chimeric antigen receptor for TRAIL-receptor 1 induces apoptosis in various types of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eiji; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Hamana, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Hidetoshi; Jin, Aishun; Lin, Zhezhu; Muraguchi, Atsushi

    2014-10-31

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its associated receptors (TRAIL-R/TR) are attractive targets for cancer therapy because TRAIL induces apoptosis in tumor cells through TR while having little cytotoxicity on normal cells. Therefore, many agonistic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for TR have been produced, and these induce apoptosis in multiple tumor cell types. However, some TR-expressing tumor cells are resistant to TR-specific mAb-induced apoptosis. In this study, we constructed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) of a TRAIL-receptor 1 (TR1)-specific single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody (TR1-scFv-CAR) and expressed it on a Jurkat T cell line, the KHYG-1 NK cell line, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). We found that the TR1-scFv-CAR-expressing Jurkat cells killed target cells via TR1-mediated apoptosis, whereas TR1-scFv-CAR-expressing KHYG-1 cells and PBLs killed target cells not only via TR1-mediated apoptosis but also via CAR signal-induced cytolysis, resulting in cytotoxicity on a broader range if target cells than with TR1-scFv-CAR-expressing Jurkat cells. The results suggest that TR1-scFv-CAR could be a new candidate for cancer gene therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chimeras taking shape: Potential functions of proteins encoded by chimeric RNA transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Lacroix, Vincent; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Levin, Yishai; Gabashvili, Alexandra; Prilusky, Jaime; del Pozo, Angela; Tress, Michael; Johnson, Rory; Guigo, Roderic; Valencia, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Chimeric RNAs comprise exons from two or more different genes and have the potential to encode novel proteins that alter cellular phenotypes. To date, numerous putative chimeric transcripts have been identified among the ESTs isolated from several organisms and using high throughput RNA sequencing. The few corresponding protein products that have been characterized mostly result from chromosomal translocations and are associated with cancer. Here, we systematically establish that some of the putative chimeric transcripts are genuinely expressed in human cells. Using high throughput RNA sequencing, mass spectrometry experimental data, and functional annotation, we studied 7424 putative human chimeric RNAs. We confirmed the expression of 175 chimeric RNAs in 16 human tissues, with an abundance varying from 0.06 to 17 RPKM (Reads Per Kilobase per Million mapped reads). We show that these chimeric RNAs are significantly more tissue-specific than non-chimeric transcripts. Moreover, we present evidence that chimeras tend to incorporate highly expressed genes. Despite the low expression level of most chimeric RNAs, we show that 12 novel chimeras are translated into proteins detectable in multiple shotgun mass spectrometry experiments. Furthermore, we confirm the expression of three novel chimeric proteins using targeted mass spectrometry. Finally, based on our functional annotation of exon organization and preserved domains, we discuss the potential features of chimeric proteins with illustrative examples and suggest that chimeras significantly exploit signal peptides and transmembrane domains, which can alter the cellular localization of cognate proteins. Taken together, these findings establish that some chimeric RNAs are translated into potentially functional proteins in humans. PMID:22588898

  16. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  17. Quantitative imaging with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldofsky, P.J.; Hammond, N.D.

    1988-01-01

    The ability to image tumor by using radiolabeled monoclonal antibody products has been widely demonstrated. The questions of safety and efficacy remain open and require further experience, but at least in some clinical situations radioimmunoimaging has provided clinically useful information. Imaging tumor with radiolabeled monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies has been widely reported, and several summaries have recently appeared. For extensive review of recent clinical imaging the reader is referred to these excellent sources. Having demonstrated the possibility of imaging tumor with radiolabeled antibody, the question now apparent is: will the imaging modality provide information new and different from the already available with established techniques in computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and standard nuclear medicine?

  18. [Monoclonal antibodies in diagnosis of acute leukemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyńska, A; Robak, T

    1996-01-01

    Immunophenotyping has become an essential component for the study of acute myeloblastic (AML) and lymphoblastic (ALL) leukaemias. The recent development of highly specific monoclonal antibodies (Mc Ab) to differentiation antigens (CD) of haematopoetic cells have made it readily available to clinical laboratories in most major hospitals. Immunophenotyping complements standard morphology by providing information on lineage, stage of differentiation and clonality. In addition some of the flow cytometry findings have independent prognostic significance. Monoclonal antibodies useful in defining lineage (B-cell versus T-cell) and stages of differentiation of ALL. It can be also used in identifying characteristic feature of AML and aiding in lineage determination in acute leukaemias that are morphologically undifferentiated. Surface immunophenotyping is especially helpful for recognizing mixed lineage acute leukaemia and diagnosing certain rare entities such as erythroleukaemia (M6), acute megakaryocytic leukaemia (M7) and minimally differentiation acute myeloid leukaemia.

  19. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs

  20. Taking aim at cancer with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klausner, A.

    1986-01-01

    Conjugating radioisotopes to monoclonal antibodies could have certain advantages in cancer therapy. Radioactive compounds have the double-edged ability to kill cells that are up to centimeter or more away. This is a plausible way to overcome tumor heterogeneity, but it also means that normal cells near the tumor could be affected. Hybritech (San Diego, CA) has been supplying antibody linked to the radioisotope yttrium-90 for a number of clinical trials. Work at Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD) has focused on polyclonal antibodies to hepatoma. Monoclonal antibodies will be used there soon, and trials could be expanded eventually to include breast, lung, and prostate cancer as well. Hybritech also expects that the yttrium-antibody conjugates developed with NCI will enter the clinic later this year for treating leukemia and lymphoma systems; treatments for melanomas should follow

  1. Monoclonal TCR-redirected tumor cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, Nathaniel; Bossi, Giovanna; Adams, Katherine J; Lissina, Anna; Mahon, Tara M; Hassan, Namir J; Gavarret, Jessie; Bianchi, Frayne C; Pumphrey, Nicholas J; Ladell, Kristin; Gostick, Emma; Sewell, Andrew K; Lissin, Nikolai M; Harwood, Naomi E; Molloy, Peter E; Li, Yi; Cameron, Brian J; Sami, Malkit; Baston, Emma E; Todorov, Penio T; Paston, Samantha J; Dennis, Rebecca E; Harper, Jane V; Dunn, Steve M; Ashfield, Rebecca; Johnson, Andy; McGrath, Yvonne; Plesa, Gabriela; June, Carl H; Kalos, Michael; Price, David A; Vuidepot, Annelise; Williams, Daniel D; Sutton, Deborah H; Jakobsen, Bent K

    2012-06-01

    T cell immunity can potentially eradicate malignant cells and lead to clinical remission in a minority of patients with cancer. In the majority of these individuals, however, there is a failure of the specific T cell receptor (TCR)–mediated immune recognition and activation process. Here we describe the engineering and characterization of new reagents termed immune-mobilizing monoclonal TCRs against cancer (ImmTACs). Four such ImmTACs, each comprising a distinct tumor-associated epitope-specific monoclonal TCR with picomolar affinity fused to a humanized cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3)-specific single-chain antibody fragment (scFv), effectively redirected T cells to kill cancer cells expressing extremely low surface epitope densities. Furthermore, these reagents potently suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Thus, ImmTACs overcome immune tolerance to cancer and represent a new approach to tumor immunotherapy.

  2. New monoclonal antibody to human apolipoprotein J

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapková, Jana; Geussová, Gizela; Pěknicová, Jana

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 2002, č. 48 (2002), s. 40-42 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV524/96/K162 Grant - others:NFDK-MAOB(XE) 1985-NFDK-MAOB Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : apo J * human spermatoza * monoclonal antibody Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.615, year: 2002

  3. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  4. Construction, purification, and characterization of a chimeric TH1 antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier-González Luís

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TH1 immune response antagonism is a desirable approach to mitigate some autoimmune and inflammatory reactions during the course of several diseases where IL-2 and IFN-γ are two central players. Therefore, the neutralization of both cytokines could provide beneficial effects in patients suffering from autoimmune or inflammatory illnesses. Results A chimeric antagonist that can antagonize the action of TH1 immunity mediators, IFN-γ and IL-2, was designed, engineered, expressed in E. coli, purified and evaluated for its in vitro biological activities. The TH1 antagonist molecule consists of the extracellular region for the human IFNγ receptor chain 1 fused by a four-aminoacid linker peptide to human 60 N-terminal aminoacid residues of IL-2. The corresponding gene fragments were isolated by RT-PCR and cloned in the pTPV-1 vector. E. coli (W3110 strain was transformed with this vector. The chimeric protein was expressed at high level as inclusion bodies. The protein was partially purified by pelleting and washing. It was then solubilized with strong denaturant and finally refolded by gel filtration. In vitro biological activity of chimera was demonstrated by inhibition of IFN-γ-dependent HLA-DR expression in Colo 205 cells, inhibition of IFN-γ antiproliferative effect on HEp-2 cells, and by a bidirectional effect in assays for IL-2 T-cell dependent proliferation: agonism in the absence versus inhibition in the presence of IL-2. Conclusion TH1 antagonist is a chimeric protein that inhibits the in vitro biological activities of human IFN-γ, and is a partial agonist/antagonist of human IL-2. With these attributes, the chimera has the potential to offer a new opportunity for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  5. Chimeric creatures in Greek mythology and reflections in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazopoulou-Kyrkanidou, E

    2001-04-15

    "The Chimaera" in Homer's Iliad, "was of divine stock, not of men, in the forepart a lion, in the hinder a serpent, and in the midst a goat, ellipsis Bellerophon slew her, trusting in the signs of the gods." In Hesiod's Theogony it is emphasized that "Chimaera ellipsis had three heads, one of a grim-eyed lion, another of a goat, and another of a snakeellipsis". In addition to this interspecies animal chimera, human/animal chimeras are referred to in Greek mythology, preeminent among them the Centaurs and the Minotaur. The Centaurs, as horse/men, first appear in Geometric and early Archaic art, but in the literature not until early in the fifth century B.C. The bullheaded-man Minotaur, who is not certainly attested in the literary evidence until circa 500 B.C., first appears in art about 650 B.C. Attempts, in the fourth century B.C. and thereafter, to rationalize their mythical appearance were in vain; their chimeric nature retained its fascinating and archetypal form over the centuries. Early in the 1980s, experimental sheep/goat chimeras were produced removing the reproductive barrier between these two animal species. Late in the 1990s, legal, political, ethical, and moral fights loomed over a patent bid on human/animal chimeras. Chimeric technology is recently developed; however, the concept of chimerism has existed in literary and artistic form in ancient mythology. This is yet another example where art and literature precede scientific research and development. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss. Inc.

  6. DIVA vaccine properties of the live chimeric pestivirus strain CP7_E2gif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Rosen, Tanya; Rangelova, Desislava Yordanova; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Live modified vaccines to protect against classical swine fever virus (CSFV), based on chimeric pestiviruses, have been developed to enable serological Differentiation of Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA). In this context, the chimeric virus CP7_E2gif vaccine candidate is unique as it does...

  7. High-resolution air quality simulation over Europe with the chemistry transport model CHIMERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Terrenoire

    2015-01-01

    The results suggest that future work should focus on the development of national bottom-up emission inventories including a better account for semi-volatile organic compounds and their conversion to SOA, the improvement of the CHIMERE urban parameterization, the introduction into CHIMERE of the coarse nitrate chemistry and an advanced parameterization accounting for windblown dust emissions.

  8. Chimeric ZHHH neuroglobin acts as a cell membrane-penetrating inducer of neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Nozomu; Onozuka, Wataru; Watanabe, Seiji; Wakasugi, Keisuke

    2017-09-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a heme protein expressed in the vertebrate brain. We previously engineered a chimeric Ngb protein, in which module M1 of human Ngb is replaced by that of zebrafish Ngb, and showed that the chimeric ZHHH Ngb has a cell membrane-penetrating activity similar to that of zebrafish Ngb and also rescues cells from death caused by hypoxia/reoxygenation as does human Ngb. Recently, it was reported that overexpression of mammalian Ngb in neuronal cells induces neurite outgrowth. In this study, we performed neurite outgrowth assays of chimeric Ngb using rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Addition of chimeric Ngb, but not human or zebrafish Ngb, exogenously to the cell medium induces neurite outgrowth. On the other hand, the K7A/K9Q chimeric Ngb double mutant, which cannot translocate into cells, did not induce neurite outgrowth, suggesting that the cell membrane-penetrating activity of the chimeric Ngb is crucial for its neurite outgrowth-promoting activity. We also prepared several site-directed chimeric Ngb mutants and demonstrated that residues crucial for neurite outgrowth-inducing activity of the chimeric Ngb are not exactly the same as those for its neuroprotective activity.

  9. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheng Newick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells are engineered constructs composed of synthetic receptors that direct T cells to surface antigens for subsequent elimination. Many CAR constructs are also manufactured with elements that augment T-cell persistence and activity. To date, CAR T cells have demonstrated tremendous success in eradicating hematological malignancies (e.g., CD19 CARs in leukemias. This success is not yet extrapolated to solid tumors, and the reasons for this are being actively investigated. Here in this mini-review, we discuss some of the key hurdles encountered by CAR T cells in the solid tumor microenvironment.

  10. 78 FR 13691 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of m971 and m972 Chimeric Antigen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... Exclusive License: The Development of m971 and m972 Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) for the Treatment of B... ``M971 Chimeric Antigen Receptors'' [HHS Ref. E-291-2012/0-US-01], and (b) U.S. Patent Application 61/042... malignancies that express CD22 on their cell surface using chimeric antigen receptors which contain the m971 or...

  11. 78 FR 70955 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive Patent License: GMCSF-BclxL-Derived Chimeric Therapeutics for Use...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... Exclusive Patent License: GMCSF-BclxL- Derived Chimeric Therapeutics for Use in Treatment of Cancer...-BclxL-derived chimeric therapeutics and immunotherapeutics, alone or in combination, for restoring...: [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The subject invention is to a chimeric protein...

  12. 77 FR 62520 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Anti-CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptors...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... Exclusive License: The Development of Anti- CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) for the Treatment of B... ``Anti-CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptors'' [HHS Ref. E-265-2011/0-US-01], and (b) U.S. Patent Application... CD22 on their cell surface using chimeric antigen receptors which contain the HA22 or BL22 antibody...

  13. Protective efficacy of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies in a nonhuman primate model of Ebola hemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Andrea; Yoshida, Reiko; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Ishijima, Mari; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Higuchi, Megumi; Matsuyama, Yukie; Igarashi, Manabu; Nakayama, Eri; Kuroda, Makoto; Saijo, Masayuki; Feldmann, Friederike; Brining, Douglas; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2012-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is the causative agent of severe hemorrhagic fever in primates, with human case fatality rates up to 90%. Today, there is neither a licensed vaccine nor a treatment available for Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF). Single monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) have been successfully used in passive immunization experiments in rodent models, but have failed to protect nonhuman primates from lethal disease. In this study, we used two clones of human-mouse chimeric MAbs (ch133 and ch226) with strong neutralizing activity against ZEBOV and evaluated their protective potential in a rhesus macaque model of EHF. Reduced viral loads and partial protection were observed in animals given MAbs ch133 and ch226 combined intravenously at 24 hours before and 24 and 72 hours after challenge. MAbs circulated in the blood of a surviving animal until virus-induced IgG responses were detected. In contrast, serum MAb concentrations decreased to undetectable levels at terminal stages of disease in animals that succumbed to infection, indicating substantial consumption of these antibodies due to virus replication. Accordingly, the rapid decrease of serum MAbs was clearly associated with increased viremia in non-survivors. Our results indicate that EBOV neutralizing antibodies, particularly in combination with other therapeutic strategies, might be beneficial in reducing viral loads and prolonging disease progression during EHF.

  14. Protective efficacy of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies in a nonhuman primate model of Ebola hemorrhagic fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Marzi

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV is the causative agent of severe hemorrhagic fever in primates, with human case fatality rates up to 90%. Today, there is neither a licensed vaccine nor a treatment available for Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF. Single monoclonal antibodies (MAbs specific for Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV have been successfully used in passive immunization experiments in rodent models, but have failed to protect nonhuman primates from lethal disease. In this study, we used two clones of human-mouse chimeric MAbs (ch133 and ch226 with strong neutralizing activity against ZEBOV and evaluated their protective potential in a rhesus macaque model of EHF. Reduced viral loads and partial protection were observed in animals given MAbs ch133 and ch226 combined intravenously at 24 hours before and 24 and 72 hours after challenge. MAbs circulated in the blood of a surviving animal until virus-induced IgG responses were detected. In contrast, serum MAb concentrations decreased to undetectable levels at terminal stages of disease in animals that succumbed to infection, indicating substantial consumption of these antibodies due to virus replication. Accordingly, the rapid decrease of serum MAbs was clearly associated with increased viremia in non-survivors. Our results indicate that EBOV neutralizing antibodies, particularly in combination with other therapeutic strategies, might be beneficial in reducing viral loads and prolonging disease progression during EHF.

  15. Chimeric anti-tenascin antibody 81C6: Increased tumor localization compared with its murine parent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalutsky, Michael R.; Archer, Gary E.; Garg, Pradeep K.; Batra, Surinder K.; Bigner, Darell D.

    1996-01-01

    When labeled using the Iodogen method, a chimeric antibody composed of the human IgG 2 constant region and the variable regions of murine anti-tenascin 81C6 exhibited superior uptake in human glioma xenografts compared with its murine parent. In the current study, three paired-label experiments were performed in athymic mice with subcutaneous D-54 MG human glioma xenografts to evaluate further the properties of radioiodinated chimeric 81C6. These studies demonstrated that (a) the enhanced tumor uptake of chimeric 81C6 is specific; (b) when labeling was performed using N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate, chimeric 81C6 again showed preferential accumulation in tumor compared with murine 81C6; and (c) the tumor uptake advantage observed previously with murine 81C6 for N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate compared with Iodogen labeling did not occur with chimeric 81C6

  16. Identification and analysis of pig chimeric mRNAs using RNA sequencing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene fusion is ubiquitous over the course of evolution. It is expected to increase the diversity and complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes through chimeric sequence segments or altered regulation. However, chimeric mRNAs in pigs remain unclear. Here we identified some chimeric mRNAs in pigs and analyzed the expression of them across individuals and breeds using RNA-sequencing data. Results The present study identified 669 putative chimeric mRNAs in pigs, of which 251 chimeric candidates were detected in a set of RNA-sequencing data. The 618 candidates had clear trans-splicing sites, 537 of which obeyed the canonical GU-AG splice rule. Only two putative pig chimera variants whose fusion junction was overlapped with that of a known human chimeric mRNA were found. A set of unique chimeric events were considered middle variances in the expression across individuals and breeds, and revealed non-significant variance between sexes. Furthermore, the genomic region of the 5′ partner gene shares a similar DNA sequence with that of the 3′ partner gene for 458 putative chimeric mRNAs. The 81 of those shared DNA sequences significantly matched the known DNA-binding motifs in the JASPAR CORE database. Four DNA motifs shared in parental genomic regions had significant similarity with known human CTCF binding sites. Conclusions The present study provided detailed information on some pig chimeric mRNAs. We proposed a model that trans-acting factors, such as CTCF, induced the spatial organisation of parental genes to the same transcriptional factory so that parental genes were coordinatively transcribed to give birth to chimeric mRNAs. PMID:22925561

  17. Identification and analysis of pig chimeric mRNAs using RNA sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Lei

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene fusion is ubiquitous over the course of evolution. It is expected to increase the diversity and complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes through chimeric sequence segments or altered regulation. However, chimeric mRNAs in pigs remain unclear. Here we identified some chimeric mRNAs in pigs and analyzed the expression of them across individuals and breeds using RNA-sequencing data. Results The present study identified 669 putative chimeric mRNAs in pigs, of which 251 chimeric candidates were detected in a set of RNA-sequencing data. The 618 candidates had clear trans-splicing sites, 537 of which obeyed the canonical GU-AG splice rule. Only two putative pig chimera variants whose fusion junction was overlapped with that of a known human chimeric mRNA were found. A set of unique chimeric events were considered middle variances in the expression across individuals and breeds, and revealed non-significant variance between sexes. Furthermore, the genomic region of the 5′ partner gene shares a similar DNA sequence with that of the 3′ partner gene for 458 putative chimeric mRNAs. The 81 of those shared DNA sequences significantly matched the known DNA-binding motifs in the JASPAR CORE database. Four DNA motifs shared in parental genomic regions had significant similarity with known human CTCF binding sites. Conclusions The present study provided detailed information on some pig chimeric mRNAs. We proposed a model that trans-acting factors, such as CTCF, induced the spatial organisation of parental genes to the same transcriptional factory so that parental genes were coordinatively transcribed to give birth to chimeric mRNAs.

  18. Assay for the specificity of monoclonal antibodies in crossed immunoelectrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, K; Schou, C; Koch, C

    1984-01-01

    A method is described based on crossed immunoelectrophoresis of a complex antigen mixture in agarose gel followed by incubation of the gel with the monoclonal antibody. The bound monoclonal antibody is detected by the use of a secondary enzyme-labelled antibody. Using this technique we have been ...... I molecules. In other experiments using the same technique we demonstrated the reaction of a monoclonal antibody specific for chicken Ig light chains. Udgivelsesdato: 1984-Aug-3...

  19. Mixed chimerism to induce tolerance for solid organ transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wren, S.M.; Nalesnik, M.; Hronakes, M.L.; Oh, E.; Ildstad, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    Chimerism, or the coexistence of tissue elements from more than one genetically different strain or species in an organism, is the only experimental state that results in the induction of donor-specific transplantation tolerance. Transplantation of a mixture of T-cell-depleted syngeneic (host-type) plus T-cell-depleted allogeneic (donor) bone marrow into a normal adult recipient mouse (A + B----A) results in mixed allogeneic chimerism. Recipient mice exhibit donor-specific transplantation tolerance, yet have full immunocompetence to recognize and respond to third-party transplantation antigens. After complete hematolymphopoietic repopulation at 28 days, animals accept a donor-specific skin graft but reject major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus-disparate third-party grafts. We now report that permanent graft acceptance can also be achieved when the graft is placed at the time of bone marrow transplantation. Histologically, grafts were viable and had only minimal inflammatory changes. This model may have potential future clinical application for the induction of donor-specific transplantation tolerance

  20. A multiple multicomponent approach to chimeric peptide-peptoid podands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Daniel G; León, Fredy; Concepción, Odette; Morales, Fidel E; Wessjohann, Ludger A

    2013-05-10

    The success of multi-armed, peptide-based receptors in supramolecular chemistry traditionally is not only based on the sequence but equally on an appropriate positioning of various peptidic chains to create a multivalent array of binding elements. As a faster, more versatile and alternative access toward (pseudo)peptidic receptors, a new approach based on multiple Ugi four-component reactions (Ugi-4CR) is proposed as a means of simultaneously incorporating several binding and catalytic elements into organizing scaffolds. By employing α-amino acids either as the amino or acid components of the Ugi-4CRs, this multiple multicomponent process allows for the one-pot assembly of podands bearing chimeric peptide-peptoid chains as appended arms. Tripodal, bowl-shaped, and concave polyfunctional skeletons are employed as topologically varied platforms for positioning the multiple peptidic chains formed by Ugi-4CRs. In a similar approach, steroidal building blocks with several axially-oriented isocyano groups are synthesized and utilized to align the chimeric chains with conformational constrains, thus providing an alternative to the classical peptido-steroidal receptors. The branched and hybrid peptide-peptoid appendages allow new possibilities for both rational design and combinatorial production of synthetic receptors. The concept is also expandable to other multicomponent reactions. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Development and Characterization of Canine Distemper Virus Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxiu; Hao, Liying; Li, Xiangdong; Wang, Linxiao; Zhang, Jianpo; Deng, Junhua; Tian, Kegong

    2017-06-01

    Five canine distemper virus monoclonal antibodies were developed by immunizing BALB/c mice with a traditional vaccine strain Snyder Hill. Among these monoclonal antibodies, four antibodies recognized both field and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus without neutralizing ability. One monoclonal antibody, 1A4, against hemagglutinin protein of canine distemper virus was found to react only with vaccine strain virus but not field isolates, and showed neutralizing activity to vaccine strain virus. These monoclonal antibodies could be very useful tools in the study of the pathogenesis of canine distemper virus and the development of diagnostic reagents.

  2. Monoclonal Idiotope Vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Mary K.; Ward, Ronald E.; Kohler, Heinz

    1984-12-01

    A monoclonal anti-idiotope antibody coupled to a carrier protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice against a lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Vaccinated mice developed a high titer of antibody to phosphorylcholine, which is known to protect against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Measurement of the median lethal dose of the bacteria indicated that anti-idiotope immunization significantly increased the resistance of BALB/c mice to the bacterial challenge. Antibody to an idiotope can thus be used as an antigen substitute for the induction of protective immunity.

  3. Protein chimerism: novel source of protein diversity in humans adds complexity to bottom-up proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado-Vela, Juan; Lacal, Juan Carlos; Elortza, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Three main molecular mechanisms are considered to contribute expanding the repertoire and diversity of proteins present in living organisms: first, at DNA level (gene polymorphisms and single nucleotide polymorphisms); second, at messenger RNA (pre-mRNA and mRNA) level including alternative splicing (also termed differential splicing or cis-splicing); finally, at the protein level mainly driven through PTM and specific proteolytic cleavages. Chimeric mRNAs constitute an alternative source of protein diversity, which can be generated either by chromosomal translocations or by trans-splicing events. The occurrence of chimeric mRNAs and proteins is a frequent event in cells from the immune system and cancer cells, mainly as a consequence of gene rearrangements. Recent reports support that chimeric proteins may also be expressed at low levels under normal physiological circumstances, thus, representing a novel source of protein diversity. Notably, recent publications demonstrate that chimeric protein products can be successfully identified through bottom-up proteomic analyses. Several questions remain unsolved, such as the physiological role and impact of such chimeric proteins or the potential occurrence of chimeric proteins in higher eukaryotic organisms different from humans. The occurrence of chimeric proteins certainly seems to be another unforeseen source of complexity for the proteome. It may be a process to take in mind not only when performing bottom-up proteomic analyses in cancer studies but also in general bottom-up proteomics experiments. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Recurrent chimeric RNAs enriched in human prostate cancer identified by deep sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Kalpana; Wang, Liguo; Wang, Jianghua; Ittmann, Michael M.; Li, Wei; Yen, Laising

    2011-01-01

    Transcription-induced chimeric RNAs, possessing sequences from different genes, are expected to increase the proteomic diversity through chimeric proteins or altered regulation. Despite their importance, few studies have focused on chimeric RNAs especially regarding their presence/roles in human cancers. By deep sequencing the transcriptome of 20 human prostate cancer and 10 matched benign prostate tissues, we obtained 1.3 billion sequence reads, which led to the identification of 2,369 chimeric RNA candidates. Chimeric RNAs occurred in significantly higher frequency in cancer than in matched benign samples. Experimental investigation of a selected 46 set led to the confirmation of 32 chimeric RNAs, of which 27 were highly recurrent and previously undescribed in prostate cancer. Importantly, a subset of these chimeras was present in prostate cancer cell lines, but not detectable in primary human prostate epithelium cells, implying their associations with cancer. These chimeras contain discernable 5′ and 3′ splice sites at the RNA junction, indicating that their formation is mediated by splicing. Their presence is also largely independent of the expression of parental genes, suggesting that other factors are involved in their production and regulation. One chimera, TMEM79-SMG5, is highly differentially expressed in human cancer samples and therefore a potential biomarker. The prevalence of chimeric RNAs may allow the limited number of human genes to encode a substantially larger number of RNAs and proteins, forming an additional layer of cellular complexity. Together, our results suggest that chimeric RNAs are widespread, and increased chimeric RNA events could represent a unique class of molecular alteration in cancer. PMID:21571633

  5. Functional analysis of aldehyde oxidase using expressed chimeric enzyme between monkey and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kunio; Asakawa, Tasuku; Hoshino, Kouichi; Adachi, Mayuko; Fukiya, Kensuke; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Yorihisa

    2009-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Each subunit consists of about 20 kDa 2Fe-2S cluster domain storing reducing equivalents, about 40 kDa flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD) domain and about 85 kDa molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) domain containing a substrate binding site. In order to clarify the properties of each domain, especially substrate binding domain, chimeric cDNAs were constructed by mutual exchange of 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains between monkey and rat. Chimeric monkey/rat AO was referred to one with monkey type 2Fe-2S/FAD domains and a rat type MoCo domain. Rat/monkey AO was vice versa. AO-catalyzed 2-oxidation activities of (S)-RS-8359 were measured using the expressed enzyme in Escherichia coli. Substrate inhibition was seen in rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, but not in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, suggesting that the phenomenon might be dependent on the natures of MoCo domain of rat. A biphasic Eadie-Hofstee profile was observed in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, but not rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, indicating that the biphasic profile might be related to the properties of MoCo domain of monkey. Two-fold greater V(max) values were observed in monkey AO than in chimeric rat/monkey AO, and in chimeric monkey/rat AO than in rat AO, suggesting that monkey has the more effective electron transfer system than rat. Thus, the use of chimeric enzymes revealed that 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains affect the velocity and the quantitative profiles of AO-catalyzed (S)-RS-8359 2-oxidation, respectively.

  6. Aggregates in monoclonal antibody manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Rey, María; Lang, Dietmar A

    2011-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have proved to be a highly successful class of therapeutic products. Large-scale manufacturing of pharmaceutical antibodies is a complex activity that requires considerable effort in both process and analytical development. If a therapeutic protein cannot be stabilized adequately, it will lose partially or totally its therapeutic properties or even cause immunogenic reactions thus potentially further endangering the patients' health. The phenomenon of protein aggregation is a common issue that compromises the quality, safety, and efficacy of antibodies and can happen at different steps of the manufacturing process, including fermentation, purification, final formulation, and storage. Aggregate levels in drug substance and final drug product are a key factor when assessing quality attributes of the molecule, since aggregation might impact biological activity of the biopharmaceutical. In this review it is analyzed how aggregates are formed during monoclonal antibody industrial production, why they have to be removed and the manufacturing process steps that are designed to either minimize or remove aggregates in the final product. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Kinetics of intralymphatically delivered monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.; Geatti, O.; Liebert, M.; Beers, B.; Jackson, G.; Laino, L.; Kronberg, S.; Wilson, B.S.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) administration subcutaneously (sq), so that preferential uptake is to the lymphatics, holds significant promise for the detection of lymph node metastases. Only limited information is available about clearance rates of intralymphatically administered MoAbs. I-131 labeled intact IgG (225.28S), F(ab's)2 (225.28S) or IgM (FT162) were administered sq to anesthetized Balb/C mice. Eight mice were studied with each MoAb, 4 with a foot-pad injection, 4 with an anterior abdominal injection. Gamma camera images were collected into a computer, over the first 6 hrs after injection with the animals anesthetized and immobile. Animals were then allowed to move about freely. Additional images were then acquired out to 48 hrs. Regions of interest wre selected over the injection site and the kinetics of antibody egress determined. Clearance rates from local sq injection sites are influenced by motion and somewhat by location. The class and fragment status of the MoAb appear relatively less important in determining clearance rates from sq injections than they are in determining whole-body clearance after iv injections. Additional studies using Fab fragments and additional monoclonals will be useful in extending these observations

  8. Bone marrow dosimetry for monoclonal antibody therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigler, R.E.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Leonard, R.

    1986-01-01

    Immunoglobulins must permeate through the basement membrane of capillaries in order to enter the extracellular space (ECS) of tissue. Since the process is quite slow, the blood plasma activity in various organs contributes considerably to the radiation dose of the dose-limiting tissues. In bone marrow the basement membrane is absent and the blood circulation is functionally open. Therefore, blood plasma and marrow ECS maintain equal concentrations of labeled immunoglobulins. A combination of factors including intravenous administration, slow absorption into most tissues, slow breakdown and elimination of labeled immunoglobulin, and rapid entry into bone marrow ECS as well as known radiosensitivity of marrow led the authors to expect this tissue would prove to be the primary tissue at risk for systemic monoclonal antibody therapy. They have developed and applied in a Phase I clinical study of 131 I labeled CEA antibody a procedure for estimation of radiation dose to red bone marrow. Serieal measurements of blood plasma and total body retention are carried out. Binding of labeled antibody to the cellular components of blood is verified to be very low. They have observed bone marrow depression at doses greater than 400 rad. If no special procedures are used to reconstitute marrow after radiation treatment, this level represents a much greater than generally recognized limitation to radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy. 25 references, 4 tables

  9. Emerging monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péchiné, Séverine; Janoir, Claire; Collignon, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are characterized by a high recurrence rate despite antibiotic treatments and there is an urgent need to develop new treatments such as fecal transplantation and immonotherapy. Besides active immunotherapy with vaccines, passive immunotherapy has shown promise, especially with monoclonal antibodies. Areas covered: Herein, the authors review the different assays performed with monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and surface proteins to treat or prevent primary or recurrent episodes of C. difficile infection in animal models and in clinical trials as well. Notably, the authors lay emphasis on the phase III clinical trial (MODIFY II), which allowed bezlotoxumab to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. They also review new strategies for producing single domain antibodies and nanobodies against C. difficile and new approaches to deliver them in the digestive tract. Expert opinion: Only two human Mabs against TcdA and TcdB have been tested alone or in combination in clinical trials. However, many animal model studies have provided rationale for the use of Mabs and nanobodies in C. difficile infection and pave the way for further clinical investigation.

  10. Generation and characterization of rat and mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for MeCP2 and their use in X-inactivation studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Laurence Jost

    Full Text Available Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2 binds DNA, and has a preference for methylated CpGs and, hence, in cells, it accumulates in heterochromatin. Even though it is expressed ubiquitously MeCP2 is particularly important during neuronal maturation. This is underscored by the fact that in Rett syndrome, a neurological disease, 80% of patients carry a mutation in the MECP2 gene. Since the MECP2 gene lies on the X chromosome and is subjected to X chromosome inactivation, affected patients are usually chimeric for wild type and mutant MeCP2. Here, we present the generation and characterization of the first rat monoclonal MeCP2 specific antibodies as well as mouse monoclonal antibodies and a rabbit polyclonal antibody. We demonstrate that our antibodies are suitable for immunoblotting, (chromatin immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence of endogenous and ectopically expressed MeCP2. Epitope mapping revealed that most of the MeCP2 monoclonal antibodies recognize the C-terminal domain and one the N-terminal domain of MeCP2. Using slot blot analysis, we determined a high sensitivity of all antibodies, detecting amounts as low as 1 ng of MeCP2 protein. Moreover, the antibodies recognize MeCP2 from different species, including human, mouse, rat and pig. Lastly, we have validated their use by analyzing and quantifying X chromosome inactivation skewing using brain tissue of MeCP2 heterozygous null female mice. The new MeCP2 specific monoclonal antibodies described here perform well in a large variety of immunological applications making them a very valuable set of tools for studies of MeCP2 pathophysiology in situ and in vitro.

  11. Generating chimeric mice from embryonic stem cells via vial coculturing or hypertonic microinjection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    The generation of a fertile embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived or F0 (100 % coat color chimerism) mice is the final criterion in proving that the ESC is truly pluripotent. Many methods have been developed to produce chimeric mice. To date, the most popular methods for generating chimeric embryos is well sandwich aggregation between zona pellucida (ZP) removed (denuded) 2.5-day post-coitum (dpc) embryos and ESC clumps, or direct microinjection of ESCs into the cavity (blastocoel) of 3.5-dpc blastocysts. However, due to systemic limitations and the disadvantages of conventional microinjection, aggregation, and coculturing, two novel methods (vial coculturing and hypertonic microinjection) were developed in recent years at my laboratory.Coculturing 2.5-dpc denuded embryos with ESCs in 1.7-mL vials for ~3 h generates chimeras that have significantly high levels of chimerism (including 100 % coat color chimerism) and germline transmission. This method has significantly fewer instrumental and technological limitations than existing methods, and is an efficient, simple, inexpensive, and reproducible method for "mass production" of chimeric embryos. For laboratories without a microinjection system, this is the method of choice for generating chimeric embryos. Microinjecting ESCs into a subzonal space of 2.5-dpc embryos can generate germline-transmitted chimeras including 100 % coat color chimerism. However, this method is adopted rarely due to the very small and tight space between ZP and blastomeres. Using a laser pulse or Piezo-driven instrument/device to help introduce ESCs into the subzonal space of 2.5-dpc embryos demonstrates the superior efficiency in generating ESC-derived (F0) chimeras. Unfortunately, due to the need for an expensive instrument/device and extra fine skill, not many studies have used either method. Recently, ESCs injected into the large subzonal space of 2.5-dpc embryos in an injection medium containing 0.2-0.3 M sucrose very efficiently generated

  12. Authentic display of a cholera toxin epitope by chimeric type 1 fimbriae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentebjerg-Olesen, Bodil; Pallesen, Lars; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1997-01-01

    . Several of the chosen positions seemed amenable even for large foreign inserts; the chimeric proteins were exposed on the bacterial surface and the cholera toxin epitope was authentically displayed, i.e. it was recognized on bacteria by specific antiserum. Display of chimeric fimbriae was tested...... with respect to host background in three different Escherichia coli strains, i.e. an isogenic set of K-12 strains, differing in the presence of an indigenous fim gene cluster, as well as a wild-type isolate. Immunization of rabbits with purified chimeric fimbriae resulted in serum which specifically recognized...

  13. Chimerism representing both paternal alleles detected by HLA typing before kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette; Petersen, Mikkel Steen; Møller, Bjarne Kuno

    2014-01-01

    trisomy 6p or by chimerism. Flow cytometric analysis, employing antibodies specific for the two paternal HLA-A alleles, clearly showed two distinct populations of cells: 83% expressing HLA-A11 and 12% expressing HLA-A2, suggesting a paternal chimerism. We are studying these cell populations to possibly...... identify the mechanism behind this rather unusual paternally derived chimerism. This exceptional case illustrates that careful scrutiny of HLA-typing results may produce atypical conclusions. Clinically, the father is considered the best donor based on immunogenetics....

  14. Crossreactivity of boar sperm monoclonal antibodies with human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Monoclonal antibodies against the head (H mabs) and tail (Tmabs) of boar spermatozoa were produced. Spermatozoa from boar, stallion, bull, human, ram, goat and rabbit were independently incubated with the monoclonal antibodies and later stained by immunofluorescence method. There were positive reactions of the ...

  15. A monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes m6A nucleoside

    OpenAIRE

    Espuny, Ruth; Castro, Ana; Codony, Carles; Eritja Casadellà, Ramón; Bach-Elias, Montse

    1998-01-01

    A hybridoma against the nucleoside m6A has been obtained from mouse spleen. This hybridoma was named H65 and it secretes monoclonal antibodies anti-m6A. The competition assays showed that the monoclonal antibody was highly specific for m6A nucleoside.

  16. Monoclonal antibody PAL-E specific for endothelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlingemann, R. O.; Dingjan, G. M.; Emeis, J. J.; Blok, J.; Warnaar, S. O.; Ruiter, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, PAL-E, is described that is specific for endothelial cells. The monoclonal antibody, an IgG2a, markedly stains endothelium of capillaries, medium-sized and small veins, and venules in frozen sections of human and some animal tissues tested. It reacts not at all or only weakly

  17. New Chimeric Antigen Receptor Design for Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuedi Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T-cell therapy has become popular in immunotherapy, particularly after its tremendous success in the treatment of lineage-restricted hematologic cancers. However, the application of CAR T-cell therapy for solid tumors has not reached its full potential because of the lack of specific tumor antigens and inhibitory factors in suppressive tumor microenvironment (TME (e.g., programmed death ligand-1, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and transforming growth factor-β. In this review, we include some limitations in CAR design, such as tumor heterogeneity, indefinite spatial distance between CAR T-cell and its target cell, and suppressive TME. We also summarize some new approaches to overcome these hurdles, including targeting neoantigens and/or multiple antigens at once and depleting some inhibitory factors.

  18. Confined Blood Chimerism in Monochorionic Dizygotic Twins Conceived Spontaneously

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kanda

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, monochorionicity has been regarded as synonymous with monozygosity. However, several recent cases of monochorionic dizygotic twins have shown that monochorionic twins can be dizygous. We report a rare case of monochorionic diamnionic, gender-discordant twins who were conceived spontaneously. Initially, a monochorionic placenta was diagnosed by ultrasonography at 8 weeks of gestation and then confirmed by pathology after delivery. The twins had different genders. A comparison of cytogenetic analyses using peripheral blood lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts revealed that chimerism was confined to blood cells. We have experienced two cases of monochorionic dizygotic twins since 2003. These cases suggest that monochorionic dizygotic twins are not as rare as previously thought.

  19. Synergistic gene and drug tumor therapy using a chimeric peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kai; Chen, Si; Chen, Wei-Hai; Lei, Qi; Liu, Yun; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2013-06-01

    Co-delivery of gene and drug for synergistic therapy has provided a promising strategy to cure devastating diseases. Here, an amphiphilic chimeric peptide (Fmoc)2KH7-TAT with pH-responsibility for gene and drug delivery was designed and fabricated. As a drug carrier, the micelles self-assembled from the peptide exhibited a much faster doxorubicin (DOX) release rate at pH 5.0 than that at pH 7.4. As a non-viral gene vector, (Fmoc)(2)KH(7)-TAT peptide could satisfactorily mediate transfection of pGL-3 reporter plasmid with or without the existence of serum in both 293T and HeLa cell-lines. Besides, the endosome escape capability of peptide/DNA complexes was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). To evaluate the co-delivery efficiency and the synergistic anti-tumor effect of gene and drug, p53 plasmid and DOX were simultaneously loaded in the peptide micelles to form micelleplexes during the self-assembly of the peptide. Cellular uptake and intracellular delivery of gene and drug were studied by CLSM and flow cytometry respectively. And p53 protein expression was determined via Western blot analysis. The in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo tumor inhibition effect were also studied. Results suggest that the co-delivery of gene and drug from peptide micelles resulted in effective cell growth inhibition in vitro and significant tumor growth restraining in vivo. The chimeric peptide-based gene and drug co-delivery system will find great potential for tumor therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bone marrow dosimetry in rats using direct tissue counting after injection of radio-iodinated intact monoclonal antibodies or F(ab')2 fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchegger, F.; Chalandon, Y.; Pelegrin, A.; Hardman, N.; Mach, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Normal rats were injected intravenously with 131I- and 125I-labeled intact murine and chimeric mouse-human monoclonal antibodies directed against carcinoembryonic antigen or with the corresponding F(ab')2 fragments. At different times after injection, individual animals were killed and radioactivity of blood and major organs, including bones and bone marrow, was determined. Ratios comparing radioactivity concentration in different tissues with that of bone marrow were calculated and found to remain stable during several effective half-lives of the antibodies. Mean bone marrow radioactivity was 35% (range, 29%-40%) of that of blood and 126% (range, 108%-147%) of that of liver after injection of intact Mabs or F(ab')2 fragments. In nude rats bearing human colon carcinoma xenografts producing carcinoembryonic antigen, relative bone marrow radioactivity was slightly lower than that in normal rats

  1. Treatment with anti-interferon-δ monoclonal antibodies modifies experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in interferon-δ receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C.; Penkowa, Milena; Saez-Torres, I.

    2001-01-01

    Neuroinflammation, neuronal degeneration, regeneration, monoclonal antibodies, multiple schlerosis......Neuroinflammation, neuronal degeneration, regeneration, monoclonal antibodies, multiple schlerosis...

  2. Induction and characterization of monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies reactive with idiotopes of canine parvovirus neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); J. van Es (Johan); G.A. Drost; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractMonoclonal anti-idiotypic (anti-Id) antibodies (Ab2) were generated against idiotypes (Id) of canine parvovirus (CPV) specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs). The binding of most of these anti-Id antibodies to their corresponding Id could be inhibited by antigen, thus classifying these

  3. M1 chimerism following mutagen treatment of seeds in rice and some other cereals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, T.

    1983-01-01

    Articles reporting on M 1 chimerism following treatment of seed with mutagen in cereals were mostly published in the 1960's. Rice is a good material for making such studies because of its relatively large number of seeds per panicle, rather easily identifiable tillering and panicle branching systems and uniform growth after seedling transplanting. The present article summarizes results of studies on M 1 chimerism in rice and some other cereals which may serve as reference information in discussing M 1 chimerism of those plant species showing different development patterns, as dicotyledonous plants, following treatment of seed with mutagen. Studies on M 1 chimerism provide not only knowledge of the sporophyte development but also basic information for developing methods of harvesting M 2 seed which provide the maximum numbers of mutants of different origins in a limited number of M 2 plants. (author)

  4. Tentative mapping of transcription-induced interchromosomal interaction using chimeric EST and mRNA data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Unneberg

    Full Text Available Recent studies on chromosome conformation show that chromosomes colocalize in the nucleus, bringing together active genes in transcription factories. This spatial proximity of actively transcribing genes could provide a means for RNA interaction at the transcript level. We have screened public databases for chimeric EST and mRNA sequences with the intent of mapping transcription-induced interchromosomal interactions. We suggest that chimeric transcripts may be the result of close encounters of active genes, either as functional products or "noise" in the transcription process, and that they could be used as probes for chromosome interactions. We have found a total of 5,614 chimeric ESTs and 587 chimeric mRNAs that meet our selection criteria. Due to their higher quality, the mRNA findings are of particular interest and we hope that they may serve as food for thought for specialists in diverse areas of molecular biology.

  5. A chimeric measles virus with a lentiviral envelope replicates exclusively in CD4+/CCR5+ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourez, Thomas; Mesel-Lemoine, Mariana; Combredet, Chantal; Najburg, Valerie; Cayet, Nadege; Tangy, Frederic

    2011-01-01

    We generated a replicating chimeric measles virus in which the hemagglutinin and fusion surface glycoproteins were replaced with the gp160 envelope glycoprotein of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239). Based on a previously cloned live-attenuated Schwarz vaccine strain of measles virus (MV), this chimera was rescued at high titers using reverse genetics in CD4+ target cells. Cytopathic effect consisted in the presence of large cell aggregates evolving to form syncytia, as observed during SIV infection. The morphology of the chimeric virus was identical to that of the parent MV particles. The presence of SIV gp160 as the only envelope protein on chimeric particles surface altered the cell tropism of the new virus from CD46+ to CD4+ cells. Used as an HIV candidate vaccine, this MV/SIVenv chimeric virus would mimic transient HIV-like infection, benefiting both from HIV-like tropism and the capacity of MV to replicate in dendritic cells, macrophages and lymphocytes.

  6. T cells expressing VHH-directed oligoclonal chimeric HER2 antigen receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamnani, Fatemeh Rahimi; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) originated from antibodies is a promising strategy in cancer immunotherapy. Several unsuccessful trials, however, highlight the need for alternative conventional binding domains and the better combination...

  7. Frequency of chimerism in populations of the kelp Lessonia spicata in central Chile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra V González

    Full Text Available Chimerism occurs when two genetically distinct conspecific individuals fuse together generating a single entity. Coalescence and chimerism in red seaweeds has been positively related to an increase in body size, and the consequent reduction in susceptibility to mortality factors, thus increasing survival, reproductive potential and tolerance to stress in contrast to genetically homogeneous organisms. In addition, they showed that a particular pattern of post-fusion growth maintains higher genetic diversity and chimerism in the holdfast but homogenous axes. In Chilean kelps (brown seaweeds, intraorganismal genetic heterogeneity (IGH and holdfast coalescence has been described in previous research, but the extent of chimerism in wild populations and the patterns of distribution of the genetically heterogeneous thallus zone have scarcely been studied. Since kelps are under continuous harvesting, with enormous social, ecological and economic importance, natural chimerism can be considered a priceless in-situ reservoir of natural genetic resources and variability. In this study, we therefore examined the frequency of IGH and chimerism in three harvested populations of Lessonia spicata. We then evaluated whether chimeric wild-type holdfasts show higher genetic diversity than erect axes (stipe and lamina and explored the impact of this on the traditional estimation of genetic diversity at the population level. We found a high frequency of IGH (60-100% and chimerism (33.3-86.7%, varying according to the studied population. We evidenced that chimerism occurs mostly in holdfasts, exhibiting heterogeneous tissues, whereas stipes and lamina were more homogeneous, generating a vertical gradient of allele and genotype abundance as well as divergence, constituting the first time "within- plant" genetic patterns have been reported in kelps. This is very different from the chimeric patterns described in land plants and animals. Finally, we evidenced that IGH

  8. Context Dependent Effects of Chimeric Peptide Morpholino Conjugates Contribute to Dystrophin Exon-skipping Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    HaiFang Yin; Prisca Boisguerin; Hong M Moulton; Corinne Betts; Yiqi Seow; Jordan Boutilier; Qingsong Wang; Anthony Walsh; Bernard Lebleu; Matthew JA Wood

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and novel chimeric peptides containing CPP (referred as B peptide) and muscle-targeting peptide (referred as MSP) motifs significantly improve the systemic exon-skipping activity of morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomers (PMOs) in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In the present study, the general mechanistic significance of the chimeric peptide configuration on the activity and tissue uptake of peptide conjugated PMOs in vivo was ...

  9. Context Dependent Effects of Chimeric Peptide Morpholino Conjugates Contribute to Dystrophin Exon-skipping Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haifang; Boisguerin, Prisca; Moulton, Hong M; Betts, Corinne; Seow, Yiqi; Boutilier, Jordan; Wang, Qingsong; Walsh, Anthony; Lebleu, Bernard; Wood, Matthew Ja

    2013-09-24

    We have recently reported that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and novel chimeric peptides containing CPP (referred as B peptide) and muscle-targeting peptide (referred as MSP) motifs significantly improve the systemic exon-skipping activity of morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomers (PMOs) in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In the present study, the general mechanistic significance of the chimeric peptide configuration on the activity and tissue uptake of peptide conjugated PMOs in vivo was investigated. Four additional chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates including newly identified peptide 9 (B-9-PMO and 9-B-PMO) and control peptide 3 (B-3-PMO and 3-B-PMO) were tested in mdx mice. Immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and western blot results indicated that B-9-PMO induced significantly higher level of exon skipping and dystrophin restoration than its counterpart (9-B-PMO), further corroborating the notion that the activity of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates is dependent on relative position of the tissue-targeting peptide motif within the chimeric peptide with respect to PMOs. Subsequent mechanistic studies showed that enhanced cellular uptake of B-MSP-PMO into muscle cells leads to increased exon-skipping activity in comparison with MSP-B-PMO. Surprisingly, further evidence showed that the uptake of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates of both orientations (B-MSP-PMO and MSP-B-PMO) was ATP- and temperature-dependent and also partially mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), indicating that endocytosis is likely the main uptake pathway for both chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates. Collectively, our data demonstrate that peptide orientation in chimeric peptides is an important parameter that determines cellular uptake and activity when conjugated directly to oligonucleotides. These observations provide insight into the design of improved cell targeting compounds for future therapeutics studies.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e124; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013

  10. Context Dependent Effects of Chimeric Peptide Morpholino Conjugates Contribute to Dystrophin Exon-skipping Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HaiFang Yin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs and novel chimeric peptides containing CPP (referred as B peptide and muscle-targeting peptide (referred as MSP motifs significantly improve the systemic exon-skipping activity of morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomers (PMOs in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In the present study, the general mechanistic significance of the chimeric peptide configuration on the activity and tissue uptake of peptide conjugated PMOs in vivo was investigated. Four additional chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates including newly identified peptide 9 (B-9-PMO and 9-B-PMO and control peptide 3 (B-3-PMO and 3-B-PMO were tested in mdx mice. Immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and western blot results indicated that B-9-PMO induced significantly higher level of exon skipping and dystrophin restoration than its counterpart (9-B-PMO, further corroborating the notion that the activity of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates is dependent on relative position of the tissue-targeting peptide motif within the chimeric peptide with respect to PMOs. Subsequent mechanistic studies showed that enhanced cellular uptake of B-MSP-PMO into muscle cells leads to increased exon-skipping activity in comparison with MSP-B-PMO. Surprisingly, further evidence showed that the uptake of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates of both orientations (B-MSP-PMO and MSP-B-PMO was ATP- and temperature-dependent and also partially mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG, indicating that endocytosis is likely the main uptake pathway for both chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates. Collectively, our data demonstrate that peptide orientation in chimeric peptides is an important parameter that determines cellular uptake and activity when conjugated directly to oligonucleotides. These observations provide insight into the design of improved cell targeting compounds for future therapeutics studies.

  11. Endothelial cell chimerism associated with graft rejection after human lung transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ratajczak , Philippe; Murata , Hideyuki; Meignin , Véronique; Groussard , Odile; Fournier , Michel; Socié , Gérard; Mal , Hervé; Janin , Anne

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Endotheliitis is a major sign of graft rejection. Recipient-derived endothelial cells found in two series of liver and kidney transplants were related to graft rejection. Here, we assessed the presence and the number of chimeric endothelial cells in lung transplants, and their relation with graft rejection. In six males grafted with female lungs out of 193 lung transplantations, endothelial chimerism was studied by combined XY-fluorescent in situ hybridization with CD3...

  12. Establishment of donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0234 TITLE: Establishment of donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion PRINCIPAL...14/2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Establishment of donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...tolerance induction of all types of allografts. In this study, we investigate whether co-infusion of amnion- derived multipotent progenitor (AMP) cells

  13. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ( 123 I, 131 I, and 111 In) and with another radionuclide, 211 At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for 111 In and 123 I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches

  14. Radiolabeling and animal experimental studies of anti-breast cancer McAb 6C6 and mouse-human chimeric antibody 6C6CHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhi; Hu Xiaoqian; Li Erqiu

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study bio-distribution and tumor absorption of anti breast cancer monoclonal antibody 6C6 and its chimeric antibody 6C6-CHI. The modified Schwartz method was employed to label 6C6 and 6C6CHI with 99 Tc m . The labeled antibody was injected to mouse via tail vein and the blood clearance and whole body clearance were observed. Nude mice bearing breast cancer MCF7 were injected with 99 Tc m -labeled antibody and the bio-distribution was studied and imaged with γ-ray camera. The yield of the two labeled antibodies was more than 90% and their immunoactivities were more than 80%. The whole body eliminated half-time of 99 Tc m -6C6 was 4.1h, and the half-times in blood were T α =0.55h and T β =12.42h respectively. The whole body half-time of 99 Tc m -6C6CHI was 4.28h and the half-times in blood were T α =0.98h and T β =12.42h respectively. The bio-distribution of nude mice bearing breast cancer MCF7 cells was as follows: the ID%/g of tumor and blood was (7.42±0.85) and (5.67±1.44) respectively at 23h after injection of 99 Tc m -6C6. The T/NT (tumor to non tumor) ratios were all more than 1.0 except kidney and the ID%/g of tumor and blood was (4.23±0.64) and (6.97±0.23) respectively at 23 h after injection of 99 Tc m -6C6CHI. The T/NT (tumor to non tumor) ratios were all more than 1.0 except blood and kidney. The γ imaging results showed that the tumor was imaged clearly at 24h after injection of radiolabeled antibodies and the other organs did not concentrate the antibodies except kidney. Anti-breast cancer monoclonal antibody 6C6 can be well located in tumor. Although ID%/g of tumor of the chimeric antibody 6C6CHI was slightly lower than that of 6C6 antibody, and ID%/g of blood was higher than that of 6C6, the tumor imaging of 6C6-CHI was also clear

  15. Pharmacokinetics of chimeric L6 conjugated to indium-111- and yttrium-90-DOTA-peptide in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeNardo, S.J.; Zhong, G.R.; Salako, Q.

    1995-01-01

    A bifunctional chelating agent, DOTA-Gly 3 -L-(p-isothiocyanato)-phenylalanine amide (DOTA-peptide-NCS), was studied in nude mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts (HBT 3477) to determine its potential for radioimmunoconjugate therapy. Indium-111 and yttrium-90 were attached to an anti-adenocarcinoma chimeric L6 (ChL6) monoclonal antibody (MAb) after pre-chelation to the DOTA-peptide-NCS and the desired neutral radiochelates were obtained by purification. The unique characteristic of the DOTA-peptide-NCS to form neutral complexes with trivalent metals was utilized to separate the resulting 111 In and 90 Y radiochelates from excess chelating agent and other anionic by-products resulting from metal impurities. The purified radiochelates were then conjugated to ChL6. The paramacokinetics of 111 In- and 90 Y-DOTA-peptide-ChL6 were obtained for 5 days after injection in nude mice bearing HBT 3477 xenographs. The results were compared with the pharmacokinetics of 125 I-ChL6 obtained in the same mouse model. The whole-body clearance of 125 I-ChL6, 90 Y-and 111 In-DOTA-peptide-ChL6 was monoexponential with biologic half-times of 92, 104 and 160 hr, respectively. Blood clearances of the three radiopharmaceuticals were biphasic. The radiometal immunoconjugates had greater tumor uptake and slower clearances. Indium-111- and 90 Y-DOTA-peptide-ChL6 can be produced at high specific activity with fewer than one chelate per MAb by using a pre-labeling method that permits radiochelate purification by charge selection. Studies in mouse xenografts indicate that tumor uptake in enhanced and a favorable therapeutic index is achieved using these agents. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Analytical characterization of ch14.18: a mouse-human chimeric disialoganglioside-specific therapeutic antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, Gopalan; Kallarakal, Abraham T; Michiel, Dennis; Yang, Xiaoyi; Saptharish, Nirmala; Jiang, Hengguang; Giardina, Steve; Gilly, John; Mitra, George

    2012-01-01

    Ch14.18 is a mouse-human chimeric monoclonal antibody to the disialoganglioside (GD2) glycolipid. In the clinic, this antibody has been shown to be effective in the treatment of children with high-risk neuroblastoma, either alone or in combination therapy. Extensive product characterization is a prerequisite to addressing the potential issues of product variability associated with process changes and manufacturing scale-up. Charge heterogeneity, glycosylation profile, molecular state and aggregation, interaction (affinity) with Fcγ receptors and functional or biological activities are a few of the critical characterization assays for assessing product comparability for this antibody. In this article, we describe the in-house development and qualification of imaged capillary isoelectric focusing to assess charge heterogeneity, analytical size exclusion chromatography with online static and dynamic light scattering (DLS), batch mode DLS for aggregate detection, biosensor (surface plasmon resonance)-based Fcγ receptor antibody interaction kinetics, N-glycoprofiling with PNGase F digestion, 2-aminobenzoic acid labeling and high performance liquid chromatography and N-glycan analysis using capillary electrophoresis. In addition, we studied selected biological activity assays, such as complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The consistency and reproducibility of the assays are established by comparing the intra-day and inter-day assay results. Applications of the methodologies to address stability or changes in product characteristics are also reported. The study results reveal that the ch14.18 clinical product formulated in phosphate-buffered saline at a concentration of 5 mg/ml and stored at 2-8°C is stable for more than five years.

  17. Biological, immunological and functional properties of two novel multi-variant chimeric recombinant proteins of CSP antigens for vaccine development against Plasmodium vivax infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Samaneh H; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Salmanian, Ali H; Amani, Jafar; Mehrizi, Akram A; Snounou, Georges; Nosten, François; Andolina, Chiara; Mourtazavi, Yousef; Djadid, Navid D

    2017-10-01

    The circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of the malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax is a major pre-erythrocyte vaccine candidate. The protein has a central repeat region that belongs to one of repeat families (VK210, VK247, and the P. vivax-like). In the present study, computer modelling was employed to select chimeric proteins, comprising the conserved regions and different arrangements of the repeat elements (VK210 and VK247), whose structure is similar to that of the native counterparts. DNA encoding the selected chimeras (named CS127 and CS712) were synthetically constructed based on E. coli codons, then cloned and expressed. Mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs; anti-Pv-210-CDC and -Pv-247-CDC), recognized the chimeric antigens in ELISA, indicating correct conformation and accessibility of the B-cell epitopes. ELISA using IgG from plasma samples collected from 221 Iranian patients with acute P. vivax showed that only 49.32% of the samples reacted to both CS127 and CS712 proteins. The dominant subclass for the two chimeras was IgG1 (48% of the positive responders, OD 492 =0.777±0.420 for CS127; 48.41% of the positive responders, OD 492 =0.862±0.423 for CS712, with no statistically significant difference P>0.05; Wilcoxon signed ranks test). Binding assays showed that both chimeric proteins bound to immobilized heparan sulphate and HepG2 hepatocyte cells in a concentration-dependent manner, saturable at 80μg/mL. Additionally, anti-CS127 and -CS712 antibodies raised in mice recognized the native protein on the surface of P. vivax sporozoite with high intensity, confirming the presence of common epitopes between the recombinant forms and the native proteins. In summary, despite structural differences at the molecular level, the expression levels of both chimeras were satisfactory, and their conformational structure retained biological function, thus supporting their potential for use in the development of vivax-based vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  18. Reduced immune responses in chimeric mice engrafted with bone marrow cells from mice with airways inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Naomi M; Ng, Royce L X; McGonigle, Terence A; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H

    2015-11-01

    During respiratory inflammation, it is generally assumed that dendritic cells differentiating from the bone marrow are immunogenic rather than immunoregulatory. Using chimeric mice, the outcomes of airways inflammation on bone marrow progenitor cells were studied. Immune responses were analyzed in chimeric mice engrafted for >16 weeks with bone marrow cells from mice with experimental allergic airways disease (EAAD). Responses to sensitization and challenge with the allergen causing inflammation in the bone marrow-donor mice were significantly reduced in the chimeric mice engrafted with bone marrow cells from mice with EAAD (EAAD-chimeric). Responses to intranasal LPS and topical fluorescein isothiocyanate (non-specific challenges) were significantly attenuated. Fewer activated dendritic cells from the airways and skin of the EAAD-chimeric mice could be tracked to the draining lymph nodes, and may contribute to the significantly reduced antigen/chemical-induced hypertrophy in the draining nodes, and the reduced immune responses to sensitizing allergens. Dendritic cells differentiating in vitro from the bone marrow of >16 weeks reconstituted EAAD-chimeric mice retained an ability to poorly prime immune responses when transferred into naïve mice. Dendritic cells developing from bone marrow progenitors during airways inflammation are altered such that daughter cells have reduced antigen priming capabilities.

  19. Mosaic origins of a complex chimeric mitochondrial gene in Silene vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Storchova

    Full Text Available Chimeric genes are significant sources of evolutionary innovation that are normally created when portions of two or more protein coding regions fuse to form a new open reading frame. In plant mitochondria astonishingly high numbers of different novel chimeric genes have been reported, where they are generated through processes of rearrangement and recombination. Nonetheless, because most studies do not find or report nucleotide variation within the same chimeric gene, evolution after the origination of these chimeric genes remains unstudied. Here we identify two alleles of a complex chimera in Silene vulgaris that are divergent in nucleotide sequence, genomic position relative to other mitochondrial genes, and expression patterns. Structural patterns suggest a history partially influenced by gene conversion between the chimeric gene and functional copies of subunit 1 of the mitochondrial ATP synthase gene (atp1. We identified small repeat structures within the chimeras that are likely recombination sites allowing generation of the chimera. These results establish the potential for chimeric gene divergence in different plant mitochondrial lineages within the same species. This result contrasts with the absence of diversity within mitochondrial chimeras found in crop species.

  20. Prolonged Survival of Subcutaneous Allogeneic Islet Graft by Donor Chimerism without Immunosuppressive Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brend Ray-Sea Hsu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether tolerance-induced protection of islets in the renal subcapsular space can also prevent subcutaneous allogeneic islets from being rejected. We used bone marrow stem cells from C57BL/6 (H2b mice to construct donor chimerism in conditioned diabetic BALB/c (H2d mice and investigated the effect of donor chimerism on engraftment and survival of subcutaneously transplanted allogeneic islets in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. We also studied the anti-inflammatory effect of mesenchymal stem cell on islet engraftment. Full but not low-grade or no donor chimerism was associated with successful engraftment of allogeneic islets and restoration of normoglycemia in the treated diabetic mice. The temporary hyperglycemia was 11 ± 1 versus 19 ± 5 days (p<0.05 for the mice with full donor chimerism with transplanted islets in the renal subcapsular space versus the subcutaneous space, respectively. Cotransplantation of mesenchymal stem cell did not enhance alloislet engraftment. Full multilineage donor chimerism was associated with a higher transient expansion of CD11b+ and Gr-1+ myeloid progenitor cells and effector memory CD4 and CD8 T cells. In conclusion, full donor chimerism protected both renal subcapsular and subcutaneous allogeneic islets in this rodent transplantation model.

  1. Study the effect of F17S mutation on the chimeric Bacillus thermocatenulatus lipase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Khaleghinejad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipases (triacylglycerol acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.3 are one of the highest value commercial enzymes as they have potential applications in biotechnology for detergents, food, pharmaceuticals, leather, textiles, cosmetics, and paper industries; and are currently receiving considerable attention because of their potential applications in biotechnology. Bacillus thermocatenulatus Lipase 2 (BTL2 is one of the most important research targets, because of its potential industrial applications. In this study, the effect of substitution Phe17 with Ser in mutated BTL2 lipase, which conserved pentapeptide (112Ala-His-Ser-Gln-Gly116 was replaced with similar sequences (207Gly-Glu-Ser-Ala-Gly211 of Candida rugosa lipase (CLR at the nucleophilic elbow region. Docking results confirmed the mutated lipase to be better than the chimeric lipase. So, cloning was conducted, and the mutated and chimeric btl2 genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and then the enzymes were purified by anion exchange chromatography. The mutation increased lipase lipolytic activity against most of the applied substrates, with the exception of tributyrin when compared with chimeric lipase. Further, the mutated lipase exhibited higher activity than the chimeric lipase at all temperatures. Optimum pH of the mutated lipase was obtained at pH 9.5, which was more than the chimeric one. Enzyme activity of the mutated lipase in the presence of organic solvents, detergents, and metal ions was also improved than the chimeric lipase.

  2. Redirecting Specificity of T cells Using the Sleeping Beauty System to Express Chimeric Antigen Receptors by Mix-and-Matching of VL and VH Domains Targeting CD123+ Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Thokala

    Full Text Available Adoptive immunotherapy infusing T cells with engineered specificity for CD19 expressed on B- cell malignancies is generating enthusiasm to extend this approach to other hematological malignancies, such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. CD123, or interleukin 3 receptor alpha, is overexpressed on most AML and some lymphoid malignancies, such as acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL, and has been an effective target for T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs. The prototypical CAR encodes a VH and VL from one monoclonal antibody (mAb, coupled to a transmembrane domain and one or more cytoplasmic signaling domains. Previous studies showed that treatment of an experimental AML model with CD123-specific CAR T cells was therapeutic, but at the cost of impaired myelopoiesis, highlighting the need for systems to define the antigen threshold for CAR recognition. Here, we show that CARs can be engineered using VH and VL chains derived from different CD123-specific mAbs to generate a panel of CAR+ T cells. While all CARs exhibited specificity to CD123, one VH and VL combination had reduced lysis of normal hematopoietic stem cells. This CAR's in vivo anti-tumor activity was similar whether signaling occurred via chimeric CD28 or CD137, prolonging survival in both AML and ALL models. Co-expression of inducible caspase 9 eliminated CAR+ T cells. These data help support the use of CD123-specific CARs for treatment of CD123+ hematologic malignancies.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies and Fc fragments for treating solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenbeis AM

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrea M Eisenbeis, Stefan J GrauDepartment of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyAbstract: Advances in biotechnology, better understanding of pathophysiological processes, as well as the identification of an increasing number of molecular markers have facilitated the use of monoclonal antibodies and Fc fragments in various fields in medicine. In this context, a rapidly growing number of these substances have also emerged in the field of oncology. This review will summarize the currently approved monoclonal antibodies used for the treatment of solid tumors with a focus on their clinical application, biological background, and currently ongoing trials.Keywords: targeted therapy, monoclonal antibodies, cancer, biological therapy

  4. The detection of ovarian cancer using 123I monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granowska, M.; Britton, K.E.; Shepherd, J.

    1984-01-01

    The technique of the production of monoclonal antibodies is described. Antibodies show reactivity with epithelial surfaces of cancer of breast, colon and ovary. The iodogen reaction is used for labelling monoclonal antibodies with 123 I. Description of labelling technique and quality control. After intravenous injection of 74 MBq 123 I-labelled monoclonal antibody (0.5 mg) static camera images of the abdomen were recorded at 10 min, 4 and 22 hours in anterior and posterior position. 20 out of 22 patients with ovarian cancer with and without metastases were correctly diagnosed and confirmed at surgery. (author)

  5. Monoclonal gammopathy: a diagnosis for to keep in mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howland Alvarez, Ivon; Figueredo Peguero, Yrving; Luna Conde, Clara

    2011-01-01

    How to identify monoclonal gammopathies at risk for progression has been studied for the last year. 40 patients were studied in which a monoclonal band had been detected, in some of the cases de novo. The electrophoresis was performed in the Hydrasys system. Of the total of electrophoresis carried out, the 14% was monoclonal gammopathy. In 36% a diagnostic assumption was not stated. Most frequent diagnosis in the group of patients with a diagnosis was multiple myeloma. Average age of patients was 61.5 years and there were differences among percentages for sex

  6. Identification of Metabolism and Excretion Differences of Procymidone between Rats and Humans Using Chimeric Mice: Implications for Differential Developmental Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Jun; Tomigahara, Yoshitaka; Tarui, Hirokazu; Omori, Rie; Kawamura, Satoshi

    2018-02-28

    A metabolite of procymidone, hydroxylated-PCM, causes rat-specific developmental toxicity due to higher exposure to it in rats than in rabbits or monkeys. When procymidone was administered to chimeric mice with rat or human hepatocytes, the plasma level of hydroxylated-PCM was higher than that of procymidone in rat chimeric mice, and the metabolic profile of procymidone in intact rats was well reproduced in rat chimeric mice. In human chimeric mice, the plasma level of hydroxylated-PCM was less, resulting in a much lower exposure. The main excretion route of hydroxylated-PCM-glucuronide was bile (the point that hydroxylated-PCM enters the enterohepatic circulation) in rat chimeric mice, and urine in human chimeric mice. These data suggest that humans, in contrast to rats, extensively form the glucuronide and excrete it in urine, as do rabbits and monkeys. Overall, procymidone's potential for causing teratogenicity in humans must be low compared to that in rats.

  7. The evolving role of monoclonal antibodies in colorectal cancer: early presumptions and impact on clinical trial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    Targeted biologic agents have an established role in treating metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Bevacizumab, a recombinant monoclonal antibody against the vascular endothelial growth factor ligand is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bevacizumab-naïve patients. Cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is FDA approved as a single agent, or in combination with irinotecan, in both irinotecan-naïve and refractory patients, and has additional efficacy in combination with oxaliplatin. Panitumumab, a fully human EGFR mAb, is FDA approved as a single agent in refractory patients but has additional efficacy in combination with chemotherapy. After reaching a temporary therapeutic plateau of FDA-approved agents for the treatment of mCRC, pivotal results have developed that critically affect the care for these patients. Correlative data from randomized trials of EGFR inhibitors across disease settings have demonstrated higher response rates, specifically for patients with wild-type K-RAS tumors. The interpretation of the B-RAF mutation and other molecular markers may further define the appropriateness of anti-EGFR therapy. Recent literature revealed that the first-line use of combined anti-EGFR therapy plus bevacizumab resulted in inferior outcomes and additional toxicities. Furthermore, the role of biologic agents for locally advanced colon cancer cannot be advocated at this time. With impending changes in the health care system, the economic impact of mAbs will continue to be scrutinized. Hence, as the significance of molecular markers continues to develop, their role as it pertains to the appropriate use of biologic agents in the treatment of mCRC will continue to evolve.

  8. Facilitation of syngeneic stem cell engraftment by anti-class I monoclonal antibody pretreatment of unirradiated recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voralia, M.; Semeluk, A.; Wegmann, T.G.

    1987-01-01

    We have established a murine model of syngeneic bone marrow transplantation based on the use of monoclonal antibody as the sole conditioning regimen in unirradiated recipients. Administration of a single injection of monoclonal antibody directed against major histocompatibility complex-encoded class I determinants facilitated permanent hemopoietic stem cell engraftment without any apparent side-effects. Whereas untreated hosts exhibited a maximal chimerism of 15% at donor cell doses of up to 12 X 10(7) bone marrow cells, pretreatment by 2 mg of anti-class I antibody one week prior to transplantation of 3 X 10(7) syngeneic bone marrow cells resulted in a mean donor representation of about 80%. The antibody can be given up to four weeks prior to transplantation, and the degree of donor engraftment observed is a function of the dose of antibody administered. The fact that specific antibody enhanced engraftment in two strain combinations indicates that antibody is the active agent in facilitating engraftment and that facilitation is not strain-restricted. Anti-class I antibodies of the IgG2a, but not IgG1, isotype are effective in promoting engraftment. Although the isotype requirement suggests a role for antibody-mediated cytotoxicity in promoting stem cell engraftment, the extensive time-frame of facilitation suggests that other effects of the antibody may also be involved. The model of syngeneic bone marrow transplantation we describe here will be useful in studying the mechanisms regulating stem cell engraftment and may have potential clinical application as an approach to autologous marrow transplantation

  9. Monoclonal gammopathy: a diagnosis for to keep in mind; Gammapatia monoclonal: un diagnostico a tener en cuenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howland Alvarez, Ivon; Figueredo Peguero, Yrving; Luna Conde, Clara, E-mail: ihowlanda@infomed.sld.cu [Centro de Investigaciones Medico Quirurgicas, La Habana (Cuba); others, and

    2011-07-01

    How to identify monoclonal gammopathies at risk for progression has been studied for the last year. 40 patients were studied in which a monoclonal band had been detected, in some of the cases de novo. The electrophoresis was performed in the Hydrasys system. Of the total of electrophoresis carried out, the 14% was monoclonal gammopathy. In 36% a diagnostic assumption was not stated. Most frequent diagnosis in the group of patients with a diagnosis was multiple myeloma. Average age of patients was 61.5 years and there were differences among percentages for sex.

  10. ChimerDB 3.0: an enhanced database for fusion genes from cancer transcriptome and literature data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myunggyo; Lee, Kyubum; Yu, Namhee; Jang, Insu; Choi, Ikjung; Kim, Pora; Jang, Ye Eun; Kim, Byounggun; Kim, Sunkyu; Lee, Byungwook; Kang, Jaewoo; Lee, Sanghyuk

    2017-01-04

    Fusion gene is an important class of therapeutic targets and prognostic markers in cancer. ChimerDB is a comprehensive database of fusion genes encompassing analysis of deep sequencing data and manual curations. In this update, the database coverage was enhanced considerably by adding two new modules of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) RNA-Seq analysis and PubMed abstract mining. ChimerDB 3.0 is composed of three modules of ChimerKB, ChimerPub and ChimerSeq. ChimerKB represents a knowledgebase including 1066 fusion genes with manual curation that were compiled from public resources of fusion genes with experimental evidences. ChimerPub includes 2767 fusion genes obtained from text mining of PubMed abstracts. ChimerSeq module is designed to archive the fusion candidates from deep sequencing data. Importantly, we have analyzed RNA-Seq data of the TCGA project covering 4569 patients in 23 cancer types using two reliable programs of FusionScan and TopHat-Fusion. The new user interface supports diverse search options and graphic representation of fusion gene structure. ChimerDB 3.0 is available at http://ercsb.ewha.ac.kr/fusiongene/. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Monoclonal antibody 6E4 against human GAPDHS protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dorosh, Andriy

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 3 (2011), s. 321-321 ISSN 1554-0014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Monoclonal antibody * GAPDHS Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 0.417, year: 2011

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) VITELLOGENIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have obtained a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against fathead minnow vitellogenin (Vtg) for use in sensitive ELISAs to quantify the response of exposure in vivo to estrogen or estrogen mimics.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies in clinical diagnosis: A brief review application

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... More than 100 different monoclonal antibody diagnostic products are ... are produced by in vitro and in vivo method but have advantages and some disadvantages. .... replication and differentiation, advancing our knowledge.

  14. Biodistribution mechanisms of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Mohammad; Bornstein, Gadi Gazit; Suria, Hamza

    2010-03-01

    The monoclonal antibody market continues to witness an impressive rate of growth and has become the leading source of expansion in the biologic segment within the pharmaceutical industry. Currently marketed monoclonal antibodies target a diverse array of antigens. These antigens are distributed in a variety of tissues such as tumors, lungs, synovial fluid, psoriatic plaques, and lymph nodes. As the concentration of drug at the proximity of the biological receptor determines the magnitude of the observed pharmacological responses, a significant consideration in effective therapeutic application of monoclonal antibodies is a thorough understanding of the processes that regulate antibody biodistribution. Monoclonal antibody distribution is affected by factors such as molecular weight, blood flow, tissue and tumor heterogeneity, structure and porosity, target antigen density, turnover rate, and the target antigen expression profile.

  15. Protective and immunological behavior of chimeric yellow fever dengue vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Scott B; Russell, Philip K

    2016-03-29

    Clinical observations from the third year of the Sanofi Pasteur chimeric yellow fever dengue tetravalent vaccine (CYD) trials document both protection and vaccination-enhanced dengue disease among vaccine recipients. Children who were 5 years-old or younger when vaccinated experienced a DENV disease resulting in hospitalization at 5 times the rate of controls. On closer inspection, hospitalized cases among vaccinated seropositives, those at highest risk to hospitalized disease accompanying a dengue virus (DENV) infection, were greatly reduced by vaccination. But, seronegative individuals of all ages after being vaccinated were only modestly protected from mild to moderate disease throughout the entire observation period despite developing neutralizing antibodies at high rates. Applying a simple epidemiological model to the data, vaccinated seronegative individuals of all ages were at increased risk of developing hospitalized disease during a subsequent wild type DENV infection. The etiology of disease in placebo and vaccinated children resulting in hospitalization during a DENV infection, while clinically similar are of different origin. The implications of the observed mixture of DENV protection and enhanced disease in CYD vaccinees are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radial symmetry in a chimeric glutamate receptor pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Timothy J.; Lopez, Melany N.; Huettner, James E.

    2014-02-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors comprise two conformationally different A/C and B/D subunit pairs. Closed channels exhibit fourfold radial symmetry in the transmembrane domain (TMD) but transition to twofold dimer-of-dimers symmetry for extracellular ligand binding and N-terminal domains. Here, to evaluate symmetry in open pores we analysed interaction between the Q/R editing site near the pore loop apex and the transmembrane M3 helix of kainate receptor subunit GluK2. Chimeric subunits that combined the GluK2 TMD with extracellular segments from NMDA receptors, which are obligate heteromers, yielded channels made up of A/C and B/D subunit pairs with distinct substitutions along M3 and/or Q/R site editing status, in an otherwise identical homotetrameric TMD. Our results indicate that Q/R site interaction with M3 occurs within individual subunits and is essentially the same for both A/C and B/D subunit conformations, suggesting that fourfold pore symmetry persists in the open state.

  17. Competitive annealing of multiple DNA origami: formation of chimeric origami

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majikes, Jacob M; Nash, Jessica A; LaBean, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    Scaffolded DNA origami are a robust tool for building discrete nanoscale objects at high yield. This strategy ensures, in the design process, that the desired nanostructure is the minimum free energy state for the designed set of DNA sequences. Despite aiming for the minimum free energy structure, the folding process which leads to that conformation is difficult to characterize, although it has been the subject of much research. In order to shed light on the molecular folding pathways, this study intentionally frustrates the folding process of these systems by simultaneously annealing the staple pools for multiple target or parent origami structures, forcing competition. A surprising result of these competitive, simultaneous anneals is the formation of chimeric DNA origami which inherit structural regions from both parent origami. By comparing the regions inherited from the parent origami, relative stability of substructures were compared. This allowed examination of the folding process with typical characterization techniques and materials. Anneal curves were then used as a means to rapidly generate a phase diagram of anticipated behavior as a function of staple excess and parent staple ratio. This initial study shows that competitive anneals provide an exciting way to create diverse new nanostructures and may be used to examine the relative stability of various structural motifs. (paper)

  18. Chimeric TALE recombinases with programmable DNA sequence specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Andrew C; Gaj, Thomas; Fuller, Roberta P; Barbas, Carlos F

    2012-11-01

    Site-specific recombinases are powerful tools for genome engineering. Hyperactivated variants of the resolvase/invertase family of serine recombinases function without accessory factors, and thus can be re-targeted to sequences of interest by replacing native DNA-binding domains (DBDs) with engineered zinc-finger proteins (ZFPs). However, imperfect modularity with particular domains, lack of high-affinity binding to all DNA triplets, and difficulty in construction has hindered the widespread adoption of ZFPs in unspecialized laboratories. The discovery of a novel type of DBD in transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins from Xanthomonas provides an alternative to ZFPs. Here we describe chimeric TALE recombinases (TALERs): engineered fusions between a hyperactivated catalytic domain from the DNA invertase Gin and an optimized TALE architecture. We use a library of incrementally truncated TALE variants to identify TALER fusions that modify DNA with efficiency and specificity comparable to zinc-finger recombinases in bacterial cells. We also show that TALERs recombine DNA in mammalian cells. The TALER architecture described herein provides a platform for insertion of customized TALE domains, thus significantly expanding the targeting capacity of engineered recombinases and their potential applications in biotechnology and medicine.

  19. A compound chimeric antigen receptor strategy for targeting multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K H; Wada, M; Pinz, K G; Liu, H; Shuai, X; Chen, X; Yan, L E; Petrov, J C; Salman, H; Senzel, L; Leung, E L H; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2018-02-01

    Current clinical outcomes using chimeric-antigen receptors (CARs) against multiple myeloma show promise in the eradication of bulk disease. However, these anti-BCMA (CD269) CARs observe relapse as a common phenomenon after treatment due to the reemergence of either antigen-positive or -negative cells. Hence, the development of improvements in CAR design to target antigen loss and increase effector cell persistency represents a critical need. Here, we report on the anti-tumor activity of a CAR T-cell possessing two complete and independent CAR receptors against the multiple myeloma antigens BCMA and CS1. We determined that the resulting compound CAR (cCAR) T-cell possesses consistent, potent and directed cytotoxicity against each target antigen population. Using multiple mouse models of myeloma and mixed cell populations, we are further able to show superior in vivo survival by directed cytotoxicity against multiple populations compared to a single-expressing CAR T-cell. These findings indicate that compound targeting of BCMA and CS1 on myeloma cells can potentially be an effective strategy for augmenting the response against myeloma bulk disease and for initiation of broader coverage CAR therapy.

  20. Chimeric animal models in human stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc; Halasi, Gabor; Kasumacic, Nedim

    2009-01-01

    The clinical use of stem cells for regenerative medicine is critically dependent on preclinical studies in animal models. In this review we examine some of the key issues and challenges in the use of animal models to study human stem cell biology-experimental standardization, body size, immunological barriers, cell survival factors, fusion of host and donor cells, and in vivo imaging and tracking. We focus particular attention on the various imaging modalities that can be used to track cells in living animals, comparing their strengths and weaknesses and describing technical developments that are likely to lead to new opportunities for the dynamic assessment of stem cell behavior in vivo. We then provide an overview of some of the most commonly used animal models, their advantages and disadvantages, and examples of their use for xenotypic transplantation of human stem cells, with separate reviews of models involving rodents, ungulates, nonhuman primates, and the chicken embryo. As the use of human somatic, embryonic, and induced pluripotent stem cells increases, so too will the range of applications for these animal models. It is likely that increasingly sophisticated uses of human/animal chimeric models will be developed through advances in genetic manipulation, cell delivery, and in vivo imaging.

  1. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C.; Calder, Lesley J.; Melero, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV F occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV F , we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV F at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy

  2. Antilymphocytic antibodies and marrow transplantation. VIII. Recipient conditioning with Clq-affine monoclonal anti-pan T antibodies prevents GVHD in homozygous fully mismatched mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierfelder, S.; Kummer, U.; Schuh, R.; Mysliwietz, J.

    1986-01-01

    An approach to suppressing secondary disease with antibodies was studied that differed from conventional antibody treatment of donor marrow in vitro. It consisted of the selection of anti-Thy-1 antibodies with high affinity for Clq, the first subunit of the complement cascade, and a single injection of such antibodies into prospective irradiated marrow recipients. Monoclonal mouse IgM and rat IgG 2c antibodies of high titers in complement-dependent test systems but with low affinity for Clq caused little immunosuppression. Monoclonal rat IgG2b or mouse IgG2a anti-Thy-1 antibodies with high affinity for Clq prevented acute and chronic mortality of graft-v-host disease (GVHD), however, when injected in irradiated CBA or AKR mice prior to C57BL/6 spleen and/or bone marrow cell transfusion. This treatment simultaneously suppressed residual host-v-graft reactivity of the irradiated mice, so that permanent hematopoietic engraftment ensued even at 5 or 6 Gy. Full chimerism and specific tolerance were obtained. Primary immune response to SRBC was clearly depressed in the chimeras; secondary immune response was not. Clearance of T cell antibody activity (greater than 6 days), timing, and dose of injected antibody, as well as other modalities of the conditioning treatment that may have contributed to the remarkable immunosuppression, are discussed

  3. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga [Unidad de Biología Viral, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain); Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C. [Unidad de Microscopía Electrónica y Confocal, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain); Calder, Lesley J. [National Institute for Medical Research, MRC, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA (United Kingdom); Melero, José A., E-mail: jmelero@isciii.es [Unidad de Biología Viral, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV{sub F} occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV{sub F}, we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV{sub F} at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy.

  4. ChimericSeq: An open-source, user-friendly interface for analyzing NGS data to identify and characterize viral-host chimeric sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Fwu-Shan; Jongeneel, Patrick; Steffen, Jamin D.; Lin, Selena; Jain, Surbhi; Song, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Identification of viral integration sites has been important in understanding the pathogenesis and progression of diseases associated with particular viral infections. The advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled researchers to understand the impact that viral integration has on the host, such as tumorigenesis. Current computational methods to analyze NGS data of virus-host junction sites have been limited in terms of their accessibility to a broad user base. In this study, we developed a software application (named ChimericSeq), that is the first program of its kind to offer a graphical user interface, compatibility with both Windows and Mac operating systems, and optimized for effectively identifying and annotating virus-host chimeric reads within NGS data. In addition, ChimericSeq’s pipeline implements custom filtering to remove artifacts and detect reads with quantitative analytical reporting to provide functional significance to discovered integration sites. The improved accessibility of ChimericSeq through a GUI interface in both Windows and Mac has potential to expand NGS analytical support to a broader spectrum of the scientific community. PMID:28829778

  5. ChimericSeq: An open-source, user-friendly interface for analyzing NGS data to identify and characterize viral-host chimeric sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fwu-Shan Shieh

    Full Text Available Identification of viral integration sites has been important in understanding the pathogenesis and progression of diseases associated with particular viral infections. The advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS has enabled researchers to understand the impact that viral integration has on the host, such as tumorigenesis. Current computational methods to analyze NGS data of virus-host junction sites have been limited in terms of their accessibility to a broad user base. In this study, we developed a software application (named ChimericSeq, that is the first program of its kind to offer a graphical user interface, compatibility with both Windows and Mac operating systems, and optimized for effectively identifying and annotating virus-host chimeric reads within NGS data. In addition, ChimericSeq's pipeline implements custom filtering to remove artifacts and detect reads with quantitative analytical reporting to provide functional significance to discovered integration sites. The improved accessibility of ChimericSeq through a GUI interface in both Windows and Mac has potential to expand NGS analytical support to a broader spectrum of the scientific community.

  6. Novel antibodies against follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meerten, Tom; Hagenbeek, Anton

    2011-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab has revolutionized the treatment of patients with follicular B-cell lymphoma. With the combination of chemotherapy and rituximab the overall survival rate has increased with approximately 30%. Unfortunately, there is resistance to rituximab with relapse of

  7. Identification of relevant drugable targets in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using a genome-wide unbiased CD20 guilt-by association approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Mathilde R. W.; Visser, Lydia; Huls, Gerwin; Diepstra, Arjan; van Vugt, Marcel; Ammatuna, Emanuele; van Rijn, Rozemarijn S.; Vellenga, Edo; van den Berg, Anke; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; van Meerten, Tom

    2018-01-01

    Forty percent of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) show resistant disease to standard chemotherapy (CHOP) in combination with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab (R). Although many new anti-cancer drugs were developed in the last years, it is unclear which of these drugs

  8. Immunological tolerance and tumor rejection in embryo-aggregated chimeric mice – Lessons for tumor immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Alexander Y; Holle, Eric; Holle, Lori; Yu, Xianzhong; Schwamberger, Günter

    2008-01-01

    Rejection of transplanted tumors by the immune system is a rare event in syngeneic hosts, and is considered to be dependent on the local interaction of defensive immune reactions and tumor tolerance mechanisms. Here, we have enlisted the aid of a unique set of embryo-aggregated lineage chimeric mice derived from C57/BL6 and FVB donors to study the interplay between local and systemic tumor immunity and tolerance in rejection of mouse B16 melanoma cells, syngeneic to the C57/BL6 donor strain. Two variants of embryo-aggregated chimeric mice with either variable or no contribution of C57-derived cells to their skin were generated by the fusion of different ratios of morula stage blastomers. Chimeric mice were analyzed for s.c. growth of B16 tumors in comparison to their respective donor strains as well as normal F1 hybrids, and the relative frequencies of cellular components of the immune system by FACS analysis of peripheral blood or lymph node cells. B16 tumors grew significantly faster in mice with full chimerism in their skin as compared to syngeneic C57 or semi-syngeneic C57 × FVB F1 hosts. In contrast, s.c. tumor growth was either absent or significantly reduced in chimeric mice lacking C57-derived cells in their skin, but tolerant to C57 tissue in other organs. Comparison of the relative frequencies of various immune cells in the periphery via FACS-analysis did not reveal any significant differences between the two types of chimeric mice with respect to their donor strains. Our data suggest a complex interplay between mechanisms of local peripheral tolerance and innate antitumor mechanisms possibly involving NK cell allorecognition as a basis for the differential growth or rejection of B16 tumors in these unique chimeric mice, which we suggest to constitute a valuable new model system for the study of immune-mediated tumor rejection

  9. Immune Reconstitution Kinetics following Intentionally Induced Mixed Chimerism by Nonmyeloablative Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayoun Kim

    Full Text Available Establishing mixed chimerism is a promising approach for inducing donor-specific transplant tolerance. The establishment and maintenance of mixed chimerism may enable long-term engraftment of organ transplants while minimizing the use of immunosuppressants. Several protocols for inducing mixed chimerism have been reported; however, the exact mechanism underlying the development of immune tolerance remains to be elucidated. Therefore, understanding the kinetics of engraftment during early post-transplant period may provide insight into establishing long-term mixed chimerism and permanent transplant tolerance. In this study, we intentionally induced allogeneic mixed chimerism using a nonmyeloablative regimen by host natural killer (NK cell depletion and T cell-depleted bone marrow (BM grafts in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC-mismatched murine model and analyzed the kinetics of donor (C57BL/6 and recipient (BALB/c engraftment in the weeks following transplantation. Donor BM cells were well engrafted and stabilized without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD as early as one week post-bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Donor-derived thymic T cells were reconstituted four weeks after BMT; however, the emergence of newly developed T cells was more obvious at the periphery as early as two weeks after BMT. Also, the emergence and changes in ratio of recipient- and donor-derived NKT cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs including dendritic cells (DCs and B cells were noted after BMT. Here, we report a longitudinal analysis of the development of donor- and recipient-originated hematopoietic cells in various lymphatic tissues of intentionally induced mixed chimerism mouse model during early post-transplant period. Through the understanding of immune reconstitution at early time points after nonmyeloablative BMT, we suggest guidelines on intentionally inducing durable mixed chimerism.

  10. Identification and typing of herpes simplex viruses with monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Balachandran, N; Frame, B; Chernesky, M; Kraiselburd, E; Kouri, Y; Garcia, D; Lavery, C; Rawls, W E

    1982-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies which reacted with type-specific antigens of herpes simplex virus type 2 or with antigens shared by herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 were used in an indirect immunofluorescence assay to type virus isolates and to detect viral antigens in cells obtained from herpetic lesions. Complete concordance was obtained for 42 isolates typed by endonuclease restriction analysis of viral DNA and by indirect immunofluorescence with monoclonal antibodies. Examination of a limited num...

  11. Rapid screening of monoclonal antibodies: new 'microstick' radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheinberg, D.A.; Strand, M.; Wilsnack, R.

    1983-01-01

    A new system for assaying monoclonal antibodies consisting of an 8 x 12 array of sticks which fits into a 96-well microtiter plate is described. Tests using virus specific monoclonal antibodies and virus proteins demonstrated sensitivity equivalent to the conventional microtiter plate assay. Antibody production, antigen specific antibody, and immunoglobulin isotypes could be measured under sterile conditions directly in the original fusion mixture wells and much greater rapidity than with the microtiter plate assay. (Auth.)

  12. Rat Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for LST1 Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Schiller, Christian; Nitschké, Maximilian J. E.; Seidl, Alexander; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Weiss, Elisabeth H.

    2009-01-01

    The LST1 gene is located in the human MHC class III region and encodes transmembrane and soluble isoforms that have been suggested to play a role in the regulation of the immune response and are associated with inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Here we describe the generation and characterization of the first monoclonal antibodies against LST1. Two hybridoma lines secreting monoclonal antibodies designated 7E2 and 8D12 were established. The 7E2 antibody detects recombinant a...

  13. Breast cancer imaging with mouse monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Major, P.; Wang Taqui; Unger, M.; Rosenthall, L.

    1989-10-01

    The localization of /sup 111/In-labelled MA5 monoclonal antibody, reactive with a breast tumor associated antigen, was studied in 17 patients. MA5 was selected because (1) it reacts with >95% of primary and metastatic lesions, (2) the recognized antigen is present on the cell surface in vivo and (3) MA5 gives excellent localization in human breast tumor xenografts. Each patient received 2 mg antibody labeled with 5 mCi /sup 111/In and in some cases, 3 mg or 18 mg unlabeled carrier antibody. No serious allergic reactions were noted. There was a large uptake in the liver, less significant uptake in the spleen and bone and minimal accumulation in the bowel. Bone lesions, primary tumors, soft tissue recurrences and lung metastases larger than 3 cm diameter were imaged, while only 1 lesion smaller than 3 cm was detected. Non specific accumulation of tracer was noted at the site of a port-a-cath, in a hematoma, in fibrocystic lesions, and at sites of previous radiation treatment. Extensive fibrosis and poor vascularization characteristic of breast tumors may explain in part the limited sensitivity of the imaging. (orig.).

  14. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs.

  15. Human/murine chimeric 81C6 F(ab')2 fragment: preclinical evaluation of a potential construct for the targeted radiotherapy of malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boskovitz, Abraham; Akabani, Gamal H.; Pegram, Charles N.; Bigner, Darrell D.; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    We have obtained encouraging responses in recent Phase I studies evaluating 131 I-labeled human/murine chimeric 81C6 anti-tenascin monoclonal antibody (ch81C6) administered into surgically-created tumor resection cavities in brain tumor patients. However, because the blood clearance is slow, hematologic toxicity has been higher than seen with murine 81C6 (mu81C6). In the current study, a series of paired-label experiments were performed in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous D-245 MG human glioma xenografts to compare the biodistribution of the fragment ch81C6 F(ab') 2 labeled using Iodogen to a) intact ch81C6, b) mu81C6, and c) ch81C6 F(ab') 2 labeled using N-succinimidyl 3-[ 131 I]iodobenzoate. Tumor retention of radioiodine activity for the F(ab') 2 fragment was comparable to that for intact ch81C6 for the first 24 h and to that for mu81C6 for the first 48 h; as expected, blood and other normal tissue levels declined faster for ch81C6 F(ab') 2. Radiation dosimetry calculations suggest that 131 I-labeled ch81C6 F(ab') 2 may warrant further evaluation as a targeted radiotherapeutic for the treatment of brain tumors

  16. Production of infectious chimeric hepatitis C virus genotype 2b harboring minimal regions of JFH-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Asako; Kato, Takanobu; Akazawa, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Nao; Date, Tomoko; Masaki, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Shingo; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizokami, Masashi; Yokosuka, Osamu; Nomoto, Akio; Wakita, Takaji

    2012-02-01

    To establish a cell culture system for chimeric hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2b, we prepared a chimeric construct harboring the 5' untranslated region (UTR) to the E2 region of the MA strain (genotype 2b) and the region of p7 to the 3' UTR of the JFH-1 strain (genotype 2a). This chimeric RNA (MA/JFH-1.1) replicated and produced infectious virus in Huh7.5.1 cells. Replacement of the 5' UTR of this chimera with that from JFH-1 (MA/JFH-1.2) enhanced virus production, but infectivity remained low. In a long-term follow-up study, we identified a cell culture-adaptive mutation in the core region (R167G) and found that it enhanced virus assembly. We previously reported that the NS3 helicase (N3H) and the region of NS5B to 3' X (N5BX) of JFH-1 enabled replication of the J6CF strain (genotype 2a), which could not replicate in cells. To reduce JFH-1 content in MA/JFH-1.2, we produced a chimeric viral genome for MA harboring the N3H and N5BX regions of JFH-1, combined with a JFH-1 5' UTR replacement and the R167G mutation (MA/N3H+N5BX-JFH1/R167G). This chimeric RNA replicated efficiently, but virus production was low. After the introduction of four additional cell culture-adaptive mutations, MA/N3H+N5BX-JFH1/5am produced infectious virus efficiently. Using this chimeric virus harboring minimal regions of JFH-1, we analyzed interferon sensitivity and found that this chimeric virus was more sensitive to interferon than JFH-1 and another chimeric virus containing more regions from JFH-1 (MA/JFH-1.2/R167G). In conclusion, we established an HCV genotype 2b cell culture system using a chimeric genome harboring minimal regions of JFH-1. This cell culture system may be useful for characterizing genotype 2b viruses and developing antiviral strategies.

  17. Faith-based perspectives on the use of chimeric organisms for medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeling, Chris; Irvine, Rob; Kerridge, Ian

    2014-04-01

    Efforts to advance our understanding of neurodegenerative diseases involve the creation chimeric organisms from human neural stem cells and primate embryos--known as prenatal chimeras. The existence of potential mentally complex beings with human and non-human neural apparatus raises fundamental questions as to the ethical permissibility of chimeric research and the moral status of the creatures it creates. Even as bioethicists find fewer reasons to be troubled by most types of chimeric organisms, social attitudes towards the non-human world are often influenced by religious beliefs. In this paper scholars representing eight major religious traditions provide a brief commentary on a hypothetical case concerning the development and use of prenatal human-animal chimeric primates in medical research. These commentaries reflect the plurality and complexity within and between religious discourses of our relationships with other species. Views on the moral status and permissibility of research on neural human animal chimeras vary. The authors provide an introduction to those who seek a better understanding of how faith-based perspectives might enter into biomedical ethics and public discourse towards forms of biomedical research that involves chimeric organisms.

  18. Theoretical design of a new chimeric protein for the treatment of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Meysam; Mahnam, Karim; Mirmohammad-Sadeghi, Hamid; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    p28 and NRC peptides are two anticancer peptides with various mechanisms have shown to be effective against breast cancer. Therefore, it seems that construction of a chimeric protein containing the two peptides might cause synergistic cytotoxic effects. However, since the two peptides bear opposite charges, production of a chimeric protein in which the two moieties do not intervene each other is difficult. In this study, our goal was to find a suitable peptide linker for the new chimeric protein in a manner that none of the peptides intervene the other’s function. We selected some linkers with different characteristics and lengths and created a small library of the chimeric proteins harboring these linkers. Homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulation revealed that (PA)5P and (EAAAK)3 linkers can separate the p28 and NRC peptides effectively. Thus, the chimeric protein linked with (PA)5P or (EAAAK)3 linkers might show synergistic and stronger anticancer effects than the separate peptide moieties because they could exert their cytotoxic effects freely which is not influenced by the other part. PMID:27499788

  19. Hemispheric metacontrol and cerebral dominance in healthy individuals investigated by means of chimeric faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgesi, Cosimo; Bricolo, Emanuela; Aglioti, Salvatore M

    2005-08-01

    Cerebral dominance and hemispheric metacontrol were investigated by testing the ability of healthy participants to match chimeric, entire, or half faces presented tachistoscopically. The two hemi-faces compounding chimeric or entire stimuli were presented simultaneously or asynchronously at different exposure times. Participants did not consciously detect chimeric faces for simultaneous presentations lasting up to 40 ms. Interestingly, a 20 ms separation between each half-chimera was sufficient to induce detection of conflicts at a conscious level. Although the presence of chimeric faces was not consciously perceived, performance on chimeric faces was poorer than on entire- and half-faces stimuli, thus indicating an implicit processing of perceptual conflicts. Moreover, the precedence of hemispheric stimulation over-ruled the right hemisphere dominance for face processing, insofar as the hemisphere stimulated last appeared to influence the response. This dynamic reversal of cerebral dominance, however, was not caused by a shift in hemispheric specialization, since the level of performance always reflected the right hemisphere specialization for face recognition. Thus, the dissociation between hemispheric dominance and specialization found in the present study hints at the existence of hemispheric metacontrol in healthy individuals.

  20. Reversible Heat-Induced Inactivation of Chimeric β-Glucuronidase in Transgenic Plants1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almoguera, Concepción; Rojas, Anabel; Jordano, Juan

    2002-01-01

    We compared the expression patterns in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) of two chimeric genes: a translational fusion to β-glucuronidase (GUS) and a transcriptional fusion, both with the same promoter and 5′-flanking sequences of Ha hsp17.7 G4, a small heat shock protein (sHSP) gene from sunflower (Helianthus annuus). We found that immediately after heat shock, the induced expression from the two fusions in seedlings was similar, considering chimeric mRNA or GUS protein accumulation. Surprisingly, we discovered that the chimeric GUS protein encoded by the translational fusion was mostly inactive in such conditions. We also found that this inactivation was fully reversible. Thus, after returning to control temperature, the GUS activity was fully recovered without substantial changes in GUS protein accumulation. In contrast, we did not find differences in the in vitro heat inactivation of the respective GUS proteins. Insolubilization of the chimeric GUS protein correlated with its inactivation, as indicated by immunoprecipitation analyses. The inclusion in another chimeric gene of the 21 amino-terminal amino acids from a different sHSP lead to a comparable reversible inactivation. That effect not only illustrates unexpected post-translational problems, but may also point to sequences involved in interactions specific to sHSPs and in vivo heat stress conditions. PMID:12011363

  1. B-cell inhibition by cross-linking CD79b is superior to B-cell depletion with anti-CD20 antibodies in treating murine collagen-induced arthritis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bruhl, H.; Cihak, J.; Talke, Y.; Rodriguez-Gomez, M.; Hermann, F.; Goebel, N.; Renner, K.; Plachý, Jiří; Stangassinger, M.; Archemann, S.; Nimmerjahn, F.; Mack, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2015), s. 705-715 ISSN 0014-2980 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Arthritis * B cells * B-cell depletion * B-cell inhibition * CD79b * Humoral immune response Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.179, year: 2015

  2. Replacement of the V3 domain in the surface subunit of the feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein with the equivalent region of a T cell-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 results in a chimeric surface protein that efficiently binds to CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Silvia A; Falcón, Juan I; Affranchino, José L

    2014-03-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and the T cell-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) share the use of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for cell entry. To study this process further we developed a cell surface binding assay based on the expression of a soluble version of the FIV SU C-terminally tagged with the influenza virus hemagglutinin epitope (HA). The specificity of the assay was demonstrated by the following evidence: (1) the SU-HA protein bound to HeLa cells that express CXCR4 but not to MDCK cells that lack this chemokine receptor; and (2) binding of the SU-HA to HeLa cells was blocked by incubation with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 as well as with the anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) 12G5. Deletion of the V3 region from the FIV SU glycoprotein abolished its ability to bind CXCR4-expressing cells. Remarkably, substitution of the V3 domain of the FIV SU by the equivalent region of the HIV-1 NL4-3 isolate resulted in efficient cell surface binding of the chimeric SU protein to CXCR4. Moreover, transfection of MDCK cells with a plasmid encoding human CXCR4 allowed the association of the chimeric SU-HA glycoprotein to the transfected cells. Interestingly, while cell binding of the chimeric FIV-HIV SU was inhibited by an anti-HIV-1 V3 MAb, its association with CXCR4 was found to be resistant to AMD3100. Of note, the chimeric FIV-HIV Env glycoprotein was capable of promoting CXCR4-dependent cell-to-cell fusion.

  3. Monoclonal antibody to DNA containing thymine glycol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leadon, S A; Hanawalt, P C [Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1983-08-01

    Exposure of DNA to ionizing or near ultraviolet radiation modifies thymine to form ring-saturated products. One of the major products formed is 5,6-dihydroxy-5.6-dihydrothymine (thymine glycol). Thymine glycol can also be selectively formed by oxidizing DNA with OsO/sub 4/. We have isolated hybrids that produce monoclonal antibodies against thymine glycol by fusing mouse myeloma cells (P3X63-Ag8-6.5.3) with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with OsO/sub 4/-oxidized poly(dT) complexed with methylated bovine serum albumin. This report describes the characterization of the antibody from one hybridoma using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The antibody reacted with both single- and double-stranded DNA treated with OsO/sub 4/, and with OsO/sub 4/-treated poly(dA-dT) and poly(dT); it did not crossreact with unmodified or apurinic DNA. It also reacted with DNA treated with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or with ..gamma..-rays at doses as low as 250 rad. We were able to detect 2 fmoles of thymine glycol in OsO/sub 4/-treated DNA and could quantitate 1 thymine glycol per 220000 thymines. Using the antibody and the ELISA, the formation and removal of thymine glycol was examined in cultures of African green monkey cells irradiated with 25 krad of ..gamma..-rays. The antibody reactive sites produced by irradiation (8.5 per 10/sup 6/ thymines) were efficiently removed from the cellular DNA.

  4. Novel monoclonal treatments in severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteran, Howraman; Meteran, Hanieh; Porsbjerg, Celeste; Backer, Vibeke

    2017-12-01

    To provide a general overview of the current biological treatments and discuss their potential anti-asthmatic effects. We reviewed articles in PubMed found using the search words "Asthma/therapy AND antibodies, monoclonal/therapeutic use AND cytokines." Only articles published in English since 2000 were considered. The search identified 29 studies; 8 additional studies were found by hand search, generating 37 studies. Of the 37 studies investigating biological treatments of asthma, 5 were on the effects of anti-IgE (omalizumab); 12 on anti-IL-5; 8 on anti-IL-13; 5 on anti-IL-4R-α; 3 on anti-IL-9; one on TNF-α; one on anti-IL-2R-α; one on TSLP (Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin); and one on OX40L. Sample sizes ranged from 3 to 943 participants. Studies of therapies targeting IgE, IL-2, IL4R-α, IL-5, and IL-13 showed some efficacy, whereas those targeting TSLP, IL-9, and TNF-α lacked convincing effectiveness. Research on the biological treatment of asthma shows promising results. While anti-IgE (omalizumab) has been used in the treatment of asthma for some years, anti-IL-5 has recently been approved for use. The efficacy of results of other large studies with a longer duration is needed to draw a firm conclusion. Such studies should not only focus on clinical outcomes, but also consider asthma-related quality of life. Knowledge on the asthma phenotypes and identification of biomarkers associated with these will be useful for physicians considering the right treatment for the asthma patient.

  5. Rats and mice immunised with chimeric human/mouse proteinase 3 produce autoantibodies to mouse Pr3 and rat granulocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geld, Ymke M.; Hellmark, Thomas; Selga, Daina; Heeringa, Peter; Huitema, Minke G.; Limburg, Pieter C.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: In this study, we employed chimeric human/ mouse Proteinase 3 ( PR3) proteins as tools to induce an autoantibody response to PR3 in rats and mice. Method: Rats and mice were immunised with recombinant human PR3 ( HPR3), recombinant murine PR3 ( mPR3), single chimeric human/ mouse PR3 ( HHm,

  6. Silkworms transformed with chimeric silkworm/spider silk genes spin composite silk fibers with improved mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of a spider silk manufacturing process is of great interest. piggyBac vectors were used to create transgenic silkworms encoding chimeric silkworm/spider silk proteins. The silk fibers produced by these animals were composite materials that included chimeric silkworm/spider silk prote...

  7. The determination of lymphoid cell chimerism using peripheral blood lymphocytes from murine bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skidmore, B.J.; Miller, L.S.

    1978-01-01

    A simple, rapid and accurate method was devised for determining lymphoid cell chimerism in bone marrow-reconstituted mice. Chimeras were produced by reconstituting lethally irradiated mice with semi-allogeneic bone marrow cells. Lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of individual chimeric mice were purified by sedimentation in dextran solution and differential flotation in Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. From 250-500 μl of blood, 1-7 x 10 5 cells were routinely obtained. The extent of chimerism was determined serologically by using peripheral blood lymphocytes as target cells in a dye exclusion microcytotoxicity assay. Using this new technique, approximately 80% of the reconstituted mice were found to be repopulated with lymphocytes of the donor type. (Auth.)

  8. Inhibition of tumor growth in syngenetic chimeric mice mediated by a depletion of suppressor T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotter, V.; Trainin, N.

    1975-01-01

    Syngeneic chimeric (lethally irradiated and reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow cells) mice manifested an increased resistance to the development of Lewis lung carcinoma. In addition, these mice had a higher response to polyvinylpyrrolidone and a reduced reactivity to T mitogens. The present findings suggest that syngeneic chimeric mice lack suppressor T cells shown to regulate the development of Lewis lung tumor and the response to polyvinylpyrrolidone. Other components of the T cell population, such as helper cells responding to sheep red blood cells or cells involved in allograft rejection, assayed in these syngeneic chimeras were found unaffected. The fact that chimeric mice are deficient in a certain suppressor T cell population whereas other T activities are normal suggests the existence of different cell lines within the T cell population. (U.S.)

  9. THE CHIMERIC ALT-VASTUS LATERALIS FREE FLAP IN RECONSTRUCTION OF ADVANCED BRONJ OF THE MAXILLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Toia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ is a dangerous complication of bisphosphonates, a class of pharmaceutical agents used in numerous bone disorders. No gold standard therapy exists, but recent literature suggests that, in advanced stages, the best results are achieved with aggressive debridement. In this paper, we report our experience of treatment of stage 3 BRONJ of the maxilla with extensive surgical debridement and reconstruction with a chimeric ALT-Vastus lateralis flap. Methods Five selected patients with stage 3 BRONJ underwent partial maxillectomy with disease-free margins followed by immediate reconstruction with a chimeric ALT-Vastus lateralis free flap. Results Only two patients experienced minor complications. All other patients healed uneventfully within two weeks and donor site morbidity was minimal. Conclusions Our data suggest that aggressive debridement and reconstruction with a chimeric ALT -Vastus lateralis flap is an effective option for the treatment of stage III BRONJ of the maxilla.

  10. Targeted transcriptional repression using a chimeric TALE-SRDX repressor protein

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-12-14

    Transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins secreted by Xanthomonas bacteria when they infect plants. TALEs contain a modular DNA binding domain that can be easily engineered to bind any sequence of interest, and have been used to provide user-selected DNA-binding modules to generate chimeric nucleases and transcriptional activators in mammalian cells and plants. Here we report the use of TALEs to generate chimeric sequence-specific transcriptional repressors. The dHax3 TALE was used as a scaffold to provide a DNA-binding module fused to the EAR-repression domain (SRDX) to generate a chimeric repressor that targets the RD29A promoter. The dHax3. SRDX protein efficiently repressed the transcription of the RD29A

  11. Targeted transcriptional repression using a chimeric TALE-SRDX repressor protein

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.; Li, Lixin; Piatek, Marek J.; Fang, Xiaoyun; Mansour, Hicham; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth K.; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins secreted by Xanthomonas bacteria when they infect plants. TALEs contain a modular DNA binding domain that can be easily engineered to bind any sequence of interest, and have been used to provide user-selected DNA-binding modules to generate chimeric nucleases and transcriptional activators in mammalian cells and plants. Here we report the use of TALEs to generate chimeric sequence-specific transcriptional repressors. The dHax3 TALE was used as a scaffold to provide a DNA-binding module fused to the EAR-repression domain (SRDX) to generate a chimeric repressor that targets the RD29A promoter. The dHax3. SRDX protein efficiently repressed the transcription of the RD29A

  12. Bone marrow cell migration to the heart in a chimeric mouse model of acute chagasic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irion, Camila Iansen; Paredes, Bruno Diaz; Brasil, Guilherme Visconde; Cunha, Sandro Torrentes da; Paula, Luis Felipe; Carvalho, Alysson Roncally; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos de; Carvalho, Adriana Bastos; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli Dos Santos

    2017-08-01

    Chagas disease is a public health problem caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. There is currently no effective therapy for Chagas disease. Although there is some evidence for the beneficial effect of bone marrow-derived cells in chagasic disease, the mechanisms underlying their effects in the heart are unknown. Reports have suggested that bone marrow cells are recruited to the chagasic heart; however, studies using chimeric mouse models of chagasic cardiomyopathy are rare. The aim of this study was to investigate the migration of bone marrow cells to the heart after T. cruzi infection in a model of chagasic disease in chimeric mice. To obtain chimerical mice, wild-type (WT) C57BL6 mice were exposed to full body irradiation (7 Gy), causing bone marrow ablation. Then, bone marrow cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic mice were infused into the mice. Graft effectiveness was confirmed by flow cytometry. Experimental mice were divided into four groups: (i) infected chimeric (iChim) mice; (ii) infected WT (iWT) mice, both of which received 3 × 104 trypomastigotes of the Brazil strain; (iii) non-infected chimeric (Chim) mice; and (iv) non-infected WT mice. At one-month post-infection, iChim and iWT mice showed first degree atrioventricular block with decreased heart rate and treadmill exercise parameters compared to those in the non-infected groups. iChim mice showed an increase in parasitaemia, myocarditis, and the presence of amastigote nests in the heart tissue compared to iWT mice. Flow cytometry analysis did not detect haematopoietic progenitor cells in the hearts of infected mice. Furthermore, GFP+ cardiomyocytes were not detected in the tissues of chimeric mice.

  13. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells for acute lymphoid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupp, Stephan A; Kalos, Michael; Barrett, David; Aplenc, Richard; Porter, David L; Rheingold, Susan R; Teachey, David T; Chew, Anne; Hauck, Bernd; Wright, J Fraser; Milone, Michael C; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H

    2013-04-18

    Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells with specificity for CD19 have shown promise in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). It remains to be established whether chimeric antigen receptor T cells have clinical activity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Two children with relapsed and refractory pre-B-cell ALL received infusions of T cells transduced with anti-CD19 antibody and a T-cell signaling molecule (CTL019 chimeric antigen receptor T cells), at a dose of 1.4×10(6) to 1.2×10(7) CTL019 cells per kilogram of body weight. In both patients, CTL019 T cells expanded to a level that was more than 1000 times as high as the initial engraftment level, and the cells were identified in bone marrow. In addition, the chimeric antigen receptor T cells were observed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), where they persisted at high levels for at least 6 months. Eight grade 3 or 4 adverse events were noted. The cytokine-release syndrome and B-cell aplasia developed in both patients. In one child, the cytokine-release syndrome was severe; cytokine blockade with etanercept and tocilizumab was effective in reversing the syndrome and did not prevent expansion of chimeric antigen receptor T cells or reduce antileukemic efficacy. Complete remission was observed in both patients and is ongoing in one patient at 11 months after treatment. The other patient had a relapse, with blast cells that no longer expressed CD19, approximately 2 months after treatment. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells are capable of killing even aggressive, treatment-refractory acute leukemia cells in vivo. The emergence of tumor cells that no longer express the target indicates a need to target other molecules in addition to CD19 in some patients with ALL.

  14. Tumor-Triggered Geometrical Shape Switch of Chimeric Peptide for Enhanced in Vivo Tumor Internalization and Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kai; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Weiyun; Wang, Shibo; Xu, Luming; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Xianzheng; Han, Heyou

    2017-03-28

    Geometrical shape of nanoparticles plays an important role in cellular internalization. However, the applicability in tumor selective therapeutics is still scarcely reported. In this article, we designed a tumor extracellular acidity-responsive chimeric peptide with geometrical shape switch for enhanced tumor internalization and photodynamic therapy. This chimeric peptide could self-assemble into spherical nanoparticles at physiological condition. While at tumor extracellular acidic microenvironment, chimeric peptide underwent detachment of acidity-sensitive 2,3-dimethylmaleic anhydride groups. The subsequent recovery of ionic complementarity between chimeric peptides resulted in formation of rod-like nanoparticles. Both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that this acidity-triggered geometrical shape switch endowed chimeric peptide with accelerated internalization in tumor cells, prolonged accumulation in tumor tissue, enhanced photodynamic therapy, and minimal side effects. Our results suggested that fusing tumor microenvironment with geometrical shape switch should be a promising strategy for targeted drug delivery.

  15. Human glial chimeric mice reveal astrocytic dependence of JC virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondo, Yoichi; Windrem, Martha S; Zou, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    with humanized white matter by engrafting human glial progenitor cells (GPCs) into neonatal immunodeficient and myelin-deficient mice. Intracerebral delivery of JCV resulted in infection and subsequent demyelination of these chimeric mice. Human GPCs and astrocytes were infected more readily than...... that was chimeric for human astrocytes and GPCs. JCV effectively propagated in these mice, which indicates that astroglial infection is sufficient for JCV spread. Sequencing revealed progressive mutation of the JCV capsid protein VP1 after infection, suggesting that PML may evolve with active infection...

  16. Interspecies chimeric complementation for the generation of functional human tissues and organs in large animal hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The past decade's rapid progress in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) research has generated hope for meeting the rising demand of organ donation, which remains the only effective cure for end-stage organ failure, a major cause of death worldwide. Despite the potential, generation of transplantable organs from hPSCs using in vitro differentiation is far-fetched. An in vivo interspecies chimeric complementation strategy relying on chimeric-competent hPSCs and zygote genome editing provides an auspicious alternative for providing unlimited organ source for transplantation.

  17. Translation activity of chimeric ribosomes composed of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis or Geobacillus stearothermophilus subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaka Tsuji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome composition, consisting of rRNA and ribosomal proteins, is highly conserved among a broad range of organisms. However, biochemical studies focusing on ribosomal subunit exchangeability between organisms remain limited. In this study, we show that chimeric ribosomes, composed of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis or E. coli and Geobacillus stearothermophilus subunits, are active for β-galactosidase translation in a highly purified E. coli translation system. Activities of the chimeric ribosomes showed only a modest decrease when using E. coli 30 S subunits, indicating functional conservation of the 50 S subunit between these bacterial species.

  18. Radiation induced chimeric rearrangement flower structure of Rhododendron simsii Planch. (Azaleaindica L. ) Use of recurrent irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Loose, R [IWONL (IRSIA) Irradiation Laboratory, Institute of Ornamental Plant Growing, Melle (Belgium)

    1979-02-01

    A radiation-induced chimeric flower colour sport of vegetatively propagated Rhododendron simsii Planch was recurrently irradiated (up to three times in three consecutive years) with soft X-rays (50kV-30mA), as compared to a single treatment. Because of the low true flower colour mutation frequency the efficiency of the different radiation treatments was compared on the basis of the number of chimeric rearrangements in flower structure i.e. the flower colour change from red with broad white edge towards either homogeneous carminered or white. It is quite clear that recurrent irradiation with appropiate doses is most efficient.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to drosophila cytochrome P-450's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundseth, S.S.; Kennel, S.J.; Waters, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    Hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies were prepared by the fusion of SP2/0 myeloma cells and spleen cells from a female BALB/c mouse immunized by cytochrome P-450-A and P-450-B purified from Drosophila Hikone-R (BG) microsomes. P-450-A and P-450-B are electrophoretically distinct subsets of Drosophila P-450. P-450-A is ubiquitous among strains tested, while P-450-B is present in only a few strains displaying unique enzyme activities and increased insecticide resistance. The Oregon-R strain contains only cytochromes P-450-A and is susceptible to insecticides. The authors Hikone-R (BG) strain expresses both cytochromes P-450-A and P-450-B and is insecticide resistant. Antibody producing hybridomas were detected in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) by binding to Hikone-R (BG) or Oregon-R microsomes. Four independent hybridomas were identified as producing monoclonal antibodies that recognized proteins in the P-450 complex by immunoblot experiments. Three monoclonal antibodies recognized P-450-A proteins, while one monoclonal antibody bound predominantly P-450-B. This monoclonal antibody also recognized southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania, Cramer) microsomal proteins

  20. Tubular and endothelial chimerism in renal allografts using fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization (FISH, CISH) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Zsuzsanna; Gaspert, Ariana; Behnke, Silvia; von Teichman, Adriana; Fritzsche, Florian; Fehr, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    The role of endothelial and tubular chimerism in renal allograft adaptation and rejection varies in different studies. We addressed the correlation between different clinico-pathological settings and sex-chromosomal endothelial and/or tubular chimerism in renal allografts. We examined the presence or absence of the X and Y chromosomes by fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization (FISH, CISH) methodology on paraffin embedded kidney biopsies in 16 gender mismatched renal transplants (1 to 12 years post-transplantation). Twelve patients were male, four female. Four groups were selected: (i) Vascular calcineurin inhibitor toxicity without rejection; (ii) T-cell mediated vascular rejection; (iii) antibody mediated rejection; and (iv) C4d-positivity in AB0-incompatible transplants with or without rejection. Twelve non-transplant kidney biopsies (8 female, 4 male) were used as controls. Tubular chimerism was detected more frequently (69%) than endothelial chimerism (12%) in renal transplants. One of 12 control patients had tubular and endothelial chimeric cells (8%). The Y chromosome occurred in 8/12 male recipients (67%) in tubular epithelial cells and in 5/12 male recipients (42%) in endothelial cells. Double X chromosomes were detected in 3/4 female recipients in tubular epithelium. Tubular chimerism occurred more often with endothelial chimerism and capillaritis without correlation with other parameters, such as rejection. Combined Y chromosomal tubular and lymphatic endothelial chimerism correlated with T-cell mediated vascular rejection in two out of three patients (66%). Combined Y chromosomal tubular and peritubular capillary chimerism correlated with antibody mediated C4d+ rejection in one out of two patients (50%). Tubular and/or endothelial chimerism occur frequently in gender mismatched renal allografts and, when combined, this is associated with T-cell mediated rejection. © 2012 The Authors. Pathology International © 2012 Japanese Society of

  1. Treatment of therapy-resistant perineal metastatic Crohn's disease after proctectomy using anti-tumor necrosis factor chimeric monoclonal antibody, cA2 - Report of two cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dullemen, HM; de Jong, E; Slors, F; Tytgat, GNJ; van Denventer, SJH

    PURPOSE: Two young females with well-documented Crohn's disease and nonhealing perineal wounds following proctectomy compatible with "metastatic Crohn's disease" are described, We hypothesized that metastatic Crohn's disease would be a tumor necrosis factor-dependent inflammatory-reaction and have

  2. An intelligent identification algorithm for the monoclonal picking instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hua; Zhang, Rongfu; Yuan, Xujun; Wang, Qun

    2017-11-01

    The traditional colony selection is mainly operated by manual mode, which takes on low efficiency and strong subjectivity. Therefore, it is important to develop an automatic monoclonal-picking instrument. The critical stage of the automatic monoclonal-picking and intelligent optimal selection is intelligent identification algorithm. An auto-screening algorithm based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) is proposed in this paper, which uses the supervised learning method, which combined with the colony morphological characteristics to classify the colony accurately. Furthermore, through the basic morphological features of the colony, system can figure out a series of morphological parameters step by step. Through the establishment of maximal margin classifier, and based on the analysis of the growth trend of the colony, the selection of the monoclonal colony was carried out. The experimental results showed that the auto-screening algorithm could screen out the regular colony from the other, which meets the requirement of various parameters.

  3. Exploration of novel strategies to enhance monoclonal antibodies targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khawli, L.A.; Epstein, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper highlights the major obstacles and prospects of antibody targeting for the radio imaging and therapy of human malignant lymphomas and more challenging solid tumors. To improve the therapeutic potential of monoclonal antibodies, the authors have focused their attention on the development of new and successful methods to augment antibody uptake in the tumor. These approaches include the use of radiolabeled streptavidin to target biotinylated monoclonal antibodies already bound to tumor, pretreatment with vasoactive immunoconjugates, and the use of chemically modified antibodies. Because of the promising preclinical data obtained with these three newer approaches, plans are underway to test them in the clinic. More generally, these approaches are applicable to the use of other monoclonal antibody/tumor systems for the diagnosis and therapy of human cancers and related diseases

  4. Radioimmunoimaging of experimental gliomas using radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaessner, H.

    1986-01-01

    The biodistribution and tumour uptake of radiolabelled (131 I) glioma-seeking monoclonal antibodies (14 AC1) and their F(ab') 2 fragments were investigated in nude mice having received glioma transplants. Radioimmunoimaging by external scintigraphy at 48 and 96 hours pointed to a superior tumour localisation by the fragments that was clearly related to the dose. Wholebody determinations of the biokinetic behaviour led to the following results: Faster clearance anc more ready elimination from the blood pool for the fragments, preferential uptake in the tumour; intact antibodies; binding in the liver, spleen and lungs. The study confirmed the value of fragments of monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis of tumours and pointed to the possibility of using intact monoclonal antibodies as carriers of radioisotopes and cytotoxic drugs within the scope of therapeutic programmes. (TRV) [de

  5. Efficacy of Wnt-1 monoclonal antibody in sarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Iwao; Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Jablons, David M; You, Liang; He, Biao; Xu, Zhidong; Batra, Sonny; Lee, Amie Y; Mazieres, Julien; Reguart, Noemi; Uematsu, Kazutsugu

    2005-01-01

    Sarcomas are one of the most refractory diseases among malignant tumors. More effective therapies based on an increased understanding of the molecular biology of sarcomas are needed as current forms of therapy remain inadequate. Recently, it has been reported that Wnt-1/β-catenin signaling inhibits apoptosis in several cancers. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of a monoclonal anti-Wnt-1 antibody in sarcoma cells. We treated cell lines A-204, SJSA-1, and fresh primary cultures of lung metastasis of sarcoma with a monoclonal anti-Wnt-1 antibody. Wnt-1 siRNA treatment was carried out in A-204. We assessed cell death using Crystal Violet staining. Apoptosis induction was estimated by flow cytometry analysis (Annexin V and PI staining). Cell signaling changes were determined by western blotting analysis. We detected Wnt-1 expression in all tissue samples and cell lines. Significant apoptosis induction was found in monoclonal anti-Wnt-1 antibody treated cells compared to control monoclonal antibody treated cells (p < 0.02). Similarly, we observed increased apoptosis in Wnt-1 siRNA treated cells. Blockade of Wnt-1 signaling in both experiments was confirmed by analyzing intracellular levels of Dishevelled-3 and of cytosolic β-catenin. Furthermore, the monoclonal anti-Wnt-1 antibody also induced cell death in fresh primary cultures of metastatic sarcoma in which Wnt-1 signaling was active. Our results indicate that Wnt-1 blockade by either monoclonal antibody or siRNA induces cell death in sarcoma cells. These data suggest that Wnt-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of a subset of sarcoma cells in which Wnt-1/β-catenin signaling is active

  6. Making Recombinant Monoclonal Antibody And Radiolabelling For Medical Purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thi Thu; Duong Van Dong; Vo Thi Cam Hoa; Bui Van Cuong; Chu Van Khoa; Vu Bich Huong; Le Quang Huan

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant monoclonal antibody labeling with 131 I specific to tumor cell has been studied and prepared for treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma. In this study, a recombinant monoclonal antibody with two specific properties is a hybrid molecule created by coupling an antibody variable fragments with peptide melittin. The gene coding the antibody fragment has been obtained from human synthetic Fv libraries using for panning and screening on populations of lymphocytes fragmented from human blood cells with Hodgkin diseases. The gene encoding peptit melittin has been cloned from honeybee Apis cerana DNA. The gene coding recombinant monoclonal antibody has been expressed in E.coli BL21 (DE3) at 37 o C and was induced with 0.6 mM IPTG. The recombinant compound has been purified by affinity chromatography with HiTrap affinity column. The obtained recombinant monoclonal antibody has showed cytolytic activities when added to cell culture medium for LU cancer cell line with the amount of 100 - 200 mg/ml. This monoclonal antibody is labeled with 131 I using chloramine T procedure. ChT mass for the oxidation of 50 μg monoclonal antibody in 76 MBq was 10 μg. Sodium metabisulfite was used as a reducing agent. Reaction time was above 3 mins. The radiochemical purity was determined using electrophoresis and TLC methods. Radiochemical yield was > 97%. Radiochemical purity after purification was > 99%. Nuclear purity was > 99%. Stability of the label antibody was 12 days. This is the product promise potential used in the diagnostic and therapeutic of Hodgkin lymphoma. (author)

  7. High throughput production of mouse monoclonal antibodies using antigen microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Masi, Federico; Chiarella, P.; Wilhelm, H.

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in proteomics research underscore the increasing need for high-affinity monoclonal antibodies, which are still generated with lengthy, low-throughput antibody production techniques. Here we present a semi-automated, high-throughput method of hybridoma generation and identification....... Monoclonal antibodies were raised to different targets in single batch runs of 6-10 wk using multiplexed immunisations, automated fusion and cell-culture, and a novel antigen-coated microarray-screening assay. In a large-scale experiment, where eight mice were immunized with ten antigens each, we generated...

  8. Monoclonal anti-melanoma antibodies and their possible clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellstroem, K.E.; Hellstroem, Ingegerd; Washington Univ., Seattle; Washington Univ., Seattle

    1985-01-01

    Cell surface antigens of human melanoma, as defined by monoclonal antibodies, are discussed and in particular the three antigens p97, a GD3 ganglioside and a proteoglycan. The potential diagnostic uses of antibodies to melanoma antigens are reviewed including in vitro diagnosis by immuno-histology, in vitro diagnosis by serum assays and in vivo diagnosis by tumour imaging using radioactively labelled antibodies. The potential therapeutic uses of monoclonal antibodies to melanoma antigens are also reviewed including targets for antibody therapy, the use of antibodies alone, radiolabelled antibodies, antibody-toxin conjugates, antibody-drug conjugates, anti-idiotypic antibodies and vaccines. (UK)

  9. ERBB oncogene proteins as targets for monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanovski, O L; Lebedenko, E N; Deyev, S M

    2012-03-01

    General properties of the family of tyrosine kinase ERBB receptors are considered in connection with their role in the generation of cascades of signal transduction in normal and tumor cells. Causes of acquisition of oncogene features by genes encoding these receptors and their role in tumorigenesis are analyzed. Anti-ERBB monoclonal antibodies approved for therapy are described in detail, and mechanisms of their antitumor activity and development of resistance to them are reviewed. The existing and the most promising strategies for creating and using monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives for therapy of cancer are discussed.

  10. Production and radioiodination of monoclonal antibodies and its applications in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1988-12-01

    The basis of the monoclonal antibody production methodology, some immunological concepts which are important for the understanding of what is a Monoclonal Antibody, its radioiodination and acceptance as receptor-specific radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine are reviewed. (author) [pt

  11. Monoclonal antibodies: an overview of their advantages and limitations in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revillard, J.P.; Cohen, J.

    1982-01-01

    The following topics were reviewed: antigen recognition by the immune system; development of immunoassays for antigenic components of biological fluids; monoclonal antibodies against infectious agents; monochonal antibodies against tumor and differentiation antigens; human monoclonal antibodies

  12. Chimeric Ply187 endolysin kills Staphylococcus aureus more effectively than the parental enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptidoglycan hydrolases are an effective new source of antimicrobials. A chimeric fusion protein of the Ply187 endopeptidase domain and LysK SH3b cell wall binding domain is a potent agent against Staphylococcus aureus in three functional assays....

  13. Chimeric plant virus particles administered nasally or orally induce systemic and mucosal immune responses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brennan, F.R.; Bellaby, T.; Helliwell, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The humoral immune responses to the D2 peptide of fibronectin-binding protein B (FnBP) of Staphylococcus aureus, expressed on the plant virus cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), were evaluated after mucosal delivery to mice. Intranasal immunization of these chimeric virus particles (CVPs), either alone...

  14. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication by chimeric phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides applied in free solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, O S; Hansen, J E

    1998-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing a variable number of 3' and 5' terminal phosphorothioate linkages were applied in free solution to cells infected by HIV-1. ODNs of 28 nt length were applied at up to 5 microM concentration. The ODNs were found to inhibit HIV-1 infection in a dose dependent...... by these modified chimers....

  15. Intravitreal injection of a chimeric phage endolysin Ply187 protects mice from Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: The treatment of endophthalmitis is becoming very challenging due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Hence, the development of novel therapeutic alternatives for ocular use is essential. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of Ply187AN-KSH3b, a chimeric phage endol...

  16. Optimized total body irradiation for induction of renal allograft tolerance through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimikawa, Masaaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo

    1996-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen can induce mixed chimerism and renal allograft tolerance between MHC-disparate non-human primates. The basic regimen includes anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), total body irradiation (TBI, 300 cGy), thymic irradiation (TI, 700 cGy), splenectomy, donor bone marrow (DBM) infusion, and posttransplant cyclosporine therapy (CYA, discontinued after 4 weeks). To evaluate the importance and to minimize the toxicity of irradiation, kidney allografts were transplanted with various manipulations of the irradiation protocol. Monkeys treated with the basic protocol without TBI and TI did not develop chimerism or long-term allograft survival. In monkeys treated with the full protocol, all six monkeys treated with two fractionated dose of 150 cGy developed chimerism and five monkeys appeared tolerant. In contrast, only two of the four monkeys treated with fractionated doses of 125 cGy developed chimerism and only one monkey survived long term. The degree of lymphocyte depletion in all recipients was proportional to the TBI dose. The fractionated TBI regimen of 150 cGy appears to be the most consistently effective regimen for establishing donor bone marrow cell engraftment and allograft tolerance. (author)

  17. Isolation of chicken embryonic stem cell and preparation of chicken chimeric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yani; Yang, Haiyan; Zhang, Zhentao; Shi, Qingqing; Wang, Dan; Zheng, Mengmeng; Li, Bichun; Song, Jiuzhou

    2013-03-01

    Chicken embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were separated from blastoderms at stage-X and cultured in vitro. Alkaline phosphatase activity and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 staining was conducted to detect ESCs. Then, chicken ESCs were transfected with linearized plasmid pEGFP-N1 in order to produce chimeric chicken. Firstly, the optimal electrotransfection condition was compared; the results showed the highest transfection efficiency was obtained when the field strength and pulse duration was 280 V and 75 μs, respectively. Secondly, the hatchability of shedding methods, drilling a window at the blunt end of egg and drilling a window at the lateral shell of egg was compared, the results showed that the hatchability was the highest for drilling a window at the lateral shell of egg. Thirdly, the hatchability of microinjection (ESCs was microinjected into chick embryo cavity) was compared too, the results showed there were significant difference between the injection group transfected with ESCs and that of other two groups. In addition, five chimeric chickens were obtained in this study and EGFP gene was expressed in some organs, but only two chimeric chicken expressed EGFP gene in the gonad, indicating that the chimeric chicken could be obtained through chick embryo cavity injection by drilling a window at the lateral shell of egg.

  18. Custom-engineered chimeric foot-and-mouth disease vaccine elicits protective immune responses in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimeric foot-and-mouth disease viruses (FMDV) of which the antigenic properties can be readily manipulated is a potentially powerful approach in the control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in sub-Saharan Africa. FMD vaccine application is complicated by the extensive variability of the South Africa...

  19. Engineered Chimeric Peptides as Antimicrobial Surface Coating Agents toward Infection-Free Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Hilal; O'Neill, Mary B; Kacar, Turgay; Wilson, Brandon R; Oren, E Emre; Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tamerler, Candan

    2016-03-02

    Prevention of bacterial colonization and consequent biofilm formation remains a major challenge in implantable medical devices. Implant-associated infections are not only a major cause of implant failures but also their conventional treatment with antibiotics brings further complications due to the escalation in multidrug resistance to a variety of bacterial species. Owing to their unique properties, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have gained significant attention as effective agents to combat colonization of microorganisms. These peptides have been shown to exhibit a wide spectrum of activities with specificity to a target cell while having a low tendency for developing bacterial resistance. Engineering biomaterial surfaces that feature AMP properties, therefore, offer a promising approach to prevent implant infections. Here, we engineered a chimeric peptide with bifunctionality that both forms a robust solid-surface coating while presenting antimicrobial property. The individual domains of the chimeric peptides were evaluated for their solid-binding kinetics to titanium substrate as well as for their antimicrobial properties in solution. The antimicrobial efficacy of the chimeric peptide on the implant material was evaluated in vitro against infection by a variety of bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus. epidermidis, and Escherichia coli, which are commonly found in oral and orthopedic implant related surgeries. Our results demonstrate significant improvement in reducing bacterial colonization onto titanium surfaces below the detectable limit. Engineered chimeric peptides with freely displayed antimicrobial domains could be a potential solution for developing infection-free surfaces by engineering implant interfaces with highly reduced bacterial colonization property.

  20. Preparation and Characterization of a Novel Chimeric Protein VEGI-CTT in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiping Cai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial cell growth inhibitor (VEGI is a recently identified antiangiogenic cytokine that belongs to the TNF superfamily, and could effectively inhibit endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Synthetic peptide CTT (CTTHWGFTLC has been found to suppress invasion and migration of both tumor and endothelial cells by potent and selective inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9. To prepare chimeric protein VEGI-CTT for more potent antitumor therapy, the recombinant expression vector pET-VEGI-CTT was constructed. This fusion protein was expressed in inclusion bodies in E. coli BL21 (DE3, and was refolded and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography using His-tag. Purified VEGI-CTT protein was characterized by proliferation assays of the endothelial cells and casein degradation assay in vitro. The results demonstrated that chimeric protein VEGI-CTT had a potent activity of antiangiogenesis through inhibiting the proliferation of endothelial cells, and could effectively reduce the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. The preliminarily in vivo study demonstrated that chimeric protein VEGI-CTT had more potent antitumor activity than VEGI and/or CTT peptide against CA46 human lymphoma xenografts in nude mice. Thus, these facts that are derived from the present study suggest that the chimeric protein VEGI-CTT may be used for tumor therapy in the future.

  1. Origination of an X-linked testes chimeric gene by illegitimate recombination in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Roman Arguello

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The formation of chimeric gene structures provides important routes by which novel proteins and functions are introduced into genomes. Signatures of these events have been identified in organisms from wide phylogenic distributions. However, the ability to characterize the early phases of these evolutionary processes has been difficult due to the ancient age of the genes or to the limitations of strictly computational approaches. While examples involving retrotransposition exist, our understanding of chimeric genes originating via illegitimate recombination is limited to speculations based on ancient genes or transfection experiments. Here we report a case of a young chimeric gene that has originated by illegitimate recombination in Drosophila. This gene was created within the last 2-3 million years, prior to the speciation of Drosophila simulans, Drosophila sechellia, and Drosophila mauritiana. The duplication, which involved the Bällchen gene on Chromosome 3R, was partial, removing substantial 3' coding sequence. Subsequent to the duplication onto the X chromosome, intergenic sequence was recruited into the protein-coding region creating a chimeric peptide with approximately 33 new amino acid residues. In addition, a novel intron-containing 5' UTR and novel 3' UTR evolved. We further found that this new X-linked gene has evolved testes-specific expression. Following speciation of the D. simulans complex, this novel gene evolved lineage-specifically with evidence for positive selection acting along the D. simulans branch.

  2. Chimerization of lactoferricin and lactoferrampin peptides strongly potentiates the killing activity against Candida albicans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolscher, J.; Nazmi, K.; van Marle, J.; van 't Hof, W.; Veerman, E.

    2012-01-01

    Bovine lactoferrin harbors 2 antimicrobial sequences (LFcin and LFampin), situated in close proximity in the N1-domain. To mimic their semi parallel configuration we have synthesized a chimeric peptide (LFchimera) in which these sequences are linked in a head-to-head fashion to the α- and ε-amino

  3. Chimeric peptide beacons: a direct polypeptide analog of DNA molecular beacons†

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Kenneth J.; Cash, Kevin J.; Lubin, Arica A.; Plaxco, Kevin W.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new biosensor architecture, which is comprised of a polypeptide–peptide nucleic acid tri-block copolymer and which we have termed chimeric peptide beacons (CPB), that generates an optical output via a mechanism analogous to that employed in DNA-based molecular beacons.

  4. Chimeric immune receptors (CIRs) specific to JC virus for immunotherapy in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Yang; E.L. Beaudoin; L. Lu; R.A. Du Pasquier (Renaud); M.J. Kuroda; R.A. Willemsen (Ralph); I.J. Koralnik; R.P. Junghans

    2007-01-01

    textabstractProgressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a deadly brain disease caused by the polyomavirus JC (JCV). The aim of this study is to develop 'designer T cells' armed with anti-JCV TCR-based chimeric immune receptors (CIRs) by gene modification for PML immunotherapy. Two T cell

  5. Alloreactive regulatory T cells allow the generation of mixed chimerism and transplant tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina eRuiz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The induction of donor-specific transplant tolerance is one of the main goals of modern immunology. Establishment of a mixed chimerism state in the transplant recipient has proven to be a suitable strategy for the induction of long-term allograft tolerance; however, current experimental recipient preconditioning protocols have many side effects, and are not feasible for use in future therapies. In order to improve the current mixed chimerism induction protocols, we developed a non-myeloablative bone-marrow transplant protocol using retinoic acid induced alloantigen-specific Tregs, clinically available immunosuppressive drugs and lower doses of irradiation. We demonstrate that retinoic acid induced alloantigen-specific Tregs in addition to a non-myeloablative bone-marrow transplant protocol generates stable mixed chimerism and induce tolerance to allogeneic secondary skin allografts in mice. Therefore, the establishment of mixed chimerism through the use of donor-specific Tregs rather than non-specific immunosuppression could have a potential use in organ transplantation.

  6. [Immunoreactivity of chimeric proteins carrying poliovirus epitopes on the VP6 of rotavirus as a vector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, X-X; Zhao, B-X; Teng, Y-M; Xia, W-Y; Wang, J; Li, X-F; Liao, G-Y; Yang, С; Chen, Y-D

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus and poliovirus continue to present significant risks and burden of disease to children in developing countries. Developing a combined vaccine may effectively prevent both illnesses and may be advantageous in terms of maximizing compliance and vaccine coverage at the same visit. Recently, we sought to generate a vaccine vector by incorporating multiple epitopes into the rotavirus group antigenic protein, VP6. In the present study, a foreign epitope presenting a system using VP6 as a vector was created with six sites on the outer surface of the vector that could be used for insertion of foreign epitopes, and three VP6-based PV1 epitope chimeric proteins were constructed. The chimeric proteins were confirmed by immunoblot, immunofluorescence assay, and injected into guinea pigs to analyze the epitope-specific humoral response. Results showed that these chimeric proteins reacted with anti-VP6F and -PV1 antibodies, and elicited antibodies against both proteins in guinea pigs. Antibodies against the chimeric proteins carrying PV1 epitopes neutralized rotavirus Wa and PV1 infection in vitro. Our study contributes to a better understanding of the use of VP6-based vectors as multiple-epitope delivery vehicles and the epitopes displayed in this form could be considered for development of epitope-based vaccines against rotavirus and poliovirus.

  7. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing Using a Chimeric Single-Guide RNA Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Butt, Haroon; Eid, Ayman; Ali, Zahir; Atia, Mohamed A. M.; Mokhtar, Morad M.; Hassan, Norhan; Lee, Ciaran M.; Bao, Gang; Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2017-01-01

    used CRISPR/Cas9 to generate targeted double-strand breaks and to deliver an RNA repair template for HDR in rice (Oryza sativa). We used chimeric single-guide RNA (cgRNA) molecules carrying both sequences for target site specificity (to generate

  8. Mixed chimerism following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in pediatric thalassemia major patients: a single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Ünal İnce

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stable mixed chimerism (MC may result in cure for thalassemia major patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, but rejection can occur. Twenty-eight HSCTs for thalassemia major were reviewed retrospectively to evaluate the clinical course of MC with possible risk factors and predictors of outcome, with a median follow-up of 1669 days (811-3576 days. Materials and Methods: Chimerism was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH or multiplex polymerase chain reaction depending on the sex match between the donor and the recipient. Results: Primary rejection, stable MC and full donor chimerism was detected in 3.6%, 17.8% and 78.6% of patients, respectively. Clinically, 4/5 patients with stable MC had thalassemia trait with donor chimerism as low as 14%. One patient was started on pRBC transfusions at 2.5 years postHSCT. Conclusion: Stable MC can result in cure for thalassemia major patients. The clinical picture remains as the best guide for intervention until a more reliable predictor is available.

  9. Exploration of genetically encoded voltage indicators based on a chimeric voltage sensing domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko eMishina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Deciphering how the brain generates cognitive function from patterns of electrical signals is one of the ultimate challenges in neuroscience. To this end, it would be highly desirable to monitor the activities of very large numbers of neurons while an animal engages in complex behaviours. Optical imaging of electrical activity using genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs has the potential to meet this challenge. Currently prevalent GEVIs are based on the voltage-sensitive fluorescent protein (VSFP prototypical design or on the voltage dependent state transitions of microbial opsins.We recently introduced a new VSFP design in which the voltage-sensing domain (VSD is sandwiched between a FRET pair of fluorescent proteins (termed VSFP-Butterflies and also demonstrated a series of chimeric VSD in which portions of the VSD of Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP are substituted by homologous portions of a voltage-gated potassium channel subunit. These chimeric VSD had faster sensing kinetics than that of the native Ci-VSD. Here, we describe a new set of VSFPs that combine chimeric VSD with the Butterfly structure. We show that these chimeric VSFP-Butterflies can report membrane voltage oscillations of up to 200 Hz in cultured cells and report sensory evoked cortical population responses in living mice. This class of GEVIs may be suitable for imaging of brain rhythms in behaving mammalians.

  10. Exploration of genetically encoded voltage indicators based on a chimeric voltage sensing domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishina, Yukiko; Mutoh, Hiroki; Song, Chenchen; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Deciphering how the brain generates cognitive function from patterns of electrical signals is one of the ultimate challenges in neuroscience. To this end, it would be highly desirable to monitor the activities of very large numbers of neurons while an animal engages in complex behaviors. Optical imaging of electrical activity using genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) has the potential to meet this challenge. Currently prevalent GEVIs are based on the voltage-sensitive fluorescent protein (VSFP) prototypical design or on the voltage-dependent state transitions of microbial opsins. We recently introduced a new VSFP design in which the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) is sandwiched between a fluorescence resonance energy transfer pair of fluorescent proteins (termed VSFP-Butterflies) and also demonstrated a series of chimeric VSD in which portions of the VSD of Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensitive phosphatase are substituted by homologous portions of a voltage-gated potassium channel subunit. These chimeric VSD had faster sensing kinetics than that of the native Ci-VSD. Here, we describe a new set of VSFPs that combine chimeric VSD with the Butterfly structure. We show that these chimeric VSFP-Butterflies can report membrane voltage oscillations of up to 200 Hz in cultured cells and report sensory evoked cortical population responses in living mice. This class of GEVIs may be suitable for imaging of brain rhythms in behaving mammalians.

  11. CCR 20th anniversary commentary: a chimeric antibody, C225, inhibits EGFR activation and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, John; Prewett, Marie; Rockwell, Patricia; Goldstein, Neil I

    2015-01-15

    Murine mAb 225 was effective against the EGFR tyrosine kinase and inhibited tumor growth in preclinical studies. A phase I trial showed safety, tumor localization, and satisfactory pharmacokinetics. Human:murine chimeric C225 retained biologic activity, which was essential for the conduct of subsequent combination therapy trials and eventual regulatory approval. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Minimal Residual Disease Diagnostics and Chimerism in the Post-Transplant Period in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Bacher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In acute myeloid leukemia (AML, the selection of poor-risk patients for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is associated with rather high post-transplant relapse rates. As immunotherapeutic intervention is considered to be more effective before the cytomorphologic manifestation of relapse, post-transplant monitoring gains increasing attention in stem cell recipients with a previous diagnosis of AML. Different methods for detection of chimerism (e.g., microsatellite analysis or quantitative real-time PCR are available to quantify the ratio of donor and recipient cells in the post-transplant period. Various studies demonstrated the potential use of mixed chimerism kinetics to predict relapse of the AML. CD34+-specific chimerism is associated with a higher specificity of chimerism analysis. Nevertheless, a decrease of donor cells can have other causes as well. Therefore, efforts continue to introduce minimal residual disease (MRD monitoring based on molecular mutations in the post-transplant period. The NPM1 (nucleophosmin mutations can be monitored by sensitive quantitative real-time PCR in subsets of stem cell recipients with AML, but for approximately 20% of patients, suitable molecular mutations for post-transplant MRD monitoring are not available so far. This emphasizes the need for an expansion of the panel of MRD markers in the transplant setting.

  13. Hematopoietic chimerism and transplantation tolerance: a role for regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise ePasquet

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The major obstacle in transplantation medicine is rejection of donor tissues by the host’s immune system. Immunosuppressive drugs can delay but not prevent loss of transplants, and their efficiency is strongly impacted by inter-individual pharmacokinetic differences. Moreover, due to the global immunosuppression induced and to the broad distribution of their targets amongst human tissues, these drugs have severe side effects. Induction of donor-specific non-responsiveness (i.e. immunological tolerance to transplants would solve these problems and would substantially ameliorate patients’ quality of life. It is widely believed that bone marrow or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and resulting (mixed hematopoietic chimerism, invariably leads to immunological tolerance to organs of the same donor. A careful analysis of the literature, reviewed here, indeed shows that chimerism consistently prolongs allograft survival. However, in absence of additional conditioning leading to the development of active regulatory mechanisms, it does not prevent chronic rejection. A central role for active tolerance in transplantation-tolerance is also supported by recent data showing that genuine immunological tolerance to organ allografts can be achieved by combining induction of hematopoietic chimerism with infusion of regulatory T lymphocytes. Therefore, conditioning regimens that lead to the establishment of hematopoietic chimerism plus active regulatory mechanisms appear required for induction of genuine tolerance to allogeneic grafts.

  14. Lenalidomide enhances antitumor functions of chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Otáhal, Pavel; Průková, D.; Král, Vlastimil; Fábry, Milan; Vockova, P.; Lateckova, L.; Trněný, M.; Klener, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2016), č. článku e1115940. ISSN 2162-402X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13201 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Chimeric antigenic receptor * lenalidomide * lymphoma * tumor immunotherapy * T cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.719, year: 2016

  15. Extensive chimerism in liver transplants: vascular endothelium, bile duct epithelium, and hepatocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, W.R.; Hoek, B. van; Bajema, I.M.; Ringers, J.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Lagaaij, E.L.

    2003-01-01

    The transplanted liver has been shown to be particularly capable of inducing tolerance. An explanation may be the presence of chimerism. Cells of donor origin have been found in recipient tissues after transplantation of any solid organ. Evidence for the presence of cells of recipient origin within

  16. Optimized total body irradiation for induction of renal allograft tolerance through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimikawa, Masaaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen can induce mixed chimerism and renal allograft tolerance between MHC-disparate non-human primates. The basic regimen includes anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), total body irradiation (TBI, 300 cGy), thymic irradiation (TI, 700 cGy), splenectomy, donor bone marrow (DBM) infusion, and posttransplant cyclosporine therapy (CYA, discontinued after 4 weeks). To evaluate the importance and to minimize the toxicity of irradiation, kidney allografts were transplanted with various manipulations of the irradiation protocol. Monkeys treated with the basic protocol without TBI and TI did not develop chimerism or long-term allograft survival. In monkeys treated with the full protocol, all six monkeys treated with two fractionated dose of 150 cGy developed chimerism and five monkeys appeared tolerant. In contrast, only two of the four monkeys treated with fractionated doses of 125 cGy developed chimerism and only one monkey survived long term. The degree of lymphocyte depletion in all recipients was proportional to the TBI dose. The fractionated TBI regimen of 150 cGy appears to be the most consistently effective regimen for establishing donor bone marrow cell engraftment and allograft tolerance. (author)

  17. Ligand-mediated negative regulation of a chimeric transmembrane receptor tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desai, D M; Sap, J; Schlessinger, J

    1993-01-01

    CD45, a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase), is required for TCR signaling. Multiple CD45 isoforms, differing in the extracellular domain, are expressed in a tissue- and activation-specific manner, suggesting an important function for this domain. We report that a chimeric protein...... that ligand-mediated regulation of receptor-PTPases may have mechanistic similarities with receptor tyrosine kinases....

  18. Ingraft chimerism in lung transplantation - a study in a porcine model of obliterative bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubes Jiri

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchial epithelium is a target of the alloimmune response in lung transplantation, and intact epithelium may protect allografts from rejection and obliterative bronchiolitis (OB. Herein we study the influence of chimerism on bronchial epithelium and OB development in pigs. Methods A total of 54 immunosuppressed and unimmunosuppressed bronchial allografts were serially obtained 2-90 days after transplantation. Histology (H&E was assessed and the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH method for Y chromosomes using pig-specific DNA-label was used to detect recipient derived cells in graft epithelium and bronchial wall, and donor cell migration to recipient organs. Ingraft chimerism was studied by using male recipients with female donors, whereas donor cell migration to recipient organs was studied using female recipients with male donors. Results Early appearance of recipient-derived cells in the airway epithelium appeared predictive of epithelial destruction (R = 0.610 - 0.671 and p R = 0.698 and p p p Conclusions In this study we demonstrate that early appearance of Y chromosomes in the airway epithelium predicts features characteristic of OB. Chimerism occurred in all allografts, including those without features of OB. Therefore we suggest that ingraft chimerism may be a mechanism involved in the repair of alloimmune-mediated tissue injury after transplantation.

  19. Chimeric SV40 virus-like particles induce specific cytotoxicity and protective immunity against influenza A virus without the need of adjuvants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Masaaki; Morikawa, Katsuma; Suda, Tatsuya; Ohno, Naohito; Matsushita, Sho; Akatsuka, Toshitaka; Handa, Hiroshi; Matsui, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are a promising vaccine platform due to the safety and efficiency. However, it is still unclear whether polyomavirus-based VLPs are useful for this purpose. Here, we attempted to evaluate the potential of polyomavirus VLPs for the antiviral vaccine using simian virus 40 (SV40). We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an HLA-A ⁎ 02:01-restricted, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope derived from influenza A virus. HLA-A ⁎ 02:01-transgenic mice were then immunized with the chimeric SV40-VLPs. The chimeric SV40-VLPs effectively induced influenza-specific CTLs and heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses without the need of adjuvants. Because DNase I treatment of the chimeric SV40-VLPs did not disrupt CTL induction, the intrinsic adjuvant property may not result from DNA contaminants in the VLP preparation. In addition, immunization with the chimeric SV40-VLPs generated long-lasting memory CTLs. We here propose that the chimeric SV40-VLPs harboring an epitope may be a promising CTL-based vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties. - Highlights: • We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an influenza virus-derived CTL epitope. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce influenza-specific CTLs in mice without adjuvants. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce long-lasting memory CTLs. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs is a promising vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties

  20. Immunological tolerance and tumor rejection in embryo-aggregated chimeric mice – Lessons for tumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xianzhong

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rejection of transplanted tumors by the immune system is a rare event in syngeneic hosts, and is considered to be dependent on the local interaction of defensive immune reactions and tumor tolerance mechanisms. Here, we have enlisted the aid of a unique set of embryo-aggregated lineage chimeric mice derived from C57/BL6 and FVB donors to study the interplay between local and systemic tumor immunity and tolerance in rejection of mouse B16 melanoma cells, syngeneic to the C57/BL6 donor strain. Methods Two variants of embryo-aggregated chimeric mice with either variable or no contribution of C57-derived cells to their skin were generated by the fusion of different ratios of morula stage blastomers. Chimeric mice were analyzed for s.c. growth of B16 tumors in comparison to their respective donor strains as well as normal F1 hybrids, and the relative frequencies of cellular components of the immune system by FACS analysis of peripheral blood or lymph node cells. Results B16 tumors grew significantly faster in mice with full chimerism in their skin as compared to syngeneic C57 or semi-syngeneic C57 × FVB F1 hosts. In contrast, s.c. tumor growth was either absent or significantly reduced in chimeric mice lacking C57-derived cells in their skin, but tolerant to C57 tissue in other organs. Comparison of the relative frequencies of various immune cells in the periphery via FACS-analysis did not reveal any significant differences between the two types of chimeric mice with respect to their donor strains. Conclusion Our data suggest a complex interplay between mechanisms of local peripheral tolerance and innate antitumor mechanisms possibly involving NK cell allorecognition as a basis for the differential growth or rejection of B16 tumors in these unique chimeric mice, which we suggest to constitute a valuable new model system for the study of immune-mediated tumor rejection.

  1. Chimeric analysis of EGFP and DsRed2 transgenic mice demonstrates polyclonal maintenance of pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Je-Young; Siswanto, Antoni; Harimoto, Kenichi; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi

    2013-06-01

    The pancreatic islet is an assembly of specific endocrine cells. There are many conflicting reports regarding whether the acinus develops from single or multiple progenitor cells. This study investigated the development and maintenance clonality of the pancreatic acinus and duct using a chimeric analysis with EGFP and DsRed2 transgenic mice. Chimeric mice (G-R mice) were obtained by the aggregation method, using 8-cell stage embryos from EGFP and DsRed2 transgenic mice. The islets from the G-R mice were chimeric and mosaic, consisting of either EGFP- or DsRed2-positive populations, as in previous reports. On the other hand, most acini developed from either EGFP or DsRed2 origin, but some were chimeric. Interestingly, these chimeric acini were clearly separated into two-color regions and were not mosaic. Some large intralobular pancreatic ducts consisting of more than 10 cells were found to be chimeric, but no small ducts made up of less than 9 cells were chimeric. Our histological observations suggest that the pancreatic acinus polyclonally and directionally is maintained by multiple progenitor cells. Pancreatic large ducts also seem to develop polyclonally and might result from the assembly of small ducts that develop from a single origin. These findings provide useful information for further understanding pancreatic maintenance.

  2. The expression and genetic immunization of chimeric fragment of Hantaan virus M and S segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fanglin; Wu Xingan; Luo Wen; Bai Wentao; Liu Yong; Yan Yan; Wang Haitao; Xu Zhikai

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is characterized by severe symptoms and high mortality, is caused by hantavirus. There are still no effective prophylactic vaccines directed to HFRS until now. In this research, we fused expressed G2 fragment of M segment and 0.7 kb fragment of S segment. We expect it could be a candidate vaccine. Chimeric gene G2S0.7 was first expressed in prokaryotic expression system pGEX-4T. After inducing expressed fusion proteins, GST-G2S0.7 was induced and its molecular weight was about 100 kDa. Meanwhile, the fusion protein kept the activity of its parental proteins. Further, BALB/c mice were vaccinated by the chimeric gene. ELISA, cell microculture neutralization test in vitro were used to detect the humoral immune response in immunized BALB/c mice. Lymphocyte proliferation assay was used to detect the cellular immune response. The results showed that the chimeric gene could simultaneously evoke specific antibody against nucleocapsid protein (NP) and glycoprotein (GP). And the immunized mice of every group elicited neutralizing antibodies with different titers. But the titers were low. Lymphocyte proliferation assay results showed that the stimulation indexes of splenocytes of chimeric gene to NP and GP were significantly higher than that of control. It suggested that the chimeric gene of Hantaan virus containing G2 fragment of M segment and 0.7 kb fragment of S segment could directly elicit specific anti-Hantaan virus humoral and cellular immune response in BALB/c mice

  3. Enhancement of mucosal immune responses by chimeric influenza HA/SHIV virus-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Lizheng; Lu Xiaoyan; Kang, S.-M.; Chen Changyi; Compans, Richard W.; Yao Qizhi

    2003-01-01

    To enhance mucosal immune responses using simian/human immunodeficiency virus-like particles (SHIV VLPs), we have produced novel phenotypically mixed chimeric influenza HA/SHIV VLPs and used them to immunize C57BL/6J mice intranasally. Antibody and cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses as well as cytokine production in both systemic and mucosal sites were compared after immunization with SHIV VLPs or chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. By using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the levels of serum IgG and mucosal IgA to the HIV envelope protein (Env) were found to be highest in the group immunized with chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. Furthermore, the highest titer of serum neutralizing antibody against HIV Env was found with the group immunized with chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. Analysis of the IgG1/IgG2a ratio indicated that a T H 1-oriented immune response resulted from these VLP immunizations. HA/SHIV VLP-immunized mice also showed significantly higher CTL responses than those observed in SHIV VLP-immunized mice. Moreover, a MHC class I restricted T-cell activation ELISPOT assay showed a mixed type of T H 1/T H 2 cytokines in the HA/SHIV VLP-immunized mice, indicating that the chimeric VLPs can enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses to the HIV Env protein at multiple mucosal and systemic sites. The results indicate that incorporation of influenza HA into heterotypic VLPs may be highly effective for targeting vaccines to mucosal surfaces

  4. Prevalence of chimerism after non-myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azulamara da Silva Ruiz

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Non-myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (NMA-HSCT is performed in onco-hematological patients who cannot tolerate ablative conditioning because of older age or comorbidities. This approach does not completely eliminate host cells and initially results in mixed chimerism. Long-term persistence of mixed chimerism results in graft rejection and relapse. Involvement of graft-versus-host disease is concomitant with complete chimerism and graft-versus-tumor effect. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of chimerism in onco-hematological patients who underwent NMA-HSCT. DESIGN AND SETTING: Observational clinical study on chimerism status after human leukocyte antigen-identical NMA-HSCT at the Discipline of Hematology and Hemotherapy of Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: We sequentially analyzed the amplification of APO-B, D1S80, DxS52, FVW, 33.6, YNZ-2 and H-ras primers using variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR on 17 pairs and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with the XY probe and SRY primer on 13 sex-unmatched pairs. RESULTS: The informativeness of the primers using VNTR was 60% for APO-B, 75% D1S80, 36% DxS52, 14% FVW, 40% YNZ-22 and 16% H-ras. The SRY primer was informative in female receptors with male donors. The XY-FISH method was informative in 100% of the sex-unmatched pairs. CONCLUSION: These methods were sensitive and informative. In VNTR, the association of APO-B with D1S80 showed 88% informativeness. The quantitative FISH method was more sensitive, but had the disadvantage of only being used for sex-unmatched pairs.

  5. Chimeric Peptides as Implant Functionalization Agents for Titanium Alloy Implants with Antimicrobial Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucesoy, Deniz T.; Hnilova, Marketa; Boone, Kyle; Arnold, Paul M.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Tamerler, Candan

    2015-04-01

    Implant-associated infections can have severe effects on the longevity of implant devices and they also represent a major cause of implant failures. Treating these infections associated with implants by antibiotics is not always an effective strategy due to poor penetration rates of antibiotics into biofilms. Additionally, emerging antibiotic resistance poses serious concerns. There is an urge to develop effective antibacterial surfaces that prevent bacterial adhesion and proliferation. A novel class of bacterial therapeutic agents, known as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), are receiving increasing attention as an unconventional option to treat septic infection, partly due to their capacity to stimulate innate immune responses and for the difficulty of microorganisms to develop resistance towards them. While host and bacterial cells compete in determining the ultimate fate of the implant, functionalization of implant surfaces with AMPs can shift the balance and prevent implant infections. In the present study, we developed a novel chimeric peptide to functionalize the implant material surface. The chimeric peptide simultaneously presents two functionalities, with one domain binding to a titanium alloy implant surface through a titanium-binding domain while the other domain displays an antimicrobial property. This approach gains strength through control over the bio-material interfaces, a property built upon molecular recognition and self-assembly through a titanium alloy binding domain in the chimeric peptide. The efficiency of chimeric peptide both in-solution and absorbed onto titanium alloy surface was evaluated in vitro against three common human host infectious bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Escherichia coli. In biological interactions such as occur on implants, it is the surface and the interface that dictate the ultimate outcome. Controlling the implant surface by creating an interface composed chimeric peptides may therefore

  6. Chimeric Human Skin Substitute Tissue: A Novel Treatment Option for the Delivery of Autologous Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Cathy A; Allen-Hoffmann, B Lynn

    2012-04-01

    For patients suffering from catastrophic burns, few treatment options are available. Chimeric coculture of patient-derived autologous cells with a "carrier" cell source of allogeneic keratinocytes has been proposed as a means to address the complex clinical problem of severe skin loss. Currently, autologous keratinocytes are harvested, cultured, and expanded to form graftable epidermal sheets. However, epidermal sheets are thin, are extremely fragile, and do not possess barrier function, which only develops as skin stratifies and matures. Grafting is typically delayed for up to 4 weeks to propagate a sufficient quantity of the patient's cells for application to wound sites. Fully stratified chimeric bioengineered skin substitutes could not only provide immediate wound coverage and restore barrier function, but would simultaneously deliver autologous keratinocytes to wounds. The ideal allogeneic cell source for this application would be an abundant supply of clinically evaluated, nontumorigenic, pathogen-free, human keratinocytes. To evaluate this potential cell-based therapy, mixed populations of a green fluorescent protein-labeled neonatal human keratinocyte cell line (NIKS) and unlabeled primary keratinocytes were used to model the allogeneic and autologous components of chimeric monolayer and organotypic cultures. Relatively few autologous keratinocytes may be required to produce fully stratified chimeric skin substitute tissue substantially composed of autologous keratinocyte-derived regions. The need for few autologous cells interspersed within an allogeneic "carrier" cell population may decrease cell expansion time, reducing the time to patient application. This study provides proof of concept for utilizing NIKS keratinocytes as the allogeneic carrier for the generation of bioengineered chimeric skin substitute tissues capable of providing immediate wound coverage while simultaneously supplying autologous human cells for tissue regeneration.

  7. A Novel Chimeric Endolysin with Antibacterial Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad Kashani, Hamed; Fahimi, Hossein; Dasteh Goli, Yasaman; Moniri, Rezvan

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine/histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) and amidase are known as catalytic domains of the bacteriophage-derived endolysin LysK and were previously reported to show lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In the current study, the in silico design and analysis of chimeric CHAP-amidase model was applied to enhance the stability and solubility of protein, which was achieved through improving the properties of primary, secondary and tertiary structures. The coding gene sequence of the chimeric CHAP-amidase was synthesized and subcloned into the pET-22(+) expression vector, and the recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) strain. Subsequent affinity-based purification yielded ~12 mg soluble protein per liter of E. coli culture. Statistical analysis indicated that concentrations of ≥1 μg/mL of the purified protein have significant antibacterial activity against S. aureus MRSA 252 cells. The engineered chimeric CHAP-amidase exhibited 3.2 log reduction of MRSA 252 cell counts at the concentration of 10 μg/mL. A synergistic interaction between CHAP-amidase and vancomycin was detected by using checkerboard assay and calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index. This synergistic effect was shown by 8-fold reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin. The chimeric CHAP-amidase displayed strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, S. epidermidis , and enterococcus . However, it did not indicate any significant antibacterial activity against E. coli and Lactococcus lactis . Taken together, these findings suggest that our chimeric CHAP-amidase might represent potential to be used for the development of efficient antibacterial therapies targeting MRSA and certain Gram-positive bacteria.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies in animal production : their use in diagnostics and passive immunization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booman, P.

    1989-01-01

    One of the landmarks in immunology was the invention and development of monoclonal antibody-secreting hybridomas by Milstein and his coworkers. The enormous promise of monoclonal antibody technology, which became apparent soon after its discovery, may explain the unusual speed with which monoclonal

  9. Production of monoclonal antibodies against Mycobacterium leprae and armadillo-derived mycobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A. H.; Ho, M. L.; Klatser, P. R.; Eggelte, T. A.; Portaels, F.

    1985-01-01

    Six monoclonal antibodies to Mycobacterium leprae and armadillo-derived mycobacteria were produced. The monoclonal antibodies were characterized by an immunofluorescence assay using 22 mycobacterial strains. One monoclonal antibody, F47-21-3, reacted only with M. leprae; two, F45-9 and F45-15,

  10. Authentic display of a cholera toxin epitope by chimeric type 1 fimbriae: effects of insert position and host background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentebjerg-Olesen, B; Pallesen, L; Jensen, LB

    1997-01-01

    . Several of the chosen positions seemed amenable even for large foreign inserts; the chimeric proteins were exposed on the bacterial surface and the cholera toxin epitope was authentically displayed, i.e. it was recognized on bacteria by specific antiserum. Display of chimeric fimbriae was tested...... with respect to host background in three different Escherichia coli strains, i.e. an isogenic set of K-12 strains, differing in the presence of an indigenous fim gene cluster, as well as a wild-type isolate. Immunization of rabbits with purified chimeric fimbriae resulted in serum which specifically recognized...

  11. Production of yam mosaic virus monoclonal antibodies in mice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-19

    Sep 19, 2011 ... 4AVRDC-The World Vegetable Center, Shanhua, Taiwan. Accepted 11 August, 2011. Yam mosaic virus (YMV) ... leaves and non-infected tissue culture yam leaves. The antibody produced had a titre of ... systems for in-vitro production of monoclonal antibodies, such as standard tissue culture techniques,.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies specific for the organophosphate pesticide azinphos-methyl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, WT; Harvey, D; Jones, SD; Ryan, GB; Wynberg, H; TenHoeve, W; Reynolds, PHS

    1995-01-01

    2-(2-Mercapto-5-methyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinan-5-yl,2-sulphide) methoxyacetic acid has been synthesized and used to prepare an azinphos hapten and protein conjugates. Monoclonal antibodies of high affinity against the pesticide azinphos-methyl were prepared from mice immunized with the

  13. Application of murine monoclonal antibodies to the serodiagnosis of tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanyl, J.; Coates, A.R.M.; Krambovitis, E.

    1982-01-01

    The immune response during infectious diseases leads to a rise in antibody titre to the various different antigenic determinants of the causative organism. The response is further complicated by the fact that it is relatively unusual for one individual to respond to all antigenic components of an organism. Demonstration of the specific immune response of an infected host by serological tests is often hampered by the broad cross-reactivity between several bacterial antigens. The authors report on a serodiagnostic application of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAB), specific for a human pathogen, M. tuberculosis by a technique which is applicable in principle to the serodiagnosis of many other infectious diseases. The serum diagnostic test is based on the competitive inhibition by human sera of the binding of 125 I-labelled murine monoclonal antibodies to M. tuberculosis-coated polyvinyl plates. Five monoclonal antibodies binding to distinct antigenic determinants of the organism were used as structural probes which conferred their stringent combining site specificities to the polyclonal mixture of antibodies from patients' sera. When compared with healthy controls, increased titres of inhibitory antibodies were found in about 70% of patients with active tuberculosis. The diagnostic value of the individual monoclonal antibodies as well as the benefit from the use of multiple specificity probes has been qualified

  14. Radioimmunodetection of human melanoma tumor xenografts with human monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomibuchi, Makoto; Saxton, R.E.; Lake, R.R.; Katano, Mitsuo; Irie, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    A human IgM monoclonal antibody has been established that defines a tumor-associated membrane antigen expressed on human melanoma cells. The antigen has been identified as the ganglioside GD2. In this paper, the authors describe the potential usefulness of the human monoclonal antibody for radioimaging. Nude mice bearing tumors derived from a human melanoma cell line were used as a model. Antibody activity was degradated significantly after labeling with 131 I by the use of a modified chloramine-T method. After testing various concentrations, labeled antibody of a specific activity of 2.8μCi/μg produced the best results. Balb/c nude mice bearing a GD2-positive M14 melanoma cell line were injected with 10-30μg of labeled antibody, and its radiolocalization in different organs and in the whole body were evaluated. The best tumor image was obtained on Day 6. The labeled antibody uptake ratio between tumor and muscle was 9.2:1; the ratio between tumor and liver was 1.4:1. These studies represent the first report of experimental tumor imaging with human monoclonal antibody. Human monoclonals will probably prove to be superior reagents for tumor imaging in melanoma patients if the problem of anti-body radiolysis is resolved. (author)

  15. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against mink leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, W.S.; Pedersen, Mikael; Gram-Nielsen, S.

    1997-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated against mink leukocytes. One antibody reacted with all T lymphocytes, one with all monocytes and one had platelet reactivity. Under reducing conditions, the T lymphocyte reactive antibody immunoprecipitated 18 kDa, 23 kDa, 25 kDa and 32-40 kDa pol...

  16. Monoclonal antibodies for the detection of Puccinia striiformis urediniospores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Frøkiær, Hanne; Hearty, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Pst causes yellow rust disease in wheat plants leading to crop losses. The organism spreads by releasing wind-dispersed urediniospores from infected plants. In this study a library of novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was developed against Pst urediniospores. Nine mAb-produci...

  17. Characterization of Binding Epitopes of CA125 Monoclonal Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos-Silva, Lara; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Halim, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    The most used cancer serum biomarker is the CA125 immunoassay for ovarian cancer that detects the mucin glycoprotein MUC16. Several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) including OC125 and M11 are used in CA125 assays. However, despite considerable efforts, our knowledge of the molecular characteristics...

  18. Iodine-based contrast media, multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; Bertolotto, Michele; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Many radiologists and clinicians still consider multiple myeloma (MM) and monoclonal gammopathies (MG) a contraindication for using iodine-based contrast media. The ESUR Contrast Media Safety Committee performed a systematic review of the incidence of post-contrast acute kidney injury...

  19. Sensitive chain specific radioimmunoassay for human immunoglobulins using monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, K; Alderson, T St.J.; Ellis, J [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Cambridge (UK)

    1983-02-25

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay is described for human immunoglobulins. This solid-phase assay uses commercially available monoclonal antibodies and is specific for different Ig chain types. Levels of less than 20 ng/ml Ig are detectable. The assay is suitable for the analysis of human hybridoma supernatants.

  20. Generation and Characterization of Novel Human IRAS Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Imidazoline receptors were first proposed by Bousquet et al., when they studied antihypertensive effect of clonidine. A strong candidate for I1R, known as imidazoline receptor antisera-selected protein (IRAS, has been cloned from human hippocampus. We reported that IRAS mediated agmatine-induced inhibition of opioid dependence in morphine-dependent cells. To elucidate the functional and structure properties of I1R, we developed the newly monoclonal antibody against the N-terminal hIRAS region including the PX domain (10–120aa through immunization of BALB/c mice with the NusA-IRAS fusion protein containing an IRAS N-terminal (10–120aa. Stable hybridoma cell lines were established and monoclonal antibodies specifically recognized full-length IRAS proteins in their native state by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. Monoclonal antibodies stained in a predominantly punctate cytoplasmic pattern when applied to IRAS-transfected HEK293 cells by indirect immunofluorescence assays and demonstrated excellent reactivity in flow immunocytometry. These monoclonal antibodies will provide powerful reagents for the further investigation of hIRAS protein functions.

  1. Generation and characterization of a monoclonal antibody to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Penicillic acid is one of the main mycotoxins in moldy feedstuff and has toxic effect on livestock and poultry and probably humans due to food chain transmission. The objective of this study was to generate and characterize a monoclonal antibody to penicillic acid for the efficient detection of penicillic acid from Penicillium ...

  2. Monoclonal antibodies AC-43 and AC-29 disrupt Plasmodium vivax ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    malaria vaccines that block the transmission of parasites by mosquito vectors ... A repertoire of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was generated against the midgut proteins of Anopheles culicifacies ... from the midgut protein extract, as indicated by western blot analysis. Similarly .... 2.2 Antigen preparation and immunization.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean-Pieper, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    In this thesis the production and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 is described. The development of a suitable radioimmunoassay for the detection of anti-HSV-2 antibodies, and the selection of an optimal immunisation schedule, is given. Three assay systems are described and their reliability and sensitivity compared. (Auth.)

  4. MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO IDENTIFY TOMATO MOSAIC TOBAMOVIRUS (TOMV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte Keila M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies were obtained against Tomato mosaic tobamovirus (ToMV isolated in Brazil. One antibody (8G7G2 isotyped as IgG2b (kappa light chain showed strong specificity and very low cross reaction with the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV. It can be used in identification of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies against human trophoblast in female infertility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláková, Alena; Elzeinová, Fatima; Bukovský, A.; Madar, J.; Ulčová-Gallová, Z.; Pěknicová, Jana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 3 (2005), s. 159 ISSN 0271-7352. [European Congress of Reproductive Immunology /3./. 05.09.11-05.09.15, Essex] R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR7838 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : monoclonal antibodies * female infertility * trophoblast Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  6. Ibrutinib continues to influence the therapeutic landscape of chronic lymphocytic leukemia: new data presented at ASCO 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molica, Stefano

    2017-08-16

    According to data presented at the 2017 American Society of Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, with more than 4 years of follow-up, ibrutinib continues to provide clinical utility in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). However, treatment of CLL patients with high-risk cytogenetics features remains a challenge and the outcome of these hard-to-treat patients is dismal. At the 2017 ASCO Meeting, results of the GENUINE phase III trial showed that, by adding ublituximab, a glycoengineered, anti-CD20 type 1 monoclonal antibody, to ibrutinib, the overall response rate (ORR), complete response rate (CRR), and minimal residual disease (MRD) negativity may be improved in high-risk CLL patients. A further way to improve the results obtained with Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors is the parallel use of ibrutinib with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. Through this investigational approach, the rate of MRD negativity was shown to be higher, implying potential eradication of CLL. These novel data indicate that ibrutinib continues to have a positive effect in CLL.

  7. Rituximab for nephrotic syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Kazumoto; Sako, Mayumi; Nozu, Kandai

    2017-04-01

    Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome is the most common chronic glomerular disease in children. At least 20 % of children with this syndrome show frequent relapses and/or steroid dependence during or after immunosuppressive therapies, a condition defined as complicated frequently relapsing/steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome (FRNS/SDNS). Approximately 1-3 % of children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome are resistant to steroids and all immunosuppressive agents, a condition defined as refractory steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS); these SRNS children have a high risk of end-stage renal failure. Rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has been shown to be effective for patients with complicated FRNS/SDNS and refractory SRNS. This review describes the recent results of rituximab treatment applied to pediatric nephrotic syndrome, as well as those of our recent study, a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of rituximab for childhood-onset complicated FRNS/SDNS (RCRNS01). The overall efficacy and safety of rituximab for this disease are discussed.

  8. Rapid-Infusion Rituximab in Lymphoma Treatment: 2-Year Experience in a Single Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atay, Sevcan; Barista, Ibrahim; Gundogdu, Fatma; Akgedik, Kiymet; Arpaci, Afey

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Rituximab is a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody. We aimed to explore the safety and tolerability of rapid infusion rituximab, (over 90 minutes) in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at Hacettepe University Department of Medical Oncology. Patients and Methods: Adult patients diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who were to receive rituximab were included in the study. The schedule of administration for cycle 1 was unaltered and delivered according to the product monograph. All subsequent cycles were administered over a total infusion time of 90 minutes (20% of the dose in the first 30 minutes, then the remaining 80% over 60 minutes, total dose delivered in 500 mL). All patients were observed for infusion-related reactions during the rituximab infusion, and vital signs were recorded every 15 minutes. Results: From July 2006 to December 2008, 75 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated with rituximab-based chemotherapy. A total of 372 infusions were administered. The majority of patients were treated with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone, or rituximab only. The 90-minute rituximab infusion schedule was well tolerated, with no grade 3 or 4 infusion-related adverse events observed. Conclusion: A rapid infusion rituximab over 90 minutes is well tolerated and safe when administered as the second and subsequent infusions in the course of therapy. PMID:22942806

  9. Rapid-infusion rituximab in lymphoma treatment: 2-year experience in a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atay, Sevcan; Barista, Ibrahim; Gundogdu, Fatma; Akgedik, Kiymet; Arpaci, Afey

    2012-05-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody. We aimed to explore the safety and tolerability of rapid infusion rituximab, (over 90 minutes) in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at Hacettepe University Department of Medical Oncology. Adult patients diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who were to receive rituximab were included in the study. The schedule of administration for cycle 1 was unaltered and delivered according to the product monograph. All subsequent cycles were administered over a total infusion time of 90 minutes (20% of the dose in the first 30 minutes, then the remaining 80% over 60 minutes, total dose delivered in 500 mL). All patients were observed for infusion-related reactions during the rituximab infusion, and vital signs were recorded every 15 minutes. From July 2006 to December 2008, 75 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated with rituximab-based chemotherapy. A total of 372 infusions were administered. The majority of patients were treated with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone, or rituximab only. The 90-minute rituximab infusion schedule was well tolerated, with no grade 3 or 4 infusion-related adverse events observed. A rapid infusion rituximab over 90 minutes is well tolerated and safe when administered as the second and subsequent infusions in the course of therapy.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to human chorionic gonadotropin and their application to two-site sandwich radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuchi, A.; Iio, M.; Miyachi, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). One monoclonal antibody recognized a conformational determinant expressed only on native HCG molecule and another monoclonal antibody had the specificity for the epitopes located on the β-subunit of HCG. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with different antigenic determinants on the HCG molecule were used to develop a simplified 2-site sandwich radioimmunoassay in which one monoclonal antibody was immobilized and another labeled with 125 iodine. This assay was highly specific for HCG and there was no cross-reactivity with α,β-subunit of HCG, luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone. (Auth.)

  11. Chimeric Anti-Human Podoplanin Antibody NZ-12 of Lambda Light Chain Exerts Higher Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity and Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity Compared with NZ-8 of Kappa Light Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mika K; Abe, Shinji; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Fujii, Yuki; Yamada, Shinji; Murata, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroaki; Tahara, Hideaki; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-02-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), a type I transmembrane 36-kDa glycoprotein, is expressed not only in normal cells, such as renal epithelial cells (podocytes), lymphatic endothelial cells, and pulmonary type I alveolar cells, but also in cancer cells, including brain tumors and lung squamous cell carcinomas. Podoplanin activates platelet aggregation by binding to C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) on platelets, and the podoplanin/CLEC-2 interaction facilitates blood/lymphatic vessel separation. We previously produced neutralizing anti-human podoplanin monoclonal antibody (mAb), clone NZ-1 (rat IgG 2a , lambda), which neutralizes the podoplanin/CLEC-2 interaction and inhibits platelet aggregation and cancer metastasis. Human-rat chimeric antibody, NZ-8, was previously developed using variable regions of NZ-1 and human constant regions of heavy chain (IgG 1 ) and light chain (kappa chain). Although NZ-8 showed high antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) against human podoplanin-expressing cancer cells, the binding affinity of NZ-8 was lower than that of NZ-1. Herein, we produced a novel human-rat chimeric antibody, NZ-12, the constant regions of which consist of IgG 1 heavy chain and lambda light chain. Using flow cytometry, we demonstrated that the binding affinity of NZ-12 was much higher than that of NZ-8. Furthermore, ADCC and CDC activities of NZ-12 were significantly increased against glioblastoma cell lines (LN319 and D397) and lung cancer cell line (PC-10). These results suggested that NZ-12 could become a promising therapeutic antibody against podoplanin-expressing brain tumors and lung cancers.

  12. Development of Murine Cyp3a Knockout Chimeric Mice with Humanized Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kota; Ohbuchi, Masato; Hamamura, Satoko; Ohshita, Hiroki; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Sato, Koya; Nakada, Naoyuki; Kawamura, Akio; Usui, Takashi; Kamimura, Hidetaka; Tateno, Chise

    2015-08-01

    We developed murine CYP3A knockout ko chimeric mice with humanized liver expressing human P450S similar to those in humans and whose livers and small intestines do not express murine CYP3A this: approach may overcome effects of residual mouse metabolic enzymes like Cyp3a in conventional chimeric mice with humanized liver, such as PXB-mice [urokinase plasminogen activator/severe combined immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) mice repopulated with over 70% human hepatocytes] to improve the prediction of drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics in humans. After human hepatocytes were transplanted into Cyp3a KO/uPA/SCID host mice, human albumin levels logarithmically increased until approximately 60 days after transplantation, findings similar to those in PXB-mice. Quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that hepatic human P450s, UGTs, SULTs, and transporters mRNA expression levels in Cyp3a KO chimeric mice were also similar to those in PXB-mice and confirmed the absence of Cyp3a11 mRNA expression in mouse liver and intestine. Findings for midazolam and triazolam metabolic activities in liver microsomes were comparable between Cyp3a KO chimeric mice and PXB-mice. In contrast, these activities in the intestine of Cyp3a KO chimeric mice were attenuated compared with PXB-mice. Owing to the knockout of murine Cyp3a, hepatic Cyp2b10 and 2c55 mRNA levels in Cyp3a KO/uPA/SCID mice (without hepatocyte transplants) were 8.4- and 61-fold upregulated compared with PXB-mice, respectively. However, human hepatocyte transplantation successfully restored Cyp2b10 level nearly fully and Cyp2c55 level partly (still 13-fold upregulated) compared with those in PXB-mice. Intestinal Cyp2b10 and 2c55 were also repressed by human hepatocyte transplantation in Cyp3a KO chimeric mice. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. The assay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies with human TSH/LH-CG chimeric receptor expressed on chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Ka Hee; Kim, Chang Min

    1996-12-01

    TSH/LH-CG chimera cDNA is transfected to CHO-K1 cell to obtain the chimeric receptor expressed on the cell surface. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurements are determined using chimeric receptors and under these conditions activity of TSAb and TSBAb in the sera of the Graves' patients. The results obtained are compared to those of TSAb assays using FRTL5 cells CHO-TSHR cells which have wild type human TSH receptor. The transfection procedure of chimeric receptor gene to CHO-K1 cells are on going. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurement using chimeric receptor will be determined after success of transfection procedure. If this study is successfully completed, not only the heterogeneity of Graves. IgG but also pathogenesis of Graves' disease will be elucidated. (author). 25 refs

  14. The assay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies with human TSH/LH-CG chimeric receptor expressed on chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ka Hee; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    TSH/LH-CG chimera cDNA is transfected to CHO-K1 cell to obtain the chimeric receptor expressed on the cell surface. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurements are determined using chimeric receptors and under these conditions activity of TSAb and TSBAb in the sera of the Graves` patients. The results obtained are compared to those of TSAb assays using FRTL5 cells CHO-TSHR cells which have wild type human TSH receptor. The transfection procedure of chimeric receptor gene to CHO-K1 cells are on going. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurement using chimeric receptor will be determined after success of transfection procedure. If this study is successfully completed, not only the heterogeneity of Graves. IgG but also pathogenesis of Graves` disease will be elucidated. (author). 25 refs.

  15. Vaccinia virus recombinants expressing chimeric proteins of human immunodeficiency virus and gamma interferon are attenuated for nude mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Giavedoni, L D; Jones, L; Gardner, M B; Gibson, H L; Ng, C T; Barr, P J; Yilma, T

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a method for attenuating vaccinia virus recombinants by expressing a fusion protein of a lymphokine and an immunogen. Chimeric genes were constructed that coded for gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and structural proteins of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In this study, we describe the biological and immunological properties of vaccinia virus recombinants expressing chimeric genes of murine or human IFN-gamma with glycoprotein gp120, gag, and a fragment of gp41...

  16. Chimeric rabbit/human Fab antibodies against the hepatitis Be-antigen and their potential applications in assays, characterization, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaolei; Watts, Norman R; Palmer, Ira W; Kaufman, Joshua D; Dearborn, Altaira D; Trenbeath, Joni L; Eren, Elif; Steven, Alasdair C; Rader, Christoph; Wingfield, Paul T

    2017-10-06

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection afflicts millions worldwide, causing cirrhosis and liver cancer. HBV e-antigen (HBeAg), a clinical marker for disease severity, is a soluble variant of the viral capsid protein. HBeAg is not required for viral replication but is implicated in establishing immune tolerance and chronic infection. The structure of recombinant e-antigen (rHBeAg) was recently determined, yet to date, the exact nature and quantitation of HBeAg still remain uncertain. Here, to further characterize HBeAg, we used phage display to produce a panel of chimeric rabbit/human monoclonal antibody fragments (both Fab and scFv) against rHBeAg. Several of the Fab/scFv, expressed in Escherichia coli , had unprecedentedly high binding affinities ( K d ∼10 -12 m) and high specificity. We used Fab/scFv in the context of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for HBeAg quantification, which we compared with commercially available kits and verified with seroconversion panels, the WHO HBeAg standard, rHBeAg, and patient plasma samples. We found that the specificity and sensitivity are superior to those of existing commercial assays. To identify potential fine differences between rHBeAg and HBeAg, we used these Fabs in microscale immunoaffinity chromatography to purify HBeAg from individual patient plasmas. Western blotting and MS results indicated that rHBeAg and HBeAg are essentially structurally identical, although HBeAg from different patients exhibits minor carboxyl-terminal heterogeneity. We discuss several potential applications for the humanized Fab/scFv.

  17. [Cloning of VH and VL Gene of Human anti-IL1RAP McAb and Construction of Recombinant Chimeric Receptor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ling-Ling; Ruan, Su-Hong; Tian, Yu; Zhao, Kai; Xu, Kai Lin

    2015-10-01

    To clone the variable region genes of human anti-IL1RAP (IL-1 receptor accessory protein) monoclonal antibodies (McAb) and to construct IL1RAP chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). The VH and VL DNA of IL1RAP single chain antibodies were amplified by RACE and overlap extension PCR from total RNA extracted from 3H6E10 and 10D8A7 hybridoma and ligated into specific IL1RAP single-chain variable fragments (scFv). CD8α transmembrane domain, CD137 intracellular domain, TCR ζ chain, human CD8α signal peptide and scFv-anti-IL1RAP were cloned into plasmid LV-lac. Recombinant lentiviruses were generated by co-transfection of recombinant plasmid LV-lac, pMD2. G, and psPAX2 helper vectors into 293FT packing cells. The VH and VL genes of 2 human anti-IL1RAP McAb were acquired. The 3H6E10 VH and VL genes consisted of 402 bp and 393 bp encoding 134 and 131 aminoacid residues, respectively; 10D8A7 VH and VL genes consisted of 423 bp and 381 bp encoding 141 and 127 amine acid residues, respectively. Recombinant expression vertors LV-3H6E10 scFv-ICD and LV-10D8A7 scFv-ICD (ICD: CD8α transmembrane domain-CD137 intracellular domain-TCR ζ chain) were constructed. The target fragments were demonstrated by sequencing analysis. Recombinant plasmids were transfected into 293FT cells and lentiviral particles were acquired. Human anti-IL1RAP recombinant receptors are constructed successfully and lay a good foundation for the construction of IL1RAP-CAR killer T cell vaccine.

  18. Antitumor activity of chLpMab-2, a human-mouse chimeric cancer-specific antihuman podoplanin antibody, via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mika K; Yamada, Shinji; Nakamura, Takuro; Abe, Shinji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Kunita, Akiko; Fukayama, Masashi; Fujii, Yuki; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-04-01

    Human podoplanin (hPDPN), a platelet aggregation-inducing transmembrane glycoprotein, is expressed in different types of tumors, and it binds to C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). The overexpression of hPDPN is involved in invasion and metastasis. Anti-hPDPN monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as NZ-1 have shown antitumor and antimetastatic activities by binding to the platelet aggregation-stimulating (PLAG) domain of hPDPN. Recently, we developed a novel mouse anti-hPDPN mAb, LpMab-2, using the cancer-specific mAb (CasMab) technology. In this study we developed chLpMab-2, a human-mouse chimeric anti-hPDPN antibody, derived from LpMab-2. chLpMab-2 was produced using fucosyltransferase 8-knockout (KO) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-S cell lines. By flow cytometry, chLpMab-2 reacted with hPDPN-expressing cancer cell lines including glioblastomas, mesotheliomas, and lung cancers. However, it showed low reaction with normal cell lines such as lymphatic endothelial and renal epithelial cells. Moreover, chLpMab-2 exhibited high antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against PDPN-expressing cells, despite its low complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Furthermore, treatment with chLpMab-2 abolished tumor growth in xenograft models of CHO/hPDPN, indicating that chLpMab-2 suppressed tumor development via ADCC. In conclusion, chLpMab-2 could be useful as a novel antibody-based therapy against hPDPN-expressing tumors. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. ChLpMab-23: Cancer-Specific Human-Mouse Chimeric Anti-Podoplanin Antibody Exhibits Antitumor Activity via Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mika K; Nakamura, Takuro; Kunita, Akiko; Fukayama, Masashi; Abe, Shinji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Yamada, Shinji; Yanaka, Miyuki; Saidoh, Noriko; Yoshida, Kanae; Fujii, Yuki; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-06-01

    Podoplanin is expressed in many cancers, including oral cancers and brain tumors. The interaction between podoplanin and its receptor C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) has been reported to be involved in cancer metastasis and tumor malignancy. We previously established many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human podoplanin using the cancer-specific mAb (CasMab) technology. LpMab-23 (IgG 1 , kappa), one of the mouse anti-podoplanin mAbs, was shown to be a CasMab. However, we have not shown the usefulness of LpMab-23 for antibody therapy against podoplanin-expressing cancers. In this study, we first determined the minimum epitope of LpMab-23 and revealed that Gly54-Leu64 peptide, especially Gly54, Thr55, Ser56, Glu57, Asp58, Arg59, Tyr60, and Leu64 of podoplanin, is a critical epitope of LpMab-23. We further produced human-mouse chimeric LpMab-23 (chLpMab-23) and investigated whether chLpMab-23 exerts antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antitumor activity. In flow cytometry, chLpMab-23 showed high sensitivity against a podoplanin-expressing glioblastoma cell line, LN319, and an oral cancer cell line, HSC-2. chLpMab-23 also showed ADCC activity against podoplanin-expressing CHO cells (CHO/podoplanin). In xenograft models with HSC-2 and CHO/podoplanin, chLpMab-23 exerts antitumor activity using human natural killer cells, indicating that chLpMab-23 could be useful for antibody therapy against podoplanin-expressing cancers.

  20. A humanized monoclonal antibody neutralizes yellow fever virus strain 17D-204 in vitro but does not protect a mouse model from disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Amanda E; Dixon, Kandice L; Piper, Joseph; Bennett, Susan L; Thibodeaux, Brett A; Barrett, Alan D T; Roehrig, John T; Blair, Carol D

    2016-07-01

    The yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D-204 is considered safe and effective, yet rare severe adverse events (SAEs), some resulting in death, have been documented following vaccination. Individuals exhibiting post-vaccinal SAEs are ideal candidates for antiviral monoclonal antibody (MAb) therapy; the time until appearance of clinical signs post-exposure is usually short and patients are quickly hospitalized. We previously developed a murine-human chimeric monoclonal antibody (cMAb), 2C9-cIgG, reactive with both virulent YFV and 17D-204, and demonstrated its ability to prevent and treat YF disease in both AG129 mouse and hamster models of infection. To counteract possible selection of 17D-204 variants that escape neutralization by treatment with a single MAb (2C9-cIgG), we developed a second cMAb, 864-cIgG, for use in combination with 2C9-cIgG in post-vaccinal therapy. MAb 864-cIgG recognizes/neutralizes only YFV 17D-204 vaccine substrain and binds to domain III (DIII) of the viral envelope protein, which is different from the YFV type-specific binding site of 2C9-cIgG in DII. Although it neutralized 17D-204 in vitro, administration of 864-cIgG had no protective capacity in the interferon receptor-deficient AG129 mouse model of 17D-204 infection. The data presented here show that although DIII-specific 864-cIgG neutralizes virus infectivity in vitro, it does not have the ability to abrogate disease in vivo. Therefore, combination of 864-cIgG with 2C9-cIgG for treatment of YF vaccination SAEs does not appear to provide an improvement on 2C9-cIgG therapy alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Isolation of a monoclonal antibody from a phage display library binding the rhesus macaque MHC class I allomorph Mamu-A1*001.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Holman

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA are useful tools for HLA-typing, tracking donor-recipient chimerisms after bone marrow transplants, and characterizing specific major histocompatibility complexes (MHC on cell surfaces. Unfortunately, equivalent reagents are not available for rhesus macaques, which are commonly used animal as models in organ transplant and infectious disease research. To address this deficiency, we isolated an antibody that recognizes the common Indian rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule, Mamu-A1*001. We induced Mamu-A1*001-binding antibodies by alloimmunizing a female Mamu-A1*001-negative rhesus macaque with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from a male Mamu-A1*001-positive donor. A Fab phage display library was constructed with PBMC from the alloimmunized macaque and panned to isolate an antibody that binds to Mamu-A1*001 but not to other common rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules. The isolated antibody distinguishes PBMC from Mamu-A1*001-positive and -negative macaques. Additionally, the Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody binds the cynomolgus macaque MHC class I ortholog Mafa-A1*001:01 but not variants Mafa-A1*001:02/03, indicating a high degree of binding specificity. The Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody will be useful for identifying Mamu-A1*001-positive rhesus macaques, for detecting Mamu-A1*001-positive cells in populations of Mamu-A1*001-negative cells, and for examining disease processes that alter expression of Mamu-A1*001 on cell surfaces. Moreover, the alloimmunization process we describe will be useful for isolating additional MHC allomorph-specific monoclonal antibodies or antibodies against other polymorphic host proteins which are difficult to isolate with traditional technologies.

  2. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize the palm subdomain of hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5B polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingravallo, P; Lahser, F; Xia, E; Sodowich, B; Lai, V C; Hong, Z; Zhong, W

    2001-06-01

    The nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) which plays an essential role in viral RNA replication. Antibodies that specifically recognize NS5B will have utilities in monitoring NS5B production and subcellular localization, as well as in structure-function studies. In this report, three mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 16A9C9, 16D9A4 and 20A12C7, against a recombinant NS5B protein (genotype 1a, H-77 strain) were produced. These mAbs specifically recognize HCV NS5B, but not RdRps of polivirus (PV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) or GB virus B (GBV-B). The mAbs can readily detect NS5B in cellular lysates of human osteosarcoma Saos2 cells constitutively expressing the nonstructural region of HCV (NS3-NS4A-NS4B-NS5A-NS5B). NS5B proteins of different HCV genotypes/subtypes (1a, 1b, 2a, 2c, 5a) showed varied affinity for these mAbs. Interestingly, the epitopes for the mAbs were mapped to the palm subdomain (amino acid 188-370) of the HCV RdRp as determined by immunoblotting analysis of a panel of HCV/GBV-B chimeric NS5B proteins. The binding site was mapped between amino acid 231 and 267 of NS5B for 16A9C9, and between 282 and 372 for 16D9A4 and 20A12C7. Furthermore, these mAbs showed no inhibitory effect on the NS5B polymerase activity in vitro.

  3. Chimpanzee-Human Monoclonal Antibodies for Treatment of Chronic Poliovirus Excretors and Emergency Postexposure Prophylaxis▿‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaochun; Chumakov, Konstantin; Dragunsky, Eugenia; Kouiavskaia, Diana; Makiya, Michelle; Neverov, Alexander; Rezapkin, Gennady; Sebrell, Andrew; Purcell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Six poliovirus-neutralizing Fabs were recovered from a combinatorial Fab phage display library constructed from bone marrow-derived lymphocytes of immunized chimpanzees. The chimeric chimpanzee-human full-length IgGs (hereinafter called monoclonal antibodies [MAbs]) were generated by combining a chimpanzee IgG light chain and a variable domain of heavy chain with a human constant Fc region. The six MAbs neutralized vaccine strains and virulent strains of poliovirus. Five MAbs were serotype specific, while one MAb cross-neutralized serotypes 1 and 2. Epitope mapping performed by selecting and sequencing antibody-resistant viral variants indicated that the cross-neutralizing MAb bound between antigenic sites 1 and 2, thereby covering the canyon region containing the receptor-binding site. Another serotype 1-specific MAb recognized a region located between antigenic sites 2 and 3 that included parts of capsid proteins VP1 and VP3. Both serotype 2-specific antibodies recognized antigenic site 1. No escape mutants to serotype 3-specific MAbs could be generated. The administration of a serotype 1-specific MAb to transgenic mice susceptible to poliovirus at a dose of 5 μg/mouse completely protected them from paralysis after challenge with a lethal dose of wild-type poliovirus. Moreover, MAb injection 6 or 12 h after virus infection provided significant protection. The MAbs described here could be tested in clinical trials to determine whether they might be useful for treatment of immunocompromised chronic virus excretors and for emergency protection of contacts of a paralytic poliomyelitis case. PMID:21345966

  4. Characterization of 7A7, an anti-mouse EGFR monoclonal antibody proposed to be the mouse equivalent of cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuzhi; Cruz, Jazmina L; Joseph, Shannon; Pett, Nicola; Chew, Hui Yi; Tuong, Zewen K; Okano, Satomi; Kelly, Gabrielle; Veitch, Margaret; Simpson, Fiona; Wells, James W

    2018-02-23

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is selectively expressed on the surface of numerous tumours, such as non-small cell lung, ovarian, colorectal and head and neck carcinomas. EGFR has therefore become a target for cancer therapy. Cetuximab is a chimeric human/mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds to EGFR, where it both inhibits signaling and induces cell death by antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Cetuximab has been approved for clinical use in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and colorectal cancer. However, only 15-20% patients benefit from this drug, thus new strategies to improve cetuximab efficiency are required. We aimed to develop a reliable and easy preclinical mouse model to evaluate the efficacy of EGFR-targeted antibodies and examine the immune mechanisms involved in tumour regression. We selected an anti-mouse EGFR mAb, 7A7, which has been reported to be "mouse cetuximab" and to exhibit similar properties to its human counterpart. Unfortunately, we were unable to reproduce previous results obtained with the 7A7 mAb. In our hands, 7A7 failed to recognize mouse EGFR, both in native and reducing conditions. Moreover, in vivo administration of 7A7 in an EGFR-expressing HPV38 tumour model did not have any impact on tumour regression or animal survival. We conclude that 7A7 does not recognize mouse EGFR and therefore cannot be used as the mouse equivalent of cetuximab use in humans. As a number of groups have spent effort and resources with similar issues we feel that publication is a responsible approach.

  5. Current status of prediction of drug disposition and toxicity in humans using chimeric mice with humanized liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Sugihara, Kazumi

    2014-01-01

    1. Human-chimeric mice with humanized liver have been constructed by transplantation of human hepatocytes into several types of mice having genetic modifications that injure endogenous liver cells. Here, we focus on liver urokinase-type plasminogen activator-transgenic severe combined immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) mice, which are the most widely used human-chimeric mice. Studies so far indicate that drug metabolism, drug transport, pharmacological effects and toxicological action in these mice are broadly similar to those in humans. 2. Expression of various drug-metabolizing enzymes is known to be different between humans and rodents. However, the expression pattern of cytochrome P450, aldehyde oxidase and phase II enzymes in the liver of human-chimeric mice resembles that in humans, not that in the host mice. 3. Metabolism of various drugs, including S-warfarin, zaleplon, ibuprofen, naproxen, coumarin, troglitazone and midazolam, in human-chimeric mice is mediated by human drug-metabolizing enzymes, not by host mouse enzymes, and thus resembles that in humans. 4. Pharmacological and toxicological effects of various drugs in human-chimeric mice are also similar to those in humans. 5. The current consensus is that chimeric mice with humanized liver are useful to predict drug metabolism catalyzed by cytochrome P450, aldehyde oxidase and phase II enzymes in humans in vivo and in vitro. Some remaining issues are discussed in this review.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and effects on serum cholinesterase activities of organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemizu, Hiroshi; Sota, Shigeto; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in foods have potential to impact human health. The aim of the current study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of acephate and chlorpyrifos orally administered at lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Absorbed acephate and its metabolite methamidophos were detected in serum from wild type mice and chimeric mice orally administered 150mg/kg. Approximately 70% inhibition of cholinesterase was evident in plasma of chimeric mice with humanized liver (which have higher serum cholinesterase activities than wild type mice) 1day after oral administrations of acephate. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated plasma concentrations of acephate and chlorpyrifos in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. Acephate cleared similarly in humans and chimeric mice but accidental/incidental overdose levels of chlorpyrifos cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in mice. The data presented here illustrate how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of toxicological potential of organophosphorus pesticides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Production and immunogenicity of chimeric virus-like particles containing the spike glycoprotein of infectious bronchitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lishan; Li, Xiaoming; Liu, Genmei; Li, Ran; Liu, Qiliang; Shen, Huifang; Wang, Wei; Xue, Chunyi; Cao, Yongchang

    2014-01-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) poses a severe threat to the poultry industry and causes heavy economic losses worldwide. Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing infection and controlling the spread of IBV, but currently available inactivated and attenuated virus vaccines have some disadvantages. We developed a chimeric virus-like particle (VLP)-based candidate vaccine for IBV protection. The chimeric VLP was composed of matrix 1 protein from avian influenza H5N1 virus and a fusion protein neuraminidase (NA)/spike 1 (S1) that was generated by fusing IBV S1 protein to the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of NA protein of avian influenza H5N1 virus. The chimeric VLPs elicited significantly higher S1-specific antibody responses in intramuscularly immunized mice and chickens than inactivated IBV viruses. Furthermore, the chimeric VLPs induced significantly higher neutralization antibody levels than inactivated H120 virus in SPF chickens. Finally, the chimeric VLPs induced significantly higher IL-4 production in mice. These results demonstrate that chimeric VLPs have the potential for use in vaccines against IBV infection.

  8. The use of chimeric vimentin citrullinated peptides for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakoutikhah, Morteza; Gómara, María J; Gómez-Puerta, José A; Sanmartí, Raimon; Haro, Isabel

    2011-11-10

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease that causes inflammation and, in many cases, destruction of the joints. To prevent progressive and irreversible structural damage, early diagnosis of RA is of paramount importance. The present study addresses the search of new RA citrullinated antigens that could supplement or complement diagnostic/prognostic existing tests. With this aim, the epitope anticitrullinated vimentin antibody response was mapped using synthetic peptides. To improve the sensitivity/specificity balance, a vimentin peptide that was selected, and its cyclic analogue, were combined with fibrin- and filaggrin-related peptides to render chimeric peptides. Our findings highlight the putative application of these chimeric peptides for the design of RA diagnosis systems and imply that more than one serological test is required to classify RA patients based on the presence or absence of ACPAs. Each of the target molecules reported here (fibrin, vimentin, filaggrin) has a specific utility in the identification of a particular subset of RA patients.

  9. Functional evolution and structural conservation in chimeric cytochromes p450: calibrating a structure-guided approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otey, Christopher R; Silberg, Jonathan J; Voigt, Christopher A; Endelman, Jeffrey B; Bandara, Geethani; Arnold, Frances H

    2004-03-01

    Recombination generates chimeric proteins whose ability to fold depends on minimizing structural perturbations that result when portions of the sequence are inherited from different parents. These chimeric sequences can display functional properties characteristic of the parents or acquire entirely new functions. Seventeen chimeras were generated from two CYP102 members of the functionally diverse cytochrome p450 family. Chimeras predicted to have limited structural disruption, as defined by the SCHEMA algorithm, displayed CO binding spectra characteristic of folded p450s. Even this small population exhibited significant functional diversity: chimeras displayed altered substrate specificities, a wide range in thermostabilities, up to a 40-fold increase in peroxidase activity, and ability to hydroxylate a substrate toward which neither parent heme domain shows detectable activity. These results suggest that SCHEMA-guided recombination can be used to generate diverse p450s for exploring function evolution within the p450 structural framework.

  10. Application of chimeric mice with humanized liver for study of human-specific drug metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Thomas J; Reddy, Vijay G B; Kakuni, Masakazu; Morikawa, Yoshio; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2014-06-01

    Human-specific or disproportionately abundant human metabolites of drug candidates that are not adequately formed and qualified in preclinical safety assessment species pose an important drug development challenge. Furthermore, the overall metabolic profile of drug candidates in humans is an important determinant of their drug-drug interaction susceptibility. These risks can be effectively assessed and/or mitigated if human metabolic profile of the drug candidate could reliably be determined in early development. However, currently available in vitro human models (e.g., liver microsomes, hepatocytes) are often inadequate in this regard. Furthermore, the conduct of definitive radiolabeled human ADME studies is an expensive and time-consuming endeavor that is more suited for later in development when the risk of failure has been reduced. We evaluated a recently developed chimeric mouse model with humanized liver on uPA/SCID background for its ability to predict human disposition of four model drugs (lamotrigine, diclofenac, MRK-A, and propafenone) that are known to exhibit human-specific metabolism. The results from these studies demonstrate that chimeric mice were able to reproduce the human-specific metabolite profile for lamotrigine, diclofenac, and MRK-A. In the case of propafenone, however, the human-specific metabolism was not detected as a predominant pathway, and the metabolite profiles in native and humanized mice were similar; this was attributed to the presence of residual highly active propafenone-metabolizing mouse enzymes in chimeric mice. Overall, the data indicate that the chimeric mice with humanized liver have the potential to be a useful tool for the prediction of human-specific metabolism of xenobiotics and warrant further investigation.

  11. Targeted induction of interferon-λ in humanized chimeric mouse liver abrogates hepatotropic virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Shin-ichiro; Hirata, Yuichi; Kameyama, Takeshi; Tokunaga, Yuko; Nishito, Yasumasa; Hirabayashi, Kazuko; Yano, Junichi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Tateno, Chise; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizokami, Masashi; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Inoue, Kazuaki; Yoshiba, Makoto; Takaoka, Akinori; Kohara, Michinori

    2013-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) system plays a critical role in innate antiviral response. We presume that targeted induction of IFN in human liver shows robust antiviral effects on hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). This study used chimeric mice harboring humanized livers and infected with HCV or HBV. This mouse model permitted simultaneous analysis of immune responses by human and mouse hepatocytes in the same liver and exploration of the mechanism of antiviral effect against these viruses. Targeted expression of IFN was induced by treating the animals with a complex comprising a hepatotropic cationic liposome and a synthetic double-stranded RNA analog, pIC (LIC-pIC). Viral replication, IFN gene expression, IFN protein production, and IFN antiviral activity were analyzed (for type I, II and III IFNs) in the livers and sera of these humanized chimeric mice. Following treatment with LIC-pIC, the humanized livers of chimeric mice exhibited increased expression (at the mRNA and protein level) of human IFN-λs, resulting in strong antiviral effect on HBV and HCV. Similar increases were not seen for human IFN-α or IFN-β in these animals. Strong induction of IFN-λs by LIC-pIC occurred only in human hepatocytes, and not in mouse hepatocytes nor in human cell lines derived from other (non-hepatic) tissues. LIC-pIC-induced IFN-λ production was mediated by the immune sensor adaptor molecules mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor molecule-1 (TICAM-1), suggesting dual recognition of LIC-pIC by both sensor adaptor pathways. These findings demonstrate that the expression and function of various IFNs differ depending on the animal species and tissues under investigation. Chimeric mice harboring humanized livers demonstrate that IFN-λs play an important role in the defense against human hepatic virus infection.

  12. Protein-like Nanoparticles Based on Orthogonal Self-Assembly of Chimeric Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Linhai; Xu, Dawei; Namitz, Kevin E; Cosgrove, Michael S; Lund, Reidar; Dong, He

    2016-10-01

    A novel two-component self-assembling chimeric peptide is designed where two orthogonal protein folding motifs are linked side by side with precisely defined position relative to one another. The self-assembly is driven by a combination of symmetry controlled molecular packing, intermolecular interactions, and geometric constraint to limit the assembly into compact dodecameric protein nanoparticles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Chimerism in M1 plants of Vicia faba, Capsicum annuum and Linum usitatissimum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermelin, T.; Brunner, H.; Daskalov, S.; Nakai, H.

    1983-01-01

    One important task of our group at IAEA is to develop procedures aiming to improve sampling of M 2 seeds to facilitate the recovery of a maximum number of induced mutations in crop plants. Results from studies on three species are reported in this paper. Seeds have been mutagen treated and the chimeric M 1 plants were progeny tested in M 2 . The position of the M 2 seeds on the M 1 plants has been recorded

  14. Targeted induction of interferon-λ in humanized chimeric mouse liver abrogates hepatotropic virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: The interferon (IFN system plays a critical role in innate antiviral response. We presume that targeted induction of IFN in human liver shows robust antiviral effects on hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV. METHODS: This study used chimeric mice harboring humanized livers and infected with HCV or HBV. This mouse model permitted simultaneous analysis of immune responses by human and mouse hepatocytes in the same liver and exploration of the mechanism of antiviral effect against these viruses. Targeted expression of IFN was induced by treating the animals with a complex comprising a hepatotropic cationic liposome and a synthetic double-stranded RNA analog, pIC (LIC-pIC. Viral replication, IFN gene expression, IFN protein production, and IFN antiviral activity were analyzed (for type I, II and III IFNs in the livers and sera of these humanized chimeric mice. RESULTS: Following treatment with LIC-pIC, the humanized livers of chimeric mice exhibited increased expression (at the mRNA and protein level of human IFN-λs, resulting in strong antiviral effect on HBV and HCV. Similar increases were not seen for human IFN-α or IFN-β in these animals. Strong induction of IFN-λs by LIC-pIC occurred only in human hepatocytes, and not in mouse hepatocytes nor in human cell lines derived from other (non-hepatic tissues. LIC-pIC-induced IFN-λ production was mediated by the immune sensor adaptor molecules mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor molecule-1 (TICAM-1, suggesting dual recognition of LIC-pIC by both sensor adaptor pathways. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that the expression and function of various IFNs differ depending on the animal species and tissues under investigation. Chimeric mice harboring humanized livers demonstrate that IFN-λs play an important role in the defense against human hepatic virus infection.

  15. Bellerophon: a program to detect chimeric sequences in multiple sequence alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Thomas; Faulkner, Geoffrey; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2004-09-22

    Bellerophon is a program for detecting chimeric sequences in multiple sequence datasets by an adaption of partial treeing analysis. Bellerophon was specifically developed to detect 16S rRNA gene chimeras in PCR-clone libraries of environmental samples but can be applied to other nucleotide sequence alignments. Bellerophon is available as an interactive web server at http://foo.maths.uq.edu.au/~huber/bellerophon.pl

  16. CCR 20th Anniversary Commentary: Chimeric Antigen Receptors-From Model T to the Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, Patrick

    2015-07-15

    The research article by Kershaw and colleagues, published in the October 15, 2006, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, presents one of the first clinical trials to utilize chimeric antigen receptors. Subsequent studies have shown promise for the treatment of patients with lymphoid malignancies, but further progress will require optimization, including the identification of more specific antigens for solid tumors. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Live Zika virus chimeric vaccine candidate based on a yellow fever 17-D attenuated backbone

    OpenAIRE

    Nougairede, Antoine; Klitting, Raphaelle; Aubry, Fabien; Gilles, Magali; Touret, Franck; De Lamballerie, Xavier

    2018-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) recently dispersed throughout the tropics and sub-tropics causing epidemics associated with congenital disease and neurological complications. There is currently no commercial vaccine for ZIKV. Here we describe the initial development of a chimeric virus containing the prM/E proteins of a ZIKV epidemic strain incorporated into a yellow fever 17-D attenuated backbone. Using the versatile and rapid ISA (Infectious Subgenomic Amplicons) reverse genetics method, we compared diff...

  18. EVIR: chimeric receptors that enhance dendritic cell cross-dressing with tumor antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Hansen, Sarah K; De Palma, Michele

    2018-03-01

    We describe a lentivirus-encoded chimeric receptor, termed extracellular vesicle (EV)-internalizing receptor (EVIR), which enables the selective uptake of cancer-cell-derived EVs by dendritic cells (DCs). The EVIR enhances DC presentation of EV-associated tumor antigens to CD8 + T cells primarily through MHCI recycling and cross-dressing. EVIRs should facilitate exploring the mechanisms and implications of horizontal transfer of tumor antigens to antigen-presenting cells.

  19. Homologous recombination in hybridoma cells: heavy chain chimeric antibody produced by gene targeting.

    OpenAIRE

    Fell, H P; Yarnold, S; Hellström, I; Hellström, K E; Folger, K R

    1989-01-01

    We demonstrate that murine myeloma cells can efficiently mediate homologous recombination. The murine myeloma cell line J558L was shown to appropriately recombine two transfected DNA molecules in approximately 30% of cells that received and integrated intact copies of both molecules. This activity was then exploited to direct major reconstructions of an endogenous locus within a hybridoma cell line. Production of antigen-specific chimeric heavy chain was achieved by targeting the human IgG1 h...

  20. Monoclonal antibodies for radioimmunodetection of tumours and for targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, R.W.; Embleton, M.J.; Pimm, M.V.

    1983-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody 791T/36 prepared against human osteogenic sarcoma has been used to detect primary and metastatic colorectal carcinomas by external imaging of patients following injection of 131 I-labelled antibody. In 10 of 11 patients radiolabelled 791T/36 antibody localized in tumours, the tumour/non tumour ratio of radioactivity ranging from 1.5:1 to 8.1. 791T/36 antibody was also evaluated for its potential for targeting anti-tumour agents including cytotoxic drugs (Vindesine) and immunomodulating agents (interferon). Vindesine-791T/36 conjugates were preferentially cytotoxic in vitro for target cells expressing the 791T/36 anti-body defined antigen. Also interferon conjugated to 791T/36 antibody, like free interferon activated peripheral blood natural killer cell activity. These in vitro tests together with related studies on antibody localization in vivo indicate the potential of monoclonal antibody targeting of anti-tumour agents

  1. Enzymatic Production of Monoclonal Stoichiometric Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducani, Cosimo; Kaul, Corinna; Moche, Martin; Shih, William M.; Högberg, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Single-stranded oligonucleotides are important as research tools as probes for diagnostics and gene therapy. Today, production of oligonucleotides is done via solid-phase synthesis. However, the capabilities of current polymer chemistry are limited in comparison to what can be produced in biological systems. The errors in synthetic DNA increases with oligonucleotide length, and sequence diversity can often be a problem. Here, we present the Monoclonal Stoichiometric (MOSIC) method for enzymatic DNA oligonucleotide production. Using this method, we amplify oligonucleotides from clonal templates followed by digestion of a cutter-hairpin, resulting in pools of monoclonal oligonucleotides with precisely controlled relative stoichiometric ratios. We present data where MOSIC oligonucleotides, 14–378 nt long, were prepared either by in vitro rolling-circle amplification, or by amplification in Escherichia coli in the form of phagemid DNA. The formation of a DNA crystal and folding of DNA nanostructures confirmed the scalability, purity and stoichiometry of the produced oligonucleotides. PMID:23727986

  2. Localisation of metastatic carcinoma by a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley, H M; Ritson, A; Wraight, P; Sikora, K [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (UK); Hinchingbrooke Hospital, Huntingdon (UK)); Finan, P [St. James Hospital, Leeds (UK); Lennox, E S; Takei, F [Medical Research Council, Cambridge (UK)

    1983-02-01

    Rat monoclonal antibodies were prepared by immunising rats with human colorectal carcinoma cell membranes and fusing splenic lymphocytes with a rat myeloma. Hybridoma supernatants were screened by binding assays on membranes prepared from colorectal carcinoma tissue. One hybridoma supernatant, containing a monoclonal antibody with high binding activity on malignant compared to normal colon sections, was grown in large quantities in serum-free medium. After ammonium sulphate precipitation the antibody was purified by ion-exchange chromatography and labelled with /sup 131/I. Radiolabelled antibody was administered i.v. to 27 patients with colonic and other tumours. Scintigrams were obtained at 48 h. Computerised subtraction of the blood pool image revealed localised areas of uptake corresponding with areas of known disease in 13/16 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 3/4 patients with breast cancer.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies: potential role in radiation therapy and oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Order, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    Specificity, which is a hallmark of the immune system, will be used in radiation oncology in both diagnosis and therapy through the application of radiolabelled monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Antigenic specificities, antibody preparations, and the tumor as a target for radiolabelled antibody is reviewed. Several clinical situations, i.e. single tumor cell suspensions, intraperitoneal single cells and masses, and solid tumors are reviewed in regard to both immune antibody targeting and specific differences between tumors in these regions. The concentration of tumor associated antigens is introductory to radiolabelled antibodies in diagnosis. In the radiation therapy of solid tumors, data regarding tumor dose, tumor effective half-life, varied antibody preparations, and the use of radiolabelled antibody as a method of tumor implantation is discussed using antiferritin 131 I-IgG as a model in hepatoma. The theoretical applications of monoclonal antibody integrated in cancer therapy are then presented as a new goal for future development

  4. [Diagnosis of rabies infection in animals using monoclonal antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akacem, O; Taril, A; Benelmouffok, A; Bemansour, A; Couillin, P; Brahimi, M; Benhassine, M

    1989-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (M.A.), specific for viral nucleocapsid, the M.A. D-20 and the M.A. D-43 raised against a fixed strain of rabies virus (C.V.S. 11), have been tested in parallel with a standard antirabies serum (S.A.R.) in diagnosis of animal rabies virus infection. 44 brain imprints from animals which died from rabies were tested by indirect immunofluorescent technique with monoclonal antibodies. Constant correlation has been found between the M.A. D-43 and the S.A.R. in the diagnosis of animal rabies virus infection in all cases studied. For M.A. D-20, concordance of results with S.A.R. was found only in limited number of cases.

  5. Development of radiolabelling techniques of anti-CEA monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiglia, S.G. de

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to label monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies with 99 Tc m such as the ior-CEA-1 antibody and polyclonal IgG using a direct method, to check the radiochemical and biological behavior of labelled products, to prepare it under sterile and apyrogenic conditions as a lyophilized kit and to employ it in clinical trials. In addition, a photoactivation method was used to label polyclonal IgG with 99 Tc m and to compare with the established method using mercaptoethanol (2-ME) as the reducing agent. Finally polyclonal IgG was labelled using an indirect method in which a chelator was covalently attached to the protein and the 99 Tc m added as glucoheptonate complex. The properties of 99 Tc m when labelled with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies by different methods were assessed by in vitro and in vivo studies

  6. Long-term experience of plasmapheresis in antibody-mediated rejection in renal transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brown, C M

    2009-11-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) continues to pose a serious challenge in renal transplantation with potentially devastating consequences. Treatment options for this condition include plasmapheresis, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis with low-dose IVIG, and the use of rituximab (anti-CD20 chimeric antibody). We previously reported on the short-term outcome of plasmapheresis as a rescue therapy for AMR in our centre. We now report on the long-term follow up.

  7. Boronated monoclonal antibody conjugates for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.; Elmore, J.J. Jr.; Ferrone, S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the effectiveness of 10 B-labeled monoclonal antibodies against Colo-38 human melanoma in vitro. The authors obtained high boron to antibody ratios while maintaining antibody activity by using dextran intermediate carriers to link 10 B to the antibody. They developed a double cell quasi-competitive binding bioassay to minimize the effects of nonspecific binding of boronated complexes to cells. 1 fig., 2 tabs

  8. Human monoclonal antibodies: the residual challenge of antibody immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Herman

    2014-01-01

    One of the major reasons for seeking human monoclonal antibodies has been to eliminate immunogenicity seen with rodent antibodies. Thus far, there has yet been no approach which absolutely abolishes that risk for cell-binding antibodies. In this short article, I draw attention to classical work which shows that monomeric immunoglobulins are intrinsically tolerogenic if they can be prevented from creating aggregates or immune complexes. Based on these classical studies two approaches for active tolerization to therapeutic antibodies are described.

  9. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, T; Díaz, A M; Zlotnik, H

    1990-01-01

    Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis whole-cell extracts were used as antigens to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Six stable hybrid cell lines secreting anti-Nocardia spp. MAbs were obtained. These were characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot (immunoblot), and immunofluorescence assay. Although all the MAbs exhibited different degrees of cross-reactivity with N. asteroides and N. brasiliensis antigens as well as with culture-filtrate antigens from Myco...

  11. A chimeric human-mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Nicholas A; Wu, Lai-Chu; Bruss, Michael; Kaffenberger, Benjamin H; Hampton, Jeffrey; Bolon, Brad; Jarjour, Wael N

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of Sjögren's Syndrome (SjS), the pathogenic mechanisms remain elusive and an ideal model for early drug discovery is not yet available. To establish a humanized mouse model of SjS, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy volunteers or patients with SjS were transferred into immunodeficient NOD-scid IL-2rγ(null) mouse recipients to produce chimeric mice. While no difference was observed in the distribution of cells, chimeric mice transferred with PBMCs from SjS patients produced enhanced cytokine levels, most significantly IFN-γ and IL-10. Histological examination revealed enhanced inflammatory responses in the lacrimal and salivary glands of SjS chimeras, as measured by digital image analysis and blinded histopathological scoring. Infiltrates were primarily CD4+, with minimal detection of CD8+ T-cells and B-cells. These results demonstrate a novel chimeric mouse model of human SjS that provides a unique in vivo environment to test experimental therapeutics and investigate T-cell disease pathology. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Novel chimeric peptide with enhanced cell specificity and anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Nam-Hong; Lee, Jong-Wan; Jang, Jin-Sun; Park, Yung-Hoon; Park, Seong-Cheol; Jang, Mi-Kyeong

    2015-07-31

    An antimicrobial peptide (AMP), Hn-Mc, was designed by combining the N-terminus of HPA3NT3 and the C-terminus of melittin. This chimeric AMP exhibited potent antibacterial activity with low minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), ranging from 1 to 2 μM against four drug-susceptible bacteria and ten drug-resistant bacteria. Moreover, the hemolysis and cytotoxicity was reduced significantly compared to those of the parent peptides, highlighting its high cell selectivity. The morphological changes in the giant unilamellar vesicles and bacterial cell surfaces caused by the Hn-Mc peptide suggested that it killed the microbial cells by damaging the membrane envelope. An in vivo study also demonstrated the antibacterial activity of the Hn-Mc peptide in a mouse model infected with drug-resistant bacteria. In addition, the chimeric peptide inhibited the expression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokines in RAW 264.7 cells by preventing the interaction between LPS and Toll-like receptors. These results suggest that this chimeric peptide is an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory candidate as a pharmaceutic agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional rescue of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice by a chimeric peptide-PMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haifang; Moulton, Hong M; Betts, Corinne; Merritt, Thomas; Seow, Yiqi; Ashraf, Shirin; Wang, Qingsong; Boutilier, Jordan; Wood, Matthew Ja

    2010-10-01

    Splice modulation using antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) has been shown to yield targeted exon exclusion to restore the open reading frame and generate truncated but partially functional dystrophin protein. This has been successfully demonstrated in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice and in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. However, DMD is a systemic disease; successful therapeutic exploitation of this approach will therefore depend on effective systemic delivery of AOs to all affected tissues. We have previously shown the potential of a muscle-specific/arginine-rich chimeric peptide-phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PMO) conjugate, but its long-term activity, optimized dosing regimen, capacity for functional correction and safety profile remain to be established. Here, we report the results of this chimeric peptide-PMO conjugate in the mdx mouse using low doses (3 and 6 mg/kg) administered via a 6 biweekly systemic intravenous injection protocol. We show 100% dystrophin-positive fibers and near complete correction of the dystrophin transcript defect in all peripheral muscle groups, with restoration of 50% dystrophin protein over 12 weeks, leading to correction of the DMD pathological phenotype and restoration of muscle function in the absence of detectable toxicity or immune response. Chimeric muscle-specific/cell-penetrating peptides therefore represent highly promising agents for systemic delivery of splice-correcting PMO oligomers for DMD therapy.

  14. Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

    2006-10-01

    The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

  15. Connections between Transcription Downstream of Genes and cis-SAGe Chimeric RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwalenia, Katarzyna; Qin, Fujun; Singh, Sandeep; Tangtrongstittikul, Panjapon; Li, Hui

    2017-11-22

    cis-Splicing between adjacent genes (cis-SAGe) is being recognized as one way to produce chimeric fusion RNAs. However, its detail mechanism is not clear. Recent study revealed induction of transcriptions downstream of genes (DoGs) under osmotic stress. Here, we investigated the influence of osmotic stress on cis-SAGe chimeric RNAs and their connection to DoGs. We found,the absence of induction of at least some cis-SAGe fusions and/or their corresponding DoGs at early time point(s). In fact, these DoGs and their cis-SAGe fusions are inversely correlated. This negative correlation was changed to positive at a later time point. These results suggest a direct competition between the two categories of transcripts when total pool of readthrough transcripts is limited at an early time point. At a later time point, DoGs and corresponding cis-SAGe fusions are both induced, indicating that total readthrough transcripts become more abundant. Finally, we observed overall enhancement of cis-SAGe chimeric RNAs in KCl-treated samples by RNA-Seq analysis.

  16. Generation of Chimeric RNAs by cis-splicing of adjacent genes (cis-SAGe) in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jian-Shu; Jing, Xiao-Yan; Du, Xin; Yang, Xiu-Qin

    2018-02-20

    Chimeric RNA molecules, possessing exons from two or more independent genes, are traditionally believed to be produced by chromosome rearrangement. However, recent studies revealed that cis-splicing of adjacent genes (cis- SAGe) is one of the major mechanisms underlying the formation of chimeric RNAs. cis-SAGe refers to intergenic splicing of directly adjacent genes with the same transcriptional orientation, resulting in read-through transcripts, termed chimeric RNAs, which contain sequences from two or more parental genes. cis-SAGe was first identified in tumor cells, since then its potential in carcinogenesis has attracted extensive attention. More and more scientists are focusing on it. With the development of research, cis-SAGe was found to be ubiquitous in various normal tissues, and might make a crucial contribution to the formation of novel genes in the evolution of genomes. In this review, we summarize the splicing pattern, expression characteristics, possible mechanisms, and significance of cis-SAGe in mammals. This review will be helpful for general understanding of the current status and development tendency of cis-SAGe.

  17. Design of chimeric expression elements that confer high-level gene activity in chromoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroca, Rodrigo; Howell, Katharine A; Hasse, Claudia; Ruf, Stephanie; Bock, Ralph

    2013-02-01

    Non-green plastids, such as chromoplasts, generally have much lower activity of gene expression than chloroplasts in photosynthetically active tissues. Suppression of plastid genes in non-green tissues occurs through a complex interplay of transcriptional and translational control, with the contribution of regulation of transcript abundance versus translational activity being highly variable between genes. Here, we have investigated whether the low expression of the plastid genome in chromoplasts results from inherent limitations in gene expression capacity, or can be overcome by designing appropriate combinations of promoters and translation initiation signals in the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR). We constructed chimeric expression elements that combine promoters and 5'-UTRs from plastid genes, which are suppressed during chloroplast-to-chromoplast conversion in Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit ripening, either just at the translational level or just at the level of mRNA accumulation. These chimeric expression elements were introduced into the tomato plastid genome by stable chloroplast transformation. We report the identification of promoter-UTR combinations that confer high-level gene expression in chromoplasts of ripe tomato fruits, resulting in the accumulation of reporter protein GFP to up to 1% of total cellular protein. Our work demonstrates that non-green plastids are capable of expressing genes to high levels. Moreover, the chimeric cis-elements for chromoplasts developed here are widely applicable in basic and applied research using transplastomic methods. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Skin Recurrence of Transformed Mycosis Fungoides Postumbilical Cord Blood Transplant despite Complete Donor Chimerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Pawar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Allogeneic stem cell transplant is the treatment of choice for systemic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL which provides graft-versus-lymphoma effect. Herein we discuss a case of recurrence of CTCL skin lesions after cord blood transplant in a patient who continued to have 100% donor chimerism in bone marrow. Case Presentation. A 48-year-old female with history of mycosis fungoides (MF presented with biopsy proven large cell transformation of MF. PET scan revealed multiple adenopathy in abdomen and chest suspicious for lymphoma and skin biopsy showed large cell transformation. She was treated with multiple cycles of chemotherapy. Posttherapy PET scan showed resolution of lymphadenopathy. Later she underwent ablative preparative regimen followed by single cord blood transplant. Bone marrow chimerism studies at day +60 after transplant showed 100% donor cells without presence of lymphoma. However 5 months after transplant she had recurrence of MF with the same genotype as prior skin lesion. Bone marrow chimerism study continued to show 100% donor cells. Conclusion. A differential graft-versus-lymphoma effect in our case prevented lymphoma recurrence systemically but failed to do so in skin. We hypothesize that this response may be due to presence of other factors in the bone marrow and lymph node microenvironments preventing recurrence in these sites.

  19. Mast Cell Targeted Chimeric Toxin Can Be Developed as an Adjunctive Therapy in Colon Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The association of colitis with colorectal cancer has become increasingly clear with mast cells being identified as important inflammatory cells in the process. In view of the relationship between mast cells and cancer, we studied the effect and mechanisms of mast cells in the development of colon cancer. Functional and mechanistic insights were gained from ex vivo and in vivo studies of cell interactions between mast cells and CT26 cells. Further evidence was reversely obtained in studies of mast cell targeted Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin. Experiments revealed mast cells could induce colon tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Cancer progression was found to be related to the density of mast cells in colonic submucosa. The activation of MAPK, Rho-GTPase, and STAT pathways in colon cancer cells was triggered by mast cells during cell-to-cell interaction. Lastly, using an Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin we constructed, we confirmed the promoting effect of mast cells in development of colon cancer. Mast cells are a promoting factor of colon cancer and thus also a potential therapeutic target. The Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin targeting mast cells could effectively prevent colon cancer in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, these data may demonstrate a novel immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of tumors.

  20. Microdosimetry of monoclonal antibodies labeled with alpha emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    The recent discovery of new techniques for the production of monoclonal antibodies (MoAB) has opened up a number of potential new applications in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Monoclonal antibodies labeled with alpha-emitting radionuclides promise to be particularly effective therapeutic agents due to the efficient cell killing ability of highly ionizing, short-range alpha particle tracks localized at specific antigen sites within the tumor mass. For a radioimmunotherapy treatment plan to be effective, one must be able to estimate the absorbed radiation dose to both tumor cells and normal tissues in the body. However, conventional methods used in nuclear medicine for estimating absorbed doses and specific absorbed fractions for radiopharmaceuticals do not apply to alpha emitters owing to their short range and the large variations in the local distribution of energy at the cellular level that result. Microdosimetric techniques developed for assessment of the radiological effects of internally deposited transuranic radionuclides take into account the statistical aspects of alpha particle track structure, energy distribution patterns, and radionuclide distribution within tissues, and provide a means for determining the number and frequency of cells irradiated, the probability densities in specific energy, and the average dose delivered to cells of interest. These techniques can be applied to the study of radiation absorbed dose from alpha-labeled monoclonal antibodies. 16 references, 6 figures