WorldWideScience

Sample records for childrens oral health

  1. Oral health status in diabetic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, S.; Qureshi, A.; Iqbal, N.; Khan, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes causes numerous oral and salivary changes leading to cariogenic and gingival lesions. The present study was designed to elucidate the role of diabetes mellitus in oral health. A cross-sectional study including 60 diabetic children (case group) and 30 non diabetic children (control group) of age 3-14 years was conducted. HbA1c and blood glucose level was measured along with the oral health including gingival status and dental caries status was visually assessed. Gingival status was coded for healthy, marginal gingivitis and calculus. Dental caries status (decayed and filled) for both deciduous and permanent dentition was assessed. Data was recorded in a pre-coded oral health proforma, which was then entered and analyzed in SPSS version 10.0. Descriptive analysis such as percentage frequencies and means was performed. Exact Chi-square test was used to analyze any significant changes observed amongst the study population, where level of significance was p < 0.05 with confidence interval 95%. The results show important difference between both groups of children. Dental caries level is significantly higher in diabetic children both in deciduous and permanent dentition than in non-diabetic children (p <0.05). Gingival health was also observed to be debilitated in diabetic children than nondiabetic children (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The study highlights that special preventive measures must be adopted to maintain a good oral health of the diabetic children. (author)

  2. ABCs of Oral Health: Nutrition - Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for gum inflammation and cavities. More ABCs of Oral Health A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | All Nutrition - Adults Nutrition - Children Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | ...

  3. Probiotics and oral health effects in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Probiotics are living micro-organisms added to food which beneficially affect the host by improving its intestinal microbial balance. OBJECTIVE: This paper aims to present a general background on probiotics and its health effects in children, and to examine the evidence for oral...... interest was conducted in children. Four papers dealt with oral installation of probiotic bacteria, and although detectable levels were found in saliva shortly after intake, the studies failed to demonstrate a long-term installation. Seven papers evaluated the effect of lactobacilli- or bifidobacteria......-derived probiotics on the salivary levels of caries-associated bacteria in placebo-controlled designs. All but one reported a hampering effect on mutans streptococci and/or yeast. The single study carried out in early childhood reported a significant caries reduction in 3- to 4-year-old children after 7 months...

  4. Oral health status of school children in Mbarara, Uganda | Batwala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The oral hygiene of school children was poor with high plaque prevalence demonstrating a lack of established oral hygiene practices. A comprehensive community-focused oral health care intervention that includes oral health education in homes and the strengthening of school health programme is needed to ...

  5. Oral Health Behavior of Parents as a Predictor of Oral Health Status of Their Children

    OpenAIRE

    Bozorgmehr, Elham; Hajizamani, Abolghasem; Malek Mohammadi, Tayebeh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. It is widely acknowledged that the behavior of parents affects their children's health. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between oral health behavior of parents and oral health status and behavior of their children in a sample of preschool children in Iran. Method and Material. A random sample of over-five-year-old preschool children and their parents were enrolled in the study. Selection of schools was by clustering method. Parents were asked to fill a piloted ques...

  6. Oral health behavior of parents as a predictor of oral health status of their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgmehr, Elham; Hajizamani, Abolghasem; Malek Mohammadi, Tayebeh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. It is widely acknowledged that the behavior of parents affects their children's health. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between oral health behavior of parents and oral health status and behavior of their children in a sample of preschool children in Iran. Method and Material. A random sample of over-five-year-old preschool children and their parents were enrolled in the study. Selection of schools was by clustering method. Parents were asked to fill a piloted questionnaire which included demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, oral health behaviors of children and their parents. Oral health status of children was examined. The parent and their children oral health relationship were tested using regression and correlation analysis. Results. About 222 parents and children participated in the study. There was a significant relationship between history of having dental problems in parents and dmft index in their children (P = 0.01). There was a significant relationship between parental frequency of tooth brushing and child frequency of tooth brushing (P = 0.05); however, there was no significant relationship between parental frequency of dental visits and those of their children (P = 0.1). Conclusion. The study concluded that some important health behaviors in parents, such as tooth brushing habits are important determinants of these behaviors in their young children. So promoting parent knowledge and attitude could affect their children oral health behavior and status.

  7. Oral health status of children with autistic disorder in Chennai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnu Rekha, C; Arangannal, P; Shahed, H

    2012-06-01

    To assess the oral health status of autistic children in Chennai. Oral health status was assessed for 483 children with autism, solicited from special education schools, autistic child centres and therapy centres. Conditions assessed were plaque accumulation, gingival health, dental caries, malocclusion, developmental anomalies, oral injuries and restorations. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests of significance were used to compare groups. Proportions test was used to compare the significance of the parameters between boys and girls. Autistic children with primary dentition showed significantly higher incidence of dental caries (24%), when compared to other oral conditions. Children with mixed dentition had more gingivitis (50%) and children with permanent dentition had more gingivitis (48.96%) and malocclusion (71.15%). All the oral conditions were seen more in boys than girls. Autistic children have significantly poor oral hygiene and higher incidence of malocclusion and dental caries when compared to other oral conditions.

  8. Oral health and oral health risk behaviour in children with and without externalising behaviour problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staberg, M; Norén, J G; Gahnberg, L; Ghaderi, A; Kadesjö, C; Robertson, A

    2018-05-15

    This was to study children with early detected externalising behaviour problems compared to matched controls regarding oral health, oral health risk behaviour and the parental evaluation of the child's oral health and dental care. Children aged 10-13 years and with externalising behaviour problems, were compared to matched controls. Behavioural characteristics were based on the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire. The children and their parents completed questionnaires regarding dental fear, tooth brushing, dietary habits and evaluation of oral health and dental care. Data on dental caries risk assessments, caries, behaviour management problems and dental trauma were obtained from dental files. There were no differences in caries prevalence in children with early detected externalising behaviour problems, compared to controls. However, the former group consumed more sweet drinks when thirsty and brushed their teeth fewer than twice daily; they also had more dental trauma in both dentitions and a higher risk range for dental fear, compared to controls. This study points out potential oral health risk factors in children with early-detected externalising behaviour problems. Although no difference in caries prevalence was observed, externalising behaviour may affect oral health. Therefore, dental professionals should support the families and the children to preserve dental health by offering increased prophylactic measures. There were no differences between children with externalising behaviour problems, compared with controls, regarding the parent evaluation of their child's dental health. However, more parents in the study group evaluated the dental care as poor or not functioning.

  9. Parental influence on children's oral health-related behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutanen, Raija; Lahti, Satu; Tolvanen, Mimmi; Hausen, Hannu

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there are differences between oral health-related knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of children and their parents, and to identify the family-related factors associated with children's poor or good oral health-related behavior. The data were gathered by means of questionnaires from 11-12-year-old schoolchildren and their parents who replied without having knowledge of the answers of the others. Differences between subgroups of children were analyzed by cross-tabulation, and the factors related to children's good or poor oral health-related behavior by logistic regression analyses. Parents of children who reported good oral health-related behavior had better knowledge and more favorable behaviors than those of other parents. Predictors for a child's poor oral health-related behavior were the child's poor knowledge, male gender, the parent's frequent consumption of sweets, and the parent's infrequent use of xylitol gum. When a less strict threshold for the child's poor oral health-related behavior was used, more predictors entered the model: the parent's unfavorable use of fluoride toothpaste; among girls, the parent's lack of knowledge; and among children whose mother's occupation level was high, the parent's infrequent use of xylitol gum. The parents of children whose oral health behavior was favorable were more likely to have a high level occupation and favorable oral health-related behaviors. Oral health-related knowledge of children and their parents seems to be associated with children's oral health-related behavior. Parents' behaviors, but not attitudes, were associated with children's oral health behavior.

  10. Implementation of oral health education to orphan children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, N.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the knowledge and oral hygiene status of orphange children in apune and a changes in them after health education. Study Design: Interventional study. Place and Duration of Study: Centers for Orphan Children in Pune, India, from April to June 2014. Methodology: A specially designed questionnaire was used to assess the dental problems and existing oral hygiene maintenance practice among children between 5 - 12 years of age (n=100) in an orphanage center. Pre- and post interventional intra-oral examination was carried out to check their oral hygiene status which included DMFS (Decayed Missing Filled Tooth Surfaces index (for permanent teeth)), OHIS (Simplified Oral Hygiene Index) and gingival indices. Intervention was in the form of oral health education, demonstration of correct brushing technique, diet counselling and maintenance of overall oral hygiene. Results: Present study shows that the orphans had multiple dental problems along with improper oral hygiene practices and careless attitude towards oral health. Pre- and post-interventional DMFS was compared using Wilcoxon sign rank test, which was not significant; while OHIS and gingival indices were compared by using repeat measures ANOVA(p < 0.001) which was significant for each, respectively. Conclusion: There was considerable improvement in the oral hygiene status of orphans due to educational intervention. Oral health education at right age can help to cultivate healthy oral hygiene practices in orphans which will benefit them for lifelong. Caretakers should be educated and trained about oral hygiene practices so that they can implement it and supervise the orphan children. (author)

  11. Oral health of children born small for gestational age.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, A C

    2010-10-01

    We sought to evaluate the oral health status of children born small for gestational age (SGA). Children now aged 4-8 years who were born SGA (birth weight < -2 SDS) were examined using standardised criteria. The parents completed a structured oral health questionnaire. Twenty females and 25 males, mean age 72.1 months, and mean birth weight 2.1 kg, participated in the study. Poor appetite was a concern; 32 (71%) children snacked between meals and 14 (30%) used carbonated beverages more than 3 times daily. Erosion was present in 9 (20%) children. Dental decay occurred in 22 (47%) children with 92% being untreated. Eight children had more than 5 decayed teeth. It is essential that clinicians working with children born SGA include oral health within the general health surveillance and refer these children for a dental assessment within the first 2 years to support parents in establishing safe feeding patterns for their children.

  12. Oral Health Condition of Children Living with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Spillere Rovaris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available AIDS progression is faster in children than adults. Little is known about the oral health status of children living with HIV. Aim: To carry out a literature review about the oral health conditions of children living with HIV in order to observe if this specific population presents different oral health conditions compared to children without HIV infection. Methods: A documental study of literature review was carried out. Studies were searched at PubMed using “oral health”, “children”, “HIV” and “AIDS” as keywords. Papers published between 2001 and 2011 were included. After applying the exclusion criteria and complete reading of the selected studies, other articles were selected from the references lists of the first ones. Results: Firstly, 24 studies were identified. Among them, 65.5% were excluded according to the exclusion criteria. From the five selected articles, another five from the references of these were included. Only one article compared the oral health conditions of children living with HIV with controls without HIV infection. Conclusions: Only 10 papers contained information on the oral health conditions of children living with HIV, and just one compared the results with controls. The few studies found were insufficient to establish the oral health condition profile of children living with HIV. This lack of information could represent the lack of interest of researchers and health authorities in more integrative care and can result in neglect with this specific population of children.

  13. Pattern of presentation of oral health conditions by children at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-05

    Apr 5, 2013 ... Oral health presentations by children in University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital. 48 ... Results. A total of 305 children aged 3 days to 16 years with a ... This can be attributed to the poor attitude towards oral .... A free application to browse and search the journal's content is now available for iPhone/iPad.

  14. Framing Young Childrens Oral Health: A Participatory Action Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Chimere C; Villa-Torres, Laura; Sams, Lattice D; Zeldin, Leslie P; Divaris, Kimon

    2016-01-01

    Despite the widespread acknowledgement of the importance of childhood oral health, little progress has been made in preventing early childhood caries. Limited information exists regarding specific daily-life and community-related factors that impede optimal oral hygiene, diet, care, and ultimately oral health for children. We sought to understand what parents of young children consider important and potentially modifiable factors and resources influencing their children's oral health, within the contexts of the family and the community. This qualitative study employed Photovoice among 10 English-speaking parents of infants and toddlers who were clients of an urban WIC clinic in North Carolina. The primary research question was: "What do you consider as important behaviors, as well as family and community resources to prevent cavities among young children?" Five group sessions were conducted and they were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative research methodology. Inductive analyses were based on analytical summaries, double-coding, and summary matrices and were done using Atlas.ti.7.5.9 software. Good oral health was associated with avoidance of problems or restorations for the participants. Financial constraints affected healthy food and beverage choices, as well as access to oral health care. Time constraints and occasional frustration related to children's oral hygiene emerged as additional barriers. Establishment of rules/routines and commitment to them was a successful strategy to promote their children's oral health, as well as modeling of older siblings, cooperation among caregivers and peer support. Community programs and organizations, social hubs including playgrounds, grocery stores and social media emerged as promising avenues for gaining support and sharing resources. Low-income parents of young children are faced with daily life struggles that interfere with oral health and care. Financial constraints are pervasive, but parents

  15. Oral health related knowledge and health behavior of parents and school children

    OpenAIRE

    Lalić Maja; Aleksić Ema; Gajić Mihajlo; Malešević Đoka

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The family provides the background for developing behaviors, attitudes and knowledge related to oral health of children. The aim of this study was to compare oral health behavior of parents and their children and to asses the impact of parental behavior on children’s oral health. Material and Methods. This cross-sectional study included 99 parent - child pairs (12 to 15 years old). Data on oral health behavior, knowledge and attitudes regarding oral hygiene, fluorides and ...

  16. Community oral health literacy: improving use of oral-health care guarantee in children aged 6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Cornejo-Ovalle

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of comprehensive oral health care for children aged 6 (GES-6years showed low utilization of this guarantee, with lower use for children from municipal public schools. The empowerment and health literacy of parents improve their role as oral-health promoters for their children. Objective: To implement and to assess a strategy of empowerment and health literacy of the community about their guaranteed health rights to increase the use of GES-6years. Methods: A mixed design. Using qualitative methodology we will design a communication tool, culturally and socially appropriate to be sent to the beneficiary community of this guarantee. Using a nonrandomized community trial, this instrument designed to empower and improve oral health literacy on GES-6 guarantee, will be sent as personalized letter (intervention signed by the mayor of the municipality with a message aimed to children beneficiaries for GES -6years and another addressed to their parents/guardians. Schools would be selected from clusters (communes of the two regions selected for convenience. Communes will be randomly selected amog those whose authorities agree to participate, and will be selected as for intervention or control. Data analysis will assess the differences in the prevalence of use of this guarantee among children from municipal schools belonging to the intervention or control arm.

  17. Improving children's oral health: an interdisciplinary research framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamassimo, P S; Lee, J Y; Marazita, M L; Milgrom, P; Chi, D L; Divaris, K

    2014-10-01

    Despite the concerted efforts of research and professional and advocacy stakeholders, recent evidence suggests that improvements in the oral health of young children in the United States has not followed the prevailing trend of oral health improvement in other age groups. In fact, oral health disparities in the youngest children may be widening, yet efforts to translate advances in science and technology into meaningful improvements in populations' health have had limited success. Nevertheless, the great strides in genomics, biological, behavioral, social, and health services research in the past decade have strengthened the evidence base available to support initiatives and translational efforts. Concerted actions to accelerate this translation and implementation process are warranted; at the same time, policies that can help tackle the upstream determinants of oral health disparities are imperative. This article summarizes the proceedings from the symposium on the interdisciplinary continuum of pediatric oral health that was held during the 43rd annual meeting of the American Association for Dental Research, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. This report showcases the latest contributions across the interdisciplinary continuum of pediatric oral health research and provides insights into future research priorities and necessary intersectoral synergies. Issues are discussed as related to the overwhelming dominance of social determinants on oral disease and the difficulty of translating science into action. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  18. Oral health knowledge of health care workers in special?children?s center

    OpenAIRE

    Wyne, Amjad; Hammad, Nouf; Splieth, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children?s center. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect following information: demographics, oral hygiene practices, importance of fluoride, dental visits, cause of tooth decay, gingival health, and sources of oral health information. The study was conducted at Riyadh Center for Special Children in Riyadh City from December 2013 to May 2014. Results: All 60 health care workers in the ...

  19. Framing Young Childrens Oral Health: A Participatory Action Research Project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chimere C Collins

    Full Text Available Despite the widespread acknowledgement of the importance of childhood oral health, little progress has been made in preventing early childhood caries. Limited information exists regarding specific daily-life and community-related factors that impede optimal oral hygiene, diet, care, and ultimately oral health for children. We sought to understand what parents of young children consider important and potentially modifiable factors and resources influencing their children's oral health, within the contexts of the family and the community.This qualitative study employed Photovoice among 10 English-speaking parents of infants and toddlers who were clients of an urban WIC clinic in North Carolina. The primary research question was: "What do you consider as important behaviors, as well as family and community resources to prevent cavities among young children?" Five group sessions were conducted and they were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative research methodology. Inductive analyses were based on analytical summaries, double-coding, and summary matrices and were done using Atlas.ti.7.5.9 software.Good oral health was associated with avoidance of problems or restorations for the participants. Financial constraints affected healthy food and beverage choices, as well as access to oral health care. Time constraints and occasional frustration related to children's oral hygiene emerged as additional barriers. Establishment of rules/routines and commitment to them was a successful strategy to promote their children's oral health, as well as modeling of older siblings, cooperation among caregivers and peer support. Community programs and organizations, social hubs including playgrounds, grocery stores and social media emerged as promising avenues for gaining support and sharing resources.Low-income parents of young children are faced with daily life struggles that interfere with oral health and care. Financial constraints are

  20. Racial and ethnic disparities in children's oral health: the National Survey of Children's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Thomas; Culler, Corinna; Garcia, Raul I; Henshaw, Michelle M

    2008-11-01

    The authors evaluated racial/ethnic differences and their socioeconomic determinants in the oral health status of U.S. children, as reported by parents. The authors used interview data from the 2003 National Survey of Children's Health, a large representative survey of U.S. children. They calculated weighted, nationally representative prevalence estimates for non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics, and they used logistic regression to explore the association between parents' reports of fair or poor oral health and various socioeconomic determinants of oral health. The results showed significant racial/ethnic differences in parental reports of fair or poor oral health, with prevalences of 6.5 percent for non-Hispanic whites, 12.0 percent for non-Hispanic blacks and 23.4 percent for Hispanics. Although adjustments for family socioeconomic status (poverty level and education) partially explained these racial/ethnic disparities, Hispanics still were twice as likely as non-Hispanic whites to report their children's oral health as fair or poor, independent of socioeconomic status. The authors did find differences in preventive-care attitudes among groups. However, in multivariate models, such differences did not explain the disparities. Significant racial/ethnic disparities exist in parental reports of their children's oral health, with Hispanics being the most disadvantaged group. Disparities appear to exist independent of preventive-care attitudes and socioeconomic status.

  1. Disparities in children's oral health and access to dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouradian, W E; Wehr, E; Crall, J J

    Dental caries can be prevented by a combination of community, professional, and individual measures including water fluoridation, professionally applied topical fluorides and dental sealants, and use of fluoride toothpastes. Yet, tooth decay is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Dental care is the most prevalent unmet health need in US children with wide disparities existing in oral health and access to care. Only 1 in 5 children covered by Medicaid received preventive oral care for which they are eligible. Children from low income and minority families have poorer oral health outcomes, fewer dental visits, and fewer protective sealants. Water fluoridation is the most effective measure in preventing caries, but only 62% of water supplies are fluoridated, and lack of fluoridation may disproportionately affect poor and minority children. Childhood oral disease has significant medical and financial consequences that may not be appreciated because of the separation of medicine and dentistry. The infectious nature of dental caries, its early onset, and the potential of early interventions require an emphasis on preventive oral care in primary pediatric care to complement existing dental services. However, many pediatricians lack critical knowledge to promote oral health. We recommend financial incentives for prioritizing Medicaid Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment dental services; managed care accountability; integration of medical and dental professional training, clinical care, and research; and national leadership. JAMA. 2000;284:2625-2631.

  2. Oral Health Knowledge of Pregnant Women on Pregnancy Gingivitis and Children's Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, C; Ma, K N; Wong, Y S; So, Y; Lee, P C; Yang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy gingivitis and early childhood caries remain prevalent in Hong Kong. The aim of this study was to assess pregnant women's knowledge and beliefs related to pregnancy gingivitis and children's oral health. An outreach survey was carried out in a clinic that provided antenatal examination. A written oral health questionnaire related to pregnancy gingivitis and early childhood caries was administered to pregnant women. Of the 106 pregnant women who enrolled in the study, 100 completed the questionnaires. Among the 100 subjects, only 39% correctly identified that hormonal changes contribute to pregnancy gingivitis. Only 36% identified red and swollen gums as signs of gingivitis. Furthermore, 53% of the surveyed pregnant women were not sure about the amount of toothpaste to administer to a child aged 18 months to 5 years. Almost 50% assumed that a replanted avulsed tooth would probably not survive within a short extra-alveolar period of less than 60 minutes. Prenatal women generally lack knowledge of a common oral disease that occurs during pregnancy and of what constitutes adequate oral health care for children. Oral health care education should be implemented as part of a prenatal care program.

  3. Factors affecting children's oral health: perceptions among Latino parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Dharma E; Réategui-Sharpe, Ludmila; Spiro Iii, Avron; García, Raul I

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand factors that influence the oral health-related behaviors of Latino children, as reported by their parents. Focus groups and in-depth interviews assessed parental perceptions, experiences, attributions, and beliefs regarding their children's oral health. Guiding questions focused on a) the participant's child dental experiences; b) the impact of dental problems on the child's daily activities, emotions, self-esteem; c) parental experiences coping with child's dental problems; and d) hygienic and dietary habits. Participants were purposively sampled from dental clinics and public schools with a high concentration of Latinos; 92 urban low-income Latino Spanish-speaking parents participated. Transcriptions of the audio files were thematically analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Parents' explanations of their children's dental experiences were categorized under the following themes: caries and diet, access to dental care, migration experiences, and routines. Findings revealed fundamental multilevel (i.e., individual/child, family, and community) factors that are important to consider for future interventions to reduce oral health disparities: behaviors leading to caries, parental knowledge about optimal oral health, access to sugary foods within the living environment and to fluoridated water as well as barriers to oral health care such as lack of health insurance or limited health insurance coverage, among others. © 2011 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  4. THE IMPORTANCE OF ORAL HEALTH BEHAVIOUR OF CHILDREN FOR THEIR ORAL HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelić Ivana

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Caries or tooth decay regardless of the good knowledge of the nature of the disease and the possibility of its effective prevention is still the most widespread disease in our population. It also very often threatens the functions of organs and even the entire organism. Health culture is an integral part of general culture and health education plays an important role in maintaining health of individuals. Aim. The main objective of this study is to determine the influence of oral health behaviour of schoolchildren aged 12 to 14 on their oral health. The schoolchildren attended the seventh and eight grade at Drago Milovic Elementary School in Tivat. Method. The survey was conducted during the period from the end of January to April 2015 at Drago Milovic Elementary School in Tivat. It comprised all seventh and eight-graders that were at school those days. The survey instrument was a questionnaire specially designed for this study and it consisted of 36 closed-ended questions. Clinical examination of oral health in children was used as an additional research instrument. Assessment of oral health was carried out under natural light with dental mirror and probe according to WHO recommendations. The parameter used to assess the state of oral health was DMFT index — the number of carious, extracted and filled teeth. In addition, the assessment of oral hygiene was conducted using soft debris index according to Green-Vermillion which determines absence or presence, quantity and distribution of dental plaque and other soft deposits. Results. The majority of students stated that they lack knowledge regarding the effectiveness of fluoride toothpaste (69.4%. It was found that the lowest incidence of caries occurred among those students who think that teeth should be brushed after every meal, and the highest incidence of this diagnosis occurred in respondents who think that teeth should be brushed once a day. Half of the surveyed students

  5. Evaluation of Oral Health Status and Influential Factors in Children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... preferred by children's parents were analyzed. ... knowledge of dentists regarding autism increases, it is ... How to cite this article: Onol S, Kırzıoğlu Z. Evaluation of oral health ..... France: World Health Organization; 2013. p.

  6. Oral and General Health Promotion for Children: A Holistic Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cinar, Ayse Basak

    Inequalities in oral and general health have been rising globally; WHO calls for adoption of an integrated approach to their promotion as both share common risk factors. However, research about this issue among children is scarce. Based on the associations of such a research found in common for a...... to adopt healthy lifestyles, both in economically developing and developed countries. This book should be especially useful to researchers, professionals in dentistry and medicine, policy makers, and anyone else involved in provision of better health to community....... Turkish and Finnish children, this book underlies that oral health is turning out to be part of the global health culture, regardless of cultural differences and different oral health care systems. The book, further, by most recent literature, provides a review of 'Significance of Oral Health, Concept......Inequalities in oral and general health have been rising globally; WHO calls for adoption of an integrated approach to their promotion as both share common risk factors. However, research about this issue among children is scarce. Based on the associations of such a research found in common for all...

  7. Impact of oral hygiene on oral health-related quality of life of preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaghaghian, S; Bahmani, M; Amin, M

    2015-08-01

    To assess the impact of oral hygiene of preschool children and parental attitude on children's oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). In this cross-sectional study, 396 children of Shiraz kindergartens were selected by a randomized cluster sampling. Children's oral hygiene was assessed using the Simplified Debris Index (DI-S) and a self-made questionnaire about oral hygiene habits. Children's OHRQoL was evaluated by the Farsi version of Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (F-ECOHIS). The effect of oral hygiene determinants on OHRQoL was measured using Pearson and Spearman correlation, independent-sample t-test and anova. Children's mean DI-S and F-ECOHIS scores were 1.19 (± 0.77) and 19.36 (±8.42), respectively. Only 75% of the children had their teeth brushed once a day or more, and in 28%, toothbrushing had started before 2 years of age. DI-S values (P children. Children's OHRQoL was also significantly associated with parents' attitude towards the importance of brushing deciduous teeth (P = 0.002). Oral health status of preschool children in Shiraz was less than optimal and had a significant impact on their OHRQoL. Therefore, improvement of children's OHRQoL could be achieved by improving their home dental care. Strategies promoting parental attitude about the importance of children's toothbrushing may significantly influence children's oral hygiene and are highly recommended. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Influence of family environment on children's oral health: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rogéria Freire de Castilho

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Parents’ dental health habits influence their children's oral health. Oral health education programs aimed at preventive actions are needed to provide children not only with adequate oral health, but better quality of life. Special attention should be given to the entire family, concerning their lifestyle and oral health habits.

  9. Oral health status of children with treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Dalben, Gisele; Teixeira das Neves, Lucimara; Ribeiro Gomide, Marcia

    2006-01-01

    There is a lack of data on the oral health status of individuals with craniofacial syndromes. A group of 15 children with Treacher Collins syndrome, aged 5 to 15 years old, was examined and evaluated for plaque, caries and gingival problems. The ability of the patients to clean their teeth was also investigated. A high plaque index and poor efficacy of tooth-brushing was recorded. The caries and gingival indexes were not proportionally as high as the plaque accumulation. There was no association between the gingival index and presence of mouth breathing. There was predominance of the D component in both the dmft and DMFT indexes; this was associated with a need for restorative dental treatment in 60% of the patients, which indicated the need for dental care for these patients. Caretakers should be informed of the importance of oral health and oral hygiene and encouraged to take responsibility for the oral care of the children living at home.

  10. Oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadalagere Lakshmana Girish Babu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia is a malignancy of the bone marrow and blood. It is the most common childhood cancer in India. Advances in the treatment regimens have greatly increased the chances of survival. Both the disease and its treatment change the oral environment. In some cases, oral manifestations are the presenting feature of the disease and it will be the dentist′s responsibility to identify the underlying disorder and guide the diagnosis of the patient. Hence, the aim of present article is to review the literature concerning the oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL.

  11. Evaluation of Oral Health status and influential factors in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: The aim of the present study was to comparatively analyze oral health status and influential factors in children with autism living in the Western Mediterranean Region of Turkey. Subjects and Methods: This cross‑sectional study was conducted in two steps: 1 ‑ questionnaire and 2 ‑ interview. This study was conducted ...

  12. Campaigning for Children's Oral Health: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Arguably, the ultimate application of evidenced-based communications is translating the research recommendations into a full-fledged media campaign. This article explains the development and implementation of Watch Your Mouth, a campaign based on FrameWorks Institute's research on children's oral health. To date, this innovative campaign has been…

  13. Pattern of presentation of oral health conditions by children at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Out of a total of 305 children who visited the Child Dental Health Clinic ... traumatic dental injuries, 12.1% had malocclusion and other esthetic problems, 15.1% had other oral pathologies, 14.4% had abnormalities of tooth eruption.

  14. Representation of dental care and oral health in children's drawings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torriani, D D; Goettems, M L; Cademartori, M G; Fernandez, R R; Bussoletti, D M

    2014-06-01

    Paediatric dentistry requires knowledge of preventive measures, restorative skills and an understanding of child development. This exploratory, descriptive and qualitative study has analysed children's drawings regarding their perception of dental treatment and oral health. Children aged from six to ten years attending a dental school for treatment were randomly invited to create a drawing about 'dental treatment' and 'oral health'. Verbal expressions made by the children whilst drawing were also recorded and attached to the drawings. These representations were analysed and categorised using Vygotsky postulations for context reading. During the drawing analysis different themes emerged. Five categories regarding perceptions of dental treatment were identified: personal relationship; power relation; trauma; childhood resistance; and contextualisation of dental care in the child's life. Three categories relating to oral health were determined: dichotomy of health/sickness; ludic representation of health; and sickness seen as a process. Drawing can be used to understand children's emotions and expectations about dental treatment. Besides possessing technical skills and scientific knowledge, dentists have an obligation to pay attention to children's feelings.

  15. Short-term effect of two education methods on oral health among hearing impairment children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Pouradeli

    2016-12-01

    CONCLUSION: Both video and dental model effectively improve the oral health of children with HI in short term. Continuous school-based oral health education programs, particularly for HI children, need to be considered.

  16. [Oral health related knowledge and health behavior of parents and school children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalić, Maja; Aleksić, Ema; Gajić, Mihajlo; Malesević, Doka

    2013-01-01

    The family provides the background for developing behaviors, attitudes and knowledge related to oral health of children. The aim of this study was to compare oral health behavior of parents and their children and to asses the impact of parental behavior on children's oral health. This cross-sectional study included 99 parent--child pairs (12 to 15 years old). Data on oral health behavior, knowledge and attitudes regarding oral hygiene, fluorides and nutrition of parents and their children were collected by questionnaires. The parental dental health was assessed according to self-reported data on tooth loss and prosthodontic rehabilitation, while the dental status of children was determined by clinical examination. The parents reported the use of dental floss (p knowledge on fluorides. Approximately one third of parents thought they should not control sugar consumption of their child. There was a statistically significant correlation between parental oral hygiene and their habit to control the child in brushing with the child's oral health status. Oral health education activities directed towards the prevention of risk factors for developing caries should involve both parents and their children, because parental behavior is a significant predictor of children's oral health.

  17. Effect of oral health education and fluoridated dentifrices on the oral health status of visually impaired children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Visually impaired children are challenged everyday in their everyday skills. Oral hygiene practices among visually impaired children require a special approach with time and patience. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral health education and fluoridated dentifrices on the oral health status of visually impaired children. Materials and Methods: Fifty visually impaired children between 8 and 12 years of age formed the study group. Oral health education and motivation was done with the help of Braille. Modified Bass method of brushing was taught to the children and the required dental treatment was done. Subjects were randomly divided into two equal groups fluoridated and non-fluoridated. Oral hygiene index -simplified, DMFT, deft index, and Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus count were assessed at baseline, immediately after the treatment and at 3, 6, and 12 month intervals. The oral health awareness was assessed using a questionnaire at the beginning and end of the study. Results: At baseline, the mean OHI-S, DMFT and deft scores were 2.72, 0.47, and 0.51 respectively. At the end of 12 months there was a significant decrease in OHI-S scores in the fluoridated group. No significant difference was seen in DMFT and deft between the fluoridated and non-fluoridated groups at the different time interval. After the oral health education and comprehensive treatment there was a reduction in Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus counts in both groups; however, at the end of 3, 6, 12 months there was a significant decrease in fluoridated group as compared to the non-fluoridated. The oral health awareness increased significantly at the end of the study. Conclusion: The oral health education and motivation formulated for the visually impaired children was effective in improving their oral health status. Fluoridated dentifrices decreased the Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus counts and improved the oral hygiene status.

  18. Oral mucosal lesions' impact on oral health-related quality of life in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Luísa Jardim Corrêa; Torriani, Dione Dias; Correa, Marcos Britto; Peres, Marco Aurélio; Peres, Karen Glazer; Matijasevich, Alicia; Dos Santos, Iná da Silva; Barros, Aluisio J D; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions and their impact on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in children aged 5 years. A sample of 1118 children from Pelotas' birth cohort, born in 2004 (response rate of 85.8%), were selected to participate in the study. Data were collected using a questionnaire applied to mothers and from the oral examinations of the children. OML were identified by type, site, and size. Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS) was used to assess caregivers' perception on children's OHRQoL. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate Poisson regression analyses were carried out, considering the impact on OHRQoL (total ECOHIS score) as the outcome. The prevalence of the OML was 30.1% (95% CI 27.5-32.9). Ulcers were the more prevalent type of lesion (29.4%), and the most affected site was the gums (31.0%). In bivariate analysis, there was a positive association between the presence of OML and OHRQoL impact measured by the following: mean overall score of ECOHIS (P children with OML presented higher impact on OHRQoL [rate ratio (RR) 1.38 95% CI 1.11; 1.72] comparing with their counterparts. Analyzing specific domains, children with OML also presented higher impact on children symptoms (RR 1.46 95% CI 1.20; 1.66) and family functional (RR 3.14 95% CI 1.59; 6.22) domains. Almost one-third of children presented with oral mucosal lesions, and these lesions impaired children's oral health-related quality of life. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Workforce strategies to improve children's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Kristine

    2014-12-01

    (1) Tooth decay is the most common chronic disease for children. (2) As millions receive dental coverage under the Affordable Care Act, the demand for dental services is expected to strain the current workforce's ability to meet their needs. (3) States have adopted various workforce approaches to improve access to dental care for underserved populations.

  20. Oral Health in Children with Obesity or Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz, Fima; Casavalle, Patricia Lucia; Bordoni, Noemí; Rodriguez, Patricia Noemi; Friedman, Silvia Maria

    2016-12-01

    Oral health status must be considered in the care of children with obesity (OB) and diabetes mellitus (DM). The health of these patients' mouths may have significant effects on their overall health and evolution of their disease. Here we address periodontal disease (PD) and dental caries (DC), since these are two of the most common chronic diseases affecting OB and DM patients. OB plays a plausible role in the development of PD. Both overall OB and central adiposity are associated with increased hazards of gingivitis and its progression to PD. The inflammatory changes of PD might not be limited to the oral cavity, these may also trigger systemic consequences. Patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, T2DM) present an increased prevalence of gingivitis and PD. In diabetics PD develops at a younger age than in the healthy population, it also worsens with the prolongation of DM. The progression to PD has been correlated with the metabolic control of the disease as it is more prevalent and more severe in patients with elevated hemoglobin A1c (A1c) levels. PD negatively affects glycemic control and other diabetes related complications and there is a general consensus that treatment of PD can positively influence these negative effects. Additionally, DC is a multifactorial oral disease that is frequently detected in those with OB and DM, although its prevalence in systematic reviews is inconclusive. The associations between gingivitis, PD and DC share similar behaviors, i.e. inadequate oral hygiene habits and unhealthy dietary intake. Insufficient tooth brushing and intake of sugary foods may result in greater detrimental oral effects. Maintaining oral health will prevent oral chronic diseases and ameliorate the consequences of chronic inflammatory processes. Thus, the care of obese and diabetic patients requires a multidisciplinary team with medical and dental health professionals. Copyright© of YS Medical Media ltd.

  1. Oral health and related factors in a group of children with cystic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oral health and related factors in a group of children with cystic fibrosis in Istanbul, Turkey. ... presented as a marker of wound healing and bleeding tendency of oral cavity. ... Caries experience, oral hygiene, and dental erosion were assessed.

  2. Parents' and children's knowledge of oral health: a qualitative study of children with cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Karen; Lin, Yin-Ling; Callery, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Children with cleft lip and/or palate (CLP) are prone to poorer oral health outcomes than their peers, with serious implications for treatment. Little is known of the knowledge and practice of children with CLP in caring for teeth and how these contribute to oral health. To investigate (i) parents' and children's knowledge of oral health, (ii) how knowledge is acquired, and (iii) how knowledge is implemented. A qualitative design was used to investigate knowledge, beliefs, and practices reported by parents and children, age 5-11 years with CLP. Data were collected from 22 parents and 16 children and analysed using thematic analysis. Four themes were derived as follows: (i) implicit knowledge: children express simple knowledge underpinned by basic rationales, (ii) situated knowledge: children gain skills as part of everyday childhood routines, (iii) maintaining good practice in oral health: parents take a lead role in motivating, monitoring, and maintaining children's toothbrushing, and (iv) learning opportunities: pivotal moments provide opportunities for children to extend their knowledge. Developers of oral health education interventions should take account of children's implicit knowledge and the transmission of beliefs between generations that influence toothbrushing behaviours. This could enhance interventions to support parents and children's practice. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Health habits, attitudes and behavior towards oral health of children with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Svetlana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children suffering from epilepsy are high at risk of oral diseases primarily due to their underlying medical condition which can have an impact on the maintenance level of oral hygiene, but also due to adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs. Objective. The aim of this paper was to identify habits, attitudes and behavior of children with epilepsy and parents in respect to oral health. Method. The experimental group consisted of 50 children with epilepsy, 24 boys and 26 girls, 7-14 years old, mean age 11.2±2.2 years. The control group consisted of healthy children, matched by age and gender. The instruments of investigation consisted of the structured interview of children and parents concerning oral health habits, attitudes and behavior. We used medical records of children with epilepsy as a source of information on their diagnosis, duration of the illness and current therapy. Statistical analysis was performed by chi-squared test, nonparametric correlation, Wilcoxon’s signed rank test and logistic regression. Results. Results showed that more children with epilepsy and their parents had inappropriate habits and attitudes towards oral health, as well as nutrition habits (p<0.001. Compared to healthy controls, children with epilepsy washed their teeth less often and shorter, they had less knowledge about causes of oral diseases and about influence of oral diseases on general health, and they had worse self-rating of teeth and gum condition. In addition, significantly more children with epilepsy used an incorrect technique of teeth brushing (p<0.001. Characteristics of children’s epilepsy and educational degree of parents had no influence on these differences. Conclusion. Study results showed that children with epilepsy and their parents had worse habits, attitudes and behavior towards oral health than healthy controls and their parents. This difference can be explained primarily by worse parental estimation of oral health and

  4. Oral health knowledge, behaviour and practices among school children in Qatar

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    Mohammed Sultan Al-Darwish

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The oral health knowledge in Qatar is below the satisfactory level. Parents were the most popular source of oral health knowledge for the children followed by dentists, school teachers, and media.

  5. Oral health assessment and mouth care for children and young people receiving palliative care. Part one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, Stephanie; Chamley, Carol

    2013-03-01

    This is the first part of two articles exploring oral health problems and treatments for children receiving palliative care, successful management of which can improve considerably the quality of life for this group of children and young people. Part one includes an adapted oral health assessment tool for use in children and young people with complex and palliative healthcare needs that has the potential to help nurses identify and monitor oral health problems and prevent or minimise oral problems from developing. Part two--to be published next month--focuses on basic oral hygiene and the management of specific oral health problems.

  6. Food references in UK children's magazines - an oral health perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, K J; Fairchild, R M; Morgan, M Z

    2014-11-01

    Children's magazines are popular in the United Kingdom, but their content is poorly regulated. Consequently, food and beverages high in fat, salt and sugar (HFSS), detrimental to oral and wider health, make unrestricted appearances. The study aim was to assess the amount of HFSS food and drink children are exposed to while reading magazines; with particular focus on foods containing free sugars due to their known cariogenic properties, and foods with low pH due to their erosive potential. Eleven of the most popular UK children's magazines were selected and purchased at four separate time points in 2012. These 44 magazines were examined using content analysis; any references to food/beverages (in advertisements, free gifts, editorial and general content) were recorded. Of the 508 food references observed, 73.6% (374/508) were for foods detrimental to oral health owing to their high sugar and/or acid content. 5.9% (30/508) were considered 'unhealthy' due to their fat or salt content. 20.5% of references were for 'healthy' foods (104/508). The most common food categories referenced were baked goods (181/508) and sweets (86/508). Over a third (36.4%, 16/44) of magazines came with free sweets. In terms of positioning, the food/drink references were predominantly found in the general content of the magazines, including the editorial spreads. Direct advertisements for food/drink only accounted for 9.6% (36/374) of the total number of references counted. Food references within children's magazines are biased towards unhealthy foods especially those detrimental to oral health; these permeate throughout the general and editorial content and are not restricted to direct advertisements. Magazine editors, journalists and illustrators are responsible for the editorial and general content of magazines. Without regulation, subliminal placement of advertisements within editorial and general content leads to 'advertorials' which are known to confuse children and parents alike. This

  7. Oral health status among 12 and 15 year old children from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The assessment of oral health status of children in government and private schools provide data on the oral health status of children from different socio‑economic background. Aim: The aim of the following study is to assess and to compare the oral hygiene status, gingival status and caries experience between ...

  8. Efficacy of a public promotion program on children's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Ana Paula S; Rank, Rise C I C; Vilela, Joana Estela R; Rank, Marcos S; Ogawa, Wataro N; Molina, Omar F

    2017-09-25

    To assess the efficacy of the Baby's Mouth early dental care prevention and promotion program in preventing oral diseases (caries, gingivitis, or malocclusions) in children attended since 2010. This was a cross-sectional and cohort study that assessed 252 children between 36 and 60 months of age in both sexes. The children were divided into three groups: G1: effective participants of the program from birth; G2: children who have stopped participating for more than 24 months, and G3: children who have never attended a prevention program. The evaluation was carried out in two stages: first, an interview with the mothers and, afterwards, a clinical children examination to assess the presence of caries, gingivitis, and malocclusion. The chi-squared test was used for statistical analysis between groups (p<0.05). The diseases assessed were: caries (G1: 5.9%, G2: 54.7%, G3: 70%), gingivitis (G1: 8.3%, G2: 17.9%, G3: 40.5%), and malocclusion (G1: 22.6%; G2: 28.6%; G3: 50%). For gingivitis, there was no significant difference when comparing G1 and G2 (p=0.107), but it was significant between G1 and G3 (p<0.001). Regarding malocclusion, a statistically significant relationship was observed (p=0.004) among all groups. The prevention and promotion program in public oral health was effective in preventing caries disease, gingivitis, and malocclusion in children under 5 years of age. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of verbal, braille text, and tactile oral hygiene awareness instructions on oral health status of visually impaired children

    OpenAIRE

    P Brahmanna Chowdary; K S Uloopi; C Vinay; V Veerabhadra Rao; Chandrasekhar Rayala

    2016-01-01

    Background: Visually impaired children face limitations in interacting with the environment, as they cannot see the facial expression of parents, teachers and cannot perceive social behavior. These children are challenged every day in learning basic life skills and maintenance of oral hygiene being one among them. Aim: To evaluate the impact of verbal, braille text, and tactile oral hygiene awareness instructions on oral health status of visually impaired children. Materials and Methods: One ...

  10. Oral health knowledge, practice, oral hygiene status, and dental caries prevalence among visually impaired children in Bangalore

    OpenAIRE

    S T Prashanth; Sudhanshu Bhatnagar; Usha Mohan Das; H Gopu

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Visually impaired children daily face challenges for bearing their everyday skills. Maintenance of proper oral hygiene is one among them. Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the oral health knowledge, practice, oral hygiene status, and dental caries prevalence among visually impaired children in Bangalore. Materials and Methods: A total of 85 children were asked verbally a questionnaire regarding the frequency of brushing, cleaning tools, use of dentifrice, knowledge about t...

  11. The oral microbiota of Irish children in health and disease: a longitudinal and cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Hurley, Eimear

    2017-01-01

    The oral cavity harbours a very rich and diverse microbial community. In the last decade, the oral microbiota of children and adults has been studied in detail using continuously developing DNA sequencing methods. In particular focusing on the oral microbiome changes in the presence of diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease and the relationship of the oral microbiome with oral health and disease states. The overall aim of these studies was to unravel the complexity of the oral ec...

  12. Oral health assessment and mouth care for children and young people receiving palliative care. Part two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, S; Chamley, C

    2013-04-01

    This is the second part of a two-part article on oral health assessment and mouth care for children and young people receiving palliative care. This article covers basic oral hygiene and management of oral health problems: oral candidiasis, coated tongue/dirty mouth, dry mouth, hypersalivation, ulceration, painful mouth, stomatitis and mucositis. The article also covers treating patients who are immunocompromised and the need to educate families and carers in the basic principles of oral care, including the importance of preventing cross-infection. Part one outlined oral assessment and discussed the adaptation of the Nottingham Oral Health Assessment Tool (Freer 2000).

  13. Oral health profile of education and health professionals attending handicapped children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pomarico Luciana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes toward oral health of education and health professionals working in a children care program for handicapped children from 0 to 6 years of age, run by a public municipal institution in Rio de Janeiro. Using a printed questionnaire, 67 professionals (teachers, attendants and health professionals were interviewed. The results were compared to the children's oral hygiene habits, by directly observing their daily nursery routine. Although 97.0% said that oral health could play a part in general health, only 37.3% of the professionals answered correctly on this matter. As for methods for preventing caries, although 92.5% said that they were aware of them, only 17.9% went to the dentist for preventive treatment. Although the majority (81.3% indicated oral hygiene as a way of preventing caries, observation showed that this practice is not always put into effect in the program's day nursery. Regarding when to start toothbrushing in children, 75.0% of the teachers and 94.4% of the health professionals said that they were aware of the need to begin brushing before one year of age, although this reply was given by only 52.5% of the attendants (chi-square, p = 0.006. In view of these results, it was concluded that attitudes toward oral health were not always coherent with the knowledge that these professionals express.

  14. School-Based Educational Intervention to Improve Children's Oral Health-Related Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Holly; Dawett, Bhupinder; Leighton, Paul; Rose-Brady, Laura; Deery, Chris

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate a brief oral health promotion intervention delivered in schools by a primary care dental practice, aimed at changing oral health care knowledge and oral health-related behaviors in children. Cohort study with pretest-posttest design. Three primary schools. One hundred and fifty children (aged 9-12 years). Children received a 60-minute theory-driven classroom-based interactive educational session delivered by a dental care professional and received take-home literature on oral health. All children completed a questionnaire on oral health-related knowledge and self-reported oral health-related behaviors before, immediately after, and 6 weeks following the intervention. Children's dental knowledge significantly improved following the intervention, with improvement evident at immediate follow-up and maintained 6 weeks later. Significantly more children reported using dental floss 6 weeks after the intervention compared with baseline. No significant differences were detected in toothbrushing or dietary behaviors. School-based preventative oral health education delivered by primary care dental practices can generate short-term improvements in children's knowledge of oral health and some aspects of oral hygiene behavior. Future research should engage parents/carers and include objective clinical and behavioral outcomes in controlled study designs. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  15. A Comparison of the Oral Health Status of Children Who Are Blind and Children Who Are Sighted in Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir-Ozenen, Didem; Sungurtekin, Elif; Cildir, Sule; Sandalli, Nuket

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining oral health is central to a high quality of life because it limits the risks of disease. The oral health status of children with visual impairments should be investigated so their health care needs can be determined and preventive dental procedures can be implemented. This paper presents a study that aimed to evaluate the oral health…

  16. Oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children's center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyne, Amjad; Hammad, Nouf; Splieth, Christian

    2015-01-01

    To determine the oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children's center. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect following information: demographics, oral hygiene practices, importance of fluoride, dental visits, cause of tooth decay, gingival health, and sources of oral health information. The study was conducted at Riyadh Center for Special Children in Riyadh City from December 2013 to May 2014. All 60 health care workers in the center completed the questionnaire. A great majority (95%) of the workers brushed their teeth twice or more daily. More than two-third (71.7%) of the workers knew that fluoride helps in caries prevention. One in five (21.7%) workers thought that a dental visit only becomes necessary in case of a dental problem. Similarly, 13.3% of the workers thought to "wait till there is some pain in case of a dental cavity" before seeking dental treatment. The workers ranked soft drinks/soda (98.3%), flavored fizzy drinks (60%) and sweetened/flavored milks (43.3%) as top three cariogenic drinks. A great majority (95%) of the workers correctly responded that blood on toothbrush most probably is a sign of "gum disease". Dentists (50%) and media (45%) were the main source of their oral health information. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in workers' response in relation to their specific job. The special health care workers in the disabled children's center generally had satisfactory oral health knowledge and practices.

  17. Oral health status in children with inherited dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of rare, genetic connective tissue diseases that cause blisters in the skin and mucosal membranes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the oral health status of patients with epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica and level of knowledge and opinion of parents about the implementation of preventive measaures and quality of dental care of affected children. Methods. This study included a group of 17 patients from Serbia suffering from dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and matched control group. Dental caries status was assessed using the Klein-Palmer index. Oral hygiene status was verified with oral hygiene indices, simplified plaque index, and calculus index as described by Green and Vermillion. The gingiva was assessed as healthy or inflamed (gingivitis on the basis of any changes in color, shape, size and surface texture. The condition of oral mucosa has been registered on the basis of inspection of the lips, tongue, a floor of the mouth, mouth vestibule and palate. The level of knowledge and the impressions of parents about the application of preventive measures were investigated through two questionnaires specifically designed for this study. Results. In both dentitions, there was the highest percentage of caries teeth. In primary dentition average value of the modified plaque index was 1.4 ± 1.14 and modified calculus was 0.7 ± 1. On permanent teeth average plaque index was 2 ± 0.4, and average calculus 1.6 ± 0.6. Statistically, significant higher values were found in permanent dentition in percentage distribution of decayed, missing, filled teeth and also for plaque and calculus indices between affected children and the control group. Most common findings on mucosa were microstomia (76.5% and ankyloglossia (88.2%. Conclusion. The absence of protocol between the treating physician and the dentist and not sufficiently informed parents are leading to inadequate dental care. The implementation of

  18. Factors determining access to oral health services among children aged less than 12 years in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azañedo, Diego; Hernández-Vásquez, Akram; Casas-Bendezú, Mixsi; Gutiérrez, César; Agudelo-Suárez, Andrés A; Cortés, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Understanding problems of access to oral health services requires knowledge of factors that determine access. This study aimed to evaluate factors that determine access to oral health services among children aged Encuesta Demográfica y de Salud Familiar - ENDES). Children's access to oral health services within the previous 6 months was used as the dependent variable (i.e. Yes/No), and the Andersen and col model was used to select independent variables. Predisposing (e.g., language spoken by  tutor or guardian, wealth level, caregivers' educational level, area of residence, natural region of residence, age, and sex) and enabling factors (e.g. type of health insurance) were considered. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and multivariate analysis was performed using generalized linear models (Poisson family). Results: Of all the children, 51% were males, 56% were aged oral health services among children aged oral health services.

  19. Impact of verbal, Braille text, and tactile oral hygiene awareness instructions on oral health status of visually impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdary, P Brahmanna; Uloopi, K S; Vinay, C; Rao, V Veerabhadra; Rayala, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Visually impaired children face limitations in interacting with the environment, as they cannot see the facial expression of parents, teachers and cannot perceive social behavior. These children are challenged every day in learning basic life skills and maintenance of oral hygiene being one among them. To evaluate the impact of verbal, braille text, and tactile oral hygiene awareness instructions on oral health status of visually impaired children. One hundred and twenty institutionalized visually impaired children aged 6-16 years were selected and divided into three groups (40 children each). Group I: Verbal and tactile, Group II: Verbal and braille, Group III: Verbal, braille, and tactile. Instructions regarding maintenance of good oral hygiene and brushing technique were explained to all the children, and oral health status of these children using plaque index (Silness and Loe) and gingival index (Loe and Silness) was evaluated at 1, 3, and 6 months interval. ANOVA test was used to analyze the intra- and inter-group comparisons and Tukey post-hoc test for multiple group comparisons. Children in all the groups showed reduction in plaque and gingival scores. There was the highest percentage of reduction in plaque scores in Group III (70.6%), and the decrease in gingival scores was the highest in Group II (84%). Severity of dental plaque and gingivitis in visually impaired individuals can be reduced by a controlled and supervised educational program. The combination of all three, i.e., verbal, braille, and tactile mode of oral health educational aids proved to be effective.

  20. Prevalence of oral health status in visually impaired children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KVKK Reddy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The epidemiological investigation was carried out among 228 children selected from two schools of similar socioeconomic strata in and around Chennai city. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 128 visually impaired and 100 normal school going children in the age group of 6-15 years. The examination procedure and criteria were those recommended by W.H.O. in 1997. Results: The mean DMFT/deft was 1.1 and 0.17,0.87 and 0.47 in visually impaired and normal children, respectively. Oral hygiene levels in both groups were: mean value in good category was 0.19 and 0.67, in fair category was 0.22 and 0.1, and in poor category 0.40 and 0.23 in visually impaired children and normal children, respectively. Trauma experienced children were 0.29 and 0.13 in visually impaired children and normal children, respectively. Conclusion: The conclusions drawn from this study were that there was a greater prevalence of dental caries, poorer oral hygiene, and higher incidence of trauma in visually impaired children.

  1. Socioeconomic and clinical factors associated with caregivers' perceptions of children's oral health in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Chaiana; Marquezan, Macela; Kramer, Paulo F; Bönecker, Marcelo; Ardenghi, Thiago M

    2011-06-01

    We assessed how socioeconomic and clinical conditions could affect parents' perceptions of their child's oral health. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 455 children, aged 1-5 years, representative of Santa Maria, a southern city in Brazil. Participants were randomly selected among children attending a National Day of Children's Vaccination. Clinical examinations provided information on the prevalence of caries, dental trauma, and occlusion. The caregivers' perception of children's oral health and socioeconomic status were assessed by means of a questionnaire. A Poisson regression model using robust variance (Prevalence ratio: PR; 95% CI, P ≤ 0.05) was performed to assess the association between the predictor variables and outcomes. Parents were more likely to rate their child's oral health as 'poor' if the former earned a lower income and the latter had anterior open bite and dental caries. Parents of black children with anterior open bite and dental caries were more likely to rate their child's oral health as 'worse than that of other children'. Clinical and socioeconomic characteristics are significantly associated with parents' perceptions of their child's oral health. Understanding the caregivers' perceptions of children's oral health and the factors affecting this could be useful in the planning of public health polices, in view of the inequity in the oral health pattern. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Oral health status of rural-urban migrant children in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiao-Li; McGrath, Colman; Lin, Huan-Cai

    2011-01-01

    In China, there is a massive rural-urban migration and the children of migrants are often unregistered residents (a 'floating population'). This pilot study aimed to profile the oral health of migrant children in South China's principal city of migration and identify its socio-demographic/behavioural determinants. An epidemiological survey was conducted in an area of Guangzhou among 5-year-old migrant children (n = 138) who received oral examinations according to the World Health Organization criteria. Parents' oral health knowledge/attitude, child practices, and impact of children's oral health on their quality-of-life (QoL) were assessed. The caries rate and mean (SD) dmft were 86% and 5.17 (4.16), respectively, higher than those national statistics for both rural and urban areas (P Oral hygiene was satisfactory (DI-S Oral health impacts on QoL were considerable; 60% reported one or more impacts. 58% variance in 'dmft' was explained by 'non-local-born', 'low-educated parents', 'bedtime feeding', 'parental unawareness of fluoride's effect and importance of teeth', and 'poor oral hygiene' (all P oral health-related QoL (both P Oral health is poor among rural-urban migrant children and requires effective interventions in targeted sub-groups. © 2010 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2010 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Oral health of early head start children: a qualitative study of staff, parents, and pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofidi, Mahyar; Zeldin, Leslie P; Rozier, R Gary

    2009-02-01

    We explored the oral health knowledge, attitudes, and activities of Early Head Start (EHS) staff members, parents, and pregnant women, along with their suggestions related to future oral health educational interventions targeting EHS children. Nine focus groups were conducted with EHS staff, parents, and pregnant women. Audiotapes of sessions were transcribed and entered into ATLAS.ti 5.0 for coding and analysis. Attitudes about the importance of children's oral health among parents and pregnant women were mixed. Staff members voiced responsibility for children's oral health but frustration in their inability to communicate effectively with parents. Parents in turn perceived staff criticism regarding how they cared for their children's oral health. Gaps were noted in the oral health activities of EHS programs. Participants expressed confusion regarding the application of Head Start oral health performance standards to EHS. The need for culturally sensitive, hands-on oral health education was highlighted. Tailored, theory-based interventions are needed to improve communication between EHS staff and families. Clear policies on the application of Head Start oral health performance standards to EHS are warranted. Educational activities should address the needs and suggestions of EHS participants.

  4. Wanting better: a qualitative study of low-income parents about their children's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Charlotte W; Linsenmayer, Kristi A; Williams, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Using qualitative methods, the purpose of this study was to understand low-income parents' experiences and how these influenced their oral health-related behavior toward their children. Twenty-eight parents were recruited from 7 sites that serve low-income families. Interviews, which were audiotaped and transcribed, were comprised of mostly open-ended questions. Transcripts were analyzed for common themes. Parents' experiences influenced their oral health-related beliefs, intentions, and behaviors. Finding dentists who accept Medicaid was the greatest barrier to realizing intended preventive dental care. Physicians appeared to have relatively little impact on these families' oral health care, even though parents believed that oral health is part of overall health care. WIC (the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children) played an important role in facilitating oral health knowledge and access to dental care. Most low-income parents had received little attention to their own oral health, yet wanted better for their children. This motivated the high value placed on their children's preventive oral health. Parents faced challenges finding dental care for their children. Difficulty finding a regular source of dental care for low-income adults, however, was nearly universal. The authors identified strategies, which emerged from their interviews, to improve the oral health knowledge and dental care access for these low-income families.

  5. Beyond access: the role of family and community in children's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouradian, Wendy E; Huebner, Colleen E; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Slavkin, Harold C

    2007-05-01

    Children's health outcomes result from the complex interaction of biological determinants with sociocultural, family, and community variables. Dental professionals' efforts to reduce oral health disparities often focus on improving access to dental care. However, this strategy alone cannot eliminate health disparities. Rising rates of early childhood caries create an urgent need to study family and community factors in oral health. Using Los Angeles as a multicultural laboratory for understanding health disparities, the Santa Fe Group convened an experiential conference to consider models of ensuring child and family health within communities. This article summarizes key conference themes and insights regarding 1) children's needs and societal priorities; 2) the science of child health determinants; 3) the rapidly changing demographics of the United States; and 4) the importance of communities that support children and families. Conference participants concluded that to eliminate children's oral health disparities we must change paradigms to promote health, integrate oral health into other health and social programs, and empower communities. Oral health advocates have a key role in ensuring oral health is integrated into policy for children. Dental schools have a leadership role to play in expanding community partnerships and providing education in health determinants. Participants recommended replicating this experiential conference in other venues.

  6. Oral Health Quality of Life in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Parental Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ashiry, Eman A; Alaki, Sumer M; Nouri, Sumaya M

    To assess the parents' perception of the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQOL) in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) and compare it with normally developing children. 63 children with CP were recruited from 8 disability centers, and 99 healthy controls were recruited from 5 elementary schools. The ages of the children in both groups were from 6-12 years. The Franciscan Hospital for Children Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (FHC-OHRQOL) was used to measure the OHRQOL and an oral examination was conducted in the schools/centers of the children to assess the teeth, gingival health, and oral hygiene. The FHC-OHRQOL showed a significant difference in 3 out of 4 sections indicating lower OHRQOL in the CP group. The examination showed no significant difference in the dental and gingival health and in the level of oral hygiene. The OHRQOL of children with CP is significantly lower than that of normally developing children although the oral health status of children with CP is not significantly different from that of normally developing children.

  7. Oral health status and treatment needs of asthmatic children aged 6 – 12 Years in Lucknow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Yadav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Asthma is a growing public health problem affecting over 300 million people worldwide. Asthmatic children have an altered immune response and a high tendency to mouth breathing especially during an episode of rhinitis or an attack thus predisposing them to serious oral health problems. Aim: This study aims to assess oral health status of asthmatic children aged 6–12. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 450 asthmatic children aged 6–12 years in Lucknow, asthmatic children were chosen from pediatric department of major hospitals. Gingival index (GI, oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S, and dentition status and treatment need of World Health Organization oral health survey pro forma (1997 were used to assess oral health status. ANOVA, Chi-square test, and descriptive statistics were carried out. SPSS 16 was used for the data analysis. Results: Mean dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT was 2.98 ± 1.52 and 3.05 ± 1.60, mean GI score was 1.55 ± 0.52 and 1.53 ± 0.42 and mean OHI-S was 2.59 ± 0.68 and 2.48 ± 0.77 among the male and female asthmatic children. Conclusion: Female asthmatic children had higher mean DMFT score, but lower mean GI score and oral hygiene score than male children in comparison and also they had a compromised oral hygiene status.

  8. Influence of family environment on children's oral health: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Aline Rogéria Freire de; Mialhe, Fábio Luiz; Barbosa, Taís de Souza; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria

    2013-01-01

    To review current models and scientific evidence on the influence of parents' oral health behaviors on their children's dental caries. MEDLINE articles published between 1980 and June, 2012. Original research articles on parents' oral health behavior were reviewed. A total of 218 citations were retrieved, and 13 articles were included in the analysis. The studies were eligible for review if they matched the following inclusion criteria: (1) they evaluated a possible association between dental caries and parents' oral-health-related behaviors, and (2) the study methodology included oral clinical examination. The main search terms were "oral health", "parental attitudes", "parental knowledge", and "dental caries". : 13 experimental studies contributed data to the synthesis. Original articles, reviews, and chapters in textbooks were also considered. Parents' dental health habits influence their children's oral health. Oral health education programs aimed at preventive actions are needed to provide children not only with adequate oral health, but better quality of life. Special attention should be given to the entire family, concerning their lifestyle and oral health habits. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Social inequalities in children's oral health-related quality of life: the Generation R Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kragt, L.; Wolvius, E.B.; Raat, H.; Jaddoe, V.W.; Ongkosuwito, E.M.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) is the most important patient-reported outcome measure in oral health research. The purpose of the present research was to study the association of family socioeconomic position (SEP) with children's OHRQoL. METHODS: This cross-sectional study

  10. Putting your money where your mouth is: parents' valuation of good oral health of their children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaire, J.H.; van Exel, N.J.A.; van Loveren, C.; Brouwer, W.B.F.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the parental willingness to invest in good oral health for their child in terms of money and time and to relate this to oral health related knowledge and behavioral aspects. 290 parents of 6-year-old children, participating in a RCT on caries preventive

  11. Putting your money where your mouth is: parents' valuation of good oral health of their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaire, J H; van Exel, N J A; van Loveren, C; Brouwer, W B F

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the parental willingness to invest in good oral health for their child in terms of money and time and to relate this to oral health related knowledge and behavioral aspects. 290 parents of 6-year-old children, participating in a RCT on caries preventive strategies in The Netherlands were asked to provide information on education, oral health habits, dietary habits, knowledge on dental topics, willingness to pay and perceived resistance against investing in preventive oral health actions for their children. Despite the fact that parents overall valued oral health for their child highly, still 12% of the parents were unwilling to spend any money, nor to invest any time by brushing their children's teeth to maintain good oral health for their child. Additionally, they indicated that they were unwilling to visit the dentist for preventive measures more than once a year. These children may certainly be considered at higher risk of developing oral diseases because worse oral hygiene habits and dietary habits were found in this group. Given the results, it may be necessary to differentiate in allocating caries prevention programmes to target parents or (school-based) children directly. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Health promoting schools and children's oral health related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Zamros Y M; Jaafar, Nasruddin

    2013-12-10

    The study objective was to compare children's oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL) in schools with 6 years of implementation of a health promoting school model in Malaysia, i.e. the Doktor Muda Programme (DMP) and in schools without the DMP. This report was part of a larger study to evaluate the DMP impact on schoolchildren's oral health knowledge, attitudes, behaviour, caries progression and OHRQoL. It was conducted in Negri Sembilan state. The sample comprised 3455, Year 6 (11-12 year old) children; 1282 from DMP (intervention) and 2173 from non-DMP (control) schools. The Malay Child-OIDP index was used to evaluate children's levels of oral impacts on 8 daily performances after 6 years of DMP implementation (2006-2011). Prevalence, score, impact intensity, causes and extent of impacts were compared. Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests were used in the data analysis. Overall response rate was 95.1%. Prevalence of overall impacts was 57.8% and 60.8% (mean total impact score was 7.10 and 7.77) in the intervention and control group, respectively. The three most frequently affected performances in both groups were eating, cleaning teeth and emotional stability. Significantly less DMP children had oral impact on cleaning teeth (p = 0.034). The majority of children with impacts in both groups reported 'very little' to 'moderate' levels of impact intensity. Significantly more DMP children reported having 'very little' and 'little' levels of impact intensity on cleaning teeth (p = 0.037) and emotional stability (p = 0.020), respectively. Significantly less DMP children reported having 'very severe' level of impact intensity on speaking (p = 0.038). The most prevalent cause of impacts in both groups was toothache. Significantly less DMP children reported bleeding gums (p = 0.016) and presence of plaque/calculus as causes of impacts (p = 0.032). About 75% of children with impacts in both groups reported having up to four daily performances affected. This study showed

  13. Oral health care for children attending a malnutrition clinic in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, N

    2007-08-01

    Most health problems dealt with at a primary care level have an oral health impact, making it vital for oral health services to find means to integrate with other facility-based programmes at primary health care (PHC) centres. 1) To determine the oral status of the children attending a facility-based nutrition programme and the oral health knowledge, attitude and practices of their parents/caregivers; and 2) To develop a framework for an oral health component to complement this programme. A descriptive study of children and their parents/caregivers attending a facility-based nutrition programme (n = 60 children). A structured, administered questionnaire for parents/caregivers and an oral examination for the children was used for data collection. The response rate was 82% (n = 49). Most parents start cleaning their children's mouths between 12 and 24 months (64%), add sugar to food and feeding bottles, and visit a dentist only when the child is symptomatic. These factors clearly place this group at risk for developing dental caries and gingivitis. Their malnutrition status/history increases their risk of oral diseases. The oral examination found plaque deposits, gingivitis, caries and 'white spots'. This study clearly shows the need for an oral health component for children attending the facility-based nutrition programme. Promotion, prevention and therapeutical oral care can be maximized by the involvement of a wide range of stakeholders and an interdisciplinary approach. This shows an expanded role for the dental team with specific reference the oral hygienist in such an environment.

  14. Oral health and nutrition for children under five years of age: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-12

    Apr 12, 2013 ... Paediatric Food-Based Dietary Guidelines for South Africa: Oral health and nutrition for children under five ... obesity, diabetes, coronary heart disease and dental caries. ... research has examined the association between key.

  15. Oral health knowledge and sources of information among male Saudi school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyne, Amjad H; Chohan, Arham N; Al-Dosari, Khalid; Al-Dokheil, Majed

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of present study was to determine the oral health knowledge and sources of information in male Saudi school children. The required information was collected through a especially designed questionnaire. A total of 130 children completed the questionnaire with the mean age of 13.3 (SD 1.9) years. There was no significant difference in oral health knowledge or sources of information in relation to age and educational level. Less than half (44.6%) of the children actually had heard about fluoride, one-third (34.6%) correctly identified the action of fluoride as preventing tooth decay. Almost all (97.2%) the children thought that sweets (chocolates/candies) could cause tooth decay. However, a large number of children were not aware of cariogenic potential of soft drinks (31.5%). More than half (53.1%) of the children reported that their dentist taught them how to brush properly. However, 11.5% children were not taught by any one about proper tooth-brushing. A large number (40.0%) of children thought that one must visit the dentist only in case of pain in the teeth. Dentists were the most popular (61.5%) source of oral health information. It can be concluded that the children need further oral health education in areas of caries prevention, and there was a need to utilise parents, schoolteachers and media to enhance their oral health knowledge.

  16. Oral health activities of early head start teachers directed toward children and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Ashley M; Rozier, R Gary; Zeldin, Leslie P; Preisser, John S

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined Early Head Start (EHS) teachers' oral health program activities and their association with teacher and program characteristics. Self-completed questionnaires were distributed to the staff in all EHS programs in North Carolina. Variables for dental health activities for parents (four items) and children (four items) were constructed as the sum of responses to a 0-4 Likert-type scale (never to very frequently). Ordinary least squares regression models examined the association between teachers' oral health program activities and modifiable teacher (oral health knowledge, values, self-efficacy, dental health training, perceived barriers to dental activities) and program (director and health coordinator knowledge and perceived barriers to dental activities) characteristics. Teachers in the parent (n=260) and child (n=231) analyses were a subset of the 485 staff respondents (98 percent response rate). Teachers engaged in child oral health activities (range = 0-16; mean = 9.0) more frequently than parent activities (range = 0-16; mean = 6.9). Teachers' oral health values, perceived oral health self-efficacy, dental training, and director and health coordinator knowledge were positively associated with oral health activities (P oral health activity in EHS programs is less than optimal. Several characteristics of EHS staff were identified that can be targeted with education interventions. Evidence for effectiveness of EHS interventions needs to be strengthened, but results of this survey provide encouraging findings about the potential effects of teacher training on their oral health practices.

  17. Oral health knowledge, behaviour and practices among school children in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Darwish, Mohammed Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the oral health knowledge behaviour and practices among school children in Qatar. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in Qatar from October 2011 to April 2012. A total of 2200 school children aged 12–14 years were approached from 16 schools of different areas. The information about oral health knowledge and sources of information was obtained through a self-administrated questionnaire. Data analyses were performed. ...

  18. Effect of obesity and lifestyle on the oral health of pre adolescent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Nithya; Suresh, M; Chandrasekaran, S C

    2014-02-01

    Worldwide estimates of childhood obesity are as high as 43 million, and rates continue to increase each year. Childhood obesity is a growing problem in the present era and it causes serious consequences in the later years. In today's society, electronic media have been thoroughly integrated into the fabric of life, with television, video games, and computers being central to both work and play. While these media outlets can provide education and entertainment to children, many researches are concerned with the negative impact of electronic media on children. The current study aimed to evaluate the correlation, as to how oral hygiene and periodontal health were influenced by obesity and lifestyle factors, among pre-adolescents of ages of 9-12 years. This study was conducted in schools located around Velachery, Chennai, India. A total of 426 children of age group of 9-12 years were selected. Information on their socio-economic, dietary, oral health statuses and time spent in leisure activities were assessed by using a questionnaire, followed by BMI estimation and these variables were correlated with their oral hygiene statuses. The prevalence of poor oral hygiene and poor dietary habits was observed in children who spent more time in watching television, playing videogames and using computer. Good oral hygiene was observed in children who had visited dentists in the past. There is a strong association of lifestyle factors with oral hygiene in pre-adolescent children. Sedentary lifestyle, with more leisure activities, has a negative impact on the oral health of children.

  19. Socioeconomic gradients in general and oral health of primary school children in Shiraz, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Golkari, Ali; Sabokseir, Aira; Sheiham, Aubrey; Watt, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health status is largely determined by socio-economic status. The general health of individuals at higher social hierarchy is better than people in lower levels. Likewise, people with higher socio-economic status have better oral health than lower socio-economic groups. There has not been much work regarding the influence of socio-economic status on the health conditions of children in developing countries, particularly in Iran. The aim of this study was to compare the oral and ge...

  20. Utilization of oral health services by mothers of preschool children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine oral health services utilization by mothers of pre school children in Jos North Local Government Area, Plateau State, Nigeria Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Four Primary Health Care (PHC) Clinics in Jos North Local Government Area Participants: 200 mothers of pre school children

  1. Differences in oral health behaviour between children from high and children from low SES schools in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jerkovic-Cosic, Katarina; Binnekade, J M; van der Kruk, Joke; van der Most, J A; Talsma, A C; van der Schans, Cees

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the determinants of dental caries in relation to socio-economic status (SES) within oral health, children's eating habits and parental attitudes towards oral health. BASIC RESEARCH DESIGN: Dental screening data were collected from 6- and 10-year-old schoolchildren from low and

  2. Differences in oral health behaviour between children from high and children from low SES schools in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jerkovic, K.; Binnekade, J. M.; van der Kruk, J. J.; van der Most, J. A.; Talsma, A. C.; van der Schans, C. P.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the determinants of dental caries in relation to socio-economic status (SES) within oral health, children's eating habits and parental attitudes towards oral health. BASIC RESEARCH DESIGN: Dental screening data were collected from 6- and 10-year-old schoolchildren from low and

  3. Differences in oral health behaviour between children from high and children from low SES schools in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jerkovic, K.; Binnekade, J. M.; van der Kruk, J. J.; van der Most, J. A.; Talsma, A. C.; van der Schans, C. P.

    Objective To identify the determinants of dental caries in relation to socio-economic status (SES) within oral health, children's eating habits and parental attitudes towards oral health. Basic research design Dental screening data were collected from 6- and 10-year old schoolchildren from low and

  4. Dental health and oral health-related quality of life in children with congenital bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, K; Eshghi, P

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dental and some other aspects of oral health status of young patients with congenital bleeding disorders (CBD) and the impact of these on their quality of life (OHR-QoL) compared with controls. DMFS-dmfs (Decayed, Missed, Filled Tooth surfaces in permanent and primary teeth) scores, Simplified oral hygiene index, occurance of hypoplasia of first permanent molars, Temporomandibular joint dysfunction and occlusion of 46 CBD patients at the age range of 2-15 years and 46 of other children as control were compared, and the impact of their oral health situation on quality of life was also investigated. Data were analysed by chi-square, t-test and Pearson correlation. Patients were significantly more caries-free with less decayed teeth in primary-permanent dentition (P = 0.03, t = -2.17).The mean scores of OHR-QoL of CBD patients and controls were not significantly different. Oral Bleeding was the significant variable in relation to 'oral health-related quality of life' in CBD groups (Pearson correlation, r = -0.56, P = 0.000). OHR-QoL in the control group was related to dmfs score (r = -0.392, P = 0.011) and male gender (r = -0.329, P = 0.026). Congenital bleeding disorder CBD patients were found to have a better dental health situation in primary dentition compared with controls; however, their 'oral health-related quality of life' was similar. Oral bleeding was the only significant factor related to OHR-QoL in CBD. It shows an overall importance of development of comprehensive care centres for CBD as the main cause of this achievement. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Impact of verbal, braille text, and tactile oral hygiene awareness instructions on oral health status of visually impaired children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Brahmanna Chowdary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Visually impaired children face limitations in interacting with the environment, as they cannot see the facial expression of parents, teachers and cannot perceive social behavior. These children are challenged every day in learning basic life skills and maintenance of oral hygiene being one among them. Aim: To evaluate the impact of verbal, braille text, and tactile oral hygiene awareness instructions on oral health status of visually impaired children. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty institutionalized visually impaired children aged 6-16 years were selected and divided into three groups (40 children each. Group I: Verbal and tactile, Group II: Verbal and braille, Group III: Verbal, braille, and tactile. Instructions regarding maintenance of good oral hygiene and brushing technique were explained to all the children, and oral health status of these children using plaque index (Silness and Loe and gingival index (Loe and Silness was evaluated at 1, 3, and 6 months interval. Statistical Analysis: ANOVA test was used to analyze the intra- and inter-group comparisons and Tukey post-hoc test for multiple group comparisons. Results: Children in all the groups showed reduction in plaque and gingival scores. There was the highest percentage of reduction in plaque scores in Group III (70.6%, and the decrease in gingival scores was the highest in Group II (84%. Conclusion: Severity of dental plaque and gingivitis in visually impaired individuals can be reduced by a controlled and supervised educational program. The combination of all three, i.e., verbal, braille, and tactile mode of oral health educational aids proved to be effective.

  6. Survey of Knowledge, Beliefs, and Behaviors of Migrant Vietnamese Parents Regarding Young Children's Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Uyen N; Rowe, Dorothy J; Barker, Judith C

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the oral health knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors of migrant Vietnamese parents of 1-5 year-olds in San Jose, California. Method: A verbally-administered survey was conducted with a convenience sample of 45 Vietnamese parents recruited at San Jose public libraries. Following preliminary screening, written informed consent was obtained from eligible individuals. A pre-tested, structured 94-item questionnaire was used to collect information regarding parent demographics, and the parent's knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors about children's oral health. Simple descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Results: Vietnamese parents acknowledged a number of basic concepts regarding early childhood caries (ECC), such as influences of sugar consumption, oral hygiene, and bottle use. Unlike other groups, they reported some familiarity with the role of bacteria in caries etiology. Oral health knowledge and beliefs, however, were not reflected in parental oral health behaviors such as supervision of children's brushing. Knowledge about the preventive role of fluoride was limited and varied among the population. Parental knowledge and behaviors did not vary by education level or length of residence in US. Conclusion: Vietnamese parents demonstrated reasonably good oral health knowledge, but poor behavioral guidance of their children's oral health, indicating the need for continued parental education emphasizing age-appropriate oral care and the preventative role of fluoride. Copyright © 2017 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  7. A model for oral health gradients in children: using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahanirad, A; Joulaei, H; Jamali, J; Vossoughi, M; Golkari, A

    2017-03-01

    Detecting the underlying socioeconomic and behavioral determinants is essential for reducing oral health disparities in children. To test a conceptual model in children to explore the interaction amongst social, environmental, behavioral factors and oral health outcomes. This analytic cross-sectional study was performed in 2014-2015 in Shiraz, Iran. The sampling was conducted using a multistage stratified design to represent the whole 6-year-olds in Shiraz County. Participants were 830, 6-year-old first grade primary schoolchildren and their parents. Children were examined to register decayed, missing and filled teeth (dmft) and simplified oral hygiene index (OHI-S). Parents were asked for data on socio-cultural risk factors, oral health behaviors and children's oral health related quality of life (C-OHRQoL). Data on environmental risk factors were collected from several sources. The proposed model, a development of Peterson's, was tested using structural equation modeling (SEM). The tested model could empirically demonstrate the wide range of social and behavioral factors affecting C-OHRQoL. Socioeconomic status (SES) affected the OHRQoL of children through several pathways. Tooth brushing frequency, use of oral health services and consuming cariogenic foods were the mediators, through which SES affected dmft and subsequently C-OHRQoL. Using the modified Petersen's model and SEM, the paths in which different distal and proximal factors affect oral health outcomes in children could be clearly identified. It showed that addressing the underlying social, economic and behavioral determinants is essential for reducing oral health disparities among Iranian children. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  8. How a North Carolina program boosted preventive oral health services for low-income children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozier, R Gary; Stearns, Sally C; Pahel, Bhavna T; Quinonez, Rocio B; Park, Jeongyoung

    2010-12-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay), the most common chronic disease affecting young children, is exacerbated by limited access to preventive dental services for low-income children. To address this problem, North Carolina implemented a program to reimburse physicians for up to six preventive oral health visits for Medicaid-enrolled children younger than age three. Analysis of physician and dentist Medicaid claims from the period 2000-2006 shows that the program greatly increased preventive oral health services. By 2006 approximately 30 percent of well-child visits for children ages six months up to three years included these services. However, additional strategies are needed to ensure preventive oral health care for more low-income children.

  9. The effects of poverty on children's development and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Marcio A

    2012-01-01

    According to the US Census Bureau, the poverty rate for children under 18 years of age increased to 22% in 2010. Poverty leads to adverse health outcomes in children and adolescents such as harmful effects on learning, psychosocial development, physical health, productivity and family life. Because the citizens and residents of a country are its most valuable assets, it is unwise to allow housing instability, food insecurity and hunger to continue to exist at its current levels. Reducing poverty is likely to prevent illnesses, decrease hospitalizations, and lead to lower health care costs. There is also a need for intervention strategies to ensure equitable access to healthy foods across the world. Children who are food insecure are more likely to be in poor health and to have poor nutritional outcomes. Poverty may lead to poor dental health due to malnutrition or incorrect diet and it may also have an effect on the child's behavior in the dental office. An understanding of poverty will lessen the anger, frustration and prejudice that pediatric dentists may feel when working with low-income families. This manuscript presents a concise overview of the effects of poverty in children's lives.

  10. The Oral Microbiome of Children: Development, Disease, and Implications Beyond Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Andres; Nelson, Karen E

    2017-02-01

    In the era of applied meta-omics and personalized medicine, the oral microbiome is a valuable asset. From biomarker discovery to being a powerful source of therapeutic targets and to presenting an opportunity for developing non-invasive approaches to health care, it has become clear that oral microbes may hold the answer for understanding disease, even beyond the oral cavity. Although our understanding of oral microbiome diversity has come a long way in the past 50 years, there are still many areas that need to be fine-tuned for better risk assessment and diagnosis, especially in early developmental stages of human life. Here, we discuss the factors that impact development of the oral microbiome and explore oral markers of disease, with a focus on the early oral cavity. Our ultimate goal is to put different experimental and methodological views into perspective for better assessment of early oral and systemic disease at an early age and discuss how oral microbiomes-at the community level-could provide improved assessment in individuals and populations at risk.

  11. Oral health status of normal children and those affiliated with cardiac diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suma, G; Usha, Mohan Das; Ambika, G; Jairanganath

    2011-01-01

    If a child's general health is compromised, care for his/her oral and dental health becomes an absolute necessity. Children with heart diseases require special dental care because of the risk of developing infective endocarditis. Was to evaluate the oral health status, parental oral health care knowledge of the pediatric cardiac patients and non cardiac group and infective endocarditis awareness among the parents of the cardiac group. Include a total of 50 children with heart diseases and 50 non-cardiac children aged 2-12 years were examined for dental caries index and simplified debris index. A structured, administered questionnaire for parents/caregivers about knowledge of infective endocarditis and oral health were used for data collection. Showed no statistically significant differences between the caries experience score for the two groups and oral health knowledge. Knowledge about Infective Endocarditis in parents of study group was very poor. Simplified Debris Index of age group 6-12 years was higher in study groups compared to the controls. Improvements should be made in educating parents and children on the importance of caries prevention and maintaining a good oral hygiene in prevention of infective endocarditis.

  12. Oral health knowledge, behaviour and practices among school children in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Darwish, Mohammed Sultan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the oral health knowledge behaviour and practices among school children in Qatar. A cross-sectional study was carried out in Qatar from October 2011 to April 2012. A total of 2200 school children aged 12-14 years were approached from 16 schools of different areas. The information about oral health knowledge and sources of information was obtained through a self-administrated questionnaire. Data analyses were performed. The overall response rate was (96%). Only (25.8%) of children reported a high level of oral health knowledge. After each meal, tooth brushing was observed by a very low percentage of children (3.7%). About 44.6% of children recognized dental floss as a cleaning device for between the teeth. A large number of children (32.5%) thought incorrectly that one must visit the dentist only in case of pain. A great majority was not aware of cariogenic potential of soft drinks (39%) and sweetened milk (97.8%). Less than half (38.9%) of children actually had heard about fluoride. Only (16.8%) correctly answered the question about sign of tooth decay. Slightly, less than half (48.4%) could not define the meaning of plaque. Parents were the most popular (69.1%), source of oral health information for the children. The oral health knowledge in Qatar is below the satisfactory level. Parents were the most popular source of oral health knowledge for the children followed by dentists, school teachers, and media.

  13. Oral health in children with physical (Cerebral Palsy) and intellectual (Down Syndrome) disabilities: Systematic review I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diéguez-Pérez, Montserrat; de Nova-García, Manuel-Joaquín; Mourelle-Martínez, M Rosa; Bartolomé-Villar, Begona

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, patients with physical and/or intellectual disabilities presented greater oral pathology, owing to their condition and to other external factors. Improved social and health conditions make it necessary to update knowledge on their oral and dental health. For this purpose, a bibliographic review was done regarding the state of oral health of children with these two types of disability, in comparison with a control group. Some of the guidelines of the PRISMA statement were taken into account. The ranking of the articles found is based on the modified Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. The final number of articles evaluated was 14. Parameters such as dental caries, oral hygiene, gingival health, dental traumas, malocclusion and habits were considered. There is no consensus among authors regarding dental caries, oral hygiene and gingival health. The different results obtained are due in part to the fact that the methodologies used were not the same. However, it has been noted that, when studying other parameters and regardless of the methodology employed, the results obtained are similar. Children with physical and intellectual disabilities constitute a group that needs early and regular dental care in order to prevent and limit the severity of the pathologies observed. Oral health, dental caries, malocclusion, oral habits, dental trauma, oral hygiene, disabled child, cerebral palsy and Down syndrome.

  14. Structural Determinants and Children's Oral Health: A Cross-National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, S R; Foster Page, L; Thomson, W M; Broomhead, T; Bekes, K; Benson, P E; Aguilar-Diaz, F; Do, L; Hirsch, C; Marshman, Z; McGrath, C; Mohamed, A; Robinson, P G; Traebert, J; Turton, B; Gibson, B J

    2018-03-01

    Much research on children's oral health has focused on proximal determinants at the expense of distal (upstream) factors. Yet, such upstream factors-the so-called structural determinants of health-play a crucial role. Children's lives, and in turn their health, are shaped by politics, economic forces, and social and public policies. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between children's clinical (number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth) and self-reported oral health (oral health-related quality of life) and 4 key structural determinants (governance, macroeconomic policy, public policy, and social policy) as outlined in the World Health Organization's Commission for Social Determinants of Health framework. Secondary data analyses were carried out using subnational epidemiological samples of 8- to 15-y-olds in 11 countries ( N = 6,648): Australia (372), New Zealand (three samples; 352, 202, 429), Brunei (423), Cambodia (423), Hong Kong (542), Malaysia (439), Thailand (261, 506), United Kingdom (88, 374), Germany (1498), Mexico (335), and Brazil (404). The results indicated that the type of political regime, amount of governance (e.g., rule of law, accountability), gross domestic product per capita, employment ratio, income inequality, type of welfare regime, human development index, government expenditure on health, and out-of-pocket (private) health expenditure by citizens were all associated with children's oral health. The structural determinants accounted for between 5% and 21% of the variance in children's oral health quality-of-life scores. These findings bring attention to the upstream or structural determinants as an understudied area but one that could reap huge rewards for public health dentistry research and the oral health inequalities policy agenda.

  15. Planning and implementation of community oral health programs for caries management in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C H; Chau, Alex M H; Lo, Edward C M; Lam, Anty

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay or cavities (dental caries) can have a significant impact on children's quality of life, causing pain, infection, and other problems in the oral environment. Good oral health is a fundamental element of good general health for children, yet dental caries is still prevalent among children in many countries. Dental caries is well-understood, and effective prevention is an attainable goal. Dental professionals should actively engage with communities--in particular, the underprivileged--to identify dental caries problems and implement appropriate and effective community oral health programs (COHPs) to improve oral health and reduce oral health inequalities. This paper discusses COHPs as well as the steps involved in caries prevention for children. These steps cannot ensure the success of every COHP, but they are helpful for developing, integrating, expanding, and enhancing them. The effectiveness of COHPs for the prevention of caries in children varies from country to country, according to cultural, social, economic, and health care settings. Careful consideration of the local situation is required when selecting the elements of COHPs.

  16. Exploring the oral microbiota of children at various developmental stages of their dentition in the relation to their oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crielaard, W.; Zaura, E.; Schuller, A.A.; Huse, S.M.; Montijn, R.C.; Keijser, B.J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background An understanding of the relation of commensal microbiota to health is essential in preventing disease. Here we studied the oral microbial composition of children (N = 74, aged 3 - 18 years) in natural transition from their deciduous to a permanent dentition and related the microbial

  17. Exploring the oral microbiota of children at various developmental stages of their dentition in the relation to their oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crielaard, W.; Zaura, E.; Schuller, A.A.; Huse, S.M.; Montijn, R.C.; Keijser, B.J.F.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An understanding of the relation of commensal microbiota to health is essential in preventing disease. Here we studied the oral microbial composition of children (N = 74, aged 3 - 18 years) in natural transition from their deciduous to a permanent dentition and related the microbial

  18. Oral Health among Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Rennan Y; Yiu, Cynthia K. Y.; King, Nigel M.; Wong, Virginia C. N.; McGrath, Colman P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess and compare the oral health status of preschool children with and without autism spectrum disorders. Methods: A random sample of 347 preschool children with autism spectrum disorder was recruited from 19 Special Child Care Centres in Hong Kong. An age- and gender-matched sample was recruited from mainstream preschools as the control…

  19. Dental caries and oral health practices among 12 year old children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dental caries is a common disease in children which causes pain with resultant effect on various physiological and social functions. The main objective of the study was to determine the association between dental caries and oral health knowledge and practice among children in Nairobi West and Mathira West ...

  20. Oral health knowledge, attitude and practices of children and adolescents of orphanages in jodhpur city rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Rinki; Thomas, Susan; Dagli, Rushabh; Bhateja, Geetika Arora; Sharma, Akanksha; Singh, Amarpreet

    2014-10-01

    This study had twin objectives of assessing the oral health knowledge, attitude and practices and to assess the dental caries status and treatment needs among the orphan children of orphanages of Jodhpur city, Rajasthan, India. This cross- sectional study was carried out on 100 children to assess the oral health knowledge, attitude and practices of children and adolescents of orphanages in Jodhpur city, Rajasthan, India. The data was collected on a pre-tested questionnaire which included 20 closed ended multiple-choice questions on perceived oral health status, knowledge of oral health and attitude, oral health practices, dietary habits and behaviour towards dental treatment. On completion of the questionnaire, each child underwent an oral examination and Dentition status and treatment needs index (WHO Oral Health Surveys- 1997) was recorded for each subject. Almost 93% of the children felt the necessity of maintaining oral hygiene. There were 69% of the children who believed that it was necessary to brush teeth after every meal, 51% children believed that regular tooth-brushing prevents all tooth problems and 93% children knew that tobacco is carcinogenic in nature. Also, it was found that 77% of the children believed that regular dental visits help in maintaining oral hygiene. Many of them had acquired knowledge on oral health. More than half of the study subjects were aware of the importance of keeping good oral hygiene, regular dental visits and harmful effects of tobacco.

  1. Oral and Dental Health Problems of Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders, and Solution Proposals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceylan Çağıl Yetiş

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is the most common childhood onset behavioral disorder characterized by a developmentally inappropriate attention deficit, hyperactivity-impulsivity or a combination of these. Genetic and environmental factors play a role in the etiology. Because of the behavioral problems sourced from the disease itself and side effects of the drugs used in therapy, children with ADHD take place in the risk group in terms of oral and dental health problems and they are included in the group of patients who need special attention in pediatric dentistry. Drugs used in the treatment are known to cause dry mouth. Children with ADHD have been reported to have low oral hygiene habits and a high prevalence of dental caries. Also, parafunctional habits such as bruxism and dental trauma are observed more frequently in these children. In this review, oral health and behavior management problems in children with ADHD are pointed out, and solutions are suggested.

  2. Association between knowledge of caries preventive practices, preventive oral health habits of parents and children and caries experience in children resident in sub-urban Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folayan, Morenike O; Kolawole, Kikelomo A; Oyedele, Titus; Chukwumah, Nneka M; Chukumah, Nneka M; Onyejaka, Nneka; Agbaje, Hakeem; Oziegbe, Elizabeth O; Oshomoji, Olusegun V; Osho, Olusegun V

    2014-12-16

    The objectives of this study were to assess the association between children and parents' knowledge of caries preventive practices, the parents' caries preventive oral health behaviours and children's caries preventive oral health behaviour and caries experience. Three hundred and twenty four participants aged 8-12 years, 308 fathers and 318 mothers were recruited through a household survey conducted in Suburban Nigeria. A questionnaire was administered to generate information on fathers, mothers and children's knowledge of caries prevention measures and their oral health behaviour. Clinical examination was conducted on the children to determine their dmft/DMFT. Analysis was conducted to determine the predictors of the children's good oral health behaviour. The mothers' oral health behaviours were significant predictors of the children's oral health behaviours. Children who had good knowledge of caries prevention measures had significant increased odds of brushing their teeth twice daily or more. The children's caries prevalence was 13.9%, the mean dmft was 0.2 and the mean DMFT was 0.09. None of the dependent variables could predict the presence of caries in children. The study highlights the effect of maternal oral health behaviour on the oral health behaviour of children aged 8 years to 12 years in suburban Nigeria. A pilot study is needed to evaluate how enhanced maternal preventive oral health practices can improve the oral health preventive practices of children.

  3. Integrating Maternal and Children's Oral Health Promotion into Nursing and Midwifery Practice- A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reham Abou El Fadl

    Full Text Available Globally, oral diseases contribute to major disease problems and oral health disparities persistently exist amongst vulnerable population groups. Two contributory factors to these challenges are the shortage of dental practitioners and the characteristic separation between the medical and dental professions. Nurses and midwives, in particular, are in a potentially excellent position to assist in basic oral health services such as dental health education and intraoral screening. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of integrating promotion of oral health of young children and their mothers into nursing and midwifery practice.Seven electronic databases including CENTRAL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, GLOBAL HEALTH, CINHAL, Scopus, and Web of Science were systematically searched whereas conference proceedings and theses were retrieved via PROQUEST. Only randomized, non-randomized trials and observational studies on preventive oral health programs delivered by nurses or midwives in healthcare settings or through home visits were included. Two investigators reviewed full-text articles independently to decide on eligibility for inclusion. Quality assessment was done using Cochrane tool for risk of bias for randomized trials and Downs and Black assessment tool for all other studies. Out of 3162 retrieved records, twenty one trials on oral health interventions incorporated into standard nursing practice were reviewed. Eighteen programs reported significant positive outcomes including reduction in caries experience, better oral hygiene and dietary habits and increased rates of dental visits amongst young children as reported by their caregivers.Incorporating oral health promotion into nursing practice is a promising initiative for reducing oral health disparities by contributing to a downward trend in caries experience and increased access to dental care especially amongst the poor disadvantaged communities.

  4. Oral health-related quality of life of children with craniofacial conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geels, L.M.; Kieffer, J.M.; Hoogstraten, J.; Prahl-Andersen, B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of the Dutch Child Oral Health Impact Profile (COHIP), assessing the level of concordance between parents and children. The internal consistency and the predictive validity of the COHIP for self-reported general health were examined. Methods: Sample size was 35 pairs of parents

  5. Oral health in children investigated by Social services on suspicion of child abuse and neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvist, T; Annerbäck, E-M; Dahllöf, G

    2018-02-01

    Child abuse and neglect (CAN) are likely to have negative consequences on health; however, for oral health, studies on associated outcomes are sparse. The purpose of this study was to assess oral health and oral health behaviors in relation to suspected CAN among children being investigated by the Swedish Social Services. The material comprised data from the Social Services and dental records; the sample, 86 children and 172 matched controls. The children in the study group had a higher prevalence of dental caries than the control group; in addition, levels of non-attendance and dental avoidance were high, as was parental failure to promote good oral health. We found four factors that, taken together, indicated a high probability of being investigated because of suspected CAN: prevalence of dental caries in primary teeth, fillings in permanent teeth, dental health service avoidance, and referral to specialist pediatric dentistry clinics. If all four factors were present, the cumulative probability of being investigated was 0.918. In conclusion, there is a high prevalence of dental caries, irregular attendance, and a need for referral a pediatric dental clinic among Swedish children under investigation due to suspected CAN. Social context is an important factor in assessing the risk of developing dental caries, the inclination to follow treatment plans, and the prerequisites for cooperation during treatment. Routinely requesting dental records during an investigation would provide important information for social workers on parental skills and abilities to fulfill the basic needs of children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Oral Health Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Sharjah Mothers of Preschool Children, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Noura; Kowash, Mawlood; Hussein, Iyad; Hassan, Amar; Al Halabi, Manal

    2017-01-01

    The improvement of children's oral health, a world global health target, is essential to general health and quality of life. Hence, the aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practices of mothers toward their children's oral health in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates (UAE). A cross-sectional interview-based study was conducted among 383 mothers of preschool children (average age 3.49 [+1.63 years]) attending Sharjah Dental Center, UAE. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software for Windows, version 20.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Adequate knowledge was found among 58.2% of mothers, 99% exhibited excellent attitude, and only 20% followed good practices toward their children's oral health. Poor knowledge and practice of mothers were significantly associated with mothers' occupation and education. Employed mothers had a significantly higher score of knowledge. Mothers with secondary education and university qualifications had significantly higher scores of practice compared with mothers with primary education. Although mothers had better than average knowledge and excellent attitude toward their children's oral health issues; most of them carried out improper practices. Mothers' educational and employment backgrounds were significant influencing factors.

  7. Oral health of Anganwadi children in Tumkur city: A field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythri Halappa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In India, due to illiteracy and poor socioeconomic conditions, along with harmful oral habits, the prevalence of oro-dental diseases is widespread. Primary health care approach is the strategy to attain health for all. Hence, the objective was to assess oral health of Anganwadi children. Methodology: A descriptive cross-sectional study was designed to include 316 children from Anganwadi present in the vicinity of a field area of the dental institute, Tumkur. Results: The prevalence of dental caries was 41.77%, mean decayed, extracted, filled tooth being 2. Conclusion: The prevalence of dental caries in Anganwadi children was high indicating the need for both preventive and curative methods. The comprehensive treatment along with oral hygiene instructions was provided.

  8. Knowledge and Oral Health Attitudes among Parents of Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarna, Reshma; Rai, Kavita; Hegde, Amitha M

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a devastating complex of diseases resulting from defects of development. It affects more than 1 of every 100 live births. Early preventive dental care should be adjusted to the special needs of these children in their first years of life. Knowledge of parental attitudes and experiences of dental care are therefore important. Aim : This study was done to assess the knowledge and attitudes among parents of children with congenital heart disease towards oral health and dental care. Materials and methods : Parents (n = 105) of children with congenital heart disease of an age ranging from 0 to 16 years were included in the study. A questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge and oral health attitudes. Results : The parents' knowledge was fair but the oral health attitudes were not very satisfactory. The parents in this study also recognized the importance of oral health for the well-being of rest of the body. Conclusion : The results of this study indicate that parents' and children's attitudes toward oral health and dental care need to be improved.

  9. Oral health and feeding frequency of preschool children in a city in northern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Maia Fernandes

    2014-03-01

    Oral health and healthy eating habits are related to socioeconomic and cultural conditions of the population and imply the biopsychosocial health of the individual. This study investigated the oral health and feeding frequency of children attending a daycare in the municipality of Ananindeua, Pará State, northern Brazil. This was a cross-sectional study, quantitative and qualitative, descriptive, involving the examination of the oral cavity of children and questionnaires to parents, caregivers and those responsible for the daycare. Forty-seven children aged one to six years participated in this study; most were girls (57.5%. The daycare had no specific place for tooth brushing that was performed only once daily, without flossing. It was reported by parents that 48.94% of children have never visited a dentist. On examination of the oral cavity we observed carious lesion (51.10%, dental calculus (42.55%, fluorosis (10.64% and gingivitis (2.13%. It was found that the children had 3 or more meals and had the habit of consuming cariogenic foods such as soft drinks, candy and/or gum, even not being provided by the daycare. Most of the children had at least one decayed tooth, and the daycare offered a healthy diet, but the children had the habit of eating cariogenic foods.

  10. Integration of oral health in primary health care through motivational interviewing for mothers of young children: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Manu; Shah, Aasim Farooq; Virtanen, Jorma I

    2018-01-01

    Early childhood caries (ECC) continues to affect children worldwide. In India, primary health centers (PHCs) comprises the primary tier where Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA) provide integrated curative and preventive health care. The aim of the study was to pilot test the integration of oral health in primary health care through motivational interviewing (MI) for mothers of young children provided by ASHAs. The pilot study was conducted in Kashipur, Uttarakhand. From the six PHCs in Kashipur, three were randomly selected, one each was assigned to MI group, traditional health education group, and control group. From 60 mothers with 8-12 months child, ASHAs of all three groups gathered mother's knowledge regarding child's oral health using close-ended questionnaire and diagnosed clinical risk markers of ECC in children and ASHAs of Group A and B imparted the oral health education as per their training. The comparison of ASHA's performances on the MI training competency pre- and post-test showed an overall average of 74% improvement in post-test scores. Interexaminer reliability of the parallel clinical measurements by 6 ASHAs and the investigator for the maxillary central incisors showed 93% of agreement for both dental plaque and dental caries assessment with 0.86 and 0.89 kappa values, respectively. The health education through MI is feasible and can be cost-effective by utilization of ASHAs at PHCs to provide the oral health education to mothers which will in turn improve the oral health status of children.

  11. Influence of full mouth rehabilitation on oral health-related quality of life among disabled children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nowaiser, Abeer M; Al Suwyed, Abdulaziz S; Al Zoman, Khalid H; Robert, Asirvatham A; Al Brahim, Tarfa; Ciancio, Sebastian G; Al Mubarak, Sultan A; El Meligy, Omar A

    2017-10-01

    The efficacy of full mouth rehabilitation (FMR) on oral health-related quality of life of physically disabled children was assessed. This prospective study was performed at Dental Department of Sultan Bin Abdulaziz Humanitarian City, Riyadh, and King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, during May 2012 to September 2014. A total of 186 physically disabled children aged 11-14 years were assigned to a test group (n = 97) or a control group (n = 89). FMR was applied for test group children at baseline and 3 months' visits, whereas those in the control group did not receive FMR. Both group children received dental kits and oral hygiene instructions. Children were asked to complete the Child Perceptions Questionnaire, whereas Parental-Caregiver Perceptions Questionnaire and Family Distress Domain questionnaire were completed by the parents/caregivers at baseline and 6 months' visits. Children in both groups showed positive trends in oral symptoms at 6 months compared with those at baseline. However, when they were compared to control, significant improvement in oral symptoms was observed in the test group at 6 months' visit (p < .05). Also when they were compared to control, significant improvements were observed in the functional limitation, emotional, and social well-being subscales of the Child Perceptions Questionnaire and on the Parental-Caregiver Perceptions Questionnaire scales at the end of the study (p < .05). Compared to the parents/caregivers of the control children, the parents/caregivers of the test-group children reported insignificant but positive trends in Family Distress Domain at the end of the study (p < .05). FMR in children reduced oral-related problems subsequently to a better oral health-related quality of life.

  12. Henoch-Schönlein purpura in children: its relation to oral and to oral and oral and dental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlette Suzy Puspa Pertiwi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available > Background: Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP is a rare systemic small vessel vasculitis, which commonly occur in childrenbetween 2 and 10 years of age. The course of the disease is often self-limiting, although may manifest long-term renal morbidity. Theseverity of renal involvement decides about the prognosis of this disease. Many factors can trigger the disease attack, which is the mostcommon is bacterial invasion. Since the oral cavity is often refer as infectious foci to other part of the body, it seemed rationally tobe part that contribute the course of disease, thus management of these infectious foci, if possible, gives rise to an astoundingly goodprognosis. Purpose: This paper will describe a review on HSP and the possible association with oral and dental health since it mightbe related to the prognosis of HSP. reviews: Rashes in children are common; they may develop a rash after prescription of antibiotics.Nevertheless there are some childhood diseases that may manifest a rash presentation, such as HSP. It is important for pediatric dentistto have knowledge about HSP and consider the possibility of dental treatment or disease as potential triggers. Conclusion: Oral anddental condition may be the trigger cause of HSP attack. Therefore, it is important for pediatric dental practitioner to be aware of thecourse of the disease in order to limit the expanding complications.> latar belakang: Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP merupakan vaskulitis pembuluh darah kecil sistemik yang jarang terjadi danbiasanya menyerang anak usia 2 hingga 10 tahun. Penyakit tersebut seringkali dapat sembuh sendiri, tetapi pada jangka panjangdapat bermanifestasi dengan morbiditas ginjal. Keparahan keterlibatan ginjal menentukan prognosis penyakit. Banyak faktor yangdapat memicu serangan penyakit, tersering adalah invasi bakteri. Karena rongga mulut sering kali merupakan fokus infeksi terhadapbagian lain dari tubuh, maka mempunyai peluang sebagai faktor pemicu

  13. Oral health in children and adolescents with different socio-cultural and socio-economic backgrounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Twetman, Svante; Sundby, Annette

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the occurrence and severity of dental caries in children and adolescents and to relate these findings to the subject's socio-cultural and socio-economic backgrounds. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study in 12 706 children aged 5, 7, 12 and 15 years was conducted...... in 2006. Data on children's caries experience were collected from public oral health registers and pooled with socio-cultural and socio-economic data obtained from official statistics. The study population represented 76% of all registered inhabitants. RESULTS: Among 5- and 7-year-old children with non...... preventive strategy is proposed to meet the needs of children in risk of caries, and appropriate oral health-promotion programmes should be organized in collaboration with leaders from different ethnic minorities....

  14. Knowledge and attitude of parents toward oral health maintenance and treatment modalities for their children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Bodhale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Parents have an important role in making decisions about their child′s oral health. The purpose of this study was to determine parental awareness of their children′s oral health maintenance and their attitude toward dental treatment. Materials and Methods: Total 284 parents from different socioeconomic groups participated in the study. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire addressing various aspects of knowledge and attitude of parents toward oral health and treatment modalities. Results: Awareness among parents was significantly lower in low socioeconomic group. Their attitude toward dental treatment differed significantly in which only 53% parents from high socioeconomic group preferred going to the pediatric dentist. Conclusion: The level of awareness among parents is relatively low and there is need for the implementation of oral health awareness programs for parents to change their attitude toward dental treatment of their children.

  15. Changes in the oral health-related quality of life in children following comprehensive oral rehabilitation under general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawary, Rana; Anthonappa, Robert P; Ekambaram, Manikandan; McGrath, Colman; King, Nigel M

    2016-09-01

    To assess changes in the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), after comprehensive oral rehabilitation under general anaesthesia (CORGA), among children (i) <6 years using the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS) and (ii) aged 6-14 years using the child oral health-related quality of life (COHRQoL) instrument. A total of 136 healthy children who had CORGA were recruited over a period of 12 months. The parent or caregiver of the study participants completed the age-appropriate questionnaire prior to the dental treatment and at the subsequent follow-up appointments (2 weeks and 3 months). Data were analysed using repeated-measures anova and Bonferroni tests. The overall ECOHIS scores decreased significantly (P < 0.001) demonstrating large effect sizes. The greatest decreases were for the domains of child oral symptoms (57.5%) and psychology (38.7%) in the child impact section (CIS) and for the domain of parental distress (38.9%) and family function (40%) in the family impact section (FIS). For COHRQoL, the overall P-CPQ and FIS scores decreased significantly for all items (P < 0.001), demonstrating large effect sizes. The greatest decreases were for the domains of oral symptoms (77.7%), functional limitations (74.3%), and the FIS (80.1%). The OHRQoL of children in both age groups (<6 and 6-14 years) was significantly improved after CORGA. © 2015 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Association of oral breathing with dental malocclusions and general health in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Emilio L; Barrios, Rocío; Calvo, Juan C; de la Rosa, Maria T; Campillo, José S; Bayona, José C; Bravo, Manuel

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the association of oral breathing with dental malocclusions and aspects of general health such as acute illnesses, oxygen saturation in blood and its possible implication in the process of nutrition. A prevalence analytic study was carried out. Five dentists explored to children between 6 and 12 years and measured their oxygen saturation. Parents completed a questionnaire of 11 items about general health (colds, ear infections, tonsillitis and taking antibiotics) and the food preferences of their children. At the end, children were classified in oral breathing group (prevalence cases) or nasal breathing group (controls). There were statistical differences between cases (452 children) and controls (752 children) in the facial morphometric measurements. Oral breathing children had statistically less percentage of oxygen saturation than controls (92.3±3.3% versus 96.5±2.3%), took less time to have lunch and preferred less consistent and sugary food. Cases had had more prevalence of pathologies in the last year and of taking the antibiotics. This group also had higher prevalence of allergies compared with controls group (POral breathing is significantly associated with specific dental malocclusions and important aspects of general health such as oxygen saturation and the nutrition. On the same line, oral breathing is related to a significantly higher prevalence of allergies and a significantly more likely getting sick and taking medication.

  17. Brief oral health promotion intervention among parents of young children to reduce early childhood dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrow, Peter; Raheb, Joseph; Miller, Margaret

    2013-03-20

    Severe untreated dental decay affects a child's growth, body weight, quality of life as well as cognitive development, and the effects extend beyond the child to the family, the community and the health care system. Early health behavioural factors, including dietary practices and eating patterns, can play a major role in the initiation and development of oral diseases, particularly dental caries. The parent/caregiver, usually the mother, has a critical role in the adoption of protective health care behaviours and parental feeding practices strongly influence children's eating behaviours. This study will test if an early oral health promotion intervention through the use of brief motivational interviewing (MI) and anticipatory guidance (AG) approaches can reduce the incidence of early childhood dental decay and obesity. The study will be a randomised controlled study with parents and their new-born child/ren who are seen at 6-12 weeks of age by a child/community health nurse. Consenting parents will complete a questionnaire on oral health knowledge, behaviours, self-efficacy, oral health fatalism, parenting stress, prenatal and peri-natal health and socio-demographic factors at study commencement and at 12 and 36 months. Each child-parent pair will be allocated to an intervention or a standard care group, using a computer-generated random blocks. The standard group will be managed through the standard early oral health screening program; "lift the lip". The intervention group will be provided with tailored oral health counselling by oral health consultants trained in MI and AG.Participating children will be examined at 24, and 36 months for the occurrence of dental decay and have their height and weight recorded. Dietary information obtained from a food frequency chart will be used to determine food and dietary patterns. Data analysis will use intention to treat and per protocol analysis and will use tests of independent proportions and means. Multivariate

  18. Oral Health Education in Children before Dental Treatment under General Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valéra, Marie-Cécile; Aragon, Isabelle; Monsarrat, Paul; Vaysse, Fréderic; Noirrit-Esclassan, Emmanuelle

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the attitude of parents towards the oral health of their children before oral rehabilitation under general anesthesia (GA). Children receiving dental treatment under GA between November 2013 and July 2014 in the Pediatric Dentistry Department (University Hospital Center, Toulouse, France) were enrolled in an oral health preventive program. An anonymous questionnaire was self-administered by the parents during the pre-operative session. The sample comprised 67 children with a mean age of 4.8 years. 48 % of the parents had difficulties in maintaining the oral hygiene of their child. Two thirds of them reported a lack of cooperation. An adult cleaned the child's teeth in 43% of the cases. 14% of the study population brushed their teeth twice a day or more. In addition, half of the parents reported that they modified food consumption or teeth cleaning habits of their children since the initial consultation. This study suggests a low compliance of parents and children with the recommendations on oral hygiene and food consumption given at the initial visit and demonstrates the feasibility of a preventive program in this population.

  19. Parental knowledge and practices regarding their children's oral health in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyahya, L

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the knowledge and practices of parents toward their children's oral health in Kuwait. Study Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 300 parents who visited five dental specialty centers in Kuwait. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software (version 21; Inc., Chicago IL, USA). Data were descriptively analysed, and a chi-square test was used to determine whether each individual question varied across different sociodemographic characteristics. The overall mean knowledge and practice scores were calculated. Statistical significance was set at p≤ 0.05. The study results revealed poor parental knowledge and practices with regard to their children's oral health. Oral hygiene and feeding practices were found to be disappointing. Major weakness were observed in infant oral health-related concepts including transmission of cariogenic bacteria, nocturnal bottle feeding, and the time of the first dental visit. However, most parents identified the meaning of gum bleeding and the role of bacteria in causing it. Furthermore, participants demonstrated positive role in their children's daily oral hygiene. A significant better knowledge was detected among female subjects in areas like bacterial transmission (P = 0.031) and aetiology of gingivitis (P = 0.001). Additionally, caregivers residing in Capital governorate showed a significantly better knowledge in bacterial transmission (P = 0.000) and meaning of bleeding gum (P = 0.001) and a significantly better practice with regard to the introduction of hot food to the child for the first time (P = 0.000). Parents in Kuwait seemed to have weak knowledge and practices with regard to their children's oral health. Coordinated efforts by health professionals, including paediatricians and paediatric dentists, are required to increase parental awareness regarding oral hygiene habits, diet and feeding practices

  20. Assessment of women, infants and children providers' perceptions of oral health counseling and availability of associated resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendryga, Tiffany A; Gwozdek, Anne E

    2014-01-01

    Children from low-income families and ethnic minority groups are associated with an increased risk of developing dental disease and are often enrolled in the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) nutritional program. It has been an intention of the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) Oral Health Program (OHP) to collaborate with WIC to provide preventive oral health resources and education to their population. This project focused on achieving the goals outlined in the Michigan 2010 State Oral Health Plan. An 18 question survey was designed to identify gaps existing in oral health counseling in Michigan WIC agencies. The survey was disseminated to 56 MI WIC agencies. WIC providers perceive oral health risk assessment to be important and are asking oral health questions during certification and re-certification appointments. Seventy-nine percent of participants indicated they never had training in oral health counseling, and 79% are interested in learning more about oral health. Agencies are interested in obtaining oral health education resources for their clients. The 2010 State Oral Health Plan's goals recognized the need for oral health related resources and education within community-based programs like WIC. The results of the survey support the need for additional oral health counseling and associated resources in WIC agencies. This information will be used to help the MDCH OHP find ways to address these gaps. Copyright © 2014 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  1. Oral health status and oral health behaviors of 12-year-old urban and rural school children in Udupi, Karnataka, India: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Singh Thakur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study is to assess the oral health status and oral health behavior among 12-year-old urban and rural school children and to evaluate the relative effect of sociobehavioral risk factors on caries experience. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted which included urban and rural subgroups of 12-year-old school children. The final study population covered two groups: 12 years rural (n = 261 and urban school children (n = 264. Data were collected and compared using Chi-square test. Logistic regression analysis was done to assess the importance of variables associated with dental caries. Results: Highly significant differences (P < 0.001 were observed between rural and urban school children for the use of oral hygiene aids, frequency of tooth brushing, and dental services utilization. Dental caries level was significantly higher (P < 0.03 for rural children. Decayed teeth (DT component constituted majority of decayed, missing, and filled teeth (FT in both population. 55.6% of the rural school children required treatment compared to 42.4% of urban school children. Mean Oral Hygiene Index-Simplified values, mean DT, and FT were statistically significant for urban and rural school children. Logistic regression analysis showed that government or private school, dental care utilization, socioeconomic status, and malocclusion status were significantly associated with dental caries. Conclusion: Poor oral health and high treatment needs of children belonging to low socioeconomic background is an alarming situation. Strengthening of oral health care in the rural and underprivileged section should be priority of the policymakers.

  2. Oral health status and behaviours of preschool children in Hong Kong

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    Chu Chun-Hung

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental caries is a major public health problem in many countries. Since the last territority-wide dental survey of Hong Kong preschool children was conducted in 2001, a survey to update the information is necessary. This study aimed to describe the dental caries experience of preschool children in Hong Kong and factors affecting their dental caries status. Methods A stratified random sample of children from seven kindergartens in Hong Kong was surveyed in 2009. Ethical approval from IRB and parental consent was obtained. Clinical examinations of the children were performed by two calibrated examiners using disposable dental mirrors, an intra-oral LED light and ball-ended periodontal probes. A questionnaire to investigate possible explanatory factors for caries status was completed by the children’s parents. Caries experience was recorded using the dmft index. Multifactor-ANOVA was used to study the relationship between dental caries experience, and the background and oral health-related behaviours of the children. Results Seven hundred children (53% boys, mean age 5.3 ± 0.7 years were examined. The mean dmft score of the surveyed children was 2.2 and 51% of them had no caries experience (dmft = 0. Most (>95% of the decayed teeth were untreated. Statistically significant correlations were found between dental caries experience of the children and their oral health-related habits, family income, parental education level and parental dental knowledge. Conclusions Early childhood dental caries was prevalent among the preschool children in Hong Kong. Their caries experience was associated with their oral health-related behaviours, socio-economic background, and parental education and dental knowledge.

  3. Peer tutoring pilot program for the improvement of oral health behavior in underprivileged and immigrant children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Claus H; Löpker, Nadine; Noack, Michael J; Klein, Klaus; Rosen, Evelyne

    2009-01-01

    Caries prevalence in underprivileged children is particularly high and, even though many efforts have been made, adherence to dental preventive programs is low. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a tutoring program can improve oral health behavior in underprivileged and/or immigrant children. Thirty fourth-grade children (mean age = 9.6), over 50 percent of immigrant background, participated in this longitudinal pilot study. The fourth graders were invited to develop on oral health program for their first-grade peers. For this purpose, the fourth graders learned oral health practices and developed the peer tutoring program. Prior to the intervention and after having instructed their first-grade peers, all fourth graders were interviewed about their oral health habits and their tooth-brushing was recorded on video. Toothbrushing time, performance of circular tooth-brushing movements, and systematic cleaning of all dental surfaces were analyzed before and after the intervention. After peer teaching, there was a significant increase concerning tooth-brushing time (P = .004), performance of circular tooth-brushing movements (P tutoring program yielded a significant improvement in relevant oral care behavior. This approach provided an environment which, in contrast to traditional approaches, facilitates empowerment.

  4. Oral health knowledge, behaviors and parental practices among rural?urban migrant children in Guangzhou: a follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Ning; Cai, Li; Xu, Caijuan; Guan, Han; Jin, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite the growing number of rural?urban migrant children in China, follow-up observation on the oral health of migrant children is still scarce. This study described the changes of oral health knowledge, behaviors and parental practices in migrant children over a period of one year. Possible factors affecting changes were also investigated. Methods The study used purposive sampling to select five private schools of migrant children in Guangzhou. A total of 1900 students in Grades...

  5. Promoting oral health of children through schools--results from a WHO global survey 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, N; Petersen, P E

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the range of school-based approaches to oral health and describes what is meant by a Health Promoting School. The paper then reports the results of a World Health Organization global survey of school-based health promotion. Purposive sampling across 100 countries produced 108...... evaluations of school oral health projects spread across 61 countries around the globe. The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion noted that schools can provide a supportive environment for promoting children's health. However, while a number of well-known strategies are being applied, the full range of health...... promoting actions is not being used globally. A greater emphasis on integrated health promotion is advised in place of narrower, disease- or project-specific approaches. Recommendations are made for improving this situation, for further research and for specifying an operational framework for sharing...

  6. Changes in the oral health of the children of Dili, Timor Leste, between 2002 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babo Soares, Lucio F; Allen, Penny L; Kingi, Jenna; Roberts-Thomson, Kaye; Bettiol, Silvana; Crocombe, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    This research compared the oral health status of school children in Dili (the capital of Timor Leste) in 2002 and 2014. The 2014 oral health survey of Dili's children replicated the methods of an AusAID-supported oral health survey conducted in 2002. Equal numbers of children were invited to participate from four age groups (6-8, 9-11, 12-14 and 15-17 years). For the 2014 survey, the subdistricts of Dom Aleixo, Cristo Rei, Metinaro and Vera Cruz were randomly selected for inclusion. A questionnaire was used to collect data on demographics and oral health behaviours. Oral epidemiological examinations were conducted by four dentists and five dental nurses. The 2014 survey in Dili recruited 758 participants for the questionnaire and 655 children for the oral examination. In 2014, a lower proportion of children reported brushing their teeth the previous day (97% vs 100%, p=0.01) and a larger proportion reported having toothache (40% vs 19%, pp=0.01). There was no difference in the prevalence of decay in the primary dentition (39% vs 37%, p=0.61) or the mean number of decayed, missing or filled (dmft) teeth in the primary dentition in 2014 compared to 2002 (2.0 vs 1.8, p=0.47). However, the prevalence of decay in the permanent dentition was greater in 2014 (70% vs 53%, pp=0.04). The prevalence of gingival bleeding (65% vs 81%, ppchildren between 2002 and 2014, associated with more permanent teeth dental caries experiences.

  7. Knowledge, attitudes and behavior of children in relation to oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidović Bojana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Health education plays a very important role in maintaining health of individuals. Good oral health, as a part of general health, is largely dependent on the level of knowledge, attitudes and habits that children already have. The aim of this study is to examine the level of knowledge and habits in children regarding oral hygiene, diet and bad habits. Methods. The study included 506 school children aged 12 and 15 years in three towns (Foča, Čajniče, Kalinovik, Bosnia and Herzegovina. The survey was conducted in order to assess knowledge, attitudes and habits that children have in relation to their own oral health. Results. Most respondents stated that they began to brush their teeth at the age of 4, while a smaller number linked beginning of tooth brushing to the start of school. The parents more often help the boys during tooth brushing. A total of 54.9% of children brush their teeth after every meal, while 40.1% of them brush teeth only once during the day. Twelve year olds brush their teeth more often, especially after a meal. A total of 92.5% of children had never used fluoride tablets nor are the tablets recommended to them by anyone. More than half of the children (61.7% visited the dentist for the first time before starting school that is on the regular examination that is performed upon enrollment to school. A pain as a reason for dental visits was present in 43.9%, while the preventive check in only 31.4% of the children. Conclusion. Children included in this study, particularly 15-year-olds, are quite well informed about teeth brushing frequency and proper selection of tools for hygiene maintenance, but this knowledge is not applied. Girls are more responsible for their own health, and come regularly to the preventive dental checkups.

  8. Brief oral health promotion intervention among parents of young children to reduce early childhood dental decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe untreated dental decay affects a child’s growth, body weight, quality of life as well as cognitive development, and the effects extend beyond the child to the family, the community and the health care system. Early health behavioural factors, including dietary practices and eating patterns, can play a major role in the initiation and development of oral diseases, particularly dental caries. The parent/caregiver, usually the mother, has a critical role in the adoption of protective health care behaviours and parental feeding practices strongly influence children’s eating behaviours. This study will test if an early oral health promotion intervention through the use of brief motivational interviewing (MI) and anticipatory guidance (AG) approaches can reduce the incidence of early childhood dental decay and obesity. Methods The study will be a randomised controlled study with parents and their new-born child/ren who are seen at 6–12 weeks of age by a child/community health nurse. Consenting parents will complete a questionnaire on oral health knowledge, behaviours, self-efficacy, oral health fatalism, parenting stress, prenatal and peri-natal health and socio-demographic factors at study commencement and at 12 and 36 months. Each child–parent pair will be allocated to an intervention or a standard care group, using a computer-generated random blocks. The standard group will be managed through the standard early oral health screening program; “lift the lip”. The intervention group will be provided with tailored oral health counselling by oral health consultants trained in MI and AG. Participating children will be examined at 24, and 36 months for the occurrence of dental decay and have their height and weight recorded. Dietary information obtained from a food frequency chart will be used to determine food and dietary patterns. Data analysis will use intention to treat and per protocol analysis and will use tests of independent

  9. Oral health status of intellectually disabled school children and adolescents, in a Chilean population, 2012.

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    Carolina Garcés

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the oral health status of intellectually disabled (ID children and adolescents from state schools, Valdivia, Chile, 2012. Design: Descriptive study. A sample of students from state schools was assessed for caries history (Decayed, Missing, Filled permanent Teeth (DMFT/decayed, extracted, filled temporal teeth (deft, quality of oral hygiene (Simplified Oral Hygiene Index, OHI-S and gingival health (Gingival Index, GI. In addition, questions were asked about dental care habits, degree of ID, presence of systemic disease and medicine use. Results: 195 students with slight to moderate ID and aged from 6 to 21 years were assessed. The average DMFT/deft was 2.19/1.33 for female students and 1.59/1.93 for male students. The OHI-S in 75.9% of participants was moderate, with poorer oral hygiene found in participants with moderate ID. Only 2.6% showed code 0 for GI, reflecting poor oral hygiene. Most participants possessed their own toothbrush (88.2% and could clean their teeth unaided (96.4%.Conclusion: The state of oral health in the assessed population is deficient. The quality of oral hygiene is normal or poor, which leads to poor gingival health.

  10. Common risk factor approach to address socioeconomic inequality in the oral health of preschool children – a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Do, Loc G; Scott, Jane A; Thomson, W Murray; Stamm, John W; Rugg-Gunn, Andrew J; Levy, Steven M; Wong, Ching; Devenish, Gemma; Ha, Diep H; Spencer, A John

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental caries remains the most prevalent chronic condition in children and a major contributor to poor general health. There is ample evidence of a skewed distribution of oral health, with a small proportion of children in the population bearing the majority of the burden of the disease. This minority group is comprised disproportionately of socioeconomically disadvantaged children. An in-depth longitudinal study is needed to better understand the determinants of child oral health,...

  11. Oral health status and parental perception of child oral health related quality-of-life of children with autism in Bangalore, India

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    Richa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children with autism present with the physical-mental impairments and oral problems, which may have an impact on their quality-of-life (QoL. The aim of the following study was to assess oral health status and parental perception of child oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL among children with autism. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 4-15-year-old children with autism (n = 135 and children without autism (n = 135. Oral health status was evaluated using Oral Hygiene Index-Simplified (OHI-S, its Miglani′s modification for deciduous teeth, Decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT/dmft and Decayed, missing and filled surface (DMFS/dmfs indices. Parents answered the Parental-Caregivers Perception Questionnaire for assessing children′s OHRQoL. Mann-Whitney U, Chi-square test and Pearson′s correlation analysis were performed. Results: Mean OHI-S, DMFT, dmft scores were significantly high among children with autism (2.07 ± 0.83; 0.86 ± 1.22, 1.40 ± 2.48 when compared to children without autism (0.46 ± 0.58; 0.46 ± 1.06, 0.59 ± 1.28 respectively. Out of all domains of OHRQoL, mean score of functional limitations related to teeth problem was significantly higher among children with autism (8.87 ± 5.65 as compared to non-autism group (6.66 ± 4.97. Conclusion: Functional limitations may have a negative impact on oral health status that might influence OHRQoL.

  12. Oral Health and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Jerrold ... they may need. Read More "Oral Health and Aging" Articles Oral Health and Aging / 4 Myths About ...

  13. Socioeconomic gradients in general and oral health of primary school children in Shiraz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkari, Ali; Sabokseir, Aira; Sheiham, Aubrey; Watt, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    Health status is largely determined by socio-economic status. The general health of individuals at higher social hierarchy is better than people in lower levels. Likewise, people with higher socio-economic status have better oral health than lower socio-economic groups. There has not been much work regarding the influence of socio-economic status on the health conditions of children in developing countries, particularly in Iran. The aim of this study was to compare the oral and general health conditions of primary school children of three different socio-economic areas in the city of Shiraz, Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 335, 8- to 11-year-old primary schoolchildren in Shiraz. The children were selected by a three-stage cluster sampling method from three socio-economically different areas. Tools and methods used by the United Kingdom's Medical Research Council were used to obtain anthropometric variables as indicators of general health. The Decay, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT) Index for permanent teeth, dmft Index for primary teeth, the Modified Developmental Defects of Enamel (DDE) Index, the Gingival Index (GI) and the Debris Index-Simplified (DI-S) were used for oral health assessment.  Height (Poral health status of the primary schoolchildren of Shiraz. The influence of socio-economic status on health condition means children have different life chances based on their socio-economic conditions. These findings emphasize the significance of interventions for tackling socio-economic inequalities in order to improve the health status of children in lower socio-economic areas.

  14. Association between parental guilt and oral health problems in preschool children: a hierarchical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Monalisa Cesarino; Clementino, Marayza Alves; Pinto-Sarmento, Tassia Cristina de Almeida; Martins, Carolina Castro; Granville-Garcia, Ana Flávia; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2014-08-16

    Dental caries and traumatic dental injury (TDI) can play an important role in the emergence of parental guilt, since parents feel responsible for their child's health. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of oral health problems among preschool children on parental guilt. A preschool-based, cross-sectional study was carried out with 832 preschool children between three and five years of age in the city of Campina Grande, Brazil. Parents/caregivers answered the Brazilian version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (B-ECOHIS). The item "parental guilt" was the dependent variable. Questionnaires addressing socio-demographic variables (child's sex, child's age, parent's/caregiver's age, mother's schooling, type of preschool and household income), history of toothache and health perceptions (general and oral) were also administered. Clinical exams for dental caries and TDI were performed by three dentists who had undergone a training and calibration exercise (Kappa: 0.85-0.90). Poisson hierarchical regression was used to determine the significance of associations between parental guilt and oral health problems (α = 5%). The multivariate model was carried out on three levels using a hierarchical approach from distal to proximal determinants: 1) socio-demographic aspects; 2) health perceptions; and 3) oral health problems. The frequency of parental guilt was 22.8%. The following variables were significantly associated with parental guilt: parental perception of child's oral health as poor (PR = 2.010; 95% CI: 1.502-2.688), history of toothache (PR = 2.344; 95% CI: 1.755-3.130), cavitated lesions (PR = 2.002; 95% CI: 1.388-2.887), avulsion/luxation (PR = 2.029; 95% CI: 1.141-3.610) and tooth discoloration (PR = 1.540; 95% CI: 1.169-2.028). Based on the present findings, parental guilt increases with the occurrence of oral health problems that require treatment, such as dental caries and TDI of greater severity. Parental perceptions of

  15. Effectiveness evaluation of Contra Caries Oral Health Education Program for improving Spanish-speaking parents' preventive oral health knowledge and behaviors for their young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeft, K S; Barker, J C; Shiboski, S; Pantoja-Guzman, E; Hiatt, R A

    2016-12-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the Contra Caries Oral Health Education Program (CCOHEP) for improving low-income, Spanish-speaking parents' oral health knowledge and behaviors for their young children. Mexican American children in the United States suffer disproportionately high prevalence and severity of early childhood caries, yet few evaluated, theory-based behavioral interventions exist for this population. CCOHEP is a theory-based curriculum consisting of four 2-h interactive classes designed for and by Spanish speakers and led by designated community health educators (promotoras). Topics included children's oral hygiene, caries etiology, dental procedures, nutrition, child behavior management, and parent skill-building activities. Low-income Spanish-speaking parents/caregivers of children aged 0-5 years were recruited through community services in an agricultural city in California. Survey questions from the Oral Health Basic Research Facts Questionnaire measuring oral health-related behaviors and knowledge were verbally administered before, immediately after, and 3 months after attendance at CCOHEP. Five questions measured aspects of parental toothbrushing for their children (frequency, using fluoridated toothpaste, brushing before bed, not drinking or eating after nighttime brushing, adult assistance), three questions measured other oral health behaviors, and 16 questions measured oral health-related knowledge. Analyses of within-person changes between pre- and post-tests and again between post-test and 3-month follow-up consisted of McNemar's test for binary outcomes and sign tests for ordinal outcomes. Overall, 105 caregivers participated in CCOHEP (n = 105 pretest, n = 95 post-test, n = 79 second post-test). At baseline, all parents self-reported doing at least one aspect of toothbrushing correctly, but only 13% reported performing all five aspects according to professional guidelines. At post-test, 44% of parents reported completing all aspects of

  16. Immigrant Caregivers of Young Children: Oral Health Beliefs, Attitudes, and Early Childhood Caries Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, Deborah A; Rainchuso, Lori; Jenkins, Susan; Kierce, Erin; Rothman, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of early childhood caries (ECC) is a global public health concern. The oral health knowledge of a caregiver can affect a child's risk for developing ECC. An exploratory study of the oral health knowledge and behaviors among caregivers of children 6 years of age and younger was conducted with a convenience sample of adults (n = 114) enrolled in English language or high school equivalency examination courses. The majority of study participants were born in Asia (47 %). Other birth regions included South America (16 %), Caribbean (16 %), Africa (10 %), and Central America (6 %). Study findings showed caregivers with low oral health knowledge were more likely to engage in behaviors that increase a child's risk for developing ECC. A statistically significant relationship was found between participants' rating of their child's dental health as poor and the belief that children should not be weaned from the nursing bottle by 12 months of age (P = 0.002), brushing should not begin upon tooth eruption (P = 0.01), and fluoride does not strengthen teeth and prevent dental caries (P = 0.005). Subjects who pre-chewed their child's food also exhibited behaviors including sharing eating utensils or a toothbrush with their child (P oral health promotion programs are developed and implemented to raise awareness and reduce the risk of dental disease among immigrant populations.

  17. The oral health status and treatment needs of institutionalized children with cerebral palsy in Taiwan

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    Shun-Te Huang

    2010-06-01

    Conclusion: More decayed and missing teeth and fewer dental restorations are common problems in children with CP, and the conditions worsen with age. The grade of CP and having mental retardation or not also worsens their dental health. Promoting the oral health education of parents, caregivers and nurses, strengthening prevention programs from childhood, and motivating dental practitioners to create a dental care system for this population with disabilities are urgently required.

  18. Impact of oral health education by audio aids, braille and tactile models on the oral health status of visually impaired children of Bhopal City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Anjali; Bhambal, Ajay; Moghe, Swapnil

    2018-01-01

    Children with special needs face unique challenges in day-to-day practice. They are dependent on their close ones for everything. To improve oral hygiene in such visually impaired children, undue training and education are required. Braille is an important language for reading and writing for the visually impaired. It helps them understand and visualize the world via touch. Audio aids are being used to impart health education to the visually impaired. Tactile models help them perceive things which they cannot visualize and hence are an important learning tool. This study aimed to assess the improvement in oral hygiene by audio aids and Braille and tactile models in visually impaired children aged 6-16 years of Bhopal city. This was a prospective study. Sixty visually impaired children aged 6-16 years were selected and randomly divided into three groups (20 children each). Group A: audio aids + Braille, Group B: audio aids + tactile models, and Group C: audio aids + Braille + tactile models. Instructions were given for maintaining good oral hygiene and brushing techniques were explained to all children. After 3 months' time, the oral hygiene status was recorded and compared using plaque and gingival index. ANNOVA test was used. The present study showed a decrease in the mean plaque and gingival scores at all time intervals in individual group as compared to that of the baseline that was statistically significant. The study depicts that the combination of audio aids, Braille and tactile models is an effective way to provide oral health education and improve oral health status of visually impaired children.

  19. Impact of oral health education by audio aids, braille and tactile models on the oral health status of visually impaired children of Bhopal City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Gautam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Children with special needs face unique challenges in day-to-day practice. They are dependent on their close ones for everything. To improve oral hygiene in such visually impaired children, undue training and education are required. Braille is an important language for reading and writing for the visually impaired. It helps them understand and visualize the world via touch. Audio aids are being used to impart health education to the visually impaired. Tactile models help them perceive things which they cannot visualize and hence are an important learning tool. Aim: This study aimed to assess the improvement in oral hygiene by audio aids and Braille and tactile models in visually impaired children aged 6–16 years of Bhopal city. Settings and Design: This was a prospective study. Materials and Methods: Sixty visually impaired children aged 6–16 years were selected and randomly divided into three groups (20 children each. Group A: audio aids + Braille, Group B: audio aids + tactile models, and Group C: audio aids + Braille + tactile models. Instructions were given for maintaining good oral hygiene and brushing techniques were explained to all children. After 3 months' time, the oral hygiene status was recorded and compared using plaque and gingival index. Statistical Analysis Used: ANNOVA test was used. Results: The present study showed a decrease in the mean plaque and gingival scores at all time intervals in individual group as compared to that of the baseline that was statistically significant. Conclusions: The study depicts that the combination of audio aids, Braille and tactile models is an effective way to provide oral health education and improve oral health status of visually impaired children.

  20. Beta Testing an Oral Health Edutainment Card Game Among 12-13-Year-Old Children in Bangalore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikiran, Arkalgud Govindraju; Vadavi, Deepti; Shruti, Tulika

    2017-12-01

    Card games are easy, cost effective, culturally acceptable, as well as sustainable and require minimal infrastructure over other edutainment approaches in achieving health and oral health promotion goals. Therefore, we wanted to conceptualize, develop, and beta test an innovative oral health edutainment card game for preadolescent children in Bangalore, India. An innovative oral health card game, titled "32 warriors" was conceptualized and developed to incorporate age appropriate, medically accurate oral health information. The card game aimed at empowering children to take appropriate care of their oral health. The card game was beta tested on 45 children, aged between 12 and 13 years. Using prepost design, a 32-itemed, closed-ended questionnaire assessed children's oral health knowledge, attitude, and feedback on the game. Change in mean scores for knowledge and attitude was assessed using "Wilcoxon Sign Rank test" at P game and learned new things about oral health. The card game is appealing to children and improves their oral health knowledge and attitude as evidenced by beta test results. We need to further explore the demand, feasibility, and cost effectiveness of introducing this game in formal settings (school based)/informal settings (family and other social settings).

  1. Parental influence on children's answers to an oral-health-related quality of life questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granville-Garcia, Ana Flávia; Gomes, Monalisa Cesarino; Dantas, Laíza Rocha; Dantas, Lívia Rocha; da Silva, Bruno Rafael Cruz; Perazzo, Matheus de França; Siqueira, Maria Betânia Lins Dantas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate parental influence on children's answers to an oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) questionnaire. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a non-probabilistic sample of 84 pairs of 5-year-olds and parents/guardians. The participants were selected from a primary family healthcare center in Campina Grande, Brazil. First, the children and parents answered respective versions of the Scale of Oral Health Outcomes for Five-Year-Old Children (SOHO-5). Seven days later, the children answered their version of the SOHO-5, without the presence of their parents/guardians, and underwent a clinical exam of dental caries, traumatic dental injury and malocclusion, by a previously calibrated researcher. Statistical analysis involved a comparison of mean scores and the calculation of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Poisson regression models were used to associate the variables (α = 5%). No significant differences were found between the mean SOHO-5 scores of the children when alone or accompanied by parents/guardians (p > 0.05). The ICC between the answers of the children alone or accompanied was 0.84. White spot (PR = 6.32; 95%CI: 1.36 - 29.40) and cavitated lesions (PR = 9.81; 95%CI: 3.22 - 29.85) had an impact on OHRQoL, according to the children's self-report, whereas cavitated lesions (PR = 90.52; 95%CI: 13.26 - 617.74) and anterior open bite (PR = 1.95; 95%IC: 1.07 - 3.53) remained on the final model, according to the parents' version of the SOHO-5. In conclusion, parents did not influence the children's responses, and dental caries are the oral health problem exerting the greatest impact on the children's OHRQoL.

  2. Integration of oral health in primary health care through motivational interviewing for mothers of young children: A pilot study

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    Manu Batra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Early childhood caries (ECC continues to affect children worldwide. In India, primary health centers (PHCs comprises the primary tier where Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA provide integrated curative and preventive health care. The aim of the study was to pilot test the integration of oral health in primary health care through motivational interviewing (MI for mothers of young children provided by ASHAs. Subjects and Methods: The pilot study was conducted in Kashipur, Uttarakhand. From the six PHCs in Kashipur, three were randomly selected, one each was assigned to MI group, traditional health education group, and control group. From 60 mothers with 8–12 months child, ASHAs of all three groups gathered mother's knowledge regarding child's oral health using close-ended questionnaire and diagnosed clinical risk markers of ECC in children and ASHAs of Group A and B imparted the oral health education as per their training. Results: The comparison of ASHA's performances on the MI training competency pre- and post-test showed an overall average of 74% improvement in post–test scores. Interexaminer reliability of the parallel clinical measurements by 6 ASHAs and the investigator for the maxillary central incisors showed 93% of agreement for both dental plaque and dental caries assessment with 0.86 and 0.89 kappa values, respectively. Conclusion: The health education through MI is feasible and can be cost-effective by utilization of ASHAs at PHCs to provide the oral health education to mothers which will in turn improve the oral health status of children.

  3. Impact of Oral Health Behaviors on Dental Caries in Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Guangzhou, China

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    Zifeng Liu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental care is consistently reported as one of the primary medical needs of children with disabilities (IDC. The aim of the present study was to explore the influence of oral health behaviors on the caries experience in children with intellectual disabilities in Guangzhou, China. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 477 intellectually disabled children, 12 to 17 years old, who were randomly selected from special educational schools in Guangzhou. A self-administered parental questionnaire was used to collect data on socio-demographic characteristics and oral health behavior variables, and 450 valid questionnaires were returned. Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with dental caries. The average age of those in the sample was 14.6 years (SD = 1.3, 68.4% of whom were male, and the caries prevalence rate was 53.5% (DMFT = 1.5 ± 2.0. The factors significantly affecting the development of dental caries in IDC included gender, the presence or absence of cerebral palsy, and the frequency of dental visits and toothbrushing. In conclusion, the presence of cerebral palsy contributed to an increase risk of caries experience in intellectually disabled children, while toothbrushing more than twice a day and routine dental visits were caries-protective factors. Oral health promotion action may lead to a reduction in dental caries levels in IDC.

  4. The impact of oral health on the academic performance of disadvantaged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seirawan, Hazem; Faust, Sharon; Mulligan, Roseann

    2012-09-01

    We measured the impact of dental diseases on the academic performance of disadvantaged children by sociodemographic characteristics and access to care determinants We performed clinical dental examinations on 1495 disadvantaged elementary and high school students from Los Angeles County public schools. We matched data with academic achievement and attendance data provided by the school district and linked these to the child's social determinants of oral health and the impact of oral health on the child's school and the parents' school or work absences. Students with toothaches were almost 4 times more likely to have a low grade point average. About 11% of students with inaccessible needed dental care missed school compared with 4% of those with access. Per 100 elementary and high school-aged children, 58 and 80 school hours, respectively, are missed annually. Parents averaged 2.5 absent days from work or school per year because of their children's dental problems. Oral health affects students' academic performance. Studies are needed that unbundle the clinical, socioeconomic, and cultural challenges associated with this epidemic of dental disease in children.

  5. Self-perceived oral health and salivary proteins in children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, F; Sundin, U; Altamash, M; Klinge, B; Engström, P-E

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to validate self-perceived oral health with salivary IgG as an inflammatory parameter in children with type 1 diabetes. Unstimulated whole saliva samples were collected from 36 children with well controlled and 12 with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and 40 non-diabetic children (Controls). Salivary flow rate, random blood glucose level, salivary protein concentration and immunoglobulin A and G levels were recorded using standard techniques. Data concerning oral health and diabetes status were collected. Self-perceived gingival bleeding (bleeding gums), bad breath and dry mouth were higher in diabetic children when compared with those in controls (P diabetes (P diabetes (P Salivary flow rate was lower in the diabetic children compared to controls (P diabetes. Salivary IgG per mg protein concentration was higher in the diabetics when compared with the control group (P diabetes (P diabetes. Self-perceived gingival bleeding and salivary IgG per mg protein concentration were increased in children with type 1 diabetes compared with controls. These variables were also increased in children with poorly controlled compared with well-controlled type 1 diabetes.

  6. Oral Health, Obesity Status and Nutritional Habits in Turkish Children and Adolescents: An Epidemiological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesim, Servet; Çiçek, Betül; Aral, Cüneyt Asım; Öztürk, Ahmet; Mazıcıoğlu, Mümtaz Mustafa; Kurtoğlu, Selim

    2016-03-01

    Studies evaluating the relationship between oral health status and obesity have provided conflicting data. Therefore, there is a great need to investigate and clarify the possible connection in a comprehensive sample. To assess the relationship of obesity and oral health status among children and adolescents aged 6 to 17 years-old. Cross-sectional study. Data were obtained from 4,534 children and adolescents (2,018 boys and 2,516 girls). Questionnaires were sent home prior to examination; afterwards, anthropometric and dental data were collected from participants. Community Periodontal Index (CPI) and number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth in the permanent dentition (DMFT), and deciduous dentition (dmft) index were used to measure oral health status. Height, body weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and body fat percentage were analyzed. For DMFT scores, healthy (score=0) girls and boys had significantly higher BMI and WC values than unhealthy (score>1) girls and boys (pnutritional habits and obesity. Obesity and dental/periodontal diseases are multifactorial diseases that follow similar risk patterns and develop from an interaction between chronic conditions originating early in life. It is important for all health professionals to educate patients at risk about the progression of periodontal and dental diseases and the importance of proper oral hygiene.

  7. Impact of oral health education by audio aids, braille and tactile models on the oral health status of visually impaired children of Bhopal City

    OpenAIRE

    Anjali Gautam; Ajay Bhambal; Swapnil Moghe

    2018-01-01

    Context: Children with special needs face unique challenges in day-to-day practice. They are dependent on their close ones for everything. To improve oral hygiene in such visually impaired children, undue training and education are required. Braille is an important language for reading and writing for the visually impaired. It helps them understand and visualize the world via touch. Audio aids are being used to impart health education to the visually impaired. Tactile models help them perceiv...

  8. [Knowledge, attitudes and practices in oral health of parents and caregivers in children's homes in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Martínez, Farith; Sierra Barrios, Carmen Cecilia; Morales Salinas, Luz Edilma

    2011-01-01

    To describe knowledge,attitudes and practices in oral health of parents and caregivers. A total of 333 parents and eight caregivers in children's homes in Colombia in 2010 completed questionnaires and participated in focus group interviews.The data was analyzed for frequency using the χ² test to evaluate significance. The qualitative information was interpreted using triangulated comments to detect patterns and discrepancies. For parents, good levels of knowledge (58.9%) and favorable attitudes (74.5%) were observed. In terms of practices, 50.6% of the children brushed their teeth before bed, with 69.6% of the parents applying the toothpaste to the brush. Among caregivers, a positive attitude toward developing promotional strategies was perceived, but they considered parents to have the main responsibility in matters of healthy oral habits. Parents and caregivers demonstrated favorable conditions in terms of their perceptions, which can be considered an opportunity to promote hygiene habits in children.

  9. The impact of dental care in oral health of children

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    Anya Pimentel Gomes Fernandes Vieira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of dental decay in institutionalized children (shelteror not (stable family situation, with and without access to dental care, verifying the impactof this in both groups. Methods: The study had 133 participants of both sexes, with the same socioeconomic level and aged 3 to 6 years old, divided into four different groups. Two groups consisted of institutionalized children, one of whom had regular dental treatment and the other not; the other two groups consisted of children from nursery school, one group presenting dental treatment and the other not. Data collection consisted of medical history and clinical examination performed by one researcher properly calibrated. The index of decayed, missing and filled deciduous teeth (dmf-t was used to determine the prevalence of caries. Results: Data analysis showed statistically significant difference between groups in the dmf-t that, although high for everyone, was significantly lower for those who haddental care (p <0.001. The comparison between shelters and schools also provided statistically different values of dmf-t (p <0.001, as well as the comparison of schools and shelters among themselves (p = 0.012. In addition, we observed that treatment needs in primary dentition were higher than treatment received and, thus, the preventive approach should be highlighted, both in schools and in shelters for the effective reduction of dental caries rates in this population. Conclusion: Institutionalization as factor did not indicate a higher probability of dental decay in children. However, the absence of the dentist turned significantly higher the probability of dental caries’ occurrence.

  10. Effectiveness evaluation of Contra Caries Oral Health Education Program for improving Spanish-speaking parents’ preventive oral health knowledge and behaviors for their young children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeft, Kristin S.; Barker, Judith C.; Shiboski, Stephen; Guzman, Estela Pantoja; Hiatt, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effectiveness of the Contra Caries Oral Health Education Program (CCOHEP) for improving low-income, Spanish-speaking parents’ oral health knowledge and behaviors for their young children. Mexican American children in the United States suffer disproportionately high prevalence and severity of early childhood caries, yet few evaluated, theory-based behavioral interventions exist for this population. CCOHEP is a theory-based curriculum consisting of four 2-hour interactive classes designed for and by Spanish speakers and led by designated community health educators (promotoras). Topics included children’s oral hygiene, caries etiology, dental procedures, nutrition, child behavior management and parent skill-building activities. Methods Low-income Spanish-speaking parents/caregivers of children aged 0–5 years were recruited through community services in an agricultural city in California. Survey questions from the Oral Health Basic Research Facts Questionnaire measuring oral health related behaviors and knowledge were verbally administered before, immediately after, and 3 months after attendance at CCOHEP. Five questions measured aspects of parental tooth brushing for their children (frequency, using fluoridated toothpaste, brushing before bed, not drinking or eating after nighttime brushing, adult assistance), three questions measured other oral health behaviors, and 16 questions measured oral health-related knowledge. Analyses of within-person changes between pre- and posttests, and again between post-test and three month follow up consisted of McNemar’s test for binary outcomes and sign tests for ordinal outcomes. Results Overall, 105 caregivers participated in CCOHEP (n= 105 pretest, n=95 posttest, n=79 second posttest). At baseline, all parents self-reported doing at least one aspect of toothbrushing correctly, but only 13% reported performing all five aspects according to professional guidelines. At posttest, 44% of parents

  11. The role of parental rearing practices and family demographics on oral health-related quality of life in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Zimmer-Gembeck, M J; Kroon, J; Lalloo, R; Johnson, N W

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the direct and indirect (via oral health-related behaviour) effects of parental rearing practices on children's Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) within a family-focused, comprehensive predictive model. Participants were 11- to 14-year-old children and their parents living in Telangana State, India (N = 1130). Children were clinically assessed for dental caries, gingivitis, oral hygiene status, fluorosis, and malocclusion, and completed a self-administered questionnaire on oral health-related behaviour and OHRQoL. Parents answered questions related to their socioeconomic status (SES), family circumstances, parent's perceptions of child's OHRQoL, and child rearing practices. Structural equation modelling was used to evaluate the pathways through which parenting practices were associated with children's OHRQoL. Parents with higher positive (β = -0.106) and lower power assertion rearing practices (β = 0.103) had children with better OHRQoL. Parental rearing practices did not have any effect on children's oral hygiene behaviour. Children who had malocclusion (β = 0.076) and fluorosis (β = 0.38) had lower OHRQoL. Family SES had a significant effect on children's oral hygiene behaviour and oral hygiene status with children of higher SES demonstrating better oral hygiene behaviour and status. Children living in single-parent families reported poorer oral hygiene behaviour (β = -0.048) than those living in other types of families. Parental rearing practices had direct effects on OHRQoL. However, the hypothesised indirect effects of these practices on OHRQoL via poor oral health behaviour were not supported.

  12. Interrelation between Obesity, Oral Health, and Life-Style Factors among Turkish School Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cinar, Ayse Basak; Murtomaa, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    Obesity, dental caries, and periodontal diseases are among major public health concerns which may affect children's growth and development. This study seeks any clustering between obesity, oral health, and life-style factors among school children in Istanbul, Turkey. A cross-sectional study...... (BMI), and life-style factors (tooth-brushing frequency, milk consumption at breakfast and bedtimes on school nights) of children were examined. Data analysis included factor analysis, Student's t-test, and Chi-square tests by cross-tabulation. Public school children were more dentally diseased...... but less obese than were those in private school (P calculus (62%) and reported non-recommended tooth-brushing (68%) than did those in private school (37%, 56), (P

  13. Stigmatized Biologies: Examining the Cumulative Effects of Oral Health Disparities for Mexican American Farmworker Children

    OpenAIRE

    Horton, Sarah; Barker, Judith C.

    2010-01-01

    Severe early childhood caries (ECC) can leave lasting effects on children’s physical development, including malformed oral arches and crooked permanent dentition. This article examines the way that ECC sets up Mexican American farm worker children in the United States for lasting dental problems and social stigma as young adults. We examine the role of dietary and environmental factors in contributing to what we call “stigmatized biologies,” and that of market-based dental public health insur...

  14. Influence of children's oral health promotion on parents' behaviours, attitudes and knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolvanen, Mimmi; Anttonen, Vuokko; Mattila, Marja-Leena; Hausen, Hannu; Lahti, Satu

    2016-07-01

    Objective The aim was to compare the changes in parents' oral health-related behaviour, knowledge and attitudes in 2001-2003 and 2003-2005, during a 3.4-year-intervention in Pori and in the reference area Rauma, Finland. Materials and methods The study population consisted of parents of children who participated in the oral health promotion programme in Pori (all 5th and 6th graders who started the 2001-2002 school year in the town of Pori, n = 1691) and the parents of same-aged children in a reference town (n = 807). In 2001-2003, the promotion was targeted only to the children in Pori. In 2003-2005, the promotion was targeted also to parents, for example via local mass media. The statistical significances of the differences in parents' self-reported behaviour, knowledge and attitudes, and changes in these, were evaluated using Mann-Whitney U-tests and confidence intervals. Results In 2001-2003, the trend in changing behaviours was in favour of parents in Pori. Mothers in Pori also improved their knowledge and the attitude 'importance of brushing for health and appearance'. In 2003-2005, the trend in changing behaviours was rather similar in both towns, which may be due to diffusion of the oral health intervention to Rauma via the media. Conclusions The results suggest that health promotion targeted to children, which in previous studies has been shown to be successful in improving children's behaviours, also helped their parents in mending their habits.

  15. Oral health knowledge, behaviors and parental practices among rural-urban migrant children in Guangzhou: a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ning; Cai, Li; Xu, Caijuan; Guan, Han; Jin, Yu

    2017-06-07

    Despite the growing number of rural-urban migrant children in China, follow-up observation on the oral health of migrant children is still scarce. This study described the changes of oral health knowledge, behaviors and parental practices in migrant children over a period of one year. Possible factors affecting changes were also investigated. The study used purposive sampling to select five private schools of migrant children in Guangzhou. A total of 1900 students in Grades 3 and 4 were recruited. A self-administered questionnaire was used in November 2011 to understand their basic situations, including oral health knowledge, behaviors and parental practices. A final survey was conducted in April 2013 to detect any changes. The mean accuracy of oral health knowledge was 53.17% and 59.42% in 2011 and 2013, respectively (p oral hygiene, dietary habits and parental practices increased at the follow-up evaluation (p oral health knowledge were more likely to achieve significantly positive changes in score of knowledge (p oral hygiene (beta estimate = 0.68, p parental practices in the baseline survey were more likely to obtain beneficial changes. No significant associations between demographic characteristics and changes of oral health knowledge and behaviors (p > 0.05) were observed. Oral health knowledge, behaviors and parental practices among migrant children significantly improved at the follow-up assessment. However, the overall situation was still poor. Positive and effective health education and prevention programs tailored to rural-urban migrant children with varying levels of oral health knowledge, behaviors and parental practices will be needed.

  16. Oral health in children with Down syndrome: Parents' views on dental care in Flanders (Belgium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descamps, I; Marks, L A

    2015-06-01

    Evaluate the views and knowledge, regarding dental care, of parents who have a child with Down syndrome (DS). Parents of children with DS were invited to fill in a questionnaire. They were recruited by the Flemish Organization for DS, from schools for children with special needs and by four multidisciplinary medical DS teams at four University Hospitals. Chi-square tests were used to test the correlation between different variables. Results were assessed in the 95% confidence interval with pOral health was indicated as rather good by 53% of the parents. Of the children, 66% went to a dentist within the last six months. Most of the children (64%) received a dental examination. In 53% of the cases, parents visited the same dentist for their child with DS as their other child(ren) without DS. Eighty-three percent of the parents are pleased with their dentist. They expect the dentist to be kind and reassuring. Children aged 10 years or younger get significantly more help with tooth brushing (79%) than children older than 10 years (36%). However 20% of the parents never received any oral hygiene instructions for their child with DS. Prevention is the most frequent service provided by the dentist. Parents seem to be pleased with the dentist who treats their child with DS.

  17. Oral health and glycosylated hemoglobin among type 1 diabetes children in South India

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    K Vidya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study was an attempt to evaluate the relationship between oral health status and the level of glycemic control in type 1 diabetes patients. Methods: The study was carried out in 87 children with type 1 diabetes, aged 8–16 years, attending a diabetes specialty hospital. The oral health of these patients was measured using the WHO 1997 Oral Health Survey criteria for diagnosis of dental caries, gingival index, and plaque index. Samples were then divided into two groups as controlled (≤6.99% glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] and uncontrolled (≥7% HbA1c diabetes as per the guidelines for glycemic control in diabetics given by the American Diabetes Association. The oral health between the groups was compared. Results: Data were statistically analyzed using student t-test. Results showed a significant difference in decayed, missing, and filled surface component (P = 0.043 and gingival index scores (P< 0.001 in the permanent dentition between controlled and uncontrolled groups but not in case of the primary dentition. Conclusions: The data findings suggest that metabolic control had an impact on caries prevalence and gingival health of these patients, in case of permanent dentition. As the glycemic control became poorer, the caries prevalence and gingival inflammation increased. When primary dentition was taken into consideration, the correlation was not significant.

  18. Dental caries prevalence, oral health knowledge and practice among indigenous Chepang school children of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai Dixit, Lonim; Shakya, Ajay; Shrestha, Manash; Shrestha, Ayush

    2013-05-14

    Chepang communities are one of the most deprived ethnic communities in Nepal. According to the National Pathfinder Survey, dental caries is a highly prevalent childhood disease in Nepal. There is no data concerning the prevalence of caries along with knowledge, attitude and oral hygiene practices among Chepang schoolchildren. The objectives of this study were to 1) record the prevalence of dental caries 2) report experience of dental pain 3) evaluate knowledge, attitude and preventive practices on oral health of primary Chepang schoolchildren. A cross sectional epidemiological study was conducted in 5 government Primary schools of remote Chandibhanjyang Village Development Committee (VDC) in Chitwan district. Ethical approval was taken from the Institutional Review Board within the Research Department of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Tribhuvan University. Consent was obtained from parents for conducting clinical examination and administrating questionnaire. Permission was taken from the school principal in all schools. Data was collected using a pretested questionnaire on 131 schoolchildren aged 8-16-year- olds attending Grade 3-5. Clinical examination was conducted on 361 school children aged 5-16 -year-olds attending grade 1-5. Criteria set by the World Health Organization (1997) was used for caries diagnosis. The questionnaires, originally constructed in English and translated into Nepali were administered to the schoolchildren by the researchers. SPSS 11software was used for data analysis. Caries prevalence for 5-6 -year-old was above the goals recommended by WHO and Federation of Dentistry international (FDI) of less than 50% caries free children. Caries prevalence in 5-6-year-olds was 52% and 12-13-year-olds was 41%. The mean dmft/DMFT score of 5-6 -year-olds and 12 -13-year -olds was 1.59, 0.31 and 0.52, 0.84 respectively. The DMFT scores increased with age and the d/D component constituted almost the entire dmft/DMFT index. About 31% of 8-16-year

  19. Exploring the oral microbiota of children at various developmental stages of their dentition in the relation to their oral health

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    Montijn Roy C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An understanding of the relation of commensal microbiota to health is essential in preventing disease. Here we studied the oral microbial composition of children (N = 74, aged 3 - 18 years in natural transition from their deciduous to a permanent dentition and related the microbial profiles to their oral health status. The microbial composition of saliva was assessed by barcoded pyrosequencing of the V5-V6 hypervariable regions of the 16 S rRNA, as well as by using phylogenetic microarrays. Results Pyrosequencing reads (126174 reads, 1045 unique sequences represented 8 phyla and 113 higher taxa in saliva samples. Four phyla - Firmicutes, Bacteriodetes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria - predominated in all groups. The deciduous dentition harboured a higher proportion of Proteobacteria (Gammaproteobacteria, Moraxellaceae than Bacteroidetes, while in all other groups Bacteroidetes were at least as abundant as Proteobacteria. Bacteroidetes (mainly genus Prevotella, Veillonellaceae family, Spirochaetes and candidate division TM7 increased with increasing age, reflecting maturation of the microbiome driven by biological changes with age. Microarray analysis enabled further analysis of the individual salivary microbiota. Of 350 microarray probes, 156 gave a positive signal with, on average, 77 (range 48-93 probes per individual sample. A caries-free oral status significantly associated with the higher signal of the probes targeting Porphyromonas catoniae and Neisseria flavescens. Conclusions The potential role of P. catoniae and N. flavescens as oral health markers should be assessed in large-scale clinical studies. The combination of both, open-ended and targeted molecular approaches provides us with information that will increase our understanding of the interplay between the human host and its microbiome.

  20. A Study on Oral Health of Children with Cardiac Diseases in Mashhad, Iran in 2004

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    Mohammad Mahmoudi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. Preventing oral disease is the most desirable way of ensuring good dental health for children with heart disease. Dental and gingival infections in patients with cardiac problems may lead to infective endocarditis. The aim of this study was to evaluate oral and dental health status in children with heart disease referred to a cardiac center compared with the control group.

    Materials and Methods. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, case group consisting of 100 patients 2-12 years old with heart disease were examined for oral and dental status in Pediatric Cardiac Center in Mashhad, Iran, in 2004. Fifty healthy children with the same age as the case group referring to the Department of Pedodontics, Mashhad Faculty of Dentistry served as the control group. For each patient, dental and medical history, dmft, DMFT, debris index, tooth brushing status as well as parental knowledge of infective endocarditis and their economic status was registered on a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square and t-tests.

    Results. There were no significant differences between case and control groups in dmft (3.92 ± 3.99 and 3.54 ± 3.33, respectively, DMFT (3.7 ± 4 and 1.47 ± 1.72, respectively and their components. Tooth brushing status and debris index were significantly worse in the study group (P = 0.001 and P = 0.008, respectively. 35% of parents were aware of the importance of good oral health in cardiac children although none of them knew about infective endocarditis. Most of the parents in study group had low (30% to medium (53% economic status.

    Conclusion. In this study, the children with cardiac disease did not have a good oral and dental health status. Developing strategies toward preventive dental care of children with cardiac problems and informing their parents is suggested.

  1. Common risk factor approach to address socioeconomic inequality in the oral health of preschool children--a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Loc G; Scott, Jane A; Thomson, W Murray; Stamm, John W; Rugg-Gunn, Andrew J; Levy, Steven M; Wong, Ching; Devenish, Gemma; Ha, Diep H; Spencer, A John

    2014-05-06

    Dental caries remains the most prevalent chronic condition in children and a major contributor to poor general health. There is ample evidence of a skewed distribution of oral health, with a small proportion of children in the population bearing the majority of the burden of the disease. This minority group is comprised disproportionately of socioeconomically disadvantaged children. An in-depth longitudinal study is needed to better understand the determinants of child oral health, in order to support effective evidence-based policies and interventions in improving child oral health. The aim of the Study of Mothers' and Infants' Life Events Affecting Oral Health (SMILE) project is to identify and evaluate the relative importance and timing of critical factors that shape the oral health of young children and then to seek to evaluate those factors in their inter-relationship with socioeconomic influences. This investigation will apply an observational prospective study design to a cohort of socioeconomically-diverse South Australian newborns and their mothers, intensively following these dyads as the children grow to toddler age. Mothers of newborn children will be invited to participate in the study in the early post-partum period. At enrolment, data will be collected on parental socioeconomic status, mothers' general and dental health conditions, details of the pregnancy, infant feeding practice and parental health behaviours and practices. Data on diet and feeding practices, oral health behaviours and practices, and dental visiting patterns will be collected at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months of age. When children turn 24-30 months, the children and their mothers/primary care givers will be invited to an oral examination to record oral health status. Anthropometric assessment will also be conducted. This prospective cohort study will examine a wide range of determinants influencing child oral health and related general conditions such as overweight. It will lead to the

  2. Common risk factor approach to address socioeconomic inequality in the oral health of preschool children – a prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental caries remains the most prevalent chronic condition in children and a major contributor to poor general health. There is ample evidence of a skewed distribution of oral health, with a small proportion of children in the population bearing the majority of the burden of the disease. This minority group is comprised disproportionately of socioeconomically disadvantaged children. An in-depth longitudinal study is needed to better understand the determinants of child oral health, in order to support effective evidence-based policies and interventions in improving child oral health. The aim of the Study of Mothers’ and Infants’ Life Events Affecting Oral Health (SMILE) project is to identify and evaluate the relative importance and timing of critical factors that shape the oral health of young children and then to seek to evaluate those factors in their inter-relationship with socioeconomic influences. Methods/Design This investigation will apply an observational prospective study design to a cohort of socioeconomically-diverse South Australian newborns and their mothers, intensively following these dyads as the children grow to toddler age. Mothers of newborn children will be invited to participate in the study in the early post-partum period. At enrolment, data will be collected on parental socioeconomic status, mothers’ general and dental health conditions, details of the pregnancy, infant feeding practice and parental health behaviours and practices. Data on diet and feeding practices, oral health behaviours and practices, and dental visiting patterns will be collected at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months of age. When children turn 24-30 months, the children and their mothers/primary care givers will be invited to an oral examination to record oral health status. Anthropometric assessment will also be conducted. Discussion This prospective cohort study will examine a wide range of determinants influencing child oral health and related general conditions

  3. Effectiveness of supervised toothbrushing and oral health education in improving oral hygiene status and practices of urban and rural school children: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Satyawan G; Patil, Anil; Jain, Saru; Damle, Dhanashree; Chopal, Nilika

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate and compare the oral health status and the impact of supervised toothbrushing and oral health education among school children of urban and rural areas of Maharashtra, India. A total of 200 school children in the age group 12-15 years were selected by stratified random sampling technique from two schools and were further divided into two groups: Group A (urban school) and Group B (rural school). Both the groups were again subdivided into control group and study group. Supervised toothbrushing was recommended for both the groups. The toothbrushing teaching program included session on oral health education, individual toothbrushing instructions, and supervised toothbrushing. Dental caries increment, plaque scores, and gingival status were assessed as per the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria (1997), Turesky-Gilmore-Glickman modification of the Quigley Hein Plaque Index, and Loe-Silness Gingival Index (1963), respectively. Cronbach's alpha, Chi-square test, paired t-test, and unpaired t-test were utilized for data analysis. The mean plaque and gingival score reduction was significantly higher in the study groups as compared to the control groups. An increase in the mean of Decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) and Decayed, missing, filled teeth and surfaces (DMFS) scores throughout the study period was seen in children who participated in study. Oral health education was effective in establishing good oral health habits among school children and also in enhancing the knowledge of their parents about good oral health.

  4. Influence of family environment on children's oral health: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rogéria Freire de Castilho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review current models and scientific evidence on the influence of parents’ oral health behaviors on their children's dental caries. Sources: MEDLINE articles published between 1980 and June, 2012. Original research articles on parents’ oral health behavior were reviewed. A total of 218 citations were retrieved, and 13 articles were included in the analysis. The studies were eligible for review if they matched the following inclusion criteria: (1 they evaluated a possible association between dental caries and parents’ oral-health-related behaviors, and (2 the study methodology included oral clinical examination. The main search terms were “oral health”, “parental attitudes”, “parental knowledge”, and “dental caries”. Summary of the findings: : 13 experimental studies contributed data to the synthesis. Original articles, reviews, and chapters in textbooks were also considered. Conclusion: Parents’ dental health habits influence their children's oral health. Oral health education programs aimed at preventive actions are needed to provide children not only with adequate oral health, but better quality of life. Special attention should be given to the entire family, concerning their lifestyle and oral health habits. Resumo: Objetivo: Envolver modelos atuais e comprovações científicas sobre a influência de comportamentos de saúde bucal dos pais na cárie dentária de suas crianças. Fontes: Artigos do MEDLINE publicados entre 1980 e junho de 2012. Foram analisados artigos de pesquisa originais tratando do comportamento dos pais quanto à saúde bucal. Um total de 218 citações foi analisado e 13 artigos foram incluídos na análise. Os estudos foram considerados elegíveis para análise se atendessem aos seguintes critérios de inclusão: (1 avaliassem uma possível associação entre cáries dentárias e o comportamento dos pais relacionado à saúde bucal; e (2 se a metodologia do estudo incluísse exame

  5. A service-learning project to eliminate barriers to oral care for children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMattei, Ronda R; Allen, Jessica; Goss, Breanna

    2012-06-01

    Children with special health care needs face many barriers to oral care and are at high risk for oral disease. School nurses are in a unique position to promote oral wellness in this vulnerable population. Collaboration between school nurses and dental hygiene faculty resulted in the formation of a partnership between a university-based dental hygiene program and two special education districts in rural southern Illinois. Senior dental hygiene students participated in a school-based service-learning project that provided dental examinations, preventive services, and education to children with special health care needs. Evidence-based behavioral interventions were used to teach children to comply with oral procedures. School nurses mentored dental hygiene students in behavior management of children. Dental exams were provided to 234 children from four special education schools with the majority receiving cleanings and fluoride.

  6. Oral hygiene status of the orphan children in Ar-Rohman Foster Home Bandung after dental health education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurayni Tri Hapsari

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral hygiene status is a condition of a person’s oral cavity. Oral hygiene status can be assessed using the Oral Hygiene Index Simplified (OHI-S by Greene & Vermillion. The education given regarding oral health is one of health promotion with the purpose to increase the ability of children in terms of maintaining and improving their oral hygiene. The purpose of this study was to determine the difference of the orphans in Ar-Rohman Foster Home Bandung oral health status before and after three times of oral health education. Methods: The type of this research was a pre-experimental study with one group of pretest-posttest design with total sampling technique. Subjects of this research were orphans aged 13-15 years old. The respondents got the clinical examination of OHI-S before and after the oral health education was given for three times. The data obtained then tested using normality test, if the data were normally distributed, then analysed with a paired t-test, and if the data was not normally distributed, then will be analysed with a Wilcoxon test. Results: The results showed a significant decrease of plaque index after oral health education was given to the orphans. The examination of the calculus index (CI-S did not show any change before and after oral health education. OHI-S of children, however, showed a significant decrease. Conclusion: There was a significant increase in the orphans in Ar-Rohman Foster Home Bandung oral health status after given three times of oral health education.

  7. Clinical Comparative Study of the Effects of Helicobacter Pylori Colonization on Oral Health in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, Asim; Gurbuz, Taskin

    2016-01-01

    To isolate Helicobacter pylori (HP) from the dental plaque of a selected group of children and to compare the oral and salivary findings of patients with those of a healthy control group. A total of 70 children aged 5-15 years were included in this study. An intraoral examination was performed for each patient, and dental plaque and saliva specimens were collected for analysis. Oral health conditions, nutritional habits, tooth brushing frequency, saliva pH levels, flow velocity, and buffering capacities were noted. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison of the DMFT and dft index. The significance level was set at p=0.05. The prevalence of HP in dental plaque was higher in study group than controls (p0.05). Meanwhile, the buffering capacity of saliva was lower in HP gastritis patients (pdental plaque; thus, the oral cavity may be an important reservoir for HP. Good oral hygiene could be a positive contributor to the treatment of gastritis.

  8. Oral health behaviour of children and adults in urban and rural areas of Burkina Faso, Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varenne, Benoît; Petersen, Poul Erik; Ouattara, Seydou

    2006-01-01

    differences were found in oral health knowledge, attitudes and practices according to location and gender. At age 12, important factors of high caries experience were location (urban), and consumption of soft drinks and fresh fruits. In 35-44-year-olds, gender (female), high education level, dental visit......OBJECTIVES: To assess the level of dental knowledge and attitudes among 12 year-old children and 35-44 year-olds in Burkina Faso; to evaluate the pattern of oral health behaviour among these cohorts in relation to location, gender and social characteristics and; to evaluate the relative effect...... and discomfort from teeth were common while dental visits were infrequent. Tooth cleaning was mostly performed by use of chewsticks. Use of toothpaste was rare, particularly fluoridated toothpaste was seldom; 9% of 12-year-olds and 18% of 35-44-year-olds reported use of fluoride toothpaste. Significant...

  9. Dental Provider Attitudes Are a Barrier to Expanded Oral Health Care for Children ≤3 Years of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Clark MPH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the perspectives of general dentists regarding oral health care for children ≤3 years. Methods. Mailed survey of 444 general dentists in Michigan. Results. Although most dentists were aware of recommendations for early dental visits, only 36% recommended their own patients begin dental visits by 1 year of age. Only 37% dentists felt that screening for oral health problems can be done by medical providers, whereas 34% agreed administration of fluoride varnish by medical providers would be effective in preventing dental problems in young children. Conclusions. Dentists’ failure to recommend 1-year dental visits is due neither to lack of awareness nor to capacity problems. The limited enthusiasm for involving children’s medical providers in oral health promotion signals attitudinal barriers that must be overcome to improve children’s oral health. Primary care providers should identify and refer to dentists in their community who are willing to see young children.

  10. Correlation between oral health in disabled children and depressive symptoms in their mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, G; Cremonesi, I; Alkhamis, N; Piana, G

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence and degree of depressive symptoms in mothers of disabled children and to assess the correlation between maternal major depression risk and son/daughter oral health. A prospective study was conducted in 51 disabled children and their 51 mothers. In children dmft/DMFT values, food and/or sugar- sweetened consumption levels and daily tooth brushing frequency were evaluated. Depressive maternal symptoms were measured by EDPS questionnaire: the questionnaire scores were converted into positive predictive values (PPV) that represented the risk of falling into major depression. A regression analysis was performed on the variables (statical significance was set at p value ≤ 0.05). Children (8.68 ± 3.98 years old) average dmft/DMFT was 2.7. Fifty three percent of the mothers (38.37 ± 6.04 years) were at risk for depression (PPV > 60%), while depressive symptoms were already present in 25% of the subjects (PPV=100%). Mothers of disabled children are more likely to fall into major depression compared to mothers of healthy children. For each mother-child couple the correlation between different variables was evaluated: there was a statistically significant correlation between children's dmft/DMFT values and mothers' depression risk. The risk of maternal depression was statistically correlated to prevalence of caries and sugar consumption in children.

  11. The Affordable Care Act and Health Insurance Exchanges: Advocacy Efforts for Children's Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orynich, C Ashley; Casamassimo, Paul S; Seale, N Sue; Litch, C Scott; Reggiardo, Paul

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate legislative differences in defining the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) pediatric dental benefit and the role of pediatric advocates across states with different health insurance Exchanges. Data were collected through public record investigation and confidential health policy expert interviews conducted at the state and federal level. Oral health policy change by the pediatric dental profession requires advocating for the mandatory purchase of coverage through the Exchange, tax subsidy contribution toward pediatric dental benefits, and consistent regulatory insurance standards for financial solvency, network adequacy and provider reimbursement. The pediatric dental profession is uniquely positioned to lead change in oral health policy amidst health care reform through strengthening state-level formalized networks with organized dentistry and commercial insurance carriers.

  12. Oral Health Status among Children with Cerebral Palsy in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hashmi, Haifa; Kowash, Mawlood; Hassan, Amar; Al Halabi, Manal

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the oral health status of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Materials and Methods: Eighty-four CP and 125 healthy children were recruited from special needs centers and private/public schools in Dubai. A dental examination for decayed-missing-filled teeth in primary dentition (dmft)/Decayed-Missing-Filled teeth in permanent dentition (DMFT) indices, simplified oral hygiene index, calculus index (CI), and oral debris index was conducted. In addition, assessments of occlusal, dentofacial, soft tissue anomalies and erosion were conducted. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS for Windows, version 20.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: DMFT/dmft scores were comparable in both groups. CI was significantly higher among children with CP. CP patients had a significantly higher proportion of anterior open bite, anterior spacing, Class II molar Angle malocclusion, trauma, high-arched palate, tongue thrust, lymphadenopathy, angular cheilitis, macroglossia, drooling, and erosion as compared to controls. Conclusions: The study highlighted peculiar characteristics and needs for the CP patients in Dubai, UAE. PMID:29285470

  13. Dental caries, fluorosis, and oral health behavior of children from Herat, Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendicke, Falk; Doost, Ferhat; Hopfenmüller, Werner; Meyer-Lueckel, Hendrik; Paris, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Decades of conflict, poverty, and dysfunctional public services have affected people's health in Afghanistan. To estimate treatment needs and guide health initiatives, epidemiologic data are required. Such data are currently unavailable for dental health. The present study assessed caries experience, fluorosis, and oral health behavior in children from Afghanistan. We performed a two-stage, school-based cross-sectional study in Herat province in Afghanistan. A total of 1059 children, 369 children aged 6-7, 300 aged 12, and 390 aged 15 years, were sampled. Caries was assessed according to ICDAS, and oral hygiene, dietary habits, and parental economic and educational status evaluated. Prevalence of fluorosis was assessed, and fluoride concentrations in drinking water and in used toothpastes were measured. Mean (SD) number of decayed, missing, or filled teeth was dmft = 4.88 (3.11), DMFT = 2.57 (2.16), and DMFT = 4.04 (3.03) in 6-/7-, 12-, and 15-year-olds, respectively. The majority of lesions in 6-year-olds were cavitated, while 12- and 15-year-olds showed more non- or microcavitated lesions. Most lesions, especially in young children, were untreated. Mean (range) water fluoride concentration was 0.37 (0.19-0.67) ppm. Fluoride concentrations in evaluated toothpastes did not meet internationally recommended levels. The majority of children showed no or minimal fluorosis. Having fluorosis, infrequently consuming sweets, or having a father with high education was associated with low caries experience (dmfs/DMFS dental treatment needs and caries experience. Sufficient access to restorative treatment and prevention measures is urgently required. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Parental attitudes towards oral health and caries-risk in their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaire, J H; van Exel, Nja

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether parents can be matched with attitudes towards oral health by means of a short vignette sheet, developed based on the results of an earlier Q-methodological study. Furthermore, this study aims to explore how the attitudes associate with diet and oral hygiene habits and with clinical outcomes in children. A total of 170 parents of 6- to 9-year-old children completed a questionnaire including the vignette sheet and clinical scores (oral hygiene, caries) were retrieved from the follow-up measurement of a RCT on caries-preventive measures. Of the 170 respondents, 159 (93.5%) could be matched to a single best matching attitude. Respondents identified "well" to "very well" with at least one of the attitudes and seemed to be able to differentiate well the extent to which they matched to the different attitudes. Parents scoring high on different attitudes were found to be associated with different lifestyle patterns and clinical outcomes. It was concluded that using a self-assessed attitude tool, derived from the results of a Q-methodological study, it is possible to identify different groups of parents with different oral health-related risk factors. Of course, it is hardly likely that people are 100% only 1 type of parent; parents can be considered to be a mix of different typologies. However, information on the composition of that mix may be helpful for the dental professional to estimate risks and to deliver a more tailored prevention strategy in children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Oral health knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of children and adolescents in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Ling; Petersen, Poul Erik; Wang, Hong-Ying

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A national representative study to describe oral health behaviour, illness behaviour, oral health knowledge and attitudes among 12-year-old and 18-year-old Chinese, to analyse the oral health behaviour profile of the two age groups in relation to province and urbanisation, and to asse...

  16. Impact of dental health on children's oral health-related quality of life: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsumait, Aishah; ElSalhy, Mohamed; Raine, Kim; Cor, Ken; Gokiert, Rebecca; Al-Mutawa, Sabiha; Amin, Maryam

    2015-07-07

    To assess the impact of children's dental health status (DHS) on their oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Participants were 11- and 12-year-old children attending public schools in the Kuwait Capital Region. Children's DHS was evaluated by clinical examinations and presented using decayed, missed, filled teeth/surface (DMFT/dmft, DMFS/dmfs); restorative (RI), plaque (PI); and pulp, ulcers, fistula, abscess (PUFA) indices. Children's OHRQoL was assessed using Child's Perception Questionnaire 11-14 (CPQ11-14). Means (SD) and frequencies were used for data description. Different factors were analyzed as predictors of OHRQoL by logistic regression analysis. A total of 440 children aged 11-12 years (50.7 % females) participated in this cross-sectional study. Mean (SD) DMFT/dmft, RI, PI, and PUFA scores were 2.91(2.75), 0.21 (0.34), 3.59 (1.63), 0.31 (0.85), respectively. The mean total CPQ11-14 was 20.72 (16.81). Mean scores of oral-symptoms, functional-limitations, emotional and social well-being were 4.26 (3.32), 5.40 (4.92), 5.48 (6.15), and 5.33 (6.05), respectively. Children with more than four fillings were 95 % less likely to have had oral symptoms than those with no fillings. Children with a DMFT/dmft of 2-3 were 2.8 times more likely to have functional limitation than those with a DMFT/dmft of 0, while children with a DMFT/dmft of more than 4 were 4.4 times more likely to experience limitations. Having two or three non-cavitated lesions reduced the odds of having functional-limitation by 58 %. Children with more than four missing teeth were 45 % more likely to experience emotional stress. Having more than four fissure sealants reduced the odds of having emotional stress by 46 %. The increase in the number of carious teeth was associated with a limitation in oral functions. Preventive treatment had a positive impact on children's emotional well-being and restorative treatments improved their oral function.

  17. [The effect of daily controlled oral hygiene on the oral health of children in a town with drinking water fluoridation (Karl Marx Stadt)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgi, J; Künzel, W

    1976-03-01

    Under the conditions of an optimized (with regard to caries prevention) fluoride content of the drinking uater, the authors studied (in the framework of an oral hygiene measure covering 32 months) in 149 children 6.5-8 years of age the effects of supervised daily dental and oral care on dental health. The improvement in oral hygiene (OHI) by 33% is in harmony with an additional caries reduction by 33.3% (DMF/S index) and a decrease of the PM index by 47%. A wider use of oral hygiene actions as secondary preventive measures is, therefore, recommended also for towns with fluoridated drinking water.

  18. Oral health status and salivary properties in relation to gluten-free diet in children with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shteyer, Eyal; Berson, Tamar; Lachmanovitz, Odelia; Hidas, Ariela; Wilschanski, Michael; Menachem, Moti; Shachar, Edna; Shapira, Joseph; Steinberg, Doron; Moskovitz, Moti

    2013-07-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) have a wide variety of symptoms, from being asymptomatic to having chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, and extraintestinal symptoms. In the oral cavity, enamel defects and recurrent aphthous stomatitis are the most common symptoms. The aim of the study was to assess oral health, bacterial colonization and salivary buffering capacity of patients with CD at diagnosis were compared with patients with CD receiving a gluten-free diet (GFD) and healthy children. Three groups were prospectively investigated: newly diagnosed CD, CD treated with GFD, and a control group. All of the children were examined by pediatric dentists, and saliva samples were collected for bacterial and pH analysis. Ninety children were enrolled in the study, 30 in each group. A higher prevalence of enamel hypoplasia (66%) was found in children with CD. Plaque index was significantly lower in the celiac-treated group, which correlated with oral health behavior: teeth brushing and frequency of eating between meals. Children receiving GFD brushed their teeth and used fluoride significantly more often than other children in the study. No difference between groups was found in snack consumption, mutans streptococci and lactobacilli counts in saliva, as well as pH and buffer capacity. A lower degree of plaque was found in children with CD receiving GFD. This finding could not be explained by salivary properties or bacteria, but rather by better oral hygiene. The results should raise the awareness of pediatric gastroenterologists toward oral health-related issues in children with CD.

  19. Oral health status of Tibetan and local school children of Kushalnagar, Mysore district, India: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Havaldar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of migrants culturally different from inhabitants of the host country is now a widespread phenomenon. It is known that dietary habits and oral hygiene practices vary from country to country, which in turn has a profound effect on oral health. Objectives: To assess and compare the oral health status of Tibetan school children and local school children of Kushalnagar (Bylakuppe. Study design: A survey was conducted at Kushalnagar (Bylakuppe, in Mysore district, India to assess the oral health status of Tibetan school children (n = 300 and local school children (n = 300 and compared using World Health Organization oral health proforma (1997. Results: The proportional values are compared using chi-square test and the mean values are compared using Student′s t-test. Statistically significant results were obtained for soft tissue lesions, dental caries, malocclusion, and treatment needs. However, results were not significant when gingivitis was compared in the two populations. Conclusions: Tibetan school children showed higher prevalence of Angular cheilitis, gingival bleeding, dental caries experience, malocclusion, and treatment needs in comparison with non-Tibetans. Among the Tibetan school children, the requirement for two or more surface filling was more.

  20. Oral health status of children with congenital heart disease and the awareness, attitude and knowledge of their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Kavita; Supriya, S; Hegde, Amitha M

    2009-01-01

    The oral health status of children with congenital heart diseases and the parental awareness on maintaining good oral health and attitude towards preventive dental health measures were evaluated. A total of 170 children between the age group of 1-16 yrs belonging to both genders, with the history of congenital heart disease from Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute of Medical Science and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram and Narayana Hrudayalaya Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangalore were examined. Oral lesions and caries experience were recorded using modified WHO oral health assessment form. Oral hygiene of the children with congenital heart disease was found to be poor with tongue coating (50.6%), plaque (41.8%), calculus (35.3%), and caries (42.4%). Parental awareness on the importance of maintaining good oral hygiene, preventive dentistry, medicinal decay and its systemic effects has been found to be very poor. Dentistry should give priority to patients whose general health may be put at risk by poor dental health. Closer cooperation between Pediatrician, Pediatric Cardiologists and Pediatric Dentists could help improve dental care for these children.

  1. The second national survey of oral health status of children and adults in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Hong-Ying; Petersen, Poul Erik; Bian, Jin-You

    2002-01-01

    prevalence in children varied by province and age. Among adolescents and young adults caries levels were high in urban areas while caries experience was high for old-age people of rural areas. At national level, changes in dental caries prevalence of 12- and 15-year-olds were small. However, some provinces...... with extensive oral health programmes (e.g. Love Teeth Day) showed declining caries experience whereas provinces with limited preventive activities had increasing levels of caries. For all age groups, gingival bleeding and calculus were most frequent. Severe periodontal conditions were relatively rare...

  2. Predicting Oral Health-Related Behaviour in the Parents of Preschool Children: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Branden, Sigrid; Van den Broucke, Stephan; Leroy, Roos; Declerck, Dominique; Hoppenbrouwers, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to test the predictive validity of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) when applied to the oral health-related behaviours of parents towards their preschool children in a cross-sectional and prospective design over a 5-year interval. Methods: Data for this study were obtained from parents of 1,057 children born…

  3. Effect of Motives for Food Choice on Oral Health among Primary School Children in Mangalore: An Analytical Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Viral Vijay; Rajesh, Gururaghavendran; Rao, Ashwini; Shenoy, Ramya; Pai, Mithun; Nayak, Vijayendranath

    2017-05-01

    Parents influence children's eating behaviours by making some foods available than others and by acting as models of eating behaviour. Food selected by parents influence general and oral health of their children. Aim of this study was to assess oral health parameters among primary school children and motives for food choice among their parents in Mangalore. A total of 759 primary school children aged 5-10 years, and their parents participated in this study. Motives for food choice among parents of children were evaluated by using Food Choice Questionnaire (FCQ). Oral health status of students was assessed by using World Health Organisation (WHO) Basic Oral Health Assessment Form. Data pertaining to dietary habits and demographics was also collected. Descriptive and inferential statistics along with Pearson's correlation and Binary logistic regression were executed for the present study and level of significance was fixed at pfood choice motives positively influenced dietary patterns and caries experience of their children. Caries experience was less in children whose parents reported higher scores on FCQ. Understanding the barriers, identification of risk factors for poor food choices and targeting interventions might formulate ways by which the desired behaviour can be achieved.

  4. Changes in Area-level Socioeconomic Status and Oral Health of Indigenous Australian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Diep H; Do, Loc G; Luzzi, Liana; Mejia, Gloria C; Jamieson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Dental diseases have shown to be influenced by area-level socioeconomic status. This study aims to assess the effects of change in area-level SES on the oral health of Australian Indigenous children. Data were collected from a national surveillance survey for children's dental health at two points of time (2000-2002/2007-2010). The study examines caries experienced by area-level SES and whether changes in area-level SES (stable-high, upwardly-mobile, downwardly-mobile and stable low) affects caries experience. Dental caries in both the deciduous and permanent dentition increased significantly among Indigenous children during the study period. In stable low-SES areas, the experience of decayed, missing and overall dmft/DMFT in both dentitions was highest compared with other groups at both Time 1(2.15 vs 1.61, 1.77, 1.87 and 0.86 vs 0.55, 0.67, 0.70 respectively) and Time 2 (3.23 vs 2.08, 2.17, 2.02 and 1.49 vs 1.18, 1.21 respectively). A change in area-level SES was associated with experience of dental disease among Indigenous Australian children.

  5. Community-based oral health promotion practices targeted at children and adolescents in Finland--developing an assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Pia; Ojala, Ellinoora; Kettunen, Tarja; Poskiparta, Marita; Kasila, Kirsti

    2014-06-01

    To develop an assessment tool for evaluating oral health promotion practices and to evaluate community-based oral health promotion practices targeted at children and adolescents with this tool. A theoretical framework about health promotion planning, implementation and evaluation was made on the basis of a literature review. Then, information about Finnish community-based oral health promotion practices (n=12) targeted at children and adolescents was collected using semi-structured interviews. Also, related documents, for example action plans and reports, were collected when available. Next, an assessment tool based on the theoretical framework was developed, and the recorded and transcribed interview data and other documents were evaluated with this tool. The assessment tool proved to be practical: it pointed out the strengths and weaknesses of the practices. The tool revealed strengths in the implementation and deficiencies in the planning and evaluation of oral health promotion practices. One-quarter of the 12 practices assessed could be considered 'good practices'. There is a need to improve the planning and evaluation of oral health promotion practices. The assessment tool developed in this study might be useful for practitioners both in the field of oral health promotion and general health promotion. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Knowledge and behaviour of parents in relation to the oral and dental health of children aged 4-6 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElKarmi, R; Shore, E; O'Connell, A

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate baseline knowledge and behaviour of parents with regard to the oral and dental health of their young children. Following ethical approval, six urban and rural schools were identified. Questionnaires were distributed to the parents of pupils (children aged 4-6 years). The questionnaire included several questions evaluating parental knowledge and behaviour of oral and dental health issues in their children. Each question was assigned a score of either 0 or 1 being inconsistent or consistent with current paediatric guidelines giving a maximum score of 6 for knowledge and 7 for behaviour. Chi-square analysis was used to analyse associations among variables. Parental knowledge varied widely among parents and across questions; however, 70.2 % of parents had scores greater than 3 (range 0-6). The majority of parents (65.8 %) also had scores greater than 3 (range 0-7) for behaviour. Deficiencies were noted in oral hygiene practices; very few parents brushed their child's teeth and were not aware of the recommended age of the first dental visit at 1 year (Age 1 visit). Parents without free medical care demonstrated high levels of knowledge (P parents thought that the information available to them on the oral health of their young children was insufficient. Parents appeared to have limited knowledge regarding the dental and oral health of their young children. This study indicates a need for improved education for parents, particularly in toothbrushing behaviour and use of toothpaste. Education strategies tailored to the Irish population should be explored.

  7. Children's Reflection on Tragedy Using an Oral Storytelling Approach. Nutrition, Health and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eugene A.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined orally invented fairy tales of children in kindergarten through third grade focusing on reflections of children's fears, concerns, and stress related to kidnapping and death of a classmate. Findings suggested that children imbue stories with everyday concerns and anxiety, and that stories act as a safe place to relive a tragic…

  8. Oral Health Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors of Parents of Children with Diabetes Compared to Those of Parents of Children without Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Hyun A; Rowe, Dorothy J

    2015-06-01

    To compare the oral health knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of parents of children, aged 6 to 13, who have type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes to those of parents of similarly aged children without diabetes. The study population consisted of 46 parents of children with diabetes and 46 parents of children without diabetes from outpatient clinics, providing medical care to children with and without diabetes, respectively. After gaining permission of clinic directors, the investigator approached parents, who were waiting in the clinics' reception areas, to complete the 33-item survey. The survey included questions on socio-demographic characteristics, their child's oral hygiene practices, dental visits, dietary habits, their own oral health knowledge and attitudes, and their child's diabetic condition, when relevant. A Chi-square test was used to determine significant differences between responses of the two groups of parents. All parents approached completed the survey. Children with diabetes had significantly less frequent sugary drink consumption and less untreated dental caries than children without diabetes. The majority of parents of children with diabetes selected "don't know" for statements related to diabetes and oral health, whereas most parents of children without diabetes agreed with the statements, resulting in significant differences between groups. Most parents of children with diabetes considered these same statements important to them, while the importance to parents of children without diabetes was variable. To maintain their children's oral health, parents of children with diabetes must receive more education regarding the prevention and control of the oral complications of diabetes. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  9. Oral Health, Obesity Status and Nutritional Habits in Turkish Children and Adolescents: An Epidemiological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servet Kesim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies evaluating the relationship between oral health status and obesity have provided conflicting data. Therefore, there is a great need to investigate and clarify the possible connection in a comprehensive sample. Aims: To assess the relationship of obesity and oral health status among children and adolescents aged 6 to 17 years-old. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Data were obtained from 4,534 children and adolescents (2,018 boys and 2,516 girls. Questionnaires were sent home prior to examination; afterwards, anthropometric and dental data were collected from participants. Community Periodontal Index (CPI and number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth in the permanent dentition (DMFT, and deciduous dentition (dmft index were used to measure oral health status. Height, body weight, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, and body fat percentage were analyzed. Results: For DMFT scores, healthy (score=0 girls and boys had significantly higher BMI and WC values than unhealthy (score>1 girls and boys (p<0.05. Healthy girls had higher fat percentage values than unhealthy girls (p<0.05. In terms of CPI scores, healthy boys had lower BMI and WC values than unhealthy boys (p<0.05. According to multiple binary logistic regression results for model 1, BMI predicted DMFT scores in both genders but CPI scores only in boys. No beverage consumption predicted DMFT scores in boys, while milk consumption predicted DMFT scores in girls. No meal skipping predicted CPI scores in boys. For model 2, WC predicted DMFT scores in both genders and CPI scores only in boys. Milk consumption predicted DMFT scores only in girls. No meal skipping predicted CPI scores for both gender (p<0.05. According to DMFT, there were significant differences between the frequencies of the BMI groups (normal weight, overweight and obese at the age of 7 (girls only, 9, 10, and 16 (boys only years and overall (only girls (p<0.05. According to CPI

  10. Towards understanding oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaura, E.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term ‘oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain

  11. The oral health knowledge and oral hygiene practices among primary school children age 5-17 years in a rural area of Uasin Gishu district, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okemwa, K A; Gatongi, P M; Rotich, J K

    2010-06-01

    To determine the oral health knowledge and oral hygiene practices among school children in the study region This was a descriptive cross-sectional study carried out among primary school going children in Kapsaret Educational division, Uasin-Gishu District, Kenya. A researcher administered questionnaire was used to determine the oral health knowledge and practices in a random sample of 401 students in the period March to June 2002. 92% of the students claimed they brushed their teeth. About 48% brushed at least twice daily. More students (59.1%) reported using the chewing stick compared to those using commercial toothbrushes (p = 0.000).Female students brushed more frequently than their male counterparts (p = 0.000, chi2 = 24.65). 39.9% of the students knew the cause of tooth decay, 48.2% could state at least one method of prevention, while 16.5% knew the importance of teeth. Use of toothpaste was reported by 38.9% of the students. Less than half of the students knew the causes of tooth decay and how to prevent it. Only about half of the students brushed their teeth twice daily with the chewing stick being more frequently used. There is need to increase the oral health knowledge through well Planned school based oral health education programmes in the primary schools. This would hopefully lead to improvement on the oral hygiene practices.

  12. Midwestern Latino caregivers' knowledge, attitudes and sense making of the oral health etiology, prevention and barriers that inhibit their children's oral health: a CBPR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kimberly K; Martínez-Mier, E Angeles; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Jackson, Richard D; Stelzner, Sarah M; Galvez, Lorena C; Smith, Gabriela J; Acevedo, Miriam; Dandelet, Laura; Vega, Dulce

    2017-03-02

    Using community-based participatory research, the Health Protection Model was used to understand the cultural experiences, attitudes, knowledge and behaviors surrounding caries etiology, its prevention and barriers to accessing oral health care for children of Latino parents residing in Central Indiana. A community reference group (CBPR) was established and bi-lingual community research associates were used to conduct focus groups comprised of Latino caregivers. Transcripts were analyzed for thematic content using inductive thematic analysis. Results indicated significant gaps in parental knowledge regarding caries etiology and prevention, with cultural underlays. Most parents believed the etiology of caries was related to the child's ingestion of certain foods containing high amounts of carbohydrates. Fewer parents believed either genetics/biological inheritance or bacteria was the primary causative factor. Fatalism negatively impacted preventive practices, and a clear separation existed concerning the perceived responsibilities of mothers and fathers to provide for the oral needs of their children. Females were more likely to report they were primarily responsible for brushing their children's teeth, overseeing the child's diet and seeking dental care for the child. Fathers believed they were primarily responsible for providing the means to pay for professional care. Perceived barriers to care were related to finances and communication difficulties, especially communicating with providers and completing insurance forms. The main study implication is the demonstration of how the CBPR model provided enhanced understanding of Latino caregivers' experiences to inform improvements in oral prevention and treatment of their children. Current efforts continue to employ CBPR to implement programs to address the needs of this vulnerable population.

  13. Maternal self-report of oral health in six-year-old Pacific children from South Auckland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Janis E; Gao, Wanzhen; Sundborn, Gerhard; Cartwright, Susan

    2011-02-01

    To examine maternal and socio-demographic factors associated with oral health practices and experiences in six-year-old Pacific children. The longitudinal Pacific Islands Families (PIF) study is following a cohort of Pacific children born in Auckland, New Zealand in 2000. At approximately six years postpartum maternal reports (n = 1001) on child oral health practices and experiences of fillings and extractions were gathered. Forty-five per cent of mothers reported that their child had experienced fillings or extractions. After adjusting for confounding factors, we found that Tongan children were almost twice as likely to have their teeth filled or extracted than Samoan children (OR, 1.93; 95%, 1.34-2.77). Differences between Samoan children and children of other ethnic groups were not significant. Children of mothers who had secondary qualifications were significantly less likely to have their teeth filled or extracted compared to children of mothers who had postsecondary qualifications (OR, 0.634; 95%, 0.44-0.90). Prolonged duration of breastfeeding was associated with an increased likelihood of filling or extraction experience. In terms of maternal oral hygiene, maternal tooth brushing frequency of less that once a day was significantly associated with increased odds of fillings and/or extractions in their children (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.02-1.79). Children who were sometimes supervised for tooth brushing were significantly more likely to have fillings or extractions than children who were not provided supervision. These findings highlight the role of cultural factors and maternal hygiene in child oral health outcomes and suggest that health promotion efforts should encompass the whole family and embrace a culturally appropriate approach. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Stigmatized biologies: Examining the cumulative effects of oral health disparities for Mexican American farmworker children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Sarah; Barker, Judith C

    2010-06-01

    Severe early childhood caries (ECC) can leave lasting effects on children's physical development, including malformed oral arches and crooked permanent dentition. This article examines the way that the ECC of Mexican American farmworker children in the United States sets them up for lasting dental problems and social stigma as young adults. We examine the role of dietary and environmental factors in contributing to what we call "stigmatized biologies," and that of market-based dental public health insurance systems in cementing their enduring effects. We adapt Margaret Lock's term, local biology, to illustrate the way that biology differs not only because of culture, diet, and environment but also because of disparities in insurance coverage. By showing the long-term effects of ECC and disparate dental treatment on farmworker adults, we show how the interaction of immigrant caregiving practices and underinsurance can having lasting social effects. An examination of the long-term effects of farmworker children's ECC illustrates the ways that market-based health care systems can create embodied differences that in turn reproduce a system of social inequality.

  15. Parent's pro-health awareness concerning oral health of their children in the light of survey research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapniarska, Karolina; Buła, Katarzyna; Hilt, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Oral hygiene is a crucial part of caring for young children. This problem is frequently marginalized or even ignored by parents/guardians, what affects child's whole further life. The assessment of parents' knowledge concerning oral hygiene and prevention of dental caries in infants and young children. The test group consisted of parents, as well as men and women currently expecting a child. The study was conducted in a form of a survey, using an original questionnaire, which was carried out in several hospitals in Lodz and online, on a popular local forum for parents. The data obtained were analyzed statistically, allowing the assessment of health awareness of respondents and the creation of various profiles of parental knowledge on the subject investigated. Most of respondents knew the age at which milk and permanent teeth erupt, gave the correct frequency of brushing child's teeth and were in favor of limiting sweets in the diet. A total of 59% correctly gave the number of deciduous teeth and 66% had heard of the "bottle tooth decay". All respondents thought that helping and controlling a child while brushing their teeth is indispensable, but they did not know the best time to start using the toothpaste with fluoride. The information about child's oral hygiene was more often looked for by women (67%) than by men (29%). The study also showed that if a training on the given subject was organized, 60% of respondents would be willing to participate in it. In the test group, pro-health awareness is insufficient to maintain the oral health of the offspring and requires constant developing.

  16. Television advertising of foodstuffs potentially detrimental to oral health--a content analysis and comparison of children's and primetime broadcasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestnutt, I G; Ashraf, F J

    2002-06-01

    The study aimed to examine the nature, content and duration of advertisements broadcast during children's television; determine the proportion of advertisements promoting food; identify the potential of the food advertised to be detrimental to oral health; and to compare the nature and content of advertisements aimed at children with those transmitted during evening 'primetime' television. Children's and primetime television, broadcast on a main independent terrestrial channel in South Wales were video recorded, 237 and 42 hours being analysed in total. Analysis of the recording resulted in a total of 3,236 commercials, of which 2,345 were broadcast during children's television and 891 in primetime. During children's TV, 62.5% of advertising time was devoted to foodstuffs, significantly greater (Padvertising foods during primetime. Of the time spent advertising foods, during children's television 73.4% was devoted to products deemed potentially detrimental to oral health (primarily high in sugar), compared to 18.6% similarly categorised during evening television. Commercials for products which have the potential to adversely affect oral health constitute a large proportion of advertising time during children's television. Current codes of the Independent Television Commission governing advertising directed at children should be reviewed.

  17. An oral health education video game for high caries risk children: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljafari, Ahmad; Rice, Colm; Gallagher, Jennifer Elizabeth; Hosey, Marie Therese

    2015-05-28

    Tooth decay is the most common chronic disease of childhood in the world. Many children develop caries early in their lives, and go on to develop further caries and sepsis as they grow up, indicating failure in prevention. As a result, many end up requiring general anaesthesia to undergo treatment for a disease that is completely preventable. Previous studies have suggested that the families of these children need better oral health education as well as better support in implementing healthy practices at home, as they feel impeded by broader life challenges. Parents of these children have suggested utilizing modern technologies, such as the internet, DVDs and video games as methods of delivery of education that might fit in with their busy lifestyles. The aim of this investigation is to assess the acceptability and efficiency of an oral health education video game directed at these children and their families. A two-armed phase-II randomized controlled trial will assess a children's oral health education video game in comparison with verbal oral health education in terms of: family satisfaction, effect on oral health knowledge, and effect on dietary and oral hygiene habits. Up to 110 four- to ten-year-old children, referred for tooth extraction under general anaesthesia due to caries, will be recruited. A sample of 45 participants in each group will be needed to provide 80% statistical power. The primary outcome measures for this study are: (1) parent and child satisfaction with the intervention, as indicated using a visual analogue scale; (2) improvement in the child's dietary knowledge measured by a pictorial dietary quiz; and (3) changes in the child's diet and oral hygiene habits, measured using a children's dietary questionnaire completed by the parent, and snacking and toothbrushing diaries completed by the child. Measures will be taken at baseline, directly after the intervention, and three months later. This study is a phase-II randomized controlled trial

  18. Children?s oral health-related quality of life and associated factors: Mid-term changes after dental treatment under general anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Baghdadi, Ziad D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to document the mid-term effects of comprehensive dental treatment under general anesthesia (DTGA) on parent-assessed children?s oral health-related quality of life (COHRQoL). A second aim was to examine some epidemiological factors associated with COHRQoL and treatment outcome. Study Design: A pretest-posttest design was followed in which parents were surveyed using the Child Oral Health Quality of Life Questionnaire before and 6-9 months after their children (ag...

  19. Association between oral health habits and dental caries among children in Pyongyang, Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarvonen, P-L; Suominen, A L; Yang, G S; Ri, Y S; Sipilä, K

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the self-reported oral health habits and their association with the occurrence of dental caries among children in Pyongyang, Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), after 6 years of activities under the auspices of the Children's Oral Health Promotion Programme (COHPP). The data were collected in September 2013 in two of the most central districts of Pyongyang City, DPRK. The sample consisted of 492 children aged 10 and 13 years who had participated in the COHPP for 6 years. The children filled in a self-completed, structured questionnaire on oral health habits and were examined clinically by a dentist. The differences in mean (SD) number of decayed primary (dt) and permanent teeth (DT) and their sum (dt + DT) subdivided according to genders, age groups, districts and self-reported oral health habits were evaluated using Mann-Whitney U-test. The associations between self-reported oral health habits and the occurrence of dental caries were evaluated with chi-square test and logistic regression analyses. The school-aged children commonly reported healthy oral hygiene habits but sweet snacks were commonly used. The occurrence of dental caries associated statistically significantly with the frequency of sweet snacking (p=0.011) but not with the frequency of tooth brushing (p=0.725) or the use of water for thirst instead of sugary beverages (p=0.189). A more effective promotion of healthy dietary habits with innovative approaches and close collaboration with different social actors will be needed in future. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Establishing oral health promoting behaviours in children - parents' views on barriers, facilitators and professional support: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijster, Denise; de Jong-Lenters, Maddelon; Verrips, Erik; van Loveren, Cor

    2015-12-10

    The prevention of childhood dental caries relies on adherence to key behaviours, including twice daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and reducing the consumption of sugary foods and drinks. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore parents' perceptions of barriers and facilitators that influence these oral health behaviours in children. A further objective was to explore parents' views on limitations and opportunities for professional support to promote children's oral health. Six focus group interviews were conducted, including a total of 39 parents of 7-year old children, who were recruited from paediatric dental centres in The Netherlands. Interviews were held with Dutch parents of low and high socioeconomic status and parents from Turkish and Moroccan origin. Focus group interviews were conducted on the basis of a pre-tested semi-structured interview guide and topic list. Content analysis was employed to analyse the data. Analysis of interview transcripts identified many influences on children's oral health behaviours, operating at child, family and community levels. Perceived influences on children's tooth brushing behaviour were primarily located within the direct family environment, including parental knowledge, perceived importance and parental confidence in tooth brushing, locus of control, role modelling, parental monitoring and supervision, parenting strategies and tooth brushing routines and habituation. The consumption of sugary foods and drinks was influenced by both the direct family environment and factors external to the family, including the school, the social environment, commercials and television, supermarkets and affordability of foods. Parents raised several suggestions for professional oral health support, which included the provision of clear and consistent oral health information using a positive approach, dietary regulations at school and a multidisciplinary approach among dental professionals, child health centres and

  1. Oral diseases associated with condition-specific oral health-related quality of life and school performance of Thai primary school children: A hierarchical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewkamnerdpong, Issarapong; Krisdapong, Sudaduang

    2018-06-01

    To assess the hierarchical associations between children's school performance and condition-specific (CS) oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), school absence, oral status, sociodemographic and economic status (SDES) and social capital; and to investigate the associations between CS OHRQoL and related oral status, adjusting for SDES and social capital. Data on 925 sixth grade children in Sakaeo province, Thailand, were collected through oral examinations for dental caries and oral hygiene, social capital questionnaires, OHRQoL interviews using the Child-Oral Impacts on Daily Performances index, parental self-administered questionnaires and school documents. A hierarchical conceptual framework was developed, and independent variables were hierarchically entered into multiple logistic models for CS OHRQoL and linear regression models for school performance. After adjusting for SDES and social capital, children with high DMFT or DT scores were significantly threefold more likely to have CS impacts attributed to dental caries. However, poor oral hygiene was not significantly associated with CS impacts attributed to gingival disease. High DMFT scores were significantly associated with lower school performance, whereas high Simplified Oral Hygiene Index scores were not. The final model showed that CS impacts attributed to dental caries and school absence accounted for the association between DMFT score and school performance. Dental caries was associated with CS impacts on OHRQoL, and exerted its effect on school performance through the CS impacts and school absence. There was no association between oral hygiene and CS impacts on OHRQoL or school performance. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dental caries status and oral health practice among 12-15 year old children in Jorpati, Kathmandu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, S; Acharya, J

    2014-09-01

    Oral health is an essential component of health throughout life. There has been a decline in dental caries and periodontal disease in developed countries which can be attributed to the implementation of preventive programmes but in developing countries dental diseases are still on the rise. Therefore this cross sectional study was carried out to assess the prevalence of dental caries and oral hygiene practices among 12 to 15 years old children. Self administered close ended questionnaires were used to assess the oral hygiene practice. The overall dental caries prevalence was 58.3% and the mean DMFT score was 1.2 (± 1.79) and the deft score was 0.6 (± 1.24). Majority of the children (84.1%) presented with the practice of brushing their teeth once everyday using tooth brush and toothpaste. Regular dental check up was very poor (5.6%) but 77.4% reported that they visited a dentist in case of pain or presence of stains in the teeth. Females (63.4%) and children studying in higher secondary class (74.2%) showed a "good" level of oral hygiene practice than males and children in secondary class respectively. Children having "good" practice presented with "low" dental caries severity. The utilization of dental services was poor in the children, therefore highlighting the necessity to implement preventive programmes is important which would help in reducing the incidence of the dental caries as well as aiding in prompt treatment of dental caries at its initial stages.

  3. Ethnic disparities in children's oral health: findings from a population-based survey of grade 1 and 2 schoolchildren in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Congshi; Faris, Peter; McNeil, Deborah A; Patterson, Steven; Potestio, Melissa L; Thawer, Salima; McLaren, Lindsay

    2018-01-04

    Although oral health has improved remarkably in recent decades, not all populations have benefited equally. Ethnic identity, and in particular visible minority status, has been identified as an important risk factor for poor oral health. Canadian research on ethnic disparities in oral health is extremely limited. The aim of this study was to examine ethnic disparities in oral health outcomes and to assess the extent to which ethnic disparities could be accounted for by demographic, socioeconomic and caries-related behavioral factors, among a population-based sample of grade 1 and 2 schoolchildren (age range: 5-8 years) in Alberta, Canada. A dental survey (administered during 2013-14) included a mouth examination and parent questionnaire. Oral health outcomes included: 1) percentage of children with dental caries; 2) number of decayed, extracted/missing (due to caries) and filled teeth; 3) percentage of children with two or more teeth with untreated caries; and 4) percentage of children with parental-ratings of fair or poor oral health. We used multivariable regression analysis to examine ethnic disparities in oral health, adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic and caries-related behavioral variables. We observed significant ethnic disparities in children's oral health. Most visible minority groups, particularly Filipino and Arab, as well as Indigenous children, were more likely to have worse oral health than White populations. In particular, Filipino children had an almost 5-fold higher odds of having severe untreated dental problems (2 or more teeth with untreated caries) than White children. Adjustment for demographic, socioeconomic, and caries-related behavior variables attenuated but did not eliminate ethnic disparities in oral health, with the exception of Latin American children whose outcomes did not differ significantly from White populations after adjustment. Significant ethnic disparities in oral health exist in Alberta, Canada, even when adjusting for

  4. Influence of children's oral health-related quality of life on school performance and school absenteeism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Chaiana; Antunes, José Leopoldo Ferreira; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Guedes, Renata Saraiva; Ardenghi, Thiago Machado

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the relation of child oral health-related quality of life with school performance and school absenteeism. We followed a cross-sectional design with a multistage random sample of 312 12-year-old schoolchildren living in Brazil. The participants completed the child perceptions questionnaire (CPQ(11-14) ) that provides information about psychological factors, while their parents or guardians answered questions on their socioeconomic status measured by parents' education level and household income. A dental examination of each child provided information on the prevalence of caries and dental trauma. Data on school performance, which included the results of baseline Brazilian language (Portuguese) tests, and school absenteeism (school days missed) were obtained from the school register. Multilevel linear regression was used to investigate the association among psychological and socioeconomic status and children's school performance. In the multiple model, after adjusting for individual covariates, being a girl was associated with higher school performance (P Children's school performance and absence were influenced by psychological and socioeconomic conditions. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  5. Impact of Dental Rehabilitation on Oral Health-related Quality-of-life in Healthy Children and Those with Special Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsi, Deema J; Farsi, Nada J; El-Housseiny, Azza A; Turkistani, Jihan M; Farsi, Najat M

    2018-04-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to compare the effect of dental rehabilitation on oral health-related quality-of-life (OHRQoL) in children with special health care needs (CSHCN) and healthy children. Materials and methods: The prospective study's sample consisted of 213 parents of caries-affected children, who were aged 6 years or younger and were scheduled for dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia (DRGA). The parent-child dyads were recruited from three public hospitals in Jeddah between October 2014 and May 2016. They comprised healthy children (n = 133) and CSHCN (n = 80). Parents self-completed the early childhood oral health impact scale (ECOHIS) before and 1 month after DRGA. The parents also rated the overall oral health status of their children by answering a global question before and after DRGA. Results: At baseline, the CSHCN had significantly worse OHRQoL in most of the scale domains at 25.9 [standard deviation (SD) 11.3] and 19.9 (SD 10.3) respectively. The OHRQoL significantly improved in both groups postoperatively (p = 0.005, Wilcoxon rank-sum test). The effect size of the improvement in the CSHCN group (+1.8) was greater than that in the healthy group (+1.5) in all domains, except for the family impact and parental distress sections. Conclusion: The DRGA markedly improves OHRQoL in children aged 6 years or younger, and the improvement is even greater in CSHCN. Clinical significance: The substantial improvement in OHRQoL after DRGA highlights the importance of oral health care in young children, which should receive higher priority than it has been done to date. Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Dental caries, Early childhood oral health impact scale, General anesthesia, Oral health-related quality-of-life.

  6. Global Oral Health Inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, I.; Tabak, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite impressive worldwide improvements in oral health, inequalities in oral health status among and within countries remain a daunting public health challenge. Oral health inequalities arise from a complex web of health determinants, including social, behavioral, economic, genetic, environmental, and health system factors. Eliminating these inequalities cannot be accomplished in isolation of oral health from overall health, or without recognizing that oral health is influenced at multiple individual, family, community, and health systems levels. For several reasons, this is an opportune time for global efforts targeted at reducing oral health inequalities. Global health is increasingly viewed not just as a humanitarian obligation, but also as a vehicle for health diplomacy and part of the broader mission to reduce poverty, build stronger economies, and strengthen global security. Despite the global economic recession, there are trends that portend well for support of global health efforts: increased globalization of research and development, growing investment from private philanthropy, an absolute growth of spending in research and innovation, and an enhanced interest in global health among young people. More systematic and far-reaching efforts will be required to address oral health inequalities through the engagement of oral health funders and sponsors of research, with partners from multiple public and private sectors. The oral health community must be “at the table” with other health disciplines and create opportunities for eliminating inequalities through collaborations that can harness both the intellectual and financial resources of multiple sectors and institutions. PMID:21490232

  7. Knowledge of parents about oral health in children with heart diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Noorollahian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transient bacteremia in dentistry is discussed as an important causative factor in bacterial endocarditis. The aim of this study was evaluate the knowledge of importance of dental caries prevention in parents whose children had heart disease. Materials and Method: In this descriptive cross sectional study a simple consecutive sampling was used and 320 parents (125 fathers, 195 mothers referred to the heart clinics of Zahedan were evaluated by a questionnaire. Questions were about the demographic information and their knowledge about oral health and it's relation to heart diseases. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests.Results: The results showed that the mean of their knowledge was 21.3±10.1 of 100. The father's knowledge (24.4±8.7 was higher compared to the mothers (19.23±10.3. The knowledge rural families were more than the urban families (22.5±9.8 and 14.51±9.1 respectively. Conclusion: Our findings showed limited knowledge of the parents about the interactions between oral hygiene and the risk bacterial endocarditis

  8. Knowledge, attitude, willingness and readiness of primary health care providers to provide oral health services to children in Niagara, Ontario: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Sonica; Figueiredo, Rafael; Dupuis, Sandy; Skellet, Rachel; Wincott, Tara; Dyer, Carolyn; Feller, Andrea; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Most children are exposed to medical, but not dental, care at an early age, making primary health care providers an important player in the reduction of tooth decay. The goal of this research was to understand the feasibility of using primary health care providers in promoting oral health by assessing their knowledge, attitude, willingness and readiness in this regard. Using the Dillman method, a mail-in cross-sectional survey was conducted among all family physicians and pediatricians in the Niagara region of Ontario who have primary contact with children. A descriptive analysis was performed. Close to 70% (181/265) of providers responded. More than 90% know that untreated tooth decay could affect the general health of a child. More than 80% examine the oral cavity for more than 50% of their child patients. However, more than 50% are not aware that white spots or lines on the tooth surface are the first signs of tooth decay. Lack of clinical time was the top reason for not performing oral disease prevention measures. Overall, survey responses show a positive attitude and willingness to engage in the oral health of children. To capitalize on this, there is a need to identify mechanisms of providing preventive oral health care services by primary health care providers; including improving their knowledge of oral health and addressing other potential barriers.

  9. Awareness, habits and behaviors associated with the oral health of children in elementary schools on Kosovo and Metohia

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    Mladenović R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral health is an integral part of the general health of humans and significantly affect the quality of life. Dental caries is today the most widespread disease of our civilization, which if untreated leads to tooth loss. It is significant to note that studies show the possibility of successful prevention of diseases of the oral cavity. Traditionally, there has always been lower economic and educational level of the population in rural areas, and also a lower availability of dental services. Possible reasons for this include the lack of pediatric dental offices in schools in rural areas, the greater the distance of the dentist, the lack of properly organized school dental care, lack of knowledge about the importance of oral health by their parents as role models and unfavorable socio-economic status. The aim of this study was to examine the level of awareness and habits of children and parents toward oral hygiene and bad habits in the Serbian enclaves in Kosovo and Metohija and to compare them with children who live in urban areas in Kosovska Mitrovica. The study included 160 elementary school students in the area of Kosovska Mitrovica (urban area and the Serbian enclaves on Kosovo and Metohia (rural area which included elementary school students from Sirinić District, the Kosovo Morava, the central Kosovo, villages of Suvo Grlo and Banja in municipality Istok. By examining the frequency of tooth brushing we found that 32 (40% of children in enclaves brush their teeth once a day, 40 (50% two times a day, and only 8 (5% of them maintain hygiene teeth 3 times a day. Boys who wash their teeth three times a day were 12.5% and 37.5% of girls. The children from the enclave more often come to the dentist when they have an appointment (33:8, while children from Kosovska Mitrovica more often come to the quarterly control (21:4. An interesting fact is that 15.33% of children from urban areas cited as a source of oral health information from the Internet

  10. Parents′ perceptions of factors influencing the oral health of their preschool children in Vadodara city, Gujarat: A descriptive study

    OpenAIRE

    Vrushali G Thakare; C G Ajith Krishnan; Sachin Chaware

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To assess parents′ perceptions about the factors influencing the oral health of preschool children. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was carried out among the parents of the preschool children in Vadodara City, India. A list of preschools was obtained from the Social Science Department of the MS University, Vadodara, India. The study included 828 parents, out of whom 597 responded, with the response rate of 72.10%. Twenty-seven questionnaires were inco...

  11. Caregivers' perception of oral health-related quality of life in a group of Nigerian children living with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, A A; Diaku-Akinwumi, I N; Ola, B A

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the caregivers' perception of the effect of dental conditions on general well-being and family life of a group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected Nigerian children. A secondary aim was to investigate correlations between the children's sociodemographic and health-related variables and caregivers' global ratings of oral health and well-being. Study Design A cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey was conducted among parents/caregivers of 95 HIV-positive children receiving care at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. The "Parental-Caregivers Perception Questionnaire" which included measures of global ratings of oral health and well-being as well as effects of oral health on domains of oral symptoms, functional limitations, emotional well-being, and family well-being/parental distress was used. Assessment was based on the child's oral health within the preceding 3 months of the study. The most affected subscale of the oral health-related quality of life was functional limitation followed by parental distress and then oral symptoms. Caregivers of older children were 2½ times more likely to view oral health as impacting their child's overall health (P = 0.034). Furthermore, caregivers of children who had not yet commenced antiretroviral therapy were 15% more likely to report oral symptoms (P = 0.024) and 11% were more likely to be distressed. Data entry, validation, and analysis were done using SPSS version 17.0. Findings were considered to be statistically significant when 95% confidence intervals were not overlapping. According to caregivers' perceptions, oral symptoms, functional limitations, and parental distress outweighed emotional well-being in impacting a child's oral health quality of life. Oral health programs to improve the knowledge of caregivers on the importance of oral health in HIV-positive children are necessary for improvement in overall quality of life.

  12. Cross-Cultural Adaptation of Persian Version of Scale of Oral Health Outcomes for 5-Year-Old Children

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    Imaneh Asgari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Indicators of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL in children are widely adopted to evaluate the effects of oral problems. Recently, the scale of oral health outcomes for 5-year-old children (SOHO-5 was developed based on the children’s self-reports. This study aimed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Persian version of the questionnaire in a sample of Iranian children.Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 160 children from four areas of Isfahan selected via non-random purposive sampling. After forward-backward translation of the questionnaire, content and face validity evaluation, a pilot test was carried out. Children forms were completed by interview, while parents forms were self-administered. Test-retest reliability was evaluated in 30 subjects. Construct validity, internal consistency and descriptive quality of life score were assessed with SPSS 18. The child-parent agreement was measured with correlation test and paired t-test (α=0.05.Results: The mean (±standard deviation quality of life scores in children and parents were 2.3±3 and 1.3±1.9, respectively. The most prevalent impacts were difficulty sleeping and eating. The Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.82 and 0.67 for the child and parent versions, respectively. Significant correlation of the scores with the oral health rating, pain history and perceived need for treatment confirmed its construct validity (r: 0.4-0.6, P<0.05. The hypothesis of the agreement was not supported (P>0.05.Conclusions: Based on the findings, the Persian version of SOHO-5 has acceptable reliability and validity for use in the pediatric population of Iran while there were some conflicts by parents.Keywords: Quality of Life; Oral Health; Child; Surveys and Questionnaires

  13. Assessment of salivary and plaque pH and oral health status among children with and without intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, G; Swathi, V; Jha, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the association of disabilities and oral health. The aim of the study was to assess the salivary and plaque pH and oral health status of children with and without disabilities. A total of 100 schoolchildren (50 with disabilities and 50 without disabilities) were examined from 9 to 15 years age group. Saliva and plaque pH analysis were done to both the groups. Clinical data were collected on periodontal status, dental caries using WHO criteria. pH values of different groups, difference between the means were calculated using independent t-test, and frequency distribution was analyzed using Chi-square test. Statistical significance, P value was set at 0.05. Mean plaque and salivary pH scores were lesser (5.73 and 5.67) in children with intellectual disabilities (IDs) (Psalivary pH among children with and without ID with lower plaque and salivary pH among children with ID. In addition to this, the oral health was also more compromised in children with ID, which confirms a need for preventive treatment for these children.

  14. Oral health and the impact of socio-behavioural factors in a cross sectional survey of 12-year old school children in Laos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, Nanna; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent decades low-income countries experienced an increasing trend in dental caries among children, particularly recorded in 12-year olds, which is the principal WHO indicator age group for children. This increases the risks of negative affects on children's life. Some data exist...... on the oral health status of children in low-income countries of Southeast Asia. However, information on how oral health is associated with socio-behavioural factors is almost not available. The aims of this study were to: assess the level of oral health of Lao 12-year-olds in urban and semi-urban settings...... was found for children with good or average perception of own oral health. High risk for gingival bleeding was seen in semi-urban children and boys. CONCLUSION: Although the caries level is low it causes considerable negative impact on daily life. School based health promotion should be implemented...

  15. Oral Health Disparities and Unmet Dental Needs among Preschool Children in Chelsea, MA: Exploring Mechanisms, Defining Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isong, Inyang; Dantas, Laila; Gerard, Macda; Kuhlthau, Karen

    Significant disparities exist in children's receipt of preventive dental care (PDC) in the United States. Many of the children at greatest risk of dental disease do not receive timely PDC; when they do receive dental care, it is often more for relief of dental pain. Chelsea is a low-income, diverse Massachusetts community with high rates of untreated childhood caries. There are various dental resources available in Chelsea, yet many children do not access dental care at levels equivalent to their needs. Using Chelsea as a case-study, to explore factors contributing to forgone PDC (including the age 1 dental visit) in an in-depth way. We used a qualitative study design that included semi-structured interviews with parents of preschool children residing in Chelsea, and Chelsea-based providers including pediatricians, dentists, a dental hygienist and early childhood care providers. We examined: a) parents' dental attitudes and oral health cultural beliefs; b) parents' and providers' perspectives on facilitators and barriers to PDC, reasons for unmet needs, and proposed solutions to address the problem. We recorded, transcribed and independently coded all interviews. Using rigorous, iterative qualitative data analyses procedures, we identified emergent themes. Factors perceived to facilitate receipt of PDC included Head-Start oral health policies, strong pediatric primary care/dental linkages, community outreach and advertising, and parents' own oral health experiences. Most parents and providers perceived there to be an adequate number of accessible dental services and resources in Chelsea, including for Medicaid enrollees. However, several barriers impeded children from receiving timely PDC, the most frequently cited being insurance related problems for children and adults. Other barriers included limited dental services for children strategic oral health policies, community outreach and improved care coordination between physicians, dentists and early childhood care

  16. Oral Health Characteristics and Dental Rehabilitation of Children with Global Developmental Delay

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    Saurabh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Global developmental delay (GDD is a chronic neurological disturbance which includes defects in one or more developmental domains. The developmental domain can be motor, cognitive, daily activities, speech or language, and social or personal development. The etiology for GDD can be prenatal, perinatal, or postnatal. It can be diagnosed early in childhood as the delay or absence of one or more developmental milestones. Hence the role of pedodontist and pediatricians becomes more crucial in identifying this condition. The diagnosis of GDD requires a detailed history including family history and environmental risk factors followed by physical and neurological examinations. Investigations for GDD include diagnostic laboratory tests, brain imaging, and other evidence-based evaluations. GDD affects multiple developmental domains that not only have direct bearing on maintenance of oral health, but also require additional behavior management techniques to deliver optimal dental care. This paper describes two different spectra of children with GDD. Since the severity of GDD can vary, this paper also discusses the different behavior management techniques that were applied to provide dental treatment in such children.

  17. Oral Health Characteristics and Dental Rehabilitation of Children with Global Developmental Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Saurabh; Pai, Deepika; Saran, Runki

    2017-01-01

    Global developmental delay (GDD) is a chronic neurological disturbance which includes defects in one or more developmental domains. The developmental domain can be motor, cognitive, daily activities, speech or language, and social or personal development. The etiology for GDD can be prenatal, perinatal, or postnatal. It can be diagnosed early in childhood as the delay or absence of one or more developmental milestones. Hence the role of pedodontist and pediatricians becomes more crucial in identifying this condition. The diagnosis of GDD requires a detailed history including family history and environmental risk factors followed by physical and neurological examinations. Investigations for GDD include diagnostic laboratory tests, brain imaging, and other evidence-based evaluations. GDD affects multiple developmental domains that not only have direct bearing on maintenance of oral health, but also require additional behavior management techniques to deliver optimal dental care. This paper describes two different spectra of children with GDD. Since the severity of GDD can vary, this paper also discusses the different behavior management techniques that were applied to provide dental treatment in such children.

  18. Malnutrition and poor oral health status are major risks among primary school children at Lasbela, Balochistan, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustufa, Muhammad Ayaz; Jamali, Abdul Karim; Sameen, Ifra; Burfat, Fateh Muhammad; Baloch, Mir Yousaf; Baloch, Abdul Hameed; Baloch, Ghulam Rasool; Lashari, Shazia Kulsoom; Ayaz, Sobiya Mohiuddin; Baloch, Muhammad Younus

    2017-05-19

    This survey was focusing on health and oral hygiene status of primary school children at Lasbela district considering the comparatively less developed and socio demographically deprived part of the Country. A cross sectional survey was conducted to determine the health status of primary school children in seven tehseels of district Lasbela, Balochistan after applying proportionate sampling technique from March 2015 to July 2015. Field teams visited assigned schools to screen children and collect health related data on predesigned and pre coded proforma. Out of 200 schools, 196 schools found opened, while 2% of schools (04) remained closed. A total of 6363 students were clinically screened. About 45% of the school children had normal body mass index (BMI) and rest were falling in different categories of malnutrition. More than 19% had ear, nose and throat (ENT) problems and around 19% presented with clinical anemia. Less than 50% of children had scar of BCG vaccination and 4% informed about use of gutka/supari chewing (smokeless tobacco use). In conclusion, we estimated high prevalence of malnutrition, poor oral health including smokeless tobacco use, and low BCG coverage among primary school children at Lasbela. Current scenario suggests immediate and contextually focused interventions to confine existing public health risks and avoid future burden of disease.

  19. Reconnoitring the association of nutritional status with oral health in elementary school-going children of Ghaziabad City, North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Shveta; Ahuja, Vipin; Chowdhry, Swati

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between anthropometric measurements and oral health status in the primary dentition of school-going children. In this study, 280 elementary school children (116 girls and 164 boys, age: 3-6 years) were examined. Body mass index (BMI) of each subject was calculated and compared with age and gender using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) pediatric growth charts. Based on these growth charts, the sample population was distributed into three groups: Group I: Normal weight (5 th -85 th percentiles), Group II: Risk of overweight/obese (>85 th percentile), and Group III: Underweight (oral health status and BMI of elementary school-going children.

  20. Effectiveness of structured comprehensive paediatric oral health education for parents of children less than two years of age in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strippel, H

    2010-06-01

    To examine the effectiveness of expanding and improving oral health education in a clinical setting. Controlled prospective intervention study. Structured comprehensive oral health education (SC-OHE) supported by written information. was performed by 36 clinicians in all of the 30 specialist paediatric practices in the city and the administrative district of Kassel, central Germany. Parents of all children attending the practices for health examinations. SC-OHE was tested in two intervention groups (IG), one with a mean child age of seven months and another with a mean child age of 24 months. The SC-OHE content was adapted to the respective age groups. Control group (CG) subjects were recruited in a similar region in northern Germany and received conventional oral health education only. This consisted of comparable topics but was less comprehensive than SC-OHE. The two IGs comprised 2,170 children; the two age-matched CGs 2,040. Parental knowledge, attitudes and behaviour relevant to decreasing the risk of early childhood caries (ECC) development. The outcomes were measured by questionnaires sent to the parents. The response rate was 88%. On average, control group paediatricians provided 2.1 information items at each child examination whereas the intervention group provided 3.8 items. Parental knowledge increased by 23%. Self-efficacy and attitudes remained unchanged. 41% of 7-month-olds in the CG received baby bottles with cariogenic content during daytime as opposed to 32% in the IG (p parents were less likely to add sugar to puréed baby food of the 7-month-olds. In 24-month-old children, the frequent consumption of cariogenic beverages in the daytime decreased slightly (CG 66%, IG 61%, p parental oral health knowledge. SC-OHE provided by clinicians alone will not be capable of influencing crucial oral health behaviours in such a way that prevents ECC.

  1. The Relation Between Caregivers' Multiliterate Reading Habits and Their Children's Oral Health Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Caregivers’ oral health literacy (OHL) assessment results have been found to be related to their children’s oral health status. A further aspect of this relationship may be the role of caregivers’ reading habits. Objective Our goal was to describe the relationship between caregivers’ multimodal (digital and print) and multilingual (English and Chinese) reading habits, their OHL, and their child’s oral health status in Hong Kong. Methods A random sample of 301 child-caregiver dyads was recruited from kindergartens in Hong Kong. Data included sociodemographic information and caregivers’ self-reported digital print and reading habits across two languages (Chinese and English). Caregivers’ OHL levels were assessed by two locally developed and validated oral health literacy assessment tasks: Hong Kong Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Dentistry-30 (HKREALD-30) and the Hong Kong Oral Health Literacy Assessment Task for Pediatric Dentistry (HKOHLAT-P). Children’s oral health status was assessed using two measures: dental caries experience (number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth) and oral hygiene status (Visible Plaque Index). Results Bivariate variations revealed significant differences in mean OHL scores between caregivers with different reading habits (Preading multimodal (print/digital) and multilingual (English/Chinese) texts, their literacy levels, and their children’s oral health status (Preading habits in the regression analysis, the caregivers' habit of reading digital and print texts was significantly retained in the final model. Regression analysis revealed significant associations between caregivers’ reading habits (digital Chinese) and their OHL word recognition scores: OR 5.00, 95% CI 1.10-3.65, P=.027. Significant associations were also evident for their OHL comprehension scores (digital Chinese: OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.30-4.20, P=.004; print Chinese: OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.40-4.30, P=.001). However, no significant associations

  2. Asthma-associated oral and dental health repercussions in children aged 6 to 12 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana Angélica Ramos-Ríos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asthma, which is characterized by mouth breathing and by the use of drugs for its treatment, affects between 1 and 30% of children and adolescents. There are only few studies reporting its impact on the oral cavity. Objectives: To find out the most common asthma-associated repercussions in 6 to 12-year-old children. Methods: Cross-sectional, comparative, analytical study carried out in 2 primary schools from Coclique, Veracruz, Mexico, in 6 to 12-year-old children. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC questionnaire for parents was used. Results: In a population of 409 children, a prevalence of asthma of 6.84% (n = 28 was found, which was higher in males (15, 54%; boys aged 6, 7 and 11 years and girls aged 8, 9 and 10 years were most affected. Risk factors for oral manifestations were acidic pH (OR = 170, caries (OR = 4.29, anterior open bite (OR = 66.78, gingivitis (OR = 9.75, atypical swallowing (OR = 15.70 and high-arched palate (OR = 45.60. Conclusion: Children with chronic conditions such as asthma require an oral and dental preventive program as part of their interdisciplinary care.

  3. Provision of Oral Health Care to Children under Seven Covered by Bolsa Família Program. Is This a Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrola, Krishna Andréia Feitosa; Bezerra, Ítalo Barroso; de Menezes, Érico Alexandro Vasconcelos; Calvasina, Paola; Saintrain, Maria Vieira de Lima; Pimentel G F Vieira-Meyer, Anya

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a great improvement in the oral health of Brazilians. However, such a trend was not observed among five-year-old children. Dental caries are determined by the interplay between biological and behavioral factors that are shaped by broader socioeconomic determinants. It is well established that dental disease is concentrated in socially disadvantaged populations. To reduce social and health inequalities, the Brazilian government created Family Health Program (ESF), and the Bolsa Família Program, the Brazilian conditional cash transfer program (Bolsa Família Program). The aim of this study was to examine the oral health care and promotion provided by the Family Health Teams to children and caregivers covered by the Bolsa Família Program. Data was collected through interviews with three groups of participants: 1) dentists working for the Family Health Program; 2) Family Health Program professionals supervising the Bolsa Família Program health conditionalities (Bolsa Família Program supervisors); and 3) parents/caregivers of children covered by the Bolsa Família Program. A pretested questionnaire included sociodemographic, Bolsa Família Program, oral health promotion, dental prevention and dental treatment questions. The results showed that most dentists performed no systematic efforts to promote oral health care to children covered by the Bolsa Família Program (93.3%; n = 69) or to their parents/caregivers (74.3%; n = 55). Many dentists (33.8%) did not provide oral health care to children covered by the Bolsa Família Program because they felt it was beyond their responsibilities. Nearly all Bolsa Família Program supervisors (97.3%; n = 72) supported the inclusion of oral health care in the health conditionality of the Bolsa Família Program, but 82.4% (n = 61) stated they did not promote oral health activities to children covered by the Bolsa Família Program. Children in the routine care setting were more often referred

  4. Oral Lichen Planus in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan Das, Usha; JP, Beena

    2009-01-01

    Oral lichen planus which is one of the most common oral mucosal diseases in adults, it has been rarely described in children. There are very reports in the literature regarding oral lichen planus in children, here we report a case of intraoral lesions of lichen planus. Lichen planus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperkeratotic or erosive lesions of the oral mucosa in children.

  5. Oral health attitudes and caries-preventive behaviour of Czech parents of preschool children

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    Erika Lenčová

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To characterize the oral health-related attitudes and behavior of Czech parents of preschool children. Materials and methods. A representative sample of 796 parents was recruited for the crosssectional questionnaire survey. Study data were collected using a validated questionnaire with 44 attitudinal items related to different aspects of caries prevention. The data were analyzed by explorative factor analysis, extracted factors were subjected to reliability analysis and Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA was used to test differences in the factor scores in respondents with different levels of education and selfperceived SES. Results. The factor analysis extracted 3 factors, labeled ”Toothbrushing – perceived significance and parental efficacy”; ”External caries control” and ”Internal caries control”. They explained 28.9% of the data variability. The comparison of the factor scores in groups with different SES and education of mothers showed highly significant differences. For all three factors, median values of the aggregated Likert scale increased with increasing SES and education of the mother. Conclusion. The parents report that they are aware of their responsibility for the prevention of tooth decay in their children. In caries prevention they concentrate on toothbrushing. Dietary measures do not seem to be of similar importance to them. The increasing self-perceived SES of the family and the education level of the mother have a significantly positive effect on the caries-preventive attitudes of the parents. Based on the study results, the message to the publichealth sector in the Czech Republic should include the need to highlight the importance of a non-cariogenic diet and the role of fluorides in caries prevention.

  6. Impact of dental orientation given to mothers during pregnancy on oral health of their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, Lilian; Dalazen, Jaqueline; Garbin, Raíssa Rigo

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the perception of mothers about oral health of their children, as well as to check the influence of demographic variables, perception and preventive practice in oral health of mothers regarding guidance received during pregnancy. Quantitative and cross-sectional field study, with a non-probability sample formed by all mothers who attended the primary healthcare unit of Ijuí (RS), Brazil, from January to July 2014, comprising a sample of 79 women. Self-applied questionnaires were given to these mothers. Data analysis was carried out using descriptive and inferential statistics, the χ2 test at a significance level of 5%. The mothers who received dental orientation during pregnancy had greater perception of oral health of their children. The mean age of mothers was 26 years, most of them attended high school education (32.9%) and worked outside the home (60.8%). There was a statistically significant relation between the outcome variable, dental orientation during pregnancy, and the independent variables: schooling level of mothers, occupation, baby's first visit to the dentist, duration of breastfeeding, beginning of baby's tooth brushing and knowledge about dental decay (p<0.005). Mothers with higher schooling levels and who worked outside the home had more knowledge about oral care, because they received dental orientation during pregnancy. The dental guidance during pregnancy influences the mother in the procedures adopted with their children, as to early oral hygiene, first dentist appointment, duration of breastfeeding, knowledge about the factors that lead to dental decay. Analisar a percepção das mães em relação à saúde bucal de seus filhos, bem como verificar a influência das variáveis demográficas, de percepção e prática preventiva em saúde bucal das mães, na orientação odontológica recebida durante a gestação. Pesquisa de campo com abordagem quantitativa e delineamento transversal. A amostragem foi não probabilística com

  7. ORAL HEALTH AND THE LEVEL OF KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES OF THE CHILDREN, MOTHERS AND EDUCATORS IN IASI, ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Corneaga

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study: Evaluation of oral health condition in 6 and 12 year-old children of Iasi, analysis of the health-promoting habits of children and mothers; demonstrating the relation between the educational level of the mother and children’s health-promoting habits, as well as their influence upon their own health condition; the differences between educators and mothers on their oral health knowledge. Materials and method: The study, performed in 5 schools of Iasi, between 2009-2010, included 345 children (6-7 yeas, class I and 297 children (11-12 years, class VI, being devoted to the establishment of their odontal status, evaluated by the DMFT index, of the oral health level, evaluated with the OHI-S index and of periodontal health, appreciated with the (CPITN index, through a clinical examination performed each year in school medicine consulting rooms, the data collected being included in the WHO files, according to some previously established criteria. Information has been collected from 523 mothers and 125 schoolmasters, by the questionnaire method, the statistical data obtained being analyzed with the SPSS 14.0 program. Results: The results obtained indicate an increased prevalence of the dental caries, of 86% for 6-7 year-old children, and of 76%, respectively, for the 11-12 year-old ones, nevertheless lower than the values registered in previous years. The DMFT value in 6-7 year-old children was 2.9, the DMFT value at ages of 11-12 years being of 2.8. 47% of the mothers indicated that the ”bacteria+sugar ” association represents the main cause of dental caries, 35% incriminated the ”bacteria”, while 27%  associate the formation of caries with the consumption of sugar. The causes of gingival bleeding were: incorrect dental brush (49%, bacterial plaque (44%, unhealthy diet (35%, general diseases (30%, heredity (9%, while 9% of the mothers did not know the possible causes of gingival bleeding. It was only 1

  8. Establishing oral health promoting behaviours in children ? parents? views on barriers, facilitators and professional support: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Duijster, Denise; de Jong-Lenters, Maddelon; Verrips, Erik; van Loveren, Cor

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevention of childhood dental caries relies on adherence to key behaviours, including twice daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and reducing the consumption of sugary foods and drinks. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore parents’ perceptions of barriers and facilitators that influence these oral health behaviours in children. A further objective was to explore parents’ views on limitations and opportunities for professional support to promote children’s ...

  9. Towards understanding oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term 'oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain microbial community stability in health. However, the oral ecosystem itself is not stable: throughout life an individual undergoes multiple physiological changes while progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Recent discussions on the definition of general health have led to the proposal that health is the ability of the individual to adapt to physiological changes, a condition known as allostasis. In this paper the allostasis principle is applied to the oral ecosystem. The multidimensionality of the host factors contributing to allostasis in the oral cavity is illustrated with an example on changes occurring in puberty. The complex phenomenon of oral health and the processes that prevent the ecosystem from collapsing during allostatic changes in the entire body are far from being understood. As yet individual components (e.g. hard tissues, microbiome, saliva, host response) have been investigated, while only by consolidating these and assessing their multidimensional interactions should we be able to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem, which in turn could serve to develop rational schemes to maintain health. Adapting such a 'system approach' comes with major practical challenges for the entire research field and will require vast resources and large-scale multidisciplinary collaborations. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Pattern of presentation of oral health conditions by children at University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folaranmi, N; Akaji, E; Onyejaka, N

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the pattern of occurrence of oral conditions among children that attended the Child Dental Health clinic of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu over a 45 months period. Clinical records of 305 patients, aged 3 days to 16 years, who attended the Child Dental Health Clinic of the UNTH from April 2008 to December 2011 were retrieved and analyzed. Out of a total of 305 children who visited the Child Dental Health Clinic within this period, there were 148 (48.5%) males and 157 (51.5%) females. The ages ranged from 3 days to 16 years with a mean age of 9.05 years, only 4.6% made asymptomatic visit while 95.4% made symptomatic visit. 68.2% had caries and its sequeale, with no significant difference across the gender ( P = 1.472). Nearly 91.1% had periodontal diseases, with a significant difference noted ( P = 0.020) 2% had tooth developmental anomalies, 10.5% had traumatic dental injuries, 12.1% had malocclusion and other esthetic problems, 15.1% had other oral pathologies, 14.4% had abnormalities of tooth eruption. A significant 95.4% of the children made symptomatic visit. Periodontal disease was the most prevalent finding followed by dental caries. There is an urgent need to increase dental health awareness among children through school based continuing dental education program and also among other pediatric care givers such as parents, teachers, and pediatricians.

  11. Maternal self-report of oral health in 4-year-old Pacific children from South Auckland, New Zealand: findings from the Pacific Islands Families Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluter, Philip J; Durward, Callum; Cartwright, Susan; Paterson, Janis

    2007-01-01

    To report on the oral health risk in a disadvantaged group of 4-year-old Pacific children and their mothers living in South Auckland, New Zealand. The Pacific Islands Families study follows a cohort of Pacific infants born in 2000. Maternal self-report of mother and child's oral health practices and child's filling and extraction experience was undertaken at interview approximately 4 years postpartum. Overall, 1,048 mothers of children were interviewed. Children's reported oral health practices were generally poor, with 47 percent brushing Culturally appropriate and targeted strategies aimed at these modifiable practices need to be widely promoted so that the oral health burden carried by Pacific children can be reduced.

  12. Oral and Dental Health in Children with Chronic Liver Disease in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... Therefore, we aimed to analyze the oral and dental health status in .... patients by chewing an enclosed paraffin pellet, and saliva ..... due to hydrolysis of urea that raise the pH above the ... It may be related with that changes in radiomorphometric ... Loe H, Silness J. Periodontal disease in pregnancy.

  13. Oral health status of children and adults in urban and rural areas of Burkina Faso, Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varenne, Benoît; Petersen, Poul Erik; Ouattara, Seydou

    2004-01-01

    %), 12 years (57%), 18 years (58%), 35-44 years (49%). In addition, 10% of 35-44-year-olds had CPI score 4. Rural participants had more severe periodontal scores than did urban individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Health authorities should strengthen the implementation of community-based oral disease prevention...

  14. Parental attitudes towards oral health and caries-risk in their children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaire, J.H.; Exel, N.J.A. van

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate whether parents can be matched with attitudes towards oral health by means of a short vignette sheet, developed based on the results of an earlier Q-methodological study. Furthermore, this study aims to explore how the attitudes associate with

  15. Oral health-related quality of life in young Cambodian children: a validation study with a focus on children with cleft lip and/or palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoun, Tola; Malden, Penelope E; Turton, Bathsheba J

    2018-05-01

    Oral Health-Related Quality-of-Life (OHRQoL) measures have been developed and cross-culturally validated for use in many populations in recent years. Their use in children with cleft lip and/or palate (CLP), however, is not as well established. This study aimed to validate two OHRQoL instruments for use with Cambodian children and to describe the OHRQoL of a sample of Cambodian children with CLP, compared with other children in the same cohort. A convenience sample of 133 children aged 2-8 years and their families was recruited from two NGO health services in urban and rural areas of Cambodia. Children were assigned into clinical groups of cleft, malocclusion, severe caries (PUFA ≥ 1), and dentine caries. OHRQoL was measured using the Parental-Caregivers Perception Questionnaire (P-CPQ-16) and Family Impact Scale (FIS-8). The validity of the instruments was acceptable with an expected gradient in both scale scores being evident across self-reported oral health ratings. Children with CLP and their families experienced significantly greater impacts on OHRQoL, and the pattern of these impacts differed among the clinical groups. This study has confirmed the validity of the P-CPQ-16 and FIS-8 for use with young Cambodian children. The results impart advocacy for needed improvements in the care of children with CLP and provide a foundation for future epidemiological research of oral health in Cambodia. © 2018 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Brief oral health promotion intervention among parents of young children to reduce early childhood dental decay

    OpenAIRE

    Arrow, Peter; Raheb, Joseph; Miller, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe untreated dental decay affects a child?s growth, body weight, quality of life as well as cognitive development, and the effects extend beyond the child to the family, the community and the health care system. Early health behavioural factors, including dietary practices and eating patterns, can play a major role in the initiation and development of oral diseases, particularly dental caries. The parent/caregiver, usually the mother, has a critical role in the adoption of prot...

  17. Sleep Bruxism and Anxiety Impacts in Quality of Life Related to Oral Health of Brazilian Children and their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alencar, Nashalie Andrade; Leão, Cecília Sued; Leão, Anna Thereza Thomé; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Fonseca-Gonçalves, Andréa; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    This study aimed to assess the impact of parent reported sleep bruxism, trait anxiety and sociodemographic/socioeconomic features on quality of life related to oral health (OHRQoL) of children and their families. Healthy children aged 3-7 years, with (n=34) and without (n=32) bruxism were select for this study. Data was collected by applying the following instruments: The Early Childhood Oral Health Scale (B-ECOHIS) and Trait-anxiety Scale (TAS). The sociodemographic/socioeconomic characteristics were obtained by interviews with parents. Multiple logistic regression tests were performed to observe the influence of sociodemographic/socioeconomic characteristics, bruxism and trait-anxiety on the children's OHRQoL. No association between sleep bruxism and all evaluated sociodemographic/socioeconomic conditions, with exception of being the only child (p=0.029), were observed. Mean B-ECOHIS and TAS scores were different (pbruxism. Although an association between bruxism and OHRQoL (p=0.015) was observed, it was dropped (p=0.336; OR=1.77) in the logistic regression model. Trait anxiety was the variable responsible for the impact on the OHRQoL of children (p=0.012; OR=1.05). Our results indicated anxiety as the main factor that interfered in the OHRQoL of children with sleep bruxism.

  18. Prevalence of dental fluorosis in children taking part in an oral health programme including fluoride tablet supplements from the age of 2 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckersten, Charlotte; Pylvänen, Lena; Schröder, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of dental fluorosis in children who had participated in an oral health programme between the ages 2-5 years, including fluoride tablets from the age of 2 years.......To investigate the prevalence of dental fluorosis in children who had participated in an oral health programme between the ages 2-5 years, including fluoride tablets from the age of 2 years....

  19. [Oral health status evaluation of pre-school children: longitudinal epidemiologic study (1993-1994), Córdoba, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battellino, L J; Cornejo, L S; Dorronsoro de Cattoni, S T; Luna Maldonado de Yankilevich, E R; Calamari, S E; Azcura, A I; Virga, C

    1997-06-01

    A one-year longitudinal survey was carried out on a sample of the Cordoba City 4-year old kindergarten population (n = 820); so as to determine the role of several variables upon the incidence of caries. The dmf-t, dmf-s, oral hygiene and oral health indexes as well as incidence rates and caries relative risks of caries were inversely related to the socioeconomic level (SEL) of the children involved. Thus in the SEL III (typical proletariat, non-typical proletariat and sub-proletariat) children, the relative risk of caries was almost five times higher (RR = 4.9) than in the SEL I (entrepreneureal and managerial bourgeoisie) children. In SEL I, almost all new lesions occurred on smooth surfaces (61.2%), while in SEL III the molar occlusal faces were mainly affected (66.3%). Daily sugar intake was higher in SEL III children but experience of caries showed poor correlation to the amount (r = 0.40) and frequency (r = 0.52) of carbohydrate intake. No significant interlevel differences were observed in the biochemical salivary parameters analyzed. Assisted toothbrushing and fluoride topications strongly lowered the incidence of caries among SEL III children, also making the corresponding rates fall almost to SEL I values (0.31, 0.23 and 0.22 vs. 0.21). In conclusion, SEL III children should be treated prophylactically with effective preventive measures, because of their susceptibility to caries. Such preventive measures include assisted toothbrushing and fluoride topications.

  20. Caries-preventive effectiveness of fluoride varnish as adjunct to oral health promotion and supervised tooth brushing in preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agouropoulos, A; Twetman, S; Pandis, N

    2014-01-01

    by the varnish treatments. CONCLUSIONS: Under the present conditions, biannual fluoride varnish applications in preschool children did not show significant caries-preventive benefits when provided as an adjunct to school-based supervised tooth brushing with 1000ppm fluoride toothpaste. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE......OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of biannual fluoride varnish applications in preschool children as an adjunct to school-based oral health promotion and supervised tooth brushing with 1000ppm fluoride toothpaste. METHODS: 424 preschool children, 2-5 year of age, from 10 different pre schools.......9% diflurosilane) biannually while the control group had placebo applications. The primary endpoints were caries prevalence and increment; secondary outcomes were gingival health, mutans streptococci growth and salivary buffer capacity. RESULTS: The groups were balanced at baseline and no significant differences...

  1. Oral health-related quality of life after dental general anaesthesia treatment among children: a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankauskiene, Birute; Virtanen, Jorma I; Kubilius, Ricardas; Narbutaite, Julija

    2014-07-01

    Many young paediatric patients with severe dental caries receive dental treatment under general anaesthesia. Oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) can be evaluated to assess the outcome of dental general anaesthesia (DGA) treatment. The aim of our study was to examine the OHRQoL of young Lithuanian children in need of DGA treatment and analyse the impact of DGA treatment on children's OHRQoL. We carried out a prospective clinical follow-up study on OHRQoL among all young Lithuanian child patients who received DGA treatment at the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Hospital during 2010-2012. The study consisted of clinical dental examinations of patients younger than six years, data collected from their patient files, and an OHRQoL survey completed by their parents prior to the child's dental treatment. We conducted a follow-up OHRQoL survey one month after the DGA treatment. The Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS) and its effect size (ES) served to evaluate children's OHRQoL, and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test served for statistical analyses. We obtained complete baseline and follow-up data for 140 and 122 participants, respectively (84.7% follow-up rate). Pain and eating problems among children and parents feeling upset and guilty were the most frequently reported impacts at baseline. The parents reported greater impacts on boys than on girls. The ECOHIS score decreased significantly (69.5%, p family (2.4) sections of the ECOHIS. The OHRQoL of young Lithuanian children requiring DGA treatment is seriously impaired. Dental general anaesthesia treatment results in significant improvement of the children's OHRQoL. The children's parents also greatly appreciate this treatment modality for its positive impact on the family's quality of life.

  2. Oral Health and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-12

    This women's health podcast focuses on the importance of maintaining good oral health during pregnancy.  Created: 5/12/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/12/2009.

  3. Comparative clinical study testing the effectiveness of school based oral health education using experiential learning or traditional lecturing in 10 year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelopoulou, Matina V; Kavvadia, Katerina; Taoufik, Konstantina; Oulis, Constantine J

    2015-04-28

    School based oral health education through traditional lecturing has been found successful only in improving oral health knowledge, while has low effectiveness in oral hygiene and gingival health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of experiential learning (EL) oral health education to traditional lecturing (TL), on enhancing oral health knowledge, attitude and behavior as well as oral hygiene, gingival health and caries of 10-year-old children. Eighty-four children were recruited for the EL and 100 for the TL group from 3 locations in Greece. Data regarding oral health knowledge, attitude and behavior were collected via questionnaires. Data regarding dental plaque, gingivitis and caries were collected by clinical examination. The evaluation using questionnaires and clinical examination was assessed at baseline and 6 and 18 months afterwards. Two calibrated pediatric dentists examined the students using a periodontal probe and artificial light. Modified hygiene index (HI) was used for dental plaque recording, the simplified gingival index (GI-S) was used for gingivitis and DMFT, based on BASCD criteria, for dental caries. Based on a dedicated manual, the teacher applied in the classroom the oral health educational program using EL. EL group had statistically significant better hygiene than the TL at 6 months (p 0.05) and attitude (p > 0.05) at 6 months in comparison to baseline. EL program was found more successful than TL in oral hygiene improvement. Both oral health education programs improved the oral health knowledge, attitude and behavior of children. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02320162).

  4. Oral Health Status among 12- and 15-Year-Old Children from Government and Private Schools in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhabogi, J R; Shekar, Cbr; Hameed, Ia; Ramana, Iv; Sandhu, G

    2014-09-01

    The assessment of oral health status of children in government and private schools provide data on the oral health status of children from different socio-economic background. The aim of the following study is to assess and to compare the oral hygiene status, gingival status and caries experience between children from government and private schools in Andhra Pradesh, India. A combination of cluster and stratified random sampling was employed to select the study participants. Oral hygiene status, gingival status and caries experience was assessed and compared among 12- and 15-year-old children from three government and private schools each. The examination was carried out by three trained and calibrated investigators using a mouth mirror and explorer under natural daylight. A total of 604 children (331 government and 273 private) were examined in the study. The mean oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S) was higher among government school children (2.9 [1.1]) compared private school children (0.6 [0.4]). The mean gingival score and mean decayed missing filled teeth were also higher among government school children compared with private school children. A significantly higher number of children in the government schools had poor oral hygiene status, moderate to severe gingivitis and caries experience. The prevalence of oral diseases was relatively less among children from private schools in comparison with those from government schools. Hence, the children from government schools should be given the priority compared with private school children in any school dental health programs planned on a statewide basis.

  5. Acculturation and its impact on the oral health status of Pacific children in New Zealand: findings from the Pacific Islands Families study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluter, Philip J; Kanagaratnam, Sathananthan; Taylor, Steve; Tautolo, El-Shadan

    2017-06-01

    Immigration and acculturation are increasingly recognized as important explanatory factors for health disparities, although their impact on oral health is less well understood. This study investigates the relationship between Pacific children's cultural orientation and oral health, after adjusting for potentially moderating and confounding variables. The Pacific Islands Families (PIF) study follows a cohort of Pacific infants born in 2000. PIF study participants' data from their last dental examination were extracted from service records, and matched to the cohort. A bi-directional acculturation classification, derived from maternal reports, was related to children's oral health indices in crude and adjusted analyses. 1,376 children were eligible, of whom 922 (67.0 percent) had mothers born outside New Zealand. Matching was successful for 970 (70.5 percent) children, with mean age 12.2 years (range: 6.8, 15.4 years). Significant differences were found between acculturation groups for children's tooth brushing frequency and school dental service enrollments but these differences did not moderate relationships between acculturation and oral health status. Unmet treatment need was significantly different between acculturation groups, with children of mothers having higher Pacific orientation having worse unmet needs than those with lower Pacific orientation. No other significant differences were noted. Pacific children carry a disproportionate oral health burden, particularly amongst those with mothers more aligned to their Pacific culture. Strategies which enable Pacific people to re-shape their oral health understanding, together with reducing barriers to accessing dental health care, are needed to prevent a legacy of poor oral health in Pacific people within New Zealand. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  6. Child oral health in migrant families: A cross-sectional study of caries in 1-4 year old children from migrant backgrounds residing in Melbourne, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, L; de Silva, A M; Christian, B; Gold, L; Gussy, M; Moore, L; Calache, H; Young, D; Riggs, E; Tadic, M; Watt, R; Gondal, I; Waters, E

    2016-06-01

    Early Childhood Caries (ECC) is the most common, preventable disease of childhood. It can affect children's health and wellbeing and children from migrant families may be at greater risk of developing ECC. To describe ECC in children from migrant families, and explore possible influences. Cross-sectional analysis of caries data collected as baseline data for an oral health promotion study. The analysis sample included 630 1-4 year-old children clustered within 481 Iraqi, Lebanese and Pakistani families in Melbourne, Australia. Child participants received a community-based visual dental examination. Parents completed a self-administered questionnaire on demographics, ethnicity, and oral health knowledge, behaviour and attitudes. Child caries experience. Bivariate associations between oral health behaviours and ethnicity were tested for significance using chi-square. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify associations with ECC, adjusting for demographic variables and accounting for clustering by family. Overall, 34% of children in the sample experienced caries (both non-cavitated and cavitated). For all caries lesions, parent' length of residence in Australia, consumption of sweet drinks and parental education remained as independent predictors of child caries experience. Adding sugar to drinks was an additional risk factor for cavitation. Ethnicity was associated with some individual oral health behaviours suggesting cultural influences on health, however the relationship was not independent of other predictors. Culturally competent oral health promotion interventions should aim to support migrant families with young children, and focus on reducing sweet drink consumption.

  7. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Saini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  8. Correlation and comparative analysis of discriminative validity of the Scale of Oral Health Outcomes for Five-Year-Old Children (SOHO-5) and the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS) for dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Izabella Barbosa; Ramos-Jorge, Joana; Ramos-Jorge, Maria Letícia; Bönecker, Marcelo; Abanto, Jenny; Marques, Leandro Silva; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2015-03-10

    The perceptions of parents and children regarding oral health are useful to oral public health and clinical practice in pediatric dentistry. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between the total and item scores of the Scale of Oral Health Outcomes for Five-Year-Old Children (SOHO-5) (parental version and child's self-reports) and the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS). Subsequently, the discriminative validity of these assessment tools regarding dental caries was compared. One hundred twenty-one children randomly selected in the city of Diamantina (Brazil) were submitted to oral examinations. Parents answered the ECOHIS and SOHO-5p (parental version) and children answered the SOHO-5c (child's self-reports). Statistical analysis involved the Mann-Whitney test as well as the calculation of Spearman's correlation coefficients. A significant correlation was found between the SOHO-5p and ECOHIS (r = 0.85), whereas no significant correlations were found between the SOHO-5c and SOHO-5p (r = 0.00) or between the SOHO-5c and ECOHIS (r = -0.41). Significant differences in the impact on quality of life were found between children with severe decay and no severe decay (caries free, with initial or established caries) both the ECOHIS and SOHO-5p (p ≤ 0.05), whereas no difference was found in SOHO-5c (p > 0.05). The ECOHIS and SOHO-5p were correlated with each other. The accounts of the children differed from their parents' reports and were not capable of discriminating dental caries in advanced stages of progression.

  9. Maintaining women's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, A L; Bonci, L

    2001-07-01

    Women must adopt health-promoting strategies for both general health and the oral cavity, because the health of a woman's body and oral cavity are bidirectional. For general health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should actively advise women to minimize alcohol use, abstain from or cease smoking, stay physically active, and choose the right foods to nourish both the body and mind. For oral health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should advise women on how to prevent or control oral infections, particularly dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specifically, women need to know how to remove plaque from the teeth mechanically, use appropriate chemotherapeutic agents and dentifrices, use oral irrigation, and control halitosis. Dental practitioners also need to stress the importance of regular maintenance visits for disease prevention. Adolescent women are more prone to gingivitis and aphthous ulcers when they begin their menstrual cycles and need advice about cessation of tobacco use, mouth protection during athletic activities, cleaning orthodontic appliances, developing good dietary habits, and avoiding eating disorders. Women in early to middle adulthood may be pregnant or using oral contraceptives with concomitant changes in oral tissues. Dental practitioners need to advise them how to take care of the oral cavity during these changes and how to promote the health of their infants, including good nutrition. Older women experience the onset of menopause and increased vulnerability to osteoporosis. They may also experience xerostomia and burning mouth syndrome. Dental practitioners need to help women alleviate these symptoms and encourage them to continue good infection control and diet practices.

  10. Determinants of Oral Health: Does Oral Health Literacy Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Naghibi Sistani, Mohammad Mehdi; Yazdani, Reza; Virtanen, Jorma; Pakdaman, Afsaneh; Murtomaa, Heikki

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate oral health literacy, independent of other oral health determinants, as a risk indicator for self-reported oral health. Methods. A cross-sectional population-based survey conducted in Tehran, Iran. Multiple logistic regression analysis served to estimate the predictive effect of oral health literacy on self-reported oral health status (good versus poor) controlling for socioeconomic and demographic factors and tooth-brushing behavior. Results. In all, among 1031 partici...

  11. Strengthening of oral health systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    is either due to low availability and accessibility of oral health care or because oral health care is costly. In all countries, the poor and disadvantaged population groups are heavily affected by a high burden of oral disease compared to well-off people. Promotion of oral health and prevention of oral...... diseases must be provided through financially fair primary health care and public health intervention. Integrated approaches are the most cost-effective and realistic way to close the gap in oral health between rich and poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Programme will work......Around the globe many people are suffering from oral pain and other problems of the mouth or teeth. This public health problem is growing rapidly in developing countries where oral health services are limited. Significant proportions of people are underserved; insufficient oral health care...

  12. Self-reported temporomandibular joint disorder symptoms, oral health, and quality of life of children in kindergarten through grade 5: Do sex, race, and socioeconomic background matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglehart, Marita R; Patel, Manan H; Widmalm, Sven-Erik; Briskie, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    The authors' objectives were to determine the percentage of children in kindergarten through grade 5 who reported symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD); to assess whether sex, race, and socioeconomic background mattered; and to explore the relationships between TMJD and children's oral health and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). The research team conducted face-to-face interviews with 8,302 children in kindergarten through grade 5 (51% female, 49% male; 53% African American, 42% white). They conducted oral health screenings with 7,439 children. Overall, 23.6% of the children reported pain when chewing tough food, and 18.8% reported pain when opening their mouth wide; 23.2% reported hearing a sound (clicking) when opening their mouth wide. Female students were more likely than male students and African American children were more likely than white children to report TMJD symptoms. The prevalence of TMJD symptoms did not correlate with whether the children had a need for oral health care services or whether they had an abscess or carious teeth with pulpal involvement. TMJD symptoms were associated significantly with children's OHRQoL. Considerable percentages of 4- to 12-year-old children reported TMJD symptoms, with girls and African American children being more likely than their counterparts to be affected. Experiencing TMJD symptoms was associated significantly with poorer OHRQoL. Dental practitioners need to be aware that substantial percentages of kindergarten and elementary school-aged children experience TMJD symptoms. Taking a dental history and conducting an oral examination, therefore, should include assessments of the signs and symptoms of TMJD; treatment recommendations should be provided for affected children. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The influence of glycemic control on the oral health of children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Vera Lúcia; Fraiz, Fabian Calixto; Ferreira, Fernanda de Morais; Pintarelli, Tatiana Pegoretti; Oliveira, Ana Cristina Borges; Boguszewski, Margaret Cristina da Silva

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of disease control, expressed by the mean values of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), in the oral health of children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM). A cross sectional study involving 87 children and adolescents (59 girls), 10 ± 2.6 years old. The participants were divided into three groups: HbA1c ≤ 8%, 8% 10%. The duration of the disease, age and average HbA1c were obtained from their medical records. Oral health was evaluated according to the following indexes: Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S); Community Periodontal Index (CPI); Decayed, Missing or Filled Teeth Index (DMFT/dmft) for permanent and deciduous teeth; and the stimulated salivary flow rate (SSFR). The median SSFR was 1.1 mL/min in the group with HbA1c ≤ 8%, 0.7 mL/min in the intermediary group and 0.6 mL/min in the HbA1c > 10% group. A significant decrease in salivary flow was observed with an increase in HbA1c (p = 0.007). The DMFT/dmft and CPI indexes were higher in individuals with higher HbA1c values. More caries-free individuals were found in the group with HbA1c ≤ 8% compared to those with HbA1c > 10%. The group with HbA1c > 10% exhibited more caries and bleeding gums than the other groups. HbA1c values in girls were higher than in boys. Children and adolescents with unsatisfactory glycemic control, represented by higher HbA1c concentrations, exhibited a higher frequency of caries and gingivitis, and a reduction in salivary flow.

  14. FastStats: Oral and Dental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Oral and Dental Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data ... States, 2016, table 60 [PDF – 9.8 MB] Dental visits Percent of children aged 2-17 years ...

  15. Parental perception of psychophysical health, nutritional status and oral health in relation to sociodemographic characteristics in children in Bariloche, Argentina: an epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garibotti, Gilda; Vasconi, Cecilia; Ferrari, Alejandra; Giannini, Gabriela; Comar, Haydeé; Schnaiderman, Diego

    2015-10-01

    There is evidence of an association between social determinants and child health. To identify sociodemographic characteristics related to child health inequalities and to analize the cumulative effect on health of risk factors based on these characteristics. We evaluated 4-13 year-old children in Bariloche between June 2008 and May 2009. The following sociodemographic characteristics were taken into account: socioeconomic level, maternal education, adolescent pregnancy, medical coverage, unsafeness, and family habits. We assessed parental perception of physical, and social and emotional health, nutritional status and oral health in relation to these characteristics and the accumulation of risk factors. We used survey, anthropometry and oral examination. One hundred and eighty students participated. The level of maternal education was associated with the child's physical, social and emotional, and oral health. The percentage of children with missing teeth or cavities reached 77% among those whose mothers had, at most, completed primary school, compared to 13% among those whose mothers had completed tertiary school or university. The possibility of perceiving a non-optimal physical, and social and emotional health increased 1.8 and 1.4 times with each risk factor, respectively, and the possibility of having missing teeth or cavities was twice as much with each additional risk factor. Overweight and obesity was observed in 27.3% and 8.7% of students, respectively, and no relationship was found with sociodemographic characteristics. A low family socioeconomic level and a low maternal education level were associated with a higher prevalence of unfavorable health outcomes. Multiple risk factors have an cumulative effect on parental perception of physical, social and emotional, and oral health.

  16. [Oral health in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagojević, Duska; Brkanić, Tatjana; Stojić, Sinisa

    2002-01-01

    Good oral health care during pregnancy is essential but often overlooked factor of dental growth as well as of other structures of oral cavity. Pregnancy is the time when conscious approach to preventive oral care should increase. Preventive measures during pregnancy mean usage of fluorides, special dietary measures and increased oral hygiene habits. Preventive measures in pregnant women have one goal: providing conditions for development of fetal teeth as well as preventing tooth decay in pregnant women. The optimal period for introducing preventive measures is the first trimester of pregnancy. Because of hormonal alterations there is an increased incidence of dental diseases: gingivitis and low salivary pH (inflammation and bleeding gums). Eating habits of pregnant women may lead to frequent snacking on candy or other decay-promoting foods, thereby increasing the risk of caries. However, very poor oral health, possible dental complications and their consequences to the health as well as emotional status represent very strong reasons for activation of dental health care in this period.

  17. [Instruments for evaluating oral health knowledge, attitudes and practice for parents /caregivers of small children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignon, Stefania; Bautista-Mendoza, Gloria; González-Carrera, María; Lafaurie-Villamil, Gloria; Morales, Veicy; Santamaría, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Designing three instruments for evaluating oral health knowledge, attitudes and practice in parents/caregivers of low social-economic status 0-5 year-olds. Evaluating the instruments' reliability in terms of internal consistency and analysing items. Three instruments were constructed for evaluating low social-economic status 0-5 year-olds' parents/caregivers' oral health knowledge, attitudes and practice in the municipality of Usaquén , Bogotá , Colombia . 47 parents/caregivers were given a test establishing the instrument's reliability in terms of internal consistency and the adults' level of knowledge, attitudes and practice. A sub-sample was qualitatively analysed (content verification and understanding). Reliability was evaluated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Items were analysed for improving constructing and understanding the questions, taking four criteria into account: corrected homogeneity index (CHI), response trend, correlation between items and qualitative analysis. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for knowledge, attitudes and practice was 0,82, 0,80 and 0,62, respectively. Participants' level of knowledge, attitudes and practice was acceptable (60 %, 55 % and 91 %, respectively). This study found two out of the three evaluated instruments to be reliable (knowledge and attitudes); all three of them were then redesigned. The resulting instruments represent a valuable tool which can be used in future studies for describing and evaluating preventative programmes.

  18. Oral health status and treatment needs of hearing impaired children attending a special school in Bhimavaram, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Study Design: The study design was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in November 2012 at SVS special school for deaf, Bhimavaram, India. This study involved 180 CHI of both genders, aged 6-16 years, divided into Group-I (6-8 years, Group-II (9-12 years, and Group-III (13-16 years. Oral health status and treatment needs were recorded using methods and standards recommended by the WHO for Oral Health Surveys, 1997. Dental caries prevalence (decayed, missing, and filled teeth [DMFT/dmft], gingivitis levels (Lφe, Silness Gingival Index, plaque levels (Silness, Lφe Plaque index, and treatment needs were the parameters recorded and analyzed. Statistical Analysis: Z-test for proportion, one-way analysis of variance, and Chi-square test were used to analyze the data. Results: Prevalence of dental caries in the sample was found to be 65% with a mean level of caries prevalence (DMFT of 1.6 ± 1.3 in Group-I, 1.9 ± 1.2 in Group-II, and 2.2 ± 1.2 in Group-III. About 91.7% of the total children examined needs treatment. The mean plaque and gingivitis scores of the sample were 1.70 ± 0.61 and 1.59 ± 0.58, respectively. Conclusion: These findings imply the overwhelming situation of CHI in oral health perspective. Hence, prevention-based educational and motivational programs should be targeted to this vital group to achieve adequate oral hygiene levels.

  19. Cost-analysis of an oral health outreach program for preschool children in a low socioeconomic multicultural area in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wennhall, Inger; Norlund, Anders; Matsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    to a comprehensive oral health outreach project for preschool children conducted in a low-socioeconomic multi-cultural urban area. The outcome was compared with historical controls from the same area with conventional dental care. The cost per minute for the various dental professions was added to the cost......The aim was to calculate the total and the net costs per child included in a 3-year caries preventive program for preschool children and to make estimates of expected lowest and highest costs in a sensitivity analysis. The direct costs for prevention and dental care were applied retrospectively...... of materials, rental facilities and equipment based on accounting data. The cost for fillings was extracted from a specified per diem list. Overhead costs were assumed to correspond to 50% of salaries and all costs were calculated as net present value per participating child in the program and expressed...

  20. Effect of a health education program in the oral health profile of preschool children: an experience in the public network of Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Stürmer Badalott

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To estimate the effect of health promotion activities developed in a child education school, on the children’s oral health profile, relating oral manifestations to social, sanitary and feeding factors. Methods: Interventional, longitudinal and describing quantitative work, accomplished with 41 preschool children from four to six years old, living in the area assisted by a Family Health Team (Equipe de Saúde da Família-ESF in the city of Porto Alegre-RS. Diagnosis of dental caries and gingivitis was carried out through oral clinical examination at the beginning and at the end of the study. The dietary pattern was obtained by applying a questionnaire and the social-sanitary aspects of the families, from the records of File A in the Basic Health Care Information System (Sistema de Informação da Atenção Básica-SIAB. Results: Caries disease was diagnosed in 58.5% of the children, whose dmft index (total sum of decayed, extracted and filled teeth was 2.43. There was a decrease in the number of decayed teeth and an increase in extracted and filled teeth. The rates of visible plaque and gums bleeding got better. The social-sanitary aspects were standardized in the community, being not representative. The group presenting the highest dmft values followed a diet containing sugars, with viscous consistence and an intake frequency of four or more times a day. Conclusion: The activities of health promotion developed in the school partially changed the children’s oral conditions. There was a positive correlation between consistency, composition and frequency of diet and the presence of caries disease; on the other hand, there was no significant relation between social-sanitary conditions and the presence of oral diseases

  1. Effect of a health education program in the oral health profile of preschool children: an experience in the public network of Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Stürmer Badalotti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To estimate the effect of health promotion activities developed in a child education school, on the children’s oral health profile, relating oral manifestations to social, sanitary and feeding factors. Methods: Interventional, longitudinal and describing quantitative work, accomplished with 41 preschool children from four to six years old, living in the area assisted by a Family Health Team (Equipe de Saúde da Família-ESF in the city of Porto Alegre-RS. Diagnosis of dental caries and gingivitis was carried out through oral clinical examination at the beginning and at the end of the study. The dietary pattern was obtained by applying a questionnaire and the social-sanitary aspects of the families, from the records of File A in the Basic Health Care Information System (Sistema de Informação da Atenção Básica-SIAB. Results: Caries disease was diagnosed in 58.5% of the children, whose dmft index (total sum of decayed, extracted and filled teeth was 2.43. There was a decrease in the number of decayed teeth and an increase in extracted and filled teeth. The rates of visible plaque and gums bleeding got better. The social-sanitary aspects were standardized in the community, being not representative. The group presenting the highest dmft values followed a diet containing sugars, with viscous consistence and an intake frequency of four or more times a day. Conclusion: The activities of health promotion developed in the school partially changed the children’s oral conditions. There was a positive correlation between consistency, composition and frequency of diet and the presence of caries disease; on the other hand, therewas no significant relation between social sanitary conditions and the presence of oral diseases.

  2. Oral Health Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Parents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access ... of children with congenital heart defects attending the Paediatric Cardiology Clinic of ... Keywords: Congenital heart disease, Oral health knowledge, Oral health practices.

  3. Receipt of preventive oral health care by U.S. children: a population-based study of the 2005-2008 medical expenditure panel surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Colleen E; Bell, Janice F; Reed, Sarah C

    2013-11-01

    This study provides estimates of the annual use of preventive oral health care by U.S. children ages 6 months-17 years. We estimated the annual use of preventive oral health care with data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey for the years 2005 through 2008 (n = 18,218). Additionally, we tested associations between use of preventive oral health care and predisposing factors, enabling factors and health need within three age groups: young children, school-age children and youth. Overall, 21 % of the sample was reported to have received preventive oral health care in the prior year. More school-age children received preventive care than did young children or youth regardless of gender, race/ethnicity, health status, residence, or family size. Among the youngest children, low parental education and lack of health insurance were associated with lower odds of receiving preventive care. School-age children of racial and ethnic minority groups had a higher odds of receiving preventive care than did non-Hispanic Whites. Youth with special health care needs were less likely to receive care than their peers. Within each age group, use of preventive care increased significantly from 2005 to 2008. In the U.S. there has been an increase in use of pediatric preventive dental care. Continued effort is needed to achieve primary prevention. Outreach and education should include all parents and especially parents with low levels of education, parents of children with special health care needs and those without health insurance.

  4. Dental neglect as a marker of broader neglect: a qualitative investigation of public health nurses’ assessments of oral health in preschool children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Child neglect is a pernicious child protection issue with adverse consequences that extend to adulthood. Simultaneously, though it remains prevalent, childhood dental caries is a preventable disease. Public health nurses play a pivotal role in assessing oral health in children as part of general health surveillance. However, little is known about how they assess dental neglect or what their thresholds are for initiating targeted support or instigating child protection measures. Understanding these factors is important to allow improvements to be made in care pathways. Methods We investigated public health nurses’ assessment of oral health in preschool children in relation to dental neglect and any associations they make with child neglect more broadly. A qualitative study was conducted in Scotland during 2011/12. Sixteen public health nurses were recruited purposively from one health region. Individual, semi-structured interviews were undertaken and data were analyzed inductively using a framework approach. Categories were subsequently mapped to the research questions. Results Public health nurses assess oral health through proxy measures, opportunistic observation and through discussion with parents. Dental neglect is rarely an isolated issue that leads on its own to child protection referral. It tends to be other presenting issues that initiate a response. Threshold levels for targeted support were based on two broad indicators: social issues and concerns about child (and parental) dental health. Thresholds for child protection intervention were untreated dental caries or significant dental pain. Barriers to intervention are that dental neglect may be ‘unseen’ and ‘unspoken’. The study revealed a communication gap in the care pathway for children where a significant dental problem is identified. Conclusions Public health nurses take their child protection role seriously, but rarely make a link between dental caries and child neglect. Clear

  5. Special care with special child-oral health status of differently abled children attending special schools in Delhi: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Prasad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral health is an essential component of overall health. Oral health maintenance is more complex for the physically challenged children; the essential problem is lack of cooperation and coordination because of their physical or mental inability. Thus, physically challenged children are considered as a high-risk group for having dental problems. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess dental caries experience, oral hygiene status, periodontal status, and prevalence of malocclusion among differently abled children attending special schools in Delhi. Materials and Methods: A total of 1060 (610 males and 450 females, differently abled children were included in the study. The children were grouped into visually impaired, hearing and speech impaired, and orthopedic physically challenged only. Clinical examination was recorded using Dentition Status and Treatment Need Index and periodontal status recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO, 2013 and examination for malocclusion was made according to the Dental Aesthetic Index as described by the WHO Oral Health Survey 1997. The Simplified Oral Hygiene Index introduced by John C Greene and Jack R Vermillion in 1964 was used to assess the oral hygiene status. Results: Out of 1060 physically challenged children, 56.4% (598 had dental caries with the mean index or decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT being 1.10 (standard deviation ±1.26. It was observed that prevalence of dental caries was high in visually impaired group (63.2% and least in hearing and speech impaired group (51.7%. The overall oral hygiene status recorded was good in 58.5%, fair in 40.8%, and poor in 0.7% of the study population. Conclusion: The cumulative neglect of oral health was seen among the physically challenged children. Children with visual impairment had much more poorer oral health when compared to the hearing and speech impairment and orthopedically physically challenged group. An improved accessibility

  6. Content analysis of advertisements related to oral health in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pournaghi Azar, F; Mamizadeh, M; Nikniaz, Z; Ghojazadeh, M; Hajebrahimi, S; Salehnia, F; Mashhadi Abdolahi, H

    2018-03-01

    The evidence about the content of TV advertisements broadcast during children's viewing times with an emphasis on the number of food advertisements and the number of cariogenic food advertisements was systematically reviewed and meta-analyzed. A systematic review and meta-analysis. Articles published up until October 2017 in PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Persian databases such as Magiran, IranDoc, and Iranmedex with the keywords that were related to advertising and oral health in children were searched and screened by two reviewers independently, and the outcomes of interest were extracted. Meta-analysis was performed using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis, version 2.0. A total of 480 titles were retrieved and reduced to 256 eligible studies after deletion of duplicates, and finally, after closer assessment of titles and abstracts, five articles were selected for systematic review and meta-analysis. Of the included studies, three were conducted in the UK, one in India, and one in Greece. About 38.0% (95% confidence interval: 19.6-60.6, P = 0.296) of advertisements were related to food and also about 70.6% (95% confidence interval: 53.7-83.3, P < 0.019) of food advertisements were related to cariogenic foods. Food advertising during children's programs is dominated by food items that are potentially harmful to oral health. Moreover, the advertisements shifted toward food items that appeared healthy but contain a large amount of hidden sugar. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dental Caries Experience and Utilization of Oral Health Services Among Tibetan Refugee-Background Children in Paonta Sahib, Himachal Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Sumeet; Gaur, Ambika

    2018-06-04

    The study was done to describe the dental caries experience and dental care utilization among Tibetan refugee-background children in Paonta Sahib, India. The study was conducted on 254 school children in a Tibetan settlement in Paonta Sahib. Examination was done as per World Health Organization Oral Health Assessment criteria (2013). Data on dental services utilization was obtained from the parents of children using a structured questionnaire. Oral examination of 254 school children aged 6-18 years revealed an overall dental caries prevalence of 79.5%. The dental caries experience was greater in the mixed dentition (84%) than secondary dentition (77.3%). The mean DMFT was associated with sex and dental visiting patterns. About 60% children had never visited a dentist before. The main reason for dental visit was tooth removal (43%). The prevalence of dental caries among Tibetan refugee-background school children was high and utilization of dental care was low. A comprehensive oral health program focusing on preventive care and oral health education is recommended.

  8. Inequalities in oral health and oral health promotion

    OpenAIRE

    Moysés, Samuel Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a critical review of the problem of inequalities in oral health and discusses strategies for disease prevention and oral health promotion. It shows that oral health is not merely a result of individual biological, psychological, and behavioral factors; rather, it is the sum of collective social conditions created when people interact with the social environment. Oral health status is directly related to socioeconomic position across the socioeconomic gradient in almost all...

  9. The extent of food advertising to children on Greek television: focus on foods potentially detrimental to oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatou, T; Mamai-Homata, E; Polychronopoulou, A; Koletsi-Kounari, H

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the extent and nature of food advertising to children on Greek television, focusing on the adverts for foods with potential harmful effects on oral health, and to examine the persuasive marketing techniques used to promote food products. Advertisements broadcast on six TV-channels during children's peak viewing times on two weekdays and two weekend days in the period May-June 2010 were recorded (166.7 hours). Each advertisement was coded according to: date, day, length, type of program in which the ad appeared, type of product advertised and promotional technique used. Food advertisements were subdivided according to their sugar and/or acid content as potentially harmful or non-harmful to teeth. Food advertisements had an average frequency of 8.0 per hour during children's peak viewing times with highest frequency (11.4 per hour) on weekends during child-focused programs. Of all advertisements, 1330 (26.7%) were for foods, and 595 (44.7%) of these deemed to be potentially harmful to teeth. The most commonly advertised food product during children's programs was confectionery, 80 (27.7%). Of food advertisements, 199 (15.0%) used at least one of the promotional techniques likely to appeal to children. Advertisements for foods potentially harmful for teeth were more likely to be shown during child-focused programs (OR 2.92, 95% CI 2.04-4.16) and to promise a free gift with purchase (OR 35.43, 95% CI 10.83-115.88). Children in Greece are exposed to a large volume of advertisements for unhealthy foods and drinks, which intensively use persuasive techniques proved to affect children's food preferences and consumption. Our study provides evidence that could support advocacy and interventions for the regulation of food advertising.

  10. Children's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your child's health includes physical, mental and social well-being. Most parents know the basics of keeping children healthy, like offering ... for children to get regular checkups with their health care provider. These visits are a chance to ...

  11. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  12. Oral health during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Douglass, Alan B; Douglass, Joanna M; Silk, Laura

    2008-04-15

    Oral health care in pregnancy is often avoided and misunderstood by physicians, dentists, and patients. Evidence-based practice guidelines are still being developed. Research suggests that some prenatal oral conditions may have adverse consequences for the child. Periodontitis is associated with preterm birth and low birth weight, and high levels of cariogenic bacteria in mothers can lead to increased dental caries in the infant. Other oral lesions, such as gingivitis and pregnancy tumors, are benign and require only reassurance and monitoring. Every pregnant woman should be screened for oral risks, counseled on proper oral hygiene, and referred for dental treatment when necessary. Dental procedures such as diagnostic radiography, periodontal treatment, restorations, and extractions are safe and are best performed during the second trimester. Xylitol and chlorhexidine may be used as adjuvant therapy for high-risk mothers in the early postpartum period to reduce transmission of cariogenic bacteria to their infants. Appropriate dental care and prevention during pregnancy may reduce poor prenatal outcomes and decrease infant caries.

  13. Oral health in Libya: addressing the future challenges

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-24

    Mar 24, 2014 ... Keywords: oral health; oral health research; oral health care; dental research; dental education; Libya ... Libyan Journal of Medicine 2014. © 2014 Syed Wali Peeran ..... Clinical examination for dental erosion .... International health conference, ... (MIH) in a group of school-aged children in Benghazi, Libya.

  14. Parents' Attitude towards the Use of Fluorides and Fissure Sealants and its Effect on their Children's Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Sigalit; Ratson, Tal; Peretz, Benjamin; Dagon, Nurit

    To characterize the attitudes of Israeli parents towards caries preventive measures. participating parents completed a 21-item questionnaire on their demographics, dental history, attitudes and satisfaction from fluorides and fissure sealants. One hundred parents (average age 41.62±4.9 years, 85 females) participated. Most of the parents (88% of the mothers and 84% of the fathers) had an academic education. Most of the parents (54%) had a favorable attitude towards the use of fluoridated gels, while only 37% of them had a positive opinion regarding fluoridated water. The satisfaction levels were very high regarding fissure sealants, fluoridated mouth rinses and fluoridated gels (78.1%, 73.6% and 72.5% respectively). The satisfaction from fluoridated water was split almost equally (50.8% were 'pleased' and 49.2% 'not pleased'). The main source for parental oral health knowledge was the dentist (83%). Parents' attitude towards caries preventive measures was significantly correlated to their gender, dental experience, level of education and the number of children in the family. positive attitude towards caries preventive measures was found among parents with higher awareness for preventive oral health measures and among bigger families. Mothers were more positive about fissure sealants than fathers. Mothers with up to 12 years of education tended to have a positive opinion regarding water fluoridation.

  15. Child oral health-related quality of life (COHQoL), enamel defects of the first permanent molars and caries experience among children in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrow, P

    2013-09-01

    Published reports suggest that children with enamel defects, especially where enamel is missing or breaking down, experience considerable discomfort and are generally more fearful of dental treatment. However, children's oral health-related quality of life in relation to enamel defects has not been reported. The aim of this study was to examine the association between oral health-related quality of life among children (COHQoL) with enamel defects of the first permanent molars and deciduous caries experience. Children attending pre-primary schools in metropolitan Perth, Western Australia, were recruited and classified for enamel defects using the modified Developmental Defects of Enamel index. Caries experience of deciduous molars and canines was also recorded. Parents completed a child oral health-related quality of life questionnaire. Data were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis, Spearman's rank correlation, chi-square, multiple linear regression and ordered logistic regression to test the factors for their influence on the COHQoL. From the 550 children assessed (mean age 7.2 years) 522 COHQoL questionnaires were returned. Mean COHQoL score was 8.9 (sd 8.8). Bivariate tests showed no association of COHQoL with enamel defect status of the first permanent molars. COHQoL was associated with dmft (mean dmft 1.96, sd 2.62). Higher caries experience children had poorer reported oral health-related quality of life. The presence of enamel defects in the first permanent molars did not affect the children's oral health-related quality of life.

  16. Oral health behaviours of parents and young children in a practice-based caries prevention trial in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Lucy; Worthington, Helen V; Donaldson, Michael; O'Neil, Ciaran; Birch, Stephen; Noble, Solveig; Killough, Seamus; Murphy, Lynn; Greer, Margaret; Brodison, Julie; Verghis, Rejina; Tickle, Martin

    2018-06-01

    The NICPIP trial evaluated the costs and effects of a caries prevention intervention delivered to 2- to 3-year-old children attending dental practices in Northern Ireland. This supplementary study explored the oral health behaviours of children and their parents to help understand the reasons for the trial's findings. A mixed methods study that included a questionnaire completed by all parents (n = 1058) at the time they brought their child for the NICPIP final clinical assessment. The questionnaire collected data on frequency of toothbrushing and sugar consumption. Questionnaire data were analysed by trial group and caries status. Parents of trial participants (n = 42) were invited to take part in telephone interviews. Parents were purposively sampled according to trial group and whether or not their child developed caries. The interviews explored how and why oral health behaviours happened. Interview data were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. The questionnaire data indicated that toothbrushing and between-meal sugar snacking were common in the majority of children. The children of parents who automatically reminded their child to brush their teeth were more likely to remain caries-free (Odds Ratio 1.24; 95% CI 1.08, 1.41; P = .002). Frequency of sweet drink consumption was associated with the child developing caries (Odds Ratio 0.88; 95% CI 0.79, 0.98; P = .021). The interview data showed that parents had positive attitudes towards brushing both in terms of perceived importance and expected outcomes. Attitudes towards sugar snacking were more complex, with parents reporting difficulties in controlling this behaviour. Sugar was described as being something that was "ever present" in children's lives. Toothbrushing was widely adopted from a young age, but between-meal sugar consumption was highly prevalent. The results suggest that effective family-level and population-level interventions are needed to reduce sugar consumption

  17. Factors determining access to oral health services among children aged less than 12 years in Peru [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Azañedo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding problems of access to oral health services requires knowledge of factors that determine access. This study aimed to evaluate factors that determine access to oral health services among children aged <12 years in Peru between 2014 and 2015. Methods: We performed a secondary data analysis of 71,614 Peruvian children aged <12 years and their caregivers. Data were obtained from the Survey on Demography and Family Health 2014-2015 (Encuesta Demográfica y de Salud Familiar - ENDES. Children’s access to oral health services within the previous 6 months was used as the dependent variable (i.e. Yes/No, and the Andersen and col model was used to select independent variables. Predisposing (e.g., language spoken by  tutor or guardian, wealth level, caregivers’ educational level, area of residence, natural region of residence, age, and sex and enabling factors (e.g. type of health insurance were considered. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and multivariate analysis was performed using generalized linear models (Poisson family. Results: Of all the children, 51% were males, 56% were aged <5 years, and 62.6% lived in urban areas. The most common type of health insurance was Integral Health Insurance (57.8%, and most respondents were in the first quintile of wealth (31.6%. Regarding caregivers, the most common educational level was high school (43.02% and the most frequently spoken language was Spanish (88.4%. Univariate analysis revealed that all variables, except sex and primary educational level, were statistically significant. After adjustment, sex, area of residence, and language were insignificant, whereas the remaining variables were statistically significant. Conclusions: Wealth index, caregivers’ education level, natural region of residence, age, and type of health insurance are factors that determine access to oral health services among children aged <12 years in Peru. These factors should be considered when

  18. Oral health status and treatment needs of children and young adults attending a day centre for individuals with special health care needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akindayomi Yinka

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oral health condition of individuals with special health care needs have been reported in literature to be influenced by various sociodemographic factors, including living conditions and severity of impairment. This study was carried out to determine the oral health status and treatment needs of children and young adults attending a day institution for those with special needs. Methods This study was carried out as part of an oral health screening program organized by the institution and consent was obtained from parents and guardians before the screening. All information was supplied by the parents during the screening using a questionnaire completed by the dentist. Oral examination was carried out on all consenting subjects in attendance on the days of screening in the school clinic with parents and teachers in attendance, using standard World Health Organisation oral health indices to assess dental caries, oral hygiene status, malocclusion and other oral health parameters. Results Fifty-four subjects aged 3–26 years (mean 12.28 ± 6.82 years and comprising 72.2% males and 27.8% females participated in the study. Over 90% were from parents of high and middle level educational background. Thirty-six (66.7% were caries free, with a mean dmft score of 0.7 ± 1.77 and mean DMFT score of 0.4 ± 1.44 with no significant difference across gender (p = 0.5 and parents' educational status (p = 0.43. The mean OHI-S of the total population in this study was 1.36 ± 0.16. Females had a mean score of 0.88 ± 1.10 while males had a mean score of 1.55 ± 1.24 with no significant difference (p = 0.6. Twenty-five (46.3% had good oral hygiene, 17 (31.5% had fair oral hygiene and 12 (22.2% had poor oral hygiene, with no significant difference across gender (p = 1.11 and age groups (p = 0.07. Fifteen (27.8% had gingivitis with no significant difference across age groups (p = 0.17. Forty-five (83.3% had Angle's class I malocclusion, 6

  19. Oral health status of 12-year-old Nigerian children | Agbelusi | West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oral hygiene status (OHIS) of the students was generally fair. The girls had better oral hygiene and lower prevalence of gingivitis and calculus than the boys. The difference was however not significant (p>0.05). The treatment needs of the students revealed that 72.7% required periodontal treatment, 34.6% required ...

  20. African Journal of Oral Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Oral Health Sciences is devoted to research into oral diseases and encourages a multidisciplinary approach. Emphasis is on oral pathology, oral microbiology, oral medicine, oral physiology and biochemistry and related clinical sciences.

  1. The influence of socioeconomic status on oral health-related quality of life among Syrian children with cleft lip, or palate, or both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dak-Albab, Rahaf J; Dashash, Mayssoon A

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the impact of socioeconomic status (SES) on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among Syrian children with cleft lip, or palate, or both (CL/P). A cross-sectional study was carried out at the Pediatric Dentistry Department, Damascus University, Damascus, Syria from April 2010 to May 2011. After excluding subjects with mental disorders, dumb and/or deaf, as well, 87 cleft-children have completed the Arabic version of the Child Oral Health-Related Quality of Life Questionnaire (COHRQoL, 36-item) that was divided into 4 different domains (Oral Symptoms, Functional Limitations, Emotional Well-Being, Social Well-Being). The SES was measured by 5 questions, and based on those questions, it was divided into 3 categories (high, moderate, low). The chi square test, and ANOVA test were used to perform statistical analysis. Overall, the 4 COHRQoL domains, and each Oral Symptoms, Emotional Well-Being, and Social Well-Being domain separately showed significant differences between cleft-children in different SES levels (p<0.05). Children that belonged to a low level of SES were more worried than the others, and they also have lost more school lessons, and avoided social activities. We found that the decrease of SES can affect negatively the OHRQoL among children with CL/P. Low SES cleft-children may require special psychological and social support.

  2. Oral health: equity and social determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwan, Stella; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    This book chapter discusses the social determinants of oral health, and identifies interventions that have been, or can be, used in addressing oral health inequities (e.g. oral health promotion, education programmes, improving access to oral health care)....

  3. BETTER ORAL HEALTH TO ALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Murtomaa

    2016-12-01

    The behavioral science experts are of opinion that only comprehensive and integrated common-risk-factor-based health promotion activities can enhance oral health and its equity as a part of general health. Are health professionals ready to assume their responsibility for promoting better oral health?

  4. Knowledge, attitude and practice of oral health promoting factors among caretakers of children attending day-care centers in Kubang Kerian, Malaysia: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The role of caretakers at day-care centers has become more imperative in promoting oral health care in children since many new mothers opt to work outside their homes, leaving their children at day-care centers. The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of oral health promoting factors among secondary caretakers of children attending day-care centers. Settings and Design: This was a cross-sectional exploratory study conducted among secondary caretakers in Kubang Kerian, Malaysia. Materials and Methods: Thirty-four caretakers fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria participated in the study. The data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire addressing various aspects of knowledge, attitude and practice of oral health in children. Analysis was done using SPSS version 12.0. Results: The knowledge of factors causing dental caries was found to be good among majority of the caretakers, but the concepts of transmissibility of caries and effect of hidden sugars were not evident. Seventy one percent did not know that frequent bottle feeding could cause tooth decay. Attitudes seemed to be governed by the cultural practices of the region rather than the knowledge obtained. The knowledge was not translated to practice adequately. Giving sweetened liquid in bottles was practiced by 53% of the caretakers. Conclusion: Implementation of nursery-based oral health promotion programs for secondary caretakers is needed to counteract early childhood caries.

  5. A content analysis of advertisements related to oral health in children's Tamil television channels--a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Aparna; Diwakar, Madankumar P; Shastry, Shivakumar M

    2012-05-01

    This study was conducted to examine the nature, content, and duration of advertisements broadcasted during children's Tamil television channels and to determine the extent to which television advertising changes during school holiday and non-holiday periods and between prime time and non-prime time broadcast. Television broadcasts on two main children's Tamil television channels were video-recorded over 16 days between 17.00-19.00 hours (non-prime time) and 19.00-21.00 hours (prime time). For each commercial, the type of product advertised, as well as the duration (in seconds), was recorded. Advertisements were categorized as 'food' and 'non-food'. The former category was further subdivided into 'sugar-rich foods' and 'other foods'. The sugar-rich foods were further categorized as liquid, solid and sticky, and slowly dissolving sugars. Commercials related to the promotion of oral health products and non-food products were also recorded. Among the total of 128 h of television programmes recorded, advertising accounted for 10.15% (13.01 hours). The advertisement of sugar-rich food products, non-food and oral hygiene products occupied 50.36%, 38.41% and 1.90%, respectively, of the total advertising time. Solid and sticky products made up 100% of advertisements in this category on Chithiram television channel, compared with 62.5% of advertisements on Chutti television channel. It was concluded that the advertising of sugar-rich foods, particularly solid and sticky food products, was broadcasted more in Chithiram television channel, during school holidays and during prime time. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2011 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Parental knowledge, attitudes and cultural beliefs regarding oral health and dental care of preschool children in an Indian population: a quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, N; Chhabra, A

    2012-04-01

    Preschool children are dependent upon their parents for their dental care. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and beliefs of parents towards oral health and dental care of their children aged 1-4 years in an Indian population. Parents of 620 preschool children, who visited Krishna Dental College and Hospital, Ghaziabad, India for dental treatment were recruited into this study and completed a self administered questionnaire. It was revealed that the lack of knowledge and awareness of importance of the primary teeth, dental fear of the parents and the myths associated with dental treatment, created barriers to early preventive dental care of preschool children. The oral hygiene and feeding practices were found to be disappointing and the knowledge about the essential role of fluoride and transmission of Streptococcus mutans bacteria was found to be limited. The elders in the family, especially grandparents, highly influenced the decisions of the parents regarding dental treatment of their children. Parents' knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about the importance of dental health need to be improved. Coordinated efforts by paediatricians, paediatric dentists and other health professionals are required to impart dental health education about oral hygiene, feeding practices, importance of the primary dentition and to promote preventive dental programmes.

  7. The health production function of oral health services systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlad, R.S.; Petersen, P.E.

    2000-01-01

    Attitudes, dental status, socioeconomic factors, oral health care, production of oral health, health status, quality of life......Attitudes, dental status, socioeconomic factors, oral health care, production of oral health, health status, quality of life...

  8. Oral health problems and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Ki Kim

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease—were not related to mortality when sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral factors were considered, and there was no differential pattern between the three conditions. Multiple oral health problems were associated with a higher risk of dying.

  9. Comparing the oral health status of diabetic and non-diabetic children from Puerto Rico: a case-control pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López del Valle, Lydia M; Ocasio-López, Carlos

    2011-09-01

    Children with type 1 diabetes have infrequently been the subjects of studies examining oral health status (caries and gingival diseases); in addition, no study of this type has ever been on Puerto Rican children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the oral health status of Puerto Rican children (ranging in age from 6 to 12 years) either with or without type 1 diabetes and compare the two groups with regard to that status. This was a matched case-control study. A convenience sample of 25 children with type 1 diabetes (cases) and 25 non-diabetic children (controls), all ranging in age from 6 to 12 years and matched by age and gender, was evaluated by a calibrated dentist for caries, bleeding on probing, and plaque and calculus indexes. A sample of saliva was taken from each subject and analyzed to determine Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus counts. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test, and t-test were used to describe and assess the data. We used the caries index to evaluate the teeth of the children participating in our study; we found significant differences in the number of lesions in the permanent teeth of diabetic children compared to the number found in the permanent teeth of non-diabetic children (1.43 and 0.56, respectively; p = 0.05). The mean number of sites of bleeding on probing for diabetic children was 23.9; for non-diabetic children it was 4.2. Diabetic children had more plaque than did the control children (plaque index = 2.5 vs. 0.8; p = 0.007) and more bleeding on probing (p = 0.001). High levels of glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic children were statistically significantly associated with a greater number of sites with bleeding on probing. Diabetic children are at higher risk for caries and gum disease than are non-diabetic children.

  10. Supervised toothbrushing and oral health education program in Kuwait for children and young adults with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyama, Maddi; Al-Mutawa, Sabiha A; Honkala, Sisko; Honkala, Eino

    2003-01-01

    The authors report on the effectiveness of a school-based, supervised toothbrushing program among a group of 112 children with Down syndrome in Kuwait. The study involved 45 boys and 67 girls, who ranged in age from 11-22 years (mean, 14.8 years). The participants had moderate mental retardation and attended one of two special needs schools. Plaque was scored according to the Silness and Löe plaque index and gingivitis according to the Löe and Silness gingival index. Supervised toothbrushing and dental health education sessions were conducted twice a week. The program was evaluated at the end of three months. The mean plaque score decreased from 1.93 to 0.95 (p < 0.001), and the mean gingival score from 2.00 to 0.83 (p < 0.001). This three-month supervised toothbrushing program was effective in reducing plaque and gingivitis scores, but the key to long-term success of the program is sustaining the children's motivation to make oral hygiene a part of their daily life.

  11. Knowledge, attitudes and self-reported practices toward children oral health among mother's attending maternal and child's units, Salé, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chala, Sanaa; Houzmali, Soumia; Abouqal, Redouane; Abdallaoui, Faïza

    2018-05-11

    The occurrence of severe dental caries is particularly prevalent and harmful in children. A better understanding of parental factors that may be indicators of children's risk of developing dental caries is important for the development of preventive measures. This study was conducted to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of mothers in Salé, Morocco regarding oral health and their predictors. A cross-sectional KAP study was conducted of Mother and Child units in Salé, Morocco. Mothers attending the selected units from November 2014 to 29 January 2015 were recruited. Data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire, administered by face-to-face interviews, to record socio-demographic factors and KAPs. The main outcome measures included knowledge about oral health diseases and preventive measures, and attitudes and practices related to oral health prevention measures and dental care. KAPs scores were then recoded based on responses and scores were determined for each KAP domain. Linear regression analysis was conducted to assess predictors of KAP scores. Among 502 mothers included, 140 (27.8%) were illiterate and 285 (60.9%) were aware that fluoride has a beneficial effect in caries prevention. Mothers' own practices about dental care were statistically related to their children's use of dental care services (p knowledge score was associated with mother's age (β = 0.05; 95% CI; p oral health-related practices were mother's education level and children's health status. Limited KAP scores were observed among the studied population. A great emphasis on oral health education and some risk factor modifications are recommended.

  12. Influences on preschool children's oral health-related quality of life as reported by English and Spanish-speaking parents and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Catherine D; Divaris, Kimon; Zeldin, Leslie P; Rozier, R Gary

    2016-09-01

    This study examined young, preschool children's oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among a community-based cohort of English and Spanish-speaking parent-child dyads in North Carolina, and sought to quantify the association of parent/caregiver characteristics, including spoken language, with OHRQoL impacts. Data from structured interviews with 1,111 parents of children aged 6-23 months enrolled in the Zero-Out Early Childhood Caries study in 2010-2012 were used. OHRQoL was measured using the overall score (range: 0-52) of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS). We examined associations with parents' sociodemographic characteristics, spoken language, self-reported oral and general health, oral health knowledge, children's dental attendance, and dental care needs. Analyses included descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate methods based upon zero-inflated negative binomial regression. To determine differences between English and Spanish speakers, language-stratified model estimates were contrasted using homogeneity χ 2 tests. The mean overall ECOHIS score was 3.9 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.6-4.2]; 4.7 among English-speakers and 1.5 among Spanish speakers. In multivariate analyses, caregivers' education showed a positive association with OHRQoL impacts among Spanish speakers [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.12 (95% CI = 1.03-1.22), for every added year of schooling], whereas caregivers' fair/poor oral health showed a positive association among English speakers (PR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.02-1.41). The overall severity of ECOHIS impacts was low among this population-based sample of young, preschool children, and substantially lower among Spanish versus English speakers. Further studies are warranted to identify sources of these differences in - actual or reported - OHRQoL impacts. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  13. Probiotics as oral health biotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shyamali; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Tabrizian, Maryam; Prakash, Satya

    2012-09-01

    Oral health is affected by its resident microorganisms. Three prominent oral disorders are dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis, with the oral microbiota playing a key role in the initiation/progression of all three. Understanding the microbiota and the diseases they may cause is critical to the development of new therapeutics. This review is focused on probiotics for the prevention and/or treatment of oral diseases. This review describes the oral ecosystem and its correlation with oral health/disease. The pathogenesis and current prevention/treatment strategies of periodontal diseases (PD) and dental caries (DC) are depicted. An introduction of probiotics is followed by an analysis of their role in PD and DC, and their potential role(s) in oral health. Finally, a discussion ensues on the future research directions and limitations of probiotics for oral health. An effective oral probiotic formulation should contribute to the prevention/treatment of microbial diseases of the oral cavity. Understanding the oral microbiota's role in oral disease is important for the development of a therapeutic to prevent/treat dental diseases. However, investigations into clinical efficacy, delivery/dose optimization, mechanism(s) of action and other related parameters are yet to be fully explored. Keeping this in mind, investigations into oral probiotic therapies are proving promising.

  14. Achieving good oral health in children: the importance of a current, relevant and unbiased evidence base in paediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, J E; Bonetti, D; Worthington, H

    2013-06-01

    The Cochrane Collaboration was founded in 1993 as an international, non-profit and independent organisation dedicated to making up-to-date, accurate and reliable information about healthcare readily available. This paper discusses how the Cochrane Oral Health Group reviews have contributed to the oral health evidence base used in the development of many international and U.K. dental guidance documents, particularly in the field of paediatric dentistry.

  15. Factor analytic study of two questionnaires measuring oral health-related quality of life among children and adults in New Zealand, Germany and Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapsoba, H; Deschamps, J P; Leclercq, M H

    2000-01-01

    A questionnaire designed to measure oral health-related quality of life (OHRQOL) in adults and children was assessed for its factorial structure and reliability using data from the Second International Collaborative Study on Oral Health Outcomes in New Zealand, Poland and Germany. Principal component analysis with orthogonal and oblique rotation was applied. The three-factor structure hypothesized for the children's questionnaire (self-reported oral disease symptoms, perceived oral well-being, social and physical functioning) was confirmed in New Zealand and Poland, and two self-reported oral disease symptom dimensions emerged in Germany. Five factors instead of the three hypothesized were identified for adults: two dimensions of symptoms were identified, and social and physical functioning appeared to be independent dimensions of OHRQOL. Similarity between the factors was demonstrated in all three countries. The reliability of the questionnaire ranged from moderate to excellent depending on the dimension and the country. These findings provide preliminary evidence of the cross-cultural stability of the OHRQOL questionnaire in New Zealand, Poland and Germany, for both children and adults. Further investigations by the present authors of the properties of the instrument in other samples will focus on demonstrating the stability and replicability of the factor structure identified here.

  16. Living in a Sweetie Culture: Scottish Parents' Difficulties in Maintaining Their Children's Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patricia Anne; Freeman, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the views and experiences of parents whose children have rampant tooth decay. Methods: In-depth, semi-structured interviews were carried out with 19 parents of varied age and social background whose children had been referred to Dundee Dental Hospital for assessment for dental extractions. Participants were encouraged to…

  17. Periodontal Disease and Oral Hygiene Among Children. United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    Statistical data presented on periodontal disease and oral hygiene among noninstitutionalized children, aged 6-11, in the United States are based on a probability sample of approximately 7,400 children involved in a national health survey during 1963-65. The report contains estimates of the Periodontal Index (PI) and the Simplified Oral Hygiene…

  18. Cost-analysis of an oral health outreach program for preschool children in a low socioeconomic multicultural area in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennhall, Inger; Norlund, Anders; Matsson, Lars; Twetman, Svante

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to calculate the total and the net costs per child included in a 3-year caries preventive program for preschool children and to make estimates of expected lowest and highest costs in a sensitivity analysis. The direct costs for prevention and dental care were applied retrospectively to a comprehensive oral health outreach project for preschool children conducted in a low-socioeconomic multi-cultural urban area. The outcome was compared with historical controls from the same area with conventional dental care. The cost per minute for the various dental professions was added to the cost of materials, rental facilities and equipment based on accounting data. The cost for fillings was extracted from a specified per diem list. Overhead costs were assumed to correspond to 50% of salaries and all costs were calculated as net present value per participating child in the program and expressed in Euro. The results revealed an estimated total cost of 310 Euro per included child (net present value) in the 3-year program. Half of the costs were attributed to the first year of the program and the costs of manpower constituted 45% of the total costs. When the total cost was reduced with the cost of conventional care and the revenue of avoided fillings, the net cost was estimated to 30 Euro. A sensitivity analysis displayed that a net gain could be possible with a maximal outcome of the program. In conclusion, the estimated net costs were displayed and available to those considering implementation of a similar population-based preventive program in areas where preschool children are at high caries risk.

  19. A systematic review of the impact of parental socio-economic status and home environment characteristics on children's oral health related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santhosh; Kroon, Jeroen; Lalloo, Ratilal

    2014-03-21

    Childhood circumstances such as socio-economic status and family structure have been found to influence psychological, psychosocial attributes and Oral Health Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) in children. Therefore, the aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the published literature to assess the influence of parental Socio-Economic Status (SES) and home environment on children's OHRQoL. A systematic search was conducted in August 2013 using PubMed, Medline via OVID, CINAHL Plus via EBSCO, and Cochrane databases. Studies that have analysed the effect of parental characteristics (SES, family environment, family structure, number of siblings, household crowding, parents' age, and parents' oral health literacy) on children's OHRQoL were included. Quality assessment of the articles was done by the Effective Public Health Practice Project's Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative studies. Database search retrieved a total of 2,849 titles after removing the duplicates, 36 articles were found to be relevant. Most of the studies were conducted on Brazilian children and were published in recent two years. Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale and Children's Perception Questionnaire were the instruments of choice in preschool and school aged children respectively. Findings from majority of the studies suggest that the children from families with high income, parental education and family economy had better OHRQoL. Mothers' age, family structure, household crowding and presence of siblings were significant predictors of children's OHRQoL. However, definitive conclusions from the studies reviewed are not possible due to the differences in the study population, parental characteristics considered, methods used and statistical tests performed.

  20. Oral health in frail elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Ageing points towards increasing health problems and rising costs for the society. One of these health problems is the deteriorating oral health in care dependent elderly. The latter is related to the high need for care on many levels in these elderly. The lack of attention for oral care can be

  1. Oral and Dental Health in Children with Chronic Liver Disease in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... period in children with chronic liver disease (CLD) to prevent late complications. Therefore, we aimed .... After informed consent from the parents, a questionnaire ..... smoking, postnatal infections, anemia, and failure to thrive.

  2. Orthodontic treatment reduces the impact on children and adolescents' oral health-related quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eluza Piassi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Malocclusions treatment reduces the impact on children and adolescents' OHRQoL based on evidence assessed in the literature. The level of evidence was moderate to high to detect changes in the impact after orthodontic treatment.

  3. Knowledge and Oral Health Attitudes among Parents of Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Suvarna, Reshma; Rai, Kavita; Hegde, Amitha M

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a devastating complex of diseases resulting from defects of development. It affects more than 1 of every 100 live births. Early preventive dental care should be adjusted to the special needs of these children in their first years of life. Knowledge of parental attitudes and experiences of dental care are therefore important. Aim : This study was done to assess the knowledge and attitudes among parents of children with congenital heart disease towards...

  4. Oral Health-Related Quality of Life in Children in Chile Treated for Cleft Lip and Palate: A Case-Control Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravena, Pedro C; Gonzalez, Tania; Oyarzún, Tamara; Coronado, César

    2017-03-01

      To compare the oral health-related quality of life of patients treated for cleft lip and/or cleft palate (CL/P) versus unaffected children between 8 and 15 years of age using a Spanish-language version of the Child Oral Health Impact Profile (COHIP-Sp) administered to a Chilean population.   A cross-sectional study with a matched case-control design was used.   Participants were 48 children (mean age 11.3 years) with a history of CL/P from three cities in Chile and one group of 96 children (mean age 11.2 years) unaffected by CL/P. The COHIP-Sp was applied to both groups. Quality of life was compared according to the overall score and the average score of items and domains on the COHIP-Sp scale between the two groups (Mann-Whitney U test; P self-image" (P = .0002).   The oral health-related quality of life of children with a history of CL/P was similar to that of the control group. Nevertheless, a lower quality of life was observed concerning items associated with speech and being understood by other people. Further study into the risk factors associated with surgery and rehabilitative treatment is recommended.

  5. Dental caries and oral health practice among 12 year old school children from low socio-economic status background in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuvadze, Brighton Tasara; Mahachi, Lovemore; Mafuvadze, Benford

    2013-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases affecting children in Sub-Saharan Africa. Previous studies show a higher prevalence of dental caries in children from low socio-economic status backgrounds. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of dental caries among 12 year old children in urban and rural areas of Zimbabwe and establish preliminary baseline data. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 12 year old children at primary schools in Harare and Bikita district. A Pre-tested questionnaire was administered to elicit information from the participants on tooth cleaning, dietary habits and dental experience. Dental caries status was assessed using the DMFT index following World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Our results showed a high prevalence of dental caries in both urban (59.5%) and rural (40.8%) children. The mean DMFT in urban and rural areas was 1.29 and 0.66, respectively. Furthermore, our data showed a general lack of knowledge on oral health issues by the participants. There is high prevalence of dental caries among 12 years old school children in both urban and rural areas of Zimbabwe. This calls for early preventive strategies and treatment services. We recommend incorporation of oral health education in the elementary school curricula.

  6. Why Is Oral Health Important for Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Gum Disease and Cardiovascular Health ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... Why Is Oral Health Important for Women? Article Chapters Why Is Oral ...

  7. Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Gum Disease and Cardiovascular Health ... your desktop! more... Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health Article Chapters Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral ...

  8. Global burden of dental condition among children in nine countries participating in an international oral health promotion programme, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Denis M; Llodra, Juan Carlos

    2014-10-01

    The Live.Learn.Laugh. phase 2 programme is a unique global partnership between FDI World Dental Federation and Unilever Oral Care which aims to provide measurable improvement of oral health on a global scale through encouraging twice-daily brushing with a fluoride toothpaste. It was based on international recommendations using the principles of health promotion within school for the implementation of preventive health strategies. This paper is an overview of the dental caries condition of children from 2012 to 2013 in nine countries included in four World Health Organisation (WHO) regions. A cross-sectional study was conducted in each country before the implementation of health-promotion measures focused on twice-daily toothbrushing with fluoride toothpaste. The sample was based on stratified sampling according to the WHO pathfinder recommendations. From a total of 7,949 children examined, there were 517 children (1-2 years of age), 1,667 preschool children (3-5 years of age) and 5,789 schoolchildren (6-13 years of age). The prevalence and severity of primary dental caries, early childhood caries and temporary dental caries were described using decayed, filled teeth (dft), permanent decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) indices and the significant caries index (SCI). The major findings were a high prevalence of caries, identification of high-risk groups and inequality in the distribution of the severity of dental conditions. Aggregated data from this overview should provide justification for implementing an oral health programme. The main point is the need to retain and expand the community fluoridation programme as an effective preventive measure. At the individual level, the aggregated data identify the need for more targeted efforts to reach children early - especially among specific high-risk groups. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  9. Effect of Obesity and Lifestyle on the Oral Health of Pre Adolescent Children

    OpenAIRE

    Anand, Nithya; Suresh, M.; Chandrasekaran, S.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Worldwide estimates of childhood obesity are as high as 43 million, and rates continue to increase each year. Childhood obesity is a growing problem in the present era and it causes serious consequences in the later years. In today’s society, electronic media have been thoroughly integrated into the fabric of life, with television, video games, and computers being central to both work and play. While these media outlets can provide education and entertainment to children, many res...

  10. Oral health and oral health behaviour among 11-13-year-olds in Bhopal, India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, L.B.; Petersen, P.E.; Bhambal, A.

    2003-01-01

    ) and urban areas (n = 277). In urban slum areas convenience sampling was applied (n = 141). The data were collected through clinical examinations by means of WHO standard method, and a sub-sample completed a self-administered questionnaire on oral health behaviour, knowledge, and attitude. RESULTS....... Mean number of sextants with CPI score 0 was 3.5 among children in urban areas and 0.6 for children in slum areas. Seventy-five per cent of the children reported toothbrushing once a day, 31% used a plastic toothbrush and the general level of knowledge on oral health was low. Intake of sugary food...

  11. Changing oral health status and oral health behaviour of schoolchildren in Poland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicka, Maria; Petersen, Poul Erik; Szatko, Franciszek

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the occurrence of dental caries over time in Polish schoolchildren, to analyse the oral health behaviour of children and mothers, and to compare the levels of dental knowledge and attitudes of mothers and schoolteachers. DESIGN: Cross-sectional oral health surveys of children...... schoolteachers (response rate 95%) were identified for the questionnaire surveys in 1999. OUTCOME MEASURE: Dental caries in children was recorded by WHO methods and criteria, self-administered questionnaires were used to gather information on dental knowledge, attitudes and practices of children and mothers...... while self-administered questionnaires for teachers covered dental knowledge, attitudes and involvement in health education. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The proportions of 6-year-old children being caries-free were 13% in 1995, 17% in 1997, 18% in 1999 and 12% in 2000. The mean DMFT of children aged 12...

  12. The impact of a school based oral hygiene instruction program on the gingival health of middle school children in Riyadh: Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hessa Alwayli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the impact of a school-based oral hygiene instructions program on the gingival health of children in randomly selected middle schools in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: Nine hundred and fourteen children were selected from nine schools that were randomly determined from Riyadh City public schools. After obtaining the parents′ consent, the criteria-guided enrolment of study participants yielded 457 children in the control group and 457 students in the experimental group. The intervention design was 90 days experimental period with an intermediate follow-up visit at 45 days. A calibrated examiner (HW measured the plaque index (PI and the gingival index (GI. The indices were measured at day 1, day 45 and day 90 in both the control and the experimental groups. Results were analyzed with Wilcoxon sign rank test for each index, site, and by sessions for each group to determine if the scores had increased, decreased, or remained the same between intervals. Results: Plaque and gingival scores in the control group showed a steady improvement throughout the experimental period when compared with the baseline scores. Scores in the experimental group were significantly improved at each session between baseline and session 2 (45 days and session 3 (90days respectively. Conclusions: The continued reduction of GI and PI scores at the end of the intervention observed in this pilot study suggest that a school-based oral hygiene measures program can significantly improve oral health among school children in Saudi Arabia.

  13. Oral health status and treatment needs among 12- and 15-year-old government and private school children in Shimla city, Himachal Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shailee, Fotedar; Girish, M Sogi; Kapil, R Sharma; Nidhi, Pruthi

    2013-01-01

    To assess the dental caries, periodontal health, and malocclusion of school children aged 12 and 15 years in Shimla city and to compare them in government and private schools. A cross-sectional study of 12- and 15-year-old children in government and private schools was conducted in Shimla city, Himachal Pradesh, India. A sample of 1011 school children (both males and females) was selected by a two-stage cluster sampling method. Clinical recordings of dental caries and malocclusion were done according to World Health Organization diagnostic criteria 1997. Periodontal health was assessed by Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs index. The data collected was analyzed by SPSS package 13. The statistical tests used were t-test and Chi-square tests. The prevalence of dental caries was 32.6% and 42.2% at 12 and 15 years, respectively. At the12 years of age, the mean decayed, missing, filled teeth was 0.62 ± 1.42 and it was 1.06 ± 2.93 at 15 years of age. Females had higher level of caries than males at both the ages. At both ages, mean of decayed teeth was statistically higher in government schools as compared with private schools. Children in government schools had significantly less number of mean filled teeth at both ages as compared with private schools. The healthy component of gingiva was present in higher percentage of children in private schools as compared with government schools at both the age groups. The prevalence of malocclusion among the 12- year-old (58.1%) was more as compared with that among the 15-year-old (53.5%). The caries experience of 12- and 15-year-old children was low but the prevalence of gingivitis and malocclusion was quite high. Effective oral health promotion strategies need to be implemented to improve the oral health of school children further in Shimla city.

  14. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  15. Need for Oral Health Policy in India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    implementation of National Oral Health Policy in India in order to expand the oral health care to ... Professional dental organizations can also support government programs to .... who can play effective role in providing oral health care services.

  16. The Effect of Full-Mouth Rehabilitation on Oral Health-Related Quality of Life for Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Meligy, Omar; Maashi, Manal; Al-Mushayt, Abdullah; Al-Nowaiser, Abeer; Al-Mubark, Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Changes in oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among 40 children with special health care needs (CSHCN) aged 5-14 years before and 12 months after full-mouth rehabilitation (FMR) under general anesthesia (GA) in two hospitals in Jeddah city were assessed. The questionnaire was delivered to the parents/caregivers at baseline (pre-operative) and at the 12-month post-operative follow-up visit. Medical and dental histories and clinical findings were correlated accordingly. The follow-up response rate was 87.5% with 35 children completing a 12-month follow-up visit. The age range was from 5 to 12 years with a mean of 7.3 ± 2.4 years. More than half of the study sample was boys (63%) in the 5-8 year age-group (69%). The impact on OHRQoL was reportedly negative before FMR under GA, with overall scores ranging from 12 to 68 and a mean of 43.34 ± 14.83. OHRQoL improved significantly in all aspects evaluated (P<0.05) following FMR under GA with overall scores ranging from 4 to 41 and a mean of 18.86 ± 8.54. Treating CSHCN under GA, with 3-month recall visits for the patients, had a significant long-term effect on their OHRQoL extending up to 12 months postoperatively.

  17. School Oral Health Program in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Jitendra; Al-Mutawa, Sabiha; Nazar, Huda

    2014-01-01

    The School Oral Health Program (SOHP), Kuwait, is a joint venture between the Ministry of Health, Kuwait, and Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, Mass., USA. This program provides oral health education, prevention and treatment to almost 280,000 public school children in Kuwait. Services are delivered through a system of center- and school-based clinics and preventive mobile teams. One of the recent developments is the effective use of portable dental units for the delivery of preventive care to children in schools without the need for children to go to dental clinics. Preventive procedures performed under this program are the biannual application of fluoride varnish and the placement of pit and fissure sealants on newly erupted permanent molars and premolars. During recent years, the SOHP has improved its coverage of children, with prevention up to 80%. This has resulted in a considerable reduction in treatment needs, which is evident from the reduced number of composite restorations performed under this program during the last 6 years. This indicates that the disease level is on a decline, which can be confirmed from the results of the ongoing National Oral Health Survey on Kuwaiti school children. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Can school-based oral health education and a sugar-free chewing gum program improve oral health?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Bin; Petersen, Poul Erik; Bian, Zhuan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the outcome of school-based oral health education (OHE) and a sugar-free chewing gum program on the oral health status of children in terms of reduced caries increment and gingival bleeding over a period of 2 years. Nine primary schools randomly chosen from......'s oral hygiene; in certain circumstances children may benefit from using polyol-containing chewing gum in terms of reduced dental caries....

  19. Oral Health Promotion in Schools: Rationale and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizito, Alex; Caitlin, Meredith; Wang, Yili; Kasangaki, Arabat; Macnab, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explain the rationale and potential for the WHO health promoting schools (HPS) to improve children's oral health, and describe validated quantitative methodologies and qualitative approaches to measure program impact. Design/Methodology/Approach: Critical discussion of the impact of poor oral health and…

  20. Agreement between children aged 5-6 years and their mothers in rating child oral health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanto, Jenny; Tsakos, Georgios; Paiva, Saul Martins; Raggio, Daniela Prócida; Celiberti, Paula; Bönecker, Marcelo

    2014-09-01

    Studies have assessed parent-child agreement on ratings of school-aged children's OHRQoL. There are, however, no studies on children younger than 7 years of age. The aim was to assess the agreement between children aged 5-6 years and their mothers regarding child's oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). In this cross-sectional study, a total of 298 mother-child pairs (MCP), seeking the pediatric dental screening at the Dental School, University of São Paulo, completed the Brazilian version of the Scale of Oral Health Outcomes for 5-year-old children (SOHO-5), validated for children aged 5-6 years in Brazil. Agreement between total and items' scores was assessed using comparison and correlation analyses, by comparing the mean directional differences and by computing the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values, respectively. The mean directional difference in the total scores was 0.13 (CI 95% -0.076; 0.338) and therefore not significant for MCP. The mean absolute difference for MCP was 1.26, representing 11% of the maximum possible score. The ICC for total score was 0.84 (CI 95% 0.798; 0.867) for MCP. Mothers do rate their young children's OHRQoL similarly to children's self-reports. When assessing OHRQoL of children aged 5-6 years, mothers may be reliable proxies for their young children. © 2013 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Oro-facial pain perception and barriers to assess oral health care among the children with intellectual disability: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Radha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental caries is one of the most prevalent diseases affecting children invariably across the world; a toothache is one of the common outcomes found to be associated with dental caries as pain perception is a subjective phenomenon reporting of pain may vary among different individuals. The aim of this study was to assess the difference in oral health status and pain perception related to oral health status among the children with intellectual disability (ID and their normal counterparts. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 100 school children of 9-14 years with or without ID in Bangalore City, ethical clearance and informed consent were obtained. The study involved 50 children with ID and 50 children with non-ID (NID, of age group 9-14 years. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess participant′s demographic profile, self-assessed medical and dental conditions. Clinical assessment was done for recording dental caries and gingival status. Dental pain was measured using the "Dental Discomfort Questionnaire +" given by Versloot et al. Results: It was found that children with ID had a higher score for D(T, and M(T compared to NID control. This difference was statistically significant. Children with ID showed higher discomfort due to pain. Except for chewing on one side all other questions showed a significant difference between the groups. Conclusion: It was found that children with ID had a higher caries experience compared to NID control and showed significantly higher pain experience than children with NID.

  2. Parental knowledge of pre-school child oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Anand; Rao, Arun Prasad; Reddy, Venugopal; Ahamed, Syed Shaheed; Muhammad, Shameer; Thayumanavan, Shanmugam

    2013-10-01

    The dental health of preschool children has extensive implications on the oral heath of the individual as he grows into an adult. Parents/guardians of preschool children play a central role in enforcing proper oral hygiene and preventive regime in these children. This study was conducted with the aim of describing the views of parents/guardians about the dental health of pre-school children. Response was obtained on a 21 point questionnaire from randomly visiting parents of the outpatient section of Rajah Muthiah dental college and Hospital, Annamalainagar, India. The findings of the present study point towards poor awareness among the parents/guardians of preschool children, pertaining to their childs' oral health and this could directly translate to poor oral health among the children in this area.

  3. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and oral health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Agnieszka; Kierklo, Anna; Sielicka, Danuta; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2016-05-04

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory disease of connective tissue in children. It is characterized by progressive joint destruction which causes preserved changes in the musculoskeletal system. The literature describes fully clinical symptoms and radiological images in different subtypes of JIA. However, there is still a limited number of studies reporting on the medical condition of the oral cavity of ill children. JIA can affect hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity by: the general condition of the child's health, arthritis of the upper limbs, as the result of the pharmacotherapy, changes in secretion and composition of saliva, inflammation of the temporomandibular joint and facial deformity. The study summarizes the available literature on the condition of the teeth and periodontal and oral hygiene in the course of JIA. The presence of diverse factors that modify the oral cavity, such as facial growth, functioning of salivary glands, or the supervision and care provided by adults, prevents clear identification if JIA leads to severe dental caries and periodontal disease. Despite conflicting results in studies concerning the clinical oral status, individuals with JIA require special attention regarding disease prevention and maintenance of oral health.

  4. Influence of self-esteem on perceived orthodontic treatment need and oral health-related quality of life in children: the Generation R Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragt, Lea; Wolvius, Eppo B; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Tiemeier, Henning; Ongkosuwito, Edwin M

    2018-05-25

    Self-esteem (SE) is suggested to influence the relationship between orthodontic treatment need and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), but evidence lacks. The aim of the present study was to investigate SE in the relationship between subjective orthodontic need and OHRQoL in children. This cross-sectional study was embedded in the Generation R Study, a multi-ethnic population-based cohort. In total, 3796 10-year old children participated in the present study. OHRQoL, measured with the Child Oral Health Impact Profile-ortho, and subjective orthodontic need were assessed within parental questionnaires. SE was measured with a modified version of the Harter's self-perception profile rated by the children. The role of SE in the association between SOT and OHRQoL was evaluated with linear regression models. Furthermore, the difference in this association between children with high and low SE was investigated. Higher subjective orthodontic need was associated with lower OHRQoL scores (borderline: β [95% CI] = -0.55 [-0.77, -0.33]; definite: -1.65 [-1.87, -1.54]). Children with lower SE scores showed a stronger relationship between borderline and definite subjective orthodontic need with OHRQoL (β [95% CI] = -0.56 [-0.81, -0.31] respectively -1.68 [-1.94, -1.42]) than children with higher SE scores did (β [95% CI] = -0.51 [-0.97, -0.04] respectively -1.43 [-1.90, -0.95]). The relationship between subjective orthodontic need and OHRQoL is not based on the SE of children. However, SE modifies the relationship between subjective orthodontic need and OHRQoL. Work still needs to be done to find an explanation for the effect modification by SE in the relationship between subjective health perceptions and OHRQoL.

  5. Beyond word recognition: understanding pediatric oral health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Julia Anne; Huebner, Colleen E; Leggott, Penelope J; Mouradian, Wendy E; Mancl, Lloyd A

    2011-01-01

    Parental oral health literacy is proposed to be an indicator of children's oral health. The purpose of this study was to test if word recognition, commonly used to assess health literacy, is an adequate measure of pediatric oral health literacy. This study evaluated 3 aspects of oral health literacy and parent-reported child oral health. A 3-part pediatric oral health literacy inventory was created to assess parents' word recognition, vocabulary knowledge, and comprehension of 35 terms used in pediatric dentistry. The inventory was administered to 45 English-speaking parents of children enrolled in Head Start. Parents' ability to read dental terms was not associated with vocabulary knowledge (r=0.29, P.06) of the terms. Vocabulary knowledge was strongly associated with comprehension (r=0.80, PParent-reported child oral health status was not associated with word recognition, vocabulary knowledge, or comprehension; however parents reporting either excellent or fair/poor ratings had higher scores on all components of the inventory. Word recognition is an inadequate indicator of comprehension of pediatric oral health concepts; pediatric oral health literacy is a multifaceted construct. Parents with adequate reading ability may have difficulty understanding oral health information.

  6. Oral Health and Older Adults

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-27

    This podcast discusses the importance of older adults maintaing good oral health habits. It is primarily targeted to public health and aging services professionals.  Created: 10/27/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/27/2008.

  7. Caries-preventive effectiveness of fluoride varnish as adjunct to oral health promotion and supervised tooth brushing in preschool children: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agouropoulos, A; Twetman, S; Pandis, N; Kavvadia, K; Papagiannoulis, L

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of biannual fluoride varnish applications in preschool children as an adjunct to school-based oral health promotion and supervised tooth brushing with 1000ppm fluoride toothpaste. 424 preschool children, 2-5 year of age, from 10 different pre schools in Athens were invited to this double-blind randomized controlled trial and 328 children completed the 2-year programme. All children received oral health education with hygiene instructions twice yearly and attended supervised tooth brushing once daily. The test group was treated with fluoride varnish (0.9% diflurosilane) biannually while the control group had placebo applications. The primary endpoints were caries prevalence and increment; secondary outcomes were gingival health, mutans streptococci growth and salivary buffer capacity. The groups were balanced at baseline and no significant differences in caries prevalence or increment were displayed between the groups after 1 and 2 years, respectively. There was a reduced number of new pre-cavitated enamel lesions during the second year of the study (p=0.05) but the decrease was not statistically significant. The secondary endpoints were unaffected by the varnish treatments. Under the present conditions, biannual fluoride varnish applications in preschool children did not show significant caries-preventive benefits when provided as an adjunct to school-based supervised tooth brushing with 1000ppm fluoride toothpaste. In community based, caries prevention programmes, for high caries risk preschool children, a fluoride varnish may add little to caries prevention, when 1000ppm fluoride toothpaste is used daily. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oral food challenges in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Yung Yum

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many patients assume that allergic reactions against foods are responsible for triggering or worsening their allergic symptoms. Therefore, it is important to identify patients who would benefit from an elimination diet, while avoiding unnecessary dietary restrictions. The diagnosis of food allergy depends on the thorough review of the patients's medical history, results of supplemented trials of dietary elimination, and in vivo and in vitro tests for measuring specific IgE levels. However, in some cases the reliability of such procedures is suboptimal. Oral food challenges are procedures employed for making an accurate diagnosis of immediate and occasionally delayed adverse reactions to foods. The timing and type of the challenge, preparation of patients, foods to be tested, and dosing schedule should be determined on the basis of the patient's history, age, and experience. Although double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges(DBPCFC are used to establish definitively if a food is the cause of adverse reactions, they are time-consuming, expensive and troublesome for physician and patients. In practice, An open challenge controlled by trained personnel is sufficient especially in infants and young children. The interpretation of the results and follow-up after a challenge are also important. Since theses challenges are relatively safe and informative, controlled oral food challenges could become the measure of choice in children.

  9. Nutrition and Oral Health: Experiences in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Zohre Sadat Sangsefidi; Amin Salehi-Abargouei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Oral health is a crucial factor for overall well-being and there is a mutual relationship between nutrition and oral health. The aim of this study was to review the publications which have examined the association between nutrition or diet and oral health status or oral disease in Iran. Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, Scopus, Google scholar, scientific information database (SID), and Magiran were searched using key words of diet, nutrition, oral health, oral disease, ...

  10. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of ‘Fluoride and Oral Health’ has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fl uoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published...

  11. Oral zinc for treating diarrhoea in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzerini, Marzia; Wanzira, Humphrey

    2016-01-01

    Background In developing countries, diarrhoea causes around 500,000 child deaths annually. Zinc supplementation during acute diarrhoea is currently recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Objectives To evaluate oral zinc supplementation for treating children with acute or persistent diarrhoea. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 5), MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, CINAHL, mRCT, and reference lists up to 30 September 2016. We also contacted researchers. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared oral zinc supplementation with placebo in children aged one month to five years with acute or persistent diarrhoea, including dysentery. Data collection and analysis Both review authors assessed trial eligibility and risk of bias, extracted and analysed data, and drafted the review. The primary outcomes were diarrhoea duration and severity. We summarized dichotomous outcomes using risk ratios (RR) and continuous outcomes using mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Where appropriate, we combined data in meta-analyses (using either a fixed-effect or random-effects model) and assessed heterogeneity. We assessed the certainty of the evidence using the GRADE approach. Main results Thirty-three trials that included 10,841 children met our inclusion criteria. Most included trials were conducted in Asian countries that were at high risk of zinc deficiency. Acute diarrhoea There is currently not enough evidence from well-conducted RCTs to be able to say whether zinc supplementation during acute diarrhoea reduces death or number of children hospitalized (very low certainty evidence). In children older than six months of age, zinc supplementation may shorten the average duration of diarrhoea by around half a day (MD −11.46 hours, 95% CI −19.72 to −3.19; 2581 children, 9 trials, low

  12. Classroom Promotion of Oral Language (CPOL): protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial of a school-based intervention to improve children's literacy outcomes at grade 3, oral language and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfeld, Sharon; Snow, Pamela; Eadie, Patricia; Munro, John; Gold, Lisa; Le, Ha N D; Orsini, Francesca; Shingles, Beth; Lee, Katherine; Connell, Judy; Watts, Amy

    2017-11-20

    Oral language and literacy competence are major influences on children's developmental pathways and life success. Children who do not develop the necessary language and literacy skills in the early years of school then go on to face long-term difficulties. Improving teacher effectiveness may be a critical step in lifting oral language and literacy outcomes. The Classroom Promotion of Oral Language trial aims to determine whether a specifically designed teacher professional learning programme focusing on promoting oral language can lead to improved teacher knowledge and practice, and advance outcomes in oral language and literacy for early years school children, compared with usual practice. This is a two-arm cluster multisite randomised controlled trial conducted within Catholic and Government primary schools across Victoria, Australia. The intervention comprises 4 days of face-to-face professional learning for teachers and ongoing implementation support via a specific worker. The primary outcome is reading ability of the students at grade 3, and the secondary outcomes are teacher knowledge and practice, student mental health, reading comprehension and language ability at grade 1; and literacy, writing and numeracy at grade 3. Economic evaluation will compare the incremental costs of the intervention to the measured primary and secondary outcomes. This trial was approved by the Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee #CF13/2634-2013001403 and later transferred to the University of Melbourne #1545540. The investigators (including Government and Catholic partners) will communicate trial results to stakeholders, collaborators and participating schools and teachers via appropriate presentations and publications. ISRCTN77681972; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. The effect of social demographic factors, snack consumption and vending machine use on oral health of children living in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliderou, M; Reeves, S; Noble, C

    2006-10-07

    To investigate the effect of socio-economic status, sugar, snack consumption and vending machine use on the prevalence and severity of caries (DMF) in children. An observational study was carried out in a dental practice in inner city London. Sixty children were asked to complete a questionnaire and a three day food and drink diary. After a dental examination the number of decayed (D), missing (M) or filled (F) teeth provided a DMF score. Anova and Pearsons correlations were used to analyse the data statistically. Children from social groups I and II consumed significantly less (P vending machine less often than children from other social groups. Children from Social groups I, II and III had significantly lower DMF scores. The average DMF from social group I children was 0.5 +/- 0.6, whilst group IV children had the greatest incidence and a DMF of 4.6 +/- 0.8. Significant correlations were identified between DMF and sugar, confectionery and crisp consumption and vending machine use, and a negative correlation between DMF and vegetable consumption. Socio-economic status and access to vending machines were found to have a significant effect on sugar intakes, foods choices, and dental health. The removal of vending machines from schools or at least installing 'healthy' vending machines is recommended. Health promotion programmes that account for social groups and snacking habits that are cost effective are required.

  14. Use of national data base for strategic management of municipal oral health services for Danish children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, I.; Foldspang, Anders; Poulsen, S.

    2001-01-01

    Abstract –Objective: To evaluate the use of a national register for strategic management of dental health services for 0–17-year-old Danish children and to identify determinants for their use of the system as a strategic tool in management of the services. Methods: During the period December 1997...... decreased from 1995 to 1996. Otherwise no associations between dental health and use of the system could be demonstrated. Conclusions: SCOR is widely used as a strategic planning instrument concerning the Danish dental services for children and adolescents. The predictors associated with its use are partly...

  15. The promotion of oral health in health-promoting schools in KwaZulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Oral health promotion is a cost-effective strategy that can be implemented at schools for the prevention of oral diseases. The importance and value of school-based interventions in children has been identified in South Africa (SA). Although oral health strategies include integrated school-based interventions, ...

  16. Oral Health Knowledge, Past Oral Health Behaviors, and Barriers to Preventive Oral Care of Head Start Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay remains the most common chronic disease of childhood. The CincySmiles Foundation (CSF) developed an instrument to evaluate Head Start parents' knowledge of oral health care practices and to identify barriers Head Start parents face when seeking dental treatment for their children. Data from Head Start parents (n = 675) across 3…

  17. oral health knowledge, hygiene practices and treatment seeking

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-10-10

    Oct 10, 2011 ... and the oral health practices among 12 year-old children. Design: Descriptive ... the absence or presence of dental caries (5-7). The patient's ... secondary school teenagers had partial knowledge ... and diet counselling.

  18. Perceptions of Oral Health, Preventive Care, and Care-Seeking Behaviors among Rural Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Virginia J.; Logan, Henrietta; Brown, Cameron D.; Calderon, Angela; Catalanotto, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background: An asymmetrical oral disease burden is endured by certain population subgroups, particularly children and adolescents. Reducing oral health disparities requires understanding multiple oral health perspectives, including those of adolescents. This qualitative study explores oral health perceptions and dental care behaviors among rural…

  19. Caries With Dental Fluorosis and Oral Health Behaviour Among 12-year School Children In Moderate-fluoride Drinking Water Community in Quetta, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sami, E.; Vichayanrat, T.; Satitvipawee, P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of dental caries and its relationship with dental fluorosis, oral health behaviour and dietary behaviour among 12-year school children in moderate-fluoride drinking water community in Quetta, Pakistan. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Government and private schools of Quetta, from November 2012 to February 2013. Methodology: A total of 349 children aged 12-year from 14 randomly selected schools were included. The data collection was done on questionnaire designed for children. Dental caries status was examined by using WHO criteria. Result: Dental caries was found in 81 children (23.2 percent) with mean DMFT 0.61. Boys had 1.6 times more chance to have dental caries than girls. Dental fluorosis was found in 63.6 percent of children with majority of moderate degree (50.5 percent). Dental fluorosis status was found significantly associated with dental caries status in children. The children who had mild, moderate and severe fluorosis, had 4 times more chances to develop caries than those who did not have fluorosis. There was no significant association between children's caries status and use of paste, brushing habit, miswak, and visit to the dentist. The use of pastries and juices had a direct relation with the children's dental caries status. Conclusion: Dental caries in children of Quetta is not so much frequent as compared to the fluoride deficient countries. However, the high prevalence of moderate dental fluorosis and consumption of pastries and juices resulted in dental caries. (author)

  20. Impact of dental trauma on oral health-related quality of life among 12 years Lucknow school children: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjukta Bagchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental trauma has become an important attribute of dental public health inducing feelings of embarrassment to smile, laugh, and show teeth affecting social relationships. Available literature regarding the impact of dental trauma on the quality of life of children in Lucknow is scarce. Aims: To assess the impact of traumatic dental injuries (TDI on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL among 12-year-old school going children of Lucknow. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 12-year-old Lucknow school children. A total of 492 school children were selected through multistage cluster random sampling. The participants completed the child perceptions questionnaire (CPQ 11-14 - impact short form: 16 followed by an assessment of TDI. Unpaired t-test was used to determine the association of TDI with CPQ 11-14 because it involved two separate groups; one with dental trauma and other without dental trauma. Results: The prevalence of TDI was 10.8%. Maxillary central incisors (8.73% were the frequently traumatized teeth. Enamel fracture (7.11% was the most common type of TDI. OHRQoL had statistically significant association with TDI. Conclusions: TDI has a negative impact on OHRQoL of children affecting their personal relationships and school performance.

  1. Visionaries or dreamers? The story of infant oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Arthur J; Quiñonez, Rocio B

    2011-01-01

    To review the early history of the promotion of oral health for infants and toddlers, the impact of the AAPD guideline on infant oral health care and ways to maximize health outcomes. Review of the literature. Concepts on primary prevention and early intervention were reported as early as the 19th century. Progress to positively impact the oral health of children has been made. Nevertheless, the advice of early scholars and clinicians that oral care and prevention must begin early with the caregivers and the emergence of the infant's first tooth have not been fully embraced by the profession. A historical perspective on oral health care for infants and toddlers has been presented. There is a need to move away from the surgical approach of managing oral disease and embrace the concepts of primary care beginning perinatally while more broadly addressing social determinants of health.

  2. Oral health information systems--towards measuring progress in oral health promotion and disease prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Bratthall, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    and the general public. WHO has developed global and regional oral health databanks for surveillance, and international projects have designed oral health indicators for use in oral health information systems for assessing the quality of oral health care and surveillance systems. Modern oral health information...... been designed by WHO and used by countries worldwide for the surveillance of oral disease and health. Global, regional and national oral health databanks have highlighted the changing patterns of oral disease which primarily reflect changing risk profiles and the implementation of oral health...... programmes oriented towards disease prevention and health promotion. The WHO Oral Health Country/Area Profile Programme (CAPP) provides data on oral health from countries, as well as programme experiences and ideas targeted to oral health professionals, policy-makers, health planners, researchers...

  3. Oral microflora in preschool children attending a fluoride varnish program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Maria; Grindefjord, Margaret; Dahllöf, Göran

    2016-01-01

    hundred seven 3-year-old children were enrolled from a cohort of 3403 preschool children taking part in a community based oral health project. Two hundred sixty-three of them had attended caries-preventive program with semi-annual applications of a fluoride varnish since the age of 1 year (test group......BACKGROUND: To compare the oral microflora in preschool children attending a fluoride varnish program with a reference group receiving a standard oral health program without fluoride varnish applications. A second aim was to relate the microbial composition to the caries prevalence. METHODS: Five......) while 237 had received standard preventive care (reference group). Oral samples were collected with a sterile swab and analysed with checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization using 12 pre-determined bacterial probes. Caries and background data were collected from clinical examinations and questionnaires...

  4. Evaluation of Oral Health-Related Quality of Life to Assess Dental Treatment in Preschool Children with Early Childhood Caries: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollú, Ana Lúcia; da Costa, Maria da Encarnação Perez Requejo; Maia, Lucianne Cople; Fonseca-Gonçalves, Andréa

    The oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of preschool children with Early Childhood Caries (ECC) was used to assess the outcome of dental treatment. Children (3.56±1.31years) affected by ECC were selected. Anamnesis, clinical and radiographic exams were performed. Data about sociodemographic aspects, OHRQoL and dmf-t index were collected. The Brazilian version of Early Childhood Oral health Impact Scale (B-ECOHIS) was applied in two time intervals: before and after 30 days of treatment. B-ECOHIS scores and effect size (ES) were used to evaluate the OHRQoL of preschool children. The Student's-t test was used for comparison between the B-ECOHIS averages, considering the following aspects: gender, age, socioeconomic status, severity of caries and type of treatment. The mean dmf-t was 6.25±4.20 and no differences between boys (6.00±4.32) and girls (6.83±4.35) (p=0,942) were found. Pain and psychological problems among children and parents feeling upset and guilty were the most frequently reported impacts at baseline. There was a greater impact on girls (17.67±8.68) than on boys (13.30±10.53) (pchildren younger than 4 years (16.71±9.96) (pchildren showed a large effect size for these subjects (ES=1.19) and their families (ES=1.00). Dental treatment resulted in significant improvement of the preschool children's OHRQoL.

  5. Factors associated with oral health status and normative treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One third of the children had calculus requiring oral hygiene instructions and scaling and on average one sextant had calculus per child. One third of the children experienced bleeding upon brushing, and 54.8% had experienced toothache. All children brushed their teeth at least once a day. Knowledge on gingival health ...

  6. Oral healthcare of preschool children in Trinidad: a qualitative study of parents and caregivers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naidu, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about oral health in early childhood in the West Indies or the views and experiences of caregivers about preventive oral care and dental attendance The aims of this study were to explore and understand parents and caregivers\\' experience of oral healthcare for their preschool aged children and how, within their own social context, this may have shaped their oral health attitudes and behaviours. These data can be used to inform oral health promotion strategies for this age group.

  7. Impact of malocclusion on oral health-related quality of life in 10–14-year-old children of Mumbai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupinder Bhatia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The aim and objective of this study was to establish the relationship of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL as assessed by the Child Perception Questionnaire (CPQ 11–14 with the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN and the child's apprehension with his/her dental appearance and how upset the child would feel if he/she is unable to obtain orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: An observational cross-sectional study was conducted among 604 children between the age group of 10–14 years to analyze the effect of malocclusion on the quality of life of children on the basis of impact on oral symptoms, functional limitation, emotional well-being, and social well-being. Malocclusion was evaluated using the IOTN, and the CPQ 11–14 was used to study the OHRQoL in children. The collected data were then subjected to statistical analysis. Statistical Analysis: Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to analyze the data statistically. Results: Out of the 604 children examined, boys showed effect on emotional well-being, whereas girls showed a significant correlation on both emotional and social well-being. There was a statistically significant correlation between IOTN and all the four domains of CPQ scores with respect to the two questions that were added to the CPQ questionnaire. Conclusion: A questionnaire when developed specifically for determining the effect of malocclusion on OHRQoL focusing more on emotional and psychological impact and less on oral symptoms and functional limitation will provide advantages of having limited questions, being less time-consuming, and providing better understanding of the patients' concern.

  8. Oral health: orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martonffy, Andrea Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Improper tooth alignment due to crowding, malocclusion, and missing teeth can cause difficulties with eating and speech, and premature wear. It is estimated that more than 20% of children would benefit from orthodontic treatment to correct these conditions, many of which will persist into adulthood if not corrected. Orthodontic care is gaining popularity among adults for similar concerns, as well as for correction of cosmetic issues. The psychological effects of malocclusion should not be ignored. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that all children undergo evaluation at the first recognition of an orthodontic condition and no later than age 7 years. Some children will need early treatment to help eliminate developing conditions and improve the foundations of the bite, which can ease later treatment in adolescence. For others, treatment in adolescence without early treatment is recommended. Standard cemented braces or clear, removable aligners may be used, depending on the patient's corrective needs. Average treatment time is approximately 2 years; this may be shortened by the use of accelerative techniques. Routine preventive dental care should be continued during the treatment period. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  9. Dental caries experience and oral health behavior among 7-15 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dental caries experience and oral health behavior among 7-15 years old children attending military and paramilitary schools in Benin City. ... of caries was low and is likely to increase without oral health education, promotion and intervention.

  10. Relationship of self-liking, self-competence with self-reported oral health status among 15-year-old children of Davangere city: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjan Giriraju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychological constructs have been found to have potential effects in the improvement of health. Self-esteem (expressed in the form of sub-constructs: Self-liking and self-competence is a construct, which makes one realize the self. This in turn will result in positive oral-health-seeking behavior and improvement in oral health status. Aim: To assess the relationship of self-liking, self-competence with self-reported oral health status in children aged 15 years, in Davangere city. Materials and Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional survey was conducted on 220 15-year-old subjects in Davangere City. Specially designed pro forma containing Romanian self-administered questionnaire to record the self-reported oral health status and Tafarodi's SLC scale to measure self-liking/self-competence was used. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Results: A majority of the participants were found to have moderate self-competence and self-liking and their self-reported oral health status was expressed as "excellent." They reported very less or no untreated decayed teeth and no extracted teeth or gingival bleeding. Conclusion: The participants with better self-competence and self-liking perceived their oral health status as good. They reported lesser incidence of oral diseases and discomfort. Self-esteem and oral health were found to be positively related.

  11. Disparities in Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Private Wells Infant Formula Fluorosis Public Health Service Recommendation Water Operators & Engineers Water Fluoridation Additives Shortages of Fluoridation Additives Drinking Water Pipe Systems CDC-Sponsored Water Fluoridation Training Links to Other ...

  12. Probiotics and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejavathy Nagaraj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics, bacterial cultures or living microorganisms, upon ingestion in certain quantity promote and enhance health benefits. An International Life Science Institute Europe consensus document proposed a simple and widely accepted definition of probiotics as ′viable microbial food supplements which beneficially influence the health of human′. These bacteria should also adhere to the interstinal mucosa and finally should have the ability to inhibit the gut pathogens.

  13. Parental self-efficacy and oral health-related knowledge are associated with parent and child oral health behaviors and self-reported oral health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva-Sanigorski, Andrea; Ashbolt, Rosie; Green, Julie; Calache, Hanny; Keith, Benedict; Riggs, Elisha; Waters, Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    This study sought to advance understanding of the influence of psychosocial factors on oral health by examining how parental self-efficacy (with regard to acting on their child's oral health needs) and oral health knowledge relate to parental and child oral health behaviors and self-rated oral health. Parents of children in grades 0/1 and 5/6 (n = 804) and children in grades 5/6 (n = 377, mean age 11.5 ± 1.0, 53.9% female) were recruited from a stratified random sample of 11 primary (elementary) schools. Participants completed surveys capturing psychosocial factors, oral health-related knowledge, and parental attitudes about oral health. Parents also rated their own oral health status and the oral health of their child. Correlations and logistic regression analysis (adjusted for socioeconomic status, child age, and gender) examined associations between psychosocial factors and the outcomes of interest (parent and child behaviors and self-rated oral health status). Higher parental self-efficacy was associated with more frequent toothbrushing (by parent and child), and more frequent visits to a dental professional. These associations were particularly strong with regard to dental visits for children, with parents with the highest tertile for self-efficacy 4.3 times more likely to report that their child attended a dentist for a checkup at least once a year (95%CI 2.52-7.43); and 3 times more likely to report their child brushing their teeth at least twice a day (Adjusted Odds Ratio 3.04, 95%CI 1.64-5.64) compared with those parents in the lowest tertile for self-efficacy. No associations with oral health knowledge were found when examined by tertile of increasing knowledge. Oral health self-efficacy and knowledge are potentially modifiable risk factors of oral health outcomes, and these findings suggest that intervening on these factors could help foster positive dental health habits in families. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Knowledge, attitude, and practices of oral health care in prevention of early childhood caries among parents of children in Belagavi city: A Questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suma Sogi, H P; Hugar, Shivayogi M; Nalawade, Triveni Mohan; Sinha, Anjali; Hugar, Shweta; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the existing knowledge, attitude, and practices of "oral health care" in the prevention of early childhood caries (ECCs) among parents of children in Belagavi city. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the outpatient Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, KLE VK Institute of Dental Sciences, Belagavi, Karnataka. Institutional Ethical Clearance was obtained. The study was conducted during the month of April 2014 to October 2014 after taking prior informed consent from the 218 parents. Inclusion criteria were parents getting their children treated for dental caries and who were willing to participate. Parents who could not read and write were excluded from the study. The self-administered, close-ended questionnaire was written in English. It was then translated in local languages, i.e. Kannada and Marathi, and a pilot study was conducted on 10 parents to check for its feasibility and any changes if required were done. The response rate was 100% as all 218 parents completed the questionnaire. Of 218 parents, 116 were mothers and 102 were fathers. The overall mean knowledge score was 69.5%. The overall mean attitude score was 53.5%. The overall attitude toward prevention of ECC was not in accordance to knowledge. The overall mean of "good" practices and "bad" practices score was 33.5% and 18.5%, respectively. Good knowledge and attitude toward oral health do not necessarily produce good practices.

  15. Methamphetamine Use and Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    FOR THE DENTAL PATIENT ... Methamphetamine use and oral health M ethamphetamine is an inexpensive, easy-to-make illicit drug. It is known by several street ... and in ever-larger doses. The use of methamphetamine is on the rise in the United States, ...

  16. African Journal of Oral Health

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    b) Letters relating to materials previously published in AJOH or to topical issues relevant to the practice of dentistry. c) Update articles surveying the present state of knowledge in selected fields of Dentistry and oral health. d) Critical or analytical reviews in the area of theory, policy, or research in Dentistry. e) Reviews of ...

  17. Association of parental health literacy with oral health of Navajo Nation preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brega, A G; Thomas, J F; Henderson, W G; Batliner, T S; Quissell, D O; Braun, P A; Wilson, A; Bryant, L L; Nadeau, K J; Albino, J

    2016-02-01

    Health literacy is 'the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions'. Although numerous studies show a link between health literacy and clinical outcomes, little research has examined the association of health literacy with oral health. No large-scale studies have assessed these relationships among American Indians, a population at risk for limited health literacy and oral health problems. This analysis was conducted as part of a clinical trial aimed at reducing dental decay among preschoolers in the Navajo Nation Head Start program. Using baseline data for 1016 parent-child dyads, we examined the association of parental health literacy with parents' oral health knowledge, attitudes, and behavior, as well as indicators of parental and pediatric oral health. More limited health literacy was associated with lower levels of oral health knowledge, more negative oral health attitudes, and lower levels of adherence to recommended oral health behavior. Parents with more limited health literacy also had significantly worse oral health status (OHS) and reported their children to have significantly worse oral health-related quality of life. These results highlight the importance of oral health promotion interventions that are sensitive to the needs of participants with limited health literacy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Oral health promotion at worksites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L

    1989-01-01

    Many workplace-based health promotion programmes have been reported but only a few include or focus specifically on oral health. Although certain obstacles to oral health promotion in the workplace exist from the management side, from the dental profession and from the employees, these seem...... to be of a scale that can easily be overcome: moreover, numerous potential benefits exist. From the employer's point of view, the main arguments in favour are reduced health care costs, increased productivity and reduced absenteeism. The benefits to the dental profession are possible increases in utilization...... of services and less restraint from fee payment structures and physical environments. The immediate benefit to the employees is easy access to dental services. In addition, work-related dental hazards can be compensated for or prevented and screening activities can be more easily organized. The literature...

  19. Prevalence of dental caries and oral hygiene status among school going children: an epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, P L; Jayapalan, C S; Gondhalekar, Rajesh V; Krishna, B Jaya; Shaloob, K M Muhamed; Ummer, P Fajar

    2013-07-01

    Oral health is an important part of general health of body. Oral hygiene determines oral health status. Thus, oral hygiene is most important for good health in general. Poor oral hygiene can be source of many diseases. By maintaining the good oral hygiene, we can prevent occurrence of many disease. A survey was carried out to assess oral hygiene status and to find out caries prevalence rate among school going children of age 6 to 12 years. 957 healthy subjects including 567 boys and 390 girls from four different schools were examined in broad day light with the help of mouth mirror and explorer.

  20. Oral health knowledge attitudes and behaviors of migrant preschooler parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, Sherri M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish baseline data about oral health knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of migrant and seasonal farm workers (MSFW). The study focused on MSFWs that are parents of preschool-aged children, and who utilized services at 3 migrant dental clinics. An oral health knowledge attitudes and behaviors survey was developed and pilot tested in 2006. The resulting 34 item survey was administered by trained promotores de salud (community health workers) to 45 parents of preschoolers (15 at each clinic site) served by 3 migrant dental clinics. Parents answered questions as they pertained to their oldest preschooler (up to age 5). Dental visits in the last 12 months were reported for 26 (58%) of the children. Fifteen parents (33%) had a dental visit in the last year. Thirty-five parents (77/8%) reported their child's oral health to be good, and 21 (46.7%) reported their own to be good. Half of the children were enrolled in Head Start (HS). Of those, 18 (79%) had a dental visit in the last year, whereas 8 (36%) of those not enrolled in HS had a visit. Discrepancies existed for the age parents believed children should stop using a bottle and the age they actually did stop using a bottle. There were discrepancies in knowledge about decay causing drinks and consumption of drinks by preschool-aged children. MSFWs remain an underserved population with poor access to oral health care and multiple factors affecting oral health knowledge, attitudes and behaviors. A better understanding of influences on oral health knowledge, attitudes and behaviors within the population can assist in implementing appropriate interventions for the maintenance of good oral health in MSFW families. HS can have a positive impact on oral health for MSFW children.

  1. Digit Sucking, Age, Sex, and Socioeconomic Status as Determinants of Oral Hygiene Status and Gingival Health of Children in Suburban Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbaje, Hakeem O; Kolawole, Kikelomo A; Folayan, Morenike O; Onyejaka, Nneka K; Oziegbe, Elizabeth O; Oyedele, Titus A; Chukwumah, Nneka M; Oshomoji, Olusegun V

    2016-09-01

    This study determines prevalence of digit sucking and gingivitis, and association among age, sex, socioeconomic status, presence of digit-sucking habits, oral hygiene status (OHS), and gingivitis among a group of Nigerian children. Data of 992 children aged 1 to 12 years recruited through a household survey conducted in Osun State, Nigeria were analyzed. Information on age, sex, socioeconomic status, and history of digit-sucking habits were collected. Children were assessed for OHS and severity of gingivitis using the simplified oral hygiene index and the gingival index, respectively. Predictors of presence of gingivitis and poor oral hygiene were determined using multivariate logistic regression. One (0.2%) and 454 (93.0%) children aged 1 to 5 years had poor oral hygiene and mild gingivitis, respectively. Twenty-two (4.4%) and 361 (72.9%) children aged 6 to 12 years had poor oral hygiene and mild gingivitis, respectively. The odds of having poor oral hygiene (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 0.26; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.20 to 0.35; P oral hygiene and gingivitis. Increasing age and low socioeconomic status were factors that significantly increased chances of having poor oral hygiene and gingivitis.

  2. HABIT-an early phase study to explore an oral health intervention delivered by health visitors to parents with young children aged 9-12 months: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskyte, Ieva; Gray-Burrows, Kara; Owen, Jenny; Sykes-Muskett, Bianca; Zoltie, Tim; Gill, Susanne; Smith, Victoria; McEachan, Rosemary; Marshman, Zoe; West, Robert; Pavitt, Sue; Day, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Parental supervised brushing (PSB) when initiated in infancy can lead to long-term protective home-based oral health habits thereby reducing the risk of dental caries. However, PSB is a complex behaviour with many barriers reported by parents hindering its effective implementation. Within the UK, oral health advice is delivered universally to parents by health visitors and their wider teams when children are aged between 9 and 12 months. Nevertheless, there is no standardised intervention or training upon which health visitors can base this advice, and they often lack the specialised knowledge needed to help parents overcome barriers to performing PSB and limiting sugary foods and drinks.Working with health visitors and parents of children aged 9-24 months, we have co-designed oral health training and resources (Health Visitors delivering Advice in Britain on Infant Toothbrushing (HABIT) intervention) to be used by health visitors and their wider teams when providing parents of children aged 9-12 months with oral health advice.The aim of the study is to explore the acceptability of the HABIT intervention to parents and health visitors, to examine the mechanism of action and develop suitable objective measures of PSB. Six health visitors working in a deprived city in the UK will be provided with training on how to use the HABIT intervention. Health visitors will then each deliver the intervention to five parents of children aged 9-12 months. The research team will collect measures of PSB and dietary behaviours before and at 2 weeks and 3 months after the HABIT intervention. Acceptability of the HABIT intervention to health visitors will be explored through semi-structured diaries completed after each visit and a focus group discussion after delivery to all parents. Acceptability of the HABIT intervention and mechanism of action will be explored briefly during each home visit with parents and in greater details in 20-25 qualitative interviews after the

  3. Improving the oral health of older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    changing burden of chronic diseases in old age. Chronic disease and most oral diseases share common risk factors. Globally, poor oral health amongst older people has been particularly evident in high levels of tooth loss, dental caries experience, and the prevalence rates of periodontal disease, xerostomia...... and oral precancer/cancer. The negative impact of poor oral conditions on the quality of life of older adults is an important public health issue, which must be addressed by policy-makers. The means for strengthening oral health programme implementation are available; the major challenge is therefore...... to translate knowledge into action programmes for the oral health of older people. The World Health Organization recommends that countries adopt certain strategies for improving the oral health of the elderly. National health authorities should develop policies and measurable goals and targets for oral health...

  4. Strengthening of Oral Health Systems: Oral Health through Primary Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    Around the globe many people are suffering from oral pain and other problems of the mouth or teeth. This public health problem is growing rapidly in developing countries where oral health services are limited. Significant proportions of people are underserved; insufficient oral health care is either due to low availability and accessibility of oral health care or because oral health care is costly. In all countries, the poor and disadvantaged population groups are heavily affected by a high burden of oral disease compared to well-off people. Promotion of oral health and prevention of oral diseases must be provided through financially fair primary health care and public health intervention. Integrated approaches are the most cost-effective and realistic way to close the gap in oral health between rich and poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Programme will work with the newly established WHO Collaborating Centre, Kuwait University, to strengthen the development of appropriate models for primary oral health care. PMID:24525450

  5. Oral health and obesity indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Östberg Anna-Lena

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In western Sweden, the aim was to study the associations between oral health variables and total and central adiposity, respectively, and to investigate the influence of socio-economic factors (SES, lifestyle, dental anxiety and co-morbidity. Methods The subjects constituted a randomised sample from the 1992 data collection in the Prospective Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden (n = 999, 38- > =78 yrs. The study comprised a clinical and radiographic examination, together with a self-administered questionnaire. Obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI > =30 kg/m2, waist-hip ratio (WHR > =0.80, and waist circumference >0.88 m. Associations were estimated using logistic regression including adjustments for possible confounders. Results The mean BMI value was 25.96 kg/m2, the mean WHR 0.83, and the mean waist circumference 0.83 m. The number of teeth, the number of restored teeth, xerostomia, dental visiting habits and self-perceived health were associated with both total and central adiposity, independent of age and SES. For instance, there were statistically significant associations between a small number of teeth ( Conclusions Associations were found between oral health and obesity. The choice of obesity measure in oral health studies should be carefully considered.

  6. Comparative Assessment of Oral Health Related Quality of Life of Children Before and After Full Mouth Rehabilitation under General Anaesthesia and Local Anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Jaai Vinod; Winnier, Jasmin; Bhatia, Rupinder

    2017-01-01

    Early Childhood Caries (ECC) is an aggressive form of caries in a child who is 71 months of age or younger. If the child is cooperative, the treatment may be completed under Local Anaesthesia (LA). General Anaesthesia (GA) is considered if the child is uncooperative, medically compromised or if the parents are unable to return for regular visits and requests treatment under GA. Improved Oral health Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) has been reported after dental treatment under GA. To assess and compare the improvements in OHRQoL of children who have undergone dental treatment under GA or LA. To study the preoperative severity of events that may prompt the parents to consider treatment under GA. Parents of paediatric patients who had to undergo full mouth rehabilitation under GA and LA were selected for this study. Parents were given a questionnaire to evaluate OHRQoL of children before and after completion of treatment. Preoperative and postoperative assessments were analyzed using paired t-test. Dental disease was found to have a significant impact on children's overall well being. There was a considerable improvement with relation to eating preferences, amount of food intake, sleep and pain relief before and after dental treatment. There was no significant difference if the child was treated under GA or LA. Severe caries affects the quality of life of preschool children and improvement on quality of life is significant regardless of treatment performed under GA or LA.

  7. The sugar tax - An opportunity to advance oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wordley, V; Lee, H; Lomazzi, M; Bedi, R

    2017-07-07

    The new sugar tax was recently announced by Government, aiming to combat obesity through investment in school sports. Dental professionals should seize this rare opportunity to raise awareness of the other adverse effects of sugar; young children continue to suffer alarmingly high rates of dental cavities in the UK. A significant amount of money raised through the levy must be reinvested into ensuring fluoride toothpaste is more affordable. Since daily use of fluoride toothpaste is the most effective evidence-based oral health preventative measure that is widely used, this should receive tax exemption status from the government as a means of universal oral health prevention. There must also be a re-investment in innovative oral health education so that the next generation of children will alter their mind set about sugar. Oral health prevention advice must be tightly integrated into general health messages.

  8. Impact of traumatic dental injuries on oral health-related quality of life of preschool children: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tássia Silvana Borges

    Full Text Available Observational studies have suggested that traumatic dental injuries (TDI can lead to pain, loss of function and esthetic problems, with physical, emotional and social consequences for children and their families. However, population-based studies that investigate the impact of TDI on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL among preschool children are scarce and offer conflicting results. The aim of the systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the impact of TDI on OHRQoL among preschool children (PROSPERO-CRD42015032513.An electronic search of six databases was performed in PubMed (MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, EMBASE and Google Scholar, with no language or publication date restrictions. The eligibility criteria were TDI as the exposure variable, OHRQoL as the outcome and a population of children up to six years of age. RevMan software was used for data analysis. Results are expressed as odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals for the total score of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS as well as the scores of the Child Impact Section (CIS and Family Impact Section (FIS. The random effect model was chosen and heterogeneity was evaluated using the I2 test.2,013 articles were initially retrieved; 1,993 articles were excluded based on title and abstracts; 10 articles excluded after full-text analysis. Ten studies comprising a population of 7,461 preschool children were included in the systematic review and nine studies were included in the meta-analysis. TDI caused a negative impact on OHRQoL based on the overall ECOHIS (OR: 1.24; 95% CI: 1.08-1.43 and CIS (OR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.07-1.41, but not the FIS (OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 0.90-1.32.TDI negatively impacted on OHRQoL of preschool children. The present findings indicate the need for TDI prevention and treatment programs in early childhood.

  9. Socioeconomic inequality in oral health behavior in Iranian children and adolescents by the Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition method: the CASPIAN- IV study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiri, Saeid; Kelishadi, Roya; Heshmat, Ramin; Rahimi, Ali; Djalalinia, Shirin; Ghasemian, Anoosheh; Sheidaei, Ali; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Ardalan, Gelayol; Mansourian, Morteza; Asayesh, Hamid; Sepidarkish, Mahdi; Qorbani, Mostafa

    2016-09-14

    The present study set to describe the socioeconomic inequality associated with oral hygiene behavior among Iranian pediatric population. A representative sample of 13486 school students aged 6-18 years was selected through multistage random cluster sampling method from urban and rural areas of 30 provinces in Iran. Principle Component Analyses (PCA) correlated variables summarized as socioeconomic status (SES). Association of independent variables with tooth brushing was assessed through logistic regression analysis. Decomposition of the gap in tooth brushing between the first and fifth SES quintiles was assessed using the counterfactual decomposition technique. To assess the relation between tooth brushing and each socioeconomic category, Concentration Index (C) and the slope index of inequality (SII) were used, representing the linear regression coefficient. The participation rate was 90.6 % (50.7 % boys and 75.6 % urban inhabitants). The mean age of participants was 12.47 ± 3.36 years. The frequency of tooth brushing increased across SES quintiles, prevalence of tooth brushing between the first and fifth quintile, under 20 % difference, increased from 58.22 (95 % CI: 56.24,60.20) to 78.61 (95 % CI: 77.00,80.24). Only 3 % of the difference is explained by the factors considered in the study, and 17 % remained unknown. Residence area, family size, and smoking status made a significant contribution to the gap between the first and last SE groups. Residence area [ -2.01 (95 % CI: -3.46, -0.55)] was along the maximum levels of gaps between SE categories. The findings revealed a socio-economic inequality in oral health behavior in Iranian children and adolescents. Also, factors influencing oral health are addressed to develop and implement complementary public health actions.

  10. Effect of Fixed Metallic Oral Appliances on Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnazzawi, Ahmad

    2018-01-01

    There is a substantial proportion of the population using fixed metallic oral appliances, such as crowns and bridges, which are composed of various dental alloys. These restorations may be associated with a number of effects on oral health with variable degrees of severity, to review potential effects of using fixed metallic oral appliances, fabricated from various alloys. The MEDLINE/PubMed database was searched using certain combinations of keywords related to the topic. The search revealed that burning mouth syndrome, oral pigmentation, hypersensitivity and lichenoid reactions, and genotoxic and cytotoxic effects are the major potential oral health changes associated with fixed prosthodontic appliances. Certain oral disorders are associated with the use of fixed metallic oral appliances. Patch test is the most reliable method that can be applied for identifying metal allergy, and the simultaneous use of different alloys in the mouth is discouraged.

  11. A school-based public health model to reduce oral health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudovitz, Rebecca N; Valiente, Jonathan E; Espinosa, Gloria; Yepes, Claudia; Padilla, Cesar; Puffer, Maryjane; Slavkin, Harold C; Chung, Paul J

    2018-12-01

    Although dental decay is preventable, it remains the most common pediatric chronic disease. We describe a public health approach to implementing a scalable and sustainable school-based oral health program for low-income urban children. The Los Angeles Trust for Children's Health, a nonprofit affiliated with the Los Angeles Unified School District, applied a public health model and developed a broad-based community-coalition to a) establish a District Oral Health Nurse position to coordinate oral health services, and b) implement a universal school-based oral health screening and fluoride varnishing program, with referral to a dental home. Key informant interviews and focus groups informed program development. Parent surveys assessed preventative oral health behaviors and access to oral health services. Results from screening exams, program costs and rates of reimbursement were recorded. From 2012 to 2015, six elementary schools and three dental provider groups participated. Four hundred ninety-one parents received oral health education and 89 served as community oral health volunteers; 3,399 screenings and fluoride applications were performed on 2,776 children. Sixty-six percent of children had active dental disease, 27 percent had visible tooth decay, and 6 percent required emergent care. Of the 623 students who participated for two consecutive years, 56 percent had fewer or no visible caries at follow-up, while only 17 percent had additional disease. Annual program cost was $69.57 per child. Using a broad based, oral health coalition, a school-based universal screening and fluoride varnishing program can improve the oral health of children with a high burden of untreated dental diseases. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  12. Opportunities and challenges to promoting oral health in primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, P; Chestnutt, I G; Channing, D

    2009-09-01

    Inequalities in oral health in areas of socio-economic disadvantage are well recognised. As children spend a considerable proportion of their lives in education, schools can play a significant role in promoting children's health and oral health. However, to what extent schools are able to do this is unclear. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate opportunities and challenges to promoting oral health in primary schools. A purposive sample of 20 primary schools from socially and economically disadvantaged areas of Cardiff, UK were selected to participate in this qualitative study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews conducted with head teachers or their nominated deputies. General awareness of health and oral health was good, with all schools promoting the consumption of fruit, water and milk and discouraging products such as carbonated drinks and confectionaries. Health promotion schemes wereimplemented primarily to improve the health of the children, although schools felt they also offered the potential to improve classroom behaviour and attendance. However, oral health was viewed as a separate entity to general health and perceived to be inadequately promoted. Successful health promotion schemes were also influenced by the attitudes of headteachers. Most schools had no or limited links with local dental services and, or oral health educators, although such input, when it occurred, was welcomed and highly valued. Knowledge of how to handle dental emergencies was limited and only two schools operated toothbrushing schemes, although all expressed an interest in such programmes. This study identified a positive predisposition to promoting health in primary schools. The challenge for the dental team, however, is to promote and integrate oral health into mainstream health promotion activities in schools. The paper also makes recommendations for further research.

  13. Effect of different oral hygiene measures on oral malodor in children aged 7-15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Piyusha S; Pujar, Pallavi; Subbareddy, V V

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of various oral hygiene measures individually and in combination in reducing oral malodor. A total number of 120 children diagnosed as having oral malodor (oral malodor scores 2 and above) were included in the study. Children were then grouped under four oral hygiene categories (tooth brushing, tongue cleaning, mouth rinsing, and a combination group). There were 30 children in each group. The children were asked to perform oral hygiene methods individually and in combination. The children were then reassessed for oral malodor 2 h later. The results were analyzed and compared. Both individual oral hygiene measure or in combination of tooth brushing, tongue cleaning, and mouth rinsing; all were effective in reducing oral malodor. Significant reduction (P oral malodor was seen when all three oral hygiene measures performed together. Oral malodor was significantly reduced after performing oral hygiene measures individually, but reduced more when used in combination.

  14. An Investigation of the Views of Parents in Otago on Dental Care for Primary School-Aged Children by the Community Oral Health Service Prior to the Introduction of the Hub-Based Clinic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, B K; Gaffney, M; Marshall, K

    2016-12-01

    Prior to the introduction of the Southern District Health Board's reconfigured Community Oral Health Service in Otago, a project was undertaken with parents to investigate their knowledge, understanding and views of the historical School Dental Service and of the Community Oral Health Service that was being introduced. Focus groups were run during 2011 in ten selected schools (parents with children in years 1-8) across two areas in Otago to represent ur ban and rural settings and to represent parents who were already travelling to dental services. Parents valued the traditional School Dental Service in Otago highly, generally agreeing that the service based in schools was accessible and convenient for parents and children. Rural parents who had always taken their children to dental appointments viewed it as a normal process, accepting that there could not be a service located in every school. Parents were aware that facilities were out-of-date. They highlighted the challenges of locating therapists since they started moving from school to school in the later 1990s and felt it was difficult for children seeing different therapists at each recall. There were diverse views on the proposed new system. Some parents felt that school-aged children should go to dental clinics on their own or with peers, while other parents welcomed the opportunity to attend when their child was having health care. It appears that the Community Oral Health Services should have an ongoing process to seek the views of parents and children about the service.

  15. Current stress and poor oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Vasiliou, A.; Shankardass, K.; Nisenbaum, R.; Qui?onez, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychological stress appears to contribute to poor oral health systemically in combination with other chronic diseases. Few studies directly examine this relationship. Methods Data from a cross-sectional study of 2,412 participants between the ages of 25?64 years old living in the City of Toronto between 2009 and 2012 were used to examine the relationship between current stress and two self-rated oral health outcomes (general oral health and oral pain). Dental care utilization and ...

  16. Effects of nutrition on oral health

    OpenAIRE

    G A Agbelusi

    2010-01-01

    Nutrition represents a summation of intake, absorption, storage and utilization of foods by the tissues. Oral tissues are one of the most sensitive indicators of nutritional state of the body. Nutritional deficiencies are associated with changes in the integrity (health and appearance) of the oral structures/ tissues and these changes are frequently the first clinical signs of deficiency. Nutrition affects oral health and oral health affects nutrition. The effects of malnutrition can be s...

  17. Reflexions on oral health in Brazil

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    Anya Pimentel Gomes Fernandes Vieira Meyer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last century, numerous advances in biomedical researches and technology in the dentistry field have been responsible for improvements in health and wellbeing of populations(1. However, despite major achievements in the context of oral health, many problems still remain, such as dental caries, the most common of oral diseases. The prevalence of dental caries showed a downward trend over the last three decades of the XX century and in early twenty-first century, especially in developed countries, however, it is still considered an important worldwide public health issue, affecting 60% to 90% of school children, besides the vast majority of the adults(2-4. In the Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde Bucal do Ministério da Saúde – Projeto SB 2010(5 (National Survey of Oral Health of the Ministry of Health - SB Project 2010, improvements in the oral health status of Brazilians were observed, however, caries prevalence is still high. Among adolescents aged 15 to 19 years, for example, the average of affected teeth was 4.25 - more than twice the mean number found at the age of 12. Among the elderly aged 65 to 74 years, the number of decayed, missing and filled (DMF teeth hardly changed, remaining at 27.5 in 2010, while the average was 27.8 in 2003. In international context, according to the Brazilian Ministry of Health(5, a study by the World Health Organization (WHO in 2004 indicated that, on data from 188 countries, the average DMF at age 12 was 1.6, reaching the average of 2.8 in the Americas, while in Europe it was 1.6. In South America, only Venezuela had an average DMF at age 12 similar to the Brazilian (2.1. In other countries, the averages were higher, as in Argentina (3.4, Bolivia (4.7, Colombia (2.3, Paraguay (2.8 and Peru (3.7. The epidemiological findings on 2010 oral health in Brazil(5 showed that the country joined the group of those with low prevalence of caries at the age of 12. Although results have been encouraging in this regard

  18. Utilisation of oral health services, oral health needs and oral health status in a peri-urban informal settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westaway, M S; Viljoen, E; Rudolph, M J

    1999-04-01

    Interviews were conducted with 294 black residents (155 females and 138 males) of a peri-urban informal settlement in Gauteng to ascertain utilisation of oral health services, oral health needs and oral health status. Only 37 per cent of the sample had consulted a dentist or medical practitioner, usually for extractions. Teenagers and employed persons were significantly less likely to utilise dentists than the older age groups and unemployed persons. Forty per cent were currently experiencing oral health problems such as a sore mouth, tooth decay and bleeding/painful gums. Two hundred and twelve (73 per cent) interviewees wanted dental treatment or advice. Residents who rated their oral health status as fair or poor appeared to have the greatest need for oral health services. The use of interviews appears to be a cost-effective method of determining oral morbidity.

  19. Nutrition and Oral Health: Experiences in Iran

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    Zohre Sadat Sangsefidi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral health is a crucial factor for overall well-being and there is a mutual relationship between nutrition and oral health. The aim of this study was to review the publications which have examined the association between nutrition or diet and oral health status or oral disease in Iran. Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, Scopus, Google scholar, scientific information database (SID, and Magiran were searched using key words of diet, nutrition, oral health, oral disease, and Iran to reach the related articles published up to 2016. The English and Persian articles with cross-sectional, clinical trial, prospective, and case-control designs were selected. The Persian studies were then translated into English. The animal studies were not investigated. Results: The findings showed that nutrition and diet were associated with oral health. However, the majority of studies focused on evaluation of the relation between nutrition and dental caries. Further, a few studies were conducted on the association between nutrition and other oral problems such as periodontal disease or oral cancer. Moreover, the limited nutritional or dietary factors were investigated in the literature. Conclusions: Nutrition and diet are related to oral health and prevention of oral disease. Further studies are therefore recommended to evaluate the association between nutrition and oral health with considering various dietary or nutritional factors and different types of oral problems in Iran.

  20. Socioeconomic and psychosocial correlates of oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armfield, Jason M; Mejía, Gloria C; Jamieson, Lisa M

    2013-08-01

    It has been proposed that psychosocial variables are important determinants of oral health outcomes. In addition, the effect of socioeconomic factors in oral health has been argued to work through the shaping of psychosocial stressors and resources. This study therefore aimed to examine the role of psychosocial factors in oral health after controlling for selected socioeconomic and behavioural factors. Logistic and generalised linear regression analyses were conducted on self-rated oral health, untreated decayed teeth and number of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) from dentate participants in a national survey of adult oral health (n = 5364) conducted in 2004-2006 in Australia. After controlling for all other variables, more frequent dental visiting and toothbrushing were associated with poorer self-rated oral health, more untreated decay and higher DMFT. Pervasive socioeconomic inequalities were demonstrated, with higher income, having a tertiary degree, higher self-perceived social standing and not being employed all significantly associated with oral health after controlling for the other variables. The only psychosocial variables related to self-rated oral health were the stressors perceived stress and perceived constraints. Psychosocial resources were not statistically associated with self-rated oral health and no psychosocial variables were significantly associated with either untreated decayed teeth or DMFT after controlling for the other variables. Although the role of behavioural and socioeconomic variables as determinants of oral health was supported, the role of psychosocial variables in oral health outcomes received mixed support. © 2013 FDI World Dental Federation.

  1. Translation and validation of the instrument for the oral health-related quality of life assessment in 3 to 5 years old children in Bosnia-Herzegovina

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    Amra Hadžipašić Nazdrajić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: During 2007. in the U.S. was developed the questionnaire for caregivers with 13 items for assessing the oral health-related quality of life in children 3-5 years of age, The Early Childhood Oral Health ImpactScale, The ECOHIS. The aim of this study was to perform the fi rst part of the adaptation process for this instrument in Bosnia-Herzegovina: translation, cross-cultural adaptation and the comprehensibility testing.Methods: ECOHIS was translated from English into the one of the languages in Bosnia-Herzegovina using a standardized forward-backward translation method. Two licensed, professional English-language translators, one dentist and one pediatrician, participated in the development of the preliminary BH-ECOHIS version. All translators were native Bosnian speakers. After translation and adaptation of ECOHIS to Bosnia and Herzegovina setting, pilot-research was performed in order to check the comprehensibility of the questionnaire.Results: The original and the back-translated version were the same. Because not all children in Bosnia-Herzegovina attend preschool, school or daycare, we replaced the question number fi ve from the originalEnglish version “missed preschool, daycare or school“ with “had difficulties in everyday activities”. Translated and culturally adapted version of the ECOHIS was applied in a form of an interview (N=16. Parents/caregivershad no diffi culties to understand the questionnaire.Conclusions: BH-ECOHIS showed excellent comprehensibility. Next step in the validation process should be the testing of its measurement characteristic.

  2. Oral cancer screening practices of oral health professionals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Rodrigo; Haresaku, Satoru; McGrath, Roisin; Bailey, Denise; Mccullough, Michael; Musolino, Ross; Kim, Boaz; Chinnassamy, Alagesan; Morgan, Michael

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate oral cancer-related screening practices of Oral Health Professionals (OHPs - dentists, dental hygienists, dental therapists, and oral health therapists) practising in Victoria, Australia. A 36-item survey was distributed to 3343 OHPs. Items included socio-demographic and work-related characteristics; self-assessed knowledge of oral cancer; perceived level of confidence in discussing oral health behaviors with patients; oral cancer screening practices; and self-evaluated need for additional training on screening procedures for oral cancer. A total of 380 OHPs responded this survey, achieving an overall response rate of 9.4%. Forty-five were excluded from further analysis. Of these 335 OHP, 72% were dentists; (n = 241); either GDP or Dental Specialists; 13.7% (n = 46) were dental hygienists; 12.2% (n = 41) were oral health therapists, and the remaining 2.1% (n = 7) were dental therapists. While the majority (95.2%) agreed that oral cancer screening should be routinely performed, in actual practice around half (51.4%) screened all their patients. Another 12.8% "Very rarely" conducted screening examinations. The probability of routinely conducting an oral cancer screening was explored utilising Logistic Regression Analysis. Four variables remained statistically significant (p oral cancer screening rose with increasing levels of OHPs' confidence in oral cancer-related knowledge (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 1.09-1.67) and with higher levels of confidence in discussing oral hygiene practices with patients (OR = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.03-1.52). Results also showed that dental specialists were less likely to perform oral cancer screening examinations compared with other OHPs (OR = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.07-0.52) and the likelihood of performing an oral cancer screening decreased when the "patient complained of a problem" (OR = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.10-0.44). Only half the study sample performed oral cancer screening examinations for all of their patients

  3. An examination of the advances in science and technology of prevention of tooth decay in young children since the Surgeon General's Report on Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Zero, Domenick T; Tanzer, Jason M

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses a number of areas related to how effectively science and technology have met Healthy People 2010 goals for tooth decay prevention. In every area mentioned, it appears that science and technology are falling short of these goals. Earlier assessments identified water fluoridation as one of the greatest public health accomplishments of the last century. Yet, failure to complete needed clinical and translational research has shortchanged the caries prevention agenda at a critical juncture. Science has firmly established the transmissible nature of tooth decay. However, there is evidence that tooth decay in young children is increasing, although progress has been made in other age groups. Studies of risk assessment have not been translated into improved practice. Antiseptics, chlorhexidine varnish, and polyvinylpyrrolidone iodine (PVI-I) may have value, but definitive trials are needed. Fluorides remain the most effective agents, but are not widely disseminated to the most needy. Fluoride varnish provides a relatively effective topical preventive for very young children, yet definitive trials have not been conducted. Silver diamine fluoride also has potential but requires study in the United States. Data support effectiveness and safety of xylitol, but adoption is not widespread. Dental sealants remain a mainstay of public policy, yet after decades of research, widespread use has not occurred. We conclude that research has established the public health burden of tooth decay, but insufficient research addresses the problems identified in the report Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General. Transfer of technology from studies to implementation is needed to prevent tooth decay among children. This should involve translational research and implementation of scientific and technological advances into practice.

  4. Independent older adults perspectives on oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabra, K K; Compton, S M; Keenan, L P

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore oral health experiences from the perspective of older adults' living in community dwellings. The two objectives of this study were to identify facilitators and barriers to oral health care, and to determine how utilization of oral health services compares to utilization of other healthcare services. An interpretive descriptive methodology was employed with a purposive sample of 12 adults, aged 70 years or older. The inclusion criterion was English-speaking seniors residing in community dwellings. Community dwellings were defined as any housing outside of long-term care or other supportive living facilities. Semi-structured interviews were 30-80 min, audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Three researchers participated in the comparative analysis process to develop codes, generate categories, interpret patterns and construct themes. Three central themes surfacing from the data were as follows: life course influences on oral health, transparency in delivery of oral health services and interrelationships between oral health and overall health. Older adults in this study emphasized the value of establishing collaborative and trusting relationships between oral health practitioners and older adults. Oral health practitioners should be clear and transparent when communicating information about oral health costs and be cognizant of different circumstances from childhood to older adulthood that inhibit or promote routine utilization of oral health services. Including oral health services as part of interdisciplinary care teams could help promote understandings of the reciprocal relationship between oral health and general health and improve oral health status for older adults. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Impact of an Oral Health Education Workshop on Parents’ Oral Health Knowledge, Attitude, and Perceived Behavioral Control among African Immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Amin; Pawan Nyachhyon; Maryam Elyasi; Muhammed Al-Nuaimi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the impact of an educational workshop on parental knowledge, attitude, and perceived behavioral control regarding their child’s oral health. Materials and Methods. A one-time oral health education workshop including audio/visual and hands-on components was conducted by a trained dentist and bilingual community workers in community locations. Participants were African parents of children who had lived in Canada for less than ten years. The impact of the workshop was evalua...

  6. Current stress and poor oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliou, A; Shankardass, K; Nisenbaum, R; Quiñonez, C

    2016-09-02

    Psychological stress appears to contribute to poor oral health systemically in combination with other chronic diseases. Few studies directly examine this relationship. Data from a cross-sectional study of 2,412 participants between the ages of 25-64 years old living in the City of Toronto between 2009 and 2012 were used to examine the relationship between current stress and two self-rated oral health outcomes (general oral health and oral pain). Dental care utilization and access to dental insurance were examined as effect modifiers. A positive relationship between current stress and poor oral health was observed for both outcomes (oral pain coefficient 0.32, 95 % CI 0.26-0.38; general oral health coefficient 0.28, 95 % CI 0.19-0.36). Effects on oral pain were stronger for the uninsured, while effects on general oral health were stronger with decreasing socioeconomic position. Our findings suggest that individuals with greater perceived stress also report poorer oral health, and that this relationship is modified by dental insurance and socioeconomic position. These findings warrant a greater focus on the role of psychological stress in the development of oral disease, including how perceived stress contributes to health inequities in self-reported oral health status. Patients experiencing stressful lives may differentially require closer monitoring and more vigilant maintenance of their oral health, above and beyond that which is needed to achieve a state of health in the oral environment of less stressed individuals. There may be health promoting effects of addressing psychosocial concerns related to dental care - particularly for the poor and uninsured.

  7. Qualidade de vida e saúde bucal em crianças e adolescentes: aspectos conceituais e metodológicos Quality of life and oral health in children and adolescents: conceptual and methodological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taís de Souza Barbosa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O interesse pela qualidade de vida e saúde bucal em crianças e adolescentes vem aumentando, já que as desordens orais provavelmente apresentam efeito negativo na qualidade de vida das mesmas. Neste sentido, questionários que visam a avaliar o impacto da saúde bucal no bem-estar têm sido desenvolvidos e adaptados para este grupo específico. O objetivo deste trabalho é descrever a relação entre qualidade de vida e saúde bucal em crianças e adolescentes, focalizando aspectos conceituais e metodológicos. Os instrumentos desenvolvidos para avaliar a qualidade de vida e saúde bucal em crianças e adolescentes são: o Child Perceptions Questionnaire (CPQ, para crianças de 8-10 (CPQ8-10 e 11-14 anos (CPQ11-14; o Child-Oral Impacts on Daily Performances, para a idade de 11-12 anos; o Child Oral Health Impact Profile, para crianças de 8-14 anos, e o Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale para a faixa etária de 2-5 anos. Apesar dos progressos nessa área, ainda existem muitas questões a serem debatidas e respondidas, como a necessidade de questionários específicos para diferentes idades, a participação dos responsáveis como respondentes secundários e a avaliação do impacto da saúde bucal da criança e do adolescente na família.There has been increasing interest in the oral health-related quality of life of children and adolescents, since pediatric oral disorders are likely to have a negative effect on children's quality of life. So the questionnaires that aim to assess the impact of oral health on child' and adolescent' quality of life has been developed or adapted to this specific group. The aim of this study was to describe the relationship between the quality of life and oral health in children and adolescents, focalizing conceptual and methodological aspects. The instruments developed to assess oral health-related quality of life in children and adolescents are: the Child Perceptions Questionnaire (CPQ, for children aged 8

  8. Promotion of oral health by community nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garry, Brendan; Boran, Sue

    2017-10-02

    To explore the enablers and barriers perceived by community nurses in the promotion of oral health in an adult community trust directorate. Oral health care promotion in community care settings is being neglected. England and Wales have witnessed marked improvements in periodontal disease; however, no improvements have been seen in older people. A qualitative methodology was employed, where eight nurses from Band 5 to 7 were interviewed using a semi-structured approach. The data was analysed thematically. Data analysis was organised into four themes: professional self-concept and the development of knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary in the promotion of oral health; the impact an organisation has on the promotion of oral health and an exploration of the enablers and barriers identified by the community nurses while delivering care; the relationships between the nurse and patient and the potential impact on oral health promotion; the concept of self-regard in relation to the promotion of oral health and its overall impact. A commitment to improving oral health and requests for additional educational input were apparent. Organisational enablers and barriers were identified, alongside the crucial role a positive self-regard for oral health care may play in the promotion of oral health. Nurses need relevant education, organisational support, adequate resources and support from a multidisciplinary team to deliver optimal oral health promotion.

  9. The promotion of oral health within Health Promoting Schools in KwaZulu-Natal

    OpenAIRE

    M Reddy; S Singh

    2017-01-01

    Background. Oral health promotion is a cost-effective strategy that can be implemented at schools for the prevention of oral diseases. Theimportance and value of school-based interventions in children has been identified in South Africa (SA). Although oral health strategiesinclude integrated school-based interventions, there is a lack of published evidence on whether these strategies have been translated intopractice and whether these programmes have been evaluated.Objective. To assess the ef...

  10. Impact of dental fear on oral health-related quality of life among school going and non-school going children in Udaipur city: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha Goyal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the impact of dental fear on different domains of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL among school going and non-school going children in the Indian scenario. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 279 school children and 257 non-school going children thus making a total sample of 536 children. The sampling frame comprised of 12-15-year-old children attending two upper primary public schools and non-school going children working at shops or not working in Udaipur city, India. Information on dental fear and OHRQoL was obtained by personal interviews by a single trained and calibrated examiner through a structured questionnaire. Intercooled STATA version 9.2 was employed to perform statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at 5%. Results: Mean dental fear scores among school going (35.41 [11.79] and non-school going (47.59 [3.80] children revealed that dental fear was significantly (P ≤ 0.05 higher among non-school going than among school going children. In school going children, the likelihood of having poor oral symptoms, functional limitation and poorer social and emotional well being were significantly (P ≤ 0.05 lesser as compared with non-school going children. Conclusions: Fear has a significant impact on different domains of OHRQoL, except emotional well being, among non-school going children.

  11. The dietary patterns of 12-year-old children and their awareness about the effect of diet on oral health in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rad

    2017-04-01

    CONCLUSION: The results showed that dietary patterns was not satisfactory, and the level of consumption of cariogenic foods was high. Study findings recommend that school-based oral health programs should be designed for modifying the dietary habits in Iran.

  12. Health-oriented electronic oral health record: development and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsapai, Mansuang; Suebnukarn, Siriwan; Rajchagool, Sunsanee; Beach, Daryl; Kawaguchi, Sachiko

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to develop and evaluate a new Health-oriented Electronic Oral Health Record that implements the health-oriented status and intervention index. The index takes the principles of holistic oral healthcare and applies them to the design and implementation of the Health-oriented Electronic Oral Health Record. We designed an experiment using focus groups and a consensus (Delphi process) method to develop a new health-oriented status and intervention index and graphical user interface. A comparative intervention study with qualitative and quantitative methods was used to compare an existing Electronic Oral Health Record to the Health-oriented Electronic Oral Health Record, focusing on dentist satisfaction, accuracy, and completeness of oral health status recording. The study was conducted by the dental staff of the Inter-country Center for Oral Health collaborative hospitals in Thailand. Overall, the user satisfaction questionnaire had a positive response to the Health-oriented Electronic Oral Health Record. The dentists found it easy to use and were generally satisfied with the impact on their work, oral health services, and surveillance. The dentists were significantly satisfied with the Health-oriented Electronic Oral Health Record compared to the existing Electronic Oral Health Record (p health information recorded using the Health-oriented Electronic Oral Health Record were 97.15 and 93.74 percent, respectively. This research concludes that the Health-oriented Electronic Oral Health Record satisfied many dentists, provided benefits to holistic oral healthcare, and facilitated the planning, managing, and evaluation of the healthcare delivery system.

  13. Human papillomavirus in the oral cavity of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Raquel dos Santos; de França, Talita Ribeiro Tenório; Ferreira, Dennis de Carvalho; Ribeiro, Camila Maria Beder; Leão, Jair Carneiro; Castro, Gloria Fernanda

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this literature review was to identify studies conducted on the oral Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in children. An electronic database search was performed using the terms 'oral HPV' and 'children'. The studies on the prevalence of oral HPV in children worldwide, descriptive studies, case reports, studies on the association of oral HPV and risk factors and transmission of HPV were included. The presence of HPV in oral mucosa of children should be investigated in virtue of the various forms of transmission, and the possibility of sexual abuse eliminated, and also of its possible relation with oral carcinoma pathogenesis in children. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Efficacy of oral health promotion in primary care practice during early childhood: creating positive changes in parent's oral health beliefs and behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheus, Deborah J

    2014-06-01

    Nurse practitioners frequently provide care to children suffering from poor oral health. Creative approaches to impacting dental disease are needed due to the current lack of traditional dental providers. This study investigated the effects of oral health promotion provided by primary care providers on parental oral health beliefs and behaviors. Participants receiving standard oral care during two well child visits and two additional enhanced oral health visits (n=44) were compared to participants receiving standard oral care during two well child visits alone (n=40). Results revealed changes in parent's perception of the importance of oral care for their children's primary teeth compared to general healthcare needs (pbrushing their children's teeth (pbrushing their teeth (pbrushing (pimportant study shows that oral health programs in primary care can produce changes that can improve oral health outcomes. Parents and children exposed to oral health programs during their frequent well child care visits in the first years of life may help decrease the rate of early childhood caries and improve their quality of life.

  15. The World Oral Health Report 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2003-01-01

    of alcohol. In addition to socio-environmental determinants, oral disease is highly related to these lifestyle factors, which are risks to most chronic diseases as well as protective factors such as appropriate exposure to fluoride and good oral hygiene. Oral diseases qualify as major public health problems......Chronic diseases and injuries are the leading health problems in all but a few parts of the world. The rapidly changing disease patterns throughout the world are closely linked to changing lifestyles, which include diets rich in sugars, widespread use of tobacco, and increased consumption...... is a new strategy for managing prevention and control of oral diseases. The WHO Oral Health Programme has also strengthened its work for improved oral health globally through links with other technical programmes within the Department for Noncommunicable Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. The current...

  16. Mind Conduct disorders in children with poor oral hygiene habits and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children with excessive tooth decay

    OpenAIRE

    Dursun, Onur Burak; ?eng?l, Fatih; Esin, ?brahim Sel?uk; Demirci, Tevfik; Y?cel, Nermin; ?mezli, Mehmet Melih

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dental caries and poor oral hygiene are among the major childhood public health problems. Although dental research frequently refers to the link between these conditions and behavioural issues, little attention has been paid to understanding the reason for oral health problems from a psychiatric point of view. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between poor oral health and hygiene and parental attitudes towards child rearing, parents? and children?s oral hygien...

  17. Oral Health and Erectile Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijendra P; Nettemu, Sunil K; Nettem, Sowmya; Hosadurga, Rajesh; Nayak, Sangeeta U

    2017-01-01

    Ample evidence strongly supports the fact that periodontal disease is a major risk factor for various systemic diseases namely cardio-vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, etc. Recently, investigators focussed on exploring the link between chronic periodontitis (CP) and erectile dysfunction (ED) by contributing to the endothelial dysfunction. Both the diseases share common risk factors. Various studies conducted in different parts of the world in recent years reported the evidence linking this relationship as well as improvement in ED with periodontal treatment. Systemic exposure to the periodontal pathogen and periodontal infection-induced systemic inflammation was thought to associate with these conditions. The objective of this review was to highlight the evidence of the link between CP and ED and the importance of oral health in preventing the systemic conditions.

  18. Oral health and erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijendra P Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ample evidence strongly supports the fact that periodontal disease is a major risk factor for various systemic diseases namely cardio-vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, etc. Recently, investigators focussed on exploring the link between chronic periodontitis (CP and erectile dysfunction (ED by contributing to the endothelial dysfunction. Both the diseases share common risk factors. Various studies conducted in different parts of the world in recent years reported the evidence linking this relationship as well as improvement in ED with periodontal treatment. Systemic exposure to the periodontal pathogen and periodontal infection-induced systemic inflammation was thought to associate with these conditions. The objective of this review was to highlight the evidence of the link between CP and ED and the importance of oral health in preventing the systemic conditions.

  19. Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in oral health among 15-year-old Danish adolescents during 1995-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sengupta, Kaushik; Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Mortensen, Laust Hvas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scandinavian welfare states, despite having better population oral health than less egalitarian societies, are characterized by ubiquitous social gradients and large relative socioeconomic inequalities in oral health. However, trends in these inequalities among Scandinavian children a...

  20. An exploration of the views of Australian mothers on promoting child oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgo-Milton, Monica; Boak, Rachel; Hoare, Alexandria; Gold, Lisa; Waters, Elizabeth; Gussy, Mark; Calache, Hanny; O'Callaghan, Elise; de Silva, Andrea M

    2015-04-17

    An important role for parents and caregivers in the prevention of dental caries in children is the early establishment of health-promoting behaviours. This study aimed to examine mothers' views on barriers and facilitators to promoting child and family oral health. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of mothers (n=32) of young children. Inductive thematic analysis was conducted. Parental knowledge and beliefs, past experiences and child behaviour emerged as major influences on children's oral health. Child temperament and parental time pressures were identified as barriers to good oral health with various strategies reported for dealing with uncooperative children at tooth brushing time. Parental oral health knowledge and beliefs emerged as positive influences on child oral health, however while most mothers were aware of the common causes of dental caries, very few knew of other risk factors such as bedtime feeding. Parents own oral health experiences were also seen to positively influence child oral health, regardless of whether these were positive or negative experiences. Understanding parental oral health beliefs is essential to overcoming barriers, and promoting enablers, for good child oral health. Improving child oral health also requires consideration of child behaviour, family influences, and increasing awareness of lesser-known influencing factors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy of photobiomodulation therapy on masseter thickness and oral health-related quality of life in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria Teresa Botti Rodrigues; Nascimento, Karla Santos; Carazzato, Simone; Barros, Alina Oliveira; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Diniz, Michele Baffi

    2017-08-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) on bilateral masseter muscle thickness and amplitude of mouth opening in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP), and the impact on their oral health-related quality of life (OHRQOL). Three groups were included: experimental CP group (EG: n = 26 with oral complaints), positive control CP group (PCG: n = 26 without complaints), and negative control group (NCG: n = 26 without CP). In the EG, the masseter muscles on both sides were irradiated with an infrared low-level Ga-Al-As laser (λ = 808 ± 3 nm, 120 mW) using a 3 J/cm 2 energy dose per site, with a 20 s exposure time per site (spot area: 4 mm 2 ; irradiance: 3 W/cm 2 ; energy delivery per point: 2.4 J) six times over six consecutive weeks. Masseter thickness, assessed through ultrasonography, and the amplitude of mouth opening were measured in the EG before and after six applications of PBMT and once in the PCG and NCG. The Parental-Caregiver Perception Questionnaire (P-CPQ) was used to evaluate OHRQOL. ANOVA, chi-square, t tests, and multilevel linear regression were used for statistical analysis. In the EG, the study results revealed average increments of 0.77 (0.08) millimeter in masseter thickness (P < 0.05) and 7.39 (0.58) millimeter for mouth opening (P < 0.05) and reduction in all P-CPQ domains (P < 0.001), except for social well-being. The six applications of PBMT increased masseter thickness and mouth opening amplitude and reduced the impact of spastic CP on OHRQOL.

  2. Oral microflora in children with hematologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Vecherkovskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal was a comprehensive study of oral microflora in healthy children and those with hematologic malignancies, based on the analysis of mixed microbial biofilms composition, isolation and identification of new previously unknown microorganisms. The material was obtained in children with hematological diseases in remission, 2–10 years aged, and for the control group from St. Petersburg schoolchildren and in kindergartens. We used microbiological, biochemical and molecular genetic methods, including electron microscopy, proteomic analysis, sequencing and complete genome annotation. Microorganisms of 23 genera isolated as pure cultures and identified by biochemical activity from mixed microbial biofilm derived from saliva of healthy and sick children. In microflora of children with hematologic malignancies a previously unknown type of streptococci with a large number of antibiotic resistance genes was revealed. Differences in oral microbiota composition of healthy children and children with hematological diseases in remission were revealed. The microbiota of children with hematologic malignancies contains more genes controlling antibiotic resistance. Also, it was observed previously unknown bacterium of the genus Streptococcus.

  3. Oral microflora in children with hematologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Vecherkovskaya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal was a comprehensive study of oral microflora in healthy children and those with hematologic malignancies, based on the analysis of mixed microbial biofilms composition, isolation and identification of new previously unknown microorganisms. The material was obtained in children with hematological diseases in remission, 2–10 years aged, and for the control group from St. Petersburg schoolchildren and in kindergartens. We used microbiological, biochemical and molecular genetic methods, including electron microscopy, proteomic analysis, sequencing and complete genome annotation. Microorganisms of 23 genera isolated as pure cultures and identified by biochemical activity from mixed microbial biofilm derived from saliva of healthy and sick children. In microflora of children with hematologic malignancies a previously unknown type of streptococci with a large number of antibiotic resistance genes was revealed. Differences in oral microbiota composition of healthy children and children with hematological diseases in remission were revealed. The microbiota of children with hematologic malignancies contains more genes controlling antibiotic resistance. Also, it was observed previously unknown bacterium of the genus Streptococcus.

  4. Archives: African Journal of Oral Health

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 6 of 6 ... Archives: African Journal of Oral Health. Journal Home > Archives: African Journal of Oral Health. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 6 of 6 Items ...

  5. 4 Myths about Oral Health and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging 4 Myths About Oral Health and Aging Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Is dry mouth a natural part of the aging process? Is tooth decay just kid stuff? Separate ...

  6. Association between psychosocial disorders and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a fact that mind and body share an intimate relationship. There are many ways in which mental and physical health impact each other. Psychosocial factors play a part in the pathogenesis of physical health, and oral health is no exception. Chronic and painful oral symptoms lead to psychosocial disorder and at the same time, some patients with psychosocial disorders experience painful oral and facial symptoms. Several investigators have concluded that psychosocial factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of an array of oral problems, ranging from poor oral hygiene to chronic pain disorders, such as temporomandibular joint disorders, burning mouth syndrome, and atypical pain. This review aims at the in-depth analysis of the correlation between psychosocial disorders and various oral symptoms.

  7. Taking the Pain out of Waiting: The Oral Health Counselling Experiences of Parents of Children with Extensive Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashmore, Aaron W.; Noller, Jennifer; Johnson, Bronwyn; Ritchie, Jan; Blinkhorn, Anthony S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The Tooth Smart Programme is a hospital-based parent-counselling programme established to stabilize existing carious lesions and prevent new caries in children. The purpose of this qualitative study was to: explore participating parents' experiences of and views about parent counselling; identify and describe factors that influence the…

  8. Impact of demographic and clinical variables on the oral health-related quality of life among five-year-old children: a population-based study using self-reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanto, Jenny; Panico, Claudia; Bönecker, Marcelo; Frazão, Paulo

    2018-01-01

    Although SOHO-5 has been validated, there is no study testing this instrument in population-based samples. To evaluate the impact of demographic and oral clinical variables on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in 5-year-old children from a socially deprived Brazilian area using selfreports. Data from 588 children were analyzed. Examinations included untreated dental caries and occlusal deviations. Children answered the Brazilian SOHO-5 version and interviewers collected demographic characteristics of the child (sex and skin color). Robust Poisson regression associated outcome and exposures. General, the oral impacts were reported by 71.1% of children. The mean and standard deviation total score of the Brazilian SOHO-5 were 3.51 and 3.82, respectively. Children with untreated dental caries (PR = 1.28; P = 0.004) and increased overjet (PR = 1.35; P = 0.002) experienced a worse OHRQoL. Dark and mixed skin color children did not have a good impact on their OHRQoL (PR = 1.53; P = 0.006 and PR = 1.44; P < 0.000, respectively) compared to light ones. Untreated dental caries and increased overjet were independently associated with worst OHRQoL in 5-year-old children. As an indication of social deprivation, dark and mixed skin color children compared to light ones presented higher probability for reporting worst OHRQoL independently of the oral clinical conditions. © 2017 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Autism Developmental Profiles and Cooperation with Oral Health Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Rennan Y.; Yiu, Cynthia C. Y.; Wong, Virginia C. N.; McGrath, Colman P.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the associations between autism developmental profiles and cooperation with an oral health screening among preschool children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). A random sample of Special Child Care Centres registered with the Government Social Welfare Department in Hong Kong was selected (19 out of 37 Centres). All preschool…

  10. Relative Influence Of Sociodemographic Variables On Oral Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the results of a study to investigate the relative influence of some sociodemographic variables on oral hygiene and health of primary school children in Ibadan, Nigeria. The pupils were from two different socioeconomic strata of the society and their ages ranged between 7 and 16 years. They were ...

  11. Linking oral health, general health, and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Jacobien M; Hoogstraten, Johan

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the association among oral health, general health, and quality of life (QoL). The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-49) and the RAND-36 were distributed amongst 118 psychology freshmen. Additionally, two single items self-rated general health (SRGH) and self-rated oral health (SROH) - were administered. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to evaluate differences between SRGH and SROH categories, regarding OHIP subscale scores and RAND subscale scores. More than 75% of the subjects rated their oral and general health as good. Mean OHIP scores and RAND scores indicated a relatively good oral- and general health-related QoL respectively. The correlation between oral and general health was weak. Significant differences were found between SRGH categories regarding RAND subscale scores, except for the 'role emotional' and 'mental health' subscales. Significant differences were also found between SROH categories regarding OHIP subscale scores, except for the 'psychological disability' subscale. However, no significant differences were found between SRGH categories regarding OHIP subscale scores, or between SROH categories regarding RAND subscale scores. The findings suggest that oral health, general health, and QoL have different determinants. Furthermore, oral health and general health appear to be mostly unrelated in this seemingly healthy population. It is proposed that if no apparent disease is present, oral and general health must be regarded as separate constructs.

  12. Innovations in oral health: A toolkit for interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, Maria C; Parker, Jessica L; Werrlein, Debra T

    2017-05-01

    The integration of oral health competencies into non-dental health professions curricula can serve as an effective driver for interprofessional education (IPE). The purpose of this report is to describe a replicable oral-health-driven IPE model and corresponding online toolkit, both of which were developed as part of the Innovations in Oral Health (IOH): Technology, Instruction, Practice, and Service programme at Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, USA. Tooth decay is a largely preventable disease that is connected to overall health and wellness, and it affects the majority of adults and a fifth of children in the United States. To prepare all health professionals to address this problem, the IOH model couples programming from the online resource Smiles for Life: A National Oral Health Curriculum with experiential learning opportunities designed for undergraduate and graduate students that include simulation-learning (technology), hands-on workshops and didactic sessions (instruction), and opportunities for both cooperative education (practice) and community-based learning (service). The IOH Toolkit provides the means for others to replicate portions of the IOH model or to establish a large-scale IPE initiative that will support the creation of an interprofessional workforce-one equipped with oral health competencies and ready for collaborative practice.

  13. Linking oral health, general health, and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieffer, J.M.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the association among oral health, general health, and quality of life (QoL). The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-49) and the RAND-36 were distributed amongst 118 psychology freshmen. Additionally, two single items self-rated general health (SRGH) and self-rated

  14. Oral health and elite sport performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, Ian; Ashley, Paul; Fine, Peter; Haddad, Fares; Loosemore, Mike; de Medici, Akbar; Donos, Nikos; Newton, Tim; van Someren, Ken; Moazzez, Rebecca; Jaques, Rod; Hunter, Glenn; Khan, Karim; Shimmin, Mark; Brewer, John; Meehan, Lyndon; Mills, Steve; Porter, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    While the research base is limited, studies have consistently reported poor oral health in elite athletes since the first report from the 1968 Olympic Games. The finding is consistent both across selected samples attending dental clinics at major competitions and more representative sampling of teams and has led to calls from the International Olympic Committee for more accurate data on oral health. Poor oral health is an important issue directly as it can cause pain, negative effects on appearance and psychosocial effects on confidence and quality of life and may have long-term consequences for treatment burden. Self-reported evidence also suggests an impact on training and performance of athletes. There are many potential challenges to the oral health of athletes including nutritional, oral dehydration, exercise-induced immune suppression, lack of awareness, negative health behaviours and lack of prioritisation. However, in theory, oral diseases are preventable by simple interventions with good evidence of efficacy. The consensus statement aims to raise awareness of the issues of oral health in elite sport and recommends strategies for prevention and health promotion in addition to future research strategies. PMID:25263651

  15. [Anthropology and oral health projects in developing countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasveld, A E

    2016-01-01

    The mouth and teeth play an important role in social interactions around the world. The way people deal with their teeth and mouth, however, is determined culturally. When oral healthcare projects are being carried out in developing countries, differing cultural worldviews can cause misunderstandings between oral healthcare providers and their patients. The oral healthcare volunteer often has to try to understand the local assumptions about teeth and oral hygiene first, before he or she can bring about a change of behaviour, increase therapy compliance and make the oral healthcare project sustainable. Anthropology can be helpful in this respect. In 2014, in a pilot project commissioned by the Dutch Dental Care Foundation, in which oral healthcare was provided in combination with anthropological research, an oral healthcare project in Kwale (Kenia) was evaluated. The study identified 6 primary themes that indicate the most important factors influencing the oral health of school children in Kwale. Research into the local culture by oral healthcare providers would appear to be an important prerequisite to meaningful work in developing countries.

  16. Perceived oral health, oral self-care habits and dental attendance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived oral health, oral self-care habits and dental attendance among pregnant women in Benin-City, Nigeria. ... Results: The majority of the respondents (81.7%) rated their oral health as excellent/good using the global oral health rating scale. Seventy one percent of the respondents did not change their oral self-care ...

  17. Oral health benefits of chewing gum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades sugar-free chewing gum has developed in an oral healthcare product, next to the conventional products such as the toothbrush and mouthrinses. In this thesis we investigate the oral health benefits of chewing gum and the effects of additives to chewing gum, such as antimicrobials.

  18. Oral hygiene risk indicators among 6- to 9-year-old Taiwanese aboriginal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hui-Ju; Huang, Shun-Te; Tsai, Chi-Cheng; Chiou, Meng-Jao; Liao, Cheng-Ta

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the dental health status, dietary habits, oral hygiene levels, and caretaker risk indicators among Taiwanese children. This cross-sectional purposive sampling study included 256 aboriginal children, 6 to 9 years old, living in remote regions in southern Taiwan. Participants received dental examinations, and questionnaires were completed by caretakers. Data were analyzed using the χ(2) test, t test, and multiple logistic regressions. The deft (sum of decayed, extracted, and filled primary teeth) and defs (sum of the decayed, extracted, and filled primary dentition surfaces) indices were affected by the frequencies of drinking sweetened beverages (P = .0006) and daily toothbrushing (P = .0032). Caretakers' toothbrushing frequency was a significant predictor of children's oral hygiene status (P oral hygiene was 2.04 (P = .0184). Oral hygiene among aboriginal children in this study was inadequate. Caretakers' toothbrushing frequency and betel quid habit were significant predictors of poor children's oral hygiene. © 2012 APJPH.

  19. Description of oral motoric disorders in 2-4 years old children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossa Ayu Sabilah

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral motor disorders, such as speech and swallowing disorders, often occur in children. Generally parents complain that children refuse to eat hard food, drooling excess, and unable to speak clearly. Oral motor disturbance can occur due to the unavailability of maturation of oral motor structure. This study was aimed to determine the description of oral motor disturbance in children aged 2-4 years in some Integrated Health Service (Posyandu in Bandung. Methods: Descriptive research with cross sectional design. The study was conducted on 100 parents who came to six posyandu in Bandung by using questionnaires through guided interviews by researchers. Samples were taken using multistage random sampling technique. The results will be presented in tabular form and assessed using Arikunto standard criteria. Results: The results showed a low percentage in oral motor disturbances. Indicators of oral motor disturbance in children aged 2 - 4 years included in either category. As for children who have oral motor disorders exhibit various manifestations. Conclusion: The description of oral motor disorders in children aged 2 - 4 years in Posyandu in Bandung was shown by various manifestations. Based on the number of populations taken, oral motor disorders in children aged 2-4 years included into either category.

  20. Building oral health research infrastructure: the first national oral health survey of Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John P; Isyagi, Moses; Ntaganira, Joseph; Gatarayiha, Agnes; Pagni, Sarah E; Roomian, Tamar C; Finkelman, Matthew; Steffensen, Jane E M; Barrow, Jane R; Mumena, Chrispinus H; Hackley, Donna M

    2018-01-01

    Oral health affects quality of life and is linked to overall health. Enhanced oral health research is needed in low- and middle-income countries to develop strategies that reduce the burden of oral disease, improve oral health and inform oral health workforce and infrastructure development decisions. To implement the first National Oral Health Survey of Rwanda to assess the oral disease burden and inform oral health promotion strategies. In this cross-sectional study, sample size and site selection were based on the World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Surveys Pathfinder stratified cluster methodologies. Randomly selected 15 sites included 2 in the capital city, 2 other urban centers and 11 rural locations representing all provinces and rural/urban population distribution. A minimum of 125 individuals from each of 5 age groups were included at each site. A Computer Assisted Personal Instrument (CAPI) was developed to administer the study instrument. Nearly two-thirds (64.9%) of the 2097 participants had caries experience and 54.3% had untreated caries. Among adults 20 years of age and older, 32.4% had substantial oral debris and 60.0% had calculus. A majority (70.6%) had never visited an oral health provider. Quality-of-life challenges due to oral diseases/conditions including pain, difficulty chewing, self-consciousness, and difficulty participating in usual activities was reported at 63.9%, 42.2% 36.2%, 35.4% respectively. The first National Oral Health Survey of Rwanda was a collaboration of the Ministry of Health of Rwanda, the University of Rwanda Schools of Dentistry and Public Health, the Rwanda Dental Surgeons and Dental (Therapists) Associations, and Tufts University and Harvard University Schools of Dental Medicine. The international effort contributed to building oral health research capacity and resulted in a national oral health database of oral disease burden. This information is essential for developing oral disease prevention and management

  1. Diabetes mellitus and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common non-communicable chronic diseases, which is the combined action of genetic factors, environmental factors and lifestyle. Specific conditions occur in the oral cavity in the course of diabetes that cause changes in all oral tissues with different symptoms and signs. Increased salivary glucose level is followed by increased accumulation of dental plaque and decreased resistance to noxious agents. The most common oral manifestations in diabetic patients include higher prevalence of periodontal desease, burning mouth syndrome, disruption in salivary flow, opportunistic infections, higher prevalence of denture stomatitis, oral lichen planus, fissured tongue, angular cheilitis etc. Dental interventions in patients with well-controlled diabetes are not different from those applied to nondiabetic patients. Regular monitoring of these patients is required because of the complications that can occur.

  2. Oral health literacy and oral health outcomes in an adult population in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Marília Jesus; Lawrence, Herenia Procopio; Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosário de

    2017-07-26

    To investigate the association between critical and communicative oral health literacy (OHL) and oral health outcomes (status, oral health-related quality of life and practices) in adults. This cross-sectional study examined a household probability sample of 248 adults, representing 149,635 residents (20-64 years old) in Piracicaba-SP, Brazil. Clinical oral health and socioeconomic and demographic data, as well as data on oral health-related quality of life (OHIP-14) and health practices were collected. The oral examinations were carried out in the participants' homes, using the World Health Organization criteria for oral diseases. The critical and communicative OHL instrument was the primary independent variable, and it was measured using five Likert items that were dichotomized as 'high' ('agree' and 'strongly agree' responses for the 5 items) and 'low' OHL. Binary and multinomial logistic regressions were performed on each outcome (oral health status and practices), controlling for age, sex and socioeconomic status (SES). Approximately 71.5% presented low OHL. When adjusted for age and sex (first model) low OHL was associated with untreated caries (Odds Ratio = 1.92, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.07-3.45), tooth brushing oral health impact on quality of life (OR = 2.06, 1.15-3.69). Adjusting for age, sex and SES, OHL is related to a risk factor (biofilm) and a consequence of poor oral health (emergency dental visits) and can interfere with the impact of oral diseases on quality of life. As low OHL can be modified, the results support oral health promotion strategies directed at improving critical and communicative oral health literacy in adult populations.

  3. Oral Health Equals Total Health: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Yap

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Oral health is essential to total health and satisfactory quality of life. According to the World Health Organization (2012, oral health has been defined as a state of being free of mouth and facial pain, oral infections and sores, and oral and other diseases that limit an individual’s capacity in biting, chewing, smiling, speaking, and psychosocial well-being. Oral conditions like dental caries and periodontal (gum disease continue to plague humanity. Nearly all adults have existing tooth decay, and severe gum disease occurs in 15 to 20% of middle-aged adults. The adverse effects of inadequate care for teeth, gums, bite, and jaws can move beyond the mouth to affect overall physical and psychological health. Research has indicated that poor oral health may be associated with medical conditions such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, pneumonia, and other respiratory diseases. It has also been linked to pre-term births and low-birth-weight babies. Jaw problems are also a common cause of headaches and ear and facial pain. Dental clearance prior to medical treatment, including cancer/bisphosphonate therapy and cardiac surgery, minimizes both oral and systemic complications. Many medical conditions have oral manifestations, and some medications have side effects that lead to compromised oral health as well as jaw function disabilities. This paper summarizes and highlights the importance of oral-systemic connections. In addition, the features of common dental problems are discussed. 

  4. Oral health status, salivary pH status, and Streptococcus mutans counts in dental plaques and saliva of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Romina; Jabbarifar, Ebrahim; Ghasemi, Elnaz; Akkafzadeh, Elahe; Poursaeid, Elmira

    2017-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), accounting for 23% of all malignancies in children, is the most prevalent pediatric malignancy. This study compared dental caries, oral hygiene status, salivary pH, and Streptococcus mutans counts in dental plaques and saliva of children with leukemia with those of healthy controls. This case-control cross-sectional study assessed 32 children with ALL and 32 healthy children (4-9-year-old) for gingival bleeding index (GBI), decayed, missing, and filled/decayed, missing, and filled surfaces (DMF/dmfs), and plaque index (PI). Sampling was performed to determine salivary pH and S. mutans counts of the participants. The two groups matched in terms of age, gender, and socioeconomic status. The groups were compared using independent t-test, Mann-Whitney test, Chi-square test, and Spearman's and Pearson's correlation analyses. The mean DMF/dmfs and GBI were significantly higher in the ALL group (P DMF / dmfs = 0.03; P GBI = 0.04). However, the two groups were not significantly different in the mean PI values ( P = 0.47). The mean S. mutans counts in dental plaques and saliva of the children with leukemia were significantly lower than the healthy controls ( P salivary pH was significantly lower in the ALL group compared to the control group ( P salivary pH, and cumulative effects of other risk factors highlight the significance of oral hygiene training programs (for the parents of these children) and regular dental examinations for these children.

  5. Child oral health concerns amongst parents and primary care givers in a Sure Start local programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, B; Clarke, W; McEvoy, W; Periam, K; Zoitopoulos, L

    2010-09-01

    To conduct an oral health promotion needs assessment amongst parents and primary care givers of pre-school children in a South East London Sure Start Local Programme (SSLP). To explore the oral health concerns and oral health literacy with regard to children's oral health amongst parents and primary care givers in a South East London SSLP. A qualitative study using four in-depth focus groups with a purposive sample of 20 participants. Data were analysed using the framework method. The SSLP was identified as an important source of information, support and social interaction for participants. Participants rated the informal networks of the programme as equally authoritative as other formal sources of information. Oral health concerns included: introducing healthy eating, establishing tooth brushing, teething and access to dental care. While participants had adequate knowledge of how to prevent oral disease they cited many barriers to acting on their knowledge which included: parents' tiredness, lack of confidence in parenting skills, confusing information, widespread availability of sugary foods and drinks, and lack of local child friendly dentists. Parenting skills and the social support provided by the SSLP appeared to be integral to the introduction of positive oral health behaviours. SSLPs were seen as a trusted source of support and information for carers of pre-school children. Integration of oral health promotion into SSLPs has the potential to tap into early interventions which tackle the wider support needs of carers of pre-school children while also supporting the development of positive oral health behaviours.

  6. Islamic fasting and oral health and diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Javadzadeh Blouri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fasting is a religious obligation, which can be challenging for individuals with oral conditions due to its stringent code of conduct. Moreover, food abstinence during fasting can restrict oral feeding even further in patients whose nutrition has been already compromised. Previous research has mainly concentrated on oral hygiene and gum health, disregarding orodental conditions and diseases. This highlights the importance of further research in this regard. In this paper, we intended to clarify the correlation between fasting and oral injections, bleeding following tooth extraction, and brushing to overcome common misconceptions which indicate the breach of religious disciplines under such circumstances. We also aimed to determine the grave effects of fasting on health in case of severe immunological deficiencies, chronic oral ulcers and certain drug administration protocols for those with rigid religious beliefs.

  7. To assess the self-reported oral health practices, behaviour and oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-03

    Oct 3, 2017 ... in order to improve referral of pregnant women, oral health awareness and dental service utilization among pregnant women in the region. Keywords: oral health practices, oral health status, pregnant women, traditional birth attendant clinics, Nigerian rural community. 17. African Journal of Oral Health.

  8. Effect of different oral hygiene measures on oral malodor in children aged 7-15 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyusha S Patil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effect of various oral hygiene measures individually and in combination in reducing oral malodor. Materials and Methods: A total number of 120 children diagnosed as having oral malodor (oral malodor scores 2 and above were included in the study. Children were then grouped under four oral hygiene categories (tooth brushing, tongue cleaning, mouth rinsing, and a combination group. There were 30 children in each group. The children were asked to perform oral hygiene methods individually and in combination. The children were then reassessed for oral malodor 2 h later. The results were analyzed and compared. Results: Both individual oral hygiene measure or in combination of tooth brushing, tongue cleaning, and mouth rinsing; all were effective in reducing oral malodor. Significant reduction (P < 0.05 in oral malodor was seen when all three oral hygiene measures performed together. Conclusion: Oral malodor was significantly reduced after performing oral hygiene measures individually, but reduced more when used in combination.

  9. Addressing the oral healthcare needs of special needs children: pediatric nurses' self-perceived effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Carrigan L; Singer, Richard; Abel, Stephen; Metsch, Lisa R

    2014-01-01

    To examine the oral health knowledge and practices of pediatric nurses who coordinate healthcare services for special needs children and to identify those factors that influenced their perceived effectiveness in managing their patients' oral health needs. Self-reported data were collected from 376 nurses employed at Children's Medical Services who responded to an online survey. Likert scale scores were used to specifically assess the nurses' perceived effectiveness in addressing the oral health needs of special needs children. Characteristics significantly associated with special needs pediatric nurses who described themselves as "effective or very effective" included: the self-perception of being very knowledgeable about basic oral health, receiving four or more hours of continuing education training, and securing dental appointments for the majority of their pediatric special needs patients with minimal waiting times. Findings reveal that oral health knowledge significantly influenced nurses' perceived effectiveness in addressing the oral health needs of special needs children, as well as their ability to secure timely dental appointments. These results support the need to incorporate oral health education into nursing curricula and expand upon the dental workforce available and willing to treat disabled patients. © 2013 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. World Health Organization global policy for improvement of oral health--World Health Assembly 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2008-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Global Oral Health Programme has worked hard over the past five years to increase the awareness of oral health worldwide as an important component of general health and quality of life. Meanwhile, oral disease is still a major public health problem in high income...... countries and the burden of oral disease is growing in many low- and middle income countries. In the World Oral Health Report 2003, the WHO Global Oral Health Programme formulated the policies and the necessary actions for the improvement of oral health. The strategy is that oral disease prevention...... and the promotion of oral health needs to be integrated with chronic disease prevention and general health promotion as the risks to health are linked. The World Health Assembly (WHA) and the Executive Board (EB) are supreme governance bodies of WHO and for the first time in 25 years oral health was subject...

  11. Happiness, subjective and objective oral health status, and oral health behaviors among Korean elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun-Seo; Kim, Hae-Young; Patton, Lauren L; Chun, Jin-Ho; Bae, Kwang-Hak; Lee, Mi-Ok

    2013-10-01

    This study aims to comprehensively assess the association of subjective and objective oral health status and oral health behaviors with happiness, under consideration of demographic, socioeconomic, and general health-related factors. This study also aims to test whether subjective oral health outcomes are better predictors of happiness compared with objective oral health outcomes. The data were collected from 479 community-dwelling elders aged 65 years or over selected by a cluster sampling method. A questionnaire and an oral examination were implemented. A multiple regression method was conducted to assess associations with happiness index (HI). The mean age of the elders was 74.6 years. Mean (standard deviation, SD) HI, EuroQol-visual analog scale (EQ-VAS) and 14-item oral health impact profile (OHIP-14) index were 5.7 (SD 2.3), 59.8 (SD 21.1), and 16.3 (SD 13.1). In the final model, a significant association with HI of the OHIP-14 index (P = 0.091) among all the participants and significant associations of oral symptoms (P = 0.038), wearing a removable denture (P = 0.039), and of the oral health behavior of daily toothbrushing (P = 0.007) among poorer oral health QoL group were confirmed under consideration of other related factors. While correlations of HI to subjective measures of health, EQ-VAS and OHIP-14 score were moderate to weak, those to objective measures of health were only weak or insignificant. Oral impacts which might persistently affect one's daily life need to be considered in designing and delivering public services aimed to promote people's happiness. With oral health impacts and behaviors accounting for 10% of happiness among elders, public and community services for the elderly that support oral health and daily toothbrushing for the dentate are critical for the well-being of our elders. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Oral health of female prisoners in HMP Holloway: implications for oral health promotion in UK prisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouxel, P.; Duijster, D.; Tsakos, G.; Watt, R.G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study describes the oral health status and associated risk factors in a sample of female prisoners and compares their oral health to that of the female population from the 2009 Adult Dental Health Survey. Method A random sample of prisoners was selected from HMP Holloway, London.

  13. Tobacco and oral health--the role of the world health organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2003-01-01

    on a groundbreaking public health treaty to control tobacco supply and consumption. The treaty covers tobacco taxation, smoking prevention and treatment, illicit trade, advertising, sponsorship and promotion, and product regulation. Oral health professionals and dental associations worldwide should consider......In addition to several other chronic diseases, tobacco use is a primary cause of many oral diseases and adverse oral conditions. For example, tobacco is a risk factor for oral cancer, periodontal disease, and congenital defects in children whose mothers smoke during pregnancy. The epidemic...... this platform for their future work for tobacco prevention since in several countries they play an important role in communication with patients and communities. The WHO Oral Health Programme gives priority to tobacco control in many ways through the development of national and community programmes which...

  14. Tobacco and oral health--the role of the world health organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2003-01-01

    In addition to several other chronic diseases, tobacco use is a primary cause of many oral diseases and adverse oral conditions. For example, tobacco is a risk factor for oral cancer, periodontal disease, and congenital defects in children whose mothers smoke during pregnancy. The epidemic of tobacco use is one of the greatest threats to global health; sadly the future appears worse because of the globalization of marketing. The World Health Organization (WHO) has strengthened the work for effective control of tobacco use. At the World Health Assembly in May 2003 the Member States agreed on a groundbreaking public health treaty to control tobacco supply and consumption. The treaty covers tobacco taxation, smoking prevention and treatment, illicit trade, advertising, sponsorship and promotion, and product regulation. Oral health professionals and dental associations worldwide should consider this platform for their future work for tobacco prevention since in several countries they play an important role in communication with patients and communities. The WHO Oral Health Programme gives priority to tobacco control in many ways through the development of national and community programmes which incorporates oral health and tobacco issues, tobacco prevention through schools, tobacco risk assessment in countries, and design of modern surveillance systems on risk factors and oral health. Systematic evaluation of coordinated efforts should be carried out at country and inter-country levels.

  15. Comparing medical and dental providers of oral health services on early dental caries experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Ashley M; Rozier, R Gary; Preisser, John S; Stearns, Sally C; Weinberger, Morris; Lee, Jessica Y

    2014-07-01

    Most state Medicaid programs reimburse nondental primary care providers (PCPs) for providing preventive oral health services to young children. We examined the association between who (PCP, dentist, or both) provides these services to Medicaid enrollees before age 3 years and oral health at age 5 years. We linked North Carolina Medicaid claims (1999-2006) to oral health surveillance data (2005-2006). Regression models estimated oral health status (number of decayed, missing, and filled primary teeth) and untreated disease (proportion of untreated decayed teeth), with adjustment for relevant characteristics and by using inverse-probability-of-treatment weights to address confounding. We analyzed data for 5235 children with 2 or more oral health visits from a PCP, dentist, or both. Children with multiple PCP or dentist visits had a similar number of overall mean decayed, missing, and filled primary teeth in kindergarten, whereas children with only PCP visits had a higher proportion of untreated decayed teeth. The setting and provider type did not influence the effectiveness of preventive oral health services on children's overall oral health. However, children having only PCP visits may encounter barriers to obtaining dental treatment.

  16. Influência do ambiente familiar sobre a saúde bucal de crianças: uma revisão sistemática Influence of family environment on children's oral health: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rogéria Freire de Castilho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Envolver modelos atuais e comprovações científicas sobre a influência de comportamentos de saúde bucal dos pais na cárie dentária de suas crianças. FONTES: Artigos do MEDLINE publicados entre 1980 e junho de 2012. Foram analisados artigos de pesquisa originais tratando do comportamento dos pais quanto à saúde bucal. Um total de 218 citações foi analisado e 13 artigos foram incluídos na análise. Os estudos foram considerados elegíveis para análise se atendessem aos seguintes critérios de inclusão: (1 avaliassem uma possível associação entre cáries dentárias e o comportamento dos pais relacionado à saúde bucal; e (2 se a metodologia do estudo incluísse exame clínico bucal. Os principais termos de pesquisa foram "saúde bucal", "atitudes dos pais", "conhecimento dos pais" e "cáries dentárias". RESUMO DOS ACHADOS: Ao todo, 13 estudos experimentais contribuíram com dados para a síntese. Também foram considerados trabalhos, revisões e capítulos originais em livros didáticos. CONCLUSÃO: Os hábitos de saúde dental dos pais influenciam a saúde bucal de seus filhos. São necessários programas de educação em saúde bucal com ações preventivas para proporcionar não apenas saúde bucal adequada às crianças, mas também uma melhor qualidade de vida. Deve ser dada atenção especial a toda a família, com relação a seu estilo de vida e hábitos relacionados à saúde bucal.OBJECTIVE: To review current models and scientific evidence on the influence of parents' oral health behaviors on their children's dental caries. SOURCES: MEDLINE articles published between 1980 and June, 2012. Original research articles on parents' oral health behavior were reviewed. A total of 218 citations were retrieved, and 13 articles were included in the analysis. The studies were eligible for review if they matched the following inclusion criteria: (1 they evaluated a possible association between dental caries and parents

  17. Ecstasy (MDMA) and oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Dun, S.N.; Nieuw Amerongen, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), more commonly known as 'ecstasy' or XTC, is frequently used by young adults in the major cities. Therefore, it is likely that dentists might be confronted with individuals who use ecstasy. This review describes systemic and oral effects of ecstasy.

  18. Exploration of the relationship between parent/guardian sociodemographics, intention, and knowledge and the oral health status of their children/wards enrolled in a Central Florida Head Start Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherwax, J A; Bray, K K; Williams, K B; Gadbury-Amyot, C C

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify possible relationships between parent/guardian sociodemographics, intention, knowledge, and the oral health status of their child/ward. Intention includes three factors as defined in the Theory of Planned Behavior: attitudes, subjective norms and perceived control, and oral health status was measured by decayed, missing and filled teeth (dmft) scores. A convenience sample of parent/guardian with child/ward with age of three to five (n = 181 dyads) enrolled in a Head Start program in the state of Florida participated. A cross-sectional observational study comprised of two components, parent/guardian questionnaire and an oral health status form for recording dmft scores of participating child/ward was employed. Parent/guardian race/ethnicity and years of education were significantly related to dmft of child/ward. The highest rates of severe early childhood caries (ECC) were found in child/ward whose parent/guardian is Hispanic and parent/guardian with less than a high school education. Multivariate regression analysis found that increased education level of parent/guardian was significantly associated with lower dmft in this population. No significant relationship was found between parent/guardian self-reported intention (attitudes, subjective norms and perceived control), knowledge and dmft scores of the child/ward. Researchers have called for greater attention to the impact of parental influences in the aetiology of ECC. Results from this study were consistent with current studies where parent/guardian race/ethnicity and educational level served as predictors of oral health status of children. In this study population, parent/guardian intention and knowledge were not shown to significantly impact the oral health status of their child/ward. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Evaluation of an oral health education session for Early Head Start home visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatt, Kevin; Okunseri, Christopher; Flanagan, Diane; Simpson, Pippa; Cao, Yumei; Willis, Earnestine

    2016-06-01

    Home visiting programs promote the education and health of Early Head Start (EHS) children and pregnant women. However, EHS's oral health component is unevenly implemented. We conducted an educational intervention to improve oral health knowledge and motivational interviewing techniques among Wisconsin EHS home visitors. A questionnaire assessing oral health-related knowledge and confidence was administered to home visitors before and after an educational session. Changes between pre/post-responses were analyzed with McNemar's test and Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. After the intervention there were increases in both knowledge and confidence related to oral health communication. Knowledge increases were observed in such topics as fluoridation, dental caries, and caregivers' role in assisting and supervising children's tooth brushing. A brief educational intervention was associated with increased home visitor knowledge and confidence in communicating oral health messages to EHS caregivers and pregnant women. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  20. Oral health awareness, practices and status of patients with diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty-five (24.5%) knew that diabetes could worsen oral health condition and only 3 (2.1%) could correctly explain the association between diabetes and oral health conditions. Forty-three (30.1%) had participated in an oral health education program focused on diabetes and oral health. The majority (88.6%) had calculus ...

  1. Associations between Indigenous Australian oral health literacy and self-reported oral health outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamieson Lisa M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To determine oral health literacy (REALD-30 and oral health literacy-related outcome associations, and to calculate if oral health literacy-related outcomes are risk indicators for poor self-reported oral health among rural-dwelling Indigenous Australians. Methods 468 participants (aged 17-72 years, 63% female completed a self-report questionnaire. REALD-30 and oral health literacy-related outcome associations were determined through bivariate analysis. Multivariate modelling was used to calculate risk indicators for poor self-reported oral health. Results REALD-30 scores were lower among those who believed teeth should be infrequently brushed, believed cordial was good for teeth, did not own a toothbrush or owned a toothbrush but brushed irregularly. Tooth removal risk indicators included being older, problem-based dental attendance and believing cordial was good for teeth. Poor self-rated oral health risk indicators included being older, healthcare card ownership, difficulty paying dental bills, problem-based dental attendance, believing teeth should be brushed infrequently and irregular brushing. Perceived need for dental care risk indicators included being female and problem-based dental attendance. Perceived gum disease risk indicators included being older and irregular brushing. Feeling uncomfortable about oro-facial appearance risk indicators included problem-based dental attendance and irregular brushing. Food avoidance risk indicators were being female, difficulty paying dental bills, problem-based dental attendance and irregular brushing. Poor oral health-related quality of life risk indicators included difficulty paying dental bills and problem-based dental attendance. Conclusions REALD-30 was significantly associated with oral health literacy-related outcomes. Oral health literacy-related outcomes were risk indicators for each of the poor self-reported oral health domains among this marginalised population.

  2. Development of oral health in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Samuel J

    2003-01-01

    Around 80% of African communities can be considered to be materially deprived. The presence of widespread poverty and underdevelopment in Africa means that communities are increasingly exposed to all of the major environmental determinants of oral disease. Previous approaches to oral health in Africa have failed to recognize the epidemiological priorities of the region or identify reliable and appropriate strategies to address them. Efforts have consisted of providing unplanned, ad hoc and spasmodic curative oral health services, which in most cases are poorly distributed and only reach affluent or urban communities. Realizing the limited impact of existing strategies, the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa (WHO/AFRO) developed a regional oral health strategy to assist African countries and their partners in identifying priorities and planning preventive-oriented programmes, particularly at the district level. The long-term objective is to provide equitable and universal access to cost-effective quality oral healthcare and thereby significantly reduce the incidence of oral diseases in Africa. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Assessment of relationship between oral health behavior, oral hygiene and gingival status of dental students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsheen Lalani

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Thus, it is concluded that there is a significant relationship between the oral health behavior, oral hygiene, and gingival status of dental students. Dental students with better self-reported oral health behavior had lower plaque and gingival scores indicating a better attitude toward oral health.

  4. Preventive oral health practices of school pupils in Southern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folayan, Morenike O; Khami, Mohammad R; Onyejaka, Nneka; Popoola, Bamidele O; Adeyemo, Yewande Isabella

    2014-07-07

    One of the goals of the World Health Organisation goal is to ensure increased uptake of preventive oral self-care by 2020. This would require the design public health programmes that will ensure children place premium on preventive oral health care uptake. One effort in that direction is the need for countries to define baseline measures on use of preventive oral self-care measures by their population as well as identify factors that impact on its use. This study aims to determine the prevalence and the impact of age and sex on the use of recommended oral self-care measures by pupils in Southern Nigeria. Pupils age 8 to 16 years (N = 2,676) in two urban sites in Southern Nigeria completed a questionnaire about recommended oral self-care (use of fluoridated toothpaste, flossing, regularity of consuming sugary snacks between main meals), time of the last dental check-up and cigarette smoking habit. Chi square was used to test association between age (8-10years, 11-16 years), sex, and use of recommended oral self-care. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of use of recommended oral self-care. Only 7.8% of the study population practiced the recommended oral self-care. Older adolescents had an 8.0% increased odds (OR: 1.08; CI:0.81-1.43; p = 0.61) and males had a 20.0% decreased odds (OR: 0.80; CI:0.60-1.06; p = 0.12) of practicing recommended oral self-care though observed differences were not statistically significant. Very few respondents (12.7%) had visited the dental clinic for a check-up in the last one year. Majority of the respondents (92.2%) were non-smokers. The use of a combination of oral self-care approaches was very low for this study population. Age and sex were predictive factors for the use of components of the oral self-care measures but not significant predictors of use of recommended oral self-care. Future studies would be required to understand 'why' and 'how' age and sex impacts on the use of caries

  5. Oral health in patients with liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard Grønkjær, Lea; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    frequently (P=0.001), more rarely brushed teeth (P=0.001) and had problems with oral dryness (68 vs. 14%, P=0.0001). The patients’ mean OHIP score was 5.21±7.2, with the most commonly reported problems being related to taste and food intake. An association was observed between the OHIP score and the patients...... Services Research report on the Danish population’s dental status. Results: One hundred and seven patients participated. Their oral care habits and self-perceived oral health were poorer than the Danish population; the patients had fewer teeth (on average 19 vs. 26, P=0.0001), attended the dentist less...... importance. Our results emphasize the need for measures to protect and improve the oral health of cirrhosis patients....

  6. Prebiotics and Probiotics and Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurman, J. H.

    The first part of this chapter describes the unique characteristics of the mouth with special emphasis on the oral microbiota. Next, the highly prevalent dental diseases are briefly described together with more rare but still important diseases and symptoms of the mouth. Prevention and treatment of oral and dental diseases are also discussed focusing on aspects considered important with respect to the potential application of prebiotics and probiotics. The second part of the chapter then concentrates on research data on prebiotics and probiotics in the oral health perspective, ending up with conclusions and visions for future research.

  7. Assessment of parental oral health knowledge and behaviors among American Indians of a Northern Plains tribe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anne; Brega, Angela G; Batliner, Terrence S; Henderson, William; Campagna, Elizabeth J; Fehringer, Karen; Gallegos, Joaquin; Daniels, Dallas; Albino, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Investigate the relationship between sociodemographic variables and oral health knowledge and behaviors of American Indian (AI) parents as the initial step in a program aimed at reducing caries experience among AI children. Survey data were collected from a sample of 147 AI parents of children ages 0-7 years who are residents of a Northern Plains reservation. Questions addressed sociodemographic variables for parents/their children and parent oral health knowledge and behavior. Overall knowledge was measured as percentage of items answered correctly. Overall behavior was measured as percentage of items reflecting behavior consistent with accepted oral health recommendations. Oral health knowledge and behaviors, and the relationship between them, were evaluated across groups defined by quartiles. Parent sociodemographic variables were not significantly associated with behavior scores. Female gender, higher level of education, and higher income were significantly and positively associated with mean knowledge scores. Behavior and knowledge scores were significantly correlated. On average, survey participants identified the best answer for 75 percent of knowledge items and engaged in 58 percent of optimal oral health behaviors. Participants in higher oral health knowledge quartiles had greater adherence with recommended oral health behaviors than those in lower quartiles. Surveyed AI parents had reasonably high levels of knowledge about oral health and caries prevention for their children but engaged at relatively lower levels in parental behaviors necessary to promote oral health. Strategies focused on behavior change, rather than knowledge alone, may be most likely to affect oral health outcomes for AI children. © 2013 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  8. Conhecimentos e práticas em saúde bucal com crianças hospitalizadas com câncer Knowledge and practices of oral health on hospitalized children with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline May Barbosa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar os conhecimentos e práticas em saúde bucal (SB com crianças hospitalizadas com câncer. A amostra foi composta pela equipe de enfermagem, cuidadores e crianças. Foi aplicado um questionário relacionado ao conhecimento geral sobre SB, métodos e instrumentos utilizados para a higiene oral (HO e dados socioeconômicos. Baseado nos resultados, quem realiza a HO das crianças são os cuidadores (90,7%, que receberam orientações da equipe de enfermagem em 21,4% dos casos. Com relação ao desconforto na cavidade bucal, a equipe de enfermagem reportou que todos apresentaram manifestações clínicas, enquanto apenas 62,8% dos cuidadores reportaram casos. Todos os participantes consideram importante haver um CD no setor de oncologia. Pôde-se concluir que não existe um protocolo de cuidados com a higiene bucal de crianças hospitalizadas com câncer e que as manifestações bucais mais frequentes entre os pacientes em tratamento antineoplásico foram: mucosite, enjoos, vômitos, xerostomia e ausência de paladar.The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and practices of oral health (OH in hospitalized children with cancer. The sample was composed by the nurse team, caretakers and children. It was applied a questionnaire concerning the general knowledge about OH, methods and instruments used for oral hygiene (OH. According to the results, the responsible of OH of children are the caretakers (90.7% who receive instructions from the nurse team in 21.4% of cases. As for the oral cavity discomfort, the nurse team reported that all patients exhibited clinical manifestations while the caretakers reported a different number, 62.8% of cases. All participants considered important having a dentist in the oncology sector. According to the results obtained, it was possible to conclude that there is no oral health protocol for hospitalized children with cancer and that the most frequent oral manifestations among

  9. The importance of family functioning, mental health and social and emotional well-being on child oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzaho, A M N; de Silva-Sanigorski, A

    2014-07-01

    To examine the strength of associations between child oral health and aspects of the home environment (child behaviour, parental psychological distress and family functioning) in a large sample of 1- to 12-year-old Australian children. The current study used data from the 2006 Victorian Child Health and Wellbeing Study. Data were obtained on 4590 primary carers. Measures of the family environment included the level of family functioning, parental psychological distress, child's emotion and behavioural problems and the family structure. The odds of children having good oral health status were lower with increasing parental psychological distress and poor family functioning across all age groups, and lower with increasing child mental health or conduct problems among children aged 4 years or older. Socioeconomic factors were also related to child oral health status, but this was significant only among children aged 4-7 years, with the odds of children having good oral health status 68% higher in households with a yearly income ≥AUD$ 60 000 compared with households with income family functioning and the mental health of parents and children into existing systems reaching vulnerable community members may improve child oral health outcomes and reduce the unequal distribution of oral disease across the social gradient. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Self-Esteem, Oral Health Behaviours, and Clinical Oral Health Status in Chinese Adults: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Luzy Siu-Hei; Chan, Joanne Chung-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This is an exploratory study to examine the relations among self-esteem, oral health behaviours and clinical oral health status in Chinese adults. In addition, gender differences in clinical oral health status and oral health behaviours were explored. Methods: Participants were 192 patients from a private dental clinic in Hong Kong…

  11. Personal responsibility in oral health: ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertsen, Andreas

    2012-11-30

    Personal responsibility is a powerful idea supported by many values central to West European thought. On the conceptual level personal responsibility is a complex notion. It is important to separate the concept of being responsible for a given state of affairs from the concept of holding people responsible by introducing measures that decrease their share of available resources. Introducing personal responsibility in oral health also has limitations of a more practical nature. Knowledge, social status and other diseases affect the degree to which people can be said to be responsible for their poor oral health. These factors affect people's oral health and their ability to take care of it. Both the conceptual and practical issues at stake are not reasons to abandon the idea of personal responsibility in oral health, but they do affect what the notion means and when it is reasonable to hold people responsible. They also commit people who support the idea of personal responsibility in oral health to supporting the idea of societal responsibility for mitigating the effects of factors that diminish people's responsibility and increase the ava