WorldWideScience

Sample records for children reduces classroom

  1. Reducing children's classroom sitting time using sit-to-stand desks: findings from pilot studies in UK and Australian primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemes, Stacy A; Barber, Sally E; Bingham, Daniel D; Ridgers, Nicola D; Fletcher, Elly; Pearson, Natalie; Salmon, Jo; Dunstan, David W

    2016-09-01

    This research examined the influence of sit-to-stand desks on classroom sitting time in primary school children. Pilot controlled trials with similar intervention strategies were conducted in primary schools in Melbourne, Australia, and Bradford, UK. Sit-to-stand desks replaced all standard desks in the Australian intervention classroom. Six sit-to-stand desks replaced a bank of standard desks in the UK intervention classroom. Children were exposed to the sit-to-stand desks for 9-10 weeks. Control classrooms retained their normal seated desks. Classroom sitting time was measured at baseline and follow-up using the activPAL3 inclinometer. Thirty UK and 44 Australian children provided valid activPAL data at baseline and follow-up. The proportion of time spent sitting in class decreased significantly at follow-up in both intervention groups (UK: -9.8 ± 16.5% [-52.4 ± 66.6 min/day]; Australian: -9.4 ± 10% [-43.7 ± 29.9 min/day]). No significant changes in classroom sitting time were observed in the UK control group, while a significant reduction was observed in the Australian control group (-5.9 ± 11.7% [-28.2 ± 28.3 min/day]). Irrespective of implementation, incorporating sit-to-stand desks into classrooms appears to be an effective way of reducing classroom sitting in this diverse sample of children. Longer term efficacy trials are needed to determine effects on children's health and learning. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. The effect of increased classroom ventilation rate indicated by reduced CO2 concentration on the performance of schoolwork by children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, S; Jensen, K L; Pedersen, A L S; Rasmussen, H S

    2016-06-01

    The article reports on an experiment which investigated the effect of increased classroom ventilation rate on the performance of children aged 10-12 years. The experiment was executed at two different schools (two classrooms at each school) as a double-blind 2 × 2 crossover intervention where four different performance tests were used as surrogates for short-term concentration and logical thinking. Only complete pairs of test responses were included in the within-subject comparisons of performance, and data were not corrected for learning and fatigue effects. Analysis of the total sample suggested the number of correct answers was improved significantly in four of four performance test, addition (6.3%), number comparison (4.8%), grammatical reasoning (3.2%), and reading and comprehension (7.4%), when the outdoor air supply rate was increased from an average of 1.7 (1.4-2.0) to 6.6 l/s per person. The increased outdoor air supply rate did not have any significant effect on the number of errors in any of the performance tests. Results from questionnaires regarding pupil perception of the indoor environment, reported Sick Building Syndrome symptoms, and motivation suggested that the study classroom air was perceived more still and pupil were experiencing less pain in the eyes in the recirculation condition compared to the fresh air condition.

  3. Classroom interventions for children with ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Yvonne; Gaastra, Geraldina F.; Tucha, Lara I.; Tucha, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    In a typical classroom, children are instructed to remain seated, perform independent seatwork and follow teachers’ instructions. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may find these classroom demands particularly difficult to adhere to because, by definition, children with A

  4. Helping Children Understand Routines and Classroom Schedules. What Works Briefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrosky, M. M.; Jung, E. Y.; Hemmeter, M. L.; Thomas, D.

    Studies have documented that schedules and routines influence children's emotional, cognitive, and social development. Predictable and consistent schedules in preschool classrooms help children feel secure and comfortable. Also, schedules and routines help children understand the expectations of the environment and reduce the frequency of behavior…

  5. Classroom Observation of Potential Special Education Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forness, Steven R.

    The present study is a portion of a larger study dealing with early identification of children with potential learning or behavioral difficulties. Specifically, the purpose of this phase of the project was (1) to refine classroom observation techniques and procedures and (2) to collect classroom observation data on children in regular classes who…

  6. Predictable Books in the Children's EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linse, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the use for ELT young learners of predictable stories and books. These stories and books originally written for native English speaking children are finding their way into classrooms for second and foreign language learners. This genre can be used to help native English speaking children as well as children learning English…

  7. Developing Children's Classroom Listening Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Rebecca; Anderson, Patricia

    1993-01-01

    Argues that classroom activities offer excellent opportunities for students to become listeners. Discusses how teachers can model good listening, teach skill and strategy lessons, and provide meaningful reasons for listening. (SR)

  8. The contribution of children's self-regulation and classroom quality to children's adaptive behaviors in the kindergarten classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Curby, Tim W; Grimm, Kevin J; Nathanson, Lori; Brock, Laura L

    2009-07-01

    In this study, the authors examined the extent to which children's self-regulation upon kindergarten entrance and classroom quality in kindergarten contributed to children's adaptive classroom behavior. Children's self-regulation was assessed using a direct assessment upon entrance into kindergarten. Classroom quality was measured on the basis of multiple classroom observations during the kindergarten year. Children's adaptive classroom behavior in kindergarten was assessed through teacher report and classroom observations: Teachers rated children's cognitive and behavioral self-control and work habits during the spring of the kindergarten year; observers rated children's engagement and measured off-task behavior at 2-month intervals from November to May. Hierarchical linear models revealed that children's self-regulation upon school entry in a direct assessment related to teachers' report of behavioral self-control, cognitive self-control, and work habits in the spring of the kindergarten year. Classroom quality, particularly teachers' effective classroom management, was linked to children's greater behavioral and cognitive self-control, children's higher behavioral engagement, and less time spent off-task in the classroom. Classroom quality did not moderate the relation between children's self-regulation upon school entry and children's adaptive classroom behaviors in kindergarten. The discussion considers the implications of classroom management for supporting children's early development of behavioral skills that are important in school settings.

  9. Classroom Writing Environments and Children's Early Writing Skills: An Observational Study in Head Start Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenyi; Hur, Jinhee; Diamond, Karen E.; Powell, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the classroom writing environment in 31 Head Start classrooms, and explored the relations between the writing environment, children's (N = 262) name-writing, and children's letter knowledge using pathway analysis. Our analyses showed that Head Start classrooms provided opportunities (i.e., writing materials and teachers'…

  10. Classroom Writing Environments and Children's Early Writing Skills: An Observational Study in Head Start Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenyi; Hur, Jinhee; Diamond, Karen E.; Powell, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the classroom writing environment in 31 Head Start classrooms, and explored the relations between the writing environment, children's (N = 262) name-writing, and children's letter knowledge using pathway analysis. Our analyses showed that Head Start classrooms provided opportunities (i.e., writing materials and teachers'…

  11. Dimensions of Children's Classroom Behavior as Perceived by Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Daniel; Kendall, Arthur J.

    A study was conducted to ascertain which dimensions of children's classroom behavior are seen to be important by teachers and how accurate teachers' perceptions are of children's behavior in terms of such dimensions. Teachers in six suburban fourth-grade classrooms rated classroom behavior of each of their students (105 boys and 78 girls) using…

  12. Thinking through children's literature in the classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Torres, Agustín; Soler-Pardo, Betlem

    2014-01-01

    This book is the result of understanding literature as a central part of children's education. Fiction and nonfiction literary works constitute a source to open young minds and to help them understand how and why people - themselves included - live as they do, or to question through critical lenses whether they could live otherwise. By integrating philological, cultural, and pedagogical inquiries, Thinking through Children's Literature in the Classroom approaches the use of literature as a crucial factor to motivate students not only to improve their literacy skills, but also to develop their

  13. Classroom Labels That Young Children Can Use: Enhancing Biliteracy Development in a Dual Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Gonzalez, Irasema; Arreguin-Anderson, Maria G.; Alanís, Iliana

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on biliteracy development of English and Spanish through the practical strategy of systematically labeling the classroom within the context of daily classroom activities and providing children with various opportunities to use the words throughout the day. Using the foundational work related to classroom labels from Pinnell…

  14. Coexistence, Classroom Climate and Philosophy for Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Romero Izarra

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the relationship between the classroom’s social climate and the general climate of society in which the school is inserted. We consider essential to start from this reflection in order to define an educational process for social transformation. Philosophy for Children is a methodological option to improve this social climate as it offers teachers and pupils a potentially transforming work that deepens into the values of human relationships for people who are concerned with what happens around them. These are the foundations for democratic relations and a positive classroom social climate.

  15. Classroom Centers for Multiple Handicapped Children 1972-1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigsby, Camilla

    The Classroom Centers for Multiple Handicapped Children were designed to provide profoundly retarded children with instructional programs meeting individual needs. In addition to the educational and training components of the program, speech and physical therapy services were also included. Seven classroom centers served approximately 56 children…

  16. Classroom Pivotal Response Teaching for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahmer, Aubyn C.; Suhrheinrich, Jessica; Reed, Sarah; Schreibman, Laura; Bolduc, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    This practical manual and accompanying DVD-ROM present a research-supported behavioral intervention for children with autism that teachers can easily integrate into their existing classroom curriculum. Classroom Pivotal Response Teaching (CPRT) enhances children's motivation and participation in learning; increases the number of learning…

  17. The Effects of Classroom Interventions on Off-Task and Disruptive Classroom Behavior in Children with Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Meta-Analytic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaastra, Geraldina F; Groen, Yvonne; Tucha, Lara; Tucha, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often exhibit problem behavior in class, which teachers often struggle to manage due to a lack of knowledge and skills to use classroom management strategies. The aim of this meta-analytic review was to determine the effectiveness of several types of classroom interventions (antecedent-based, consequence-based, self-regulation, combined) that can be applied by teachers in order to decrease off-task and disruptive classroom behavior in children with symptoms of ADHD. A second aim was to identify potential moderators (classroom setting, type of measure, students' age, gender, intelligence, and medication use). Finally, it was qualitatively explored whether the identified classroom interventions also directly or indirectly affected behavioral and academic outcomes of classmates. Separate meta-analyses were performed on standardized mean differences (SMDs) for 24 within-subjects design (WSD) and 76 single-subject design (SSD) studies. Results showed that classroom interventions reduce off-task and disruptive classroom behavior in children with symptoms of ADHD (WSDs: MSMD = 0.92; SSDs: MSMD = 3.08), with largest effects for consequence-based (WSDs: MSMD = 1.82) and self-regulation interventions (SSDs: MSMD = 3.61). Larger effects were obtained in general education classrooms than in other classroom settings. No reliable conclusions could be formulated about moderating effects of type of measure and students' age, gender, intelligence, and medication use, mainly because of power problems. Finally, classroom interventions appeared to also benefit classmates' behavioral and academic outcomes.

  18. Integrating Technology Into Classroom Instructions for Reduced Misconceptions in Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maizam Alias

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Misconceptions in statistics among students of non-statistics major are quite common. This paper will present the humble efforts of the author in trying to reduce misconceptions among her statistics students using technology. The examples were drawn from the teaching and learning of statistics to Master of Technical and Vocational Education students in the Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia. EXCEL spreadsheet, power point presentation slides and a concept-mapping tool were integrated into classroom instructions on descriptive statistics. Increased class-room interactions were observed through out the learning process and a decrease in the percentage of students committing the specific misconceptions were recorded.

  19. Teacher characteristics, social classroom relationships, and children's social, emotional, and behavioral classroom adjustment in special education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeman, L.D.; Wubbels, T.; van Lier, P.A.C.; Verhulst, F.C.; van der Ende, J.; Maras, A.; Hopman, J.A.B.; Tick, Nouchka

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore relations between teacher characteristics (i.e., competence and wellbeing); social classroom relationships (i.e., teacher–child and peer interactions); and children's social, emotional, and behavioral classroom adjustment. These relations were explored at both t

  20. Authenticity in the Language Classroom and Beyond: Children and Adolescent Learners. TESOL Classroom Practice Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas-Whitney, Maria, Ed.; Rilling, Sarah, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This volume in the TESOL Classroom Practice Series presents instructional practices that are particularly successful with children and adolescent language learners. These practices take into account the unique needs and characteristics of these age groups and reflect a wide range of educational contexts, goals, and challenges from classrooms in…

  1. Teacher characteristics, social classroom relationships, and children's social, emotional, and behavioral classroom adjustment in special education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeman, L.D.; Wubbels, T.; van Lier, P.A.C.; Verhulst, F.C.; van der Ende, J.; Maras, A.; Hopman, J.A.B.; Tick, Nouchka

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore relations between teacher characteristics (i.e., competence and wellbeing); social classroom relationships (i.e., teacher–child and peer interactions); and children's social, emotional, and behavioral classroom adjustment. These relations were explored at both t

  2. A Comparison of Response Cost and Differential Reinforcement of Other Behavior to Reduce Disruptive Behavior in a Preschool Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyers, Carole; Miltenberger, Raymond; Maki, Amber; Barenz, Rebecca; Jurgens, Mandy; Sailer, Angela; Haugen, Meredith; Kopp, Brandon

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of response cost and differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) in reducing the disruptive behaviors of 25 children in a preschool classroom. Using an alternating treatments design, disruptive behavior was reduced when the participants earned tokens for the absence of disruptive behavior (DRO) or…

  3. catering for children with special needs in the regular classroom

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elizabeth Egbochuku

    are overcrowded and over populated with little or no attention paid to the special child. Furthermore ... children who cannot benefit maximally from the regular classroom teaching/learning ... done by parents, teachers, siblings and classmates.

  4. Educating children with learning disabilities in Foxfire classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugelmass, J W

    1995-11-01

    Because every classroom in American schools contains heterogeneous groups of students, inclusion is more than an issue of concern just for special educators. This article provides examples of elementary classrooms that have adopted the Foxfire approach to instruction as a means of developing learning communities that serve all children. The teachers who are described turned to learner-centered instruction not as a method to promote the inclusion of children with learning disabilities, but, rather, as a means of providing optimal learning experiences for all their students. The rationale for developing elementary classrooms that are learner-centered communities is explored, and specific examples of instructional approaches are provided.

  5. Instructions, feedback, and reinforcement in reducing activity levels in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, J L; Suran, B G; Stevens, T M; Kupst, M J

    1979-01-01

    The biomotometer, an electronic device which simultaneously measures motor activity and provides auditory feedback, was used in combination with material reinforcers in an experiment to reduce children's activity level in a classroom setting. Subjects were nine boys and two girls, aged 9--13, from a day hospital program for emotionally disturbed children. After five baseline trials, each child had five contingent reinforcement trials in which he/she received feedback "beeps" from the biomotometer and was given toy or candy rewards after each trial in which activity fell at least 20% below mean baseline level. Then five noncontingent reinforcement trials were run in which children received rewards for wearing the apparatus without the feedback attachment. Results indicated that the intervention "package," including instructions, feedback, and contingent reinforcement, was successful in all five trials for 8 of 11 children. Activity levels increased during the final noncontingent phase.

  6. Reducing bullying and victimization: student- and classroom-level mechanisms of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarento, Silja; Boulton, Aaron J; Salmivalli, Christina

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the mediating mechanisms by which the KiVa antibullying program, based on the Participant Role approach, reduces bullying and victimization among elementary school students. Both student-level mechanisms leading to reduced perpetration of bullying and classroom-level mechanisms leading to reductions in bullying and victimization are considered. Analyses are based on a sample of 7,491 students (49.5% boys) nested within 421 classrooms within 77 schools. At the beginning of program implementation, the children were in Grades 4, 5, and 6 (mean age 11.3 years). Multilevel structural equation modeling was used to analyze whether changes in the hypothesized mediators accounted for later reductions in the outcomes. At the student level, antibullying attitudes and perceptions regarding peers' defending behaviors and teacher attitudes toward bullying mediated the effects of KiVa on self-reported bullying perpetration. The effects on peer-reported bullying were only mediated by antibullying attitudes. At the classroom level, the program effects on both self- and peer-reported bullying were mediated by students' collective perceptions of teacher attitudes toward bullying. Also, perceived reinforcing behaviors predicted bullying but did not emerge as a significant mediator. Finally, bullying mediated the effects of the classroom-level factors on victimization. These findings enhance knowledge of the psychosocial developmental processes contributing to bullying and victimization and shed light on the key mechanisms by which school bullying can successfully be counteracted.

  7. Storytime: Young Children's Literary Understanding in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipe, Lawrence R.

    2007-01-01

    The author draws on his own extensive research in urban classrooms to present a grounded theoretical model of young children's understanding of picture storybooks. Advancing a much broader and deeper theory of literary understanding, the author suggests that children respond in five different ways during picture storybook readalouds; that these…

  8. Elementary School Teachers' Reflections on Shy Children in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosacki, Sandra Leanne; Coplan, Robert J.; Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Hughes, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    This study explored teachers' perceptions of shy children in the classroom during the elementary school grades. Seven teachers (1 male, 6 female) from elementary schools located in geographically diverse areas of Canada participated in semistructured telephone interviews that explored their perceptions of and experiences with shy children in the…

  9. Developing Children's Language Awareness: Switching Codes in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoll, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how learning an additional language can positively affect children's opinions and feelings about languages and how this process can be enriched when different languages--namely, the additional language and the children's L1s--are present and used in the classroom in an informed way. It is hypothesised that this will benefit…

  10. Classroom performance of children with cochlear implants in mainstream education.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, G.W.J.A.; Oever-Goltstein, M.H. van den; Langereis, M.C.; Chute, P.M.; Mylanus, E.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We compared classroom performance of children with a cochlear implant (CI) with that of their normal-hearing peers in mainstream education. METHODS: Thirty-two CI children in mainstream education, congenitally or prelingually deaf, participated in this study, as did 37 hearing classmates

  11. Children of Divorce: The Impact on Classroom Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Kevin Seiji

    This paper presents research on the influence of divorce on the classroom behavior of school-aged children. It attempts to uncover some contributing factors that may play a role in how a child deals with divorce. It explores the role of the teacher and school in the intervention and discusses what teachers have observed in working with children of…

  12. The Influence of Classroom Layout on Children's English Learning Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林琬媚

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, more and more Children English Training organization developed, all the parents and teachers also want to improve the children's English. So the parents will find the organization where the teachers are better in teaching. They will motive a lot of imagine and acquire many information which you can not know. If we can care more about this point from the children, may be it also can help children to learn English well. This essay aims at how does classroom Layout influence the children to learn English well and let the children love this environment.

  13. A comparison of response cost and differential reinforcement of other behavior to reduce disruptive behavior in a preschool classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyers, Carole; Miltenberger, Raymond; Maki, Amber; Barenz, Rebecca; Jurgens, Mandy; Sailer, Angela; Haugen, Meredith; Kopp, Brandon

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of response cost and differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) in reducing the disruptive behaviors of 25 children in a preschool classroom. Using an alternating treatments design, disruptive behavior was reduced when the participants earned tokens for the absence of disruptive behavior (DRO) or lost tokens for the occurrence of disruptive behavior (response cost). Initially, DRO was more successful in reducing the number of disruptive behaviors; however, over time, response cost proved to be more effective.

  14. A comparison of response cost and differential reinforcement of other behavior to reduce disruptive behavior in a preschool classroom.

    OpenAIRE

    Conyers, Carole; Miltenberger, Raymond; Maki, Amber; Barenz, Rebecca; Jurgens, Mandy; Sailer, Angela; Haugen, Meredith; Kopp, Brandon

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of response cost and differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) in reducing the disruptive behaviors of 25 children in a preschool classroom. Using an alternating treatments design, disruptive behavior was reduced when the participants earned tokens for the absence of disruptive behavior (DRO) or lost tokens for the occurrence of disruptive behavior (response cost). Initially, DRO was more successful in reducing the number of disruptive behavi...

  15. Children's Problem Behaviour and Techniques to Classroom Management: A Case Study of a Preschool Classroom in Klang Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarulzaman, Wirawani binti; Zhi Siew, Pang

    2015-01-01

    Classroom management is a skill that every teacher should be equipped well with. Although it is common for children to misbehave once in a while in classrooms, inability for teachers to handle the situation will make the problem behaviour worsen. The study explores some of the problem behaviour that occurred in a classroom in a preschool at Klang…

  16. Teacher practices as predictors of children's classroom social preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Amori Yee; Griggs, Marissa Swaim; Reuland, Meg M; Gregory, Anne

    2012-02-01

    Students who do not get along with their peers are at elevated risk for academic disengagement and school failure. Research has predominantly focused on factors within such children that contribute to their peer problems. This study considers whether teacher practices also predict social preference for children in that classroom. Participants were 26 elementary school teachers and 490 students in their classrooms followed for one school year. Results suggested that teachers who favored the most academically talented students in the fall had classrooms where children had lower average social preference in the spring after statistical control of children's fall social preference and externalizing behavior problems. Teachers who demonstrated emotionally supportive relationships with students in the fall had classrooms where children had greater possibility of changing their social preference from fall to spring. Although children with high externalizing behaviors tended to experience declining social preference over the course of the school year, teachers' learner-centered practices attenuated this progression. However, teachers' favoring of the most academically talented accentuated the negative relation between externalizing behaviors and social preference. Implications for school psychology practitioners are discussed.

  17. The Effects of Classroom Interventions on Off-Task and Disruptive Classroom Behavior in Children with Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Meta-Analytic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldina F Gaastra

    Full Text Available Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD often exhibit problem behavior in class, which teachers often struggle to manage due to a lack of knowledge and skills to use classroom management strategies. The aim of this meta-analytic review was to determine the effectiveness of several types of classroom interventions (antecedent-based, consequence-based, self-regulation, combined that can be applied by teachers in order to decrease off-task and disruptive classroom behavior in children with symptoms of ADHD. A second aim was to identify potential moderators (classroom setting, type of measure, students' age, gender, intelligence, and medication use. Finally, it was qualitatively explored whether the identified classroom interventions also directly or indirectly affected behavioral and academic outcomes of classmates. Separate meta-analyses were performed on standardized mean differences (SMDs for 24 within-subjects design (WSD and 76 single-subject design (SSD studies. Results showed that classroom interventions reduce off-task and disruptive classroom behavior in children with symptoms of ADHD (WSDs: MSMD = 0.92; SSDs: MSMD = 3.08, with largest effects for consequence-based (WSDs: MSMD = 1.82 and self-regulation interventions (SSDs: MSMD = 3.61. Larger effects were obtained in general education classrooms than in other classroom settings. No reliable conclusions could be formulated about moderating effects of type of measure and students' age, gender, intelligence, and medication use, mainly because of power problems. Finally, classroom interventions appeared to also benefit classmates' behavioral and academic outcomes.

  18. Variation in Children's Classroom Engagement Throughout a Day in Preschool: Relations to Classroom and Child Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, Virginia E.; Booren, Leslie M.; Downer, Jason T.; Williford, Amanda P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined sources of variability in preschool children's positive and negative engagement with teachers, peers, and tasks, and how that variability was related to both classroom activity settings (e.g., teacher-structured time, outdoor time, transitions) and child factors (age, gender). Participants were 283 socioeconomically and…

  19. Just Clowning Around: Classroom Perspectives on Children's Humour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobday-Kusch, Jody; McVittie, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Using a post-structural, interpretive perspective, we studied children's humour in a grade-1 and -2 classroom. In this article, we report our observations of two boys who took on the role of "class clown." The boys used humour to negotiate power, which we defined as participation in discourse, taking on the role of class clowns and…

  20. Operating Classroom Aesthetic Reading Environment to Raise Children's Reading Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Mei-Ju; Cheng, Jui-Ching; Cheng, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to explore how preschool educators understand about raising children's reading motivation through operating classroom aesthetic reading environment. With one year qualitative research, sixteen 4-6 years old young were observed and interviewed. The first stage interviews were undergone with environmental guidance. After the…

  1. Behaviors of Children Referred by Classroom Teachers as Hyperactive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shecket, Susan M.; Shecket, William C.

    In this study, a classroom observation technique was employed to examine the behaviors of a group of teacher-referred hyperactive children in order to determine the frequency of specific behaviors exhibited. The purpose behind the study was the further investigation of behavioral observation and intervention techniques used by other researchers as…

  2. Classroom-to-Home Connections: Young Children's Experiences with a Technology-Based Parent Involvement Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Bridget A.; Cromer, Heidi; Weigel, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: DVD classroom newsletters are one proposed technology tool to promote classroom-to-home connections. The present study explored the experiences of prekindergarten children from predominantly Spanish-speaking homes with bilingual (English and Spanish) DVD classroom newsletters. On average, parents reported that children watched…

  3. Elephant in the classroom helping children learn and love maths

    CERN Document Server

    Boaler, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Why do millions struggle with mathematics and what can be done to change that for the next generation? Jo Boaler outlines what has gone wrong in mathematics education, identifying the problems facing children in classrooms today. How can children be prepared for the mathematics they will need in the future? They need to be taught to be quantitatively literate, to think flexibly and creatively and how to problem solve. Jo Boaler offers concrete solutions for parents and teachers that will revolutionise children's experiences with maths. Drawing on Jo Boaler's work with Carol Dweck, demon

  4. Reducing Sugar in Children's Diets: Why? How?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Cosby S.; Morris, Sandra S.

    1986-01-01

    Maintains that sugar intake should be reduced in young children's diets because of its link to dental cavities, poor nutrition, and obesity. Reducing the focus on sweetness, limiting sugar consumption, and using natural sources of sweetness and other treats are ways to help reduce sugar intake. (BB)

  5. Effective Classroom Assessment for Children's Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志红

    2004-01-01

    Formative assessment is a new concept introduced to the English teachers in China by the National English Curriculum (NEC). Its main feature is to provide quick feedback to promote learning and improve teaching, compared with summative assessment. Mostly, formative assessment is implemented during teaching practice. It should be a part of teaching and learning process. So far as it is concerned, teachers play a very important role. They should be able to decide or select what to be assessed and how to assess in classroom teaching. Thus, the focus of this article is to show them the practical ways to reach the goal, i.e. how to implement formative assessment more effectively.

  6. Children's Reasoning as Collective Social Action through Problem Solving in Grade 2/3 Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijung

    2016-01-01

    Research on young children's reasoning show the complex relationships of knowledge, theories, and evidence in their decision-making and problem solving. Most of the research on children's reasoning skills has been done in individualized and formal research settings, not collective classroom environments where children often engage in learning and reasoning together to solve classroom problems. This study posits children's reasoning as a collective social activity that can occur in science classrooms. The study examined how children process their reasoning within the context of Grade 2/3 science classrooms and how the process of collectivity emerges from classroom interactions and dialogue between children as they attempt to solve their classroom problems. The study findings suggest that children's reasoning involves active evaluation of theories and evidence through collective problem solving, with consensus being developed through dialogical reasoning.

  7. Children Writing Ethnography: Children's Perspectives and Nomadic Thinking in Researching School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohti, Riikka

    2016-01-01

    This article makes a connection between narrative ethnography, childhood studies and new materialist theories in studying children's perspective on school. It presents "children writing ethnography" as an approach based on complexity and involving participatory research. The question of "what is happening in the classroom" is…

  8. Television Violence: An Intervention to Reduce Its Impact on Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkoetter, Lawrence I.; Rosenkoetter, Sharon E.; Acock, Alan C.

    2008-01-01

    In an attempt to minimize the adverse effects of television violence, the authors implemented a classroom-based intervention with 496 children in 32 classrooms (grades 1 to 4). The intervention consisted of 28 brief lessons conducted by university staff over the course of 7 months. Participants were individually interviewed prior to the…

  9. Television Violence: An Intervention to Reduce Its Impact on Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkoetter, Lawrence I.; Rosenkoetter, Sharon E.; Acock, Alan C.

    2008-01-01

    In an attempt to minimize the adverse effects of television violence, the authors implemented a classroom-based intervention with 496 children in 32 classrooms (grades 1 to 4). The intervention consisted of 28 brief lessons conducted by university staff over the course of 7 months. Participants were individually interviewed prior to the…

  10. Psychophysiological Characteristics and School Performance of Children in Open and Traditional Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Lynne Sanford; Farley, Frank H.

    1982-01-01

    Children in open and traditional classrooms were observed and tested on physiological and performance measures. The children were categorized into subgroups according to their arousal level. Analyses of variance revealed that performance of high-arousal children in open classrooms decreased over time in contrast to all other subgroups. (Author/AL)

  11. Children's Play Behavior During Board Game Play in Korea and America Kindergarten Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kee-Young

    2005-01-01

    This study explored Korean and American children's play behaviors during board games in a kindergarten classroom using an ethnographic approach. The Korean participants were 20 children and one teacher of one classroom at attached kindergarten of public elementary school. The American participants were 11 kindergarten children and one teacher from…

  12. Enhancing Social Behavior of Children with Autism in an Inclusive Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Though laws relating to including children on the autism spectrum and general education in public school settings are in place, inclusion of students is still not a widespread practice in all elementary classrooms. This study examines the social needs of children with autism and in an inclusive classroom. Children with autism are often placed in…

  13. Prediction of Children's Academic Competence from Their Effortful Control, Relationships, and Classroom Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Carlos; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Swanson, Jodi; Reiser, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined the relations among children's effortful control, school relationships, classroom participation, and academic competence with a sample of 7- to 12-year-old children (N = 264). Parents and children reported on children's effortful control, and teachers and children reported on children's school relationships and classroom…

  14. Enhancing Children's Prosocial Behavior in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Daniel; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A program designed to enhance children's prosocial development was conducted in three suburban elementary schools for five years. Findings for students from kindergarten through grade four emphasize the need for supportive teacher-student relationships and opportunities for student decision making, autonomy, and collaborative interaction. (TJH)

  15. Creating a Caring Classroom with Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamme, Linda Leonard; McKinley, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Based on one teacher's experiences with children's books that have caring themes, ways for teachers to nurture preschoolers' natural altruism are discussed. An annotated bibliography of books on caring for the sick, the disadvantaged, special friends, neighbors, siblings, parents and grandparents, people in distress, the environment, and animals…

  16. Differential Effectiveness of Interdependent and Dependent Group Contingencies in Reducing Disruptive Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Kelsey; Gresham, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Disruptive behavior in the classroom negatively affects all students' academic engagement, achievement, and behavior. Group contingencies have been proven effective in reducing disruptive behavior as part of behavior interventions in the classroom. The Good Behavior Game is a Tier 1 classwide intervention that utilizes an interdependent group…

  17. Improving the classroom listening skills of children with Down syndrome by using sound-field amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennetts, Lee K; Flynn, Mark C

    2002-03-01

    Many children with Down syndrome have fluctuating conductive hearing losses further reducing their speech, language and academic development. It is within the school environment where access to auditory information is crucial that many children with Down syndrome are especially disadvantaged. Conductive hearing impairment which is often fluctuating and undetected reduces the child's ability to extract the important information from the auditory signal. Unfortunately, the design and acoustics of the classroom leads to problems in extracting the speech signal through reduced speech intensity due to the increased distance of the student from the teacher in addition to masking from excessive background noise. One potential solution is the use of sound-field amplification which provides a uniform amplification to the teacher's voice through the use of a microphone and loudspeakers. This investigation examined the efficacy of sound-field amplification for 4 children with Down syndrome. Measures of speech perception were taken with and without the sound-field system and found that the children perceived significantly more speech in all conditions where the sound-field system was used (p classroom success.

  18. Associations among Preschool Children's Classroom Literacy Environment, Interest and Engagement in Literacy Activities, and Early Reading Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroody, Alison E.; Diamond, Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the relations among the classroom literacy environment, children's interest and engagement in literacy activities, and children's early reading skills in a sample of 167 children aged 4 and 5 years enrolled in 31 Head Start classrooms. Researchers rated the classroom literacy environment. Teachers reported on children's…

  19. Examining How and Why Children in My Transitional Kindergarten Classroom Engage in Pretend Gunplay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    This self-study of pretend gunplay in my Transitional Kindergarten (TK) classroom was designed to guide me in not only improving my practice within the classroom, but also informing the development of sound classroom policies related to pretend gun-and-weapons play that balance children's developmental needs with my commitment to peace and…

  20. Children's Agreement on Classroom Social Networks: Cross-Level Predictors in Urban Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, Elise; Neal, Jennifer Watling; Sahu, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Informed by research on interpersonal perception, peer relationships, and classroom climate, this study examines predictors of children's agreement with classmates on their classroom social networks. Social network data, peer nominations of positive behavior, and classroom observations were collected from 418 second-grade to fourth-grade children…

  1. Children's Agreement on Classroom Social Networks: Cross-Level Predictors in Urban Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, Elise; Neal, Jennifer Watling; Sahu, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Informed by research on interpersonal perception, peer relationships, and classroom climate, this study examines predictors of children's agreement with classmates on their classroom social networks. Social network data, peer nominations of positive behavior, and classroom observations were collected from 418 second-grade to fourth-grade children…

  2. Everyone's Included: Supporting Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Responsive Classroom Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterman, Kathleen G.; Sapona, Regina H.

    2002-01-01

    This case study discusses how Jon, a boy with autism, was fully included into general education classrooms in grades K-2 that implemented tenets of the "Responsive Classroom." The guiding principles of a responsive classroom approach, benefits for children with autism, and the need for collaboration among professionals are discussed.…

  3. Reducing Children's Littering on a Nature Trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHart, David E.; Bailey, Jon S.

    1975-01-01

    This study compared incentives and educational methods to motivate children to pick up litter and to prevent littering. Incentives did aid in getting litter picked up. One-sentence anti-litter statements, educational materials, and lectures reduced littering, but incentives did not. (MR)

  4. The Social Networks of Children With and Without Disabilities in Early Childhood Special Education Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Lin, Tzu-Jung; Justice, Laura; Sawyer, Brook

    2017-09-01

    Interaction with peers is an important contributor to young children's social and cognitive development. Yet, little is known about the nature of social networks within preschool inclusive classrooms. The current study applied a social network analysis to characterize children's peer interactions in inclusive classrooms and their relations with children's disability status. The participants were 485 preschoolers from 64 early childhood special education (ECSE) inclusive classrooms. Results from teachers' report of children's social networks showed that children with disabilities formed smaller play networks compared to their typically developing peers in the classroom, but no evidence indicated that children with disabilities engaged in more conflict networks than their counterparts. Children's play and conflict networks were segregated by children's disability status.

  5. The effects of exergaming on physical activity among inactive children in a physical education classroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fogel, Victoria A; Miltenberger, Raymond G; Graves, Rachel; Koehler, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    ... on the reinforcing effects of video games to increase physical activity in children. This study evaluated the effects of exergaming on physical activity among 4 inactive children in a physical education (PE) classroom...

  6. A speech perception test for children in classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijoo, Sergio; Fernandez, Santiago; Alvarez, Jose Manuel

    2002-11-01

    The combined effects of excessive ambient noise and reverberation in classrooms interfere with speech recognition and tend to degrade the learning process of young children. This paper reports a detailed analysis of a speech recognition test carried out with two different children populations of ages 8-9 and 10-11. Unlike English, Spanish has few minimal pairs to be used for phoneme recognition in a closed set manner. The test consisted in a series of two-syllable nonsense words formed by the combination of all possible syllables in Spanish. The test was administered to the children as a dictation task in which they had to write down the words spoken by their female teacher. The test was administered in two blocks on different days, and later repeated to analyze its consistency. The rationale for this procedure was (a) the test should reproduce normal academic situations, (b) all phonological and lexical context effects should be avoided, (c) errors in both words and phonemes should be scored to unveil any possible acoustic base for them. Although word recognition scores were similar among age groups and repetitions, phoneme errors showed high variability questioning the validity of such a test for classroom assessment.

  7. Identity Revealed through Talk among Young Language-Minority Children in Norwegian Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydland, Veslemoy; Aukrust, Vibeke Grover

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated the ethnic identity development of Turkish-speaking children in Norwegian preschool and first-grade classrooms, examining how they made their ethnicity interactionally relevant in everyday talk. Classroom conversations and interviews revealed their interest in ethnic diversity. The manner in which the children talked about…

  8. An Inclusive Classroom? A Case Study of Inclusiveness, Teacher Strategies, and Children's Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilholm, Claes; Alm, Barbro

    2010-01-01

    A case study of what appears to be an inclusive classroom in Sweden is reported. The group of children in the class studied was very heterogeneous: five of the 15 children had a disability diagnosis at the time of the study. One aim of the study was to develop a methodology which can be used in order to investigate in what sense classrooms are…

  9. Differential Use of the Open Classroom: A Study of More and Less Exploratory Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuchin, Patricia P.

    This grant application describes the theoretical background and research design of a project intended to study the interaction between children's styles of functioning and the opportunities and requirements of an open classroom environment. A major assumption to be tested is that exploratory children function more effectively in open classrooms.…

  10. "Who's the Boss?" Young Children's Power and Influence in an Early Childhood Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Joo; Recchia, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    Using classroom observations and teacher interviews, this study examined how three young children, considered classroom leaders by their teachers, created complex dilemmas for their teachers through their interactions with teachers and peers. Findings showed that the children's powerful influence on their peers could be both positive and negative,…

  11. Classroom quality at pre-kindergarten and kindergarten and children's social skills and behavior problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuizen, Martine L.; Mokrova, Irina L.; Burchinal, Margaret R.; Garrett-Peters, Patricia T.

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on the continuity in the quality of classroom environments as children transition from preschool into elementary school, this study examined the associations between classroom quality in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten and children's social skills and behavior problems in kindergarten and

  12. An Eco-Behavioral Analysis of Children's Engagement in Urban Public School Preschool Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Douglas R.; Burchinal, Margaret R.; File, Nancy; Kontos, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to identify particular group configurations and teacher behaviors that co-occurred with children's active engagement in public school early childhood classrooms for 4-year-olds. Children (N=138, 52% boys) were observed using a time sampling method in 12 classrooms in 12 urban schools serving students from…

  13. Handwriting in 2015: A Main Occupation for Primary School-Aged Children in the Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, Emily; Roberts, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Historically, handwriting is a skill acquired by children in the classroom. The relevance of this skill today is currently debated due to advances in technology. A nonexperimental time-series design investigated how much time Australian primary school children spend on handwriting in the classroom. A second aim investigated how much time was spent…

  14. Young African American Children Constructing Academic and Disciplinary Identities in an Urban Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Justine M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I offer a framework for exploring the academic and disciplinary identities young African American children construct in urban science classrooms. Using interviews, fieldnotes, and videotapes of classroom lessons, I juxtapose the ways in which two children tell about their experiences in school and science with their performances of…

  15. Young African American Children Constructing Academic and Disciplinary Identities in an Urban Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Justine M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I offer a framework for exploring the academic and disciplinary identities young African American children construct in urban science classrooms. Using interviews, fieldnotes, and videotapes of classroom lessons, I juxtapose the ways in which two children tell about their experiences in school and science with their performances of…

  16. Detecting reduced renal function in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Trine Borup; Jødal, Lars; Erlandsen, Erland J

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the ability of renal indicators [serum creatinine (SCr), cystatin C (SCysC)] and glomerular filtration rate (GFR)-models to discriminate normal and reduced renal function. As a single cut-off level will always lead to false classifications, we propose...... function was defined as a GFR ofmodels were compared for their ability to correctly classify renal function as normal or reduced. Cut-off levels were determined so as to give 99 % certainty outside the gray zone...... using two cut-off levels, dividing renal function into normal or reduced, with an intermediate "gray zone" of indeterminable results.Methods Glomerular filtration rate was measured by plasma clearance of 51Cr-EDTA (13.7–147.4 mL/min/1.73 m2) in 119 children (age range 2.3–14.9 years).Reduced renal...

  17. Children's Imagination and Fantasy: Implications for Development, Education, and Classroom Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Maureen; Mathur, Ravisha

    2009-01-01

    The authors review the research on children's imagination and fantasy as they relate to children's socio-emotional and cognitive development and link those findings to children's academic and classroom competence. Specifically, children who are imaginative and/or fantasy prone tend to have better coping skills and the ability to regulate their…

  18. A Semiotic Analysis of Young Children's Symbol Making in a Classroom Computer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbo, Linda D.

    1996-01-01

    Investigates kindergarten children's production and use of symbol making on the computer in the classroom. Uses the metaphor of "screenland" to describe children's stances toward their work--children viewed the computer as a land to be entered for various purposes. Suggests that as these children emerged as users of symbols they also learned how…

  19. Classroom noise and children learning in a second language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peggy; Kohnert, Kathryn; Sabur, Sabina; Shaw, Daniel

    2005-04-01

    The presence of background noise affects children more negatively than adults. Understanding speech in noise is a skill that continues to develop well into a child's adolescent years. Childrens' experience with a specific language also may affect their ability to make sense of incoming speech. Research suggests that even for adults the presence of background noise negatively affects the ability to listen in a second language. Two studies were conducted to investigate the effects of classroom noise on attention and speech perception in native Spanish-speaking second graders learning English as their second language (L2), as compared to English-only speaking peers (EO). In Study 1 we measured childrens' on-task behavior during instructional activities with and without soundfield amplification. In Study 2 we measured the effects of noise (+10 dB signal-to-noise ratio) using an experimental English word-recognition task. Findings indicate although there were no effects of amplification on on-task behavior, word-recognition performance declined significantly for both EO and L2 groups in the noise condition. In particular, the impact of the noise was disproportionately greater for the L2 group. Children learning in their L2 appear to be at a distinct disadvantage when listening in rooms with typical noise and reverberation.

  20. Decoding skills in children with language impairment: contributions of phonological processing and classroom experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambyraja, Sherine R; Farquharson, Kelly; Logan, Jessica A R; Justice, Laura M

    2015-05-01

    Children with language impairment (LI) often demonstrate difficulties with word decoding. Research suggests that child-level (i.e., phonological processing) and environmental-level (i.e., classroom quality) factors both contribute to decoding skills in typically developing children. The present study examined the extent to which these same factors influence the decoding skills of children with LI, and the extent to which classroom quality moderates the relationship between phonological processing and decoding. Kindergarten and first-grade children with LI (n = 198) were assessed on measures of phonological processing and decoding twice throughout the academic year. Live classroom observations were conducted to assess classroom quality with respect to emotional support and instructional support. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that of the 3 phonological processing variables included, only phonological awareness significantly predicted spring decoding outcomes when controlling for children's age and previous decoding ability. One aspect of classroom quality (emotional support) was also predictive of decoding, but there was no significant interaction between classroom quality and phonological processing. This study provides further evidence that phonological awareness is an important skill to assess in children with LI and that high-quality classroom environments can be positively associated with children's decoding outcomes.

  1. Children's behavioral regulation and literacy: The impact of the first grade classroom environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Stephanie L; Connor, Carol McDonald; McClelland, Megan M

    2015-10-01

    Classroom learning environments are an important source of influence on children's development, particularly with regard to literacy achievement and behavioral regulation, both of which require the coordination of task inhibition, attention, and working memory. Classroom observations were conducted in 18 schools and 51 first grade classrooms for 500 children. The non-instructional activities were recorded for each student in the classroom. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that children with weaker fall behavioral regulation were more likely to attend classrooms where more time was spent in disruptions and wasted instructional time over the course of the school year, such as waiting for the teacher to gather materials before beginning instruction. For literacy outcomes, children who were in classrooms where more time in disruptions, transitions, and waiting was observed showed weaker literacy skill gains in the spring compared to children in classrooms with lesser amounts of such unproductive non-instructional time and this effect was generally greater for students with initial weaker skills. These results also reveal that the classroom environment and the incoming characteristics of the students themselves influence students' development of behavioral regulation and literacy.

  2. Interventions to Reduce Myopia Progression in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Su Ann; Farzavandi, Sonal; Tan, Donald

    2017-03-01

    Efforts to reduce the progression of myopia in childhood are on the rise, due to an increasing incidence of myopia worldwide and its associated sight-threatening complications. Interventions are aimed at reducing myopia in childhood and include environmental considerations, spectacles, contact lenses, and pharmacological agents. We reviewed recent literature with interventions aimed at reducing myopia progression in children and found that a number of interventions were significant in reducing the progression of myopia. Of these interventions, atropine showed the largest dose-related effect on myopia progression control. Although higher doses are associated with side effects of pupil dilatation, loss of accommodation, near vision blur, and rebound phenomenon, low-dose atropine has also been shown to provide effective myopia control with minimal side effects and rebound. To a lesser degree, bifocal soft contact lenses have also been shown to be effective in reducing the progression of myopia, though compliance is an issue. Similarly, orthokeratology lenses have also been shown to be effective in reducing axial length elongation and myopia progression, though long-term data on its rebound effects are unavailable.

  3. School-readiness profiles of children with language impairment: linkages to home and classroom experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentimonti, Jill M; Justice, Laura M; Kaderavek, Joan N

    2014-01-01

    This study represents an effort to advance our understanding of the nature of school readiness among children with language impairment (LI), a population of children acknowledged to be at risk of poor academic achievement. The academic, social-emotional, and behavioural competencies with which children arrive at kindergarten affect the nature of their future educational experiences, and their overall academic achievement. To examine whether there are reliable profiles that characterize children with LI just prior to kindergarten entrance, and the extent to which profile membership is associated with characteristics of children's homes and preschool experiences. Questions addressed were twofold: (1) To what extent are there reliable profiles of children with LI with respect to their school readiness? (2) To what extent is children's profile membership associated with characteristics of their homes and preschool classrooms? Participants were 136 children with LI from early childhood special education classrooms. We utilized latent class analysis (LCA) to classify individuals into profiles based on individual responses on school readiness measures. We then used multilevel hierarchical generalized linear models to examine the relations between profile membership and children's home/classroom experiences. LCA analyses revealed that a four-profile solution was the most appropriate fit for the data and that classroom experiences were predictive of these profiles, such that children in classrooms with more instructional/emotional support were more likely to be placed in profiles characterized by higher school readiness skills. These results suggest that the school readiness profiles of young children with LI are associated with the quality of children's classroom experiences, and that high-quality classroom experiences can be influential for ensuring that young children with LI arrive in kindergarten ready to learn. © 2014 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  4. Reducing Fever in Children: Safe Use of Acetaminophen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Reducing Fever in Children: Safe Use of Acetaminophen Share Tweet ... re in the drug store, looking for a fever-reducing medicine for your children. They range in ...

  5. Wordless Book-Sharing Styles in Bilingual Preschool Classrooms and Latino Children's Emergent Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Adina

    2015-01-01

    The current study explored the preschool classroom environment as an important context for supporting dual-language learning Latino children's development of emergent literacy skills. The results of the study showed that teachers in Spanish-English bilingual preschool classrooms varied in the way they shared wordless picture books with the…

  6. Classroom Management of Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. A Storied Model: Torey Hayden's One Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Mike; Disney, Gayle; Wilson, Kayce Jo

    2004-01-01

    Torey Hayden's style of classroom management in her nonfiction book "One Child" was examined. "One Child" unfolds within the space of a special education classroom for children with severe behavioral impairments and focuses on Sheila, a troubled 6-year-old, who has tied a 3-year-old boy to a tree and critically burned him. Each technique Hayden…

  7. Relations among Preschool Teachers' Self-Efficacy, Classroom Quality, and Children's Language and Literacy Gains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Piasta, Shayne B.; Justice, Laura M.; Kaderavek, Joan N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relations among preschool teachers' self-efficacy (n = 67), classroom quality (instructional and emotional support), and children's (n = 328) gains in print awareness and vocabulary knowledge over an academic year in the US. Results indicated that teachers' self-efficacy and classroom quality served as significant and…

  8. A Comparison of Function-Based Differential Reinforcement Interventions for Children Engaging in Disruptive Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGray, Matthew W.; Dufrene, Brad A.; Sterling-Turner, Heather; Olmi, D. Joe; Bellone, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    This study provides a direct comparison of differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) and differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA). Participants included three children in center-based classrooms referred for functional assessments due to disruptive classroom behavior. Functional assessments included interviews and brief…

  9. Using Children's Picture Books about Autism as Resources in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmon, Miranda L.; Tackett, Mary E.; Azano, Amy Price

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on developing teacher understanding of how to carefully select and use children's picture books about autism as a tool for teaching awareness, empathy, and acceptance in an elementary classroom setting. We describe how the increased rate of autism and growing practice of inclusive educational settings affect classroom practice…

  10. Back to Basics: Working with Young Children with Autism in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deris, Aaron R.; Di Carlo, Cynthia F.

    2013-01-01

    Young children with autism benefit from various adaptations made to an early childhood classroom. This article includes modifications for both teacher-directed and child-initiated activities. Adaptations are given for the classroom environment, daily schedule, sensory needs, transitions and general teaching strategies. The techniques described are…

  11. Classroom Dimensions Predict Early Peer Interaction when Children Are Diverse in Ethnicity, Race, and Home Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Carollee; Guerra, Alison Wishard; Fuligni, Allison; Zucker, Eleanor; Lee, Linda; Obregon, Nora B.; Spivak, Asha

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a model for predicting preschool-age children's behaviors with peers from dimensions of the classroom and teacher-child relationship quality when the children were from diverse race, ethnic, and home language backgrounds. Eight hundred children, (M=age 63 months, SD=8.1 months), part of the National Evaluation…

  12. Differential Use of the Open Classroom: A Study of Exploratory and Cautious Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuchin, Patricia

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences between exploratory children and cautious children as they functioned in open classrooms over a period of time and to document some general aspects of child behavior in open educational settings. Sixty children were observed through the course of the school year in their first grade open…

  13. Children's Reasoning as Collective Social Action through Problem Solving in Grade 2/3 Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijung

    2016-01-01

    Research on young children's reasoning show the complex relationships of knowledge, theories, and evidence in their decision-making and problem solving. Most of the research on children's reasoning skills has been done in individualized and formal research settings, not collective classroom environments where children often engage in learning and…

  14. Effects of a Classroom-Based Physical Activity Program on Children's Physical Activity Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Tan Leng; Hannon, James; Webster, Collin Andrew; Podlog, Leslie William; Brusseau, Timothy; Newton, Maria

    2014-01-01

    High levels of physical inactivity are evident among many American children. To address this problem, providing physical activity (PA) during the school day within the CSPAP framework, is one strategy to increase children's PA. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a classroom-based PA program on children's PA. Two hundred…

  15. Connecting Reading and Writing Using Children's Literature in the University L2 Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Priscila

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the potential benefits of using children's literature in adult second language (L2) classrooms. A short-term, intensive university course for English reading and writing was designed incorporating children's literature into the curriculum. The author describes the course and discusses how children's literature can be used…

  16. Classroom Dimensions Predict Early Peer Interaction when Children Are Diverse in Ethnicity, Race, and Home Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Carollee; Guerra, Alison Wishard; Fuligni, Allison; Zucker, Eleanor; Lee, Linda; Obregon, Nora B.; Spivak, Asha

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a model for predicting preschool-age children's behaviors with peers from dimensions of the classroom and teacher-child relationship quality when the children were from diverse race, ethnic, and home language backgrounds. Eight hundred children, (M=age 63 months, SD=8.1 months), part of the National Evaluation…

  17. Connecting Reading and Writing Using Children's Literature in the University L2 Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Priscila

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the potential benefits of using children's literature in adult second language (L2) classrooms. A short-term, intensive university course for English reading and writing was designed incorporating children's literature into the curriculum. The author describes the course and discusses how children's literature can be used…

  18. Theory of Mind Dynamics in Children's Play: A Qualitative Inquiry in a Preschool Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Soyeon

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore children's understanding of mind shown in children's play in a preschool classroom. Previous research on children's theory of mind has relied on empirical studies utilizing several tasks, such as false belief tasks. Since children's emerging understanding of self and others is a complex process of entering a community of theories of mind (Nelson, Henseler, & Plesa, 2000), it is important to expand our understanding of children's theories of mind through...

  19. Creating a Community Classroom: Strategies to Promote Inclusion and Reduce Bullying in Early Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie C. Parker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Research suggests that young children with disabilities often fall victim to bullying because of a lack of social competence and social skills necessary for consistent engagement with peers. This article focuses on a comprehensive approach to classroom management and offers important strategies for a multi-level positive behavioral support plan. The positive behavioral support plan is embedded in the daily curriculum and includes strategies that enhance cooperative learning and socialization experiences, increases academic readiness, and supports academic success.

  20. Individual and classroom variables associated with relational aggression in elementary-school aged children : A multilevel analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuppens, S.; Grietens, H.; Onghena, P.; Michiels, D.; Subramanian, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    Relational aggression was studied within classroom environments by examining individual and classroom correlates among 2731 children (3rd-5th graders) during two successive measurement years. Multilevel analyses yielded small gender differences for relational aggression, indicating that such aggress

  1. Individual and classroom variables associated with relational aggression in elementary-school aged children : A multilevel analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuppens, S.; Grietens, H.; Onghena, P.; Michiels, D.; Subramanian, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    Relational aggression was studied within classroom environments by examining individual and classroom correlates among 2731 children (3rd-5th graders) during two successive measurement years. Multilevel analyses yielded small gender differences for relational aggression, indicating that such aggress

  2. Instructions, Feedback, and Reinforcement in Reducing Activity Levels in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Jerome L.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Results indicated that the intervention package--including instructions, feedback from an electronic device that measures motor activity, and contingent reinforcement--was successful in reducing activity in the classroom for 8 of the 11 emotionally disturbed Ss (ages 9 to 13 years). (Author/DLS)

  3. Peer effects in preschool classrooms: is children's language growth associated with their classmates' skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura M; Petscher, Yaacov; Schatschneider, Christopher; Mashburn, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    With an increasing number of young children participating in preschool education, this study determined whether peer effects are present in this earliest sector of schooling. Specifically, this work examined whether peer effects were influential to preschoolers' growth in language skills over an academic year and whether peer effects manifest differently based on children's status in reference to their peers. Peer effects were assessed for 338 children in 49 classrooms. A significant interaction between the language skills of children's classmates and children's fall language skills indicated that peer effects were strongest for children with low language skills who were in classrooms that served children with relatively low skill levels, on average. Findings further showed that reference status, or children's relative standing to their peers, has the greater consequence for children with very low language skills in relation to their peers. © 2011 The Authors. Child Development © 2011 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  4. Why Classroom Climate Matters for Children High in Anxious Solitude: A Study of Differential Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kathleen; Coplan, Robert J

    2017-03-20

    The goal of the current study was to examine the complex links among anxious solitude, classroom climate, engagement, achievement, and gender. In particular, drawing upon the differential susceptibility hypothesis (Belsky, 1997), we investigated if children high in anxious solitude were particularly sensitive and responsive to the classroom environment. Participants were N = 712 children in Grade 3, drawn from the National Institute of Child and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development data set. Classroom climate and engagement were assessed using the Classroom Observation Scale (NICHD, 1998). Teachers completed the Teacher Report Form (Achenbach, 1991) as a measure of anxious solitude and the Academic Rating Scale (NICHD, 2010) as a measure of achievement. Hypothesized associations among variables were tested by way of a moderated-mediation model. Among the results, engagement was found to mediate the relation between classroom climate and achievement. In addition, anxious solitude and gender were found to moderate the relation between classroom climate and engagement. Support for the differential susceptibility hypothesis was found, suggesting that children high in anxious solitude may be more reactive (both positively and negatively) to elements of the classroom environment. In addition, gender differences were observed, indicating that boys may be more responsive to the classroom environment as compared with girls. Implications for future research and educational policies are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Preliminary Evidence for a Classroom Based Psychosocial Intervention for Disaster Exposed Children with Posttraumatic Stress Symptomatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elklit, Ask; Rønholt, Stine; Karsberg, Sidsel

    2013-01-01

    a substantial number of symptoms 3 years after the incident. Thus, a treatment program designed to target PTSD symptoms in trauma-exposed children was established. Objectives The first aim of this study was to provide preliminary evidence that a classroom-based psychosocial intervention program for children....... Furthermore, the results indicated that the Darryl instrument is a useful screening tool for assessing PTSD symptoms in this sample of children. Keywords Trauma Disaster Treatment Children Assessment...

  6. Children's metamemory: A review of the literature and implications for the classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen KARABLY

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine the development of children's metamemory and provide practical implications of research findings for the classroom. In the first part of the paper we define and discuss the global concept of metacognition, the component processes of metacognition and the importance of each component to children's learning. We then examine the development of children's knowledge about memory and ability to monitor memory (i.e., metamemory. We focus, in particular, on seven major research themes: children's metamemory develops with age and experience, younger children are less aware than older children of the benefits of categorization on recall, younger children use different strategies than older children, children's causal attributions may affect metamemory, instructional interventions must be appropriately timed, children will show more strategy transfer when explicit instructions are provided and children overestimate their memory ability. We discuss implications of these major themes for teachers of young children.

  7. Promoting Oral Language Skills in Preschool Children through Sociodramatic Play in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapaksha, P. L. N. Randima

    2016-01-01

    Children best learn language through playful learning experiences in the preschool classroom. The present study focused on developing oral language skills in preschool children through a sociodramatic play intervention. The study employed a case study design under qualitative approach. The researcher conducted a sociodramatic play intervention…

  8. Exploratory and Cautious Children in Open Classrooms: Autonomy, Learning and Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuchin, Patricia

    This study explored the functioning of exploratory and cautious children in open classrooms. Four areas of functioning were focused on: curiosity and exploration, learning and mastery, autonomous behavior, and interpersonal contacts. Thirty exploratory and 30 cautious children were selected through teacher ratings and exploratory tasks and…

  9. The Effect of Therapy Balls on the Classroom Behavior and Learning of Children with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodmon, Leilani B.; Leverett, Raven; Royer, Amanda; Hillard, Gracia; Tedder, Tracey; Rakes, Lori

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the behavioral and learning benefit found from the use of therapy balls as classroom seats in children with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (e.g., Schilling, Washington, Billingsley, & Deitz, 2003) generalizes to children with dyslexia who suffer from similar attention problems…

  10. Classroom Management Strategies for Young Children with Challenging Behavior within Early Childhood Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivette, Kristine; Steed, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Many preschool, Head Start, and kindergarten educators of young children express concern about the number of children who exhibit frequent challenging behaviors and report that managing these behaviors is difficult within these classrooms. This article describes research-based strategies with practical applications that can be used as part of…

  11. Preschool Classroom Processes as Predictors of Children's Cognitive Self-Regulation Skills Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhs, Mary Wagner; Farran, Dale C.; Nesbitt, Kimberly Turner

    2013-01-01

    This research focuses on the associations between interactive processes of early childhood classrooms and gains in children's cognitive self-regulation (CSR) across the preschool year. Data from 803 children (45.8% female; "M" = 54 months; 39.1% Caucasian, 26.3% African American, 24.6% Hispanic, 9.9% Other) were collected at fall and…

  12. Do-It-Yourself World Music Curriculum: Collecting Children's Musical Culture for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Your integration of children's musical culture into the general music curriculum does not need to end with the song collections on your bookshelf. Consider expanding on the materials available by reaching out to friends, students, colleagues, and elders and collecting children's musical culture for yourself and your classroom.

  13. Exploring Children's Perceptions of the Perceived Seriousness of Disruptive Classroom Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursley, Louise; Betts, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Children's reports of the perceived seriousness of disruptive classroom behaviours were examined from their own perspective and from their perceptions of their peers' beliefs about the same behaviour. Two hundred and seventy-six (116 female and 161 male, M[subscript age]?=?11.00?years, SD[subscript age]?=?1.29) children recruited from a primary…

  14. Social Interactions in Preschool Classrooms and the Development of Young Children's Conceptions of the Personal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Melanie; Smetana, Judith G.

    1999-01-01

    Two studies examined preschool teacher and child interactions regarding personal, moral, and socioconventional issues in the classroom and the development of personal concepts. Findings suggested that in both judgments and social interactions, teachers and children identified a personal domain in which children can and should make choices about…

  15. Classroom Interactions, Dyadic Teacher-Child Relationships, and Self-Regulation in Socially Disadvantaged Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadima, Joana; Verschueren, Karine; Leal, Teresa; Guedes, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the quality of the classroom climate and dyadic teacher-child relationships as predictors of self-regulation in a sample of socially disadvantaged preschool children (N = 206; 52 % boys). Children's self-regulation was observed in preschool at the beginning and at the end of the school year. At the middle of the preschool year, classroom observations of interactions were conducted by trained observers and teachers rated the quality of dyadic teacher-child relationships. Results from multilevel analyses revealed that teacher-child closeness predicted improvements in observed self-regulation skills. Children showed larger gains in self-regulation when they experienced closer teacher-child relationships. Moreover, a moderating effect between classroom instructional quality and observed self-regulation was found such that children with low initial self-regulation skills benefit the most from classrooms with higher classroom quality. Findings have implications for understanding the role of classroom social processes on the development of self-regulation.

  16. Social Integration between African American and European American Children in Majority Black, Majority White, and Multicultural Elementary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodkin, Philip C.; Wilson, Travis; Ahn, Hai-Jeong

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors use social network analysis and multilevel modeling to examine a central feature of classroom social organization: the ethnic composition of the classroom. They examine classroom ethnic composition as it relates to patterns of social integration between African American and European American children. They asked…

  17. Social and academic implications of acoustically hostile classrooms for hard of hearing children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Janet R.

    2005-04-01

    The correlation between lowered academic achievement and classroom noise has been demonstrated for normally hearing children (Shield and Dockrell, 2003). However, the implications of poor classroom acoustics on the socialization and academic performance of children who are hard of hearing have not been examined. Eleven hard of hearing students in one school district, ranging from kindergarten to grade 7, were the foci of the present study. Acoustic measurements of each of the 11 classrooms in both unoccupied and occupied conditions revealed that all classrooms were acoustically challenging for the hard of hearing students, particularly at transition times, when ventilation was operational, and in the primary grades, when language learning needs are greatest. Interviews with parents and teachers underscored the difficulty these students experienced in comprehending teacher instructions and participating in group work. The students seldom initiated conversation or seatwork independently, but, rather, followed the lead of their peers. The hard of hearing students experienced frequent difficulties in understanding or participating in informal peer-to-peer conversations in the classroom, and parents and teachers attributed the children's frequent social isolation and withdrawal at school to the combined effects of poor hearing abilities and hostile classroom acoustics. [Work supported by Hampton Research Fund.

  18. Classroom displays - attraction or distraction? evidence of impact on attention and learning from children with and without autism.

    OpenAIRE

    Hanley, Mary; Khairat, Mariam; Taylor, Korey; Wilson, Rachel; Cole-Fletcher, Rachel; Riby, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    Paying attention is a critical first step towards learning. For children in primary school classrooms there can be many things to attend to other than the focus of a lesson, such as visual displays on classroom walls. The aim of this study was to use eye-tracking techniques to explore the impact of visual displays on attention and learning for children. Critically, we explored these issues for children developing typically and for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Both groups of c...

  19. Measures of classroom quality in prekindergarten and children's development of academic, language, and social skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Andrew J; Pianta, Robert C; Hamre, Bridget K; Downer, Jason T; Barbarin, Oscar A; Bryant, Donna; Burchinal, Margaret; Early, Diane M; Howes, Carollee

    2008-01-01

    This study examined development of academic, language, and social skills among 4-year-olds in publicly supported prekindergarten (pre-K) programs in relation to 3 methods of measuring pre-K quality, which are as follows: (a) adherence to 9 standards of quality related to program infrastructure and design, (b) observations of the overall quality of classroom environments, and (c) observations of teachers' emotional and instructional interactions with children in classrooms. Participants were 2,439 children enrolled in 671 pre-K classrooms in 11 states. Adjusting for prior skill levels, child and family characteristics, program characteristics, and state, teachers' instructional interactions predicted academic and language skills and teachers' emotional interactions predicted teacher-reported social skills. Findings suggest that policies, program development, and professional development efforts that improve teacher-child interactions can facilitate children's school readiness.

  20. Variability in Classroom Social Communication: Performance of Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and Typically Developing Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellmer, Liselotte; Olswang, Lesley B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined how variability in classroom social communication performance differed between children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and pair-matched, typically developing peers. Method: Twelve pairs of children were observed in their classrooms, 40 min per day (20 min per child) for 4 days over a…

  1. Insider Views of the Emotional Climate of the Classroom: What New Zealand Children Tell Us about Their Teachers' Feelings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Rachel J.; Evans, Ian M.; Harvey, Shane T.

    2012-01-01

    To explore children's perceptions of their teachers' feelings in everyday classroom contexts, the authors conducted focus groups with New Zealand primary (elementary) school children to discuss what they observed about positive classroom teachers' interactional style and emotional behavior. Seventy-nine students between age 8 and 12 years, from…

  2. Hand sanitiser provision for reducing illness absences in primary school children: a cluster randomised trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Priest

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The potential for transmission of infectious diseases offered by the school environment are likely to be an important contributor to the rates of infectious disease experienced by children. This study aimed to test whether the addition of hand sanitiser in primary school classrooms compared with usual hand hygiene would reduce illness absences in primary school children in New Zealand. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This parallel-group cluster randomised trial took place in 68 primary schools, where schools were allocated using restricted randomisation (1:1 ratio to the intervention or control group. All children (aged 5 to 11 y in attendance at participating schools received an in-class hand hygiene education session. Schools in the intervention group were provided with alcohol-based hand sanitiser dispensers in classrooms for the winter school terms (27 April to 25 September 2009. Control schools received only the hand hygiene education session. The primary outcome was the number of absence episodes due to any illness among 2,443 follow-up children whose caregivers were telephoned after each absence from school. Secondary outcomes measured among follow-up children were the number of absence episodes due to specific illness (respiratory or gastrointestinal, length of illness and illness absence episodes, and number of episodes where at least one other member of the household became ill subsequently (child or adult. We also examined whether provision of sanitiser was associated with experience of a skin reaction. The number of absences for any reason and the length of the absence episode were measured in all primary school children enrolled at the schools. Children, school administrative staff, and the school liaison research assistants were not blind to group allocation. Outcome assessors of follow-up children were blind to group allocation. Of the 1,301 and 1,142 follow-up children in the hand sanitiser and control groups, respectively, the

  3. Effect of Active Videogames on Underserved Children's Classroom Behaviors, Effort, and Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zan; Lee, Jung Eun; Pope, Zachary; Zhang, Dachao

    2016-09-30

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of active videogames (AVGs) on underserved minority children's on-task classroom behavior, academic effort, and fitness. A one group pre- and posttest repeated measures design was used. In Fall 2013, 95 fourth grade children (57 boys, 38 girls; 96% of minority) from three classes at an underserved urban elementary school participated in teacher-supervised AVG activities (e.g., Wii Sports, Xbox Just Dance). Specifically, students participated in a 50-minute weekly AVG program at school for 6 weeks. Children's academic effort was evaluated by classroom teachers using a validated scale that assessed activity, attention, conduct, and social/emotional behavior. Moreover, children's classroom behavior was observed immediately before and after each AVG session by trained researchers. Finally, cardiovascular fitness was also measured. A paired t-test was used to assess teacher-rated student effort, while one-way (gender) analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures was performed to analyze children's on-task classroom behavior. There was a significant effect on children's effort between the first (mean = 3.24, SD = 0.75) and last week (mean = 3.41, SD = 0.73) assessments, t = 2.42, P = 0.02. In addition, there was a significant effect on classroom behavior, F = 33.103, P classroom on-task behavior and academic effort. Future studies may include a control group to further confirm the effectiveness of AVG activities. Practical implications for educators and other stakeholders are provided.

  4. Helping Parents Reduce Children's Television Viewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Leonard A.; Fries, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Parents and educators around the country are concerned about the amount of time children watch television. Part of this concern stems from the fact that a considerable amount of violence is regularly portrayed on television. In addition, those youngsters who watch an excessive amount of television have little time for developing other interests…

  5. Helping Parents Reduce Children's Television Viewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Leonard A.; Fries, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Parents and educators around the country are concerned about the amount of time children watch television. Part of this concern stems from the fact that a considerable amount of violence is regularly portrayed on television. In addition, those youngsters who watch an excessive amount of television have little time for developing other interests…

  6. Integrating Planetarium and Classroom Instruction to Engage Children in the Practices of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, J. D.; Small, K. J.

    2014-07-01

    Children should be learning how to engage in science practices in ways that reflect the domain-specific nature of learning to “do science.” Our work explores methods for engaging children in science practices in astronomy, such as developing representations and models, using evidence, and organizing observations into patterns. We used research literature on learning in formal and informal environments to develop learning environment design principles that integrate classroom and planetarium instruction. These were used to develop an intervention for first-grade students. Children first participated in an anticipatory lesson in their classroom. They next visited the planetarium, where they were engaged in a modular planetarium design program that mixed live interaction with video sequences. Finally, children applied what they learned as they engaged in activities in their classroom. Initial analysis of interviews conducted with children before and after instruction suggest the intervention was successful in improving students' reasoning about the Moon and illustrates successful methods of integrating a field trip with a classroom-based lesson.

  7. Including and teaching blind children in ordinary classrooms Teaching tools teachers use and their influence on the inclusion of blind children ordinary classrooms in a primary school

    OpenAIRE

    Niwagaba, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    The study aims to investigate what teaching tools do teachers use and how do these tools influence on the inclusion of blind children in ordinary classrooms in a primary school. The study used qualitative approach and Interview method with teachers from one primary school. In depth interviews were chosen as the main instrument of data collection. Purposeful sampling and qualitative analysis was used in exploring and investigating the phenomenon of the study. Three special needs teachers for t...

  8. Children's effortful control and academic achievement: do relational peer victimization and classroom participation operate as mediators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Carlos; Swanson, Jodi; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Berger, Rebecca H

    2014-08-01

    Given that early academic achievement is related to numerous developmental outcomes, understanding processes that promote early success in school is important. This study was designed to clarify how students' (N=291; M age in fall of kindergarten=5.66 years, SD=0.39 year) effortful control, relational peer victimization, and classroom participation relate to achievement, as students progress from kindergarten to first grade. Effortful control and achievement were assessed in kindergarten, classroom participation and relational peer victimization were assessed in the fall of first grade, and achievement was reassessed in the spring of first grade. Classroom participation, but not relational peer victimization, mediated relations between effortful control and first grade standardized and teacher-rated achievement, controlling for kindergarten achievement. Findings suggest that aspects of classroom participation, such as the ability to work independently, may be useful targets of intervention for enhancing academic achievement in young children.

  9. The Impact of Classroom Activity Breaks on the School-Day Physical Activity of Rural Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershwinger, Teresa; Brusseau, Timothy A

    Schools have been identified as a central element in a system that ensures that children participate in enough physical activity to develop healthy lifestyles. Even with this recommendation, many school-based physical activity opportunities are being eliminated/minimized (i.e. physical education (PE), recess). With children spending much of their time at school, other supplemental physical activity opportunities are essential. One such opportunity is through classroom teacher led activity breaks. Very little evidence exists identifying the impact of classroom activity breaks on the daily physical activity patterns of children. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to determine the impact of classroom teacher led activity breaks on the step counts and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) of 4(th) grade children at school. Participants in this pilot study included a 4(th) grade class (N=18; aged 9.2±.4 years; mostly Caucasian (n=14); BMI=19.9±2.8) in a rural school district in the Northeast US. Children wore the NL-1000 piezoelectric pedometer for 2-weeks (a baseline week and an activity break week) during the winter of 2012. Activity breaks were created by the teacher/students to give them ownership in the program (activities included numerous classroom games and walking activities). At baseline, children averaged 4806±639 steps and 17.7±2.8 minutes of MVPA/day. During implementation of the physical activity breaks, children significantly increased both their steps (pclassroom activity breaks have the potential to increase children's daily physical activity patterns at school. Future studies are needed with a larger and more diverse population to support these findings.

  10. Torey Hayden's Teacher Lore: Classroom Behavior Management of Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Mike; Disney, Gayle

    2006-01-01

    Torey Hayden's portrayal of classroom behavior management in her teacher lore, autobiographical writings about teaching children with emotional and behavioral disorders, is examined. Five of her books were sampled: "One child", "Somebody else's kids", "Just another kid", "Ghost girl" and "Beautiful child". Each of these books unfolds within the…

  11. Mathematical Modelling as Problem Solving for Children in the Singapore Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric, Chan Chun Ming

    2009-01-01

    The newly revised mathematics curriculum in Singapore has recently factored Applications and Modelling to be part of the teaching and learning of mathematics. Its implication is that even children should now be involved in works of mathematical modelling. However, to be able to implement modelling activities in the primary mathematics classroom,…

  12. Navajo and Caucasian Children's Verbal and Nonverbal-Visual Behavior in the Urban Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilmet, George M.

    1978-01-01

    A formal observation technique was used in an urban classroom context to assess the verbal and nonverbal-visual behavior of 17 Navajo and 7 Caucasian children. Two statistical techniques revealed significant intergroup differences in verbal and nonverbal-visual style. ( Author)

  13. Teacher Self-Efficacy in Working with Children with Autism in the General Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Mary Irene

    2014-01-01

    Autism is being diagnosed at an unprecedented rate, with an influx of children with autism being educated in the general education classroom. A positive self-efficacy amongst teachers is imperative as education moves toward the inclusive education model. Bandura theorized a bidirectional approach in the improvement of self-efficacy. The purpose of…

  14. Physical Activity as Reinforcement for Classroom Calmness of ADHD Children: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azrin, Nathan H.; Vinas, Veronica; Ehle, Christopher T.

    2007-01-01

    Contingent reward procedures have been found beneficial in improving classroom conduct of ADHD children. Based on the conceptualization of the Premack Principle, a previous single-subject study of an ADHD Autistic child suggested the novel use of physical activity availability as a reinforcer for attentive calmness of the Attention Deficit…

  15. Are children participating in a quasi-experimental education outside the classroom intervention more physically active?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneller, Mikkel Bo; Duncan, Scott; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Education outside the classroom (EOtC) is a curriculum-based approach to teaching that has shown positive associations with children's physical activity and academic learning in small-scale case studies. The purpose of this large-scale quasi-experimental study was to determine...

  16. The Documentation of Kindergarten Children's Interactional Competency in an Informal Context of the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Janet K.

    The interactional competence of 12 kindergarten children was studied through naturalistic research of their sociodramatic play in a classroom context. Data were collected by both videotape and trained observers. Contextual and interactional information was analyzed according to an Interactional Competency Checklist (ICC) designed by the author.…

  17. Young African American Children Constructing Identities in an Urban Integrated Science-Literacy Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Justine M.

    2009-01-01

    This is a qualitative study of identities constructed and enacted by four 3rd-grade African American children (two girls and two boys) in an urban classroom that engaged in a year-long, integrated science-literacy project. Juxtaposing narrative and discursive identity lenses, coupled with race and gender perspectives, I examined the ways in which…

  18. Addressing Disability as a Part of Diversity through Classroom Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasatir, Diane; Horn, Eva

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses disability as one aspect of diversity in inclusive early childhood classrooms and offers a framework for evaluating children's books that address disability as a part of diversity. The nine criteria are explained and discussed: illustrations, story line, lifestyles, relationships, self-image, author/illustrator backgrounds,…

  19. Torey Hayden's Teacher Lore: Classroom Behavior Management of Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Mike; Disney, Gayle

    2006-01-01

    Torey Hayden's portrayal of classroom behavior management in her teacher lore, autobiographical writings about teaching children with emotional and behavioral disorders, is examined. Five of her books were sampled: "One child", "Somebody else's kids", "Just another kid", "Ghost girl" and "Beautiful child". Each of these books unfolds within the…

  20. The Literacy Environment of Preschool Classrooms: Contributions to Children's Emergent Literacy Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Justice, Laura M.; Kaderavek, Joan N.; McGinty, Anita

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relations among features of the classroom physical literacy environment (book materials, literacy area and writing materials) and psychological literacy environment (instructional support), and preschool children's gains in two areas of emergent literacy over an academic year. Results showed that features of the physical…

  1. Navajo and Caucasian Children's Verbal and Nonverbal-Visual Behavior in the Urban Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilmet, George M.

    1978-01-01

    A formal observation technique was used in an urban classroom context to assess the verbal and nonverbal-visual behavior of 17 Navajo and 7 Caucasian children. Two statistical techniques revealed significant intergroup differences in verbal and nonverbal-visual style. ( Author)

  2. Awakening Pre-Service Teachers to Children's Social Exclusion in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedžune, Ginta

    2015-01-01

    Children's social exclusion in the classroom is a threat to the sustainability of education. Teachers should be sensitised to this issue, which raises important implications for teacher education. This paper reports on an action research study in the context of pre-service teacher education aimed at enriching prospective early childhood educators'…

  3. Vulnerable Children in Varying Classroom Contexts: Bystanders' Behaviors Moderate the Effects of Risk Factors on Victimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, Antti; Voeten, Marinus; Poskiparta, Elisa; Salmivalli, Christina

    2010-01-01

    We examined whether the bystanders' behaviors in bullying situations influence vulnerable students' risk for victimization. The sample consisted of 6,980 primary school children from Grades 3-5, who were nested within 378 classrooms in 77 schools. These students filled out Internet-based questionnaires in their schools' computer labs. The results…

  4. Vulnerable Children in Varying Classroom Contexts Bystanders' Behaviors Moderate the Effects of Risk Factors on Victimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kärnä, A.; Voeten, M.J.M.; Poskiparta, E.H.; Salmivalli, C.

    2010-01-01

    We examined whether the bystanders' behaviors in bullying situations influence vulnerable students' risk for victimization. The sample consisted of 6,980 primary school children from Grades 3-5, who were nested within 378 classrooms in 77 schools. These students filled out Internet-based questionnai

  5. Vulnerable Children in Varying Classroom Contexts: Bystanders' Behaviors Moderate the Effects of Risk Factors on Victimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, Antti; Voeten, Marinus; Poskiparta, Elisa; Salmivalli, Christina

    2010-01-01

    We examined whether the bystanders' behaviors in bullying situations influence vulnerable students' risk for victimization. The sample consisted of 6,980 primary school children from Grades 3-5, who were nested within 378 classrooms in 77 schools. These students filled out Internet-based questionnaires in their schools' computer labs. The results…

  6. The impact of classroom aggression on the development of aggressive behavior problems in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Duane E; Bierman, Karen L

    2006-01-01

    Prior research suggests that exposure to elementary classrooms characterized by high levels of student aggression may contribute to the development of child aggressive behavior problems. To explore this process in more detail, this study followed a longitudinal sample of 4,907 children and examined demographic factors associated with exposure to high-aggression classrooms, including school context factors (school size, student poverty levels, and rural vs. urban location) and child ethnicity (African American, European American). The developmental impact of different temporal patterns of exposure (e.g., primacy, recency, chronicity) to high-aggression classrooms was evaluated on child aggression. Analyses revealed that African American children attending large, urban schools that served socioeconomically disadvantaged students were more likely than other students to be exposed to high-aggressive classroom contexts. Hierarchical regressions demonstrated cumulative effects for temporal exposure, whereby children with multiple years of exposure showed higher levels of aggressive behavior after 3 years than children with primacy, less recent, and less chronic exposure, controlling for initial levels of aggression. Implications are discussed for developmental research and preventive interventions.

  7. Young African American Children Constructing Identities in an Urban Integrated Science-Literacy Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Justine M.

    2009-01-01

    This is a qualitative study of identities constructed and enacted by four 3rd-grade African American children (two girls and two boys) in an urban classroom that engaged in a year-long, integrated science-literacy project. Juxtaposing narrative and discursive identity lenses, coupled with race and gender perspectives, I examined the ways in which…

  8. A randomized controlled trial of the impact of a teacher classroom management program on the classroom behavior of children with and without behavior problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Judy; Martin-Forbes, Pam; Daley, David; Williams, Margiad Elen

    2013-10-01

    This randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluated the efficacy of the Incredible Years (IY) Teacher Classroom Management (TCM; Webster-Stratton & Reid, 2002) program to assess whether training teachers in IY-TCM principles improve teacher behavior, whether any observed improvements impact pupil behavior classroom-wide, and whether these effects can be demonstrated with children at risk of developing conduct problems. Six intervention and six control classrooms comprising 12 teachers and 107 children (aged 3 to 7years) were recruited. Children were screened for high or low behavior problems using the cut-off points of the teacher-rated Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (Goodman, 1997). The primary outcome measure was independent classroom observations using the Teacher-Pupil Observation Tool (Martin et al., 2010). Multilevel modeling analyses were conducted to examine the effect of the intervention on teacher, classroom, and child behavior. Results showed a significant reduction in classroom off-task behavior (d=0.53), teacher negatives to target children (d=0.36), target child negatives towards the teacher (d=0.42), and target child off-task behavior (d=0.48). These preliminary results demonstrate the potential impact of IY-TCM on both teacher and child behavior. Copyright © 2013 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Single-Subject Meta-Analysis of the Effectiveness of Time-Out in Reducing Disruptive Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegas, Kristopher C.; Jenson, William R.; Kircher, John C.

    2007-01-01

    One current area of dispute in the psychological literature is the inclusion of and proper meta-analytic data analysis procedures for single-subject designs. The current single-subject meta-analysis (N = 25) investigated the effect of time-out for the reduction of disruptive classroom behaviors in nondevelopmentally delayed children. Two separate…

  10. Do school classrooms meet the visual requirements of children and recommended vision standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negiloni, Kalpa; Ramani, Krishna Kumar; Sudhir, Rachapalle Reddi

    2017-01-01

    Visual demands of school children tend to vary with diverse classroom environments. The study aimed to evaluate the distance and near Visual Acuity (VA) demand in Indian school classrooms and their comparison with the recommended vision standards. The distance and near VA demands were assessed in 33 classrooms (grades 4 to 12) of eight schools. The VA threshold demand relied on the smallest size of distance and near visual task material and viewing distance. The logMAR equivalents of minimum VA demand at specific seating positions (desk) and among different grades were evaluated. The near threshold was converted into actual near VA demand by including the acuity reserve. The existing dimensions of chalkboard and classroom, gross area in a classroom per student and class size in all the measured classrooms were compared to the government recommended standards. In 33 classrooms assessed (35±10 students per room), the average distance and near logMAR VA threshold demand was 0.31±0.17 and 0.44±0.14 respectively. The mean distance VA demand (minimum) in front desk position was 0.56±0.18 logMAR. Increased distance threshold demand (logMAR range -0.06, 0.19) was noted in 7 classrooms (21%). The mean VA demand in grades 4 to 8 and grades 9 to 12 was 0.35±0.16 and 0.24±0.16 logMAR respectively and the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.055). The distance from board to front desk was greater than the recommended standard of 2.2m in 27 classrooms (82%). The other measured parameters were noted to be different from the proposed standards in majority of the classrooms. The study suggests the inclusion of task demand assessment in school vision screening protocol to provide relevant guidance to school authorities. These findings can serve as evidence to accommodate children with mild to moderate visual impairment in the regular classrooms.

  11. English Language Classroom Practices: Bangladeshi Primary School Children's Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Prithvi Narayan

    2013-01-01

    English language teaching (ELT) has been investigated from various angles including how English language teachers perceive what happens in an ELT classroom. How primary school English language learners perceive their experiences of ELT is rarely reported in the published literature, particularly from developing countries such as Bangladesh. This…

  12. English Language Classroom Practices: Bangladeshi Primary School Children's Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Prithvi Narayan

    2013-01-01

    English language teaching (ELT) has been investigated from various angles including how English language teachers perceive what happens in an ELT classroom. How primary school English language learners perceive their experiences of ELT is rarely reported in the published literature, particularly from developing countries such as Bangladesh. This…

  13. An intervention to reduce television viewing by preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Barbara A; Russo, Theresa J; Burdick, Patrick A; Jenkins, Paul L

    2004-02-01

    Television viewing has been associated with increased violence in play and higher rates of obesity. Although there are interventions to reduce television viewing by school-aged children, there are none for younger children. To develop and evaluate an intervention to reduce television viewing by preschool children. Randomized controlled trial conducted in 16 preschool and/or day care centers in rural upstate New York. Children aged 2.6 through 5.5 years. Children attending intervention centers received a 7-session program designed to reduce television viewing as part of a health promotion curriculum, whereas children attending the control centers received a safety and injury prevention program. Change in parent-reported child television/video viewing and measured growth variables. Before the intervention, the intervention and control groups viewed 11.9 and 14.0 h/wk of television/videos, respectively. Afterward, children in the intervention group decreased their television/video viewing 3.1 h/wk, whereas children in the control group increased their viewing by 1.6 h/wk, for an adjusted difference between the groups of -4.7 h/wk (95% confidence interval, -8.4 to -1.0 h/wk; P =.02). The percentage of children watching television/videos more than 2 h/d also decreased significantly from 33% to 18% among the intervention group, compared with an increase of 41% to 47% among the control group, for a difference of -21.5% (95% confidence interval, -42.5% to -0.5%; P =.046). There were no statistically significant differences in children's growth between groups. This study is the first to show that a preschool-based intervention can lead to reductions in young children's television/video viewing. Further research is needed to determine the long-term effects associated with reductions in young children's television viewing.

  14. The influence of classroom peers on cognitive performance in children with behavioural problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevington, J; Wishart, J G

    1999-03-01

    Identifying factors linked to underachievement is fundamental to understanding the associated academic difficulties and crucial to the development of effective intervention strategies. Underachievement in a number of academic domains has been shown to be associated with behavioural problems in the classroom but the nature of the association and direction of any causal link has yet to be clarified. This study explored the association between poor academic achievement and behavioural problems by examining the direct effects of peer presence on classroom performance in children with identified behavioural difficulties. Specifically, it was hypothesised that independent performance on a cognitive task would decrease as number of classroom peers present increased. A total of 24 children attending two special schools for children with emotional and behavioural difficulties participated in the study. Age range was 9-14 years. A within-subjects design was used in which performance on a set of perceptual/conceptual matching tasks was assessed under three conditions: the child working alone, alongside one other peer, or within a group of six. Measures of non-verbal intelligence and academic attainment were collected, along with teacher ratings of the severity of each child's problem behaviour. Performance was found to be significantly influenced by peer presence, both in terms of number of correct responses and time taken to complete the matching tasks. Direction of effects on these two performance indicators differed according to number of peers present. Findings highlight the importance of contextual factors in determining classroom performance in children with behavioural difficulties. Given the current pressure to educate all children in mainstream classes, findings have implications for classroom management.

  15. Practical Strategies for Helping Children of Divorce in Today's Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul A.; Ryan, Patti; Morrison, William

    1999-01-01

    Considers how to provide a supportive, secure environment to children of divorce through opportunities to exercise personal control, being tolerant of variable academic performance, and expressing faith in children's character and capacity for growth. Provides suggestions for creating safe channels for communication and teaching children coping…

  16. Classroom Pets and Young Children: Supporting Early Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadan, Hedda; Jegatheesan, Brinda

    2010-01-01

    Many young children have a natural attraction to and curiosity about animals. They like to observe, touch, talk to, and ask questions about them. Teachers and parents both can use this broad interest to facilitate children's development and learning in a variety of domains. Research shows that children across ages find emotional comfort in their…

  17. Children's Environmental Identity and the Elementary Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugurian, Linda P.; Carrier, Sarah J.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative research explores children's environmental identity by describing how fifth grade children view their relationship with the natural world alongside their experience of elementary school science. Qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews with 17 grade 5 children was supported with a survey that included responses to open-ended…

  18. Intelligence, classroom behavior, and academic achievement in children at high and low risk for psychopathology: a structural equation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worland, J; Weeks, D G; Janes, C L; Strock, B D

    1984-09-01

    The intelligence, academic achievement, and classroom behavior of 158 children were assessed in a sample that is being followed longitudinally. The sample included children at high risk for mental disorder by virtue of having a parent with a psychiatric diagnosis of schizophrenia or affective disorder, children at moderate risk, and children at low risk. A series of path analyses indicated that in this sample (1) classroom behavior was more likely an affect that a cause of academic achievement, and (2) the influence of parental psychopathology on classroom behavior was mediated by a child's intelligence and academic achievement. We were unable to substantiate an unmediated causal link between parental psychopathology and children's academic achievement or classroom behavior.

  19. Reduced accommodation in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leat, S J

    1996-09-01

    Accommodation in 43 subjects with cerebral palsy was measured objectively using a dynamic retinoscopy technique, which has already been shown to be reliable and repeatable. The subject's ages ranged from 3 to 35 years. Of these, 42% were found to have an accommodative response pattern which was different from the normal control group for his/her age. Nearly 29% had an estimated amplitude of accommodation of 4 D or less. The presence of reduced accommodation was found to be associated with reduced visual acuity, but was not associated with cognitive or communication ability, refractive error or age. The prevalence of other ocular disorders in this group is also high. These findings have developmental and educational implications.

  20. Observed classroom behavior of children with ADHD: relationship to gender and comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abikoff, Howard B; Jensen, Peter S; Arnold, L L Eugene; Hoza, Betsy; Hechtman, Lily; Pollack, Simcha; Martin, Diane; Alvir, Jose; March, John S; Hinshaw, Stephen; Vitiello, Benedetto; Newcorn, Jeffrey; Greiner, Andrew; Cantwell, Dennis P; Conners, C Keith; Elliott, Glen; Greenhill, Laurence L; Kraemer, Helena; Pelham, William E; Severe, Joanne B; Swanson, James M; Wells, Karen; Wigal, Tim

    2002-08-01

    Examined hypothesized gender and comorbidity differences in the observed classroom behavior of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The behavior of 403 boys and 99 girls with ADHD, ages 7-10, was compared (a) to observed, sex-specific classroom behavior norms, (b) by sex, and (c) by comorbid subgroups. Boys and girls with ADHD deviated significantly from classroom norms on 15/16 and 13/16 categories, respectively. Compared to comparison girls, girls with ADHD had relatively high rates of verbal aggression to children. Boys with ADHD engaged in more rule-breaking and externalizing behaviors than did girls with ADHD, but the sexes did not differ on more "neutral," unobtrusive behaviors. The sex differences are consistent with notions of why girls with ADHD are identified and referred later than boys. Contrary to hypothesis, the presence of comorbid anxiety disorder (ANX) was not associated with behavioral suppression; yet, as hypothesized, children with a comorbid disruptive behavior disorder (DBD) had higher rates of rule-breaking, and impulsive and aggressive behavior, than did children with ADHD alone and those with ADHD+ANX. Elevated rates of ADHD behaviors were also observed in children with comorbid DBD, indicating that these behaviors are truly present and suggesting that reports of higher ADHD ratings in this subgroup are not simply a consequence of negative halo effects and rater biases.

  1. Teachers' education, classroom quality, and young children's academic skills: results from seven studies of preschool programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Diane M; Maxwell, Kelly L; Burchinal, Margaret; Alva, Soumya; Bender, Randall H; Bryant, Donna; Cai, Karen; Clifford, Richard M; Ebanks, Caroline; Griffin, James A; Henry, Gary T; Howes, Carollee; Iriondo-Perez, Jeniffer; Jeon, Hyun-Joo; Mashburn, Andrew J; Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen; Pianta, Robert C; Vandergrift, Nathan; Zill, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to provide high-quality preschool education, policymakers are increasingly requiring public preschool teachers to have at least a Bachelor's degree, preferably in early childhood education. Seven major studies of early care and education were used to predict classroom quality and children's academic outcomes from the educational attainment and major of teachers of 4-year-olds. The findings indicate largely null or contradictory associations, indicating that policies focused solely on increasing teachers' education will not suffice for improving classroom quality or maximizing children's academic gains. Instead, raising the effectiveness of early childhood education likely will require a broad range of professional development activities and supports targeted toward teachers' interactions with children.

  2. Effects of classroom animal-assisted activities on social functioning in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Haire, Marguerite E; McKenzie, Samantha J; McCune, Sandra; Slaughter, Virginia

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to implement and evaluate a classroom-based Animal-Assisted Activities (AAA) program on social functioning in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This was a multisite, control-to-intervention design study. The study was conducted in 41 classrooms in 15 schools in Brisbane, Australia. Sixty-four (64) 5- to 12-year-old children diagnosed with ASD comprised the study group. The AAA program consisted of 8 weeks of animal exposure in the school classroom in addition to 16 20-minute animal-interaction sessions. Teacher- and parent-reported child behavior and social functioning were assessed through standardized instruments at three time points: upon study entry (Time 1), after an 8-week waiting period during the week prior to the AAA program (Time 2), and during the week following the 8-week AAA program (Time 3). Significant improvements were identified in social functioning, including increases in social approach behaviors and social skills, and decreases in social withdrawal behaviors, from before to after the AAA program, but not during the waitlist period. Over half of parents also reported that participants demonstrated an increased interest in attending school during the program. Results demonstrate the feasibility and potential efficacy of a new classroom-based Animal-Assisted Activities model, which may provide a relatively simple and cost-effective means of helping educators and families to improve the social functioning of children with ASD.

  3. Classroom Displays--Attraction or Distraction? Evidence of Impact on Attention and Learning from Children with and without Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Mary; Khairat, Mariam; Taylor, Korey; Wilson, Rachel; Cole-Fletcher, Rachel; Riby, Deborah M.

    2017-01-01

    Paying attention is a critical first step toward learning. For children in primary school classrooms there can be many things to attend to other than the focus of a lesson, such as visual displays on classroom walls. The aim of this study was to use eye-tracking techniques to explore the impact of visual displays on attention and learning for…

  4. How Are They Really Doing? Observation of Inclusionary Classroom Participation for Children with Mild-to-Moderate Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, Christina M.; Barnett, David; Bauer, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    Direct observation was utilized to study how 5 children with mild-to-moderate deafness participated within inclusive classroom settings. Responses to practice and prompt opportunities, levels of prompting required to follow classroom directions, and engagement were analyzed across students with mild-to-moderate deafness and were compared to…

  5. Individual and Classroom Variables Associated with Relational Aggression in Elementary-School Aged Children: A Multilevel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppens, S.; Grietens, H.; Onghena, P.; Michiels, D.; Subramanian, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    Relational aggression was studied within classroom environments by examining individual and classroom correlates among 2731 children (3rd-5th graders) during two successive measurement years. Multilevel analyses yielded small gender differences for relational aggression, indicating that such aggressive behavior was more associated with girls as…

  6. Hair-aluminum concentrations and children's classroom behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, C; Marlowe, M

    1986-12-01

    The study investigated the relationship between children's hair-Al concentrations and children's behavioral performance in school. Hair-Al levels of 102 children drawn from a general school population were correlated with teachers' ratings of the children on the Walker Problem Behavior Identification Checklist (WPBIC). Increasing hair-Al values correlated significantly with increased scores on the WPBIC total scale score. A continuing reexamination of Al exposure in the young is needed in order to determine the margin of safety regarding potentially toxic levels of Al.

  7. Using a Virtual Classroom Environment to Describe the Attention Deficits Profile of Children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboa, Yafit; Rosenblum, Sara; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Toledano-Alhadef, Hagit; Rizzo, Albert; Josman, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the nature of the attention deficits in children with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in comparison with typically developing (TD) children, using the Virtual Classroom (VC), and to assess the utility of this instrument for detecting attention deficits. Twenty-nine NF1 children and 25 age-and…

  8. Social Network Analysis of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Predictors of Fragmentation and Connectivity in Elementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ariana; Locke, Jill; Kretzmann, Mark; Kasari, Connie

    2016-01-01

    Although children with autism spectrum disorder are frequently included in mainstream classrooms, it is not known how their social networks change compared to typically developing children and whether the factors predictive of this change may be unique. This study identified and compared predictors of social connectivity of children with and…

  9. Supporting Children's Oral Language Development in the Preschool Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whorrall, Jennifer; Cabell, Sonia Q.

    2016-01-01

    Supporting children's oral language development during the preschool years is critical for later reading success. Research shows that preschool teachers may be missing opportunities to engage children in the kinds of conversations that foster the development of rich oral language skills. Teachers hoping to support these skills can provide children…

  10. Helping Children with Attentional Challenges in the Montessori Classroom: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehring Massie, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Catherine Nehring Massie provides important contextual information in considering children with attentional challenges. She discusses the prevalence of attentional challenges in today's culture and the contributing factors. She gives a general overview of the spectrum of attentional challenges and some of the indicators in children. Her history of…

  11. Food Allergy Concerns in Primary Classrooms: Keeping Children Safe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Peggy; Cameron, Elizabeth Ann

    2012-01-01

    Food-allergy awareness and management have only lately come to the forefront in early childhood settings, although advocacy organizations have been working on the issue for more than a decade. A national poll (C.S. Mott Children's Hospital 2009) asked parents with children in early education settings if they were aware of what their program does…

  12. Supporting Children's Oral Language Development in the Preschool Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whorrall, Jennifer; Cabell, Sonia Q.

    2016-01-01

    Supporting children's oral language development during the preschool years is critical for later reading success. Research shows that preschool teachers may be missing opportunities to engage children in the kinds of conversations that foster the development of rich oral language skills. Teachers hoping to support these skills can provide children…

  13. Teaching Children's Literature Online: Modern Technology and Virtual Classroom Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenika-Agbaw, Vivian

    2010-01-01

    Online teaching, a new phenomenon in literary studies has elicited strong emotions among scholars of children's literature, some of whom are noted for their progressive beliefs. Like most of my colleagues in the academy, I was skeptical about teaching a graduate children's literature course online initially because I thought it would not only…

  14. What hearing children think regarding the inclusion of deaf children in the regular classroom: a comparative study with Brazilian children in a public and a private school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Vargas Dorneles

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates how hearing children relate to the presence of a deaf child in a classroom group. An analysis is made of the influence of social class in relation to the acceptance of the deaf child by the hearing children. The 144 children from the 3rd to 5th series that participated in the study were distributed thus: 76 from a private school and 68 from a public school, both from Porto Alegre, RS. The public school largely attended lower level socioeconomic classes, while the private school attended pupils from predominantly middle to upper social classes. All received the same task: Complete a story that describes the reaction of hearing students to the insertion of a new deaf colleague in the classroom group. The study demonstrates that pupils wish to attempt to communicate with the deaf child and would socialize with the child outside the classroom. They demonstrate a somewhat protective discourse in relation to the subject who they consider disabled but not incapable of communicating. Understanding how hearing children relate to, and include a deaf child within the classroom, raises the possibility of new forms of thinking regarding the preparation of hearing children to possible inclusion processes. Recognizing their ideas, feelings and forms of communication aids educational institutions to invest in inclusion policies.

  15. Effects of classroom bilingualism on task-shifting, verbal memory, and word learning in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushanskaya, Margarita; Gross, Megan; Buac, Milijana

    2014-07-01

    We examined the effects of classroom bilingual experience in children on an array of cognitive skills. Monolingual English-speaking children were compared with children who spoke English as the native language and who had been exposed to Spanish in the context of dual-immersion schooling for an average of 2 years. The groups were compared on a measure of non-linguistic task-shifting; measures of verbal short-term and working memory; and measures of word learning. The two groups of children did not differ on measures of non-linguistic task-shifting and verbal short-term memory. However, the classroom-exposure bilingual group outperformed the monolingual group on the measure of verbal working memory and a measure of word learning. Together, these findings indicate that while exposure to a second language in a classroom setting may not be sufficient to engender changes in cognitive control, it can facilitate verbal memory and verbal learning. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The questions verbal children with autism spectrum disorder encounter in the inclusive preschool classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Eric J; Irvin, Dwight W; Belardi, Katie; McCune, Luke; Boyd, Brian A; Odom, Samuel L

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated questions adults asked to children with autism spectrum disorder in inclusive pre-kindergarten classrooms, and whether child (e.g. autism severity) and setting (i.e. adult-to-child ratio) characteristics were related to questions asked during center-time. Videos of verbal children with autism spectrum disorder (n = 42) were coded based on the following question categories adapted from the work of Massey et al.: management, low cognitive challenging, or cognitively challenging. Results indicated that management questions (mean = 19.97, standard deviation = 12.71) were asked more than less cognitively challenging questions (mean = 14.22, standard deviation = 8.98) and less cognitively challenging questions were asked more than cognitively challenging questions (mean = 10.00, standard deviation = 6.9). Children with higher language levels had a greater likelihood of receiving cognitively challenging questions (odds ratio = 1.025; p = 0.007). Cognitively challenging questions had a greater likelihood of being asked in classrooms with more adults relative to children (odds ratio = 1.176; p = 0.037). The findings present a first step in identifying the questions directed at preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder in inclusive classrooms. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Effects of Classroom Bilingualism on Task Shifting, Verbal Memory, and Word Learning in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushanskaya, Margarita; Gross, Megan; Buac, Milijana

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of classroom bilingual experience in children on an array of cognitive skills. Monolingual English-speaking children were compared with children who spoke English as the native language and who had been exposed to Spanish in the context of dual-immersion schooling for an average of two years. The groups were compared on a measure of non-linguistic task-shifting; measures of verbal short-term and working memory; and measures of word-learning. The two groups of children did not differ on measures of non-linguistic task-shifting and verbal short-term memory. However, the classroom-exposure bilingual group outperformed the monolingual group on the measure of verbal working memory and a measure of word-learning. Together, these findings indicate that while exposure to a second language in a classroom setting may not be sufficient to engender changes in cognitive control, it can facilitate verbal memory and verbal learning. PMID:24576079

  18. Private speech in preschool children: developmental stability and change, across-task consistency, and relations with classroom behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsler, Adam; De León, Jesus René; Wallace, Beverly A; Carlton, Martha P; Willson-Quayle, Angela

    2003-08-01

    This study examined (a) developmental stability and change in children's private speech during the preschool years, (b) across-task consistency in children's self-speech, and (c) across-setting relations between children's private speech in the laboratory and their behaviour at home and in the preschool classroom. A group of 32 normally developing three- and four-year-old children was observed twice (six month interobservation interval) while engaging in the same individual problem-solving tasks. Measures of private speech were collected from transcribed videotapes. Naturalistic observations of children's behaviour in the preschool classroom were conducted, and teachers and parents reported on children's behaviour at home and school. Individual differences in preschool children's private speech use were generally stable across tasks and time and related to children's observed and reported behaviour at school and home. Children whose private speech was more partially internalized had fewer externalizing behaviour problems and better social skills as reported by parents and teachers. Children whose private speech was largely task-irrelevant engaged in less goal-directed behaviour in the classroom, expressed more negative affect in the classroom, and rated as having poorer social skills and more behaviour problems. Developmental change occurred during the preschool years in children's use and internalization of private speech during problem-solving in the form of a reduction over time in the total number of social speech utterances, a decrease in the average number of words per utterance, and an increase in the proportion of private speech that was partially internalized.

  19. Low intensity phonological awareness training in a preschool classroom for children with communication impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Sandra P; Espeland, Wendy

    2005-01-01

    Phonological awareness is a term that refers to one's knowledge of the sound structure of spoken language. Children who understand that sounds in language represent the letters used in reading and writing typically learn to read more easily than children who do not. Children with language and/or speech impairments often demonstrate a lack of phonological awareness. Thus, it is important to identify problems in phonological awareness and to implement intervention programs early. The purpose of this study was to determine if a low intensity, classroom phonological awareness program improved phonological awareness skills for preschool children with language and/or speech impairments. Results suggested that children made significant gains in phonological awareness after participating in the intervention. As a result of this activity, the reader will be able to: (1) identify components of phonological awareness program; (2) evaluate effectiveness of phonological awareness intervention.

  20. Real Children and Technology in the Cosmic Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Gary

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on elementary and middle school children, the technology they are embracing, and Montessori methods in education. Connects Montessori philosophy and practices with the concepts of Marshall McLuhan on interactivity and technological change. (ET)

  1. Moral, Social, and Civic Issues in the Classroom. Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Powell, Brenda, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Critiques a set of children's books that focus on moral, social, and civic issues. All of the titles offer concrete examples of critical thinking and steer clear of agenda-based politics. Includes nonfiction, anthologies, and curriculum guides. (MJP)

  2. Reducing Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure of Preschool Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Class-Based Health Education and Smoking Cessation Counseling for Caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Yun Wang; Zhiqiang Huang; Mei Yang; Fuzhi Wang; Shuiyuan Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess counseling to caregivers and classroom health education interventions to reduce environmental tobacco smoke exposure of children aged 5–6 years in China. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial in two preschools in Changsha, China, 65 children aged 5–6 years old and their smoker caregivers (65) were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 33) and control (no intervention) groups (n = 32). In the intervention group, caregivers received self-help materials and smoking ces...

  3. Assessment of inhibition deficits with the virtual classroom in children with traumatic brain injury: a pilot-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolin, Pierre; Martin, Cyndie; Bouchard, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the performance of 8 children who have sustained a traumatic brain injury on the traditional VIGIL Continuous Performance Test and the Continuous Performance Test included in the Virtual Classroom. Results supported the hypothesis, showing that the Continuous Performance Test from the Virtual Classroom showed more sensitivity concerning inhibition deficits. More precisely, children showed more commission errors and longer reaction time. These results can be explained by the ecological character of the Virtual Classroom, meaning that this instrument is close to real-life experiences and requires more attention and inhibition resources.

  4. Profiles of dysfluency and errors in classroom discourse among children with language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peets, Kathleen F

    2009-01-01

    The current study is part of a larger study that focused on within-group classroom discourse patterns of children in special education classes for language impairment (LI). Eleven children with LI aged 7-9 were examined across 4 classroom contexts: dialogic journal-writing, group lesson, peer play and sharing time. Amount and complexity of language produced (mean length of turn, type token ratio), dysfluency (self-correction, self-repetition and speaker overlap) and communicative errors were plotted for visual analysis of profiles of performance. Results showed group differences in amount and complexity of language produced, dysfluency and errors. Profiles revealed individual variation in patterns of performance that tended to cluster into sub-group similarities in amount and complexity of talk, dysfluency and errors. Implications relate to the sub-classification of LI, as well as to assessment of and therapy for such subgroups. The reader will be able to consider why within-group patterns offer different and more qualitative information than cross-group comparisons, and understand the need for both approaches to the study of language in atypically developing children. The reader will be able to differentiate between group patterns and individual differences in dimensions of classroom discourse. The reader will be able to appreciate the impact of social context on different dimensions of communication among children with LI in the classroom. The reader will be able to discuss the role that individual differences and group patterns bear on issues of assessment and treatment of LI in the school system.

  5. Young African American children constructing identities in an urban integrated science-literacy classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Justine M.

    This is a qualitative study of identities constructed and enacted by four 3rd-grade African American children (two girls and two boys) in an urban classroom that engaged in a year-long, integrated science-literacy project. Juxtaposing narrative and discursive identity lenses, coupled with race and gender perspectives, I examined the ways in which the four children saw and performed themselves as students and as science students in their classroom. Interview data were used for the narrative analysis and classroom Discourse and artifacts were used for the discursive analysis. A constructivist grounded theory framework was adopted for both analyses. The findings highlight the diversity and richness of perspectives and forms of engagement these young children shared and enacted, and help us see African American children as knowers, doers, and talkers of science individually and collectively. In their stories about themselves, all the children identified themselves as smart but they associated with smartness different characteristics and practices depending on their strengths and preferences. Drawing on the children's social, cultural, and ethnolinguistic resources, the dialogic and multimodal learning spaces facilitated by their teacher allowed the children to explore, negotiate, question, and learn science ideas. The children in this study brought their understandings and ways of being into the "lived-in" spaces co-created with classmates and teacher and influenced how these spaces were created. At the same time, each child's ways of being and understandings were shaped by the words, actions, behaviors, and feelings of peers and teacher. Moreover, as these four children engaged with science-literacy activities, they came to see themselves as competent, creative, active participants in science learning. Although their stories of "studenting" seemed dominated by following rules and being well-behaved, their stories of "sciencing" were filled with exploration, ingenuity

  6. The Effects of Summer Reading on Low Income Children's Literacy Achievement from Kindergarten to Grade 8: A Metaanalysis of Classroom and Home Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, James S.; Quinn, David M.

    2013-01-01

    This meta-analysis reviewed research on summer reading interventions conducted in the United States and Canada from 1998 to 2011. The synthesis included 41 classroom-and home-based summer reading interventions involving children from kindergarten to Grade 8. Compared to control group children, children who participated in classroom interventions,…

  7. Group Contingencies, Randomization of Reinforcers, and Criteria for Reinforcement, Self-Monitoring, and Peer Feedback on Reducing Inappropriate Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coogan, Brenda Anne; Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.; Chafouleas, Sandra M.

    2007-01-01

    Considerable research has demonstrated the effectiveness of interdependent and unknown dependent group contingencies on reducing inappropriate classroom behavior. Several investigators have focused on the addition of self-monitoring and peer feedback to these interdependent and unknown dependent group contingencies in order to further improve…

  8. Live Video Classroom Observation: An Effective Approach to Reducing Reactivity in Collecting Observational Information for Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiwen

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the significance of live video classroom observations of teaching practice to reduce reactivity (the observer effect) so as to obtain more credible observational information for teacher professional development in a secondary school in the largest city in southern China. Although much has been discussed regarding the use of…

  9. Effects of Classwide Positive Peer "Tootling" to Reduce the Disruptive Classroom Behaviors of Elementary Students with and without Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihak, David F.; Kirk, Emily R.; Boon, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of a classwide positive peer reporting intervention known as "tootling" in conjunction with a group contingency procedure to reduce the number of disruptive behaviors in a third-grade inclusive classroom. Nineteen elementary students including four students with disabilities (i.e., specific learning…

  10. Live Video Classroom Observation: An Effective Approach to Reducing Reactivity in Collecting Observational Information for Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiwen

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the significance of live video classroom observations of teaching practice to reduce reactivity (the observer effect) so as to obtain more credible observational information for teacher professional development in a secondary school in the largest city in southern China. Although much has been discussed regarding the use of…

  11. Effect of a classroom-based behavioral intervention package on the improvement of children's sitting posture in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Wataru; Tanaka-Matsumi, Junko

    2009-03-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of a classroom-based behavioral intervention package to improve Japanese elementary school children's sitting posture in regular classrooms (N=68). This study uses a multiple-baseline design across two classrooms with a modified repeated reversal within each class. The article defines appropriate sitting posture as behavior composed of four components (feet, buttocks, back, and a whole body). The intervention package includes modeling, correspondence training, prompt, and reinforcement, among others. The authors counted the number of children with appropriate sitting posture in each classroom across all 28 sessions throughout the study. Interobserver agreement of appropriate sitting posture ranged from 80% to 100%. As a result of the intervention, the mean proportion of children with appropriate posture increased from approximately 20% to 90%. In addition, their academic writing productivity increased with the improved sitting posture. Teachers' acceptance of the intervention program proved to be excellent.

  12. Classroom norms of bullying alter the degree to which children defend in response to their affective empathy and power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peets, Kätlin; Pöyhönen, Virpi; Juvonen, Jaana; Salmivalli, Christina

    2015-07-01

    This study examined whether the degree to which bullying is normative in the classroom would moderate associations between intra- (cognitive and affective empathy, self-efficacy beliefs) and interpersonal (popularity) factors and defending behavior. Participants were 6,708 third- to fifth-grade children (49% boys; Mage = 11 years) from 383 classrooms. Multilevel modeling analyses revealed that children were more likely to defend in response to their affective empathy in classrooms with high levels of bullying. In addition, popular students were more likely to support victims in classrooms where bullying was associated with social costs. These findings highlight the importance of considering interactions among individual and contextual influences when trying to understand which factors facilitate versus inhibit children's inclinations to defend others.

  13. Reduced error signalling in medication-naive children with ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Allen, Elena A; Eichele, Heike;

    2016-01-01

    and correlated them with reaction times (RT). Additionally, we analyzed post-error adaptations in behaviour and motor component activations. RESULTS: We included 25 children with ADHD and 29 controls in our analysis. Children with ADHD displayed reduced activation to errors in cingulo-opercular regions......BACKGROUND: We examined the blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activation in brain regions that signal errors and their association with intraindividual behavioural variability and adaptation to errors in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). METHODS: We acquired...... functional MRI data during a Flanker task in medication-naive children with ADHD and healthy controls aged 8-12 years and analyzed the data using independent component analysis. For components corresponding to performance monitoring networks, we compared activations across groups and conditions...

  14. Reduced error signalling in medication-naive children with ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Allen, Elena A; Eichele, Heike

    2016-01-01

    functional MRI data during a Flanker task in medication-naive children with ADHD and healthy controls aged 8-12 years and analyzed the data using independent component analysis. For components corresponding to performance monitoring networks, we compared activations across groups and conditions......BACKGROUND: We examined the blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activation in brain regions that signal errors and their association with intraindividual behavioural variability and adaptation to errors in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). METHODS: We acquired...... and correlated them with reaction times (RT). Additionally, we analyzed post-error adaptations in behaviour and motor component activations. RESULTS: We included 25 children with ADHD and 29 controls in our analysis. Children with ADHD displayed reduced activation to errors in cingulo-opercular regions...

  15. Effects of sensory education based on classroom activities for lower grade school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Taejung; Lee, Kyung-Hea

    2013-08-01

    This study is to verify the effects of sensory education based on classroom activities for 2(nd) and 3(rd) grade children. The hypothesis is that children who participated in sensory education would demonstrate positive changes in eating behaviors through sensory experiences. The sensory education program consists of 12 lessons. Twenty-six children were being recruited from one school in Changwon, Korea. Two control groups, one of which was the same age as the educated group and the other group of sixth graders, were selected by random sampling from the same school. Children answered a self-administered questionnaire. The parents (n = 20) of the children who participated in the program, took part in evaluating the program through self-administered questionnaires after the program ended. The questionnaire contained variables of general characteristics, education satisfaction, nutrition knowledge, eating attitude and behavior concerning unfamiliar foods. The score of nutrition knowledge was improved in educated children (P < 0.05). Food neophobia score towards unfamiliar foods (P < 0.05) was increased in educated children, but there are no changes in eating behaviors in all groups towards unfamiliar foods. In conclusion, sensory education is useful for having a positive eating attitude among children. Its consistent implementation could lead to healthier and well-balanced eating behaviors for children.

  16. Attention-getting skills of deaf children using American Sign Language in a preschool classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Amy M

    2015-07-01

    Visual attention is a necessary prerequisite to successful communication in sign language. The current study investigated the development of attention-getting skills in deaf native-signing children during interactions with peers and teachers. Seven deaf children (aged 21-39 months) and five adults were videotaped during classroom activities for approximately 30 hr. Interactions were analyzed in depth to determine how children obtained and maintained attention. Contrary to previous reports, children were found to possess a high level of communicative competence from an early age. Analysis of peer interactions revealed that children used a range of behaviors to obtain attention with peers, including taps, waves, objects, and signs. Initiations were successful approximately 65% of the time. Children followed up failed initiation attempts by repeating the initiation, using a new initiation, or terminating the interaction. Older children engaged in longer and more complex interactions than younger children. Children's early exposure to and proficiency in American Sign Language is proposed as a likely mechanism that facilitated their communicative competence.

  17. The Effects of Classroom Interventions on Off-Task and Disruptive Classroom Behavior in Children with Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder : A Meta-Analytic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaastra, Geraldina F; Groen, Yvonne; Tucha, Lara; Tucha, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often exhibit problem behavior in class, which teachers often struggle to manage due to a lack of knowledge and skills to use classroom management strategies. The aim of this meta-analytic review was to determine the effectiveness of seve

  18. Vocabulary learning in Head Start: Nature and extent of classroom instruction and its contributions to children's learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Annemarie H; Wasik, Barbara A

    2013-06-01

    In the current study, we employed the 2006 cohort of the large-scale, nationally representative, Head Start Family and Child Experiences (FACES) dataset to construct a snapshot of vocabulary instruction and learning in high-poverty preschools. Specifically, we examined Head Start teachers' reports of the frequency of vocabulary instruction in their classrooms as well as the overall quality of their classroom instruction. We also explored the teacher- and center-level factors that predicted these dual aspects of instruction, and the role of that instruction in children's vocabulary development over the preschool year. Participants included 293 teachers in 116 Head Start centers, as well as 2501 children in their classrooms. Results showed that, whereas there was notable variation, most teachers reported providing a variety of vocabulary-focused instructional activities nearly every day. The quality of their classroom instruction was generally modest. Classroom instructional quality was predictive of children's vocabulary learning, with stronger relations apparent for children with lower initial skills and for classrooms with higher quality instruction. The frequency of instruction in vocabulary was not related to children's word learning. Results provide new descriptive data about the state of vocabulary instruction in Head Start preschools and highlight both areas of success and opportunities for additional support.

  19. The association between lead and micronutrient status, and children's sleep, classroom behavior, and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordas, Katarzyna; Casavantes, K Marcela; Mendoza, Cristina; Lopez, Patricia; Ronquillo, Dolores; Rosado, Jorge L; Vargas, Gonzalo García; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2007-01-01

    The role of lead exposure or micronutrient deficiencies in children's sleep problems is unknown. Although elevated blood lead concentrations (BPb) are clearly related to behavior problems in children, few researchers have used objective observations. The authors investigated relationships between lead, micronutrient status, sleep, classroom behavior, and activity in Mexican children aged 6-8 years living close to a metal foundry. Mean BPb was 11.5 +/- 6.1 microg/dL; 50% had levels >or= 10 microg/dL. Ten percent of children had hemoglobin or= 10 microg/dL was associated with later waking time and shorter duration of sleep. Anemia was linked to more off-task behaviors, lower physical activity, earlier bedtime, and shorter sleep onset. Researchers should investigate these relationships further, using more sensitive measures.

  20. Literacy and Children's Literature: Evidence from Actual Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Darwish, Salwa

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study aims at detecting areas that requires to be developed in the EFL reading program in elementary stages in Kuwaiti public schools by using children's literature. It also examines the reading program in the public elementary curriculum. The participants were six English language major students from the College of Basic…

  1. Children of Divorce in the Elementary School Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Mary E.

    In this document, literature is reviewed concerning (1) effects of divorce on the academic achievement, behavior, and self-concept of elementary school students; and (2) ways the adjustment of children whose parents have divorced can be facilitated in schools by teachers and counselors. Annotations of 40 articles are provided. Also included are a…

  2. The Magical Classroom: Exploring Science, Language, and Perception with Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Michael J.

    The science of magic is the subject of this book which also examines how to help children experience and describe the world, how to experiment and ask questions about it, and how to make decisions about what is true and what is not. Background information about the relationship between magic and science and the nature of effects and illusions are…

  3. Children's Talking and Listening within the Classroom: Teachers' Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosacki, Sandra; Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Coplan, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that social communication (verbal and non-verbal) plays a key role in students' and teachers' elementary-school experiences. Within the framework of sociocognitive developmental theory, this qualitative study investigates teachers' experiences and perceptions of children's talking and listening habits within the elementary-grade…

  4. The Role of Children's Books in Classroom Discourse and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the factors that contributed to how typical book reading practices and the time spent on book reading were implemented during the school day. Previous research has shown the importance of reading books to young children and that providing access to books has led to reading growth and progress. However, little…

  5. Solving Ethical Dilemmas with Children: Empowering Classroom Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Michelann

    2010-01-01

    This article identifies and discusses ethical dilemmas inherent when undertaking research with children or other vulnerable populations: power relations, risks and benefits, and informed consent and confidentiality (Maguire, 2005). Ethical dilemmas often arise when researchers attempt to merge the interests of their research and the interests of…

  6. Kindergarten Plus: Integrating Children with Disabilities into Early Childhood Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch-Berney, Tomi; Ticke, Lynne

    1995-01-01

    New York City's SuperStart Plus and Kindergarten Plus programs provide a developmentally appropriate learning environment that encourages both general- and special-education children's language, cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development. Teachers integrate multicultural and English-as-a-Second-Language strategies into their teaching.…

  7. The Role of Children's Books in Classroom Discourse and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the factors that contributed to how typical book reading practices and the time spent on book reading were implemented during the school day. Previous research has shown the importance of reading books to young children and that providing access to books has led to reading growth and progress. However, little…

  8. Children's Talking and Listening within the Classroom: Teachers' Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosacki, Sandra; Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Coplan, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that social communication (verbal and non-verbal) plays a key role in students' and teachers' elementary-school experiences. Within the framework of sociocognitive developmental theory, this qualitative study investigates teachers' experiences and perceptions of children's talking and listening habits within the elementary-grade…

  9. Classroom displays-Attraction or distraction? Evidence of impact on attention and learning from children with and without autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Mary; Khairat, Mariam; Taylor, Korey; Wilson, Rachel; Cole-Fletcher, Rachel; Riby, Deborah M

    2017-07-01

    Paying attention is a critical first step toward learning. For children in primary school classrooms there can be many things to attend to other than the focus of a lesson, such as visual displays on classroom walls. The aim of this study was to use eye-tracking techniques to explore the impact of visual displays on attention and learning for children. Critically, we explored these issues for children developing typically and for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Both groups of children watched videos of a teacher delivering classroom activities-2 of "story-time" and 2 mini lessons. Half of the videos each child saw contained high levels of classroom visual displays in the background (high visual display [HVD]) and half had none (no visual display [NVD]). Children completed worksheets after the mini lessons to measure learning. During viewing of all videos children's eye movements were recorded. The presence of visual displays had a significant impact on attention for all children, but to a greater extent for children with ASD. Visual displays also had an impact on learning from the mini lessons, whereby children had poorer learning scores in the HVD compared with the NVD lesson. Individual differences in age, verbal, nonverbal, and attention abilities were important predictors of learning, but time spent attending the visual displays in HVD was the most important predictor. This novel and timely investigation has implications for the use of classroom visual displays for all children, but particularly for children with ASD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Effects of sound-field frequency modulation amplification on reducing teachers' sound pressure level in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, C M; Crandell, C C; Curtis, B

    1999-09-01

    Voice problems are a frequent difficulty that teachers experience. Common complaints by teachers include vocal fatigue and hoarseness. One possible explanation for these symptoms is prolonged elevations in vocal loudness within the classroom. This investigation examined the effectiveness of sound-field frequency modulation (FM) amplification on reducing the sound pressure level (SPL) of the teacher's voice during classroom instruction. Specifically, SPL was examined during speech produced in a classroom lecture by 10 teachers with and without the use of sound-field amplification. Results indicated a significant 2.42-dB decrease in SPL with the use of sound-field FM amplification. These data support the use of sound-field amplification in the vocal hygiene regimen recommended to teachers by speech-language pathologists.

  11. Observations of Representational Practices by Indian-Descent Children in a US Preschool Classroom: Connections among People, Spaces and Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braswell, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study examined children's experiences with producing and comprehending external representations in a preschool classroom. Data collection and analyses focused on how artifacts, spaces, adult-guided routines, and social conventions shape young children's representational development. Participants included 4- and…

  12. A Strategy to Increase the Social Interactions of 3-Year-Old Children with Disabilities in an Inclusive Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton-Chapman, Tina L.; Brown, Tiara S.

    2015-01-01

    The current study evaluated the play behaviors of children with disabilities (e.g., developmental delays, specific language impairment) who participated in a social communication intervention targeting skills such as initiations, responses, name use, proximity, and turn-taking. Three children who were enrolled in an inclusive classroom met the…

  13. Relationship of Children's Social Desirability Response Tendencies to Their Expectations of Response to Achievement Behaviors in Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Ellen F.

    This study clarifies the relationship between children's social desirability (CSD) response tendencies and their withdrawal from classroom achievement situations by investigating the effects of the child's expectations of peer response. Data gathered included scores on the Children's Social Desirability Scale, scores on an expectancy of response…

  14. First adaptation of coping power program as a classroom-based prevention intervention on aggressive behaviors among elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Pietro; Bertacchi, Iacopo; Giuli, Consuelo; Lombardi, Lavinia; Bonetti, Silvia; Nocentini, Annalaura; Manfredi, Azzurra; Polidori, Lisa; Ruglioni, Laura; Milone, Annarita; Lochman, John E

    2015-04-01

    Children with high levels of aggressive behavior create a major management problem in school settings and interfere with the learning environment of their classmates. We report results from a group-randomized trial of a program aimed at preventing aggressive behaviors. The purpose of the current study, therefore, was to determine the extent to which an indicated prevention program, Coping Power Program, is capable of reducing behavioral problems and improving pro-social behavior when delivered as a universal classroom-based prevention intervention. Nine classes (five first grade and four second grade) were randomly assigned to intervention or control conditions. Findings showed a significant reduction in overall problematic behaviors and in inattention-hyperactivity problems for the intervention classes compared to the control classes. Students who received Coping Power Program intervention also showed more pro-social behaviors at postintervention. The implications of these findings for the implementation of strategies aimed at preventing aggressive behavior in school settings are discussed.

  15. What works to promote classroom well-being and learning from the perspective of children and young people?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Kevin Anthony

    2016-01-01

    findings and give participants backstage insights about what students perceive promotes (or hinders) classroom well-being and learning, thereby giving participants new ideas that could be applied in their settings. Secondly, the presenter will gain insights from Australian practitioners concerning...... the impact that this new practice has on the overall classroom well-being and the learning environment. The aim of this project is to help fill this knowledge gap by investigating what impact this new practice has on classroom well-being and learning from the perspectives of students. The study takes place...... in ten local authority run schools and contributes towards understanding the micro-processes at play that either promote or obstruct classroom well-being and learning. The workshop draws on data gathered through thirty focus group interviews with children across the school age spectrum as well classroom...

  16. Are children participating in a quasi-experimental education outside the classroom intervention more physically active?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneller, Mikkel Bo; Duncan, Scott; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2017-01-01

    Background: Education outside the classroom (EOtC) is a curriculum-based approach to teaching that has shown positive associations with children's physical activity and academic learning in small-scale case studies. The purpose of this large-scale quasi-experimental study was to determine...... if children who participate regularly in EOtC spend more time being physically active than children who do not. Methods: In the 2014/2015 study TEACHOUT, classes were recruited in pairs such that each EOtC class had a non-EOtC comparison class at the same school and grade level. Participants in 17 EOt...... to treat' (ITT) approach. The amount of EOtC the participants were exposed to was monitored. Associations between time spent in different physical activity intensities and EOtC group and sex were assessed using generalised linear models adjusted for age. In a second analysis, we modified the sample using...

  17. The effects of exergaming on physical activity among inactive children in a physical education classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Victoria A; Miltenberger, Raymond G; Graves, Rachel; Koehler, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Childhood obesity, which is due in part to lack of physical activity, is a serious concern that requires the attention of the behavioral community. Although excessive video game play has been noted in the literature as a contributor to childhood obesity, newer video gaming technology, called exergaming, has been designed to capitalize on the reinforcing effects of video games to increase physical activity in children. This study evaluated the effects of exergaming on physical activity among 4 inactive children in a physical education (PE) classroom. Results showed that exergaming produced substantially more minutes of physical activity and more minutes of opportunity to engage in physical activity than did the standard PE program. In addition, exergaming was socially acceptable to both the students and the PE teacher. Exergaming appears to hold promise as a method for increasing physical activity among inactive children and might be a possible intervention for childhood obesity.

  18. Topical anaesthesia in children: reducing the need for specialty referral.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Gabrielle

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: The management of wounds in children is stressful, not only for the child, but also for parents and staff. In our Emergency Department (ED), we currently do not have a paediatric sedation policy, and thus children requiring suturing, not amenable to distraction and infiltrative anaesthesia, are referred to specialty teams for general anaesthesia. We proposed that the introduction of a topical anaesthetic gel (lidocaine, adrenaline, tetracaine - LAT) might help to reduce the number of referrals, by allowing the ED staff to perform the procedures, in combination with nonpharmacological approaches. METHODS: We carried out a retrospective review of ED records of all children aged 14 years or less attending with wounds, over an 8-month period, from 01 May 2007 to 31 January 2008. RESULTS: Two hundred and one (50.6%) patients presented before the introduction of LAT gel, whereas 196 (49.3%) patients presented afterwards. A total of 39 (19.4%) patients were referred for specialty review pre-LAT, whereas only 19 (9.7%) patients were referred in the LAT group. Of these, 31 (15.4%) pre-LAT and 15 (7.7%) LAT group required general anaesthesia. There is a significant difference between these two groups, using Fischer\\'s exact test, P=0.018. CONCLUSION: We have found that the introduction of topical anaesthetic gel in ED has significantly reduced the number of children with wounds referred to specialty teams for general anaesthesia. This has important implications for patient safety and hospital resources.

  19. Manganese exposure from drinking water and children's classroom behavior in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Khalid; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Wasserman, Gail A; Liu, Xinhua; Ahmed, Ershad; Parvez, Faruque; Slavkovich, Vesna; Levy, Diane; Mey, Jacob; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H

    2011-10-01

    Evidence of neurological, cognitive, and neuropsychological effects of manganese (Mn) exposure from drinking water (WMn) in children has generated widespread public health concern. At elevated exposures, Mn has been associated with increased levels of externalizing behaviors, including irritability, aggression, and impulsivity. Little is known about potential effects at lower exposures, especially in children. Moreover, little is known regarding potential interactions between exposure to Mn and other metals, especially arsenic (As). We conducted a cross-sectional study of 201 children to investigate associations of Mn and As in tube well water with classroom behavior among elementary school children, 8-11 years of age, in Araihazar, Bangladesh. Data on exposures and behavioral outcomes were collected from the participants at the baseline of an ongoing longitudinal study of child intelligence. Study children were rated by their school teachers on externalizing and internalizing items of classroom behavior using the standardized Child Behavior Checklist-Teacher's Report Form (CBCL-TRF). Log-transformed WMn was positively and significantly associated with TRF internalizing [estimated β = 0.82; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.08-1.56; p = 0.03], TRF externalizing (estimated β = 2.59; 95% CI, 0.81-4.37; p =0.004), and TRF total scores (estimated β = 3.35; 95% CI, 0.86-5.83; p = 0.008) in models that adjusted for log-transformed water arsenic (WAs) and sociodemographic covariates. We also observed a positive monotonic dose-response relationship between WMn and TRF externalizing and TRF total scores among the participants of the study. We did not find any significant associations between WAs and various scales of TRF scores. These observations reinforce the growing concern regarding the neurotoxicologic effects of WMn in children.

  20. The Fun Families Study: intervention to reduce children's TV viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Markham, Christine M; Addy, Robert C; Greisinger, Anthony; Murray, Nancy G; Brehm, Brenda

    2010-02-01

    Media consumption may contribute to childhood obesity. This study developed and evaluated a theory-based, parent-focused intervention to reduce television and other media consumption to prevent and reduce childhood obesity. Families (n = 202) with children ages 6-9 were recruited from a large, urban multiethnic population into a randomized controlled trial (101 families into the intervention group and 101 into the control group), and were followed for 6 months. The intervention consisted of a 2-hour workshop and six bimonthly newsletters. Behavioral objectives included: (i) reduce TV watching; (ii) turn off TV when nobody is watching; (iii) no TV with meals; (iv) no TV in the child's bedroom; and (v) engage in fun non-media related activities. Parents were 89% female, 44% white, 28% African American, 17% Latino, and 11% Asian, mean age 40 years (s.d. = 7.5); 72% were married. Children were 49% female, mean age 8 years (s.d. = 0.95). Sixty-five percent of households had three or more TVs and video game players; 37% had at least one handheld video game, and 53% had three or more computers. Average children's weekday media exposure was 6.1 hours. At 6 months follow-up, the intervention group was less likely to report the TV being on when nobody was watching (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.23, P TV (AOR = 0.47, P TV in the child's bedroom (AOR = 0.23, P TV viewing were identified.

  1. Effects of a classroom intervention with spatial play materials on children's object and viewer transformation abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Heyden, Karin M; Huizinga, Mariette; Jolles, Jelle

    2017-02-01

    Children practice their spatial skills when playing with spatial toys, such as construction materials, board games, and puzzles. Sex and SES differences are observed in the engagement in such spatial play activities at home, which relate to individual differences in spatial performance. The current study investigated the effects of explicitly providing spatial play activities in the school setting on different types of spatial ability. We presented 8- to 10-year-old children with a short and easy-to-adopt classroom intervention comprising a set of different spatial play materials. The design involved a pretest-posttest comparison between the intervention group (n = 70) and a control group without intervention (n = 70). Effects were examined on object transformation ability (i.e., a paper-and-pencil mental rotation and paper folding task) and viewer transformation ability (i.e., a hands-on 3D spatial perspective-taking task). Results showed specific effects: there were no differences between the intervention and control group in progress on the two object transformation tasks. Substantial improvements were found for the intervention group compared to the control group on the viewer transformation task. Training progress was not related to sex and socioeconomic background of the child. These findings support the value of spatial play in the classroom for the spatial development of children between 8 and 10 years of age. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Reduced social morbidity of laparoscopic appendectomy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantoco, Joselito G; Levitt, Marc A; Hollands, Celeste M; Brisseau, Guy F; Caty, Michael G; Glick, Philip L

    2004-09-01

    Laparoscopic appendectomy has not been uniformly adopted by pediatric surgeons. Our children's hospital adopted laparoscopic appendectomy due to perceived benefits to patients and their families. We hypothesized that laparoscopic appendectomy in children resulted in less social morbidity than those undergoing open appendectomy. A questionnaire focused on a set of postoperative variables affecting the patient's and the family's return to normal activities. Families expressed their answers as a range of days. Five different ranges were assigned a numerical value for 10 different social morbidity variables. The numerical values were analyzed using Pearson chi2 test; statistical significance was defined as P appendicitis. Children undergoing laparoscopic appendectomy had shorter hospital stays and earlier resumption of feeding, return to school, return to pain-free walking and stair climbing, and resumption of normal activities including gym. Additionally, they had fewer wound problems, shorter duration of oral pain medication usage, and their parents returned to work quicker than the open group. All these were statistically significant. Laparoscopic appendectomy results in significantly reduced social morbidity for children and their families.

  3. Reduced Oblique Effect in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoeva, Olga V.; Davletshina, Maria A.; Orekhova, Elena V.; Galuta, Ilia A.; Stroganova, Tatiana A.

    2016-01-01

    People are very precise in the discrimination of a line orientation relative to the cardinal (vertical and horizontal) axes, while their orientation discrimination sensitivity along the oblique axes is less refined. This difference in discrimination sensitivity along cardinal and oblique axes is called the “oblique effect.” Given that the oblique effect is a basic feature of visual processing with an early developmental origin, its investigation in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) may shed light on the nature of visual sensory abnormalities frequently reported in this population. We examined line orientation sensitivity along oblique and vertical axes in a sample of 26 boys with ASD (IQ > 68) and 38 typically developing (TD) boys aged 7–15 years, as well as in a subsample of carefully IQ-matched ASD and TD participants. Children were asked to detect the direction of tilt of a high-contrast black-and-white grating relative to vertical (90°) or oblique (45°) templates. The oblique effect was reduced in children with ASD as compared to TD participants, irrespective of their IQ. This reduction was due to poor orientation sensitivity along the vertical axis in ASD children, while their ability to discriminate line orientation along the oblique axis was unaffected. We speculate that this deficit in sensitivity to vertical orientation may reflect disrupted mechanisms of early experience-dependent learning that takes place during the critical period for orientation selectivity. PMID:26834540

  4. Optimization of the virtual mouse HeadMouse to foster its classroom use by children with physical disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merce TEIXIDO

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the optimization of a virtual mouse called HeadMouse in order to foster its classroom use by children with physical disabilities. HeadMouse is an absolute virtual mouse that converts head movements in cursor displacement and facial gestures in click actions. The virtual mouse combines different image processing algorithms: face detection, pattern matching and optical flow in order to emulate the behaviour of a conventional computer mouse. The original implementation of HeadMouse requires large computational power and this paper proposes specific optimizations in order to enable its use by children with disabilities in standard low cost classroom computers.

  5. Teachers of young children (3-5 years old and their interaction with pupils: approaching positive classroom management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryni Paraskevopoulou

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the social and emotional development of children between three to five years old, the factors that affect their in-school behaviour and strategies for positive teacher classroom management. It is suggested that teachers need to reflect upon children’s development in order for an effective classroom management to be achieved. Aspects of teachers’ expectations about interaction between children and teachers will also be exemplified. Literature research was employed as a method to explore the relevant issues.

  6. Seeing is believing - reducing misconceptions about children's hospice care through effective teaching with undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jayne; Dornan, Jean; Quail, Lorraine

    2013-09-01

    Children's palliative care has evolved in recent years and is now recognised as a distinct area of health and social care practice. Whilst children's hospices are viewed as central to quality care for these children and families, lack of knowledge regarding the exact nature of care they provide exists. Education can go part way to changing attitudes and knowledge about the key contribution of hospices, thus improving future care. Alternative and innovative strategies to stimulate meaningful learning are pivotal to children's nurse education and this paper examines one such innovation adopted with 2nd year children's nursing students. Aiming to help students explore the ethos of children's hospice an educational visit was arranged, followed by an on line discussion. Although some practical challenges were encountered, the visit heightened student awareness moving them from the readily held perception that children's hospices were exclusively for dying children and was viewed by students as more effective than a traditional classroom session.

  7. Children's Engagement within the Preschool Classroom and Their Development of Self-Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williford, Amanda P; Vick Whittaker, Jessica E; Vitiello, Virginia E; Downer, Jason T

    2013-01-01

    This study used an observational measure to examine how individual children's engagement with teachers, peers, and tasks was associated with gains in self-regulation. A sample of 341 preschoolers was observed and direct assessments and teacher reports of self- regulation were obtained in the fall and spring of the preschool year. RESEARCH FINDINGS: Children's positive engagement with teachers was related to gains in compliance/executive function and children's active engagement with tasks was associated with gains in emotion regulation across the year. Engaging positively with teachers or peers was especially supportive of children's gains in task orientation and reductions in dysregulation. PRACTICE & POLICY: Results are discussed in relation to Vygotsky's developmental theory, emphasizing that psychological processes are developed in the context of socially embedded interactions. Systematically observing how a child interacts with peers, teachers, and learning tasks in the preschool classroom holds potential to inform the creation of professional development aimed at supporting teachers in fostering individual children's development within the early education environment.

  8. A Preliminary Investigation of a Specialized Music Therapy Model for Children with Disabilities Delivered in a Classroom Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Mendelson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Music therapy is gaining popularity as an intervention strategy for children with developmental disabilities, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD. This study was a pilot investigation of a classroom-based music-based intervention, Voices Together®, for improving communication skills in children with ASD and children with intellectual disabilities. Four local public elementary school special education classrooms, serving 5 children with a classification of autistic disorder and 32 children with intellectual disability without autism, were randomly selected to receive one of two levels of exposure to Voices Together music therapy: “long-term” (15 weeks beginning in January 2015 (Time 1, n=14 or “short-term” (7 weeks beginning 7 weeks later in February (Time 2, n=17. Using observational ratings, investigators reliably scored participants live in terms of their level of verbal responsiveness to prompts during three songs featured each week of the program. Both groups demonstrated increases in verbal responses over time; however, only the long-term group demonstrated significant within-group increases. Preliminary findings suggest that music therapy delivered in a classroom in 45-minute weekly sessions for 15 weeks can promote improvements in verbal responsiveness among individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. Findings warrant further investigation into the efficacy of classroom-based music therapy programs.

  9. A Preliminary Investigation of a Specialized Music Therapy Model for Children with Disabilities Delivered in a Classroom Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Jenna; White, Yasmine; Hans, Laura; Adebari, Richard; Schmid, Lorrie; Riggsbee, Jan; Goldsmith, Ali; Ozler, Burcu; Buehne, Kristen; Jones, Sarah; Shapleton, Jennifer; Dawson, Geraldine

    2016-01-01

    Music therapy is gaining popularity as an intervention strategy for children with developmental disabilities, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study was a pilot investigation of a classroom-based music-based intervention, Voices Together®, for improving communication skills in children with ASD and children with intellectual disabilities. Four local public elementary school special education classrooms, serving 5 children with a classification of autistic disorder and 32 children with intellectual disability without autism, were randomly selected to receive one of two levels of exposure to Voices Together music therapy: "long-term" (15 weeks beginning in January 2015 (Time 1), n = 14) or "short-term" (7 weeks beginning 7 weeks later in February (Time 2), n = 17). Using observational ratings, investigators reliably scored participants live in terms of their level of verbal responsiveness to prompts during three songs featured each week of the program. Both groups demonstrated increases in verbal responses over time; however, only the long-term group demonstrated significant within-group increases. Preliminary findings suggest that music therapy delivered in a classroom in 45-minute weekly sessions for 15 weeks can promote improvements in verbal responsiveness among individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. Findings warrant further investigation into the efficacy of classroom-based music therapy programs.

  10. A Preliminary Investigation of a Specialized Music Therapy Model for Children with Disabilities Delivered in a Classroom Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Yasmine; Hans, Laura; Adebari, Richard; Goldsmith, Ali; Ozler, Burcu; Buehne, Kristen; Jones, Sarah; Shapleton, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Music therapy is gaining popularity as an intervention strategy for children with developmental disabilities, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study was a pilot investigation of a classroom-based music-based intervention, Voices Together®, for improving communication skills in children with ASD and children with intellectual disabilities. Four local public elementary school special education classrooms, serving 5 children with a classification of autistic disorder and 32 children with intellectual disability without autism, were randomly selected to receive one of two levels of exposure to Voices Together music therapy: “long-term” (15 weeks beginning in January 2015 (Time 1), n = 14) or “short-term” (7 weeks beginning 7 weeks later in February (Time 2), n = 17). Using observational ratings, investigators reliably scored participants live in terms of their level of verbal responsiveness to prompts during three songs featured each week of the program. Both groups demonstrated increases in verbal responses over time; however, only the long-term group demonstrated significant within-group increases. Preliminary findings suggest that music therapy delivered in a classroom in 45-minute weekly sessions for 15 weeks can promote improvements in verbal responsiveness among individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. Findings warrant further investigation into the efficacy of classroom-based music therapy programs. PMID:27999683

  11. Randomization of Group Contingencies and Reinforcers To Reduce Classroom Disruptive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Lea A.; Bray, Melissa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Jenson, William R.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the effect of randomizing both contingencies for reinforcement and reinforcers to decrease classroom disruptive behavior in five adolescent students with serious emotional disorder. Results reveal that the percentage of observed intervals of disruptive behaviors decreased immediately and dramatically in all students. (Contains 24…

  12. The Role of Professional Learning in Reducing Isolation Experienced by Classroom Music Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jayne; Dwyer, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    There is substantial evidence in the literature to suggest that professional isolation is a significant problem for music teachers. This paper reports on the results of a survey regarding the professional learning of classroom music teachers (n = 53) from Foundation (also known as Preparatory, Reception or Kindergarten) to Year Nine. Teachers who…

  13. Antibiotics do not reduce post-tonsillectomy morbidity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Layla, Abdulmonem; Mahafza, Tareq M

    2013-01-01

    The objectives are to assess the efficacy of antibiotics in reducing post-tonsillectomy morbidities in children. This is a clinical trial study that was undertaken at the Jordan University Hospital during the period from June 2008 to July 2009. All patients undergoing tonsillectomy were randomly divided into two matched groups on alternating basis: group A included patients who received antibiotics (amoxicillin with clavulanic acid) for 5 days in the post-tonsillectomy period and group B included patients who received none. The two groups were compared with respect to fever, secondary bleeding, throat pain, and the time to resume to normal diet. Bleeding was more common in group A (5.5 %) than in group B (2 %). The average duration of throat pain was 4.2 days in group A, while it was 3.9 days in group B. The average time to resume normal diet was 5.7 days in group A, whereas it was 5.3 days in group B. Fever was noted in 17 (31 %) patients from group A, while it was observed in 15 (30 %) patients from group B. The use of antibiotics in the post-tonsillectomy period does not reduce post-operative morbidity in children and therefore it is advised to use antibiotics on an individual basis rather than routinely for patients undergoing tonsillectomy.

  14. Long-term Maintenance of a Classroom-Based Social Skills Training for Preschool Children.

    OpenAIRE

    清水, 寿代

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined long-term maintenance of classroom-based Social Skills Training (SST) on preschool children. Twenty-six preschool children (4-5 age) participated in six sessions of SST. The target social skills were positive social initiations and responses. The coaching procedure comprised instruction, modeling, behavioral rehearsal, feedback, and reinforcement. The results indicated maintenance of intervention effects in teacher-rated social skills, problem behavior, and social b...

  15. The Effects of Summer Reading on Low-Income Children's Literacy Achievement From Kindergarten to Grade 8: A Meta-Analysis of Classroom and Home Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, James Sangil; Quinn, David Michael

    2013-01-01

    This meta-analysis reviewed research on summer reading interventions conducted in the United States and Canada from 1998 to 2011. The synthesis included 41 classroom- and home-based summer reading interventions, involving children from kindergarten to Grade 8. Compared to control group children, children who participated in classroom interventions, involving teacher-directed literacy lessons, or home interventions, involving child-initiated book reading activities, enjoyed significan...

  16. Predictors of Children's Kindergarten Classroom Engagement: Preschool Adult-Child Relationships, Self-Concept, and Hyperactivity/Inattention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Amelia Kate; Miller-Lewis, Lauren R.; Sawyer, Michael G.; Baghurst, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to identify preschool factors that are associated with children's classroom engagement during their 1st school year. The study was guided by a social-motivational process model that highlights the importance of parent-child and teacher-child relationships in promoting engagement. In preschool, parents and…

  17. Early and Middle Childhood Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions Concerning Foster Children's Academic Ability and Behavior in a Regular Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlawn, Penny Ann

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of early and middle level childhood pre-service teachers concerning foster children's academic abilities and behaviors in a regular classroom. The participants consisted of a convenience sample of students from a junior level education class. The participants rated their degree of…

  18. Exploring the Impact of the Design of the Physical Classroom Environment on Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Caren S.

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported a 1600% increase in the number of individuals between the ages of 6 and 22 years with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Knowledge about educational interventions for children with ASD is substantial; however, less is known about the design of supportive classroom environments where they learn.…

  19. Practices of Other-Initiated Repair in the Classrooms of Children with Specific Speech and Language Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Repair practices used by teachers who work with children with specific speech and language difficulties (SSLDs) have hitherto remained largely unexplored. Such classrooms therefore offer a new context for researching repairs and considering how they compare with non-SSLD interactions. Repair trajectories are of interest because they are dialogic…

  20. Enhancing Peer Acceptance of Children with Learning Difficulties: Classroom Goal Orientation and Effects of a Storytelling Programme with Drama Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Yin-kum; Lam, Shui-fong; Law, Wilbert; Tam, Zoe W. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Peer acceptance is an important facilitator for the success of inclusive education. The aim of the current study is twofold: (1) to examine how classroom goal orientation is associated with children's acceptance of peers with learning difficulties; and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of a storytelling programme with drama techniques on…

  1. A Touch of Reinforcement: The Effects of Contingent Teacher Touch on the Classroom Behaviour of Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheldall, Kevin; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Two studies are reported in which the behaviors of four infant class teachers in England and their respective classes were observed and recorded. The aim of the studies was to examine the effects of contingent teacher touch behavior upon children's classroom behavior. Touch was found to increase on-task behavior and decrease disruptive behavior.…

  2. African American and European American Children in Diverse Elementary Classrooms: Social Integration, Social Status, and Social Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Travis; Rodkin, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    With a sample of African American and European American 3rd- and 4th-grade children (N = 486, ages 8-11 years), this study examined classroom ethnic composition, peer social status (i.e., social preference and perceived popularity as nominated by same- and cross-ethnicity peers), and patterns of ethnic segregation (i.e., friendship, peer group,…

  3. Classroom-Based Physical Activity Breaks and Children's Attention: Cognitive Engagement Works!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Mirko; Benzing, Valentin; Kamer, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Classroom-based physical activity breaks are postulated to positively impact children's attention during their school day. However, empirical evidence for this claim is scarce and the role of cognitive engagement in enhancing children's attentional performance is unexplored in studies on physical activity breaks. The aim of the present study was therefore to disentangle the separate and/or combined effects of physical exertion and cognitive engagement induced by physical activity breaks on primary school children's attention. In addition, the role of children's affective reactions to acute interventions at school was investigated. Using a 2 × 2 between-subjects experimental design, 92 children between the ages of 11 and 12 years (M = 11.77, SD = 0.41) were randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions: (1) combo group (physical activity with high cognitive demands), (2) cognition group (sedentary with high cognitive demands), (3) physical group (physical activity with low cognitive demands), and (4) control group (sedentary with low cognitive demands). Attention and affect were measured before and immediately after a 10-min intervention. ANCOVAs revealed that whereas physical exertion had no effect on any measure of children's attentional performance, cognitive engagement was the crucial factor leading to increased focused attention and enhanced processing speed. Mediational analyses showed that changes in positive affect during the interventions mediated the effect between cognitive engagement and focused attention as well as between cognitive engagement and processing speed. These surprising results are discussed in the light of theories predicting both facilitating and deteriorative effects of positive affect on attention.

  4. [General practice of pedagogic management by teachers of hyperkinetic attention deficit disordered children in the classroom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, Jan; Döpfner, Manfred; Biegert, Hans; Lehmkuhl, Gerd

    2002-01-01

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder is one of the most common behavior disorders in child and adolescent psychiatry. The problems resulting from the core symptoms of the disorder often endure into adolescence and adulthood placing these children at significant long-term risk for academic psychological and social morbidity. Despite the importance of the school in this process relatively few teachers of regular schools have sufficient knowledge about the foundations and principles of treatment concerning ADHD nor do they receive adequate training how to deal with ADHD related problems in the classroom. Moreover there is a significant lack of cooperation between schools, parents and therapeutic institutions inhibiting a multimodal treatment. This article resumes the experiences of a 3 months ADHD intervention program for teachers in a Cologne elementary school. It gives informations and advices for appropriate measurements in the classroom setting that include: 1. intensive information of teachers about the disorder, 2. intensified involvement of teachers in the treatment process and 3. the implementation of distinct didactic elements and well structured principles of behavior therapy in the school lessons.

  5. Democracy in the Hearing Impaired Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, James F.; Moore, Marian B.

    1974-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce classroom misbehavior and encourage positive accomplishments among congenitally deaf children, a democratic theoretical model based on the concepts of Alfred Adler and Rudolf Dreikurs was applied with 27 deaf children (ages 4 to 9 years) in four classes. (LC)

  6. Democracy in the Hearing Impaired Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, James F.; Moore, Marian B.

    1974-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce classroom misbehavior and encourage positive accomplishments among congenitally deaf children, a democratic theoretical model based on the concepts of Alfred Adler and Rudolf Dreikurs was applied with 27 deaf children (ages 4 to 9 years) in four classes. (LC)

  7. Reducing Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure of Preschool Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Class-Based Health Education and Smoking Cessation Counseling for Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess counseling to caregivers and classroom health education interventions to reduce environmental tobacco smoke exposure of children aged 5–6 years in China. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial in two preschools in Changsha, China, 65 children aged 5–6 years old and their smoker caregivers (65 were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 33 and control (no intervention groups (n = 32. In the intervention group, caregivers received self-help materials and smoking cessation counseling from a trained counselor, while their children were given classroom-based participatory health education. Children’s urinary cotinine level and the point prevalence of caregiver quitting were measured at baseline and after 6 months. Results: At the 6-month follow-up, children’s urinary cotinine was significantly lower (Z = –3.136; p = 0.002 and caregivers’ 7-day quit rate was significantly higher (34.4% versus 0% (p < 0.001; adjusted OR = 1.13; 95% CI: 1.02–1.26 in the intervention than control group. Conclusions: Helping caregivers quitting smoke combined with classroom-based health education was effective in reducing children’s environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Larger-scale trials are warranted.

  8. Clown intervention to reduce preoperative anxiety in children and parents: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, Alberto; Sangiorgi, Diego; Flangini, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated whether a clown doctor intervention could reduce preoperative anxiety in children hospitalized for minor surgery and in their parents. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 77 children and 119 parents: the clown group consisted of 52 children accompanied in the preoperating room by their parents (n = 89) and two clowns while the comparison group consisted of children accompanied by the parents only. The clown intervention significantly reduced the children's preoperative anxiety: children benefited from the clown's presence and showed better adjustment than children in the comparison group. Mothers in Comparison Group showed higher anxiety.

  9. Experimental investigation of the effects of the acoustical conditions in a simulated classroom on speech recognition and learning in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Daniel L; Plevinsky, Hallie M; Franco, John M; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth C; Lewis, Dawna E

    2012-01-01

    The potential effects of acoustical environment on speech understanding are especially important as children enter school where students' ability to hear and understand complex verbal information is critical to learning. However, this ability is compromised because of widely varied and unfavorable classroom acoustics. The extent to which unfavorable classroom acoustics affect children's performance on longer learning tasks is largely unknown as most research has focused on testing children using words, syllables, or sentences as stimuli. In the current study, a simulated classroom environment was used to measure comprehension performance of two classroom learning activities: a discussion and lecture. Comprehension performance was measured for groups of elementary-aged students in one of four environments with varied reverberation times and background noise levels. The reverberation time was either 0.6 or 1.5 s, and the signal-to-noise level was either +10 or +7 dB. Performance is compared to adult subjects as well as to sentence-recognition in the same condition. Significant differences were seen in comprehension scores as a function of age and condition; both increasing background noise and reverberation degraded performance in comprehension tasks compared to minimal differences in measures of sentence-recognition. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  10. The impact of including children with intellectual disability in general education classrooms on the academic achievement of their low-, average-, and high-achieving peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermier Dessemontet, Rachel; Bless, Gérard

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed at assessing the impact of including children with intellectual disability (ID) in general education classrooms with support on the academic achievement of their low-, average-, and high-achieving peers without disability. A quasi-experimental study was conducted with an experimental group of 202 pupils from classrooms with an included child with mild or moderate ID, and a control group of 202 pupils from classrooms with no included children with special educational needs (matched pairs sample). The progress of these 2 groups in their academic achievement was compared over a period of 1 school year. No significant difference was found in the progress of the low-, average-, or high-achieving pupils from classrooms with or without inclusion. The results suggest that including children with ID in primary general education classrooms with support does not have a negative impact on the progress of pupils without disability.

  11. The effects of moderately raised classroom temperatures and classroom ventilation rate on the performance of schoolwork by children (RP-1257)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wargocki, Pawel; Wyon, David Peter

    2007-01-01

    Two independent field intervention experiments were carried out in school classrooms in late summer (in 2004 and 2005). The air temperature was manipulated by either operating or idling split cooling units installed for the purpose. In one of these experiments, the outdoor air supply rate was also...... series. The above improvements were mainly in terms of the speed at which tasks were performed, with negligible effects on error rate. Most school classrooms worldwide experience raised air temperatures during increased thermal loads, e.g., in warm weather; these results show that providing some means...

  12. The effects of moderately raised classroom temperatures and classroom ventilation rate on the performance of schoolwork by children (RP-1257)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wargocki, Pawel; Wyon, David Peter

    2007-01-01

    Two independent field intervention experiments were carried out in school classrooms in late summer (in 2004 and 2005). The air temperature was manipulated by either operating or idling split cooling units installed for the purpose. In one of these experiments, the outdoor air supply rate was also...... series. The above improvements were mainly in terms of the speed at which tasks were performed, with negligible effects on error rate. Most school classrooms worldwide experience raised air temperatures during increased thermal loads, e.g., in warm weather; these results show that providing some means...

  13. A safe place to grow: Children, animals and caring in a life science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Leslie

    The ecological systems of the earth are in crisis. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact an elementary school life science education program based on an ethic of care had on children's ability to value the natural world. It is a study of how care-based science education supports personal connections to animals and nature; and how strength-based science education emphasizes creativity as a means for students to explore and express scientific knowledge through the arts. This qualitative study was conducted in a life science classroom filled with a wide variety of animals: fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals the students studied and developed caring relationships with. The participants were 55 fourth, fifth and sixth-grade students who spent two years studying the natural world both inside the classroom and outside in the field. Invertebrates, trees, birds, mammals and wildflowers were studied in fourth grade. Evolution, and the study of vertebrate animals, were studied in the fifth grade. As teacher researcher, I collected data including audio-taped interviews, observations, field notes, and artifacts including children's creative projects expressing their factual understanding and thoughts about the animals and the natural world. This study revealed themes reflecting children's caring for animals, scientific knowledge, creative expression of knowledge, and the natural world. The themes are illustrated through four "portraits of care" based on students' voices, experiences, and class-work. The findings indicate that caring relationships with animals supported personal connections to the natural world and scientific knowledge. Children had better understanding and retained knowledge due to their personal connections to the animals. The concepts of evolution and interdependence of living organisms enhanced their relationships with animals and nature. Through the arts, students expressed scientific knowledge in ways that had personal meaning

  14. A Qualitative Process Evaluation of Classroom-Based Cognitive Behaviour Therapy to Reduce Adolescent Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Taylor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Small scale trials indicate that classroom-based Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT for adolescents has good reach and can help prevent depression. However, under more diverse everyday conditions, such programmes tend not to show such positive effects. This study examined the process of implementing a classroom-based CBT depression prevention programme as part of a large (n = 5,030 randomised controlled trial across eight UK secondary schools which was not found to be effective (PROMISE, ISRCTN19083628. The views of young people (n = 42, teachers (n = 12 and facilitators (n = 16 involved in the Resourceful Adolescent Programme (RAP were obtained via focus groups and interviews which were thematically analysed. The programme was considered to be well structured and contain useful content, particularly for younger pupils. However, challenges associated with implementation were its age appropriateness for all year groups, its perceived lack of flexibility, the consistency of quality of delivery, the competing demands for teacher time and a culture where academic targets were prioritised over personal, social and health education. Whilst schools are convenient locations for introducing such programmes and allow good reach, the culture around improving well-being of young people in schools, increasing engagement with teachers and young people and sustaining such programmes are issues that need addressing.

  15. Classwide Intervention to Manage Disruptive Behavior in the Kindergarten Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoey, Kara E.; Schneider, Dana L.; Rezzetano, Kristin M.; Prodan, Tana; Tankersley, Melody

    2010-01-01

    The authors present an investigation of a classwide intervention to reduce disruptive behavior in a kindergarten classroom. Participants included children in 3 kindergarten classrooms and their teachers in an at-risk school district in Northeast Ohio. On the basis of student behaviors and teacher goals, the authors chose the Good Behavior Game…

  16. Unique and Protective Contributions of Parenting and Classroom Processes to the Adjustment of African American Children Living in Single-Parent Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Gene H.; Dorsey, Shannon; Forehand, Rex; Armistead, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Examined contributions parenting and classroom processes make to 7- to 15-year-olds' self-regulation and adjustment among single-parent Black families. Found that parenting and classroom processes contributed uniquely to children's adjustment through the development of self-regulation, and that each process could serve a protective or stabilizing…

  17. Improving academic performance of school-age children by physical activity in the classroom: 1-year program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullender-Wijnsma, Marijke J; Hartman, Esther; de Greeff, Johannes W; Bosker, Roel J; Doolaard, Simone; Visscher, Chris

    2015-06-01

    An intervention was designed that combined physical activity with learning activities. It was based upon evidence for positive effects of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) on academic achievement. The aim of this study was to describe the program implementation and effects on academic achievement after 1 year. Second- and third-grade classes of 6 elementary schools were included in the study. The intervention group participated in physically active academic lessons and the control group in regular classroom lessons. Implementation measures were obtained and the children were pretested and posttested on mathematics and reading. Teacher observations and self-reports indicated that the lessons were implemented as planned. Classroom observations showed that children's on-task behavior during the lessons was above 70%. On the basis of heart rate measures, on average 64% of the lesson time was spent in MVPA. Posttest mathematics and reading scores of third-grade children who participated in the intervention were significantly higher in comparison with control children. Posttest mathematics scores of second-grade children in the intervention condition were significantly lower in comparison with control children. The intervention program was successfully implemented and the lessons contributed to the academic outcomes of third-grade children. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  18. Reducing anxiety among children born preterm and their young mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswalt, Krista L; McClain, Darya Bonds; Melnyk, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    To examine the efficacy of COPE on maternal and child anxiety associated with younger mothers of premature infants. The COPE program provides instruction and practice in parenting behaviors specific to the NICU, in combination with information that reduces ambiguity about their infant's appearance and behaviors. Secondary data analysis was conducted on data obtained from a larger randomized controlled trial with 253 mothers of low birthweight premature infants to examine the efficacy of the Creating Opportunities for Parent Empowerment (COPE) program, an educational-behavioral parent intervention in the NICU, on maternal and child anxiety based on maternal age. For these analyses, child and maternal anxiety were assessed using the Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 2 to 3 and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory collected at 24 months and 2 to 4 days postintervention, respectively. To test study hypotheses, we conducted multiple regression models using the structural equation modeling approach to path analysis. Multiple regression results for the full model indicated that there was a significant COPE × mothers' age interaction effect on both mothers' anxiety and child anxiety. Participation in the COPE program significantly predicted lower levels of mothers' anxiety at postintervention as well as lower levels of child anxiety at 24 months for younger mothers (18-21 years old), but not for mothers over 21 years old. Participating in COPE was associated with more favorable mental health outcomes for younger mothers and their children than mothers over 21 years old. Participation in the COPE program may help close the health disparities gap by improving behaviors in infants of younger mothers to rates similar to those of children of mothers over 21 years old.

  19. Pollen immunotherapy reduces the development of asthma in children with seasonal rhinoconjunctivitis (the PAT-study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Christian; Dreborg, Sten; Ferdousi, Hosne A

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with allergic rhinitis are likely to develop asthma. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether specific immunotherapy can prevent the development of asthma and reduce bronchial hyperresponsiveness in children with seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivi...

  20. The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC): an observational measure of the intentional communication of children with autism in an unstructured classroom setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasco, Greg; Gordon, Rosanna K; Howlin, Patricia; Charman, Tony

    2008-11-01

    The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC) was devised to provide ecologically valid outcome measures for a communication-focused intervention trial. Ninety-one children with autism spectrum disorder aged 6 years 10 months (SD 16 months) were videoed during their everyday snack, teaching and free play activities. Inter-rater reliability was high and relevant items showed significant associations with comparable items from concurrent Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic (Lord et al. 2000, J Autism Dev Disord 30(3):205-223) assessments. In a subsample of 28 children initial differences in rates of initiations, initiated speech/vocalisation and commenting were predictive of language and communication competence 15 months later. Results suggest that the use of observational measures of intentional communication in natural settings is a valuable assessment strategy for research and clinical practice.

  1. Interventions for reducing medication errors in children in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaskant, Jolanda M; Vermeulen, Hester; Apampa, Bugewa; Fernando, Bernard; Ghaleb, Maisoon A; Neubert, Antje; Thayyil, Sudhin; Soe, Aung

    2015-03-10

    Many hospitalised patients are affected by medication errors (MEs) that may cause discomfort, harm and even death. Children are at especially high risk of harm as the result of MEs because such errors are potentially more hazardous to them than to adults. Until now, interventions to reduce MEs have led to only limited improvements. To determine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing MEs and related harm in hospitalised children. The Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group (EPOC) Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the following sources for primary studies: The Cochrane Library, including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Economic Evaluation Database (EED) and the Health Technology Assessments (HTA) database; MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, Proquest Dissertations & Theses, Web of Science (citation indexes and conference proceedings) and the EPOC Register of Studies. Related reviews were identified by searching the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE). Review authors searched grey literature sources and trial registries. They handsearched selected journals, contacted researchers in the field and scanned reference lists of relevant reviews. They conducted searches in November 2013 and November 2014. They applied neither language nor date limits. Randomised controlled trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series investigating interventions to improve medication safety in hospitalised children (≤ 18 years). Participants were healthcare professionals authorised to prescribe, dispense or administer medications. Outcome measures included MEs, (potential) patient harm, resource utilisation and unintended consequences of the interventions. Two review authors independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed study quality using the EPOC data collection

  2. Does parental physical violence reduce children's standardized test score performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek-Asa, Corinne; Maxwell, Leah; Stromquist, Ann; Whitten, Paul; Limbos, Mary Ann; Merchant, James

    2007-11-01

    Many negative cognitive and behavioral outcomes have been identified among children living in households with parental violence, but few studies have examined academic performance. In a rural population-based cohort, we examine the role of parental violence on standardized test score performance. The cohort included 306 children ages 6 through 17. Parents responded to a health interview that included questions about physical violence. Children's standardized test scores were collected prospectively for 5 years after the parent interview. Hierarchical multivariate models clustering on school, household, and repeated individual test scores and controlling for children's and parent's characteristics were run to predict test score performance. One in five children lived in a household in which parents reported at least one act of physical violence. Children whose parents reported intimate partner violence (IPV) performed an average of 12.2 percentile points lower than children whose parents reported no IPV (95% CI, -19.2--5.2; p Parent-reported IPV led to larger test score reductions for girls than for boys and for children less than 12 years old than for older children. Parental physical violence was common, and children in homes with violence had significantly poorer performance on standardized test scores.

  3. Observation of Classroom Performance Using Therapy Balls as a Substitute for Chairs in Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoyne, Molly E.; Ketcham, Caroline J.

    2015-01-01

    Many classrooms are beginning to substitute standard chairs with therapy balls, which help to improve students' focus and classroom performance, according to teacher and student reports. Researchers conducted an observational study in a classroom at a local elementary school that implemented therapy balls. For each hour-long observation, three…

  4. Reducing Racial Disparities in Influenza Vaccination Among Children With Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Zimmerman, Richard K; Moehling, Krissy K; Conti, Tracey; Allred, Norma J; Reis, Evelyn C

    2016-01-01

    A multifaceted intervention to raise influenza vaccination rates was tested among children with asthma. In a pre/post study design, 18 primary care practices implemented the 4 Pillars Immunization Toolkit along with other strategies. The primary outcome was the difference in influenza vaccination rates at each practice among children with asthma between the baseline year (before the intervention) and at the end of year 2 (after the intervention), both overall and by race (White vs. non-White). Influenza vaccination rates increased significantly in 13 of 18 practices. The percentage of vaccinated non-White children increased from 46% to 61% (p children increased from 58% to 65% (p children before the intervention (odds ratio = 0.66; 95% confidence interval = 0.59-0.73; p children with asthma. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. All rights reserved.

  5. Promoting Expressive Language in Young Children with or At-Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder in a Preschool Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Justin D; Shepley, Collin; Lieberman-Betz, Rebecca

    2016-10-01

    Young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often demonstrate delays in expressive communication, impacting their ability to independently function in typical environments. Individuals with ASD who develop expressive language during early childhood experience better outcomes later in life; therefore, examination of naturalistic language interventions (NLIs) remain an important area of investigation. The current study used a multiple probe design across participants to examine the effects of a classroom-based NLI on various expressive language targets in three preschool-aged children demonstrating characteristics of ASD. Findings suggest the intervention had positive and maintained effects on trial-based use of language targets, as well as concomitant changes in commenting, requesting, and phrase complexity. Implications regarding implementation of NLIs within typical classroom play activities are discussed.

  6. African American and European American children in diverse elementary classrooms: social integration, social status, and social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Travis; Rodkin, Philip C

    2011-01-01

    With a sample of African American and European American 3rd- and 4th-grade children (N = 486, ages 8-11 years), this study examined classroom ethnic composition, peer social status (i.e., social preference and perceived popularity as nominated by same- and cross-ethnicity peers), and patterns of ethnic segregation (i.e., friendship, peer group, and cross-ethnicity dislike). African American--but not European American--children had more segregated relationships and were more disliked by cross-ethnicity peers when they had fewer same-ethnicity classmates. African American children's segregation was positively associated with same-ethnicity social preference and perceived popularity and with cross-ethnicity perceived popularity. European American children's segregation was positively associated with same-ethnicity social preference but negatively associated with cross-ethnicity social preference and perceived popularity.

  7. An attempt to reduce negative stereotyping of obesity in children by changing controllability beliefs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anesbury, T; Tiggemann, M

    2000-01-01

    .... The study found that the intervention was successful in reducing the amount of controllability that children assigned to obesity, but was not successful in reducing negative stereotyping of the obese...

  8. CDC Vital Signs: Reducing Sodium in Children's Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foods sold and served in schools that will reduce sodium up to 50% by 2022. Reducing sodium intake ... have already made efforts to reduce added sodium. Replace sodium with alternatives like spices, herbs, and vegetables. Shop ...

  9. Reduced Intellectual Development in Children with Prenatal Lead Exposure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lourdes Schnaas; Stephen J. Rothenberg; Maria-Fernanda Flores; Sandra Martinez; Carmen Hernandez; Erica Osorio; Silvia Ruiz Velasco; Estela Perroni

    .... We statistically evaluated dose-response nonlinearity. Participants: A cohort of 175 children, 150 of whom had complete data for all included covariates, attended the National Institute of Perinatology in Mexico City from 1987 through 2002...

  10. The Psychometric Properties of the Attention-Distraction, Inhibition-Excitation Classroom Assessment Scale (ADIECAS) in a Sample of Children with Moderate and Severe Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Suzanne; Buckley, Sarah; McEvoy, John; Hillery, John; Dodd, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The Attention-Distraction, Inhibition-Excitation Classroom Assessment Scale (ADIECAS) [Evans, P. L. C. (1975). Inhibition and stimulus generalization in the discrimination learning of ESN(S) and ESN(M) children. Unpublished Ph.D. thesis. Manchester, UK: University of Manchester] assesses attention-related difficulties in children with intellectual…

  11. The differential effects of teacher and peer attention on the disruptive classroom behavior of three children with a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northup, J; Broussard, C; Jones, K; George, T; Vollmer, T R; Herring, M

    1995-01-01

    We conducted functional analyses of classroom disruption during contingent teacher and peer attention conditions for 3 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Attention provided by peer confederates appeared to function as a distinct form of positive reinforcement for all 3 children.

  12. Prospective Associations between Children's Preschool Emotional and Behavioral Problems and Kindergarten Classroom Engagement, and the Role of Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Amelia K.; Sawyer, Michael G.; Miller-Lewis, Lauren R.; Baghurst, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    This 1-year prospective study aimed to examine associations between children's preschool emotional and behavioral problems and their kindergarten classroom engagement, and to identify any gender differences in this association. In preschool, parents and teachers completed questionnaires assessing aspects of children's (n = 575) emotional…

  13. Efficacy of a Classroom Integrated Intervention of Phonological Awareness and Word Recognition in "Double-Deficit Children" Learning a Regular Orthography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Andreas; Motsch, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    This study analysed the effects of a classroom intervention focusing on phonological awareness and/or automatized word recognition in children with a deficit in the domains of phonological awareness and rapid automatized naming ("double deficit"). According to the double-deficit hypothesis (Wolf & Bowers, 1999), these children belong…

  14. Beginning English Literacy Development and Achievement among Spanish-Speaking Children in Arizona's English-Only Classrooms: A Four-Year Two-Cohort Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Castellanos, Oscar; Blanchard, Jay; Atwill, Kim; Jiménez-Silva, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    This study examined beginning English literacy-skill development and achievement among Spanish-speaking children enrolled in state-mandated English-only classrooms. The children possessed Spanish skill at or above age-appropriate level, yet minimal English skill, and came from a Spanish-speaking community adjacent to the U.S.-Mexico border. Under…

  15. Reducing the gender achievement gap in college science: a classroom study of values affirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Akira; Kost-Smith, Lauren E; Finkelstein, Noah D; Pollock, Steven J; Cohen, Geoffrey L; Ito, Tiffany A

    2010-11-26

    In many science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines, women are outperformed by men in test scores, jeopardizing their success in science-oriented courses and careers. The current study tested the effectiveness of a psychological intervention, called values affirmation, in reducing the gender achievement gap in a college-level introductory physics class. In this randomized double-blind study, 399 students either wrote about their most important values or not, twice at the beginning of the 15-week course. Values affirmation reduced the male-female performance and learning difference substantially and elevated women's modal grades from the C to B range. Benefits were strongest for women who tended to endorse the stereotype that men do better than women in physics. A brief psychological intervention may be a promising way to address the gender gap in science performance and learning.

  16. Ergonomics related to seating arrangements in the classroom: worst in South East Asia? The situation in Sri Lankan school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaratne, I L K; Fernando, D N

    2009-01-01

    Sri Lanka is a resource-poor country in the South-East Asian region with good health indices. Ergonomics of children in educational environments is still novel in the region. An exploration into such issues and dissemination of the scientific evidence will stimulate policy makers in both education and health sector. An important ergonomic issue of the classroom is the seating arrangement. Essential aspects of seating include location of the chair and desk in relation to the blackboard and features of the chair and desk. Musculoskeletal pain is considered to be the most important negative effect due to mismatched ergonomics. A school-based descriptive cross sectional study was carried out in a district of Sri Lanka to ascertain the distribution of selected ergonomic factors related to seating arrangements in the classroom of school-going early adolescents and to assess their relationship to musculoskeletal pain. A sample of 1607 school children of Grade 6,7 and 8 were selected using stratified multi-stage cluster sampling method. There were 52.1% (N=838) females and 47.9% (N=769) males. Many ergonomic aspects related to classroom seating arrangements are not conducive for children. Children were seated with a mean distance of 398.04 cm (SD=132.09) to the blackboard. Nearly 23% of children had to turn more than 45~degrees to see the blackboard. A prevalence of > 80% mismatch was found between body dimensions of children and measurements of furniture. Musculoskeletal pain may have resulted from efforts to maintain stability while seated in incompatible furniture. Nearly 36% children complained of recurrent musculoskeletal pain. Musculoskeletal pain may have resulted from efforts to maintain stability while seated in incompatible furniture. Mismatched seat depth - buttock-popliteal length posed 1.59 times risk recurrent musculoskeletal pain. Despite, children perceived a good chair comfort. Use of backrest lowered the risk of recurrent pain. Results shows that

  17. Impaired Antioxidant Status and Reduced Energy Metabolism in Autistic Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essa, M. M.; Braidy, N.; Waly, M. I.; Al-Farsi, Y. M.; Al-Sharbati, M.; Subash, S.; Amanat, A.; Al-Shaffaee, M. A.; Guillemin, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that oxidative stress induced mechanisms are believed to be associated with the pathophysiology of autism. In this study, we recruited 19 Omani autistic children with age-matched controls to analyze their plasma and serum redox status and the levels of ATP, NAD[superscript +] and NADH using well established…

  18. Reduced error signalling in medication-naive children with ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Allen, Elena A; Eichele, Heike

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We examined the blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activation in brain regions that signal errors and their association with intraindividual behavioural variability and adaptation to errors in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). METHODS: We acquired functio...

  19. Reducing inappropriate antibiotic use among children with influenza infection

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Bat-Chen; Schwabe-Warf, Derek; Goldman, Ran

    2011-01-01

    Question With the influenza season reaching a peak, I see numerous children in my clinic with fever and influenza-like illnesses. Parents are concerned and at times ask for antibiotic treatment in hopes that the treatment will shorten the duration of illness. What strategies can I use in order to minimize inappropriate prescription of antibiotics during the influenza season?

  20. Impaired Antioxidant Status and Reduced Energy Metabolism in Autistic Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essa, M. M.; Braidy, N.; Waly, M. I.; Al-Farsi, Y. M.; Al-Sharbati, M.; Subash, S.; Amanat, A.; Al-Shaffaee, M. A.; Guillemin, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that oxidative stress induced mechanisms are believed to be associated with the pathophysiology of autism. In this study, we recruited 19 Omani autistic children with age-matched controls to analyze their plasma and serum redox status and the levels of ATP, NAD[superscript +] and NADH using well established…

  1. Using Rituals and Traditions to Create Classroom Community for Children, Teachers, and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Patricia; Howell, Jacqueline

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the value of teachers establishing rituals and traditions in early childhood classrooms. Using the lens of a particular preschool classroom, where one of the co-authors taught for many years, the article describes specific traditions that have been established over the years and how these rituals, activities, and events…

  2. How To Raise Children's Early Literacy? The Influence of Family, Teacher, and Classroom in Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Bruce; Dellagnelo, Lucia; Strath, Annelie; Barretto Bastos, Eni Santana; Holanda Maia, Mauricio; Lopes de Matos, Kelma Socorro; Luiza Portela, Adelia; Lerche Vieira, Sofia

    1999-01-01

    A study of 140 first- and second-grade classrooms and 1,925 students in the Brazilian states of Bahia and Ceara examined teaching practices and teacher behaviors in the classroom and their effects on students' early literacy achievement, as well as the influences of student, home, teacher, and school characteristics on literacy scores. (SV)

  3. Are There Toxic Plants in Your Classroom? A Resource for Teachers of Children with Exceptional Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, Retha M.; Murdick, Nikki L.

    2008-01-01

    In elementary and secondary classrooms, educators use plants for various reasons. Plants are often used during learning activities and science experiments. Also, educators frequently decorate their classrooms with plants to make the room more inviting and comfortable. Few new educators have been informed of the potential hazards of commonly known…

  4. Kissing Brides and Loving Hot Vampires: Children's Construction and Perpetuation of Heteronormativity in Elementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Caitlin L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores notions of (hetero)sexuality circulating in elementary school classrooms through an analysis of students' own talk and interactions. Data collected during a multi-site ethnography in a diverse set of elementary schools demonstrate that while curricular silences and teachers contribute to heteronormative classroom environments,…

  5. Young Children's Exploration of Semiotic Resources during Unofficial Computer Activities in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkvall, Anders; Engblom, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    The article describes and discusses the learning potential of unofficial techno-literacy activities in the classroom with regards to Swedish 7-8-year-olds' exploration of semiotic resources when interacting with computers. In classroom contexts where every child works with his or her own computer, such activities tend to take up a substantial…

  6. Antecedent Classroom Factors and Disruptive Behaviors of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Maureen A.; Asmus, Jennifer M.; Boyd, Brian A.; Ladwig, Crystal N.; Sellers, Jennifer A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined relationships between antecedent classroom factors and the disruptive behaviors of five elementary-aged students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A descriptive analysis was conducted to determine the influence of four types of molar antecedent classroom factors (i.e., instructional setting, instructional activity,…

  7. What Questions Are We Asking in the Contemporary Children's Literature Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Aziz, Fazhuda

    2012-01-01

    This case study of four B.Ed TESL Overseas Link Degree trainee teachers was undertaken with the intention of discovering what goes on in the classroom in terms of the trainee teachers' classroom interactions in relation to their questioning techniques and responses. This is looked at how much of thinking is being encouraged and how much of the…

  8. "Ganchulinas" and "Rainbowli" Colors: Young Multilingual Children Play with Language in Head Start Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Ysaaca

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this ethnographic case study was to study the language development of 4-year-old emergent bilinguals in a bilingual (Spanish/English) Head Start classroom with flexible language practices. Data were collected throughout the 10-month school year by visiting the classroom 2-3 times per week. Data include: field notes (observations and…

  9. Kissing Brides and Loving Hot Vampires: Children's Construction and Perpetuation of Heteronormativity in Elementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Caitlin L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores notions of (hetero)sexuality circulating in elementary school classrooms through an analysis of students' own talk and interactions. Data collected during a multi-site ethnography in a diverse set of elementary schools demonstrate that while curricular silences and teachers contribute to heteronormative classroom environments,…

  10. Muscle growth is reduced in 15-month-old children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Anna; Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Willerslev-Olsen, Maria;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Lack of muscle growth relative to bone growth may be responsible for development of contractures in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Here, we used ultrasonography to compare growth of the medial gastrocnemius muscle in children with and without CP. METHOD: Twenty-six children with spastic CP...... developing children at 15 months of age (pBone length increased with age without significant difference (p=0.49). INTERPRETATION: Muscle growth in children with CP initially follows that of typically developing children, but decreases at 15 months of age. This may be related to reduced physical...... (15 males, 11 females; mean age 35mo, range 8-65mo) and 101 typically developing children (47 males, 54 females; mean age 29mo, range 1-69mo) were included. Functional abilities of children with CP equalled levels I to III in the Gross Motor Function Classification System. Medial gastrocnemius muscle...

  11. The effects of outdoor air supply rate and supply air filter condition in classrooms on the performance of schoolwork by children (RP-1257)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wargocki, Pawel; Wyon, David Peter

    2007-01-01

    in the classrooms as judged by a sensory panel of adults blind to conditions, as perceived by children, and as indicated by the reduction in the average CO2 concentration from 1300 to 900 ppm, taking this as a marker of reduced bioeffluent concentration. It was not possible to test the effect of replacing a soiled...... established for one week at a time in a blind crossover design with repeated measures on 10- to 12-year-old children in two classes. Seven exercises exemplifying different aspects of schoolwork (numerical or language-based) were performed as part of normal lessons by pupils who also marked visual analogue...... scales to indicate their environmental perceptions and the intensity of any symptoms. The children indicated that the air was fresher but otherwise perceived little difference when the outdoor air supply rate increased from 3.0 to 8.5 L/s (6.4-18 cfm) per person, while the speed at which they performed...

  12. Classroom intervention to change peers’ attitudes towards children who stutter: A feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha Kathard

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Before interventions are implemented, the potential treatment benefit must be determined.Objectives: The primary objective of this feasibility study was to assess if peers’ attitudes towards children who stutter (CWS change one month after the administration of the Classroom Communication Resource (CCR. The secondary objectives of the study were to determine if differences in peer attitudes were related to gender and to previous exposure to a person who stutters.Method: The study used a cluster randomised control trial design. The study included 211 Grade 7 participants from schools in the Cape Town Metropole. The CCR intervention was administered to 97 participants in the experimental group, whilst 114 participants in the control group did not receive the intervention. The Stuttering Resource Outcome Measure(SROM used as the outcome measure during pre- and post-test period. STATISTICA was used for in-depth data analysis.Results: An overall positive direction of change in scores was observed for the experimental group compared with the control group. However, the magnitude of change in the experimental group was not statistically significant (p = 0.2683. Male and female participants did not differ significantly in their scores on the SROM across pre-test and post-test periods. Participants who had exposure to individuals who stutter had significantly more positive scores on the SROM in the pre-test and post-test periods compared to those who had no direct exposure to stuttering.Conclusion: This result indicated the beginning of positive attitude change which may be attributed to the intervention. Further investigation is warranted.

  13. Self-Efficacy Reduces Impediments to Classroom Discussion for International Students: Fear, Embarrassment, Social Isolation, Judgment, and Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Maeda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Approximately one million international students were enrolled at U.S. universities in the academic year 2015–2016, and the number has been steadily rising since. Although these students aim to increase intercultural communication skills, international knowledge, and critical thinking skills, some international students experience difficulty participating in class discussion. Several studies have revealed a range of obstacles to full participation in in-class discussions, including language, cultural differences, academic differences, and social isolation. Among these barriers, some studies have identified emotional factors that significantly affect learning. This study was an in-depth exploration of the adverse emotional factors that impede discussion participation. Using a qualitative approach, twenty-three international students at one university were interviewed, and their responses analyzed. Students reported that fear, embarrassment, social isolation, judgment and discrimination were barriers to participation. These findings are discussed in the context of a framework for reducing negative emotional states, employing self-efficacy theory. This framework was applied to the interview results and the author’s observation of international students’ behavior in dormitories and university offices. These findings suggest a possible intervention approach for educators to help international students express themselves in the classroom.

  14. "It's because they care": understanding pathways to classroom concentration problems among HIV-affected children and youth in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovdal, Morten

    2016-03-01

    Children and young people living in households affected by HIV are experiencing poorer educational outcomes compared to their peers. This article explores how different forms of marginalisation interface and manifest themselves in classroom concentration problems, undermining their education. This mixed qualitative methods study was conducted with teachers and pupils from three primary and three secondary schools in the Siaya County of Western Kenya. Specifically, it involved 18 teachers through individual interviews and 51 HIV-affected children and youth through individual interviews (n = 47) and Photovoice (n = 51). Verbatim transcripts were imported into NVivo10 for thematic indexing and analysis. The analysis revealed three core pathways to classroom concentration problems amongst HIV-affected pupils. One, a general 'lack of care' and neglect in the context of household poverty and illness, meant that many of the participating pupils went to school hungry, unable to follow classes. Others were teased by peers for looking visibly poor, and felt anxious when in school. Two, some HIV-affected pupils play a key role in keeping their household afloat, generating food and income as well as providing practical support. 'Caregiving' pupils often reported coming to school exhausted, with limited physical and mental energy left for learning. Three, many participating pupils had their minds at home ('caring about'). They were concerned about sick or frail household members, thinking about their next meal and care needs. Although the pupils demonstrated an admirable attentiveness to the needs of others, this came at a heavy price, namely their ability to concentrate in class. The paper argues that care ethics, household poverty and familial HIV are central to understanding the classroom concentration problems of HIV-affected pupils. To ensure school-going children and youth affected by HIV have the same opportunities as their peers, education initiatives must

  15. Homeopathic Ear Drops as an Adjunct in Reducing Antibiotic Usage in Children With Acute Otitis Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James A; Jacobs, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine if use of a homeopathic ear drop preparation reduces antibiotic use in children diagnosed with acute otitis media (AOM). Methods. Children 6 months to 11 years old, diagnosed with AOM and managed with a delayed antibiotic approach, were randomized to standard therapy alone or standard therapy plus a homeopathic ear drop preparation. The primary outcome was whether or not the antibiotic prescription given at the index visit was filled during a 12- to 15-day follow-up period. Results. Among 210 enrolled children, follow-up antibiotic data were collected on 206. During the 12- to 15-day follow-up period, fewer parents of children randomized to the homeopathic ear drops group filled the antibiotic prescription compared with those of children receiving standard therapy alone (26.9% and 41.2%, respectively, P = .032). Conclusion. Homeopathic ear drops may be effective in reducing the use of antibiotics in children with AOM managed with a delayed antibiotic approach.

  16. Can instructional and emotional support in the first-grade classroom make a difference for children at risk of school failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamre, Bridget K; Pianta, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    This study examined ways in which children's risk of school failure may be moderated by support from teachers. Participants were 910 children in a national prospective study. Children were identified as at risk at ages 5-6 years on the basis of demographic characteristics and the display of multiple functional (behavioral, attention, academic, social) problems reported by their kindergarten teachers. By the end of first grade, at-risk students placed in first-grade classrooms offering strong instructional and emotional support had achievement scores and student-teacher relationships commensurate with their low-risk peers; at-risk students placed in less supportive classrooms had lower achievement and more conflict with teachers. These findings have implications for understanding the role that classroom experience may play in pathways to positive adaptation.

  17. Mozart K.545 Mimics Mozart K.448 in Reducing Epileptiform Discharges in Epileptic Children

    OpenAIRE

    Lung-Chang Lin; Mei-Wen Lee; Ruey-Chang Wei; Hin-Kiu Mok; Hui-Chuan Wu; Chin-Lin Tsai; Rei-Cheng Yang

    2012-01-01

    Mozart K.448 has been shown to improve cognitive function, leading to what is known as the Mozart Effect. Our previous work reveals positive effects of Mozart K.448 in reducing epileptiform discharges in epileptic children. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Mozart K.545 and compared the effects with those of Mozart K.448 on epileptiform discharges in children with epilepsy. Thirty-nine epileptic children with epileptiform discharges were included in the study. They received electroenc...

  18. Mozart K.545 Mimics Mozart K.448 in Reducing Epileptiform Discharges in Epileptic Children

    OpenAIRE

    Lung-Chang Lin; Mei-Wen Lee; Ruey-Chang Wei; Hin-Kiu Mok; Hui-Chuan Wu; Chin-Lin Tsai; Rei-Cheng Yang

    2012-01-01

    Mozart K.448 has been shown to improve cognitive function, leading to what is known as the Mozart Effect. Our previous work reveals positive effects of Mozart K.448 in reducing epileptiform discharges in epileptic children. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Mozart K.545 and compared the effects with those of Mozart K.448 on epileptiform discharges in children with epilepsy. Thirty-nine epileptic children with epileptiform discharges were included in the study. They received electroenc...

  19. Use of Praise and Reprimands as Critical Ingredients of Teacher Behavior Management: Effects on Children's Development in the Context of a Teacher-Mediated Classroom Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilt, Jantine L; Leflot, Geertje; Onghena, Patrick; Colpin, Hilde

    2016-08-01

    This intervention study examined teachers' use of verbal praise and reprimands as specific components of teacher behavior management that can promote children's development in schools. The impact of teacher praise and reprimands on children's development was examined in the context of a teacher-mediated, classroom intervention. The sample involved 570 children and 30 teachers from second grade classrooms in 15 primary schools. The Good Behavior Game was implemented in half of the classrooms based on random assignment within schools. Teacher behavior management (praise for appropriate behavior and reprimands for inappropriate behavior) was observed during regular classroom lessons. Hyperactive, disruptive, and withdrawn child behavior were assessed using teacher and peer reports, global self-concept and emotional engagement were assessed using child self-reports. All variables were assessed at the beginning (pre-test) and at the end (post-test) of the school year. Multilevel regression models accounted for the nested structure of the data. The results suggested positive effects of fewer reprimands and more praise on child outcomes (except emotional school engagement), although the results differed by informant. We also found indirect effects of the Good Behavior Game (GBG) on child outcomes via teacher praise and reprimands. Overall, the study suggests that teachers' use of praise and reprimands is a malleable classroom factor that influences children's behavioral and socio-emotional development.

  20. Reducing Listening-Related Stress in School-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, Gary; Chisari, Donella; Saunders, Kerryn; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2017-01-01

    High levels of stress and anxiety are common in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Within this study of school-aged children (20 male, 6 female) we hypothesised that functional hearing deficits (also pervasive in ASD) could be ameliorated by auditory interventions and that, as a consequence, stress levels would be reduced. The use of…

  1. Evaluation of a Behavioral Treatment Package to Reduce Sleep Problems in Children with Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Keith D.; Kuhn, Brett R.; DeHaai, Kristi A.; Wallace, Dustin P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of a behavioral treatment package to reduce chronic sleep problems in children with Angelman Syndrome. Participants were five children, 2-11 years-of-age. Parents maintained sleep diaries to record sleep and disruptive nighttime behaviors. Actigraphy was added to provide…

  2. The use of noncontingent escape to reduce disruptive behaviors in children with speech delays.

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, C. L.; Holmes, P A

    1998-01-01

    Noncontingent escape (NCE) was used to reduce disruptive behavior in 3 children during regularly scheduled speech therapy sessions. Results showed rapid decreases in disruptive behavior and accompanying increases in compliance across children. Findings suggest that speech therapists with little expertise in behavior analysis can effectively implement NCE.

  3. An attempt to reduce negative stereotyping of obesity in children by changing controllability beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anesbury, T; Tiggemann, M

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether changing children's beliefs about the controllability of obesity would reduce their negative attitudes toward fat people. The participants were 74 children from Grades 4-6, 42 in the experimental group and 32 in the control group. The experimental group were presented with a brief intervention which focussed on the uncontrollability of weight. The study found that the intervention was successful in reducing the amount of controllability that children assigned to obesity, but was not successful in reducing negative stereotyping of the obese among the experimental group compared to the control group. These results indicate that while children's beliefs about the controllability of obesity can be changed, reducing their negative stereotyping is more difficult.

  4. Orthodontic treatment reduces the impact on children and adolescents' oral health-related quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eluza Piassi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Malocclusions treatment reduces the impact on children and adolescents' OHRQoL based on evidence assessed in the literature. The level of evidence was moderate to high to detect changes in the impact after orthodontic treatment.

  5. Enhancing Treatment for School-Age Children Who Stutter II. Reducing Bullying through Role-Playing and Self-Disclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, William P.; Yaruss, J. Scott; Quesal, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes several treatment strategies that clinicians can use to help children who stutter who are experiencing bullying and other negative reactions from their peers. Specific strategies include problem-solving activities designed to help the child develop appropriate responses to bullying and a classroom presentation designed to…

  6. The Knowledge of Teachers about Rights of Children to Reducing Child Abuse in Homeless Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Pourrajab, Bahare Fallahi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review paper is to identify the important role of teachers about reporting child abuse in their classroom to reduce and prevention of child abuse with considers the homeless students. The findings of this study show that teachers have an important role to intervene and prevent of child abuse, because they spend a lot of time with students and contact with them in classroom. This study also finds that, teachers believed that the appropriate training has not been taught them in colleges, universities or teachers training centers. Furthermore, this paper pursues the professional abilities of teachers in order to find the child abuse signs of their students as well as the homeless ones and the skills of reporting them.

  7. Orchestrating classroom change to engage children in the process of scientific reasoning: Challenges for teachers and strategies for success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Melissa J.

    Science curricula should reflect the nature of science as experienced by its practitioners (Hacking, 1992; Harding & Hare, 2000; Latour, 1987; Pickering, 1992). Contemporary literature depicts scientific research laboratories as social spaces, where intellectual debate plays a significant role in discovery. However, this is not the way science instruction is conducted in most science classrooms. Tharp and Gallimore (1988) argue that pedagogical methods have not changed in The United States in over one hundred years. Driver, Leach, Millar, and Scott (1996) suggest that in order for students to understand the scientific process, teachers must focus on the "actual work of scientists and illustrate the internal social relations within science" (p. 146). In light of the widespread appeals for change, why does the traditional classroom structure persist? The aim of the present study is to address the issue of classroom change to support students as they engage in the practice of posing questions and constructing scientific explanations complete with peer review. Although theoretical perspectives clearly support designing classroom environments in which the language of conjecture and evidence is the norm, translating these ideas into classroom practice has not been as successful. The original intent of the current study was to explore how students in one intact fifth grade class, positioned as specialists who each had access to one component of a problem with the responsibility of teaching that component to their peers, would differ from students in a second intact fifth grade class, who did not assume this role. The students were compared in terms of the predictions made and the types of evidence presented to support claims. The data indicated that the students did not engage in discussions as anticipated. In fact, the children from both classes approached the problem as a search for the correct answer. Very little evaluation of evidence or debate took place. Given that

  8. Using a flipped classroom and the perspective of families to teach medical students about children with disabilities and special education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Mary E; Vitalone-Raccaro, Nancy; Kaari, Jacqueline M; Ajumobi, Taiwo T

    2017-10-01

    The need to teach medical students to care for children with disabilities, work effectively with these patients' families, and collaborate with schools has been well established. Yet, what is not clear is the exact nature of the content to be taught and how medical schools develop the systems and enabling structures required to ensure medical education responds to the needs of children with disabilities and their families. The aim of this study was to develop and assess the efficacy of an educational intervention designed to introduce the topics of special education law and practices and working with parents of children with disabilities into an undergraduate medical education pediatrics course. A new curricular element based upon the flipped classroom that included an on-line module followed by participation in a panel discussion comprised of parents of children with disabilities, and concluding with an on-line discussion was implemented. Medical students completed a pre- and post-assessment that evaluated their knowledge of special education law and practices. Students demonstrated increased understanding of special education laws and practices. Qualitative findings showed that students recognized the importance and value of learning the content to support their patients and their patients' families. Based upon study findings, the flipped classroom method improved student knowledge of the topic and students reported they valued the content. This addition to the undergraduate medical curriculum provided students with an effective introductory overview and demonstrated one viable option for incorporating necessary topics into the undergraduate medical curriculum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The impact of instructional context on classroom on-task behavior: a matched comparison of children with ADHD and non-ADHD classmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imeraj, Lindita; Antrop, Inge; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Deboutte, Dirk; Deschepper, Ellen; Bal, Sarah; Roeyers, Herbert

    2013-08-01

    Classroom inattentiveness is an important reason for clinical referral of children with ADHD and a strong predictor of their educational achievement. This study investigates classroom on-task behavior of Flemish children with ADHD withdrawn from medication as a function of instructional context. Thirty-one pairs of children (one with ADHD and one age- and sex-matched control; 25 boys and 6 girls 6 to 12years of age) were observed in their classroom environment during two consecutive school days. On-task behavior (time on-task and on-task span) of ADHD and non-ADHD individuals was compared in different class contexts (i.e., different class structures and academic content types). Individualized teacher supervision was simultaneously assessed. Generalized estimation equation analyses showed that children with ADHD were significantly less on-task than controls during individual work and whole class group teaching, but not during small group work, and had significantly shorter on-task span during academic tasks (mathematics, language, and sciences) and instructional transitions between tasks, but not during music and arts. These effects persisted even after controlling for the higher levels of teacher supervision observed for ADHD pupils (7%) across all contexts (vs. 4% in controls). Findings suggest that despite receiving more overall teacher supervision, children with ADHD displayed lower levels of on-task behavior in settings that place high self-regulatory, information processing, and motivational demands on them. This finding may have initial implications for classroom interventions in this population.

  10. Hypothesis: Impregnated school uniforms reduce the incidence of dengue infections in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, A; Lover, A; Kittayapong, P; Burnham, G

    2011-06-01

    Dengue infection causes a significant economic, social and medical burden in affected populations in over 100 countries in the tropics and sub-tropics. Current dengue control efforts have generally focused on vector control but have not shown major impact. School-aged children are especially vulnerable to infection, due to sustained human-vector-human transmission in the close proximity environments of schools. Infection in children has a higher rate of complications, including dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndromes, than infections in adults. There is an urgent need for integrated and complementary population-based strategies to protect vulnerable children. We hypothesize that insecticide-treated school uniforms will reduce the incidence of dengue in school-aged children. The hypothesis would need to be tested in a community based randomized trial. If proven to be true, insecticide-treated school uniforms would be a cost-effective and scalable community based strategy to reduce the burden of dengue in children.

  11. Effectiveness and specificity of a classroom-based group intervention in children and adolescents exposed to war in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Elie G; Fayyad, John; Nasser Karam, Aimee; Cordahi Tabet, Caroline; Melhem, Nadine; Mneimneh, Zeina; Dimassi, Hani

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness and specificity of a classroom-based psychosocial intervention after war. All students (n=2500) of six villages in Southern Lebanon designated as most heavily exposed to war received a classroom-based intervention delivered by teachers, consisting of cognitive-behavioural and stress inoculation training strategies. A random sample of treated students (n=101) and a matched control group (n=93) were assessed one month post-war and one year later. Mental disorders and psychosocial stressors were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents - Revised with children and parents. War exposure was measured using the War Events Questionnaire. The prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD), separation anxiety disorder (SAD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was examined pre-war, one month post-war (pre-intervention), and one year post-war. Specificity of treatment was determined by rating teachers' therapy diaries. The rates of disorders peaked one month post-war and decreased over one year. There was no significant effect of the intervention on the rates of MDD, SAD or PTSD. Post-war MDD, SAD and PTSD were associated with pre-war SAD and PTSD, family violence parameters, financial problems and witnessing war events. These findings have significant policy and public health implications, given current practices of delivering universal interventions immediately post-war.

  12. Enhancing the Capacity of School Nurses to Reduce Excessive Anxiety in Children: Development of the CALM Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Kelly L; Stewart, Catherine E; Muggeo, Michela A; Ginsburg, Golda S

    2015-08-01

    Excessive anxiety is among the most common psychiatric problems facing youth. Because anxious youth tend to have somatic complaints, many seek help from the school nurse. Thus, school nurses are in an ideal position to provide early intervention. This study addresses this problem and describes the plans to develop and test a new intervention (Child Anxiety Learning Modules; CALM), delivered by school nurses, to reduce child anxiety and improve academic functioning. An iterative development process including consultation with an expert panel, two open trials, and a pilot randomized controlled study comparing CALM to usual care is proposed. Feedback will be solicited from all participants during each phase and data on outcome measures will be provided by children, parents, teachers, and independent evaluators. Data will be collected on intervention satisfaction and feasibility. Primary outcomes that include child anxiety symptoms, classroom behavior, and school performance (e.g., attendance, grades, standardized test scores) will be collected at pre- and post-interventions and at a 3-month follow-up evaluation. Pediatric anxiety is a common problem that school nurses frequently encounter. Consequently, they are well positioned to play a key role in enhancing access to behavioral health interventions to reduce anxiety and may therefore make a significant positive public health impact. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Reducing sibling conflict in maltreated children placed in foster homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, L Oriana; Jimenez, Jessica; Nesci, Cristina; Pearson, Eva; Beller, Sarah; Edwards, Nancy; Levin-Rector, Alison

    2015-02-01

    Sibling aggression among maltreated children placed in foster homes is linked to other externalizing problems and placement disruption. The reduction of sibling conflict and aggression may be achieved via a multicomponent ecologically focused intervention for families in the foster care system. The focus of the study is to evaluate the feasibility and short-term effectiveness of a transtheoretical intervention model targeting sibling pairs and their foster parent that integrates family systems, social learning theory, and a conflict mediation perspective. In this pilot study, sibling pairs (N = 22) and their foster parent were randomized into a three-component intervention (n = 13) or a comparison (n = 9) group. Promoting Sibling Bonds (PSB) is an 8-week prevention intervention targeting maltreated sibling pairs ages 5-11 years placed together in a foster home. The siblings, parent, and joint components were delivered in a program package at the foster agency by a trained two-clinician team. Average attendance across program components was 73 %. Outcomes in four areas were gathered at pre- and postintervention: observed sibling interaction quality (positive and negative) including conflict during play, and foster parent reports of mediation strategies and sibling aggression in the foster home. At postintervention, adjusting for baseline scores and child age, intervention pairs showed higher positive (p Foster parents in the intervention group reported a higher number of conflict mediation strategies than those in the comparison group (p Foster parents in the intervention group reported lower sibling physical aggression from the older toward the younger child than those in the comparison group (p foster home.

  14. Vitamin A supplementation reduces the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 intestinal immune response of Mexican children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kurt Z; Santos, Jose Ignacio; Estrada Garcia, Teresa; Haas, Meredith; Firestone, Mathew; Bhagwat, Jui; Dupont, Herbert L; Hertzmark, Ellen; Rosado, Jorge L; Nanthakumar, Nanda N

    2006-10-01

    The impact of vitamin A supplementation on childhood diarrhea may be determined by the regulatory effect supplementation has on the mucosal immune response in the gut. Previous studies have not addressed the impact of vitamin A supplementation on the production of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), an essential chemokine involved in pathogen-specific mucosal immune response. Fecal MCP-1 concentrations, determined by an enzyme-linked immuno absorption assay, were compared among 127 Mexican children 5-15 mo of age randomized to receive a vitamin A supplement ( or =12 mo, 45,000 iu) every 2 mo or a placebo as part of a larger vitamin A supplementation trial. Stools collected during the summer months were screened for MCP-1 and gastrointestinal pathogens. Values of MCP-1 were categorized into 3 levels (nondetectable, or =median). Multinomial logistic regression models were used to determine whether vitamin A-supplemented children had different categorical values of MCP-1 compared with children in the placebo group. Differences in categorical values were also analyzed stratified by gastrointestinal pathogen infections and by diarrheal symptoms. Overall, children who received the vitamin A supplement had reduced fecal concentrations of MCP-1 compared with children in the placebo group (median pg/mg protein +/- interquartile range: 284.88 +/- 885.35 vs. 403.39 +/- 913.16; odds ratio 0.64, 95% CI 0.42-97, P = 0.03). Vitamin A supplemented children infected with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) had reduced MCP-1 levels (odds ratio = 0.38, 95% CI 0.18-0.80) compared with children in the placebo group. Among children not infected with Ascaris lumbricoides vitamin A supplemented children had reduced MCP-1 levels (OR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.41-0.94). These findings suggest that vitamin A has an anti-inflammatory effect in the gastrointestinal tract by reducing MCP-1 concentrations.

  15. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial of Classroom-Based Mindfulness Meditation Compared to an Active Control Condition in 6th Grade Children

    OpenAIRE

    Britton, Willoughby B.; Lepp, Nathaniel E.; Niles, Halsey F.; Rocha, Tomas; Fisher, Nathan; Gold, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Children in the United States are at risk for numerous psychological problems, such as anxiety, attention problems, and mood disorders, and are underserved by current mental health provisions. The current study is a pilot trial to examine the effects of a nonelective, classroom-based, teacher-implemented, mindfulness meditation intervention on standard clinical measures of mental health and affect in middle school children. A total of 101 healthy sixth-grade students (55 boys and 46 girls) we...

  16. "It's Harder to Catch a Boy Because They're Tougher": Using Fairytales in the Classroom to Explore Children's Understandings of Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Traditional fairytales serve to socially construct gendered categories and reify dominant understandings of masculinities and femininities. Using reading groups and participant observations in an elementary school classroom, this article explores how children actively engage with gendered messages within fairytales--specifically examining…

  17. Teaching with Technology: Step Back and Hand over the Cameras! Using Digital Cameras to Facilitate Mathematics Learning with Young Children in K-2 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcote, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Digital cameras are now commonplace in many classrooms and in the lives of many children in early childhood centres and primary schools. They are regularly used by adults and teachers for "saving special moments and documenting experiences." The use of previously expensive photographic and recording equipment has often remained in the domain of…

  18. Expanding the Horizons for Critical Literacy in a Bilingual Preschool Classroom: Children's Responses in Discussions with Gender-Themed Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Jung

    2016-01-01

    The current study explores how picture books can be used in bilingual classrooms to support more critical understandings of gender stereotypes by preschool children. The research uses a reader-response perspective that stresses the importance of the reader's role in interpreting texts as well as sociocultural theory to analyze the social dynamics…

  19. The Combined Effects of Social Script Training and Peer Buddies on Generalized Peer Interaction of Children with ASD in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundert, Joel; Rowe, Sarah; Harrison, Erin

    2014-01-01

    One of the challenges in supporting young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in inclusive classrooms is the generalization of improved social behaviors. Using a multiple-baseline design across participants, this study examined the generalized effects of social script training alone and combined with peer buddies on the interactive play…

  20. Toward More Just Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Children, 2010

    2010-01-01

    To address issues of equity with young children, early childhood educators must become interventionists. They must reconsider how they interact with children to identify the subtle ways that power structures classroom life and shapes children's identities. It is important to attend to the materials in the classroom to ensure that they are…

  1. Children's Participation in a Virtual Epidemic in the Science Classroom: Making Connections to Natural Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neulight, Nina; Kafai, Yasmin B.; Kao, Linda; Foley, Brian; Galas, Cathleen

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated students' understanding of a virtual infectious disease in relation to their understanding of natural infectious diseases. Two sixth-grade classrooms of students between the ages of 10 and 12 (46 students) took part in a participatory simulation of a virtual infectious disease, which was integrated into their science…

  2. Children's Participation in a Virtual Epidemic in the Science Classroom: Making Connections to Natural Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neulight, Nina; Kafai, Yasmin B.; Kao, Linda; Foley, Brian; Galas, Cathleen

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated students' understanding of a virtual infectious disease in relation to their understanding of natural infectious diseases. Two sixth-grade classrooms of students between the ages of 10 and 12 (46 students) took part in a participatory simulation of a virtual infectious disease, which was integrated into their science…

  3. Classroom Keyboard Instruction Improves Kindergarten Children's Spatial-Temporal Performance: A Field Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Frances H.; Zupan, Mary Anne

    2000-01-01

    Determined the effects of classroom music instruction featuring the keyboard on the spatial-temporal reasoning of 62 kindergartners assigned to keyboard or no music conditions. Found that the keyboard group scored significantly higher than the no music group on both spatial-temporal tasks after 4 months of lessons, a difference that was greater in…

  4. Emotional Intelligence and Beliefs about Children, Discipline and Classroom Practices among Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Maryclare E.

    2009-01-01

    This research sought to explore how emotional intelligence (EI) shapes the beliefs of pre-service teachers with respect to issues such as classroom management and student behavior. 101 pre-service teachers were recruited from undergraduate and graduate education courses at a private, mid-sized university. The Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i),…

  5. My-Bookstore: Using Information Technology to Support Children's Classroom Reading and Book Recommendation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Tzu-Chao; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Ko, Hwa-Wei; Ku, Yu-Min; Chan, Tak-Wai

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a learning system, named My-Bookstore, where students buy (make records of) books (paper books) which they have read, and then sell (recommend) the books they like to others. This system is designed to encourage elementary students' classroom reading and book recommendation. The long-term influence of the My-Bookstore system…

  6. Helping Children with Attentional Challenges in a Montessori Classroom: The Role of the Physician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy-Ryan, Maureen

    2017-01-01

    Maureen Murphy-Ryan offers a clinical look at attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Her thorough definition of ADHD and the diagnoses that may occur simultaneously offer teachers an awareness of what this could look like in a classroom. However, it is only with professional medical input that a true diagnosis can be made and appropriate…

  7. Managing Classroom Behavior of Head Start Children Using Response Cost and Token Economy Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Jennifer D.; Fortson, Beverly L.; McNeil, Cheryl B.; Humphreys, Lisa A.

    2005-01-01

    The efficacy of three behavior management techniques used in a Head Start classroom was examined. The three techniques included: (a) techniques currently used by the teacher, (b) response cost, and (c) the Level System (token economy). The current study used an ABACA single subject withdrawal design with follow-up where all conditions were…

  8. Natives and Newcomers: Gaining Access to Literacy in a Classroom for Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Claire; Padden, Carol

    1998-01-01

    Describes a residential school classroom for deaf third graders. A critical school skill, the ability to engage in literacy activities, grows from the ability to exploit American Sign Language-based (ASL) literacy practices, which are indigenous to the culture of signing deaf people and critical for literacy learning when ASL is the medium of…

  9. Measurement of Aspects of Classroom Environment Considered Likely to Influence Children's Prosocial Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Daniel; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes procedures used to measure aspects of a classroom environment in which the development of prosocial characteristics is emphasized. Explains observation procedures, a teacher questionnaire, a child interview, and a child questionnaire. Finds observation to be the most useful means of assessment, with the other three procedures…

  10. Reduced Bone Mineral Density in Children and Adolescents: Causes, Incidence and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Maltsev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis in children is an urgent problem, since it occurs at different ages. The main risk factors and causes of primary and secondary osteoporosis in children include exogenous and endogenous, modifiable and non-modifiable factors. Critical age periods of childhood characterized by a high risk of reduced bone mineral density and fractures are specified. The article describes the biological effects of calcium, vitamin D and osteotropic trace elements and shows their role in osteogenesis and bone remodeling. It also presents the results of the study of reduced bone mineral density in children, the data on the availability of vitamin D for children at different ages, and provides recommendations for treatment.

  11. Effects of Fixed-Time Reinforcement Delivered by Teachers for Reducing Problem Behavior in Special Education Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlin, Michelle; Reed, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The effects of fixed-time (FT) reinforcement schedules on the disruptive behavior of 4 students in special education classrooms were studied. Attention provided on FT schedules in the context of a multiple-baseline design across participants substantially decreased all students' challenging behavior. Disruptive behavior was maintained at levels…

  12. Reduced Bone Mineral Density in Children and Adolescents: Causes, Incidence and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    S. V. Maltsev; G.Sh. Mansurova

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis in children is an urgent problem, since it occurs at different ages. The main risk factors and causes of primary and secondary osteoporosis in children include exogenous and endogenous, modifiable and non-modifiable factors. Critical age periods of childhood characterized by a high risk of reduced bone mineral density and fractures are specified. The article describes the biological effects of calcium, vitamin D and osteotropic trace elements and shows their role in osteogenesis ...

  13. Two Novel Treatments to Reduce Overeating in Overweight Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutelle, Kerri N.; Zucker, Nancy L.; Peterson, Carol B.; Rydell, Sarah A.; Cafri, Guy; Harnack, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Our purpose in this study was to examine 2 treatments targeted at reducing eating in the absence of hunger in overweight and obese children. Method: Thirty-six overweight and obese 8- to 12-year-old children (58% female; mean age = 10.3 years, SD = 1.3), with high scores on eating in the absence of hunger, and their parents were…

  14. Behavioral intervention reduces unhealthy eating behaviors in preschool children via a behavior card approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming; Pan, Li-Ping; Han, Juan; Li, Li; Jiang, Jing-Xiong; Jin, Run-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Many eating behaviors form in childhood, and some unhealthy behaviors may persist into adulthood and have potential impacts on people's health. This study evaluated the effectiveness of behavioral intervention in reducing consumption of Western fast food, sweetened beverages, fried food in preschool children, and changing parents' rewarding behaviors that encourage the consumption of the unhealthy foods. The research was a cluster randomized trial of seven kindergartens, involving 1138 children aged 3-6 years and their parents in Beijing, China. Parents and children allocated to the intervention group received two lectures and printed resources, including behavior cards, educational sheets. Children's behavior cards, applied with behavior-changing techniques, were used to intervene, and monitor behavior changes over time. Children in the control group just followed their usual health education curriculum in kindergartens. Intervention effects on food consumption behaviors were assessed by examining pre- and post-questionnaires. Of the 1138 children screened at baseline, 880 (77.3%) were measured at the end of the intervention period. The intervention lasted from March to June in 2010. The results showed that consumption of Western fast food, sweetened beverages, and fried food was decreased among the intervention group (Pchildren were decreased (P=0.002). From March to June 2010, the frequency of each target behavior in children tended to decrease over the intervention period (Pchildren and reduces the parents' practice of using unhealthy foods as reward.

  15. Can presence of a dog reduce pain and distress in children during venipuncture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagnoli, Laura; Caprilli, Simona; Vernucci, Chiara; Zagni, Silvia; Mugnai, Francesca; Messeri, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of animal-assisted intervention as distraction for reducing children's pain and distress before, during, and after standard blood collection procedure. Fifty children (ages 4-11 years) undergoing venipuncture were randomly assigned to the experimental group (EG; n = 25) or to the control group (CG; n = 25). The blood collection procedure was carried on the children in the EG arm in the presence of a dog, whereas no dog was present when venipuncture was conducted on children in CG. In both cases, parents accompanied the child in the procedure room. Distress experienced by the child was measured with the Amended Observation Scale of Behavioral Distress, while perceived pain was measured with a visual analog scale or the Wong Baker Scale (Faces Scale); levels of cortisol in blood also were analyzed. Parental anxiety during the procedure was measured with State Trait Anxiety Inventory. Children assigned to the EG group reacted with less distress than children in the CG arm. Furthermore, cortisol levels were lower in the EG group compared with the CG group. There were no significant differences in pain ratings and in the level of parental anxiety. It appears that the presence of dogs during blood draw procedures reduces distress in children.

  16. Low-Income Children's Self-Regulation in the Classroom: Scientific Inquiry for Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raver, C. Cybele

    2012-01-01

    Over 21% of children in the United States today are poor, and the income gap between our nation's richest and poorest children has widened dramatically over time. This article considers children's self-regulation as a key mediating mechanism through which poverty has deleterious consequences for their later life outcomes. Evidence from field…

  17. Investigating Children's Emotion Regulation in Socio-Emotionally Challenging Classroom Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurki, Kristiina; Järvelä, Sanna; Mykkänen, Arttu; Määttä, Elina

    2015-01-01

    Decades of research have associated effective emotion and behaviour regulation with learning and social competence among young children. However, further studies on children's use of emotion regulation in their everyday lives are required. This study focuses on investigating six- to nine-year-old children's (N?=?24) use of emotion regulation…

  18. Effective Behavior Management in Preschool Classrooms and Children's Task Orientation: Enhancing Emergent Literacy and Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs-Oates, Jennifer; Kaderavek, Joan N.; Guo, Ying; Justice, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relations among preschool teachers' behavior management, children's task orientation, and children's emergent literacy and language development, as well as the extent to which task orientation moderated the relation between teachers' behavior management and children's emergent literacy and language development.…

  19. Teaching Creole-Speaking Children: Issues, Concerns and Resolutions for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigglesworth, Gillian; Billington, Rosey

    2013-01-01

    There are now significant numbers of children who speak a language other than English when they enter the formal school system in Australia. Many of these children come from a language background that is entirely different from the school language. Many Indigenous children, however, come from creole-speaking backgrounds where their home language…

  20. Companion Angels on a Leash: Welcoming Service Dogs into Classroom Communities for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kathleen I.; Sholtis, Stephanie D.

    2016-01-01

    Love, affection, acceptance, and companionship to children, these are just some of the benefits of a service dog for children. Yet there is much that these remarkable animals can do. From opening doors for children with cerebral palsy to warning a child with diabetes of low blood sugar, the abilities of a properly trained service dog are wide and…

  1. Classroom Learning Environments and the Mental Health of First Grade Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkie, Melissa A.; Warner, Catharine H.

    2011-01-01

    Sociological research focuses on how poverty, family, and neighborhood dynamics shape children's problems, but knowledge about how school is related to children's mental health is underdeveloped, despite its central presence in children's lives. Using a social structure and personality-stress contagion perspective, the authors use a nationally…

  2. Methylphenidate, Add, and Classroom Performance

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The degree to which methylphenidate (MPH) normalized the classroom behavior and academic functioning of 31 children with attention deficit disorder (ADD) was evaluated at Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA.

  3. Reducing Mental Health Emergency Services for Children Served Through California's Full Service Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell, Katharan D; Snowden, Lonnie R

    2017-03-01

    Children's Full Service Partnerships (FSP), created through California's Mental Health Services Act of 2004 are comprehensive treatment and support programs incorporating a wraparound model designed to serve undertreated families with children who have a serious emotional disturbance and are at risk for suicide, violence, residential instability, criminal justice involvement, or involuntary hospitalization. This study investigated whether FSP programs resulted in reduced crisis-related mental health emergency services (MHES) for the children they served. Using a statewide data set for 464,880 children and youth ages 11to <18 served by California's county mental health systems between 2004 and 2012, the study compared age-related trajectories of MHES use for FSP-served children before and after treatment alongside children in usual care. Estimates were made within stratified age groups (11 to <15 and 15 to <18), utilizing propensity score adjusted random effects for each child's increasing age to control individual differences in MHES likelihood and trajectory, while controlling for age, cohort, county of service, and clinical and demographic covariates. Before treatment in FSP, FSP-served children showed higher and increasing MHES rates initially, reflecting greater severity. After FSP treatment, FSP-served children's MHES trajectory declined more rapidly than those of controls. There is strong evidence for the success of FSP's aggressive approach in reducing dangerous, increasing trajectories in MHES use. More research is needed, but key efficacious components within the program may be candidates for broader application when providing community-based, crisis-averting care for the most socially and economically vulnerable, seriously mentally ill children and youth.

  4. Reducing errors benefits the field-based learning of a fundamental movement skill in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capio, C M; Poolton, J M; Sit, C H P; Holmstrom, M; Masters, R S W

    2013-03-01

    Proficient fundamental movement skills (FMS) are believed to form the basis of more complex movement patterns in sports. This study examined the development of the FMS of overhand throwing in children through either an error-reduced (ER) or error-strewn (ES) training program. Students (n = 216), aged 8-12 years (M = 9.16, SD = 0.96), practiced overhand throwing in either a program that reduced errors during practice (ER) or one that was ES. ER program reduced errors by incrementally raising the task difficulty, while the ES program had an incremental lowering of task difficulty. Process-oriented assessment of throwing movement form (Test of Gross Motor Development-2) and product-oriented assessment of throwing accuracy (absolute error) were performed. Changes in performance were examined among children in the upper and lower quartiles of the pretest throwing accuracy scores. ER training participants showed greater gains in movement form and accuracy, and performed throwing more effectively with a concurrent secondary cognitive task. Movement form improved among girls, while throwing accuracy improved among children with low ability. Reduced performance errors in FMS training resulted in greater learning than a program that did not restrict errors. Reduced cognitive processing costs (effective dual-task performance) associated with such approach suggest its potential benefits for children with developmental conditions.

  5. Moral beings and becomings : children's moral practices in classroom peer interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Niemi, Kreeta

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates children’s social and moral practices as they appear in everyday classroom peer interaction. Its focus is on the relations between children’s interaction and moral understandings in situ. Juxtaposing the most archetypal ways of addressing and investigating morality in mainstream educational psychology, this study approaches morality is as it handled and man- aged as part of everyday intersubjective interaction. Ethnomethodological approaches alongside wi...

  6. Homeopathic Ear Drops as an Adjunct in Reducing Antibiotic Usage in Children With Acute Otitis Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Taylor MD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine if use of a homeopathic ear drop preparation reduces antibiotic use in children diagnosed with acute otitis media (AOM. Methods. Children 6 months to 11 years old, diagnosed with AOM and managed with a delayed antibiotic approach, were randomized to standard therapy alone or standard therapy plus a homeopathic ear drop preparation. The primary outcome was whether or not the antibiotic prescription given at the index visit was filled during a 12- to 15-day follow-up period. Results. Among 210 enrolled children, follow-up antibiotic data were collected on 206. During the 12- to 15-day follow-up period, fewer parents of children randomized to the homeopathic ear drops group filled the antibiotic prescription compared with those of children receiving standard therapy alone (26.9% and 41.2%, respectively, P = .032. Conclusion. Homeopathic ear drops may be effective in reducing the use of antibiotics in children with AOM managed with a delayed antibiotic approach.

  7. Mozart K.545 Mimics Mozart K.448 in Reducing Epileptiform Discharges in Epileptic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-Chang Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mozart K.448 has been shown to improve cognitive function, leading to what is known as the Mozart Effect. Our previous work reveals positive effects of Mozart K.448 in reducing epileptiform discharges in epileptic children. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Mozart K.545 and compared the effects with those of Mozart K.448 on epileptiform discharges in children with epilepsy. Thirty-nine epileptic children with epileptiform discharges were included in the study. They received electroencephalogram examinations before, during, and after listening to Mozart K.448 and K.545, one week apart, respectively. The frequencies of epileptiform discharges were compared. There was a significant decrease in the frequency of epileptiform discharges during and right after listening to Mozart K.448 and K.545 (reduced by 35.7±32.7% during Mozart K.448 and 30.3±44.4% after Mozart K.448; and 34.0±39.5% during Mozart K.545 and 31.8±39.2% after Mozart K.545. Spectrogrammatic analysis of the two pieces of music demonstrated that both share similar spectrogrammatic characteristics. Listening to Mozart K.448 and K.545 decreased the epileptiform discharges in epileptic children. This suggests that Mozart K.448 is not the only piece of music to have beneficial effects on children with epilepsy. Other music with lower harmonics may also decrease epileptiform discharges in epileptic children.

  8. Reduced long-range functional connectivity in young children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Yoshimura, Yuko; Hiraishi, Hirotoshi; Munesue, Toshio; Hashimoto, Takanori; Tsubokawa, Tsunehisa; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Michio; Higashida, Haruhiro; Minabe, Yoshio

    2015-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is often described as a disorder of aberrant neural connectivity. Although it is important to study the pathophysiology of ASD in the developing cortex, the functional connectivity in the brains of young children with ASD has not been well studied. In this study, brain activity was measured non-invasively during consciousness in 50 young human children with ASD and 50 age- and gender-matched typically developing human (TD) children. We employed a custom child-sized magnetoencephalography (MEG) system in which sensors were located as close to the brain as possible for optimal recording in young children. We focused on theta band oscillations because they are thought to be involved in long-range networks associated with higher cognitive processes. The ASD group showed significantly reduced connectivity between the left-anterior and the right-posterior areas, exhibiting a decrease in the coherence of theta band (6 Hz) oscillations compared with the TD group. This reduction in coherence was significantly correlated with clinical severity in right-handed children with ASD. This is the first study to demonstrate reduced long-range functional connectivity in conscious young children with ASD using a novel MEG approach. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Reduced long-range functional connectivity in young children with autism spectrum disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Yuko; Hiraishi, Hirotoshi; Munesue, Toshio; Hashimoto, Takanori; Tsubokawa, Tsunehisa; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Michio; Higashida, Haruhiro; Minabe, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is often described as a disorder of aberrant neural connectivity. Although it is important to study the pathophysiology of ASD in the developing cortex, the functional connectivity in the brains of young children with ASD has not been well studied. In this study, brain activity was measured non-invasively during consciousness in 50 young human children with ASD and 50 age- and gender-matched typically developing human (TD) children. We employed a custom child-sized magnetoencephalography (MEG) system in which sensors were located as close to the brain as possible for optimal recording in young children. We focused on theta band oscillations because they are thought to be involved in long-range networks associated with higher cognitive processes. The ASD group showed significantly reduced connectivity between the left-anterior and the right-posterior areas, exhibiting a decrease in the coherence of theta band (6 Hz) oscillations compared with the TD group. This reduction in coherence was significantly correlated with clinical severity in right-handed children with ASD. This is the first study to demonstrate reduced long-range functional connectivity in conscious young children with ASD using a novel MEG approach. PMID:24652855

  10. Mozart k.545 mimics mozart k.448 in reducing epileptiform discharges in epileptic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lung-Chang; Lee, Mei-Wen; Wei, Ruey-Chang; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Wu, Hui-Chuan; Tsai, Chin-Lin; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Mozart K.448 has been shown to improve cognitive function, leading to what is known as the Mozart Effect. Our previous work reveals positive effects of Mozart K.448 in reducing epileptiform discharges in epileptic children. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Mozart K.545 and compared the effects with those of Mozart K.448 on epileptiform discharges in children with epilepsy. Thirty-nine epileptic children with epileptiform discharges were included in the study. They received electroencephalogram examinations before, during, and after listening to Mozart K.448 and K.545, one week apart, respectively. The frequencies of epileptiform discharges were compared. There was a significant decrease in the frequency of epileptiform discharges during and right after listening to Mozart K.448 and K.545 (reduced by 35.7 ± 32.7% during Mozart K.448 and 30.3 ± 44.4% after Mozart K.448; and 34.0 ± 39.5% during Mozart K.545 and 31.8 ± 39.2% after Mozart K.545). Spectrogrammatic analysis of the two pieces of music demonstrated that both share similar spectrogrammatic characteristics. Listening to Mozart K.448 and K.545 decreased the epileptiform discharges in epileptic children. This suggests that Mozart K.448 is not the only piece of music to have beneficial effects on children with epilepsy. Other music with lower harmonics may also decrease epileptiform discharges in epileptic children.

  11. Episodic future thinking reduces delay discounting and energy intake in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Tinuke Oluyomi; Said, Michele; Stanton, Christina M; Epstein, Leonard H

    2015-08-01

    Discounting of larger future rewards in favor of smaller immediate rewards is known as delay discounting. High delay discounting or a bias towards immediate gratification impedes self-regulation and is associated with maladaptive eating behaviors. Children in general show greater delay discounting than adults. Obese children in particular, have greater difficulty delaying gratification for edible rewards. Episodic future thinking (EFT) which is mental self-projection to pre-experience future events reduces delay discounting and reduces energy intake in overweight/obese adults. However, these EFT effects have not been examined in children. We evaluated the effects of EFT versus control episodic recent thinking (ERT) on delay discounting and ad libitum energy intake while thinking about episodic cues in 42 overweight/obese 9 to 14year olds. Results showed that EFT led to less delay discounting and lowered energy intake, and EFT had the greatest effect on reducing energy intake in children with a higher desire to restrict food intake. This suggests that EFT may be useful in pediatric obesity treatment programs to help children regulate energy intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Nature of Relationships Between Young Children and Their Secondary Caregiver In a Childcare Center Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Reigle, Karen E.

    2004-01-01

    Children's relationships with their childcare teachers and its effects on their subsequent behaviors, attachments, and outcomes have been an interest in the last two or three decades primarily due to the significant increase of young children in full-time childcare. Attachment Theory, and its identifying behaviors in children categorized by the Strange Situation or the Attachment Q-Sort, has been the main focus of previous research. The purpose of my study, using an ethnographic approach, was...

  13. Abnormal gut integrity is associated with reduced linear growth in rural Malawian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Ariana J; Manary, Micah J; Stephenson, Kevin; Agapova, Sophia; Manary, Faith G; Thakwalakwa, Chrissie; Shulman, Robert J; Manary, Mark J

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relation of environmental enteropathy, as measured by the dual sugar absorption test, to linear growth faltering in 2- to 5-year-old Malawian children. Dietary quality, food insecurity, anthropometry, and site-specific sugar testing were measured in 418 children, and anthropometry was reassessed 3 months later. A linear regression model predicting linear growth was created. Better growth was associated with less urinary lactulose excretion, more clean water usage, not sleeping with animals, and no previous history of malnutrition. Eighty-seven percent of children studied demonstrated evidence of environmental enteropathy. In conclusion, abnormal gut integrity is associated with reduced linear growth in a population of rural African preschool-age children.

  14. Self-Concept Development in Inclusive Classroom Settings focusing on Children with and without Visual Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Wieckert

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The encouragement of the development of a realistic self-concept of the children in their classes is an important challenge for school teachers. Children who know about their strengths and weaknesses can work on the competences, which need to be improved, more effectively. This contribution presents a study which focuses on the special time of first-grade when primary school children get to know their new learning environment. In that context a survey takes place in Germany and accompanies children with and without special needs in the field of vision which learn together in school.

  15. Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

  16. Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

  17. Introduction of a paediatric anaesthesia comic information leaflet reduced preoperative anxiety in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassai, B; Rabilloud, M; Dantony, E; Grousson, S; Revol, O; Malik, S; Ginhoux, T; Touil, N; Chassard, D; Pereira de Souza Neto, E

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether the introduction of a paediatric anaesthesia comic information leaflet reduced preoperative anxiety levels of children undergoing major surgery. Secondary objectives were to determine whether the level of understanding of participants and other risk factors influence STAIC-S (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children-State subscale) score in children. We performed a randomized controlled parallel-group trial comparing preoperative anxiety between two groups of children aged >6 and comic information leaflet at home in addition to routine information given by the anaesthetist at least 1 day before surgery. The control group received the routine information only. The outcome measure was the difference between STAIC-S scores measured before any intervention and after the anaesthetist's visit. A multiple regression analysis was performed to explore the influence of the level of education, the anxiety of parents, and the childrens' intelligence quotient on STAIC-S scores. One hundred and fifteen children were randomized between April 2009 and April 2013. An intention-to-treat analysis on data from 111 patients showed a significant reduction (P=0.002) in STAIC-S in the intervention group (n=54, mean=-2.2) compared with the control group (n=57, mean=0.90). The multiple regression analysis did not show any influence on STAIC-S scores of the level of education, parental anxiety, or the intelligence quotient of the children. A paediatric anaesthesia comic information leaflet was a cheap and effective means of reducing preoperative anxiety, measured by STAIC-S, in children. NCT 00841022. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The 'Sydney Principles' for reducing the commercial promotion of foods and beverages to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinburn, Boyd; Sacks, Gary; Lobstein, Tim; Rigby, Neville; Baur, Louise A; Brownell, Kelly D; Gill, Tim; Seidell, Jaap; Kumanyika, Shiriki

    2008-09-01

    A set of seven principles (the 'Sydney Principles') was developed by an International Obesity Taskforce (IOTF) Working Group to guide action on changing food and beverage marketing practices that target children. The aim of the present communication is to present the Sydney Principles and report on feedback received from a global consultation (November 2006 to April 2007) on the Principles. The Principles state that actions to reduce marketing to children should: (i) support the rights of children; (ii) afford substantial protection to children; (iii) be statutory in nature; (iv) take a wide definition of commercial promotions; (v) guarantee commercial-free childhood settings; (vi) include cross-border media; and (vii) be evaluated, monitored and enforced. The draft principles were widely disseminated and 220 responses were received from professional and scientific associations, consumer bodies, industry bodies, health professionals and others. There was virtually universal agreement on the need to have a set of principles to guide action in this contentious area of marketing to children. Apart from industry opposition to the third principle calling for a statutory approach and several comments about the implementation challenges, there was strong support for each of the Sydney Principles. Feedback on two specific issues of contention related to the age range to which restrictions should apply (most nominating age 16 or 18 years) and the types of products to be included (31% nominating all products, 24% all food and beverages, and 45% energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods and beverages). The Sydney Principles, which took a children's rights-based approach, should be used to benchmark action to reduce marketing to children. The age definition for a child and the types of products which should have marketing restrictions may better suit a risk-based approach at this stage. The Sydney Principles should guide the formation of an International Code on Food and Beverage

  19. Do children's cognitive advertising defenses reduce their desire for advertised products?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, E.; Buijzen, M.A.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    In both the academic and societal debates, it is widely assumed that cognitive advertising defenses can reduce children's susceptibility to advertising effects. Empirical evidence supporting this crucial assumption is however missing. It is precisely this gap that the present study aims to fill In a

  20. Do Differences in Childhood Diet Explain the Reduced Overweight Risk in Breastfed Children?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, Salome; Brunekreef, Bert; Smit, Henriette A.; Gast, Gerrie-Cor M.; Hoekstra, Maarten O.; De Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Gerritsen, Jorrit; Seidell, Jaap C.; Wijga, Alet H.

    2008-01-01

    Breastfeeding has been associated with a reduced risk of overweight later in life. This study investigates whether differences in diet and lifestyle at 7 years of age between breastfed and formula-fed children can explain the difference in overweight prevalence at 8 years of age. We studied 2,043 Du

  1. Reducing Transfers of Children in Family Foster Care through Onsite Mental Health Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Carmen; Levine, Paul

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a successful pilot project in New York City that effectively reduced the number of transfers or replacements of children in family foster care through the placement of mental health clinicians onsite at two foster care agencies. (Contains 2 tables and 2 footnotes.)

  2. Strategies to Reduce the Bullying of Young Children with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, Tony

    2004-01-01

    Bullying can start in a child's early school years, and this paper initially explains the distinct profile of behaviour and abilities of young children with Asperger Syndrome and why they can be more vulnerable than their peers to being the target of bullying. The paper subsequently describes a range of strategies designed to reduce the frequency…

  3. Do Differences in Childhood Diet Explain the Reduced Overweight Risk in Breastfed Children?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, Salome; Brunekreef, Bert; Smit, Henriette A.; Gast, Gerrie-Cor M.; Hoekstra, Maarten O.; De Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Gerritsen, Jorrit; Seidell, Jaap C.; Wijga, Alet H.

    2008-01-01

    Breastfeeding has been associated with a reduced risk of overweight later in life. This study investigates whether differences in diet and lifestyle at 7 years of age between breastfed and formula-fed children can explain the difference in overweight prevalence at 8 years of age. We studied 2,043

  4. Reduced corticomotor excitability and motor skills development in children born preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Julia B; Schneider, Luke A; Burns, Nicholas R; Drysdale, John L; Higgins, Ryan D; Ridding, Michael C; Nettelbeck, Theodore J; Haslam, Ross R; Robinson, Jeffrey S

    2012-11-15

    The mechanisms underlying the altered neurodevelopment commonly experienced by children born preterm, but without brain lesions, remain unknown. While individuals born the earliest are at most risk, late preterm children also experience significant motor, cognitive and behavioural dysfunction from school age, and reduced income and educational attainment in adulthood. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional assessments to examine corticomotor development in 151 children without cerebral palsy, aged 10-13 years and born after gestations of 25-41 completed weeks. We hypothesized that motor cortex and corticospinal development are altered in preterm children, which underpins at least some of their motor dysfunction. We report for the first time that every week of reduced gestation is associated with a reduction in corticomotor excitability that remains evident in late childhood. This reduced excitability was associated with poorer motor skill development, particularly manual dexterity. However, child adiposity, sex and socio-economic factors regarding the child's home environment soon after birth were also powerful influences on development of motor skills. Preterm birth was also associated with reduced left hemisphere lateralization, but without increasing the likelihood of being left handed per se. These corticomotor findings have implications for normal motor development, but also raise questions regarding possible longer term consequences of preterm birth on motor function.

  5. Reducing Children's Implicit Racial Bias through Exposure to Positive Out-Group Exemplars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Antonya M.; Steele, Jennifer R.; Baron, Andrew S.

    2017-01-01

    Studies with adults suggest that implicit preferences favoring White versus Black individuals can be reduced through exposure to positive Black exemplars. However, it remains unclear whether developmental differences exist in the capacity for these biases to be changed. This study included 369 children and examined whether their implicit racial…

  6. Communication Disorders and Challenging Behaviors: Supporting Children's Functional Communication Goals in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Katy

    2017-01-01

    Children with communication disorders may express frustrations through challenging behaviors such as aggressive behaviors and social withdrawal. Challenging behaviors may lead to difficulties with building social competencies including emotional regulation and peer engagement. Individualized planning of functional goals for children with…

  7. Evaluation of a Classroom Program of Creative Expression Workshops for Refugee and Immigrant Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Cecile; Drapeau, Aline; Lacroix, Louise; Bagilishya, Deogratias; Heusch, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This evaluative study assessed the effect of a creative expression program designed to prevent emotional and behavioral problems and to enhance self-esteem in immigrant and refugee children attending multiethnic schools. Method: The 12-week program involved 138 children, aged 7 to 13, registered in both integration classes designed for…

  8. Children's National Identity in Multicultural Classrooms in Costa Rica and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-Campos, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The development of healthy national identifications in children and youth has important implications for the construction of democratic citizenries in culturally and linguistically diverse societies. In this comparative qualitative case study of two multicultural public schools-one in the United States and one in Costa Rica--I examined children's…

  9. An Overview of Dyscalculia: Methods for Ascertaining and Accommodating Dyscalculic Children in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelson, Matthew Thomas

    2007-01-01

    For many children, mathematics is an inherently difficult subject to learn. Between 5 and 8 percent of children between the ages of 6 and 14 have a particular type of cognitive deficiency that limits their aptitude to acquire knowledge and understanding of fundamental ideas in numeracy. Increasingly, researchers in the cognitive sciences are…

  10. What Elementary Students Experience outside of the Classroom: Children's Responses to Social Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiffriller, Sheila H.; Kangos, Kelsey A.; Milone, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Social exclusion and the behaviors, thoughts, and feelings it evokes in children were examined in the present study. Two forms of exclusion were identified: being rejected and being ignored. Surveys were administered to third and fifth grade students in a Northeastern suburb in the United States to see how children respond overall and if younger…

  11. Low-Income Central American Immigrant Mothers' Goals and Their Children's Classroom Competencies in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denmark, Nicole Marie; Harden, Brenda Jones; Gonzalez, Maritza

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: Unlike other Latino groups, there is little information about the early socialization of children from Central American (CA) immigrant families. This study examined CA immigrant mothers' short-term goals and the implications of these goals for children's behavior in preschool. A total of 47 low-income mothers described their…

  12. Identifying Twice-Exceptional Children and Three Gifted Styles in the Japanese Primary Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Manabu

    2010-10-01

    Children with mild developmental disorders sometimes show giftedness. In this study, an original checklist was developed to identify gifted characteristics specific to science learning among twice-exceptional primary school children in Japan. The checklist consisted of 60 items on Attitudes, Thinking, Skills, and Knowledge/Understanding. A total of 86 children from eight primary schools in an urban area in Japan, 50% of whom had Learning Disabilities (LD), Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and/or High-functioning Autism (HA), were observed using the checklist. Factor analysis revealed three factors. A cluster analysis with the subscale points of each factor identified three "gifted styles" in science. These were: (1) Spontaneous Style; (2) Expert Style; and (3) Solid Style. LD/ADHD/HA children characteristically displayed a Spontaneous Style while the non- LD/ADHD/HA children were characterized by the Solid Style. In both subject groups, the number of Expert Style children was the lowest with no significant difference in their numbers. Based on the results of this research, this paper discusses the implications of the findings for teaching science to twice-exceptional children and argues the benefits of inclusive science education for children with and without mild developmental disorders.

  13. Social Aggression on Television and Its Relationship to Children's Aggression in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Nicole; Wilson, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    A survey was conducted with over 500 children in grades K-5 to examine whether exposure to socially aggressive content was related to children's use of social aggression. The results of the survey revealed a significant relationship between exposure to televised social aggression and increased social aggression at school, but only for girls and…

  14. Identifying Twice-Exceptional Children and Three Gifted Styles in the Japanese Primary Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Manabu

    2010-01-01

    Children with mild developmental disorders sometimes show giftedness. In this study, an original checklist was developed to identify gifted characteristics specific to science learning among twice-exceptional primary school children in Japan. The checklist consisted of 60 items on Attitudes, Thinking, Skills, and Knowledge/Understanding. A total…

  15. Preliminary Evidence for a Classroom Based Psychosocial Intervention for Disaster Exposed Children with Posttraumatic Stress Symptomatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønholt, Stine; Karsberg, Sidsel; Elklit, Ask

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2004, a firework factory in a residential area of a large Danish city exploded. The children at the local school were screened for symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 16 months and 3½ years after the incident. A large proportion of the children still suffered from a substantial number of symptoms 3½ years after the…

  16. Refugee Children's Adaptation to American Early Childhood Classrooms: A Narrative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Megan A.; Niesz, Tricia

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that a paucity of research exists on refugee youth in early childhood education settings. Arguing that children's stories provide educators a valuable resource for understanding the meaning children make of initial cross-cultural experiences, this article presents a narrative inquiry into the stories and artwork of three…

  17. Classroom Organization and Teacher Stress Predict Learning Motivation in Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakarinen, Eija; Kiuru, Noona; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Siekkinen, Martti; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which observed teaching practices and self-reported teacher stress predict children's learning motivation and phonological awareness in kindergarten. The pre-reading skills of 1,268 children were measured at the beginning of their kindergarten year. Their learning motivation and phonological awareness were…

  18. Effects of Minority Status in the Classroom on Children's Intergroup Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christia Spears; Bigler, Rebecca S.

    2002-01-01

    Three studies examined effects of relative group size on the development of children's intergroup attitudes during a summer school program in which elementary school children were assigned to majority or minority novel groups denoted by tee-shirt color. Results showed a complex effect of relative group size, varying as a function of the relative…

  19. Spatial Stages Development in Children and Teacher Classroom Style in Geography. International Research in Geographic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltman, Joseph P., Ed.

    The papers and research reports in this monograph form two parts. Part I is intended to help geography educators learn more about how children conceptualize space. The validity of Piaget's views on the evolution of conceptions of territorial size among children of different countries was investigated. Reflecting a different concern for educators…

  20. Differing Levels of Gender Salience in Preschool Classrooms: Effects on Children's Gender Attitudes and Intergroup Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Lacey J.; Liben, Lynn S.

    2010-01-01

    Developmental intergroup theory posits that when environments make social-group membership salient, children will be particularly likely to apply categorization processes to social groups, thereby increasing stereotypes and prejudices. To test the predicted impact of environmental gender salience, 3- to 5-year-old children (N = 57) completed…

  1. Liver transplantation in children with hyper-reduced grafts - a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Naveen; Thomas, Gordon; Verran, Deborah; Stormon, Michael; O'Loughlin, Edward; Shun, Albert

    2010-05-01

    In small infants and babies who receive split or living-related adult left lateral segmental liver grafts, further reduction (hyper-reduction) of the graft may be necessary to optimize the size of the graft for the child. We report our experience with hyper-reduction of adult left lateral segment grafts in nine children. A retrospective review of the medical records of children who received hyper-reduced grafts at the Children's Hospital at Westmead, Australia was performed. Of 215 liver transplants performed on 186 children between 1986 and May 2009, 147 were reduced grafts. Nine grafts were further reduced (hyper-reduced) after an on-table assessment of graft size relative to the available abdominal space was made. Mean graft size reduction was by 30%. The pledgetted technique of resection was used in four patients. All required delayed closure of the abdomen, and in three patients, fascial closure was not possible and a Surgisis patch (Cook Surgical International, West Lafayette, IN, USA) was placed to augment the abdominal capacity. Two children had hepatic artery thrombosis. One was successfully thrombectomized. In the other, technical problems with the donor liver contributed to death 10 days post-transplant. Two bile leaks, one from the cut surface and the other at the anastomotic site, were oversewn at the time of abdominal closure. On follow-up (median 33 months), two developed biliary strictures requiring dilatation. Hyper-reduction of segmental grafts can be safely performed when needed. In view of its versatility, it may be preferable to hyper-reduce a graft rather than use a monosegment graft. Comparable long-term results are possible. The pledgetted technique of resection is easy, quick, and safe. The fact that it can be performed after revascularization with minimal blood loss adds great flexibility to this technically challenging procedure.

  2. 农村留守儿童课堂教育问题初探%An Approach to Classroom Education of Rural Leftbehind Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康良辉

    2012-01-01

    农村留守儿童的学业水平普遍都处于中等偏下,原因既有家庭教育缺失,也有教育资源配置的不合理,还包括大环境的影响。当前课堂教育是留守儿童获得教育的最主要途径,但是一方面教师不能因人施教,另一方面教材脱离农村实际及课程设置不科学,导致课堂失去了对孩子们的吸引力。为此应该加强课堂教学,在提高教师素质的基础上,注重对留守儿童心理的把握和疏导,灵活设置新课程,把孩子吸引进课堂,最终使其喜欢学习。%The learning status of rural left-behind children is bad,the reasons for which is both the lack of family education,but also the irrational allocation of educational resources,but also by environmental influences.Classroom education is the main way of access to education of the children left behind,but the one hand,teachers are not individualized instruction,teaching materials on the other hand out of the rural reality and Curriculum unscientific lost its appeal to children,resulting in the classroom.This should strengthen classroom teaching,on the basis of improving the quality of teachers,focusing on the psychology of children left behind to grasp and to ease the flexibility to set a new course,to attract children into the classroom,and eventually like to learn.

  3. Designing an iPad App to Monitor and Improve Classroom Behavior for Children with ADHD: iSelfControl Feasibility and Pilot Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Sabrina; Emmerson, Natasha; Ziv, Hadar; Collins, Penelope; Arastoo, Sara; Warschauer, Mark; Crinella, Francis; Lakes, Kimberley

    2016-01-01

    Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) receive approximately 80% of instruction in the general education classroom, where individualized behavioral management strategies may be difficult for teachers to consistently deliver. Mobile device apps provide promising platforms to manage behavior. This pilot study evaluated the utility of a web-based application (iSelfControl) designed to support classroom behavior management. iSelfControl prompted students every 'Center' (30-minutes) to self-evaluate using a universal token-economy classroom management system focused on compliance, productivity, and positive relationships. Simultaneously, the teacher evaluated each student on a separate iPad. Using Multi Level Modeling, we examined 13 days of data gathered from implementation with 5th grade students (N = 12) at a school for children with ADHD and related executive function difficulties. First, an unconditional growth model evaluated the overall amount of change in aggregated scores over time as well as the degree of systematic variation in scores within and across teacher-student dyads. Second, separate intercepts and slopes were estimated for teacher and student to estimate degree of congruency between trajectories. Finally, differences between teacher and student scores were tested at each time-point in separate models to examine unique 'Center' effects. 51% of the total variance in scores was attributed to differences between dyads. Trajectories of student and teacher scores remained relatively stable across seven time-points each day and did not statistically differ from each other. On any given day, students tended to evaluate their behaviors more positively (entered higher scores for themselves) compared to corresponding teacher scores. In summary, iSelfControl provides a platform for self and teacher evaluation that is an important adjunct to conventional classroom management strategies. The application captured teacher/student discrepancies

  4. Designing an iPad App to Monitor and Improve Classroom Behavior for Children with ADHD: iSelfControl Feasibility and Pilot Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerson, Natasha; Ziv, Hadar; Collins, Penelope; Arastoo, Sara; Warschauer, Mark; Crinella, Francis; Lakes, Kimberley

    2016-01-01

    Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) receive approximately 80% of instruction in the general education classroom, where individualized behavioral management strategies may be difficult for teachers to consistently deliver. Mobile device apps provide promising platforms to manage behavior. This pilot study evaluated the utility of a web-based application (iSelfControl) designed to support classroom behavior management. iSelfControl prompted students every ‘Center’ (30-minutes) to self-evaluate using a universal token-economy classroom management system focused on compliance, productivity, and positive relationships. Simultaneously, the teacher evaluated each student on a separate iPad. Using Multi Level Modeling, we examined 13 days of data gathered from implementation with 5th grade students (N = 12) at a school for children with ADHD and related executive function difficulties. First, an unconditional growth model evaluated the overall amount of change in aggregated scores over time as well as the degree of systematic variation in scores within and across teacher-student dyads. Second, separate intercepts and slopes were estimated for teacher and student to estimate degree of congruency between trajectories. Finally, differences between teacher and student scores were tested at each time-point in separate models to examine unique ‘Center’ effects. 51% of the total variance in scores was attributed to differences between dyads. Trajectories of student and teacher scores remained relatively stable across seven time-points each day and did not statistically differ from each other. On any given day, students tended to evaluate their behaviors more positively (entered higher scores for themselves) compared to corresponding teacher scores. In summary, iSelfControl provides a platform for self and teacher evaluation that is an important adjunct to conventional classroom management strategies. The application captured teacher

  5. At-risk elementary school children with one year of classroom music instruction are better at keeping a beat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Jessica; Tierney, Adam; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Temporal processing underlies both music and language skills. There is increasing evidence that rhythm abilities track with reading performance and that language disorders such as dyslexia are associated with poor rhythm abilities. However, little is known about how basic time-keeping skills can be shaped by musical training, particularly during critical literacy development years. This study was carried out in collaboration with Harmony Project, a non-profit organization providing free music education to children in the gang reduction zones of Los Angeles. Our findings reveal that elementary school children with just one year of classroom music instruction perform more accurately in a basic finger-tapping task than their untrained peers, providing important evidence that fundamental time-keeping skills may be strengthened by short-term music training. This sets the stage for further examination of how music programs may be used to support the development of basic skills underlying learning and literacy, particularly in at-risk populations which may benefit the most.

  6. The awareness level and needs for education on reducing sugar consumption among mothers with preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Younhee; Joo, Nami

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out the level of knowledge on sugar-related nutrition among mothers with preschool children. The study conducted a survey on 350 mothers whose children attended daycare. The dietary lives of the children and the nutritional knowledge of the mothers on sugar were checked. In order to analyze results, SPSS 18.0 was used. ANOVA and t-test were also performed to analyze recognition and educational needs. When the degree of nutritional knowledge was measured and analyzed, the results showed about 11 average points out of 15. The higher a group's nutritional knowledge, the better the dietary habits and activities were and the activities were more ccommon. The group with a low level of nutritional knowledge consumed more foods with high sugar content, but this difference was not statistically significant. Also the children from the group of mothers that provided nutritional education to their children were more likely to engage in better dietary habits and activities. 66.5% respondents did not know about policies to reduce sugar consumption, but most indicated that education on reducing sugar consumption is needed. Therefore, a government-driven search for efficient methods to campaign and publicize sugar reduction is needed in order to continuously provide appropriate education.

  7. Enriching Preschool Classrooms and Home Visits with Evidence-Based Programming: Sustained Benefits for Low-Income Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, Karen L.; Heinrichs, Brenda S.; Welsh, Janet A.; Nix, Robert L.; Gest, Scott D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Growing up in poverty undermines healthy development, producing disparities in the cognitive and social-emotional skills that support early learning and mental health. Preschool and home-visiting interventions for low-income children have the potential to build early cognitive and social-emotional skills, reducing the disparities in…

  8. A review of different behavior modification strategies designed to reduce sedentary screen behaviors in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, Jeremy A; Thompson, Dixie L; Bassett, David R; Fitzhugh, Eugene C; Raynor, Hollie A

    2012-01-01

    Previous research suggests that reducing sedentary screen behaviors may be a strategy for preventing and treating obesity in children. This systematic review describes strategies used in interventions designed to either solely target sedentary screen behaviors or multiple health behaviors, including sedentary screen behaviors. Eighteen studies were included in this paper; eight targeting sedentary screen behaviors only, and ten targeting multiple health behaviors. All studies used behavior modification strategies for reducing sedentary screen behaviors in children (aged 1-12 years). Nine studies only used behavior modification strategies, and nine studies supplemented behavior modification strategies with an electronic device to enhance sedentary screen behaviors reductions. Many interventions (50%) significantly reduced sedentary screen behaviors; however the magnitude of the significant reductions varied greatly (-0.44 to -3.1 h/day) and may have been influenced by the primary focus of the intervention, number of behavior modification strategies used, and other tools used to limit sedentary screen behaviors.

  9. A combined intervention of art therapy and clown visits to reduce preoperative anxiety in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, Alberto; Gremigni, Paola

    2017-03-01

    To test whether a combined intervention of art therapy and clown visits could enhance the efficacy of oral medication in reducing children's anxiety at parental separation prior to induction of anaesthesia. Approximately 50% of children undergoing surgery report high anxiety at anaesthesia induction. Complementary therapies have been used to decrease children's anxiety, but no study has evaluated the efficacy of a combination of such therapies. This is an observational study, which involved allocating different interventions to two groups and measuring their anxiety at two time points. This study assigned 78 children (aged 3-11 years) undergoing general anaesthesia for surgery to two conditions. The control group underwent general anaesthesia following standard practice, and the intervention group received an intervention of integrated art therapy and clown visits upon their arrival at the hospital and throughout their time in the preoperating room. Each child in both groups received 0·5 mg/kg oral midazolam 30 minutes before surgery and had a parent present throughout their time in the preoperating room. Each child's anxiety was evaluated twice using the Modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale: at baseline and at separation from parents. Repeated measures anova was used to test for differences between the time points and the two groups. Children in the intervention group showed a significant (p art therapy and clown visits enhanced the effect of midazolam in reducing children's anxiety at preoperative separation from parents. Paediatric staffs may consider using such a combination of strategies in preparing children for anaesthesia induction. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Confident parents for easier children : strengthening parental self-efficacy to reduce young children's externalizing behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Mouton, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    By interacting with their child, parents build their own sense of competence as a parent. This parental self-efficacy relates to each parent’s representation of a “good parent”, an ideal parent-child relationship and the belief that he is doing a good job or not as a parent. What if the child is being difficult, non-compliant, aggressive or agitated? This dissertation presents an innovative parenting program called Confident Parents designed for parents of young children displaying difficult ...

  11. Community Asthma Initiative to Improve Health Outcomes and Reduce Disparities Among Children with Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Elizabeth R; Bhaumik, Urmi; Sommer, Susan J; Chan, Elaine; Tsopelas, Lindsay; Fleegler, Eric W; Lorenzi, Margarita; Klements, Elizabeth M; Dickerson, Deborah U; Nethersole, Shari; Dulin, Rick

    2016-02-12

    Black and Hispanic children are hospitalized with complications of asthma at much higher rates than white children. The Boston Children's Hospital Community Asthma Initiative (CAI) provides asthma case management and home visits for children from low-income neighborhoods in Boston, Massachusetts, to address racial/ethnic health disparities in pediatric asthma outcomes. CAI objectives were to evaluate 1) case management data by parent/guardian report for health outcomes and 2) hospital administrative data for comparison between intervention and comparison groups. Data from parent/guardian reports indicate that CAI decreased the number of children with any (one or more) asthma-related hospitalizations (decrease of 79% at 12 months) and any asthma-related emergency department visits (decrease of 56% at 12 months) among children served, most of whom were non-Hispanic black or Hispanic. Hospital administrative data also indicate that the number of asthma-related hospitalizations per child significantly decreased among CAI participants compared with a comparison group. The CAI model has been replicated in other cities and states with adaptations to local cultural and systems variations. Health outcome and cost data have been used to contribute to a business case to educate legislators and insurers about outcomes and costs for this enhanced approach to care. Strong partnerships with public health, community, and housing agencies have allowed CAI to leverage its outcomes to expand systemic changes locally and statewide to reduce asthma morbidity.

  12. Collaborating with Parents in Reducing Children's Challenging Behaviors: Linking Functional Assessment to Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Fettig

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between a functional assessment-based parent intervention and preschoolers' challenging behaviors was examined in the current study. A single subject design with a multiple baseline across 2 parent-child dyads was implemented. The researchers collaborated with parents to design the FA-based interventions and parents received varying levels of support throughout the study. Results indicate that parents were able to implement the functional assessment-based interventions, and these interventions effectively reduced children's challenging behaviors. In addition, parents continued implementing the intervention strategies following termination of the intervention, and children's challenging behaviors remained low.

  13. Reduced-Concentration Clavulanate for Young Children with Acute Otitis Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberman, Alejandro; Paradise, Jack L; Rockette, Howard E; Jeong, Jong-Hyeon; Kearney, Diana H; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Shope, Timothy R; Muñiz, Gysella; Martin, Judith M; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Haralam, MaryAnn; Pope, Marcia A; Nagg, Jennifer P; Zhao, Wenchen; Miah, Mohammad Kowser; Beumer, Jan; Venkataramanan, Raman; Shaikh, Nader

    2017-07-01

    Amoxicillin-clavulanate (A/C) is currently the most effective oral antimicrobial in treating children with acute otitis media (AOM), but the standard dosage of 90 mg amoxicillin/6.4 mg clavulanate/kg of body weight/day commonly causes diarrhea. We examined whether an A/C formulation containing lower concentrations of clavulanate would result in less diarrhea while maintaining plasma levels of amoxicillin and clavulanate adequate to eradicate middle-ear pathogens and to achieve clinical success. We conducted an open-label study in children with AOM who were 6 to 23 months of age. In phase 1, we treated 40 children with a reduced-clavulanate A/C formulation providing 90 mg amoxicillin/3.2 mg clavulanate/kg/day for 10 days. In phase 2, we treated 72 children with the same formulation at a dosage of 80 mg amoxicillin/2.85 mg clavulanate/kg/day for 10 days. We compared the rates of protocol-defined diarrhea (PDD), diaper dermatitis, and AOM clinical response in these children with rates we had reported in children who received the standard A/C regimen, and we obtained plasma levels of amoxicillin and clavulanate at various time points. Outcomes in phase 1 children and in children who had received the standard regimen did not differ significantly. Rates of PDD in children receiving phase 2 and standard regimens were 17% and 26%, respectively (P = 0.10). The corresponding rates of diaper dermatitis were 21% and 33% (P = 0.04) and of AOM treatment failure were 12% and 16% (P = 0.44). Symptomatic responses did not differ significantly between regimens; both gave clavulanate levels sufficient to inhibit β-lactamase activity. In young children with AOM, clavulanate dosages lower than those currently used may be associated with fewer side effects without reducing clinical efficacy. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT02630992.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Self-Instructional Cognitive Training to Reduce Impulsive Cognitive Style in Children with Attention Deficit with Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Flores, Gladys Wilma

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Children with attention deficit with hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have an impulsive, rigid and field-dependent cognitive style. This study examines whether self-instructional cognitive training reduces impulsive cognitive style in children diagnosed with this disorder. Method: The subjects were 10 children between the ages of 6 and…

  15. First-Grade Teacher Behaviors and Children's Prosocial Actions in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Asha L.; Farran, Dale C.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examines whether specific teacher instructional practices in early education are associated with children's engagement in prosocial behavior. Teachers' verbal encouragement of prosocial behavior and empathy, emotional warmth, positive behavior management, vocabulary instruction, and encouragement of expressive…

  16. First-Grade Teacher Behaviors and Children's Prosocial Actions in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Asha L.; Farran, Dale C.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examines whether specific teacher instructional practices in early education are associated with children's engagement in prosocial behavior. Teachers' verbal encouragement of prosocial behavior and empathy, emotional warmth, positive behavior management, vocabulary instruction, and encouragement of expressive…

  17. Improving the speech intelligibility in classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Choi Ling Coriolanus

    One of the major acoustical concerns in classrooms is the establishment of effective verbal communication between teachers and students. Non-optimal acoustical conditions, resulting in reduced verbal communication, can cause two main problems. First, they can lead to reduce learning efficiency. Second, they can also cause fatigue, stress, vocal strain and health problems, such as headaches and sore throats, among teachers who are forced to compensate for poor acoustical conditions by raising their voices. Besides, inadequate acoustical conditions can induce the usage of public address system. Improper usage of such amplifiers or loudspeakers can lead to impairment of students' hearing systems. The social costs of poor classroom acoustics will be large to impair the learning of children. This invisible problem has far reaching implications for learning, but is easily solved. Many researches have been carried out that they have accurately and concisely summarized the research findings on classrooms acoustics. Though, there is still a number of challenging questions remaining unanswered. Most objective indices for speech intelligibility are essentially based on studies of western languages. Even several studies of tonal languages as Mandarin have been conducted, there is much less on Cantonese. In this research, measurements have been done in unoccupied rooms to investigate the acoustical parameters and characteristics of the classrooms. The speech intelligibility tests, which based on English, Mandarin and Cantonese, and the survey were carried out on students aged from 5 years old to 22 years old. It aims to investigate the differences in intelligibility between English, Mandarin and Cantonese of the classrooms in Hong Kong. The significance on speech transmission index (STI) related to Phonetically Balanced (PB) word scores will further be developed. Together with developed empirical relationship between the speech intelligibility in classrooms with the variations

  18. Flip Classroom Study Reduces English Learning Anxiety%翻转课堂降低英语学习焦虑的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁虹

    2015-01-01

    本文首先对焦虑和英语学习焦虑等概念进行了说明和解释,然后指出了能够降低学生英语学习焦虑的几种有效方法,最后通过在具体的教学中采用翻转课堂教学模式利用微视频等方法来有效降低英语学习焦虑。%First this paper explains what are English learning anxiety and anxiety,and points out several effective methods that can reduce students'English learning anxiety.Finally flipped classroom model by using specific teaching methods such as the use of micro video English learning to effectively reduce English learning anxiety.

  19. Teaching Gifted Children in Today's Preschool and Primary Classrooms: Identifying, Nurturing, and Challenging Children Ages 4-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smutny, Joan Franklin; Walker, Sally Yahnke; Honeck, Ellen I.

    2016-01-01

    These proven, practical early childhood teaching strategies help teachers identify young gifted children, differentiate curriculum, assess and document students' development, and build partnerships with parents. Chapters focus on early identification, curriculum compacting, social studies, language arts, math and science, cluster grouping,…

  20. Reducing Individual Variation for fMRI Studies in Children by Minimizing Template Related Errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Weng

    Full Text Available Spatial normalization is an essential process for group comparisons in functional MRI studies. In practice, there is a risk of normalization errors particularly in studies involving children, seniors or diseased populations and in regions with high individual variation. One way to minimize normalization errors is to create a study-specific template based on a large sample size. However, studies with a large sample size are not always feasible, particularly for children studies. The performance of templates with a small sample size has not been evaluated in fMRI studies in children. In the current study, this issue was encountered in a working memory task with 29 children in two groups. We compared the performance of different templates: a study-specific template created by the experimental population, a Chinese children template and the widely used adult MNI template. We observed distinct differences in the right orbitofrontal region among the three templates in between-group comparisons. The study-specific template and the Chinese children template were more sensitive for the detection of between-group differences in the orbitofrontal cortex than the MNI template. Proper templates could effectively reduce individual variation. Further analysis revealed a correlation between the BOLD contrast size and the norm index of the affine transformation matrix, i.e., the SFN, which characterizes the difference between a template and a native image and differs significantly across subjects. Thereby, we proposed and tested another method to reduce individual variation that included the SFN as a covariate in group-wise statistics. This correction exhibits outstanding performance in enhancing detection power in group-level tests. A training effect of abacus-based mental calculation was also demonstrated, with significantly elevated activation in the right orbitofrontal region that correlated with behavioral response time across subjects in the trained group.

  1. Reduced Bone Mineral Density in Children with Screening-detected Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björck, Sara; Brundin, Charlotte; Karlsson, Magnus; Agardh, Daniel

    2017-03-17

    To assess if bone mass and metabolism are impaired in genetically at risk children with screening-detected celiac disease. Included were 71 children with screening-detected celiac disease diagnosed at 10.0 ± 0.7 (mean ± SD) years and 142 matched controls as well as 30 children with screening-detected celiac disease diagnosed at 3.3 ± 0.4 years of age presently on a gluten-free diet for 6.9 ± 1.1 years and 60 matched controls. All participants were assessed for bone mineral density (BMD) of total body and spine by Dual X-ray absorptiometry, serum 25(OH) vitamin D3, parathyroid hormone (PTH), IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-15, IFNγ, and TNFα. At diagnosis, screening-detected celiac disease children as compared to controls had a mean -0,03 g/cm reduced BMD of both total body and spine (p = 0.009 and p = 0.005 respectively), a mean -11.4 nmol/L lower level of 25(OH) vitamin D3 (p celiac disease as compared to controls (p celiac disease have reduced BMD, lower levels of vitamin D3, higher levels of PTH and signs of systemic inflammation compared with controls. These differences were not found in celiac disease children on a gluten-free diet, indicating that children with screening-detected celiac disease benefit from an early diagnosis and treatment.

  2. MRI in assessing children with learning disability, focal findings, and reduced automaticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urion, David K; Huff, Hanalise V; Carullo, Maria Paulina

    2015-08-18

    In children with clinically diagnosed learning disabilities with focal findings on neurologic or neuropsychological evaluations, there is a hypothesized association between disorders in automaticity and focal structural abnormalities observed in brain MRIs. We undertook a retrospective analysis of cases referred to a tertiary-hospital-based learning disabilities program. Individuals were coded as having a focal deficit if either neurologic or neuropsychological evaluation demonstrated focal dysfunction. Those with abnormal MRI findings were categorized based on findings. Children with abnormalities from each of these categories were compared in terms of deficits in automaticity, as measured by the tasks of Rapid Automatized Naming, Rapid Alternating Stimulus Naming, or the timed motor performance battery from the Physical and Neurological Examination for Soft Signs. Data were compared in children with and without disorders of automaticity regarding type of brain structure abnormality. Of the 1,587 children evaluated, 127 had a focal deficit. Eighty-seven had a brain MRI (52 on 1.5-tesla machines and 35 on 3.0-tesla machines). Forty of these images were found to be abnormal. These children were compared with a clinic sample of 150 patients with learning disabilities and no focal findings on examination, who also had undergone MRI. Only 5 of the latter group had abnormalities on MRI. Reduced verbal automaticity was associated with cerebellar abnormalities, whereas reduced automaticity on motor or motor and verbal tasks was associated with white matter abnormalities. Reduced automaticity of retrieval and slow timed motor performance appear to be highly associated with MRI findings. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  3. Reducing the Digital Divide among Children Who Received Desktop or Hybrid Computers for the Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gila Cohen Zilka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Researchers and policy makers have been exploring ways to reduce the digital divide. Parameters commonly used to examine the digital divide worldwide, as well as in this study, are: (a the digital divide in the accessibility and mobility of the ICT infrastructure and of the content infrastructure (e.g., sites used in school; and (b the digital divide in literacy skills. In the present study we examined the degree of effectiveness of receiving a desktop or hybrid computer for the home in reducing the digital divide among children of low socio-economic status aged 8-12 from various localities across Israel. The sample consisted of 1,248 respondents assessed in two measurements. As part of the mixed-method study, 128 children were also interviewed. Findings indicate that after the children received desktop or hybrid computers, changes occurred in their frequency of access, mobility, and computer literacy. Differences were found between the groups: hybrid computers reduce disparities and promote work with the computer and surfing the Internet more than do desktop computers. Narrowing the digital divide for this age group has many implications for the acquisition of skills and study habits, and consequently, for the realization of individual potential. The children spoke about self improvement as a result of exposure to the digital environment, about a sense of empowerment and of improvement in their advantage in the social fabric. Many children expressed a desire to continue their education and expand their knowledge of computer applications, the use of software, of games, and more. Therefore, if there is no computer in the home and it is necessary to decide between a desktop and a hybrid computer, a hybrid computer is preferable.

  4. Applying Manual Pressure before Benzathine Penicillin Injection for Rheumatic Fever Prophylaxis Reduces Pain in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derya, Emre-Yavuz; Ukke, Karabacak; Taner, Yavuz; Izzet, Ayhan Yusuf

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of applying manual pressure before benzathine penicillin injection and compare it with the standard injection technique in terms of reducing discomfort in children with rheumatic heart disease grouped by age and gender. This was a single-blind, randomized, crossover study. Fifty-one patients aged 7.1-19.9 years were recruited for this study carried out in the pediatric cardiology outpatient clinic. Twenty-nine were girls (56.9%). All subjects received an intramuscular injection of benzathine penicillin with manual pressure to one buttock or with the standard technique to the other buttock at 3-week intervals. The two techniques were used randomly. The subjects were blinded to the injection technique and a visual analogue scale was used after the procedure. Findings demonstrate that children experienced significantly less pain when they received injections with manual pressure (1.3 ± 0.9) compared with the standard injection (4.4 ± 1.6) technique. The perceived injection pain was negatively related to the age of the children in both techniques. Compared with boys, girls felt more pain, but the difference between each technique group according to gender was negligible. The application of manual pressure reduces pain in children under the stress of repeated intramuscular injections, which supports the suggestion that it should be used in routine practice. Manual pressure to the injection site is a simple, pain-reducing technique. Implementing this technique in routine practice may also promote adherence to the prophylaxis regimen, especially in children.

  5. Reduced white matter connectivity in the corpus callosum of children with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Grüner, Renate; Lundervold, Arvid

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain imaging studies have revealed anatomical anomalies in the brains of individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS). Prefrontal regions have been found to be larger and the corpus callosum (CC) area smaller in children and young adults with TS compared with healthy control subjects...... interhemispheric fibers or reduced axonal myelination. FA values did not correlate significantly with the severity of tic symptoms. Group differences in measures of connectivity did not seem to be attributable to the presence of comorbid ADHD or OCD, to medication exposure, or group differences in IQ. CONCLUSION......: Our findings of a reduced interhemispheral white matter connectivity add to the understanding of neural connectivity and plasticity in the brains of children who have TS....

  6. Learning with Don Quixote for Children: the Presence of the Knight in Interactive Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Borham Puyal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available As a masterpiece, Don Quixote has become an iconic figure, owing to well-known episodes such as the tilting at windmills, which young readers already discover in editions of this classic for children. The present article provides an overview and assessment of the ways in which Spanish children have access to the text in an increasingly technological learning environment and how ICTs play a very important role in the ongoing popularity of Cervantes’ novel in the 21st century, as well as in the development of a form of education that goes beyond mere literacy by means of the approach to this text.

  7. Stress contagion in the classroom? The link between classroom teacher burnout and morning cortisol in elementary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Eva; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the link between classroom teachers' burnout levels and students' physiological stress response. Drawing from a stress-contagion framework, we expected higher levels of teacher burnout to be related to elevated cortisol levels in elementary school students (N = 406, 50% female, Mean age = 11.26, SD = .89). Classroom teacher burnout was assessed with the Maslach Burnout Inventory modified for teachers. Salivary cortisol was collected as an indicator of students' hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) functioning. We collected salivary cortisol in children at 9 a.m., 11:30 a.m., and 2 p.m. in the classroom setting. Using Multilevel Modeling, we found that children's morning cortisol levels significantly varied between classrooms (10% variability). Higher levels of classroom teacher burnout significantly predicted the variability in morning cortisol. Teacher burnout reduced the unexplained variability in cortisol at the classroom level to 4.6%. This is the first study to show that teachers' occupational stress is linked to students' physiological stress regulation. We discuss the present findings in the context of potential stress contagion in the classroom, considering empirical and practical relevance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The psychometric properties of the Attention-Distraction, Inhibition-Excitation Classroom Assessment Scale (ADIECAS) in a sample of children with moderate and severe intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Suzanne; Buckley, Sarah; McEvoy, John; Hillery, John; Dodd, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The Attention-Distraction, Inhibition-Excitation Classroom Assessment Scale (ADIECAS) [Evans, P. L. C. (1975). Inhibition and stimulus generalization in the discrimination learning of ESN(S) and ESN(M) children. Unpublished Ph.D. thesis. Manchester, UK: University of Manchester] assesses attention-related difficulties in children with intellectual disabilities (ID). The present study explored the psychometric properties of the ADIECAS with a sample of 84 children with moderate and severe ID whose teachers completed the ADIECAS and the Conners' Teachers Rating Scale [Goyette, C. H, Conners, C. K., & Ulrich, R. F. (1978). Normative data on revised Conners' parent and teachers rating scales. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 6, 221-236]. Following factor analysis the Evans and Hogg [Evans, P. L. C., & Hogg, J. (1984). A classroom rating scale for use with mentally retarded children. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 23, 187-194] structure was the most appropriate for use with this sample. Moderate to strong positive relationships were found between the ADIECAS and the Conners', and the ADIECAS factors were significant predictors of the Conners' subscales. This study provides further support for the ADIECAS as a reliable and valid measure of ADHD-related symptoms among children with moderate and severe ID.

  9. Building on Young Children's Cultural Histories through Placemaking in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Lenny

    2011-01-01

    This article suggests placemaking as a framework to more deeply understand how teaching and learning can take into account young children's cultural histories. Placemaking, a form of analysis commonly found in land development literature, critically interprets the relationship between power, politics and the production of place. In this article,…

  10. Can Classroom Emotional Support Enhance Prosocial Development among Children with Depressed Caregivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stacy R.; Seidenfeld, Adina M.; Izard, Carroll E.; Kobak, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Preschool children from economically disadvantaged families often experience difficulties in developing prosocial behavior. Risk associated with depressive symptomatology in caregivers (parents and guardians) may further compound these difficulties. The overall objective of the present study was to examine the compensatory effect of Head Start…

  11. Peer Effects in Preschool Classrooms: Is Children's Language Growth Associated with Their Classmates' Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura M.; Petscher, Yaacov; Schatschneider, Christopher; Mashburn, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    With an increasing number of young children participating in preschool education, this study determined whether peer effects are present in this earliest sector of schooling. Specifically, this work examined whether peer effects were influential to preschoolers' growth in language skills over an academic year and whether peer effects manifest…

  12. Recognizing and Responding to Young Children's Sexual Behaviors in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Maureen C.; Dinehart, Laura H.; Wurtele, Sandy K.

    2015-01-01

    Many early childhood educators encounter children who exhibit sexual behavior and are not sure how to respond. Although they have had training in childhood development, sexual development is rarely given the attention it deserves. At the same time, early childhood education personnel often get training in child abuse and in their responsibilities…

  13. Effects of a Classroom Intervention with Spatial Play Materials on Children's Object and Viewer Transformation Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Heyden, Karin M.; Huizinga, Mariette; Jolles, Jelle

    2017-01-01

    Children practice their spatial skills when playing with spatial toys, such as construction materials, board games, and puzzles. Sex and SES differences are observed in the engagement in such spatial play activities at home, which relate to individual differences in spatial performance. The current study investigated the effects of explicitly…

  14. Classroom Emotional Support Predicts Differences in Preschool Children's Cortisol and Alpha-Amylase Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Bridget E.; Hestenes, Linda L.; Kintner-Duffy, Victoria L.; O'Brien, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests children enrolled in full-time child care often display afternoon elevations of the hormone cortisol, which is an indicator of stress. Recent advances in immunoassays allow for measurement of activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the autonomic sympathetic nervous system from saliva, and measurement…

  15. Playing with Popular Culture -- An Ethnography of Children's Sociodramatic Play in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Catharine Ann

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how ethnography allows for an understanding of the way children are empowered through the use of popular culture during sociodramatic play. The study discussed was conducted in an inner-city Primary school in regional New South Wales, Australia. The participants were a composite fifth-to-sixth grade class, and the research…

  16. Helping Children with Attentional Challenges in a Montessori Classroom: The Role of the Occupational Therapist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luborsky, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Barbabra Luborsky links the medical field and Montessori pedagogy to address atypical attention in children through the lens of the occupational therapist. She provides an overview of attention and sensory processing disorders and then informs about particular diagnoses, particularly ADHD and its comorbidity with other diagnoses. Her specific…

  17. A Classroom at Home: Children and the Lived World of MOOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yin; Adams, Catherine; Goble, Erika; Francisco Vargas Madriz, Luis

    2015-01-01

    This research asks "What is it like for a K-12 school-age child to learn in a massive open online course (MOOC)?" Evidence suggested that a significant number of children are participating in MOOCs either independently or alongside their parents, both inside and outside the K-12 school system. Researchers have expressed concerns…

  18. Selecting Chicano Children's Literature in a Bilingual Classroom: Investigating Issues of Cultural Authenticity and Avoiding Stereotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamillo, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Before the Civil Rights movement, the lack of accurate representations of people of color was evident. Children's literature did not present accurate depictions of Mexican-Americans in the text. Sarapes, sombreros and fiestas were typical symbols used to identify Mexican culture and traditions. The Civil Rights Movement sparked a change for…

  19. Pre-K Classroom-Economic Composition and Children's Early Academic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Portia; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth; McQuiggan, Meghan; Shaw, Alyssa

    2017-01-01

    There are currently 2 principal models of publicly funded prekindergarten programs (pre-K): targeted pre-K, which is means-tested, and universal pre-K. These programs often differ in terms of the economic characteristics of the preschoolers enrolled. Studies have documented links between individual achievement in school-age children and the…

  20. Mainstream Teachers' Attitude and Approaches to Support Children's Biliteracy Development in Australian Classroom Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafar, Muhammad Basri

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the role of mainstream teachers in supporting children's biliteracy development and bilingualism in a public primary school where English is the medium of instruction. It reports a research conducted in a public primary school in Australia. The research employs a longitudinal ethnographic approach to collect data on how the…

  1. Classroom Emotional Support Predicts Differences in Preschool Children's Cortisol and Alpha-Amylase Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Bridget E.; Hestenes, Linda L.; Kintner-Duffy, Victoria L.; O'Brien, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests children enrolled in full-time child care often display afternoon elevations of the hormone cortisol, which is an indicator of stress. Recent advances in immunoassays allow for measurement of activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the autonomic sympathetic nervous system from saliva, and measurement…

  2. Supporting Children with Genetic Syndromes in the Classroom: The Example of 22q Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Colin; Stedman, Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of children are likely to have a known genetic cause for their special educational needs. One such genetic condition is 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS), a genetic syndrome associated with early speech and language difficulties, global and specific cognitive impairments, difficulties with attention and difficulties with…

  3. Music in the Classroom: Its Influence on Children's Brain Development, Academic Performance, and Practical Life Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jenny Nam

    A growing body of research reveals the beneficial effects of music on education performance. Research indicates that music plays an important role in the brain development of a child. Furthermore, researchers believe that children who have more exposure to music and music training benefit from enhanced brain activity which has been shown to…

  4. Temperament in the Classroom: Children Low in Surgency are More Sensitive to Teachers' Reactions to Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Hideko Hamada; Denham, Susanne A.; Fettig, Nicole B.; Curby, Timothy W.; Mohtasham, Mandana; Austin, Nila

    2017-01-01

    Based on the emotion socialization and bioecological models, the present study examined the contributions of teacher emotion socialization (i.e., teacher reactions to child emotions) on children's social-emotional behaviors, and the moderating effect of child temperamental surgency on these relations in the preschool context. A total of 337…

  5. A Classroom-Based Study of Small-Group Planned Improvisation with Fifth-Grade Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, Amy C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and describe children's music improvisations and the interactions that transpired within their four-person groups during regular weekly music classes as they planned and performed music improvisations in response to three different prompts: a poem, a painting, and a musical composition. Participants were…

  6. Supporting Children with Genetic Syndromes in the Classroom: The Example of 22q Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Colin; Stedman, Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of children are likely to have a known genetic cause for their special educational needs. One such genetic condition is 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS), a genetic syndrome associated with early speech and language difficulties, global and specific cognitive impairments, difficulties with attention and difficulties with…

  7. Peer Effects in Preschool Classrooms: Is Children's Language Growth Associated with Their Classmates' Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura M.; Petscher, Yaacov; Schatschneider, Christopher; Mashburn, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    With an increasing number of young children participating in preschool education, this study determined whether peer effects are present in this earliest sector of schooling. Specifically, this work examined whether peer effects were influential to preschoolers' growth in language skills over an academic year and whether peer effects manifest…

  8. The Effects of Early Childhood Classroom Size and Duration on Development of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbeldek, Merve; Isikoglu Erdogan, Nesrin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The numbers of early childhood education programs are dramatically increasing throughout Turkey, and the regulations to ensure quality are frequently changing. A very limited number of studies have examined the quality of Turkish ECE programs on children's development. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify the effects of…

  9. Is Teaching Sign Language in Early Childhood Classrooms Feasible for Busy Teachers and Beneficial for Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brereton, Amy Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Infants' hands are ready to construct words using sign language before their mouths are ready to speak. These research findings may explain the popularity of parents and caregivers teaching and using sign language with infants and toddlers, along with speech. The advantages of using sign language with young children go beyond the infant and…

  10. The Application of Rational-Emotive Behavior Therapy to Reduce Stress among Mother with Leukemia Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuni Sufyanti Arief

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A child who is diagnosed with Leukemia will undergo several procedures are long and painful action. During the process of hospitalization due to leukemia children and parents can experience a variety of events or actions handling according to various studies shown by the experience very traumatic and stressful (Supartini 2004 in Arif, SY, 2007. Some of the methods used to deal with anxiety is psikoprofilaksis, relaxation and imagination (Reeder et al., 2011. Rational-emotive behavior therapy by Albert Ellis in 1990 describes a unique man who is basically have a tendency to think rational and irrational. Methods: aim of this study is to explain the effect of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT for stress levels of mothers with children suffering from Leukemia. The study design used was a pre-experiment Quasy-post control group design. The sample was 10 mothers of children diagnosed with leukemia are treated in a child hematology ward Soetomo hospital. Variable in this study is the level of depression and anxiety mothers with children suffering from leukemia. Result: Based on the results obtained Wilcoxon statistical test p = 0.025 in the treatment group and p = 0.32 in the control group. Mann Whitney test results obtained p = 0.012. Conclution: Rational-emotive behavior therapy can reduce levels of depression and anxiety (stress mothers with children suffering from leukemia. It is expected that the application of rational -emotive behavior therapy can be done to reduce depression and anxiety in women with chronic disease cases while maintaining the effectiveness the goal of REBT. Keywords: stress, anxiety, depression, rational-emotive behavior

  11. Classroom Discipline and Socialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kayoun

    This study explored how children are socialized through discipline in the preschool classroom. Using detailed descriptions of teacher-student interactions and an interpretive method, the study mapped the process of the children's socialization and the role of discipline. The case study in one 4-year-olds' room examined early socialization…

  12. THE EFFECTS OF EXERGAMING ON PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AMONG INACTIVE CHILDREN IN A PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLASSROOM

    OpenAIRE

    Fogel, Victoria A; Miltenberger, Raymond G; Graves, Rachel; Koehler, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Childhood obesity, which is due in part to lack of physical activity, is a serious concern that requires the attention of the behavioral community. Although excessive video game play has been noted in the literature as a contributor to childhood obesity, newer video gaming technology, called exergaming, has been designed to capitalize on the reinforcing effects of video games to increase physical activity in children. This study evaluated the effects of exergaming on physical activity among 4...

  13. Investigating Efficacy of Melatonin and Gabapentin in Reducing Anxiety and Pain of Lumbar Puncture in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Fallah

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The lumbar puncture is one of the most important diagnostic and therapeutic procedures within children which child’s non-cooperativeness and procedural sedation are regarded necessary to conduct it. This study aimed to compare efficacy and safety of melatonin and gabapentin in reducing anxiety and pain of lumbar puncture in children. Methods: In a parallel single-blinded randomized clinical trial, sixty children aged 6 months -7 years, were evaluated in Pediatric Ward of Shahid Sadoughi Hospital, in Yazd (Iran in 2012. The children were distributedrandomly into two groups (30 children in each group. In group one, they received 0.3 mg/kg/dose of melatonin and theother group received 15 mg/kg/dose of gabapentin. Primary endpoints were success rate in reducing anxiety (anxiety score of≥ four and reducing pain when the needle was inserted to skin for lumbarpuncture (pain score of less than four. The clinicalside effects were investigated as well. Results: Twenty two girls (36.7% and 38 boys (63.3% with mean age of 2.79 ± 1.92 years were evaluated. Anxiety reduction (achieving the anxiety score of ≥ four was obtained in 43.3% in melatonin and in 36.7% in gabapentin groups, respectively and both drugs were equally effective in anxiety reduction (p.value = 0.598.Pain reduction ( achieving the pain score of less than four was obtained in 23.3% in melatonin and in 50% in gabapentin groups, respectively and thus, gabapentin wasproved to be more effective in pain reduction (p.value = 0.032.Mild side effects were observed in 10% of melatonin group and in 16.7% of gabapentin group. No statistically significant differences were seen from viewpoint of safety between the two drugs (p.value=0.448. Conclusion: Melatonin and gabapentin were not effective drugs in anxiety reduction for lumbar puncture of children. However, gabapentin is a safe and effective drug in pain reduction in painful diagnostic therapeutic procedures.

  14. Naturalistic Observations of Nonverbal Children with Autism: A Study of Intentional Communicative Acts in the Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Drain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined evoked and spontaneous communicative acts in six nonverbal children with autism (10–15 years, M = 12.8, SD = 2.1. All participants attended the same special school for children with autism but were in different classes. Each was observed for 30 minutes during a typical school day. An observer coded the presence/absence of an antecedent, the form and function of the communicative act, and the teacher’s response to the child. One hundred and fifty-five communicative acts were observed, 41% were spontaneous and 59% were evoked. The main antecedents to evoked communicative acts were verbal prompts, and most of the evoked communicative acts were physical in nature (i.e., motor acts and gestures. However, verbalizations and the use of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS were higher for spontaneous communicative acts. The functions of spontaneous communicative acts were primarily requests. Results showed a substantial number of “nonresponses” from teachers, even following evoked communicative acts. These results suggest that teachers may not actively promote intentional communication as much as possible. Therefore, our findings provide information concerning ways in which educators could facilitate intentional communication in non-verbal children with autism.

  15. Oral Clonidine Premedication Reduces Nausea and Vomiting in Children after Appendectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Alizadeh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Clonidine is an α2-agonist which is used as a sedative premedication in children. There are conflicting results in the published literature about the effect of clonidine on the incidence of post operative nausea and vomiting (PONV. We therefore decided to evaluate the effect of oral clonidine given preoperatively on the incidence of PONV in children after appendectomy.Methods: sixty children, 5-12 years old, classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II, who were scheduled for appendecectomy were enrolled in this randomized double blinded clinical trial. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups of 30 patients. Patients in clonidine group were given4 μg.kg -1 clonidine in 20 cc of apple juice and patients in control group were given only 20 cc of apple juice 1 hour before transporting to operating room. The protocol of general anesthesia and postoperative analgesia was the same for two groups. Incidence of PONV and antiemetic usage of patients were assessed during 0-24hours after anesthesia.Findings: The patients' characteristics were similar in two groups. Patients who had received clonidine had significantly less episodes of PONV and also less rescue antiemetic usage than patients in control group.Conclusion: we showed that oral clonidine at a dose of 4 μg.kg -1 administered preoperatively is associated with a reduced incidence of postoperative vomiting in children who have undergone appendectomy.

  16. Advertising to children initiatives have not reduced unhealthy food advertising on Australian television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Wendy L; Lau, Vivien; Wellard, Lyndal; Hughes, Clare; Chapman, Kathryn

    2017-02-02

    In response to rising childhood obesity rates, the Australian food industry implemented two initiatives in 2009 to reduce the marketing of unhealthy food to children. This study evaluated the efficacy of these initiatives on the rate of unhealthy food advertising to children on Australian television. The rates of food advertisements on three free-to-air commercial television channels and a youth-oriented digital channel in Sydney, Australia were analysed over 2 weekdays (16 h) and two weekend days (22 h). Advertisements were categorized according to the healthiness of foods advertised (non-core, core, miscellaneous) and signatory status to the food industry advertising initiatives. Total food advertising rates for the three channels increased from 5.5/h in 2011 to 7.3/h in 2015, due to an increase of 0.8/h for both core and miscellaneous foods. The rate of non-core food advertisements in 2015 (3.1/h) was similar to 2011 (3.0/h). The youth-oriented channel had fewer total food advertisements (3.7/h versus 7.3/h) but similar fast-food advertisement rates (1.3/h versus 1.3/h). There was no change in the rate of unhealthy food advertising since 2011, suggesting minimal impact of the current food industry initiatives on reducing children's exposure to unhealthy food advertising.

  17. Effecacy of painting therapy in reducing aggression in children with conduct disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Jangi Ghoojeh Beigloo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study was carried out to examine the effectiveness of painting therapy in reducing aggression in children with conduct disorder. Methods: This study was a semi-experimental research (pretest-posttest with control group design in which the statistical population consisted of thirty 8-12 year-old children with conduct disorder who were studying in Parsabad city in the academic year of 2013-2014 and were selected through convenience sampling method. Then, they were divided into two equal groups (experimental and control using sample random sampling. The instruments for data collection consisted of Raven's intelligence test, child symptom inventory-4 and Eysenck aggression inventory. The experimental underwent painting therapy for 12 sessions and every session lasted 40 minutes. The obtained data were analyzed by ANCOVA and t-test for dependent and independent groups. Results: There was not a significant difference between the mean aggression scores of experimental group in the post-test and follow up compared with pre-test. Also, a significant difference was reported between the mean aggression scores of experimental and control groups in post-test and follow up phases (P<0.05. Conclusion: Painting therapy is an effective method in reducing aggression in children with conduct disorder.

  18. Beginning English Literacy Development and Achievement among Spanish-Speaking Children in Arizona's English-Only Classrooms: A Four-Year Two-Cohort Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Castellanos, Oscar; Blanchard, Jay; Atwill, Kim; Jiménez-Silva, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    This study examined beginning English literacy-skill development and achievement among Spanish-speaking children enrolled in state-mandated English-only classrooms. The children possessed Spanish skill at or above age-appropriate level, yet minimal English skill, and came from a Spanish-speaking community adjacent to the U.S.-Mexico border. Under…

  19. [Physical activity programmes to reduce overweight and obesity in children and adolescents; a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Cordero, M J; Ortegón Piñero, A; Mur Vilar, N; Sánchez García, J C; García Verazaluce, J J; García García, I; Sánchez López, A M

    2014-10-01

    Obesity treatment has been the subject of much controversy; various authors have recommended the application of a comprehensive treatment programme, and in the light of this previous research, we consider the question of what is the most effective programme of physical activity to reduce overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. To analyse major studies on the effectiveness of physical activity in reducing overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. Systematic review of the results of physical activity programmes, published in scientific articles, to reduce overweight and obesity. Using an automated database search in PubMed and Google Scholar, conducted from October 2013 to March 2014, we identified 85 valid items. In selecting the items, the criteria applied included the usefulness and relevance of the subject matter and the credibility or experience of the research study authors. The internal and external validity of each of the articles reviewed was taken into account. This review confirmed the effectiveness of physical activity in reducing overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. The most effective programmes were those combining aerobic and anaerobic exercises. It is generally accepted that at least 180 minutes per week should be dedicated to exercise, in the form of three 60-minute sessions of moderate intensity. Such programmes could be sufficient for persons with overweight or obesity. Researchers in this field agree that when a diet based on an appropriate distribution of meals is combined with regular physical activity, they reinforce each other, and thus optimum results are obtained. Weight reduction programmes that take account of family involvement are more effective than nutrition education itself or other routine interventions that fail to consider family involvement. The role of pa rents and of the persons around the child or adolescent is essential to reinforce positive behaviour toward lifestyle change. Copyright AULA

  20. Montelukast reduces asthma exacerbations in 2- to 5-year-old children with intermittent asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Zielen, Stefen; Garcia-Garcia, María Luz

    2005-01-01

    The PREVIA study was designed to investigate the role of montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist, in the prevention of viral-induced asthma exacerbations in children aged 2 to 5 years with a history of intermittent asthma symptoms. The study was a 12-month multicenter, double-blind, parallel......-group study of patients with asthma exacerbations associated with respiratory infections and minimal symptoms between episodes. Patients were randomized to receive oral montelukast 4 or 5 mg (depending on age) (n = 278) or placebo (n = 271) once per day for 12 months. Caregivers recorded children's symptoms......, beta-agonist use, and health care resource use in a diary card. Over 12 months of therapy, montelukast significantly reduced the rate of asthma exacerbations by 31.9% compared with placebo. The average rate of exacerbation episodes per patient was 1.60 episodes per year on montelukast compared with 2...

  1. Pretreatment modeling. A technique for reducing children's fear in the dental operatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, P E; Melamed, B G

    1988-10-01

    Research on modeling indicates that this technique offers dentists a means of reducing fear in child patients of all ages. As a preventive measure used with children who have had no prior exposure to dental treatment, it can be particularly efficacious. Based on the assumption that much of adult dental avoidance is based on dental fears acquired in childhood treatment, the reduction of children's dental fear would have a positive effect on the individual's tendency to seek out dental health care throughout his or her lifespan. For the dentist, there are also short- and long-term benefits. Dental management of the child is prerequisite to providing good dental care. Pedodontics as a specialty recognizes behavioral management of the child cannot be separated from the quality of the dentist's work. Fear has been identified as an important factor in disruptive behavior of school age children in the dental office. Practicing dentists consider the fearful, disruptive child to be among the most troublesome of problems in their clinical work. The child must cooperate or at least passively comply with the dentist's procedures in order to have the technical work completed. By reducing disruptive patient behavior (crying, screaming children whose peripheral and gross motor movements often make direct contact with the dentist or his equipment) the most unpalatable aspect of pediatric dentistry is minimized. Further, the actual time for treatment becomes shorter rather than longer. Although modeling is not restricted to videotape media, the emergence of current videotape technology provides the practitioner with the means for incorporating patient viewing of prerecorded modeling tapes as part of the usual waiting period. Such a procedure would mean that in the long run, the dentist will spend more time doing dentistry and less in behavioral management tasks.

  2. Reducing the 137Cs-load in the organism of "Chernobyl" children with apple-pectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterenko, V B; Nesterenko, A V; Babenko, V I; Yerkovich, T V; Babenko, I V

    2004-01-10

    As a complement of standard radioprotective measures, apple-pectin preparations are given, especially in the Ukraine, to reduce the 137Cs uptake in the organism of children. The question has been raised: is oral pectin also useful when children receive radiologically clean food, or does this polysaccharide only act in binding 137Cs in the gut, blocking its intestinal absorption? In this case, pectin would be useless if radiologically clean food could be given. The study was a randomised, double blind placebo-controlled trial comparing the efficacy of a dry and milled apple-extract containing 15-16% pectin with a similar placebo-powder, in 64 children originating from the same group of contaminated villages of the Gomel oblast. The average 137Cs load was of about 30 Bq/kg bodyweight (BW). The trial was conducted during the simultaneous one-month stay in the sanatorium Silver Spring. In this clean radiological environment only radiologically "clean" food is given to the children. The average reduction of the 137Cs levels in children receiving oral pectin powder was 62.6%, the reduction with "clean" food and placebo was 13.9%, the difference being statistically significant (p <0.01). The reduction of the 137Cs load is medically relevant, as no child in the placebo group reached values below 20 Bq/kg BW (which is considered by Bandazhevsky as potentially associated with specific pathological tissue damages), with an average value of 25.8 +/- 0.8 Bq/kg. The highest value in the apple-pectin group was 15.4 Bq/kg, the average value being 11.3 +/- 0.6 Bq/kg BW.

  3. Educational outreach to general practitioners reduces children's asthma symptoms: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladden Michael

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood asthma is common in Cape Town, a province of South Africa, but is underdiagnosed by general practitioners. Medications are often prescribed inappropriately, and care is episodic. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of educational outreach to general practitioners on asthma symptoms of children in their practice. Methods This is a cluster randomised trial with general practices as the unit of intervention, randomisation, and analysis. The setting is Mitchells Plain (population 300,000, a dormitory town near Cape Town. Solo general practitioners, without nurse support, operate from storefront practices. Caregiver-reported symptom data were collected for 318 eligible children (2 to 17 years with moderate to severe asthma, who were attending general practitioners in Mitchells Plain. One year post-intervention follow-up data were collected for 271 (85% of these children in all 43 practices. Practices randomised to intervention (21 received two 30-minute educational outreach visits by a trained pharmacist who left materials describing key interventions to improve asthma care. Intervention and control practices received the national childhood asthma guideline. Asthma severity was measured in a parent-completed survey administered through schools using a symptom frequency and severity scale. We compared intervention and control group children on the change in score from pre-to one-year post-intervention. Results Symptom scores declined an additional 0.84 points in the intervention vs. control group (on a nine-point scale. p = 0.03. For every 12 children with asthma exposed to a doctor allocated to the intervention, one extra child will have substantially reduced symptoms. Conclusion Educational outreach was accepted by general practitioners and was effective. It could be applied to other health care quality problems in this setting.

  4. A single intervention for cockroach control reduces cockroach exposure and asthma morbidity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabito, Felicia A; Carlson, John C; He, Hua; Werthmann, Derek; Schal, Coby

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to cockroaches is an important asthma trigger, particularly for children with asthma living in inner cities. Integrated pest management is the recommended approach to cockroach abatement; however, it is costly and difficult to implement. The impact of reducing cockroach exposure on asthma outcomes is not known. We sought to test the use of a single intervention, insecticidal bait, to reduce cockroach exposure in the home of children with asthma in New Orleans and to examine the impact of cockroach reduction on asthma outcomes. One hundred two children aged 5 to 17 years with moderate to severe asthma were enrolled in a 12-month randomized controlled trial testing the use of insecticidal bait on cockroach counts and asthma morbidity. Homes were visited 6 times and asthma symptoms were assessed every 2 months. After adjustment, intervention homes had significantly fewer cockroaches than did control homes (mean change in cockroaches trapped, 13.14; 95% CI, 6.88-19.39; P Children in control homes had more asthma symptoms and unscheduled health care utilization in the previous 2 weeks (1.82, 95% CI, 0.14-3.50, P = .03; 1.17, 95% CI, 0.11-2.24, P = .03, respectively) and a higher proportion of children with FEV1 of less than 80% predicted (odds ratio, 5.74; 95% CI, 1.60-20.57; P = .01) compared with children living in intervention homes. Previous research has demonstrated improvement in asthma health outcomes using multifaceted interventions. The strategic placement of insecticidal bait, which is inexpensive, has low toxicity, and is widely available, resulted in sustained cockroach elimination over 12 months and was associated with improved asthma outcomes. This single intervention may be an alternative to multifaceted interventions currently recommended to improve asthma morbidity. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Review of Different Behavior Modification Strategies Designed to Reduce Sedentary Screen Behaviors in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy A. Steeves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research suggests that reducing sedentary screen behaviors may be a strategy for preventing and treating obesity in children. This systematic review describes strategies used in interventions designed to either solely target sedentary screen behaviors or multiple health behaviors, including sedentary screen behaviors. Eighteen studies were included in this paper; eight targeting sedentary screen behaviors only, and ten targeting multiple health behaviors. All studies used behavior modification strategies for reducing sedentary screen behaviors in children (aged 1–12 years. Nine studies only used behavior modification strategies, and nine studies supplemented behavior modification strategies with an electronic device to enhance sedentary screen behaviors reductions. Many interventions (50% significantly reduced sedentary screen behaviors; however the magnitude of the significant reductions varied greatly (−0.44 to −3.1 h/day and may have been influenced by the primary focus of the intervention, number of behavior modification strategies used, and other tools used to limit sedentary screen behaviors.

  6. Bibliotherapy Revisited: Issues in Classroom Management. Developing Teachers' Awareness and Techniques to Help Children Cope Effectively with Stressful Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Marilyn N. Malloy

    2006-01-01

    Are teachers aware of the stress in their classrooms? Do teachers plan for stress control? Educators need to understand why stress is a part of classroom life and how it affects the teacher-student relationship. Bibliotherapy can be an intervention in stress management through books. The use of appropriate reading material to help solve emotional…

  7. Evaluation of the Safety Detective Program: A Classroom-Based Intervention to Increase Kindergarten Children's Understanding of Home Safety Hazards and Injury-Risk Behaviors to Avoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrongiello, Barbara A; Bell, Melissa; Park, Katey; Pogrebtsova, Katya

    2016-01-01

    Home injuries are a leading cause of mortality and morbidity for young children. Most programs that aim to improve their knowledge of home safety have been narrowly focused on one injury type and/or required specialized personnel for delivery. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new Safety Detective Program that was designed to teach young children (4-6 years) about several types of home safety hazards and unsafe behaviors, with the program delivered in a classroom setting by non-experts based on manualized training. The current study used a randomized group, pre-post design to evaluate the effectiveness of the program to increase children's knowledge and understanding of home safety hazards and injury-risk behaviors to avoid. Children participated in six structured sessions, covering burns, falls, drowning, and poisoning. Each session involved play-based activities (storybook, song, and game or craft) to teach main messages about hazards and injury-risk behaviors, a take home activity, and a parent information sheet about the injury type covered that day. An individually administered photo-sort task with follow-up interview was used to measure intervention and control group participants' knowledge and understanding of injury-risk behaviors before and after program delivery. Children in the intervention, but not the control, group exhibited significant gains in their knowledge and understanding of home safety hazards and injury-risk behaviors to avoid, establishing the effectiveness of the program. This evaluation indicates that the Safety Detective Program can be delivered in classrooms without requiring specialized personnel or extensive training and with positive changes obtained. The program holds much promise as a means of improving kindergarten children's understanding of a broad range of home hazards and injury-risk behaviors that are relevant to their safety.

  8. Influence of combined dust reducing carpet and compact air filtration unit on the indoor air quality of a classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, P.T.J.; Hartog, J.J. de; Reijnaerts, J.; Beckmann, G.; Anzion, R.B.M.; Poels, K.; Godderis, L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary schools mostly rely on natural ventilation but also have an interest in affordable technology to improve indoor air quality (IAQ). Laboratory tests show promising results for dust reducing carpets and compact air filtration systems but there is no information available on the performance of

  9. Strategies to Reduce Hospitalizations of Children With Medical Complexity Through Complex Care: Expert Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coller, Ryan J; Nelson, Bergen B; Klitzner, Thomas S; Saenz, Adrianna A; Shekelle, Paul G; Lerner, Carlos F; Chung, Paul J

    Interventions to reduce disproportionate hospital use among children with medical complexity (CMC) are needed. We conducted a rigorous, structured process to develop intervention strategies aiming to reduce hospitalizations within a complex care program population. A complex care medical home program used 1) semistructured interviews of caregivers of CMC experiencing acute, unscheduled hospitalizations and 2) literature review on preventing hospitalizations among CMC to develop key drivers for lowering hospital utilization and link them with intervention strategies. Using an adapted version of the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method, an expert panel rated each model for effectiveness at impacting each key driver and ultimately reducing hospitalizations. The complex care program applied these findings to select a final set of feasible intervention strategies for implementation. Intervention strategies focused on expanding access to familiar providers, enhancing general or technical caregiver knowledge and skill, creating specific and proactive crisis or contingency plans, and improving transitions between hospital and home. Activities aimed to facilitate family-centered, flexible implementation and consideration of all of the child's environments, including school and while traveling. Tailored activities and special attention to the highest utilizing subset of CMC were also critical for these interventions. A set of intervention strategies to reduce hospitalizations among CMC, informed by key drivers, can be created through a structured, reproducible process. Both this process and the results may be relevant to clinical programs and researchers aiming to reduce hospital utilization through the medical home for CMC. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduced Theta Connectivity during Set-Shifting in Children with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doesburg, Sam M; Vidal, Julie; Taylor, Margot J

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a characterized by deficits in social cognition and executive function. An area of particular difficulty for children with ASD is cognitive flexibility, such as the ability to shift between attentional or response sets. The biological basis of such deficits remains poorly understood, although atypical development of structural and functional brain connectivity have been reported in ASD, suggesting that disruptions of normal patterns of inter-regional communication may contribute to cognitive problems in this group. The present magnetoencephalography study measured inter-regional phase synchronization while children with ASD and typically developing matched controls (6-14 years of age) performed a set-shifting task. Reduced theta-band phase synchronization was observed in children with ASD during extradimensional set-shifting. This reduction in task-dependent inter-regional connectivity encompassed numerous areas including multiple frontal lobe regions, and indicates that problems with communication among brain areas may contribute to difficulties with executive function in ASD.

  11. Reduced theta connectivity during set-shifting in children with autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam McLeod Doesburg

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a characterized by deficits in social cognition and executive function. An area of particular difficulty for children with ASD is cognitive flexibility, such as the ability to shift between attentional or response sets. The biological basis of such deficits remains poorly understood, although atypical development of structural and functional brain connectivity have been reported in ASD, suggesting that disruptions of normal patterns of inter-regional communication may contribute to cognitive problems in this group. The present MEG study measured inter-regional phase synchronization while children with ASD and typically developing matched controls (6-14 years of age performed a set-shifting task. Reduced theta-band phase synchronization was observed in children with ASD during extradimensional set-shifting. This reduction in task-dependent inter-regional connectivity encompassed numerous areas including multiple frontal lobe regions, and indicates that problems with communication among brain areas may contribute to difficulties with executive function in ASD.

  12. Reducing children's social anxiety symptoms: exploring a novel parent-administered cognitive bias modification training intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jennifer Y F; Pettit, Eleanor; Creswell, Cathy

    2013-07-01

    Social fears and worries in children are common and impairing. Yet, questions have been raised over the efficacy, suitability and accessibility of current frontline treatments. Here, we present data on the effectiveness of a novel parent-administered Cognitive Bias Modification of Interpretations (CBM-I) training tool. CBM-I capitalises on findings demonstrating an association between anxiety symptoms and biased interpretations, the tendency to interpret ambiguous situations negatively. Through CBM-I training, participants are exposed to benign resolutions, and reinforced for selecting these. In adults and adolescents, CBM-I training is effective at reducing symptoms and mood reactivity. In the present study, we developed a novel, child-appropriate form of CBM-I training, by presenting training materials within bedtime stories, read by a parent to the child across three consecutive evenings. Compared to a test-retest control group (n = 17), children receiving CBM-I (n = 19) reported greater endorsement of benign interpretations of ambiguous situations post-training (compared to pre-training). These participants (but not the test-retest control group) also showed a significant reduction in social anxiety symptoms. Pending replication and extensions to a clinical sample, these data may implicate a cost-effective, mechanism-driven and developmentally-appropriate resource for targeting social anxiety problems in children.

  13. Reduced satellite cell number in situ in muscular contractures from children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayanidhi, Sudarshan; Dykstra, Peter B; Lyubasyuk, Vera; McKay, Bryon R; Chambers, Henry G; Lieber, Richard L

    2015-07-01

    Satellite cells (SC) are quiescent adult muscle stem cells critical for postnatal development. Children with cerebral palsy have impaired muscular growth and develop contractures. While flow cytometry previously demonstrated a reduced SC population, extracellular matrix abnormalities may influence the cell isolation methods used, systematically isolating fewer cells from CP muscle and creating a biased result. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to use immunohistochemistry on serial muscle sections to quantify SC in situ. Serial cross-sections from human gracilis muscle biopsies (n = 11) were labeled with fluorescent antibodies for Pax7 (SC transcriptional marker), laminin (basal lamina), and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (nuclei). Fluorescence microscopy under high magnification was used to identify SC based on labeling and location. Mean SC/100 myofibers was reduced by ∼70% (p muscle growth and apparent decreased responsiveness of CP muscle to exercise. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Campylobacter Infections Associated with Reduced Growth in Peruvian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gwenyth; Pan, William; Peñataro Yori, Pablo; Paredes Olortegui, Maribel; Tilley, Drake; Gregory, Michael; Oberhelman, Richard; Burga, Rosa; Chavez, Cesar Banda; Kosek, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Background Although diarrheal illnesses are recognized as both a cause and effect of undernutrition, evidence for the effect of specific enteropathogens on early childhood growth remains limited. We estimated the effects of undernutrition as a risk factor for campylobacteriosis, as well as associations between symptomatic and asymptomatic Campylobacter infections and growth. Methodology/Principal Findings Using data from a prospective cohort of 442 children aged 0–72 months, the effect of nutritional status on the incidence of Campylobacter infection was estimated using uni- and multivariate Poisson models. Multivariate regression models were developed to evaluate the effect of Campylobacter infection on weight gain and linear growth. Overall, 8.3% of diarrheal episodes were associated with Campylobacter (crude incidence rate = 0.37 episodes/year) and 4.9% of quarterly asymptomatic samples were Campylobacter positive. In univariate models, the incidence of Campylobacter infection was marginally higher in stunted than non-stunted children (IRR 1.270, 95% CI (0.960, 1.681)(p = 0.095). When recent diarrheal burdens were included in the analysis, there was no difference in risk between stunted and unstunted children. Asymptomatic and symptomatic Campylobacter infections were associated with reduced weight gain over a three-month period (65.5 g (95% CI: −128.0, −3.0)(p = 0.040) and 43.9 g (95% CI:−87.6, −1.0)(p = 0.049) less weight gain, respectively). Symptomatic Campylobacter infections were only marginally associated with reduced linear growth over a nine month period (−0.059 cm per episode, 95% CI: −0.118, 0.001)(p = 0.054), however relatively severe episodes were associated with reduced linear growth (−0.169 cm/episode, 95% CI −0.310, −0.028)(p = 0.019). Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggest that Campylobacter is not as benign as commonly assumed, and that there is evidence to support expanding the indications for

  15. Antiemetics for reducing vomiting related to acute gastroenteritis in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbys Fedorowicz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vomiting is a common manifestation of acute gastroenteritis in children and adolescents. When untreated, it can be a hindrance to oral rehydration therapy, which is the cornerstone in the management of acute gastroenteritis. Evidence is needed concerning the safety and efficacy of antiemetic use for vomiting in acute gastroenteritis in children. OBJECTIVES: To assess the safety and effectiveness of antiemetics on gastroenteritis induced vomiting in children and adolescents. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Upper Gastrointestinal and Pancreatic Diseases Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and hand searches of relevant journals and abstract books of conferences. The search was re-run and is up to date as on 20 July 2010. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials comparing antiemetics with placebo or no treatment, in children and adolescents under the age of 18, for vomiting due to gastroenteritis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. MAIN RESULTS: We included seven trials involving 1,020 participants. Mean time to cessation of vomiting in one study was 0.34 days less with dimenhydrinate suppository compared to placebo (P value = 0.036. Pooled data from three studies comparing oral ondansetron with placebo showed: a reduction in the immediate hospital admission rate (RR 0.40, NNT 17, 95% CI 10 to 100 but no difference between the hospitalization rates at 72 hours after discharge from the Emergency Department (ED; a reduction in IV rehydration rates both during the ED stay (RR 0.41, NNT 5, 95% CI 4 to 8, and in follow-up to 72 hours after discharge from the ED stay (worst-best scenario for ondansetron RR 0.57, NNT 6, 95% CI 4 to 13 and an increase in the proportion of patients with cessation of vomiting (RR 1.34, NNT 5, 95% CI 3 to 7. No significant difference was noted in the revisit

  16. "Tuning into Kids": reducing young children's behavior problems using an emotion coaching parenting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havighurst, Sophie S; Wilson, Katherine R; Harley, Ann E; Kehoe, Christiane; Efron, Daryl; Prior, Margot R

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluated a 6-session group parenting program, Tuning into Kids (TIK), as treatment for young children (aged 4.0-5.11 years) with behavior problems. TIK targets parent emotion socialization (parent emotion awareness, regulation and emotion coaching skills). Fifty-four parents, recruited via a child behavior clinic, were randomized into intervention (TIK) or waitlist (clinical treatment as usual). Parents reported emotion awareness/regulation, emotion coaching, empathy and child behavior (pre-intervention, post-intervention, 6-month follow-up); teachers reported child behavior and observers rated parent-child emotion coaching and child emotion knowledge (pre-intervention, follow-up). Data were analyzed using growth curve modeling and ANCOVA. Parents in both conditions reported less emotional dismissiveness and reduced child behavior problems; in the intervention group, parents also reported greater empathy and had improved observed emotion coaching skills; their children had greater emotion knowledge and reduced teacher-reported behavior problems. TIK appears to be a promising addition to treatment for child behavior problems.

  17. Sufentanil reduces emergence agitation in children receiving sevoflurane anesthesia for adenotonsillectomy compared with fentanyl

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; HUANG Zhi-lian; ZHANG Xu-tong; LUO Ke; ZHANG Zhan-qin; MAO Yi; ZHUANG Xiao-biao; LIAN Qing-quan; CAO Hong

    2011-01-01

    Background Emergence agitation is a common problem in pediatric anesthesia,especially after sevoflurane induction and maintenance anesthesia.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of sufentanil to reduce emergence agitation after sevoflurane anesthesia in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy compared with fentanyl.Methods One hundred and five children,aged 3-11 years,were randomly allocated to receive normal saline (control group),sufentanil 0.2 μg/kg (S2) or fentanyl 2 μg/kg (F2) 1 minute after loss of the eyelash reflex.Anesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane.Time to tracheal extubation,recovery time,Paediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium (PAED) scale,and emergence behavior were assessed.Results The incidence of severe agitation was significantly lower in S2 and F2 groups vs.the control group,4/32 and 15/34 vs.24/34 respectively,(P=0.002,0.009,respectively).PAED scales were significantly different among three groups (P=0.007),and lower in the S2 and F2 groups than in the control group (P=0.007 and P=0.025,respectively).And the incidence of severe agitation and the PAED scale score was significantly different between the S2 and F2 groups (P=0.007,P=0.019,respectively).Time to tracheal extubation and recovery time were similar in all three groups.Conclusions Administration of sufentanil at 0.2 μg/kg after induction of anesthesia reduced emergence agitation in children receiving sevoflurane anesthesia for adenotonsillectomy compared with fentanyl.This was without delaying the recovery time or causing significant hypotension.

  18. Zinc or multiple micronutrient supplementation to reduce diarrhea and respiratory disease in South African children: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kany-Kany Angelique Luabeya

    Full Text Available Prophylactic zinc supplementation has been shown to reduce diarrhea and respiratory illness in children in many developing countries, but its efficacy in children in Africa is uncertain.To determine if zinc, or zinc plus multiple micronutrients, reduces diarrhea and respiratory disease prevalence.Randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.Rural community in South Africa.THREE COHORTS: 32 HIV-infected children; 154 HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers; and 187 HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-uninfected mothers.Children received either 1250 IU of vitamin A; vitamin A and 10 mg of zinc; or vitamin A, zinc, vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12, C, D, E, and K and copper, iodine, iron, and niacin starting at 6 months and continuing to 24 months of age. Homes were visited weekly.Primary outcome was percentage of days of diarrhea per child by study arm within each of the three cohorts. Secondary outcomes were prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms and percentage of children who ever had pneumonia by maternal report, or confirmed by the field worker.Among HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers, median percentage of days with diarrhea was 2.3% for 49 children allocated to vitamin A; 2.5% in 47 children allocated to receive vitamin A and zinc; and 2.2% for 46 children allocated to multiple micronutrients (P = 0.852. Among HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-uninfected mothers, median percentage of days of diarrhea was 2.4% in 56 children in the vitamin A group; 1.8% in 57 children in the vitamin A and zinc group; and 2.7% in 52 children in the multiple micronutrient group (P = 0.857. Only 32 HIV-infected children were enrolled, and there were no differences between treatment arms in the prevalence of diarrhea. The prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms or incidence of pneumonia did not differ by treatment arms in any of the cohorts.When compared with vitamin A alone, supplementation with zinc, or with zinc and multiple

  19. Prebiotics Reduce Body Fat and Alter Intestinal Microbiota in Children Who Are Overweight or With Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolucci, Alissa C; Hume, Megan P; Martínez, Inés; Mayengbam, Shyamchand; Walter, Jens; Reimer, Raylene A

    2017-09-01

    It might be possible to manipulate the intestinal microbiota with prebiotics or other agents to prevent or treat obesity. However, little is known about the ability of prebiotics to specifically modify gut microbiota in children with overweight/obesity or reduce body weight. We performed a randomized controlled trial to study the effects of prebiotics on body composition, markers of inflammation, bile acids in fecal samples, and composition of the intestinal microbiota in children with overweight or obesity. We performed a single-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 2 separate cohorts (March 2014 and August 2014) at the University of Calgary in Canada. Participants included children, 7-12 years old, with overweight or obesity (>85th percentile of body mass index) but otherwise healthy. Participants were randomly assigned to groups given either oligofructose-enriched inulin (OI; 8 g/day; n=22) or maltodextrin placebo (isocaloric dose, controls; n=20) once daily for 16 weeks. Fat mass and lean mass were measured using dual-energy-x-ray absorptiometry. Height, weight, and waist circumference were measured at baseline and every 4 weeks thereafter. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 16 weeks, and analyzed for lipids, cytokines, lipopolysaccharide, and insulin. Fecal samples were collected at baseline and 16 weeks; bile acids were profiled using high-performance liquid chromatography and the composition of the microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The primary outcome was change in percent body fat from baseline to 16 weeks. After 16 weeks, children who consumed OI had significant decreases in body weight z-score (decrease of 3.1%), percent body fat (decrease of 2.4%), and percent trunk fat (decrease of 3.8%) compared with children given placebo (increase of 0.5%, increase of 0.05%, and decrease of 0.3%, respectively). Children who consumed OI also had a significant reduction in level of

  20. Physical activity in young children is reduced with increasing bronchial responsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasholt, Martin; Baty, Florent; Bisgaard, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity is essential for young children to develop adequately and for quality of life. It can be lower in children with subclinical asthma, and therefore methods to reveal subclinical reduction in physical activity in young children are warranted....

  1. The impact of school furniture on fourth grade children's on-task and sitting behavior in the classroom: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingrat, Jennifer K; Exner, Charlotte E

    2005-01-01

    Schoolchildren spend much of their day sitting in classroom furniture that is often too large or too small. To assess the impact of the size and fit of school furniture on the sitting and task behaviors of schoolchildren, 63 fourth-graders were observed while seated in 2 different sizes, types, and arrangements of furniture in their classroom. A correlated group design was used to compare the sitting and task behaviors of the students while seated in their traditional classroom furniture consisting of tables and chairs, and while sitting in smaller, appropriately sized desks and chairs, arranged in clusters and then in rows. The results indicate that the children sat better and were on task more when seated in the smaller furniture, as indicated by a significant main effect for condition, F = 51.478 (4, 330), pfurniture arranged in clusters compared to rows. Girls showed a slightly greater improvement compared to boys, and there was a significant correlation between better sitting positions and being on-task (r = 0.549, pfurniture that fits their size better.

  2. Joy in the Montessori Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Tamara D.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author states that it is a delight to walk into a Montessori classroom to the hum of children engaged in a variety of activities, especially when there is an accompanying feeling of joy and happiness. In desiring the peaceful calm of the classroom, educators may inadvertently hinder the joy, enthusiasm, and imagination that…

  3. A reduced phytate diet does not reduce endogenous fecal zinc in children on a habitual high-phytate diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Malawian children, ages 3 to 5 years, at risk for zinc deficiency and receiving a habitual maize-based high-phytate diet, received maize after phytate reduction for 40 days and had their endogenous fecal zinc (EFZ) measured using stable isotope techniques before and after phytate reduction. The ...

  4. Play and Community in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Nechie R.

    1997-01-01

    Children recognize two kinds of classroom play: instrumental play organized by teachers for academic purposes; and illicit play stressing surreptitious, unsanctioned activities like whispering and clowning around. Each is associated with a particular form of classroom community. This article considers how the nature of classroom play influences…

  5. Capturing Earth Science Learning Dynamics: Communication Interactions of ESE Teachers and Children Occurring in Online, Classroom, and Small-Group Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, C. W.; Prince, B. L.

    2002-12-01

    While the processes of schooling in science are usually measured in the resulting skills and products that students acquire or generate, another way to understand science learning is to explore the interactions and discourse that occur during actual learning activities. To investigate the dynamics of inquiry-based learning of earth science, we have explored the patterns that emerge in several learning environments: when teachers create dialog with other teachers in online ESE courses; when they teach earth science lessons in their classrooms; when they discuss their teaching perspectives in interviews; and when small groups of children engage in learning earth science together. By observing and scoring lesson exchanges, preserving online discussions, and documenting words and interactions in audio or video recordings, we are able to distinguish communication configurations that occur when teachers and children engage in the learning of earth science that would otherwise be invisible.

  6. Monoclonal antibody for reducing the risk of respiratory syncytial virus infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andabaka, Tea; Nickerson, Jason W; Rojas-Reyes, Maria Ximena; Rueda, Juan David; Bacic Vrca, Vesna; Barsic, Bruno

    2013-04-30

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most important viral pathogens causing acute respiratory infections in children. It results in about 3.4 million hospitalisations annually in children under five. Palivizumab is an anti-RSV monoclonal antibody, administered intramuscularly at a dose of 15 mg/kg once every 30 days. The efficacy and safety of palivizumab has been evaluated in multicentre, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and a large number of economic evaluations (EEs) have tested its cost-effectiveness. To assess the effectiveness and safety of palivizumab prophylaxis compared with placebo, or another type of prophylaxis, in reducing the risk of complications (hospitalisation due to RSV infection) in high-risk infants and children. To assess the cost-effectiveness (or cost-utility) of palivizumab prophylaxis compared with no prophylaxis in infants and children in different risk groups. We searched CENTRAL 2012, Issue 7, MEDLINE (1996 to July week 4, 2012), EMBASE (1996 to August 2012), CINAHL (1996 to August 2012) and LILACS (1996 to August 2012) for studies of effectiveness and safety. We searched the NHS Economic Evaluations Database (NHS EED 2012, Issue 4), Health Economics Evaluations Database (HEED, 9 August 2012) and Paediatric Economic Database Evaluations (PEDE, 1980 to 2009), MEDLINE (1996 to July week 4, 2012) and EMBASE (1996 to August 2012) for economic evaluations. We included RCTs comparing palivizumab prophylaxis with a placebo, no prophylaxis or another type of prophylaxis in preventing serious lower respiratory tract disease caused by RSV in paediatric patients at high risk. We included cost-effectiveness analyses and cost-utility analyses comparing palivizumab prophylaxis with no prophylaxis. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias for the included studies and extracted data for both the RCTs and EEs. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) and their associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dichotomous outcomes and for

  7. The Role of School Libraries in Reducing Learning Disadvantages in Migrant Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Kleijnen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The educational achievement of children from non-Western migrant families in the Netherlands and other Western countries lags behind that of natives, especially when it comes to language proficiency and reading ability. This literature review pinpoints what is known and what is as yet unknown about reducing learning disadvantages through school libraries to point to directions for future research. A considerable body of research has shown that school libraries are positively related to learning outcomes in children, as well as to their reading behavior and attitude toward reading, factors that correlate positively with reading and language skills. However, on the basis of existing research, it is hard to draw firm conclusions about the effect of school libraries on students from migrant families in particular. This article indicates that future research should explicitly focus on the impact of school libraries’ reading promotion efforts on the reading behavior, attitude toward reading, and reading and language skills of migrant students, leading to more effective educational policies.

  8. Reducing iron deficiency anemia in Bolivian school children: calcium and iron combined versus iron supplementation alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Melissa; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Pizarro, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of combined calcium and iron versus single iron supplementation on iron status in Bolivian schoolchildren. Children ages 6 to 10 y old (N = 195), were randomly assigned to receive either 700 mg Ca (as calcium carbonate) plus 30 mg Fe (as ferrous sulfate) (Ca + Fe group) or 30 mg Fe (as ferrous sulfate) (Fe group). The doses were administered daily, from Monday to Friday, between meals at school over 3 mo. Iron status was assessed at baseline and after intervention. Additionally, overall nutritional status was assessed by anthropometry and an estimation of dietary intake. At baseline, the prevalence of anemia in the Ca + Fe group and the Fe group were 15% and 21.5%, respectively. After 3 mo follow-up, the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia dropped significantly (P Iron dietary intake was within recommended levels, but calcium intake only covered 39% of the Recommended Daily Intake. Combined calcium and iron supplementation is equally as effective as single iron supplementation in reducing the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in Bolivian school children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reducing Sex Differences in Children's Empathy for Animals through a Training Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angantyr, Malin; Hansen, Eric M.; Eklund, Jakob Håkansson; Malm, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Humane education programs designed to increase children's empathy for animals are becoming more common. A quasi-experiment tested the effectiveness of one such program by comparing 80 children who had completed the program with a control group of 57 children who had not. The children read a story involving an injured dog and rated the degree of…

  10. Reducing Sex Differences in Children's Empathy for Animals through a Training Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angantyr, Malin; Hansen, Eric M.; Eklund, Jakob Håkansson; Malm, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Humane education programs designed to increase children's empathy for animals are becoming more common. A quasi-experiment tested the effectiveness of one such program by comparing 80 children who had completed the program with a control group of 57 children who had not. The children read a story involving an injured dog and rated the degree of…

  11. Effects of 'Context-Optimization' on the acquisition of grammatical case in children with specific language impairment: an experimental evaluation in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motsch, Hans-Joachim; Riehemann, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    Disorders in the acquisition of morphological agreement phenomena, e.g. case marking, are characteristic of German children with specific language impairment (SLI). Although the success of individual therapy has already been documented, there are general doubts about the success of grammar facilitation in the classroom. To investigate whether children with SLI, who were trained with the new program 'Context-Optimization' during classes, achieved significant improvements in the acquisition of case and whether this therapeutic approach was more effective than the traditional methods used in a control group. Forty-five classes of 19 special language schools participated in the study. Within 12 weeks the experimental group, consisting of 63 children, received 12 hours of therapy during their lessons. The therapeutic measures were implemented directly by their class teachers, who are additionally qualified as school speech and language pathologists. The case marking skills of the 63 children constituting the control group were also trained during classes or within individual or group therapy, although their teachers used other methods than Context-Optimization. The experimental group participants increased their case-marking skills significantly, even after a short-term intervention, and these effects remained stable. It is evident that their improvements were independent of any risk factors such as deficits in the perception and processing of language, problems in gender agreement and bilingualism. Context-Optimization therapy in the classroom is effective for both accusative and dative, the prominent therapy goal, while traditional methods are only effective for accusative. A critical analysis of the data reveals two important implications for future interventions: (1) the reduction of language material to ensure proper use of gender during therapy sequences; and (2) the adaptation of therapeutic steps to the learning tempo of the pupils.

  12. 少儿英语课堂教学策略%Strategies of English Classroom Teaching of Children in Primary Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓娜

    2013-01-01

      在少儿英语教学中,教师往往忽视少儿的学习特征,产生领人担忧的后果。该文从分析少儿生理和心理特征与英语学习的关系着手,从四个方面给读者展示了少儿英语课堂教学策略,包括:营造氛围,启发策略,情感策略,设计教学活动,同时分析了一些具体的教学方法及他们的特点。这些方法与课堂教学和日常生活紧密联系。文章结尾部分作者总结了少儿英语课堂教学策略的重要性与功能,并且希望少儿英语教育者能从中受益。%  In the English teaching for children, teachers sometimes ignore children’s learning characteristics, which cause an un⁃pleasant result for children. This thesis attempts to introduce the strategies of classroom teaching of English in primary education. On the basis of an analysis of the relationship between children’s physiological and psychological characteristics and English learn⁃ing, this paper is devoted to illustrate the four most important strategies in terms of enlivening atmosphere, enlightenment, emotion and designing teaching process, along with their own methods and characteristics and connections with the vivid classroom scenari⁃os and daily life respectively. The author also sums up the importance and function of strategies in classroom teaching of English, and hopes English teachers in primary school can benefit from the strategies.

  13. The effects of fixed-time reinforcement schedules on problem behavior of children with emotional and behavioral disorders in a day-treatment classroom setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Karina; O'Neill, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    The current study assessed the effects of fixed-time reinforcement schedules on problem behavior of students with emotional-behavioral disorders in a clinical day-treatment classroom setting. Three elementary-aged students with a variety of emotional and behavioral problems participated in the study. Initial functional assessments indicated that social attention was the maintaining reinforcer for their verbally disruptive behavior. Baseline phases were alternated with phases in which attention was provided on fixed-time schedules in the context of an ABAB design. The results indicated that the provision of attention on fixed-time schedules substantially reduced the participants' rate of verbal disruptions. These decreases were maintained during initial thinning of the schedules. The results provide one of the first examples that such an intervention can be successfully implemented in a classroom setting.

  14. Does the Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Training programme have positive effects for young children exhibiting severe externalizing problems in school?: a quasi-experimental pre-post study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bente Kirkhaug

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young children exhibiting severe externalizing problems in school are at risk of developing several poor outcomes. School-based intervention programs have been found to be effective for students with different problems, including those with behavioral problems, emotional distress, or social problems. The present study investigated whether the IY-TCM programme, as a universal stand-alone school intervention programme, reduced severe child externalizing problems as reported by the teacher, and evaluated if these children improved their social competence, internalizing problems, academic performances and student- teacher relationship as a result of the IY TCM training. Methods A quasi-experimental pre-post study was conducted, including 21 intervention schools and 22 control schools. Children in 1st – 3rd grade (age 6–8 years assessed by their teacher as having severe externalizing problems on the Sutter–Eyberg Student Behavior Inventory-Revised (SESBI-R total Intensity score, were included in the study, N = 83 (65 boys and 18 girls. Treatment effects were evaluated using 3- level linear mixed models analysis. Results In our study we found no differences in change between the two conditions from baseline to follow-up in externalizing problems, social skills, internalizing problems and closeness with teacher. The intervention condition did however show advantageous development in terms of student-teacher conflicts and increased academic performances. Conclusion The IY Teacher Classroom Management program is not sufficient being a stand-alone universal program in a Norwegian primary school setting, for students with severe externalizing problems. However; some important secondary findings were found. Still, young school children with severe externalizing problems are in need of more comprehensive and tailored interventions.

  15. Does the Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Training programme have positive effects for young children exhibiting severe externalizing problems in school?: a quasi-experimental pre-post study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkhaug, Bente; Drugli, May Britt; Handegård, Bjørn Helge; Lydersen, Stian; Åsheim, Merethe; Fossum, Sturla

    2016-10-26

    Young children exhibiting severe externalizing problems in school are at risk of developing several poor outcomes. School-based intervention programs have been found to be effective for students with different problems, including those with behavioral problems, emotional distress, or social problems. The present study investigated whether the IY-TCM programme, as a universal stand-alone school intervention programme, reduced severe child externalizing problems as reported by the teacher, and evaluated if these children improved their social competence, internalizing problems, academic performances and student- teacher relationship as a result of the IY TCM training. A quasi-experimental pre-post study was conducted, including 21 intervention schools and 22 control schools. Children in 1(st) - 3(rd) grade (age 6-8 years) assessed by their teacher as having severe externalizing problems on the Sutter-Eyberg Student Behavior Inventory-Revised (SESBI-R) total Intensity score, were included in the study, N = 83 (65 boys and 18 girls). Treatment effects were evaluated using 3- level linear mixed models analysis. In our study we found no differences in change between the two conditions from baseline to follow-up in externalizing problems, social skills, internalizing problems and closeness with teacher. The intervention condition did however show advantageous development in terms of student-teacher conflicts and increased academic performances. The IY Teacher Classroom Management program is not sufficient being a stand-alone universal program in a Norwegian primary school setting, for students with severe externalizing problems. However; some important secondary findings were found. Still, young school children with severe externalizing problems are in need of more comprehensive and tailored interventions.

  16. Multiple micronutrients in powder delivered through primary health care reduce iron and vitamin A deficiencies in young Amazonian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cristieli Sm; Sampaio, Patrícia; Muniz, Pascoal T; Cardoso, Marly A

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of home fortification with multiple micronutrient powder (MNP) on anaemia and micronutrient status of young Amazonian children. A pragmatic controlled trial was performed. A control group (CG) of children aged 11-14 months was recruited in the routine of primary health-care centres for assessing anaemia and micronutrient status. At the same time, an intervention group (IG) of infants aged 6-8 months was recruited in the same health centres to receive MNP daily in complementary feeding for 2 months. The IG children were assessed 4-6 months after enrolment (n 112) when they had reached the age of the CG participants (n 128) for comparisons. Primary health centres in Rio Branco city, Brazilian Amazon. A total of 240 children ageddeficiency (VAD; serum retinol complementary feeding delivered through primary health care was effective in reducing iron and vitamin A deficiencies among young Amazonian children.

  17. Examination of the Psychometric Properties of the Children's Loneliness Scale for Students with and without Special Needs in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekinarslan, Ilknur Cifci; Kucuker, Sevgi

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of loneliness in children, especially children with special needs who are at greater risk for loneliness, is crucial for planning appropriate interventions. A review of studies regarding the assessment of loneliness in children reveals the Children's Loneliness Scale (CLS) is commonly used in other cultures whereas information…

  18. Reducing disease burden and health inequalities arising from chronic disease among Indigenous children: an early childhood caries intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Merrick Jessica; Chong Alwin; Parker Eleanor; Roberts-Thomson Kaye; Misan Gary; Spencer John; Broughton John; Lawrence Herenia; Jamieson Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background This study seeks to determine if implementing a culturally-appropriate early childhood caries (ECC) intervention reduces dental disease burden and oral health inequalities among Indigenous children living in South Australia, Australia. Methods/Design This paper describes the study protocol for a randomised controlled trial conducted among Indigenous children living in South Australia with an anticipated sample of 400. The ECC intervention consists of four components: (1) p...

  19. Reducing Maladaptive Behaviors in Preschool-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Using the Early Start Denver Model

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, Elizabeth,; Eapen, Valsamma; Črnčec, Rudi; Walter, Amelia; Rogers, Sally

    2014-01-01

    The presence of maladaptive behaviors in young people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can significantly limit engagement in treatment programs, as well as compromise future educational and vocational opportunities. This study aimed to explore whether the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM) treatment approach reduced maladaptive behaviors in preschool-aged children with ASD in a community-based long day care setting. The level of maladaptive behavior of 38 children with ASD was rated using an ...

  20. Reducing maladaptive behaviors in preschool-aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorder using the Early Start Denver Model

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth eFulton; Valsamma eEapen; Rudi eČrnčec; Amelia eWalter; Sally eRogers

    2014-01-01

    The presence of maladaptive behaviors in young people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) can significantly limit engagement in treatment programs, as well as compromise future educational and vocational opportunities. This study aimed to explore whether the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM) treatment approach reduced maladaptive behaviors in preschool-aged children with ASD in a community-based long day care setting. The level of maladaptive behavior of 38 children with ASD was rated using an ...

  1. Clinical Study of Gushen Tablet(固肾片) in Reducing Children's Nephrotic Syndrome Relapse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    云鹰; 高雅; 马玉宏; 刘望乐; 赵蒙; 高智铭

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of Gushen tablet (固肾片, GST) in reducing the relapse of children′s nephrotic syndrome and the possible mechanism of drugs used. Methods: Fifty children with primary nephrotic syndrome who had been induced and alleviated with regular glucocorticoid (GC) were randomly divided into two groups: the GST group used GST and standard middle-long term course of GC,and the control group adopted standard middle-long term course of GC and immunoinhibitory or immunomodulatory agents for treatment. The 0.5, 1 and 2 years after the treatment the relapse episodes, time for urinary protein negative conversion after relapse, the episodes of patienfs infection and relapse after infection were evaluated. Before and after treatment the plasma cortisol and T lymphocyte subpopulation were determined. Results: The relapse rate of GST group: the rates after 0.5, 1, 2 years were 20.0 %, 30.0 %and 40.9%, and the frequent relapse rate were 0, 6.7% and 9.2% respectively, which were lower than those of control group (60.0%, 70. 0%, 69.2% and 25.0%, 15.0%, 15.4% respectively) ; in the GST group no relapse occurred within 0. 5 year, the relapse rate after 1 and 2 years reduced by 40. 0% and 28.3%, compared with those of the control group (all P<0.05) ; during the observation period, the mean infection/every child patient was 1.86 episodes in GST group, after infection the nephrotic relapse rate was 28. 3%, which was lower than that of the control group (2.25 episodes, 71. 1%, P<0. 05); the relapse per patient in GST group was 0.8 episodes, time for urinary protein negative conversion was 12.00±8.98 days, lower than those of control group (1.6 episodes, 20.75±11.95 days, P<0.05) ; 3 months after GST treatment the plasma cortisol level normalized, and the CD4/CD8 ratio elevated (P<0. 05). Conclusion: GST could possibly reduce the relapse of children nephrosis, and the frequent relapse and relapse episodes, and the time for post-relaptic urinary

  2. Iron supplementation reduces the frequency and severity of breath-holding attacks in non-anaemic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Zehetner

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron supplementation reduces the frequency and severity of breath-holding attacks (BHAs, particularly in children with iron deficiency. The issue of iron supplementation is less clear for Westernized children with BHAs who present to an outpatient community clinic and are not iron-deficient. This is the first reported case series of iron-replete children with frequent and disabling breath-holding attacks who have responded to a course of oral iron supplementation. This intervention is safe, improves quality of life for both child and carer, and is significantly cost-effective in terms of health resource utilization.

  3. The Migrant Paradox in Children and the Role of Schools in Reducing Health Disparities: A Cross-Sectional Study of Migrant and Native Children in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ying; Wang, Yanling; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Yan; Chang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Migrants usually exhibit similar or better health outcomes than native-born populations despite facing socioeconomic disadvantages and barriers to healthcare use; this is known as the "migrant paradox." The migrant paradox among children is highly complex. This study explores whether the migrant paradox exists in the health of internal migrant children in China and the role of schools in reducing children's health disparities, using a multi-stage stratified cluster sampling method. Participants were 1,641 student and parent pairs from Grades 4, 5, and 6 of eight primary schools in Beijing. The following school types were included: state schools with migrant children comprising over 70% of total children (SMS), private schools with migrant children comprising over 70% (PMS), and state schools with permanent resident children comprising over 70% (SRS). Children were divided into Groups A, B, C or D by the type of school they attended (A and B were drawn from SRSs, C was from SMSs, and D was from PMSs) and whether they were in the migrant population (B, C, and D were, but A was not). Related information was collected through medical examination and questionnaires completed by parents and children. Prevalence of caries, overweight and obesity, poor vision, and self-reported incidence of colds and diarrhea in the previous month were explored as health outcomes. The results partially demonstrated the existence of the migrant paradox and verified the role of schools in lowering health disparities among children; there are theoretical and practical implications for improving the health of migrant children.

  4. The Migrant Paradox in Children and the Role of Schools in Reducing Health Disparities: A Cross-Sectional Study of Migrant and Native Children in Beijing, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Ji

    Full Text Available Migrants usually exhibit similar or better health outcomes than native-born populations despite facing socioeconomic disadvantages and barriers to healthcare use; this is known as the "migrant paradox." The migrant paradox among children is highly complex. This study explores whether the migrant paradox exists in the health of internal migrant children in China and the role of schools in reducing children's health disparities, using a multi-stage stratified cluster sampling method. Participants were 1,641 student and parent pairs from Grades 4, 5, and 6 of eight primary schools in Beijing. The following school types were included: state schools with migrant children comprising over 70% of total children (SMS, private schools with migrant children comprising over 70% (PMS, and state schools with permanent resident children comprising over 70% (SRS. Children were divided into Groups A, B, C or D by the type of school they attended (A and B were drawn from SRSs, C was from SMSs, and D was from PMSs and whether they were in the migrant population (B, C, and D were, but A was not. Related information was collected through medical examination and questionnaires completed by parents and children. Prevalence of caries, overweight and obesity, poor vision, and self-reported incidence of colds and diarrhea in the previous month were explored as health outcomes. The results partially demonstrated the existence of the migrant paradox and verified the role of schools in lowering health disparities among children; there are theoretical and practical implications for improving the health of migrant children.

  5. Relation between language experiences in preschool classrooms and children's kindergarten and fourth-grade language and reading abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, David K; Porche, Michelle V

    2011-01-01

    Indirect effects of preschool classroom indexes of teacher talk were tested on fourth-grade outcomes for 57 students from low-income families in a longitudinal study of classroom and home influences on reading. Detailed observations and audiotaped teacher and child language data were coded to measure content and quantity of verbal interactions in preschool classrooms. Preschool teachers' use of sophisticated vocabulary during free play predicted fourth-grade reading comprehension and word recognition (mean age=9; 7), with effects mediated by kindergarten child language measures (mean age=5; 6). In large group preschool settings, teachers' attention-getting utterances were directly related to later comprehension. Preschool teachers' correcting utterances and analytic talk about books, and early support in the home for literacy predicted fourth-grade vocabulary, as mediated by kindergarten receptive vocabulary.

  6. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Intake Modifies Preschool Children's Intestinal Microbiota, Alleviates Penicillin-Associated Changes, and Reduces Antibiotic Use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Korpela

    Full Text Available Antibiotic use is considered among the most severe causes of disturbance to children's developing intestinal microbiota, and frequently causes adverse gastrointestinal effects ranging from mild and transient diarrhoea to life-threatening infections. Probiotics are commonly advocated to help in preventing antibiotic-associated gastrointestinal symptoms. However, it is currently unknown whether probiotics alleviate the antibiotic-associated changes in children's microbiota. Furthermore, it is not known how long-term probiotic consumption influences the developing microbiota of children. We analysed the influence of long-term Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG intake on preschool children's antibiotic use, and antibiotic-associated gastrointestinal complaints in a double blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial with 231 children aged 2-7. In addition, we analysed the effect of L. rhanmosus GG on the intestinal microbiota in a subset of 88 children. The results show that long-term L. rhamnosus GG supplementation has an influence on the composition of the intestinal microbiota in children, causing an increase in the abundance of Prevotella, Lactococcus, and Ruminococcus, and a decrease in Escherichia. The treatment appeared to prevent some of the changes in the microbiota associated with penicillin use, but not those associated with macrolide use. The treatment, however, did reduce the frequency of gastrointestinal complaints after a macrolide course. Finally, the treatment appeared to prevent certain bacterial infections for up to 3 years after the trial, as indicated by reduced antibiotic use.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01014676.

  7. Singing Smoothes Classroom Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Just as humming a merry tune helped Snow White and her furry animal friends to quickly clean a filthy cottage in the movie "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (Disney & Cottrell, 1937), singing can be an effective way to help keep young children fully engaged during classroom transitions. The purposes of this article are to: (1) consider why…

  8. The Classroom Traffic Jam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Arthur W.

    1977-01-01

    The importance of energy conservation is developed in this simulation. Children draw an automobile and then are asked to drive it through the classroom roadways. When a traffic jam results, students offer ways to eliminate it. The importance of mass transportation and car pools is stressed by the teacher. (MA)

  9. Reduced levels of mercury in first baby haircuts of autistic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Amy S; Blaxill, Mark F; Haley, Boyd E

    2003-01-01

    Reported rates of autism have increased sharply in the United States and the United Kingdom. One possible factor underlying these increases is increased exposure to mercury through thimerosal-containing vaccines, but vaccine exposures need to be evaluated in the context of cumulative exposures during gestation and early infancy. Differential rates of postnatal mercury elimination may explain why similar gestational and infant exposures produce variable neurological effects. First baby haircut samples were obtained from 94 children diagnosed with autism using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM IV) criteria and 45 age- and gender-matched controls. Information on diet, dental amalgam fillings, vaccine history, Rho D immunoglobulin administration, and autism symptom severity was collected through a maternal survey questionnaire and clinical observation. Hair mercury levels in the autistic group were 0.47 ppm versus 3.63 ppm in controls, a significant difference. The mothers in the autistic group had significantly higher levels of mercury exposure through Rho D immunoglobulin injections and amalgam fillings than control mothers. Within the autistic group, hair mercury levels varied significantly across mildly, moderately, and severely autistic children, with mean group levels of 0.79, 0.46, and 0.21 ppm, respectively. Hair mercury levels among controls were significantly correlated with the number of the mothers' amalgam fillings and their fish consumption as well as exposure to mercury through childhood vaccines, correlations that were absent in the autistic group. Hair excretion patterns among autistic infants were significantly reduced relative to control. These data cast doubt on the efficacy of traditional hair analysis as a measure of total mercury exposure in a subset of the population. In light of the biological plausibility of mercury's role in neurodevelopmental disorders, the present study provides further insight into one

  10. Reduced visual cortex grey matter volume in children and adolescents with reactive attachment disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Koji; Takiguchi, Shinichiro; Mizushima, Sakae; Fujisawa, Takashi X; Saito, Daisuke N; Kosaka, Hirotaka; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Tomoda, Akemi

    2015-01-01

    Child maltreatment increases the risk for psychiatric disorders throughout childhood and into adulthood. One negative outcome of child maltreatment can be a disorder of emotional functioning, reactive attachment disorder (RAD), where the child displays wary, watchful, and emotionally withdrawn behaviours. Despite its clinical importance, little is known about the potential neurobiological consequences of RAD. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether RAD was associated with alterations in grey matter volume (GMV). High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging datasets were obtained for children and adolescents with RAD (n = 21; mean age = 12.76 years) and typically developing (TD) control subjects (n = 22; mean age = 12.95 years). Using a whole-brain voxel-based morphometry approach, structural images were analysed controlling for age, gender, full scale intelligence quotient, and total brain volume. The GMV was significantly reduced by 20.6% in the left primary visual cortex (Brodmann area 17) of the RAD group compared to the TD group (p = .038, family-wise error-corrected cluster level). This GMV reduction was related to an internalising problem measure of the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire. The visual cortex has been viewed as part of the neurocircuit regulating the stress response to emotional visual images. Combined with previous studies of adults with childhood maltreatment, early adverse experience (e.g. sensory deprivation) may affect the development of the primary visual system, reflecting in the size of the visual cortex in children and adolescents with RAD. These visual cortex GMV abnormalities may also be associated with the visual emotion regulation impairments of RAD, leading to an increased risk for later psychopathology.

  11. Reduced visual cortex grey matter volume in children and adolescents with reactive attachment disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Shimada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Child maltreatment increases the risk for psychiatric disorders throughout childhood and into adulthood. One negative outcome of child maltreatment can be a disorder of emotional functioning, reactive attachment disorder (RAD, where the child displays wary, watchful, and emotionally withdrawn behaviours. Despite its clinical importance, little is known about the potential neurobiological consequences of RAD. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether RAD was associated with alterations in grey matter volume (GMV. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging datasets were obtained for children and adolescents with RAD (n = 21; mean age = 12.76 years and typically developing (TD control subjects (n = 22; mean age = 12.95 years. Using a whole-brain voxel-based morphometry approach, structural images were analysed controlling for age, gender, full scale intelligence quotient, and total brain volume. The GMV was significantly reduced by 20.6% in the left primary visual cortex (Brodmann area 17 of the RAD group compared to the TD group (p = .038, family-wise error-corrected cluster level. This GMV reduction was related to an internalising problem measure of the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire. The visual cortex has been viewed as part of the neurocircuit regulating the stress response to emotional visual images. Combined with previous studies of adults with childhood maltreatment, early adverse experience (e.g. sensory deprivation may affect the development of the primary visual system, reflecting in the size of the visual cortex in children and adolescents with RAD. These visual cortex GMV abnormalities may also be associated with the visual emotion regulation impairments of RAD, leading to an increased risk for later psychopathology.

  12. MODEL2TALK: An Intervention to Promote Productive Classroom Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Chiel; van der Wilt, Femke; van Kruistum, Claudia; van Oers, Bert; Michaels, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the MODEL2TALK intervention, which aims to promote young children's oral communicative competence through productive classroom talk. Productive classroom talk provides children in early childhood education with many opportunities to talk and think together. Results from a large-scale study show that productive classroom talk…

  13. Reduced short term adaptation to robot generated dynamic environment in children affected by Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Rosa Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that healthy adults can quickly adapt to a novel dynamic environment, generated by a robotic manipulandum as a structured disturbing force field. We suggest that it may be of clinical interest to evaluate to which extent this kind of motor learning capability is impaired in children affected by cerebal palsy. Methods We adapted the protocol already used with adults, which employs a velocity dependant viscous field, and compared the performance of a group of subjects affected by Cerebral Palsy (CP group, 7 subjects with a Control group of unimpaired age-matched children. The protocol included a familiarization phase (FA, during which no force was applied, a force field adaptation phase (CF, and a wash-out phase (WO in which the field was removed. During the CF phase the field was shut down in a number of randomly selected "catch" trials, which were used in order to evaluate the "learning index" for each single subject and the two groups. Lateral deviation, speed and acceleration peaks and average speed were evaluated for each trajectory; a directional analysis was performed in order to inspect the role of the limb's inertial anisotropy in the different experimental phases. Results During the FA phase the movements of the CP subjects were more curved, displaying greater and variable directional error; over the course of the CF phase both groups showed a decreasing trend in the lateral error and an after-effect at the beginning of the wash-out, but the CP group had a non significant adaptation rate and a lower learning index, suggesting that CP subjects have reduced ability to learn to compensate external force. Moreover, a directional analysis of trajectories confirms that the control group is able to better predict the force field by tuning the kinematic features of the movements along different directions in order to account for the inertial anisotropy of arm. Conclusions Spatial abnormalities in children affected

  14. Reduced short term adaptation to robot generated dynamic environment in children affected by Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background It is known that healthy adults can quickly adapt to a novel dynamic environment, generated by a robotic manipulandum as a structured disturbing force field. We suggest that it may be of clinical interest to evaluate to which extent this kind of motor learning capability is impaired in children affected by cerebal palsy. Methods We adapted the protocol already used with adults, which employs a velocity dependant viscous field, and compared the performance of a group of subjects affected by Cerebral Palsy (CP group, 7 subjects) with a Control group of unimpaired age-matched children. The protocol included a familiarization phase (FA), during which no force was applied, a force field adaptation phase (CF), and a wash-out phase (WO) in which the field was removed. During the CF phase the field was shut down in a number of randomly selected "catch" trials, which were used in order to evaluate the "learning index" for each single subject and the two groups. Lateral deviation, speed and acceleration peaks and average speed were evaluated for each trajectory; a directional analysis was performed in order to inspect the role of the limb's inertial anisotropy in the different experimental phases. Results During the FA phase the movements of the CP subjects were more curved, displaying greater and variable directional error; over the course of the CF phase both groups showed a decreasing trend in the lateral error and an after-effect at the beginning of the wash-out, but the CP group had a non significant adaptation rate and a lower learning index, suggesting that CP subjects have reduced ability to learn to compensate external force. Moreover, a directional analysis of trajectories confirms that the control group is able to better predict the force field by tuning the kinematic features of the movements along different directions in order to account for the inertial anisotropy of arm. Conclusions Spatial abnormalities in children affected by cerebral palsy may be

  15. Reduced short term adaptation to robot generated dynamic environment in children affected by Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masia, Lorenzo; Frascarelli, Flaminia; Morasso, Pietro; Di Rosa, Giuseppe; Petrarca, Maurizio; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo

    2011-05-21

    It is known that healthy adults can quickly adapt to a novel dynamic environment, generated by a robotic manipulandum as a structured disturbing force field. We suggest that it may be of clinical interest to evaluate to which extent this kind of motor learning capability is impaired in children affected by cerebal palsy. We adapted the protocol already used with adults, which employs a velocity dependant viscous field, and compared the performance of a group of subjects affected by Cerebral Palsy (CP group, 7 subjects) with a Control group of unimpaired age-matched children. The protocol included a familiarization phase (FA), during which no force was applied, a force field adaptation phase (CF), and a wash-out phase (WO) in which the field was removed. During the CF phase the field was shut down in a number of randomly selected "catch" trials, which were used in order to evaluate the "learning index" for each single subject and the two groups. Lateral deviation, speed and acceleration peaks and average speed were evaluated for each trajectory; a directional analysis was performed in order to inspect the role of the limb's inertial anisotropy in the different experimental phases. During the FA phase the movements of the CP subjects were more curved, displaying greater and variable directional error; over the course of the CF phase both groups showed a decreasing trend in the lateral error and an after-effect at the beginning of the wash-out, but the CP group had a non significant adaptation rate and a lower learning index, suggesting that CP subjects have reduced ability to learn to compensate external force. Moreover, a directional analysis of trajectories confirms that the control group is able to better predict the force field by tuning the kinematic features of the movements along different directions in order to account for the inertial anisotropy of arm. Spatial abnormalities in children affected by cerebral palsy may be related not only to disturbance in

  16. Brief oral health promotion intervention among parents of young children to reduce early childhood dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrow, Peter; Raheb, Joseph; Miller, Margaret

    2013-03-20

    Severe untreated dental decay affects a child's growth, body weight, quality of life as well as cognitive development, and the effects extend beyond the child to the family, the community and the health care system. Early health behavioural factors, including dietary practices and eating patterns, can play a major role in the initiation and development of oral diseases, particularly dental caries. The parent/caregiver, usually the mother, has a critical role in the adoption of protective health care behaviours and parental feeding practices strongly influence children's eating behaviours. This study will test if an early oral health promotion intervention through the use of brief motivational interviewing (MI) and anticipatory guidance (AG) approaches can reduce the incidence of early childhood dental decay and obesity. The study will be a randomised controlled study with parents and their new-born child/ren who are seen at 6-12 weeks of age by a child/community health nurse. Consenting parents will complete a questionnaire on oral health knowledge, behaviours, self-efficacy, oral health fatalism, parenting stress, prenatal and peri-natal health and socio-demographic factors at study commencement and at 12 and 36 months. Each child-parent pair will be allocated to an intervention or a standard care group, using a computer-generated random blocks. The standard group will be managed through the standard early oral health screening program; "lift the lip". The intervention group will be provided with tailored oral health counselling by oral health consultants trained in MI and AG.Participating children will be examined at 24, and 36 months for the occurrence of dental decay and have their height and weight recorded. Dietary information obtained from a food frequency chart will be used to determine food and dietary patterns. Data analysis will use intention to treat and per protocol analysis and will use tests of independent proportions and means. Multivariate

  17. Collaborating with Parents in Using Effective Strategies to Reduce Children's Challenging Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettig, Angel; Schultz, Tia R.; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.

    2013-01-01

    Challenging behavior is often a source of frustration for parents. Challenging behavior is defined as any behavior that interferes with children's learning and development, is harmful to children and to others, and puts a child at risk for later social problems or school failure (Bailey & Wolery, 1992; Kaiser & Rasminsky, 2003). Children's…

  18. Pregnant mothers with resolved anxiety disorders and their offspring have reduced heart rate variability: implications for the health of children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke A K A Braeken

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Active anxiety disorders have lasting detrimental effects on pregnant mothers and their offspring but it is unknown if historical, non-active, maternal anxiety disorders have similar effects. Anxiety-related conditions, such as reduced autonomic cardiac control, indicated by reduced heart rate variability (HRV could persist despite disorder resolution, with long-term health implications for mothers and children. The objective in this study is to test the hypotheses that pregnant mothers with a history of, but not current anxiety and their children have low HRV, predicting anxiety-like offspring temperaments. METHODS: The participants in this case-control study consist of 56 women during their first trimester and their offspring (15 male, 29 female. Women had a history of an anxiety disorder (n=22 or no psychopathology (n=34 determined using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The main outcome measures were indices of autonomic cardiac control including root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD and high frequency (HF variability. Children's fearfulness was also assessed using the Laboratory Temperament Assessment Battery (Lab-TAB-Locomotor Version. RESULTS: HRV was lower in women and children in the past anxiety group compared to controls. HRV measures for mothers and children were positively correlated in the anxiety group only. In all children, low HRV measures at 2-4 months were associated with a higher chance of fearful behavior at 9-10 months. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnant women with previous but not current anxiety and their children have low HRV. Children with low HRV tend to show more fearfulness. These findings have implications for identifying children at risk of anxiety disorders and point to possible underlying mechanisms of child psychopathology.

  19. Project Refresh: Testing the Efficacy of a School-Based Classroom and Cafeteria Intervention in Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hee-Jung; Grutzmacher, Stephanie; Munger, Ash L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a school-based nutrition program using a cafeteria environment intervention and classroom nutrition education on self-reported fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption, self-efficacy to select FV, and preference for healthy foods. Methods: Using quasi-experimental pre-post design with 3…

  20. Self-Care in the Classroom for Children with Chronic Illness: A Case Study of a Student with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Julie Elizabeth Jonson

    1994-01-01

    Describes the essential self-care of an eight-year old second-grade student. This study illustrates a school counselor's use of a multimodal, behavioral intervention to increase the level of self-care in the classroom. Relevant reinforcements, individual and group counseling, and peer support, resulted in improved self-care. (RJM)