WorldWideScience

Sample records for children nutritional status

  1. Nutritional status of children on the National School Nutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. School feeding programmes are intended to alleviate short-term hunger, improve nutrition and cognition of children, and provide incomes to families. Objectives. To assess the nutritional status of children receiving meals provided by the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) in Capricorn Municipality, ...

  2. Nutritional status of children in Alexandra township

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    D. J. Coetzee, P. Ferrinho. A community-based survey of the nutritional status of children aged 12 - 23 months was conducted. A cluster sampling technique was used. The weight and height of. 426 children were measured. Compared with clinic-based growth-monitoring data, which showed that 5,5% of the children were ...

  3. Nutrition Status of HIV+ Children in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnyepi, Maria; Bennink, Maurice R.; Jackson-Malete, Jose; Venkatesh, Sumathi; Malete, Leapetswe; Mokgatlhe, Lucky; Lyoka, Philemon; Anabwani, Gabriel M.; Makhanda, Jerry; Weatherspoon, Lorraine J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Identifying and addressing poor nutritional status in school-aged children is often not prioritized relative to HIV/AIDS treatment. The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the benefits of integrating nutrition (assessment and culturally acceptable food supplement intervention) in the treatment strategy for this target group.…

  4. Nutrition status of children in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Corvalán, C.; Garmendia, M. L.; Jones‐Smith, J.; Lutter, C. K.; Miranda, J. Jaime; Pedraza, L. S.; Popkin, B.M.; Ramirez‐Zea, M.; Salvo, D; Stein, Aryeh D.

    2017-01-01

    Summary The prevalence of overweight and obesity is rapidly increasing among Latin American children, posing challenges for current healthcare systems and increasing the risk for a wide range of diseases. To understand the factors contributing to childhood obesity in Latin America, this paper reviews the current nutrition status and physical activity situation, the disparities between and within countries and the potential challenges for ensuring adequate nutrition and physical activity. Acro...

  5. Nutritional status of underfive children in a pastoral community in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutritional status of underfive children in a pastoral community in Simanjiro District, Tanzania. ... The nutritional status of the children under study was slightly lower than the national average. In conclusion ... a description of the source 250

  6. Nutritional status of children under five years and associated factors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Information on nutritional status of children under five years is an indicator of the nutritional situation in society. Identification of core factors influencing nutrition of this population supports plans to alleviate child malnutrition and its consequences. This study sought to determine the nutritional status of children under five ...

  7. Physical growth and nutritional status assessment of school children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physical growth and nutritional status assessment of school children in Enugu, Nigeria. ... Background: Physical growth of a child is a reflection of its state of nutrition. ... have normal growth with the remainder in both extremes of malnutrition.

  8. Nutritional status of HIV/AIDS orphaned children in households ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although a lot of research has been conducted on the role of good nutrition in mitigating the effects of HIV/AIDS, little is known about the health and nutritional status of HIV/AIDS orphaned children who mostly live with their elderly grand parents. The major objective of this study was therefore to assess the nutritional status of ...

  9. Nutritional status and food intake data on children and adolescents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-15

    Feb 15, 2012 ... Department of Food and Nutrition Consumer Sciences, Durban University of Technology. Oldewage-Theron ... Keywords: nutritional status, food intake data, children, adolescents, residential care facilities. Nutritional status ...... metabolic programming, which results in the conservation of energy. The author ...

  10. Nutrition status of children in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, M. L.; Jones‐Smith, J.; Lutter, C. K.; Miranda, J. J.; Pedraza, L. S.; Popkin, B. M.; Ramirez‐Zea, M.; Salvo, D.; Stein, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Summary The prevalence of overweight and obesity is rapidly increasing among Latin American children, posing challenges for current healthcare systems and increasing the risk for a wide range of diseases. To understand the factors contributing to childhood obesity in Latin America, this paper reviews the current nutrition status and physical activity situation, the disparities between and within countries and the potential challenges for ensuring adequate nutrition and physical activity. Across the region, children face a dual burden of undernutrition and excess weight. While efforts to address undernutrition have made marked improvements, childhood obesity is on the rise as a result of diets that favour energy‐dense, nutrient‐poor foods and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle. Over the last decade, changes in socioeconomic conditions, urbanization, retail foods and public transportation have all contributed to childhood obesity in the region. Additional research and research capacity are needed to address this growing epidemic, particularly with respect to designing, implementing and evaluating the impact of evidence‐based obesity prevention interventions. PMID:28741907

  11. Nutrition status of children in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvalán, C; Garmendia, M L; Jones-Smith, J; Lutter, C K; Miranda, J J; Pedraza, L S; Popkin, B M; Ramirez-Zea, M; Salvo, D; Stein, A D

    2017-07-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity is rapidly increasing among Latin American children, posing challenges for current healthcare systems and increasing the risk for a wide range of diseases. To understand the factors contributing to childhood obesity in Latin America, this paper reviews the current nutrition status and physical activity situation, the disparities between and within countries and the potential challenges for ensuring adequate nutrition and physical activity. Across the region, children face a dual burden of undernutrition and excess weight. While efforts to address undernutrition have made marked improvements, childhood obesity is on the rise as a result of diets that favour energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle. Over the last decade, changes in socioeconomic conditions, urbanization, retail foods and public transportation have all contributed to childhood obesity in the region. Additional research and research capacity are needed to address this growing epidemic, particularly with respect to designing, implementing and evaluating the impact of evidence-based obesity prevention interventions. © 2017 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity.

  12. Assessment of protein nutritional status in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencharz, Paul B

    2008-02-01

    When considering the effects of disease on nutritional status it is useful to think of the body consisting of lean mass and fat mass. The latter relates to energy status and the former to protein nutritional status. In addition, childhood growth in length/height is to a high degree dependent upon having an adequate protein intake. If insufficient non-protein energy is fed, then protein is used to help meet energy needs. Hence achieving an optimum protein nutritional status also requires receiving sufficient energy. Assessment of protein nutritional status starts with measurement of length/height and weight in relationship to growth standards. Next comes using mid-upper arm parameters in which the measurement of muscle area or circumference is a reflection of protein nutritional status while triceps skin-fold thickness is a measurement of energy status. Serum albumin remains the number one short term parameter reflecting protein nutritional status followed by serum transferrin. Plasma amino acid profiles can be measured but are mostly dependent on recent dietary intake and so are hard to interpret. Classically, nitrogen balance has been used as a reflection of dietary protein intake. While it has been used extensively on a research basis its clinical applicability is limited. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Impact of school lunch programmes on nutritional status of children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SLP had a positive significant effect on the nutritional status of participating children. More schools and parents in similar environments should therefore be encouraged to venture into the SLP because of their positive outcome on nutritional status as well as the diet quality of participating children. Key words: School Lunch ...

  14. Nutritional status of children with congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro,Flávia Paula Magalhães; Araujo,Thelma Leite de; Lopes,Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; Chaves,Daniel Bruno Resende; Beltrão,Beatriz Amorim; Costa,Alice Gabrielle de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to characterize nutritional status and variables that predict nutritional changes in children with congenital heart disease. METHOD: a cross-sectional study undertaken in two health institutions between January and June 2009, using a questionnaire with questions about nutrition, applied to 132 children under two years of age who had congenital heart disease. Children who had additional serious illnesses were excluded. RESULT: the predominant percentile values and Z scores were conc...

  15. Nutritional status and food intake data on children and adolescents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-15

    Feb 15, 2012 ... Keywords: nutritional status, food intake data, children, adolescents, residential care facilities .... West province in South Africa on 10-15-year-old school children investigated weight status and determinants of overweight and obesity. It showed that overall, the children ...... Effects of fast-food consumption on.

  16. Nutritional status and HIV in rural South African children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimani-Murage, Elizabeth W; Norris, Shane A; Pettifor, John M; Tollman, Stephen M; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Gómez-Olivé, Xavier F; Dunger, David B; Kahn, Kathleen

    2011-03-25

    Achieving the Millennium Development Goals that aim to reduce malnutrition and child mortality depends in part on the ability of governments/policymakers to address nutritional status of children in general and those infected or affected by HIV/AIDS in particular. This study describes HIV prevalence in children, patterns of malnutrition by HIV status and determinants of nutritional status. The study involved 671 children aged 12-59 months living in the Agincourt sub-district, rural South Africa in 2007. Anthropometric measurements were taken and HIV testing with disclosure was done using two rapid tests. Z-scores were generated using WHO 2006 standards as indicators of nutritional status. Linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted to establish the determinants of child nutritional status. Prevalence of malnutrition, particularly stunting (18%), was high in the overall sample of children. HIV prevalence in this age group was 4.4% (95% CI: 2.79 to 5.97). HIV positive children had significantly poorer nutritional outcomes than their HIV negative counterparts. Besides HIV status, other significant determinants of nutritional outcomes included age of the child, birth weight, maternal age, age of household head, and area of residence. This study documents poor nutritional status among children aged 12-59 months in rural South Africa. HIV is an independent modifiable risk factor for poor nutritional outcomes and makes a significant contribution to nutritional outcomes at the individual level. Early paediatric HIV testing of exposed or at risk children, followed by appropriate health care for infected children, may improve their nutritional status and survival.

  17. Gut microbiomes of Indian children of varying nutritional status

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Gupta, Sourav Sen; Bhattacharya, Tanudeep; Yadav, Deepak; Barik, Anamitra; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Das, Bhabatosh; Mande, Sharmila S; Nair, G Balakrish

    2014-01-01

    .... Consequently, dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in malnutrition. Metagenomics approach was adopted to investigate the gut microbiome sampled from 20 rural Indian children with varying nutritional status...

  18. Nutrition knowledge and nutritional status of primary school children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The respondents showed average nutrition knowledge in the majority of the questions. Conclusions: This study observed malnutrition and average nutrition knowledge, with many gaps relating to aspects, such as the role of the various food groups in the diet and safe hygiene practices. Keywords: primary school children; ...

  19. NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF PRESCHOOL TRIBAL CHILDREN IN NORTH KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu V

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Tribals are one of the most vulnerable groups in India. Under-nutrition and various morbidities go hand in hand, particularly in children. Nutritional status is a sensitive indicator of community health and nutrition. The present study is an attempt to assess the nutritional status of pre-school children of Kozhikode district in Kerala. The objectives of this study were 1. To study the prevalence of malnutrition among the preschool tribal children 2. To study the associated risk factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was a community-based, cross- sectional. Study was carried out in randomly selected 10 panchayaths in Kozhikode. Cluster sampling method was used. Anthropometric measurements were taken. Various indices of nutritional status were expressed in standard deviation units (z scores from the reference median. RESULTS More than half of the children say 57.6% (152/246 had deficits in at least one of the two anthropometric indicators. The prevalence of underweight and stunting was 47.3% and .38.6% respectively. The analysis showed significant associations between under-nutrition and educational status of mother, tribe to which the child belonged, large family size, high birth order and low preschool attendance. CONCLUSION The findings of the present study revealed the widespread prevalence of under-nutrition among pre-school tribal children and highlight a need for an integrated approach towards improving the child health as well as nutritional status in this area.

  20. Nutritional status of preschool children in Novi Sad

    OpenAIRE

    Stupar Dušan; Popović Boris; Vujović Peko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the nutritional status of preschool children (preparatory group - before starting school), aged 6 to 7 years. The survey was conducted in four kindergartens preschool 'Happy Childhood' in Novi Sad, in a sample of 209 children (116 boys and 92 girls). Anthropometric measurements were carried out in October 2012. Based on the results calculated BMI (body mass index (weight (kg) / body height2 (m2)) and determined the degree of nutritional status of each ch...

  1. intestinal parasites and nutritional status on Nigerian children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nutritional status of children with heavy intestinal parasites was studied as compared to children of similar socio-economic background and characteristics with non parasitic infections. The result revealed the fact that the children with heavy intestinal parasites were shorter in heights and lower in weights than non ...

  2. Assessment of nutritional status of preschool children of Gumbrit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... children in rural communities is affected by low family income. To improve nutritional status of children the full implementation of the poverty alleviation programmes should be considered and appropriate measures need to be taken to support needy families with children. The Ethiopian Journal of Health Development Vol.

  3. Complementary feeding practices and nutritional status of children 6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Inappropriate complementary feeding practices among children aged 6-23 months is major cause of under nutrition. There is scarce information on the relationship between complementary feeding practices and nutritional status. This study aimed to determine the factors contributing to the complementary ...

  4. Anthropometrically determined nutritional status of children in public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Under-nutrition remains high while overweight/obesity are on the rise in developing countries. Little is known about the differences in the prevalence of malnutrition among public and private primary school children in urban areas of Lagos, Nigeria. This study determined and compared the nutritional status of ...

  5. Complementary feeding practices and nutritional status of children 6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-01-30

    Jan 30, 2015 ... A nutrition assessment carried out in eastern region of Kenya showed that among the children under five years, 32.2% were stunted, 21.2% were underweight while 4.2% were wasted (KDHS, 2008-09). A lot of effort has been put to promote the maternal, newborn infant and young child nutritional status.

  6. Assessing nutritional status in children with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachel M; Dhawan, Anil

    2005-12-01

    The metabolic changes compounded by anorexia associated with chronic liver disease adversely affect growth in children. In many cases, this requires the administration of artificial nutritional support. It is important in this group of patients that those who are becoming nutritionally depleted are identified quickly and in those receiving artificial nutritional support, the effectiveness is monitored. The current review is an examination of methods available to assess nutritional status. These include anthropometry, methods available in the laboratory and a selection of less commonly used methods undergoing evaluation at research level. A brief discussion accompanies each technique, outlining the limitations of its use in children with chronic liver disease. The review concludes with an outline of how nutritional status should be assessed in this group of children, and suggests further research.

  7. Nutritional status of primary school children in Abbottabad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Saadia; Ayub, Muhammad; Shore, Najla; Tariq, Usman; Zaman, Shakila

    2013-01-01

    In Abbottabad district, with the vast poverty stricken rural majority and 80% literacy rate, primary-level education faces great influx of students. This study was carried out to see the nutritional status of children 5-10 years of age attending primary schools of Abbottabad. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study carried out in June 2009 on 400 schoolchildren of 5-10 years of age from three randomly selected primary schools of Abbottabad. After informed consent by the parents/ teachers, a semi-structured Performa/questionnaire was filled for each child. Anthropometric measurements were recorded. Correlation of age of the child with height, and weight was calculated. The nutritional status of the study children was particularly optimum; 90% children were in optimal nutritional status and had sound skeletal growth irrespective of their socioeconomic background. There was a significant correlation of nutritional status and skeletal growth of children with parents socioeconomic status. There was a direct correlation between height and weight of children, and their age. Anthropometric measurements indicate a high majority of children in healthy status despite the overall poor setup.

  8. intestinal parasites and nutritional status of nigerian children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    5/ Adekunle. Intestinal parasites and nutritional status of children. 117. Table 1: Percentage Distribution of Intestinal Parasites. Found in the Stool Specimen of the Children. No. %. Helminthes. Ascaris lumbricoides. 128. 39.0. Trichuris trichuria. 93. 28.4. Hookworm. 87. 26.5. Strongyloides stercoralis. 4. 1.2. Taenia saginata.

  9. Changes in the Nutritional Status of School Children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of overweight and obesity among children is increasing worldwide with significant health and social consequences. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the current nutritional status and its changes between 1983 and 2006 among school children and adolescents in a South ...

  10. Breastfeeding pattern and nutritional status of children under two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study aims to assess breastfeeding pattern among mothers and nutritional status of children under two years. Methodology: The cross sectional study was carried out in Oshogbo Local Government Area, Osun State. A total of 350 nursing mothers and their children undertwo years were randomly selected ...

  11. Assessment of Nutritional Status in Children from Eastern Sudan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malnutrition is a very important risk factor leading illness and death in children worldwide. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional status and relevant haematological and biochemical parameters in school children. Materials and Methods: Cross sectional study, was conducted in 120 (70 ...

  12. Nutritional status of preschool children in Novi Sad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stupar Dušan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the nutritional status of preschool children (preparatory group - before starting school, aged 6 to 7 years. The survey was conducted in four kindergartens preschool 'Happy Childhood' in Novi Sad, in a sample of 209 children (116 boys and 92 girls. Anthropometric measurements were carried out in October 2012. Based on the results calculated BMI (body mass index (weight (kg / body height2 (m2 and determined the degree of nutritional status of each child. Parameter values of BMI were adjusted by age and gender. Survey results show that 116 boys, 72.41% has an normal weight, under nutrition were 5.17%, while moderate nutritional abnormalities observed at 13.79%, obesity was found in 8.62% boys. The girls have similar results, namely obesity was 9.78%, prone to obesity 7.61%, the optimal weight of 75% and under nutrition 7.61% girls.

  13. Nutritional status of children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Flávia Paula Magalhães; de Araujo, Thelma Leite; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; Chaves, Daniel Bruno Resende; Beltrão, Beatriz Amorim; Costa, Alice Gabrielle de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    to characterize nutritional status and variables that predict nutritional changes in children with congenital heart disease. a cross-sectional study undertaken in two health institutions between January and June 2009, using a questionnaire with questions about nutrition, applied to 132 children under two years of age who had congenital heart disease. Children who had additional serious illnesses were excluded. the predominant percentile values and Z scores were concentrated within the range of normal levels. The Z scores, however, presented negative variations with a deviation to the left. In the analysis of predictive factors, the occurrence of immediate and acute malnutrition was related to a decrease in skinfold thickness (decrease in subscapular skinfold thickness, while immediate malnutrition was related to a high Apgar score. Chronic malnutrition was related to female children with higher ages. it is evidenced that it is necessary to carry out nutritional strategies which improve prognosis, so as to widen the nursing care directed at these children.

  14. Nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, Emine Handan; Güven, Duygu Korkem; Eker, Levent; Elbasan, Bülent; Bülbül, Selda Fatma

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional status, and provide information regarding anthropometric measurements of cerebral-palsied children living in the city of Ankara, Turkey. A total of 447 children with cerebral palsy (CP) were participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were assessed for functional motor impairment by the gross motor function classification system (GMFCS). Assesment of nutritional status was based on the triceps skinfold thickness (TSF), arm fat area (AFA) estimates derived from TSF and mid-upper arm circumference measurements. TSF and AFA Z-scores were computed using reference data. Cerebral-palsied children had lower TSF and AFA Z-scores compared to reference data from healthy children. The prevalence of underweight and overweight among boys was 8.3 and 9.5%, respectively, whereas it was 19.0 and 0.5% for girls. Underweight was more prevalent in the low functioning children than in moderate functioning children. The findings of this study indicate that cerebral-palsied children face nutritional challenges. Underweight is more prevalent than overweight among cerebral-palsied children. To optimize the outcomes of rehabilitation and prevention efforts, an understanding of the heterogeneity of nutritional status among children with CP is required.

  15. [The nutritional status of children in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uglitskikh, A K; Kon', I Ia; Ostreĭkov, I F; Shilina, N M; Smirnov, V F

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the nutritional status of infants in intensive care units (ICU). It shows nutritional trends in 269 children aged 1 month to 15 years, treated in the ICU of a Tushino children's city hospital, Moscow, for brain injury, abdominal surgical diseases, and severe pneumonia. The paper evaluates the physical development of children in the ICU, shows the trends in weight-height, somatometric, laboratory parameters, and balance study data. The values of protein losses and nitrogen balance in children in the postaggression period and their relationship to age and feeding mode (enteral, parenteral-enteral) are shown.

  16. Micronutrient status and its relationship with nutritional status in preschool children in urban Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasinghe, Eshani; Chackrewarthy, Sureka; Abeysena, Chrishantha; Rajindrajith, Shaman

    2015-01-01

    To assess the micronutrient status and its relationship with nutritional status in preschool children. In a cross sectional study, anthropometric data and fasting blood samples were obtained from 340 children attending preschool in urban Sri Lanka. Serum concentrations of vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, vitamin A, zinc and haemoglobin were measured. Z-scores of anthropometric indices of height-for-age, weight-for-age and weight-for-height were computed to evaluate the nutritional status. Prevalence of stunting, underweight, wasting and anaemia among children were 7.1%, 16.9%, 21.2% and 7.4%, respectively. Deficiencies of zinc and vitamin A occurred among 67% and 38% of children, respectively. Vitamin D deficiency (Nutritional status was significantly correlated (pnutritional status of the children was related to vitamin D status and with haemoglobin status. Zinc and vitamin A levels were low in children with severe stunting. Vitamins A, D and zinc levels were associated with haemoglobin status.

  17. Nutritional status and nutritional management in children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, Edward P T; Sullivan, Peter B

    2015-12-01

    Malnutrition is often seen at the point of diagnosis in childhood malignancy or may develop during the course of treatment. Strategies for optimal diagnosis and management of nutritional problems in children with cancer are limited in the published literature. Identification of children who may be malnourished or at nutritional risk can be achieved through improved approaches for risk stratification and classification. Once recognised, various strategies have been demonstrated to reduce malnutrition, minimise side effects of treatment and improve survival. Novel approaches in vivo and adult oncology populations provide future avenues for investigation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Dietary habits and nutritional status of children in preschool age

    OpenAIRE

    Panova, Gordana; Dzidrova, Violeta; Nikolovska, Lence; Sumanov, Gorgi; Jovevska, Svetlana; Panova, Blagica; Panov, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Early childhood is the most important for the overall development of the personality. During this period, each child realizes that it is an independent entity, and it expresses certain requirements, desires, actions, proceedings and behaviour. Our research aims to display nutritional status and degree of obesity among preschool children in the Republic of Macedonia and nutritional quality of their diet. Because of the increasing incidence of obesity in childhood and it...

  19. Health & nutritional status of HIV infected children in Hyderabad, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetha, G Krishna; Hemalatha, R; Prasad, U V; Murali, Vasudev; Damayanti, K; Bhaskar, V

    2015-01-01

    Information on nutritional status of HIV infected children from India is lacking and is required before taking up nutritional supplementation trials. Thus, the aim of the present study was to assess the growth and morbidity status of HIV infected children over a period of one year in a city in southern India. This was an observational study carried out between July 2009 and February 2011, at two orphanages in Hyderabad, India. Seventy seven HIV-positive children aged between 1 and half and 15 years, both on and not on antiretroviral therapy (ART) were included. Nutritional status was assessed longitudinally for one year by weight gain, linear growth and body composition. Serum samples were analyzed for haemoglobin, micronutrients, CD4 and CD8 counts. Dietary intakes were assessed by institutional diet survey and morbidity data were recorded every day for 12 months. Mean energy intakes were less than recommended dietary allowance (RDA) in all age groups. Iron and folate intakes were less than 50 per cent of RDA; 46 (59.7%) children were stunted, 36 (46.8%) were underweight and 15 (19.5%) had low BMI for age. Anaemia was observed in 35 (45.5%) children. Micronutrient deficiencies such as vitamin D (40/77; 51.9%), vitamin A (11/77; 14.3%), folate (37/77; 48.1%), iron (38/77; 49.3%) were widely prevalent. HIV viral load was higher in children not on ART and those with morbidity. Respiratory (36.6%) and dermatological illnesses (18.8%) were the commonest presentations. Acute, chronic malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies were common in HIV infected children, especially in those not on ART and having morbidity. With severe malnutrition being an alarming consequence of HIV, prophylactic nutritive care should be considered for integration into HIV care strategies besides initiation of ART to improve the nutritional status and quality of life of these children.

  20. Health & nutritional status of HIV infected children in Hyderabad, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Krishna Swetha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Information on nutritional status of HIV infected children from India is lacking and is required before taking up nutritional supplementation trials. Thus, the aim of the present study was to assess the growth and morbidity status of HIV infected children over a period of one year in a city in southern India. m0 ethods: This was an observational study carried out between July 2009 and February 2011, at two orphanages in Hyderabad, India. Seventy seven HIV-positive children aged between 1 and half and 15 years, both on and not on antiretroviral therapy (ART were included. Nutritional status was assessed longitudinally for one year by weight gain, linear growth and body composition. Serum samples were analyzed for haemoglobin, micronutrients, CD4 and CD8 counts. Dietary intakes were assessed by institutional diet survey and morbidity data were recorded every day for 12 months. Results: Mean energy intakes were less than recommended dietary allowance (RDA in all age groups. Iron and folate intakes were less than 50 per cent of RDA; 46 (59.7% children were stunted, 36 (46.8% were underweight and 15 (19.5% had low BMI for age. Anaemia was observed in 35 (45.5% children. Micronutrient deficiencies such as vitamin D (40/77; 51.9%, vitamin A (11/77; 14.3%, folate (37/77; 48.1%, iron (38/77; 49.3% were widely prevalent. HIV viral load was higher in children not on ART and those with morbidity. Respiratory (36.6% and dermatological illnesses (18.8% were the commonest presentations. Interpretation &conclusions: Acute, chronic malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies were common in HIV infected children, especially in those not on ART and having morbidity. With severe malnutrition being an alarming consequence of HIV, prophylactic nutritive care should be considered for integration into HIV care strategies besides initiation of ART to improve the nutritional status and quality of life of these children.

  1. Gut microbiomes of Indian children of varying nutritional status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarini Shankar Ghosh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malnutrition is a global health problem affecting more than 300 million pre-school children worldwide. It is one of the major health concerns in India since around 50% of children below the age of two suffer from various forms of malnutrition. The gut microbiome plays an important role in nutrient pre-processing, assimilation and energy harvest from food. Consequently, dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in malnutrition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Metagenomics approach was adopted to investigate the gut microbiome sampled from 20 rural Indian children with varying nutritional status. The changes in the abundances of various taxonomic and functional groups were investigated across these gut microbiomes. A core set of 23 genera were observed across samples, with some showing differential abundances with varying nutritional status. One of the findings of the current study is the positive/negative associations of specific taxonomic and functional groups with the nutritional status of the children. Notable alterations in the architecture of the inter-microbial co-occurrence networks were also observed with changes in nutritional status. A key example is the clustering of potentially pathogenic groups into a distinct hub in severely malnourished gut. Our data does not demonstrate causality with the microbiome patterns that we observed, rather a description of some interesting patterns, whose underlying mechanism remains to be uncovered. CONCLUSIONS: The present study envisioned interrelationships between the pattern of gut microbiome and the nutritional status of children. The cause of this pattern needs to be explored. However, insights obtained from the present study form the basis for further metagenomic investigations on larger population of children. Results of such studies will be useful in identifying the key microbial groups that can be utilized for targeted therapeutic interventions for managing severe acute

  2. Gut microbiomes of Indian children of varying nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Gupta, Sourav Sen; Bhattacharya, Tanudeep; Yadav, Deepak; Barik, Anamitra; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Das, Bhabatosh; Mande, Sharmila S; Nair, G Balakrish

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition is a global health problem affecting more than 300 million pre-school children worldwide. It is one of the major health concerns in India since around 50% of children below the age of two suffer from various forms of malnutrition. The gut microbiome plays an important role in nutrient pre-processing, assimilation and energy harvest from food. Consequently, dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in malnutrition. Metagenomics approach was adopted to investigate the gut microbiome sampled from 20 rural Indian children with varying nutritional status. The changes in the abundances of various taxonomic and functional groups were investigated across these gut microbiomes. A core set of 23 genera were observed across samples, with some showing differential abundances with varying nutritional status. One of the findings of the current study is the positive/negative associations of specific taxonomic and functional groups with the nutritional status of the children. Notable alterations in the architecture of the inter-microbial co-occurrence networks were also observed with changes in nutritional status. A key example is the clustering of potentially pathogenic groups into a distinct hub in severely malnourished gut. Our data does not demonstrate causality with the microbiome patterns that we observed, rather a description of some interesting patterns, whose underlying mechanism remains to be uncovered. The present study envisioned interrelationships between the pattern of gut microbiome and the nutritional status of children. The cause of this pattern needs to be explored. However, insights obtained from the present study form the basis for further metagenomic investigations on larger population of children. Results of such studies will be useful in identifying the key microbial groups that can be utilized for targeted therapeutic interventions for managing severe acute malnutrition.

  3. Determinants of Nutritional Status in Children living in Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Shafieian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children are one of the most vulnerable groups to sub-optimal nutritional intake in most societies. We have investigated some of the potential determinants of malnutrition in children of 2-5 years of age.   Methods and Materials: A cross sectional study was conducted to determine the relationship between nutritional status (weight for age, height for age and weight for height and dietary and socioeconomic factors in 671 children (24-59 months of age from selected health centers in Mashhad city, Iran. Children were assessed for weight and height and the care givers were interviewed and a questionnaire was completed by the interviewers. The data were analyzed using SPSS13 software and the Z-scores were calculated using the WHO anthropometric software package.   Results: The study showed that 24.4% of children were mildly underweight, 4.3% were underweight, 13% were mildly stunted, 23.6% of children were mildly wasted and 3.1% were stunted. Educational attainment, whether the children had been breast feed, average daily consumption of milk, feeding practices and type of first food were found to be the main factors determining nutritional status in our study.   Conclusion: A higher daily consumption of milk, lower age at which first solid food was started; lower age for consumption of meat and good feeding practices may resolve malnutrition in this population. These findings support the need for a family-based prevention program that focus on guiding parents to foster appropriate feeding practices as well as to promote healthy food intake in the children. Future research should determine the cost-effectiveness of both short- and long-term interventions for child malnutrition.   Keywords:Malnutrition Prevention, Nutritional Intake, Nutritional Status, Preschool Children.  

  4. NUTRIENTS INTAKE AND NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF STREET CHILDREN IN BANDUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Patriasih

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The objectives of this research were to analyze food habits and nutrients intake, and health and nutritional status of street children. The research was carried out in the City of Bandung, West Java; Indonesia. A sample of 324 street children was selected randomly. The sample consisted of 232 boys and 92 girls. The data obtained from questionnaires. Means, standard deviation, frequency and proportion were calculated with a combination of software applications:  Microsoft Excel and Statistical Analysis System. The result showed the level of consumption adequacy did not meet the recommended dietary allowances i.e. with the shortage of 10-15%, this is an indication that the street children should be aware of their daily food consumption. The most common diseases suffered by the respondents were acute respiratory infections (ARI (47%. In addition, 22.7 % and 18.4 % of them suffered from diarrhoea and skin diseases, respectively. Blood haemoglobin status of street children shows that the incidence of anemia was 29.3%. Based on the classification of nutritional status, 42.7% and 80.4 % of street children were underweight and stunted, respectively. Key words: nutrients intake, nutritional status, street children

  5. Intestinal helminthiasis and nutritional status of children living in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intestinal helminthiasis and nutritional status of children living in orphanages in Benin City, Nigeria. ... 2 standard deviation of the reference median, respectively, in the World Health Organization growth chart. Statistical Analysis: The data obtained was entered into spread sheet using the Microsoft Excel 2007 and the ...

  6. Nutritional status of children in food insecure households in two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, the objective of this study is to assess nutritional status of children and other related information in food insecure households. Two hundred food insecure households (HHs) were selected from two districts of North Showa zone of Amhara in 2007. The criteria for inclusion were being landless, oxen-less, and/ or ...

  7. Determinants of nutritional status of children in farming households ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    economic, household and child-related factors on the nutritional status of children (0-5yrs) in farming households of Oyo State, Nigeria. The study was conducted using a multistage sampling technique to select 201 mother-child pairs from 18 farming ...

  8. nutritional status of hiv/aids orphaned children in households ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ROPSERVER

    Sub-counties have a combined population of almost 200, 000 including more than ... program to improve nutrition status of the vulnerable children. ... selected home. Purposive sampling technique was used based on its usefulness in identifying the potential families. Informants made work easy by using research assistants ...

  9. Nutritional and health status of preschool children from local women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutritional and health status of preschool children from local women entrepreneurial households in Ohaji Local Government Area. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information ...

  10. Food pattern and nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Patrícia Ayrosa C; Amancio, Olga Maria S; Araújo, Roberta Faria C; Vitalle, Maria Sylvia de S; Braga, Josefina Aparecida P

    2013-09-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess the food intake pattern and the nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 90 children from two to 12.8 years with cerebral palsy in the following forms: hemiplegia, diplegia, and tetraplegia. Nutritional status was assessed by weight, height, and age data. Food intake was verified by the 24-hour recall and food frequency questionnaire. The ability to chew and/or swallowing, intestinal habits, and physical activity were also evaluated. RESULTS For 2-3 year-old age group, the mean energy intake followed the recommended range; in 4-6 year-old age group with hemiplegia and tetraplegia, energy intake was below the recommended limits. All children presented low intake of carbohydrates, adequate intake of proteins and high intake of lipids. The tetraplegia group had a higher prevalence of chewing (41%) and swallowing (12.8%) difficulties compared to 14.5 and 6.6% of children with hemiplegia, respectively. Most children of all groups had a daily intestinal habit. All children presented mild physical activity, while moderate activity was not practiced by any child of the tetraplegia group, which had a significantly lower height/age Z score than those with hemiplegia (-2.14 versus -1.05; p=0.003). CONCLUSIONS The children with cerebral palsy presented inadequate dietary pattern and impaired nutritional status, with special compromise of height. Tetraplegia imposes difficulties regarding chewing/swallowing and moderate physical activity practice.

  11. Food pattern and nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Ayrosa C. Lopes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES To assess the food intake pattern and the nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 90 children from two to 12.8 years with cerebral palsy in the following forms: hemiplegia, diplegia, and tetraplegia. Nutritional status was assessed by weight, height, and age data. Food intake was verified by the 24-hour recall and food frequency questionnaire. The ability to chew and/or swallowing, intestinal habits, and physical activity were also evaluated. RESULTS For 2-3 year-old age group, the mean energy intake followed the recommended range; in 4-6 year-old age group with hemiplegia and tetraplegia, energy intake was below the recommended limits. All children presented low intake of carbohydrates, adequate intake of proteins and high intake of lipids. The tetraplegia group had a higher prevalence of chewing (41% and swallowing (12.8% difficulties compared to 14.5 and 6.6% of children with hemiplegia, respectively. Most children of all groups had a daily intestinal habit. All children presented mild physical activity, while moderate activity was not practiced by any child of the tetraplegia group, which had a significantly lower height/age Z score than those with hemiplegia (-2.14 versus -1.05; p=0.003. CONCLUSIONS The children with cerebral palsy presented inadequate dietary pattern and impaired nutritional status, with special compromise of height. Tetraplegia imposes difficulties regarding chewing/swallowing and moderate physical activity practice.

  12. The development of android - based children's nutritional status monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanto, Agus; Paramita, Octavianti; Pribadi, Feddy Setio

    2017-03-01

    The calculation of BMI (Body Mass Index) is one of the methods to calculate the nutritional status of a person. The BMI calculation has not yet widely understood and known by the public. In addition, people should know the importance of progress in the development of child nutrition each month. Therefore, an application to determine the nutritional status of children based on Android was developed in this study. This study restricted the calculation for children with the age of 0-60 months. The application can run on a smartphone or tablet PC with android operating system due to the rapid development of a smartphone or tablet PC with android operating system and many people own and use it. The aim of this study was to produce a android app to calculate of nutritional status of children. This study was Research and Development (R & D), with a design approach using experimental studies. The steps in this study included analyzing the formula of the Body Mass Index (BMI) and developing the initial application with the help of a computer that includes the design and manufacture of display using Eclipse software. This study resulted in android application that can be used to calculate the nutritional status of children with the age 0-60 months. The results of MES or the error calculation analysis using body mass index formula was 0. In addition, the results of MAPE percentage was 0%. It shows that there is no error in the calculation of the application based on the BMI formula. The smaller value of MSE and MAPE leads to higher level of accuracy.

  13. Evaluation of nutritional status in children with refractory epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Testolin G

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background children affected by refractory epilepsy could be at risk of malnutrition because of feeding difficulties (anorexia, chewing, swallowing difficulties or vomiting and chronic use of anticonvulsants, which may affect food intake and energy metabolism. Moreover, their energy requirement may be changed as their disabilities would impede normal daily activities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate nutritional status, energy metabolism and food intake in children with refractory epilepsy. Methods 17 children with refractory epilepsy (13 boys and 4 girls; mean age 9 ± 3,2 years; Body Mass Index 15,7 ± 3,6 underwent an anthropometric assessment, body composition evaluation by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, detailed dietetic survey and measurement of resting energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry. Weight-for-age, height-for-age (stunting and weight-for-height (wasting were estimated compared to those of a reference population of the same age. Results 40% of children were malnourished and 24% were wasted. The nutritional status was worse in the more disabled children. Dietary intake resulted unbalanced (18%, 39%, 43% of total daily energy intake derived respectively from protein, lipid and carbohydrate. Adequacy index [nutrient daily intake/recommended allowance (RDA × 100] was Conclusion many children with refractory epilepsy would benefit from individual nutritional assessment and management as part of their overall care.

  14. Evaluation of nutritional status in children with refractory epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, S; Cardinali, S; Veggiotti, P; Trentani, C; Testolin, G; Tagliabue, A

    2006-01-01

    Background children affected by refractory epilepsy could be at risk of malnutrition because of feeding difficulties (anorexia, chewing, swallowing difficulties or vomiting) and chronic use of anticonvulsants, which may affect food intake and energy metabolism. Moreover, their energy requirement may be changed as their disabilities would impede normal daily activities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate nutritional status, energy metabolism and food intake in children with refractory epilepsy. Methods 17 children with refractory epilepsy (13 boys and 4 girls; mean age 9 ± 3,2 years; Body Mass Index 15,7 ± 3,6) underwent an anthropometric assessment, body composition evaluation by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, detailed dietetic survey and measurement of resting energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry. Weight-for-age, height-for-age (stunting) and weight-for-height (wasting) were estimated compared to those of a reference population of the same age. Results 40% of children were malnourished and 24% were wasted. The nutritional status was worse in the more disabled children. Dietary intake resulted unbalanced (18%, 39%, 43% of total daily energy intake derived respectively from protein, lipid and carbohydrate). Adequacy index [nutrient daily intake/recommended allowance (RDA) × 100] was nutritional assessment and management as part of their overall care. PMID:16640779

  15. [Research advance in assessment of nutritional status of children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Qi

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition is not a simple disease, which occurs in the condition when the body does not get the right amount of nutrients to maintain healthy tissues and organ functions. Malnutrition generally refers both to undernutrition and overnutrition, but usually it is used to refer solely to a deficiency of nutrition. Infants and young children are the most vulnerable because of their high nutritional requirements for growth and development. Growth is an important indicator of health and nutritional status of a child. Generally, underweight, studding and wasting are used as the indicators of malnutrition. In fact, a gain in height is a better indicator of the adequacy of a diet than a gain in weight. Rates of weight gain needs to accompany accelerated height gain to maintain normal body proportions (weight-for-height). Now therefore WHO recommends using weight-for-height as the indicator of malnutrition of epidemic intensity in communities and of nutritional condition evaluation, including treatment assessment. The assessment of nutritional status is commonly summarized by the mnemonic "ABCD," which stands for anthropometric measurement (A), biochemical or laboratory tests (B), clinical indicators (C) and dietary assessment (D). Children with malnutrition are required to ingest more than 30 essential nutrients including both functional, protective nutrients (type I) and growth nutrients (type II), in order to have a catch-up growth in weight and height.

  16. Nutritional status of tribal children in Andhra Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangam Sukhdas, Sairam Challa, Prakash Bhatia, A.R. Rao, Koteswara Rao.P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context: Tribes constitute separate socio-cultural groups, having distinct customs, traditions, marriage, kinship, and property inheritance systems. They live largely in agricultural and pre-agricultural level of technology. Their dependency on nature and impoverished economy bear effect on the nutritional status different compared to the general population. Aims: To study the prevalence of malnutrition in the under-five years age group tribal children in the three regions of Andhra Pradesh and compare the same with national statistics. Methods and Material: A cross sectional survey was carried out to assess the nutritional status of under-five age group children in three Integrated Tribal Development Agency (ITDA blocks of Andhra Pradesh. Results & Conclusions: Based on the WHO Child Growth Standards, the prevalence of malnutrition was lower in the AP tribal blocks than the national averages among tribal populations, but higher than the overall national and state averages.

  17. HEALTH AND NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF CHILDREN UNDER FIVE YEARS IN POSYANDU NUTRITION PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadang Sukandar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The objectives of this research were to analyze health, nutritional status of children under five years and its influential factors. This research was carried out in two sub-districts of Bogor: Sub-District of Ciomas and Sub-District of Darmaga. As many as 16 posyandu nutrition program were obtained. A total number of 240 mothers had been divided into control and intervention groups. Baseline data were collected during the pre-study, while endline data were collected after conducting intervention (experiment. The experiment had been conducted for five months in the form of providing nutrition education once in two weeks and implementing home gardening. The data analysis included estimation of mean, standard deviation, minimum value, maximum value and proportion. Based on the General Linear Model (GLM analysis, it was found that intervention had significant impact on the nutritional status (WAZ of children under five years. Intervention did not have significant effects on the nutritional status according to HAZ and WHZ. Key words: Health status, nutritional status, nutrition program, children under five years.

  18. Iodine Nutritional Status of School Children in Nauru 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jui Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about iodine nutritional status in island countries in the Pacific Ocean. The primary objective of this study was to report for the first time the iodine nutritional status of people in Nauru. In addition, sources of iodine nutrition (i.e., water and salt were investigated. A school-based cross-sectional survey of children aged 6–12 years was conducted in three primary schools of Nauru. Urinary iodine concentration (UIC was determined by spot urine samples. Available water and salt samples in Nauru were collected for the measurement of iodine content. A food frequency questionnaire was conducted. The median UIC was 142 μg/L, and 25.2% and 7.4% of the population had median UIC below 100 μg/L and 50 μg/L, respectively. Natural iodine-containing foods such as seaweeds and agar were rare. Iodine was undetectable in Nauruan tank water, filtered tap water, and raindrops. Of the analyzed salt products, five kinds were non-iodized, and three were iodized (iodine content: 15 ppm, 65 ppm, and 68 ppm, respectively. The results indicate that the iodine status in Nauruan school children is adequate. Iodized salt may serve as an important source of iodine nutrition in Nauru.

  19. Nutritional status at diagnosis of children with malignancies in Casablanca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazi, Illias; Hidane, Zakia; Zafad, Saadia; Harif, Mhamed; Benchekroun, Said; Ribeiro, Raul

    2008-10-01

    Nutritional assessment is an essential component of the initial assessment of children with cancer. Malnutrition may be present at diagnosis due to the effects of the malignancy or, in low income countries (LIC), due to poverty and an inadequate diet. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of malnutrition at diagnosis in children with cancer in Morocco. Nutritional status of 100 children aged less than 18 years with newly diagnosed malignancy between January 2005 and January 2006 was evaluated by anthropometric and biochemical parameters before initiating therapy. We measured weight, height, weight-for-height using z-scores index for children and body mass index for adolescents, triceps skinfold thickness and mid-upper arm circumference, and serum albumin. A total of 100 patients were included. The mean age was 7 years (range 1 to 18 years). Sixty percent were boys. The diagnosis was: Burkitt lymphoma (n = 19), acute myeloblastic leukaemia (n = 18), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (n = 14), rhabdomyosarcoma (n = 13), Ewing sarcoma (n = 7), nephroblastoma (n = 6), Hodgkin disease (n = 5), osteosarcoma (n = 5), retinoblastoma (n = 4), neuroblastoma (n = 3), germ cell tumor (n = 3), orbital lymphoma (n = 1), cerebral lymphoma (n = 1), ependymoma (n = 1). Incidence of malnutrition ranged from 20 to 50%, depending upon the measurement used. The prevalence of malnutrition in this study was high, so interventions are being implemented to improve the nutritional status of these patients. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. The relationship between neonatal developmental status and post-natal nutritional status in Hungarian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Kalman; Molnar, Denes; Gyenis, Gyula; Zsakai, Annamaria

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal development may have an influence on post-natal nutritional status. Age at adiposity rebound is critical for later development of nutritional status. The objective was to analyse the relationship between neonatal development and post-natal changes in nutritional status. Subjects were studied in a longitudinal national survey (1980-2001) from birth (n = 6219) to 18.0 years (n = 1448). Subjects were divided into small (SGA), appropriate (AGA) and large for gestational age (LGA) sub-groups. Nutritional status was assessed by BMI. The Reed-Asefa model was fitted to the subject's serial data of BMI. The body parameters of the neonatal developmental sub-groups differed significantly in all studied neonatal body dimensions: the higher the intra-uterine growth rate (the slowest growth rate was assumed in the SGA, the fastest in the LGA children), the heavier the body weight, the longer the length and the bigger the BMI values found. The nutritional status of the neonatal developmental sub-groups differed significantly during the studied post-natal interval: the higher the pre-natal growth rate, the better nutritional status (the larger BMI) was found after birth. Neonatal development influenced strongly the post-natal nutritional status of children. The results indicate that not only age at adiposity rebound but also neonatal developmental status can be used as an indicator of later obesity.

  1. Determinants of Nutritional Status in Children living in Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Shafieian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children are one of the most vulnerable groups to sub-optimal nutritional intake in most societies. We have investigated some of the potential determinants of malnutrition in children of 2-5 years of age.   Methods and Materials: A cross sectional study was conducted to determine the relationship between nutritional status (weight for age, height for age and weight for height and dietary and socioeconomic factors in 671 children (24-59 months of age from selected health centers in Mashhad city, Iran. Children were assessed for weight and height and the care givers were interviewed and a questionnaire was completed by the interviewers. The data were analyzed using SPSS13 software and the Z-scores were calculated using the WHO anthropometric software package.   Results: The study showed that 24.4% of children were mildly underweight, 4.3% were underweight, 13% were mildly stunted, 23.6% of children were mildly wasted and 3.1% were stunted. Educational attainment, whether the children had been breast feed, average daily consumption of milk, feeding practices and type of first food were found to be the main factors determining nutritional status in our study.   Conclusion: A higher daily consumption of milk, lower age at which first solid food was started; lower age for consumption of meat and good feeding practices may resolve malnutrition in this population. These findings support the need for a family-based prevention program that focus on guiding parents to foster appropriate feeding practices as well as to promote healthy food intake in the children. Future research should determine the cost-effectiveness of both short- and long-term interventions for child malnutrition.  

  2. Apelin and nutritional status in children on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Sevgi; Cetinkaya, Senay; Anarat, Ali; Bayazıt, Aysun Karabay

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to evaluate whether serum apelin could reflect the nutritional status of children on dialysis. Twelve patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) and 20 patients on hemodialysis (HD) were enrolled. Patients received individualized diet for six months. Anthropometric and laboratory indices were measured at onset and the end of the study. The anthropometric indices were all significantly lower in patients than in controls whereas similar in PD and HD patients. The protein catabolic rate (nPCR), height, mid-arm circumference (MAC), triceps skinfold thickness (TSF), arm muscle area (AMA) and arm fat area (AFA) z scores were significantly increased in dialysis patients after nutritional intervention. Weight z scores statistically increased in HD group whereas did not statistically change in PD group. Serum albumin levels were significantly improved in PD and HD patients. Apelin levels were similar in PD, HD and control groups. Post nutritional apelin values did not differ in each dialysis groups. On multivariate analysis, apelin was independently associated with age, weight, ESR and TG. Apelin seems to be not a useful indicator for monitoring the nutritional status in children on dialysis. However, the close link of apelin with inflammatory and lipid parameters suggested that apelin might be a novel target for slowing the atherogenic process in pediatric dialysis patients.

  3. [Nutritional status by social stratification in Venezuelan school children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Nayka; Páez, María Concepción; Solano, Liseti

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed nutritional status of 590 children from Naguanagua, Valencia, attending school, aged between 4 and 14 years and its relation to social stratification, age and gender. Body dimension indicators were used for nutritional diagnosis. NCHS/OMS and Frisancho references were used for height/age (HA) weight/height (WH) cut-off points, and body mass index (BMI). Graffar modified by Mendez was used to establish socioeconomic status. Statistical analyses included descriptives, x2 and student-test. 91% of the children were in poverty, (71% relative and 20% critical). For HA, 6.4% classified as short, 27.6% in risk, and 4.9% tall for age without significative differences between sex. For WH, 0.6% were in nutritional deficit, 10.2% in risk and 22.1% in excess. For BMI, 12.9% had nutritional deficit, 7.3% excess but no significative differences for sex. Stunting and deficit were present in all age groups, but more significantly in those older than 10 years (12%; 23.9% respectively). Social stratification was associated with WH and BMI being deficit more prevalent in III and V class, predominating excess in IV class. The high prevalence of obesity makes this group as a high risk one for chronic degenerative diseases.

  4. The effects of hospitalization on the nutritional status of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Geila A; Rocha, Edmundo J M; Martins, Ceci V

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the nutritional status of children at hospital admission and again at hospital discharge and to investigate factors associated with the onset and/or exacerbation of malnutrition. An observational study of 203 children under 5 years old admitted to a hospital in the city of Fortaleza between August and December 2003. Nutritional status, expressed in z-scores for weight/age, stature/age and weight/stature, was compared at the time of admission and on hospital discharge and broken down by sex, age, condition responsible for hospitalization and length of hospital stay. On admission prevalence rates for moderate and/or severe malnutrition (z-score pneumonia as the disease responsible for their hospitalization. Children who had malnutrition on admission were still malnourished at hospital discharge and 10 (9.17%) well-nourished children developed mild malnutrition while hospitalized. The prevalence of malnutrition at the time of admission was elevated and remained unchanged by discharge. Prolonged hospitalization and pneumonia were linked with weight loss in hospital.

  5. Nutritional status of children hospitalized for parapneumonic effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huysentruyt, Koen; Alliet, Philippe; Raes, Marc; Willekens, Julie; De Schutter, Iris; De Wachter, Elke; Malfroot, Anne; Devreker, Thierry; Goyens, Philippe; Vandenplas, Yvan; De Schepper, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Among children hospitalized for pneumonia, those with parapneumonic effusion (PPE) are at particular risk for nutritional deterioration. This study aimed to 1) investigate the evolution of the nutritional status during hospitalization and at outpatient follow-up; 2) determine clinical risk factors for weight loss during hospitalization; 3) describe the nutritional interventions for these children. Retrospective chart review (January '07 - September '12) of 56 children with pneumonia, complicated by PPE in two Belgian hospitals for data on body weight and height at admission (t0) and discharge (t1), and two weeks (t2) and one month (t3) after discharge. Length of hospitalization (LoS), length of stay in paediatric intensive care (LoSPICU) and maximal in-hospital weight loss (tmax) were calculated and nutritional interventions were recorded. The median (range) age was 3.5 (1.0-14.8) years. Weight or height was lacking in five (8.9%) children at t0 and in 28 (50%) at t1; 21.4% was weighed only once during hospitalization. At tmax, respectively 17/44 and 5/44 children lost ≥ 5% and ≥ 10% of their weight. Median (range) LoS and LoSPICU were 18.0 (10-41) and 4.0 (0-23) days. One-fourth received a nutritional intervention. Weight for height at admission (WFH(t0)) significantly predicted maximal weight loss (β (95% CI) = -0.34 (-2.0--0.1); p = 0.03). At t2 and t3, 13/32 and 5/22 of the children with available follow-up data did not reach WFH(t0), whilst in 4/35 and 5/26 body weight remained ≥ 5% under the weight(t0). One-third of children with pneumonia complicated by PPE and monitored for weight and height, lost ≥ 5% of their body weight during hospitalization. One-fourth did not reach initial WFH one month after discharge. Those with a higher WFH at admission were at higher risk of weight loss. More attention for monitoring of weight loss and the nutritional policy during and after hospitalization is warranted.

  6. Nutritional status of children hospitalized for parapneumonic effusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen Huysentruyt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: Among children hospitalized for pneumonia, those with parapneumonic effusion (PPE are at particular risk for nutritional deterioration. This study aimed to 1 investigate the evolution of the nutritional status during hospitalization and at outpatient follow-up; 2 determine clinical risk factors for weight loss during hospitalization; 3 describe the nutritional interventions for these children. METHODS: Retrospective chart review (January '07 - September '12 of 56 children with pneumonia, complicated by PPE in two Belgian hospitals for data on body weight and height at admission (t0 and discharge (t1, and two weeks (t2 and one month (t3 after discharge. Length of hospitalization (LoS, length of stay in paediatric intensive care (LoSPICU and maximal in-hospital weight loss (tmax were calculated and nutritional interventions were recorded. RESULTS: The median (range age was 3.5 (1.0-14.8 years. Weight or height was lacking in five (8.9% children at t0 and in 28 (50% at t1; 21.4% was weighed only once during hospitalization. At tmax, respectively 17/44 and 5/44 children lost ≥ 5% and ≥ 10% of their weight. Median (range LoS and LoSPICU were 18.0 (10-41 and 4.0 (0-23 days. One-fourth received a nutritional intervention. Weight for height at admission (WFH(t0 significantly predicted maximal weight loss (β (95% CI = -0.34 (-2.0--0.1; p = 0.03. At t2 and t3, 13/32 and 5/22 of the children with available follow-up data did not reach WFH(t0, whilst in 4/35 and 5/26 body weight remained ≥ 5% under the weight(t0. CONCLUSIONS: One-third of children with pneumonia complicated by PPE and monitored for weight and height, lost ≥ 5% of their body weight during hospitalization. One-fourth did not reach initial WFH one month after discharge. Those with a higher WFH at admission were at higher risk of weight loss. More attention for monitoring of weight loss and the nutritional policy during and after hospitalization is warranted.

  7. Assessment of nutritional status in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglialonga, F; Felice Civitillo, C; Groppali, E; Edefonti, A

    2010-06-01

    The achievement of a normal nutritional status, that is a normal body composition and a normal pattern of growth, is a cornerstone in the management of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Protein-energy wasting (PEW) which indicates the state of decreased body protein mass and fuel reserves (body protein and fat mass), is a common condition in this population, and a source of morbidity and mortality. For the diagnosis of this condition, a lot of methods have been proposed, but due to the clinical characteristics of children with CKD, the intrinsic limits of the available indices and some methodological issues concerning published pediatric studies, none of these parameters could be considered as the gold standard. Given these limitations, a general consensus exists according to which only the combination of more indices integrated in a multidisciplinary approach can give the idea of the individual nutritional status. Among these indices, recent guidelines recommend dietary intake (by means of 3-day diary or 24-hour recall), anthropometric parameters (weight, height, height velocity, body mass index, head circumference) and, only for adolescent on hemodialysis, normalized protein catabolic rate as the most accurate ones. Other methods, such as mid-arm anthropometry, bioimpedance analysis, biochemical indices, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry could certainly help in the nutritional evaluation, taking into account the advantages and drawbacks of each method.

  8. Anthropometric Parameters of Nutritional Status in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melunovic, Melika; Hadzagic-Catibusic, Feriha; Bilalovic, Vildan; Rahmanovic, Samra; Dizdar, Selma

    2017-03-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy (CP), besides the basic neurological damage, are also often undernourished. Adequate nutrition for children is very important during the period of intensive growth and development, which is of particular importance in patients with CP. To evaluate the nutritional status of patients with CP who are treated at the Pediatric Clinic, Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University and causes of malnutrition in these patients. Eighty patients with CP underwent anthropometric assessment (body weight, body height, body mass index, head circumference, subscapular skinfold thickness, triceps skinfold thickness and mid upper arm muscle circumference). Severity of CP was classified based on the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). We compared the anthropometric parameters of our patients with normal values of healthy children, as well as with degree of motor impairment, oromotor dysfunction, feeding assistance, length of meals and daily feeding time. There were significant differences in all monitored parameters in relation to normal values, with 38 (47.5%) malnourished patients in the total group, out of which 29 (63.0%) with severe motor impairment and with 9 (11.3%) obese patients in the total group. The presence of oromotor dysfunction and other monitored parameters had a significant impact on the nutritional status of these patients. In severely disabled patients with CP there is a risk of profound malnutrition. Early identification and treatment of these patients is very important for their growth, development and health.

  9. Nutrition knowledge and nutritional status of primary school children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-04

    Jan 4, 2010 ... normally.5 Furthermore, research has shown that dietary habits in childhood impact ... implemented globally, focusing mainly on obesity, the importance of ... the same group of 10 randomly selected primary school children.

  10. Association between nutritional status and subjective health status in chronically ill children attending special schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Koen; van der Velde, Kelly; Joosten, Pieter; Rutten, Hans; Hulst, Jessie; Dulfer, Karolijn

    2016-04-01

    In hospitalized children with a chronic disease, malnutrition was associated with a lower subjective health status. In outpatient children with a chronic disease attending special schools, this association has never been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the association between nutritional status and subjective health status in chronically ill children attending special schools. Overall, 642 children, median age 9.8 years (IQR 7.7-11.5), 60 % male, 72 % Caucasian, were included in this prospective study in nine special schools for chronically ill children in the Netherlands. Overall malnutrition was assessed as: acute malnutrition (nutritional risk-screening tool STRONGkids. Subjective health status was assessed with EQ-5D. Overall, 16 % of the children had overall malnutrition: 3 % acute and 13 % chronic malnutrition. Nurses reported 'some/severe problems' on the health status dimensions mobility (15 %), self-care (17 %), usual activities (19 %), pain/discomfort (22 %), and anxiety/depression (22 %) in chronically ill children. Their mean visual analogue scale score (VAS) was 73.0 (SD 11.1). Malnutrition, medication usage, and younger age explained 38 % of the variance of the VAS score. The presence of overall malnutrition in chronically ill children attending special schools was associated with lower subjective health status, especially in younger children and in those with chronic medication usage. Therefore, it is important to develop and use profile-screening tools to identify these children.

  11. Nutritional status of preschool children in semi-urban Area of Benue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutritional status of preschool children in semi-urban Area of Benue State, Nigeria. ... Majority (56.9%) of the mothers had just secondary school education, only 16.3% earned a monthly income above N25, 000. ... Keywords: Nutritional status, Under-nutrition, Dietary diversity, Preschool aged children, Under five ...

  12. Nutritional Status of Children from Women with Previously Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenes, Jessica Cristina; Nicoletti, Carolina Ferreira; de Souza Pinhel, Marcela Augusta; Cortes-Oliveira, Cristiana; Salgado Júnior, Wilson; Nonino, Carla Barbosa

    2017-10-05

    Number of pregnancies has been increasing in women of childbearing age after the gastric bypass. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nutritional status of children of women submitted to gastric bypass. We evaluated anthropometric, breastfeeding and biochemical profile, body composition, and dietary intake indicators of children of both sexes who were born alive after the surgery. For statistical analysis, were performed Shapiro-Wilk and ANOVA test (p breastfeeding (65.5 ± 2.1 mg/dL, p artificial and breast milk presented lower fat mass (3.8 ± 1.9 kg; p Breastfeeding may play a protective role in the development of obesity in these children.

  13. Growth and nutritional status of children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Viviane Martins; de Oliveira Lopes, Marcos Venícios; de Araujo, Thelma Leite

    2007-01-01

    Factors predictive of growth deficit and nutritional status in children with congenital heart disease remain unclear. The objective of this study was to characterize the growth and nutritional status of children with congenital heart disease based on anthropometric measurements and z scores. One hundred and thirty-five children 1 year or younger, who had not undergone surgical correction, were evaluated. The variables studied were sex; age; type of heart disease; length, weight; z scores (length-for-age, weight-for-age, weight-for-length); abdominal, thoracic, and cephalic circumferences; triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness; and birth weight and birth length. The mean age of children in this study was 4.75 +/- 3.75 months and most (66.7%) were male. Mean anthropometric measurements were birth length, 48.6 +/- 2.34 cm; birth weight, 3.11 +/- 0.63 kg; cephalic circumference, 38.51 +/- 3.28 cm; thoracic circumference, 38.65 +/- 3.76 cm; abdominal circumference, 37.96 +/- 3.27 cm; triceps skinfold thickness, 3.69 +/- 1.57 mm; subscapular skinfold thickness, 3.22 +/- 1.34 mm; current length, 57.54 +/- 7.87 cm; and current weight, 4.46 +/- 1.49 kg. Variables significant for malnutrition in logistic regression models were sex, type of heart disease, birth weight, birth length, subscapular thickness, triceps thickness, and cephalic circumference. Nutritional defects were more evident in the case of the weight-for-age index. Boys had greater deterioration in the weight-for-age index, possibly indicating acute malnutrition, and girls had worse values for the height-for-age index, indicating a risk of chronic malnutrition.

  14. Nutritional status of preschool children attending kindergartens in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysha, Agim; Gjergji, Tahire M; Ploeger, Angelika

    2017-06-02

    There is very limited data on malnutrition of preschool children in Kosovo. The main objective of the study is to provide a nutritional status profile of preschool children attending kindergartens in Kosovo. Cross-sectional study of children aged 12-59 months (n = 352 children) and children aged 60-83 months (n = 134) enrolled in public and private kindergartens of Kosovo. Anthropometric measurements used for this study are weight and height of the preschoolers (12-83 months). A measuring board was used for measuring the length/height of children younger than 2 years, while digital weight and height scale Seca 763 was used for measuring of preschool children taller than 110 and Seca 213 was used for measuring the height for children who were shorter than 110 cm. Statistical analyses of underweight and overweight trends across sex and age groups as well as between children from public and private kindergartens were carried out. Qualitative variables were tested with a chi-square test. The differences between groups were assessed with a Student t test for normally distributed variables and a Mann-Whitney test for abnormally distributed numerical variables. The mean z-scores for weight-for-age, height-for-age, weight-for-height, and BMI-for-age largely fell within 0.0 and 1.0. The percentage of stunted children is 3%, whereas child wasting is 1.9%. The overall percentage of obese children is 2.3%; furthermore, 8.9% are overweight and 27.3% have a possible risk of being overweight. The incidence of children underweight is slightly decreasing. The prevalence of overweight and obese children in sample chosen is evident.

  15. Maternal perception of children's nutritional status in the Federal District, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Maternal perception of child's nutritional status has a potential impact on the identification, prevention, and treatment of childhood overweight. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of misperception and factors associated with maternal perception of the nutritional status of first- to third-grade elementary school students from private schools in the Federal District, Brazil. This cross-sectional study was conducted with 554 mother-child pairs. Children's nutritional status was assessed by measuring their weight and height. The mothers completed an online questionnaire about sociodemographic data, maternal nutritional status, maternal perception of her own nutritional status (silhouette scale for female adults), and maternal perception of child's nutritional status (silhouette scale for children). Only 30.0% of the mothers were successful in choosing the most appropriate silhouette to represent child's nutritional status. Highly educated mothers (Adjusted OR = 1.51) and mothers of male children (Adjusted OR = 2.53) or of non-overweight children (Adjusted OR = 1.65) were more likely to underestimate child's nutritional status. Conversely, mothers below 35 years of age (Adjusted OR = 1.85) and mothers of female children (Adjusted OR = 2.24) or of overweight children (Adjusted OR = 1.94) were more likely to overestimate child's nutritional status. There was a high prevalence of misperception, which shows the need for interventions for children that take into account the relevance of mother's role and the adequate recognition of child's nutritional status. PMID:28445494

  16. Assessment of Nutritional Status in Children With Cancer and Effectiveness of Oral Nutritional Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürlek Gökçebay, Dilek; Emir, Suna; Bayhan, Turan; Demir, Hacı Ahmet; Gunduz, Mehmet; Tunc, Bahattin

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common consequence of cancer in children, but the most effective methods of nutrition intervention are under debate. We aimed to evaluate the nutritional status of children diagnosed with cancer, and to investigate the effect of oral nutritional supplements on anthropometric measurements, biochemical parameters, and outcome. A randomized clinical study of 45 newly diagnosed cancer patients was performed. Anthropometric and biochemical data and related factors were assessed at 0, 3, and 6 months after diagnosis. On initial anthropometric assessment, prevalence of malnutrition by weight or height was found to be lower as compared with body mass index (BMI), or weight for height (WFH), or arm anthropometry. Twenty-six of the patients (55%) received oral nutritional supplement. During the second 3 months after diagnosis, there was a statistically significant decrease in number of the patients with WFH Nutritional intervention is necessary to promote normal development and increase functional status as a child receives intensive treatment. Protein- and energy-dense oral nutritional supplements are effective for preventing weight loss in malnourished children.

  17. assessment of the nutritional status of children in a rural community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uwaifoh

    2012-05-31

    May 31, 2012 ... Although Nigeria is referred to as the giant of Africa, her nutritional status remains a major public health challenge especially amongst children. Therefore, to achieve her vision 2020, the nutritional status of children in rural communities must be improved. Keywords: Children, Malnutrition, Growth, Nigeria.

  18. Nutritional status and growth of indigenous Xavante children, Central Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Aline A; Welch, James R; Santos, Ricardo V; Gugelmin, Silvia A; Coimbra, Carlos E A

    2012-01-11

    The aim of this study was to characterize the nutritional status of Xavante Indian children less than 10 years of age in Central Brazil and to evaluate the hypothesis of an association between child nutrition and socioeconomic differentiation in this population. A cross-sectional study was conducted in July 2006 that included all children under the age of 10 from the Xavante village Pimentel Barbosa in Mato Grosso, Brazil. The data collected included weight, height, and sociodemographic information. Sociodemographic data were used to generate two indices ("income" and "wealth") and to determine the proportion of adults in each household. Descriptive analyses were performed for weight-for-age (W/A), height-for-age (H/A), and weight-for-height (W/H) using the NCHS and the WHO growth references. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted using H/A and W/A as a response variables. Of a total of 246 children under the age of ten residing in the village, 232 (94.3%) were evaluated. Following the NCHS reference, 5.6% of children under the age of ten presented low W/A and 14.7% presented low H/A. Among children under the age of five, deficit percentages for weight and height were 4.5% and 29.9%, respectively, following the WHO curves. Among children profile observed among Brazilian children nationally, which is characterized by a sharp decline in child undernutrition in recent decades, even in the poorest regions of the country. This discrepancy calls attention to the persistent health disparities that exist between indigenous and non-indigenous people in Brazil.

  19. NUTRITIONAL STATUS IN BLIND CHILDREN: ISFAHAN ABABASIR BOARDING SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M RAJAI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inadequate dietary intake causes malnutrition associated with poor physical and mental development, specially in children. This study evaluated the nutritional status in blind children in Ababasir Boarding Center (a boarding school in Isfahan city. Methods: A 72 hours food regimen survey was measured in 50 subjects (boys and girls by weighting method. The anthropometric data was collected to compare with NCHS normal data. Results: Energy intake was less than 75 percent RDA in all the subjects and the amounts of animal protein intake was also little. Chronic malnutrition was more prevalent. Discussion: Althought the energy intake was lower than RDA, but it did not cause under weight among them probably because of reduced physical activity due to their disability and inadequate high quality protein and other nutrients probably could be the major cause in chronic malnutrition.

  20. Children with atopic dermatitis in Daejeon, Korea: individualized nutrition intervention for disease severity and nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Hee; Lee, Jae Ho; Ly, Sun Yung

    2016-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis is one of the most common pediatric chronic inflammatory skin diseases, and certain food allergens and nutrients are closely related to the development and severity of atopic dermatitis. While avoidance of the causative foods is considered the mainstay of treatment, unverified excessive restriction might induce unnecessary limitations in the food intake, consequently leading to nutritional deficiencies and poor growth. This study aimed to identify the characteristics and nutrient intake status in children with atopic dermatitis and to investigate the effects of individualized nutrition intervention. We retrospectively reviewed electronic medical records of 77 pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis who received 4 months of individualized nutrition intervention combined with an elimination diet. The patient characteristics, nutrient intake status, and clinical status were examined before and after the intervention. Before the intervention, 5 children had a weight for height z-score below -2.0, and 48.1% had experienced food restriction; these children showed a significantly higher SCORing of Atopic Dermatitis index than those without experiences, with the number of restricted foods before the intervention positively correlating with the disease severity. The intakes of n-6 and n-3 fatty acids, calcium, folate, and vitamin D were lower than the recommended nutrient intakes for Koreans. After the intervention, the weight for height z-score of 35 children was significantly increased and their SCORing of Atopic Dermatitis index was significantly reduced (pnutrition intervention appears useful for alleviating the severity of atopic dermatitis and improving the growth status by improving the nutrient intake.

  1. [Assessment of nutritional status in children with atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Campos, Xiomara; Castro-Almarales, Raúl Lázaro; Massip Nicot, Juliette

    2011-01-01

    There has been described some exacerbating factors for atopic dermatitis, including foods. Several investigations have reported controversial results about the influence of foods on atopic dermatitis. But there is scarce information about the nutritional status of patients with atopic dermatitis. To characterize the nutritional condition in a sample of children with atopic dermatitis in Old Havana, Cuba. In this descriptive study, were included 60 children, aged between 2 and 14 years, with the diagnosis of atopic dermatitis from the Allergy Department in the municipality Havana, from January to April of 2008. For every patient we evaluated anthropometrics, biochemical and immunologic measurements, as well the frequency of meals ingestion and the types of foods. We found that 83.3% of the patients were younger than 6 years, with a slight prevalence of females (53.3%). Ninety-seven percent of the children had a normal height for its age and 48.3% had a normal weight for their height, and 20% of the patients had malnutrition. It was detected mild and moderate anemia in 63.3%. The daily frequency of taking breakfast was carried out in 55%, the lunch in 100% and dinner in 95%. The products of regular consumption are carbohydrates, candies nd sodas in 76.6%. Fish and shellfish are consumed only for 16% of the patients. In the studied sample of children with atopic dermatitis we found a high prevalence of malnutrition associated with poor dietary habits. Breast milk feeding was related to a less malnutrition percentage in children with atopic dermatitis.

  2. Growth and nutritional status of children with homozygous sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Saqladi, A.-W. M.; Cipolotti, R.; Fijnvandraat, K.; Brabin, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Poor growth and under-nutrition are common in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). This review summarises evidence of nutritional status in children with SCD in relation to anthropometric status, disease severity, body composition, energy metabolism, micronutrient deficiency and

  3. Nutritional status of underfive children in a pastoral community in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In conclusion, malnutrition in Simanjiro district is prevalent, and therefore, appropriate multidisciplinary approach on nutrition education, environmental sanitation and hygienic practices at family and community level need to be promoted to reduce childhood illnesses thereby increasing child health and nutritional status.

  4. Nutritional status and effect of maternal employment among children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, stunting is significantly influenced by mothers' education, household wealth and child age. However, maternal employment was not statistically associated with child nutritional status. Thus, nutritional intervention initiatives should focus on improving household food security, maternal education and agricultural ...

  5. Dietary Habits and Nutritional Status of Rural School Age Children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stunting was significantly (p<0.05) higher among 10-14year old children (56.1%) than 5-9 year olds (34.6%). Conclusion: There is urgent need for nutrition intervention targeted at rural school age children inEbonyi State. Keywords: School age children, dietary habits, hemoglobin levels, stunting, overweight, underweight, ...

  6. Nutritional Status of Children in Displacement Camps in Sierra Leone

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, stunting, under nutrition, and wasting were measured among 454 children under the age of 10 years in four internally displaced persons (IDP) camps. Stunting was found to be the most common nutritional abnormality in all four IDP camps with the highest prevalence rate (29.3%) in the Trade Center Camp and ...

  7. Ordinal logistic regression analysis on the nutritional status of children in KarangKitri village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyver, Margaretha; Yongharto, Kimmy Octavian

    2015-09-01

    Ordinal logistic regression is a statistical technique that can be used to describe the relationship between ordinal response variable with one or more independent variables. This method has been used in various fields including in the health field. In this research, ordinal logistic regression is used to describe the relationship between nutritional status of children with age, gender, height, and family status. Nutritional status of children in this research is divided into over nutrition, well nutrition, less nutrition, and malnutrition. The purpose for this research is to describe the characteristics of children in the KarangKitri Village and to determine the factors that influence the nutritional status of children in the KarangKitri village. There are three things that obtained from this research. First, there are still children who are not categorized as well nutritional status. Second, there are children who come from sufficient economic level which include in not normal status. Third, the factors that affect the nutritional level of children are age, family status, and height.

  8. FEEDING PATTERN TOWARD THE INCREASING OF NUTRITIONAL STATUS IN CHILDREN AGED 1–3 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Subarkah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of nutritional status problems with underweight in Indonesia at the moments is (19,6%. Data showed that children with less nutritional status aged 1-3 years in Kalijudan, Surabaya are existed. Provide feeding pattern properly is one effort to improve the nutritional status by fulfilling the needs of the child nutrition. The purpose of this study was to explain the relationship of feeding pattern and nutritional status in children aged 1-3 years in the Kalijudan district, Surabaya. Methods: The research design used was cross-sectional study with dietary habit as the independent variable and nutritional status as dependent variable. The sample was taken from 154 mothers and children. Consecutive sampling was deployed. Data collection by questionnaires, and then data analysis using the Spearman’s Rho in level  of significance α≤0.05. Result and Analysis: There was strong relationship between feeding pattern and nutritional status (r=0.640. The result showed that inappropriate feeding patterns with nutritional status is very thin (44.4% a proper feeding patterns with normal nutritional status (89.7%.  Discussion and Conclussion: The efforts to improve nutritional status of children aged 1-3 years related to feeding patterns should be improved in order to achieve a normal nutritional status. Further research may explore on the feeding patterns based on dietary allowances. Keywords: feeding pattern, nutritional status, 1-3 years old children

  9. [Influence of sociohygienic factors on the shaping of the nutritional status in children and teenagers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolova, E S; Kuzmichev, Yu G; Olushina, E A; Polyashova, A S; Kotova, N V; Badeeva, T V; Ashina, M V; Maksimenko, E O; Kiseleva, A S; Pisareva, A N; Kovalchuk, S N; Shaposhnikova, M V

    There was revealed the structure of deteriorations in the nutritional status of schoolchildren in the city: the most of students has normal nutritional status, but there was noted the high prevalence of excessive body weight and obesity among children and teenagers. Risk factors for development of deteriorations of the nutrition state were detected as follows: irrational food regimen, qualitative compartment offood, factors of educational environment, lifestyle. The main role in system of control of the nutritional status in children is referred to the correction of socio-hygienic factors which prove to be the priority ones in the shaping of the nutritional status in students. As the main condition determining the nutrition state of the up-to-date schoolchildren and the quality of their life in the whole the social cultural level of children and adolescents must be regarded as a result of the hygienic education and training in fundamentals of healthy lifestyle. Priority protective factors of the gain in the part of schoolchildren with normal nutritional status (optimalfood regimen, optimal dietary habits, sufficient level of physical activity) laidfrom the child age in conditions of the family, sufficient level of the physical activity and the implementation of the other element of hygienically expedient day regimen served as the base for the elaboration of the system of the control of nutritional status. Algorithm of the control of the nutritional status in the students of educational institutions includes the creation of healthcare educational environment, optimization of nutrition and physical activity, the shaping of the culture of healthy lifestyle, health-improving measures for children with disorders of nutritional status and their psychological pedagogical supports at the stage of the correction of the nutritional status, improvement of the medical service for the early detection of deviations of nutritional status with the estimation of the efficiency of

  10. Nutritional status (BMI in children suffering from asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šćepanović Anđelka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The research encompassed 708 children of both genders, aged 6 to 15. Three hundred and fifty four of the total number had been diagnosed with Asthma bronchiale, whereas the other half of the children were healthy and served as a control group. Their nutritional condition was determined on the basis of the percentile value of their BMI. Recent studies on the level of nutrition and its connection to asthma have shown contradictory results. This paper was aimed at estimating the nutritional level of sick children in relation to healthy ones. The data were analyzed in relation to group, gender and age by means of descriptive methods, univariate (analysis of variance - ANOVA and multivariate (multivariate analysis of variance - MANOVA, whereas the results were tested by Roy’s test (Pearson contingency coefficient χ, coefficient of multiple correlation R. It was determined that male children more frequently suffer from this disease than female children do. Both healthy and sick children were normally nourished. However, as regards the sick, the number of normally nourished was considerably lower, whereas the number of underweight was considerably higher, as well as those that were overweight. Intergroup differences in the distribution of certain levels of nutrition of male and female children occurred in only two non-sequential age groups, being later in boys than in girls. This uneven distribution is probably a consequence of the joint effects of environment factors, sickness and therapy.

  11. [Nutritional status of adolescents from a cohort of preterm children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Stäger, M Angélica; Rodríguez Fernández, Alejandra; Muñoz Valenzuela, Carolina; Ojeda Sáez, Alejandra; San Martín Navarrete, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Catch-up growth in preterm-born children occurs in the first months of life, but in some cases, growth recovery takes place in adolescence. The objective of this study was to study the growth and development of preterm-born adolescents from a cohort of preterm infants born between 1995 and 1996, who resided in the cities of Chillán and San Carlos in the Biobío Region, Chile. The results were then compared with term-born adolescents. A sample of 91 children from the cohort was studied and compared with 91 term-born adolescents matched for gender, age, and attendance at the same educational institution. The nutritional status was assessed by BMI-for-age, height-for-age, body composition by skinfold, cardiovascular risk due to blood pressure, and waist circumference. There was 23.0% and 24.1% overweight and obesity in preterm-born and term-born adolescents, respectively, with 25.5% of preterm-born and small for gestational age adolescents vs. 14.5% of those born adequate for gestational age were overweight. Lower height was observed in 16.5% and 5.5% of the preterm-born and term-born adolescents, respectively, and with a higher proportion of girls (P<.04). Preterm-born adolescents had a more fat mass than the controls, particularly in the suprailiac skinfold. No significant differences were found in blood pressure and waist circumference. The results indicate that there is a group of preterm-born children who do not recover height during adolescence, especially girls. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. FAMILY’S ECONOMIC LEVEL AND CULTURE CORRELATE WITH NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF CHILDREN UNDER FIVE YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Muhith

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutrition is an important thing for human life. Variety in family’s economic level and culture have effect on family’s eating habit. Family with higher economic status have big opportunity to met under fi ve year’s nutrition. Cultural diversity on each family has an impact on the difference of raw food selection, processing methods, and presentation of food. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between family’s economic level and culture with nutritional status of children under fi ve year. Method: Research design was observational analytic with cross sectional approach. The population were mother and their children under fi ve years at Desa Jatigono Kunir, Kabupaten Lumajang. Sampel were 184 respondents, taken by using cluster sampling. Independent variables were family’s economic level and culture. Dependent variable was nutritional status of children under fi ve years. Data were collected by using questionnaire and observational sheet. Then, data were analyzed by using Spearman Rho Test with α<0.05. Result: The results showed that 140 (76.1% respondents have low economic level, 105 (57.1% respondents have negative culture in children’s nutrition, and 89 (48% respondents have good nutritional status. The result of Spearman-rho test showed that family’s economic level (p=0.000 and culture (0.019 have correlated with nutritional status of children under five years. Discussion: It can be concluded that family’s economic level and culture have correlated with nutritional status of children under fi ve years. Nurses should develop health education and counseling to improve family’s knowledge about nutrition, so children will have good nutritional status. Keywords: economic level, family’s culture, nutritional status, children under five years

  13. The Relationship between the Neighborhood Safety and Nutritional Status of Children in Baghdad City, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanain Faisal Ghazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The neighborhoods where the children live play an important role in their development physically and mentally. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between neighborhood safety and child nutritional status in Baghdad city, Iraq. Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out in Baghdad city, Iraq, among 400 primary school children from 4 schools. BMI-for-age Z score was used to assess the nutritional status of the children. Newly developed questionnaires on neighborhood safety were distributed to the parents to answer them. Results. In this study, males were more predominant than females with 215 participants compared to 185 females. A total of 49% were normal weight, 38.8% either overweight or obese, and only 12.2% underweight. There was a significant relationship between father education, father and mother working status, family income, and children nutritional status (P=0.10, 0.009, <0.001, 0.37, respectively. The association between neighborhood safety variables and child nutritional status was significant except for worrying about child safety and thinking of leaving the neighborhood (P=0.082, 0.084, respectively. Conclusion. Nutritional status of school children continues to be a public health issue in Iraq especially Baghdad city. There was a significant association between neighborhood safety and children nutritional status.

  14. Effect of mother support groups on nutritional status in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    morbidity, mortality and disability.1. Malnutrition is an underlying cause in more than 50 % of all deaths among children, mostly due to increased ..... eral awareness on nutrition initiated by the establishment of mother support groups might contribute to reduce the stigma, and as such lower the threshold for mothers to.

  15. Effect of mother support groups on nutritional status in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In tackling the ongoing malnutrition problem in many parts of Kenya, the government has initialized preventive actions such as mother support groups in order to improve health and nutrition among children. Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of such intervention. Objective: This study aimed at ...

  16. Nutritional status of under five children in Ethiopia: a systematic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The baseline levels of undernutrition remain so high that Ethiopia still needs to continue substantial investment in nutrition.Therefore, the aim of this study was to obtain estimates of over-time trends in the prevalence of undernutrition in Ethiopia and to determine risk factors for undernutrition among children of under five ...

  17. Improving the nutritional status of malnourished children using soybean products in Rwanda

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mugo, C; Niyibituronsa, M; Kyallo, F; Gaidashova, S

    2014-01-01

    ...). The contribution of soybean (Glycine max L), which is an important source of high quality and inexpensive protein and oil, to improvement of nutritional status of malnourished children is unclear...

  18. Factors associated with the nutritional status of children aged 3-5 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -13.3, p=0.0155). Conclusion: Child malnutrition continue to be a public health concern given that preventable factors such as environmental and family were demonstrated to have a higher association with nutritional status of the children.

  19. Gut Microbiomes of Indian Children of Varying Nutritional Status: e95547

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tarini Shankar Ghosh; Sourav Sen Gupta; Tanudeep Bhattacharya; Deepak Yadav; Anamitra Barik; Abhijit Chowdhury; Bhabatosh Das; Sharmila S Mande; G Balakrish Nair

    2014-01-01

    .... Consequently, dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in malnutrition. Methodology/Principal Findings Metagenomics approach was adopted to investigate the gut microbiome sampled from 20 rural Indian children with varying nutritional status...

  20. Nutritional status in sick children and adolescents is not accurately reflected by BMI-SDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusch, Gerhard; Raja, Preeya; Dung, Nguyen Quang; Karaolis-Danckert, Nadina; Barr, Ronald; Fusch, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional status provides helpful information of disease severity and treatment effectiveness. Body mass index standard deviation scores (BMI-SDS) provide an approximation of body composition and thus are frequently used to classify nutritional status of sick children and adolescents. However, the accuracy of estimating body composition in this population using BMI-SDS has not been assessed. Thus, this study aims to evaluate the accuracy of nutritional status classification in sick infants and adolescents using BMI-SDS, upon comparison to classification using percentage body fat (%BF) reference charts. BMI-SDS was calculated from anthropometric measurements and %BF was measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for 393 sick children and adolescents (5 months-18 years). Subjects were classified by nutritional status (underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese), using 2 methods: (1) BMI-SDS, based on age- and gender-specific percentiles, and (2) %BF reference charts (standard). Linear regression and a correlation analysis were conducted to compare agreement between both methods of nutritional status classification. %BF reference value comparisons were also made between 3 independent sources based on German, Canadian, and American study populations. Correlation between nutritional status classification by BMI-SDS and %BF agreed moderately (r (2) = 0.75, 0.76 in boys and girls, respectively). The misclassification of nutritional status in sick children and adolescents using BMI-SDS was 27% when using German %BF references. Similar rates observed when using Canadian and American %BF references (24% and 23%, respectively). Using BMI-SDS to determine nutritional status in a sick population is not considered an appropriate clinical tool for identifying individual underweight or overweight children or adolescents. However, BMI-SDS may be appropriate for longitudinal measurements or for screening purposes in large field studies. When accurate nutritional

  1. The nutritional status of school-aged children: why should we care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Cora; Neufingerl, Nicole; van Geel, Laura; van den Briel, Tina; Osendarp, Saskia

    2010-09-01

    The nutritional status of school-aged children impacts their health, cognition, and subsequently their educational achievement. The school is an opportune setting to provide health and nutrition services to disadvantaged children. Yet, school-aged children are not commonly included in health and nutrition surveys. An up-to-date overview of their nutritional status across the world is not available. To provide a summary of the recent data on the nutritional status of school-aged children in developing countries and countries in transition and identify issues of public health concern. A review of literature published from 2002 to 2009 on the nutritional status of children aged 6 to 12 years from Latin America, Africa, Asia, and the Eastern Mediterranean region was performed. Eligible studies determined the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies or child under- and overnutrition using biochemical markers and internationally accepted growth references. A total of 369 studies from 76 different countries were included. The available data indicate that the nutritional status of school-aged children in the reviewed regions is considerably inadequate. Underweight and thinness were most prominent in populations from South-East Asia and Africa, whereas in Latin America the prevalence of underweight or thinness was generally below 10%. More than half of the studies on anemia reported moderate (> 20%) or severe (> 40%) prevalence of anemia. Prevalences of 20% to 30% were commonly reported for deficiencies of iron, iodine, zinc, and vitamin A. The prevalence of overweight was highest in Latin American countries (20% to 35%). In Africa, Asia, and the Eastern Mediterranean, the prevalence of overweight was generally below 15%. The available data indicate that malnutrition is a public health issue in school-aged children in developing countries and countries in transition. However, the available data, especially data on micronutrient status, are limited. These findings emphasize

  2. Nutritional and socioeconomic status in cognitive development of Santal children of Purulia district, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sutanu Dutta; Ghosh, Tusharkanti

    2011-03-01

    Cognitive development of children depends on nutritional and socioeconomic factors. The objectives of the present study were to assess the cognitive development and to investigate the relationship of nutritional and socioeconomic status (SES) to cognitive development in 5-12 year old Santal children of Purulia district of West Bengal, India. The nutritional status of each child was assessed by z-score of height-for-age, weight-for-height and weight-for-age parameters. SES was measured using the updated Kuppusswami scale. Cognitive development was measured by Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM). The growth curve of RCPM scores of Santal children remained around the 5(th) percentile values of British children. The RCPM scores of the adequately nourished children and upper-lower SES were significantly higher (p nutritional status. About 42.96% and 27.69% of Santal children were found to be in the intellectually deficient and below average groups, respectively. RCPM scores of Santal children were significantly correlated with nutritional status and socioeconomic factors (p cognitive functions. The vulnerable nutritional and socioeconomic statuses of Santal children are the major causes for their poor cognitive development.

  3. Nutrition Status Of Children (1-6 Years In Slums Of Ghaziabad City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg S.K

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question : What are the nutritional problems of pre- school children in slums? Objectives: (i To assess the nutritional status of the children . (ii To find out the nutritional deficiency disorders in them (iii To study their dietary intake. Study design: Cross- sectional. Setting : Slums of Ghaziabad city. Participants :771 children (1-6 years. Study Variables : Age, sex, caste, ICDS beneficiary status, weight, nutritional deficiency disorders, dietary intake and supplementary nutrition. Statistical analysis : Simple proportions and Chi- square test. Results : A majority (58.2 % of children were having under nutrition of varying grades irrespective of their sex and caste but influenced by their age and ICDS beneficiary status. Anaemia, xerophthalmia and goitre were present in 14.7%, 1.6% and 0.6 % children respectively. Average daily dietary intake of energy & nutrients were lower than the recommended daily allowances (RDA. Conclusion: Regular nutritional supplementation along with adequate nutrition education would reduce the nutritional deficiency disorders among children.

  4. Nutritional Status Of Under-Five Children In An Urban Community In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    About 28.1% of the children were underweight while 22.6% were stunted. Maternal educational status was associated with correct practice of exclusive breast-feeding but not related to nutritional status of children. Female gender and correct practice of exclusive breast-feeding were significantly associated with good ...

  5. Differences in nutritional status of preschool children in the context of the maternal social characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potocka, Adrianna; Jacukowicz, Aleksandra

    2017-07-14

    It is generally accepted that maternal factors are important in maintaining the adequate nutritional status of young children. This study was aimed at verifying whether mother's socio-demographic (age and relationship status) and socio-economic features (education and professional status) differentiate the child's nutritional status. A cross-sectional study was conducted between April and October 2013. Five hundred thirty mothers of preschool children from 5 different regions of Poland were interviewed. Mothers were interviewed on their socio-demographic and socio-economic status. To assess the child's nutritional status, body mass index (BMI) z-score and the diet indicators were calculated, such as the percentage of the estimated average requirement for energy (%EAR), the percentage of energy coming from carbohydrates (%EC), fat (%ET) and proteins (%EP). Percentage of the estimated average requirement for energy, %EC, %ET and %EP was obtained from 24-h dietary recalls conducted with the mothers. The results showed that mother's education and professional status did not differentiate any of the indices of the child's nutritional status. However, maternal age and her relationship status occurred significant (ANOVA; p nutrition standards as compared to children of mothers with a partner. When a child is diagnosed with any type of malnutrition, it is worth assessing various factors that might influence the nutritional status, such as child's social background (e.g., maternal factors). Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(5):811-821.

  6. Changes in nutritional status among displaced North Korean children living in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo-Kyung; Nam, So-Young; Hoffman, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As many nations experience the nutrition transition, changes in the nutritional status of children moving from food insecure to food affluent societies has become an important, but infrequently studied, public health issue. To determine changes in the nutritional status of North Korean children after relocating to food-affluent South Korea (SK) from food-deficient North Korea (NK) and relationships of current nutritional status with food environment at birth and exposure to food affluent environments. Socioeconomic status, relocation history and anthropometric information were obtained from 70 NK children (6-15 years) living in SK, through questionnaires, interviews and direct measurements. Following the first 2 years in SK, the height and weight of NK children significantly (p = 0.000) improved, yet they were still shorter (p = 0.000) than SK peers, while the prevalence of obesity was similar to those of SK children. The likelihood of remaining stunted was significantly associated with older age and shorter residency in SK (p < 0.05), but there was no significant association with food security situation at birth. Even a short exposure to food affluent environments improved the nutritional status among children, but linear growth deficits are slow to recover as overall nutritional status remains poor compared to peers without exposures to food insecurity.

  7. Nutritional status in children with cancer: Before, during and after therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, R D

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is prevalent in children with cancer at diagnosis, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) where the great majority of children live. It is associated with an added burden of morbidity and mortality. Answers were sought to the best measure of nutritional status in LMIC, the impact of anti-neoplastic therapy, effective interventions to achieve normal nutritional status and the impact of these on clinical outcomes. Arm anthropometry offers reasonable estimates of fat mass and lean body mass that are both impacted adversely by treatment. Nutritional supplementation, including the use of simple local resources, is beneficial and can improve survival. Long-term survivors may continue to exhibit perturbed nutritional status. The prevalence and severity of malnutrition in children with cancer in LMIC demand attention. Opportunities exist to conduct studies in India to examine the effects of nutritional interventions, including on the overall well-being of survivors.

  8. Postural and nutritional status of children involved in football and children that are not involved in sports aged 11 years

    OpenAIRE

    Radaković Mića; Radaković Ksenija; Protić-Gava Branka; Šćepanović Tijana; Radanović Danilo; Marko Gušić; Madić Dejan

    2016-01-01

    Many authors have studied the influence of sports training on postural status and nutritional status of children, finding that there are positive and negative aspects, depending on the given sport. The aim of this study was to determine differences in postural and nutritional status of children who play football and their peers who are not involved in sports. Our sample comprised 141 male respondents, 79 respondents who play football for three years and more, and 62 respondents who do not pla...

  9. Nutritional status in mentally disabled children and adolescents: A study from Western Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Hakime Nogay, Nalan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the nutritional status of mentally disabled children in Turkey on the basis of anthropometric indicators and dietary intake. Methodology: The sample of the study consisted of 77 mentally disabled children with ages between 10 and 18 years. The body mass index and body fat ratios of the children were calculated by measuring their body weight, height, and the skinfold thickness of their triceps and subscapular. Their three-day nutrition consumption was recorded in order to ...

  10. evaluation of nutritional status among school-aged children in rural

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    as the priority of nutritional interventions focus on fetal development and the first years of life. This study .... purpose of the study was to investigate the nutritional status of school children, aged 5 - 12 years in rural ... including demographic information was completed by twenty researchers trained by an academic registered ...

  11. Nutritional status of 1-3-year-old children and maternal care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutritional status of 1-3-year-old children and maternal care behaviours in the Orang Asli of Malaysia. S Shashikala, M Kandiah, MS Zalilah, GL Khor. Abstract. No Abstract. South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition Vol. 18(2) 2005: 173-180. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for ...

  12. Postural and nutritional status of children involved in football and children that are not involved in sports aged 11 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radaković Mića

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many authors have studied the influence of sports training on postural status and nutritional status of children, finding that there are positive and negative aspects, depending on the given sport. The aim of this study was to determine differences in postural and nutritional status of children who play football and their peers who are not involved in sports. Our sample comprised 141 male respondents, 79 respondents who play football for three years and more, and 62 respondents who do not play sports. Postural status was assessed using a modified method of Napoleon Wolanski, while the nutritional status was determined using the BMI formula. Differences in postural and nutritional status were analyzed by x2 test (p≤0.05. Statistically significant differences in postural status between football players and non-sportsmen were found in postural disorder winged blades (p=0.005, (there was a greater oercentage of this disorder in respondents who play football where it was determined that this postural disorder had a higher percentage of respondents who play football. Statistically significant differences were found in nutritional status (p=0.005, confirming a better nutritional status of football players. Early detection of postural disorders, prevention and education of children about proper posture and nutrition are very important. Children's participation in organized physical activities can produce positive effects, but only with the good work of professionals, and with a combination of corrective exercises and specific sports.

  13. Nutritional/Growth Status in a Large Cohort of Medically Fragile Children Receiving Long-Term Enteral Nutrition Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zahra; Marinschek, Sabine; Pahsini, Karoline; Scheer, Peter; Morris, Nicholas; Urlesberger, Berndt; Dunitz-Scheer, Marguerite

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the nutritional status and growth of medically fragile children receiving long-term enteral nutritional support (ENS). A retrospective cross-sectional survey was conducted at a tertiary-level pediatric hospital. Growth features and nutritional intake of children (n = 287) receiving ENS were evaluated. During a period of 5 years (2009-2013), study patients in the age group of 1 to 36 months had been referred for the explicit reason of tube weaning. Data were documented with the help of ARCHIMED (version 46.2) and analyzed using SPSS for Windows version 21. Nutritional/growth status was determined by using World Health Organization growth standard tables. Anthropometric parameters of children were compared with World Health Organization standards, and the prevalence of underweight, wasting, and stunting was very high despite being exclusively or predominantly on ENS. Results revealed that the age of a child, inadequate amount of caloric supply/day, the diagnosis of small-for-gestational age, and the type of tube (nasogastric tube) were significantly associated with growth/nutritional status (P nutritional/growth outcomes. In medically fragile children, ENS does not ensure adequate growth per se. ENS requires highly specialized and individually tailored management and in many cases regular adjustments. Long-term tube feeding plans often seem unable to ensure the required amount of nutritional support, which surely compromise the individual efficacy of ENS.

  14. Nutrition and Goiter Status of Primary School Children in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rev Olaleye

    Faisalabad District, Pakistan. Rural Remote Health. 3(1):130. Amigo H, Erazo M and Bustos P (2000) Heights of childean parents and their children from different ethnicity and social status. Salud Publica Mexico. 42:504-510. Brahmbhatt SR, Brahmbhatt RM, Boyages SC. (2001). Impact of Protein-Energy Malnutrition on.

  15. Nutritional status of foster children in the U.S.: Implications for cognitive and behavioral development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, Ursula A; Makhoul, Zeina; Fisher, Philip A

    2016-11-01

    Children in foster care are at greater risk for poor health, physical, cognitive, behavioral, and developmental outcomes than are children in the general population. Considerable research links early nutrition to later cognitive and behavioral outcomes. The aim of this narrative review is to examine the prevalence of poor nutrition and its relation to subsequent health and development in foster children. Relevant studies for inclusion were identified from numerous sources (e.g., PubMed, Google Scholar, and reference sections). Inclusion criteria were studies published between 1990 and 2016 of (i) the nutritional status of children in foster care or (ii) the nutritional status of children exposed to early adversity (e.g., low-income and internationally adopted children) or (iii) the developmental effects of poor nutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. Two key findings that have adverse implications for cognitive development emerged: (i) the prevalence of anemia and iron-deficiency anemia is higher among foster children than among the general population of children in the U.S., and (ii) the developmental demands of catch-up growth post-placement may lead to micronutrient deficiencies even after children have begun sufficient dietary intake of these nutrients. Moreover, there is a paucity of recent studies on the nutritional status of children in foster care, despite the multiple factors that may place them at risk for malnutrition. Attention to nutritional status among care providers and medical professionals may remove one of the possible negative influences on foster children's development and in turn significantly alter their trajectories and place them on a more positive path early in life. Recommendations for further research, policy, and practice are discussed.

  16. Correlation between Calorie Intake and Nutritional Status of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryo Windaru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD is a severe pervasive developmental disorder with prevalence as high as one in sixty-eight children. Children diagnosed with ASD may have food intake problem and might affect their nutritional status in the future. The objective of this study was to analyze the correlation between total calorie intake and nutritional status of ASD children. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Indigrow Child Development and Autism Center involving 16 patients from October to November 2015. Total calorie intake was assessed by 24-hour food recall and nutritional status was measured by Z-score. Correlation was analyzed using Spearman’s Rho. Results: Overweight and obesity were found in 10 out of 16 ASD children assessed. Total calorie intake was not significantly correlated with nutritional status of ASD children (r=0.021, p=0.940. Conclusions: There is no significant relevance between total calorie intake and nutritional status in ASD children at Indigrow Child Development and Autism Center.

  17. Assessment of nutritional status, cognitive development, and mother-child interaction in Central American refugee children

    OpenAIRE

    Monica Laude

    1999-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted between July and December 1992 to assess the nutritional status, cognitive development, and mother-child interactions in a group of 153 Nicaraguan refugee children living in Costa Rica. Nutritional status was assessed using anthropometric indices. Cognitive development was assessed with the Bayley Scale of Mental Development. Mother-child interaction was assessed with the Nursing Child Assessment Teaching Scale and Caldwell's Home Observation and Measurem...

  18. Growth and nutritional status of children with homozygous sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saqladi, A-W M; Cipolotti, R; Fijnvandraat, K; Brabin, B J

    2008-09-01

    Poor growth and under-nutrition are common in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). This review summarises evidence of nutritional status in children with SCD in relation to anthropometric status, disease severity, body composition, energy metabolism, micronutrient deficiency and endocrine dysfunction. A literature search was conducted on the Medline/PUBMED, SCOPUS, SciELO and LILACS databases to July 2007 using the keywords sickle cell combined with nutrition, anthropometry, growth, height and weight, body mass index, and specific named micronutrients. Forty-six studies (26 cross-sectional and 20 longitudinal) were included in the final anthropometric analysis. Fourteen of the longitudinal studies were conducted in North America, the Caribbean or Europe, representing 78.8% (2086/2645) of patients. Most studies were observational with wide variations in sample size and selection of reference growth data, which limited comparability. There was a paucity of studies from Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, highlighting a large knowledge gap for low-resource settings. There was a consistent pattern of growth failure among affected children from all geographic areas, with good evidence linking growth failure to endocrine dysfunction, metabolic derangement and specific nutrient deficiencies. The monitoring of growth and nutritional status in children with SCD is an essential requirement for comprehensive care, facilitating early diagnosis of growth failure and nutritional intervention. Randomised controlled trials are necessary to assess the potential benefits of nutritional interventions in relation to growth, nutritional status and the pathophysiology of the disease.

  19. Nutritional status of children in two districts of the mountain region of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, M; Neopane, A K; Singh, U K; Aryal, N; Agrawal, K; Shrestha, B

    2013-09-01

    Nutritional status is a prime indicator of health. Generally, three anthropometric indicators are often used to assess nutritional status during childhood and adolescence: underweight (weight-for-age), stunting (height- for-age) and thinness (BMI-for-age). Malnutrition in children is a major public health problem in many developing countries. This study was conducted to assess nutritional status among children attending health camps in two mountainous districts in Nepal. Five hundred and seventy five children below 15 years of age attending the medical camp in Humla and Mugu districts in October 2011 were assessed for nutritional status. For children less than five years, weight for age, weight for height and height for age as per WHO classification, and for children between five to 15 years age specific values of height, weight and Body Mass Index (BMI) were calculated. In Humla district, 28.2% children were undernourished, 8.8% wasted and 22.4% stunted in less than five years. In the same age group, 31.7% children were undernourished, 9.4% wasted and 29.4% stunted in Mugu district. In the age group five to 15 years, thinness was seen in 22.4% and 29.4% children in Humla and Mugu respectively. Malnutrition (underweight, stunting, wasting and thinness) still constitutes a major health problem among Nepalese children, particularly in mountainous regions.

  20. Mothers' perceptions about the nutritional status of their overweight children: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caliandra Francescatto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: this systematic review aims to explore and describe the studies that have as a primary outcome the identification of mothers' perception of the nutritional status of their children. SOURCES: the PubMed, Embase, LILACS, and SciELO databases were researched, regardless of language or publication date. The terms used for the search, with its variants, were: Nutritional Status, Perception, Mother, Maternal, Parents, Parental. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: after screening of 167 articles, 41 were selected for full text reading, of which 17 were included in the review and involved the evaluation of the perception of mothers on the nutritional status of 57,700 children and adolescents. The methodological quality of the studies ranged from low to excellent. The proportion of mothers who inadequately perceived the nutritional status of their children was high, and was the most common underestimation for children with overweight or obesity. CONCLUSION: despite the increasing prevalence of obesity in pediatric age, mothers have difficulty in properly perceiving the nutritional status of their children, which may compromise referral to treatment programs.

  1. Dietary diversity is associated with nutritional status of Orang Asli children in Krau Wildlife Reserve, Pahang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ey Chua, E Y; Zalilah, M S; Ys Chin, Y S; Norhasmah, S

    2012-04-01

    It is known that dietary diversity improves diet quality and nutritional status of young children. This study aimed to determine the relationship between dietary diversity and nutritional status of Orang Asli children in Krau Wildlife Reserve. A total of 216 children from three Orang Asli sub-tribes (Jah Hut, Temuan and Che Wong) aged 1 to 6 years from 162 households in 16 villages participated in this cross-sectional study. Children and mothers were measured for body weight and height. Mothers were interviewed for household socio-demographic information and diet diversity of children in the last 7 days. Diet diversity score (DDS) was calculated based on 15 food groups. There was a high prevalence of underweight (50.9%) and stunting (61.6%) in Orang Asli children. For mothers, 11.1%, 27.8% and 7.4% were underweight, overweight and obese, respectively. Mean DDS of children was 6.38 [95% CI-6.10, 6.65] of the possible 15. Higher DDS of children was significantly related to older age (p nutrition problem among Orang Asli children living within the forest reserve. Efforts to promote dietary diversity should emphasise traditional and nutritious foods that could improve health and nutritional status of the Orang Asli children.

  2. Nutritional Status of New Orleans, Mississippi and Alabama Head Start Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jack L.

    Three purposes guided compilation of this final report on the nutritional status of New Orleans, Mississippi, and Alabama Head Start children: (1) to evaluate the causes of anemia through detailed studies of urban New Orleans preschool children and their mothers, (2) to study the effect of dietary supplementation of school feeding programs upon…

  3. Nutritional Status of Mexican American Preschool Children in East Los Angeles and San Diego.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jane S.; And Others

    Results of a 1968 pilot study of the nutritional status of Mexican American preschool children in East Los Angeles and San Diego are reported in this document. Questionnaire data collected from mothers of preschool children are presented in terms of a description of families, prenatal care, clinical examinations, dietary intakes, and biochemical…

  4. Nutritional status of soil-transmitted helminthiasis-infected and uninfected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly Simarmata

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion We find significantly more STH infected children with mild to moderate malnutrition than the uninfected group. We also find significantly more mildly to moderately malnourished children with moderate infection intensity than mild infection intensity. Higher severity of infection is associated with lower nutritional status.

  5. Nutritional status of under-five children in Libya: a national ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To describe the nutritional status of children under-five years of age in Libya. Population and methods: A secondary analysis of data of 5348 children taken from a national representative, two-stage, cluster-sample survey that was performed in 1995. Results: Prevalence rates of underweight, wasting, stunting, and ...

  6. Assessment of nutritional status of children attending paediatric outpatient department at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreyash J Gandhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The nutrition status is always neglected issue of public health. The high prevalence of malnutrition in NFHS data gives alarm to work for the children who are assets of our country in future. Objectives To study the nutritional status of children attending pediatric OPD by anthropometric measurements and to know the health status of these children and their relation with nutritional status. Methods The nutritional profile of children of age group 0-5 years attending Paediatric OPD at New Civil Hospital (NCH, Surat was studied. Stratification to get equal representation of both gender by enrolling 50 boys and 50girls of each age group 0-6 months, 6-12 months, 1-2 years, 2-3 years, 3-4 years and 4-5 years was done. Total 600 children of age group of 0-5 years were enrolled. Results As per WHO growth standards, 17.5%, 46% and 39.33% children had wasting, stunting and underweight respectively. Total malnutrition cases were 386 with a prevalence of 64.3 %. Age group wise prevalence of under nutrition was highest in 37-48 months age group (69.2 %. As per assessment of nutritional status of children aged 6-60 months using MUAC, 45.8 % children have mild to moderate malnutrition whereas 1.8 % has severe malnutrition. Conclusion Malnutrition is more in boys compared to girls. Malnutrition was more prevalent in 12-60 months age group children and was found statistically significant. Reduction of malnutrition in 0-5 age group can be ensured by availability of supplementary feed.

  7. Nutritional Status of Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Y. Kiddie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This is a pilot study of the dietary intake and nutrient status of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD. Method. Nutritional assessment of 43 children aged 6–12 with ADHD was performed using a 3-day food record, 24-hour recall, and serum assessors. Results. Macronutrient intake and consumption of Low-Nutrient Foods were comparable to population norms; however, 66% were found to be deficient in zinc and 23% in copper. Conclusions. This pilot study reports the food intake and nutrient status of children with ADHD and shows a predisposition for low zinc and copper status in ADHD.

  8. The impact of community context on children's health and nutritional status in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lei

    2017-04-01

    The link between community environment and individual health outcomes has been widely documented in Western literature, but little is known about whether community context influences children's health over and above individual characteristics in developing countries. This study examines how community socioeconomic status (SES) influences children's self-rated health and nutritional status in urban and rural China and explores whether the effects of community SES vary by a child's gender and family background. Using data from the China Family Penal Studies in 2010, this study focuses on children aged 10-15 years old living in 261 urban neighborhoods and 293 rural villages in China. Multilevel regression models are estimated to examine the effect of community SES on the probability of reporting poor/fair health and nutritional status measured by height for age while controlling for individual and family characteristics. The results suggest that community SES has a positive and curvilinear effect on children's health and nutritional status in urban China, and it only positively influences children's nutrition in rural China. Community SES has a stronger effect for boys than for girls, and for children in poorer families and families with lower levels of parental involvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. ROLE OF MATERNAL EDUCATION & OCCUPATION IN THE NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF UNDER THREE CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaili Vyas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Research question: To determine the role of  Maternal  Education & Occupation in the nutritional status of  <3yrs children. Objectives: To assess the role of  maternal education & occupation in the nutritional status of  <3yrs children.  Study design: Cross sectional study. Settings:In the field practice area of Department of Community Medicine, Dehradun. Participants:500 children between 0-3years. Statistical Analysis:Chi Square . Results:  Majority of mothers (41.20% were found to be illiterate & of these majority had undernourished children (73.30%. In our study, most (92.20% of the mothers were housewives or were unemployed ,whereas maximum undernutrition (88.46% was found in children whose mothers were unskilled labourer by occupation, whereas children of housewives were found to be only 59.22%  undernourished.

  10. Nutritional status of children from low-income countries arriving in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhassen-García, Moncef; Velasco-Tirado, Virginia; Lopez-Bernus, Amparo; Muñoz Bellido, Juan Luis; Muro, Antonio; Cordero, Miguel; Pardo-Lledias, Javier

    2017-09-01

    Nutritional problems, anaemia and infectious diseases are the main causes of morbidity and mortality in children and adolescents in tropical and subtropical areas. The main objective of this study was to determine the nutritional status in children from low-income countries who migrated to Spain and the value of the usual biochemistry markers of nutrition in these children, as well as to evaluate the nutritional status associated with imported infectious diseases. Moreover, we evaluated the association between anaemia and nutrition problems. We prospectively evaluated immigrants younger than 18 years of age, from tropical or subtropical areas, who were referred on suspicion of or screening for imported diseases. Detailed medical records and physical and oral examinations were obtained. Blood count and biochemical measures of micronutrients and nutritional biomarkers were performed. We included microbiological methods for diagnosing imported infectious diseases according to the region of origin and clinical setting. 373 minors were evaluated, including 250 (67.0%) from sub-Saharan Africa, 67 (18.0%) from North Africa and 56 (15.0%) from Latin America. The mean BMI of the subjects was 19.8±0.2. BMI increased by 0.02 for each month of stay in Spain. Nineteen patients (6.8%) had a nutritional risk of growth problems, and 50 (17.8%) were overweight. The time since arrival was longer in patients who were overweight (pnutritional issue. A low level of ferritin is the most frequently detected nutritional problem and the main cause of anaemia.

  11. Nutritional status of children on the National School Nutrition Programme in Capricorn District, Limpopo Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Malongane

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. School feeding programmes are intended to alleviate short-term hunger, improve nutrition and cognition of children, andprovide incomes to families.Objectives. To assess the nutritional status of children receiving meals provided by the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP inCapricorn Municipality, Limpopo Province, South Africa.Methods. The setting was 18 randomly selected schools on the NSNP in Capricorn District. The total sample comprised 602 randomlyselected schoolchildren from grades 4 to 7, aged 10 (26.6%, 11 (35.4% and 12 (35.4%. Socioeconomic characteristics, anthropometricmeasurements, dietary patterns and school attendance were determined. Children were interviewed to assess their nutritional status using avalidated questionnaire. Descriptive statistics such as means, standard deviations (SDs and ranges were used for socioeconomic parametersand dietary patterns, and z-scores for anthropometric data.Results. The results showed that boys (9.5% and girls (7.8% were underweight. The prevalence of stunting in the sample was 11.3% forboys and 7.4% for girls, whereas boys (3.6% and girls (4.2%were wasted, with az-score of –2 SD. School attendance was good.Conclusion. The nutritional status of most subjects in the study was within the acceptable range as indicated by the assessment of growthusing anthropometric measurements.

  12. Nutritional status of children aged 3-6 years in a rural area of tamilnadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R, Anuradha; Sivanandham, Ranjit; Salome, Sam Dashni; Francis, Roniya; D, Roopa; Sampavi, Sakthi; S R, Sabu; Prasad, Ranjit

    2014-10-01

    A child's entire life is determined in large measures by the food given to him during his first five years. Since childhood is the most vulnerable phase in the life of human being, nutritional inadequacies will result in the hampering of the development of the body. Future of the country is determined by the growing generation of the country. a) To assess the nutritional status of children aged 3-6 y in a rural area of TamilNadu. b) To identify the factors associated with the nutritional status of the above study population. Kuthambakkam village in Tamilnadu, Cross sectional study. Total number of children aged 3-6 y is 172 in Kuthambakkam village. The entire children aged 3-6 y was included in the study. Mothers of the children were interviewed using an interview schedule to collect information regarding the sociodemographic profile, feeding practices, and immunization status. Socio-economic status was assessed using modified BG Prasad's classification. Weight of the children was measured using a portable weighing machine. Nutritional status among 3-6 y old children was assessed by computing weight for age (standard used - National Centre For Health Statistics (NCHS) standards for weight for age) and grading of nutritional status of the children was done using the Indian Academy of Paediatrics (IAP) classification. Grade I to Grade IV nutritional grade is taken as undernourished. Statistical Analytical: Prevalence will be expressed in percentage and Chi-square test will be used to find association with factors. The prevalence of under-nutrition (≤ 80 percentage of standard weight for age) was 66.5%. The prevalence of grade 1 malnourishment was 46.2%.The prevalence of under nourishment increased with increasing age and the difference was found to be statistically significant (pnutritional status. Community based preventive measures should be taken to allievate malnutrition. Health education to the mothers on dietary practices like feeding their children with

  13. Household food insecurity, nutritional status and morbidity in Brazilian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubert, Muriel Bauermann; Spaniol, Ana Maria; Bortolini, Gisele Ane; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2016-08-01

    To identify the association of household food insecurity (HFI) with anthropometric status, the risk of vitamin A deficiency and anaemia, morbidities such as cough and fever, and hospitalizations for diarrhoea and pneumonia in children under 5 years old. Cross-sectional study using data from the 2006 Brazilian Demographic and Health Survey. HFI was measured with the Brazilian Food Insecurity Measurement Scale (EBIA). Vitamin A deficiency and anaemia were assessed in blood samples. Child morbidities were reported by the child's mother and included cough, fever, and hospitalizations for diarrhoea and pneumonia. Regression results were expressed as unadjusted and adjusted OR and corresponding 95 % CI for severe food insecurity, with statistical significance set at Ppneumonia, wasting or overweight. The prevalence of cough, fever, hospitalization for diarrhoea and stunting were associated with degree of HFI severity. There was a significant association of morbidities and stunting with severe food insecurity (v. food secure). After controlling for confounders, the association between severe food insecurity (v. food secure/rest of food insecurity categories) and the prevalence of common morbidities remained strong, showing that severely food-insecure children had a greater likelihood of experiencing cough (adjusted OR=1·79) and of being hospitalized for diarrhoea (adjusted OR=2·55). Severe HFI was associated with cough and severe diarrhoea among Brazilian children.

  14. Mothers' conceptions about excess weight in infancy and the nutritional status of their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Janaína Paula Costa; Sarubbi, Vicente; Nascimento, Viviane Gabriela; Bertoli, Ciro João; Gallo, Paulo Rogério; Leone, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    To analyze maternal conceptions about excess weight in infancy and the nutritional status of their preschool-aged children. A mixed, exploratory study was performed using semi-structured interviews. Two study groups were defined: a group of 16 mothers of children with excess weight and a group of 15 mothers of eutrophic children. The interviews were submitted to content analysis using CHIC software (Classification Hiérarchique Implicative et Cohésitive¯). The mothers of children with excess weight tended to conceive thin children as malnourished, while those of normal weight children emphasized the influence of family and genetics as determinants of a child's nutritional status. Although there was a certain consensus among the mothers that an unhealthy diet contributes to the risk of a child developing excess weight, the concept of genetics as a determinant of a child's nutritional status was also present in the dialogue from the mothers of both groups. This result indicates a lack of clarity regarding the influence of eating behavior and family lifestyle on weight gain and the formation of a child's eating habits. Both groups indicated that the mother has a decisive role in the eating habits of her child; however, the mothers of children with excess weight did not seem to take ownership of this concept when addressing the care of their own children. Differences in conceptions, including taking ownership of care, may contribute to the development of excess weight in preschool-aged children.

  15. Nutritional status of children with inflammatory bowel disease in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mouzan, Mohammad Issa; Al Edreesi, Mohammed Hadi; Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman Abdullah; Saadah, Omar Ibrahim; Al Qourain, Abdulaziz Abdullatif; Al Mofarreh, Mohammad Abdullah; Al Saleem, Khalid Abdulrahman

    2016-02-07

    To assess the prevalence of nutritional disorders in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Saudi Arabia. The data from a national cohort of children newly diagnosed with IBD between 2003 and 2012 were analyzed. The diagnosis of IBD and the differentiation between Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) were confirmed by gastroenterologists according to the standard criteria. The body mass index (BMI) of each child [weight (kg)/height(2) (m)] was calculated at the time of diagnosis. The World Health Organization standards and references were used and the BMI for age > +1 and nutritional status between children underweight. Awareness of this finding is important for patient care.

  16. The Relevance of Assessment of Nutritional Status in Children with Chronic Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    L. A. Gandaeva; T. E. Borovik; Ye. N. Basargina; N. G. Zvonkova; V. A. Skvortsova; N. N. Semyonova; T. N. Stepanova; T. V. Bushueva

    2015-01-01

    The article provides information on disorders of nutritional status (malnutrition) in children with chronic heart failure (congenital heart diseases, cardiomyopathy), discusses the causes of growth retardation and failure to thrive. The factors of the risk of nutritionaldeficiency development and the possibility of its correction with the use of nutritional products with a specially given composition. It is presented the clinical observation of an infant with congenital heart disease, aortic ...

  17. Effect of a School-based Nutrition Education Program on the Nutritional Status of Primary School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Keshani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Regarding the high prevalence of unhealthy food habits among Iranian children, we aimed to assess the effect of a school-based nutrition education program on nutritional status of primary school students in Shiraz. Materials and Methods: This randomized educational controlled trial was carried out on 221 primary school age children selected by cluster sampling in the elementary schools of Shiraz-Iran. The intervention consisted of 6 nutrition education sessions carried out through one year for children, using active learning methods. Mothers’ education was carried out in person in both lecture and question-answer sessions also via sending text messages and pamphlets. Weight, height and waist circumference (WC of children were measured before and after the intervention. Also a 168-item food frequency questionnaire was completed. Two separate nutrition knowledge questionnaires were filled up by children and their mothers. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results: 171 children (83 in the case and 88 in the control group, aged 9.5-10.5 years, completed the study. Anthropometric and nutritional knowledge of the participants in both the intervention and control groups was significantly increased. Weight, height, WC and nutritional knowledge increased significantly more in the intervention group compared to the controls. Consumption of fruits and vegetables decreased in the intervention group while plain sugar and fast foods intake increased among the controls. There were no significant differences between the changes in the intake of any of the food groups in the two groups. Conclusions: In conclusion, the designed nutrition education program could increase students’ nutritional knowledge, and lead to a non-significant change towards reducing the consumption of unhealthy foods such as fast foods, sweets and salty snacks.

  18. [Evaluation of nutritional status of school-age children after implementation of "Nutrition Improvement Program" in rural area in Hunan, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhu-Juan; Mao, Guang-Xu; Wang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Li; Chen, Yan

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the nutritional status of school-age children in rural area in Hunan, China from 2012 to 2015 and to evaluate the effectiveness of the "Nutrition Improvement Program for Compulsory Education Students in Rural Area" (hereinafter referred to as "Nutrition Improvement Program"). The nutritional status of school-age children aged 6-14 years was evaluated after the implementation of the "Nutrition Improvement Program" and the changing trend of the children's nutritional status was analyzed. The statistical analysis was performed on the monitoring data of the school-age children aged 6-14 years in rural area in Hunan, China from 2012 to 2015, which came from "The Nutrition and Health Status Monitoring and Evaluation System of Nutrition Improvement Program for Compulsory Education Students in Rural Area". In 2015, female students aged 6-7 years in rural area in Hunan, China had a significantly greater body length than the rural average in China (PNutrition Improvement Program", the prevalence rate of growth retardation decreased (PNutrition Improvement Program" has achieved some success, but the nutritional status of school-age children has not improved significantly. Overweight/obesity and malnutrition are still present. Therefore, to promote the nutritional status of school-age children it is recommended to improve the measures for the "Nutrition Improvement Program".

  19. Nutritional status as a predictor of duration of mechanical ventilation in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippa, Rafaela B; Silva, Paola S; Barbosa, Eliana; Bresolin, Nilzete L; Mehta, Nilesh M; Moreno, Yara M F

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) often are malnourished. The aim of this study was to determine the role of nutritional status on admission as a predictor of the duration of mechanical ventilation in critically ill children. This was a single-center, prospective cohort study, including consecutive children (ages 1 mo to 15 y) admitted to a PICU. Demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, and nutritional status were recorded and patients were followed up until hospital discharge. Nutritional status was evaluated by anthropometric parameters and malnutrition was considered if the Z-scores for the parameters were ≤-2. Adjusted Cox's regression analysis was used to determine the association between nutritional status and duration of mechanical ventilation. In all, 72 patients were included. The prevalence of malnutrition was 41.2%, according to height-for-age Z-score, 18.6% according to weight-for-height Z-score, and 22.1% according body mass index-for-age Z-score. Anthropometrical parameters that predicted the duration of mechanical ventilation were weight-for-age (hazard ratio [HR], 2.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-5.18); height-for-age (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.44-4.28); and upper arm muscle area-for-age (HR, 5.22; 95% CI, 1.19-22.76). Malnutrition, based on a variety of anthropometric variables, was associated with the duration of mechanical ventilation in this cohort of critically ill children. Assessment of nutritional status by anthropometry should be performed on admission to the PICU to allow targeted nutritional rehabilitation for the subset of children with existing malnutrition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Nutritional status in children with intellectual disabilities based on anthropometric profile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossio-Bolaños, Marco; Vidal-Espinoza, Rubén; Lagos-Luciano, Juan; Gómez-Campos, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Anthropometric variables such as weight, height and body length in children and adolescents with and without intellectual disabilities should be studied in connection with nutritional status, physical growth and biological maturation. a) to analyze the anthropometric profile based on nutritional status, b) to determine the prevalence of overweight and short stature c) to propose equations for predicting height from anthropometric variables. A total of 49 children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities, and from a special education school were studied (30 boys and 19 girls). Weight, height, trunk-cephalic height, forearm and foot length were evaluated. The calculation of nutritional status resulted in the establishment of nutritional categories: underweight, normal and overweight. The anthropometric profile of males varies significantly when classified according to nutritional categories (P.05). Also, high values of overweight prevalence were observed in both genders (43% of boys and 26% of girls). Variables such as age, weight, length of the forearm in females, and foot length in males are good predictors of height (R(2) = 91-94% males and R(2) = 87% females). A high percentage of overweight cases were observed; therefore, rigorous control and monitoring of nutritional status are suggested. The proposed regression equations could be an option in schools to easily and simply predict height. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  1. Nutritional status of indigenous children: findings from the First National Survey of Indigenous People's Health and Nutrition in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Bernardo L; Santos, Ricardo Ventura; Welch, James R; Cardoso, Andrey M; dos Santos, Janaína Vieira; Assis, Ana Marlúcia Oliveira; Lira, Pedro C I; Coimbra, Carlos E A

    2013-04-03

    The prevalence of undernutrition, which is closely associated with socioeconomic and sanitation conditions, is often higher among indigenous than non-indigenous children in many countries. In Brazil, in spite of overall reductions in the prevalence of undernutrition in recent decades, the nutritional situation of indigenous children remains worrying. The First National Survey of Indigenous People's Health and Nutrition in Brazil, conducted in 2008-2009, was the first study to evaluate a nationwide representative sample of indigenous peoples. This paper presents findings from this study on the nutritional status of indigenous children nutritional status of children underweight, and wasting were 25.7%, 5.9%, and 1.3%, respectively. Even after controlling for confounding, the prevalence rates of underweight and stunting were higher among children in the North region, in low socioeconomic status households, in households with poorer sanitary conditions, with anemic mothers, with low birthweight, and who were hospitalized during the prior 6 months. A protective effect of breastfeeding for underweight was observed for children under 12 months. The elevated rate of stunting observed in indigenous children approximates that of non-indigenous Brazilians four decades ago, before major health reforms greatly reduced its occurrence nationwide. Prevalence rates of undernutrition were associated with socioeconomic variables including income, household goods, schooling, and access to sanitation services, among other variables. Providing important baseline data for future comparison, these findings further suggest the relevance of social, economic, and environmental factors at different scales (local, regional, and national) for the nutritional status of indigenous peoples.

  2. [Study on status of nutrition in children under three years old in rural area in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Wu, Qi; Tian, Xiao-Bo

    2008-03-01

    To understand the nutrition status of children under three years in rural area of western China and to explore the influencing factors so as to provide reasonable suggestions for policy making. Use PPS sampling method to investigate the 13,532 children under three years old. Height and weight were used as nutritional indexes. The prevalence of stunting (height for age Z-score Z-score Z-score influencing factors of malnutrition. Under-6-month children who were not taken care by their mothers showed higher risk of stunting. Over-6-month children stunting had significant relationship with age, gender, sibling order, nationality,maternal educational level,special cooking for children and residential region. Underweight of over-6-month children significantly related to age, nationality, and maternal educational level, yolk supply during 6-8 month old and living region. Malnutrition was really prevalent among children in China,suggesting that intervention should be done according to the influencing factors.

  3. [Nutritional status and pulmonary function in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umławska, Wioleta; Krzyżanowska, Monika; Zielińska, Anna; Sands, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Somatic development and respiratory function are the most important prognostic factors for the course of the disease and the expected lifespan of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (cF). Aim of the study was to evaluate nutritional status and pulmonary function in children and adolescents suffering from cystic fibrosis. Pulmonary function was evaluated in relation to several factors connected to the course of the disease. Anthropometric and spirometric data were extracted from the medical histories of 89 children diagnosed and treated at the institute of Mother and child in Warsaw. Molecular DnA was analyzed in all the patients in order to determine the type of CFTR gene mutation. Anthropometric parameters were expressed in terms of standard deviations away from age-specific and sex-specific reference for the population of Warsaw. the studied children were significantly shorter than healthy children. Ten of the children (11.2%) had severe growth disturbances. nutritional status was also adversely affected. Almost 50% of the children were mal-nourished. the children suffered from a deficit in muscularity and adiposity. The percent of predicted FeV1 was highest in those children who were well-nourished, and lowest in the severely malnourished patients. the effect of the nutritional status on pulmonary function was observed. chronic infection by P. aeruginosa had a marked adverse effect on pulmonary function.

  4. Bone mass in Indian children--relationships to maternal nutritional status and diet during pregnancy: the Pune Maternal Nutrition Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganpule, A; Yajnik, C S; Fall, C H D; Rao, S; Fisher, D J; Kanade, A; Cooper, C; Naik, S; Joshi, N; Lubree, H; Deshpande, V; Joglekar, C

    2006-08-01

    Bone mass is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Recent studies have highlighted associations between maternal nutritional status during pregnancy and bone mass in the offspring. We hypothesized that maternal calcium intakes and circulating micronutrients during pregnancy are related to bone mass in Indian children. DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Nutritional status was measured at 18 and 28 wk gestation in 797 pregnant rural Indian women. Measurements included anthropometry, dietary intakes (24-h recall and food frequency questionnaire), physical workload (questionnaire), and circulating micronutrients (red cell folate and plasma ferritin, vitamin B12, and vitamin C). Six years postnatally, total body and total spine bone mineral content and bone mineral density (BMD) were measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in the children (n = 698 of 762 live births) and both parents. Both parents' DXA measurements were positively correlated with the equivalent measurements in the children (P Children of mothers who had a higher frequency of intake of calcium-rich foods during pregnancy (milk, milk products, pulses, non-vegetarian foods, green leafy vegetables, fruit) had higher total and spine bone mineral content and BMD, and children of mothers with higher folate status at 28 wk gestation had higher total and spine BMD, independent of parental size and DXA measurements. Modifiable maternal nutritional factors may influence bone health in the offspring. Fathers play a role in determining their child's bone mass, possibly through genetic mechanisms or through shared environment.

  5. Child care practices and nutritional status of children aged 0-2 years ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design: Cross sectional descriptive survey using a structured questionnaire and taking of anthropometric measurements to determine the nutritional status of children aged 0 to 2 years. In addition, two day (10 hour) observations were conducted in a subsample of households to assess time allocation for the main child care ...

  6. Dietary diversity and nutritional status of pre-school children from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional survey was carried out in Gitega health zone (Burundi) and Butembo health zone (Democratic Republic of Congo.DRC) with the objective of establishing dietary diversity and nutritional status of pre-school children fromrural-banana dependent households. The two health zones were selected based on ...

  7. Childcare practices and nutritional status of children aged 6-36 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative cross-sectional study was carried out to compare childcare practices and nutritional status of children aged 6–36 months in Mwembesongo and Mjimpya wards that had long and short experiences respectively with the Child Survival, Protection and Development (CSPD) programme. The purpose of the study ...

  8. Evaluation of nutritional status among school-aged children in rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anthropometric indices of heights and weights were obtained from 411 school- aged children, (5-12 years old) in 5 villages (Asakraka, Awiseasu, Miaso, Oframase and Oworobong) during June 2012. Anthropometric parameters and influences that contributed to nutritional status (environmental, health facilities, availability ...

  9. Factors associated with the iron nutritional status of Brazilian children aged 4 to 7 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercílio Paulino ANDRÉ

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate factors associated with the iron nutritional status of Brazilian children aged 4 to 7 years in the city of Viçosa, Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 357 children aged 4-7 years who had been followed-up up for during their first six months of life by the Breastfeeding Support Program. Socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, feeding practices, nutritional status (height-for-age and body mass index-for-age, and serum ferritin and hemoglobin concentrations were evaluated. Multiple linear regression analysis was carried out to evaluate factors independently associated with iron nutritional status (hemoglobin and ferritin, considering α=0.05 as the significance level. Results The prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency was (34 9.52% and (11 11.00%, respectively. The factors independently associated with anemia were younger child age, low maternal education, low height-for-age Z-scores, and children of single and separated mothers or widows. Iron deficiency was associated with child younger age and consumption of chocolates and chocolate flavored milk. Conclusion The results obtained allow us to conclude that anemia among children 4-7 years of age is a public health problem in the city of Viçosa, Minas Gerais. Therefore, there is a need for intervention measures targeting children in this age group. These measures can be implemented through food and nutritional education by encouraging the consumption of iron-rich foods.

  10. Nutritional status in children and adolescents with leukemia: An emphasis on clinical outcomes in low and middle income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ronald D; Mosby, Terezie T

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this narrative review is to examine the information available on the nutritional status of children with leukemia in low and middle income countries (LMICs), where the great majority of them live and malnutrition is prevalent, in order to identify best practices and remaining deficits in knowledge. Literature relevant to measurement of nutritional status and the impact of nutritional status on important clinical outcomes in this population, and others of relevance, was reviewed. Arm anthropometry provides more accurate information on nutritional status than measures based on body weight in children with cancer. Both over- and under-nutrition are important determinants of tolerance of chemotherapy, compliance with treatment, relapse of disease, and survival. These relationships are subject to change with nutritional intervention. There are valuable roles for educational tools and 'ready-to-use-therapeutic-foods'. Assessment of nutritional status is mandatory in this population and accomplishable at various levels of sophistication according to available resources. Recognition of the fundamental role of nutritional status in affecting outcomes in children with leukemia is expanding, but knowledge gaps remain. An apparently counter-intuitive strategy of caloric restriction may be worthy of exploration. There is a particular need to establish normative data, including measures of body composition, in children in LMICs. Developing adaptive clinical practice guidelines for the measurement of nutritional status and for nutritional interventions, incorporating assessment of health-related quality of life, are evident priorities in the care of children with leukemia in LMICs.

  11. Nutritional status at diagnosis in children with cancer. 2. An assessment by arm anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ronald; Collins, Laura; Nayiager, Trishana; Doring, Nancy; Kennedy, Charlene; Halton, Jacqueline; Walker, Scott; Sala, Alessandra; Webber, Colin

    2011-04-01

    Assessment of nutritional status in children with cancer is important but measures based on weight can be problematic at diagnosis, especially in those with advanced disease. Likewise, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry may be confounded by other radiological procedures and is not commonly available in low-income countries where most children with cancer live. Arm anthropometry is not subject to these constraints. In a study sample of 99 Canadian patients with cancer at diagnosis, mid-upper arm circumference correlated well with lean body mass as measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry but triceps skin fold thickness was a poor predictor of fat mass. Arm anthropometry can be a useful tool for the measurement of nutritional status in children with cancer. However, further studies, particularly in low-income countries and in children with solid tumors at diagnosis, are required to determine the full extent of its utility.

  12. The Relevance of Assessment of Nutritional Status in Children with Chronic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Gandaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides information on disorders of nutritional status (malnutrition in children with chronic heart failure (congenital heart diseases, cardiomyopathy, discusses the causes of growth retardation and failure to thrive. The factors of the risk of nutritionaldeficiency development and the possibility of its correction with the use of nutritional products with a specially given composition. It is presented the clinical observation of an infant with congenital heart disease, aortic coarctation and patent ductus arteriosus, chronic heart failure 2B-A st. and severe malnutrition. The correction of nutritional status using a specialized formula for enteral nutrition in the course of adequate medical therapy allowed to improve the general condition of a patient and positive dynamics of body weight.

  13. Household food insecurity and nutritional status of children and women in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek; Singh, Ashish; Ram, Faujdar

    2014-03-01

    Information on the association between household food insecurity and nutritional status of children and women based on a nationally representative sample is not available from Nepal. To examine the association between food insecurity and nutritional status of children and married women in Nepal using data from the 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey. The Household Food Insecurity Access Scale was used to assess food insecurity in the 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey. We used body mass index (BMI) to assess the nutritional status of married women, and stunting, wasting, and underweight to assess the nutritional status of children under 5 years of age. Binary logistic regression and multinomial logistic regression were performed to examine the associations. In severely food-insecure households, 51% of children were stunted and 40% were underweight; 27% of married women had a BMI below 18.5 kg/m2; children were 1.50 (95% CI, 1.15 to 1.97) and 1.40 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.85) times as likely as children in food-secure households to be stunted and underweight, respectively; and married women were 1.5 (95% CI, 1.17 to 1.92) times as likely as married women in food-secure households to have a BMI below 18.5 kg/m2. No association was found between household food insecurity and wasting among children. There is a significant association between food insecurity and malnutrition among children in Nepal. Among women, food insecurity is associated with underweight (BMI or = 25.0 kg/m2).

  14. Nutritional status of children during and post-global economic crisis in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, ChunMing; He, Wu; Wang, YuYing; Deng, LiNa; Jia, FengMei

    2011-08-01

    To describe the impact of the global economic crisis on the nutritional status of children in China during and after the crisis. Data from 1990 to 2010 were sourced from the National Food and Nutrition Surveillance System. Approximately 16 000 children under 5 years old were selected using a stratified random cluster method from 40 surveillance sites. Anthropometric and hemoglobin measurements for children under 5 were conducted. Nutritional status was determined according to WHO child growth standards. Prevalence of underweight and stunting in children under 5 had a downward trend. Underweight prevalence was close to normal (less than 5%), with prevalence of stunting 12.6% in 2009 and 12.1% in 2010 in rural areas. Prevalence of stunting in infants under 6 months and 6-12 months old in poorer rural areas increased from 5.7%-9.1% and 6.7%-12.5%, respectively, in 2008-2009. This trend also continued post-crisis in 2010. Prevalence of stunting in children left behind by mothers was 20%-30% higher than in children the same age in general and poorer rural areas. Prevalence of anemia in children did not change in rural areas, but prevalence of anemia in all age groups increased in poorer rural areas, especially in children under 24 months old. Level reached 30%-40% in 2009, and fluctuated in 2010. The nutritional status of children under 5 was comparatively stable during and after the global economic crisis, attributable to the Chinese government's policy response. The nutritional status in poorer rural areas fluctuated in response to the economic crisis and, thus, relevant action and intervention must be taken immediately to help the most vulnerable population in poorer rural areas. A proper national nutritional strategy for children under 2 years old, including nutrition supplementation for pregnant women and in-home fortification for complementary feeding, should be initiated. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by

  15. A Study on Nutritional Status of Rural School going Children in Kavre District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, D I; Haque, M K; Sharma, K; Mehta, D K; Shakya, R

    2015-01-01

    Background Childhood is a time of active growth in terms of physical size, mental, emotional and psychological development. Normal growth is dependent on adequate nutrition and encompasses major transformations from birth to adulthood. Nutrition is a focal point for health and well being; and has special significance in countries with disadvantages in socioeconomic and hygienic standards. Objective The objective of the present study was to assess the nutritional status in terms of prevalence of underweight, stunting and thinness among rural school going children. Method The present study was cross-sectional study, conducted on 438 rural school going children (169 male and 259 female) with the age group 4-16 years, during the period from April 2014 to July 2014. Age was recorded in year; height and weight were measured in centimeter and kilogram respectively. BMI was calculated by using standard equation. Result The present study concluded that the nutritional status in terms of prevalence of underweight, stunting and thinness were found to be 30.85%, 24.54% and 10.05% respectively among rural school going children of Kavre district. It was revealed that 37.87% was underweight, 29.59% was stunted and 11.25% was thinness among male children whereas in female children, 26.27% was underweight, 21.24% was stunted and 9.27% was thinness. Hence, high prevalence of underweight, stunting and thinness were observed in male than in female children. Conclusion The present study has successfully documented the nutritional status in terms of prevalence of underweight, stunting and thinness among the rural school going children of Kavre district. The results of the present study will be useful for policy makers in their endeavor to formulate various developmental and health care programs.

  16. Intensive nutritional support improves the nutritional status and body composition in severely malnourished children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Contreras, Andrea A; Vásquez-Garibay, Edgar M; Romero-Velarde, Enrique; Ibarra-Gutiérrez, Ana Isabel; Troyo-Sanromán, Rogelio; Sandoval-Montes, Imelda E

    2014-04-01

    To demonstrate that a nutritional support intervention, via naso-enteral tube-feeding or gastrostomy, has a significant impact on the nutritional status and body composition in severely malnourished children with cerebral palsy spastic quadriplegia. Thirteen patients with moderate/severe malnutrition and cerebral palsy spastic quadriplegia who were fed via naso-enteral tube-feeding or gastrostomy were included in a cohort study. Anthropometric measurements and estimated body composition by bioelectric impedance analysis were obtained. ANOVA and Wilcoxon tests were used. During the four weeks of nutritional recovery, an average weight increase of 2700 g was achieved. There were significant increases in anthropometric indicators, including BMI and weight/length (p < 0.01). The increase in arm fat area was significantly higher than the increase in arm muscle area (104.5 vs 17.5%). Intensive nutritional support for four weeks had a significant effect on the nutritional status and body composition of severe and moderately malnourished children with cerebral palsy spastic quadriplegia. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  17. Nutritional status according to sensitized food allergens in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ha-Na; Hong, Soyoung; Lee, Soo-Hyung; Yum, Hye-Yung

    2011-01-01

    Food allergies can affect the growth and nutritional status of children with atopic dermatitis (AD). This study was conducted to determine the association between the number of sensitized food allergens and the growth and nutritional status of infants and young children with AD. We studied 165 children with AD, aged 5 to 47 months, and who visited the Atopy Clinic of the Seoul Medical Center. We recorded the birth weight, time at which food weaning began, scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) index, eosinophil counts in peripheral blood, and total serum IgE and specific IgE to six major allergens (egg white, cow's milk, soybean, peanut, wheat, and fish). The height and weight for age and weight for height were converted to z-scores to evaluate their effects on growth and nutritional status. Specific IgE levels ≥0.7 kUA/L, measured via the CAP assay, were considered positive. As the number of sensitized food allergens increased, the mean z-scores of weight and height for age decreased (P=0.006 and 0.018, respectively). The number directly correlated with the SCORAD index (r=0.308), time at which food weaning began (r=0.332), eosinophil counts in peripheral blood (r=0.266), and total serum IgE (r=0.394). Inverse correlations were observed with the z-scores of weight for age (r=-0.358), height for age (r=-0.278), and weight for height (r=-0.224). A higher number of sensitized food allergens was associated with negative effects on the growth and nutritional status of infants and young children with AD. Therefore, a thorough evaluation of both growth and nutritional status, combined with adequate patient management, is crucial in pediatric AD patients presenting with numerous sensitized food allergies.

  18. THE NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF HOSPITALIZED CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS: A COMPARISON BETWEEN TWO NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT TOOLS WITH ANTHROPOMETRIC PARAMETERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Thaynara Cristina de; Albuquerque, Izabela Zibetti de; Stringhini, Maria Luiza Ferreira; Mortoza, Andrea Sugai; Morais, Bruna Alves de

    2017-01-01

    Verify the association between anthropometric indicators and the Subjective Global Assessment of Nutritional Status (SGA) and the Screening of Risk for Nutritional Status and Growth (STRONGkids) scales. A cross-sectional study with patients from 0 to 18 years admitted in the Hospital das Clínicas, Goiânia (GO), between August and November 2015. Children and adolescents admitted in up to 48 hours were included. Patients who required specific instruments for assessing their nutritional status and those hospitalized in Intensive Care were excluded. Identification and anthropometric data was collected and applied to the SGA and STRONGkids. We performed an analysis comparing proportions and did an agreement assessment, where pnutritional risk. According to the SGA, malnutrition prevalence was 38.1%. There was an association between the SGA and body mass index/age (p=0.022), height/age (pnutritional risk versus severe malnutrition and low nutritional risk x the well-nourished (pnutritional risk. The SGA should be applied to nutritional assessment due to its association with anthropometry.

  19. Relationship between nutritional status, psychosocial stimulation, and cognitive development in preschool children in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsito, Oktarina; Hernawati, Neti; Anwar, Faisal

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to analyze nutritional status, psychosocial stimulation, and factors affecting the cognitive development of preschool-age children. This study was conducted in the Village of Babakan, Sub-District of Dramaga, Bogor Regency, West Java. This cross-sectionally designed study was conducted with mothers who had preschool children aged 3-5 years as respondents. Fifty-eight children were included. The distribution of mother's educational level was quite diverse, and the largest percentage (44.8%) had senior high school education. Approximately 78% of the family income per capita was classified into the non-poor category and 22.4% into the poor category. The average mother's nutritional knowledge score was 76.7 ± 2.5 (moderate category). Most of the preschool children (84.4%) had psychosocial stimulation scores in the moderate category (30-45). The nutritional status of children showed that 15.5% were underweight, 5.2% were wasted, 3.4% were severely wasted, and 19% of the children were in the short and very short categories (stunted). The stepwise regression results showed that psychosocial stimulation (P cognitive development of the preschool children (adjusted R2, 0.434; P = 0.028). PMID:23198025

  20. Dietary intake and nutritional status of vegetarian and omnivorous preschool children and their parents in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chin-En; Yen, Chi-Hua; Huang, Men-Chung; Cheng, Chien-Hsiang; Huang, Yi-Chia

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare dietary intake and nutritional status of vegetarian and omnivorous preschool children and their parents. Fifty-six omnivores (28 children and 28 parents) and 42 vegetarians (21 preschool children with 18 lacto-ovo-vegetarians and 3 ovo-vegetarians; 21 parents with 16 lacto-ovo-vegetarians, 2 ovo-vegetarians, 1 lacto-vegetarian, and 2 vegans) were recruited. Anthropometric measurements were taken; body mass index and weight-for-height index (WHI) were calculated. Nutrient intake was recorded using 3-day dietary records. Fasting venous blood samples were obtained to estimate hematologic and vitamin status parameters. Height, weight, body mass index, WHI, and triceps skinfold thickness value differences between omnivores and vegetarians in both parent and child groups were not found. Both omnivorous parents and their children had significantly higher fat and lower fiber intakes than vegetarian parents and children. Omnivorous children had significantly higher protein and lower vitamin C intakes than vegetarian children, whereas omnivorous parents had significantly lower vitamin A and iron intakes than vegetarian parents. Vegetarians and omnivores in both parent and child groups had mean calcium consumption less than 75% of the Taiwan dietary intakes. All mean hematologic and biochemical nutrient status indices were within the reference range in any groups. However, both vegetarian parents and children had significantly lower mean total cholesterol and serum ferritin concentrations than those of omnivorous parents and children. Our vegetarian and omnivorous preschool children had normal growth and adequate nutritional status. However, both parents and children had inadequate calcium intakes, which may potentially affect bone health, especially for preschool children in the growing stage.

  1. The nutritional status of hospitalized children: Has this subject been overlooked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapçı, Nermin; Akçam, Mustafa; Koca, Tuğba; Dereci, Selim; Kapcı, Mücahit

    2015-07-01

    To determine the nutritional status of hospitalized children at the time of admission and to investigate the relationship between diagnosis and nutritional status. Body weight, height, triceps skinfold thickness, and mid-arm circumference were measured on admission and percentages of weight-for-age, weight-for-height, body mass index, mid-arm circumference, and triceps skinfold thickness were calculated. The nutritional status was evaluated using the Waterlow, Gomez, and other anthropometric assessments. A total of 511 patients were included in the study with a mean age of 5.8±4.9 years. Malnutrition was determined in 52.7% of patients according to the Waterlow classification. Mild malnutrition was determined in 39%, moderate in 12%, and severe in 1.7%, with the characteristics of acute malnutrition in 23.9%, acute-chronic in 7.3%, and chronic in 21.5%. The highest rate of malnutrition was in the 0-2 years age group (62.3%). According to the Gomez classification, malnutrition rate was determined as 46.8%. The rates of malnutrition in malignant, gastrointestinal, and infectious diseases were 60%, 59.8%, and 54.5%, respectively. The prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalized children was noticeably high. The nutritional evaluation of all patients and an early start to nutritional support could provide a significant positive contribution.

  2. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INFLUENCE ON NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Radulović

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of excessive body weight and obesity among children is increasing in many countries, including our country. It is believed that one of the two most important reasons for this increase is insufficient physical activity of children.The aim of this study was to examine the state of the level of nourishment of preschool children in relation to their level of physical activity. The survey was conducted in preschools in Pancevo. The sample consisted of 193 children (88 boys and 105 girls, aged 4 and 5 years. The assessment of the level of nourishment of the children and their parents was done after the standard anthropometric measurements of height, body weight, determining the body mass index and waist circumference and comparing the obtained values with the growth plates given by World Health Organization. Physical activity of the children was evaluated by a questionnaire which parents filled up. Inappropriate level of nourishment had 60 (31.1% children, of which 26 (13.5% with excessive body mass, obese 29 (15.0%, while 5 (2.5% were malnourished. Children are most attracted to sports such as ballet or folk dances, ball games and swimming, but only 22 (15.83% children are members of some sports club. The lack of finances and the lack of sports facilities and terrains are given as reasons by most parents. During the implementation of physical activities, 65.2% of children are never or sometimes exposed to excessive physical effort. The prevalence of insufficient physical activity among preschool children in Pancevo was high, particularly among children with excessive body weight and obese children. Socio-demographic and behavioral factors as well as behavior of parents significantly contributed to physical inactivity.

  3. Combined intensive nutrition education and micronutrient powder supplementation improved nutritional status of mildly wasted children on Nias Island, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayati, Dyah A; Scherbaum, Veronika; Purwestri, Ratna C; Wirawan, Nia N; Suryantan, Julia; Hartono, Susan; Bloem, Maurice A; Pangaribuan, Rosnani V; Biesalski, Hans K; Hoffmann, Volker; Bellows, Anne C

    2012-01-01

    To assess the impact of intensive nutrition education (INE) with or without the provision of micronutrient powder (MNP) on the nutritional status of mildly wasted children in Nias, Indonesia, two groups of mildly wasted (>=-1.5 to =6 to nutrition education program (NNE) with or without MNP (n=50 both respectively). WHZ, weight, height, haemoglobin (Hb) level, and morbidity data were assessed at admission, during the study, and at individual discharge. Children's weight gain (g/kg body weight/day) was highest in INE+MNP group (2.2±2.1), followed by INE (1.1±0.9), NNE+MNP (0.3±0.5) and NNE (0.3±0.4) group. In both MNP intervention groups (INE+MNP, NNE+MNP), supplements significantly increased Hb value (g/L) of respective children (10.0±10.0; pnutrition education supported by MNP supplementation produced the best results regarding weight gain and haemoglobin status of mildly wasted children.

  4. Nutritional status and social behavior in preschool children: the mediating effects of neurocognitive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianghong; Raine, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    Early malnutritional status has been associated with reduced cognitive ability in childhood. However, there are almost no studies on the effect of malnutrition on positive social behavior, and no tests of possible mediating mechanisms. This study tests the hypothesis that poor nutritional status is associated with impaired social functioning in childhood, and that neurocognitive ability mediates this relationship. We assessed 1553 male and female 3-year-olds from a birth cohort on measures of malnutrition, social behavior and verbal and spatial neurocognitive functions. Children with indicators of malnutrition showed impaired social behavior (p nutritional status. These associations even persisted after controlling for social adversity and parental education. Findings were not moderated by gender or ethnicity, and there was no interaction effect with parental education. A dose-response relationship was observed between degree of malnutrition and degree of social behavior, with increased malnutrition associated with more impaired social behavior. Neurocognitive ability was found to mediate the nutrition-social behavior relationship. The mediation effect of neurocognitive functioning suggests that poor nutrition negatively impacts brain areas that play important roles in developing positive social behavior. Findings suggest that reducing poor nutrition, alternatively promoting good nutrition, may help promote positive social behavior in early childhood during a critical period for social and neurocognitive development, with implications for improving positive health in adulthood. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Intestinal helminthiasis and nutritional status of children living in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-06

    Jul 6, 2012 ... Abstract. Background: Intestinal helminths are often associated with poor growth and reduced physical activities, and may ... Physical growth of the children was classified as stunted, wasted, and under-weight using height for age Z-score, weight ... preschool and school aged children due to increased.

  6. Nutritional status and food intake data on children and adolescents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine growth indicators and dietary intake patterns of children aged 4-18 years residing in residential care facilities in Durban. Method: Thirty-three girls and 110 boys, aged 5-18 years, in three different children's homes participated in the study. Anthropometric measurements ...

  7. Nutritional Status of Pre-School Children in Rural Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence rates of underweight, wasting, and stunting were higher in infected than the non-infected children, but only the difference in the rate of stunting reached statistical significance (p = 0.052). Conclusion: Helminthiasis may contribute to the high prevalence of malnutrition in rural Nigerian children. Key Words: ...

  8. nutritional status of children admitted for diarrhoeal diseases in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-07

    Jul 7, 2013 ... disease, without chronic co-morbidities or visible severe malnutrition, were systematically enrolled into the study between ... We excluded children with chronic co-morbidities and those with obvious severe malnutrition .... Of Diarrhea In Children Younger Than 5 Years Of. Age Admitted In A Rural Hospital Of ...

  9. Breastfeeding pattern and nutritional status of children under two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-26

    Apr 26, 2016 ... Complementary foods given to the children are mostly home prepared cereals, solids and semi-solid foods. About 30.4% of the children were stunted, 25.4% were underweight and 15.3% were wasted. However 4.3% mothers ..... including introduction of water, traditional medicine and formula milk to their ...

  10. Nutrition status and associated factors among children in public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Among the children surveyed, 24.5% were stunted, 14.9% underweight and 9.7% were wasted. There were more boys than girls who were stunted. Breakfast contributed 10.2% of the daily energy intake. Few children consumed foods from more than four food groups. Incidence of diarrhea, colds/coughs increased ...

  11. Association between nutritional status and subjective health status in chronically ill children attending special schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.F.M. Joosten (Koen); K. van der Velde (Kelly); P. Joosten (Pieter); H. Rutten (Hans); J.M. Hulst (Jessie); K. Dulfer (Karolijn)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: In hospitalized children with a chronic disease, malnutrition was associated with a lower subjective health status. In outpatient children with a chronic disease attending special schools, this association has never been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the

  12. Mothers’ conceptions about excess weight in infancy and the nutritional status of their children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Paula Costa da Silva

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze maternal conceptions about excess weight in infancy and the nutritional status of their preschool-aged children. METHODS: A mixed, exploratory study was performed using semi-structured interviews. Two study groups were defined: a group of 16 mothers of children with excess weight and a group of 15 mothers of eutrophic children. The interviews were submitted to content analysis using CHIC software (Classification Hiérarchique Implicative et Cohésitive¯. RESULTS: The mothers of children with excess weight tended to conceive thin children as malnourished, while those of normal weight children emphasized the influence of family and genetics as determinants of a child’s nutritional status. Although there was a certain consensus among the mothers that an unhealthy diet contributes to the risk of a child developing excess weight, the concept of genetics as a determinant of a child’s nutritional status was also present in the dialogue from the mothers of both groups. This result indicates a lack of clarity regarding the influence of eating behavior and family lifestyle on weight gain and the formation of a child’s eating habits. Both groups indicated that the mother has a decisive role in the eating habits of her child; however, the mothers of children with excess weight did not seem to take ownership of this concept when addressing the care of their own children. CONCLUSION: Differences in conceptions, including taking ownership of care, may contribute to the development of excess weight in preschool-aged children.

  13. Assessment of Nutritional Status of Children Under Five years of age in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chataut, J; Khanal, K

    2016-01-01

    Background Nutritional status of children is one of the major predictors of child survival. However, malnutrition is a major public health problem in most of the developing countries and occurs prominently among under-five children. In context of Nepal, nearly 37% children are suffering from underweight, 41% from stunting and 11% are suffering from wasting. These children are at a substantially greater risk of severe acute malnutrition and death. Objective The objective of the study was to assess the nutritional status of children under five years of age and to find the factors associated with malnutrition. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted in Dolakha and Kavre districts of Nepal for assessing the nutritional status of under-five children and associated factors. A total of 243 under five children were included from two purposively selected village development committees (VDCs) i.e. one from each district. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 22 Version and ENA Software Version 2011 were used for analyzing the data. Result Out of 243 children, according to WHO based on weight for height assessment, 17 (7.0%) were wasted, in height for age analysis, 97 (39.9%) were stunted and in weight for age assessment, 46 (18.9%) were underweight. Conclusion In the study population, there is high prevalence of malnutrition, especially stunting among under-five. Taking into account weight, height, age, and mid upper arm circumference (MUAC) measurements of malnourished children more than threefifths of them were found below -2SD and nearly one-fourths below -3SD which needs intervention.

  14. [Nutritional status of street children in the district of Manga (Burkina Faso)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diongue, M; Ndiaye, P; Yameogo, I; Faye, B F; Dia, A Tal; Diousse, P

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition is an important indicator of development, and its consequences in children and adolescents produce a serious socioeconomic burden. Children living on the street are more vulnerable than others. Thus, our objective was to analyze the nutritional status of children living on the streets of Manga, through a cross-sectional and analytical study. The snowball technique was used for sampling. Data came from individual interviews, blood samples and medical examinations. Of the 237 children studied, 84.8% were boys; the overall mean age was 11.5 years, and 72.6% were adolescents (aged 10 to 17 years). Growth retardation (15.9%) predominated among the children aged 4 to 9 years, while a weight deficit (27.9%) was most common among those aged 10 to 17. Half of the children (50.2%) with blood tests (N = 119) had anemia. There was a link between anemia and underweight (p = 0.0145). Children who ate at least three times a day were 2.63 times less likely to be anemic (p<0.001). Factors associated with anemia (p<0.005) included survival activities. We frequently found nutritional deficits and anemia in these children. A targeted nutritional program would be a good entry point for their successful reintegration..

  15. Gut Microbiomes of Indian Children of Varying Nutritional Status

    OpenAIRE

    Tarini Shankar Ghosh; Sourav Sen Gupta; Tanudeep Bhattacharya; Deepak Yadav; Anamitra Barik; Abhijit Chowdhury; Bhabatosh Das; Mande, Sharmila S; Balakrish Nair, G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malnutrition is a global health problem affecting more than 300 million pre-school children worldwide. It is one of the major health concerns in India since around 50% of children below the age of two suffer from various forms of malnutrition. The gut microbiome plays an important role in nutrient pre-processing, assimilation and energy harvest from food. Consequently, dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in malnutrition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Metagenomics...

  16. Nutritional status in preschool children: current trends of mother's body perception and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparício, Graça; Cunha, Madalena; Duarte, João; Pereira, Anabela; Bonito, Jorge; Albuquerque, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    Studies in several countries indicate that parents show little concern and aren't much aware of the nutritional status of their children, and have the tendency to underestimate the overweight which may present a difficulty when promoting healthier life styles. The aim of this study was to identify maternal body image perceptions in preschool children and analyze its relationship with nutritional status and family social demographic variables. A transversal and descriptive study was developed in a sample of 1424 preschool children and their mothers living in several parts of Portugal. The children were weighted and measured by trained personnel, the BMI was calculated and the nutritional status was classified according to the NCHS referential (CDC, 2000).(1) Mother's real and ideal body image perception from their children was evaluated according to Collins' body image silhouettes (1991).(2) The ideal and real perception was translated in a negative index on both children's genders, however 67.2% of the mothers revealed accuracy of perception, while 22.3% had a negative and 12.8% a positive discrepancy, being this significant concerning gender and age of the children. Children's actual weight status (ie, 60.2% normal weight, 16.9% overweight, 17.4% obese and 5.5% underweight) was significantly different from their parents' perceptions (ie, 52.3% normal weight, 27.5% overweight 0,6% obesity and 19.6% underweight) explaining in 25.9% the variability of this perception. Globally 42.3% has no discrepancy but 44.3% thinks that children were thin and 13.4% heavier. This difference is significant concerning the age and scholarship of the mothers but has no relation with the income and residence. Despite signs of a positive trend, mothers continue to show difficulty in recognizing the children's nutritional status, so effective public health strategies to increase parents' awareness could be the first step in an effort to prevent childhood obesity. Copyright © 2013

  17. Association between maternal perceptions and actual nutritional status for children in a study group in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Cruz, M; Serralde-Zúñiga, A E; Frigolet Vázquez-Vela, Ma E; Blancas Galicia, L; Islas-Ortega, L

    2012-01-01

    Mexico has the highest rates of childhood obesity of any country in the world. As an environmental risk factor, family perception and behavior concerning child obesity is thought to have an important influence on the prevention and treatment of obesity. the aim of this study was to evaluate maternal perceptions of children's weight and to determine whether these perceptions are associated with the actual weight of the children. A descriptive study was conducted that assessed 273 children and included interviews with their mothers. Maternal perceptions of the children's weight status were compared with the measured weights, statures and body mass indices (BMI). The mean BMIs of the children and mothers were 18.1 ± 3.6 and 27.7 ± 4.7 kg/m², respectively. The perceptions of mothers of children's weight are not associated with actual BMI category of children (p children who were overweight and obese (27%); 62.2% of the mothers of these children considered them to be overweight and obese and 37.8% of these mothers felt that their sons were of normal weight when in fact they were overweight (p = 0.038). We found no association between actual BMI category of children and their mother's perceptions of their weight. In addition, found that third of mothers with obese or overweight children reported that their children had a normal nutritional status.

  18. Nutritional status and clinical outcome of children on continuous renal replacement therapy: a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo Ana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No studies on continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT have analyzed nutritional status in children. The objective of this study was to assess the association between mortality and nutritional status of children receiving CRRT. Methods Prospective observational study to analyze the nutritional status of children receiving CRRT and its association with mortality. The variables recorded were age, weight, sex, diagnosis, albumin, creatinine, urea, uric acid, severity of illness scores, CRRT-related complications, duration of admission to the pediatric intensive care unit, and mortality. Results The sample comprised 174 critically ill children on CRRT. The median weight of the patients was 10 kg, 35% were under percentile (P 3, and 56% had a weight/P50 ratio of less than 0.85. Only two patients were above P95. The mean age for patients under P3 was significantly lower than that of the other patients (p = 0.03. The incidence of weight under P3 was greater in younger children (p = 0.007 and in cardiac patients and in those who had previous chronic renal insufficiency (p = 0.047. The mortality analysis did not include patients with pre-existing renal disease. Mortality was 38.9%. Mortality for patients with weight P3 (51% vs 33%; p = 0.037. In the univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses, the only factor associated with mortality was protein-energy wasting (malnutrition (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.067-4.173; p = 0.032. Conclusions The frequency of protein-energy wasting in children who require CRRT is high, and the frequency of obesity is low. Protein-energy wasting is more frequent in children with previous end-stage renal disease and heart disease. Underweight children present a higher mortality rate than patients with normal body weight.

  19. Nutritional status and clinical outcome of children on continuous renal replacement therapy: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Ana; Santiago, Maria J; López-Herce, Jesús; Montoro, Sandra; López, Jorge; Bustinza, Amaya; Moral, Ramón; Bellón, Jose M

    2012-09-27

    No studies on continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) have analyzed nutritional status in children. The objective of this study was to assess the association between mortality and nutritional status of children receiving CRRT. Prospective observational study to analyze the nutritional status of children receiving CRRT and its association with mortality. The variables recorded were age, weight, sex, diagnosis, albumin, creatinine, urea, uric acid, severity of illness scores, CRRT-related complications, duration of admission to the pediatric intensive care unit, and mortality. The sample comprised 174 critically ill children on CRRT. The median weight of the patients was 10 kg, 35% were under percentile (P) 3, and 56% had a weight/P50 ratio of less than 0.85. Only two patients were above P95. The mean age for patients under P3 was significantly lower than that of the other patients (p = 0.03). The incidence of weight under P3 was greater in younger children (p = 0.007) and in cardiac patients and in those who had previous chronic renal insufficiency (p = 0.047). The mortality analysis did not include patients with pre-existing renal disease. Mortality was 38.9%. Mortality for patients with weight P3 (51% vs 33%; p = 0.037). In the univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses, the only factor associated with mortality was protein-energy wasting (malnutrition) (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.067-4.173; p = 0.032). The frequency of protein-energy wasting in children who require CRRT is high, and the frequency of obesity is low. Protein-energy wasting is more frequent in children with previous end-stage renal disease and heart disease. Underweight children present a higher mortality rate than patients with normal body weight.

  20. Immunization and Nutritional Status Survey of Children in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Immunization coverage and anthropometry of a community constitute a good index for measuring child-health status for that community. We therefore, studied the anthropometry, and the coverage of the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) vaccines in randomly selected rural communities of Sokoto ...

  1. Physical growth and nutritional status assessment of school children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-02

    Mar 2, 2016 ... physical and mental development of the school‑aged child. Physical growth ... linked to slower cognitive development, poor school attendance, high ..... Conflicts of interest. There are no conflicts of interest. References. 1. Physical status: The use and interpretation of anthropometry. Report of a. WHO Expert ...

  2. [Food insecurity and nutritional status of preschool children in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas-Nasu, Lucía; Rivera-Dommarco, Juan A; Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Mundo-Rosas, Verónica; Méndez-Gómez Humarán, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    To describe the relation between malnutrition and food insecurity (FI) in preschool children from Mexico. Information of 10 513 preschool children and their families was analyzed. The FI was measured through the Latin American and Caribbean Food Security Scale (ELCSA). Adjusted prevalence of FI and malnutrition with related variables were assessed by logistic regression. 31% of households had moderate and server FI. Rural and south, indigenous households, in the Q1 and Q2, showed the highest prevalence of moderate and severe FI as well. We observed a high tendency of malnutrition in the severe FI group; the prevalence of overweight was similar in the four groups of FI. Conclusions. The risk of chronic malnutrition is 42% bigger in children less than five years old with severe FI than in those that experienced food security.

  3. Nutritional status in mentally disabled children and adolescents: A study from Western Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakime Nogay, Nalan

    2013-04-01

    To assess the nutritional status of mentally disabled children in Turkey on the basis of anthropometric indicators and dietary intake. The sample of the study consisted of 77 mentally disabled children with ages between 10 and 18 years. The body mass index and body fat ratios of the children were calculated by measuring their body weight, height, and the skinfold thickness of their triceps and subscapular. Their three-day nutrition consumption was recorded in order to determine their nutrient intake. When the body weights of the children were evaluated according to their ages, 14.3% of the children were found to be thin. The shortness rate among the participants was 28.6%. The shortness ratio was found to increase with age and girls had a higher inclination for shortness than boys. The ratios of those with ≤5(th) percentile upper middle arm circumference were 32.7% in the 10-13 age group, and 36.0% in the 14-18 age group. The folic acid and calcium intakes of girls in the 10-13 age group, and the calcium intakes of boys in the 10-13 age group were under the suggested values. In the 14-18 age group the vit C and calcium intakes of girls and the calcium intakes of boys were under the recommended values. The prevalence of malnutrition is high among mentally disabled children. In order to raise their quality of life, mentally disabled children must be provided with sufficient nutritional support.

  4. Nutrition status and associated factors among children in public primary schools in Dagoretti, Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwaniki, E W; Makokha, A N

    2013-03-01

    Malnutrition among school-age children is due to inadequacies in one or more of the three main preconditions for good nutrition: food, care and health. Children stunted at school age are likely to have been exposed to poor nutrition since early childhood. Interventions for school age children can supplement efforts to reduce levels of stunting in the preschool years. To assess the nutrition status and associated risk factors of children in selected public primary schools in Dagoretti Division, Nairobi. Descriptive cross sectional design was used. 208 students aged 4-11years of both gender were randomly selected from four public primary schools in Dagoretti Division. Data was collected from school registers and directly questioning the students, parents /guardians. Among the children surveyed, 24.5% were stunted, 14.9% underweight and 9.7% were wasted. There were more boys than girls who were stunted. Breakfast contributed 10.2% of the daily energy intake. Few children consumed foods from more than four food groups. Incidence of diarrhea, colds/coughs increased the risk of stunting and underweight. Consumption of food which is inadequate in required calories and from less than four varieties of food groups by the children were important predictors of malnutrition.

  5. Asymptomatic Giardiasis and Nutritional Status of Children in Two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giardiasis is found throughout the world but more prevalent in developing countries. The present study utilised ELISA coproantigen to determine the prevalence of Giardia lamblia in stool samples of children in day-care centres, nursery and primary schools in two Local Government Areas, Sabon-Gari and Zaria, in Kaduna ...

  6. Nutrition and Goiter Status of Primary School Children in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was observed that 42.2% of the school children had palpable goiter, 21.2% were stunted, 15.1% were underweight and 3.7% were wasted. There was no significant gender difference observed for goiter, stunting, wasting and underweight. It was observed that, only goiter and stunting were significantly associated (p<0.05) ...

  7. Nutritional Status and Cognitive Performance among Children Aged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Raven's Standardized Progressive Matrices Sets A-E was used to measure cognitive performance. The relationship between these indices with the cognitive performance was evaluated using chi-square analysis. The study revealed that 27.7% of the children were stunted, 29.9% were underweight and 25.5% wasted.

  8. The nutritional status of children in Bhutan: results from the 2008 National nutrition survey and trends over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zangmo Ugyen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few reports on the nutritional status of Bhutanese children. The objective of this paper is to summarize results from the 2008 National Nutrition Survey and to describe progress achieved during the last two decades. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 2376 children aged 6 to 59 months was conducted during November-December 2008 to provide national and regional estimates. A multi-stage cluster sampling method was applied and 40 gewogs/thromdes were selected from each region (Western, Central, Eastern. Guidelines on how to measure length/height and weight followed WHO standardized procedures. Data were analysed for consistency and validation using the software WHO Anthro and the WHO SPSS macro. Underweight, stunting, overweight, wasting and thinness were defined based on the WHO Child Growth Standards. Data from 1986-88 and 1999 national surveys were reanalysed using the WHO standards to describe trends in nutritional status. Results Nationally, 34.9% Bhutanese preschool children are stunted and 10.4% are underweight. Wasting is 4.7%, with severe wasting close to 2% in rural areas, while overweight affects 4.4% of preschool children. While underweight rates are similar across regions, wasting is substantially more prevalent in the Western region and stunting in the Eastern region. Stunting shows a steep rise during the first two years of life, as high as 40%, and levels off thereafter, while wasting is greatest among children aged 6-24 months and subsequently decreases. The prevalence of stunting fell from 60.9% in 1986-88 to 34.9% in 2008, and underweight declined from 34.0% to 10.4% during same period. The percentage of wasted children dropped from 5.2% in 1986-88 to 2.5% in 1999 but then increased to 4.7% in 2008. Conclusions There have been major improvements in the nutritional status of Bhutanese children over the past two decades, however, linear growth retardation remains a significant concern. Early

  9. The nutritional status of children in Bhutan: results from the 2008 National Nutrition Survey and trends over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangmo, Ugyen; de Onis, Mercedes; Dorji, Tandin

    2012-09-19

    There are few reports on the nutritional status of Bhutanese children. The objective of this paper is to summarize results from the 2008 National Nutrition Survey and to describe progress achieved during the last two decades. A cross-sectional survey of 2376 children aged 6 to 59 months was conducted during November-December 2008 to provide national and regional estimates. A multi-stage cluster sampling method was applied and 40 gewogs/thromdes were selected from each region (Western, Central, Eastern). Guidelines on how to measure length/height and weight followed WHO standardized procedures. Data were analysed for consistency and validation using the software WHO Anthro and the WHO SPSS macro. Underweight, stunting, overweight, wasting and thinness were defined based on the WHO Child Growth Standards. Data from 1986-88 and 1999 national surveys were reanalysed using the WHO standards to describe trends in nutritional status. Nationally, 34.9% Bhutanese preschool children are stunted and 10.4% are underweight. Wasting is 4.7%, with severe wasting close to 2% in rural areas, while overweight affects 4.4% of preschool children. While underweight rates are similar across regions, wasting is substantially more prevalent in the Western region and stunting in the Eastern region. Stunting shows a steep rise during the first two years of life, as high as 40%, and levels off thereafter, while wasting is greatest among children aged 6-24 months and subsequently decreases. The prevalence of stunting fell from 60.9% in 1986-88 to 34.9% in 2008, and underweight declined from 34.0% to 10.4% during same period. The percentage of wasted children dropped from 5.2% in 1986-88 to 2.5% in 1999 but then increased to 4.7% in 2008. There have been major improvements in the nutritional status of Bhutanese children over the past two decades, however, linear growth retardation remains a significant concern. Early identification of growth faltering is essential for improving the

  10. Helicobacter pylori associated with breastfeeding, nutritional status and recurrent abdominal pain in healthy Nigerian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senbanjo, Idowu O; Oshikoya, Kazeem A; Njokanma, Olisamedua F

    2014-04-15

    There is limited knowledge about the associations of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections in developing countries. This study aimed to determine the current prevalence and associations of H. pylori infection with breastfeeding practices, nutritional status, and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in a group of apparently healthy children and adolescents in Lagos, Nigeria. This was a prospective hospital-based study conducted at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital that involved 118 children who came to the hospital for routine pediatric care. Seroprevalence status of the children was determined by measuring immunoglobulin G antibodies against H. pylori using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Seventy-five (63.6%) children were seropositive for H. pylori. The prevalence of H. pylori infection increased significantly from 40.4% in children less than five years of age to 85.1% at six to ten years of age (χ(2) = 20.9, p nutrition. The prevalence of H. pylori infection is high, particularly among children from low socioeconomic backgrounds in Lagos, Nigeria. It is associated with RAP. The effect of this infection on children's health requires further studies.

  11. [Food preferences and nutritional status in school-age children living in Mexico City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-García, Rocío; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; González-Unzaga, Marco Aurelio

    Childhood is a basic period for the development of habits and their continuation during the course of life. The objective of this study was to identify food preferences and their variations according to the nutritional status in school-age children living in Mexico City. A cross-sectional study was carried out including 1465 school-age children attending eight public elementary schools in Mexico City. Children were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding their preferences to 70 selected different foods. Anthropometric measurements were also carried out. Parents of the children provided sociodemographic information. For each food, the preference was evaluated using a Likert scale. Frequencies were calculated for the total sample and for different nutritional status levels. Median age of children was 9 years old. Forty-eight percent of the children were overweight or obese. The most preferred foods were fruits, pizzas, flavored milk, and French fries. The least preferred foods were vegetables, whole-grain cereals, fish, meat, and panela cheese. Plain water (72%) and sugar-sweetened beverages (71%) had a high level of preference. There was no preference variation according to nutritional status. Food preference patterns of school-age children are a risk for unhealthy food consumption as well as for the increase in obesity prevalence in this population. Interventions focused on the promotion of a healthy food environment are necessary, aimed at improving food preferences from early childhood. Copyright © 2014 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF RURAL PRIMARY SCHOOL CHILDREN AND THEIR SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC CORRELATES: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY FROM VARANASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kaushik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: What is the nutritional status of primary school children in rural area of Varanasi and what factors are associated with malnutrition? Objective: To assess the nutritional status of primary school children in rural Varanasi and to find out various socio-demographic correlates of nutritional status. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Setting: Four primary schools from Chiraigaon Community Development Block of Varanasi were selected for study purpose. Participants: Eight hundred and sixteen students from four schools were involved in the study. Results: Out of total 816 study subjects 429 or 52.6% (201 boys and 228 girls were underweight and 75 or 9.2% (39 boys and 36 girls were stunted. Educational status of the parents was found to be significantly associated with the nutritional status of school children Conclusion: As the literacy status of the parents has been revealed to be strongly associated with nutritional status of children, there is an increasing need to focus the efforts towards the parents to improve the nutritional status of primary school children.

  13. Giardia intestinalis and nutritional status in children participating in the complementary nutrition program, Antioquia, Colombia, May to October 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botero-Garcés, Jorge H; García-Montoya, Gisela M; Grisales-Patiño, Dayvin; Aguirre-Acevedo, Daniel C; Alvarez-Uribe, Martha C

    2009-01-01

    Giardia intestinalis infection is prevalent throughout the world and widely distributed in developing countries. In general, children display serious consequences to their state of health, including slow height-weight development; therefore, the main aim of this study was to determine the association between Giardia infection and the nutritional status of children who participate in the program of complementary feeding (Mejoramiento Alimentario y Nutricional de Antioquia (MANA) - Instituto Colombiano de Bienestar Familiar (ICBF)). A cross-sectional study examining the association of giardiasis with nutritional status was conducted. A total of 2035 children aged eight months to six years-old were studied. Data were collected using structured questionnaires, anthropometric measurements and laboratory analysis of blood and stool samples. Analysis of the results showed that 27.6% of children were infected with G. intestinalis, while 8.1% and 1.9% were mildly and significantly underweight, respectively, and 14.1% presented stunting. Giardiasis was statistically identified as a strong predictor of stunting in this study population.

  14. [Effects of neonatal nutritional status on the risk for metabolic syndrome in Chilean obese children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapunar, Jorge; Bustos, Paulina; Sáez, Katia; Muñoz, Sergio; Asenjo, Sylvia

    2014-12-01

    Neonatal malnutrition defined by birth weight (BW) is a risk factor for obesity and cardio-metabolic diseases in adults. Neonatal ponderal index (NPI) may have better diagnostic value than BW to establish nutritional status. To determine the effect of neonatal nutritional status, established by the three NPI curves available in Chile, on the risk of Metabolic Syndrome (MS) in obese school children. A nested case/control study in a sample of 410 obese school children aged 10 to 16 years (57% males) was performed. The dichotomous response variable was the presence of MS defined as International Diabetes Federation (IDF) or Cook's criteria. The exposure variable was having NPI children with neonatal malnutrition exceeded 20%. A significantly increased risk for MS was only found when PNI was defined according to Lagos's Table and MS was defined using IDF criteria. Having a PNI > p90, however, showed a trend towards a reduced risk of MS, which only reached significance using Lagos's Table and Cook's Criteria. Neonatal malnutrition defined by NPI is common in obese school children. The condition of neonatal under nutrition defined as PNI p90 could be protective.

  15. Nutritional status and intellectual development in children: A community-based study from rural Southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Amita; Thomas, Leah; Stephen, Kezia; Marconi, Sam; Noel, J; Jacob, K S; Prasad, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    There is a dearth of recent data on the relationship between nutritional status and intellectual development among children in India. To determine whether such a relationship exists, we studied children in a rural area of Tamil Nadu. We stratified villages in Kaniyambadi block, Tamil Nadu, and recruited consecutive children who satisfied the study criteria. We assessed nutritional status by measuring height and weight and recording chronological age, and calculated indices weight-for-age, height-for-age, weight-forheight and their Z scores. We assessed intellectual development using the Indian adaptation of the Vineland Social Maturity Scale. We used a case-control framework to determine the relationship and logistic regression to adjust for common confounders. We recruited 114 children between the ages of 12 and 72 months. Z score means (weight-for-age -1.36; height-for-age -1.42; weight-for-height -0.78) were much less than 0 and indicate undernutrition. Z score standard deviations (weight-for-age 1.04; height-for-age 1.18; weightfor- height 1.06) were within the WHO recommended range for good quality of nutrition data suggesting reduced measurement errors and incorrect reporting of age. The frequency distributions of population Z scores suggest high undernutrition, wasting and medium stunting. A tenth of the population (9.6%) had values to suggest borderline/below average intelligence (social quotient development demand an urgent re-assessment of national food policies and programmes.

  16. Vitamin supplementation and related nutritional status in Thai children, aged 1-5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanachu-ek, Suntaree

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of vitamin supplementation in Thai children aged 1-5 years at Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health (QSNICH), parental knowledge of vitamins, practices, and related factors such as nutritional status in vitamin supplementation. A cross-sectional study was performed at the Well Child Clinic, QSNICH, from 1-31 May 2005. Five hundred parents of young children, aged 1-5 years were interviewed by using the questionnaire to obtain information regarding knowledge and practices of vitamin supplementation. Weight and length/height were measured and nutritional status was assessed using the Thai growth reference. The relationships among vitamin supplement, nutritional status, and other related factors were analyzed using Chi-square test. The p-value supplementation was 76%, including vitamin C 62%, multi-vitamin (MTV) 35%, and cod-liver oil 20%. Regarding parental knowledge of vitamins, 57% of them knew the health benefits but 74% did not know the toxic effects of vitamins. The reasons for vitamin supplementation were poor feeding 63%, under-weight 23% and unhealthy status 14%. Vitamins were obtained from over-the-counter 59%, health services 40%, and friends 1%. Vitamin supplementation was significantly higher in children over 2 years of age, whose parents knew the benefits of vitamins, and in those children with malnutrition. The prevalence of vitamin supplementation was high in malnourished children, over 2 years of age whose parents had knowledge about benefits of vitamins. Parents should be warned about the dangers of high dose of vitamin consumption.

  17. Nutritional status of children with sickle cell disease at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei-Yeboah, C; Rodrigues, O; Enweronu-Laryea, C

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) with its attendant increased energy requirements has an adverse effect on growth. Good nutrition is essential for normal childhood growth and development. Differences in growth between children living within the same SEC's are likely to be due to the effects of the sickle cell disease. To determine the relationship between SCD and nutritional status in children. This cross-sectional study, conducted at the Paediatric Sickle Cell Clinic of the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, recruited 427 children aged 1-12 years: 357 SCD patients (cases) and 70 of their siblings with Hb AA (controls), over a four-month period. Their socio-demographic data, weight and height/length were documented, and the weight-for-age (WAZ) and height/length-for-age (HAZ), weight-for-height/length (WHZ) scores calculated as indices of nutritional status. The mean (SD) age of SCD participants was 7.18 (3.15) years and of controls was 5.13 (3.28) years, (p=0.8). The prevalence of malnutrition was 61.3% among SCD subjects and 28.6% among controls, (p<0.001). The WAZ (underweight) and HAZ (stunting) scores were significantly more common among SCD children than controls, but the difference in the rates of wasting (WHZ) was not significant (p=0.3). Ghanaian SCD children are more underweight and stunted than their Hb AA counterparts living under similar socio-economic conditions. Better education of families about the nutritional needs of SCD children in our community is needed.

  18. Nutritional status in children with Shwachman-diamond syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Judith; Meyer, Rosan; Köglmeier, Jutta; Ancliff, Phil; Shah, Neil

    2015-05-01

    In Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), pancreatic insufficiency can lead to malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins and trace elements. The aim of this study was to assess the serum concentrations of vitamins A and E, zinc, copper, and selenium and their deficiencies. This retrospective review was performed in 21 children (12 were male; median age, 7.8 years) with genetically confirmed SDS at a tertiary pediatric hospital. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) and vitamin or trace elements supplements were documented. Twenty patients (95%) had pancreatic insufficiency receiving PERT, 10 (47%) had a combined vitamin and trace element deficiency, 6 (29%) had an isolated vitamin deficiency, and 4 (19%) had an isolated trace element deficiency. Vitamins A and E deficiency occurred in 16 (76%) and 4 (19%) of 21, respectively. Low serum selenium was found in 10 (47%), zinc deficiency in 7 (33%), and copper deficiency in 5 (24%). Eleven patients (52%) were on multivitamin supplementation, and 2 (10%) on zinc and selenium supplements. No statistical differences were found between repeated measurements for all micronutrients. More than 50% of the children had vitamin A and selenium deficiencies despite adequate supplementation of PERT and supplements. Micronutrients should be routinely measured in SDS patients to prevent significant complications.

  19. Growth and nutritional status in children with chronic kidney disease on maintenance dialysis in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stańczyk, Małgorzata; Miklaszewska, Monika; Zachwieja, Katarzyna; Wierciński, Ryszard; Stankiewicz, Roman; Firszt-Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Zachwieja, Jacek; Borzęcka, Hanna; Zagożdżon, Ilona; Ziółkowska, Helena; Leszczyńska, Beata; Medyńska, Anna; Adamczyk, Piotr; Szczepańska, Maria; Tkaczyk, Marcin

    2016-03-01

    Despite vast availability of modern methods of treatment of chronic kidney disease and its complications, the short stature still is a major point of concern in adolescents with chronic kidney disease. The aim of the study was to assess changes in growth and nutritional status of Polish children on renal replacement therapy in the decade, 2004-2013. The study was designed as a cross-sectional analysis of anthropometric values and selected indices of growth status amongst children receiving dialysis in Poland between the years 2004 and 2013. Data were acquired during two different multicentre studies on hypertension in dialyzed children in Poland. Basic anthropometric parameters (body weight, body height/length, body mass index - BMI), dialysis adequacy and duration of RRT were assessed. The study showed that anthropometric parameters of children undergoing renal replacement therapy had not significantly changed in the last 10 years of observation. Children on RRT were still of short stature despite availability of modern methods of hormonal therapy and nutrition. Median of height z-score was -2.10 in 2004 and -2.19 in 2013. Expected clinical improvement in these measures was not proven. The cause of chronic kidney disease, method of dialysis, time on dialysis or dialysis adequacy did not influence the anthropometric parameters significantly in dialyzed children in Poland. Copyright © 2015 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. Nutritional Status and Other Baseline Predictors of Mortality among HIV-Infected Children Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwiru, Ramadhani S; Spiegelman, Donna; Duggan, Christopher; Seage, George R; Semu, Helen; Chalamilla, Guerino; Kisenge, Rodrick; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2015-01-01

    We assembled a prospective cohort of 3144 children less than 15 years of age initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The relationships of nutritional status and other baseline characteristics in relation to mortality were examined using Cox proportional hazards model. Compared with children with weight for age (WAZ) > -1, those with WAZ ≤ -2 to nutritional status may be used as an adjunct to ART. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. Nutritional Status and Other Baseline Predictors of Mortality among HIV–infected Children Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwiru, Ramadhani S.; Spiegelman, Donna; Duggan, Christopher; Seage, George R.; Semu, Helen; Chalamilla, Guerino; Kisenge, Rodrick; Fawzi, Wafaie W.

    2015-01-01

    Background We assembled a prospective cohort of 3144 children less than 15 years of age initiating ART in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods The relationships of nutritional status and other baseline characteristics in relation to mortality were examined using Cox proportional hazards model. Results Compared with children with weight for age (WAZ) >−1, those with WAZ ≤−2 to nutritional status may be used as adjunct to ART. PMID:24106055

  2. [Family characteristics associated with the nutritional status of schools children in the city of Cartagena].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pastrana, Yina; Díaz-Montes, Carmen

    2015-12-01

    Objective To determine the family characteristics associated with the nutritional status of school children in the city of Cartagena. Method A cross-sectional study involving a population of 104 384 children aged 6 to 10 in the city of Cartagena. Confidence levels were 95 % and prevalence levels were 5.8 % with 2 % error. The sample was 544 students. The schools were selected by proportional affixation in each of the three locations in the city, for a total of 21 schools. Later, the number of classrooms and the list of the students were requested. Children from these classrooms were randomly selected to complete the sample in each school. The tab and the family APGAR were the instruments used to assess the family characteristics as well as their family functionality. For nutritional status, anthropometric measurements were taken and evaluated in the WHO Anthro Plus program. The information was processed in the statistical package Epi info 7. Results 53.9 % of students had adequate nutritional status and 46.1 % malnutrition. The family characteristics associated with the child malnutrition by excess are: the number of family members OR 0.65 (CI: 0.4 -0.9) and family income OR 0.53 (CI: 0.3 -0.7). Meanwhile, the malnutrition by deficit was associated only with family income OR 2.08 (CI: 1.1 -3.9). Conclusion The variables that showed association with nutritional status were: income equal to or less than the minimum wage and number of family members.

  3. Street children in Pakistan: a situational analysis of social conditions and nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Moazzam; Shahab, Saqib; Ushijima, Hiroshi; de Muynck, Aime

    2004-10-01

    This paper examines the social conditions and nutritional status of street children in Pakistan. Nutritional status is evaluated by an assessment of height and weight relative to age. A heterogeneous sample of 108 street children in the twin cities of Rawalpindi and Islamabad was studied. One hundred and one of them were children "on the street" having regular family contact; seven were "of the street", without any family contact. Most street children came from large families which had recently moved to the city in search of economic opportunities. Their parents had low education levels and were either unemployed or employed in unskilled occupations. Poverty clearly was an important factor. The majority of the children moved to the street to augment family income. Most of the children were males (81%) and the average age at beginning life on the street was under 10 years. The majority was working 8-12 h daily with an average income of Rs. 40-60 per day (USD 1 = Rs. 60). Important issues were parental exploitation, police harassment, abuse, and the impact of other street peers in their lives. The distribution of height-for-age relative to the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) reference standard showed that 20% were stunted and 12% had wasting. Wasting was equal between sexes, while fewer girls than boys were stunted. The study concludes that the issue of street children in Rawalpindi and Islamabad is mainly one of "children on the street," while "children of the street" are an exceptional phenomenon. It was noted that, with some exceptions, street children in other world regions share similar risk factors and backgrounds. Findings from this study will facilitate both the identification of high-risk families, i.e. those whose children are likely to take to the street, and timely preventive and rehabilitative measures.

  4. Effect of a nutrition education programme on nutritional status of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of a nutrition education programme on nutritional status of children aged 3 - 5 years in Limpopo Province, South Africa. ... The nutrition intervention did not have a significant effect on indicators of nutritional status, possibly owing to its short duration (12 months) and the fact that food supplementation was not included.

  5. Micronutrient levels and nutritional status of school children living in Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amare, Bemnet; Moges, Beyene; Fantahun, Bereket; Tafess, Ketema; Woldeyohannes, Desalegn; Yismaw, Gizachew; Ayane, Tilahun; Yabutani, Tomoki; Mulu, Andargachew; Ota, Fusao; Kassu, Afework

    2012-12-13

    Several micronutrients are essential for adequate growth of children. However, little information is available on multiple micronutrient status of school children in Ethiopia. The present study was designed to evaluate the relationship between multiple micronutrient levels and nutritional status among school children. In this cross-sectional study, anthropometric data, blood and stool samples were collected from 100 children at Meseret Elementary School in Gondar town, Northwest Ethiopia. Serum concentration of magnesium, calcium, iron, copper, zinc, selenium and molybdenum were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Anthropometric indices of weight-for-age, height-for-age and BMI-for-age were used to estimate the children's nutritional status. Stool samples were examined by standard microscopic methods for intestinal parasites. The prevalence of stunting, underweight, wasting and intestinal parasitoses among school children was 23%, 21%, 11% and 18%, respectively. The mean serum levels of magnesium, calcium, iron, copper, zinc, selenium and molybdenum were 2.42±0.32 (mg/dl), 15.31±2.14 (mg/dl), 328.19±148.91 (μg/dl), 191.30±50.17 (μg/dl), 86.40±42.40 (μg/dl), 6.32±2.59 (μg/dl), and 0.23±0.15 (μg/dl), respectively. Selenium deficiency, zinc deficiency and magnesium deficiency occurred in 62%, 47%, and 2% of the school children, respectively. Height-for-age showed significant positive correlation with the levels of copper and molybdenum (p = 0.01) and with the levels of magnesium (p = 0.05). Deficiencies of selenium and zinc were high among the school children although the deficiencies were not significantly related with their nutritional status. The prevalence of both malnutrition and intestinal parasitism was not negligible. These calls for the need to undertake multicentre studies in various parts of the country to substantiate the data obtained in the present study so that appropriate and beneficial strategies for micronutrient

  6. Dietary practices and nutritional status of 0-24-month-old children from Brazilian Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, T G; Baraldi, L G; Muniz, P T; Cardoso, M A

    2009-12-01

    To assess the nutritional status and dietary practices of 0-24-month-old children living in Brazilian Amazonia. Cross-sectional study. Information on children's dietary intakes was obtained from diet history data. Weight and length were measured for anthropometric evaluation. Fe status was assessed using fasting venous blood samples; Hb, serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations were measured. The towns of Assis Brasil and Acrelândia in the state of Acre, north-west Brazil. A total of sixty-nine randomly selected 0-24-month-old children. Of these children, 40.3 % were anaemic, 63.1 % were Fe-deficient, 28.1 % had Fe-deficiency anaemia and 11.6 % were stunted. Breast-feeding was initiated by 97.1 % of mothers, followed by early feeding with complementary foods. The dietary pattern reflected a high intake of carbohydrate-rich foods and cow's milk, with irregular intakes of fruit, vegetables and meat. All infants and 92.3 % of toddlers were at risk of inadequate Fe intakes. Fe from animal foods contributed on average 0.5 % and 14.3 % to total dietary Fe intake among infants and toddlers, respectively. Poor nutritional status and inadequate feeding practices in this study population reinforce the importance of exclusive breast-feeding during the first 6 months of life. Greater emphasis is required to improve the bioavailability of dietary Fe during complementary feeding practices.

  7. STATE-LEVEL DIETARY DIVERSITY AS A CONTEXTUAL DETERMINANT OF NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF CHILDREN IN INDIA: A MULTILEVEL APPROACH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkotoky, Kakoli; Unisa, Sayeed; Gupta, Ashish Kumar

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the determinants of nutritional status of children in India with a special focus on dietary diversity at the state level. Household-level consumption data from three rounds of the Consumer Expenditure Survey of the National Sample Survey Organization (1993-2012) were used. Information on the nutritional status of children was taken from the National Family Health Survey (2005-06). Dietary diversity indices were constructed at the state level to examine diversity in quantity of food consumed and food expenditure. Multilevel regression analysis was applied to examine the association of state-level dietary diversity and other socioeconomic factors with the nutritional status of children. It was observed that significant variation in childhood stunting, wasting and underweight could be explained by community- and state-level factors. The results indicate that dietary diversity has increased in India over time, and that dietary diversity at the state level is significantly associated with the nutritional status of children. Moreover, percentage of households with a regular salaried income in a state, percentage of educated mothers and mothers receiving antenatal care in a community are important factors for improving the nutritional status of children. Diversity in complementary child feeding is another significant determinant of nutritional status of children. The study thus concludes that increasing dietary diversity at the state level is an effective measure to reduce childhood malnutrition in India.

  8. Nutritional status, metabolic state and nutrient intake in children with bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cosmi, V; Mehta, N M; Boccazzi, A; Milani, G P; Esposito, S; Bedogni, G; Agostoni, C

    2017-05-01

    Nutrition has a coadjuvant role in the management of children with acute diseases. We aimed to examine nutritional status, macronutrient requirements and actual macronutrient delivery in bronchiolitis. The nutritional status was classified according to WHO criteria and resting energy expenditure (MREE) was measured using an indirect calorimeter. Bland-Altman analysis was used to examine the agreement between MREE and estimated energy expenditure (EEE) with standard equations. Based on the ratio MREE/EEE in relation to Schofield equation on admission, we defined the subjects' metabolic status. A total of 35 patients were enrolled and 46% were malnourished on admission, and 25.8% were hypermetabolic, 37.1% hypometabolic and 37.1% normometabolic. We performed a 24-h recall in 10 children and 80% were overfed (AEI: MREE >120%). Mean bias (limits of agreement) with MREE was 8.9 (-73.9 to 91.8%) for Schofield; 61.0 (-41 to 163%) for Harris-Benedict; and 9.9 (-74.4 to 94.2%) for FAO-WHO equation. Metabolism of infants with bronchiolitis is not accurately estimated by equations.

  9. Selenium intake and nutritional status of children with phenylketonuria in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Michelle R A; Starling, Ana L P; Kanufre, Viviane C; Soares, Rosângelis D L; Norton, Rocksane de C; Aguiar, Marcos J B; Januario, José N

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate selenium dietary intake and nutritional status of patients with phenylketonuria. The study prospectively evaluated 54 children with phenylketonuria, from 4 to10 years old. The study was performed before and after the use of a selenium-supplemented amino acid mixture. The second phase of the study was performed after, at least, 90 days of use of the supplementation. Selenium nutritional status was assessed through the analysis of biochemical parameters: serum free thyroxin and selenium and glutathione peroxidase in erythrocytes. Selenium dietary intake was evaluated by the administration of the Food Frequency Questionnaire. Mean age of the children was of 7.0±1.8 years, and 35.2% were female. Mean time of supplementation of selenium, on special formula, was 122.2±25.1 days. The selenium-supplemented amino acid mixture represented 72.9% of the daily supply of the mineral. Upon supplementation, mean concentrations of serum selenium and glutathione peroxidase in erythrocytes increased significantly (p selenium increased significantly (p Selenium supplementation through protein replacement is effective to improve and adapt the nutritional status of selenium in patients with phenylketonuria.

  10. Does Household Food Insecurity Affect the Nutritional Status of Preschool Children Aged 6–36 Months?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahama Saaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study used three dependent measures of food security to assess the magnitude of household food insecurity and its consequences on the nutritional status of children 6–36 months in Tamale Metropolis of Northern Ghana. Methods. An analytical cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 337 mother/child pairs in June 2012. Food access was measured as household food insecurity access scale (HFIAS, household dietary diversity score (HDDS, and food consumption score (FCS. Results. The magnitude of household food insecurity depended on the food access indicator, with HFIAS yielding the highest household food insecurity of 54%. Of the three food access indicators, 30-day HFIAS was not related to any of the nutrition indices measured. HDDS and FCS were both significantly associated with BMI of mothers and chronic malnutrition (stunted growth but not acute malnutrition (wasting with FCS being a stronger predictor of nutritional status. Compared to children in food insecure households, children in food secure households were 46% protected from chronic malnutrition (, 95% CI: 0.31–0.94. Conclusions and Recommendations. The results of this study show that different measures of household food insecurity produce varied degree of the problem. Efforts at reducing chronic child malnutrition should focus on improving the adequacy of the diet.

  11. Nutritional status, intestinal parasite infection and allergy among school children in northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amare, Bemnet; Ali, Jemal; Moges, Beyene; Yismaw, Gizachew; Belyhun, Yeshambel; Gebretsadik, Simon; Woldeyohannes, Desalegn; Tafess, Ketema; Abate, Ebba; Endris, Mengistu; Tegabu, Desalegn; Mulu, Andargachew; Ota, Fusao; Fantahun, Bereket; Kassu, Afework

    2013-01-12

    Parasitic infections have been shown to have deleterious effects on host nutritional status. In addition, although helmintic infection can modulate the host inflammatory response directed against the parasite, a causal association between helminths and allergy remains uncertain. The present study was therefore designed to evaluate the relationship between nutritional status, parasite infection and prevalence of allergy among school children. A cross sectional study was performed involving school children in two elementary schools in Gondar, Ethiopia. Nutritional status of these children was determined using anthropometric parameters (weight-for-age, height-for-age and BMI-for-age). Epi-Info software was used to calculate z-scores. Stool samples were examined using standard parasitological procedures. The serum IgE levels were quantified by total IgE ELISA kit following the manufacturer's instruction. A total of 405 children (with mean age of 12.09.1 ± 2.54 years) completed a self-administered allergy questionnaire and provided stool samples for analysis. Overall prevalence of underweight, stunting and thinness/wasting was 15.1%, 25.2%, 8.9%, respectively. Of the total, 22.7% were found to be positive for intestinal parasites. The most prevalent intestinal parasite detected was Ascaris lumbricoides (31/405, 7.6%). There was no statistically significant association between prevalence of malnutrition and the prevalence of parasitic infections. Median total serum IgE level was 344 IU/ml (IQR 117-2076, n=80) and 610 IU/ml (143-1833, n=20), respectively, in children without and with intestinal parasite infection (Z=-0.198, P>0.8). The prevalence of self reported allergy among the subset was 8%. IgE concentration was not associated either with the presence of parasitic infection or history of allergy. The prevalence of malnutrition, intestinal parasitism and allergy was not negligible in this population. In addition, there was no significant association between the

  12. Migration, Agribusiness and Nutritional Status of Children under Five in Northwest Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Montaño

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the nutritional status of children of Mexican migrant worker families under five years of age within the context of global food markets. The sample included 404 children less than five years old from farms and agricultural communities in northwest Mexico. Prevalence of stunting and underweight of children appeared very similar to that of indigenous children from the national sample survey (difference 0.9 and 1.6 percentage points, respectively. Compared to the national sample of Mexican children, stunting and underweight seemed higher in migrant children (difference 17.7 and 4.5 percentage points, respectively, but wasting, an indicator of both chronic and acute undernutrition, appeared to indicate a process of nutritional recuperation. Migrant children living in poverty and suffering from chronic undernutrition, poor performance and scarce education opportunities, can be expected to eventually become agricultural workers with low productivity and poor general health. Consumer’s demands on social and environmental standards of fresh food production in developed countries could be an opportunity to impact the lives of migrant agricultural workers, their families and communities.

  13. Migration, Agribusiness and Nutritional Status of Children under Five in Northwest Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, María-Isabel; Rosales, Cecilia; de Zapien, Jill Guernsey; Aranda, Patricia; Castañeda, Alejandro; Saucedo, Socorro; Montaño, Cecilia; Contreras, Alma

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the nutritional status of children of Mexican migrant worker families under five years of age within the context of global food markets. The sample included 404 children less than five years old from farms and agricultural communities in northwest Mexico. Prevalence of stunting and underweight of children appeared very similar to that of indigenous children from the national sample survey (difference 0.9 and 1.6 percentage points, respectively). Compared to the national sample of Mexican children, stunting and underweight seemed higher in migrant children (difference 17.7 and 4.5 percentage points, respectively), but wasting, an indicator of both chronic and acute undernutrition, appeared to indicate a process of nutritional recuperation. Migrant children living in poverty and suffering from chronic undernutrition, poor performance and scarce education opportunities, can be expected to eventually become agricultural workers with low productivity and poor general health. Consumer’s demands on social and environmental standards of fresh food production in developed countries could be an opportunity to impact the lives of migrant agricultural workers, their families and communities. PMID:22470276

  14. Migration, agribusiness and nutritional status of children under five in Northwest Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, María-Isabel; Rosales, Cecilia; de Zapien, Jill Guernsey; Aranda, Patricia; Castañeda, Alejandro; Saucedo, Socorro; Montaño, Cecilia; Contreras, Alma

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the nutritional status of children of Mexican migrant worker families under five years of age within the context of global food markets. The sample included 404 children less than five years old from farms and agricultural communities in northwest Mexico. Prevalence of stunting and underweight of children appeared very similar to that of indigenous children from the national sample survey (difference 0.9 and 1.6 percentage points, respectively). Compared to the national sample of Mexican children, stunting and underweight seemed higher in migrant children (difference 17.7 and 4.5 percentage points, respectively), but wasting, an indicator of both chronic and acute undernutrition, appeared to indicate a process of nutritional recuperation. Migrant children living in poverty and suffering from chronic undernutrition, poor performance and scarce education opportunities, can be expected to eventually become agricultural workers with low productivity and poor general health. Consumer's demands on social and environmental standards of fresh food production in developed countries could be an opportunity to impact the lives of migrant agricultural workers, their families and communities.

  15. Nutritional status among hospitalized children with mixed diagnoses at a referral teaching hospital in Manizales, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santafé Sánchez, L R; Sánchez Rodríguez, D A; Villegas Galarza, A L; González-Correa, C H

    2012-01-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of malnutrition in pediatric hospitals, this remains a problem that must be recognized and to call the attention of academia and health authorities to be handled in time. To evaluate the nutritional status of hospitalized children at a referral teaching hospital and to describe the current prevalence of malnutrition. The study was conducted during the months of February, March and April 2010 at the University Hospital Rafael Henao Toro Colombian Red Cross in Manizales, Colombia, South America. We evaluated all patients admitted to a day of each month by calculating the Z score of the, weight for age, height or length for age, body mass index, mid-arm circumference, triceps and subscapular folds for children under 5 years and height for age and body mass index for school children and adolescents. A total of 174 children (age 1-216 mo) were evaluated during the 3-days survey. There were 52.8% children less than 60 months old, 17.2% between 61 and 120 months and 29.9% over 121 months. There were 44.3% females and 55.7% males. Children from the urban residence were 83.3% and 16.6% were rural. The overall prevalence of underweight was 27%, stunting 22.4%, wasting 16.6% and overweight and obesity 6.3%. Males less than five years old were more affected than older children. Rural children were more affected than urban children. The prevalence of overweight children was greater in children 61-120 months than other ages. Given the observed levels of malnutrition, it takes up a system for early identification of children hospitalized with nutritional risk in order to provide adequate and timely support and prevent hospital-acquired malnutrition. This requires the use of previously validated pediatric protocols.

  16. Nutritional status among adolescent girls in children's homes: Anthropometry and dietary patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Tone; Magala-Nyago, Christine; Iversen, Per Ole

    2017-03-25

    Malnutrition is widespread among disadvantaged people in low-income countries like Uganda. Children and adolescents living in children's homes are considered an especially vulnerable group, and malnutrition among girls is of particular concern since it has intergenerational consequences. Virtually no information exists about the nutritional status of adolescent girls living in children's homes in Uganda. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional study to assess the nutritional status by evaluating anthropometric indicators, body composition and dietary patterns. Forty-four girls aged 10-19 years living in five children's homes participated in addition to a reference group of 27 adolescent girls from three boarding schools; both in the Ugandan capital Kampala. Height and weight were measured to assess anthropometry. Body composition data was obtained by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Dietary intake was evaluated with a food frequency questionnaire, calculation of dietary diversity score, and a 24-h dietary recall. The adolescent girls living in children's homes suffered from stunting (18.6%), overweight or obesity (18.6%), and were at risk of insufficient intakes of multiple micronutrients, especially of vitamins A, B 12 , C, D, E and calcium. They also had a low intake of essential fatty acids. Dietary diversity was low with a median score of 3 out of 9 food groups. Animal products were rarely consumed. The majority of girls in children's homes consumed a less adequate diet compared to the reference group, thus being at risk of nutrient deficiency-related disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  17. Oral motor, communication, and nutritional status of children during intrathecal baclofen therapy: a descriptive pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornson, Kristie F; McLaughlin, John F; Loeser, John D; Nowak-Cooperman, Kim M; Russel, Mark; Bader, Kathy A; Desmond, StarRina A

    2003-04-01

    To describe the oral motor, communication, and nutritional status of children receiving intrathecal baclofen (ITB) therapy for spasticity of cerebral origin. Observational cross-sectional design. Tertiary-care regional children's hospital. Thirty children with spasticity of cerebral origin receiving ITB therapy. Not applicable. One interviewer administered a structured in-person interview tool designed for this pilot study, data from which were collapsed into 4 change categories: communication and speech, feeding and nutrition, oral motor function, and gastrointestinal function. Functional severity was ranked with the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). Speech: 10 improved (5 in GMFCS level V) and 2 worsened. Use of assistive technology to communicate: 6 improved (5 in GMFCS level V). Appetite: 10 improved (6 in GMFCS level V) and 4 worsened. Self-feeding: 9 improved (2 in GMFCS level III, 4 in level IV, 3 in level V) and 2 worsened. Saliva control: 10 improved (1 in GMFCS level III, 1 in level IV, 8 in level V) and 8 worsened. Cup drinking: 12 improved (5 in GMFCS level V) and 2 worsened. Indicates thirst: 9 improved (4 in GMFCS level IV, 5 in level V) and none worsened. Stool frequency: 8 improved (8 in GMFCS level V) and 14 worsened. Some aspects of speech, communication, and saliva control seemed to have improved, with bowel movement frequency decreased in some children receiving ITB. Fewer changes in feeding and nutritional status were reported. On the basis of this pilot study, prospective management guidelines are proposed that relate objective outcome measures of oral motor function, communication, and nutrition to changes in spasticity with ITB.

  18. Associations of prenatal growth with metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and nutritional status in Chilean children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardones, Francisco; Arnaiz, Pilar; Pacheco, Paz; Dominguez, Angelica; Villarroel, Luis; Eriksson, Johan G; Barja, Salesa; Farías, Marcelo; Castillo, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    The association of prenatal growth with nutritional status, metabolic syndrome (MS), and insulin resistance (IR) was studied in school-age children. A retrospective cohort study was designed linking present data of children with perinatal records. 3325 subjects were enrolled. Anthropometry, blood pressure (BP), and pubertal status were assessed. Blood lipids, glucose, and insulin were measured. Linear associations were assessed using the Cochran-Armitage test. Odds ratios and nonlinear associations were computed. 3290 children (52% females, mean age of 11.4 ± 1 years) were analyzed. Prevalence of obesity, stunting, MS, and IR was 16.0%, 3.6%, 7.3%, and 25.5%, respectively. The strongest positive association was between birth weight (BW) and obesity (OR 2.97 (95% CI 2.01-4.40) at BW ≥ 4,000 g compared to BW 2,500-2,999). The strongest inverse association was between birth length (BL) and stunting (OR 8.70 (95% CI 3.66-20.67) at BL < 48 cm compared to BL 52-53 cm). A U-shaped association between BL and BP ≥ 90th percentile was observed. Significant ORs were also found for MS and IR. Adjustments for present fat mass increased or maintained the most prenatal growth influences. Prenatal growth influences MS, IR, and nutritional status. Prenatal growth was more important than present body composition in determining these outcomes.

  19. Nutritional status and dietary intakes of children aged 6 months to 12 years: findings of the Nutrition Survey of Malaysian Children (SEANUTS Malaysia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Bee Koon; Ng, Boon Koon; Siti Haslinda, Mohd Din; Nik Shanita, Safii; Wong, Jyh Eiin; Budin, Siti Balkis; Ruzita, Abd Talib; Ng, Lai Oon; Khouw, Ilse; Norimah, A Karim

    2013-09-01

    The dual burden of malnutrition reportedly coexists in Malaysia; however, existing data are scarce and do not adequately represent the nutritional status of Malaysian children. The Nutrition Survey of Malaysian Children was carried out with the aim of assessing the nutritional status in a sample of nationally representative population of children aged 6 months to 12 years. A total of 3542 children were recruited using a stratified random sampling method. Anthropometric measurements included weight, height, mid-upper arm circumference, and waist and hip circumferences. Blood biochemical assessment involved analyses of Hb, serum ferritin, and vitamins A and D. Dietary intake was assessed using semi-quantitative FFQ, and nutrient intakes were compared with the Malaysian Recommended Nutrient Intakes (RNI). The prevalence of overweight (9·8%) and obesity (11·8%) was higher than that of thinness (5·4%) and stunting (8·4%). Only a small proportion of children had low levels of Hb (6·6%), serum ferritin (4·4%) and vitamin A (4·4%), but almost half the children (47·5%) had vitamin D insufficiency. Dietary intake of the children was not compatible with the recommendations, where more than one-third did not achieve the Malaysian RNI for energy, Ca and vitamin D. The present study revealed that overnutrition was more prevalent than undernutrition. The presence of high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and the inadequate intake of Ca and vitamin D are of concern. Hence, strategies for improving the nutritional status of Malaysian children need to consider both sides of malnutrition and also put emphasis on approaches for the prevention of overweight and obesity as well as vitamin D insufficiency.

  20. Feeding practices and nutritional status of children receiving care within the family health strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixis Figueroa Pedraza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the eating habits and nutritional status of children under one year old attended at the Family Health Strategy. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study developed in the city of Campina Grande, Paraíba. 633 mothers were interviewed and information included feeding practices (food eaten in the 24 hours preceding the survey of their children. The nutritional status was analyzed using weight/age and length/age anthropometric indices. Results: Breastfeeding in the first hour of life was reported by 70.9% (n=443 of respondents. Foods most consumed were water and breast milk, followed by other types of milk. The high frequency of consumption of foods not recommended such as snacks, candies/chocolates/ lollipops and soft drinks was also reported. As for the anthropometric profile, weight and length deficits reached respectively 5.3% (n=32 and 11.9% (n=17 of children. Conclusion: Feeding practices of children under one year old disagree with the recommendations of the World Health Organization and the Ministry of Health of Brazil. Additionally, a high prevalence of stunting was also found in the context of public health.

  1. Nutritional status and metabolic disorders in HIV-exposed uninfected prepubertal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio, Cristiane Chiantelli; Patin, Rose Vega; Palchetti, Cecília Zanin; Machado, Daisy Maria; Succi, Regina Célia de Menezes; Oliveira, Fernanda Luisa Ceragioli

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the nutritional status and metabolic alterations in HIV-exposed uninfected (HIVe) children compared with HIV-unexposed (HIVn) children. A cross-sectional study was carried out with 76 children distributed into two groups: HIVe (n = 31) and HIVn (n = 45). Biochemical data (hematologic test, lipid profile, insulin resistance, hepatic profile, and C-reactive protein) were evaluated. Anthropometric parameters and body composition analyses were performed. The groups were similar regarding body mass index-for-age z-scores (P = 0.297) and height-for-age z-scores (P = 0.666). HIVe had a higher dyslipidemia prevalence (38.7% versus 11.1%; P = 0.010), altered total cholesterol (TC) values (19.4% versus 2.2%; P = 0.016) higher LDL-C mean levels (97.8 mg/dl versus 86 mg/dl; P = 0.028), borderline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (40% versus 14%; P = 0.011) and TC (41.9% versus 20%; P = 0.038) compared with HIVn. Despite the similar nutritional status between groups, our data clearly demonstrated a higher prevalence of dyslipidemia, altered TC, higher LDL-C levels and also LDL-C and TC borderline values in HIVe children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Vaccination and nutritional status of children in Karawari, East Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiak, Louis; Emeto, Theophilus I

    2017-01-01

    Delivery of health care services to rural and remote populations in Papua New Guinea (PNG) is problematic. This is mainly due to difficulties with transportation and communication. Hence, the children in this region of PNG are likely to be at risk of malnutrition compounded by inadequate vaccination that may predispose them to preventable diseases. This study was conducted to determine the vaccination and nutritional status of children less than 5 years old in the remote and rural Karawari area of PNG. 105 children were included in the study, of whom 55% were male and 45% female. The mean age of children included in the study was 32.6 months. Their age, height, and weight by gender was not significantly different. Overall, 85% of children had incomplete vaccination. However, children above the median age of 32 months (34%) were more likely to be fully vaccinated for their age, χ2 (1) = 23.294, p children were below the -1 SD (Z-scores) for weight-for-height, 33% below the -1 SD for weight-for-age, and 25.5% below the -1 SD for height-for-age compared to WHO standards. A large proportion of children had poor nutrition status and lack protection from vaccine preventable diseases. This study recommends that the government should introduce a surveillance system for detecting issues of importance to the rural majority. We also recommend that the PNG government reopen the nearby health centre, and/ or establish new facilities within the region, with adequately trained and compensated staff.

  3. Niacin nutritional status in HIV type 1-positive children: preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremeschin, Marina Hjertquist; Cervi, Maria Célia; Camelo Júnior, José Simon; Negrini, Bento Vidal de Moura; Martinez, Francisco Eulógio; Motta, Fabrízio; Meirelles, Mônica Silva de Souza; Vanucchhi, Helio; Monteiro, Jacqueline Pontes

    2007-05-01

    HIV infection induces a state of pellagra in cell culture models. This study compared the nutritional status and the 24-hour urine excretion of N-methylnicotinamide between HIV-positive children and HIV-negative children who were or were not born of mothers with HIV-1 infection. Forty patients were included in the study: HIV-positive children (group 1; n = 20), HIV-negative children born to infected mothers (group 2; n = 10), and HIV-negative control children (group 3; n = 10). Usual dietary intake was assessed by a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Weight and height were assessed and compared with the reference data of the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For the estimation of fat-free mass and total body water, bioelectrical impedance technique was used. N-methylnicotinamide was measured by a modified method of high-performance liquid chromatography. Groups were matched in relation to age, sex, percentage of malnutrition, anthropometric measures, and body composition. Daily niacin intake did not differ statistically across groups (group 1 = 18.0 +/- 11.4 mg/day; group 2 = 18.9 +/- 8.0 mg/day; group 3 = 14.2 +/- 5.2 mg/day), nor did intake of tryptophan, vitamin B6, and zinc. The values of urinary niacin per gram of creatinine were similar and adequate across the groups (group 1 = 4.68 [0.75-14.9]; group 2 = 3.74 [1.13-5.69]; group 3 = 3.85 [1.80-8.19]). HIV-positive children excreted the same amount of N-methylnicotinamide in urine as did the control children. These findings may be attributed to similarities in nutritional status, adequate intestinal absorption (no children experienced diarrhea) and stable clinical condition.

  4. Nutritional status and social behavior in preschool children: the mediating effects of neurocognitive functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianghong; Raine, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Early malnutritional status has been associated with reduced cognitive ability in childhood. However, there are almost no studies on the effect of malnutrition on positive social behavior, and no tests of possible mediating mechanisms. This study tests the hypothesis that poor nutritional status is associated with impaired social functioning in childhood, and that neurocognitive ability mediates this relationship. We assessed 1553 male and female 3-year-olds from a birth cohort on measures of malnutrition, social behavior and verbal and spatial neurocognitive functions. Children with indicators of malnutrition showed impaired social behavior (p malnutrition and degree of social behavior, with increased malnutrition associated with more impaired social behavior. Neurocognitive ability was found to mediate the nutrition–social behavior relationship. The mediation effect of neurocognitive functioning suggests that poor nutrition negatively impacts brain areas that play important roles in developing positive social behavior. Findings suggest that reducing poor nutrition, alternatively promoting good nutrition, may help promote positive social behavior in early childhood during a critical period for social and neurocognitive development, with implications for improving positive health in adulthood. PMID:27133006

  5. Prospective evaluation of growth, nutritional status, and body composition in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stettler, N; Kawchak, D A; Boyle, L L; Propert, K J; Scanlin, T F; Stallings, V A; Zemel, B S

    2000-08-01

    Several cross-sectional studies have shown improvement in the growth of children with cystic fibrosis (CF) because of increased awareness of and more comprehensive care of their special nutritional needs. However, longitudinal data on the nutritional status of these children are rare. The objective was to compare changes in growth, body composition, and nutritional status between children with and without CF. This was a prospective 3-y cohort study of 25 children aged 5-10 y with CF, mild pulmonary disease, and pancreatic insufficiency and of 26 healthy control children. Three methods were used to assess body composition: measurements of skinfold thickness, total body water by deuterium oxide, and total-body electrical conductivity. Growth and body-composition changes over time were analyzed by a longitudinal mixed-effects model. Over the 3 y of the study, the statural growth of the boys with CF was slower than that of the control subjects (P = 0.004). The same divergence over time between the boys with and without CF was observed for fat-free mass assessed by skinfold-thickness measurements and total body water (P = 0.008 and 0.02, respectively) and for fat mass assessed by skinfold-thickness measurements and total-body electrical conductivity (P = 0.009 and 0.001, respectively). The differences in the pattern of changes in growth and body composition were less striking for girls. Despite comprehensive care, the growth of boys with CF was impaired on the basis of height, fat-free mass, and fat mass, when observed longitudinally. Caution should be used when interpreting cross-sectional measurements because they often do not detect suboptimal growth.

  6. Effect of selected factors associated with the clinical course of the disease on nutritional status in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umławska, Wioleta; Krzyżanowska, Monika; Zielińska, Anna; Sands, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition and delayed growth are commonly seen in children with cystic fibrosis and are indicators of poor prognosis. Understanding the factors that affect growth and nutritional status may improve care, treatment and longevity. To determine how nutritional status, as estimated using anthropometric measurements, in children with cystic fibrosis is affected by 1) the type of CFTR mutation, 2) colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 3) age at diagnosis. The relationship between nutritional status and pulmonary function was also investigated. Anthropometric data on height, weight, circumferences and skinfold thicknesses were extracted from the medical histories of 41 boys and 48 girls diagnosed with cystic fibrosis who were treated at the Institute of Mother and Child in Warsaw, Poland. Muscle and fat tissue area were calculated from these measurements. The values for children with CF were compared to the Polish national growth reference charts. Multivariate linear regression tested the effect of three factors on nutritional status: colonization with P. aeruginosa, age at diagnosis, and the type of CFTR mutation. All values for children with CF were significantly lower than in the reference population. The results show that, in the children examined, nutritional status is more adversely affected than growth. Of the factors related to the clinical picture of the disease, only the presence of respiratory tract colonization by P. aeruginosa had an effect on physical development in the children examined. Neither the type of mutation present nor age at diagnosis had any significant effect. Chronic colonization by P. aeruginosa interfered with growth and markedly worsened nutritional status, and was also associated with reductions in both total and lean body mass. Early nutritional intervention can improve nutritional state and pulmonary function in children with CF.

  7. Growth, Nutritional Status, and Pulmonary Function in Children with Chronic Recurrent Bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umławska, Wioleta; Lipowicz, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Bronchitis is a common health problem in children. Frequent bronchitis in infancy increases the risk of developing chronic respiratory diseases. The aim of the study was to assess the level of growth and the nutritional status in children and youths with special regard to the level of body fatness assessed by measuring skin-fold thickness. Relationships between somatic development, pulmonary function and the course of the disease were also explored. The study was carried out using anthropometric and spirometric measurements and also information on the severity and course of the disease in 141 children with chronic or recurrent bronchitis. All of the subjects were patients of the Pulmonary Medicine and Allergology Center in Karpacz, Poland. The mean body height did not differ significantly between the children examined and their healthy peers. However, the infection-prone children had excessive body fatness and muscle mass deficiency. The increased level of subcutaneous adipose tissue occurred especially in children with short duration of the disease, i.e. a maximum of 1 year. The functional lung parameters were generally normal. The presence of atopic diseases such as allergic rhinitis or atopic dermatitis did not impair the course of the children's somatic development. Also, long-term disease or the presence of additional allergic diseases did not impair lung function in the examined children. Taking appropriate preventive measures is recommended to achieve and maintain normal body weight in children who receive therapy due to bronchitis.

  8. [VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY AMONG CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH NORMAL NUTRITIONAL STATUS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durá-Travé, Teodoro; Gallinas-Victoriano, Fidel; Chueca Guindulain, María Jesús; Berrade-Zubiri, Sara

    2015-09-01

    to analyze the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency throughout a natural year in a pediatric population with normal nutrition status. cross sectional clinical and analytical study (calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, calcidiol and parathyroid hormone) in 413 caucasian individuals (aged 3.1 to 15.4 years): 227 school children (96 males and 131 females) and 186 adolescents (94 males and 92 females), all of them in a normal nutrition status, during the year 2014. Vitamin D deficiency was defined according to the United States Endocrine Society guidelines. calcidiol levels were lower during spring (25.96 ± 6.64 ng/ml) and reached its maximum level in summer (35.33 ± 7.51 ng/ml); PTH levels were lower in summer (27.13 ± 7.89 pg/ml) and reached maximum level in autumn (34.73 ± 15.38 pg/ml). Vitamin D deficiency prevalence was 14.3% in summer and 75.3% in spring. PTH levels were compatible with secondary hyperparathyroidism in 8 individuals (1.9%). There was a negative correlation between calcidol and PTH levels (p nutrition status shows a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency during the months of autumn and winter and, especially, in spring; the addition of vitamin supplements and/ or an increase in the ingestion of their natural dietary sources should be considered. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  9. Zinc nutritional status and its relationships with hyperinsulinemia in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marreiro, Dilina Do Nascimento; Fisberg, Mauro; Cozzolino, Silvia Maria Franciscato

    2004-08-01

    A perturbation of zinc metabolism has been noted in subjects with obesity. The present work intends to investigate whether the zinc nutritional status is associated with hyperinsulinemia in obesity. A study was carried out in a group of obese children and adolescents (n=23) and compared to a control group (n=21), both between 7 and 14 yr of age. Software analyzed diet information from 3-d food records. Body composition was evaluated by body mass index (BMI), bioelectrical impedance, and skin-fold measurements. Zinc nutritional status was evaluated by Zn determination in plasma, erythrocyte, and 24-h urine, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (lambda=213.9 nm). Insulin was measured by radioimmunoassay (Linco Res). Diets consumed by both groups had marginal concentrations of zinc. Zinc concentrations in plasma and erythrocytes were significantly lower in the obese group. Urinary zinc excretion and serum insulin were significantly higher in the same group, although the insulinemia and the parameters of zinc nutritional status were not significantly correlated. As a result, considering that zinc is part of the synthesis and secretion of this hormone, an assessment is necessary of the possible participation of the oligoelement in the mechanisms of insulin resistance, commonly present in obese patients.

  10. [Clinical evolution and nutritional status in asthmatic children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Rosinha Yoko Matsubayaci; Strufaldi, Maria Wany Louzada; Puccini, Rosana Fiorini

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical evolution and the association between nutritional status and severity of asthma in children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care. A retrospective cohort study of 219 asthmatic patients (3 to 17 years old) enrolled in primary care services (PCSs) in Embu das Artes (SP), from 2007 to 2011. Secondary data: gender, age, diagnosis of asthma severity, other atopic diseases, family history of atopy, and body mass index. To evaluate the clinical outcome of asthma, data were collected on number of asthma exacerbations, number of emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids at follow-up visits in the 6th and 12th months. The statistical analysis included chi-square and Kappa agreement index, with 5% set as the significance level. 50.5% of patients started wheezing before the age of two years, 99.5% had allergic rhinitis and 65.2% had a positive family history of atopy. Regarding severity, intermittent asthma was more frequent (51.6%) and, in relation to nutritional status, 65.8% of patients had normal weight. There was no association between nutritional status and asthma severity (p=0,409). After one year of follow-up, 25.2% of patients showed reduction in exacerbations and emergency room consultations, and 16.2% reduced the amount of inhaled corticosteroids. The monitoring of asthmatic patients in PCSs showed improvement in clinical outcome, with a decreased number of exacerbations, emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids. No association between nutritional status and asthma severity was observed in this study. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical evolution and nutritional status in asthmatic children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Rosinha Yoko Matsubayaci; Strufaldi, Maria Wany Louzada; Puccini, Rosana Fiorini

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical evolution and the association between nutritional status and severity of asthma in children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 219 asthmatic patients (3-17 years old) enrolled in Primary Care Services (PCSs) in Embu das Artes (SP), from 2007 to 2011. Secondary data: gender, age, diagnosis of asthma severity, other atopic diseases, family history of atopy, and body mass index. To evaluate the clinical outcome of asthma, data were collected on number of asthma exacerbations, number of emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids at follow-up visits in the 6th and 12th months. The statistical analysis included chi-square and Kappa agreement index, with 5% set as the significance level. Results: 50.5% of patients started wheezing before the age of 2 years, 99.5% had allergic rhinitis and 65.2% had a positive family history of atopy. Regarding severity, intermittent asthma was more frequent (51.6%) and, in relation to nutritional status, 65.8% of patients had normal weight. There was no association between nutritional status and asthma severity (p=0.409). After 1 year of follow-up, 25.2% of patients showed reduction in exacerbations and emergency room consultations, and 16.2% reduced the amount of inhaled corticosteroids. Conclusions: The monitoring of asthmatic patients in Primary Care Services showed improvement in clinical outcome, with a decreased number of exacerbations, emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids. No association between nutritional status and asthma severity was observed in this study. PMID:26316387

  12. Clinical evolution and nutritional status in asthmatic children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosinha Yoko Matsubayaci Morishita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the clinical evolution and the association between nutritional status and severity of asthma in children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 219 asthmatic patients (3-17 years old enrolled in Primary Care Services (PCSs in Embu das Artes (SP, from 2007 to 2011. Secondary data: gender, age, diagnosis of asthma severity, other atopic diseases, family history of atopy, and body mass index. To evaluate the clinical outcome of asthma, data were collected on number of asthma exacerbations, number of emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids at follow-up visits in the 6th and 12th months. The statistical analysis included chi-square and Kappa agreement index, with 5% set as the significance level. Results: 50.5% of patients started wheezing before the age of 2 years, 99.5% had allergic rhinitis and 65.2% had a positive family history of atopy. Regarding severity, intermittent asthma was more frequent (51.6% and, in relation to nutritional status, 65.8% of patients had normal weight. There was no association between nutritional status and asthma severity (p=0.409. After 1 year of follow-up, 25.2% of patients showed reduction in exacerbations and emergency room consultations, and 16.2% reduced the amount of inhaled corticosteroids. Conclusions: The monitoring of asthmatic patients in Primary Care Services showed improvement in clinical outcome, with a decreased number of exacerbations, emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids. No association between nutritional status and asthma severity was observed in this study.

  13. Nutritional Status in Children with Un-Operated Congenital Heart Disease: An Egyptian Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Basheir A; Albanna, Ehab A; Morsy, Saed M; Siam, Ahmed G; Al Shafie, Mona M; Elsaadany, Hosam F; Sherbiny, Hanan S; Shehab, Mohamed; Grollmuss, Oswin

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in children with congenital heart disease (CHD). This study aimed to identify prevalence and predictors of malnutrition in Egyptian children with symptomatic CHD. This case-control study included 100 children with symptomatic CHD (76 acyanotic and 24 cyanotic) and 100 healthy children matched for age and sex as a control group. Clinical Evaluation and Laboratory Assessment of Nutritional Status were documented. Anthropometric measurements were recorded and Z scores for weight for age (WAZ), weight for height (WHZ), and height for age (HAZ) have been calculated. Malnutrition was defined as weight, height, and weight/height Z score ≤-2. The overall prevalence of malnutrition was 84.0% in patients with CHD and 20% in controls. Severe malnutrition was diagnosed in 71.4% of cases. All anthropometric measurements and levels of biochemical markers of nutritional state were significantly lower in the patients group compared to controls. In patients with acyanotic CHD, stunting was proportionately higher (57.89%) than in cyanotic CHD, while wasting was predominant (45.83%) in the latter. Malnutrition correlated significantly with low hemoglobin level, low arterial oxygen saturation, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, and poor dietary history. Malnutrition is a very common problem in children with symptomatic CHD and predicted by the presence of low hemoglobin level, low arterial oxygen saturation, heart failure, poor dietary history, and pulmonary hypertension.

  14. Nutritional Status among the Urban Meitei Children and Adolescents of Manipur, Northeast India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maibam Samson Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the nutritional status (underweight and overweight among Meitei children and adolescents. Methods. Cross-sectional data on 854 subjects (384 boys and 470 girls were collected during the months of May 2009 to August 2009 following house-to-house survey. An anthropometric rod and a weighing scale were used to measure height and weight. The presence of underweight and overweight has been evaluated using the international cutoff points for children and adolescents. MS-Excel software was used for all statistical analyses. Results. A high prevalence of underweight (30.21% and overweight (3.12% in the present study was found among children and adolescent boys, respectively. Among girls, the prevalence of both underweight (33.86% and overweight (5.18% was reported higher among children than adolescents, and the differences in the distribution were significant at 0.05 levels. The overall prevalence of underweight (28.29% was found more or less the same among boys and girls, but overweight (5.10% was reported higher among girls than boys (2.34%. Conclusion. The possible reasons for both forms of malnutrition among Meitei children and adolescents could be traced through poverty, low dietary intake, socioeconomic condition, nutrition transition, and changing lifestyles. The other possible reasons could be due to peer pressure, eating habits, or emotional factor.

  15. Nutritional and Immunization Status as Determinant of Pneumonia Incident in Children Under Five in East Nusa Tenggara Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majematang Mading

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:Pneumonia in children under five years old is a health problem in Indonesia. It is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to pneumonia. One of the control efforts are in recognition of the determinant factors of pneumonia in children under five, so the reduction and prevention of this disease can be done properly. This paper aims to outline some of the determinant factors of pneumonia in children under five years old in the province of East Nusa Tenggara include immunization status, nutritional status and healthy home. Methods:The data used are secondary data Provincial Health Office of East Nusa Tenggara in 2012 include data cases, nutritional status, immunization, exclusive breastfeeding and healthy home were analyzed. Results: The results indicate the scope of discovery and handling pneumonia in children under five in 2012 amounted to 19.2%, a factor of determination relating to pneumonia incidence was 59% complete immunization status, Nutritional status is less their 12.6%, 1.4% severe malnutrition, coverage exclusive breastfeeding is 49.7%, and 61.1% coverage of a healthy home. Conclusion: Cases of pneumonia in children under five in NTT has increased in 2012. The condition factor of immunization status, coverage Exclusive breastfeeding, nutritional status be a factor supporting the occurrence of pneumonia in under five. Recommendation: Suggested an improve in education about pneumonia, exclusive breastfeeding, toddler nutrition and the importance of immunization and growth monitoring sessions mobilize the community in a way increased participation posyandu cadres so as to improve immunization status and improvement of nutritional status of children under five years old.

  16. The Effectiveness of Community-Based Nutrition Education on the Nutrition Status of Under-five Children in Developing Countries. A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majamanda, J; Maureen, D; Munkhondia, T M; Carrier, J

    2014-12-01

    This systematic review aimed at examining the best available evidence on the effectiveness of community-based nutrition education in improving the nutrition status of under five children in developing countries. A systematic search of the literature was conducted utilising the following data bases: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), EMBASE, Medline, and Web of Knowledge. 9 studies were identified for the critical appraisal process. The Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) critical appraisal check-list for experimental studies was utilised and two reviewers conducted the appraisal process independently. 7 studies were included for this review and data was extracted using the JBI data extraction form for experimental studies. The extracted data was heterogeneous as such narrative synthesis was conducted. The nutritional status of children in all studies improved and this was evidenced by increases in weight, height, mid upper arm circumference and reduced morbidity. Key messages about education were age at introduction of complementary foods, nutrition value on different types of feeds found locally and frequency of feeding the children. However, there were varied results regarding the effects of the intervention on the nutrition status of children. This was attributed by differences in implementers' characteristics, different intervention strategy and intensity, difference in age of the children at enrolment, pre-existing children's growth and nutritional status and follow-up periods. In addition to home visiting, conducting group meetings of care givers and community leaders, providing education twice a week and use of cooking demonstrations have shown that they produce highly significant findings. The evidence from the identified studies suggests that community- based nutrition education improves the nutrition status of under-five children in developing countries.

  17. Effects of naso-gastric tube feeding on the nutritional status of children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Broeder, E; Lippens, R J; van't Hof, M A; Tolboom, J J; van Staveren, W A; Hofman, Z; Sengers, R C

    1998-07-01

    To study the effect of sufficient energy intake, by means of the protocolized administration of naso-gastric tube feeding, on the nutritional status of a child with cancer. A comparative experimental study. Tertiary care at the Centre for Pediatric Oncology, South East Netherlands, University Hospital, Nijmegen. Seven children, newly diagnosed with cancer, were included in the experimental study and all completed the trial period. Fourteen patients were included in the retrospective study. They were randomly chosen from a group of patients previously treated for a malignancy at our department and who had received naso-gastric tube feeding for at least 16 weeks. Protocolized (experimental group) vs non-protocolized (retrospective group) administration of naso-gastric tube feeding over a period of 16 weeks. The main difference was the amount of tube feeding administered. In addition to energy from other foods, children in the experimental group received 106+/-13% of their total daily energy requirements (TDER) by means of tube feeding, whereas children in the retrospective group had received 75+/-24%. Weight as a percentage of weight for height according to the 50th percentile of a healthy reference population=ideal weight. Weight, expressed as a percentage of the ideal weight, increased significantly in the experimental group (18.2 8.4; P=0.01) and the retrospective study group (5.2 7.3; P=0.001). However, the increase was statistically significant in favour of the experimental group (P=0.003), in which all the children reached their ideal weight, compared to 21% in the retrospective group. Aggressive protocolized nutritional intervention during the intensive phase of anti-cancer treatment, in the form of naso-gastric tube feeding that provides the child's total daily energy requirements, results in considerable improvement in the nutritional status.

  18. Household Food Insecurity Is Associated with Nutritional Status among Iranian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahraki, Soudabeh Hamedi; Amirkhizi, Farshad; Amirkhizi, Behzad; Hamedi, Sousan

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine household food security status and sociodemographic factors influencing it and to examine whether food insecurity of household is a risk factor for underweight, stunting, and thinness in primary school children of Sistan and Baluchestan Province in southeastern Iran. A sample of 610 students aged 7-11 years was selected by a multistage cluster random sampling method during December 2013-May 2014. Using U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Security questionnaire, 42.3% of households showed some degree of food insecurity. Food insecurity was positively associated with household size (p = .002) and number of children per household (p = .001) and negatively associated with mother's and father's education level (p = .005 and p = .042, respectively), father's occupation status, and household income (p underweight, stunted, and thin, respectively, as counterparts from food secure households. The findings showed food insecurity was prevalent and associated with sociodemographic factors among households with schoolchildren in southeastern Iran. Nutritional status of children was also associated with food security status of their households.

  19. Nutritional status of pre-school children from low income families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Oliveira Adriana G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We evaluated growth and nutritional status of preschool children between 2 and 6 years old from low income families from 14 daycare centers. Methods Cross-sectional study with 1544 children from daycare centers of Santo Andre, Brazil. Body weight (W, height (H and body mass index (BMI were classified according to the 2000 National Center for Health Statistics (CDC/NCHS. Cutoff points for nutritional disorders: -2 z scores and 2.5 and 10 percentiles for malnutrition risk, 85 to 95 percentile for overweight and above BMI 95 percentile for obesity. Stepwise Forward Regression method was used including age, gender, birth weight, breastfeeding duration, age of mother at birth and period of time they attended the daycare center. Results Children presented mean z scores of H, W and BMI above the median of the CDC/NCHS reference. Girls were taller and heavier than boys, while we observed similar BMI between both genders. The z scores tended to rise with age. A Pearson Coefficient of Correlation of 0.89 for W, 0.93 for H and 0.95 for BMI was documented indicating positive association of age with weight, height and BMI. The frequency of children below -2 z scores was lower than expected: 1.5% for W, 1.75% for H and 0% for BMI, which suggests that there were no malnourished children. The other extremity of the distribution evidenced prevalence of overweight and obesity of 16.8% and 10.8%, respectively. Conclusion Low income preschool children are in an advanced stage of nutritional transition with a high prevalence of overweight.

  20. [Living conditions, nutritional status and morbidity in children in prisons and detention centers in Burkina Faso].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, D; Zoma, A; Kabore, A; Yonaba, C; Savadogo, H; Ouedraogo, S A P; Dao, L; Koueta, F

    2015-01-01

    In Burkina Faso, although children are sometimes separated from adults in prisons, they still live in the same conditions of overcrowding, which can reach 180% of the capacity. The aim of our study was to describe living conditions, nutritional status, and morbidity of children in detention centers of Burkina Faso. The objective of this cross-sectional descriptive study is to describe the social and health conditions of children held in 20 detention centers in Burkina Faso. During the study period, 109 children, with a mean age of 16.3 years, were examined in 20 correction centers. The main reason for incarceration was theft (66% cases, n = 72). Detention exceeded more than one month for 76 children (70%), and 59% (N = 46) had had fewer than one visit per month since their incarceration. Of these 20 facilities, 6 had no separate quarters for children. The main symptoms and diseases encountered in these children were fever in 19% of the cases (N = 16), macroscopic hematuria in 13% (N = 11), urinary tract infection in 12% (N = 10) and diarrhea in 12% (N = 10). These results show that there is a need to take preventive measures to protect these children's health, especially by improving the quality of living conditions in detention center.

  1. Nutritional status of under-five children in HIV-affected households in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndirangu, Murugi; Wariero, James O; Sachs, Sonia Ehrlich; Masibo, Peninah; Deckelbaum, Richard J

    2011-06-01

    Households affected by HIV/AIDS are at an increased risk for food insecurity and malnutrition. Poor nutrition contributes to more than a third of all deaths associated with infectious diseases among children under 5 years of age in developing countries. With increased household food insecurity, and a greater disease burden associated with HIV/AIDS, the growth of children under five could be impacted, resulting in increased malnutrition for this vulnerable group. To determine whether there is an association between the type of household (HIV-affected compared with HIV-unaffected) and the nutritional status of children under 5 years of age residing in these households. The study was set in a Millennium Village Project site in western Kenya and used a cross-sectional design to compare the stunting, wasting, and underweight status among 102 and 99 under-five children living in HIV-affected and -unaffected households, respectively. Height-for-age, weight-for-age, and weight-for-age z-scores were calculated based on the World Health Organization growth standards and compared. Proportions, means, and standard deviations were used to describe the data. The data were analyzed with the use of the chi-square test for comparison of proportions and the independent t-test for comparison of means. Children in HIV-affected households had a significantly higher degree of stunting (height-for-age HIV-affected and -unaffected households. Residing in HIV-affected households is associated with stunting in children under 5 years of age.

  2. Nutritional status and morbidity pattern in school age children in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Bhandari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available School Health has been regarded as a high priority intervention in developing countries. However it has not been prioritized in Nepal for many years. The objectives of the study are to find out the nutritional status and morbidity pattern in school age children. To arouse importance of personal hygiene and healthful surrounding through information, education and communication (IEC. This cross-sectional study was administered in two schools located in Bolde phedeche and Mahure of Kavrepalanchowk. From the selected schools, a total number of 160 students studying from Grade 1 to V were enumerated in the study using census survey method. Among 160 students, the most important three problems were pediculosis 42(26.2 %, dental caries 29(18.1%, and waxy ear 27(17.1 %. Thus the school health education should put more emphasis on oral care, nutrition, personal hygiene and others. Applying classification of Indian Academy of Pediatrics: based on weight for age, 36(55.3% boys and 34(35.8% girls fall under 1st degree malnutrition and 15(23.07% boys and 44(46.3% girls fall under IInd degree malnutrition, 7(7.2 % girls fall under IIIrd degree malnutrition.The health and nutritional standards of school children in this study were found to be unsatisfactory. Among different morbidity pediculosis is found more in girls. The present study put more emphasis on the need for initiation of school health program in the school with more on improving personal hygiene, prevention of disease like parasitic infection/infestation and improvement of their nutritional status. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal,2012,Vol-8,No-2, 12-16 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i2.6832

  3. Nutritional Status and Related Factors in Children, Bandar Turkmen District, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Ebrahimzadehkor

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevalence of protein-energy malnutrition (PEM is one of the important problems of third-world countries including Iran. This study assessed nutritional status and some related factors among children aged 0-5 years in Bandar Turkmen district. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 616 children aged less than 5 years were selected with stratified random sampling. Malnutrition was defined as +2 SD NCHS reference. Data were collected by interview with mothers and were analyzed with SPSS-11.5 software. Results: In this study, prevalence of underweight, wasting and stunting and obesity were 3.7, 3.9, 7 and 6% respectively. Exclusively breastfeeding, mother’s BMI, mother’s weight and parental educational and economic status had significant correlation with children’s PEM (p4000 g (p=0.031, breast feeding duration 30 years (p=0.043 and formula or cow’s milk plus breast feeding up to 6 months old (p=0.018 had significant correlation with children’s obesity. In multivariate analysis on logistic regression, mother’s nutritional knowledge (OR=11.22, p=0.001 was most important risk factor for PEM. Exclusively breast feeding up to 6 months of age rather than formula or cow’s milk plus breast feeding, reduced 2.45 times obesity risk (p=0.019. Conclusion: We conclude that breast feeding at first 6 months of age, longer breast feeding duration and pregnancy in lower than 30 years of age reduce risk of child nutritional status.

  4. Assessment of nutritional status, cognitive development, and mother-child interaction in Central American refugee children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Laude

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted between July and December 1992 to assess the nutritional status, cognitive development, and mother-child interactions in a group of 153 Nicaraguan refugee children living in Costa Rica. Nutritional status was assessed using anthropometric indices. Cognitive development was assessed with the Bayley Scale of Mental Development. Mother-child interaction was assessed with the Nursing Child Assessment Teaching Scale and Caldwell's Home Observation and Measurement of the Environment Inventory. Correlational analysis was performed to examine the relationship between child cognitive development scores and mother-child interaction measures and also between anthropometric measures and child cognitive development scores. Multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between the mother-child interaction measures and cognitive development scores, after adjusting by anthropometric measures. Thirty-three percent of the children were below the 10th percentile for height-for-age. There was no significant correlation between the total amount of mother-child interaction and child cognitive development. However, certain aspects of the home environment correlated with cognitive development, specifically the manner in which the mother responded emotionally and verbally to her child, and the organization of the child's physical and temporal environment. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the manner in which the mother responded and the child's weight-for-height were important in predicting child cognitive development. The child's weight-for-height and certain aspects of the home environment played an important role in the cognitive development of this refugee population. The findings indicate the importance of assessing nutritional status in this refugee population.

  5. Relationships between different nutritional anthropometric statuses and health-related fitness of South African primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, M E G; Lambert, M I; Lambert, E V

    2017-05-01

    A double burden of both under- and over-nutrition exists among South African children. To describe associations between nutritional statuses and health-related fitness test performances. Height and weight of 10 285 children (6-13 years; n = 5604 boys and 4681 girls) were measured and used to calculate body mass index (BMI) and prevalence of overweight and obesity, stunting, wasting and underweight. Physical fitness scores for standing long jump, shuttle run, sit-and-reach, sit-up (EUROFIT) and cricket ball throw were assessed. Age- and gender-specific z-scores were calculated for these variables. Physical fitness for each nutritional status group was compared to children of normal weight. Compared to normal weight children, overweight and obese children scored lower on all fitness tests (p fitness tests (p fitness tests.

  6. [Association between dental caries and nutritional status of 7-and 12-years-old children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chłapowska, Joanna; Rataj-Kulmacz, Agata; Krzyżaniak, Alicja; Borysewicz-Lewicka, Maria

    2014-01-01

    One of the etiological factors of dental caries are improper eating habits, which also influence the nutritional state of the organism. This similarity tends to establish the relationship between the intensity of tooth decay, and body weight disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental caries in 7 and 12-year-old children, depending on the nutritional status. The study included 225 children of both sex, age 7 (132) and 12 years (93) attending to randomly selected schools in Poznań. Dental examination was performed by dentists in schools in artificial light using mirrors and dental probe (criteria according to WHO 1997 ). Based on collected data, caries frequency and caries intensity were calculated (DMF-t -7 and 12-year-olds and dmf-t 7-year olds). Anthropometric measurements such as height and weight were made by school nurses in accordance with guidelines for the performance of screening tests for people of school age. A deficiency or excess body weight in surveyed children rated BMI (Body Mass Index), including percentile ranges for the population of children in Poznań. Assessment of dental caries in groups of pupils were formed due to nutritional status of the respondents i. e. normal-weight and underweight and overweight. Caries frequency in children of normal weight in the population of 7-year-olds was 82.2% and 53.2% of children aged 12 years. In the group of 7-year-old pupils with overweight and underweight was respectively, 95.0% and 90.9%, 84.2% and 50.0% in the older group. A statistically significant difference between the attendance of dental caries in a group of 12-year-old children with overweight and normal weight and its deficiency was show. The average value of dmf-t in 7-year-old children was 4.02, and the DMF-permanent dentition - 0.19 and the children with over- and underweight respectively dmf- 4.25 and 3,82 and DMF- 0.35 and 0,27. In population of 12-year olds caries DMF was - 1.62, and for children with

  7. Assessment of nutritional status in children with chronic kidney disease and on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrangelo, Antonio; Paglialonga, Fabio; Edefonti, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW) is defined as a state of decreased body protein mass and fuel reserves (body protein and fat mass) and is a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is multifactorial: the main causative factors are hormonal imbalances and a low nutrient intake, but low residual renal function, inadequate dialysis dose, chronic inflammation and metabolic acidosis are other important contributory factors. Adult PEW has been defined, but there is no accepted definition of pediatric PEW and consequently no precise diagnostic criteria. Assessing nutritional status in children is also complicated by the absence of a gold standard, specific abnormalities in body composition, and the slowly progressive course of the disease. The evaluation of PEW should take into account all of its pathogenetic aspects, which include dietary assessment, clinical and anthropometric assessment (based on weight, height, and body mass index), a panel of biochemical parameters, and a normalized protein catabolic rate (in the case of adolescents on hemodialysis). Bioimpedance indices can be used in individual patients on a regular basis in centers with expertise. The longitudinal follow-up data relating to the above parameters are valuable for comparing patient and normative data. Given the complex nature of PEW, only a multidisciplinary approach can provide an accurate assessment of nutritional status and its derangements in children with CKD and on dialysis.

  8. Modifications of adiposity in school-age children according to nutritional status: a 20-year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Tatiane K; Ferrari, Gerson Luis M; Silva Júnior, João Pedro da; Silva, Leonardo José da; Oliveira, Luís C; Matsudo, Victor K R

    2012-05-01

    To analyze adiposity changes in school-age children over a 20 year-period, according to nutritional status. The study is part of the Ilhabela Longitudinal Mixed Project on Growth, Development and Physical Fitness. A sample of 1,095 school students of both sexes, from 7 to 10 years, met the following inclusion criteria: (a) at least one complete assessment in one of the analyzed periods; (b) to be in prepubertal stage of sexual maturation; (c) to be apparently healthy. The periods analyzed were 1990/1991 (initial), 2000/2001 (10 years) and 2010/2011 (20 years). The variables analyzed were: body weight, height and adiposity through individual analysis of each skinfold. Children were classified as eutrophic, overweight and obese, according to the curves of body mass index for age and sex proposed by the World Health Organization. The statistical analysis used was one-way ANOVA, followed by Scheffé's post-hoc test, with p nutritional status was controlled, showing that individuals who have similar body mass indexes may vary in proportion and distribution of subcutaneous adipose tissue. In both sexes, the increase was higher in the overweight group, and mainly in central skinfolds.

  9. The nutritional status of children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Déborah Teixeira; Rondó, Patrícia Helen Carvalho; Reis, Ligia Cardoso

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to assess the nutritional status of children and adolescents with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). One hundred and eighteen subjects aged 6-19 years attending an outpatient clinic in São Paulo city were involved in the study. The following anthropometric measurements were assessed: weight, height, waist circumference and triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness. One (0.9%) adolescent was diagnosed with abdominal obesity based on waist circumference measurement; three (2.5%) adolescents were obese based on subscapular skinfold thickness. According to the body mass index, the population studied was mainly eutrophic. The prevalence of fat redistribution, a characteristic of patients with HIV/AIDS under HAART, was low. We advise the development of further studies to assess the nutritional status of children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS using anthropometric measurements as well as computed tomography to detect fat redistribution.

  10. [Pilot study about the effectivity of an intervention based on games in nutritional status and muscle strength on children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Sánchez, Johana Patricia; Pavez Saldiviar, Nicolás Fernando; Bravo-Gatica, Javier Ignacio; White Ortiz, Alan Rigoberto; Jaque Fernández, Francisco Ignacio; Vargas-Gyllen, Cristian Ignacio; Arriagada Cárdenas, Sandra; Carrasco Naranjo, Fernando; Cano-Cappellacci, Marcelo Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The overnutrition is a constant on developing countries; Chile is not an exception because it has a marked tendency to overweight and obesity in schoolchildren. The muscular strength has been associated with cardiovascular and metabolic health status in scholars. Effective interventions using games are needed to improve the nutritional status and physical fitness in school children. To assess the intervention effectiveness based on games played at school time to improve the nutritional status and physical fitness in schoolchildren. 156 students aged between 7 to 15 years, attending to two public schools with full school day, to which a pilot program was applied. This pilot program was based on dynamic recreational games during 45 minutes from monday to friday for 3 months in the largest playtime of the school day. At the end of the intervention, we observed a significant modification on children nutritional status, which highlights an increase in the number of children that reached the normal nutritional status (p school playtime, improving nutritional status. However, we didn't observed modifications in the muscular strength. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  11. THE NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF HIGH SCHOOL CHILDREN IN A GOVERNMENT SCHOOL OF ANANTAPURAMU TOWN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durga

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of overweight and underweight in Government High School children in Anantapuramu town and to assess the various determinants associated with the two nutritional statuses. Overweight and underweight are major health problems among high school children . METHODS: Cross - sectional study was carried out in government high school in Anantapuramu town by using preformed questionnaire. Totally 50 high school children from 8th, 9th and 10th standard were included in th e study. Anthropometric measurements such as height, weight, body mass index, waist and hip ratio were assessed. RESULTS : Majority of students were underweight. Only few students were overweight, and no cases of obesity were found. The overweight students were mainly boys and the underweight were mainly girls. Nutritional values of the majority of students were poor due to unhealthy food , lifestyles, lack of exercise, outdoor activities, imbalanced diet and inadequate food intake . CONCLUSION: Only 4% of gir ls were overweight compared to 8% boys who were overweight. In the present study, majority of high school students in 8th, 9th, and 10 th standards were underweight, and the prevalence of overweight and obesity were less.6 4% of female students were underwe ight as compared to 48% of male students who were under weight.

  12. Energy expenditure, nutrition status, and body composition in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Verónica B; Velandia, Sylvia; Hunter, Bessie; Gattas, Vivien; Fielbaum, Oscar; Herrera, Oscar; Díaz, Erik

    2004-02-01

    Undernutrition is a frequent complication in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Elevated energy requirements have been found to be 4% to 33% higher than in controls in some studies. Whether or not this is caused by a primary defect or energy metabolism is still a matter of controversy. To this end, we assessed energy expenditure, nutrition status, and body composition of clinically stable CF outpatients. Fifteen clinically stable CF patients, ages 2 to 15 y, were paired with 15 healthy control children. Measurements consisted of anthropometry and body composition. Plasma tocopherol, retinol, and hair zinc content were measured. Resting energy expenditure was determined by indirect calorimetry. Physical activity and dietary intake were recorded by recall methods. Two children were nutritionally at risk according to the weight/height index, eight were normal, three were overweight, and two were obese. Body composition was similar in both groups. Zinc, tocopherol, and retinol levels were low in three, two, and three patients, respectively. Resting energy expenditures were 4.7 MJ/d (1127 +/- 220 kcal/d) in CF children and 4.63 MJ/d (1108 +/- 191 kcal/d) in control children (P = not significant). Physical activity level was sedentary in 86.6% of CF patients; the rest had a light physical activity pattern. Energy intake represented 141% of the estimated daily energy expenditure. Non-oxygen-dependent CF children, without acute respiratory infection, had resting energy expenditures comparable to those of matched controls. Total energy expenditure was similar to or slightly lower than that in healthy children. Dietary recommendations for CF patients need to be reassessed.

  13. Nutritional Awareness of Mothers in Relation to Nutritional Status of the Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Santoshi; Kejriwal, Sunita

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the developing world, nearly one-third (35%) of under-five children are stunted and rural children are twice likely to be underweight as those in urban areas (United Nations, Children education Fund, UNICEF Global Database (2006-2010). United Nations Development Assistance Framework of Uganda. Retrieved from…

  14. Nutritional status and malaria infection in primary school-aged children

    OpenAIRE

    Washli Zakiah; Tiangsa Sembiring; Lily Irsa

    2015-01-01

    Background The most common nutritional problem affecting the pediatric population in developing countries is protein energy malnutrition (PEM). The nutritional problem may be caused by a variety of factors, most of which are related inadequate food intake and infection. One of the highest causes of morbidity and mortality in endemic areas is malaria. Malaria infection and nutritional status have been suggested to be interrelated. Objective To assess for a relationship between nutritional ...

  15. Nutritional status and malaria infection in primary school-aged children

    OpenAIRE

    Washli Zakiah; Tiangsa Sembiring; Lily Irsa

    2015-01-01

    Background The most common nutritional problem affecting the pediatric population in developing countries is protein energy malnutrition (PEM). The nutritional problem may be caused by a variety of factors, most of which are related inadequate food intake and infection. One of the highest causes of morbidity and mortality in endemic areas is malaria. Malaria infection and nutritional status have been suggested to be interrelated. Objective To assess for a relationship between nutritional s...

  16. Nutritional Status of Under-five Children Living in an Informal Urban Settlement in Nairobi, Kenya

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beatrice Olack; Heather Burke; Leonard Cosmas; Sapna Bamrah; Kathleen Dooling; Daniel R. Feikin; Leisel E. Talley; Robert F. Breiman

    2011-01-01

    .... To investigate whether food insecurity due to post-election violence resulted in high prevalence of acute and chronic malnutrition in children, a nutritional survey was undertaken among children aged...

  17. Dietary intake and nutritional status of HIV-1-infected children and adolescents in Florianopolis, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillesheim, Elaine; Lima, Luiz R A; Silva, Rosane C R; Trindade, Erasmo B S M

    2014-05-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the nutritional status and dietary intake of HIV-infected children and adolescents and the relationship between nutritional status and dietary intake and CD4(+) T-cell count and viral load. The sample was composed of 49 subjects aged 7-17 years and living in Florianópolis, Brazil. Nutritional status was assessed by height-for-age and body mass index-for-age. Dietary intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Spearman correlations and multiple linear regressions were used to determine the relationship between energy, nutrient intake and body mass index-for-age and CD4(+) T-cell count and viral load. The mean body mass index-for-age and height-for-age values were -0.26 ± 0.86 and -0.56 ± 0.92, respectively. The energy intake was 50.8% above the estimated energy requirement and inadequate intake of polyunsaturated fat, cholesterol, fibre, calcium and vitamin C was present in 100%, 57.1%, 40.8%, 61.2% and 26.5% of the sample, respectively. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that energy intake was correlated with CD4+ T-cell count (r = 0.33; p = 0.028) and viral load (r = -0.35; p = 0.019). These data showed low body mass index-for-age and height-for-age z-scores, high energy intake and inadequate intake of important nutrients for immune function, growth and control of chronic diseases. A lower energy intake was correlated with viral suppression and immune preservation.

  18. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Poor Nutritional Status among Children in the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babill Stray-Pedersen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated the prevalence and risk factors for poor nutritional status among children less than 36 months of age in the Kilimanjaro region of Tanzania. Using a cross sectional study design, children and their caregivers were recruited into the study. Anthropometric measures were taken based on established protocol while a standard questionnaire was utilized to collect socio-demographic data. A finger-prick blood sample was collected from all the children and haemoglobin (Hb concentration analyzed using a HemoCue photometer (HemoCue AB, Angelholm, Sweden. Four hundred and twenty three (423 children (214 females took part in this study. Participating children were aged between 1–35 months (mean = 13.04, SD = 7.70. We observed high rates of stunting (44.2% and underweight (19.1%. Nearly 70% (n = 295 of the sample was anaemic (Hb < 11 g/dL. In a multivariate logistic regression model concerns on child growth, maternal education, and child’s age were found to independently predict stunting; whereas concerns over child’s growth and development, and distance to water source were found to uniquely predict being underweight. Maternal education was the only factor related to the child’s anaemia. The current study further emphasizes the need to implement context relevant interventions to combat malnutrition in this region of Tanzania and other similar settings.

  19. Prevalence and risk factors for poor nutritional status among children in the Kilimanjaro region of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Amina; Uriyo, Jacqueline; Msuya, Sia E; Swai, Mark; Stray-Pedersen, Babill

    2012-10-05

    The current study investigated the prevalence and risk factors for poor nutritional status among children less than 36 months of age in the Kilimanjaro region of Tanzania. Using a cross sectional study design, children and their caregivers were recruited into the study. Anthropometric measures were taken based on established protocol while a standard questionnaire was utilized to collect socio-demographic data. A finger-prick blood sample was collected from all the children and haemoglobin (Hb) concentration analyzed using a HemoCue photometer (HemoCue AB, Angelholm, Sweden). Four hundred and twenty three (423) children (214 females) took part in this study. Participating children were aged between 1–35 months (mean = 13.04, SD = 7.70). We observed high rates of stunting (44.2%) and underweight (19.1%). Nearly 70% (n = 295) of the sample was anaemic (Hb underweight. Maternal education was the only factor related to the child's anaemia. The current study further emphasizes the need to implement context relevant interventions to combat malnutrition in this region of Tanzania and other similar settings.

  20. A Cross-sectional Survey of Growth and Nutritional Status in Children With Cerebral Palsy in West China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Cai, Qianyun; Shi, Wei; Jiang, Huayin; Li, Na; Ma, Dan; Wang, Qiu; Luo, Rong; Mu, Dezhi

    2016-05-01

    We describe the growth and nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy (2 to 18 years old) in West China and to explore the correlation between the nutritional status and age, gender, and gross and fine motor function. We performed a cross-sectional survey of children registered as having cerebral palsy in the China Disabled Persons' Federation branch in Chengdu. Growth (height and weight) and nutritional (body mass index) status were recorded. Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) were used to determine gross and fine motor function, respectively. The association between nutritional status and age, GMFCS and MACS levels was evaluated. We enrolled 377 children (53.6% male), among whom 160 (42.4%) were stunting, 48 (12.7%) underweight, 81 (21.5%) thin, and 70 (18.5%) overweight and obese. Thinness was the main nutritional problem in older patients (12 to 18 years), whereas overweight and obesity were the major issues in younger patients (2 to 12 years). Growth deviation and malnutrition were significantly more prevalent in patients with severe motor impairments. A significant negative correlation was found between nutritional status and age, GMFCS and MACS levels, and between growth and GMFCS and MACS levels. Growth abnormality is common in children with cerebral palsy. Malnutrition and overnutrition both exist in children with cerebral palsy. Characteristics at different age stages and motor functional levels should be taken into consideration in the management of growth and nutrition in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Geohelminth Infections and Nutritional Status of Preschool Aged Children in a Periurban Settlement of Ogun State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Omitola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the geohelminth and nutritional status of preschoolers in a periurban community of Ogun state. Fresh stool specimens were collected for laboratory analysis, processed using ether concentration method, and examined under the microscope for geohelminth ova. Demographic characteristics and daily nutrient intake of children were subjectively assessed during an interview session with parents, following anthropometric data collection. Data obtained were analysed using a statistical software for Windows. Nutritional indicators such as underweight, stunting, and wasting were computed from anthropometric data. Results showed an overall prevalence of 39.2% and 12.4% for Ascariasis and Hookworm infection, respectively, with no significant difference (P>0.05 between the sexes. Prevalence of nutritional indicators was 52.6%, 35.1%, 34.0%, and 9.3% for underweight, stunting, wasting, and thinness conditions, respectively. A good proportion of the malnourished preschoolers were free of Ascaris infection but infected with Hookworm parasite. The adverse effect of geohelminth infection cannot still be ignored in impaired growth, reduced survival, poor development, and cognitive performance of preschoolers. Therefore promotion of adequate health education program on measures of preventing geohelminth infections is needed.

  2. [Nutritional status of children and adolescents from a town in the semiarid Northeastern Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramires, Elyssia Karine Nunes Mendonça; de Menezes, Risia Cristina Egito; Oliveira, Juliana Souza; Oliveira, Maria Alice Araújo; Temoteo, Tatiane Leocádio; Longo-Silva, Giovana; Leal, Vanessa Sá; Costa, Emília Chagas; Asakura, Leiko

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the nutritional status of schoolchildren, resident in a semiarid region in the Northeastern Brazil. This is a cross-sectional study, involving 860 children and adolescents aged from 5-19 years-old, enrolled in three public schools in the county. The selection of schools was non-probabilistic type and unintentional. The initial population, which integrated the database, was composed by 1,035 children and teenagers, and 175 students (16.9%) were excluded because of inconsistency in the anthropometric data, resulting in a sample of 860 students. The following outcomes were considered: stunting (malnutrition), overweight and obesity (overweight), being the height/age and body mass index/age (BMI/Age), indices respectively used. Children and adolescents with height <-2 standard deviations and overweight and obese weight z score ≥1 were considered stunted. The statistical analysis was descriptive. The prevalence of stunting and overweight/obesity was 9.1% and 24.0%, respectively. Overweight and stunting were higher in adolescents aged 15 and over, compared to other age groups analyzed. In relation to gender, malnutrition presented itself in a similar way, but overweight was more frequent among females. The results revealed that excess weight, here represented by the sum of overweight and obesity, was more prevalent than stunting (malnutrition), highlighting the urgent need for attention to this problem in order to design interventions capable of contributing to the improvement of schoolchildren nutritional status. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Body image, nutritional status, abdominal strength, and cardiorespiratory fitness in children and adolescents practicing sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Alexandre; Januário, Renata Selvatici B; Casonatto, Juliano; Sonoo, Christi Noriko

    2013-01-01

    To verify the association between nutritional status, physical fitness, and body image in children and adolescents. This cross-sectional study included 401 students (236 boys and 165 girls) aged between 8 and 16 years that were regularly enrolled in sports in the local clubs. The nutritional status was evaluated by the body mass index. Students were assessed for satisfaction with body image, abdominal strength resistance, and cardiorespiratory fitness. The variables were assessed on the same day following a standardized order. In order to verify relationships between variables, the chi-square test was used. Afterwards, the binary logistic regression was applied to identify the magnitude of the associations, considering p<0.05 as significant. Association was found between body image and body mass index (p=0.001), abdominal strength resistance (p=0.005) and cardiorespiratory fitness (p=0.001). The Odds Ratio for presenting the body image insatisfaction for those who have not achieved the expected values for the health criteria in abdominal strength resistance and cardiorespiratory fitness were 2.14 and 2.42 times respectively, and for those with overweight and obesity, 2.87 times. Insatisfaction with body image is associated with body mass index and also with physical fitness, abdominal strength resistance, and cardiorespiratory fitness variables.

  4. CORRECTION OF NUTRITIONAL STATUS IN COMPLEX THERAPY FOR CHILDREN SUFFERING FROM DYSTROPHIC FORMS OF INNATE EPIDERMOLYSIS BULLOSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Makarova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Children  suffering  from  dystrophic  forms  of  innate  epidermolysis  bullosa  (IEB,  have  malnutrition  of  multifactorial  genesis.  And, despite the experience of working with this complex group of patients, many practical issues of optimal nutrition organization at IEB remain  unsolved.  The review presents  modern  approaches  to the assessment  of nutritional status  with children,  including those developed for the assessment of eating disorders with children having IEB; the formulas for calculating the nutrient requirement are presented. The analysis of the scientific data on the pathogenesis and characteristics of disturbances in nutritional status with children having IEB is done. It is noted that the complexity of nutritional support of this severe category of patients is due to a mismatch between the increased need for nutrients and limited assimilation of food, which requires a special diet with increased energy and protein value without increasing the amount of food intake. Reasonability of the organization of feeding children having IEB with specialized products for enteral nutrition and nutritional support is analyzed.

  5. Education and Nutritional Status of Orphans and Children of HIV-Infected Parents in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vinod; Arnold, Fred; Otieno, Fredrick; Cross, Anne; Hong, Rathavuth

    2007-01-01

    We examined whether orphaned and fostered children and children of HIV-infected parents are disadvantaged in schooling, nutrition, and health care. We analyzed data on 2,756 children aged 0-4 years and 4,172 children aged 6-14 years included in the 2003 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey, with linked anonymous HIV testing, using multivariate…

  6. ASSESSMENT OF NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH SPASTIC QUADRIPLEGIC CEREBRAL PALSY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, Thaisa Barboza; Lomazi, Elizete Aparecida; Montenegro, Maria Augusta Santos; Bellomo-Brandão, Maria Angela

    2017-01-01

    Due to several factors, such as gastrointestinal's diseases and difficulty in feeding, children with Spastic Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy tend to present nutritional deficits. To assess the nutritional status of pediatric patients with Spastic Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy according to reference curves for this population and with the measures of folds and circumferences, obtained by the upper arm circumference and triceps skin fold. The data were obtained from: knee-height, estimated height, weight, upper arm circumference, and triceps skin fold. Values of folds and circumferences were compared with Frisancho, and specific curves for these patients were used as reference. The relationship between the values in the growth curve for healthy children, Z-Score, and comparison with the reference curve were verified by Fisher's exact test. We adopted the significance level of 5%. We evaluated 54 patients. The mean age was 10.2 years, and 34 were male, 25 fed by gastrostomy and 29, orally. The frequency of low weight by the reference curve was 22.22%. More than half of the patients presented the parameters indicating lean mass below the 5th percentile. The height of all patients was classified as adequate for the age by the reference curve. Low weight was found in 22% of patients, and there is a greater tendency to present reduced muscle mass and increased fat mass, showing the need for evaluation and appropriate interventions for patients with Spastic Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy.

  7. ASSESSMENT OF NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH SPASTIC QUADRIPLEGIC CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaisa Barboza CASELLI

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Due to several factors, such as gastrointestinal’s diseases and difficulty in feeding, children with Spastic Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy tend to present nutritional deficits. OBJECTIVE: To assess the nutritional status of pediatric patients with Spastic Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy according to reference curves for this population and with the measures of folds and circumferences, obtained by the upper arm circumference and triceps skin fold. METHODS: The data were obtained from: knee-height, estimated height, weight, upper arm circumference, and triceps skin fold. Values of folds and circumferences were compared with Frisancho, and specific curves for these patients were used as reference. The relationship between the values in the growth curve for healthy children, Z-Score, and comparison with the reference curve were verified by Fisher’s exact test. We adopted the significance level of 5%. RESULTS: We evaluated 54 patients. The mean age was 10.2 years, and 34 were male, 25 fed by gastrostomy and 29, orally. The frequency of low weight by the reference curve was 22.22%. More than half of the patients presented the parameters indicating lean mass below the 5th percentile. The height of all patients was classified as adequate for the age by the reference curve. CONCLUSION: Low weight was found in 22% of patients, and there is a greater tendency to present reduced muscle mass and increased fat mass, showing the need for evaluation and appropriate interventions for patients with Spastic Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy.

  8. Nutritional Status and Nutrient Intake Challenges in Children With Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nilesh M; Newman, Haley; Tarrant, Stacey; Graham, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Nutrition is recognized as a core component of multidisciplinary care for patients with spinal muscular atrophy, but specific nutritional challenges in this population are not well described. We aimed to describe the nutritional status and nutrient intake in children with spinal muscular atrophy. We performed a retrospective medical record review of prospectively collected data from children with spinal muscular atrophy followed at a multidisciplinary clinic at a tertiary referral center. We collected data including clinical parameters; anthropometrics, including weight, height, and body mass index (BMI); and 24-hour dietary intake records in all children followed in the clinic. Available data were found in records from the dietitian as part of a standard evaluation process, and additional clinical data were acquired from patient medical records. Subjects were classified based on spinal muscular atrophy type, and nutritional intake data were compared with dietary reference intakes for gender and age. Z-scores were calculated for weight for age (WAZ), height for age, and BMI (BMIZ) using the World Health Organization AnthroPlus software with appropriate World Health Organization reference growth standards. Subjects were classified as malnourished if their WAZ was +2. Anthropometric measurements were obtained at first visit and at a follow-up visit at an average of a 3-year interval between the clinic visits. A decline of more than 0.5 WAZ over this period was defined a priori as significant nutritional deterioration. We analyzed data from 60 subjects, 26 (43%) female, with median age 5.5 years (interquartile range 2 years to 12 years). The cohort consisted of children with spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (28 %), type 2 (45 %), and type 3 (27 %). At the first clinic visit, nine (15%) patients were malnourished. Thirteen (23%) subjects had a significant decline in WAZ from -0.35 (-1.31 to 0.58) to -1.04 (-2.15 to 0.02) at follow-up after approximately 3 years. A

  9. Impact of fortified blended food aid products on nutritional status of infants and young children in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Expósito, Ana B; Klein, Barbara P

    2009-12-01

    Fortified blended foods were developed in the 1960s to improve the nutritional status of children suffering from malnutrition. The present review was conducted to examine the impact that fortified blended foods used in humanitarian relief programs have had on the health and nutritional status of infants and young children with moderate malnutrition, or at risk of undernutrition, in developing countries. Published articles were identified using electronic databases and general Web searches. Search terms included commodity types and names and terms related to food assistance and fortification programs. Positive effects on recovery from moderate acute malnutrition and weight gain were observed when fortified blended foods were distributed as dietary supplements. Prevention of severe micronutrient deficiencies in populations reliant on food aid has been reported, but measurements of micronutrient status have rarely been conducted. Evidence of the efficacy of fortified blended foods for improving nutritional outcomes is currently limited and weak.

  10. Diet patterns are associated with demographic factors and nutritional status in South Indian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehoe, Sarah H; Krishnaveni, Ghattu V; Veena, Sargoor R; Guntupalli, Aravinda M; Margetts, Barrie M; Fall, Caroline H D; Robinson, Sian M

    2014-01-01

    The burden of non-communicable chronic disease (NCD) in India is increasing. Diet and body composition 'track' from childhood into adult life and contribute to the development of risk factors for NCD. Little is known about the diet patterns of Indian children. We aimed to identify diet patterns and study associations with body composition and socio-demographic factors in the Mysore Parthenon Study cohort. We collected anthropometric and demographic data from children aged 9.5 years (n = 538). We also administered a food frequency questionnaire and measured fasting blood concentrations of folate and vitamin B12. Using principal component analysis, we identified two diet patterns. The 'snack and fruit' pattern was characterised by frequent intakes of snacks, fruit, sweetened drinks, rice and meat dishes and leavened breads. The 'lacto-vegetarian' pattern was characterised by frequent intakes of finger millet, vegetarian rice dishes, yoghurt, vegetable dishes and infrequent meat consumption. Adherence to the 'snack and fruit' pattern was associated with season, being Muslim and urban dwelling. Adherence to the lacto-vegetarian pattern was associated with being Hindu, rural dwelling and a lower maternal body mass index. The 'snack and fruit' pattern was negatively associated with the child's adiposity. The lacto-vegetarian pattern was positively associated with blood folate concentration and negatively with vitamin B12 concentration. This study provides new information on correlates of diet patterns in Indian children and how diet relates to nutritional status. Follow-up of these children will be important to determine the role of these differences in diet in the development of risk factors for NCD including body composition. © 2013 The Authors. Maternal and Child Nutrition published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Association of Alimentary Factors and Nutritional Status with Caries in Children of Leon, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guizar, Juan Manuel; Muñoz, Nathalie; Amador, Norma; Garcia, Gabriela

    To determine the association between types of food consumed, nutritional status (BMI) and caries in schoolchildren. A cross-sectional study was performed with 224 schoolchildren 6 to 12 years of age. DMFT/ dmft indices, level of oral hygiene, nutritional status as quantified by BMI and types of food consumed were determined in all participants. Data were analysed using multiple linear regression with significance set at p carbohydrates (R2 = 0.30; p carbohydrates. No relationship was found between caries and nutritional status.

  12. Nutritional status, dietary intake patterns and nutrition knowledge of children aged 5-6 years attending kindergartens in the Klang Valley, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, B K; Kathryn Tham, B L; Wong, S N; Winnie Chee, S S; Tee, E S

    2012-08-01

    Early childhood is a period during which many factors influence the development of lifelong eating habits. This study aimed to assess the nutritional status of young children and to determine factors related to eating habits. A total of 992 children aged 5-6 years attending kindergartens that participated in the Bright Start Nutrition programme in the Klang Valley were included in the study. Anthropometric measurements were taken and body mass index (BMI) calculated. A questionnaire to assess the children's nutrition knowledge was administered through interviews, while their mothers self-administered another set of questionnaires regarding knowledge, attitude and practice on nutrition. The mean BMI was 15.7 +/- 2.7 kg/m2 in boys and 15.4 +/- 2.4 kg/m2 in girls. Based on the WHO 2007 growth reference, the prevalence of overweight and obesity were 9.1% and 9.3%, respectively; while the prevalence of thinness and stunting were 5.8% and 3.9%, respectively. Most of the children consumed breakfast (86.4%), lunch (94.1%) and dinner (93.4%) daily. The majority liked fruits (95.1%), snacks (93.8%), Western fast food (93.3%) and milk (90.8%), while less than two-thirds (65.1%) liked vegetables. The mean nutrition knowledge scores for the children and mothers were 73.2 +/- 9.8% and 60.2 +/- 18.8%, respectively. Maternal nutrition knowledge was correlated positively with children's vegetable intake (r=0.111, punderweight and thinness among the urban young children studied. As mother's nutrition knowledge was found to exert a positive influence on children's eating habits, it is important to provide nutrition education to both mothers and children when conducting intervention programmes.

  13. Nutritional status, dietary intake and serum levels of vitamin C upon diagnosis of cancer in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima de Araújo, L; Maciel Barbosa, J; Gomes Ribeiro, A P; Oliveira dos Santos, A C; Pedrosa, F

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of malnutrition upon diagnosis, together with reduced food intake secondary to disease and treatment, make the periodic assessment of nutritional status (including the intake of antioxidant nutrients) of considerable importance to the follow up of patients with cancer. Assess the nutritional status and frequency of inadequate vitamin C levels among children and adolescents with cancer at the beginning of treatment and determine associated factors. A cross-sectional study was carried out with 30 patients under 18 years. Nutritional status was assessed using laboratory methods and anthropometric measurements. Vitamin C adequacy was assessed through its serum concentration and dietary intake. In the sample, 10% were short for their age and 13.3% were underweight. The triceps skinfold measurement revealed fat depletion in 68% and the arm muscle circumference measurement revealed muscle depletion in 32.0%. Seventy percent of the patients had vitamin C deficiency and had greater weight loss, lower Z scores for all anthropometric indicators analyzed, lower serum albumin and higher C-reactive protein than those without vitamin C deficiency, but these differences were not statistically significant. Children with cancer may have nutritional deficits upon diagnosis. Further studies are needed on the association between serum levels of antioxidant and nutritional status in order to offer safe, effective nutritional support.

  14. Nutritional status of children living with HIV and receiving antiretroviral (ARV) medication in the Klang Valley, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd, Nasir M T; Yeo, J; Huang, M S L; Kamarul, Azahar M R; Koh, M T; Khor, G L

    2011-04-01

    Nutrition and HIV are closely related. Any immune impairment as a result of HIV leads to malnutrition, which in turn, can also lead to reduced immunity, thus contributing to a more rapid progression to AIDS. This cross-sectional study determined the nutritional status of children living with HIV and are receiving antiretroviral medication in the Klang Valley. A total of 95 children aged one to eighteen years old were recruited between September 2008 and February 2009. Data collected included socio-economic status, anthropometric measurements, dietary intake, medical history and serum levels of selected micronutrients specific for immunity. The mean age of the children was 8.4 +/- 3.9 years and the mean duration on antiretroviral medications was 68.3 +/- 38.3 months. Anthropometric assessment found that 9.5% of the children were underweight and 31.6% were overweight. In contrast, 20.8% were stunted and 14.6% severely stunted. Biochemical indicators showed that 10.4% had deficiency in vitamin A while 12.5% had deficiency in selenium. Total cholesterol and HDL-C levels were found to be low in 30.5% and 10.5% of the children respectively. Dietary assessment showed almost all the children did not achieve the recommended energy intake for their age groups and almost half of the children did not achieve the RNI for selenium and vitamin A. This study provides an insight on the nutritional status of children living with HIV.

  15. Nutritional status and lipid profile of HIV-positive children and adolescents using antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contri, Patricia Viganó; Berchielli, Erica Miranda; Tremeschin, Marina Hjertquist; Negrini, Bento Vidal de Moura; Salomão, Roberta Garcia; Monteiro, Jacqueline Pontes

    2011-01-01

    To describe nutritional status, body composition and lipid profile in children and adolescents receiving protease inhibitors. Fifty-nine patients, 23 treated with protease inhibitors (group 1) and 36 not using protease inhibitors (group 2). Their dietary intake, anthropometry, bioimpedance analysis and lipid profile variables were measured. There was no difference in nutritional status or body composition between groups at the beginning of the study. After 6 months of follow-up, there was an increase in weight and height in both groups, as well as in waist circumference and subscapular skinfold thickness. In group 2, body mass index and triceps skinfold thickness adequacy were significantly higher after 6 months of follow-up. The groups had similar energy and macronutrient intake at any time point. After 6 months, group 1 had a higher cholesterol intake and group 2 had a higher fiber intake. Triglyceride serum levels were significantly different between the groups, with higher values in G1, at any time point [G1: 153 mg/dl (30-344); 138 (58-378) versus G2: 76 mg/dl (29-378); 76 (29-378)]. After 6 months of follow-up, G1 had higher LDL-cholesterol than G2 [104 mg/dl (40-142) versus 82 (42-145)]. The use of protease inhibitors, per se, does not seem to significantly interfere with anthropometric measures, body composition and food intake of HIV-infected children and adolescents. However, this antiretroviral therapy was associated with a significant increase in triglyceride and LDL-cholesterol in our subjects.

  16. FEEDING DIFFICULTIES IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN, PREVIOUS FEEDING PRACTICES, AND NUTRITIONAL STATUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Hélcio de Sousa; Aguiar, Renata Cunha de; Lira, Débora Teixeira Jales de; Sales, Mônica Úrsula Figuerêdo; Nóbrega, Nathalia Ávila do Nascimento

    2017-10-30

    To identify the prevalence of feeding difficulties in preschoolers, its association with epidemiological factors and previous eating habits, and repercussion on nutritional status. Cross-sectional study with a questionnaire given to the mothers of 301 children aged 2-6 years enrolled in public and private kindergartens in Natal, Northeast Brazil, conducted in 2014-2015. Feeding difficulty was assessed according to Kerzner's criteria, resulting in the profiles "highly selective intake", "active child with small appetite", "fear of feeding", and "child with psychological disorder or neglected". Association with the following independent variables was analyzed by logistic regression: breastfeeding time, age of cows' milk and complementary feeding introduction, age range, family income, type of school, mothers' profile (responsive or nonresponsive), and body mass index (BMI). Feeding difficulty was found in 37.2% of cases, with predominance of "highly selective intake" (25.4%). It was not associated with infancy feeding practices, family income or type of school. There were no differences between the BMI Z score means for the groups with and without feeding difficulty (1.0±1.5 SD and 1.1±1.4 SD, respectively). The five-to-six age range had more occurrences (OR 1.8; 95%CI 1.1-2.9). Children of responsive mothers were less likely to have feeding difficulties (OR 0.4; 95%CI 0.2-0.8). Feeding difficulties were very frequent. Nutritional status was not impacted by it, and infancy eating habits were not associated with it. Responsive mothers' profile is a protective factor against eating difficulties and reinforces the importance of behavioral factors and mother-child interaction.

  17. Sex differences in nutritional status of HIV-exposed children in Rwanda: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condo, Jeanine U; Gage, Anastasia; Mock, Nancy; Rice, Janet; Greiner, Ted

    2015-01-01

    To examine sex differences in nutritional status in relation to feeding practices over time in a cohort of HIV-exposed children participating in a complementary feeding programme in Rwanda. We applied a longitudinal design with three measurements 2-3 months apart among infants participating in a complementary feeding programme who were 6-12 months old at baseline. Using early feeding practices and a composite infant and child feeding index (ICFI) as indicators of dietary patterns, we conducted a multivariate analysis using a cross-sectional time series to assess sex differences in nutritional status and to determine whether there was a link to discrepancies in dietary patterns. Among 222 boys and 258 girls, the mean (±SD) Z-score of stunting, wasting and underweight was -2.01 (±1.59), -0.15 (±1.46), -1.19 (±1.29) for boys; for girls they were -1.46 (±1.56), 0.22 (±1.29), -0.63 (±1.19); all sex differences in all three indicators were statistically significant (P < 0.001). However, there were only minor differences in early feeding practices and none in the ICFI by sex. HIV-exposed male children may be at higher risk of malnutrition in low-resource setting countries than their female counterparts. However, at least in a setting where complementary foods are being provided, explanations may lie outside the sphere of dietary patterns. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Oral and nutritional health status in children attending a school in Cartagena, 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Martinez, Ketty; González-Martínez, Farith; Luna-Ricardo, Luzmayda

    2010-12-01

    Describing the association between the nutritional and oral health status of children attending a school in Cartagena, Colombia. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The sample consisted of 180 children between aged 5 to 12. Malnutrition was assessed by anthropometric and biochemical tests, a questionnaire was used for ascertaining theirdiets andgingival disease, changes in soft tissues, dental caries, enamel abnormalities and oral hygiene status were measured clinically. Descriptive statistics involved frequency distributions. Disease prevalence was estimated for inferring the results; odds ratios(OR)were used for assessing the strength of association between variables (95 % confidence interval)and the X² test was used determining statistical significance. 2 % (0.0-4.4 95 % CI)chronic malnutrition was found. The most prevalent oral diseases were dental caries (82 %;77-88 95 % CI), periodontal disease (66 %;59-73 95 % CI), fluorosis (30 %; 23-37 95 % CI), hypocalcification (11 %; 6-15 95 % CI) and hypoplasia (6 %;3-10 95 % CI). Malnutrition and hypoplasia and the risk of malnutrition andfluorosis had the highest estimates of association (OR=18.5; 2.33-147.2 95 % CI; p=0.000 and OR=2.63;1.02-6.76 95 % CI;p=0.04, respectively). A direct association between malnutrition and oral pathologies could not be determined;alterationssuch as fluorosis and hypoplasia could be influenced by malnutrition.

  19. Anemia in young children living in the Surinamese interior: the influence of age, nutritional status and ethnicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijlmans CWR

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available CWR Zijlmans,1 A Stuursma,2 AJ Roelofs,2 BC Jubitana,3 MS MacDonald-Ottevanger1 1Department of Mother & Child Health Care, Scientific Research Center Suriname, Academic Hospital Paramaribo, Paramaribo, Suriname; 2Faculty of Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; 3Department of Monitoring Evaluation Surveillance & Research, Medical Mission PHCS, Paramaribo, Suriname Purpose: This study investigates the prevalence of anemia in young children living in the interior of Suriname and the influence of the associated factors age, nutritional status and ethnicity. Patients and methods: In this cross-sectional observational study, 606 children aged 1–5 years from three different regions of Suriname’s interior were included, and hemoglobin levels and anthropometric measurements were collected. Logistic regression models were computed to examine independent associations between anemic and nonanemic groups and to measure the influence of age, nutritional status and ethnicity. Results: A total of 606 children were included, of whom 330 (55% were aged 1–3 years and 276 were aged 4–5 years. The overall prevalence of anemia was 63%. Younger age was associated with anemia (odds ratio [OR]=1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.27–2.51. Anemia was less prevalent in Amerindian than in Maroon children (OR=0.51; 95% CI: 0.34–0.76. Hemoglobin level was not influenced by nutritional status nor by sex. Conclusion: The prevalence of anemia in children aged 1–5 years living in Suriname’s interior is high (63% compared to that in similar aged children in Latin America and the Caribbean (4–45%. Children aged 1–3 years were more affected than those aged 4–5 years as were Maroon children compared to Amerindian children. Nutritional status and sex were not of influence. Keywords: Maroon, Amerindian, hemoglobin, malnutrition, stunting, younger age

  20. Physical Growth and Nutritional Status among Ao Naga Children of Nagaland, Northeast India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temsumongla Longkumer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out on 571 Ao Naga children including 289 boys and 282 girls aged 8 to 15 years from Mokokchung town, Nagaland. This study tried to find out the physical growth according to the height and weight and nutritional status according to the body mass index (BMI following the classification by Cole et al. Our study revealed that the girls were taller than boys till 13 years and the boys became taller thereafter. As for weight, the girls were heavier during 10 to 14 years. The mean height and weight increased as the age advanced in both boys and girls. The prevalence of underweight was 30.12% and the prevalence of overweight was 2.28% among the Ao Naga children, and the girls were found to have a higher prevalence of overweight and the boys had a higher prevalence of underweight. This revealed that both underweight and overweight coexisted among the Ao Naga children from Mokokchung town, although the prevalence of overweight was not high.

  1. Childcare practices and nutritional status of children aged 6–36 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applied Human Nutrition Programme, Department of Food Technology and Nutrition, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya ... findings have demonstrated that financial capacity to support children's food and care requirements forms a springboard from which ..... Manual for social surveys on food habits and consumption in.

  2. Effects of nutritional status on academic performance of Malaysian primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaini, M Z Anuar; Lim, C T; Low, W Y; Harun, F

    2005-01-01

    Numerous factors are known to affect the academic performance of students. These include prenatal conditions, birth conditions, postnatal events, nutritional, socio-economic factors and environmental factors. This paper examines the nutritional status and its relationship with academic performance of 9-10 years old primary school children recruited randomly in Selangor, Malaysia. A standard self-administered questionnaire was utilized to obtain pertinent information and a face-to-face interview was also conducted with the parents. Results of the academic performances were extracted from the students' report cards. The intellectual performance was assessed using Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices. Physical examination was also conducted on these students by doctors. Overall 1,405 students and 1,317 parents responded to the survey. Of these 83.6% were Malays, 11.6% Indians, and 4.2% Chinese. The majority of them (82.9%) were from urban areas. The female: male ratio was 51:49; mean age was 9.71 years. The mean height and weight were 32.3 kg and 135.2 cm respectively. Their mean BMI was 17.42 kg/cm2, with 0.9% underweight, 76.3% normal BMI, 16.3% overweight, and 6.3% obese. Academic performance was significantly correlated with breast feeding, income and educational level of their parents, BMI, and whether they have been taking breakfast. There was a weak correlation between presence of anaemia and intellectual performance. Improving the socio-economic status of the parents will lend a helping hand in the academic performance of the students. Since breast feeding is associated with better academic and intellectual performance it must be emphasized, particularly to expectant mothers in the antenatal clinics.

  3. Feeding practices and nutritional status of Mexican children affiliated to the Medical Insurance for a New Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Huerta, Samuel; Klünder-Klünder, Miguel; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre

    2012-01-01

    To identify feeding practices and nutritional status in children affiliated to the Medical Insurance for a New Generation (SMNG). An in-home survey addressed to mothers which included anthropometric measures of children; performed in March and April 2009 in Mexican States. The prevalence of any form of breastfeeding was (months) 6-11: 67.9%; 12-17: 43.6%; 18-23: 26.4%; >23: 16.7%; with higher figures in rural children. BF duration was eight months. Continued breastfeeding at 1 year of age was 43%. At 1 year of age, almost all children consumed fruits, vegetables, cereals and legumes; however, 13.5%-20.3% did not consume foods of animal origin, but ~84% and ~60% consumed fried and sweet foods and soft drinks. Nutrisano (a food supplement) was consumed by just 2/3 of the Oportunidades Children. Stunting and overweight were the predominant alterations of nutritional status. Improving the nutritional status of children affiliated to the SMNG requires promotion of appropriate healthy dietary practices and the surveillance of infant growth.

  4. [Association between intracellular zinc levels and nutritional status in HIV-infected and uninfected children exposed to the virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez G, Erika María; Maldonado C, María Elena; Rojas L, Mauricio; Posada J, Gladys

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition, growth retardation and opportunistic infections outlast the metabolic, immune and gastrointestinal disorders produced by HIV. Zinc deficiency has been associated with deteriorating nutritional status, growth failure, and risk of infection. The aim of this study is to determine the association between zinc levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the nutritional status of HIV-infected and uninfected children exposed to the virus. An analytical, observational, cross-sectional study was conducted on 17 infected and 17 exposed children, aged 2-10 years. Anthropometric measurements, clinical and nutritional history, 24h recall, measurement of physical activity, and zinc in PBMC by flow cytometry analysis were recorded. Height according to age, energy consumption and adequacy of energy, protein and dietary zinc were significantly higher in children exposed to the virus compared to those infected with HIV (P .05). However, the median levels of zinc in monocytes of infected patients was higher (218.6) compared to the control group (217.0). No association was found between zinc intake and levels of intracellular zinc. The deterioration of nutritional status and growth retardation in children were associated with HIV, but not with the levels of intracellular zinc. The dietary intake of this nutrient was not associated with levels of zinc in monocytes or CD4 + and CD4- lymphocytes. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  5. [Nutritional status, obesity and metabolic control in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, E; Pitzalis, G; Vania, A; De Angelis, P; Guidi, R; Fontana, L; Ferrante, L; Cervoni, M; Multari, G

    1999-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional status of children with type 1 diabetes and to search for possible influences of changes in body composition on aspects of diabetes. A group of 96 diabetic subjects (41 males and 55 females) were studied, aged between 3 and 19 years old. The following parameters were examined: weight, stature, 5 skin folds, 7 circumferences, bioelectric impedance, arterial pressure, cholesterolemia, triglyceridemia, insulin dose, HbA1c and duration of disease. Obesity and overweight were present in 34.5% of the sample, but obesity was only observed in females (25.5%). There was also a high percentage of underweight subjects (11.5% of the entire sample). The mean values of weight BMI, 5 skin folds, 4 circumferences, FM (calculated using fold measurement and BIA) and AFA were higher in females, whereas mean values of waist/hip ratio and waist/thigh ratio and FFM (in % of body weight) were higher in males. A close correlation was also found between the 4 weight classes (underweight, normal weight, overweight, obese) and the majority of marker parameters for adiposity (5 folds, 4 circumferences, BIA, FM calculated using BIA, fold measurement and AFA). Of the other parameters examined (mean duration of disease, HbA1c assay, daily insulin dose, total cholesterolemia, triglycerididemia, arterial pressure), only the daily insulin dose showed higher values in females in 3 weight classes (underweight, normal weight and obese). Following a comparison with the control population (2469 subjects), higher mean values were found in the latter compared to diabetic subjects, but only in relation to 3 skin folds (tricipital, subscapular and suprailiac) and one circumference (forearm). The study shows a high frequency of overweight and obesity in children with type 1 diabetes, comparable to that in the healthy population. The finding of a higher frequency of obesity in diabetic females might be explained by their advanced puberal status, given that

  6. [Preoperational nutritional status for the children with congenital heart disease and the influential factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chunxiang; Jiang, Juan; Li, Ying; Wang, Dianjun; Chen, Jiarui; Tang, Siyuan

    2017-09-28

    To investigate the preoperational nutritional condition for the children with congenital heart disease, and to analyze the relevant factors.
 Methods: According to the standards of WHO, the Z-scores was used to assess the nutritional condition for the children, and the generational information questionnaire, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Self-Rating Depression Scale and Parent Understanding Questionnaire were used to analyze the maternal factors.
 Results: Stunting, underweighting and wasting represented the poor nutritional conditions, which accounted for 28.6%, 25.3% and 25.3%, respectively. Maternal accurate perception and the psychological problems such as anxiety and depression were the main relevant factors.
 Conclusion: The poor nutritional condition for the congenital heart disease was serious. It is very important to improve the maternal accurate perception and to relieve the maternal psychological problems for changing the nutritional condition through appropriate health education and effective intervention.

  7. Nutritional status of the Indian population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 26; Issue 4. Nutritional status of the Indian population ... Abstract. High prevalence of low birth weight, high morbidity and mortality in children and poor maternal nutrition of the mother continue to be major nutritional concerns in India. Although nationwide intervention ...

  8. Household food (in)security and nutritional status of urban poor children aged 6 to 23 months in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutisya, Maurice; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Ngware, Moses Waithanji; Kabiru, Caroline W

    2015-10-13

    Millions of people in low and low middle income countries suffer from extreme hunger and malnutrition. Research on the effect of food insecurity on child nutrition is concentrated in high income settings and has produced mixed results. Moreover, the existing evidence on food security and nutrition in children in low and middle income countries is either cross-sectional and/or is based primarily on rural populations. In this paper, we examine the effect of household food security status and its interaction with household wealth status on stunting among children aged between 6 and 23 months in resource-poor urban setting in Kenya. We use longitudinal data collected between 2006 and 2012 from two informal settlements in Nairobi, Kenya. Mothers and their new-borns were recruited into the study at birth and followed prospectively. The analytical sample comprised 6858 children from 6552 households. Household food security was measured as a latent variable derived from a set of questions capturing the main domains of access, availability and affordability. A composite measure of wealth was calculated using asset ownership and amenities. Nutritional status was measured using Height-for-Age (HFA) z-scores. Children whose HFA z-scores were below -2 standard deviation were categorized as stunted. We used Cox regression to analyse the data. The prevalence of stunting was 49 %. The risk of stunting increased by 12 % among children from food insecure households. When the joint effect of food security and wealth status was assessed, the risk of stunting increased significantly by 19 and 22 % among children from moderately food insecure and severely food insecure households and ranked in the middle poor wealth status. Among the poorest and least poor households, food security was not statistically associated with stunting. Our results shed light on the joint effect of food security and wealth status on stunting. Study findings underscore the need for social protection policies to

  9. Dietary Diversity and Nutritional Status of Pre-School Children from

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJFAND

    2011-07-04

    Jul 4, 2011 ... nutrition indices and results classified according to World Health Organization 2006 cut-off points. Findings showed that 48% and 42% of the children from Butembo. (DRC) and Gitega (Burundi) respectively had consumed food items from less than 3 food groups. Only 7% and 29% of children from Butembo ...

  10. Nutritional Status of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs): A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marí-Bauset, Salvador; Llopis-González, Agustín; Zazpe-García, Itziar; Marí-Sanchis, Amelia; Morales-Suárez-Varela, María

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have problems of food selectivity, implying risks of nutritional deficiencies. The aim was to compare intakes of macro and micronutrients and body mass index in ASD and typically developing (TD) children. In a case--control study, 3-day food diaries and anthropometric measurements were completed for ASD…

  11. School feeding program has resulted in improved dietary diversity, nutritional status and class attendance of school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenebe, Mastewal; Gebremedhin, Samson; Henry, Carol J; Regassa, Nigatu

    2018-01-23

    School Feeding Program (SFP) is a targeted safety net program designed to provide educational and health benefits to vulnerable children. However, limited evidence exists regarding the effect of the intervention on the nutritional status and school attendance of children. The study is aimed at examining the effects of SFP on dietary diversity, nutritional status and class attendance of school children in Boricha district, Southern Ethiopia. The study was conducted based on a representative data collected from 290 students drawn from the district. A school-based comparative cross-sectional study was conducted on school children aged 10-14 years. Data were collected using structured pretested questionnaire. The effects of SFP on dietary diversity score (DDS), class attendance rate, body-mass-index for age (BAZ) and height-for-age (HAZ) Z-scores were assessed using multivariable linear regression model. The finding showed significantly higher mean (±SD) of DDS in SFP beneficiaries (5.8 ± 1.1) than the non-beneficiaries (3.5 ± 0.7) (P nutritional status, and class attendance of school children, we strongly recommend scaling up the program to other food insecure areas.

  12. [The nutritional status among children under 60 months year-old after one year of the Earthquake in Wenchuan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xian-feng; Yin, Shi-an; Zhao, Li-yun; Fu, Ping; Zhang, Jian; Ma, Guan-sheng

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of Wenchuan Earthquake on the nutritional status, growth, and the prevalence nutritional anemia, vitamin A deficiency (VAD) and vitamin D deficiency among children under 60 months old living in the disaster areas. A nutritional survey was conducted in April 2009. The survey recruited 466 under 60 months old children, including 162 children aged 0 months old and 304 children aged 24 - 59 months old. The children's growth status, prevalence of anemia, and the iron deficiency prevalence, vitamin A, D, B(12), folic acid status were measured. The study findings were compared to the results from 2002 Chinese Nutritional and Health Survey. The exclusive breast milk feeding rate among infants under 6-months was 58.8% (30/51). Among the 0 - 23 months old children, only 10.7% (16/150) got breast feeding within one hour after delivery. Ninety-two per cent (149/162) 0 - 23 months old children never received any nutrient supplements. The average cereals and roots intakes of the 24 - 59 months old children living in the disaster area were (267.2 ± 154.3) g/d, higher than the result of rural children average (178.75 g/d) of 2002 National Nutrition and Health Survey (u = 9.995, P vitamin A deficiency and marginal deficiency was 15.4% (29/188) and 30.3% (57/188), respectively. The sum of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency was 92.0% (183/199). The prevalence of anemia of the 0-months old children and 24 - 59 months old children was 47.5% (77/162) and 21.5% (60/279), respectively. The prevalence of iron and zinc deficiencies was 45.7% (86/188) and 65.5% (127/197). The prevalence of stunt was 13.6% (38/279) among the 24 - 59 months old children. The results indicated that the dietary structure of the children living in the disaster area was not ideal. Although, the intakes of energy and protein supporting foods could meet the requirements, but the dietary lacks of meats, poultries, dairy products, legume products, aquatic products and vegetables. The

  13. Relationship between breastfeeding practices and nutritional status ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship between breastfeeding practices and nutritional status of children aged 0-24 months in Nairobi, Kenya. ... African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development ... Only 34.0% of children aged less than six months were still exclusively breastfeeding, the rest were on complementary feeds. More than ...

  14. Maximal work capacity in relation to nutritional status in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulmans, V A; de Meer, K; Brackel, H J; Helders, P J

    1997-09-01

    In children with cystic fibrosis, objective parameters of exercise tolerance are needed which are easy to measure in nonspecialized centres. We investigated maximal workload (W'max) in children with cystic fibrosis in relation to body weight and fat-free mass, and compared this with results for maximal oxygen consumption (V'O2,max). Fourteen patients with cystic fibrosis performed an incremental maximal exercise test on a bicycle ergometer. W'max, V'O2,max, body weight and fat-free mass were measured. W'max and V'O2,max were significantly correlated (r = 0.91; p < 0.001). Using standard deviation scores in relation to reference values, W'max and V'O2,max per kilogram body weight were significantly higher than uncorrected W'max and V'O2,max (mean difference (95% CI) 0.63 (0.24-1.01) and 0.91 (0.32-1.49) SD units, respectively). There was no such difference after correction for fat-free mass. Standardized V'O2,max was significantly higher than standardized W'max (mean difference (95% CI): 1.59 (1.14-2.04)), also after correction for body weight and fat-free mass. In children with mild-to-moderate cystic fibrosis, maximal workload per kilogram fat-free mass, but not per kilogram body weight, is a useful parameter to correct for diminished nutritional status. In these patients, maximal workload is consistently lower than maximal oxygen consumption. Taking into account this difference, maximal workload and maximal workload per kilogram fat-free mass can be used for follow-up of paediatric patients with cystic fibrosis in nonspecialized settings.

  15. Study on nutritional status of children under 5 years in palpa district, nepal: speacial reference to baal vita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deelip Kumar Karki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malnutrition is a pathological state resulting from a relative or absolute deficiency or excess of one or more essential nutrients. Malnutrition is a major underlying cause of the child morbidity and mortality in Nepal. Adequate nutrition is a fundamental right for every human being. Malnourished child is depriving from physical and mental development. Objectives: To assess the nutritional status of children under 5 years and to find out the knowledge and practice regarding micronutrient powder “Baal vita” Materials and Methods: Descriptive cross sectional community based study was conducted in Palpa district, total of 390 respondents at the age of 6-59 months were selected with the help of multistage sampling. Through anthropometry, prevalence of underweight, stunting and wasting was determined. Results: Prevalence of underweight, stunting and wasting was 25.9%, 27.2% and 7.3% respectively. The association between age of the mother at the birth of the children and nutritional status of children is not statistically significant. Majority of the children (80.5% used to take junk foods sometimes, followed by 16.7% very often, 2.8% children never used to take. Majority of the children (52.6% were taken the micronutrient powder (first course but the coverage of second course of micronutrient powder was 29.5% and followed by third course coverage was only 18.9%. Conclusion: The nutritional status of children in this study were found to be satisfactory because compared to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs target but the coverage of micronutrient powder is low.

  16. Serum Copper Status in School-Age Children and Pregnant Women in China Nutrition and Health Survey 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaobing; Piao, Jianhua; Zhang, Yu; Li, Min; Li, Weidong; Yang, Lichen; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2016-10-01

    Serum copper is an insensitive but reliable biomarker reflecting the change of copper nutritional status in both depleted and replete populations. The current study aimed to establish the reference values of serum copper in school-age children and pregnant women in China and to explore the adequate range of serum copper for both these two categories of people. A multistage, stratified, random sampling combined with probability proportionate to regional size sampling method was employed. A total of 4019 subjects (2736 school-age children and 1283 pregnant women) were selected from China Nutrition and Health Survey 2010-2012 (CNHS 2010-2012). The concentration of serum copper was determined by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS). The adequate range of serum copper was determined by the logistic sigmoid saturation curve of the median derivatives. The median concentration of serum copper was 1140.9 μg/L with a range of 746.7-1677.6 μg/L for school-age children and 1933.4 μg/L with a range of 947.4-3391.4 μg/L for pregnant women. The adequate range of serum copper was 905.7-1440.7 μg/L for school-age children and 1308.8-2537.8 μg/L for pregnant women. These parameters represent an essential prerequisite for the assessment of copper nutritional status, as well as nutrition interventions.

  17. Nutritional status among the Shabar tribal children living in urban, rural and forest habitats of Orissa, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Chakrabarty

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: The current trend towards increasing urbanization due to urban migration among the scheduled tribes in developing countries like India should be reflected in differential nutritional outcomes and its associated factors. The aims of the present study are to investigate the nutritional status amongst Shabar children living in urban, rural and forest habitats and factors associated to nutritional state.

    Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted among 577 Shabar children (boys and girls aged 5 to 19 years (258 urban, 195 rural and 124 forest. The anthropometric nutritional indices, socio-economic condition and disease prevalence were used to evaluate the present conditions.

    Results: The results revealed that children from forest regions had the highest prevalence of under-nutrition followed by their rural and urban counterparts, 33.87%, 24.62% and 20.16%, respectively. Malaria prevalence in forest areas and economic conditions in rural and urban habitats might have been significantly related to underweight and stunting.

    Conclusions: To reduce the prevalence and the extent of under-nutrition, it is essential to improve the economic conditions and to simultaneously carry out measurements for reducing malaria specifically in forest habitats.

  18. Nutritional status of Bedouin children aged 6-10 years in Lebanon and Syria under different nomadic pastoral systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, N; Shaar, K; Hamadeh, S; Adra, N

    1994-01-01

    During April-July 1993, anthropometric measurements of 296 children aged 6-10 years from four different Bedouin groups of Lebanon and Syria and interviews with their caretakers were conducted to determine child nutritional status and to examine the association between their diet and nutritional status. The children were from the semi-settled Bedouins of the Beqa'a valley in Lebanon, who practice livestock production and seasonal labor; the transhumant Bedouins of the Akkar area of Lebanon, who follow traditional migration routes between winter quarters in valleys to summer mountain grazing areas; true nomadic groups in Syria with limited access to markets and agricultural produce; and settled Bedouins herding governmental livestock in exchange for food and pay in Syria's Aleppo dessert. The Bedouin children in the Beqa'a valley were less likely to be malnourished than those in the other groups. 6.8% of Beqa'a valley children were severely stunted (2 Z-scores below the reference population) compared to 14.8% of those from the Akkar, 24% from the Palmyra, and 41.1% from the Aleppo. 41.8% of Beqa'a valley children were mildly stunted (1 Z-score below the reference population) compared to their counterparts (43.2%, 69%, and 70.5%, respectively). 3.9% of the Beqa'a valley children were severely underweight compared to 5.7% of the Akkar, 7% of the Palmyra, and 14.7% of the Aleppo. Proportion of mildly underweight children was 26.3% for Beqa'a valley children, 48.9% for Akkar children, 67.5% for Palmyra children, and 64.7% for Aleppo children. The children in the Beqa'a valley had higher intakes of important macronutrients and micronutrients than those from the other groups, confirming that diet and food availability contribute to stunting and underweight in Bedouin children. The arid region with frequent droughts, difficult living conditions, scarcity of fruits and vegetables, and lack of extra income sources likely contributed to the poor nutritional status of the true

  19. Recent illness, feeding practices and father's education as determinants of nutritional status among preschool children in a rural Nigerian community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, Titilola B; Yakubu, Alhassan M

    2015-04-01

    Good nutrition is necessary for the growth and development of preschool children. In sub-Saharan Africa, however, data on the determinants of their nutritional status are lacking. A cross-sectional survey of 366 preschool children was conducted in a rural community in northern Nigeria. Anthropometric measurements of the children were taken and information about feeding practices, immunization and parental education was obtained from their mothers. Fifty-two percent were stunted, 30% were underweight and 25% were wasted. Recent history of diarrhea was associated with wasting (OR = 2.66, p education were less likely to be stunted (OR = 0.45, p = 0.01) or underweight (OR = 0.37, p = 0.005). Promoting exclusive breastfeeding, preventing recurrent diarrhea and including fathers in community interventions will improve the health of children in this community. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Comparative study of the growth and nutritional status of Brazilian and Nigerian school-aged children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Samuel A; Figueiredo, Maria S; Adekile, Adekunle D; Braga, Josefina A P

    2017-09-28

    Comparative studies of patients in different sociogeographic/ecological zones may unravel potential environmental and nutritional factors influencing disease phenotype. In sickle cell disease (SCD), differential access to comprehensive care may influence their growth and nutritional status. From June 2015 to February 2016, steady-state nutritional parameters of 109 Brazilian and 95 Nigerian children with SCD attending routine clinic visits at Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Brazil and Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital, Ile-Ife (Ilesa unit), respectively, were compared. A relatively high proportion of the children in both centres (23.5%) were wasted [body-mass index (BMI)-for-age z-scoreBrazilians. A higher proportion of Brazilian patients were overweight or obese (9.2 vs. 4.3%), and taller for age (15.6 vs. 8.4%). None of the Nigerian patients had severe vitamin D deficiency, only 12.6% (12/95) had suboptimal vitamin D and 1.1% (1/95) had low serum zinc levels, unlike 79.8% (87/109) of the Brazilian patients with suboptimal vitamin D and 10.1% (11/109) with low zinc. Undernutrition is still prevalent among the two cohorts. Nigerian patients were thinner and had reduced linear growth for age. This observation justifies the continued need for specialized nutritional care for children with SCD. In addition to hydroxyurea therapy, research is needed to determine appropriate nutritional intervention and exercise regimens for these children.

  1. Nutritional status, socio-economic and hygienic condition of school aged children of a village of Pune District, Maharashtra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puranik SS

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The field of anthropometry encompasses a variety of human body measurements, such as weight, height and size; including skin fold thickness, circumference, lengths, and breadths. Anthropometry is a key component of nutritional status assessment in children and adults. Anthropometric data for children reflect general health status, dietary adequacy and growth and development over time. The main objective of the study was to diagnose and analyze the magnitude and causes of nutritional and health problems of the village. Method: Anthropometric reference data of 100 children between 7-14 years of age from a small village situated 30 km from Pune. Using this data BMI i.e. Body Mass Index was calculated which helps in determining whether an individual is overweight or underweight. Result: The overall study helped us to find out the socioeconomic condition, hygienic condition as well as nutritional status of children. All the anthropometric measurements of the girls and boys in 7-14 years age group was found to be significantly normal. Conclusion: The hygienic condition of the village was good enough and in turn BMI data shows that the socioeconomic condition of the village was also good.

  2. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in children from communities in Northeastern Brazil: molecular detection and relation to nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Quetz, Josiane; Lima, Ila Fernanda Nunes; Havt, Alexandre; de Carvalho, Eunice Bobo; Lima, Noélia Leal; Soares, Alberto Melo; Mota, Rosa Maria Salani; Guerrant, Richard Littleton; Lima, Aldo Angelo Moreira

    2010-07-01

    This study determined the prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni/coli and its relation with nutritional status in children from Northeastern Brazil. This was a case-control study design. Stool samples were evaluated for hipO (C. jejuni), ask (C. coli), and cdtABC (C. jejuni's cytolethal distending toxin) genes. The nutritional status from these children was assessed by anthropometric measures and z-scores. C. jejuni and C. coli were detected in 9.6% (8/83) and 6.0% (5/83) in the diarrhea group and in 7.2% (6/83) and 1.2% (1/83) of the nondiarrhea group, respectively. Children with positive molecular detection of C. jejuni showed significantly lower z-scores than children without C. jejuni. The cdtABC operon was found in 57% of hipO(+) samples. C. jejuni/coli prevalence was similar in diarrhea and nondiarrhea groups. There was a significant association of C. jejuni infection with lower nutritional status.

  3. Nutritional status of indigenous children younger than five years of age in Mexico: results of a national probabilistic survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera Juan A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of undernutrition and anemia in indigenous and non-indigenous children 0.05. The prevalence of anemia in indigenous children was one third greater than in non-indigenous children at the national level (p0.05 in rural areas. These differences were reduced to about half when adjusting for SES but remained significantly higher in indigenous children (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Indigenous children have higher probabilities of stunting and underweight than non-indigenous children. The differences are larger in urban areas and in higher socioeconomic geographic regions and are explained mostly by socioeconomic factors. The overall difference in the probability of anemia is small, is higher only in urban relative to rural areas, and is explained to a lesser degree by socioeconomic factors. Policy and programs should be designed and implemented to reduce the dramatic differences in nutritional status between indigenous and non-indigenous children in Mexico.

  4. Effect of community level intervention on nutritional status and feeding practices of under five children in Ile Ife, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogundele, Olorunfemi Akinbode; Ogundele, Tolulope

    2015-01-01

    Childhood malnutrition remains a widespread problem in developing world like Nigeria. The country ranks second among the ten countries contributing to sixty percent of the world's wasted under-five children. Community Integrated Management of Childhood illness (CIMCI) is a programme that employs the use of community based counsellors to address child health and nutritional challenges of the under-five and has the potential to reduce the morbidity and mortality resulting from poor nutritional and feeding practices. The study assessed the effect of community level intervention on nutritional status and feeding practices of children in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. A cross-sectional comparative study that employed the use of multi stage cluster sampling techniques in selecting 722 mothers of index under five children. The study was done in two Local Government Areas of Osun State, Nigeria. Quantitative techniques were used in data collection. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 20.0. Descriptive and bivariate analyses was performed. The two Local Government Area (LGA) did not differ significantly in their wealth index (p = 0.344). However, more children in the non-implementing LGA (16.1%) had low weight for age compared with 3.6% in the CIMCI implementing LGA (p = 0.000). A statistically significant difference exist in the MUAC measurement of children 12-23 months between the CIMCI implementing and non-implementing communities (p = 0.007). A higher percentage of caregivers (19.3%) introduced complementary feeding earlier than 6 months in the non-implementing area (p nutritional counseling can greatly improve nutritional status and feeding practices of under five children.

  5. An urban nutrition education and rehabilitation centre: a description of the programme and change in nutritional status of children who were enrolled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, B F; Phillips, N; Clemens, J D; Wroot, B; Gafur, Z; Fleischman, J; Khair, T

    1987-07-01

    We report on a community-based day care nutrition rehabilitation and education centre which was established by the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) in a slum in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Between March-December, 1985 approximately 10 children aged 1 to 5 years with a percent weight for height (% wt/ht) of 60 to 85 were enrolled in each of 9 sessions which were 3 to 5 weeks long. The children were fed 3 meals and 2 snacks daily made from locally available inexpensive foods. A nutrition education programme, developed with input from several feeding centres in Dhaka, included daily lessons, participatory cooking and personal hygiene sessions. Of the 85 children entering the programme, 82 (95%) completed 3 or more weeks. Relative to baseline, a median increase of 8.7% wt/ht was observed at 5 weeks (p less than 0.001), with the greatest improvement occurring in those children presenting with the lowest weights. Median increases of 7.2 and 7.4% wt/ht were noted 6 and 10 months after admission, respectively. Gender and minor illness did not have a significant impact on change in nutritional status. Poor performance of mothers in assigned chores was associated with inferior improvement in nutritional status 5 weeks but not 6 months post-admission. These results suggest that the intervention implemented by the centre may have been effective in improving nutritional status and that more rigorous evaluation of participants in relation to suitably matched concurrent controls should be performed.

  6. Abnormalities in body composition and nutritional status in HIV-infected children and adolescents on antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, L C de Barros; Gonçalves, E M; de Carvalho, W R G; Guerra-Junior, G; Centeville, M; Aoki, F H; Morcillo, A M; dos Santos Vilela, M M; da Silva, M T N

    2011-08-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to compare growth, nutritional status and body composition outcomes between a group of 94 HIV-infected children and adolescents on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and 364 healthy controls, and to evaluate their association with clinical and lifestyle variables within the HIV-infected group. When compared with the control group, HIV patients had higher risk of stunting (odds ratio [OR] 5.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.83-10.04) and thinness (OR 4.7, 95% CI: 2.44-9.06), higher waist-to-hip ratios (medians 0.89 versus 0.82 for boys and 0.90 versus 0.77 for girls, P HIV-infected children on ART showed significant nutritional status and body composition abnormalities, consistent with the severity of vertical HIV infection and the consequences of prolonged ART.

  7. KAITAN ANTARA STATUS GIZI, PERKEMBANGAN KOGNITIF, DAN PERKEMBANGAN MOTORIK PADA ANAK USIA PRASEKOLAH (RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NUTRITIONAL STATUS, COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT, AND MOTOR DEVELOPMENT IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rindu Dwi Malateki Solihin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Growth failure (stunting in children under five causes a variety of development disorders, including cognitive and motor development. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between nutritional status, cognitive development, and motor development in preschool children. This survey was conducted on 73 children aged 3-5 years in Bogor regency, West Java. This study showed that 30.2 percent children had low height for age. 98.6 percent children had normal birth weight and 76.7 percent children had normal birth length. Children’s level of cognitive (54.8% and fine motor development (68.5% were low, while gross motor development level were moderate (41.1%. Factors that significantly associated with children’s nutritional status were mother’s height, children’s energy and protein sufficiency level, and birth length of children. Factors that significantly associated with children’s fine and gross motor development were children’s nutritional status, early education, and age of children. Factors that significantly associated with children’s cognitive development were children’s nutritional status, age of children, early education, and children care practices of mother. Children’s nutrient sufficiency level, especially energy and protein, has significant association to their nutritional status and development Keywords: nutritional status, cognitive development, motor development, preschool children   ABSTRAK Kegagalan pertumbuhan (stunting pada anak usia di bawah lima tahun (balita dapat menyebabkan berbagai gangguan perkembangan, termasuk perkembangan kognitif dan motorik. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis kaitan antara status gizi, perkembangan kognitif dan motorik pada anak usia prasekolah. Penelitian berdesain survei ini dilakukan pada 73 anak usia 3-5 tahun di Desa Cibanteng, Kabupaten Bogor, Jawa Barat. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa sebanyak 30,2 persen anak balita berstatus gizi

  8. Evaluation of nutritional status and support in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasquez, A; Clouzeau, H; Fayon, M; Mouton, J-B; Thambo, J-B; Enaud, R; Lamireau, T

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this disease was to determine the prevalence of malnutrition in children with congenital heart disease (CHD). A total of 125 children with CHD, under 6 months of age, were divided into four groups: no pulmonary hypertension (PH) or cyanosis (group 1, n=47), isolated cyanosis (group 2, n=52), isolated PH (group 3, n=16), and PH and cyanosis (group 4, n=10). Six children died at 6 months (n=4), 12 months (n=1) and 19 months (n=1). The remaining children were followed-up for 24 months. Prevalence of moderate to severe malnutrition (weight/weight for height nutritional support.

  9. Availability of irrigation water for domestic use in Pakistan: its impact on prevalence of diarrhoea and nutritional status of children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Hoek, Wim; Feenstra, Sabiena G; Konradsen, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    in the house had a much lower prevalence of diarrhoea and stunting than children from families without this facility. Having a toilet was protective for diarrhoea and stunting. Increased quantity of water for domestic use and provision of toilet facilities were the most important interventions to reduce burden......This study assessed whether availability of water for domestic use had any impact on nutritional status of children in an area where people depend on irrigation water for all their domestic water needs. During May 1998-April 1999, data on the occurrence of diarrhoea among 167 children aged less......, hygiene, and socioeconomic status. Height-for-age and longitudinal prevalence of diarrhoea were used as outcome measures. Quantity of water available in households was a strong predictor of height-for-age and prevalence of diarrhoea. Children from households with a large storage capacity for water...

  10. Nutrition status of children in Kasese district at the Uganda – Congo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To establish the magnitude and risk factors for malnutrition in Kasese district at the Uganda-Congo border. Design: Cross sectional nutrition survey. Methods: Thirty clusters were selected. The height, weight, and mid upper arm circumference of at least 31 children per cluster were measured. Data on food ...

  11. Assessment of selenium nutritional status of school-age children from rural areas of China in 2002 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Piao, J; Li, M; Zhang, Y; Yun, C; Yang, C; Yang, X

    2016-03-01

    To assess the selenium nutritional status of 3458 school-age children recruited from rural areas using the China Nutrition and Health Survey 2002 and 2012 (CNHS 2002 and CNHS 2012). The serum selenium concentration was determined by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The prevalence of dietary selenium intake insufficiency was calculated according to the formula suggested by and the estimated average requirements of the new Chinese Dietary Reference Intakes. The percentage of low selenium was based on the cutoff values with a serum selenium concentration below the threshold limit of clinical importance in coronary and cardiovascular diseases (selenium concentration was 64.3 μg/l in the CNHS 2002 and 74.2 μg/l in the CNHS 2012. The median calculated dietary selenium intake was 26.7 μg/day in the CNHS 2002 and 33.2 μg/day in the CNHS 2012 together with a 61.1% and 52.8% dietary selenium intake insufficiency in the CNHS 2002 and in the CNHS 2012. In addition, the percentages of low selenium (selenium nutritional status of school-age children was significantly improved in the CNHS 2012 versus the CNHS 2002. However, the health risk for selenium malnutrition in school-age children remains a potential problem affecting children's health.

  12. Women's work in farming, child feeding practices and nutritional status among under-five children in rural Rukwa, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordang, Sunniva; Shoo, Tiransia; Holmboe-Ottesen, Gerd; Kinabo, Joyce; Wandel, Margareta

    2015-11-28

    Some progress has been achieved in reducing the prevalence of undernutrition among children under 5 years of age in Tanzania. In the Rukwa region (2010), the level of stunted and underweight children was 50·4 and 13·5 %, respectively. The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional status of children under 5 years of age, feeding practices and risk factors of undernutrition in a rural village in the Rukwa region, as well as to discuss the results in light of a similar study conducted in 1987/1988. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 152 households with children under 5 years of age. Data were obtained from the child's main caretaker and the household head, using a structured questionnaire and a 24 h dietary recall. Children's length/height and weight were measured. The prevalence of stunting and underweight was found to be 63·8 and 33·6 % (Z-scoreunderweight (Punderweight was 25·0 %, similar to that reported in 1987/1988 (26·4 %). In conclusion, the underweight prevalence was found to be at the same level in 2010 as was recorded in 1987/1988. Current child-feeding practices were not in line with WHO recommendations. Women working in farms, food shortage, dry-season cultivation and diseases partly explain the children's poor nutritional status.

  13. Complementary school garden, nutrition, water, sanitation and hygiene interventions to improve children's nutrition and health status in Burkina Faso and Nepal: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erismann, Séverine; Shrestha, Akina; Diagbouga, Serge; Knoblauch, Astrid; Gerold, Jana; Herz, Ramona; Sharma, Subodh; Schindler, Christian; Odermatt, Peter; Drescher, Axel; Yang, Ray-Yu; Utzinger, Jürg; Cissé, Guéladio

    2016-03-09

    Malnutrition and intestinal parasitic infections are common among children in Burkina Faso and Nepal. However, specific health-related data in school-aged children in these two countries are scarce. In the frame of a larger multi-stakeholder project entitled "Vegetables go to School: Improving Nutrition through Agricultural Diversification" (VgtS), a study has been designed with the objectives to: (i) describe schoolchildren's health status in Burkina Faso and Nepal; and to (ii) provide an evidence-base for programme decisions on the relevance of complementary school garden, nutrition, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions. The studies will be conducted in the Centre Ouest and the Plateau Central regions of Burkina Faso and the Dolakha and Ramechhap districts of Nepal. Data will be collected and combined at the level of schools, children and their households. A range of indicators will be used to examine nutritional status, intestinal parasitic infections and WASH conditions in 24 schools among 1144 children aged 8-14 years at baseline and a 1-year follow-up. The studies are designed as cluster randomised trials and the schools will be assigned to two core study arms: (i) the 'complementary school garden, nutrition and WASH intervention' arm; and the (ii) 'control' arm with no interventions. Children will be subjected to parasitological examinations using stool and urine samples and to quality-controlled anthropometric and haemoglobin measurements. Drinking water will be assessed for contamination with coliform bacteria and faecal streptococci. A questionnaire survey on nutritional and health knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) will be administered to children and their caregivers, also assessing socioeconomic, food-security and WASH conditions at household level. Focus group and key-informant interviews on children's nutrition and hygiene perceptions and behaviours will be conducted with their caregivers and school personnel. The studies will

  14. Dietary fiber, energy intake and nutritional status during the treatment of children with chronic constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speridião P.G.L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The present prospective study was carried out to determine dietary fiber and energy intake and nutritional status of children during the treatment of chronic constipation. Twenty-five patients aged 2 to 12 years with chronic constipation were submitted to clinical evaluation, assessment of dietary patterns, and anthropometry before and after 45 and 90 days of treatment. The treatment of chronic constipation included rectal disimpaction, ingestion of mineral oil and diet therapy. The standardized diet prescribed consisted of regular food without a fiber supplement and met the nutrient requirements according to the recommended daily allowance. The fiber content was 9.0 to 11.9 g for patients aged less than 6 years and 12.0 to 18.0 g for patients older than 6 years. Sixteen patients completed the 90-day follow-up and all presented clinical improvement. The anthropometric variables did not change, except midarm circumference and triceps skinfold thickness which were significantly increased. Statistically significant increases were also found in percent calorie intake adequacy in terms of recommended daily allowance (55.5 to 76.5% on day 45 and to 68.5% on day 90; P = 0.047. Percent adequacy of minimum recommended daily intake of dietary fiber (age + 5 g increased during treatment (from 46.8 to 52.8% on day 45 and to 56.3% on day 90; P = 0.009. Food and dietary fiber intake and triceps skinfold thickness increased during follow-up. We conclude that the therapeutic program provided a good clinical outcome.

  15. Nutritional status at presentation, comparison of assessment tools, and importance of arm anthropometry in children with cancer in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, P; Jhaveri, U; Idhate, T B; Dhingra, S; Arolkar, P; Arora, B

    2015-01-01

    In India, approximately 40,000 new cases of cancer in children are diagnosed each year. However, there are no good studies analyzing their nutritional status. Also, since accurate and sensitive nutritional assessment is critical for optimal clinical outcomes through timely remediation of malnutrition, it is important to assess the relative sensitivity and feasibility of commonly used nutritional screening tools. This observational study analyzed height/length (cm), weight (kg), mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), triceps skinfold thickness (TSFT) as well as their Z-scores or percentiles, albumin levels and history of weight loss at diagnosis in children aged 2-15 years being treated for cancer between November 2008 to December 2013. Body mass index (BMI) and arm muscle circumference (AMC) were calculated respectively from height and weight, and MUAC and TSFT. A total of 1693 new patients were enrolled; 1187 had all anthropometric measurements performed. The prevalence of malnutrition was 38%, 57%, 76%, 69% and 81% on the basis of BMI, TSFT, MUAC, AMC, and arm TSFT + MUAC respectively with the highest prevalence in solid abdominal tumours. Addition of BMI and serum albumin to arm anthropometry increased the proportion classified as severely nutritionally depleted by a mere 2% & 1.5% respectively. Positive history of significant weight loss additionally identified 16.5% at nutritional risk over arm anthropometry. The prevalence of malnutrition in Indian children with cancer at presentation is very high ranging from 40% and 80% depending on the method used for assessment, being higher with MUAC and lowest with BMI. Either MUAC alone or TSFT + MUAC (wherever feasible) should be used for screening for malnutrition in children with cancer at diagnosis to plan timely nutritional interventions, reduce the treatment-related morbidity and optimise their chance of long-term cure.

  16. Effect of fortified milk on growth and nutritional status in young children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Misa; Harb, Tracy; David, Michael; Davies, Peter Sw; Hill, Rebecca J

    2017-05-01

    Adequate nutrition is critical for optimal growth and development. However, young children may be at risk of nutrient deficiencies when transitioning to weaning foods for a variety of reasons. Supplementation with fortified milk may provide potentially lacking essential nutrients, but effects on growth and nutritional status are yet to be established. Five databases were searched for randomised controlled trials using fortified milk against control milk in young children. Outcomes were growth, body composition and/or biochemical markers. Pooled differences in means were calculated for continuous outcomes and odds ratios for binary outcomes. Randomised controlled trials set in any country. Otherwise healthy children aged 6-47 months. Fifteen articles met the eligibility criteria. Fortification varied from Fe, Zn, vitamins, essential fatty acids, to pre- and/or probiotics. Frequently reported outcomes were weight, height and Fe status. Studies varied in geographical location, sample size and duration. Fortified milk had minimal effects on weight gain (mean difference=0·17 kg; 95 % CI 0·02, 0·31 kg) compared with control milk. The risk of anaemia was reduced in fortified milk groups (OR=0·32; 95 % CI 0·15, 0·66) compared with control groups. There were no significant effects on height gain, changes in body composition or Hb concentration. Fortified milk is an effective source of complementary nutrition to supplement children in need when consumed in appropriate amounts in addition to a normal diet. Due to compositional differences, further research on fortified milk is warranted before making global recommendations on benefits for growth and nutritional outcomes in young children.

  17. Anthropometric Status and Nutritional Intake in Children (6–9 Years in Valencia (Spain: The ANIVA Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Morales-Suárez-Varela

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to assess nutritional intake and anthropometric statuses in schoolchildren to subsequently determine nutritional adequacy with Spanish Dietary Reference Intake (DRIs. The ANIVA study, a descriptive cross-sectional study, was conducted in 710 schoolchildren (6–9 years in 2013–2014 in Valencia (Spain. Children’s dietary intake was measured using 3-day food records, completed by parents. Anthropometric measures (weight and height were measured according to international standards, and BMI-for-age was calculated and converted into z-scores by WHO-Anthro for age and sex. Nutrient adequacy was assessed using DRI based on estimated average requirement (EAR or adequate intake (AI. Pearson’s chi-square and Student’s t-test were employed. Of our study group (47.61% boys, 52.39% girls, 53.1% were normoweight and the weight of 46.9% was inadequate; of these, 38.6% had excess body weight (19.6% overweight and 19.0% obesity. We found intakes were lower for biotin, fiber, fluoride, vitamin D (p < 0.016, zinc, iodine, vitamin E, folic acid, calcium and iron (p < 0.017, and higher for lipids, proteins and cholesterol. Our results identify better nutritional adequacy to Spanish recommendations in overweight children. Our findings suggest that nutritional intervention and educational strategies are needed to promote healthy eating in these children and nutritional adequacies.

  18. Maternal education and micro-geographic disparities in nutritional status among school-aged children in rural northwestern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuili Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Prior evidence suggests geographic disparities in the effect of maternal education on child nutritional status between countries, between regions and between urban and rural areas. We postulated its effect would also vary by micro-geographic locations (indicated by mountain areas, plain areas and the edge areas in a Chinese minority area. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted with a multistage random sample of 1474 school children aged 5-12 years in Guyuan, China. Child nutritional status was measured by height-for-age z scores (HAZ. Linear mixed models were used to examine its association with place of residence and maternal education. RESULTS: Micro-geographic disparities in child nutritional status and the level of socioeconomic composition were found. Children living in mountain areas had poorer nutritional status, even after adjusting for demographic (plain versus mountain, β = 0.16, P = 0.033; edge versus mountain, β = 0.29, P = 0.002 and socioeconomic factors (plain versus mountain, β = 0.12, P = 0.137; edge versus mountain, β = 0.25, P = 0.009. The disparities significantly widened with increasing years of mothers' schooling (maternal education*plain versus mountain: β = 0.06, P = 0.007; maternal education*edge versus mountain: β = 0.07, P = 0.005. Moreover, the association between maternal education and child nutrition was negative (β = -0.03, P = 0.056 in mountain areas but positive in plain areas (β = 0.02, P = 0.094 or in the edge areas (β = 0.04, P = 0.055. CONCLUSIONS: Micro-geographic disparities in child nutritional status increase with increasing level of maternal education and the effect of maternal education varies by micro-geographic locations, which exacerbates child health inequity. Educating rural girls alone is not sufficient; improving unfavorable conditions in mountain areas might make such investments more effective in promoting child health. Nutrition programs targeting to the least

  19. Maternal education and micro-geographic disparities in nutritional status among school-aged children in rural northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuili; Kane, Robert L; Xu, Dongjuan; Li, Lingui; Guan, Weihua; Li, Hui; Meng, Qingyue

    2013-01-01

    Prior evidence suggests geographic disparities in the effect of maternal education on child nutritional status between countries, between regions and between urban and rural areas. We postulated its effect would also vary by micro-geographic locations (indicated by mountain areas, plain areas and the edge areas) in a Chinese minority area. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a multistage random sample of 1474 school children aged 5-12 years in Guyuan, China. Child nutritional status was measured by height-for-age z scores (HAZ). Linear mixed models were used to examine its association with place of residence and maternal education. Micro-geographic disparities in child nutritional status and the level of socioeconomic composition were found. Children living in mountain areas had poorer nutritional status, even after adjusting for demographic (plain versus mountain, β = 0.16, P = 0.033; edge versus mountain, β = 0.29, P = 0.002) and socioeconomic factors (plain versus mountain, β = 0.12, P = 0.137; edge versus mountain, β = 0.25, P = 0.009). The disparities significantly widened with increasing years of mothers' schooling (maternal education*plain versus mountain: β = 0.06, P = 0.007; maternal education*edge versus mountain: β = 0.07, P = 0.005). Moreover, the association between maternal education and child nutrition was negative (β = -0.03, P = 0.056) in mountain areas but positive in plain areas (β = 0.02, P = 0.094) or in the edge areas (β = 0.04, P = 0.055). Micro-geographic disparities in child nutritional status increase with increasing level of maternal education and the effect of maternal education varies by micro-geographic locations, which exacerbates child health inequity. Educating rural girls alone is not sufficient; improving unfavorable conditions in mountain areas might make such investments more effective in promoting child health. Nutrition programs targeting to the least educated groups in plain and in edge areas would be

  20. What Effect Does International Migration Have on the Nutritional Status and Child Care Practices of Children Left Behind?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renuka Jayatissa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite an increasing trend in labour migration and economic dependence on foreign migrant workers in Sri Lanka, very little is known about the child care and nutritional status of “children left behind”. The aim of this study was to examine the factors influencing the nutritional status and care practices of children left behind. A sample of 321 children, 6–59 months old of international migrant workers from a cross-sectional nationally represented study were included. Care practices were assessed using ten caregiving behaviours on personal hygiene, feeding, and use of health services. Results revealed the prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight to be 11.6, 18.2 and 24.0 percent, respectively. Father being a migrant worker has a positive effect on childcare practices and birthweight of the child. This study indicates that undernutrition remains a major concern, particularly in the poorest households where the mother is a migrant worker, also each additional 100 g increase in the birthweight of a child in a migrant household, decreases the probability of being wasted, stunted and underweight by 6%, 8% and 23% respectively. In depth study is needed to understand how labour migration affects household level outcomes related to child nutrition and childcare in order to build skills and capacities of migrant families.

  1. What Effect Does International Migration Have on the Nutritional Status and Child Care Practices of Children Left Behind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatissa, Renuka; Wickramage, Kolitha

    2016-02-15

    Despite an increasing trend in labour migration and economic dependence on foreign migrant workers in Sri Lanka, very little is known about the child care and nutritional status of "children left behind". The aim of this study was to examine the factors influencing the nutritional status and care practices of children left behind. A sample of 321 children, 6-59 months old of international migrant workers from a cross-sectional nationally represented study were included. Care practices were assessed using ten caregiving behaviours on personal hygiene, feeding, and use of health services. Results revealed the prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight to be 11.6, 18.2 and 24.0 percent, respectively. Father being a migrant worker has a positive effect on childcare practices and birthweight of the child. This study indicates that undernutrition remains a major concern, particularly in the poorest households where the mother is a migrant worker, also each additional 100 g increase in the birthweight of a child in a migrant household, decreases the probability of being wasted, stunted and underweight by 6%, 8% and 23% respectively. In depth study is needed to understand how labour migration affects household level outcomes related to child nutrition and childcare in order to build skills and capacities of migrant families.

  2. Seasonal variation in the nutritional status of children aged 6 to 60 months in a resettlement village in West Timor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline; Ritchie, Brett; Tran, Cuong; Beggs, Sean; Lada, Christina Olly; Whetter, Kathryn; Cobiac, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Childhood malnutrition remains a public health issue in Indonesia with a national prevalence of wasting of 13% and stunting of 36%. In rural areas nutritional status depends on local agriculture and may fluctuate in relation to harvest time. The aim of this study was to characterise seasonal variations in nutritional status in two resettlement villages in the Oesao district, Nusa Tenggara Timur. A cross sectional study was conducted in a convenience sample of children after the wet season (March). Children aged 6 to 60 months were assessed for nutritional status using anthropometric and biochemical measures. A subset of these children was re-assessed for anthropometry after the dry season (November). Weight-for-height z scores improved significantly from mean±SD of -1.7± 0.9 in March to -1.3±0.9 in November (p<0.001). There was no significant change in height between seasons. Prevalence of wasting, (weight-for-height z score <-2), was 42% in March and 19% in November (p<0.001). However, stunting rates increased significantly from 42% in March to 45% in November (p<0.001). Thirty six per cent of children were anaemic (Hb level <11 mg/100 mL), 68% were vitamin A deficient (plasma vitamin A level <0.8 μmol/L) and 50% were zinc deficient (plasma zinc <9.94 μmol/L). All children except one were positive for intestinal parasites. These data indicate seasonal changes in anthropometry with inconsistent effects depending on the anthropometric index measured. Wasting and stunting were higher than the national average, alongside high rates of anaemia, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies.

  3. [Feeding practices in 6-to-24-month-old children in Yaoundé, Cameroon: relationship with their nutritional status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo Um-Sap, S; Mbassi Awa, H; Hott, O; Tchendjou, P; Womga, A; Tanya, A; Koki Ndombo, P

    2014-01-01

    Shifting from breastfeeding to solid food is known as the complementary feeding period. When complementary feeding is inadequate, malnutrition results in most cases. These practices differ depending on cultural and religious backgrounds as well as geographical location. Ruel and Menon studied the relationship between feeding practices during diversification and nutritional status of children at 6 and 36 months, using a score called the Infant and Child Feeding Index (ICFI). This ICFI scored feeding practices such as breastfeeding, bottle-feeding, food diversity, and meal frequency, which has never been studied in Cameroon. The aim of this study was to describe actual feeding practices in children in our context as well as to investigate their relationship with children's nutritional status. We carried out a cross-sectional study throughout the month of January 2011 at the Chantal-Biya Foundation. Mothers completed a questionnaire on how their infants were fed at birth, the initiation of complementary food, and feeding practices for the 3 days before the survey. The children's anthropometric parameters were noted. All mothers coming for vaccination or vitamin A supplementation for their children aged between 6 and 24 months were enrolled in the study. We enrolled 197 mothers and their infants. Breastfeeding was the main feeding method at birth, but was exclusive until 6 months for only 15 % of the infants. Three-quarter of nursing mothers started adding complementary food at age 4-6 months, using pap. Half of the children did not receive animal products, fruits, or vegetables. When applying the ICFI to these practices, it appeared that the various diversification practices scored less than 8 for 50% of the population. A positive association was noted between the ICFI and nutritional status, as expressed by height-of-age Z-score (HAZ) and the weight-for-age Z-score (WAZ). We concluded that the codified feeding practices with respect to Ruel and Menon's ICFI are

  4. Child fostering and children's nutritional outcomes in rural Mali: the role of female status in directing child transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, S E

    1995-03-01

    Research in West Africa has begun to document the phenomenon of child fostering although little attention has focussed on other types of non-maternal child care arrangements and their impact on child health. Evidence from a sample of 77 weaned children under five in rural Mali found that over one third (35%) of children were not the prime responsibility of both their biological parents. Nineteen per cent (N = 15) of the sample were formally fostered children, known as sukaabe bambaabe, who lived neither with their biological mothers nor with their biological fathers. Others lived under flexible or semi-permanent non-maternal care arrangements both within and outside the agnatic family. Factors precipitating fostering are outlined and are divided into: (i) those under which the child is fostered away from its biological family through force of circumstance; and (ii) those under which the child is actively requested by its foster mother. Rather than fostering providing a universal option for over-burdened mothers with too many or too closely-spaced children, the field evidence shows that the movement of children within and between households is rigorously controlled by the female social hierarchy. Children are transferred in a uni-directional fashion from the care of their low status biological mothers to high status foster mothers. Their transfer serves to visibly reinforce socio-political power differentials between these women who are at different stages of the female life-cycle and in different sets of household circumstances. Economic factors are not associated with the decision to keep the child or to foster it away, but do appear to determine whether the children living under non-maternal care are fostered out under a structured or unstructured fostering arrangement. Contrary to findings in other West African settings, fostering per se has little impact on children's nutritional outcomes as measured by their weight-for-age Z-Scores, probably because the use of

  5. Nutritional Status of Working Children as a Neglected Group in Kermanshah West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Pasdar

    2014-07-01

    Methods: This case-control study was carried out as cross-sectional, on 90 working and 90 non-working 8-18 year-old boys in Kermanshah. The data gathering tools were demographic and food frequency questionnaires (FFQ. Anthropometric parameters were measured using standard tools. 5 ml blood for blood biomarkers test was collected from the participants. Results: Average height and weight of working children were respectively 3.7 cm and 5.7 kg less than of the non- working children (P = 0.02. Prevalence of iron deficiency in working children was more than double in the non-working children (28% vs 11.3%, P = 0.01. Hemoglobin concentration was less significantly in working children compare to non-working children (p=0.05. The working children as significantly consumed all of the food groups except the bread and cereals less than the non-working children (P <0.001. Conclusions: Working children are at risk to develop anemia and malnutrition so they need to emergencies nutritional supports.

  6. Nutritional status of Haitian children, 1978-1995: deleterious consequences of political instability and international sanctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulder-Sibanda Menno

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Results from three national surveys in Haiti suggest that the prevalence of stunting, underweight, and wasting in children fell considerably between 1978 and 1990. In the following four years, rates of stunting and underweight levelled off, while that of wasting nearly doubled. Child nutrition deteriorated dramatically during a period of intense political crisis and international sanctions that included a strictly enforced trade embargo. Human welfare should be monitored whenever international sanctions are imposed to regulate a country's behavior.

  7. Height, weight and BMI percentiles and nutritional status relative to the international growth references among Pakistani school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Muhammad Umair; Gull, Sibgha; Mushtaq, Komal; Abdullah, Hussain Muhammad; Khurshid, Usman; Shahid, Ubeera; Shad, Mushtaq Ahmad; Akram, Javed

    2012-03-19

    Child growth is internationally recognized as an important indicator of nutritional status and health in populations. This study was aimed to compare age- and gender-specific height, weight and BMI percentiles and nutritional status relative to the international growth references among Pakistani school-aged children. A population-based study was conducted with a multistage cluster sample of 1860 children aged five to twelve years in Lahore, Pakistan. Smoothed height, weight and BMI percentile curves were obtained and comparison was made with the World Health Organization 2007 (WHO) and United States' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2000 (USCDC) references. Over- and under-nutrition were defined according to the WHO and USCDC references, and the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) cut-offs. Simple descriptive statistics were used and statistical significance was considered at P nutrition estimates were higher (P underweight and thinness/wasting were lower (P underweight and 10% vs. 13% thinness). Significantly lower overweight (8%) and obesity (5%) prevalence and higher thinness grade one prevalence (19%) was seen with use of the IOTF cut-offs as compared to the WHO and USCDC references. Mean difference between height-for-age z scores and difference in stunting prevalence relative to the WHO and USCDC references was not significant. Pakistani school-aged children significantly differed from the WHO and USCDC references. However, z score means relative to the WHO reference were closer to zero and the present study as compared to the USCDC reference. Overweight and obesity were significantly higher while underweight and thinness/wasting were significantly lower relative to the WHO reference as compared to the USCDC reference and the IOTF cut-offs. New growth charts for Pakistani children based on a nationally representative sample should be developed. Nevertheless, shifting to use of the 2007 WHO child growth reference might have important implications

  8. Impact of nutritional education on nutritional status of under-five children in two rural communities of south-west Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sule, S S; Onayade, A A; Abiona, T C; Fatusi, A O; Ojofeitimi, E O; Esimai, O A; Ijadunola, K T

    2009-06-01

    This study evaluated the impact of nutritional education on knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) of mothers concerning infants and young children feeding and their children's nutritional status in two semi-urban communities of south-west Nigeria. This is a community intervention study. We recruited 150 mothers of children aged 0-18 months independently from the intervention and control communities through a multi-stage sampling technique. We collected data with the aid of an interviewer-administered questionnaire at baseline and at six months after intervention from both communities to obtain information on feeding of infants and young children. In addition, we measured weights and heights of recruited children. Intervention involved group counselling of mothers and food demonstrations at designated health facilities. Data analysis for quantitative data was done using Epi-Info software, and for qualitative data, content analysis of major themes was used. Before intervention, recruited mothers and their children from the two communities were comparable in terms of all the parameters assessed (P>0.05 in all cases). After six months of intervention, mothers who had nutritional education demonstrated better knowledge and attitudes to key infant and young children feeding recommendations. There was also limited improvement in feeding practices. Mothers from the intervention community exclusively breastfed their infants longer with mean age at introduction of complementary foods at 5.3 months compared to 4.5 months in the control community (Pnutritional education of mothers only had positive impact on their level of KAP on infant and young children feeding.

  9. Nutrition education and introduction of broad bean-based complementary food improves knowledge and dietary practices of caregivers and nutritional status of their young children in Hula, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negash, Canaan; Belachew, Tefera; Henry, Carol J; Kebebu, Afework; Abegaz, Kebede; Whiting, Susan J

    2014-12-01

    Nutritious complementary foods are needed in countries where undernutrition and stunting are major problems, but mothers may be reluctant to change from traditional gruels. To test whether a recipe-based complementary feeding education intervention would improve knowledge and practice of mothers with young children in Hula, Ethiopia. A baseline survey of 200 eligible, randomly selected mother-child pairs gathered data on sociodemographic characteristics, food security status, knowledge and practices concerning complementary feeding, food group intakes of children aged 6 to 23 months by 24-hour recalls, and children's anthropometric measurements. Twice a month for 6 months, women in the intervention group received an education session consisting of eight specific messages using Alive and Thrive posters and a demonstration and tasting of a local barley and maize porridge recipe containing 30% broad beans. The control group lived in a different area and had no intervention. At 6 months, knowledge and practice scores regarding complementary feeding were significantly improved (p nutrition education over 6 months that included demonstration of a local porridge recipe with broad beans added improved the complementary feeding practices of caregivers and the nutritional status of their young children.

  10. Nutritional Status of under 5 Children belonging to Tribal Population Living in Riverine (Char) Areas of Dibrugarh District, Assam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Safikul; Mahanta, Tulika Goswami; Sarma, Ratna; Hiranya, Saikia

    2014-07-01

    Assam's main lifeline, the Brahmaputra river, braided nature created numerous sand bars and islands known as chars/sapories. They are home to more than 3 million people. Over 90% of the cultivated land on the river islands is flood-prone; the flood leaves the islands completely separated from mainland, preventing access to health infrastructure and services. To assess the nutritional status of under 5 children residing in the char areas of Dibrugarh district and to identify the factors influencing their nutritional status. A community-based cross-sectional study conducted in the riverine areas of Dibrugarh district of Assam. Nutritional status was assessed using anthropometry. Undernutrition was classified using World Health Organization (WHO) recommended Z- score system. Data collection was done by house to house visit of all chars using proportionate allocation. Rates, ratios, proportions, and chi-square test. Overall prevalence of underweight, stunting, and wasting was 29%, 30.4%, and 21.6%, respectively. Prevalence of underweight and stunting was less than the prevalence of underweight (36.4%) and stunting (46.5%) in Assam, but the prevalence of wasting was more than that of Assam (13.7%) as observed in National Family Health Survey-3. Significant association was observed between the prevalence of undernutrition and socioeconomic status, literacy status of parents, infant, and young child feeding practices and size of the family (P < 0.05). Special focus is needed for nutritional improvement of under 5 living in char areas to prevent preventable morbidities and to achieve optimum development.

  11. Nutritional status of under 5 children belonging to tribal population living in riverine (Char areas of Dibrugarh district, Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safikul Islam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Assam′s main lifeline, the Brahmaputra river, braided nature created numerous sand bars and islands known as chars/sapories. They are home to more than 3 million people. Over 90% of the cultivated land on the river islands is flood-prone; the flood leaves the islands completely separated from mainland, preventing access to health infrastructure and services. Aims: To assess the nutritional status of under 5 children residing in the char areas of Dibrugarh district and to identify the factors influencing their nutritional status. Settings and Design: A community-based cross-sectional study conducted in the riverine areas of Dibrugarh district of Assam. Materials and Methods: Nutritional status was assessed using anthropometry. Undernutrition was classified using World Health Organization (WHO recommended Z- score system. Data collection was done by house to house visit of all chars using proportionate allocation. Statistical Analysis Used: Rates, ratios, proportions, and chi-square test. Results: Overall prevalence of underweight, stunting, and wasting was 29%, 30.4%, and 21.6%, respectively. Prevalence of underweight and stunting was less than the prevalence of underweight (36.4% and stunting (46.5% in Assam, but the prevalence of wasting was more than that of Assam (13.7% as observed in National Family Health Survey-3. Significant association was observed between the prevalence of undernutrition and socioeconomic status, literacy status of parents, infant, and young child feeding practices and size of the family (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Special focus is needed for nutritional improvement of under 5 living in char areas to prevent preventable morbidities and to achieve optimum development.

  12. Impact of rice fortified with iron, zinc, thiamine and folic acid on laboratory measurements of nutritional status of preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceres Mattos Della Lucia

    Full Text Available Abstract Fortification of food constitutes an important strategy for the control of micronutrient deficiency and has advantages such as high population coverage and maintenance of eating habits. This study aimed to assess the impact of using fortified rice (Ultra Rice® - UR® on the nutritional status of preschoolers. Ninety-nine children enrolled in two philanthropic preschools participated of the study. Children of one of the preschools were offered UR® mixed with polished rice, as part of school meals (test group and the children of another preschool were offered pure polished rice (control group. Biochemical evaluations were performed before and after 4 months of intervention. Dietary assessment and sensory evaluation of UR® mixed with polished rice were performed during the study. The fortified rice improved the concentrations of zinc (p < 0.001, thiamine (p < 0.001, folic acid (p = 0.003, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (p < 0.001 and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (p < 0.001. The fortified rice showed good acceptability among preschoolers. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of using rice fortified with iron, zinc, thiamine and folic acid on the nutritional status of children.

  13. Effects of Nutrient-Fortified Milk-Based Formula on the Nutritional Status and Psychomotor Skills of Preschool Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavil May C. Cervo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This randomized, single-masked, controlled trial examined the effects of nutrient-fortified milk-based formula supplementation on nutritional status, nutrient intake, and psychomotor skills of selected preschool children with mean age of 4.10 ± 0.14 years. The study participants were divided equally into three major groups, normal, underweight, and severely underweight based on WHO-Child Growth Standards, and were further divided into two groups: fortified milk group who was given two glasses of fortified milk (50 g of powdered milk/serving a day for twelve weeks in addition to their usual diet and the nonintervention group who was not given fortified milk and thus maintained their usual intake. Anthropometric measurements, dietary intake, and psychomotor developmental score were analyzed. Results showed that consumption of two servings of fortified milk a day for twelve weeks significantly increased the height of preschool children by 1.40 cm, weight by 1.35 kg, body mass index by 0.96 kg/m2, mid-upper arm circumference by 0.66 cm, and psychomotor scores by 13.74% more than those children who did not consume fortified milk (p<0.0001. Hence, fortified milk-based supplement in the diet of preschool children improved overall nutritional status, nutrient intake, and performance in psychomotor scale. This study is registered in Philippine Health Research Registry: PHRR140923-000234.

  14. Effects of Nutrient-Fortified Milk-Based Formula on the Nutritional Status and Psychomotor Skills of Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervo, Mavil May C; Mendoza, Diane S; Barrios, Erniel B; Panlasigui, Leonora N

    2017-01-01

    This randomized, single-masked, controlled trial examined the effects of nutrient-fortified milk-based formula supplementation on nutritional status, nutrient intake, and psychomotor skills of selected preschool children with mean age of 4.10 ± 0.14 years. The study participants were divided equally into three major groups, normal, underweight, and severely underweight based on WHO-Child Growth Standards, and were further divided into two groups: fortified milk group who was given two glasses of fortified milk (50 g of powdered milk/serving) a day for twelve weeks in addition to their usual diet and the nonintervention group who was not given fortified milk and thus maintained their usual intake. Anthropometric measurements, dietary intake, and psychomotor developmental score were analyzed. Results showed that consumption of two servings of fortified milk a day for twelve weeks significantly increased the height of preschool children by 1.40 cm, weight by 1.35 kg, body mass index by 0.96 kg/m 2 , mid-upper arm circumference by 0.66 cm, and psychomotor scores by 13.74% more than those children who did not consume fortified milk ( p < 0.0001). Hence, fortified milk-based supplement in the diet of preschool children improved overall nutritional status, nutrient intake, and performance in psychomotor scale. This study is registered in Philippine Health Research Registry: PHRR140923-000234.

  15. Impact of Bolsa Família Program on the nutritional status of children and adolescents from two Brazilian regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiara SPERANDIO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To assess and compare the impact of the Bolsa Família Program (Family Allowance on the nutritional status of children and adolescents from the Brazilian Northeastern and Southeastern regions. Methods: The study used data from a database derived from a subsample of the Family Budget Survey conducted from 2008 to 2009. The ratios of underweight, stunted, and overweight children were calculated. Impact measurement analysis was preceded by propensity score matching, which matches beneficiary and non-beneficiary families in relation to a set of socioeconomic features. The nearest-neighbor matching algorithm estimated the program impact. Results: The ratio of underweight children and adolescents was, on average, 1.1% smaller in the beneficiary families than in the non-beneficiary families in the Northeastern region. As for the Southeastern region, the ratio of overweight children and adolescents was, on average, 4.2% smaller in the beneficiary families. The program did not affect stunting in either region. Conclusion: The results showed the positive impact and good focus of the program. Thus, once linked to structural actions, the program may help to improve the nutritional status and quality of life of its beneficiaries.

  16. Soil-transmitted helminth infections and nutritional status in school-age children from rural communities in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Ana Lourdes; Gabrie, Jose Antonio; Usuanlele, Mary-Theresa; Rueda, Maria Mercedes; Canales, Maritza; Gyorkos, Theresa W

    2013-01-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections are endemic in Honduras and efforts are underway to decrease their transmission. However, current evidence is lacking in regards to their prevalence, intensity and their impact on children's health. To evaluate the prevalence and intensity of STH infections and their association with nutritional status in a sample of Honduran children. A cross-sectional study was done among school-age children residing in rural communities in Honduras, in 2011. Demographic data was obtained, hemoglobin and protein concentrations were determined in blood samples and STH infections investigated in single-stool samples by Kato-Katz. Anthropometric measurements were taken to calculate height-for-age (HAZ), BMI-for-age (BAZ) and weight-for-age (WAZ) to determine stunting, thinness and underweight, respectively. Among 320 children studied (48% girls, aged 7-14 years, mean 9.76 ± 1.4) an overall STH prevalence of 72.5% was found. Children >10 years of age were generally more infected than 7-10 year-olds (p = 0.015). Prevalence was 30%, 67% and 16% for Ascaris, Trichuris and hookworms, respectively. Moderate-to-heavy infections as well as polyparasitism were common among the infected children (36% and 44%, respectively). Polyparasitism was four times more likely to occur in children attending schools with absent or annual deworming schedules than in pupils attending schools deworming twice a year (punderweight and 2.2% had anemia. Moderate-to-heavy infections and polyparasitism were significantly associated with decreased values in WAZ and marginally associated with decreased values in HAZ. STH infections remain a public health concern in Honduras and despite current efforts were highly prevalent in the studied community. The role of multiparasite STH infections in undermining children's nutritional status warrants more research.

  17. Anthropometric and cycloergometric assessment of the nutritional status of the children of agricultural migrant workers in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, I D; Garcia Tavares, M L; Dutra de Oliveira, B S; Desai, M I; Romero, L S; Vichi, F L; Duarte, F A; Dutra de Oliveira, J E

    1981-09-01

    In our survey of the food habits and nutritional status of "Boia-Fria" agricultural migrant workers in Southern Brazil, a special project was undertaken to assess the influence of socioeconomic and dietary deprivation on the physical growth and development and physical performance of their children. Four hundred fifty-five children in Boia-Fria families from Vila Recreio, a periurban slum of Ribeirao Preto located in the interior of the state of Sao Paulo, were examined for body weight, standing height, mid-upper arm muscle circumference, and head circumference. For comparison, 475 children from "Vita et Pax", a private school attended primarily by children of well-to-do families from the city of Ribeirao Preto, were also examined using similar anthropometric procedures. A small group of selected Boia-Fria children and their well-to-do counterparts were subjected to ergometric-cum-electrocardiographic testing for submaximal physical work performance. The overall results of this comparative study indicate that the physical growth and development and the physical performance of the Boia-Fria children are significantly lower than their well-to-do counterparts. It is suggested that the poor anthropometric and ergometric status of the Boia-Fria children is a reflection of poor dietary habits and socioeconomic deprivation prevalent among the agricultural migrant workers and poor periurban populations of Brazil.

  18. Nutritional and health status primary schoolchildren in rural Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poor nutrition and health can affect children's education. The nutritional status of school children (9-15 years) was assessed in Kumi district, Eastern Uganda in 2006-2007. Selection of schools was done using modified cluster sampling involving 34 schools (n= 645). Assessments for nutritional status were done ...

  19. Relationship between institutional food service in Nursery Schools and Household feeding with the nutritional status of preschool children attending two Nursery Schools in Valparaiso, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirta Crovetto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity in children under 6 years of age, who attend Nursery Schools belonging to INTEGRA Foundation (Chile, may be associated with the diet received at school, their home or both. Objectives: To determine if there is a relationship between children’s dietary patterns and their nutritional status. Material and Methods: A descriptive, associative, cross-sectional method was used. Sample (n=33 was children 4 and 5 years old from two Nursery Schools from Valparaiso. It was assessed: i energy intake provided by nursery school and household’s diets, according to the recommendations of the Chilean dietary guidelines and ii nutritional status, W/A; W/H; H/A; body mass index, growth charts for children under 6 years of age, World Health Organization (Standards of the National Chilean Health Program for Children. Fisher’s exact test was used in order to associate food consumption patterns with nutritional status. Results: Nursery school provided the expected caloric contribution, while household provided 67% over the expected percentage (354 additional kcal per capita/day. From 21.2% to 27% of the children were overweight (W/H and BMI. Children with food consumption pattern 1 had normal nutritional status. Those with pattern 2 presented a 50% of malnutrition related to overconsumption. Fisher’s exact test was p=0.001. Conclusions: There is an association between dietary pattern and nutritional status of preschool children attending two INTEGRA Nursery Schools. This study is limited due to sample size.

  20. Breakfast habits, nutritional status, body weight, and academic performance in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampersaud, Gail C; Pereira, Mark A; Girard, Beverly L; Adams, Judi; Metzl, Jordan D

    2005-05-01

    Breakfast has been labeled the most important meal of the day, but are there data to support this claim? We summarized the results of 47 studies examining the association of breakfast consumption with nutritional adequacy (nine studies), body weight (16 studies), and academic performance (22 studies) in children and adolescents. Breakfast skipping is highly prevalent in the United States and Europe (10% to 30%), depending on age group, population, and definition. Although the quality of breakfast was variable within and between studies, children who reported eating breakfast on a consistent basis tended to have superior nutritional profiles than their breakfast-skipping peers. Breakfast eaters generally consumed more daily calories yet were less likely to be overweight, although not all studies associated breakfast skipping with overweight. Evidence suggests that breakfast consumption may improve cognitive function related to memory, test grades, and school attendance. Breakfast as part of a healthful diet and lifestyle can positively impact children's health and well-being. Parents should be encouraged to provide breakfast for their children or explore the availability of a school breakfast program. We advocate consumption of a healthful breakfast on a daily basis consisting of a variety of foods, especially high-fiber and nutrient-rich whole grains, fruits, and dairy products.

  1. Nutritional status of children from three to five years old in three districts of Lima. Peru, 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Javier Navarrete Mejía

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To know the nutritional status of children from 3 to 5 years old living in the districts of Villa el Salvador, San Juan de Miraflores and San Juan de Lurigancho for the period from April to June 2016. Material and methods: Prospective, transversal, non-experimental study. The information includes 1,416 children from the districts of Villa El Salvador, Villa Maria del Triunfo and San Juan de Lurigancho (340, 322 and 754 respectively. The information collected included data on weight, height and age and based on this information, chronic malnutrition, acute malnutrition, overweight and obesity was determined according to the reference standard of the World Health Organization. S/Aand W/S indicators was calculated. Results: It was determined that the population of San Juan de Lurigancho had higher chronic malnutrition (8.6 % and higher overweight (11.0 % , the population of the district of Villa Maria del Triunfo had higher acute malnutrition (1.3 % and population of Villa El Salvador greater obesity (4.6 %. Conclusion: In recent years the nutritional issue has a major boost by the Peruvian government through social programs, focusing on the determinants level of causality. Today only food security, maternal and child care and environmental quality are observed, neglecting health approach causality, considered the most important approach to the problem. Large national guidelines on nutrition strategies should include not only reduction of nutritional problems but also preventing these

  2. What is the nutritional status of children of obese mothers in South Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, Nelia Patricia; Labadarios, Demetre; Nel, Johanna; Kruger, H Salome; Maunder, Eleni M W

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the anthropometric status of children of obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥30 kg/m2) mothers who participated during the 2005 National Food Consumption Study. The survey population consisted of children 1-9 y of age and their mothers 16 to 35 y of age living in the same households (n = 1532). A national sample of households was drawn, representative of all nine provinces and urban and rural areas. Trained fieldworkers measured the heights and weights of participants at their homes. The prevalence of obesity was high in the mothers (27.9%), particularly in the 26- to 35-y-old (older) group (32.3%) and in urban areas (29.1%). Children of older mothers had a significantly (P underweight children, whereas underweight women and stunted women were significantly more likely to have underweight and stunted children, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Emotional development and nutritional status of HIV/AIDS orphaned children aged 6-12 years old in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaranurug, Sirikul; Chompikul, Jiraporn

    2009-01-01

    To explore the emotional development and nutritional status of HIV/AIDS orphans by their infection status. A community-based cross-sectional survey was conducted during January and December 2005 in four provinces and Bangkok Metropolis where the prevalence of HIV/AIDS among pregnant women was high. The study population consisted of 388 HIV/AIDS orphans who were maternal or paternal or double orphans aged 6-12 years old. The orphans' main caregivers gave informed consent to the project and assessed the emotional development of their orphaned children. The children were measured for weight, height, and emotional development by standard instruments. They were divided into three groups regarding their HIV/AIDS infection status reported by their caregivers: infected, non-infected, and unknown. The chi(2) test was used to determine the association between nutritional status and infection status. Regarding HIV/AIDS infected children, 19.1% were infected, 57.5% were not infected, and 23.4% were unknown. The main caregivers of all types of orphans were grandparents. Only 13.7% of infected orphans lived with their mothers. Most caregivers were females and more than 40 years old. Infected orphans had mean scores of overall emotional development and for each domain less than other groups. The mean scores of self-control and quick recovery were significantly different between infected and non-infected groups (P-value HIV/AIDS infected orphans are most vulnerable. Acceptable and friendly services for orphans and their families are crucial. The services should continue and protect stigmatization.

  4. Factors associated with nutritional status of infants and young children in Somali Region, Ethiopia: a cross- sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekadu, Yirgu; Mesfin, Addisalem; Haile, Demewoz; Stoecker, Barbara J

    2015-09-02

    Inadequate nutrition during the first two years of life may lead to childhood morbidity and mortality, as well as inadequate brain development. Infants are at increased risk of malnutrition by six months, when breast milk alone is no longer sufficient to meet their nutritional requirements. However the factors associated with nutritional status of infants after 6 months of age have received little attention in pastoralist communities of Ethiopia. Therefore this study aimed to identify the factors associated with nutritional status of infants and young children (6-23 months) in Filtu town, Somali Region, Ethiopia. A cross-sectional community-based study was conducted. Simple random sampling was employed to select 214 infants for the study. Univariable and multivariable logistic regressions models were used in the statistical analysis. The strength of association was measured by odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Both the crude (COR) and adjusted odds ratios (AOR) are reported. The prevalence of wasting, stunting and underweight among infants and young children were 17.5% (95% CI: 12.91-23.22), 22.9% (95% CI: 17.6-28.9) and 19.5% (95% CI: 14.58-25.3) respectively. The multivariable logistic regression model showed that breastfeeding was independently associated with reduced odds of wasting (AOR = 0.38(95% CI: 0.14-0.99)). Diarrhea in the past 15 days (AOR = 2.13 (95% CI: 1.55-4.69)) was also associated with increased odds for wasting. The independent predictors of reduced odds for stunting were dietary diversity score ≥ 4 (AOR = 0.45(95% CI: 0.21-0.95)) and introduction of complementary feeding at 6 months (AOR = 0.25 (95% CI: 0.09-0.66)). Bottle feeding was associated with increased odds of stunting (AOR = 3.83 (95% CI: 1.69-8.67)). Breastfeeding was associated with reduced odds of underweight (AOR = 0.24 (95% CI: 0.1-0.59)), while diarrheal disease in the past 15 days was associated with increased odds of underweight (AOR = 3.54 (95% CI: 1

  5. Phase angle and World Health Organization criteria for the assessment of nutritional status in children with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pileggi, Vicky Nogueira; Scalize, Antonio Rodolpho Hakime; Camelo Junior, José Simon

    2016-12-01

    To compare the phase angle of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta treated at a tertiary university hospital with patients in a control group of healthy children, and to assess the nutritional status of these patients through the body mass index proposed by the World Health Organization. Cross-sectional study carried out in a university hospital that included seven patients with osteogenesis imperfecta and a control group of 17 healthy children of the same gender and age. Weight and height were measured and bioelectrical impedance was performed. Subsequently, the phase angle was calculated based on resistance and reactance values. The phase angle of the group of children with osteogenesis imperfecta was significantly lower than that of the control group (posteogenesis imperfecta have a nutritional risk detected by the phase angle, which is a useful tool for nutritional screening. The calculation result could help in the diet therapy of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Nutritional Status and Infectious Disease of Undernourished Children under five in Desa Cipacing, Jatinangor Subdistrict, West Java, from April to December 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palomina Caesarea Nurhasanah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Undernutrition frequently occurs in children under five. If not treated, it will cause acute health effects and affect on cognitive development, social, physical work capacity and productivity. Undernutrition can be accompanied by the presence of infectious disease that can worsen the children’s nutritional status. This study aimed to describe the nutritional status and infectious disease of undernutrition children under five in Jatinangor Subdistrict. Methods: A qualitative study was carried out to 7 parents and undernourished children under five, in Desa Cipacing, Jatinangor. It was conducted from April to December 2012. The inclusion criterias were undernourished children under five with a history of infectious disease in the previous year, and the parents were willing to participate in this study. Exclusion criteria were parents and/or the children who were not at home when the collection of the data was conducted.. Data collection was conducted using measurement of nutritional status, in depth interview and environmental observation. The data were presented in tables, figures and narration. Results: Three subjects with undernutrition (-3SD to -2SD and four subjects with severe undernutrition (<-3SD. Factors affecting poor nutritional status were weight loss, no significant weight gain, diet and eating habit, and onset of disease. Commonly occurred infectious diseases were common cold, diarrhea, fever and cough. Some factors affecting infectious diseases were family member transmission, immunization, and treatment behavior. Conclusions: Poor nutritional status and infectious diseases contribute to undernutrition in children under five.

  7. Trends in nutrient intakes, nutritional status, and correlates of undernutrition among rural children below 5 years of age: The National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau Survey 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I I Meshram

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In spite of several national nutrition intervention programs that have been in operation since the past four decades, undernutrition continues to be an important public health problem in India. Aim: The aim of the present study was to assess the trends in food and nutrient intakes and nutritional status of children in India below 5 years of age. Setting and Design: A community-based, cross-sectional study was carried out in ten National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau states by adopting a multistage random sampling procedure. Methods: Data were collected on the household (HH socioeconomic and demographic particulars, and anthropometric measurements of the children, such as their length/height and weight, were noted. A 24-h dietary recall method was used for assessing dietary intake. Results: Intake of all the foodstuffs except pulses, vegetables, and fats and oils declined over a period of time (1975–1979 to 2011–2012 while the intake of all the micronutrients except Vitamins A and C declined during the same period. The prevalence of undernutrition, i.e. underweight, stunting, and wasting has declined from 76%, 82%, and 27%, respectively in 1975–1979 to 42%, 44%, and 19%,respectively, in 2011–2012 among 1-5 year children. The severe form of undernutrition has also declined during the same period. The prevalence of undernutrition was significantly (P < 0.01 higher among children of illiterate mothers, those belonging to lower socioeconomic status, and those living in nuclear families. Conclusions: The prevalence of undernutrition declined over the period despite the decrease in food and nutrient intake. However, the pace of decline was slower and it was attributed to improved health-care services coupled with control of communicable diseases and increase in the HHs income. Further efforts are needed to improve the literacy of parents, environmental and personal hygiene, along with the food security of HHs through a public

  8. Height, weight and BMI percentiles and nutritional status relative to the international growth references among Pakistani school-aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Muhammad Umair

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Child growth is internationally recognized as an important indicator of nutritional status and health in populations. This study was aimed to compare age- and gender-specific height, weight and BMI percentiles and nutritional status relative to the international growth references among Pakistani school-aged children. Methods A population-based study was conducted with a multistage cluster sample of 1860 children aged five to twelve years in Lahore, Pakistan. Smoothed height, weight and BMI percentile curves were obtained and comparison was made with the World Health Organization 2007 (WHO and United States' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2000 (USCDC references. Over- and under-nutrition were defined according to the WHO and USCDC references, and the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF cut-offs. Simple descriptive statistics were used and statistical significance was considered at P Results Height, weight and BMI percentiles increased with age among both boys and girls, and both had approximately the same height and a lower weight and BMI as compared to the WHO and USCDC references. Mean differences from zero for height-, weight- and BMI-for-age z score values relative to the WHO and USCDC references were significant (P Conclusion Pakistani school-aged children significantly differed from the WHO and USCDC references. However, z score means relative to the WHO reference were closer to zero and the present study as compared to the USCDC reference. Overweight and obesity were significantly higher while underweight and thinness/wasting were significantly lower relative to the WHO reference as compared to the USCDC reference and the IOTF cut-offs. New growth charts for Pakistani children based on a nationally representative sample should be developed. Nevertheless, shifting to use of the 2007 WHO child growth reference might have important implications for child health programs and primary care pediatric clinics.

  9. Nutritional status of school going children and adolescents aged 9-13 years at Haldia in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Datta Banik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Malnutrition in children and adolescents is a global problem. In developing nations of Africa and Southeast Asia, the prevalence of undernutrition in children is very high. There is scanty data 'With respect to the nutritional status of school going children and adolescents, especially from suburban and rural areas in India. Objective A study was undertaken among boys (n = 174 and girls (n = 128 aged 9 13 years in a suburban area of Purba Medinipur district of West Bengal in India to understand age and sex variation of nutritional status of the subjects. Methods A crosssectional study among the schoolgoing children and adolescent aged 9 13 years was done during JuneSeptember 2009 in Haldia. Results Age and sex variation of anthropometric characteristics (body mass index or BMI and conicity index or CI revealed that remarkable sections of both the sexes were suffering from underweight (8.30%, stunting (14.60% and wasting (2.80%. Significant sex differences were observed in cases of mean CI (P=O.OO1, weightforage zscore (P = 0.0001 and weight-for-height ,-score (P 0.0001. Discussion Besides notable prevalence of under nutrition in both sexes, situation of the girls is worse (underweight - 11.70% and stunting - 21.10% compared to the boys. This is most evident among the subjects of both sexes aged 11 and 12 years.

  10. Nutritional status and correlated socio-economic factors among preschool and school children in plantation communities, Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgamuwa, Lahiru Sandaruwan; Iddawela, Devika; Dharmaratne, Samath D; Galgamuwa, G L S

    2017-05-02

    Child malnutrition is a major public health concern worldwide, leading to higher morbidity and mortality. It is mostly preventable through public health and economic development. The aim of the present study was to determine socio-economic factors associated with nutritional status among children in plantation communities, Sri Lanka. A cross-sectional study was performed among preschool and school going children in three rural communities of Sri Lanka from January to August 2014. Demographic and household characteristics were documented and anthropometric measurements were collected to calculate weight-for-age (WAZ), height-for-age (HAZ) and BMI-for-age (BAZ). Anthroplus, epiinfo and SPSS versions were used for the analysis of data. A total of 547 children (aged 1-15 years, mean 7.0 ± 3.6 years, 53% female) participated in the study. 35.6%, 26.9% and 32.9% of children were underweight, stunting and wasting respectively. Undernutrition was more common in primary school children. Maternal employment, high number of siblings, high birth orders and female children were significantly associated with undernutrition among preschool children. Living in small houses, large number of family members, low monthly income and maternal employment were significantly associated with undernutrition among school children. Child undernutrition is a major public health concern in the plantation sector, Sri Lanka. Health education programs among the study population could be effective for solving the problem.

  11. Bone mineral density, vitamin D, and nutritional status of children submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Denise Johnsson; Boguszewski, César Luiz; Funke, Vaneuza Araujo Moreira; Bonfim, Carmem Maria Sales; Kulak, Carolina Aguiar Moreira; Pasquini, Ricardo; Borba, Victória Zeghbi Cochenski

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) on bone mineral density (BMD), serum vitamin D levels, and nutritional status of 50 patients between ages 4 and 20 y. We conducted pre-HSCT and 6-mo post-HSCT evaluations. We measured BMD at the lumbar spine (LS) and total body (TB) by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA); body composition by bioimpedance analysis, and dietary intakes of calcium and vitamin D using the 24-h recall and semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire methods. We observed a significant reduction in BMD 6 mo post-HSCT. Nearly half (48%) of patients had reductions at the LS (average -9.6% ± 6.0%), and patients who developed graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) had the greatest reductions (-5.6% versus 1.2%, P nutritional status, and vitamin D levels. We suggest that early routine assessment be done to permit prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nutritional status of children living in a community with high HIV prevalence in rural Uganda: a cross-sectional population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalwoga, Agnes; Maher, Dermot; Todd, Jim; Karabarinde, Alex; Biraro, Samuel; Grosskurth, Heiner

    2010-04-01

    To assess the nutritional status of children in a rural community with high HIV prevalence in rural Uganda and to examine the impact of HIV infection at the individual and population level. Methods Cross-sectional population-based survey of children aged 0-12 in a cohort comprising the residents of 25 neighbouring villages in rural southwest Uganda. Anthropometric indicators of nutritional status (height for age, weight for age and weight for height) were assessed in relation to children's HIV serostatus, maternal HIV serostatus and maternal vital status. Children with a Z score of HIV seroprevalence among children aged 2-12 was 0.7%. The prevalence of underweight was significantly higher in HIV-positive than in HIV-negative children (52%vs. 30%), as was the prevalence of stunting (68%vs. 42%), but there was no significant difference in the prevalence of wasting (4%vs. 9%). There were no significant differences in the prevalences of indicators of undernutrition in children classified by maternal HIV and vital status. Chronic childhood undernutrition is common in this rural community. HIV infection had a direct effect in worsening children's nutritional status, but no indirect effect in terms of maternal HIV infection or maternal death. The population-level impact of childhood HIV infection on nutritional status is limited on account of the low HIV prevalence in children. The response to undernutrition in children in Africa requires action on many fronts: not only delivering community-wide HIV and nutritional interventions but also addressing the many interacting factors that contributed to childhood undernutrition before the HIV era and still do so now.

  13. Prevalence of anemia and nutritional status among HIV-positive children receiving antiretroviral therapy in Harar, eastern Ethiopa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklemariam, Zelalem; Mitiku, Habtamu; Mesfin, Firehiwot

    2015-01-01

    Anemia and growth retardation are common manifestations of HIV-positive children, which threaten their lives. Therefore, this study tried to assess the burden of anemia and the nutritional status of HIV-positive children receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in eastern Ethiopa. A total of 108 records of children on ART followed up in Hiwot Fana Specialized University Hospital from 2007 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed from November 1 to November 30, 2011. Approximately 54.4% of the children had been anemic before the initiation of their ART (at baseline): 7.8% were severely anemic and 44.7% were moderately anemic. These percentages were higher in preschool children than in school children (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 4.80 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 1.96, 11.75]), and were higher in males than in females (AOR: 2.61 [95% CI: 1.06, 6.45]). The prevalence of anemia was reduced to 39.2% 1 year after initiation of ART. The increasing of hemoglobin values was highly significant for both zidovudine (AZT)- and stavudine (d4T)-based ART (PHIV-infected children in the study area. However, there was a decline after initiation of ART. Therefore, adherence counseling to strengthen the uptake of ART is recommended. Moreover, large-scale, prospective studies should be done to understand the magnitude and etiology of the problems with HIV-negative control groups.

  14. School Children's Intestinal Parasite and Nutritional Status One Year after Complementary School Garden, Nutrition, Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Interventions in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erismann, Séverine; Diagbouga, Serge; Schindler, Christian; Odermatt, Peter; Knoblauch, Astrid M; Gerold, Jana; Leuenberger, Andrea; Shrestha, Akina; Tarnagda, Grissoum; Utzinger, Jürg; Cissé, Guéladio

    2017-09-01

    The potential health benefits of combined agricultural, nutrition, water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) interventions are poorly understood. We aimed to determine whether complementary school garden, nutrition, and WASH interventions reduce intestinal parasites and improve school children's nutritional status in two regions of Burkina Faso. A cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted in the Plateau Central and Center-Ouest regions of Burkina Faso. A total of 360 randomly selected children, aged 8-15 years, had complete baseline and end-line survey data. Mixed regression models were used to assess the impact of the interventions, controlling for baseline characteristics. The prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections decreased both in intervention and control schools, but the decrease was significantly higher in the intervention schools related to the control schools (odds ratio [OR] of the intervention effect = 0.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.1-0.5). Indices of undernutrition did not decrease at end-line in intervention schools. Safe handwashing practices before eating and the use of latrines at schools were significantly higher in the intervention schools than in the control schools at end-line (OR = 6.9, 95% CI = 1.4-34.4, and OR = 14.9, 95% CI = 1.4-153.9, respectively). Parameters of water quality remained unchanged. A combination of agricultural, nutritional, and WASH-related interventions embedded in the social-ecological systems and delivered through the school platform improved several child health outcomes, including intestinal parasitic infections and some WASH-related behaviors. Sustained interventions with stronger household and community-based components are, however, needed to improve school children's health in the long-term.

  15. Nutritional status of young children in Mumbai slums: a follow-up anthropometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sushmita

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic childhood malnutrition remains common in India. As part of an initiative to improve maternal and child health in urban slums, we collected anthropometric data from a sample of children followed up from birth. We described the proportions of underweight, stunting, and wasting in young children, and examined their relationships with age. Methods We used two linked datasets: one based on institutional birth weight records for 17 318 infants, collected prospectively, and one based on follow-up of a subsample of 1941 children under five, collected in early 2010. Results Mean birth weight was 2736 g (SD 530 g, with a low birth weight ( Discussion Our data support the idea that much of growth faltering was explained by faltering in height for age, rather than by wasting. Stunting appeared to be established early and the subsequent decline in height for age was limited. Our findings suggest a focus on a younger age-group than the children over the age of three who are prioritized by existing support systems. Funding The trial during which the birth weight data were collected was funded by the ICICI Foundation for Inclusive Growth (Centre for Child Health and Nutrition, and The Wellcome Trust (081052/Z/06/Z. Subsequent collection, analysis and development of the manuscript was funded by a Wellcome Trust Strategic Award: Population Science of Maternal and Child Survival (085417ma/Z/08/Z. D Osrin is funded by The Wellcome Trust (091561/Z/10/Z.

  16. Lack of association between nutritional status and change in clinical category among HIV-infected children in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maraisa Centeville

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Malnutrition is common among HIV-infected children. Our objective was to study the occurrence of malnutrition and its relationship with changes in clinical category among HIV-infected children. DESIGN AND SETTING: Longitudinal study, at the Pediatrics Department and Pediatrics Investigation Center (CIPED, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp. METHODS: We reviewed the hospital records of 127 vertically HIV-infected children. Anthropometric measurements were obtained at the beginning of follow-up, at clinical category change and five months later. These were converted to z-scores of weight/age, height/age and weight/height. Data were presented as means, standard deviations, frequency counts and percentages. The Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests and odds ratios were used in the analysis. RESULTS: We found that 51 (40.2% were undernourished and 40 (31.5% were stunted, with higher risk of being included in clinical category C. There was an association between nutritional condition and the clinical categories of the Centers for Disease Control classification (1994, and with age at symptom onset (except for height z-score. During follow-up, 36 patients (28.4% changed their clinical category, which occurred early among the undernourished patients. The group that changed its clinical category maintained the same z-score distribution for weight, height and weight/height throughout follow-up. CONCLUSION: Aids manifestation severity was associated with nutritional status and with age at symptom onset, but change in clinical category was not followed by worsening of nutritional status.

  17. Dietary Intake, Nutritional Status, and Body Composition in Children With End-Stage Kidney Disease on Hemodialysis or Peritoneal Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontón-Vázquez, Consuelo; Vásquez-Garibay, Edgar Manuel; Hurtado-López, Erika Fabiola; de la Torre Serrano, Adriana; García, Germán Patiño; Romero-Velarde, Enrique

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate that dietary intake, anthropometric indicators, and body composition in children with end-stage kidney disease differs between those on peritoneal dialysis (PD) and those on hemodialysis (HD). This was a cross-sectional and consecutive study that included 55 children and adolescents with end-stage kidney disease who were undergoing replacement therapy (22 PD patients and 33 HD patients). Two 24-hour dietary recall surveys were conducted for each patient. Anthropometric, biochemical, and body composition indicators were estimated. A Student's t-test and a Mann-Whitney U test were used for the parametric variables, whereas association tests were estimated for the nonparametric variables (i.e., χ 2 , Fisher exact test, and odds ratio). Regression models were designed to predict dietary intake on anthropometric and body composition indicators. The mid-upper arm circumference was greater on the patients undergoing HD than on the PD patients (odds ratio = 15.8 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.9, 85.1], P vitamin C (128 ± 66 vs. 146 ± 70, P = .046), and lower sodium (62 ± 43 vs. 79 ± 42, P = .044) than children on HD. Dietary intake predicted 40% to 80% of the variability in the nutritional status in children on PD and 28% to 60% in children on HD. Nutritional status is affected in most patients on dialysis treatment, which differs significantly among those who are undergoing PD or HD. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Key Informants' Perceptions on the Implementation of a National Program for Improving Nutritional Status of Children in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodsi, Delaram; Omidvar, Nasrin; Rashidian, Arash; Raghfar, Hossein; Eini-Zinab, Hassan; Ebrahimi, Marziyeh

    2016-01-01

    Childhood malnutrition is a major public health issue. Multidisciplinary approach for Improvement of Nutritional Status of Children in Iran was implemented in order to reduce malnutrition among children. This study aimed to evaluate the implementation aspect of the program and to explore key informants' perceptions and experience regarding the factors affected its implementation. Data were collected through the review of secondary data and semistructured interviews at national, province, and local levels. Four layers of key informants were selected purposefully for interviewing, including policymakers, senior nutrition officers, head of Hygiene, Remedy and Insurance Affairs in Imam Khomeini Relief Foundation, and community health workers. Qualitative content analysis was carried out based on Supporting the Use of Research Evidence framework and Tailored Implementation for Chronic Diseases' checklist to interpret the viewpoints of the study participants. Results showed that the program had successes in improving mother's knowledge on health, nutrition, and child care through health system and increased families' access to food, but there were some aspects that affected program's implementation. Some of these factors are the lack of clarity in the program's protocol and indicators, human shortage and inadequate financial resources, poor facilities, inattention to staff motivation, insufficient commitment among different sections, poor communication and supervision among different executive sections, and program protocols designing regardless of practical condition. Based on the results, top-down approach in policymaking and inadequate financial and human resources were responsible for most of the challenges encountered in the implementation.

  19. [Severe vitamin D deficiency in children from Punta Arenas, Chile: Influence of nutritional status on the response to supplementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Karin; Le Roy, Catalina; Iñiguez, Germán; Borzutzky, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    There is a high risk of vitamin D (VD) deficiency in the population of southern Chile that can be treated with VD supplements. Weight excess (WE) can influence the response to supplements. To study the prevalence of VD deficiency and the effect of cholecalciferol (VD3) supplements in healthy children from Punta Arenas, Chile, and evaluate a possible association with nutritional status. Demographic and anthropometric data, as well as laboratory assessment of serum 25-hidroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and other bone metabolism parameters were evaluated. After baseline evaluation, children were supplemented with VD3 1600 IU/day for one month, after which 25OHD was retested. Of the 108 children studied, 50% were boys, and had a mean age of 9.6±0.5 years. Nutritional assessment showed that 39% had normal weight, 46% were overweight, and 15% were obese. Median 25OHD was 10.9ng/ml: 96.3% had deficiency (30ng/ml). Children with WE had a significantly lower increase in 25OHD than children with normal weight (5±5.5 vs. 7.7±4.9, p=03). Children with WE may require 32% higher VD dose than normal weight children to attain the same 25OHD concentration. Chilean schoolchildren from Punta Arenas have high prevalence of WE and VD deficiency, with a majority in the range of severe VD deficiency. WE interferes in the response to VD supplementation, leading to a lower increase in 25OHD. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. SOCIOECONOMIC AND DEMOGRAPHIC VARIATION IN NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF UNDER-FIVE BANGLADESHI CHILDREN AND TREND OVER THE TWELVE-YEAR PERIOD 1996-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsena, Masuda; Goto, Rie; Mascie-Taylor, C G Nicholas

    2017-03-01

    The nutritional status of under-five-year-old children is a sensitive indicator of a country's health status as well as economic condition. The objectives of this study were to analyse trends in the nutritional status in Bangladeshi children over the period 1996-2007 and to examine the associations between nutritional and socioeconomic status variables. Bangladesh Demographic Health Surveys (BDHS) were the source of data, and a total of 16,278 children were examined. The Z-scores of the children were analysed as continuous as well as categorical variables (stunted, underweight and wasted). The socioeconomic status variables used were region, urban-rural residence, education and occupation of the parents, house type and household possession score. A series of General Linear Model and Sequential Linear and Binary Logistic Regression analyses were done to assess the relationship between demographic and socioeconomic variables and nutritional status. The trends of Z-scores were analysed by survey, as well as by child birth cohort. Region, house type, educational level of parents and household possession score showed significant associations with all three Z-scores of children after removing the effects of age, period of DHS and other explanatory variables in the model. No significant sex difference was observed between any of the Z-scores. There were improvements in mean WAZ and HAZ between 1996 and 2007 but deterioration in mean WHZ over this period. The obesity rate was below 2% in 2007, although the absolute numbers of obese children had nearly doubled in this 12-year period. Children from poorer households showed greater improvement than their better-off counterparts. The study reveals that over the years there has been substantial improvement in nutritional status of under-five children in Bangladesh and the main gains have been amongst the lower socioeconomic groups; it is also evident that malnutrition in Bangladesh is a multidimensional problem, like poverty

  1. Nutritional status of children from Cochabamba, Bolivia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuet-Aumatell, Cristina; Ramon-Torrell, Josep Maria; Banqué-Navarro, Marta; Dávalos-Gamboa, María Del Rosario; Montaño-Rodríguez, Sandra Lucía

    2015-12-01

    To assess the adequacy of energy and nutritional intakes compared to recommended daily intakes (RDIs) in schoolchildren from the Cochabamba region (Bolivia) and to determine micronutrient intake distributions across different ages and genders. This nutritional study (n = 315) was part of a larger population-based crosssectional study (the "Bolkid" survey) that collected data on schoolchildren 5-16 years old in 2010 in the Cochabamba region. Information about food intake was gathered with a semiquan-titative, food-frequency, parent-administered questionnaire about l2 months before the study. Descriptive and bivariate analyses of energy and nutrient intakes were assessed. For all ages studied and both genders, the average energy and micronutrient intakes were acceptable but below the requirements. The diet included high amounts of fiber, some minerals (iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, sodium), and vitamins (pantothenic acid, niacin, vitamins B2, B12, C, and E), but was low in calcium and vitamin D. However, more than half the children had insufficient energy intake, and low calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin D intakes, according to RDIs adjusted for age and gender; one-third of the children had insufficient folate and magnesium intakes; and adolescent girls had low iron intakes. Regardless of recommendations or demographic characteristics, the vast majority of children in Cochabamba consumed insufficient energy and too little calcium, folate, magnesium, and vitamin A and D. In addition, adolescent girls consumed insufficient iron. Higher energy intake for schoolchildren through increased food availability, frequency, and size portions in daily meals should be a priority for Bolivian public health institutions.

  2. [Dissatisfaction with body image and its relation to nutritional status, cardiometabolic risk and cardiorespiratory capacity in public school children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Floody, Pedro Antonio; Martínez Salazar, Cristian; Caamaño Navarrete, Felipe; Jerez Mayorga, Daniel; Osorio Poblete, Aldo; García Pinillos, Felipe; Latorre Román, Pedro

    2017-10-24

    The increase in abdominal fat and excess weight are related to dissatisfaction with body image, which nowadays is highly prevalent nationally and internationally. The purpose of the study was to relate dissatisfaction levels to body image, nutritional status, cardiometabolic risk and cardiorespiratory capacity in pre-adolescent students. Three hundred and thirty-nine students participated in the study, 165 girls (11.29 ± 0.69 years) and 174 boys (11.22 ± 0.72 years). Anthropometric data were collected: BMI, percentage of body fat (%BF), waist circumference (WC), height-to-weight ratio (HWR), VO2max and body image. In the comparison by sex, we found higher V02max values in boys (p body image (p > 0.05); 27.7% of the study sample were overweight and 29.2% were obese. The subjects with obesity had the lowest VO2max levels. Dissatisfaction with body image was found to be associated with nutritional status (p dissatisfaction with their body image and 19.4% of the children with cardiometabolic risk exhibited some type of dissatisfaction; the two variables were related (p = 0.008). The study provides evidence that children with malnutrition by excess present disorders associated with body dissatisfaction and other health indicators that limit integral growth in pre-adolescence.

  3. Improving iodine nutritional status and increasing prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Palaniappan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the link between excess iodine intake as evidenced by increased urinary iodine excretion (UIE and autoimmune thyroiditis in children and to assess the correlation between UIE and thyroid microsomal antibody (thyroid peroxidase [TPO] titers in children. Materials and Methods: All children with goiter between age group 6 and 12 years, were subjected to blood tests for free thyroxine, thyroid stimulating hormone, and TPO antibody, fine needle aspiration was advised for all children with goiter. Forty-three children with confirmed autoimmune thyroiditis served as cases, and 43 children with euthyroid goiter with workup negative for autoimmune thyroiditis and iodine deficiency were enrolled as controls. UIE was estimated in spot urine sample for both cases and controls. The levels of urinary iodine were compared between cases and controls. Results: The levels of urinary iodine were significantly higher in children with autoimmune thyroiditis as compared with control. There was a positive correlation between UIE and antimicrosomal antibody titers among cases. Among cases 65% children had subclinical hypothyroidism, 27.9% had overt hypothyroidism and 7% of cases, and 100% of controls had euthyroid functional status. Excessive (≥300 μg/L UIE was strongly associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. If the UIE level is ≥ 300 μg/L, then there is 17.94 times higher chance of having amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis than those who have UIE level < 300 μg/L (P < 0.001. Conclusions: A possible association between increased iodine intake and autoimmune thyroiditis was found in this study. Excessive iodine intake may trigger thyroid autoimmunity and eventually thyroid hypofunction.

  4. [Nutritional status of children with congenital heart disease and left-to-right shunt. The importance of the presence of pulmonary hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, H P; de Camargo Carvalho, A C; Fisberg, M

    1995-11-01

    To assess the nutritional status of children with congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunt and the nutritional disturbances related to the presence of pulmonary hypertension (PH). In a prospective study, the nutritional status of 30 children with left-to-right shunt (16 with and 14 without PH) was determined by anthropometric parameters and plasma proteins albumin, transferrin and prealbumin. Frequency and extent of nutritional disturbances were analysed in relation to the presence of PH. A control group of 20 well-nourished children was formed, aiming to compare the values of the serum proteins. The nutritional classification according to Waterlow's criteria showed an overall prevalence of malnutrition of 83.3%, which was higher in those with PH (p = 0.0140). This patient's group was more wasted than the group without PH (median z score of weight for height -1.65 vs -0.78). There was a high occurrence of measurements of arm fat area below the 5th percentile, which were similar in both groups. Serum levels of albumin and prealbumin were significantly lower in children with congenital heart disease than in the control group and transferrin values were similar in both. The prevalence of malnutrition was high. The presence of PH was associated with higher nutritional disturbance. The nutritional assessment may be a good way to identify diagnostic groups at particular risk of failure to thrive. This can be useful in planning a management which ensures these patients to achieve adequate nutritional supplementation in early life.

  5. The Impact of Nutrition Education on Dietary Behavior and Iron Status in Participants of the Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children, and the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Nedra K.

    1993-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the impact of nutrition edu cation on participants of the Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP). The specific objectives were to: 1) determine the impact of participation in EFNEP on iron status as assessed by hematocrit (hct) and ferritin levels; 2) determine the effect of nutrition knowledge on hct and ferritin values; and 3) determine the effect dietary behavior has...

  6. Nutritional status and physical abuse among the children involved in domestic labour in Karachi Pakistan: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainab, Saima; Kadir, Masood

    2016-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of physical abuse among domestic child labours and to assess the nutritional status by calculating the Body Mass Index of children involved in domestic labour in Karachi. A cross sectional study was conducted in the squatter settlements of Karachi. Questionnaire based interviews were conducted to capture physical abuse with 385 children who worked as domestic labour in the household of their employer. The ages of the children were between 10 to 14 years belonging to both genders. The children were enrolled in study by snow-ball sampling technique. The overall prevalence of physical abuse among domestic child labour in Karachi was found to be 8.3 %. Over 9 % had low weight and about 90% were stunted. This study also highlighted that 95% of the children involved in domestic labour perform overtime work in their employer's home, more than once per week. There is high burden of physical abuse among the domestic child labour and these children are malnourished. There is a need to recognize and regulate this form of labour in Pakistan.

  7. A cross sectional study of nutritional status among a group of school children in relation with gingivitis and dental caries severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Achmad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To determine nutritional status among a school children of Barru Regency, South Sulawesi, Indonesia, in relation with gingivitis and dental caries severity. Cross-sectional study. A total of 127 school children in the age range of 9-12 years from Barru Regency were included in this study as a sample of simple random sampling. Nutritional status of children (BMI index, degree of gingival inflammation (using chi-square test statistic, and missing teeth (DMF-T index were recorded. Additional information was collected using a questionnaire survey regarding knowledge about dental health, dietary habits, and oral health behaviors. The data were processed using the program Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS. A group of who severe underweight (102 children, had higher odds for mild gingivitis (GI 79.4% than others group of who has an ideal weight (16 children, had mild gingivitis (GI 62.5%. Children, who severe underweight, had higher odds for moderate caries (38.2% than others group of who has an ideal weight, had moderate caries (18.8%. Based on chi-square test, there are correlation of nutritional status and dental caries severity (p=0.000nutritional status with gingivitis and dental caries severity among a school children.

  8. Evaluation of the association between the TAS1R2 and TAS1R3 variants and food intake and nutritional status in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia V. Melo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Taste perception plays a key role in determining individual food preferences and dietary habits and may influence nutritional status. This study aimed to investigate the association of TAS1R2 (Ile191Val - rs35874116 and TAS1R3 (-1266 C/T - rs35744813 variants with food intake and nutritional status in children followed from birth until 7.7 years old. The nutritional status and food intake data of 312 children were collected at three developmental stages (1, 3.9 and 7.7 years old. DNA was extracted from blood samples and the polymorphisms were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR using hydrolysis probes as the detection method. Food intake and nutritional status were compared among individuals with different single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotypes. At 3.9 years old, children homozygous (Val/Val for the TAS1R2 Ile191Val polymorphism ingested less sugar and sugar-dense foods than children who were *Ile carriers. This finding demonstrated that a genetic variant of the T1R2 taste receptor is associated with the intake of different amounts of high sugar-content foods in childhood. This association may provide new perspectives for studying dietary patterns and nutritional status in childhood.

  9. Estado nutricional, hábitos alimentares e conhecimentos de nutrição em escolares Nutritional status, knowledge of nutrition and food habits in school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Labronici Bertin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Associar o estado nutricional com os hábitos alimentares e conhecimentos em nutrição de escolares da cidade Indaial, Santa Catarina. MÉTODOS: Foi avaliado o estado nutricional de 259 escolares com idades entre oito e dez anos, selecionados aleatoriamente dentre os alunos matriculados na 3ª e 4ª série da rede pública de ensino da cidade de Indaial, SC, no ano de 2009, fornecido pela Gerência Regional de Ensino. A avaliação e classificação do estado nutricional foram realizadas pelo índice de massa corpórea (IMC, sendo comparado às curvas propostas pela Organização Mundial da Saúde (2007. Os hábitos alimentares e conhecimentos em nutrição foram avaliados por meio de questionário autoadministrado e classificados pela somatória de pontos, que variou de sete a 28 pontos para hábitos alimentares (maus, bons e ótimos e de zero a 12 pontos para os conhecimentos em nutrição (ruins, bons e ótimos. Realizou-se teste de qui-quadrado e regressão logística binária, sendo significante pOBJECTIVE: To study the association between nutritional status with dietary habits and nutrition knowledge of students in the municipality of Indaial, in the Brazilian state of Santa Catarina. METHODS: This cross-sectional study evaluated the nutritional status of 259 children aged between eight and ten years old. Children were randomly selected among the 3rd and 4th grades students of elementary public schools of the city. The evaluation and classification of their nutritional status were based on the body mass index (BMI and compared to growth charts proposed by the World Health Organization (2007. Dietary habits and nutrition knowledge were analyzed by a self-assessed questionnaire and classified in bad, good or excellent according to the obtained score. Statistical analysis included the chi-square test and binary logistic regression, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: Among the 256 studied students, 63% had adequate weight for age

  10. Growth impairment and nutritional status in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozeri, Betul; Mir, Sevgi; Kara, Orhan Deniz; Dincel, Nida

    2011-09-01

    Malnutrition is closely linked to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in adult patients with poor outcome. But data on pediatric patients is inadequate. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of growth failure and malnutrition in pediatric CKD patients and explore the relationship of these parameters to each other and to other clinical parameters. This study included 42 patients and 29 healthy children matched for age and gender. Patients were classified firstly in age group and secondly in therapy modalities. Nutritional evaluations were performed according to the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines, and we performed adjustments using values from children with the same chronological age as reference. In pubertal group, the mean height SDS was lower than in pre-pubertal period while it was higher than in early childhood (P=0.4 and P=0.03 respectively). In all groups, 45% of patients had malnutrition: 20 patients on predialysis, 22 patients with end stage renal disease (14 on hemodialysis, and 8 on peritoneal dialysis). The mean weight SDS was lower in end stage renal disease groups (PGrowth failure and malnutrition remain a significant clinical problem as age and therapy modalities are dependent in children with CKD.

  11. Dietary Habits and Nutritional Status in Mentally Retarded Children and Adolescents: A Study from North Western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Manju; Bhargava, Rachna; Benipal, Ramandeep; Luthra, Neena; Basu, Sabita; Kaur, Jasbinder; Chavan, B. S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dietary habits and nutritional status of mentally retarded (MR) and normal (NG) subjects and to examine the relationship between the dietary habits and nutritional status and the level of mental retardation in the MR group. Method: A case control design was utilized: 117 MR (random sampling) and 100 NG (quota sampling)…

  12. Intestinal Parasitic Infections and Nutritional Status among Primary School Children in Delo-mena District, South Eastern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begna TULU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there are efforts being underway to control and prevent intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs in Ethiopia, they are still endemic and responsible for significant morbidity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of IPIs and their association with nutritional status among primary school children of Delo-Mena district, South Eastern Ethiopia.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from April to May 2013. Demographic data was obtained, and IPIs was investigated in a single-stool sample by both direct stool examination and formol-ether concentration techniques. Anthropometric measurements were taken to calculate height for-age (HAZ, BMI-for-age (BAZ and weight-for-age (WAZ for the determination of stunting, thinness and underweight, respectively using WHO AntroPlus software. SPSS version 20 was used for statistical analysis and p value less than 0.05 was considered significant.Results: Among 492 children studied (51% boys, aged 6–18 years, mean 10.93 +2.4 an overall IPIs prevalence of 26.6% was found. The prevalence of S. mansoni, E. histolytica/dispar, H. nana, A. lumbricoides, G. lambilia, T. trichiura, S. stercolaris, E. vermicularis, Hookworms and Taenia spp were 9.6%, 7.7%, 5.3%, 3.7%, 2.0%, 1.6%, 1.4%, 1.2%, 0.8% and 0.2% respectively. Stunting and underweightedness were observed in 4.5% and 13.6% of children and associated with IPIs (P<0.001 and (P=0.001, respectively.Conclusion: IPIs and its associated malnutrition remain a public health concern in Delo-Mena district. Therefore, the overall health promotion activities coupled with snail control and de-worming to the students is crucial. Additionally, initiatives aimed at improving the nutritional status of school children are also important.

  13. The Impact of Intestinal Parasitic Infections on the Nutritional Status of Rural and Urban School-Aged Children in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth N. Opara, PhD

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:Intestinal parasitic infection and undernutrition are still major public health problems in poor and developing countries. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between intestinal parasitic infection and nutritional status in 405 primary school children from rural and urban areas of Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria.Methods:This cross-sectional survey in 2009 obtained anthropometric data, height-for-age (HA, weight-for-height (WH and weight-for-age (WA Z-scores from each child and fecal samples were also collected and screened for intestinal parasites using standard parasitological protocols.Results:The prevalence of infection with any intestinal parasite was 67.4%. A total of six intestinal parasites were detected; hookworm (41.7% had the highest prevalence. The prevalence of intestinal parasites and undernutrition was significantly higher in rural than in urban children (P<0.001. The prevalence of stunting (HAZ < -2, underweight (WAZ < -2 and wasting (WHZ < -2 for rural and urban children were 42.3% vs. 29.7%; underweight 43.2% vs. 29.6% and wasting 10.9% vs. 6.4%, respectively. With respect to nutritional indicators, the infected children had significantly (P<0.05 higher z-scores than the uninfected children. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that only Hookworm and Ascaris lumbricoides were each significantly (P<0.05 associated with stunting, wasting, and underweight.Conclusions and Public Health Implications:Since intestinal parasitic infections are associated with malnutrition, controlling these parasites could increase the physical development and well-being of the affected children.

  14. Is a single bioelectrical impedance equation valid for children of wide ranges of age, pubertal status and nutritional status? Evidence from the 4-component model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnese, C; Williams, J E; Haroun, D; Siervo, M; Fewtrell, M S; Wells, J C K

    2013-01-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is widely used to predict body composition in paediatric research and clinical practice. Many equations have been published, but provide inconsistent predictions. To test whether a single equation for lean mass (LM) estimation from BIA is appropriate across wide ranges of age, pubertal status and nutritional status, by testing whether specific groups differ in the slope or intercept of the equation. In 547 healthy individuals aged 4-24 years (240 males), we collected data on body mass (BM) and height (HT), and lean mass (LM) using the 4-component model. Impedance (Z) was measured using TANITA BC418MA instrumentation. LM was regressed on HT(2)/Z. Multiple regression analysis was conducted to investigate whether groups based on gender, age, pubertal status or nutritional status differed in the association of LM with HT(2)/Z. BM ranged from 5 to 128 kg. HT(2)/Z was a strong predictor of LM (r (2)=0.953, s.e.e.=2.9 kg). There was little evidence of a sex difference in this relationship, however, children aged 4-7 years and 16-19 years differed significantly from other age groups in regression slopes and intercepts. Similar variability was encountered for pubertal stage, but not for nutritional status. No single BIA equation applies across the age range 4-24 years. At certain ages or pubertal stages, the slope and intercept of the equation relating LM to HT(2)/Z alters. Failure to address such age effects is likely to result in poor accuracy of BIA (errors of several kg) for longitudinal studies of change in body composition.

  15. Development of norms for executive functions in typically-developing Indian urban preschool children and its association with nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvam, Sumithra; Thomas, Tinku; Shetty, Priya; Thennarasu, K; Raman, Vijaya; Khanna, Deepti; Mehra, Ruchika; Kurpad, Anura V; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari

    2018-02-01

    Executive functions (EFs) are essential and important for achieving success in children's everyday lives and play a fundamental role in children's cognitive, academic, social, emotional and behavioral functioning. A cross-sectional study was carried out to develop age- and sex-specific norms for EFs using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function - Preschool Version (BRIEF-P) among 2- to 5-year-olds from urban Bangalore, India. In addition, the association between EFs and anthropometric measures, a marker of nutritional status, is also examined. Primary caregivers of 412 children, equally distributed by age and sex, participated. Raw scores for each domain and indices were converted to standard t-scores and percentiles were computed. A t-score at or above 63 corresponding to the 90th percentile was considered as the cutoff for executive dysfunction in this sample. The prevalence of executive dysfunction is 10% based on the Global Executive Composite score of the BRIEF-P. The cutoff score for identifying executive dysfunction using existing United States (US) norms is higher compared to the cutoff score obtained in the current study. Therefore, using US norms for Indian children could result in the prevalence of executive dysfunction been underestimated. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that stunted and underweight children have significantly elevated EF scores after adjusting for age, sex and socioeconomic status (SES; p < .01). A greater understanding of EFs in preschool children is important for the early identification of executive dysfunction and implementing interventions to improve their future prospects. This study also shows that undernourished children are more likely to have executive dysfunction.

  16. Basal metabolic rate of Colombian children 2-16 y of age: ethnicity and nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurr, G B; Reina, J C; Hoffmann, R G

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of basal metabolic rate (BMR) were made in 528 children 2-16 y of age living in underprivileged areas of the city of Cali, Colombia (153 control and 186 undernourished boys, 93 control and 96 undernourished girls). The data are related to BMR calculated from the equations of Schofield and to estimates of the lean body mass (LBM). The ethnic composition of the subjects was 80% mestizo (mixed European and South Amerindian ancestry), 15% black, and 5% white. The data do not show any variations due to race in these subjects. The Schofield equations overestimate the BMR of boys by approximately 6% whereas the estimation of BMR in girls is not significantly different from measured values. More than 65% of the variation in BMR of both nutritionally normal and undernourished boys and girls is explained by variation in body size as estimated by the LBM.

  17. Role of Integrated Outreach Activities in Improving Nutritional Status among Under-Five Children in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mudhwahi, Ali A

    2015-01-01

    This paper intends to review the feasibility of scaling-up nutrition activities through integrated outreach activities to respond to development challenges. Evaluating the efficiency and effectiveness of current packages of outreach services during the period of 2006-2014 is the aim of this review for better access to basic and social services and economic opportunities in Yemen. The two components of health system performance are related to: (i) the levels of coverage for health interventions; and (ii) financial risk protection, with a focus on equity. In this sense, Yemen's intervention coverage indicators of the health-related MDGs, such as immunization, integrated management of childhood illnesses (IMCI), reproductive health (RH) and disease control including non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have shown good progress. Yet, malnutrition is still highly prevalent among under-five children in the country. Coverage indicators of the outreach approach in Yemen, which started in 2006, indicate a strong role of the integrated services in reaching under-five children of the most vulnerable communities with basic health services including preventive and curative ones. As well, these activities respond to the financial risk protection challenges with enhancing efficiency in the provision of health services. Considering that nutrition is part of the package of integrated outreach services, inter-related measures of universal coverage in Yemen are to be addressed together with setting the impact indicators for essential health services coverage targeting the neediest populations. Coverage of health services encompasses the full targeted population in the most malnutrition-affected areas, especially the west coast of the country, for intervention and for the age group these services are directed to.

  18. Effect of gender and nutritional status on academic achievement and cognitive function among primary school children in a rural district in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Jan J M; Amal, Mitra K; Hasmiza, H; Pim, C D; Ng, L O; Wan, Manan W M

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between gender, birth weight, nutritional status, and iron status of children with their academic performance and cognitive function. Two hundred and forty-nine children, seven to nine years of age, were recruited by systematic sampling from six primary schools in a rural area in Malaysia. Cognitive function was assessed by using Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (R-CPM). Academic performance of the children was recorded from their school final examination results in four subjects including Malay language, English, Mathematics, and Science. Birth weight was recorded from the birth certificate, and nutritional status was determined by weight-for-age z score and height-for-age z score. Girls had a significantly higher score in all the academic tests, but a lower cognitive score compared to boys. Nutritional status was found to be correlated significantly with academic performance. Academic and cognitive function scores were also found to be correlated significantly with birth weight, parents' education, and family income. In a multivariate analysis, gender remained the significant predictor of academic function, and iron status and haemoglobin were the significant predictors of cognitive function, after controlling for other variables. The study showed that girls performed better academically than boys in rural Malaysia. Nutritional status, parents' education and family income could be additional modifiable factors to improve academic performance of the children. More attention is needed to improve academic achievements of boys at their early school years.

  19. Effects of delayed pubertal development, nutritional status, and disease severity on longitudinal patterns of growth failure in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemel, Babette S; Kawchak, Deborah A; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Schall, Joan I; Stallings, Virginia A

    2007-05-01

    Previous studies of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) reported poor growth and delayed maturation. However, the prevalence, magnitude, and correlates of suboptimal growth remain poorly understood. A prospective longitudinal study was undertaken to determine the effects of disease severity and nutritional status on growth, an indicator of childhood well-being. Children, birth to 18 y of age, with SCD-SS were evaluated annually for 4 y. Growth, nutritional status, skeletal and sexual maturation, disease severity, dietary intake, and maternal education were assessed. In this sample of 148 children (78 females), growth in height, weight, or body mass index declined in 84% of subjects; 38% fell below the 5th percentile in one or more measures. Puberty was delayed 1 to 2 y, and median age at menarche was 13.2 y. Skeletal age was delayed by 0.7 +/- 1.4 y overall and by 1.3 +/- 1.5 y in children 10 to 15 y old. Height status declined over time and was positively associated with advancing puberty and hematological measures in girls, and nutritional status in girls and boys. Growth failure and maturational delay remain significant chronic problems in children with SCD-SS and are related to potentially modifiable factors such as nutritional status.

  20. Exclusive Breastfeeding and Other Foods in the First Six Months of Life: Effects on Nutritional Status and Body Composition of Brazilian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taís C. A. Magalhães

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effect of exclusive breastfeeding and consumption of other foods in the first six months of life in the nutritional status and body composition of children. Methods. A retrospective cohort study with 185 children aged from 4 to 7 years was monitored during the first months of life in a program of support to breastfeeding. We evaluated weight, height, waist circumference, and body composition by using DEXA. The nutritional status was assessed by the BMI/age index. The parameters of adiposity were classified by using as the cutoff point, the 85th percentile of the sample itself, according to gender and age. Confounding factors considered were variables related to maternal, pregnancy, birth, sociodemographic, health, lifestyle, and diet. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed, the latter by means of multiple logistic regression. Results. The median exclusive breastfeeding was 3 months. Of the children, 42.7% received cow’s milk and 35.7% received infant formula. Regarding nutritional status, 21.1% of the children showed changes. The variables of infant feeding were not independently associated with nutritional status and body composition of the children and there were no differences between the groups studied. Conclusion. Breastfeeding was not a protective factor to overweight and body fat in children.

  1. Food Insecurity and Not Dietary Diversity Is a Predictor of Nutrition Status in Children within Semiarid Agro-Ecological Zones in Eastern Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zipporah N. Bukania

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Machakos and Makueni counties in Kenya are associated with historical land degradation, climate change, and food insecurity. Both counties lie in lower midland (LM lower humidity to semiarid (LM4, and semiarid (LM5 agroecological zones (AEZ. We assessed food security, dietary diversity, and nutritional status of children and women. Materials and Methods. A total of 277 woman-child pairs aged 15–46 years and 6–36 months respectively, were recruited from farmer households. Food security and dietary diversity were assessed using standard tools. Weight and height, or length in children, were used for computation of nutritional status. Findings. No significant difference (P>0.05 was observed in food security and dietary diversity score (DDS between LM4 and LM5. Stunting, wasting, and underweight levels among children in LM4 and LM5 were comparable as were BMI scores among women. However, significant associations (P=0.023 were found between severe food insecurity and nutritional status of children but not of their caregivers. Stunting was significantly higher in older children (>2 years and among children whose caregivers were older. Conclusion. Differences in AEZ may not affect dietary diversity and nutritional status of farmer households. Consequently use of DDS may lead to underestimation of food insecurity in semiarid settings.

  2. The effect of regular hemodialysis on the nutritional status of children with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfy, Hala M; Sabry, Samar M; Ghobrial, Emad E; Abed, Samer A

    2015-03-01

    Growth failure is one of the most common and profound clinical manifestation of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in infants, children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional status of Egyptian children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on regular hemodialysis (HD). The study included 50 Egyptian children with ESRD on regular HD, following-up at the Pediatric Nephrology unit, Cairo University. History, including dietary history, was taken for all patients and clinical examination was performed on all of them. Body weight, standing height, height or length SD score, the skin fold thickness, mid-arm circumference, mid-arm muscle circumference and mid-arm muscle circumference area were also assessed. The height of the patients was the most affected anthropometric parameter, as 78% of the patients were shorter (height SDS below -3). Body weight is less affected than height, as body weight SDS of 34% of patients was less than -3 SDS. In addition, the body mass index of 16% of the patients was 97 th percentile. Although most ESRD patients received adequate protein and caloric intake, their growth was markedly affected, especially with longer period on HD. We suggest that assessment of growth parameters should be performed at a minimum period of every six months in children with CKD stages 2-3. For children with more advanced CKD (stages 4-5 and 5D), more frequent evaluation may be warranted due to the greater risk of abnormalities.

  3. Intestinal parasite infections in immigrant children in the city of Rome, related risk factors and possible impact on nutritional status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manganelli Laura

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic diseases can represent a social and economic problem among disadvantaged people - even in developed countries. Due to the limited data available concerning Europe, the aims of the present study were to evaluate the presence of parasites in immigrant children and the risk factors favouring the spread of parasites. Subsequently, the possible correlation between nutritional status and parasitic infections was also investigated. Findings A convenience sample of two hundred and forty seven immigrant children (aged 0–15 attending the Poliambulatorio della Medicina Solidale in Rome was examined. Data were collected using structured questionnaires, and parasitological and anthropometric tests were applied. Chi-squared test and binary logistic multiple-regression models were used for statistical analysis. Thirty-seven children (15% tested positive to parasites of the following species: Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba coli, Giardia duodenalis, Enterobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoides and Strongyloides stercoralis. A monospecific infection was detected in 30 (81% out of 37 parasitized children, while the others (19% presented a polyparasitism. The major risk factors were housing, i.e. living in shacks, and cohabitation with other families (p Conclusions This study shows that parasite infection in children is still quite common, even in a developed country and that children’s growth and parasitism may be related. Extensive improvements in the living, social and economic conditions of immigrants are urgently needed in order to overcome these problems.

  4. Poor nutrition status and associated feeding practices among HIV-positive children in a food secure region in Tanzania: a call for tailored nutrition training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno F Sunguya

    Full Text Available METHODS: We conducted this mixed-method study among 748 children aged 6 months-14 years attending 9 of a total of 32 care and treatment centers in Tanga region, Tanzania. We collected quantitative data using a standard questionnaire and qualitative data through seven focus group discussions (FGDs. RESULTS: HIV-positive children had high magnitudes of undernutrition. Stunting, underweight, wasting, and thinness were prevalent among 61.9%, 38.7%, 26.0%, and 21.1% of HIV-positive children, respectively. They also had poor feeding practices: 88.1% were fed at a frequency below the recommendations, and 62.3% had a low level of dietary diversity. Lower feeding frequency was associated with stunting (β = 0.11, p = 0.016; underweight (β = 0.12, p = 0.029; and thinness (β = 0.11, p = 0.026. Lower feeding frequency was associated with low wealth index (β = 0.06, p<0.001, food insecurity (β =  -0.05, p<0.001, and caregiver's education. In the FGDs, participants discussed the causal relationships among the key associations; undernutrition was mainly due to low feeding frequency and dietary diversity. Such poor feeding practices resulted from poor nutrition knowledge, food insecurity, low income, and poverty. CONCLUSION: Feeding practices and nutrition status were poor among HIV-positive children even in food rich areas. Improving feeding frequency may help to ameliorate undernutrition. To improve it, tailored interventions should target children of poor households, the food insecure, and caregivers who have received only a low level of education.

  5. Nutritional status and risk factors of overweight and obesity for children aged 9-15 years in Chengdu, Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Yang, Fan; Xiong, Fei; Huo, Tingzhu; Tong, Yu; Yang, Sufei; Mao, Meng

    2012-08-10

    Obesity is widespread in the world including developing countries. However malnutrition in poor areas is still a serious problem. Few investigations, especially in a large sample, have been performed in Western area of China. This study aimed to evaluate the nutritional status of school children aged 9-15 years in large Southwest city of China, and identify the differential impact of aberrant birth categories and family history of obesity related disease on childhood overweight and obesity development. A multistage random cluster sampling was performed to evaluate the prevalence of thinness, overweight and obesity, which were defined by the new age-, sex-, specific BMI reference developed by World Health Organization (WHO) (2007). And then a frequency matched case-control study was performed to identify the risk factors of overweight and obesity. 7,194 children (3,494 boys, 3,700 girls) were recruited, and 1,282 (17.8%) had excess bodyweight (14.5% overweight, 3.3% obesity). The combined prevalence gradually decreased with age, and were more prevalent among boys than girls (P 0.05). Preterm large for gestational age (OR = 2.746), maternal history of obesity related disease (OR = 1.713), paternal history of obesity related disease (OR = 1.583), preterm appropriate for gestational age (OR = 1.564), full term small for gestational age (OR = 1.454) and full term large for gestational age (OR = 1.418) were recognized as significant risk factors in the multivariate regression analysis (P overweight and obesity was dramatically spreading, malnutrition still remained a serious problem. This unmatched nutritional status should be emphasized in backward cities of China. Children born of both preterm and LGA, whose parents particularly mothers had a history of obesity related disease, should be emphatically intervened as early as possible.

  6. Diet and nutritional status among children 24-59 months by seasons in a mountainous area of Northern Vietnam in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huong, Le Thi; Xuan, Le Thi Thanh; Phuong, Le Hong; Huyen, Doan Thi Thu; Rocklöv, Joacim

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal variation affects food availability. However, it is not clear if it affects dietary intake and nutritional status of children in Vietnam. This paper aims at examining the seasonal variation in nutrition status and dietary intake of children aged 24-59 months. A repeated cross-sectional study design was used to collect data of changes in nutritional status and diets of children from 24 to 59 months through four seasons in Chiem Hoa district, Tuyen Quang province, a predominately rural mountainous province of northern Vietnam. The quantitative component includes anthropometric measurements, 24 hours dietary recall and socio-economic characteristics. The qualitative component was conducted through focus group discussions (FGDs) with mothers of the children surveyed in the quantitative component. The purpose of FGDs was to explore the food habits of children during the different seasons and the behaviours of their mothers in relation to the food that they provide during these seasons. The prevalence of underweight among children aged 24-59 months is estimated at around 20-25%; it peaked in summer (24.9%) and reached a low in winter (21.3%). The prevalence of stunting was highest in summer (29.8%) and lowest in winter (22.2%). The prevalence of wasting in children was higher in spring and autumn (14.3%) and lower in summer (9.3%). Energy intake of children was highest in the autumn (1259.3 kcal) and lowest in the summer (996.9 kcal). Most of the energy and the nutrient intakes during the four seasons did not meet the Vietnamese National Institute of Nutrition recommendation. Our study describes some seasonal variation in nutrition status and energy intake among children in a mountainous area northern Vietnam. Our study indicated that the prevalence of stunting and underweight was higher in summer and autumn, while the prevalence of wasting was higher in spring and autumn. Energy intake did not always meet national recommendations, especially in summer.

  7. Comparison of nutritional status between children with autism spectrum disorder and typically developing children in the Mediterranean Region (Valencia, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marí-Bauset, Salvador; Llopis-González, Agustín; Zazpe, Itziar; Marí-Sanchis, Amelia; Morales Suárez-Varela, Maria

    2017-04-01

    This case-control study investigated nutrient intake, healthy eating index with 10 items on foods and nutrients, on 3-day food diaries and anthropometric measurements in 105 children with autism spectrum disorder and 495 typically developing children (6-9 years) in Valencia (Spain). Children with autism spectrum disorder were at a higher risk for underweight, eating more legumes, vegetables, fiber, and some micronutrients (traditional Mediterranean diet) but fewer dairy and cereal products, and less iodine, sodium, and calcium than their typically developing peers. Differences existed in total energy intake but healthy eating index and food variety score differences were not significant. Autism spectrum disorder group failed to meet dietary recommendations for thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin C, or calcium. Risk of inadequate intake of fiber, vitamin E, and sodium was lower in children with autism spectrum disorder than typically developing children. Results suggest that (1) risk of inadequate intake of some micronutrients in children with autism spectrum disorder and (2) cultural patterns and environment may influence food intake and anthropometric characteristics in autism spectrum disorder. Primary care should include anthropometric and nutritional surveillance in this population to identify intervention on a case-by-case basis. Future research should explore dietary patterns and anthropometric characteristics in different autism spectrum disorder populations in other countries, enhancing our understanding of the disorder's impact.

  8. Nutritional status of 8- to 12-year-old children with height below or at 25th percentile associated with height in the Seoul metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Hee; Choue, Ryowon

    2011-07-01

    Childhood is the best time to establish healthful dietary habits through adulthood. However, as of yet, there is relatively little research on the nutritional status of children with low height. This study aimed to evaluate the nutritional status of school-aged children with low height. This study was implemented in the Seoul metropolitan area with 8- to 12-year-old Korean children (n = 93) who fall below the 25th percentile (Nutritional status was assessed using anthropometry and dietary assessment. Dietary assessment was carried out using a 24-hour recall on a typical and quantitative food frequency questionnaire. The Pearson' s correlation analysis was conducted to determine associations between height and nutrient intake. The mean percentiles of height were 19.5(th) for boys, and 19.0(th) for girls, respectively. Nutrients ingested below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) of the Dietary Reference Intakes for Koreans (KDRIs), considered inadequate, were folic acid, calcium, vitamin C, and iron. Significant differences between recommended and consumed servings of food groups were observed in the meat, fish, egg, and legume group (p = 0.039), vegetable group (p carbohydrates (p nutritional status of children are needed to improve dietary adequacy based on food groups and to increase the growth of children with low height.

  9. [ENTERAL NUTRITION ON THE NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escortell Sánchez, Raquel; Reig García-Galbis, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    to identify what effect causes enteral nutrition on nutritional status of cancer. a search was performed using the keywords "Cancer" AND "Enteral Nutrition" AND "Supplementation" in four document databases: Pubmed, EBSCO, ProQuest, and Web of Science. age of the sample, major than 18 years; submitted to surgery for cancer; that the intervention program was including diet and employment or not of nutritional Supplementation; clinical trials published between January 2004 and December 2014, in scientific journals indexed. we analyzed 660 articles, of which only 2% has been included. 58% of intervention programs are applied outside Spain; 84% of the interventions was carried out in a hospitable ambient; 58% of the sample is formed by adults older than 54 years; 33% of the interventions were multidisciplinary and its duration ranges between 1 and 4 years. we found just a few national interventions in cancer participants and there two types of interventions: by exclusive polymeric enteral formula or mixed with immunonutrition. enteral nutrition shows against the parenteral and its introduction at an early stage, it helps to improve nutritional status of the patient; polymeric formulas next immunonutrition, it helps to reduce the time of hospitalization; the analytical parameters are shown as a measurement pattern when assessing the improvement in nutritional status in cancer. It is recommended to increase the research in this field, especially in children. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  10. Nutritional status is associated with health-related quality of life in children with cystic fibrosis aged 9-19 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoff, Suzanne M; Tluczek, Audrey; Laxova, Anita; Farrell, Philip M; Lai, HuiChuan J

    2013-12-01

    The impact of improved nutritional status on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is unknown for children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Associations between nutritional status and HRQOL were examined over 2 years in 95 children, aged 9-19 years, who were followed in the Wisconsin Newborn Screening Project. HRQOL was assessed using the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire (CFQ). Associations between height z-score (HtZ), BMI z-score (BMIZ) and seven CFQ dimensions were evaluated. Mean values of at least 80 were observed for all CFQ dimensions except respiratory symptoms and treatment burden. Treatment burden was significantly worse in patients with meconium ileus (57) compared to pancreatic insufficient (65) and sufficient (78) subjects, pnutritional status was associated with increased HRQOL scores. Early diagnosis through newborn screening and improved nutrition provides an opportunity to enhance quality of life and body image perception. Copyright © 2013 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. NUTRITIONAL STATUS IS ASSOCIATED WITH HEALTH-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE IN CHILDREN WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS AGED 9–19 YEARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoff, Suzanne M.; Tluczek, Audrey; Laxova, Anita; Farrell, Philip M.; Lai, HuiChuan J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The impact of improved nutritional status on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is unknown for children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods Associations between nutritional status and HRQOL were examined over 2 years in 95 children, aged 9–19 years, who were followed in the Wisconsin Newborn Screening Project. HRQOL was assessed using the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire (CFQ). Associations between height z-score (HtZ), BMI z-score (BMIZ) and seven CFQ dimensions were evaluated. Results Mean values of at least 80 were observed for all CFQ dimensions except respiratory symptoms and treatment burden. Treatment burden was significantly worse in patients with meconium ileus (57) compared to pancreatic insufficient (65) and sufficient (78) subjects, pnutritional status was associated with increased HRQOL scores. Early diagnosis through newborn screening and improved nutrition provides an opportunity to enhance quality of life and body image perception. PMID:23410621

  12. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of albendazole in improving nutritional status of pre-school children in urban slums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, S; Pande, V K; Fletcher, R H

    2000-01-01

    To study the clinical efficacy and the incremental cost-effectiveness of albendazole in improving the nutritional status of pre-school children. Single blind, placebo-controlled trial with child as the unit of randomization. In the Anganwadi centers of the Integrated Child Development Services situated in the urban slums of Lucknow, North India. Thirty-two Anganwadi centers were randomly selected for the trial. Included were registered resident children between 1.5 to 3.5 years of age with informed and written parental consent. The intervention group received 600 mg of albendazole powder every six months while the placebo group received same quantity of calcium powder. Enrolled children were contacted once in six months from January 1995 to 1997 and given treatment. The outcome measure were change in the proportion of underweight (weight for age 95%. During the 2 year follow-up, the proportion of stunted children increased by 11.44% and 2.06% in the placebo and albendazole groups, respectively, and the difference was 9.38% (95% CI 6.01% to 12.75%; p value cognitive performance, as judged by the revised Denver prescreening questionnaire, in both the groups at enrollment as well as at the end of the study. Six monthly albendazole reduces the risk of stunting with a small increase in the expenditure on health care from the payer's perspective. Larger trials are needed to study the effect of albendazole on prevention of stunting, cognitive functions and all-cause childhood mortality.

  13. Intestinal Parasites and Nutritional Status in Children under 14 years of age at the Paediatric Hospital David Bernardino in Luanda, Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelina Barros

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in a paediatric population aged from 0 to 14 years old, hospitalized in the Paediatric Hospital David Bernardino in Luanda (HPDBL, and its association with nutritional status. The study involved 64 children admitted in the wards of "undernutrition" and "general". Detection of intestinal parasites in faecal samples was assessed by fresh examination stained with Lugol, as used at the HPDBL. The evaluation of nutritional status of children in HPDBL included clinical, biochemical and anthropometric parameters. Out of the 64 children analyzed, six (9.3% were infected with Giardia lamblia (6.3%, Ascaris lumbricoides (1.6% and Hymenolepis diminuta (1.6%. These cases of parasitism were more common in children over three years and hospitalized in the general ward. Regarding nutritional status, the majority (56.3% had some kind of nutritional deficiency (body weight below 70%, oedema in both legs, severe thinness, which were more frequent in females (55.6% and in children under 24 months (77.7%. About 92.2% of children admitted were from suburban areas of Luanda presenting greater vulnerability to parasitic infections and other diseases owing to households conditions, with a majority without piped water. However, no evidence has been encountered in this population sample of an association between intestinal parasites and malnutrition throughout the present study.

  14. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children: Nutritional Status and Associations with Serum Leptin, Ghrelin, and IGF-1 Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Gulin; Ozkan, Tanju Basarir; Ozgur, Taner; Altay, Derya; Cavun, Sinan; Goral, Guher

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastrointestinal diseases such as gastritis, peptic ulcers, malignancy and lymphoma, and extra-gastrointestinal conditions. H. pylori infection is negatively associated with children's growth. Chronic inflammation of the stomach that results in the loss of appetite and, dysregulation of neuroendocrine hormones such as leptin, and ghrelin are the probable reasons of this negative association. The objective of this study is to determine the serum levels of leptin, ghrelin, and IGF-1 in H. pylori-infected children and their relations with growth. A hundred and sixty-one school children aged between 6 and 14 years were selected randomly from five primary schools representing a cross section of population. Demographic and sociocultural characteristics, and anthropometric measurements were recorded. Serum H. pylori IgG, insulin-like growth factor-1, leptin, and ghrelin levels were measured in all children. The children were grouped according to the nutritional status and Helicobacter pylori seropositivity. Nutritional indices were compared among groups in association with serum leptin, ghrelin, and insulin-like growth factor-1 levels. H. pylori IgG positivity was found in 34.2%, and 14.9% of children were malnourished. H. pylori seropositivity was significantly higher in older ages (10.32 ± 2.26 vs 9.53 ± 2.36 years, p = .036), and body weight and height Z scores were significantly lower in H. pylori-seropositive children (-0.33 ± 1.08 vs 0.04 ± 1.26, p = .044 and 0.13 ± 0.92 vs 0.23 ± 0.91, p = .018 respectively). H. pylori seropositivity was found to be an independent risk factor for shorter body height (p = .01). Serum leptin, ghrelin, and IGF-1 levels were not associated with H. pylori IgG seropositivity (0.35 vs 0.55 ng/mL, p = .3; 3267.4 ± 753.0 vs 2808.3 ± 911.4 pg/mL, p = .06; 470 ± 176 vs 521 ± 179 ng/mL, p = .32, respectively). Children infected with H. pylori are prone to short stature. This effect seems to be

  15. Profiles of body mass index and the nutritional status among children and adolescents categorized by waist-to-height ratio cut-offs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Xiu; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Chu, Zun-Hua; Zhao, Jin-Shan

    2016-11-15

    Waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) is proposed as a simple, valid and convenient measure of abdominal obesity and health risks in practice. The present study examined the distribution of nutritional status among children and adolescents categorized by WHtR cut-offs. A total of 30,459 students (15,249 boys and 15,210 girls) aged 7-18years participated in the study. Height, weight and waist circumference (WC) of all subjects were measured, body mass index (BMI) and WHtR were calculated. The grades of nutritional status (thinness, normal weight, overweight and obesity) was defined by the international BMI cut-offs. All subjects were divided into three groups (low, moderate and high) according to their WHtR, BMI level and the distribution of nutritional status among the three groups were compared. In both boys and girls, significant differences in BMI level and the nutritional status were observed among the three groups. Children and adolescents aged 7-18years in the 'high WHtR group' (≥0.5) had higher BMI than those in the 'low WHtR group' (nutritional status is found in the 'moderate WHtR group' (between 0.4 and 0.5) with the highest proportion of normal weight and low prevalence of thinness and obesity. WHtR is associated with nutritional status, which could be an indicator of nutritional status and early health risk. It is necessary to develop optimal boundary values in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nutritional Status among the Children of Age Group 5-14 Years in Selected Arsenic Exposed and Non-Exposed Areas of Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaul Karim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To assess and compare the nutritional status of children aged 5-14 years in arsenic exposed and non- exposed areas.It was a cross sectional study conducted on 600 children of age 5-14 years from arsenic exposed and non-exposed areas in Bangladesh. Designed questionnaire and check list were used for collection of data. To estimate BMI necessary anthropometric measurements of the studied children were done. Dietary intakes of the study children were assessed using 24-hours recall method.The difference of socio-economic conditions between the children of exposed area and non-exposed area was not significant. On an average the body mass index was found to be significantly (p < 0.01 lower among the children of arsenic exposed area (49% in comparison to that of children in non-exposed area (38%. Stunting (p < 0.01, wasting (p < 0.05 and underweight (p < 0.05 were significantly higher in exposed group in comparison to non-exposed group. No significant difference of nutrition intake was found between exposed and non-exposed children as well as thin and normal children.In this study children exposed to arsenic contaminated water were found to be suffered from lower nutritional status.

  17. Nutritional Quality of Breakfast and Physical Activity Independently Predict the Literacy and Numeracy Scores of Children after Adjusting for Socioeconomic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, Jennifer A.; Mugridge, Anna C.

    2012-01-01

    Health-related behaviors [physical activity (PA), nutritional quality of breakfast and sleep]; personal variables (self-esteem, attitudes to PA and gender) and socioeconomic status (SES) (school SES and parental education), were examined in relation to literacy and numeracy scores of 824 grade 3-7 children. Participants completed a questionnaire,…

  18. Gender inequality and bio-social factors in nutritional status among under five children attending anganwadis in an urban slum of a town in Western Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kriti A; Langare, Sanjivani D; Naik, J D; Rajderkar, S S

    2013-04-01

    Nutrition for under-5 children is of great importance as the foundation for life-time health, strength, and intellectual vitality is laid during this period. Globally, more than one-third of the child deaths are attributable to under-nutrition. The discriminatory attitudes against female children vary from being implicit to those that are quite explicit. So, the present cross-sectional study aims to assess the nutritional status (gender differences) of 146 under-5 children attending Anganwadis and also to study the bio-socio-demographic factors associated with malnutrition attending three Anganwadis of Adopted Urban slum area, involving anthropometric examination using standardized techniques and interview using predesigned semi-structured questionnaire for the mothers in September-October 2011. Nutritional status grading was done based on weight for age as per Indian Academy of Pediatrics (IAP) Classification and using height for age as per Vishveshwara Rao's Classification. 51.4% were males, majority in age group of 2-3 years. 63% children were malnourished, majority in Grade I malnutrition. Out of the total females, 72% were stunted and 43% were severely malnourished having mid arm circumference <12.5 cm. Birth order (P < 0.05), education status of the mother (P < 0.001), socio-economic status (P < 0.05) and type of family (P < 0.05) were found to be significantly associated with malnutrition.

  19. Gender inequality and bio-social factors in nutritional status among under five children attending anganwadis in an urban slum of a town in Western Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kriti A Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition for under-5 children is of great importance as the foundation for life-time health, strength, and intellectual vitality is laid during this period. Globally, more than one-third of the child deaths are attributable to under-nutrition. The discriminatory attitudes against female children vary from being implicit to those that are quite explicit. So, the present cross-sectional study aims to assess the nutritional status (gender differences of 146 under-5 children attending Anganwadis and also to study the bio-socio-demographic factors associated with malnutrition attending three Anganwadis of Adopted Urban slum area, involving anthropometric examination using standardized techniques and interview using predesigned semi-structured questionnaire for the mothers in September-October 2011. Nutritional status grading was done based on weight for age as per Indian Academy of Pediatrics (IAP Classification and using height for age as per Vishveshwara Rao′s Classification. 51.4% were males, majority in age group of 2-3 years. 63% children were malnourished, majority in Grade I malnutrition. Out of the total females, 72% were stunted and 43% were severely malnourished having mid arm circumference <12.5 cm. Birth order ( P < 0.05, education status of the mother ( P < 0.001, socio-economic status ( P < 0.05 and type of family ( P < 0.05 were found to be significantly associated with malnutrition.

  20. Effect of gluten-free diet on the growth and nutritional status of children with coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gluten-free diet (GFD presents the basis of coeliac disease (CD treatment. If strictly applied, the disorders of the small bowel mucosa and other disease signs rapidly resolve. Objective. The goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of GFD on the growth and nutritional status of children with the classical form of CD. In addition, we analyzed the differences between these parameters with the duration and the patients' compliance with GFD. Methods. The study goals were achieved on a sample of 90 children, 56 female and 34 male, aged 0.5-7.5 (1.53±1.05 years, with the classic CD diagnosed on the basis of typical pathohistological findings of the small bowel mucosa and clinical recovery of patients on GFD. The duration of the patients' follow-up was 1.08-8.75 (3.03±1.14 years, i.e. until the age of 2.5-15 (4.59±1.78 years. The initial and control values of body height (BH in relation to matched values for age and gender were expressed in percentiles, while the deviation in body weight (BW for the matched values of height and gender was expressed in percentages. The referent haemoglobin (Hb rate in blood, as a laboratory indicator of nutritional status in children aged up to 5 years was ≥110 g/L, and for those aged above 5 years it was ≥115 g/L. Compliance with GFD was based on the pathohistological findings of the small bowel mucosa or determination of tissue transglutaminase. Results. Over the studied period, the effect of GFD was highly significant, both on the increase of BH percentiles (37.62±26.26 vs. 57.22±25.29; p<0.001, and on the decrease of BW deficit 11.58±10.80 vs. 0.89±8.194; p<0.001. After the treatment period, none of the children showed slowed growth rate or BW deficit above 20%, while BW deviation ranging between 10-20% in relation to the referent values was registered in 17 (18.19% and the excess of over 20% in 2 patients. In 86 (95.56% patients, control Hb values in blood were normal, while mild

  1. Household Food Insecurity and Its Association with Nutritional Status of Children 6–59 Months of Age in East Badawacho District, South Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejajo, Tekle; Alemseged, Fissahaye; Massa, Desalegn

    2017-01-01

    Background. Ethiopia has one of the highest child malnutrition rates in the world. Food insecurity is one of the determinant factors of malnutrition in developing countries; however its role remains unclear. Objective. To assess household food insecurity and its association with the nutritional status of children 6–59 months of age in East Badawacho District, South Ethiopia. Methods. A community based cross-sectional study was conducted from February 20 to 30, 2014 on a sample of 508 mother/child pairs of 6–59-month-old children. Sample households with eligible children were selected using systematic random sampling technique. Both bivariate and multivariate analysis were used to identify factors associated with nutritional status of children. P value of underweight, and wasting among children were 45.6%, 26.3%, and 14.6%, respectively. Household food insecurity was significantly associated with underweight (AOR = 3.82; CI = 1.78–8.19) and stunting (AOR = 6.7; CI = 3.71–12.1) but not with wasting. Conclusion and Recommendation. Household food insecurity and the prevalence rates of stunting, underweight, and wasting, among children 6 to 59 months, were high. Intervention programs should focus on improving household food insecurity and nutritional status of children. PMID:28408936

  2. Household Food Insecurity and Its Association with Nutritional Status of Children 6-59 Months of Age in East Badawacho District, South Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betebo, Bealu; Ejajo, Tekle; Alemseged, Fissahaye; Massa, Desalegn

    2017-01-01

    Background . Ethiopia has one of the highest child malnutrition rates in the world. Food insecurity is one of the determinant factors of malnutrition in developing countries; however its role remains unclear. Objective . To assess household food insecurity and its association with the nutritional status of children 6-59 months of age in East Badawacho District, South Ethiopia. Methods . A community based cross-sectional study was conducted from February 20 to 30, 2014 on a sample of 508 mother/child pairs of 6-59-month-old children. Sample households with eligible children were selected using systematic random sampling technique. Both bivariate and multivariate analysis were used to identify factors associated with nutritional status of children. P value of underweight, and wasting among children were 45.6%, 26.3%, and 14.6%, respectively. Household food insecurity was significantly associated with underweight (AOR = 3.82; CI = 1.78-8.19) and stunting (AOR = 6.7; CI = 3.71-12.1) but not with wasting. Conclusion and Recommendation . Household food insecurity and the prevalence rates of stunting, underweight, and wasting, among children 6 to 59 months, were high. Intervention programs should focus on improving household food insecurity and nutritional status of children.

  3. Prenatal factors associated with birth weight and length and current nutritional status of hospitalized children aged 4-24 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariante Giesta, Juliana; Ramón da Rosa, Suélen; Moura Pessoa, Juliana Salino; Lúcia Bosa, Vera

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the associations of prenatal factors with birth weight and length, as well as current nutritional status, of children hospitalized in southern Brazil. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 300 child-mother pairs. Children were between 4 and 24 months old. They were at the inpatient unit or pediatric emergency department of the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre. Anthropometric data were collected, and a questionnaire on gestational data was answered by the children's mothers. Maternal variables of interest were: prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain, smoking and/or use of alcohol, use of illicit drugs, gestational diabetes and/ or high blood pressure. Children's variables of interest were: sex, gestational age, birth weight (BW) and birth length (BL), and current anthropometric data [body mass index for age (BMI/A), height for age (H/A), and weight for age (W/A)]. The gestational weight gain and smoking were associated with BW. We also found that H/A was associated with BW and BL, W/A was associated with BW, and BMI/A was associated with BL. The gestational weight gain was associated with BL, diabetes was associated with BW and BL, and high blood pressure was associated with low height in the first two years of life. We concluded that prenatal factors may have an influence on both BW and BL, causing the birth of small and large for gestational age children, and thus affecting their growth rate during the first years of life. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. Nutritional Status of Children Under Different Frequency and Level Visit to Posyandu Knowledge in Village Bungaya District Bebandem Karangasem Regency Bali Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukartini Adnyana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The toddler’s mother Posyandu presence is expected to add to the knowledge about the toddler’s mother nutrition and health. This study aims to determine the differences in nutritional status of children based on the frequency of visits to health posts and toddler nutrition knowledge of mothers in the village Bungaya Bebandem Sub district Karangasem regency Bali province. In accordance with the results of statistical analysis with independent t-test test at 5 % significance level (α = 0.05 it can be concluded that there are differences in nutritional status of children based on the frequency of visits to the neighborhood health center sample, there were no differences in the level of knowledge of the sample based on the frequency of visits to a sample of Posyandu and found that there was no difference in nutritional status of children based on the level of knowledge of the sample. Reasons not to visit the toddler’s mother Posyandu is largely for reasons of busy, so to improve the toddler’s mother visits to Posyandu activities need to be tailored to particular communities flurry toddler’s mother.

  5. Studies on the nutritional status of children aged 0-5 years in a drought-affected desert area of western Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Madhu B; Fotedar, Ranjana; Lakshminarayana, J; Anand, P K

    2006-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the impact of drought on the nutritional status of pre-school children aged 0-5 years from a rural population in a desert area facing drought conditions very frequently. The sampling design for assessment was the three-stage sampling technique. The study was carried out in 24 villages belonging to six tehsils (sub-units of district) of Jodhpur District, a drought-affected desert district of western Rajasthan, during a drought in 2003. A total of 914 children were examined at household level, with nutritional status assessed by anthropometry, dietary intake and clinical signs of nutritional deficiency. The results revealed growth retardation. Stunting (malnutrition of long duration) was observed in 53% of children and underweight in 60%. Wasting, an indicator of short-duration malnutrition, was present in 28% of children. The extent of malnutrition was significantly higher in girls than boys (Plivestock losses and reduced harvests, leading to increased poverty and poor food intake of the inhabitants. Due to inadequate consumption of daily food the children were suffering from wasting and PEM. Efforts should be made to incorporate measures, such as ensuring the supply of adequate energy and protein to all age groups and especially pre-school children, into ongoing nutrition programmes in order to improve the food security of local inhabitants in this area.

  6. Functional assessment of nutrition status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Mary Krystofiak

    2015-04-01

    Functional status assessment has been recommended as a part of a complete nutrition assessment for decades, but the specific components of this assessment have eluded a consensus definition. The recent Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition consensus criteria for identification of malnutrition include functional assessment determined by handgrip dynamometry, with the understanding that this technique is not practical for use in some patient populations. Other techniques for functional assessment include physical performance measures such as timed gait and chair stands, as well as activities of daily living tools such as the Katz Index, Lawton Scale, and Karnofsky Scale Index. Manual muscle testing and computed tomography scan assessment of lean tissue are other tools that show promise in correlating functional and nutrition assessments. Functional assessment parameters may be least well correlated with nutrition status in older individuals. Despite a number of scientific studies of a variety of tools for functional assessment, there is to date no definitive tool for use in all individuals in all settings. Nutrition scientists and clinicians must continue to collaborate with colleagues in physical and occupational therapy, geriatrics, and nursing to refine current functional assessment tools to more effectively correlate with nutrition and malnutrition assessment parameters. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  7. The Role of Nutritional Status on Follow-up among HIV-infected Children at a Teaching Hospital Clinic in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, M; Gjelsvik, A; Lurie, M N; Enimil, A; Antwi, S; Kwara, A

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition and HIV infection in children interact adversely and may have a combined effect on clinical outcomes, including response to antiretroviral treatment (ART). Evidence of the role of malnutrition at the point of registration at HIV clinics is limited. This study sought to determine the role of nutritional status and other clinical factors on loss to follow-up (LTFU) among children at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital Pediatric HIV clinic in Kumasi, Ghana. A total of 324 HIV-positive children aged 1.5 to 10 years old who were registered at the clinic from January 1, 2007 to June 30, 2011 were included in this retrospective study. Weight-for-age z-score (WAZ) was used to classify nutritional status. Characteristics of children who were LTFU and those who remained in care were compared using bivariate analysis and logistic regression. At registration, 116 (35.8%) children were severely underweight (WAZ -2) were more likely to be LTFU (P = 0.003). Initiation of antiretroviral therapy was associated with a lower risk of LTFU. In the multivariate analysis, hospital admission (OR 4.38; 95% CI 2.30, 8.34) and initiation of ART (OR 0.33; CI 0.19, 0.56) were independently associated with LTFU. Malnutrition was common among Ghanaian HIV-infected children and appeared to be associated with a higher risk of hospitalization and LTFU. Irrespective of nutritional status, the initiation of ART was associated with better retention in care.

  8. The nutritional status of young children and feeding practices two years after the Wenchuan Earthquake in the worst-affected areas in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Huo, Junsheng; Zhao, Liyun; Fu, Ping; Wang, Jie; Huang, Jian; Wang, Lijuan; Song, Pengkun; Fang, Zheng; Chang, Suying; Yin, Shian; Zhang, Jian; Ma, Guansheng

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the nutritional status and feeding practices of young children in the worst-affected areas of China two years after the Wenchuan Earthquake. The sample consisted of 1,254 children 6-23 months of age living in four selected counties from the disaster-affected provinces of Sichuan, Shaanxi and Gansu. Length-for-age, weight-for-age, weight-for-length, and hemoglobin concentration were used to evaluate nutritional status. Interviews with selected children's caretakers collected basic demographic information, children's medical history, and child feeding practices. Stunting, underweight, and wasting prevalence rates in children 6-23 months of age were 10.8%, 4.9% and 2.8% respectively, and anemia prevalence was 52.2%. Only 12.3% of children had initiated breastfeeding within the first hour after birth. Overall, 90.9% of children had ever been breastfed, and 87% children 6-8 months of age had received solid, semi-solid or soft foods the day before the interview. The diets of 45% of children 6-23 months of age met the definition of minimum dietary diversity, and the diets of 39% of breastfed and 7.6% non- breastfed children 6-23 months of age met the criteria for minimum meal frequency. The results highlight that a substantial proportion of young children in the earthquake affected disaster areas continue to have various forms of malnutrition, with an especially high prevalence of anemia, and that most feeding practices are suboptimal. Further efforts should be made to enhance the nutritional status of these children. As part of this intervention, it may be necessary to improve child feeding practices.

  9. Impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy on nutritional and immunologic status in HIV-infected children in the low-income country of Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebissa, Getachew; Deyessa, Negusse; Biadgilign, Sibhatu

    2016-06-01

    HIV/AIDS and malnutrition combine to undermine the immunity of individuals and are inextricably interrelated. Although the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on growth in HIV-infected children is well known, the influence of prior nutritional and immunologic status on the response to HAART is not well documented. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of HAART on nutritional and immunological status in HIV-infected children in the low-income country of Ethiopia. A multicenter, retrospective cohort study was conducted on HIV-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy at the pediatric units of public hospitals in Addis Ababa (Black Lion, Zewditu, Yekatit 12 and ALERT hospitals), Ethiopia. Nutritional status was defined as stunting (height-for-age Z score [HAZ] underweight (weight-for-age Z score [WAZ] nutritional status) in children predicts immunologic outcomes. In all, 556 HIV-infected children receiving HAART from January 2008 to December 2009 were included in this study. Over the 24-mo follow-up period, the study showed that the immunologic recovery of stunted and underweight children, regardless of their baseline nutritional status, responded equally to treatment. However, wasted children showed less immunologic recovery at the different follow-up visits. Predictors of positive shift in WHZ after 24 mo of follow-up were advanced disease stage (World Health Organization clinical stages 3 and 4) with odds ratio (OR), 0.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34-0.99; P = 0.045) and baseline severe underweight OR, 0.19 (95% CI, 0.09-0.56; P = 0.003). The independent predictors of positive shift of growth shift in WAZ over 24 mo were lower baseline age (underweight itself with OR, 0.11 (95% CI, 0.05-0.25; P = 0.0001) were predictors of positive shift (shift to normal). Despite the apparent growth response in HIV-infected children after initiation of HAART, moderate and severe underweight are both independent

  10. Prevalence and intensity of soil-transmitted helminthiasis, prevalence of malaria and nutritional status of school going children in honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia Torres, Rosa Elena; Franco Garcia, Dora Nelly; Fontecha Sandoval, Gustavo Adolfo; Hernandez Santana, Adriana; Singh, Prabhjot; Mancero Bucheli, Sandra Tamara; Saboya, Martha; Paz, Mirian Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Many small studies have been done in Honduras estimating soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH) prevalence but a country-wide study was last done in 2005. The country has the highest burden of malaria among all Central American countries. The present study was done to estimate country-wide STH prevalence and intensity, malaria prevalence and nutritional status in school going children. A cross-sectional study was conducted following PAHO/WHO guidelines to select a sample of school going children of 3rd to 5th grades, representative of ecological regions in the country. A survey questionnaire was filled; anthropometric measurements, stool sample for STH and blood sample for malaria were taken. Kato-Katz method was used for STH prevalence and intensity and rapid diagnostic tests, microscopy, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used for malaria parasite detection. A total of 2554 students were studied of which 43.5% had one or more STH. Trichuriasis was the most prevalent (34%) followed by ascariasis (22.3%) and hookworm (0.9%). Ecological regions II (59.7%) and VI (55.6%) in the north had the highest STH prevalence rates while IV had the lowest (10.6%). Prevalence of one or more high intensity STH was low (1.6%). Plasmodium vivax was detected by PCR in only 5 students (0.2%), all of which belonged to the same municipality; no P. falciparum infection was detected. The majority of children (83%) had normal body mass index for their respective age but a significant proportion were overweight (10.42%) and obese (4.35%). Biannual deworming campaigns would be necessary in ecological regions II and VI, where STH prevalence is >50%. High prevalence of obesity in school going children is a worrying trend and portends of future increase in obesity related diseases. Malaria prevalence, both symptomatic and asymptomatic, was low and provides evidence for Honduras to embark on elimination of the disease.

  11. [NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND BIOCHEMICAL MARKERS OF DEFICIENCY OR EXCESS OF MICRONUTRIENTS IN 4 TO 14 YEAR-OLD CHILEAN CHILDREN: A CRITICAL REVIEW].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozowski Narkunska, Jaime; Castillo Valenzuela, Oscar; Figari Jullian, Nicole; García-Díaz, Diego F; Cruchet Muñoz, Sylvia; Weisstaub Nuta, Gerardo; Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Gotteland Russel, Martín

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of obesity in Chilean children has been increasing steadily for the last two decades. The first study to determine nutritional status and food intake in a representative sample of this population was carried out in 1960. Recently the National Food Consumption Survey (ENCA) carried out in 2012 was released by the Ministry of Health. However, this study did not include biochemical determinations of micronutrients which would allow a better diagnosis of nutritional status in children. to review the literature available from 2004 to 2014 in food intake and nutritional status in Chilean children aged 4 to 14 years. a total of 362 references published between 2004 and 2014 were obtained through searches in the databases PubMed, Lilacs, Embase and Scielo. From these, 40 articles were selected for a thorough review. food intake by children is characterized by a high-energy intake, a low consumption of fruits and vegetables and a high consumption of bread. The ENCA showed that 95% of the Chilean population has a deficient diet. A high prevalence of obesity is observed from very early in life. There is a dearth of data available on plasma indicators of vitamin and mineral status since 1960, which would provide more reliable information on nutritional assessment. It is imperative to implement a representative nutrition survey of children in Chile that includes biochemical indicators to get reliable information in order to develop strategies aimed to correct micronutrient malnutrition from excess or deficiency. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. Study on relationship between the nutritional status and dental caries in 8-12 year old children of Udaipur City, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, N K; Mohan, A; Arora, R; Gupta, A; Marya, C M; Dhingra, S

    2014-01-01

    The future health of individuals depends on the well being of the children of today. Proper nutrition for children is very important. The most commonly used index of obesity and over weight is Body Mass Index. The growth of children should be monitored using the Body Mass Index (BMI) and risk factors assessed through a dietary and physical activity history. The increase in obesity is attributed to increased carbohydrate consumption among children. Obesity and caries are both diet-based conditions that share a cause that is, excessive ingestion of fermentable carbohydrates. This study was undertaken to determine the association of nutritional status with dental caries in 8 to 12 year old children of Udaipur city. The present study was conducted on a random sample of 1000 boys and girls, aged 8-12 years. The children were selected from schools located in the Udaipur City, Rajasthan. The schools examined were of government and private sector schools in Udaipur city. The children from schools of Udaipur city was taken in the study with male, female and age group ratio as per distribution in population. A proforma was used to record children's age, gender, school, year, height, weight, parental income and dental caries status. Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package of Social Science (SPSS Version 15; Chicago Inc., USA). It was found that caries free individuals were more from normal nutritional status group with 134 (13.4 %) subjects where as only 11 (1.1 %) of subjects obese children were found caries free. Study shows that the children with normal BMI for age had more caries in their primary teeth, as well as in their permanent teeth, than the overweight children.

  13. Classification of nutritional status in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, HuiChuan J

    2006-11-01

    Nutritional status impacts on the progression of cystic fibrosis. Current guidelines recommend the use of anthropometric indicators to classify nutritional status and identify malnutrition. However, the current nutrition-classification systems are problematic. I summarize these problems and review recent progress in the development of evidence-based anthropometric criteria for classifying nutritional status in cystic fibrosis patients. Percentage of ideal body weight as a malnutrition index is flawed. In children with cystic fibrosis, this index underestimates the severity of underweight in short patients and overestimates it in tall patients. In adults with cystic fibrosis, percentage of ideal body weight based on the Metropolitan Life Insurance reference weights for medium/large frames overestimates the severity of underweight. Body-mass-index percentile for children and body mass index for adults as underweight indices have been proven to be valid. Strong associations between body mass index and lung function are also observed, but cutoff values to maintain a desirable level of lung function can vary. Body mass index should replace the use of percentage of ideal body weight for classifying underweight in cystic fibrosis patients. More research is needed to identify appropriate indicators to classify short stature in children with cystic fibrosis.

  14. Malaria and nutritional status in children living in the East Usambara ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was no variation in most of the clinical history/symptoms among children with malaria in the two villages. However, coughing (P=0.014) was frequently observed among children in Shambangeda. The use of mosquito nets was more common among the residents of Shambangeda than Kwelumbizi (P=0.001). Children ...

  15. Childcare practices and nutritional status of children aged 6–36 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    five-year old children. This has resulted in over. 200 million children with malnutrition in developing countries, and contributes to more than half of the twelve million deaths of under- five-year old children that occur in each year.1 UNICEF ...

  16. Vitamin D Nutritional Status and its Related Factors for Chinese Children and Adolescents in 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yichun; Chen, Jing; Wang, Rui; Li, Min; Yun, Chunfeng; Li, Weidong; Yang, Yanhua; Piao, Jianhua; Yang, Xiaoguang; Yang, Lichen

    2017-09-15

    Vitamin D plays a critical role in calcium and phosphate metabolism and helps maintain skeletal integrity in childhood, yet vitamin D status in Chinese children and adolescents is not well documented. The aim of this study was to assess the vitamin D status and analyze the risk factors for vitamin D deficiency in Chinese children and adolescents aged 6-17 years. Serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was measured with a radioimmunoassay kit in 15,000 children and adolescent participants in the Chinese national nutrition and health survey (CNNHS) 2010-2012. Age, gender, region type, ethnicity, outdoor time, and vitamin D supplementation were recorded in unified design questionnaires. The season was recorded by the date of blood taken; location was divided into north and south by China's Qinling Mountains and Huaihe River; and ambient ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation level was classified according to the corresponding dose of each participant living area from National Aeronautics and Space Administration data. 14,473 participants from the cross-sectional study of CNNHS 2010-2012 were included in this study. The median serum 25(OH)D concentration was 48.2 (35.4-63.4) nmol/L, and the concentration for males was 50.0 (36.5-65.7) nmol/L, which was statistically higher than that of females (46.7 (34.4-60.9) nmol/L) ( P vitamin D deficiency was 53.2%; 50.0% for males and 56.5% for females at the cut-off 50 nmol/L. According to the results of the log-binomial regression analysis, vitamin D deficiency in Chinese children and adolescents was specifically related to female gender ( P vitamin D deficiency was very common among children and adolescents aged 6-17 years in China. Effective sun exposure should be encouraged in both genders aged 6-17 years, dietary vitamin D and vitamin D supplements are also recommended, especially in the seasons of spring and winter.

  17. MOTOR SKILLS AND NUTRITIONAL STATUS OUTCOMES FROM A PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION IN SHORT BREAKS ON PRESCHOOL CHILDREN CONDUCTED BY THEIR EDUCATORS: A PILOT STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalves-Alvarez, Matias; Castro-Sepulveda, Mauricio; Zapata-Lamana, Rafael; Rosales-Soto, Giovanni; Salazar, Gabriela

    2015-10-01

    childhood obesity is a worldwide health concern. For this issue different intervention have being planned to increase physical activity patterns and reduce the excess of weight in children with limited or no success. the aim of this study is to evaluate the results of a pilot intervention consisting in three 15-minute breaks conducted by educators and supervised by physical education teachers on motor skills and nutritional status in preschool children. sample was 70 preschool children (32 boys and 38 girls), age 4 ± 0,6 years. The physical activity classes were performed three times a week, 45 minutes daily, distributed in three 15 minutes breaks. The circuits were planned to have; jumps, sprints, carrying medicinal balls, gallops and crawling. Motor skill tests that were performed Standing long jump (SLJ) and Twelve meter run. with the intervention no significant differences in nutritional status where found on mean Z score (boys p = 0.49, girls p = 0.77). An increment on weight and height was fount after the intervention (p intervention when we normalize by weight in boys (p = 0.002) and girls (p intervention (p intervention with more intense activities in small breaks (15 minutes), and guided by the educators could improve essential motor skills (running and jumping) in preschool children of a semi-rural sector independent of nutritional status. This gaining in motor skills is the first step to increase physical activity levels in preschool children. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  18. Nutritional status of children with congenital heart disease Estado nutricional de niños con cardiopatías congénitas Estado nutricional de crianças com cardiopatias congênitas

    OpenAIRE

    Flávia Paula Magalhães Monteiro; Thelma Leite de Araujo; Marcos Venícios de Oliveira Lopes; Daniel Bruno Resende Chaves; Beatriz Amorim Beltrão; Alice Gabrielle de Sousa Costa

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to characterize nutritional status and variables that predict nutritional changes in children with congenital heart disease. METHOD: a cross-sectional study undertaken in two health institutions between January and June 2009, using a questionnaire with questions about nutrition, applied to 132 children under two years of age who had congenital heart disease. Children who had additional serious illnesses were excluded. RESULT: the predominant percentile values and Z scores were conc...

  19. Nutritional status of children (6-59 months) among HIV-positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Few studies have attempted to establish the burden of childhood malnutrition and the associated factors among households of HIV-positive mothers/caregivers particularly in urban settings. There is also no satisfactory evidence of health and nutritional benefits of food aid in this particular group where options to attain a ...

  20. Dietary intake and nutritional status of children and adolescents in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambert, J.; Agostoni, C.; Elmadfa, I.; Hulshof, K.; Krause, E.; Livingstone, B.; Socha, P.; Pannemans, D.; Samartín, S.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project was to collect and evaluate data on nutrient intake and status across Europe and to ascertain whether any trends could be identified. Surveys of dietary intake and status were collected from across Europe by literature search and personal contact with country experts.

  1. Soil Transmitted Helminth Infections in Medan: a cross-sectional study of the correlation between the infection and nutritional status among elementary school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Masyithah Darlan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background . Soil Transmitted Helminth (STH infections are a major public health problem that affects more than two billion people around the world. These infections are the cause of children’s under nutrition, especially among school-aged children. Objectives. To assess the correlation between the presence of STH infections and nutritional status among elementary school children in Medan, Indonesia. Material and methods . We conducted an analytical cross-sectional study involving students from the public elementary school 060925 Medan in September 2015. The study participants were chosen by the total sampling technique and according to predetermined inclusion criteria (80 students from third and fourth grades. Univariate analysis was performed to determine STH infection prevalence, and bivariate analysis was used to find the correlation between STH infections and eosinophil levels through the chi-square (χ2 test. Results . We found that the prevalence of STH among study subjects was 40%, and 26 students (32.5% were underweight. The most common types of worm infections were Ascaris lumbricoides (25.0%, Trichuris trichiura (11.2% and mixed infections (3.8%. A significant correlation was found between the presence of STH infection and underweight nutritional status (C = 0.24; χ2 = 5.02; p = 0.025 and the risk of STH infection and nutritional status in children with a prevalence ratio (PR of 2.05 (CI 95%: 1.08–3.87. Conclusions . The presence of STH infection in children is strongly influenced by their hygiene practices. Small clinics and student healthcare units should play an active role in conducting periodic assessment of children’s nutritional status and in providing them with information on STH symptoms and prevention.

  2. Effectiveness Of A School-Based Multicomponent Intervention On Nutritional Status Among Primary School Children In Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Nattapon; Panza, Alessio; Sirikulchayanonta, Chutima; Kumar, Ramesh; Taneepanichskul, Surasak

    2017-01-01

    Childhood obesity has become a major public health issue today. The prevalence of obesity and overweight is increasing in both adults and children. Childhood obesity in Thailand has more than doubled since the 1960s and a recent study reported that overweight and obesity in Thais is the 5th highest in Asia. The present study objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of a life-skills, multicomponent, school-based intervention on child nutritional status. A quasi-experimental design was conducted in two-groups (control and intervention schools) on 453 students attending grade levels 4-5 in Bangkok. Two schools were selected for control, and two schools for intervention groups. The interventions included education, diet, physical activity (PA), food-environment, school builtenvironment, and life-skills components. Subjects were measured at baseline and at 6 months post-treatment. The intervention group had significant differences in overall healthy practices (+1.5 mean difference, p=0.048), dietary habits, physical activity, lower total cholesterol (TC) levels (-2.43 mean, p=0.019) and higher high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels (+4.06 p=0.028) as compared to the control. A higher reduction of overweight individuals among the intervention group over the intervention period was observed. Physical activity and consumption of vegetables increased while consumption of high-caloric snacks and fast foods decreased in children after the intervention. This study indicated that a multidisciplinary approach in school-based interventions is most likely to be effective in preventing children from becoming overweight in the long term. More research should be conducted on school-based interventions with longer intervention periods and higher sustainability.

  3. A restrospective study of the nutritional status of primary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malnourished children may grow up to become adults with reduced physical and cognitive capacity. Knowledge of trends of children's nutritional status over time is important to raise awareness, guide resource allocation as well as develop nutrition-related interventions for communities. A retrospective study was conducted ...

  4. Nutritional Status of School Children Aged 8-12 Years in Deprived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Packed lunches consisted mainly of eggs and convenience foods such as sausages without any vegetables. Poor snacking habits, that is, high consumption of salty corn-based snacks, were identified among these children. Age of school children was significantly associated (p<0.05) with the amount of money spent on ...

  5. Nutritional status and malaria infection in primary school-aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washli Zakiah

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion There are significantly more children with mild-moderate malnutrition in the uninfected group than in the malaria-infected group, furthermore, of those with mild-moderate malnutrition, there are significantly more stunted and stunted-wasted children who were uninfected than malaria-infected.

  6. Nutritional Status of Children as an Indicator of Bushmeat Utilization in Western Serengeti

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Mramba, Rosemary

    2011-01-01

    Serengeti ecosystem supports great number of large mammals ranging from grazers, browsers and carnivores. Some of these animals migrate between seasonal water sources and grasslands. The human population in the western boundary of the park is currently high and increases at the rate of 4% per annum. Majority of local communities are subsistence farmers who derive their needs such as bush meat from the park. The purpose of the study was to test if bush meat utilization contributes to nutrition...

  7. Spirulina Supplements Improved the Nutritional Status of Undernourished Children Quickly and Significantly: Experience from Kisantu, the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaisi, Kikuni; Nkuadiolandu, Adolphine Bedi; Kazadi Lukusa, Aimé; Aloni, Michel Ntetani

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Despite high levels of malnutrition, there is still very little information on the nutritional benefits of Spirulina, a natural alga that provides essential amino acids, rare essential lipids, and numerous minerals and vitamins, to undernourished children in the world. Methods. We carried out a prospective study of 50 children aged between six and 60 months. The intervention group consisted of 16 children who received 10 g of Spirulina daily, as well as the local diet administered by the nutritional centre, and the control group of 34 children who just received the local diet. Both groups of children were assessed on day zero, day 15, and day 30. Results. After treatment, the weight-for-age Z scores and weight-for-height Z scores increased significantly in the intervention group. At day 15, there was a statistically significant difference between the mean corpuscular volume, total proteins, and albumin (p nutritional status of undernourished children who received Spirulina supplements as well as the local diet administered by the nutritional centre improved quickly and significantly. PMID:27777589

  8. Spirulina Supplements Improved the Nutritional Status of Undernourished Children Quickly and Significantly: Experience from Kisantu, the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Féfé Khuabi Matondo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Despite high levels of malnutrition, there is still very little information on the nutritional benefits of Spirulina, a natural alga that provides essential amino acids, rare essential lipids, and numerous minerals and vitamins, to undernourished children in the world. Methods. We carried out a prospective study of 50 children aged between six and 60 months. The intervention group consisted of 16 children who received 10 g of Spirulina daily, as well as the local diet administered by the nutritional centre, and the control group of 34 children who just received the local diet. Both groups of children were assessed on day zero, day 15, and day 30. Results. After treatment, the weight-for-age Z scores and weight-for-height Z scores increased significantly in the intervention group. At day 15, there was a statistically significant difference between the mean corpuscular volume, total proteins, and albumin (p<0.05 in both groups, in favour of the intervention group, and at day 30, this difference extended to all of the studied parameters (p<0.05. Conclusion. This study found that the nutritional status of undernourished children who received Spirulina supplements as well as the local diet administered by the nutritional centre improved quickly and significantly.

  9. Nutritional Status Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Middle-School Children in the City of Montes Claros - Mg, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz Igor Raineh Durães; Mourão Daniella Mota; Freitas Daniel Antunes; Souza Andrey George Silva; Pereira Alessandra Ribeiro; Aidar Felipe José; Carneiro André Luiz Gomes

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between nutritional status and prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in middle-school students in the city of Montes Claros - MG. The sample consisted of 382 students, aged 10?16 years. Nutritional status was evaluated using the Body Mass Index (BMI). Metabolic syndrome (MS) was defined as the presence of two or more criteria in accordance with definition of the International Diabetes Federation. The overall prevalence of MS was 7.9%. 9...

  10. Growth and nutritional status of children from dysfunctional families with alcohol addicted parents in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanć, Tomasz; Czapla, Zbigniew; Szwed, Anita; Durda, Magdalena; Krotowska, Aleksandra; Cieślik, Joachim

    2015-07-01

    The study was aimed at assessment of impact of parents' alcohol addiction on growth and prevalence of underweight and overweight in their children. Two groups of subjects were compared: 80 children of alcohol addicted parents (ChAAP) aged from 7 to 14 years and reference group (RG) of 1000 children selected in terms of age and place of residence. Differences in z scores for height and Body Mass Index (BMI), prevalence of underweight and overweight were assessed. Families of ChAAP were characterized by: lower parents' education, higher unemployment rate, a greater number of children than in RG. The differences between ChAAP and RG in z scores for height (z scores: -0.54 vs. 0.45, t = -7.01, p development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Diet patterns are associated with demographic factors and nutritional status in south Indian children

    OpenAIRE

    Kehoe, Sarah H; Krishnaveni, Ghattu V.; Veena, Sargoor R.; Guntupalli, Aravinda M.; Margetts, Barrie M.; Fall, Caroline H D; Robinson, Sian M.

    2014-01-01

    The burden of non-communicable chronic disease (NCD) in India is increasing. Diet and body composition ‘track’ from childhood into adult life and contribute to the development of risk factors for NCD. Little is known about the diet patterns of Indian children. We aimed to identify diet patterns and study associations with body composition and socio-demographic factors in the Mysore Parthenon Study cohort. We collected anthropometric and demographic data from children aged 9.5 years (n = 538)....

  12. Risk factors associated with hemoglobin levels and nutritional status among Brazilian children attending daycare centers in Sao Paulo City, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Novaes Oliveira, Mariana; Martorell, Reynaldo; Nguyen, Phuong

    2010-03-01

    Like many other developing countries, Brazil has been going a nutritional transition which presence both malnutrition and overweight. Stunting and overweight are the major public health problems in Brazilian children. The objective of this study was to document the prevalence of stunting, overweight and anemia in preschool children and examine if those nutritional problems are related; also identify if these nutritional problems have the same risk factors. Data from the "Efficient Daycare Center Project" which include 270 children attending nurseries of eight daycare centers in Sao Paulo city, Brazil were used for this study. Data on height and weight were converted to z-scores using WHO anthro software. Hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations were determined on finger-prick blood samples. The co-occurrence of stunting, overweight and anemia was investigated by contingency tables a log-linear model. Univariate and multiple regression analyses were performed to estimate the association of HAZ, WAZ, WHZ and Hb levels with their risk factors. The results showed high prevalence of overweight (22.2%), risk of stunting (22.6%) and anemia (37%). Percent of daycare attendance, age, number of siblings under 5 years old and per capita income are associated with Hb levels. This study provides evidence that Brazil is going through a nutritional transition and suggest that the adoption of public policies to expand and improve services in daycare centers may help to prevent multi-nutritional problems in preschool children.

  13. Effect of nutritional status on Tuberculin skin testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro, Roi; Cilleruelo, María José; García-Hortelano, Milagros; García-Ascaso, Marta; Medina-Claros, Antonio; Mellado, María José

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate Tuberculin skin test (TST) results in a population of immigrants and internationally adopted children from several geographical areas; to analyze whether nutritional status can modify TST results. This cross-sectional observational study included adopted children and immigrants evaluated in the authors' unit between January 2003 and December 2008. Children diagnosed with tuberculosis, or vaccinated with live attenuated virus 2 mo earlier, HIV-infected, chronically ill or under treatment with immunosuppressive agents were excluded. TST was considered as dependent variable. Independent variables were gender, age, geographical origin, BCG scar, nutritional status, immune status and intestinal parasitism. One thousand seventy four children were included; 69.6 % were girls. There was a BCG scar in 79 % of children. Mantoux = 0 mm was found in 84.4 %, Nutrition (McLaren's classification) was normal (≥90 %) in 26.7 % of the subjects, with mild malnutrition (80-89 %) in 36 %, moderate (70-79 %) in 23.2 % and severe (≤69 %) in 14.1 %. There was no difference in TST results among different nutritional status children. The nutritional status, measured by McLaren's classification, does not changes the results of TST. McLaren's classification only grades protein-caloric malnutrition, so in authors' experience this type of malnutrition does not interfere with TST results. Implementing other nutritional parameters could help to determine whether nutritional status should be taken into account when interpreting TST results.

  14. Assessment of nutritional status of children under five years of age, pregnant women, and lactating women living in relief camps after the tsunami in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatissa, Renuka; Bekele, Aberra; Piyasena, C L; Mahamithawa, S

    2006-06-01

    A strong earthquake that hit Aceh on December 26, 2004, triggered a powerful tsunami, resulting in an unprecedented catastrophe in Sri Lanka. The initial phase of the disaster was marked by limited access to food coupled with an inadequate supply of safe water and poor environmental hygiene and sanitation, all of which placed children at increased risk for undernutrition. To assess the nutritional status of children under five years of age, pregnant women, and lactating women residing in 40 relief camps after the tsunami. A cross-sectional, 30-cluster study was performed. Thirty children under five from each cluster (camp) and all pregnant and lactating women in selected camps were studied. Data were collected by interviews with the primary caregivers of the children, interviews with key informants in the camps, direct observation, and focus group discussions with mothers. Weight, height, or length was measured on children and pregnant women. Mid-upper-arm circumference of lactating women was measured. A total of 878 children were assessed, of whom 16.1%, 20.2%, and 34.7% were wasted, stunted, and underweight, respectively. The prevalence of each indicator was higher in boys than in girls. During the 2 weeks before the survey, 69.5% of the children had acute respiratory tract infections and 17.9% had diarrhea. Although the general food distribution was well in place, the food supply lacked diversity, and 70.9% of the children did not get appropriate supplementary food. The prevalence of undernutrition among pregnant women (n = 168) was 37%. Thirty-one percent of lactating women (n = 97) were underweight, and 20% were overweight. The prevalence of both acute and chronic undernutrition among children in the camps is significantly higher than the national Sri Lankan average. There is a need to establish nutritional surveillance systems to monitor the nutritional status of displaced and nondisplaced children and mothers.

  15. The nutritional status and factors contributing to malnutrition in children with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczyk, E; Wejnarska, K; Dadalski, M; Kierkus, J; Ryzko, J; Oracz, G

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of malnutrition among children with chronic pancreatitis (CP). Furthermore, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between etiological factors of CP, its clinical characteristics, and the severity of malnutrition. The study included 208 children with CP (113 girls and 95 boys; mean age: 10.8 years, range: 1.6-18 years), hospitalized at our center between 1988 and 2012. The severity of malnutrition was graded on the basis of Cole's ratios, and its prevalence was analyzed according to the etiological factors of pancreatitis. Moreover, the analysis of discrimination was performed to identify the factors contributing to malnutrition among the following variables: age at CP onset, duration of CP, number of CP exacerbations, the number of ERCPs performed, the grade of pancreatic damage documented on imaging, co-occurrence of diabetes, and the results of 72-h fecal fat quantification. We documented features of malnutrition in 52 (25%) children with CP, including 36 (17.3%) patients with moderate malnutrition, and 2 (0.96%) with severe malnutrition. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of malnutrition between groups of patients with various etiological factors of chronic pancreatitis. The age at CP onset showed the best discrimination ability of malnourished patients: the mean age at disease onset in a subgroup of malnourished children was significantly higher than in children with Cole's index >85%. A considerable percentage of children with CP can suffer from clinically significant malnutrition. Later age at CP onset predisposes to development of malnutrition. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Child Mortality as Predicted by Nutritional Status and Recent Weight Velocity in Children under Two in Rural Africa.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    WHO has released prescriptive child growth standards for, among others, BMI-for-age (BMI-FA), mid-upper arm circumference-for-age, and weight velocity. The ability of these indices to predict child mortality remains understudied, although growth velocity prognostic value underlies current growth monitoring programs. The study aims were first to assess, in children under 2, the independent and combined ability of these indices and of stunting to predict all-cause mortality within 3 mo, and second, the comparative abilities of weight-for-length (WFL) and BMI-FA to predict short-term (<3 mo) mortality. We used anthropometry and survival data from 2402 children aged between 0 and 24 mo in a rural area of the Democratic Republic of Congo with high malnutrition and mortality rates and limited nutritional rehabilitation. Analyses used Cox proportional hazard models and receiver operating characteristic curves. Univariate analysis and age-adjusted analysis showed predictive ability of all indices. Multivariate analysis without age adjustment showed that only very low weight velocity [HR = 3.82 (95%CI = 1.91, 7.63); P < 0.001] was independently predictive. With age adjustment, very low weight velocity [HR = 3.61 (95%CI = 1.80, 7.25); P < 0.001] was again solely retained as an independent predictor. There was no evidence for a difference in predictive ability between WFL and BMI-FA. This paper shows the value of attained BMI-FA, a marker of wasting status, and recent weight velocity, a marker of the wasting process, in predicting child death using the WHO child growth standards. WFL and BMI-FA appear equivalent as predictors.

  17. Nutritional status and growth of children on macrobiotic diets : a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dagnelie, P.C.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis reports on the relationship between diet, growth, blood chemistry, psychomotor development, and clinical findings in the Dutch population of children on macrobiotic diets.- The macrobiotic diet mainly consisted of cereals, pulses and vegetables with small additions of seaweeds,

  18. Association between nutritional status, C-reactive protein, adiponectin and HOMA-AD in Brazilian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Domingos, Ana Luiza; Luiz Lins Machado-Coelho, George; Pinheiro Volp, Ana Carolina; Luiz Pereira de Oliveira, Fernando; Santana Caldas, Ivo; Nascimento de Freitas, Silvia

    2014-07-01

    In children, the presence of obesity is a major risk factor for the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases on the adulthood. To evaluate the association of anthropometry, body composition, clinical variables and biochemical profile with C-reactive protein and adiponectin levels, and insulin resistance in children in the municipality of Nova Era, Brazil. Nested case-control study following a crosssectional study. We evaluated 178 children, 57 of them classified as obese and 121 as normal-weight from a population of 1024 schoolchildren 6 to 10 years old: Blood samples were collected after 12-hour fast to obtain serum and plasma. We collected anthropometric and body composition measures, systolic and diastolic blood pressure data. Sexual maturation was assessed according to the stage of sexual development. We performed Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, Pearson's correlation, Spearman's test and multiple linear regression analysis. Independent variables with p body fat percentage estimated by skinfold thickness (R2 adjusted = 27.6%, p body fat percentage estimated by skinfold thickness (R2 adjusted = 75.5%, p body composition, anthropometry, clinical variables, biochemical profile and adiponectin and C-reactive protein levels and insulin resistance in obese and normal-weight children. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  19. Nutritional Status of Children Aged 6 to 59 Months in Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community Based Education and Service (COBES) centres are annually used by Moi University College of Health Sciences for community diagnosis of various health problems including malnutrition. The objective was to determine the prevalence of malnutrition in children aged 5 to 59 months in selected COBES health ...

  20. Nutritional assessment of children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Terezie Tolar; Barr, Ronald D; Pencharz, Paul B

    2009-01-01

    Regardless of which parts of the world they live in, most children will develop and grow at a similar rate if proper nutrition is ensured. Children from developing countries are at risk for primary malnutrition. Children undergoing anticancer therapy are at higher risk for secondary malnutrition, including obesity and growth retardation. Periodic nutritional assessments are important for planning effective dietary interventions for such children. In this review, we describe malnutrition as it occurs in children with cancer and various ways of assessing the nutritional status of these children, depending on the availability of resources in their local hospitals. Objective and subjective data should be used to complete the nutritional assessment. We discuss screening methods, including the use of subjective global assessment. Different parts of nutritional assessment include medical history; physical examination; biochemical and hematological data, such as visceral proteins, blood glucose levels, and lipid profiles, hemoglobin and hematocrit, and the lymphocyte count; anthropometric measurements; and food and nutrition history. We review medical tests and procedures to determine nutritional status, including nitrogen balance, delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity, prognostic nutritional index, creatinine height index, maldigestion and malabsorption tests, indirect calorimetry, and dual energy X ray absorptiometry (DXA scan). Evaluation and interpretation of data and estimation of nutritional risk are discussed, including proper techniques and use of anthropometric measures, selection and use of growth charts, calculation of caloric and protein needs, and the percentage of calories ingested. These methods will enable local health care providers to accurately assess the nutritional status of children with cancer, identify children at risk, and plan adequate nutritional interventions.

  1. Impact of intermittent preventive anti-malarial treatment on the growth and nutritional status of preschool children in rural Senegal (west Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntab, Balthazar; Cissé, Badara; Boulanger, Denis; Sokhna, Cheikh; Targett, Geoffrey; Lines, Jo; Alexander, Neal; Trape, Jean-François; Simondon, François; Greenwood, Brian M; Simondon, Kirsten B

    2007-09-01

    Negative consequences of malaria might account for seasonality in nutritional status in children in the Sahel. We report the impact of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of seasonal intermittent preventive anti-malarial treatment on growth and nutritional status in 1,063 Senegalese preschool children. A combination of artesunate and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine was given monthly from September to November. In the intervention arm, mean weight gain was significantly greater (122.9 +/- 340 versus 42.9 +/- 344 [SD] g/mo, P < 0.0001) and losses in triceps and subscapular skinfold measurements were less (-0.39 +/- 1.01 versus -0.66 +/- 1.01 mm/mo, and -0.15 +/- 0.64 versus -0.36 +/- 0.62 mm/mo, respectively, P < 0.0001 for both). There was no difference in height increments. The prevalence of wasting increased significantly in the control arm (4.6% before versus 9.5% after, P < 0.0001), but remained constant in intervention children: 5.6% versus 7.0% (P = 0.62). The prevention of malaria would improve child nutritional status in areas with seasonal transmission.

  2. The effect of preoperative nutritional status on postoperative outcomes in children undergoing surgery for congenital heart defects in San Francisco (UCSF) and Guatemala City (UNICAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radman, Monique; Mack, Ricardo; Barnoya, Joaquin; Castañeda, Aldo; Rosales, Monica; Azakie, Anthony; Mehta, Nilesh; Keller, Roberta; Datar, Sanjeev; Oishi, Peter; Fineman, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the association between preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcomes in children undergoing surgery for congenital heart defects (CHD). Seventy-one patients with CHD were enrolled in a prospective, 2-center cohort study. We adjusted for baseline risk differences using a standardized risk adjustment score for surgery for CHD. We assigned a World Health Organization z score for each subject's preoperative triceps skin-fold measurement, an assessment of total body fat mass. We obtained preoperative plasma concentrations of markers of nutritional status (prealbumin, albumin) and myocardial stress (B-type natriuretic peptide [BNP]). Associations between indices of preoperative nutritional status and clinical outcomes were sought. Subjects had a median (interquartile range [IQR]) age of 10.2 (33) months. In the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) cohort, duration of mechanical ventilation (median, 19 hours; IQR, 29 hours), length of intensive care unit stay (median, 5 days; IQR 5 days), duration of any continuous inotropic infusion (median, 66 hours; IQR 72 hours), and preoperative BNP levels (median, 30 pg/mL; IQR, 75 pg/mL) were associated with a lower preoperative triceps skin-fold z score (P nutritional status decrease, supporting the hypothesis that malnourishment is associated with decreased myocardial function. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nutritional status of children and adolescents based on body mass index: agreement between World Health Organization and International Obesity Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazzotto, Timothy Gustavo; Brasil, Marcos Roberto; Oliveira, Vinicius Machado; da Silva, Schelyne Ribas; Ronque, Enio Ricardo V; Queiroga, Marcos Roberto; Serassuelo Junior, Helio

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the agreement between two international criteria for classification of children and adolescents nutritional status. The study included 778 girls and 863 boys aged from six to 13 years old. Body mass and height were measured and used to calculate the body mass index. Nutritional status was classified according to the cut-off points defined by the World Health Organization and the International Obesity Task Force. The agreement was evaluated using Kappa statistic and weighted Kappa. In order to classify the nutritional status, the agreement between the criteria was higher for the boys (Kappa 0.77) compared to girls (Kappa 0.61). The weighted Kappa was also higher for boys (0.85) in comparison to girls (0.77). Kappa index varied according to age. When the nutritional status was classified in only two categories--appropriate (thinness + accentuated thinness + eutrophy) and overweight (overweight + obesity + severe obesity)--, the Kappa index presented higher values than those related to the classification in six categories. A substantial agreement was observed between the criteria, being higher in males and varying according to the age.

  4. Immunologic outcomes of antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected Nigerian children and its association with early infant feeding and nutritional status at treatment initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoni, Adetayo O; Christian, Parul S; Sadoh, Wilson E; Okechukwu, Adaora; Olateju, Eyinade; Omoigberale, Austin; Blattner, William; Charurat, Man E

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate immunologic response to antiretroviral treatment (ART) among HIV-infected Nigerian children (nutritional status at treatment initiation. Mixed prospective and retrospective cohort study. One hundred fifty HIV-infected children were followed for 12 months from initiation of ART. CD4 count/CD4% was assessed at baseline and every 4-6 months. Nutritional status was assessed by height-for-age, weight-for-age and weight-for-height Z scores using the 2006 World Health Organization growth reference. Children were classified into 4 feeding groups--exclusively breast-fed, predominantly breast-fed, mixed fed and exclusively formula fed. Logistic regression was used to model odds of failure to reach CD4% of ≥ 25% at the 12-month follow-up. Linear random effects models were used to model the longitudinal change in CD4%. There was a significant increase in CD4% for all children from 13.8% at baseline to 28.5% after 12 months (ΔCD4% = 14.7%, 95% confidence interval: 12.1%-17.4%). There was no association of feeding pattern with immunologic outcomes. In adjusted analyses, children who were underweight (weight-for-age nutritional status and CD4% were independently associated with failure to reach CD4% ≥ 25% at 12 months among HIV-infected Nigerian children on ART. These results emphasize the importance of early screening and initiation of ART among children in resource-poor settings before malnutrition and severe immunosuppression sets in.

  5. DIETARY AND NUTRITION SCREENING FOR CHILDREN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RopSvr

    Since growth monitoring records form the basis of diet and nutrition education and counseling, this lack of communication greatly undermines the objective of keeping growth records. Without their appropriate use, care-givers will be left unaware of both the children's nutritional status and appropriate dietary interventions.

  6. Nutrition in children posttransplantation | Goddard | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrition support is a vitally important issue in the pretransplantation period. Once a child has been assessed and placed on a list for transplantation the child must see a dietitian to optimise the child's nutritional status as this is vital to improve the outcome at surgery. Children with chronic liver disease who are candidates for ...

  7. Food and nutrition insecurity in northern Benin : impact on growth performance of children and on year to year nutritional status of adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ategbo, E.A.D.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the consequences of a substantial nutritional stress, created by an unimodal climate on the energy balance of adults and on children's growth. Coping strategies of adults, at an individual level, with the seasonal fluctuations in food availability

  8. Association between household food access insecurity and nutritional status indicators among children aged <5 years in Nepal: results from a national, cross-sectional household survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T; Ramakrishnareddy, N; Subramaniam, Mayoori

    2015-11-01

    To examine the association between household food insecurity score and Z-scores of childhood nutritional status indicators. Population-based, cross-sectional survey, Nepal Demographic and Health Survey 2011. A nationally representative sample of 11 085 households selected by a two-stage, stratified cluster sampling design to interview eligible men and women. Children (n 2591) aged 0-60 months in a sub-sample of households selected for men's interview. Prevalence of moderate and severe household food insecurity was 23·2% and 19·0%, respectively, for children aged 0-60 months. Weighted prevalence rates for stunting (height-for-age Z-score (HAZ) underweight (weight-for-age Z-score (WAZ) underweight by level of household food insecurity were statistically significant (Punderweight. Community nutrition interventions may use household food insecurity scales for identifying those households where children may be at risk of growth faltering.

  9. Effect of Pre-treatment Nutritional Status, Folate and Vitamin B12 Levels on Induction Chemotherapy in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Sneha; Moulik, Nirmalya Roy; Kumar, Archana; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate pre-treatment undernutrition, and folate and B12 deficiency in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and their correlation with complications and outcome of induction chemotherapy. Observational study. Tertiary care teaching hospital in Northern India. 50 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Children were assessed for nutritional status (Weight for age Z-score, serum albumin, folate and B12) at presentation, and were followed-up during induction for bone marrow response, counts and outcome. Folate and B12 were repeated twice at monthly intervals after induction. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done to determine the association of nutritional parameters with the outcome variables. Baseline undernutrition was observed in 66%, hypo-albuminemia in 32.6%, folate deficiency in 41.3% and B12 deficiency in 36.9% of included children. Significant decline in folate levels was noted on serial assays during chemotherapy (P=0.001). Folate deficient children had higher risk for delayed marrow recovery and counts on day 14 (P=0.007 and P=0.001). Hypoalbuminemia (P=0.04), B12 deficiency (P=0.001) and folate (P=0.03) deficiency were associated with toxic deaths during induction. Baseline nutritional deficiencies negatively influence the outcome and occurrence of complications during induction chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  10. Nutritional status and association of overweight with gender and age in children and adolescents. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n1p29

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleverton Krinski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional status and the association of excess body weight (EBW with gender and age among children and adolescents from the town of Vilhena, Rondonia, Brazil. A total of 5,883 students, including children (6 to 11 years and adolescents (12 to 17 years, from public schools participated in the study. Body weight and height were measured and the body mass index was calculated for subsequent classification of nutritional status. The t-test was used for comparison between genders and the chi-square test and Poisson regression were used to evaluate the association between EBW, gender, and age. Data were analyzed withthe SPSS 11.0 program at a level of significance of p < 0.05. The prevalence of EBW was 19.3% among children and 17.4% among adolescents. EBW was significantly associated with gender and age among children. In addition, the prevalence of EBW was higher among girls (PR = 1.81, 95% CI 1.49 to 2.21 than among boys. Adolescent girls also presented a higher prevalence of EBW than boys (PR = 1.81, 95% CI 1.49 to 2.21. The prevalence of EBW increased linearlyin children (6 to 11 years and decreased in adolescents (15 to 17 years. These results suggest that the prevalence of overweight is high among children and adolescents from northern Brazil.

  11. Aging, Nutritional Status and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma Leslie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The older population is increasing worldwide and in many countries older people will outnumber younger people in the near future. This projected growth in the older population has the potential to place significant burdens on healthcare and support services. Meeting the diet and nutrition needs of older people is therefore crucial for the maintenance of health, functional independence and quality of life. While many older adults remain healthy and eat well those in poorer health may experience difficulties in meeting their nutritional needs. Malnutrition, encompassing both under and over nutrition increases health risks in the older population. More recently the increase in obesity, and in turn the incidence of chronic disease in older adults, now justifies weight management interventions in obese older adults. This growing population group is becoming increasingly diverse in their nutritional requirements. Micro-nutrient status may fluctuate and shortfalls in vitamin D, iron and a number of other nutrients are relatively common and can impact on well-being and quality of life. Aging presents a number of challenges for the maintenance of good nutritional health in older adults.

  12. Nutrition in children posttransplantation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    decreases infectious complications and shortens ventilation time. Parenteral nutrition ... cholestasis and poor intake. Cholestasis leads to malabsorption of fat soluble vitamins. Managing malnutrition in children in with end stage liver disease is a challenge. ... including additional vitamin D as needed together with folic acid,.

  13. Nutritional status and height, weight and BMI centiles of school-aged children and adolescents of 6-18-years from Kinshasa (DRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhendwa, Rudahaba Augustin; Roelants, Mathieu; Thomis, Martine; Nkiama, Constant E

    2017-09-01

    The last study to establish centiles of main anthropometric measurements in Kinshasa was conducted over 60 years ago, which questions its current adequacy to describe or monitor growth in this population. To assess the nutritional status of school-aged children and adolescents and to estimate centile curves of height, weight and body mass index (BMI). A representative sample of 7541 school-aged children and adolescents (48% boys) aged 6-18 years was measured between 2010-2013. Smooth centiles of height, weight and BMI-for-age were estimated with the LMS method and compared with the WHO 2007 reference. Nutritional status was assessed by comparing measurements of height and BMI against the appropriate WHO cut-offs. Compared to the WHO reference, percentiles of height and BMI were generally lower. This difference was larger in boys than in girls and increased as they approached adolescence. The prevalence of short stature ( 1 SD) was higher in girls (8.6%) than in boys (4.5%). Children from Kinshasa fall below WHO centile references. This study established up-to-date centile curves for height, weight and BMI by age in children and adolescents. These reference curves describe the current status of these anthropometric markers and can be used as a basis for comparison in future studies.

  14. Iodine nutritional status in Asturian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riestra Fernández, María; Menéndez Torre, Edelmiro; Díaz Cadórniga, Francisco; Fernández Fernández, Juan Carlos; Delgado Álvarez, Elías

    2017-11-01

    Iodine deficiency is a public health problem, and iodine nutritional status should therefore be regularly measured. To ascertain iodine nutritional status in Asturias and its relation to use of iodized salt and to other sociodemographic and nutritional parameters. A descriptive, observational study was conducted in a random sample of schoolchildren aged 5 to 14 years, in whom urinary iodine levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Families completed a survey on use of iodized salt, consumption of dairy products and fish, and sociodemographic data. The study sample consisted of 705 schoolchildren (51.1% females) with a mean age of 9.9 years (SD 2.6). In a total of 620 valid measurements, mean urinary iodine level was 204.1 μg/L (SD 120.6), while the median value was 180.7 μg/L (P25-P75: 124-252.3 μg/L, interquartile range 128.3 μg/L). Urinary iodine levels were <100 μg/L in 16.6% of children, and very low (<20 μg/L) in 0.2%. Iodized salt was used in 69.3% of all households, and in all school canteens. Consumption of dairy products was significantly associated to urinary iodine levels (P<.0005). Iodine nutrition of Asturian schoolchildren is adequate, although the target of use of iodized salt in 90% of households is still far away. Adequate iodine nutrition may be due to other sources, such as dairy products. Public health campaigns are required to promote iodized salt consumption. Regular assessment of iodine nutritional status is also needed. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of Nutritional Status between Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Typically Developing Children in the Mediterranean Region (Valencia, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marí-Bauset, Salvador; Llopis-González, Agustín; Zazpe, Itziar; Marí-Sanchis, Amelia; Morales Suárez-Varela, Maria

    2017-01-01

    This case-control study investigated nutrient intake, healthy eating index with 10 items on foods and nutrients, on 3-day food diaries and anthropometric measurements in 105 children with autism spectrum disorder and 495 typically developing children (6-9 years) in Valencia (Spain). Children with autism spectrum disorder were at a higher risk for…

  16. Longitudinal cohort protocol study of oropharyngeal dysphagia: relationships to gross motor attainment, growth and nutritional status in preschool children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfer, Katherine A; Weir, Kelly A; Bell, Kristie L; Ware, Robert S; Davies, Peter S W; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OPD) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is estimated to be between 19% and 99%. OPD can impact on children's growth, nutrition and overall health. Despite the growing recognition of the extent and significance of health issues relating to OPD in children with CP, lack of knowledge of its profile in this subpopulation remains. This study aims to investigate the relationship between OPD, attainment of gross motor skills, growth and nutritional status in young children with CP at and between two crucial age points, 18–24 and 36 months, corrected age. Methods and analysis This prospective longitudinal population-based study aims to recruit a total of 200 children with CP born in Queensland, Australia between 1 September 2006 and 31 December 2009 (60 per birth-year). Outcomes include clinically assessed OPD (Schedule for Oral Motor Assessment, Dysphagia Disorders Survey, Pre-Speech Assessment Scale, signs suggestive of pharyngeal phase impairment, Thomas-Stonell and Greenberg Saliva Severity Scale), parent-reported OPD on a feeding questionnaire, gross motor skills (Gross Motor Function Measure, Gross Motor Function Classification System and motor type), growth and nutritional status (linear growth and body composition) and dietary intake (3 day food record). The strength of relationship between outcome and exposure variables will be analysed using regression modelling with ORs and relative risk ratios. Ethics and dissemination This protocol describes a study that provides the first large population-based study of OPD in a representative sample of preschool children with CP, using direct clinical assessment. Ethics has been obtained through the University of Queensland Medical Research Ethics Committee, the Children's Health Services District Ethics Committee, and at other regional and organisational ethics committees. Results are planned to be disseminated in six papers submitted to peer reviewed journals

  17. Nutritional Status Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Middle-School Children in the City of Montes Claros - Mg, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz Igor Raineh Durães

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the association between nutritional status and prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS in middle-school students in the city of Montes Claros - MG. The sample consisted of 382 students, aged 10-16 years. Nutritional status was evaluated using the Body Mass Index (BMI. Metabolic syndrome (MS was defined as the presence of two or more criteria in accordance with definition of the International Diabetes Federation. The overall prevalence of MS was 7.9%. 9.7% of students with MS were overweight and 72.4% were obese. Therefore, it can be inferred that carrying excess weight considerably increases the chances for a child to develop MS, and concomitantly increases the child’s risk for developing cardiovascular disease.

  18. [Evaluation of nut