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Sample records for childhood unintentional injuries what

  1. Prevention of unintentional childhood injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurer, Wesley M; Bhavsar, Amit K

    2013-04-01

    Unintentional injury accounts for 40 percent of childhood deaths annually, most commonly from motor vehicle crashes. The proper use of child restraints is the most effective strategy to prevent injury or death. Motor vehicle restraint guidelines have recently been revised to an age-based system that delays the progression in type of restraint for most children. Strategies to prevent suffocation in children include using appropriate bedding, positioning babies on their backs to sleep, and removing items from the sleep and play environment that could potentially entrap or entangle the child. Fencing that isolates a swimming pool from the yard and surrounding area and "touch" adult supervision (i.e., an adult is in the water and able to reach and grab a child) have been shown to be most effective in preventing drownings. Swimming lessons are recommended for children older than four years. Poison prevention programs have been shown to improve prevention behavior among caregivers, but may not decrease poisoning incidence. Syrup of ipecac is not recommended. Smoke detector maintenance, a home escape plan, and educating children about how to respond during a fire emergency are effective strategies for preventing fire injuries or death. Fall injuries may be reduced by not using walkers for infants and toddlers or bunk beds for children six years and younger. Consistent helmet use while bicycling reduces head and brain injuries. Although direct counseling by physicians appears to improve some parental safety behaviors, its effect on reducing childhood injuries is uncertain. Community-based interventions can be effective in high-risk populations.

  2. Predictors of unintentional childhood injuries seen at the Accident ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-12-12

    Dec 12, 2015 ... Background: Unintentional childhood injuries pose a major health challenge especially in developing countries. Aim: This study sought to determine the predictors of unintentional childhood injuries in the three tertiary health centres studied. Methods: The study was a cross- sectional study. Socio-.

  3. Understanding unintentional childhood home injuries: pilot surveillance data from Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Nukhba; Khan, Uzma R; Razzak, Junaid A; Puvanachandra, Prasanthi; Hyder, Adnan A

    2012-01-19

    Childhood injuries, an important public health issue, globally affects more than 95% of children living in low-and middle-income countries. The objective of this study is to describe the epidemiology of childhood unintentional injuries in Karachi, Pakistan with a specific focus on those occurring within the home environment. This was a secondary analysis of a childhood unintentional injury surveillance database setup in the emergency department of the Aga Khan Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan for 3 months. The data was collected by interviewing caretakers of children under 12 years of age presenting with an unintentional injury to the emergency departments of the four major tertiary care hospitals of Karachi, Pakistan. The surveillance included 566 injured children of which 409 (72%) injuries had taken place at/around home. Of 409 children, 66% were males and mostly between 5 and 11 years of age. Injuries commonly occurred during play time (51%). Fall (59%), dog bites (11%) and burns (9%) were the commonest mechanisms of injury. The majority of the children (78%) were directly discharged from the emergency room with predicted short term disability (42%). There were 2 deaths in the emergency department both due to falls. Childhood injury surveillance system provides valuable in-depth information on child injuries. The majority of these unintentional childhood injuries occur at home; with falls, dog bites and burns being the most common types of unintentional childhood home injuries. Specific surveillance systems for child injuries can provide new and valuable information for countries like Pakistan.

  4. Smoking and medication during pregnancy predict repeated unintentional injuries in early childhood but not single unintentional injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junger, Marianne; Japel, C.; Cote, S.; Xu, Q.; Boivin, M.; Tremblay, R.E.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates prospectively the development of single and repeated unintentional injuries from birth to 42 months in a random population sample of new-born children in Quebec (Canada) (N = 1,770). The outcome measures are single unintentional injuries (SUI) and repeated unintentional

  5. Childhood unintentional injuries: Supervision and first aid provided

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel Jonkheijm

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The aim of this study was to investigate the circumstances surrounding unintentional injuries of children and the appropriateness of the first aid provided by caregivers. Materials and Methods : This prospective study included children with aged range 0-12 years, who presented with an unintentional injury at the Trauma Unit of a hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, over a 3 month period. Caregivers were interviewed about the circumstances of the injury and the first aid provided. Experts classified the first aid as appropriate, appropriate but incomplete, or inappropriate. Results: A total of 313 children were included with a median age of 3.75 years. The most common causes of injury were falls (39.6%, n = 124, burns (23.9%, n = 75 and motor vehicle crashes (10.5%, n = 33. More than a quarter of the children (27.2%, n = 81 had been left under the supervision of another child below the age of 12. When the injury occurred, 7.1% (n = 22 of the children were unattended. First aid was provided in 43.1% (n = 134 of the cases. More than half of these interventions (53%, n = 72 were inappropriate or appropriate but incomplete. Conclusions: Especially young children are at risk for unintentional injuries. Lack of appropriate supervision increases this risk. Prevention education of parents and children may help to protect children from injuries. First-aid training should also be more accessible to civilians as both the providing of as well as the quality of first-aid provided lacked in the majority of cases.

  6. Childhood unintentional injuries: supervision and first aid provided.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkheijm, Annabel; Zuidgeest, Jenny Johanna Hendrijntje; van Dijk, Monique; van As, Arjan Bastiaan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the circumstances surrounding unintentional injuries of children and the appropriateness of the first aid provided by caregivers. This prospective study included children with aged range 0-12 years, who presented with an unintentional injury at the Trauma Unit of a hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, over a 3 month period. Caregivers were interviewed about the circumstances of the injury and the first aid provided. Experts classified the first aid as appropriate, appropriate but incomplete, or inappropriate. A total of 313 children were included with a median age of 3.75 years. The most common causes of injury were falls (39.6%, n = 124), burns (23.9%, n = 75) and motor vehicle crashes (10.5%, n = 33). More than a quarter of the children (27.2%, n = 81) had been left under the supervision of another child below the age of 12. When the injury occurred, 7.1% (n = 22) of the children were unattended. First aid was provided in 43.1% (n = 134) of the cases. More than half of these interventions (53%, n = 72) were inappropriate or appropriate but incomplete. Especially young children are at risk for unintentional injuries. Lack of appropriate supervision increases this risk. Prevention education of parents and children may help to protect children from injuries. First-aid training should also be more accessible to civilians as both the providing of as well as the quality of first-aid provided lacked in the majority of cases.

  7. Childhood bruising distribution observed from eight mechanisms of unintentional injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibberd, Owen; Nuttall, Diane; Watson, Rhiannon E; Watkins, William J; Kemp, Alison Mary; Maguire, Sabine

    2017-12-01

    To inform the assessment of described mechanisms of bruising in children. Prospective cross-sectional study. The emergency department, and children in the local community. Children aged 0-13 years with bruises from unintentional injuries. bleeding disorder, medication affecting coagulation or child protection concerns. Injury incidents were categorised into one of eight causal mechanisms (fall fromsports or motor vehicle collision). Location, number and mechanism of bruising for each injury mechanism. 372 children had 559 injury incidents, resulting in 693 bruises; 85.2% of children were walking independently, with impact injuries and fall from standing height (including hitting an object) being the predominant mechanisms. A single bruise was observed in 81.7% of all incidents. Stair falls resulted in ≥3 bruises only with falls involving ≥10 steps (6/16). Bruising was rarely observed on the buttocks, upper arm, back of legs or feet. No bruises were seen in this dataset on ears, neck or genitalia. Petechial bruising was only noted in 1/293 unintentional incidents, involving a high-impact injury in a school-aged child. These findings have the potential to aid an assessment of the plausibility of the explanation given for a child with bruising. Certain bruise distributions were rarely observed, namely multiple bruises from a single mechanism, petechiae and bruising to the ears, neck or genitalia. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Unintentional Childhood Injuries in Urban and Rural Ujjain, India: A Community-Based Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Mathur

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Injuries are a major global public health problem. There are very few community-based studies on childhood injury from India. The objective of this cross-sectional, community-based survey was to identify the incidence, type, and risk factors of unintentional childhood injuries. The study was done in seven villages and ten contiguous urban slums in Ujjain, India. World Health Organization (WHO tested tools and definitions were used for the survey, which included 2518 households having 6308 children up to 18 years of age, with 2907 children from urban households and 3401 from rural households. The annual incidence of all injuries was 16.6%, 95% Confidence Interval 15.7–17.5%, (n = 1049. The incidence was significantly higher among boys compared to girls (20.2% versus 12.7%, respectively, was highest in age group 6–10 years of age (18.9%, and in urban locations (17.5%. The most commonly identified injury types were: physical injuries (71%, burns (16%, poisonings (10%, agriculture-related injuries (2%, near drowning (2%, and suffocations (2%. The most common place of injury was streets followed by home. The study identified incidence of different types of unintentional childhood injuries and factors associated with increased risk of unintentional injuries. The results can help in designing injury prevention strategies and awareness programs in similar settings.

  9. Pattern and severity of childhood unintentional injuries in Ismailia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opperwjj

    The resulting data should encourage interventional ... child injury, there are proven ways to reduce both the likelihood and severity of injury – yet awareness of the problem and its preventability, as ... the South African Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital injury surveillance study instrument, and previous work done.

  10. Influence of sociodemographic factors on the risk of unintentional childhood home injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bjarne; Nielsen, Jeppe W

    2008-01-01

    children for specific injury mechanisms and involved products. METHODS: Information on injuries in 173 504 children treated at emergency departments was recorded for the period 1998-2003. The information was linked to data including parents' education and income and family type, and the results were...... compared with those for a random sample of the population. RESULTS: A total of 50 561 injuries were analysed. The risk was 1.5 (1.5-1.6) for children with mothers having only primary education compared to tertiary education, and 1.5 (1.4-1.6) for children in families with the lowest vs. the highest income......BACKGROUND: While social differences in childhood injuries are recognized, less is known about how social and demographic differences relate to injury mechanism. The purpose of the study was to reveal how sociodemographic factors affect the incidence of unintentional home injuries in Danish...

  11. Epidemiology of unintentional injuries in childhood: a population-based survey in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otters, H.; Schellevis, F.G.; Damen, J.; Wouden, J.C. van der; Suijlekom-Smit, L.W.A.; Koes, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the incidence of unintentional injuries presented in general practice, and to identify children at risk from experiencing an unintentional injury. We used the data of all 0–17-yearold children from a representative survey in 96 Dutch general practices in 2001. We computed

  12. Population-Based Study of Unintentional Injury Incidence and Impact during Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivara, Frederick P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Medically treated unintentional injuries of children and adolescents were studied for one year in the clinic and the emergency room of a health maintenance organization. The highest rates of injury resulted from falls, recreational activities, and competitive sports. Restricted activity was needed for 55.9 per cent of the injuries. (VM)

  13. Unintentional childhood injury patterns, odds, and outcomes in Kampala City: an analysis of surveillance data from the National Pediatric Emergency Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutto, Milton; Lawoko, Stephen; Nansamba, Catherine; Ovuga, Emilio; Svanstrom, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Unintentional Childhood Injuries pose a major public health challenge in Africa and Uganda. Previous estimates of the problem may have underestimated the childhood problem. We set to determine unintentional childhood injury pattern, odds, and outcomes at the National Paediatric Emergency unit in Kampala city using surveillance data. Incident proportions, odds and proportional rates were calculated and used to determine unintentional injury patterns across childhood (1-12 years). A total of 556 cases recorded between January and May 2008 were analyzed: majority had been transported to hospital by mothers using mini-buses, private cars, and motorcycles. Median distance from injury location to hospital was 5 km. Homes, roads, and schools were leading injury locations. Males constituted 60% of the cases. Play and daily living activities were commonest injury time activities. Falls, burns and traffic accounted for 70.5% of unintentional childhood injuries. Burns, open wounds, fractures were commonest injury types. Motorcycles, buses and passenger-cars caused most crashes. Play grounds, furniture, stairs and trees were commonest source of falls. Most burn injuries were caused by liquids, fires and hot objects. 43.8% of cases were admitted. 30% were discharged without disability; 10%, were disabled; 1%, died. Injury odds and proportional incidence rates varied with age, place and cause. Poisoning and drowning were rare. Local pediatric injury priorities should include home, road and school safety. Unintentional injuries are common causes of hospital visit by children under 13 years especially boys. Homes, roads and educational facilities are commonest unintentional injury sites. Significant age and gender differences exist in intentional injury causation, characteristics and outcomes. In its current form, our surveillance system seems inefficient in capturing poisoning and drowning. The local prevention priorities could include home, road and school safety; especially

  14. Health promotion in childhood and young adolescence for prevention of unintentional injuries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Towner, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    "The aim of this publication is to critically review th world literature to provide information about the most effective forms of health promotion interventions in reducing childhood and adolescent (0-14 years...

  15. Uk Armed Forces unintentional firearm injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, T; Rushforth, G

    2009-03-01

    To report on the incidence of unintentional firearm discharge and injury across the UK Armed Forces and present several cases of this wounding phenomenon. Munitions Incidents and Defects (MID) Cell data on UK Military Negligent Discharges and unintentional firearm injuries from 01 Jan 03 to 31 Dec 07 was categorised according to cause of injury, wound, service affiliation, incident context and weapon type. The injuries of three patients are described. Over the 5 year period there were 1158 Unintentional firearm discharges, forty three (4%) of which resulted in injury. Fifty five military personnel sustained unintentional firearm injuries during the review period, more than half of which were gunshot wounds and this included one fatality. The Regular Army suffers an average of 7.7 unintentional firearm injuries per 100 000 Regular Army person years. Unintentional firearm injury is well recognised across the civilian and police sectors worldwide. Despite the recent tempo of high grade training and operations that currently engage UK Armed Forces this form of injury remains uncommon. We hope to facilitate discussion with the chain of command to manage the risk of these injuries.

  16. Prevention of unintentional injuries in early childhood: Using an E-health4Uth home safety intervention to promote parents’ child safety behaviours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E.J. van Scholing-van Beelen (Mirjam)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEvery day around the world the lives of more than two thousand families are torn apart by the loss of a child due to an unintentional injury [1]. Such tragedy can change lives irrevocably. It is a major public health problem that requires urgent attention. “Unintentional injury” is

  17. Unintentional Injuries In Children: Are Our Homes Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruque, Ahmad Vaqas; Mateen Khan, Muhammad Arif

    2016-05-01

    Unintentional injuries are a leading cause of death in childhood globally. Injuries lead to emotional trauma and financial burden for children, parents, and society. Here are the frequencies of unintentional injuries in children presented to the emergency and paediatric surgery clinics of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, from January to December 2012. Aretrospective chart review of children aged 0 day to 14 years presented with falls, burns, foreign body ingestion or inhalation, poisoning, fingers caught in doors, electrocution injuries and drowning, was conducted. Atotal of 165 children were included. Domestic injuries were frequently occurring injuries in our set-up which could be prevented by doing small adjustments to make the home safe for children.

  18. Domestic unintentional injury of 1 to 5-year-old children in a rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Childhood unintentional injury, a major public health problem in India, is largely preventable. The aim of this study was to determine the burden and determinants of unintentional injury of 12 to 59 months old child at household level. Method: A community based cross-sectional study was conducted at Singur ...

  19. Pediatric unintentional injury: behavioral risk factors and implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwebel, David C; Gaines, Joanna

    2007-06-01

    Unintentional injury is the leading cause of death for children and adolescents between the ages of 1 and 18 in the United States, accounting for more deaths than the next 20 causes of mortality combined. It is estimated that pediatric injury accounts for more than $50 billion in annual losses from medical care costs, future wages, and quality of life. Despite these numbers, much remains to be learned about the behavioral risks for pediatric unintentional injury. This article reviews behavioral risk factors for pediatric unintentional injury risk, with a particular focus on four broad areas. First, we discuss the effects of demographic risk factors, including gender, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity. Second, we present information about child-specific risk factors, including temperament, personality, psychopathology, and cognitive development. Third, we discuss the influence of parents and other primary caregivers on childhood injury risk, with a particular focus on the effects of supervision and parenting quality and style. Finally, we discuss the role of peers on child injury risk. We conclude with a discussion of the ways in which the material reviewed has been translated into injury prevention techniques, with a focus on how pediatricians might use knowledge about etiological risk to prioritize safety counseling topics. We also present thoughts on four priorities for future research: injury risk in diverse nations and cultures; developmental effects of injury; the influence of multiple risk factors together on injury risk; and translation of knowledge about risk for injury into intervention and prevention techniques.

  20. Socioeconomic differences in injury risks in childhood and adolescence: a nation-wide study of intentional and unintentional injuries in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engström, K; Diderichsen, F; Laflamme, L

    2002-01-01

    registers. Children were divided into four age groups and allocated to four household socioeconomic status groups. Absolute and relative risks were compiled using children of high/intermediate level salaried employees as the comparison group. Four diagnostic groups were considered: fall, traffic......, interpersonal violence, and self inflicted injuries. RESULTS: Injury incidences were relatively low and socioeconomic differences negligible in the 0-4 year olds. Thereafter, significant socioeconomic differences were observed in all diagnostic groups except falls. The highest absolute differences were...... the social pattern of intentional but not that of unintentional injuries. CONCLUSIONS: Socioeconomic differences in injury risks are not necessarily constant over age. Inequalities are particularly high in absolute terms among adolescents 15-19 years old for traffic injuries and in relative terms among 10...

  1. Unintentional Injuries in Preschool Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Ethem; Dursun, Onur Burak; Esin, İbrahim Selcuk; Öğütlü, Hakan; Özcan, Halil; Mutlu, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death among children. Previous research has shown that most of the injuries occur in and around the home. Therefore, parents have a key role in the occurrence and prevention of injuries. In this study, we examined the relationship among home injuries to children and parental attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, parental attitudes, and children's behavioral problems. Forty children who were admitted to the emergency department because of home injuries constitute the study group. The control group also consisted of 40 children, who were admitted for mild throat infections. The parents filled out questionnaires assessing parental ADHD, child behavioral problems, and parenting attitudes. Scores were significantly higher for both internalizing disorders and externalizing disorders in study groups. We also found that ADHD symptoms were significantly higher among fathers of injured children compared with fathers of control groups. Democratic parenting was also found to correlate with higher numbers of injuries. Parenting style, as well as the psychopathology of both the parents and children, is important factors in children's injuries. A child psychiatrist visit following an emergency procedure may help to prevent further unintentional injuries to the child. PMID:26266395

  2. What types of unintentional injuries kill our children? Do infants die of the same types of injuries? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janete Honda Imamura

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to review mortality from external causes (accidental injury in children and adolescents in systematically selected journals. This was a systematic review of the literature on mortality from accidental injury in children and adolescents. We searched the Pubrvled, Latin-American and Caribbean Health Sciences and Excerpta Medica databases for articles published between July of 2001 and June of 2011. National data from official agencies, retrieved by manual searches, were also reviewed. We reviewed 15 journal articles, the 2011 edition of a National Safety Council publication and 2010 statistical data from the Brazilian National Ministry of Health Mortality Database. Most published data were related to high-income countries. Mortality from accidental injury was highest among children less than 1 year of age. Accidental threats to breathing (non-drowning threats constituted the leading cause of death among this age group in the published articles. Across the pediatric age group in the surveyed studies, traffic accidents were the leading cause of death, followed by accidental drowning and submersion. Traffic accidents constitute the leading external cause of accidental death among children in the countries understudy. However, infants were vulnerable to external causes, particularly to accidental non-drowning threats to breathing, and this age group had the highest mortality rates for external causes. Actions to reduce such events are suggested. Further studies investigating the occurrence of accidental deaths in low-income countries are needed to improve the understanding of these preventable events.

  3. PELVIC INJURY IN CHILDHOOD: WHAT IS ITS CURRENT IMPORTANCE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, María Roxana Viamont; Braga, Susana Reis; Akkari, Miguel; Santili, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the importance of pelvic fractures in childhood by analyzing epidemiological characteristics and associated injuries. This is a retrospective study performed between 2002 and 2012 at two trauma referral centers in São Paulo. We identified 25 patients aged 16 years old or younger with pelvic fracture. The main mechanism of trauma was traffic accident (80%), followed by fall from height (16%). At hospital admission, 92% had traumatic brain injury and 40% had hemodynamic instability. Besides pelvic fractures, 56% of the children had other associated injuries (genitourinary, abdominal, vascular, chest and neurological), and 79% of them required operative treatment. According to the Torode and Zieg classification, the majority of cases were types III and IV. Seventy-two percent of all pelvic fractures were treated by surgery; 52% involved external fixation and 20% involved open reduction and internal fixation. The pelvic fractures in childhood can be considered a marker for injury severity, because the associated injuries usually are severe, needing operative treatment and leading to a high mortality rate (12%). Level of Evidence IV, Case Series.

  4. PELVIC INJURY IN CHILDHOOD: WHAT IS ITS CURRENT IMPORTANCE?

    OpenAIRE

    GUERRA, MAR?A ROXANA VIAMONT; BRAGA, SUSANA REIS; AKKARI, MIGUEL; SANTILI, CLAUDIO

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the importance of pelvic fractures in childhood by analyzing epidemiological characteristics and associated injuries. Methods: This is a retrospective study performed between 2002 and 2012 at two trauma referral centers in São Paulo. We identified 25 patients aged 16 years old or younger with pelvic fracture. Results: The main mechanism of trauma was traffic accident (80%), followed by fall from height (16%). At hospital admiss...

  5. Unintentional Injuries, Violence, and the Health of Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This fact sheet defines unintentional injuries and violence as the terms are used by the CDC and provides statistics on the leading causes of injury mortality and morbidity among children and adolescents, as well as information on the context of injury occurrence. (Contains 2 tables.)

  6. Socioeconomic differences in injury risks in childhood and adolescence: a nation-wide study of intentional and unintentional injuries in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engström, K; Diderichsen, F; Laflamme, L

    2002-01-01

    registers. Children were divided into four age groups and allocated to four household socioeconomic status groups. Absolute and relative risks were compiled using children of high/intermediate level salaried employees as the comparison group. Four diagnostic groups were considered: fall, traffic......STUDY OBJECTIVE: To measure socioeconomic differences in injuries among different age groups of children and adolescents. SUBJECTS: Children under 20 living in Sweden between 1990 and 1994 (about 2.6 million). METHOD: A cross sectional study based on record linkage between 15 Swedish national......, interpersonal violence, and self inflicted injuries. RESULTS: Injury incidences were relatively low and socioeconomic differences negligible in the 0-4 year olds. Thereafter, significant socioeconomic differences were observed in all diagnostic groups except falls. The highest absolute differences were...

  7. Unintentional injuries in the home in the United States Part I: mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyan, Carol W; Casteel, Carri; Perkis, David; Black, Carla; Marshall, Stephen W; Johnson, Renee M; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Waller, Anna E; Viswanathan, Shankar

    2005-01-01

    Unintentional injuries are a leading cause of death in the United States. It is unclear, however, what proportion of these injuries occur in the home. The purpose of this paper is to quantify and describe fatal unintentional injuries that take place in the home environment. Data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) were used to calculate average annual rates for unintentional home injury deaths, with 95% confidence intervals from 1992 to 1999 for the United States overall, and by mechanism of injury, gender, and age group. From 1992 to 1999, an average of 18,048 unintentional home injury deaths occurred annually in the United States (6.83 deaths per 100,000). Home injury deaths varied by age and gender, with males having higher rates of home injury death than females (8.78 vs 4.97 per 100,000), and older adults (>/=70 years) having higher rates than all other age groups. Falls (2.25 per 100,000), poisoning (1.83 per 100,000), and fire/burn injuries (1.29 per 100,000) were the leading causes of home injury death. Rates of fall death were highest for older adults, poisoning deaths were highest among middle-aged adults, and fire/burn death rates were highest among children. Inhalation/suffocation and drowning deaths were important injury issues for young children. Unintentional injury in the home is a significant problem. Specific home injury issues include falls among older adults, poisonings among middle-aged adults, fire/burn injuries among older adults and children, and inhalation/suffocation and drowning among young children. In addition, recommendations are presented for improvements to the NVSS.

  8. The prevalence of intentional and unintentional injuries in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intentional and unintentional injuries were reported to be the second leading cause of Disability Adjusted Life Years in South Africa in 2000. We present household experiences of such injuries in 5 impoverished housing settlements in Johannesburg, Gauteng Province. Data for this study were extracted from the database of ...

  9. Suicide and unintentional injury mortality among homeless people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Sandra Feodor; Hjorthøj, Carsten Rygaard; Erlangsen, Annette

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Homeless people have elevated mortality, especially due to external causes. We aimed to examine suicide and unintentional injury mortality levels and identify predictors in the homeless population. METHODS: A nationwide, register-based cohort study of homeless people aged 16 years...... and older was carried out using the Danish Homeless Register, 1999-2008. RESULTS: In all, 32 010 homeless people (70.5% men) were observed. For men, the mortality rate was 174.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 150.6-198.1] per 100 000 person-years for suicide and 463.3 (95% CI = 424...... and unintentional injury. CONCLUSION: People in the homeless shelter population with a history of a psychiatric disorder constitute a high-risk group regarding the elevated suicide and unintentional injury mortality....

  10. [Unintentional injuries in childhood and adolescence: current prevalence, determinants, and trends: results of the KiGGS study: first follow-up (KiGGS Wave 1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saß, Anke-Christine; Poethko-Müller, C; Rommel, A

    2014-07-01

    In Germany and worldwide, unintentional injuries (UI) are a major health threat for children and adolescents. The first follow-up of the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS Wave 1, 2009-2012) continued the national UI monitoring that started with the KiGGS baseline study (2003-2006). The present analysis provides updated information and for the first time gives indications on time trends. KiGGS Wave 1 is a combined nationwide cross-sectional and longitudinal survey by the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) providing information about 12,368 participating children and adolescents (0-17 years old; response rates: 38.8% first time invited, 72.9% reinvited). Parents were asked about their children's UI and poisonings via telephone interviews. Information on UI is available for 11,665 children and adolescents (1-17 years old). The 12-month prevalence rate and 95% confidence interval were calculated, and KiGGS Wave 1 was compared with the KiGGS baseline study. The Rao-Scott chi-square test corrected over the F distribution was used to test for the statistical significance of subgroup differences and trend effects. Within the previous 12 months, 15.5% of all children and adolescents aged 1-17 years were medically treated for UI. UI were significantly more prevalent among boys (17.0%) than among girls (14.0%), and 3.4% of the subjects had more than one accident leading to UI. One in eight children and adolescents who suffered UI stayed in hospital (12.3%) for inpatient treatment for at least one night. The home, childcare and educational institutions, and sports facilities/playgrounds were the predominant accident locations. Compared to the baseline study, neither the overall prevalence of UI nor the gender- and age-specific patterns changed significantly. Since a large proportion of UI is avoidable, knowledge of high-risk subgroups and accident locations is of particular use for prevention. KiGGS Wave 1 makes an important

  11. Profile and Risk Factor Analysis of Unintentional Injuries in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamkar, Rahul; Seth, Bageshree; Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-10-01

    To study the profile and various risk factors associated with unintentional injuries in children. The study is a cross sectional analysis of data collected from 351 children presenting with unintentional injury to a tertiary care hospital in Navi Mumbai, India. Data were collected about variables based on Haddon Phase Factor Matrix - host, environment and agent factors. Proportions for categorical variables across various groups were compared using Chi square test or Fisher's exact test. Logistic regression model was used to evaluate the factors. Falls (36 %) were the most common injuries followed by bites (23 %). Majority of children were school going children (38 %) followed by preschool children (29 %). Forty-seven percent were from lower socioeconomic class. Commonest place of injury was home (48 %) and the commonest time was evening (49 %). Though there was male predominance in injuries, the difference across gender did not vary significantly (p = 0.15). Poisonings were significantly more common in infants and toddlers and in rural population (p Injuries from rural area and lower socioeconomic class were more serious, requiring hospitalization; they were also more likely to present late to the hospital (p injuries varies widely as per the variations in agent, host and environmental factors. Socio-environmental, economic conditions and infancy-toddler age groups are predisposing risk factors for bites and poisoning. Although rural areas and lower socioeconomic class population are more vulnerable to serious types of injuries, they still lack essential basic medical care.

  12. Ecological approaches to the prevention of unintentional injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Allegrante

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Injury as a cause of significant morbidity and mortality has remained fairly stable in countries with developed economies. Although injury prevention often is conceptualised as a biomedical construct, such a reductionist perspective overlooks the importance of the psychological, environmental, and sociocultural conditions as contributing factors to injury and its consequences. This paper describes the potential of the ecological model for understanding the antecedent causes of unintentional injuries and guiding injury prevention approaches. We review the origins and conceptualise the elements of the ecological model and conclude with some examples of applications of ecological approaches to the prevention of unintentional injury and promotion of community safety.

    Methods: A review of the English-language literature on the conceptualization of ecological models in public health and injury prevention, including the application of the ecological model in the prevention of falls and road traffic injuries and in the community safety promotion movement.

    Results: Three dimensions are important in social-ecological systems that comprise key determinants of injuries: 1 the individual and his or her behaviour, 2 the physical environment, and 3 the social environment. Social and environmental determinants have profound impact on population health and in the causation of injuries.

    Conclusions: Social and environmental determinants of injury should be studied with the same energy, urgency, and intellectual rigor as physical determinants. Application of the ecological model in injury prevention shows the most promise in falls injury prevention, road traffic injury prevention, and community safety promotion.

  13. Unintentional injuries in children of Danish and foreign-born mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Bjarne; Møller, Hanne

    2009-08-01

    Unintentional injuries in children of foreign-born mothers were studied and compared with those in children of Danish-born mothers. A population of 173,504 children living in 32 municipalities in Denmark was followed from 1998 to 2003. Detailed information on childhood unintentional injuries from hospital records was linked to register data on parents' education, country of origin, income, family type, etc. Poisson regression was used to analyse differences in injury risk between children of different origins. We found 133,649 injuries, of which 15,389 occurred in children of foreign-born mothers. The injury rates in children of Western and non-Western origin were 0.83 (0.70-0.98) times and 0.84 (0.79- 0.90) times that of children of Danish-born mothers, respectively. The difference was largest in children of families with unemployed parents. The injury rate in girls of non-Western origin was 29% lower than in girls of Danish origin, while the rate in boys of non-Western origin was only 5% lower than in boys of Danish origin. This gender difference was particularly pronounced for sports and traffic injuries. Children of non-Western origin had a three-fold higher rate of burns caused by hot water, tea or oil than children of Danish origin. Prevention of injuries in children of non-Western origin should especially focus on scalds from tea, oil, and hot water.

  14. Parental Perceptions, Risks, and Incidence of Pediatric Unintentional Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Catherine M; Weaver, Nancy L; Cioni, Claire; Fry, Jessica; Hamilton, Alyssa; Thompson, Samantha

    2017-10-06

    More than 9,000 children die annually from various causes of unintentional injury. Of all the pediatric unintentional injuries occurring in the United States, 8.7 million are treated in emergency departments, and 225,000 require hospitalization annually. Health education programs are available to address these injuries. The objective of this research was to examine the distribution of self-reported high priority injury risks in an urban Midwestern pediatric level 1 trauma center and investigate the relationship between parental perceptions and injury-prevention behaviors. Prevalence rates for 3 data sources are compared. Missouri Information for Community Assessment (MICA) was categorized to mirror variables corresponding with risks of injury presented in the Safe 'n' Sound (SNS) program. Level 1 trauma center data were examined to determine how the variables were distributed compared with MICA data and with the parent-reported levels. A total of 429 SNS surveys were compared with ED data and MICA data. For SNS users, car crashes were identified as the highest risk, specifically due to the use of incorrect car seats. The injuries seen most often in the emergency department were falls, and falls were also the most prevalent injury captured by MICA. Controlling for demographics, parental perceptions predicted several risks for injury. Because parental perceptions are significantly related to risks of injury, prevention programs aiming to decrease injuries could focus on the perceptions. Not only can perceptions be used to tailor health communication materials, these perceptions can be the targets of change. Further work might investigate the extent to which changes in perceptions result in increased adoption of safety practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Experiences and attitudes of collegiate athletic trainers regarding alcohol-related unintentional injury in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, James W; Metz, Stacie M; Entriken, Jack; Brenner, Christina J

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol-related unintentional injury (ARUI) has been an unexamined consequence of alcohol consumption by collegiate athletes. It has a potentially devastating effect on their athletic performances and careers. Awareness of this problem in athletes could have a huge effect on what athletic trainers (ATs) do to recognize, treat, and prevent it in a collegiate athlete population. To examine the experiences and attitudes among collegiate and university ATs about ARUI in the athletes in their care. Cross-sectional study. Web-based survey. A total of 1767 e-mail addresses for collegiate and university ATs within National Athletic Trainers' Association Districts 1, 2, 3, and 9. We calculated frequencies, percentages, and attitudes of ATs regarding ARUI in collegiate athletes during the 2010-2011 academic year. The resulting sample size for the analysis was 459 (26.0%) participants of the initial total sample. More than 56% (n = 260) of the ATs reported that they had evaluated, treated, or referred if needed at least 1 ARUI in a collegiate athlete. On average, these ATs had evaluated, treated, or referred if needed 3 alcohol-related unintentional injuries within the 2010-2011 academic year. About 73% (n = 331) of ATs agreed that ARUI is a serious problem. Nearly 80% (n = 358) indicated they believe ATs should receive more training to identify student-athletes with alcohol-related problems. Alcohol-related unintentional injury is a common and serious consequence of alcohol use among collegiate athletes. Many ATs also view it as a serious problem yet would like more training in how to address it. Alcohol-related unintentional injury may have important negative effects on the careers and athletic performances of athletes. Researchers need to determine how prevalent ARUI is in the collegiate athlete population and what ATs can do to address it.

  16. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of family physicians and nurses regarding unintentional injuries among children under 15 years in Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elboray, Shereen; Elawdy, Mohamed Yehia; Dewedar, Sahar; Elezz, Nahla Abo; El-Setouhy, Maged; Smith, Gordon S; Hirshon, Jon Mark

    2017-03-01

    Unintentional injuries are a leading cause of death among children, especially in developing countries. Lack of reliable data regarding primary health care professionals' role in childhood unintentional injury prevention hinders the development of effective prevention strategies. A survey of 99 family physicians and nurses from 10 family health centres sought to develop insight into their knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding unintentional injury prevention for children injuries and injury prevention. Falls and road traffic crashes were identified as primary causes of childhood injuries by 54.5%. While >90% agreed injury prevention counselling (IPC) could be effective, only 50.5% provided IPC. Lack of time and educational materials were the leading barriers to provision of IPC (91.9% and 85.9%, respectively), while thinking counselling is not part of their clinical duties was the least perceived barrier (9.1%). There is a large disconnect between providers' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding IPC, more training and provision of counselling tools are essential for improving IPC by Egyptian medical providers.

  17. Psychopathology, Temperament and Unintentional Injury: Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Richard; Simonoff, Emily; Silberg, Judy L.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Growing evidence indicates a link between unintentional injury and both disruptive and emotional psychopathology. We present further evidence of these associations and address the underlying mechanisms. We also examine the genetic contribution to unintentional injury. Methods: The Virginia Twin Study of Adolescent Behavioral…

  18. Behavioral and Social Sciences Theories and Models: Are They Used in Unintentional Injury Prevention Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, L. B.; Gielen, A. C.; Sleet, D. A.; Hopkins, K.

    2005-01-01

    Behavioral and social sciences theories and models have the potential to enhance efforts to reduce unintentional injuries. The authors reviewed the published literature on behavioral and social science theory applications to unintentional injury problems to enumerate and categorize the ways different theories and models are used in injury…

  19. Behavioral and social sciences theories and models: are they used in unintentional injury prevention research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, L B; Gielen, A C; Sleet, D A; Hopkins, K

    2005-06-01

    Behavioral and social sciences theories and models have the potential to enhance efforts to reduce unintentional injuries. The authors reviewed the published literature on behavioral and social science theory applications to unintentional injury problems to enumerate and categorize the ways different theories and models are used in injury prevention research. The authors conducted a systematic review to evaluate the published literature from 1980 to 2001 on behavioral and social science theory applications to unintentional injury prevention and control. Electronic database searches in PubMed and PsycINFO identified articles that combined behavioral and social sciences theories and models and injury causes. The authors identified some articles that examined behavioral and social science theories and models and unintentional injury topics, but found that several important theories have never been applied to unintentional injury prevention. Among the articles identified, the PRECEDE PROCEED Model was cited most frequently, followed by the Theory of Reasoned Action/Theory of Planned Behavior and Health Belief Model. When behavioral and social sciences theories and models were applied to unintentional injury topics, they were most frequently used to guide program design, implementation or develop evaluation measures; few examples of theory testing were found. Results suggest that the use of behavioral and social sciences theories and models in unintentional injury prevention research is only marginally represented in the mainstream, peer-reviewed literature. Both the fields of injury prevention and behavioral and social sciences could benefit from greater collaborative research to enhance behavioral approaches to injury control.

  20. Prevention of childhood injuries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    violence, homicide or suicide) or unintentional (especially through road traffic crashes, drowning, burns, poisoning or falls), has become a major health and social ... Since 1983, trauma has officially been called 'the number 1 killer of children' globally.[3] In. SA, children continue to be threatened by injuries of various kinds,.

  1. Insomnia symptoms and risk for unintentional fatal injuries--the HUNT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugsand, Lars Erik; Strand, Linn B; Vatten, Lars J; Janszky, Imre; Bjørngaard, Johan Håkon

    2014-11-01

    To assess the association between insomnia symptoms and risk of fatal unintentional injuries. Population-based prospective cohort study with a mean follow-up of 14 y, linking health survey data with information on insomnia symptoms to the National Cause of Death Registry. Nord-Trøndelag County, Norway. A total of 54,399 men and women 20-89 y of age who participated in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study between 1995 and 1997. N/A. There were 277 unintentional fatal injuries, including 57 fatal motor vehicle injuries during follow-up. There was a dose-dependent association between the number of insomnia symptoms and risk of unintentional fatal injuries (P for trend 0.001) and fatal motor vehicle injuries (P for trend 0.023), respectively. The proportion of unintentional fatal injuries cases that could have been prevented in the absence of difficulties initiating sleep, difficulties maintaining sleep, and having a feeling of nonrestorative sleep were 8%, 9%, and 8%, respectively. The corresponding estimates for motor vehicle injuries were 34%, 11%, and 10%. Insomnia is a major contributor to both unintentional fatal injuries in general as well as fatal motor vehicle injuries. Increasing public health awareness about insomnia and identifying persons with insomnia may be important in preventing unintentional fatal injuries.

  2. Unintentional injury prevention and the role of occupational therapy in the Solomon Islands: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daufanamae, Barbara U; Franklin, Richard C; Eagers, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    Unintentional injuries (injuries for which there is no evidence of a predetermined intent) are one of the leading causes of death worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Although evidence demonstrates unintentional injuries are preventable it is a public health challenge for many LMICs such as the Solomon Islands. Occupational therapists are well placed to contribute to injury prevention, as they have specialised skills to analyse the accessibility and safety of the environments within which people conduct their daily occupations. While the role of occupational therapy in unintentional injury prevention is well known in high-income countries, it is unfamiliar in LMICs, especially in the Solomon Islands. This integrative review aimed to explore the incidence of common unintentional injuries, and the burden in the Solomon Islands; and explore the potential role of occupational therapy in unintentional injury prevention in the Solomon Islands, based on current activities in LMICs. Articles were reviewed from six databases (Medline, CINAHL, OTDBase, OT Seeker, Scopus and PsychInfo). Five articles met the inclusion criteria for the first objective and 15 articles met the inclusion criteria for the second objective. These articles were thematically analysed where themes and codes associated with the research objectives were extracted and analysed. Unintentional injuries in the Solomon Islands reported in the literature included ocular trauma, falls from fruit trees and coconut palms, and road traffic crashes. Burden of injury reported was mostly associated with loss of productivity. Occupational therapists undertook rehabilitative, biomechanical, neurodevelopmental and educational roles in LMIC, focusing on tertiary and secondary injury prevention. This integrative review suggests that there is limited information regarding injury in the Solomon Islands. However, evidence is available in LMICs to suggest that occupational therapy services can

  3. Mortality due to unintentional injuries in The Netherlands, 1950-1995

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.F. van Beeck (Ed); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To detect and explain changing trends in incidence, case fatality rates, and mortality for unintentional injuries in the Netherlands for the years 1950 through 1995. METHODS: Using national registry data, the authors analyzed trends in traffic

  4. Fatal unintentional injuries in the home in the U.S., 2000-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Karin A; Rudd, Rose A; Mickalide, Angela D; Ballesteros, Michael F

    2013-03-01

    From 1992 to 1999, an average of more than 18,000 unintentional home injury deaths occurred in the U.S. annually. The objective of this study was to provide current prevalence estimates of fatal unintentional injury in the home. Data from the 2000-2008 National Vital Statistics System were used in 2011 to calculate average annual rates for unintentional home injury deaths for the U.S. overall, and by mechanism of injury, gender, and age group. From 2000 to 2008, there was an annual average of 30,569 unintentional injury deaths occurring in the home environment in the U.S. (10.3 deaths per 100,000). Poisonings (4.5 per 100,000) and falls (3.5 per 100,000) were the leading causes of home injury deaths. Men/boys had higher rates of home injury death than women/girls (12.7 vs 8.2 per 100,000), and older adults (≥80 years) had higher rates than other age groups. Home injury deaths and rates increased significantly from 2000 to 2008. More than 30,000 people die annually in the U.S. from unintentional injuries at home, with the trend rising since the year 2000. The overall rise is due in large part to the dramatic increase in deaths due to poisonings, and to a lesser degree falls at home. Unintentional home injuries are both predictable and preventable. Through a multifaceted approach combining behavioral change, adequate supervision of children, installation and maintenance of safety devices, and adherence to building codes, safety regulations and legislation, home injuries can be reduced. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. [Correspondence analysis of association between types of unintentional injuries and influential factors among rural rear pupils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Dongmei; Wang, Peixi

    2015-07-01

    To explore the association between types of unintentional injuries and influential factors among rural rear pupils. The multistage stratified sampling method was used to select the study participant and thus 594 rural pupils were sampled, 292 rear pupils were confirmed and measured with unintentional injuries and influential factors of rural rear pupils scale. Binary logistic regression analysis indicate that the risk facts related to unintentional injury were left-behind status (OR = 2.68, 95% CI 1.06-6.79), gender (OR = 5.12, 95% C2.68-9.79) and surrounding environment (OR = 3.44, 95% CI 1.37-8.70). Correspondence analysis showed living with father, middle personality and low age were related possibly with traffic accident injury. Living with grandparents, extrovert personality and elder pupils were related possibly with unintentional falls injury. Living with mother, introvert personality and middle-age pupils were related possibly with animmal injury. The personality, ages and guardian types of rural rear pupils are correlated with types of unintentional injuries.

  6. Inequalities in unintentional injuries between indigenous and non-indigenous children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Holger; Falster, Kathleen; Ivers, Rebecca; Jorm, Louisa

    2015-04-01

    Indigenous children suffer a disproportionally high burden of unintentional injuries. A more detailed understanding of the underlying causes, risk factors and gaps in research is required to inform prevention efforts and direct future research. The aim of this review was to systematically assess the evidence regarding differences in rates of unintentional injuries between indigenous and non-indigenous children and to identify leading causes and underlying risk factors contributing to these differences. We systematically searched the literature including 10 electronic databases, institutional websites and reference lists of relevant studies. Due to the substantial heterogeneity between studies, results were summarised in a narrative synthesis and no meta-analysis was carried out. A total of 39 studies were included in this review. Most studies were descriptive and only five adjusted for potential confounding in the analysis. Indigenous to non-indigenous rate ratios for morbidity and mortality for unintentional injury ranged from 1.2 to 2.3 and 1.8 to 8.2, respectively. The difference varied greatly by cause of injury and between studies, ranging from a reduced risk of hospitalisation due to fall injuries to a 17-fold increased risk of mortality due to pedestrian injuries. Burns, poisoning and transport injuries were the major contributors to the increased injury burden in indigenous children. The studies offered only limited insight into the underlying causes of these differences, but socioeconomic status and parents' educational attainment were contributing factors. Indigenous children experience a significantly higher burden of morbidity and mortality from unintentional injuries across different indigenous communities worldwide. Most of these injuries are highly preventable, presenting substantial potential to improve indigenous child health. However, there is limited evidence to illuminate the underlying risk factors for unintentional injuries in indigenous

  7. Mortality from Unspecified Unintentional Injury among Individuals Aged 65 Years and Older by U.S. State, 1999–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunjie Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent changes in unspecified unintentional injury mortality for the elderly by U.S. state remain unreported. This study aims to examine U.S. state variations in mortality from unspecified unintentional injury among Americans aged 65+, 1999–2013; Methods: Using mortality rates from the U.S. CDC’s Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS™, we examined unspecified unintentional injury mortality for older adults aged 65+ from 1999 to 2013 by state. Specifically, the proportion of unintentional injury deaths with unspecified external cause in the data was considered. Linear regression examined the statistical significance of changes in proportion of unspecified unintentional injury from 1999 to 2013; Results: Of the 36 U.S. states with stable mortality rates, over 8-fold differences were observed for both the mortality rates and the proportions of unspecified unintentional injury for Americans aged 65+ during 1999–2013. Twenty-nine of the 36 states showed reductions in the proportion of unspecified unintentional injury cause, with Oklahoma (−89%, Massachusetts (−86% and Oregon (−81% displaying the largest changes. As unspecified unintentional injury mortality decreased, mortality from falls in 28 states and poisoning in 3 states increased significantly. Mortality from suffocation in 15 states, motor vehicle traffic crashes in 12 states, and fire/burn in 8 states also decreased; Conclusions: The proportion of unintentional injuries among older adults with unspecified cause decreased significantly for many states in the United States from 1999 to 2013. The reduced proportion of unspecified injury has implications for research and practice. It should be considered in state-level trend analysis during 1999–2013. It also suggests comparisons between states for specific injury mortality should be conducted with caution, as large differences in unspecified injury mortality across states and over time

  8. Status and risk factors of unintentional injuries among Chinese undergraduates: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Qiang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injuries affect all age groups but have a particular impact on young people. To evaluate the incidence of non-fatal, unintentional, injuries among undergraduates in Wenzhou, China, assess the burden caused by these injuries, and explore the associated risk factors for unintentional injuries among these undergraduates, we conducted a college-based cross-sectional study. Methods Participants were selected by a multi-stage random sampling method, and 2,287 students were asked whether they had had an injury in the last 12 months; the location, cause, and consequences of the event. The questionnaire included demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, lifestyle habits, and the scale of type A behaviour pattern (TABP. Multivariate logistic regression models were used; crude odds ratios (ORs, adjusted ORs and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs were estimated, with students having no injuries as the reference group. Results The incidence of injuries among undergraduates in Wenzhou was 18.71 injuries per 100 person-years (95%CI: 17.12~20.31 injuries per 100 person-years. Falls were the leading cause of injury, followed by traffic injuries, and animal/insect bites. Male students were more likely to be injured than female students. Risk factors associated with unintentional injuries among undergraduates were: students majoring in non-medicine (adjusted OR: 1.53; 95% CI: 1.19-1.96; type A behaviour pattern (adjusted OR: 2.99; 95% CI: 1.45-6.14; liking sports (adjusted OR: 1.86; 95% CI: 1.41-2.45. Conclusions Injuries have become a public health problem among undergraduates. Falls were the major cause of non-fatal injury. Therefore, individuals, families, schools and governments should promptly adopt preventive measures aimed at preventing and controlling morbidity due to non-fatal injury, especially among students identified to be at high-risk; such as male students with type A behaviour pattern who like sports.

  9. Status and risk factors of unintentional injuries among Chinese undergraduates: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongying; Yang, Xinjun; Huang, Chenping; Zhou, Zumu; Zhou, Qiang; Chu, Maoping

    2011-07-05

    Injuries affect all age groups but have a particular impact on young people. To evaluate the incidence of non-fatal, unintentional, injuries among undergraduates in Wenzhou, China, assess the burden caused by these injuries, and explore the associated risk factors for unintentional injuries among these undergraduates, we conducted a college-based cross-sectional study. Participants were selected by a multi-stage random sampling method, and 2,287 students were asked whether they had had an injury in the last 12 months; the location, cause, and consequences of the event. The questionnaire included demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, lifestyle habits, and the scale of type A behaviour pattern (TABP). Multivariate logistic regression models were used; crude odds ratios (ORs), adjusted ORs and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated, with students having no injuries as the reference group. The incidence of injuries among undergraduates in Wenzhou was 18.71 injuries per 100 person-years (95%CI: 17.12~20.31 injuries per 100 person-years). Falls were the leading cause of injury, followed by traffic injuries, and animal/insect bites. Male students were more likely to be injured than female students. Risk factors associated with unintentional injuries among undergraduates were: students majoring in non-medicine (adjusted OR: 1.53; 95% CI: 1.19-1.96); type A behaviour pattern (adjusted OR: 2.99; 95% CI: 1.45-6.14); liking sports (adjusted OR: 1.86; 95% CI: 1.41-2.45). Injuries have become a public health problem among undergraduates. Falls were the major cause of non-fatal injury. Therefore, individuals, families, schools and governments should promptly adopt preventive measures aimed at preventing and controlling morbidity due to non-fatal injury, especially among students identified to be at high-risk; such as male students with type A behaviour pattern who like sports.

  10. Unintentional non-fatal home-related injuries in Central Anatolia, Turkey: frequencies, characteristics, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alptekin, Fadimana; Uskun, Ersin; Kisioglu, Ahmet Nesimi; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2008-05-01

    Injuries constitute a major public health problem worldwide. Homes are an important setting for non-fatal unintentional injuries. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency, the characteristics, and the outcome of unintentional non-fatal injuries in the household, and to describe the related risk factors through a community-based survey. The study was conducted using a household-based survey design. Eight hundred inhabitants were sampled from the entire population in the city centre by a stratified sampling method in 2004. All unintentional non-fatal home-related injuries occurring in the previous year were registered and examined, making special note of the mechanism of the injuries, the time and place of the incidents and their outcomes. The frequency of unintentional non-fatal home-related injuries requiring some form of medical attention was established as 10.8%. Falls were the most common injuries among all the study groups. Injury rates were highest among the oldest (aged > or =65) and youngest (aged adults having incomes under euro 500, individuals living alone, or the unemployed. Contact with hot objects/substances or hot liquid/gas was the leading mechanism in children 4 years of age or younger, falls ranking second. Falls are a significant problem particularly among older adults. Multiple analysis revealed that participants with low incomes, living alone and single or divorced had a high risk for injury at home. The findings related to disability highlighted a need to focus attention on the prevention of residential falls among the elderly, and the burns and falls among young children. Preventive measures should be prioritised to risk groups such as individuals with low incomes and those living alone.

  11. Unintentional injuries treated in hospital emergency departments among persons aged 65 years and older, United States, 2006-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGrauw, Xinyao; Annest, Joseph L; Stevens, Judy A; Xu, Likang; Coronado, Victor

    2016-02-01

    With the aging of the United States population, unintentional injuries among older adults, and especially falls-related injuries, are an increasing public health concern. We analyzed emergency department (ED) data from the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample, 2006-2011. We examined unintentional injury trends by 5-year age groups, sex, mechanism, body region, discharge disposition, and primary payer. For 2011, we estimated the medical costs of unintentional injury and the distribution of primary payers, plus rates by injury mechanisms and body regions injured by 5-year age groups. From 2006 to 2011, the age-adjusted annual rate of unintentional injury-related ED visits among persons aged ≥ 65 years increased significantly from 7987 to 8163, per 100,000 population. In 2011, 65% of injuries were due to falls. Rates for fall-related injury ED visits increased with age and the highest rate was among those aged ≥ 100. Each year, about 85% of unintentional injury-related ED visits in this population were expected to be paid by Medicare. In 2011, the estimated lifetime medical cost of unintentional injury-related ED visits among those aged ≥ 65 years was $40 billion. Increasing rates of ED-treated unintentional injuries, driven mainly by falls among older adults, will challenge our health care system and increase the economic burden on our society. Prevention efforts to reduce falls and resulting injuries among adults aged ≥ 65 years have the potential to increase well-being and reduce health care spending, especially the costs covered by Medicare. With the aging of the U.S. population, unintentional injuries, and especially fall-related injuries, will present a growing challenge to our health care system as well as an increasing economic burden. To counteract this trend, we must implement effective public health strategies, such as increasing knowledge about fall risk factors and broadly disseminating evidence-based injury and fall prevention programs in both

  12. Mortality rate and years of life lost from unintentional injury and suicide in South India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bose, Anuradha; Konradsen, Flemming; John, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    We calculated mortality rates and years of life lost because of unintentional injuries and suicides using community based information obtained prospectively over a 7-year period, from 1998 to 2004, among a rural and peri-urban population of 108,000 in South India. Per 100,000 population the total...... over the study period while 18.9% of all deaths in the population were attributable to unintentional injuries and suicides in the same period. The high burden is particularly notable in the 15-29 age group, where up to 70% of years of life lost are due to injury. The burden of injuries reported...... in this study is significantly higher than the figures reflected in available reports for India and is likely due to the under reporting in routine mortality statistics, particularly of suicides....

  13. Unintentional injuries in child care centers in the United States: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashikawa, Andrew N; Newton, Manya F; Cunningham, Rebecca M; Stevens, Martha W

    2015-03-01

    The study systematically reviewed all types of unintentional injury and injury prevention research studies occurring within child care centers in the United States. A total of 2 reviewers searched 11 electronic databases to identify 53 articles meeting inclusion criteria. No studies used trauma registries or randomized control trials. Data were not pooled for further analysis because studies lacked standardized definitions for injury, rates, severity, exposure, and demographics. The following child care center injury rates were reported: (0.25-5.31 injuries per 100,000 child-hours); (11.3-18 injuries per 100 children per year); (6-49 injuries per 1000 child-years); (2.5-8.29 injuries per child-year); (2.6-3.3 injuries per child); (3.3-6.3 injuries per 100 observations); (635-835 medically attended injuries per year per 100,000 children and 271-364 child care center playground injuries per year per 100,000 children); and (3.8 injuries per child per 2000 exposure hours). Child care center injury rates were comparable to injury rates published for schools, playground, and summer camp. Most injuries were minor, while most severe injuries (fractures and concussions) were falls from playground structures. Future studies need to use standardized injury definitions and injury severity scales, focus efforts on preventing severe playground injuries in child care centers, and report child care parameters for inclusion in national injury databases. © The Author(s) 2013.

  14. Individual risk factors associated with general unintentional injuries and the relationship to traumatic dental injuries among children aged 0-15 years in the Swedish BITA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldin, Anna; Lundgren, Jesper; Norén, Jörgen G; Robertson, Agneta

    2016-08-01

    To investigate general unintentional injuries (GUI) and traumatic dental injuries (TDI) in relation to behavioral and psychosocial strengths and difficulties among Swedish children aged 0-17 years, and to investigate general unintentional injuries in relation to temperament and socioeconomic status among the same children. The study included 2363 children in four different age cohorts aged 3, 7, 11, and 15 years at the study start. Twelve Public Dental Service clinics in Sweden participated, representing different types of demographic areas, both rural and urban. Data were collected from parents and children through an interview, questionnaires, and dental records. Twenty-four percentage (24%) of the children had experienced a serious general unintentional injury (GUI) at some point during their lifetime up until 3 months prior to the study start. Children who were regarded by their parents as being injured more often than other children also had occasions with general unintentional injuries to a greater extent. Most general unintentional injuries occurred at home. Children with incidents of general unintentional injuries had occasions with TDI to a greater extent than children without general unintentional injury. Children, whose mothers had 11 years of school/education or less, were involved in more general unintentional injuries during the 3-month period prior to the study start, compared to children of mothers with higher education level. Children with general unintentional injuries had more traumatic dental injuries. Children who were assessed by their parents as being injured more often than other children also had occasions with general unintentional injuries to a greater extent. Temperament, behavioral and psychosocial strengths and difficulties had different impacts at different ages for experiencing a general unintentional injury. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Epidemiology of Unintentional Child Injuries in the Makwanpur District of Nepal: A Household Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Puspa Raj; Towner, Elizabeth; Ellis, Matthew; Manandhar, Dharma; Pilkington, Paul; Mytton, Julie

    2015-11-30

    Secondary sources of information indicate that the proportion of child deaths due to injuries is increasing in Nepal. This study aimed to describe the epidemiology of unintentional injuries in children, explore risk factors and estimate the burden faced by families and the community in the Makwanpur district. We conducted a household survey in Makwanpur, covering 3441 households. Injuries that occurred during the 12 months before the survey and required treatment or caused the child to be unable to take part in usual activities for three or more days were included. We identified 193 cases of non-fatal unintentional child injuries from 181 households and estimated an annual rate of non-fatal injuries of 24.6/1000 children; rates for boys were double (32.7/1000) that for girls (16.8/1000). The rates were higher among the children of age groups 1-4 years and 5-9 years. Falls were the most common cause of non-fatal child injuries followed by burns in preschool children and road traffic injuries were the most likely cause in adolescence. Mean period of disability following injury was 25 days. The rates and the mechanisms of injury vary by age and gender. Falls and burns are currently the most common mechanisms of injury amongst young children around rural homes.

  16. The shrinking health advantage: unintentional injuries among children and youth from immigrant families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Natasha Ruth; Macpherson, Alison; Guan, Jun; Sheng, Lisa; Guttmann, Astrid

    2017-08-01

    Immigrants typically arrive in good health. This health benefit can decline as immigrants adopt behaviours similar to native-born populations. Risk of injury is low in immigrants but it is not known whether this changes with increasing time since migration. We sought to examine the association between duration of residence in Canada and risk of unintentional injury. Population-based cross-sectional study of children and youth 0 to 24 years in Ontario, Canada (2011-2012), using linked health and administrative databases. The main exposure was duration of Canadian residence (recent: 0-5 years, intermediate: 6-10 years, long-term: >10 years). The main outcome measure was unintentional injuries. Cause-specific injury risk by duration of residence was also evaluated. Poisson regression models estimated rate ratios (RR) for injuries. 999951 immigrants were included with 24.2% recent and 26.4% intermediate immigrants. The annual crude injury rates per 100000 immigrants were 6831 emergency department visits, 151 hospitalizations, and 4 deaths. In adjusted models, recent immigrants had the lowest risk of injury and risk increased over time (RR 0.79; 95% CI 0.77, 0.81 recent immigrants, RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.88, 0.92 intermediate immigrants, versus long-term immigrants). Factors associated with injury included young age (0-4 years, RR 1.30; 95% CI 1.26, 1.34), male sex (RR 1.52; 95% CI 1.49, 1.55), and high income (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.89, 0.96 quintile 1 versus 5). Longer duration of residence was associated with a higher risk of unintentional injuries for most causes except hot object/scald burns, machinery-related injuries, non-motor vehicle bicycle and pedestrian injuries. The risk of these latter injuries did not change significantly with increasing duration of residence in Canada. Risk of drowning was highest in recent immigrants. Risk of all-cause and most cause-specific unintentional injuries in immigrants rises with increasing time since migration. This indicates the need

  17. The shrinking health advantage: unintentional injuries among children and youth from immigrant families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Ruth Saunders

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immigrants typically arrive in good health. This health benefit can decline as immigrants adopt behaviours similar to native-born populations. Risk of injury is low in immigrants but it is not known whether this changes with increasing time since migration. We sought to examine the association between duration of residence in Canada and risk of unintentional injury. Methods Population-based cross-sectional study of children and youth 0 to 24 years in Ontario, Canada (2011-2012, using linked health and administrative databases. The main exposure was duration of Canadian residence (recent: 0–5 years, intermediate: 6–10 years, long-term: >10 years. The main outcome measure was unintentional injuries. Cause-specific injury risk by duration of residence was also evaluated. Poisson regression models estimated rate ratios (RR for injuries. Results 999951 immigrants were included with 24.2% recent and 26.4% intermediate immigrants. The annual crude injury rates per 100000 immigrants were 6831 emergency department visits, 151 hospitalizations, and 4 deaths. In adjusted models, recent immigrants had the lowest risk of injury and risk increased over time (RR 0.79; 95% CI 0.77, 0.81 recent immigrants, RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.88, 0.92 intermediate immigrants, versus long-term immigrants. Factors associated with injury included young age (0-4 years, RR 1.30; 95% CI 1.26, 1.34, male sex (RR 1.52; 95% CI 1.49, 1.55, and high income (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.89, 0.96 quintile 1 versus 5. Longer duration of residence was associated with a higher risk of unintentional injuries for most causes except hot object/scald burns, machinery-related injuries, non-motor vehicle bicycle and pedestrian injuries. The risk of these latter injuries did not change significantly with increasing duration of residence in Canada. Risk of drowning was highest in recent immigrants. Conclusions Risk of all-cause and most cause-specific unintentional injuries in immigrants

  18. Long-term health effects of unintentional injuries in Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bjarne; Møller, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of self-reported health effects of unintentional injuries in the adult Danish population, including the limitation of daily activities and perceived general health. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the 2005 National Health...... reported poor health in general. The most severe health effects affected the head, neck and back, as well as multiple body parts. Those injuries that entailed the most severe health effects were caused by traffic injuries and falls. CONCLUSION: Long-term effects of injuries are prevalent in the adult...... population and most can be attributed to falls and traffic injuries. Back injuries and multiple injuries had the largest influence on perceived health. FUNDING: The work was supported by TrygFonden grant no. 7585-07. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  19. Unintentional Drowning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or transfer for further care (compared with a hospitalization rate of about 6% for all unintentional injuries). 1,2 These nonfatal drowning injuries can cause severe brain damage that may result in long-term disabilities such as memory problems, learning disabilities, and ...

  20. The health consequences of child mental health problems and parenting styles: unintentional injuries among European schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Katherine M; Susser, Ezra; Pilowsky, Daniel J; Hamilton, Ava; Bitfoi, Adina; Goelitz, Dietmar; Kuijpers, Rowella C W M; Lesinskiene, Sigita; Mihova, Zlatka; Otten, Roy; Kovess, Viviane

    2014-10-01

    Unintentional injury is the leading cause of death for schoolchildren. We assessed the association between externalizing psychopathology, parenting style, and unintentional injury in European children in the community. Data were drawn from the School Children Mental Health in Europe project and included 4517 schoolchildren across seven diverse European regions. Past-year injuries serious enough to seek medical attention were reported by mothers. Child mental health problems were assessed using validated measures and reported by the mothers, teachers, and children. Parenting styles were based on The Parenting Scale and the Parent Behaviors and Attitudes Questionnaire. Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity symptoms and oppositional defiant symptoms had a higher risk of injury compared to other children whether based on parent report (OR=1.47, 95% C.I. 1.2-1.9), teacher report (OR=1.36, 95% C.I. 1.1-1.7), or parent and teacher report combined (OR=1.53, 95% C.I. 1.1-2.1). Children who self-reported oppositional symptoms also had higher risk of injury (OR=1.6, 95% C.I. 1.1-2.4). Low-caring behavior of parents increased the risk of injury (OR=1.4, 95% C.I. 1.1-1.9). Unintentional injury is a potential adverse health consequence of child externalizing problems. Interventions to improve parent-child relationships and prevention as well as focused treatment for externalizing problems may reduce the burden of injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Unintentional and Intentional Injuries Amongst Children in Malaysia: Addressing the ‘grey’ area of underlying cause of injuries

    OpenAIRE

    ANNE NOOR SRI JUWANEETA JAMALUDIN

    2018-01-01

    Children are considered to be one of the most vulnerable populations in the world. Injuries in children, either unintentional or intentional, have the same physical, mental and psychosocial effect as adults. Victims of child maltreatment, intimate partner violence and sexual violence have been shown to have a broad array of adverse health effects that can persist over a lifetime. Likewise, injuries from other causes (road traffic, falls, burns, etc.) can result in long-term neg...

  2. Unintentional injuries among Chinese children with different types and severity of disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huiping; Xiang, Huiyun; Xia, Xin; Yang, Xia; Li, Dan; Stallones, Lorann; Du, Yukai

    2014-01-01

    Little research has been done in China to study injury in individuals with disability. We investigated the impact of type and severity of disability on injury among children with disability in Hubei Province of China. A sample of 1201 children with disability were matched with 1201 healthy children on gender, age, and neighborhood. Disability type and severity were determined using the Chinese national standards. Caregivers were interviewed face-to-face about nonfatal unintentional injuries suffered by the child in the past 12 months before the interview. Univariate χ(2) test and logistic regression models were used to investigate association between disability type/severity and nonfatal unintentional injuries. Injury rate among children with disability was significantly higher than that among children without disability (10.2% vs. 4.4%; P disability and injury varied by type and severity of disability. The magnitude of the association between the presence or absence of disability in children and their risk of injury was large and significant, regardless of the type or severity of the children's disabilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Traumatic Stress, Depression, and Recovery: Child and Parent Responses After Emergency Medical Care for Unintentional Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Bakker, Anne; Marsac, Meghan L; Fein, Joel A; Winston, Flaura Koplin

    2015-11-01

    To assess psychological symptoms in injured children (aged 8-17 years) and their parents after emergency department (ED) care to examine the relationship between posttraumatic stress and depression symptoms, co-occurrence of symptoms within families, and the relationship of these symptoms to parent-reported overall recovery. Children and parents (n = 263 child-parent dyads) were enrolled during ED treatment for unintentional injury. Approximately 5 months later, children and parents (n = 178 dyads) completed standardized measures of posttraumatic stress and depression symptoms and parents reported on child overall recovery. Follow-up assessments found significant posttraumatic stress symptoms in 15% of children and 5% of parents, significant depression symptoms in 13% of children and 16% of parents, and problematic overall recovery in 17% of children. For both children and parents, posttraumatic stress and depression symptom severity were strongly associated. Child and parent symptoms were only modestly associated with each other, and there were few families in which both child and parent had significant posttraumatic stress or depression. Parent symptoms, but not child symptoms, were inversely associated with children's overall recovery. For about 1 in 6 children and parents, unintentional injury treated in the ED can be associated with negative psychological sequelae and suboptimal recovery. Within families, child and parent responses may differ; their relative association with overall recovery deserves additional research. To promote emotional recovery, ED clinicians should be aware of the potential psychological impact of unintentional injury, provide timely evidence-based anticipatory guidance, and communicate these concerns to primary care clinicians.

  4. Unintentional Injuries and Violence among Adults in Northern Jordan: A Hospital-Based Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzghoul, Manal M.; Shakhatreh, Mohammed K.; Al-sheyab, Nihaya

    2017-01-01

    Injuries (unintentional and intentional) are the main cause of death and disability worldwide, including Jordan. The main purpose of this hospital-based retrospective study was to identify characteristics, causes, and risk factors of unintentional injuries and violence among all adult patients who approached the Accidents and Emergency department because of injury in Northern Jordan. Data were collected retrospectively from four major hospitals from January 2008 to January 2013. A total of 2425 Jordanian individuals who accessed and were treated by the four hospitals were included in this study. The findings show that the majority of patients who approached the Accidents and Emergency departments in the four hospitals were males (n = 2044, 87.16%) versus females (n = 301, 12.8%). Violence was the most common reason of injury (70.66%), followed by road traffic crashes (23.21%). The most common anatomical locations of reported injuries were the head (38.74%), followed by abdomen/pelvis and lower back, among males and females (9.93%). Violence had a high significant effect on the site of injuries. Patients who had been injured to the head because of a stab wound or fighting were substantially over-involved in head injuries, with injury rates 3.88 and 7.51 times higher than those who had been injured to the head due to gunshot, respectively. Even patients who had been injured to the head because of assault show much higher involvement in injury risk than non-assault patients (Odds Ratio = 8.46). These findings highlight the need for a large national study to confirm the findings. It also draws attention to the importance of public awareness and to special injury prevention programs that not only focus on saving lives and lessening the number of injuries, illnesses, and fatalities, but also to limit the social and economic burden of injury among adults in Northern Jordan. PMID:28338614

  5. Fatal childhood injuries in Finland, 1971-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkkari, Jari; Mattila, Ville; Kivistö, Juho; Niemi, Seppo; Palvanen, Mika; Kannus, Pekka

    2013-06-01

    Childhood injuries are a major public health problem worldwide, injuries being the leading cause of death and disability from early childhood through adolescence. To examine the 40-year nationwide trends in the number and incidence of fatal injuries among children aged 0-14 years in Finland, a country with a white European population of 5.3 million. Data were obtained from the Official Cause-of-Death Statistics of Finland during 1971-2010. The main categories for unintentional injury deaths were road traffic injury, water traffic injury, falls, drowning and poisoning. For intentional injury deaths, the main categories were suicide and homicide. In 1971, there were 109 fatal injuries involving girls and 207 involving boys, and in 2010, these numbers were 10 and 16. The corresponding incidence rates (per 100 000 children per year) were 20.1 and 2.3 (girls), and 36.7 and 3.5 (boys). The reduction in fatal injuries was mostly due to fewer unintentional injuries. The greatest decline occurred in the number of fatal motor vehicle injuries: from 57 (girls) and 92 (boys) in 1971 to 5 (girls) and 2 (boys) in 2010. Drownings followed a similar pattern. Violence-related deaths also showed a decreasing trend. In 1971, there were 14 intentional deaths in girls and 15 in boys, while in 2010 these numbers were 0 and 3, respectively. This nationwide study confirms a decline in childhood injury deaths over the last four decades, with the greatest declines occurring in the number of fatal motor vehicle injuries, drownings and intentional injuries.

  6. Relating off-premises alcohol outlet density to intentional and unintentional injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Christopher; Smith, Karen; Gruenewald, Paul J; Ponicki, William R; Lee, Juliet P; Cameron, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the hypotheses that (i) intentional and unintentional injuries occur more frequently in areas with greater density of off-premises alcohol outlets; and (ii) larger and chain outlets selling cheaper alcohol contribute more substantially to injury risk than smaller and independent outlets. Ecological cross-sectional. From the 256 Statistical Area level 2 (SA2) census units in Melbourne, Australia, we selected a random sample of 62 units. There were 2119 Statistical Area level 1 (SA1) units nested within the selected SA2 units. The selected units contained 295 off-premises outlets. Two independent observers conducted premises assessments in all off-premises outlets, assessing the volume of alcohol available for sale (paces of shelf space), price (least wine price) and other operating characteristics (chain versus independent, drive-through). Outlet counts, assessed outlet characteristics and other area characteristics (population density, median age, median income, retail zoning) were aggregated within SA1 units. Dependent variables were counts of ambulance attended intentional injuries (assaults, stabbings, shootings) and unintentional injuries (falls, crush injuries and object strikes). In univariable analyses, chain outlets were larger (r = 0.383; P outlets. In Bayesian spatial Poisson models, off-premises outlet density was positively related to both intentional [incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 1.38; 95% credible interval (CI) = 1.19, 1.60] and unintentional injuries (IRR = 1.18; 95% CI = 1.06, 1.30). After disaggregation by outlet characteristics, chain outlet density was also related to both intentional (IRR = 1.35; 95% CI = 1.11, 1.64) and unintentional injuries (IRR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.08, 1.38). Greater off-premises outlet density is related to greater incidence of traumatic injury, and chain outlets appear to contribute most substantially to traumatic injury risk. © 2015 Society for the Study of

  7. Severe unintentional injuries sustained by Ohio children: Is there urban/rural variation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster Ovalle, Victoria; Pomerantz, Wendy J; Anderson, Brit L; Gittelman, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Determining at risk populations is essential to developing interventions that prevent injuries. This study examined the rates of severe unintentional injuries among urban versus rural Ohio children. Demographic and injury data for children 0 to 14 years old who had unintentional injuries from January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2012, were extracted retrospectively from the Ohio Trauma Acute Care Registry. Cases with no designated county were excluded. Injury rates per 100,000 children 14 years or younger were calculated annually using county of residence and US census data. Each county was assigned an urbanization level based on population density (A = most urban, D = most rural). There were 40,625 patients from 88 Ohio counties who met the inclusion criteria; the overall annual injury rate was 231.9. The mean age was 6.7 (SD, 4.5) years; 26,035 (64.1%) were male, and 31,468 (77.5%) were white. There were 593 deaths (1.5%). Injury rates by urbanization level were as follows: A: 120.4, B: 196.8, C: 249.1, and D: 247.4 (p = 0.04). Nearly 50% of all deaths occurred in the most urban counties. Those in the most urban areas were more likely to suffer injury from burns, drownings, and suffocations and less likely to be injured by animal bites or motorized vehicle collisions (p children (p injuries. Specific mechanisms of injury differed by demographics and urbanization in Ohio, suggesting areas for targeted injury prevention. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  8. Unintentional Injuries and Psychosocial Correlates among in-School Adolescents in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Karl Peltzer; Supa Pengpid

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to provide estimates of the prevalence and psychosocial correlates of unintentional injury among school-going adolescents in Malaysia. Cross-sectional data from the Global School-Based Health Survey (GSHS) included 21,699 students (predominantly ?13 to ?17 years) that were selected by a two-stage cluster sample design to represent all secondary school students in Forms 1 to 5. The percentage of school children reporting one or more serious injuries in the past year was 34.9%, ...

  9. Does living density matter for nonfatal unintentional home injury in Asian urban settings? Evidence from Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Emily Y Y; Kim, Jean H; Griffiths, Sian M; Lau, Joseph T F; Yu, Ignatius

    2009-11-01

    Injury is a major global disease burden for the twenty-first century. There are, however, few studies of unintentional household injury in Asian urban settings where living environments are characterized by extremely compact, high-living-density, multistory apartments. This study investigated the association between nonfatal unintentional household injuries with the resident's sociodemographic attributes and household characteristics in Hong Kong, the city with the world's highest population density. A cross-sectional retrospective recall study was conducted in May 2007 using a random telephone survey with a modified Chinese version of the World Health Organization Injury and Violence instrument. The study sample included 1,001 noninstitutionalized Cantonese-speaking Hong Kong residents of all ages, including foreign live-in domestic helpers. Multivariate regression was conducted to identify risk factors for nonfatal unintentional injuries in Hong Kong. Among a predominantly adult sample, household size and time spent at home were not associated with nonfatal unintentional household injuries in the general population in Hong Kong. The multivariate analyses indicated that female gender, owners of private homes, lower square footage of living space per person, and those with slip prevention devices in the bathroom were significantly associated with household injuries. Injured and noninjured groups were found to have adopted different injury prevention strategies toward household injuries. The results identified potential target groups for household injury prevention programs.

  10. A systematic review of technology-based interventions for unintentional injury prevention education and behaviour change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omaki, Elise; Rizzutti, Nicholas; Shields, Wendy; Zhu, Jeffrey; McDonald, Eileen; Stevens, Martha W; Gielen, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The aims of this literature review are to (1) summarise how computer and mobile technology-based health behaviour change applications have been evaluated in unintentional injury prevention, (2) describe how these successes can be applied to injury-prevention programmes in the future and (3) identify research gaps. Studies included in this systematic review were education and behaviour change intervention trials and programme evaluations in which the intervention was delivered by either a computer or mobile technology and addressed an unintentional injury prevention topic. Articles were limited to those published in English and after 1990. Among the 44 technology-based injury-prevention studies included in this review, 16 studies evaluated locally hosted software programmes, 4 studies offered kiosk-based programmes, 11 evaluated remotely hosted internet programmes, 2 studies used mobile technology or portable devices and 11 studies evaluated virtual-reality interventions. Locally hosted software programmes and remotely hosted internet programmes consistently increased knowledge and behaviours. Kiosk programmes showed evidence of modest knowledge and behaviour gains. Both programmes using mobile technology improved behaviours. Virtual-reality programmes consistently improved behaviours, but there were little gains in knowledge. No studies evaluated text-messaging programmes dedicated to injury prevention. There is much potential for computer-based programmes to be used for injury-prevention behaviour change. The reviewed studies provide evidence that computer-based communication is effective in conveying information and influencing how participants think about an injury topic and adopt safety behaviours. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Childhood psychosocial development and fatal injuries in Gauteng, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, K; Van Niekerk, A

    2015-01-01

    In South Africa, injuries are the third leading cause of death and disability. Children are especially susceptible to unintentional injuries, especially pedestrian injuries, burns and drowning. Injury risk is informed by children's exposure to adverse environmental circumstances, and individual capacities dependent on developmental maturity. Boys are at greater risk than girls. This study investigates the incidence of fatal childhood injuries as well as sex differences across psychosocial development stages. Data on fatal injuries in Gauteng, South Africa's most populous province, were obtained from the National Injury Mortality Surveillance System. The analysis drew on Erikson's psychosocial theory of development which was used to create meaningful age groups. Age-specific population data from the 2011 Census were used to calculate rates, and significant differences were determined through the generation of risk ratios and confidence intervals. There were 5404 fatal injuries among children in Gauteng from 2008 to 2011. The average age of victims was 8.9 years, and the majority male (65.6%). In infancy, the mortality rates for all injuries and non-traffic unintentional injuries were significantly higher than for the other age groups. Burns were the most common cause of death in infancy and early childhood. Pedestrian injuries accounted for a third of mortality in preschool and school age, and homicide rates were significantly higher in adolescence than in the other developmental stages. For injuries in general, boys had significantly higher mortality rates than girls in all age groups except preschool. The only instance where the mortality rate for girls was significantly higher than for boys was for adolescent ingestion poisoning suicides. The exposure to environmental and social risks is differentially moderated with maturing age and levels of autonomy. The sex of the child also informs risk. The nature of these risks is important when considering child injury

  12. Epidemiology of unintentional injuries among children under six years old in floating and residential population in four communities in Beijing: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Gong, Limin; Wang, Huishan; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiaoying; Kaime-Atterhög, Wanjiku

    2014-05-01

    To explore and compare the epidemiological characteristics of non-fatal unintentional injury among children in floating and residential population. Using a structured survey, quantitative data were collected on a total of 352 floating and 201 residential families. Some potential influencing factors were questioned, such as socio-demographic characteristics, injury-related family environment, knowledge, attitude and behavior, and child's character. The self-reported incidence of non-fatal unintentional injuries was 11.9 % in the floating group and 12.9 % in the residential group. Unintentional injuries were more serious and caused more disease burden in floating children than residential children, with the average medical cost being over ten times in the floating group than in the residential group. Results of multiple regression analysis showed that children living in floating families have more risk of unintentional injuries than those children in residential families. Older children and children with extroverted character were more vulnerable to unintentional injuries. Risky family environment was also an important risk factor of unintentional injuries. Better household economic status and having more siblings appeared to reduce the probability of unintentional injuries among children. Floating children are more vulnerable to unintentional injuries comparing with residential children. These findings can be used as preliminary data supporting intervention strategies and activities to promote safe living environment and decrease injury incidence among floating children.

  13. Gun storage practices and risk of youth suicide and unintentional firearm injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, David C; Mueller, Beth A; Riedy, Christine; Dowd, M Denise; Villaveces, Andres; Prodzinski, Janice; Nakagawara, Jon; Howard, John; Thiersch, Norman; Harruff, Richard

    2005-02-09

    Household firearms are associated with an elevated risk of firearm death to occupants in the home. Many organizations and health authorities advocate locking firearms and ammunition to prevent access to guns by children and adolescents. The association of these firearm storage practices with the reduction of firearm injury risk is unclear. To measure the association of specific household firearm storage practices (locking guns, locking ammunition, keeping guns unloaded) and the risk of unintentional and self-inflicted firearm injuries. Case-control study of firearms in events identified by medical examiner and coroner offices from 37 counties in Washington, Oregon, and Missouri, and 5 trauma centers in Seattle, Spokane, and Tacoma, Wash, and Kansas City, Mo. CASES AND CONTROLS: Case firearms were identified by involvement in an incident in which a child or adolescent younger than 20 years gained access to a firearm and shot himself/herself intentionally or unintentionally or shot another individual unintentionally. Firearm assaults and homicides were excluded. We used records from hospitals and medical examiners to ascertain these incidents. Using random-digit dial telephone sampling, control firearms were identified by identification of eligible households with at least 1 firearm and children living or visiting in the home. Controls were frequency matched by age group and county. The key exposures of interest in this study were: (1) whether the subject firearm was stored in a locked location or with an extrinsic lock; (2) whether the firearm was stored unloaded; (3) whether the firearm was stored both unloaded in a locked location; (4) whether the ammunition for the firearm was stored separately; and (5) whether the ammunition was stored in a locked location. Data regarding the storage status of case and control guns were collected by interview with respondents from the households of case and control firearms. We interviewed 106 respondents with case firearms and

  14. Unintentional Injuries and Psychosocial Correlates among in-School Adolescents in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2015-11-20

    The study aimed to provide estimates of the prevalence and psychosocial correlates of unintentional injury among school-going adolescents in Malaysia. Cross-sectional data from the Global School-Based Health Survey (GSHS) included 21,699 students (predominantly ≤13 to ≥17 years) that were selected by a two-stage cluster sample design to represent all secondary school students in Forms 1 to 5. The percentage of school children reporting one or more serious injuries in the past year was 34.9%, 42.1% of boys and 27.8% of girls. The two major causes of the most serious injury were "fall" (9.9%) and motor vehicle accident or being hit by a motor vehicle (5.4%), and the most frequent type of injury sustained was cut, puncture, or stab wound (6.2%) and a broken bone or dislocated joint (4.2%). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, sociodemographic factors (being male and low socioeconomic status), substance use (tobacco and cannabis use), frequent soft drink consumption, attending physical education classes three or more times a week, other risky behavior (truancy, ever having had sex, being bullied), psychological distress, and lack of parental or guardian bonding were associated with annual injury prevalence. Several factors were identified, which could be included in injury prevention promotion programs among secondary school children.

  15. Unintentional Injuries and Psychosocial Correlates among in-School Adolescents in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Peltzer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to provide estimates of the prevalence and psychosocial correlates of unintentional injury among school-going adolescents in Malaysia. Cross-sectional data from the Global School-Based Health Survey (GSHS included 21,699 students (predominantly ≤13 to ≥17 years that were selected by a two-stage cluster sample design to represent all secondary school students in Forms 1 to 5. The percentage of school children reporting one or more serious injuries in the past year was 34.9%, 42.1% of boys and 27.8% of girls. The two major causes of the most serious injury were “fall” (9.9% and motor vehicle accident or being hit by a motor vehicle (5.4%, and the most frequent type of injury sustained was cut, puncture, or stab wound (6.2% and a broken bone or dislocated joint (4.2%. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, sociodemographic factors (being male and low socioeconomic status, substance use (tobacco and cannabis use, frequent soft drink consumption, attending physical education classes three or more times a week, other risky behavior (truancy, ever having had sex, being bullied, psychological distress, and lack of parental or guardian bonding were associated with annual injury prevalence. Several factors were identified, which could be included in injury prevention promotion programs among secondary school children.

  16. Unintentional Injuries and Psychosocial Correlates among in-School Adolescents in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to provide estimates of the prevalence and psychosocial correlates of unintentional injury among school-going adolescents in Malaysia. Cross-sectional data from the Global School-Based Health Survey (GSHS) included 21,699 students (predominantly ≤13 to ≥17 years) that were selected by a two-stage cluster sample design to represent all secondary school students in Forms 1 to 5. The percentage of school children reporting one or more serious injuries in the past year was 34.9%, 42.1% of boys and 27.8% of girls. The two major causes of the most serious injury were “fall” (9.9%) and motor vehicle accident or being hit by a motor vehicle (5.4%), and the most frequent type of injury sustained was cut, puncture, or stab wound (6.2%) and a broken bone or dislocated joint (4.2%). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, sociodemographic factors (being male and low socioeconomic status), substance use (tobacco and cannabis use), frequent soft drink consumption, attending physical education classes three or more times a week, other risky behavior (truancy, ever having had sex, being bullied), psychological distress, and lack of parental or guardian bonding were associated with annual injury prevalence. Several factors were identified, which could be included in injury prevention promotion programs among secondary school children. PMID:26610542

  17. Predictors of unintentional childhood injuries seen at the Accident ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 3 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  18. Unintentional injury mortality among indigenous communities of Taiwan: trends from 2002 to 2013 and evaluation of a community-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Stephen W; Chong, Hiu Ha; Kao, Hui-Chuan

    2017-11-27

    Indigenous communities in Taiwan shoulder a disproportionate burden of unintentional injury fatalities. We compare unintentional injury mortality rate trends among Taiwan's indigenous communities and the general population from 2002 to 2013, and evaluate potential impact of a community-based injury prevention programme on indigenous unintentional injury death rates. Standardised and crude unintentional injury mortality rates were obtained from Taiwan government reports. Segmented linear regression was used to estimate and compare unintentional injury mortality rate trends before and after the intervention. Between 2002 and 2013, unintentional injury mortality rates among Taiwan's indigenous population significantly declined by about 4.5 deaths per 100 000 each year (pindigenous Taiwanese and the general population significantly decreased by approximately 1% each successive year (p=0.02). However, we were unable to detect evidence that the 'Healthy and Safe Tribe' programme was associated with a statistically significant decrease in the unintentional injury mortality rate trend among indigenous persons (p=0.81). Taiwanese indigenous communities remain at significantly higher risk of unintentional injury death, though the gap may be slowly narrowing. We found no evidence that the 'Healthy and Safe Tribe' indigenous injury-prevention programme significantly contributed to the nationwide decline in unintentional injury mortality among indigenous Taiwanese communities from 2009 to 2013. Future interventions to address the disproportionate burden of unintentional injury fatalities among indigenous Taiwanese should consider interventions with wider coverage of the indigenous population, and complementing grass roots led community-based interventions with structural policy interventions as well. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise

  19. Unintentional injuries in developing countries: the epidemiology of a neglected problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G S; Barss, P

    1991-01-01

    The WHO has a special office to coordinate global injury epidemiology and prevention; 2 world Bank policy and planning projects identified injuries as a priority area. The epidemiology of unintentional injuries based on the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, external causes codes: E800-E949, in developing countries is reviewed. Developing countries are those with an annual gross national product/capita of US$2500, based on 1986 figures form the World Bank. It includes countries generally with a population greater than 1 million. Only Sri Lanka, Thailand, Egypt, and Mauritius reported injury data to the WHO between 1977-87. There were no data available from the Caribbean and Central and South America. Information included here was obtained from a review of world literature on injuries indexed in 3 computer databases: Medlars, Biosis, and Excerpta Medica for the period 1966-90. 2500 reference titles and abstracts were reviewed. Those focusing on risk factors for and causes of injuries were selected for inclusion. Injury mortality is discussed in terms of its health impact and local population based studies. Injury morbidity discussion refers to the Gordon study on the rural Indian population and rates of injuries, urban studies in Brazil, Chile, Cuba, and Venezuela on causes of injury, and longterm disability from a Nepal study, and a Brazilian study on costs of injuries. The discussion of risk factors common to many injuries identifies age and sex particularly for the elderly, and alcohol or kola nuts as leading to higher accidents rates. Poverty, urban residence, and race are also suggested, but there is little evidence to support this. Specific attention is given to the following injuries: drowning, burns and fires, falls, poisoning, animal bites and wounds, machinery or tool or sharp objects, bicycles, eye, and disasters. Emergency medical services have been found to decrease trauma; it is suggested, that for those unable to afford mobile

  20. Unintentional Injuries in Children Up to Six Years of Age and Related Parental Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagati, Gabriella; Vezzosi, Luigi; Angelillo, Italo F

    2016-10-01

    To describe risk factors associated with unintentional injuries among children aged injuries and related preventive measures. A cross-sectional survey was conducted between May and July 2015 on a random sample of 794 parents of 3- to 6-year-old children through a self-administered anonymous questionnaire. A total of 409 parents participated. Two-thirds of the children had experienced at least 1 unintentional injury in the previous 12 months. More than one-half of these children were boys. The leading cause was falls; the injuries occurred mainly at home, and only 9.2% were brought for attention to an emergency department. Parents who did not believe that it is possible to prevent unintentional injuries were more likely to have had a child injured. Approximately 70% of respondents were aware of security measures to prevent pediatric injuries, and this knowledge was more prevalent in older parents and in those with at least a college level of education compared with those with a middle school education. The perceived utility of education about preventive measures of pediatric injuries had a mean value of 8.9 on a Likert scale of 1-10 (1, not useful, to 10, very useful) and was significantly higher in mothers. This study highlights a clear need for public health educational programs for parents regarding prevention of unintentional injuries in children as a valuable tool to increase safety and injury prevention and to reduce risks, because the majority of such injuries occur at home. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. History of maltreatment among unintentional injury deaths: analyses of Texas child fatality review data, 2005-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Sharyn E; Mirchandani, Gita; Rodriguez, Susan; Hellsten, John

    2011-02-01

    This report examines unintentional injury deaths among children with and without a history of child maltreatment. Data are from reviews of 1192 unintentional injury deaths occurring among children in Texas during 2005-2007. The study examined differences in child demographic characteristics, injury mechanism, and supervisor status at time of death between children with and without maltreatment history by using descriptive statistics and χ² tests. Separate analyses compared characteristics of asphyxia, drowning, and poisoning deaths. In 10% of the unintentional injury deaths that were reviewed, the child had a history of maltreatment. The prevalence of a history of maltreatment was highest among black decedents and lowest among white decedents. Prevalence of a history of maltreatment was highest among infant decedents and lowest among youth decedents, ages 10-14 years. Among deaths where there was no maltreatment history, 54% were due to motor vehicle related incidents, whereas 51% of deaths among children with maltreatment history were caused by drowning, asphyxia, and poisoning. Supervisors of child decedents with a history of maltreatment were significantly more likely to have been alcohol impaired (6.9% vs 1.6%; pdeath. Differences between child decedents with and without maltreatment history were observed in infant sleep surface in suffocation deaths, location and barrier type in drowning deaths, and substance type in poisoning deaths. These data show that the mechanisms and circumstances surrounding unintentional injury deaths among children with a history of maltreatment differ from those without a history of maltreatment. This underscores the need for appropriate interventions to prevent unintentional and intentional injuries in families with a history of maltreatment.

  2. School-based education programmes for the prevention of unintentional injuries in children and young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Elizabeth; Whitehead, Jessica; Mhizha-Murira, Jacqueline; Clarkson, Mandy; Watson, Michael C; Mulvaney, Caroline A; Staniforth, Joy Ul; Bhuchar, Munish; Kendrick, Denise

    2016-12-27

    Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death in children aged four to 18 years and are a major cause of ill health. The school setting offers the opportunity to deliver preventive interventions to a large number of children and has been used to address a range of public health problems. However, the effectiveness of the school setting for the prevention of different injury mechanisms in school-aged children is not well understood. To assess the effects of school-based educational programmes for the prevention of injuries in children and evaluate their impact on improving children's safety skills, behaviour and practices, and knowledge, and assess their cost-effectiveness. We ran the most recent searches up to 16 September 2016 for the following electronic databases: Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; Ovid MEDLINE(R), Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations; Ovid MEDLINE(R) Daily and Ovid OLDMEDLINE(R); Embase and Embase Classic (Ovid); ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded; ISI Web of Science Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science; ISI Web of Science: Social Sciences Citation Index; ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Social Sciences & Humanities; and the 14 October 2016 for the following electronic databases: Health Economics Evaluations Database (HEED); Health Technology Assessment Database (HTA); CINAHL Plus (EBSCO); ZETOC; LILACS; PsycINFO; ERIC; Dissertation Abstracts Online; IBSS; BEI; ASSIA; CSA Sociological Abstracts; Injury Prevention Web; SafetyLit; EconLit (US); PAIS; UK Clinical Research Network Study Portfolio; Open Grey; Index to Theses in the UK and Ireland; Bibliomap and TRoPHI. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised controlled trials (non-RCTs), and controlled before-and-after (CBA) studies that evaluated school-based educational programmes aimed at preventing a range of injury mechanisms. The

  3. Preventing unintentional injury in children and adolescents--the importance of local injury data collection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Carroll, C

    2012-02-01

    We sought to prospectively study all injuries in children and adolescents up to 16 years of age presenting to a regional Emergency Department (ED), to ascertain detailed injury patterns and to use this data to recommend injury prevention priorities. Electronic injury surveillance was prospectively collected over a 10 year period (1997-2007) in a hospital with a paediatric catchment population of 75,000 in a region with pockets of high social deprivation. All fatalities were obtained from data provided by the Central Statistics Office (CSO). Over a 10 year period, there were 31 fatalities, 5,408 admissions and 40,817 new attendances due to injury. Males outnumbered females in a 3:2 ratio. Of all injuries 24,317 (60%) occurred at home. Peak injury presentation time was in the evening between 18:00 and 20:00. Minor injuries (bruises, minor head injuries, lacerations and sprains) accounted for 32,456 (80%) of total. Fractures resulting from high falls (n=1,194) tended to result from bunk beds, staircases, horses, walls and playground equipment. Burns (n=630) involved hot liquids (tea, coffee), hot bath water, hot cooking oil and hot cooking plates. Pedestrian injuries (n=251) were predominantly \\'dart outs\\' in urban areas. Car passenger injuries (n=869) showed low rates of documented car restraint use. Poisonings (n= 1,153) were predominantly medicinal products. Cyclist injuries (n=477) indicated low documented use of appropriate helmet wear. Prevention priorities should focus on home injuries, hot liquid burn and scald injuries and high falls from walls, beds and playground equipment. To prevent road-related injuries and deaths, further legislation, urban planning and greater police enforcement is required.

  4. Association between unintentional injury during pregnancy and excess risk of preterm birth and its neonatal sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiliang; Basso, Olga; Kramer, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    The sequelae of preterm births may differ, depending on whether birth follows an acute event or a chronic condition. In a population-based cohort study of 2,711,645 Canadian hospital deliveries from 2003 to 2012, 3,059 women experienced unintentional injury during pregnancy. We assessed the impact of the acute event on pregnancy outcome and on neonatal complications, such as nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage, respiratory distress syndrome, intubation, and death. We adjusted for maternal age, parity, pregnancy conditions, and (for neonates) gestational age in logistic regression analyses. Injury was significantly associated with fetal mortality and early preterm delivery. For preterm infants born to injured women during the hospitalization for injury versus those born to noninjured women, the adjusted odds ratios were 2.25 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.23, 4.17) for neonatal death, 2.44 (95% CI: 1.76, 3.37) for respiratory distress, 2.20 (95% CI: 1.26, 3.84) for nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage, and 2.17 (95% CI: 1.60, 2.96) for intubation, despite more favorable fetal growth in those born to noninjured women (adjusted birth-weight-for-gestational-age z score: 0.154 vs. 0.024, P = 0.041; small-for-gestational-age rate: 4.5% vs. 9.5%, P = 0.001). Our findings suggest that adaptation to the suboptimal intrauterine environment underlying chronic causes of preterm birth may protect preterm infants from adverse sequelae. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Unintentional Injuries in Preschool Age Children: Is There a Correlation With Parenting Style and Parental Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Ethem; Dursun, Onur Burak; Esin, İbrahim Selcuk; Öğütlü, Hakan; Özcan, Halil; Mutlu, Murat

    2015-08-01

    Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death among children. Previous research has shown that most of the injuries occur in and around the home. Therefore, parents have a key role in the occurrence and prevention of injuries. In this study, we examined the relationship among home injuries to children and parental attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, parental attitudes, and children's behavioral problems.Forty children who were admitted to the emergency department because of home injuries constitute the study group. The control group also consisted of 40 children, who were admitted for mild throat infections. The parents filled out questionnaires assessing parental ADHD, child behavioral problems, and parenting attitudes.Scores were significantly higher for both internalizing disorders and externalizing disorders in study groups. We also found that ADHD symptoms were significantly higher among fathers of injured children compared with fathers of control groups. Democratic parenting was also found to correlate with higher numbers of injuries.Parenting style, as well as the psychopathology of both the parents and children, is important factors in children's injuries. A child psychiatrist visit following an emergency procedure may help to prevent further unintentional injuries to the child.

  6. South Dakota accidental childhood deaths, 2000-2007: what can we do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svien, Lana R; Senne, Svien A; Rasmussen, Carl

    2010-05-01

    Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death in children around the world and are an under-recognized public health problem in the United States. The purpose of this study was to highlight the nature of the problem in South Dakota and outline interventions that have been successful in reducing childhood injuries in other states. This quantitative retrospective study examined mortality files in South Dakota for children birth to 19 years of age who died between January 1, 2000 to December 28, 2007. Although the number of deaths declined considerably from 2006 to 2007, South Dakota had the second-highest rate in the nation of childhood unintentional injury deaths from all causes between 2000-2005. The majority of deaths occurred in males and were associated with transportation-related deaths. Suffocation was the leading cause of death for newborns to age 1 year. Childhood accidental death in South Dakota is clearly a critical public health problem. Intervention efforts to reduce deaths from unintentional injuries amongst children should be targeted as the leading causes of accidental death for specific age groups and American Indian youth. Physicians, health educators and policymakers must play a role in prevention targeting the high-risk groups in addition to advocating for policy changes to protect childhood safety. More stringent child restraint laws, graduated driving laws, smoking cessation programs for parents, creation of safer sleep environments and further investigation of why a high proportion of American Indian children die accidentally in South Dakota are all warranted.

  7. Childhood Injuries in Singapore: Can Local Physicians and the Healthcare System Do More to Confront This Public Health Concern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvin Cong Wei Ong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Childhood injury is one of the leading causes of death globally. Singapore is no exception to this tragic fact, with childhood injuries accounting up to 37% of Emergency Department visits. Hence, it is important to understand the epidemiology and risk factors of childhood injuries locally. A search for relevant articles published from 1996–2016 was performed on PubMed, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar using keywords relating to childhood injury in Singapore. The epidemiology, mechanisms of injury, risk factors and recommended prevention strategies of unintentional childhood injuries were reviewed and described. Epidemiological studies have shown that childhood injury is a common, preventable and significant public health concern in Singapore. Home injuries and falls are responsible for majority of the injuries. Injuries related to childcare products, playground and road traffic accidents are also important causes. Healthcare professionals and legislators play an important role in raising awareness and reducing the incidence of childhood injuries in Singapore. For example, despite legislative requirements for many years, the low usage of child restraint seats in Singapore is worrisome. Thus, greater efforts in public health education in understanding childhood injuries, coupled with more research studies to evaluate the effectiveness and deficiencies of current prevention strategies will be necessary.

  8. Childhood Injuries in Singapore: Can Local Physicians and the Healthcare System Do More to Confront This Public Health Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Alvin Cong Wei; Low, Sher Guan; Vasanwala, Farhad Fakhrudin

    2016-07-16

    Childhood injury is one of the leading causes of death globally. Singapore is no exception to this tragic fact, with childhood injuries accounting up to 37% of Emergency Department visits. Hence, it is important to understand the epidemiology and risk factors of childhood injuries locally. A search for relevant articles published from 1996-2016 was performed on PubMed, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar using keywords relating to childhood injury in Singapore. The epidemiology, mechanisms of injury, risk factors and recommended prevention strategies of unintentional childhood injuries were reviewed and described. Epidemiological studies have shown that childhood injury is a common, preventable and significant public health concern in Singapore. Home injuries and falls are responsible for majority of the injuries. Injuries related to childcare products, playground and road traffic accidents are also important causes. Healthcare professionals and legislators play an important role in raising awareness and reducing the incidence of childhood injuries in Singapore. For example, despite legislative requirements for many years, the low usage of child restraint seats in Singapore is worrisome. Thus, greater efforts in public health education in understanding childhood injuries, coupled with more research studies to evaluate the effectiveness and deficiencies of current prevention strategies will be necessary.

  9. Type A personality, hostility, time urgency and unintentional injuries among Chinese undergraduates: a matched case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Associations between type A behaviour pattern (TABP) and injuries are inconsistent. These inconsistencies may be due to different effects of various components of TABP, namely time urgency/impatience, hostility and competitive drive. It is important to examine the relationship between the global TABP, its two components, and unintentional injuries, among undergraduates in China. Methods On the basis of a previous cross-sectional study, we conducted a matched case–control study. 253 cases and an equal number of age-, gender-, and major-matched controls were included. The questionnaire solicited socio-demographic information, the experience of injuries, the scale of TABP, and other potential confounding factors. Besides the correlation between the global TABP and injuries, the influences of the two components of TABP on injuries were also evaluated. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine the crude odds ratios (ORs) and adjusted ORs of injury events. Results A dose–response relationship was apparent among students who rated themselves higher on the TABP scale (P-value for trend, 0.002), with a crude OR of 2.93 (95% CI: 0.93–9.19) for injuries comparing those with TABP to those with type B behaviour pattern (TBBP). After adjustment for potential confounding factors, TABP remained statistically significant, and the adjusted OR was 5.52 (95% CI: 1.43–21.27); from a comparison of students with TABP to those with TBBP. A dose–response relationship was also apparent between the hostility component and nonfatal injuries, both in crude analysis and after adjusting for other confounders. The relationship between time-hurry and injuries was not statistically significant, based on univariate and multivariate analyses. Conclusions Both the global TABP and the hostility component were associated with a dose response increase in the risk of non-fatal unintentional injuries among Chinese undergraduates. Further studies need to be conducted to

  10. Preventing unintentional injuries in the home using the Health Impact Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Karin A; Liller, Karen D; Baldwin, Grant; Sleet, David

    2015-04-01

    Injuries continue to be the leading cause of death for the first four decades of life. These injuries result from a confluence of behavioral, physical, structural, environmental, and social factors. Taken together, these illustrate the importance of taking a broad and multileveled approach to injury prevention. Using examples from fall, fire, scald, and poisoning-related injuries, this article illustrates the utility of an approach that incorporates a social-environmental perspective in identifying and selecting interventions to improve the health and safety of individuals. Injury prevention efforts to prevent home injuries benefit from multilevel modifications of behavior, public policy, laws and enforcement, the environment, consumer products and engineering standards, as demonstrated with Frieden's Health Impact Pyramid. A greater understanding, however, is needed to explain the associations between tiers. While interventions that include modifications of the social environment are being field-tested, much more work needs to be done in measuring social-environmental change and in evaluating these programs to disentangle what works best. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  11. A socio-ecological model for unintentional injuries in minorities: a case study of Arab Israeli children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron-Epel, Orna; Ivancovsky, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Minority children have often been reported to be at high risk of injury. The higher levels of reported unintentional injuries among Arab children compared to Jewish children in Israel are mainly due to pedestrian traffic crashes, falls and burns. Arab children aged 1-4 years have a higher relative risk of injury compared to Jews. We suggest a socio-ecological model to explain these differences in risk based on individual, interpersonal, community and societal ecological levels of society. Each level is divided into social and physical environments and behaviour. Two main factors may contribute to the high rates of injury among Arab children: the quality of the physical environment in which the children live and play and the levels of child supervision. Socio-economic status may contribute to these differences at all ecological levels of society. This approach could be useful for researchers and practitioners to analyse similar issues in other communities and help develop appropriate interventions.

  12. Relationships between Sleep Behaviors and Unintentional Injury in Southern Chinese School-Aged Children: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yafei; Ma, Di; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Fuyuan; Liu, Xiangxiang; Li, Liping

    2015-10-16

    The purpose of this study is to explore the relationships between sleep behaviors and injury occurrence among Chinese school-aged children. Data were collected with self-administered questionnaires of a cross-sectional survey which covered the school-aged children from southeastern Chinese urban and rural areas in April 2010. Information was collected on unintentional injury in the past year, sleep duration, napping and daytime fatigue, sleeping pill use, and social-demographic variables. Multivariable logistic regression analyses, controlling for confounding factors, were conducted to assess sleep-related variables that were associated with injuries. Students who slept for less than 8 h had a 30% increased risk of injury (OR: 1.30; 95%CI: 1.01-1.69) compared with those who slept for 8-9 h. Lack of napping, snoring and use of sleeping pills were significantly associated with injury. Among different genders, the slight difference in sleep behaviors predicted the occurrence of injury. Rural children displayed more sleep behaviors associated with injury than urban children. The sleep behaviors of primary school students were more negatively correlated with injury occurrence than junior/senior high school children. Consideration should be given to the prevention of problematic sleep behaviors as a potential risk factor in order to decrease injury rates and promote the health of school-aged children.

  13. Relationships between Sleep Behaviors and Unintentional Injury in Southern Chinese School-Aged Children: A Population-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafei Tan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore the relationships between sleep behaviors and injury occurrence among Chinese school-aged children. Data were collected with self-administered questionnaires of a cross-sectional survey which covered the school-aged children from southeastern Chinese urban and rural areas in April 2010. Information was collected on unintentional injury in the past year, sleep duration, napping and daytime fatigue, sleeping pill use, and social-demographic variables. Multivariable logistic regression analyses, controlling for confounding factors, were conducted to assess sleep-related variables that were associated with injuries. Students who slept for less than 8 h had a 30% increased risk of injury (OR: 1.30; 95%CI: 1.01–1.69 compared with those who slept for 8–9 h. Lack of napping, snoring and use of sleeping pills were significantly associated with injury. Among different genders, the slight difference in sleep behaviors predicted the occurrence of injury. Rural children displayed more sleep behaviors associated with injury than urban children. The sleep behaviors of primary school students were more negatively correlated with injury occurrence than junior/senior high school children. Consideration should be given to the prevention of problematic sleep behaviors as a potential risk factor in order to decrease injury rates and promote the health of school-aged children.

  14. County Poverty Concentration and Disparities in Unintentional Injury Deaths: A Fourteen-Year Analysis of 1.6 Million U.S. Fatalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karb, Rebecca A; Subramanian, S V; Fleegler, Eric W

    2016-01-01

    Unintentional injury is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, and mortality due to injury has risen over the past decade. The social determinants behind these rising trends have not been well documented. This study examines the relationship between county-level poverty and unintentional injury mortality in the United States from 1999-2012. Complete annual compressed mortality and population data for 1999-2012 were obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics and linked with census yearly county poverty measures. The outcomes examined were unintentional injury fatalities, overall and by six specific mechanisms: motor vehicle collisions, falls, accidental discharge of firearms, drowning, exposure to smoke or fire, and unintentional poisoning. Age-adjusted mortality rates and time trends for county poverty categories were calculated, and multivariate negative binomial regression was used to determine changes over time in both the relative risk of living in high poverty concentration areas and the population attributable fraction. Age-adjusted mortality rates for counties with > 20% poverty were 66% higher mortality in 1999 compared with counties with < 5% poverty (45.25 vs. 27.24 per 100,000; 95% CI for rate difference 15.57,20.46), and that gap widened in 2012 to 79% (44.54 vs. 24.93; 95% CI for rate difference 17.13,22.09). The relative risk of living in the highest poverty counties has increased for all injury mechanisms with the exception of accidental discharge of firearms. The population attributable fraction for all unintentional injuries rose from 0.22 (95% CI 0.13,0.30) in 1999 to 0.35 (95% CI 0.22,0.45) in 2012. This is the first study that uses comprehensive mortality data to document the associations between county poverty and injury mortality rates for the entire US population over a 14 year period. This study suggests that injury reduction interventions should focus on areas of high or increasing poverty.

  15. Risk of fatal unintentional injuries in children by migration status: a nationwide cohort study with 46 years' follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Najmeh; Beiki, Omid; Mohammadi, Reza

    2015-04-01

    Injuries are responsible for much child and adolescent mortality in the world. To study the effect of parental birth country on the risk of fatal unintentional injuries. We established a cohort by linkages between Swedish national registers through personal identification number. The main variable was country of birth of parents. Children with both parents born in Sweden were the reference group. The cohort was followed up from the starting date of the study (1 January 1961) or date of birth, whichever occurred last, until the exit date, which was death due to unintentional injury, first emigration or end of the follow-up (31 December 2007), whichever came first. We calculated HRs with 95% CIs adjusted for age at exit, parental education and calendar period of birth by Cox proportional hazards models. We found a significantly higher risk of fatal unintentional injuries among children with a foreign background than among native children. We found a higher risk of fatal transportation-related injuries and drowning among boys with a foreign background and a higher risk of fatal burns/fire and falls among girls with a foreign background than among same sex native children. We also found a higher risk of fatal unintentional injuries among children with a foreign background at older ages than among native children at the same ages. Injury prevention work against unintentional injuries among children of foreign origin is more complex than that among native children. We recommend designing specific studies to find out the factors responsible and planning preventive interventions aiming at this particular group of children with a foreign background. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Childhood Diseases - What Parents Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Childhood Diseases - What Parents Need to Know Past Issues / ... centers is continuing to improve the outlook for childhood diseases every day. Photo: iStock When the Eunice ...

  17. What Is Spinal Cord Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Condition Information Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Spinal Cord Injury (SCI): Condition Information What is SCI? SCI is ... 3 National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Spinal cord injury: Hope through research. Retrieved June 19 , 2013 , from ...

  18. Cognitive function in childhood and early adulthood and injuries later in life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Laursen, Bjarne

    2007-01-01

    measured at both the age of 12 and 18 years was inversely associated with any form of unintentional injury. Adjustment for educational attainment at the age of 18 years attenuated these associations but did not remove them completely. The association was most evident for falls and poisoning, while......BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that cognitive function in childhood is a modifiable risk factor for adult injury. This study examines the relationship between cognitive function measured at the age of 12 and 18 years and fatal and non-fatal injuries later in adult life. METHODS: A total of 11...... associations with other injury types were weaker and disappeared after adjustment for educational status. Cognitive function was associated with repeated hospital admissions for injuries as well as length of hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS: We found marked inverse associations between cognitive function measured...

  19. Patterns in childhood sports injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damore, Dorothy T; Metzl, Jordan D; Ramundo, Maria; Pan, Sharon; Van Amerongen, Robert

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this epidemiologic study is twofold: first, to determine the relative frequency of sports-related injuries compared with all musculoskeletal injuries in patients 5 to 21 years of age presenting to the emergency department (ED), and second, to evaluate the sports-specific and anatomic site-specific nature of these injuries. Patterns of injury in patients 5 to 21 years of age presenting to four pediatric EDs with musculoskeletal injuries in October 1999 and April 2000 were prospectively studied. Information collected included age, sex, injury type, anatomical injury site, and cause of injury (sports-related or otherwise). Information about patient outcome and disposition was also obtained. There were a total of 1421 injuries in 1275 patients. Musculoskeletal injuries were more common in male patients (790/62%) than in female patients. The mean age of the patients was 12.2 years (95% CI, 12.0-12.4). Sprains, contusions, and fractures were the most common injury types (34, 30, and 25%, respectively). Female patients experienced a greater percentage of sprains (44% vs 36%) and contusions (37% vs 33%) and fewer fractures (22% vs 31%) than male patients. Sports injuries accounted for 41% (521) of all musculoskeletal injuries and were responsible for 8% (495/6173) of all ED visits. Head, forearm, and wrist injuries were most commonly seen in biking, hand injuries in football and basketball, knee injuries in soccer, and ankle and foot injuries in basketball. Sports injuries in children and adolescents were by far the most common cause of musculoskeletal injuries treated in the ED, accounting for 41% of all musculoskeletal injuries. This represents the highest percentage of sports-related musculoskeletal injuries per ED visit reported in children to date. As children and adolescents participate in sports in record numbers nationwide, sports injury research and prevention will become increasingly more important.

  20. Incidence of unintentional injuries in farming based on one year of weekly registration in Danish farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K; Carstensen, O; Lauritsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    In Denmark, farming ranks as the industry with the highest incidence rate of fatal injuries. For nonfatal injuries, insufficient registration practices prevent valid comparisons between occupations. This study examines the occurrence of farm accidents and injuries, as well as work-specific factors...

  1. Incidence of unintentional injuries in farming based on one year of weekly registration in Danish farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K; Carstensen, Ole; Lauritsen, J M

    2000-01-01

    In Denmark, farming ranks as the industry with the highest incidence rate of fatal injuries. For nonfatal injuries, insufficient registration practices prevent valid comparisons between occupations. This study examines the occurrence of farm accidents and injuries, as well as work-specific factors......, via weekly registration in a representative sample of 393 farms in one county during 1 year....

  2. Community survey of childhood injuries in North-Central Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Received 9 November 2012 accepted 10 March 2015. Introduction. Every day, worldwide, the lives of more than 2000 families are torn apart by the loss of a child to unintentional injuries [1]. Child injuries are a growing health problem and although data of incidence are available for most parts of the developed world, there ...

  3. Presence of minor and major mental health impairment in adolescence and death from suicide and unintentional injuries/accidents in men: a national longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadum, Elin Anita; Fønnebø, Vinjar; Borud, Einar Kristian

    2017-01-01

    To examine the association between minor and major mental health impairment in late adolescence and death from suicide and unintentional injuries/accidents in men. In Norway, all men attend a compulsory military medical and psychological examination. We included 558 949 men aged 17-19 years at the time of military examination in 1980-1999 and followed them up for death from suicide and unintentional injuries/accidents until the end of 2013. We used Cox proportional hazard models to examine the association between the presence of minor and major mental health impairments at examination and death from suicide and unintentional injuries/accidents. Compared to men with no mental health impairment, those with minor mental health impairment was associated with an increased risk of death from suicide (adjusted HR (HR adj )=1.63, 95% CI 1.39 to 1.92), transport accidents (HR adj =1.33, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.63), accidental poisoning (HR adj =2.27, 95% CI 1.79 to 2.88) and other unintentional injuries/accidents (HR adj =1.54, 95% CI 1.17 to 2.02). In men with major mental health impairment, the risk of death from suicide and accidental poisoning was elevated two times (HR adj =2.29, 95% CI 1.85 to 2.85) and three times (HR adj =3.53, 95% CI 2.61 to 4.79), respectively. We found an increased risk of death from suicide and unintentional injuries/accidents in men who had minor and major mental health impairment at age 17-19 years. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Alcohol and risk of admission to hospital for unintentional cutting or piercing injuries at home: a population-based case-crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornley Simon

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cutting and piercing injuries are among the leading causes of unintentional injury morbidity in developed countries. In New Zealand, cutting and piercing are second only to falls as the most frequent cause of unintentional home injuries resulting in admissions to hospital among people aged 20 to 64 years. Alcohol intake is known to be associated with many other types of injury. We used a case-crossover study to investigate the role of acute alcohol use (i.e., drinking during the previous 6 h in unintentional cutting or piercing injuries at home. Methods A population-based case-crossover study was conducted. We identified all people aged 20 to 64 years, resident in one of three regions of the country (Greater Auckland, Waikato and Otago, who were admitted to public hospital within 48 h of an unintentional non-occupational cutting or piercing injury sustained at home (theirs or another's from August 2008 to December 2009. The main exposure of interest was use of alcohol in the 6-hour period before the injury occurred and the corresponding time intervals 24 h before, and 1 week before, the injury. Other information was collected on known and potential confounders. Information was obtained during face-to-face interviews with cases, and through review of their medical charts. Results Of the 356 participants, 71% were male, and a third sustained injuries from contact with glass. After adjustment for other paired exposures, the odds ratio for injury after consuming 1 to 3 standard drinks of alcohol during the 6-hour period before the injury (compared to the day before, compared to none, was 1.77 (95% confidence interval 0.84 to 3.74, and for four or more drinks was 8.68 (95% confidence interval 3.11 to 24.3. Smokers had higher alcohol-related risks than non-smokers. Conclusions Alcohol consumption increases the odds of unintentional cutting or piercing injury occurring at home and this risk increases with higher levels of drinking.

  5. The association between adverse childhood experiences and adult traumatic brain injury/concussion: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zechen; Bayley, Mark T; Perrier, Laure; Dhir, Priya; Dépatie, Lana; Comper, Paul; Ruttan, Lesley; Lay, Christine; Munce, Sarah E P

    2018-01-12

    Adverse childhood experiences are significant risk factors for physical and mental illnesses in adulthood. Traumatic brain injury/concussion is a challenging condition where pre-injury factors may affect recovery. The association between childhood adversity and traumatic brain injury/concussion has not been previously reviewed. The research question addressed is: What is known from the existing literature about the association between adverse childhood experiences and traumatic brain injury/concussion in adults? All original studies of any type published in English since 2007 on adverse childhood experiences and traumatic brain injury/concussion outcomes were included. The literature search was conducted in multiple electronic databases. Arksey and O'Malley and Levac et al.'s scoping review frameworks were used. Two reviewers independently completed screening and data abstraction. The review yielded six observational studies. Included studies were limited to incarcerated or homeless samples, and individuals at high-risk of or with mental illnesses. Across studies, methods for childhood adversity and traumatic brain injury/concussion assessment were heterogeneous. A positive association between adverse childhood experiences and traumatic brain injury occurrence was identified. The review highlights the importance of screening and treatment of adverse childhood experiences. Future research should extend to the general population and implications on injury recovery. Implications for rehabilitation Exposure to adverse childhood experiences is associated with increased risk of traumatic brain injury. Specific types of adverse childhood experiences associated with risk of traumatic brain injury include childhood physical abuse, psychological abuse, household member incarceration, and household member drug abuse. Clinicians and researchers should inquire about adverse childhood experiences in all people with traumatic brain injury as pre-injury health conditions can

  6. Risk factors associated with unintentional house fire incidents, injuries and deaths in high-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Samantha L; Johnson, Rhodri D; Weightman, Alison L; Rodgers, Sarah E; Arthur, Geri; Bailey, Rowena; Lyons, Ronan A

    2017-04-01

    To identify the distinguishing risk factors associated with unintentional house fire incidents, injuries and deaths. Systematic review. A range of bibliographical databases and grey literature were searched from their earliest records to January 2016. To ensure the magnitude of risk could be quantified, only those study types which contained a control group, and undertook appropriate statistical analyses were included. A best evidence synthesis was conducted instead of a meta-analysis due to study heterogeneity. Eleven studies investigating a variety of risk factors and outcomes were identified. Studies ranged from medium to low quality with no high quality studies identified. Characteristics commonly associated with increased risk of house fire incidents, injuries and fatalities included: higher numbers of residents, male, children under the age of 5 years, non-working households, smoking, low income, non-privately owned properties, apartments and buildings in poor condition. Several risk factors were only associated with one outcome (eg, living alone was only associated with increased risk of injurious fires), and households with older residents were at increased risk of injurious fires, but significantly less likely to experience a house fire in the first place. This best evidence synthesis indicates that several resident and property characteristics are associated with risk of experiencing house fire incidents, injuries or death. These findings should be considered by the Fire and Rescue Services and others with a role in fire prevention. Future research should adopt robust, standardised study designs to permit meta-analyses and enable stronger conclusions to be drawn. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Incidence, patterns and severity of reported unintentional injuries in Pakistan for persons five years and older: results of the National Health Survey of Pakistan 1990–94

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Huma I

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background National level estimates of injuries are not readily available for developing countries. This study estimated the annual incidence, patterns and severity of unintentional injuries among persons over five years of age in Pakistan. Methods National Health Survey of Pakistan (NHSP 1990–94 is a nationally representative survey of the household. Through a two-stage stratified design, 18, 315 persons over 5 years of age were interviewed to estimate the overall annual incidence, patterns and severity of unintentional injuries for males and females in urban and rural areas over the preceding one year. Weighted estimates were computed adjusting for complex survey design using surveyfreq and surveylogistic option of SAS 9.1 software. Results The overall annual incidence of all unintentional injuries was 45.9 (CI: 39.3–52.5 per 1000 per year; 59.2 (CI: 49.2–69.2 and 33.2 (CI: 27.0–39.4 per 1000 per year among males and females over five years of age, respectively. An estimated 6.16 million unintentional injuries occur in Pakistan annually among persons over five years of age. Urban and rural injuries were 55.9 (95% CI: 48.1–63.7 and 41.2 (95% CI: 32.2–50.0 per 1000 per year, respectively. The annual incidence of injuries due to falls were 22.2 (95% CI: 18.0–26.4, poisoning 3.3 (95%CI: 0.5–6.1 and burn was 1.5 (95%CI: 0.9–2.1 per 1000 per year. The majority of injuries occurred at home 19.2 (95%CI: 16.0–22.4 or on the roads 17.0 (95%CI: 13.8–20.2. Road traffic/street, school and urban injuries were more likely to result in handicap. Conclusion There is high burden of unintentional injuries among persons over five years of age in Pakistan. These results are useful to plan further studies and prioritizing prevention programs on injuries nationally and other developing countries with similar situation.

  8. Unintentional Injury Risk in School-Age Children: Examining Interrelations between Parent and Child Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Melissa; Morrongiello, Barbara A.; Kane, Alexa

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Research on children's risk of injury reveals that parent and child factors are often interrelated. This study examined relations between children's risk taking, parent appraisal of this risk taking, and children's rate of injury in youth 8 and 9 years old. Methods: Responses to questionnaires and laboratory tasks were used to examine…

  9. Unintentional pediatric injuries in São Paulo. How often is it severe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abib, Simone de Campos Vieira; Françóia, Alessandra Mara; Waksman, Renata; Dolci, Maria Inês; Guimarães, Hélio Penna; Moreira, Frederico; BoarettoCezillo, Marcus Vinícius; Góes, Adenauer Marinho

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate severity and built a pilot of a national databank about pediatric trauma and to determine its severity. Prospective study of unintentional pediatric trauma in five hospitals in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. 916 patients in 4 months. 61.5% of traumatized children were male, average 6.5 years. 48. 4% were falls. Most families had an average monthly income less than three minimum wages. 42% of accidents occurred at home. 18.9% of children were alone. 59,8% of parents thought it could be prevented. 26.5% of children had previous accidents. GCS was severe: 5 patients, moderate: 8 patients. 21 patients were intubated (2.4%), RTS sports (p=0.045); pedestrian (p=0.006); child education (p=0.015) and cared by male (p=0.007). Severity occurred in 8.5% and was associated to falls, sports, traffic, child education, and cared by male. Simple preventive measures could have prevented most of the accidents. The tested tool for details was successful and can be used throughout the country.

  10. Injury hospitalizations due to unintentional falls among the Aboriginal population of British Columbia, Canada: incidence, changes over time, and ecological analysis of risk markers, 1991-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jin

    Full Text Available Aboriginal people in British Columbia (BC have higher injury incidence than the general population. Our project describes variability among injury categories, time periods, and geographic, demographic and socio-economic groups. This report focuses on unintentional falls.We used BC's universal health care insurance plan as a population registry, linked to hospital separation and vital statistics databases. We identified Aboriginal people by insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We identified residents of specific Aboriginal communities by postal code. We calculated crude incidence and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR of hospitalization for unintentional fall injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA, relative to the total population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics with community SRR of injury by linear regression.During 1991 through 2010, the crude rate of hospitalization for unintentional fall injury in BC was 33.6 per 10,000 person-years. The Aboriginal rate was 49.9 per 10,000 and SRR was 1.89 (95% confidence interval 1.85-1.94. Among those living on reserves SRR was 2.00 (95% CI 1.93-2.07. Northern and non-urban HSDAs had higher SRRs, within both total and Aboriginal populations. In every age and gender category, the HSDA-standardized SRR was higher among the Aboriginal than among the total population. Between 1991 and 2010, crude rates and SRRs declined substantially, but proportionally more among the Aboriginal population, so the gap between the Aboriginal and total population is narrowing, particularly among females and older adults. These community characteristics were associated with higher risk: lower income, lower educational level, worse housing conditions, and more hazardous types of employment.Over the years, as socio-economic conditions improve, risk of hospitalization due to unintentional fall

  11. Physical and Performance Characteristics Related to Unintentional Musculoskeletal Injury in Special Forces Operators: A Prospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heebner, Nicholas R; Abt, John P; Lovalekar, Mita; Beals, Kim; Sell, Timothy C; Morgan, Jeffery; Kane, Shawn; Lephart, Scott

    2017-12-01

      Seventy-seven percent of musculoskeletal injuries sustained by United States Army Special Forces Operators are preventable. Identification of predictive characteristics will promote the development of screening methods to augment injury-prevention programs.   To determine physical and performance characteristics that predict musculoskeletal injuries.   Clinical laboratory.   A total of 95 Operators (age = 32.7 ± 5.1 years, height = 179.8 ± 6.9 cm, mass = 89.9 ± 12.7 kg).   Laboratory testing consisted of body composition, aerobic and anaerobic capacity, upper and lower body strength and flexibility, balance, and biomechanical evaluation. Injury data were captured for 12 months after laboratory testing. Injury frequencies, cross-tabulations, and relative risks (RRs) were calculated to evaluate the relationships between physical characteristics and injury proportions. Between-groups differences (injured versus uninjured) were assessed using appropriate t tests or Mann-Whitney U tests.   Less shoulder-retraction strength (RR = 1.741 [95% confidence interval = 1.003, 3.021]), knee-extension strength (RR = 2.029 [95% confidence interval = 1.011, 4.075]), and a smaller trunk extension : flexion ratio (RR = 0.533 [95% confidence interval = 0.341, 0.831]) were significant risk factors for injury. Group comparisons showed less trunk strength (extension: P = .036, flexion: P = .048) and smaller right vertical ground reaction forces during landing ( P = .025) in injured Operators. Knee strength, aerobic capacity, and body mass index were less in the subgroup of spine-injured versus uninjured Operators ( P values = .013-.036).   Knee-extension and shoulder-retraction strength were risk factors for musculoskeletal injury in Operators. Less trunk-flexion and -extension strength, higher body mass index, lower aerobic capacity, and increased ground reaction forces during landing were characteristics that may also contribute to musculoskeletal injury. Having

  12. County Poverty Concentration and Disparities in Unintentional Injury Deaths: A Fourteen-Year Analysis of 1.6 Million U.S. Fatalities.

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    Rebecca A Karb

    Full Text Available Unintentional injury is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, and mortality due to injury has risen over the past decade. The social determinants behind these rising trends have not been well documented. This study examines the relationship between county-level poverty and unintentional injury mortality in the United States from 1999-2012. Complete annual compressed mortality and population data for 1999-2012 were obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics and linked with census yearly county poverty measures. The outcomes examined were unintentional injury fatalities, overall and by six specific mechanisms: motor vehicle collisions, falls, accidental discharge of firearms, drowning, exposure to smoke or fire, and unintentional poisoning. Age-adjusted mortality rates and time trends for county poverty categories were calculated, and multivariate negative binomial regression was used to determine changes over time in both the relative risk of living in high poverty concentration areas and the population attributable fraction. Age-adjusted mortality rates for counties with > 20% poverty were 66% higher mortality in 1999 compared with counties with < 5% poverty (45.25 vs. 27.24 per 100,000; 95% CI for rate difference 15.57,20.46, and that gap widened in 2012 to 79% (44.54 vs. 24.93; 95% CI for rate difference 17.13,22.09. The relative risk of living in the highest poverty counties has increased for all injury mechanisms with the exception of accidental discharge of firearms. The population attributable fraction for all unintentional injuries rose from 0.22 (95% CI 0.13,0.30 in 1999 to 0.35 (95% CI 0.22,0.45 in 2012. This is the first study that uses comprehensive mortality data to document the associations between county poverty and injury mortality rates for the entire US population over a 14 year period. This study suggests that injury reduction interventions should focus on areas of high or increasing poverty.

  13. The First-aid Advice and Safety Training (FAST) parents programme for the prevention of unintentional injuries in preschool children: a protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytton, Julie A; Towner, Elizabeth Ml; Kendrick, Denise; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Emond, Alan; Ingram, Jenny; Blair, Peter S; Powell, Jane; Mulvaney, Caroline; Thomas, James; Deave, Toity; Potter, Barbara

    2014-02-01

    Unintentional injury is the leading cause of preventable death in children in the UK, and 0-4-year-olds frequently attend emergency departments following injuries in the home. Parenting programmes designed to support parents, promote behaviour change and enhance parent-child relationships have been shown to improve health outcomes in children. It is not known whether group-based parenting programmes have the potential to prevent unintentional injuries in preschool children. A study to develop a group-based parenting programme to prevent unintentional home injuries in preschool children, and assess the feasibility of evaluation through a cluster-randomised controlled trial. The intervention, designed for parents of children who have sustained a medically attended injury, will be developed with two voluntary sector organisations. The feasibility study will assess ability to recruit parents, deliver the programme and follow-up participants. Participants will complete questionnaires at baseline, 3 months and 6 months, and report injuries in their preschool children using a tool designed and validated for this study. Qualitative methods will assess user and deliverer perceptions of the programme. This study will develop the first group-based parenting programme to prevent injuries in preschool children, and design tools for parent-reported injury outcomes. A key challenge will be to recruit parents to participate in a manner that is non-stigmatising, and does not result in feelings of guilt or belief that they are perceived to be a bad parent. The findings will be used to prepare a trial to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the intervention.

  14. Exploring the Athletic Trainer's Role in Assisting Student-Athletes Presenting With Alcohol-Related Unintentional Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Steven M; Barry, Adam E; Pitney, William A

    2015-09-01

    Compared with their nonathlete peers, collegiate athletes consume higher quantities of alcohol, drink with greater frequency, and exhibit an increased propensity to engage in heavy episodic drinking (ie, binge drinking), which often may result in alcohol-related consequences. Moreover, collegiate athletes are also more likely to engage in other maladaptive lifestyle behaviors, such as participating in physical fights and riding with an intoxicated driver, and less likely to engage in protective behaviors, such as wearing a helmet while operating a motorcycle, moped, or bicycle. Taken together, these behaviors clearly pose a health risk for student-athletes and increase the likelihood that they will experience an alcohol-related unintentional injury (ARUI). An ARUI represents a risk not only to the health and well-being of collegiate athletes but also to their athletic performances, collegiate careers, and potential professional opportunities. Therefore, athletic trainers need to be equipped with the knowledge and skills to provide face-to-face brief interventions to student-athletes presenting with ARUIs and to evaluate the effect of their involvement. We address potential action items for implementation by athletic trainers.

  15. Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Unintentional Nonfatal Injury Among the United States Air Force Active Duty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    maximal oxygen consumption, VO 2m•, is the greatest rate at which the large muscle groups (e.g., quadriceps and hamstring muscles) can consume oxygen...71 Structure of Covariates, and Interaction Terms ....................................... 71 Likelihood Ratio Tests & Hosmer & Lemeshow’s...Cases -vs- Controls), 1999 - 2000 ...... 70 Table 4.13. Probability of Injury Among ADAF: Unadjusted and Adjusted Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence

  16. Childhood injuries – frequency of occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Wieder-Huszla

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background . Childhood injuries and accidents constitute an important health, social and economic problem. Serious injuries require surgical intervention and hospitalization. In other cases, patients leave hospital within several hours after diagnosis and non-operative treatment, and then they receive outpatient care. Despite a downward trend, injuries remain the main cause of death among children and adolescents. Therefore, understanding their epidemiology, which would allow us to create prevention programs based on scientific evidence (evidence based medicine, is so important. Objectives. The study’s objective was an attempt at analyzing childhood injuries treated in outpatient clinics. Material and methods. The study comprised 2182 children aged 0–18, including 692 females and 1490 males. Among them 1024 children treated surgically and 1158 outpatients. In the retrospective study the authors used a method of analysis of medical records of patients treated in 2012 at the Department of Child Surgery and Traumatology and Orthopaedics with the Operating Theatre in the Nicolaus Copernicus Province Hospital in Koszalin. The analysis was conducted on the basis of operative reports in the case of afflictions and injuries requiring surgery, and outpatient admissions reports in the case of outpatients. Results. Among the outpatients, the biggest group of injuries (34.83% or 403 included bruises, cuts, lacerations etc. Regarding frequency, injuries of hand area – 14.35% (166 and arm fractures – 13.4% (159 followed. Conclusions . 1. The age and gender of patients were factors determining injuries. 2. Seasons of the year have an influence on the structure of injuries among children. 3. It is necessary to increase social awareness on the prevention and negative effects of burns.

  17. Risk of unintentional injuries in children and adolescents with ADHD and the impact of ADHD medications: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Goikoetxea, Maite; Cortese, Samuele; Aznarez-Sanado, Maite; Magallon, Sara; Luis, Elkin O; Zallo, Noelia Alvarez; de Castro-Manglano, Pilar; Soutullo, Cesar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been related to increased rates of unintentional injuries. However, the magnitude of the effect and to which extent variables such as sex, age or comorbidity can influence this relationship is unknown. Additionally, and importantly, it is unclear if, and to which degree, ADHD medications can decrease the number of unintentional injuries. Due to the amount of economic and social resources invested in the treatment of injuries, filling these gaps in the literature is highly relevant from a public health standpoint. Here, we present a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the relationship between ADHD and unintentional injuries and assess the impact of pharmacological treatment for ADHD Methods and analysis We will combine results from 114 bibliographic databases for studies relating ADHD and risk of injuries. Bibliographic searches and data extraction will be carried out independently by two researchers. The studies’ risk of bias will be assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Articles reporting ORs or HRs of suffering an injury in ADHD compared with controls (or enough data to calculate them) will be combined using Robust Variance Estimation, a method that permits to include multiple non-independent outcomes in the analysis. All analyses will be carried out in Stata. Age, sex and comorbid conduct disorders will be considered as potential causes of variance and their effect analysed through meta-regression and subgroup analysis. Sensitivity analyses will exclude articles with longer follow-ups, non-stringent definitions of ADHD or controls and statistically uncontrolled/controlled outcomes. Studies implementing a self-controlled case series methodology to investigate if ADHD drugs reduce the risk of injuries will be combined with a generalised linear mixed model using the Poisson distribution and a log link function. Registration details PROSPERO—Prospective Register of

  18. The association of social functioning, social relationships and the receipt of compensation with time to return to work following unintentional injuries to Victorian workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Fiona J; Fitzharris, Michael; Kerr, Emily; McClure, Roderick J; Watson, Wendy L

    2012-09-01

    Understanding individual factors associated with return to work (RTW) post-injury is an important goal of compensation systems research. The aim of the present study was to determine factors associated with time to return to work following acute unintentional injuries. A prospective cohort study was conducted in Victoria, Australia. The cohort comprised 133 persons who were employed at the time they were admitted to one of three study hospitals. Baseline health status data was obtained retrospectively at one-week post-injury and participants were further surveyed at 1, 6, 12, 26 and 52 weeks post-injury to measure recovery. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to examine the association between potential prognostic factors and time to RTW during the 12 month study. At the end of 12 months follow-up, 81.2% of the study cohort had returned to work. Older age, increased injury severity, self reported symptomatic pain and poor mental health at 1 week post-injury were associated with extended time to RTW. A significant statistical interaction between the receipt of compensation and high social functioning as measured by the SF-36 or strong social relationships as measured by the Assessment of Quality of Life was associated with earlier RTW. Participants reporting strong social relationships and high social functioning at 1 week post-injury and entitled to injury compensation returned to work 2.05 and 3.66 times earlier respectively, than similar participants with no entitlement to compensation. Both injury-related and psychosocial factors were associated with the duration of time to RTW following acute unintentional injuries. This study replicated previously reported findings on social functioning and compensation from an independent acute trauma sample. Programs or policies to improve social functioning early post-injury may provide opportunities to improve the duration of time to RTW following injury.

  19. Unintentional Monuments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Runa

    2015-01-01

    unleashed more than the sliding of earth and stone as it triggered a fierce dispute between Israeli and Palestinian/Muslim interests. The crux of this crisis is to be found in the temporary bridge. In this short text, I suggest to see the bridge as an 'unintentional monument' as a way to understand...... the presence of historical and political powers in the shaping of space...

  20. What Are Sports Injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Muscle and Bone Diseases Joint Replacement Surgery Bursitis Fibromyalgia Fibrous Dysplasia Growth Plate Injuries Marfan Syndrome ... Health Sprains and Strains, Questions and Answers about Bursitis and Tendinitis, Questions and Answers about Last Reviewed: ...

  1. Preventing childhood obesity: what works?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, L L; Ventura, A K

    2009-04-01

    Rates of overweight in North American children and adolescents have increased dramatically since the 1970s. Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions and calls for prevention and treatment programs to reverse this trend have been made. However, the evidence base needed for effective action is still incomplete, especially for childhood obesity prevention programs. This paper focuses on primary prevention of childhood obesity and has three aims: (1) to briefly describe current primary prevention approaches for childhood obesity and the evidence for their impact; (2) to elucidate promising, but untested intervention strategies using an ecological framework and evidence from experimental and epidemiological research on factors influencing children's eating and weight status; and (3) to introduce a multiphase strategy for screening intervention components and building and evaluating potent interventions for childhood obesity. Most childhood obesity prevention programs have focused on school-aged children and have had little success. We suggest that, given these findings, prevention efforts should be expanded to explore other contexts in which children live as possible settings for intervention efforts, including the family and childcare settings. Given that 25% of preschool children are already overweight, intervening with children before school entry should be a priority. A review of experimental research on the developing controls of food intake in infancy and childhood suggests possible intervention strategies, focusing on parenting and aspects of the feeding environment. Epidemiological findings point to even earlier modifiable risk factors, including gestational weight gain, maternal prepregnancy weight, and formula feeding. However, the potential impact of altering these risk factors remains to be evaluated. In response to this problem, we suggest a new, multiphase method for accomplishing this, including screening intervention components, refining

  2. Hospitalizations due to unintentional transport injuries among Aboriginal population of British Columbia, Canada: Incidence, changes over time and ecological analysis of risk markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, M. Anne; Jin, Andrew; Amram, Ofer; McCormick, Rod; Lalonde, Christopher E.

    2018-01-01

    Background Worldwide, Indigenous people have disproportionately higher rates of transport injuries. We examined disparities in injury-related hospitalizations resulting from transport incidents for three population groups in British Columbia (BC): total population, Aboriginal off-reserve, and Aboriginal on-reserve populations. We also examined sociodemographic, geographic and ethnic risk markers for disparities. Methods We identified Aboriginal people through BC’s universal health care insurance plan insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We calculated crude incidence rate and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR) of hospitalization for unintentional transport injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA), relative to the total population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics of Aboriginal communities with SRR of transport injury by multivariable linear regression. Results During the period 1991–2010, the SRR for the off-reserve Aboriginal population was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.71 to 1.83); and 2.00 (95% CI: 1.93 to 2.07) among those living on-reserve. Decline in crude rate and SRRs was observed over this period among both the Aboriginal and total populations of BC, but was proportionally greater among the Aboriginal population. The best-fitting multivariable risk marker model was an excellent fit (R2 = 0.912, ppopulation per room, proportion of the population with a high school certificate, proportion of the population employed; and multiplicative interactions of Aboriginal ethnicity with population per room and proportion of the population employed. Conclusions Disparities in risk of hospitalization due to unintentional transport injury have narrowed. Aboriginal ethnicity modifies the effects of socioeconomic risk factors. Continued improvement of socioeconomic conditions and implementation of culturally relevant injury prevention interventions

  3. Hospitalizations due to unintentional transport injuries among Aboriginal population of British Columbia, Canada: Incidence, changes over time and ecological analysis of risk markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brussoni, Mariana; George, M Anne; Jin, Andrew; Amram, Ofer; McCormick, Rod; Lalonde, Christopher E

    2018-01-01

    Worldwide, Indigenous people have disproportionately higher rates of transport injuries. We examined disparities in injury-related hospitalizations resulting from transport incidents for three population groups in British Columbia (BC): total population, Aboriginal off-reserve, and Aboriginal on-reserve populations. We also examined sociodemographic, geographic and ethnic risk markers for disparities. We identified Aboriginal people through BC's universal health care insurance plan insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We calculated crude incidence rate and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR) of hospitalization for unintentional transport injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA), relative to the total population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics of Aboriginal communities with SRR of transport injury by multivariable linear regression. During the period 1991-2010, the SRR for the off-reserve Aboriginal population was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.71 to 1.83); and 2.00 (95% CI: 1.93 to 2.07) among those living on-reserve. Decline in crude rate and SRRs was observed over this period among both the Aboriginal and total populations of BC, but was proportionally greater among the Aboriginal population. The best-fitting multivariable risk marker model was an excellent fit (R2 = 0.912, ppopulation per room, proportion of the population with a high school certificate, proportion of the population employed; and multiplicative interactions of Aboriginal ethnicity with population per room and proportion of the population employed. Disparities in risk of hospitalization due to unintentional transport injury have narrowed. Aboriginal ethnicity modifies the effects of socioeconomic risk factors. Continued improvement of socioeconomic conditions and implementation of culturally relevant injury prevention interventions are needed.

  4. Hospitalizations due to unintentional transport injuries among Aboriginal population of British Columbia, Canada: Incidence, changes over time and ecological analysis of risk markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Brussoni

    Full Text Available Worldwide, Indigenous people have disproportionately higher rates of transport injuries. We examined disparities in injury-related hospitalizations resulting from transport incidents for three population groups in British Columbia (BC: total population, Aboriginal off-reserve, and Aboriginal on-reserve populations. We also examined sociodemographic, geographic and ethnic risk markers for disparities.We identified Aboriginal people through BC's universal health care insurance plan insurance premium group and birth and death record notations. We calculated crude incidence rate and Standardized Relative Risk (SRR of hospitalization for unintentional transport injury, standardized for age, gender and Health Service Delivery Area (HSDA, relative to the total population of BC. We tested hypothesized associations of geographic, socio-economic, and employment-related characteristics of Aboriginal communities with SRR of transport injury by multivariable linear regression.During the period 1991-2010, the SRR for the off-reserve Aboriginal population was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.71 to 1.83; and 2.00 (95% CI: 1.93 to 2.07 among those living on-reserve. Decline in crude rate and SRRs was observed over this period among both the Aboriginal and total populations of BC, but was proportionally greater among the Aboriginal population. The best-fitting multivariable risk marker model was an excellent fit (R2 = 0.912, p<0.001, predicted SRRs very close to observed values, and retained the following terms: urban residence, population per room, proportion of the population with a high school certificate, proportion of the population employed; and multiplicative interactions of Aboriginal ethnicity with population per room and proportion of the population employed.Disparities in risk of hospitalization due to unintentional transport injury have narrowed. Aboriginal ethnicity modifies the effects of socioeconomic risk factors. Continued improvement of socioeconomic conditions

  5. Prediction of posttraumatic stress in fathers of children with chronic diseases or unintentional injuries: a six-months follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sennhauser Felix H

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While fathers were neglected for a long time in research investigating families of pediatric patients, there are now a few studies available on fathers' posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. However, little is known about the course of PTSS and PTSD in fathers of pediatric patients. The present study aimed to compare the prevalence and course of PTSS and PTSD in fathers of children with different chronic and acute conditions and to identify factors that contribute to fathers' PTSS. Methods Sixty-nine fathers of children newly diagnosed with either cancer, type I diabetes mellitus, or epilepsy and 70 fathers of children suffering from an unintentional injury completed questionnaires at 4–6 weeks (Time 1 and six months (Time 2 after diagnosis or injury. Results Noticeable PTSD rates were found in fathers of children with a chronic disease (26% at Time 1 and 21% at Time 2, respectively. These rates were significantly higher than rates found in fathers of children with unintentional injuries (12% at Time 1 and 6% at Time 2, respectively. Within six months after the child's diagnosis or accident a decrease in severity of PTSS was observed in both groups. Significant predictors of PTSS at Time 2 were the father's initial level of PTSS, the child's medical condition (injuries vs. chronic diseases and functional status, the father's use of dysfunctional coping strategies, and father's level of neuroticism. Conclusion Our findings suggest that fathers with initially high PTSS levels are at greater risk to experience PTSS at follow-up, particularly fathers of children with a chronic disease. Sensitizing health care professionals to the identification of PTSS symptoms but also to indicators of neuroticism and the use of specific coping strategies early in the treatment course is essential for the planning and implementation of adequate intervention strategies.

  6. Fatal and hospitalised childhood injuries in Fiji (TRIP Project-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naisaki, Asilika; Wainiqolo, Iris; Kafoa, Berlin; Kool, Bridget; Taoi, Mabel; McCaig, Eddie; Ameratunga, Shanthi

    2013-01-01

    Although childhood injury rates in low- and middle-income countries are known to be high, contemporary data on this topic from Pacific Island countries and territories are scant. We describe the epidemiology of childhood injuries resulting in death or hospital admission in Fiji using a population-based registry. A cross-sectional analysis of the Fiji Injury Surveillance in Hospitals system investigated the characteristics associated with childhood injuries (Fiji. Priority actions should include investment in technical support and research to identify local contextual and social determinants that inform the development and implementation of effective injury prevention interventions as a child health survival strategy. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2012 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  7. Associated factors for the occurrence of unintentional injuries in children from a low-income community in northeastern Brazil - doi 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v34i2.10313

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline de Souza Pereira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Unintentional injuries reach high levels within the scope of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and have an impact on the quality of life of children and family members. This study depicts the socio-demographic profile of families in a community and identifies the factors associated with unintentional injuries in children. This is a cross-sectional study, developed with 362 families from a community in Fortaleza (Ceará State, by applying a questionnaire to the responsible adult in the family; the data were subjected to descriptive statistics by applying Pearson’s chi-square (x2 test, with p ≤ 0.05. From the results, 78% resided in the business area of the community, 71% survived with income up to the minimum wage, 62.7% were part of a nuclear family, and most residences showed risk factors for unintentional injuries. The data corroborate the literature by reaffirming the relationship between the socio-demographic and economic profile of families living in areas of socio-environmental vulnerability with the occurrence of unintentional injuries at home.

  8. Childhood injuries in a tertiary institution in north east Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa Abdul Razaq Esin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Injury has been recognised as a preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in children. The aim of this study was to determine the aetiology, pattern and location of childhood injuries in north east Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a 3-year retrospective hospital-based descriptive study. The study included 114 children (77 boys, 37 girls; mean age 6.4 ± 3.2 years; range 2 months to 15 years who were admitted for various injuries in the female/paediatric surgical ward from January 2007 to December 2009. Information obtained from their case notes included demographic data, mechanism of injury, location of injury, anatomical site of injury and outcome of treatment. Results: Records for 114 children (77 boys, 37 girls; mean age 6.2 years; range 2 months to 15 years were available for analysis. The highest number of injuries occurred in the age group 6-10 years. Home was the most common location of injury among the age group 0-5 years while older children sustained most of their injuries outside the home on the street/highways. Burns from hot water was the most common injury among children aged 0-5 years while pedestrian accident accounted for the highest cause of injury among older children. Fall accounted for 20.2% of the injuries. The most common specific anatomic injury was head injury followed by limb fractures. Two mortalities were recorded (1.8%. Conclusion: This study provided useful information on the characteristics of childhood injuries in our environment. There is the need for parents and children education about the risks of injury and preventive measures in addition to legislation and policy on environmental modifications and enforcements to significantly reduce childhood injury.

  9. Injury Patterns among Individuals Diagnosed with Infantile Autism during Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Svend-Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Background: To date, injury risk among people with infantile autism (IA) has been a relatively poorly researched issue.Objective:The purpose of our study was to compare the prevalence and types of injuries in a clinical sample of 118 patients diagnosed with IA during childhood with those of 336 age...

  10. Child Injury: What You Need to Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-16

    This podcast is based on the April 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Many childhood deaths and injuries are preventable, including those caused by crashes, suffocation, poisoning, drowning, fires, and falls. The podcast discusses ways to help prevent these deaths and injuries.  Created: 4/16/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/16/2012.

  11. Epidemiology of childhood injuries in rural Puducherry, South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalakshmy, T; Dongre, Amol R; Kalaiselvan, Ganapathy

    2011-07-01

    To study the epidemiology of injuries among children (level Anganwadi workers (AWW) or Auxiliary Nurse Midwife (ANM) were not consulted for the treatment. Falls were the leading cause of injury. Fall on ground from height, burns, bite by scorpion/insect/snake/dogs, and road traffic accidents were the four leading causes of injury among children. There is a need for community based health education intervention for mothers, caregivers, school teacher and capacity building of village level health workers such as ANM and AWW. Health education message should include preventive measures for the leading causes of childhood injuries.

  12. The Unintentional Procrastination Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Fernie, Bruce A.; Bharucha, Zinnia; Nik?evi?, Ana V.; Spada, Marcantonio M.

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 The Author(s)Procrastination refers to the delay or postponement of a task or decision and is often conceptualised as a failure of self-regulation. Recent research has suggested that procrastination could be delineated into two domains: intentional and unintentional. In this two-study paper, we aimed to develop a measure of unintentional procrastination (named the Unintentional Procrastination Scale or the ‘UPS’) and test whether this would be a stronger marker of psychopathology than ...

  13. The unintentional procrastination scale

    OpenAIRE

    Fernie, Bruce A; Bharucha, Zinnia; Nikcevic, Ana V; Spada, Marcantonio M

    2017-01-01

    Procrastination refers to the delay or postponement of a task or decision and is often conceptualised as a failure of self-regulation. Recent research has suggested that procrastination could be delineated into two domains: intentional and unintentional. In this two-study paper, we aimed to develop a measure of unintentional procrastination (named the Unintentional Procrastination Scale or the 'UPS') and test whether this would be a stronger marker of psychopathology than intentional and gene...

  14. Trends in Unintentional Fall-Related Traumatic Brain Injury Death Rates in Older Adults in the United States, 1980-2010: A Joinpoint Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Kuan-Chin; Liang, Fu-Wen; Cheng, Tain-Junn; Lu, Tsung-Hsueh; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2015-07-15

    Unintentional fall-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) death rate is high in older adults in the United States, but little is known regarding trends of these death rates. We sought to examine unintentional fall-related TBI death rates by age and sex in older adults from 1980 through 2010 in the United States. We used multiple-cause mortality data from 1980 through 2010 (31 years of data) to identify fall-related TBI deaths. Using a joinpoint regression program, we determined the joinpoints (years at which trends change significantly) and annual percentage changes (APCs) in mortality trends. The fall-related TBI death rates (deaths per 100,000 population) in older adults ages 65-74, 75-84, and 85 years and above were 2.7, 9.2, and 21.5 for females and 8.5, 18.2, and 40.8 for males, respectively, in 1980. The rate was about the same in 1992, yet increased markedly to 5.9, 23.4, and 68.9 for females and 11.6, 41.2, and 112.4 for males, respectively, in 2010. For males all 65 years years of age and above, we found the first joinpoint in 1992, when the APC for 1980 through 1992, -0.8%, changed to 6.2% for 1992-2005. The second joinpoint occurred in 2005, when the APC decreased to 3.7% for 2005-2010. For all females 65 years of age and above, the first joinpoint was in 1993 when the APC for 1980 through 1993, -0.2%, changed to 7.6% from 1993 to 2005. The second joinpoint occurred in 2005 when the APC decreased to 3.8% for 2005-2010. This descriptive epidemiological study suggests increasing fall-related TBI death rates from 1992 to 2005 and then a slowdown of increasing trends between 2005 and 2010. Continued monitoring of fall-related TBI death rate trends is needed to determine the burden of this public health problem among older adults in the United States.

  15. Childhood agricultural injuries: an update for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Suzanne; Marlenga, Barbara; Lee, Barbara C

    2013-02-01

    Every three days a child dies in an agriculture-related incident, and every day 45 children are injured in the United States. These tragedies should not be regarded as "accidents," as they often follow predictable and preventable patterns. Prevention is not only possible, but vital, since many of these injuries are almost immediately fatal. Major sources of fatal injuries are machinery, motor vehicles, and drowning. Tractor injuries alone account for one-third of all deaths. The leading sources of nonfatal injuries are structures and surfaces, animals (primarily horses), and vehicles (primarily all-terrain vehicles [ATVs]). Children living on farms are at a higher risk than hired workers, and are unprotected by child labor laws. Preschool children and older male youth are at the highest risk for fatal injury, while nonfatal injury was most common among boys aged 10-15 years. Multiple prevention strategies have been developed, yet economic and cultural barriers often impede their implementation. Educational campaigns alone are often ineffective, and must be coupled with re-engineering of machines and safety devices to reduce fatalities. Legislation has the potential to improve child safety, yet political and economic pressures often prohibit changes in child labor laws and mandated safety requirements. Clinicians play a pivotal role in injury prevention, and should actively address common rural risk-taking behaviors as part of the routine office visit in order to help prevent these tragedies. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Imaging of cervical spine injuries of childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, Georges Y. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, 3951 JPP, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Cervical spine injuries of children, though rare, have a high morbidity and mortality. The pediatric cervical spine is anatomically and biomechanically different from that of adults. Hence, the type, level and outcome of cervical spine injuries in children are different from those seen in adults. Normal developmental variants seen in children can make evaluation of the pediatric cervical spine challenging. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric cervical spine trauma, normal variants seen in children and specific injuries that are more common in the pediatric population. We also propose an evidence-based imaging protocol to avoid unnecessary imaging studies and minimize radiation exposure in children. (orig.)

  17. Temporal variation in childhood injury from common recreational activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loder, Randall T; Abrams, Sam

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the month and day of the week of injury in common childhood activities using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System database. All emergency department visits 2002–2006 from bicycles/tricycles, scooters, playground equipment, swimming/water activities, skiing/snowboarding, trampolines, and skating were analysed. The NEISS weighted and stratified data set was analysed using SUDAAN software. Weekday and month of injury, gender, race, anatomical location of the injury, geographical location of injury, and disposition were tabulated. Simple variation by month or weekday was analysed using cosinor analysis; combined variation for both month and weekday was analysed by topographical analysis. There were an estimated 4.61 million emergency department visits for injuries from these activities in children in the United States. The average age was 9.5 years; there were 1.65 million girls (35.9%) and 2.97 boys (64.1%). Cosinor analysis demonstrated significant single peaks for month of injury for snow activities (January 27), trampolines (June 10), scooters (June 24), cycling (July 6), and water (July 12) activities. Double cosinor peaks were noted for skating (April 13 and September 12) and playground (April 22 and September 21) activities. Cosinor analyses demonstrated that the peak week days of injury were Monday for trampoline and snow activities, Saturday/Sunday for skating activities, Sunday for cycling, and Wednesday for playground equipment. There was no peak injury day for scooter or water activities. Topographical representation of paediatric injuries demonstrated that injuries from slides most frequently occurred April–May on Wednesdays and Saturdays, and those on swings April–May all days except Tuesday. Monkeybar injuries were bimodal, with the spring peak on Wednesday–Thursday in April/May and the fall peak Tuesday–Friday in September. Rollerblade injuries occurred Saturday–Sunday from March/April; rollerskates on Saturday

  18. Childhood injury after a parental cancer diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Chen (Ruoqing); A.R. Wallin (Amanda Regodón); A. Sjölander (Arvid); U. Valdimarsdóttir (Unnur); W. Ye (Weimin); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); K. Fall (Katja); C. Almqvist (Catarina); K. Czene (Kamila); F. Fang (Fang)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractA parental cancer diagnosis is psychologically straining for the whole family. We investigated whether a parental cancer diagnosis is associated with a higher-than-expected risk of injury among children by using a Swedish nationwide register-based cohort study. Compared to children

  19. [Winter sport injuries in childhood (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausbrandt, D; Höllwarth, M; Ritter, G

    1979-01-01

    3374 accidents occurring on the field of sport during the years 1975--1977 accounted for 19% of all accidents dealt with at the Institute of Kinderchirurgie in Graz. 51% of the accidents were caused by the typical winter sports: skiing, tobogganing, ice-skating and ski-jumping with skiing accounting for 75% of the accidents. The fracture localization typical of the different kinds of winter sport is dealt with in detail. The correct size and safety of the equipment were found to be particularly important in the prevention of such accidents in childhood.

  20. Shopping cart injuries, entrapment, and childhood fatality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lisbeth; Charlwood, Cheryl; Byard, Roger W

    2008-09-01

    Shopping carts may be associated with a variety of injuries, particularly in toddlers and young children. These usually relate to falls from carts or to tip-overs. Injuries that are sustained include hematomas/contusions, abrasions, lacerations, fractures, and fingertip amputations. Fatal episodes are uncommon and are usually due to blunt craniocerebral trauma from falls. A case involving a 19-month-old girl is reported who became entrapped when she inserted her head through the side frame of a cart that had been removed from a supermarket and left at her home address. Death was caused by neck compression. Although rare, the potential for lethal entrapment during unsupervised play means that the presence of stray shopping carts at private residences and in public places, including playgrounds and parks, is of concern. Strategies, such as coin deposits, should be encouraged to assist in the return of such carts to supermarkets.

  1. [Childhood traumatization, dissociation and nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior in borderline personality disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merza, Katalin; Harmatta, János; Papp, Gábor; Kuritárné Szabó, Ildikó

    2017-05-01

    Childhood traumatization plays a significant role in the etiology of borderline personality disorder. Studies found a significant association between childhood traumatization, dissociation, and nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior. The aim of our study was to assess dissociation and nonsuicidal self-injury among borderline inpatients and to reveal the association between childhood traumatization, dissociation, and self-injurious behavior. The sample consisted of 80 borderline inpatients and 73 depressed control patients. Childhood traumatization, dissociation and self-injurious behavior were assessed by questionnaires. Borderline patients reported severe and multiplex childhood traumatization. Cumulative trauma score and sexual abuse were the strongest predictors of dissociation. Furthermore, we have found that cumulative trauma score and dissociation were highly predictive of self-injurious behavior. Our results suggest that self-injurious behavior and dissociation in borderline patients can be regarded as indicators of childhood traumatization. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(19): 740-747.

  2. The Unintentional Procrastination Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernie, Bruce A; Bharucha, Zinnia; Nikčević, Ana V; Spada, Marcantonio M

    2017-01-01

    Procrastination refers to the delay or postponement of a task or decision and is often conceptualised as a failure of self-regulation. Recent research has suggested that procrastination could be delineated into two domains: intentional and unintentional. In this two-study paper, we aimed to develop a measure of unintentional procrastination (named the Unintentional Procrastination Scale or the 'UPS') and test whether this would be a stronger marker of psychopathology than intentional and general procrastination. In Study 1, a community sample of 139 participants completed a questionnaire that consisted of several items pertaining to unintentional procrastination that had been derived from theory, previous research, and clinical experience. Responses were subjected to a principle components analysis and assessment of internal consistency. In Study 2, a community sample of 155 participants completed the newly developed scale, along with measures of general and intentional procrastination, metacognitions about procrastination, and negative affect. Data from the UPS were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis and revised accordingly. The UPS was then validated using correlation and regression analyses. The six-item UPS possesses construct and divergent validity and good internal consistency. The UPS appears to be a stronger marker of psychopathology than the pre-existing measures of procrastination used in this study. Results from the regression models suggest that both negative affect and metacognitions about procrastination differentiate between general, intentional, and unintentional procrastination. The UPS is brief, has good psychometric properties, and has strong associations with negative affect, suggesting it has value as a research and clinical tool.

  3. The Association of Parental Coping and Childhood Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, Mariann; Gjelsvik, Annie; Wing, Robyn; Amanullah, Siraj

    2016-11-01

    Objectives Injuries are the leading cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality in the United States. Interaction between child, parent and environmental factors may contribute to injuries. This study investigates the association between coping with parenthood and injuries in children age 0-5 years. Methods In this cross-sectional observational study, we analyzed data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, a random-digit-dialing, nationally-representative telephone survey. Information was obtained from a caregiver about children 5 years of age or younger. Parental coping with the demands of parenthood was categorized into three groups-"very well", "somewhat well" and "not very well" or "not very well at all". Injury was defined as caregiver report of any injury within the previous 12 months that required medical attention. Results This study included 27,471 surveys about children 5 years of age or younger. With weighted analysis, 10.4 % of children were reported to have an injury; 31.1 % of caregivers reported coping with parenthood "somewhat well" and 1.7 % reported coping "not very well"/"not very well at all". The adjusted odds ratio of sustaining an injury was 1.26 (95 % CI 1.00, 1.59) for children of parents who reported coping somewhat well with the demands of parenthood compared to those with parents coping very well. Conclusions Parental report of coping with parenthood less than very well was associated with injury in children ages 0-5 years, further highlighting the importance of the interaction between parent factors and childhood injury.

  4. Data mining: childhood injury control and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepas, Joseph J

    2009-08-01

    Data mining is defined as the automatic extraction of useful, often previously unknown information from large databases or data sets. It has become a major part of modern life and is extensively used in industry, banking, government, and health care delivery. The process requires a data collection system that integrates input from multiple sources containing critical elements that define outcomes of interest. Appropriately designed data mining processes identify and adjust for confounding variables. The statistical modeling used to manipulate accumulated data may involve any number of techniques. As predicted results are periodically analyzed against those observed, the model is consistently refined to optimize precision and accuracy. Whether applying integrated sources of clinical data to inferential probabilistic prediction of risk of ventilator-associated pneumonia or population surveillance for signs of bioterrorism, it is essential that modern health care providers have at least a rudimentary understanding of what the concept means, how it basically works, and what it means to current and future health care.

  5. What Do We Know About the Association Between Firearm Legislation and Firearm-Related Injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaella-Tenorio, Julian; Cerdá, Magdalena; Villaveces, Andrés; Galea, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Firearms account for a substantial proportion of external causes of death, injury, and disability across the world. Legislation to regulate firearms has often been passed with the intent of reducing problems related to their use. However, lack of clarity around which interventions are effective remains a major challenge for policy development. Aiming to meet this challenge, we systematically reviewed studies exploring the associations between firearm-related laws and firearm homicides, suicides, and unintentional injuries/deaths. We restricted our search to studies published from 1950 to 2014. Evidence from 130 studies in 10 countries suggests that in certain nations the simultaneous implementation of laws targeting multiple firearms restrictions is associated with reductions in firearm deaths. Laws restricting the purchase of (e.g., background checks) and access to (e.g., safer storage) firearms are also associated with lower rates of intimate partner homicides and firearm unintentional deaths in children, respectively. Limitations of studies include challenges inherent to their ecological design, their execution, and the lack of robustness of findings to model specifications. High quality research on the association between the implementation or repeal of firearm legislation (rather than the evaluation of existing laws) and firearm injuries would lead to a better understanding of what interventions are likely to work given local contexts. This information is key to move this field forward and for the development of effective policies that may counteract the burden that firearm injuries pose on populations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. What do childhood anxiety disorders predict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Antje; Egger, Helen L; Erkanli, Alaattin; Jane Costello, E; Foley, Debra L; Angold, Adrian

    2007-12-01

    Few longitudinal studies of child and adolescent psychopathology have examined the links between specific childhood anxiety disorders and adolescent psychiatric disorder. In this paper we test the predictive specificity of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), overanxious disorder (OAD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and social phobia. Data come from the Great Smoky Mountains Study (GSMS). A representative population sample of children--ages 9, 11, and 13 years at intake--was followed to age 19. Diagnoses of both childhood (before age 13 years) and adolescent psychiatric disorders (age 13 to 19 years) were available from 906 participants. Childhood SAD predicted adolescent SAD, whereas OAD was associated with later OAD, panic attacks, depression and conduct disorder (CD). GAD was related only to CD. Social phobia in childhood was associated with adolescent OAD, social phobia, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Anxiety disorders in childhood are predictors of a range of psychiatric disorders in adolescence. It appears that children meriting a well-defined diagnosis are missed by the current rules for the diagnosis of GAD. Future studies should examine whether OAD deserves reconsideration as a nosological entity.

  7. Childhood hypertension: what does the radiologist contribute?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roebuck, Derek

    Hypertension may be essential (primary) or secondary to a variety of causes. The most important risk factors for essential hypertension are obesity and a family history of high BP, but there are also associations with sleep apnoea, low birth weight and prematurity. The most important cause of secondary hypertension in childhood is chronic renal disease. (orig.)

  8. Childhood hypertension: what does the radiologist contribute?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roebuck, Derek [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    Hypertension may be essential (primary) or secondary to a variety of causes. The most important risk factors for essential hypertension are obesity and a family history of high BP, but there are also associations with sleep apnoea, low birth weight and prematurity. The most important cause of secondary hypertension in childhood is chronic renal disease. (orig.)

  9. Childhood Wellbeing: What Role for Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The word wellbeing is ubiquitous in political discourse, and concerns about childhood wellbeing are particularly rife. This paper identifies, in the context of Scottish policy, how different professional discourses of wellbeing have migrated into education policy and it examines how this relates to learning. Taking a view of policy enactment as…

  10. Childhood Overweight: What the Research Tells Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The rapid increase in overweight among children and adolescents is generating widespread concern. On average, rates of overweight for boys and girls remain similar. Some groups of children are more affected by overweight than others. This paper discusses the health consequences of childhood obesity. A list of school interventions for obesity…

  11. Impairments in learning, memory, and metamemory following childhood head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Jason E; Hanten, Gerri; Li, Xiaoqi; Dennis, Maureen; Chapman, Sandra B; Levin, Harvey S

    2011-01-01

    To assess postinjury changes in learning, memory, and metamemory abilities following childhood traumatic brain injury. Prospective, longitudinal with 5 assessments made from baseline to 24 months postinjury. A total of 167 children (aged 5-15 years) with traumatic brain injury (TBI; 64 severe, 55 moderate, and 48 mild). Children completed a judgment of learning task with 4 recall trials and made 3 metamemory judgments. Relative to those with mild TBI, children with moderate or severe TBI performed worse at earlier times postinjury and had a greater change in performance over time. Performance for moderate and severe groups peaked at 12 months and the performance gap between them and mild TBI group increased slightly from 12 to 24 months. Traumatic brain injury severity did not affect initial study-recall trial performance, but groups did diverge in performance with repeated study. Greater TBI severity was associated with poorer performance on prospective metamemory judgments, but not retrospective judgments. Traumatic brain injury severity affected prospective judgments of memory performance and learning strategies, but did not appear to affect either word retention or the forgetting of words over a delay. Implications for rehabilitation are discussed.

  12. Prognostic factors in childhood-acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaklai, Sharon; Peretz Fish, Relly; Simantov, M; Groswasser, Z

    2018-01-01

    A long-term follow-up study comparing children after anoxic brain injury (AnBI) with those after traumatic brain injury (TBI) was conducted, and prognostic factors were mapped. A prospective historical study following long-term functional outcome after childhood brain injury was conducted in two phases. The first phase included patients suffering from moderate-severe TBI. The second phase assessed children after AnBI, and the results were compared. Functional outcome was recorded and factors influencing prognosis were outlined. On admission vegetative state (VS) was twice as prevalent in the AnBI subgroup. Approximately 90% of children with TBI and 60% of patients with AnBI gained independency in activities of daily living (ADL) and mobility. Long-term positive outcome, i.e., return to school and open-market employment, were higher in patients with TBI when compared with AnBI (61% and 48.1%, respectively). Significant outcome-predicting factors were VS at admission to rehabilitation, length of loss of consciousness (LOC) up to 11 days and functional independence measure (FIM) score at admission and discharge. Aetiology was not found to be a predicting factor. Duration of unconsciousness is the main long-term negative prognostic outcome factor. Anoxic brain damage, associated with longer periods of unconsciousness also heralds a less favourable outcome.

  13. Childhood obesity: what can be done to help today's youth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Linda L

    2005-01-01

    Childhood obesity is at epidemic proportions in the United States today. This epidemic has created a public health crisis. Although several initiatives are under way to address childhood obesity, including legislative bills before Congress and a call by the National Academy of Sciences for society to band together to stop the rise in the rates of childhood obesity, none of these efforts address what can be done today to help those youth that are considered morbidly obese and who have failed to find solutions with the standard medical treatment plan. This article discusses the use of bariatric surgery as a possible solution, presents a case study to illustrate the impact bariatric surgery can have on youth who are morbidly obese, and defines the pediatric nurse's role in helping to assure that youth are included in the current legislative process.

  14. Pragmatic skills after childhood traumatic brain injury: Parents' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Casey S; Creaghead, Nancy A; Turkstra, Lyn S; Vaughn, Lisa M; Kelchner, Lisa N

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize pragmatic deficits after childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI) within the home environment social contexts where they occur. We used a descriptive qualitative approach to describe parents' experiences in communicating with their child with TBI. Participants were ten mothers of children ages 6-12 years who had sustained a moderate to severe TBI more than one year prior to the study. Mothers' experiences were collected through semi-structured interviews and questionnaires. Interviews were analyzed using a deductive framework to develop social contexts and pragmatic deficit themes for communication in the home. Overall, mothers primarily described their children with TBI as exhibiting average or near average pragmatic skills at home, but nine observed some pragmatic deficits and/or social behavior problems. There were four in-home social contexts in which pragmatic deficits were observed. Emergent themes also included outside-of-the home social contexts and social behavior problems. There was some overlap of pragmatic deficit and social behavior problem themes among contexts, but many deficits were context specific. This study's pragmatic deficit themes expanded on prior childhood TBI pragmatic investigations by identifying contexts in and outside of the home in which pragmatic deficits may occur after TBI. Learning Outcomes Readers will be able to describe the day-to-day social contexts that may be impacted by pragmatic deficits after childhood TBI. Readers will be able to compare the pragmatic deficit themes identified as occurring in the home to those occurring outside of the home. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Topical Review: Negative Behavioral and Cognitive Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Early Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Dainelys; Hungerford, Gabriela M.; Bagner, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarize recent research on negative behavioral and cognitive outcomes following early childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods Topical review of the literature published since the year 2000 examining behavioral and cognitive difficulties following TBI in early childhood. Results Research findings from the reviewed studies demonstrate a variety of negative behavioral and cognitive outcomes following TBI in childhood, particularly for children

  16. Child Injury: What You Need to Know PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-16

    This 60 second PSA is based on the April 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Many childhood deaths and injuries are preventable, including those caused by crashes, suffocation, poisoning, drowning, fires, and falls. The PSA discusses ways to help prevent these deaths and injuries.  Created: 4/16/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/16/2012.

  17. Burden of injury in childhood and adolescence in 8 European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Polinder (Suzanne); J.A. Haagsma (Juanita); H. Toet (Hidde); M.J.P. Brugmans (Marco); E.F. van Beeck (Ed)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractInjury is the major cause of death and suffering among children and adolescents, but awareness of the problem and political commitment for preventive actions remain unacceptably low. We have assessed variation in the burden of injuries in childhood and adolescence in eight European

  18. Cognitive dysfunction in young men following head injury in childhood and adolescence: a population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teasdale, T W; Engberg, A W

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction among young men who had suffered a head injury during childhood or adolescence, in particular focusing upon the effects of age and the severity of the injury. METHODS: By cross linkage of Danish national registers for hospital...... factors may again play a role....

  19. 20 Years of Research on Socioeconomic Inequality and Children's—Unintentional Injuries Understanding the Cause-Specific Evidence at Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Laflamme

    2010-01-01

    Studies have been conducted at both area and individual levels, the bulk of which deal with road traffic, burn, and fall injuries. As a whole and for each injury cause separately, their results support the notion that low socioeconomic status is greatly detrimental to child safety but not in all instances and settings. In light of variations between causes and, within causes, between settings and countries, it is emphasized that the prevention of inequities in child safety requires not only that proximal risk factors of injuries be tackled but also remote and fundamental ones inherent to poverty.

  20. Trends in hepatic injury associated with unintentional overdose of paracetamol (Acetaminophen) in products with and without opioid: an analysis using the National Poison Data System of the American Association of Poison Control Centers, 2000-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, G Randall; Ho, Mona; Woodward, Randall W

    2012-02-01

    more than one paracetamol-containing product. Abuse and misuse accounted for 34% of cases but 58% of the severe injuries. Paracetamol without opioid: A total of 126 830 cases were identified, increasing 44%, and 15 706 cases merited acetylcysteine (70% increase). A total of 4674 patients (3.7%) experienced some hepatic injury (134% increase). [corrected] Use of more than one non-opioid paracetamol product occurred in 7.3% of patients and was associated with a lower injury rate. Hepatic injury associated with paracetamol use is increasing significantly faster than population, paracetamol product sales and poison centre use. This suggests a growing portion of consumers is self-dosing paracetamol beyond the toxic threshold. This is true for paracetamol with and without opioids, but the increase in hepatic injury is greater when paracetamol is taken with an opioid. This disproportionate rise is greatest with misuse and abuse of paracetamol products in combination with opioids. Increasing self-dosage of the opioid combination products for the opioid effect is likely to result in more cases of toxic exposure to paracetamol. In contrast, cases of exposure to paracetamol-containing cough and cold products are underrepresented among those injured. In the absence of opioid-containing products, consumption of more than one paracetamol-containing product did not contribute to injury. Efforts to modulate unintentional paracetamol-related hepatic injury should consider these associations.

  1. Blast Injuries: What Clinicians Need to Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-11-05

    In this podcast, Dr. Richard C. Hunt, Director of the CDC’s Division of Injury Response, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control provides a brief overview for health care providers on how to respond and care for persons injured by an explosion or blast event.  Created: 11/5/2008 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Division of Injury Response (DIR).   Date Released: 11/6/2008.

  2. A population based study of unintentional firearm fatalities

    OpenAIRE

    Cherry, D; Runyan, C; Butts, J

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To describe the circumstances of fatal unintentional firearm injuries in a statewide population in a region of the United States with high firearm fatality rates and to compare to similar data from an earlier period in the same state.

  3. Socio-economic status and types of childhood injury in Alberta: a population based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenson Lawrence W

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood injury is the leading cause of mortality, morbidity and permanent disability in children in the developed world. This research examines relationships between socio-economic status (SES, demographics, and types of childhood injury in the province of Alberta, Canada. Methods Secondary analysis was performed using administrative health care data provided by Alberta Health and Wellness on all children, aged 0 to 17 years, who had injuries treated by a physician, either in a physician's office, outpatient department, emergency room and/or as a hospital inpatient, between April 1st. 1995 to March 31st. 1996. Thirteen types of childhood injury were assessed with respect to age, gender and urban/rural location using ICD9 codes, and were related to SES as determined by an individual level SES indicator, the payment status of the Alberta provincial health insurance plan. The relationships between gender, SES, rural/urban status and injury type were determined using logistic regression. Results Twenty-four percent of Alberta children had an injury treated by physician during the one year period. Peak injury rates occurred about ages 2 and 13–17 years. All injury types except poisoning were more common in males. Injuries were more frequent in urban Alberta and in urban children with lower SES (receiving health care premium assistance. Among the four most common types of injury (78.6% of the total, superficial wounds and open wounds were more common among children with lower SES, while fractures and dislocations/sprains/strains were more common among children receiving no premium assistance. Conclusion These results show that childhood injury in Alberta is a major health concern especially among males, children living in urban centres, and those living on welfare or have Treaty status. Most types of injury were more frequent in children of lower SES. Analysis of the three types of the healthcare premium subsidy allowed a more

  4. Topical review: negative behavioral and cognitive outcomes following traumatic brain injury in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Dainelys; Hungerford, Gabriela M; Bagner, Daniel M

    2015-05-01

    To summarize recent research on negative behavioral and cognitive outcomes following early childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI). Topical review of the literature published since the year 2000 examining behavioral and cognitive difficulties following TBI in early childhood. Research findings from the reviewed studies demonstrate a variety of negative behavioral and cognitive outcomes following TBI in childhood, particularly for children behaviors, attention, language, and cognitive functioning (e.g., IQ, executive functioning). Furthermore, negative outcomes have been shown to persist up to 16 years following the injury. The empirical studies reviewed demonstrate the increased risk for negative behavioral and cognitive outcomes following early childhood TBI. Furthermore, the review highlights current strengths and limitations of TBI research with young children and the need for multidisciplinary work examining outcomes for this vulnerable pediatric population. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Childhood Eye Diseases and Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teenagers Baby's Vision Development: What to Expect the First Year Normal Vision Development in Children Refractive Errors in Children Childhood Eye Diseases and Conditions Children’s Eye Injuries: Prevention ...

  6. Trends in childhood injury mortality in South African population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trends in major causes of injury mortality and the proportion of total deaths attributable to injuries trom 1968·to 1985 tor white, coloured and Asian children < 15 years in the RSA were examined. There were 937 injury deaths in 1968 and 853 in 1985 but no clear trends in overall mortality rates were observed. There were ...

  7. Pediatric Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention. (2012). Protect the ones you love: child injuries are preventable . Retrieved August 23, 2012, from ... Disclaimer FOIA Privacy Policy Accessibility NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  8. Femur shaft fracture at a young age and the risk of subsequent severe injuries during childhood: a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    von Heideken, Johan; Svensson, Tobias; Iversen, Maura; Ekbom, Anders; Janarv, Per-Mats

    2014-01-01

    Background: A child who suffers a fracture or a soft-tissue injury at a young age faces an increased risk of subsequent injuries during childhood. This risk could be related to personal and family characteristics or to lower-than-average bone-mineral density. The purpose of this nationwide cohort study was to estimate the association between a femur shaft fracture at a young age and the subsequent risk of hospitalization for injuries during childhood. Methods: We compared the subsequent risk ...

  9. Social Competence at Two Years after Childhood Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vicki; Beauchamp, Miriam H; Yeates, Keith Owen; Crossley, Louise; Ryan, Nicholas; Hearps, Stephen J C; Catroppa, Cathy

    2017-07-15

    Children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at risk for social impairment, but research has yet to document the trajectory of these skills post-injury and factors that may predict social problems. This study addressed these gaps in knowledge, reporting on findings from a prospective, longitudinal follow-up study that investigated social outcomes post-injury and explored factors contributing to these outcomes at two years post-injury. The sample included 113 children, 74 with TBI and 39 typically developing (TD) controls. TBI participants were recruited on presentation to the hospital. Parents rated pre-injury function at that time, and all children underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants were followed up at two years post-injury. Outcomes were social adjustment, social participation, social relationships, and social cognition. Predictors of social outcomes examined included brain lesion characteristics, child cognition (6 months post-TBI), and behavior and environmental factors (pre-injury and two years). Reduced social adjustment (p = 0.011) and social participation (p Poor social adjustment was predicted by externalizing behavior problems and younger age at injury. Reduced social participation was linked to internalizing behavior problems. Greater lesion volume, lower socioeconomic status, and family burden contributed to poorer social relationships, whereas age at injury predicted social cognition. Within the TBI group, 23% of children exhibited social impairments. Younger age at injury, greater pre-injury, and current behavior problems and family dysfunction, and poorer intelligence quotient (IQ), processing speed, and empathy were linked to impairment. Further follow-up is required to track social recovery and the influences of cognition, brain, and environment over time.

  10. Health Visitor's Role in Prediction of Early Childhood Injuries and Failure to Thrive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Janet G.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the role of the health visitor in the prediction of early childhood injuries, abuse, and failure to thrive--based on a three-year study of the relationship between early maternal attitudes and subsequent child health. Journal availability: Pergamon Press Ltd., Headington Hill Hall, Oxford, OX3 OBW England. (DLS)

  11. Burden of injury in childhood and adolescence in 8 European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brugmans Marco JP

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injury is the major cause of death and suffering among children and adolescents, but awareness of the problem and political commitment for preventive actions remain unacceptably low. We have assessed variation in the burden of injuries in childhood and adolescence in eight European countries. Methods Hospital, emergency department, and mortality databases of injury patients aged 0-24 years were analyzed for Austria, Denmark, Ireland, Latvia, Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia and the United Kingdom (England, Wales. Years lost due to premature mortality (YLL, years lived with disability (YLD, and disability adjusted life years (DALYs were calculated. Results Differences in the burden of injury in childhood and adolescence are large, with a fourfold gap between the safest countries (Netherlands and UK in western-Europe and the relatively unsafe countries (Latvia and Slovenia in the east. Variation between countries is attributable to high variation in premature mortality (YLL varied from 14-58 per 1000 persons and disability (YLD varied from 3-10 per 1000 persons. Highest burden is observed among males ages 15-24. If childhood and adolescence injuries are reduced to the level of current best injury prevention practices, 6 DALYs per 1000 child years can be avoided. Conclusions Injuries in childhood and adolescence cause a high disability and mortality burden in Europe. In all developmental stages large inequalities between west and east are observed. Potential benefits up to almost 1 million healthy child years gained across Europe are possible, if proven ways for prevention are more widely implemented. Our children deserve action now.

  12. Burden of injury in childhood and adolescence in 8 European countries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Polinder, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Injury is the major cause of death and suffering among children and adolescents, but awareness of the problem and political commitment for preventive actions remain unacceptably low. We have assessed variation in the burden of injuries in childhood and adolescence in eight European countries. METHODS: Hospital, emergency department, and mortality databases of injury patients aged 0-24 years were analyzed for Austria, Denmark, Ireland, Latvia, Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia and the United Kingdom (England, Wales). Years lost due to premature mortality (YLL), years lived with disability (YLD), and disability adjusted life years (DALYs) were calculated. RESULTS: Differences in the burden of injury in childhood and adolescence are large, with a fourfold gap between the safest countries (Netherlands and UK) in western-Europe and the relatively unsafe countries (Latvia and Slovenia) in the east. Variation between countries is attributable to high variation in premature mortality (YLL varied from 14-58 per 1000 persons) and disability (YLD varied from 3-10 per 1000 persons). Highest burden is observed among males ages 15-24. If childhood and adolescence injuries are reduced to the level of current best injury prevention practices, 6 DALYs per 1000 child years can be avoided. CONCLUSIONS: Injuries in childhood and adolescence cause a high disability and mortality burden in Europe. In all developmental stages large inequalities between west and east are observed. Potential benefits up to almost 1 million healthy child years gained across Europe are possible, if proven ways for prevention are more widely implemented. Our children deserve action now.

  13. Risk of childhood injuries after prenatal exposure to maternal bereavement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virk, Jasveer; Li, Jiong; Lauritsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the risk of injuries among children exposed to a stressful life exposure (defined as bereavement) before conception or during fetal life.......The aim of this study was to assess the risk of injuries among children exposed to a stressful life exposure (defined as bereavement) before conception or during fetal life....

  14. Executive function after severe childhood traumatic brain injury - Age-at-injury vulnerability periods: The TGE prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasny-Pacini, Agata; Chevignard, Mathilde; Lancien, Sabine; Escolano, Sylvie; Laurent-Vannier, Anne; De Agostini, Maria; Meyer, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Executive function (EF) impairment is a major predictor of overall outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI). TBI severity is a factor of poor outcome, but most studies include a majority of children with mild and moderate TBI. The aims of this study were to estimate EF impairment after severe childhood TBI and to explore factors predicting EF outcome. The secondary aim was to compare recovery trajectories by age-at-injury groups. This was a prospective longitudinal study of children with severe TBI who were tested for EFs by performance-based tests and questionnaires at 3, 12 and 24 months. Children with TBI (n=65) showed significant impairment in working memory, inhibition, attention and global EF, with little or no recovery at 24 months. For flexibility and performance-based EF score, children were impaired at 3 months only and showed normal scores by 12 months. No impairment was found in planning. At 3 and 24 months, Glasgow Coma Scale score and parental education predicted global EF. Coma length was not a significant predictor of outcome. Age at injury predicted progress in EF, but the relationship was not linear; children 10-12 years old at injury showed better outcome than older and younger children. EFs are impaired after severe TBI in childhood. The relationship between age at injury and outcome is not linear. Relying on only performance-based EF tests can underestimate EF impairment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Are Children Born with Birth Defects at Increased Risk of Injuries in Early Childhood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Rachel E; Salemi, Jason L; Tanner, Jean Paul; Anjohrin, Suzanne; Cavicchia, Philip; Lake-Burger, Heather; Kirby, Russell S

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the extent to which children with birth defects experience differential likelihood of various injuries and injury-related hospitalizations in early childhood. The Florida Birth Defects Registry was used to identify infants born 2006-2010 with select birth defects. Injury matrices were used to detect injuries in inpatient, ambulatory, and emergency department admissions for each infant up to their third birthday. χ 2 tests were used to compare sociodemographic and perinatal characteristics of children, by presence of an injury-related hospital admission. Adjusted multivariable logistic and zero-inflated negative binomial regression models were used to investigate birth defect and injury associations and related hospital use. We observed a 21% (99% CI: 1.16-1.27) increased odds of injury in children with birth defects. All birth defect subgroups had a statistically significantly increased odds of injury (excluding chromosomal defects), with adjusted ORs ranging from 1.19 to 1.40. The combination of birth defects and injuries resulted in 40% (99% CI: 1.36-1.44) more frequent injury-related hospital visits and a 3-fold (99% CI: 2.76-2.96) increase in time spent receiving inpatient medical care. Over 30% of children with critical congenital heart defects had an injury-related hospital admission. Children born with specific birth defects are at increased likelihood of various injuries during early life. Although the magnitude of this increased likelihood varied by the mechanism by which the injury occurred, the location of the injury, and the type of birth defect, our study findings support a direct association between birth defects and injuries in early life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Understanding predictors of functional recovery and outcome 30 months following early childhood head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vicki A; Catroppa, Cathy; Dudgeon, Paul; Morse, Sue A; Haritou, Flora; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2006-01-01

    Much is known about outcome following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in school-age children; however, recovery in early childhood is less well understood. Some argue that such injuries should lead to good outcome, because of the plasticity of the developing brain. Other purport that the young brain is vulnerable, with injury likely to result in a substantial impairment (H. G. Taylor & J. Alden, 1997). The aim of this study was to examine outcomes following TBI during early childhood, to plot recovery over the 30 months postinjury, and to identify predictors of outcome. The study compared 3 groups of children sustaining mild, moderate, and severe TBI, ages 2.0 to 6.11 years at injury, with healthy controls. Groups were comparable for preinjury adaptive and behavioral function, psychosocial characteristics, age, and gender. Results suggested a strong association between injury severity and outcomes across all domains. Further, 30-month outcome was predicted by injury severity, family factors, and preinjury levels of child function. In conclusion, children with more severe injuries and lower preinjury adaptive abilities, and whose families are coping poorly, are at greatest risk of long-term impairment in day-to-day skills, even several years postinjury.

  17. Minor traumatic brain injurieswhat is new? | Hollander ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Minor traumatic brain injurieswhat is new? D Hollander, J Coventry, M Du Trevou. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  18. Dipoles, unintentional antennas and EMC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berend Danker

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiated emissions from equipment commonly originate from electronic circuits that act as electric dipoles created by the signal voltage between the signal conductors or as magnetic dipoles formed by the signal current flowing in a loop. Direct emission is mostly small, but circuits often couple to long conductors or large wiring loops which act as antennas and are efficient radiators. A comparable situation exists when short dipole antennas or small wiring loops receive ambient noise (susceptibility. Usually the amplitude of noise sources or the susceptibility of circuits is an invariable. The dipole strength increases with the distance between the conductors and the area. Shielding and proper grounding decreases the interaction via unintentional antennas. Short-circuiting and the insertion of lossy ferrite cores reduce the efficiency of unintentional antennas.

  19. Trends in childhood injury mortality in South African population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-01-09

    Jan 9, 1990 ... rates.2 In som~ countries, notably Mexico, rapid modernisation without adequate safety controls has ... These groups are associated with sOOinjury to social class ..... 1979, which may reflect improved housing conditions during the 1970s. Assault death rates ...

  20. Trends in childhood injury mortality in South African population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-01-09

    Jan 9, 1990 ... In South Africa, injuries are the leading cause of death in children and young people between the ages of 5 years and 34 ... Trends for the black population were not investigated, since data for this group have only been ..... and Causes of Death. 9th revision. Geneva: WHO,1978. 9. Depanment of Statistics.

  1. Risk of childhood injuries after prenatal exposure to maternal bereavement: a Danish National Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Jasveer; Li, Jiong; Lauritsen, Jens; Olsen, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the risk of injuries among children exposed to a stressful life exposure (defined as bereavement) before conception or during fetal life. Population-based cohort study. Denmark. All singleton births in Denmark between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2006 were identified. These newborns were then linked to mothers, fathers, grandparents and siblings using individually assigned civil personal registration numbers. We identified that data on childhood injuries were obtained from the Danish National Patient Registry, which contains data on all hospital stays and outpatient visits. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated from birth using log-linear Poisson regression models, and person-years were used as the offset variable. Age, residence, calendar period, maternal education, maternal income and parental-cohabitation status are treated as time-dependent variables (records were extracted from the offspring's birth year). Exposure to maternal bereavement due to a father's death had the strongest association with childhood injuries, especially when the cause of death was due to a traumatic event (adjusted estimates of IRR (aIRR): 1.25, 95%CI: 0.99 to 1.58). We did not find an association for childhood injuries and maternal bereavement due to grandparent's death, and we only found an association for sibling death when restricting to deaths due to traumatic events (aIRR: 1.20, 95%CI:1.03 to 1.39). The aetiology of childhood injuries is complex and may be related to events that take place during prenatal life. This study suggests that exposure to a stressful life event during gestation may be linked to injury susceptibility in childhood. However, changes in postnatal family conditions related to loss or genetic factors may also play a role. Developmental plasticity related to early life exposures leading to disease programming in offspring is a theory with substantial theoretical and empirical support. Prenatal stress exposure has been

  2. Social differences in traffic injury risks in childhood and youth--a literature review and a research agenda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laflamme, L; Diderichsen, Finn

    2000-01-01

    The paper reviews the scientific literature concerning social differences in traffic injuries in childhood in order to highlight the current state of knowledge and to draw the main lines of a research agenda....

  3. FastStats: Accidents or Unintentional Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Women’s Health State and Territorial Data Reproductive Health Contraceptive Use Infertility Reproductive Health ... are for the U.S. Emergency department visits Number of emergency department visits for ...

  4. Parent's information seeking in acute childhood illness: what helps and what hinders decision making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Sarah J; Jones, Caroline H D; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Roland, Damian T; Thompson, Matthew J

    2015-12-01

    Acute illness is a universal experience in early childhood. Parents find it difficult to determine whether or not their child requires medical care and seek information to inform their decision making. Little is known about parents' information seeking behaviour and what helps or hinders their decision making. This study aimed to explore parents' use of information resources during decision making in acute childhood illness at home. This exploratory qualitative study used focus groups and interviews to collect data from parents of children under 5 years of age. Twenty-seven parents were recruited in the East Midlands, UK, in South Asian and Gypsy/Travelling communities, a Children's Centre and a private sector day nursery. Parents' pre-consultation information seeking was dominated by the internet, albeit with limited success. Parents liked easy to access, professionally validated and simple messages with access to more detailed information. Some parents always sought information through personal contact, whilst others did so when independent information seeking failed. When consulting a healthcare professional, parents liked to be given information to refer to later, although the information received varied. Importantly, neither hard copy nor the internet was accessible for parents with low levels of literacy. Although there is a wealth of information parents can access independently, our findings indicate a need for easy access to clearly signposted, professionally validated resources and available in a range of formats provided through different delivery systems. One size does not fit all. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A systematic review of abusive visceral injuries in childhood--their range and recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, S A; Upadhyaya, M; Evans, A; Mann, M K; Haroon, M M; Tempest, V; Lumb, R C; Kemp, A M

    2013-07-01

    To define what abusive visceral injuries occur, including their clinical features and the value of screening tests for abdominal injury among abused children. We searched 12 databases, with snowballing techniques, for the period 1950-2011, with all identified studies undergoing two independent reviews by trained reviewers, drawn from pediatrics, radiology, pediatric surgery and pathology. Of 5802 studies identified, 188 were reviewed. We included studies of children aged 0-18, with confirmed abusive etiology, whose injury was defined by computed tomography, contrast studies or at surgery/post mortem. We excluded injuries due to sexual abuse, or those exclusively addressing management or outcome. Of 88 included studies (64 addressing abdominal injuries), only five were comparative. Every organ in the body has been injured, intra-thoracic injuries were commoner in those aged less than five years. Children with abusive abdominal injuries were younger (2.5-3.7 years vs. 7.6-10.3 years) than accidentally injured children. Duodenal injuries were commonly recorded in abused children, particularly involving the third or fourth part, and were not reported in accidentally injured children less than four years old. Liver and pancreatic injuries were frequently recorded, with potential pancreatic pseudocyst formation. Abdominal bruising was absent in up to 80% of those with abdominal injuries, and co-existent injuries included fractures, burns and head injury. Post mortem studies revealed that a number of the children had sustained previous, unrecognized, abdominal injuries. The mortality from abusive abdominal injuries was significantly higher than accidental injuries (53% vs. 21%). Only three studies addressed screening for abdominal injury among abused children, and were unsuitable for meta-analysis due to lack of standardized investigations, in particular those with 'negative' screening tests were not consistently investigated. Visceral injuries may affect any organ of the

  6. 13 CFR 123.302 - What is the interest rate on an economic injury disaster loan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is the interest rate on an... ADMINISTRATION DISASTER LOAN PROGRAM Economic Injury Disaster Loans § 123.302 What is the interest rate on an economic injury disaster loan? Your economic injury loan will have an interest rate of 4 percent per annum...

  7. Childhood leukaemia and socioeconomic status: What is the evidence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, M.; Rebholz, C. E.; Egger, M.; Zwahlen, M.; Kuehni, C. E.

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this systematic review are to summarise the current literature on socioeconomic status (SES) and the risk of childhood leukaemia, to highlight methodological problems and formulate recommendations for future research. Starting from the systematic review of Poole et al. (Socioeconomic status and childhood leukaemia: a review. Int. J. Epidemiol. 2006;35(2):370-384.), an electronic literature search was performed covering August 2002-April 2008. It showed that (1) the results are heterogeneous, with no clear evidence to support a relation between SES and childhood leukaemia; (2) a number of factors, most importantly selection bias, might explain inconsistencies between studies; (3) there is some support for an association between SES at birth (rather than later in childhood) and childhood leukaemia and (4) if there are any associations, these are weak, limited to the most extreme SES groups (the 10-20% most or least deprived). This makes it unlikely that they would act as strong confounders in research addressing associations between other exposures and childhood leukaemia. Future research should minimise case and control selection bias, distinguish between different SES measures and leukaemia subtypes and consider timing of exposures and cancer outcomes. (authors)

  8. Childhood adversities and adult use of potentially injurious physical discipline in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Maki; Kawakami, Norito; Kessler, Ronald C; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-05-01

    Using data derived from the World Mental Health Japan Survey (n = 1,186), this study examined the intergenerational continuity of potentially injurious physical discipline of children in a community sample from Japan with a special focus on the confounding effects of 11 other types of childhood adversities (CAs) and the intervening effects of mental disorders and socioeconomic status. Bivariate analyses revealed that having experienced physical discipline as children and five other CAs was significantly associated with the use of physical discipline as parents in the Japanese community examined. However, childhood physical discipline was the only CA that remained significant after adjusting for the other CAs. The association of childhood physical discipline with adult perpetration was independent of the respondents' mental disorders and household income. No significant gender differences were found in the associations between childhood physical discipline and adult perpetration. The current study on Japan provided empirical support consistent with results found in other countries regarding the intergenerational transmission of child physical abuse.

  9. Corticobulbar tract changes as predictors of dysarthria in childhood brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liégeois, Frédérique; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Pigdon, Lauren; Connelly, Alan; Morgan, Angela T

    2013-03-05

    To identify corticobulbar tract changes that may predict chronic dysarthria in young people who have sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in childhood using diffusion MRI tractography. We collected diffusion-weighted MRI data from 49 participants. We compared 17 young people (mean age 17 years, 10 months; on average 8 years postinjury) with chronic dysarthria who sustained a TBI in childhood (range 3-16 years) with 2 control groups matched for age and sex: 1 group of young people who sustained a traumatic injury but had no subsequent dysarthria (n = 15), and 1 group of typically developing individuals (n = 17). We performed tractography from spherical seed regions within the precentral gyrus white matter to track: 1) the hand-related corticospinal tract; 2) the dorsal corticobulbar tract, thought to correspond to the lips/larynx motor representation; and 3) the ventral corticobulbar tract, corresponding to the tongue representation. Despite widespread white matter damage, radial (perpendicular) diffusivity within the left dorsal corticobulbar tract was the best predictor of the presence of dysarthria after TBI. Diffusion metrics in this tract also predicted speech and oromotor performance across the whole group of TBI participants, with additional significant contributions from ventral speech tract volume in the right hemisphere. An intact left dorsal corticobulbar tract seems crucial to the normal execution of speech long term after acquired injury. Examining the speech-related motor pathways using diffusion-weighted MRI tractography offers a promising prognostic tool for people with acquired, developmental, or degenerative neurologic conditions likely to affect speech.

  10. Individual-level predictors of inpatient childhood burn injuries: a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homayoun Sadeghi-Bazargani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burn injuries are considered one of the most preventable public health issue among children; however, are a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in Iran. The aim of this study was to assess individual-level predictors of severe burn injuries among children leading to hospitalization, in East Azerbaijan Province, in North-West of Iran. Methods The study was conducted through a hospital based case–control design involving 281 burn victims and 273 hospital-based controls who were frequency matched on age, gender and urbanity. Both bivariate and multivariate methods were used to analyze the data. Results Mean age of the participants was 40.5 months (95 % CI: 37–44 with the majority of burns occurring at ages between 2 months-13.9 years. It was demonstrated that with increase in the caregiver’s age there was a decrease in the odds of burn injuries (OR = 0.94, 95 % CI: 0.92-0.97. According to the multivariate logistic regression there were independent factors associated with burn injuries including childhood ADHD (OR = 2.82, 95 % CI: 1.68 - 4.76, child’s age (OR = 0.73, 95%CI: 0.67 - 0.80, flammability of clothing (OR = 1.60, 95 % CI: 1.12 - 2.28, daily length of watching television (OR = 1.31, 95 % CI: 1.06 - 1.61, playing outdoors (OR = 1.32, 95 % CI: 1.16 - 1.50 and increment in the economic status (OR = 1.37, 95 % CI: 1.18 - 1.60. Conclusion Major risk predictors of burn injuries among the Iranian population included childhood ADHD, child’s age, watching television, playing outdoors, high economic status and flammable clothing.

  11. At Sea: What Direction for Critical Early Childhood Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I reflect on the dilemma critical early childhood research finds itself in today. In order to distinguish and distance ourselves from the certainties and seemingly unquestionable truths of post-political, mainstream, "normalised" research and its entanglement with neoliberal agendas and corporate interests, have we rendered…

  12. What Can We Do to Prevent Childhood Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumeng, Julie

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the growing problem of childhood obesity and suggests guidelines for professionals to recommend to parents. Research has shown that an overweight child at 3 years is nearly eight times as likely to become an overweight young adult as is a typically developing 3-year-old. More of America's children are becoming overweight, and…

  13. Long-term outcome from childhood traumatic brain injury: intellectual ability, personality, and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vicki; Brown, Sandra; Newitt, Heidi; Hoile, Hannah

    2011-03-01

    Only a handful of studies have attempted to explore very long-term outcomes from childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI). These studies have generally failed to fully consider the impact of injury severity or employ measures sensitive to the survivor's day-to-day function. This study examined outcomes in adulthood, with a focus on functional abilities including education, employment, and quality of life (QOL), and employed predictors including injury severity, age at injury, socioeconomic factors, intelligence, and personality. The study was retrospective and cross-sectional and included 50 adult survivors of child TBI (31 males), aged 19-30 years at evaluation (M = 24.2, SD = 3.6), with injury on average 13.3 years prior to evaluation. Participants were divided according to injury severity-mild (n = 20), moderate (n = 12), and severe (n = 18)-completed an intellectual evaluation and questionnaires regarding educational and employment status, personality, and quality of life. Intellectual and personality measures indicated good outcomes, with mean scores for all groups in the average range and few severity-based findings. In contrast, those with more severe TBI were more likely to have educational and employment problems. QOL was significantly reduced in the context of severe insult, with lower IQ and personality factors most predictive of outcome in this domain. Mild and moderate TBI were generally more benign. Findings suggest that, while TBI is a lifelong problem, its impact is most dramatic in the domain of QOL, where a complex interaction occurs between injury factors, cognition, and personality. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  14. Childhood Mishaps and Its Cognizance among Nepalese Mothers of Parsa District for Its Prevention, Small Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, S; Saha, A

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that there several unintentional causes for the unwanted childhood accidents. In addition, Nepal demographic health survey via West University of England revealed at 2006 A.D, 11% death casualties of under- five aged children are due to unintentional injuries 1. This particular study is extremely useful to health care planner, provider and researcher to have grand design to be produced by government of Nepal, such that; there shall be minimal rate of casualties of deceased children due to accidents. This study is descriptive cross sectional study carried out in Parsa district of Nepal where the respondents were mother to assess their awareness of cause of childhood accidents and its prevention. Computer software SPSS is use to scrupulous analysis of study where the chi-square test is used with 95% level of confidence (p=0.05). Poisoning 96% cases is the cause of childhood accident unintentionally, followed by 94% foreign body aspiration, 85% flame burn. Unsupervised children are more prone to injury than supervised children. Finally and foremost the crucial correlation of parents level of awareness with childhood are as follows; inadequate level of knowledge have higher percentage of accident (58%), followed by moderately adequate (32%) and adequate (10%). This study though done on small scale on small part of Parsa district can play key role to the policy to have vigilantive and supervision power to see the loopholes that need to be detected and dealing in curative manner.

  15. Learning a Music Instrument in Early Childhood: What Can We Learn from Professional Musicians' Childhood Memories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Wyverne

    2008-01-01

    Professional early childhood educators are often asked for advice about whether or when a young child should learn to play a music instrument. Many educators who do not have a background in music education may not be confident in providing such advice. A range of overseas research has supported learning a music instrument in the early childhood…

  16. Childhood injury in Tower Hamlets: audit of children presenting with injury to an inner city A&E department in London

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Dianna; Kirkwood, Graham; Pott, Jason; Kourita, Lida; Jessop, Vanessa; Pollock, Allyson M.

    2015-01-01

    IntroductionChildhood injury is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide with the most socio-economically deprived children at greatest risk. Current routine NHS hospital data collection in England is inadequate to inform or evaluate prevention strategies. A pilot study of enhanced data collection was conducted to assess the feasibility of collecting accident and emergency data for national injury surveillance.AimsTo evaluate the reliability and feasibility of supplementary data c...

  17. Mothers and childhood pneumonia: What should the focus of public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    deaths, what do mothers know about pneumonia, and what should be the content of public campaign messages? Methods: A structured questionnaire was administered to mothers attending paediatric clinics of Lagos University Teaching Hospital seeking their knowledge about the definition, causes, risk factors and ...

  18. Neuropsychological assessment in two cases of adult mild traumatic brain injury with a history of childhood head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Robert A; Priluck, Jacob; Bonilla, Xavier; Evans, Charles; Macedo, Pedro S

    2017-01-01

    The existence of residual cognitive deficits following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) has been a topic of controversy. The current paper describes neuropsychological assessment in two cases of adulthood mild traumatic brain injury. Both patients showed objective results demonstrating cognitive impairment. The first patient experienced a head trauma around the age of 4 and the other patient had a head injury around the age of 7. Discussion focuses on the need for the systematic consideration of a history of childhood head injury as a moderating factor that may account for why a subgroup of patients show cognitive deficits following MTBI.

  19. The association between hospitalisation for childhood head injury and academic performance: evidence from a population e-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbe, Belinda J; Brooks, Caroline; Demmler, Joanne C; Macey, Steven; Hyatt, Melanie A; Lyons, Ronan A

    2014-05-01

    Childhood head injury has the potential for lifelong disability and burden. This study aimed to establish the association between admission to hospital for childhood head injury and early academic performance. The Wales Electronic Cohort for Children (WECC) study is comprised of record-linked routinely collected data, on all children born or residing in Wales. Anonymous linking fields are used to link child and maternal health, environment and education records. Data from WECC were extracted for children born between September 1998 and August 2001. A Generalised Estimating Equation model, adjusted for clustering based on the maternal identifier as well as other key confounders, was used to establish the association between childhood head injury and performance on the Key Stage 1 (KS1) National Curriculum assessment administered to children aged 5-7 years. Head injury was defined as an emergency admission for >24 h for concussion, skull fracture or intracranial injury prior to KS1 assessment. Of the 101 892 eligible children, KS1 results were available for 90 661 (89%), and 290 had sustained a head injury. Children who sustained an intracranial injury demonstrated significantly lower adjusted odds of achieving a satisfactory KS1 result than children who had not been admitted to hospital for head injury (adjusted OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.72). The findings of this population e-cohort study quantify the impact of head injury on academic performance, highlighting the need for enhanced head injury prevention strategies. The results have implications for the care and rehabilitation of children admitted to hospital with head injury.

  20. Femur shaft fracture at a young age and the risk of subsequent severe injuries during childhood: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Heideken, Johan; Svensson, Tobias; Iversen, Maura; Ekbom, Anders; Janarv, Per-Mats

    2014-03-03

    A child who suffers a fracture or a soft-tissue injury at a young age faces an increased risk of subsequent injuries during childhood. This risk could be related to personal and family characteristics or to lower-than-average bone-mineral density. The purpose of this nationwide cohort study was to estimate the association between a femur shaft fracture at a young age and the subsequent risk of hospitalization for injuries during childhood. We compared the subsequent risk of hospitalization for injuries during childhood among 1,404 children (exposed) who were one to three years of age when they suffered a femur shaft fracture with the risk among 13,814 randomly selected, gender- and age-matched femur fracture-free children (unexposed). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for severe injuries defined as fractures or soft-tissue injuries requiring hospital admission were estimated in a Cox proportional hazards model. Exposed children exhibited no significantly increased risk of upper-extremity fractures or soft-tissue injuries during childhood, regardless of sex and follow-up time. Boys exhibited a 162% increased risk of suffering a lower leg fracture requiring hospital admission (HR?=?2.62, 95% CI: 1.45-4.71), but the refracture risk was not significant for girls 2.02 (0.58-6.97). We found an increased risk for subsequent fractures in the lower leg that requires inpatient care during childhood for boys, but not for girls, who were one to three years of age when they first suffered a femur shaft fracture. This increased fracture risk is probably not simply the result of greater risk-taking among boys. The explanation might relate to factors affecting the bone quality of the lower leg.

  1. Asthma and allergic rhinitis in childhood: what's new.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrorilli, Carla; Posa, Daniela; Cipriani, Francesca; Caffarelli, Carlo

    2016-12-01

    Novel approaches are currently offered for the diagnostic workup and therapeutic management of allergic rhinitis and asthma. New predictive biomarkers of allergy and asthma are available. Primary and secondary prevention, earlier intervention, and modification of the natural history of allergic rhinitis and asthma are being intensively investigated. This review highlights advances in the understanding of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of atopic airway diseases in childhood, as well as prenatal and early-life risk factors and strategies for prevention. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  3. Social Environmental Moderators of Long-term Functional Outcomes of Early Childhood Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Shari L; Zhang, Nanhua; Yeates, Keith Owen; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H Gerry

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) contributes to impairments in behavior and academic performance. However, the long-term effects of early childhood TBI on functioning across settings remain poorly understood. To examine the long-term functional outcomes of early childhood TBI relative to early childhood orthopedic injuries (OIs). We also examine the moderating role of the social environment as defined by parent report and observational measures of family functioning, parenting practices, and home environment. A prospective, longitudinal, observational cohort study conducted at each child's home, school, and hospital, including 3 children's hospitals and 1 general hospital in the Midwest. Patients were enrolled in the initial study between January 2003 and October 2006. Follow-ups were completed between January 2010 and April 2015. Fifty-eight children who sustained a TBI (67% of original enrolled cohort) and 72 children who sustained an OI (61% of the original enrolled cohort) were prospectively followed up from shortly after injury (between the ages of 3 and 7 years at enrollment) to an average of 6.7 years after injury, with assessments occurring at multiple points. Long-term functional outcomes in everyday settings, as assessed through the Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS). Of the 130 children included, the median age for those with OIs was 11.72 years and 11.97, 12.21, and 11.72 years for those with complicated mild, moderate, and severe TBIs, respectively. Children with moderate and severe TBI were rated as having more functional impairments in multiple domains than those with OIs (P authoritarian (mean CAFAS of 56.45, 41.80, 54.90, and 17.12 for severe TBI, moderate TBI, complicated mild TBI, and OI, respectively, with significant difference between severe TBI and OI [difference = 39.33; P parenting or with fewer home resources (mean CAFAS of 69.57, 47.45, 49.00, and 23.81 for severe TBI, moderate TBI, complicated mild TBI, and OI

  4. Early Childhood Caries (ECC): what's in a name?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grauwe, A; Aps, J K; Martens, L C

    2004-06-01

    It is evident from the number of published scientific papers on Early Childhood Caries (ECC) that interest in this problem has grown in recent years. Many authors have been trying to devise a clear definition or classification for ECC. The aim of this review was to inventory the prevalence of ECC and to seek a consensus regarding definition and diagnosis. Further attention was paid to the aetiological factors including the role of microrganisms. Finally, education, parenting and treatment procedures were discussed. For this review, epidemiological studies on caries prevalence in children aged between 0 and 36 months were compiled through a systematic approach using Medline. This clearly showed that ECC continues to be a serious public health problem and that there is a great variety of definitions and diagnoses used worldwide, reflected in the prevalence data. This review confirms the multicausal aetiology and the need for further research. The authors strongly support the recommendations formulated at the workshop in Bethesda 1999, and the policy statements by the AAPD. More efforts should be made to reach the high risk groups within populations, in order to reduce the prevalence of ECC and S-ECC (Severe Early Childhood Caries) and consequently to ameliorate the quality of life of these children. Long-term intervention studies are required for the evaluation of these efforts.

  5. Peritoneal Dialysis in Childhood Acute Kidney Injury: Experience in Southwest Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademola, Adebowale Dele; Asinobi, Adanze Onyenonachi; Ogunkunle, Oluwatoyin Olufunmilayo; Yusuf, Bamidele Nurudeen; Ojo, Olalekan Ezekiel

    2012-01-01

    ♦ Background: The choices for renal replacement therapy (RRT) in childhood acute kidney injury (AKI) are limited in low-resource settings. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) appears to be the most practical modality for RRT in young children with AKI in such settings. Data from sub-Saharan Africa on the use of PD in childhood AKI are few. ♦ Methods: We performed a retrospective study of children who underwent PD for AKI at a tertiary-care hospital in southwest Nigeria from February 2004 to March 2011 (85 months). ♦ Results: The study included 27 children (55.6% female). Mean age was 3.1 ± 2.6 years, with the youngest being 7 days, and the oldest, 9 years. The causes of AKI were intravascular hemolysis (n = 11), septicemia (n = 8), acute glomerulonephritis (n = 3), gastroenteritis (n = 3), and hemolytic uremic syndrome (n = 2). Peritoneal dialysis was performed manually using percutaneous or adapted catheters. Duration of PD ranged from 6 hours to 12 days (mean: 5.0 ± 3.3 days). The main complications were peritonitis (n = 10), pericatheter leakage (n = 9), and catheter outflow obstruction (n = 5). Of the 27 patients, 19 (70%) survived till discharge. ♦ Conclusions: In low-resource settings, PD can be successfully performed for the management of childhood AKI. In our hospital, the use of adapted catheters may have contributed to the high complication rates. Peritoneal dialysis should be promoted for the management of childhood AKI in low-resource settings, and access to percutaneous or Tenckhoff catheters, dialysis fluid, and automated PD should be increased. PMID:22550119

  6. Parental educational level and injury incidence and mortality among foreign-born children: a cohort study with 46 years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiki, Omid; Karimi, Najmeh; Mohammadi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Injury risk during childhood and adolescence vary depending on socio-economic factors. The aim of this study was to study if the risk of fatal and non-fatal unintentional injuries among foreign-born children was similar across parental educational level or not. In this retrospective cohort study we followed 907,335 children between 1961 and 2007 in Sweden. We established the cohort by linkage between Swedish national registers including cause of death register and in-patient register, through unique Personal Identification Numbers. The main exposure variable was parental (maternal and paternal) educational level. The cohorts was followed from start date of follow-up period, or date of birth whichever occurred last, until exit date from the cohort, which was date of hospitalization or death due to unintentional injury, first emigration, death due to other causes than injury or end of follow-up, whichever came first. We calculated hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) by Cox proportional hazards regression models. Overall, we found 705 and 78,182 cases of death and hospitalization due to unintentional injuries, respectively. Risk of death and hospitalization due to unintentional injuries was statistically significantly 1.48 (95% CI: 1.24-1.78) and 1.10 (95% CI: 1.08-1.12) times higher among children with lowest parental educational level (9 years and shorter years of study) compared to children with highest parental educational level (+13 years of study). We found similar results when stratified our study group by sex of children, by maternal and paternal educational level separately, and injury type (traffic-related, fall, poisoning, burn and drowning). It seems injury prevention work against unintentional injuries is less effective among children with low parental education compared with those with higher parental education. We recommend designing specific preventive interventions aiming at children with low parental education. © 2014 KUMS, All

  7. Childhood Traumatic Brain Injury and the Associations With Risk Behavior in Adolescence and Young Adulthood: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Eleanor; Cohen, Miriam; Munafò, Marcus

    To systematically review the evidence that childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with risk behavior in adolescence and young adulthood. Risk behavior included one or more of the following: use of substances, including alcohol, tobacco, and illicit substances; involvement in criminal behavior; and behavioral issues with conduct. A literature search was conducted using these terms: child, pediatric, traumatic brain injury, head injury, adolescent, psychosocial, antisocial, conduct, substance use. Studies describing original research were included if they reported outcomes over the age of 13 years in participants who sustained a TBI between birth and age 13 years. Six journal articles were reviewed based on 4 separate studies. Three articles indicated a relationship between childhood TBI and increased problematic substance use in adolescence and young adulthood. Three articles supported an association between childhood TBI and later externalizing behavior; however, 2 articles did not support this link. More research is warranted to explore the association between childhood TBI and later risk behavior as the relationship is not currently understood. Future research should build on existing longitudinal research with continued use of medical records for identifying TBI and inclusion of a non-brain-related trauma group to control for general injury effects.

  8. Prospective memory 7 years after severe childhood traumatic brain injury - the TGE 2 prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasny-Pacini, Agata; Francillette, Leila; Toure, Hanna; Brugel, Dominique; Laurent-Vannier, Anne; Meyer, Philippe; Evans, Jonathan; Chevignard, Mathilde

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the long-term outcome in prospective memory (PM), seven years after childhood severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), in a prospective longitudinal cohort. 76 young individuals (aged 7-22 years): 39 patients with a severe accidental TBI included prospectively seven years earlier, aged 0-15 years at injury, and 37 controls individually matched on age, gender and parental education. Three novel short PM tasks varying in the delay, motivation and context (ecological versus paper and pencil task). Individuals with severe TBI showed significantly poorer PM than matched controls in the two low-motivation PM tasks: (1) the ecological long-delay task consisting of sending a letter on a rainy day (p=0.047, odds ratio = 2.6); (2) the non-ecological short-delay task consisting of taking off post-its while identifying facial emotions (p=0.004, r=0.34). Differences in PM on the high motivation were not significant. PM is impaired several years post severe TBI.

  9. The Relationship between Childhood Maltreatment and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Serafini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionChildhood maltreatment (CM has been associated with an increased risk of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI and suicidal behaviors. However, the exact nature of the association between CM and NSSI is currently unclear. The present review aimed to systematically investigate the association between CM and NSSI in adolescence and early adulthood.MethodsA systematic search of four major electronic databases covering both medical and social science research (PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, and PsycINFO was conducted.ResultsOverall, 20 cross-sectional studies including a total of 22,517 individuals, 3 longitudinal follow-up studies including 1,728 individuals, and 3 retrospective studies including 62,089 individuals were selected. It appears that CM is a significant risk factor for both NSSI and suicide attempts. The increased vulnerability to NSSI seems to be related to experiences of CM, particularly sexual abuse. Gender differences were also found. Generally, when compared to males, females who experienced CM seem to be more vulnerable to presenting with NSSI and suicidal behaviors.ConclusionThere is a positive association between CM and NSSI. The importance of early detection and risk reduction of self-injurious behavior for adolescents is discussed.

  10. The Relationship between Childhood Maltreatment and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Gianluca; Canepa, Giovanna; Adavastro, Giulia; Nebbia, Jacopo; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Erbuto, Denise; Pocai, Benedetta; Fiorillo, Andrea; Pompili, Maurizio; Flouri, Eirini; Amore, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Childhood maltreatment (CM) has been associated with an increased risk of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal behaviors. However, the exact nature of the association between CM and NSSI is currently unclear. The present review aimed to systematically investigate the association between CM and NSSI in adolescence and early adulthood. A systematic search of four major electronic databases covering both medical and social science research (PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, and PsycINFO) was conducted. Overall, 20 cross-sectional studies including a total of 22,517 individuals, 3 longitudinal follow-up studies including 1,728 individuals, and 3 retrospective studies including 62,089 individuals were selected. It appears that CM is a significant risk factor for both NSSI and suicide attempts. The increased vulnerability to NSSI seems to be related to experiences of CM, particularly sexual abuse. Gender differences were also found. Generally, when compared to males, females who experienced CM seem to be more vulnerable to presenting with NSSI and suicidal behaviors. There is a positive association between CM and NSSI. The importance of early detection and risk reduction of self-injurious behavior for adolescents is discussed.

  11. Borderline Symptoms and Suicidality/Self-injury in Late Adolescence: Prospectively Observed Relationship Correlates in Infancy and Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons-Ruth, Karlen; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Holmes, Bjarne; Easterbrooks, Ann; Brooks, Nancy Hall

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective was to assess whether prospectively observed quality of parent-child interaction in infancy and middle childhood contributed to the prediction of borderline symptoms and recurrent suicidality/self-injury in late adolescence. Adolescents (mean 19.9 years) from 56 families participating in a longitudinal study since infancy (retention rate 74%) were assessed on the SCID-II for symptoms of borderline personality disorder, including suicidality/self-injury. Early clinical risk was indexed by clinical referral to parent-infant services. Attachment security and parent-child interaction were assessed from videotape at 18 months and 8 years. Severity of childhood abuse was rated from interview and self-report measures. Maternal withdrawal in infancy was a significant predictor of both borderline symptoms and suicidality/self-injury in late adolescence. Disorganizedcontrolling child behavior at age 8 contributed independently to the prediction of borderline symptoms. The effect of maternal withdrawal was independent of, and additive to, variability explained by severity of childhood abuse. Borderline symptoms and suicidality/self-injury may be preceded developmentally by disturbed interactions as early as 18 months of age. A parent-child transactional model is proposed to account for the findings. PMID:23123044

  12. Childhood injury in Tower Hamlets: Audit of children presenting with injury to an inner city A&E department in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dianna; Kirkwood, Graham; Pott, Jason; Kourita, Lida; Jessop, Vanessa; Pollock, Allyson M

    2015-01-01

    Childhood injury is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide with the most socio-economically deprived children at greatest risk. Current routine NHS hospital data collection in England is inadequate to inform or evaluate prevention strategies. A pilot study of enhanced data collection was conducted to assess the feasibility of collecting accident and emergency data for national injury surveillance. To evaluate the reliability and feasibility of supplementary data collection using a paper-based questionnaire and to assess the potential relationship between income deprivation and incidence of paediatric injury. Clinical staff conducted an audit of injuries in all patients under 16 years between June and December 2012 through completion of a questionnaire while taking the medical history. Descriptive statistics were produced for age, sex, time of arrival, activity at time of injury, mechanism and location of injuries. The association between known injury incidence and area level income deprivation (2010 English Index of Multiple Deprivation [IMD] Income Deprivation Domain from home postcode) was assessed using Spearman's rank correlation. Representativeness of the audit was measured using z-test statistics for time of arrival, age, sex and ethnicity. The paper audit captured 414 (6.5%) of the 6358 under-16 injury-related attendances recorded on the NHS Care Record Service Dataset. Comparison of the audit dataset with NHS records showed that the audit was not representative of the larger dataset except for sex of the patient. There was a positive correlation between injury incidence and income deprivation measured using IMD score where data were available (n = 384, p London Hospital. The audit failed to capture a high proportion of cases, likely due to the paper-based format used. This study highlights the importance of routinely collecting enhanced injury data in computerized hospital admission systems to provide the necessary evidence base for effective

  13. Social Environmental Moderators of Long-term Functional Outcomes of Early Childhood Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Shari L.; Zhang, Nanhua; Yeates, Keith Owen; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H. Gerry

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) contributes to impairments in behavior and academic performance. However, the long-term effects of early childhood TBI on functioning across settings remain poorly understood. OBJECTIVE To examine the long-term functional outcomes of early childhood TBI relative to early childhood orthopedic injuries (OIs). We also examine the moderating role of the social environment as defined by parent report and observational measures of family functioning, parenting practices, and home environment. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A prospective, longitudinal, observational cohort study conducted at each child’s home, school, and hospital, including 3 children’s hospitals and 1 general hospital in the Midwest. Patients were enrolled in the initial study between January 2003 and October 2006. Follow-ups were completed between January 2010 and April 2015. Fifty-eight children who sustained a TBI (67%of original enrolled cohort) and 72 children who sustained an OI (61% of the original enrolled cohort) were prospectively followed up from shortly after injury (between the ages of 3 and 7 years at enrollment) to an average of 6.7 years after injury, with assessments occurring at multiple points. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Long-term functional outcomes in everyday settings, as assessed through the Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS). RESULTS Of the 130 children included, the median age for those with OIs was 11.72 years and 11.97, 12.21, and 11.72 years for those with complicated mild, moderate, and severe TBIs, respectively. Children with moderate and severe TBI were rated as having more functional impairments in multiple domains than those with OIs (P authoritarian (mean CAFAS of 56.45, 41.80, 54.90, and 17.12 for severe TBI, moderate TBI, complicated mild TBI, and OI, respectively, with significant difference between severe TBI and OI [difference = 39.33; P < .001], moderate TBI and OI [difference = 24

  14. What We Feel and What We Do: Emotional Capital in Early Childhood Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Yarrow

    2015-01-01

    The ancient Greeks articulated three types of knowledge, "episteme," "techne" and "phronesis." Education has emphasised two of these--"pure" knowledge and technical skills--while neglecting the latter. Within early childhood a key aspect of "phronesis"--practical wisdom--is emotion work, and its…

  15. What is the economic burden of sports injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Selcen; Kılıç, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    Despite the health benefits of sports activities, sports injury and fear of injury are important barriers to participation in sport. The incidence, prevalence and type of sports injuries vary among men and women as well as age groups. It is usually difficult to examine these different aspects of sports injuries due to insufficient data. This study argues that sport injuries can be considered as an important economic burden in terms of the direct and indirect costs it bears. As a result, strong and effective strategies are needed to prevent sports injuries. Sports medicine has also been attracted increasing attention in recent years, particularly. In this article, the importance of sports injuries and their economic costs as well as the role of sport medicine as a prevention method for sports injuries were discussed.

  16. Neonatal ischemic brain injury: what every radiologist needs to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Ishak, Gisele E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a pictorial review of neonatal ischemic brain injury and look at its pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnoses from a radiologist's perspective. The concept of perinatal stroke is defined and its distinction from hypoxic-ischemic injury is emphasized. A brief review of recent imaging advances is included and a diagnostic approach to neonatal ischemic brain injury is suggested. (orig.)

  17. Childhood Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Childhood Stress KidsHealth / For Parents / Childhood Stress What's in this ... and feel stress to some degree. Sources of Stress Stress is a function of the demands placed ...

  18. Children’s Understanding of No Diving Warning Signs: Implications for Preventing Childhood Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A. Morrongiello

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined children’s understanding of No Diving warning signs. Normally-developing 7 to 10 year olds were asked questions to assess their understanding of text, images, and main messages on No Diving warning signs. These structured interviews were audio recorded and responses were later coded. Results revealed that children understood the behavior advised against (diving, why it is prohibited (can hit head on the bottom, and what can happen (serious injury including hospitalization. They understood that breaking your neck results in limitations in mobility and can occur from diving, but they did not anticipate that such an injury is likely to occur. There were no gender and few age differences, but diving experience was associated with children significantly downplaying their risk of injury. The findings suggest that having No Diving warning signs explicitly mention a broken neck, may serve to remind children of this potential consequence at the time of decision making. Active adult supervision is particularly important for children who have prior positive diving experiences.

  19. 10 CFR 708.6 - What constitutes “a reasonable fear of serious injury?”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What constitutes âa reasonable fear of serious injury?â... Provisions § 708.6 What constitutes “a reasonable fear of serious injury?” Participation in an activity, policy, or practice may cause an employee to have a reasonable fear of serious injury that justifies a...

  20. 46 CFR 28.580 - Unintentional flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unintentional flooding. 28.580 Section 28.580 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING... caused by deploying all fully loaded davit-launched survival craft on one side of a vessel does not...

  1. Unintentional doping in GaN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tongtong; Oliver, Rachel A

    2012-07-21

    The optimisation of GaN-based electronic and optoelectronic devices requires control over the doping of the material. However, device performance, particular for lateral transport electronic devices, is degraded by the presence of unintentional doping, which for heteroepitaxial GaN layers grown in the polar (0001) orientation is mainly confined to a layer adjacent to the GaN/substrate interface. The use of scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) has demonstrated that this layer forms due to the high rate of incorporation of gas phase impurities, primarily oxygen, during the early stages of growth, when N-rich semi-polar facets are often present. The presence of such facets leads to additional unintentional doping when defect density reduction strategies involving a three-dimensional growth phase (such as epitaxial lateral overgrowth) are employed. Many semi-polar epitaxial layers, on the other hand, exhibit significant unintentional doping throughout their thickness, except when a three-dimensional growth phase is introduced to aid in defect density reduction resulting in the presence of (0001) and non-polar facets which incorporate less dopant. Non-polar epitaxial samples exhibit behaviour more similar to (0001)-oriented material, but oxygen diffusion from the sapphire substrate along prismatic stacking faults also locally affects the extent of the unintentional doping in this case.

  2. Menace of childhood non-accidental traumatic brain injuries: A single unit report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI has high rate of mortality and morbidity worldwide. There are dearths of reports from developing countries with large paediatric population on trauma; neurosurgery trauma of nonaccidental origin is not an exemption. This study analysed menace of non-accidental TBI in the paediatric population from our center. Materials and Methods: This is a single unit, retrospective study of the epidemiology of non-accidental TBI in children starting from September, 2008 to March, 2014. The management outcomes of the epidemiology of the non-accidental TBI were analysed. Results: Total of 109 children age range from 0 (intra-natal to 16 years with a mean of 5.8 ± 4.6 years (median, 5 years were enrolled into the study. 34 (31.2% were domestic violence, 26 (23.9% street assaults, 16 (14.7% were due to animal assaults and mishaps, 17 (15.6% fall from heights. Seven (6.4% cases of collapsed buildings were also seen during the period. Four (3.7% industrial accidents and two (1.8% were self-inflicted injuries. There were also three (2.8% cases of iatrogenic TBI out of which two infants (1.8% sustained TBI from cesarean section procedure while one patient (0.9% under general anaesthesia felt from the operation bed resulting to severe TBI. Conclusion: Child abuse, unprotected child labour, parental/care-givers negligence are the main cause of nonaccidental TBI. Human right activists and government agents should be incorporated in curtailing the menace.

  3. Neonatal ischemic brain injury: what every radiologist needs to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Ishak, Gisele E. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    We present a pictorial review of neonatal ischemic brain injury and look at its pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnoses from a radiologist's perspective. The concept of perinatal stroke is defined and its distinction from hypoxic-ischemic injury is emphasized. A brief review of recent imaging advances is included and a diagnostic approach to neonatal ischemic brain injury is suggested. (orig.)

  4. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, childhood adversity and adolescent nonsuicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichl, Corinna; Heyer, Anne; Brunner, Romuald; Parzer, Peter; Völker, Julia Madeleine; Resch, Franz; Kaess, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Whereas childhood adversity (CA) and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis have been suggested to play a major role in the etiology of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), no study has thus far investigated both its associations and interactions with adolescent NSSI. We investigated CA (antipathy, neglect, physical, psychological, and sexual abuse) and indices of HPA axis activity (salivary and hair cortisol) in a clinical sample of 26 adolescents engaging in NSSI and 26 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HC). We used standardized interviews for the assessment of CA (CECA), NSSI (SITBI-G), and axis I diagnoses (MINI-KID). Salivary cortisol sampling was surveyed using a monitoring system and instructed via telephone calls. Adolescents engaging in NSSI exhibited significantly higher cortisol awakening responses compared to HC. No differences were found with respect to the diurnal slope or hair cortisol. In the presence of CA, healthy adolescents showed flatted diurnal cortisol slopes while those engaging in NSSI exhibited significantly steeper ones. Our findings indicate that adolescents engaging in NSSI may exhibit a stronger cortisol awakening response, potentially in expectation of strain. However, elevated cortisol levels may not be maintained throughout the day, especially among adolescents with a history of CA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Unintentional drowning: Role of medicinal drugs and alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajunen, Tuulia; Vuori, Erkki; Vincenzi, Frank F; Lillsunde, Pirjo; Smith, Gordon; Lunetta, Philippe

    2017-05-19

    Alcohol is a well-known risk factor in unintentional drownings. Whereas psychotropic drugs, like alcohol, may cause psychomotor impairment and affect cognition, no detailed studies have focused on their association with drowning. Finland provides extensive post-mortem toxicological data for studies on drowning because of its high medico-legal autopsy rates. Drowning cases, 2000 through 2009, for which post-mortem toxicological analysis was performed, came from the database of the Toxicological Laboratory, Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Helsinki, using the ICD-10 nature-of-injury code T75.1. The data were narrowed to unintentional drowning, using the ICD-10 external-injury codes V90, V92, and W65-74. Each drowning case had its blood alcohol concentration (BAC) and concentrations of other drugs recorded. Evaluation of the contribution of psychotropic drugs to drowning was based on their blood concentration by means of a 6-grade scale. Among victims ≥15 years old, unintentional drownings numbered 1697, of which, 303 (17.9%) were boating-related and 1394 (82.1%) non-boating-related. Among these, 65.0% of boating-related and 61.8% of non-boating-related victims were alcohol-positive (=BAC ≥ 50 mg/dL). The male-to-female ratio in alcohol-positive drownings was 7.3. At least one psychotropic drug appeared in 453 (26.7%) drowning cases, with some victims' bodies showing up to 7 different drugs. Overall 70 different psychotropic drugs were detectable, with 134 (7.9%) cases both alcohol-negative and psychotropic-drug-positive, of these, 59 (3.5%) were graded 4 to 6, indicating a possible to very probable contribution to drowning. Our findings suggest that psychotropic drugs may play a significant role in drowning, in up to 14.5% of cases, independently or in association with alcohol. Psychotropic drugs alone or in association with alcohol may be an overlooked risk factor in drowning, due to their effects on psychomotor function and cognition. Future

  6. Collapsed scrums and collision tackles: what is the injury risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Simon P; Trewartha, Grant; England, Mike; Stokes, Keith A

    2015-04-01

    To establish the propensity for specific contact events to cause injury in rugby union. Medical staff at participating English community-level rugby clubs reported any injury resulting in the absence for one match or more from the day of the injury during the 2009/2010 (n=46), 2010/2011 (n=67) and 2011/2012 (n=76) seasons. Injury severity was defined as the number of matches missed. Thirty community rugby matches were filmed and the number of contact events (tackles, collision tackles, rucks, mauls, lineouts and scrums) recorded. Of 370 (95% CI 364 to 378) contact events per match, 141 (137 to 145) were tackles, 115 (111 to 119) were rucks and 32 (30 to 33) were scrums. Tackles resulted in the greatest propensity for injury (2.3 (2.2 to 2.4) injuries/1000 events) and the greatest severity (16 (15 to 17) weeks missed/1000 events). Collision tackles (illegal tackles involving a shoulder charge) had a propensity for injury of 15 (12.4 to 18.3) injuries/1000 events and severity was 92 (75 to 112) weeks missed/1000 events, both of which were higher than any other event. Additional scrum analysis showed that only 5% of all scrums collapsed, but the propensity for injury was four times higher (2.9 (1.5 to 5.4) injuries/1000 events) and the severity was six times greater (22 (12 to 42) weeks missed/1000 events) than for non-collapsed scrums. Injury prevention in the tackle should focus on technique with strict enforcement of existing laws for illegal collision tackles. The scrum is a relatively controllable event and further attempts should be made to reduce the frequency of scrum collapse. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. What kinds of injuries do OSHA inspections prevent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviland, Amelia; Burns, Rachel; Gray, Wayne; Ruder, Teague; Mendeloff, John

    2010-08-01

    OSHA's enforcement program is one of the major public efforts to protect American workers. We examine both the scope of injury prevention that inspections can contribute and the types of standards that contribute the most. We linked Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry files for lost-time injuries and employment to calculate injury rates for 1998-2005 for all single-establishment manufacturing firms. We linked these to OSHA inspection records. Inspections with penalties did affect injury types unrelated to standards as well as those related. We also found again that citations for violations of the standard requiring personal protective equipment had the largest impact on preventing injuries. Programs requiring protective equipment use deserve added attention from consultants and inspectors. In addition, some inspections spur managers to undertake safety measures that go beyond compliance with standards. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Long-term classroom functioning and its association with neuropsychological and academic performance following traumatic brain injury during early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treble-Barna, Amery; Schultz, Hanna; Minich, Nori; Taylor, H Gerry; Yeates, Keith Owen; Stancin, Terry; Wade, Shari L

    2017-07-01

    The present study utilized ecobehavioral assessment to examine classroom functioning several years following early childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI) or orthopedic injury (OI) and its association with injury factors, neuropsychological abilities, and academic performance. Participants included 39 children with moderate to severe TBI and 51 children with OI sustained between ages 3 and 7 years. At 7.2 (± 1.3) years post injury, ecobehavioral assessment was used to examine classroom functioning. Additional outcomes included neuropsychological tests, parent and teacher ratings of dysexecutive behavior, and teacher ratings of academic performance. Groups were compared on measures controlling for demographic characteristics, and associations among outcomes were examined using linear regression. Children with TBI showed lower academic engagement relative to children with OI, as well as more frequent individual teacher attention for children with more severe injuries. For children with TBI, difficulties in classroom functioning were associated with lower cognitive flexibility and higher parent and teacher ratings of dysexecutive behavior. Lower scores on a test of fluid reasoning and a greater frequency of individual teacher attention were also associated with lower academic performance in children with TBI. Difficulties in classroom functioning are evident several years after early childhood TBI and were associated with greater injury severity, neuropsychological weaknesses, and poorer academic performance. Children with impaired cognitive flexibility and fluid reasoning skills were at greatest risk for these difficulties and associated weaknesses in academic performance. Instructional interactions may be a potential target for intervention to promote academic progress in at-risk children. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Educational, vocational, psychosocial, and quality-of-life outcomes for adult survivors of childhood traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vicki; Brown, Sandra; Newitt, Heidi; Hoile, Hannah

    2009-01-01

    To examine long-term outcomes from child traumatic brain injury (TBI) and relevance of injury severity. A retrospective cross-sectional design. One hundred and twenty-four young adult survivors of childhood TBI (81 men), aged 18 to 30 years at evaluation (mean = 23.5, SD = 2.9), with injury on average 13.7 years prior to evaluation divided according to injury severity: mild (n = 60), moderate (n = 27), and severe (n = 37). Questionnaires assessed educational and employment status, psychosocial function, and quality-of-life issues. Functional difficulties persisted into adulthood. Injury severity was a particularly strong predictor of long-term outcomes, with environmental factors playing a less consistent role. Survivors of severe TBI were particularly vulnerable, demonstrating global impairment: poorer school performance, employment difficulties, poor quality of life, and increased risk of mental health problems. Mild and moderate TBI were more benign, although lower educational attainment and employment status were identified, and moderate TBI was associated with late developing mental health issues. Traumatic brain injury is a lifelong problem, compromising the individual's capacity to meet developmental expectations across a wide range of functional domains.

  10. Playground injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeini, Hassan Sadeghi; Lindqvist, Kent; Jafari, Hamid Reza; Mirlohi, Amir Hossein; Dalal, Koustuv

    2011-06-24

    Rapid urbanization and unplanned population development can be detrimental to the safety of citizens, with children being a particularly vulnerable social group. In this review, we assess childhood playground injuries and suggest safety mechanisms which could be incorporated into playground planning. Inclusion criteria were "children" as the focus group, "playground" as the main field of study, and "unintentional injury" and "safety" as the concepts of study. The keywords used for the PubMed search were "playground", "children", and "injury". Initially we 182 articles. After screening according to inclusion criteria, 86 articles were found, and after reading the abstracts and then the full text, 14 articles were finally included for analysis. The papers reviewed included four case-control studies, three case studies, three descriptive studies, two interventional studies, one retrospective study, one cross-sectional study, and one systematic review. Playground-related fractures were the most common accidents among children, underscoring the importance of safety promotion and injury prevention in playgrounds, lowrisk equipment and playing hours (week days associated with higher risk), implementation of standards, preventing falls and fall-related fractures, and addressing concerns of parents about unsafe neighborhoods. With the exception of one study, all of the reviewed papers had not implemented any practical safety plan. Safe engineering approaches were also ignored. We recommend a systematic safety approach based on the "safety circle" which includes three main areas, ie, equipment, environment, and children.

  11. What are the Causes of Spinal Cord Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  12. Management of syndesmotic injuries: What is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnetzke, Marc; Vetter, Sven Y; Beisemann, Nils; Swartman, Benedict; Grützner, Paul A; Franke, Jochen

    2016-11-18

    Ankle fractures are accompanied by a syndesmotic injury in about 10% of operatively treated ankle fractures. Usually, the total rupture of the syndesmotic ligaments with an external rotation force is associated with a Weber type B or C fracture or a Maisonneuve fracture. The clinical assessment should consist of a comprehensive history including mechanism of injury followed by a specific physical examination. Radiographs, and if in doubt magnetic resonance imaging, are needed to ascertain the syndesmotic injury. In the case of operative treatment the method of fixation, the height and number of screws and the need for hardware removal are still under discussion. Furthermore, intraoperative assessment of the accuracy of reduction of the fibula in the incisura using fluoroscopy is difficult. A possible solution might be the assessment with intraoperative three-dimensional imaging. The aim of this article is to provide a current concepts review of the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of syndesmotic injuries.

  13. What Early Childhood Educators Need to Know About Computers in Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Specht

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent research in early childhood education centres suggests that the classroom environment and educators' knowledge about computers are not at a level that would support computer learning opportunities. The purpose of the present study was to determine what areas of support educators require in order to provide a smooth introduction of the computer into the early childhood classroom. Questionnaires assessing basic knowledge, attitudes towards computers, and information that teachers would like to have regarding computers were completed by 196 (192 females and 4 males early childhood educators from 3 mid-size Canadian cities. Overall, educators support the use of computers in the early childhood learning environment, but require information that is reliable, systematic and informed. Ideas for a computer workshop for early childhood educators are provided along with suggestions for future research. Résumé Des recherches récentes, effectuées dans des centres d’éducation de la petite enfance, suggèrent que l’environnement des salles de classe et que les connaissances en informatique des éducateurs ne sont pas d’un niveau qui puisse encourager les possibilités pédagogiques par le biais d’un ordinateur. L’objectif de la présente étude est de déterminer les domaines dans lesquels les éducateurs ont besoin de soutien, afin d’introduire, dans les meilleures conditions, l’ordinateur dans une salle de classe de la petite enfance. Des questionnaires évaluant leurs connaissances de base en informatique, leurs attitudes face à l’informatique et les informations qu’ils souhaiteraient recevoir à propos des ordinateurs ont été remplis par 196 (192 femmes et 4 hommes éducateurs de la petite enfance, situés dans 3 villes canadiennes de taille moyenne. D’une manière générale, les éducateurs encouragent l’utilisation de l’ordinateur dans l’environnement de la petite enfance, mais ils ont besoin d

  14. Neonatal encephalopathic cerebral injury in South India assessed by perinatal magnetic resonance biomarkers and early childhood neurodevelopmental outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Lally

    Full Text Available Although brain injury after neonatal encephalopathy has been characterised well in high-income countries, little is known about such injury in low- and middle-income countries. Such injury accounts for an estimated 1 million neonatal deaths per year. We used magnetic resonance (MR biomarkers to characterise perinatal brain injury, and examined early childhood outcomes in South India.We recruited consecutive term or near term infants with evidence of perinatal asphyxia and a Thompson encephalopathy score ≥6 within 6 h of birth, over 6 months. We performed conventional MR imaging, diffusion tensor MR imaging and thalamic proton MR spectroscopy within 3 weeks of birth. We computed group-wise differences in white matter fractional anisotropy (FA using tract based spatial statistics. We allocated Sarnat encephalopathy stage aged 3 days, and evaluated neurodevelopmental outcomes aged 3½ years using Bayley III.Of the 54 neonates recruited, Sarnat staging was mild in 30 (56%; moderate in 15 (28% and severe in 6 (11%, with no encephalopathy in 3 (6%. Six infants died. Of the 48 survivors, 44 had images available for analysis. In these infants, imaging indicated perinatal rather than established antenatal origins to injury. Abnormalities were frequently observed in white matter (n = 40, 91% and cortex (n = 31, 70% while only 12 (27% had abnormal basal ganglia/thalami. Reduced white matter FA was associated with Sarnat stage, deep grey nuclear injury, and MR spectroscopy N-acetylaspartate/choline, but not early Thompson scores. Outcome data were obtained in 44 infants (81% with 38 (79% survivors examined aged 3½ years; of these, 16 (42% had adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes.No infants had evidence for established brain lesions, suggesting potentially treatable perinatal origins. White matter injury was more common than deep brain nuclei injury. Our results support the need for rigorous evaluation of the efficacy of rescue hypothermic

  15. Sports Injuries about the Hip: What the Radiologist Should Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazi, Tarek M; Belair, Jeffrey A; McCarthy, Eoghan J; Roedl, Johannes B; Morrison, William B

    2016-10-01

    Injuries of the hip and surrounding structures represent a complex and commonly encountered scenario in athletes, with improper diagnosis serving as a cause of delayed return to play or progression to a more serious injury. As such, radiologists play an essential role in guiding management of athletic injuries. Familiarity with hip anatomy and the advantages and limitations of various imaging modalities is of paramount importance for accurate and timely diagnosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is often the modality of choice for evaluating many of the injuries discussed, although preliminary evaluation with conventional radiography and use of other imaging modalities such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography, and bone scintigraphy may be supplementary or preferred in certain situations. Stress fractures, thigh splints, and posterior hip dislocations are important structural injuries to consider in the athlete, initially imaged with radiographs and often best diagnosed with MR imaging. Apophyseal injuries are particularly important to consider in young athletes and may be acute or related to chronic repetitive microtrauma. Femoroacetabular impingement has been implicated in development of labral tears and cartilage abnormalities. Tear of the ligamentum teres is now recognized as a potential cause of hip pain and instability, best evaluated with MR arthrography. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome encompasses a group of conditions leading to lateral hip pain, with US playing an increasingly important role for both evaluation and image-guided treatment. Muscle injuries and athletic pubalgia are common in athletes. Lastly, snapping hip syndrome and Morel-Lavallée lesions are two less common but nonetheless important considerations. © RSNA, 2016.

  16. Prevalence and predictors of mental disorders in intentionally and unintentionally injured emergency centre patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Westhuizen, Claire; Wyatt, Gail; Williams, John K.; Stein, Dan J.; Sorsdahl, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence and predictors of mental disorders amongst injured emergency centre (EC) patients in low- and middle-income countries. Patients presenting with either an intentional or unintentional injury were recruited (n=200). Mental health, injury and psychological trauma histories were assessed. Descriptive statistics and logistic regressions were conducted and predictors for current mental disorder were identified. Diagnostic criteria for a current mental disorder, including substance use disorders, were met by 59.5% of participants. Compared to those with an unintentional injury, intentionally injured participants were more likely to be diagnosed with a current mental disorder (66.9% vs 48.8%; p=0.01). High frequencies of previous intentional injuries predicted for current mental disorder (OR = 1.460, 95% CI 1.08-1.98), while male gender and witnessed community violence predicted substance use disorder diagnoses. Findings indicate that injured EC patients, particularly those with intentional injuries, are at risk for mental disorders. Psychosocial interventions in the EC context can potentially make an important contribution in reducing the burden of mental disorders and injuries in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:25126754

  17. 13 CFR 123.603 - What is the interest rate on an economic injury disaster loan under this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is the interest rate on an... September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attacks § 123.603 What is the interest rate on an economic injury disaster loan under this subpart? Your economic injury disaster loan under this subpart will have an interest rate of...

  18. Suicide and unintentional poisoning mortality trends in the United States, 1987-2006: two unrelated phenomena?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frost James L

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two counter trends in injury mortality have been separately reported in the US in recent times - a declining suicide rate and a rapidly rising unintentional poisoning mortality rate. Poisoning suicides are especially difficult to detect, and injury of undetermined intent is the underlying cause-of-death category most likely to reflect this difficulty. We compare suicide and poisoning mortality trends over two decades in a preliminary assessment of their independence and implications for suicide misclassification. Methods Description of overall and gender- and age-specific trends using national mortality data from WISQARS, the Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System, maintained by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Subjects were the 936,633 residents dying in the 50 states and the District of Columbia between 1987 and 2006 whose underlying cause of death was classified as suicide, unintentional poisoning, or injury mortality of undetermined intent. Results The official US suicide rate declined 18% between 1987 and 2000, from 12.71 to 10.43 deaths per 100,000 population. It then increased to 11.15 deaths per 100,000 by 2006, a 7% rise. By contrast to these much smaller rate changes for suicide, the unintentional poisoning mortality rate rose more than fourfold between 1987 and 2006, from 2.19 to 9.22 deaths per 100,000. Only the population aged 65 years and older showed a sustained decline in the suicide rate over the entire observation period. Consistently highest in gender-age comparisons, the elderly male rate declined by 35%. The elderly female rate declined by 43%. Unlike rate trends for the non-elderly, both declines appeared independent of corresponding mortality trends for unintentional poisoning and poisoning of undetermined intent. The elderly also deviated from younger counterparts by having a smaller proportion of their injury deaths of undetermined intent classified as poisoning

  19. Systematic reviews of workplace injury interventions: what are we missing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, Hester J; Pompeii, Lisa A; Myers, D J; Schoenfisch, Ashley L; Dement, J M

    2009-01-01

    There are pitfalls associated with applying a biomedical model with its emphasis on experimental designs to the evaluation of workplace injury interventions. Evaluation over enough time is essential in occupational safety when interventions are expected to have a latent effect as well as to assess sustained effects. Controlled trials are not well-suited to this task and are not even possible in circumstances where a policy change, such as legislative action, affects a population of workers simultaneously. Social context influences occupational injury interventions, their evaluation and the wider generalization of findings but is lost in the pooling of data for meta-analyses. Some of these issues can be addressed through recognition of the contribution of diverse observational methodologies in intervention evaluation, improvement and maintenance of robust surveillance systems, and inclusion of qualitative methodologies not typically embraced by epidemiologists or medical researchers. Through consideration of an evaluation of a legislative effort to prevent falls from height in construction, we demonstrate lack of flexibility in current methods used for evaluating time series analyses in systematic reviews of occupational injury intervention effectiveness. These include the manner in which downward change in slope is assessed and the call to demonstrate a significant initial downward change in level. We illustrate essential contextual detail regarding this intervention that is lost in the pooling of data from multiple studies into a combined measure of effect. This reduction of occupational injury intervention evaluation to one of pure statistical significance is ill-conceived, irresponsible, and should be stopped.

  20. Minor traumatic brain injurieswhat is new?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research has concentrated on indications for neuroimaging, management guidelines for sports-related concussion and sequelae of minor traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs). Despite the emergence of several guidelines there is little agreement on several important issues, including the definition of mTBIs and concussion.

  1. Cumulative Adverse Childhood Experiences and Sexual Satisfaction in Sex Therapy Patients: What Role for Symptom Complexity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigras, Noémie; Godbout, Natacha; Hébert, Martine; Sabourin, Stéphane

    2017-03-01

    therapy. Bigras N, Godbout N, Hébert M, Sabourin S. Cumulative Adverse Childhood Experiences and Sexual Satisfaction in Sex Therapy Patients: What Role for Symptom Complexity? J Sex Med 2017;14:444-454. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring the King’s outcome scale for childhood head injury in children attending a rehabilitation hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumney, Peter; Hung, Ryan; McAdam, Laura

    2014-01-01

    are necessary to enhance clarity of the collected information and reduce rater disagreement over assigning a KOSCHI score at the moderate disability and good recovery levels. Previous studies used patient charts to assign KOSCHI scores. Clinicians vary in their note-taking when conducting a history......Objective: Few tools exist to assess and monitor impairment and disability in children with acquired brain injury. The King’s Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury (KOSCHI) was developed as an alternative to the Glasgow Outcome Scale. However, limited information is available to support its...... disability) and 4b vs 5a (moderate disability vs good recovery). Conclusions: Initial pilot evaluation suggests moderate agreement at best within and between raters. These findings suggest: (1) better training is needed to improve rater agreement and (2) revisions to the KOSCHI data collection form...

  3. Home Environment as a Predictor of Long-Term Executive Functioning following Early Childhood Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durish, Christianne Laliberté; Yeates, Keith Owen; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H Gerry; Walz, Nicolay C; Wade, Shari L

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of the home environment to long-term executive functioning (EF) following early childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants (N=134) were drawn from a larger parent study of 3- to 6-year-old children hospitalized for severe TBI (n=16), complicated mild/moderate TBI (n=44), or orthopedic injury (OI; n=74), recruited prospectively at four tertiary care hospitals in the United States and followed for an average of 6.8 years post-injury. Quality of the home environment, caregiver psychological distress, and general family functioning were assessed shortly after injury (i.e., early home) and again at follow-up (i.e., late home). Participants completed several performance-based measures of EF at follow-up. Hierarchical regression analyses examined the early and late home environment measures as predictors of EF, both as main effects and as moderators of group differences. The early and late home environment were inconsistent predictors of long-term EF across groups. Group differences in EF were significant for only the TEA-Ch Walk/Don't Walk subtest, with poorer performance in the severe TBI group. However, several significant interactions suggested that the home environment moderated group differences in EF, particularly after complicated mild/moderate TBI. The home environment is not a consistent predictor of long-term EF in children with early TBI and OI, but may moderate the effects of TBI on EF. The findings suggest that interventions designed to improve the quality of stimulation in children's home environments might reduce the long-term effects of early childhood TBI on EF. (JINS, 2018, 24, 11-21).

  4. Recognizing the Signs: What School Mental Health Professionals Can Do about Suicide and Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christina

    2009-01-01

    In the everyday bustle of high school life, a student can have wounds--physical or emotional--that often go unnoticed. A lot of issues affect adolescents of all backgrounds. Two particularly serious issues among U.S. high school students are suicide and self-injury. This article discusses what school mental health professionals can do about…

  5. MR imaging in severe upper cervical spinal cord injury in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, H.J.; Steele, N.; Tilton, A.; Bodin, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that MR imaging of the cervical spine in patients with upper cervical spinal cord injury can accurately define the extent of cord injury for prognostic and rehabilitative purpose. Seven patients, ages newborn to 11 y, had acute upper cervical spinal cord injury and required continuous respiratory assistance. All patients had cervical spine radiography initially, but the extent of injuries precluded transport for early MR imaging. One or more MR imaging studies were done when the acute injury phase subsided. Manual ventilatory support by Ambu bag with oxygen was combined with careful respiratory and cardiac monitoring during imaging

  6. Adverse childhood experiences and their impact on frequency, severity, and the individual function of nonsuicidal self-injury in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaess, Michael; Parzer, Peter; Mattern, Margarete; Plener, Paul L; Bifulco, Antonia; Resch, Franz; Brunner, Romuald

    2013-04-30

    This study aimed to investigate a specific relationship between nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and a variety of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) over and above childhood abuse and their impact on frequency, severity, and functions of NSSI. A sample of 125 inpatients (aged 13 to 26) was consecutively recruited within a psychiatric university hospital. Frequency, methods and functions of NSSI were assessed by the Functional Assessment of Self-Mutilation (FASM), ACEs were assessed by the Childhood Experiences of Care and Abuse Questionnaire (CECA.Q). The 12 month prevalence of NSSI in this representative, clinical sample was 60.0%. Engagement in NSSI was significantly related to ACEs with highest associations for maternal antipathy and neglect. Whilst ACEs were not associated with frequency or severity of NSSI, some ACEs were significantly related to the automatic functions of NSSI (e.g., affect regulation, anti-dissociative function or self-punishment) as well as to a peer identification function. NSSI represents a frequent phenomenon among young clinical populations and seems to be specifically related to ACEs with maternal antipathy or neglect commonly featured over and above experiences of abuse. Since ACEs also influence the functions of NSSI such factors need to be examined as part of clinical care planning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Unintentional child neglect: literature review and observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Emily; Billick, Stephen B

    2015-06-01

    Child abuse is a problem that affects over six million children in the United States each year. Child neglect accounts for 78% of those cases. Despite this, the issue of child neglect is still not well understood, partially because child neglect does not have a consistent, universally accepted definition. Some researchers consider child neglect and child abuse to be one in the same, while other researchers consider them to be conceptually different. Factors that make child neglect difficult to define include: (1) Cultural differences; motives must be taken into account because parents may believe they are acting in the child's best interests based on cultural beliefs (2) the fact that the effect of child abuse is not always immediately visible; the effects of emotional neglect specifically may not be apparent until later in the child's development, and (3) the large spectrum of actions that fall under the category of child abuse. Some of the risk factors for increased child neglect and maltreatment have been identified. These risk factors include socioeconomic status, education level, family composition, and the presence of dysfunction family characteristics. Studies have found that children from poorer families and children of less educated parents are more likely to sustain fatal unintentional injuries than children of wealthier, better educated parents. Studies have also found that children living with adults unrelated to them are at increased risk for unintentional injuries and maltreatment. Dysfunctional family characteristics may even be more indicative of child neglect. Parental alcohol or drug abuse, parental personal history of neglect, and parental stress greatly increase the odds of neglect. Parental depression doubles the odds of child neglect. However, more research needs to be done to better understand these risk factors and to identify others. Having a clearer understanding of the risk factors could lead to prevention and treatment, as it would allow

  8. What are the important outcomes in traumatic dental injuries?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenny, Kate P; Day, Peter F; Sharif, Mohammad O

    2018-01-01

    of a agreed and standardized collection of outcomes known as a core outcome set (COS). The aim of this study was to develop a COS for TDI in children and adults. The secondary aim was to establish what, how, when and by whom these outcomes should be measured. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The project was registered...

  9. The family environment predicts long-term academic achievement and classroom behavior following traumatic brain injury in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durber, Chelsea M; Yeates, Keith Owen; Taylor, H Gerry; Walz, Nicolay Chertkoff; Stancin, Terry; Wade, Shari L

    2017-07-01

    This study examined how the family environment predicts long-term academic and behavioral functioning in school following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in early childhood. Using a concurrent cohort, prospective design, 15 children with severe TBI, 39 with moderate TBI, and 70 with orthopedic injury (OI) who were injured when they were 3-7 years of age were compared on tests of academic achievement and parent and teacher ratings of school performance and behavior on average 6.83 years postinjury. Soon after injury and at the longer term follow-up, families completed measures of parental psychological distress, family functioning, and quality of the home environment. Hierarchical linear regression analyses examined group differences in academic outcomes and their associations with measures of the early and later family environment. The severe TBI group, but not the moderate TBI group, performed worse than did the OI group on all achievement tests, parent ratings of academic performance, and teacher ratings of internalizing problems. Higher quality early and late home environments predicted stronger academic skills and better classroom behavior for children with both TBI and OI. The early family environment more consistently predicted academic achievement, whereas the later family environment more consistently predicted classroom functioning. The quality of the home environment predicted academic outcomes more strongly than did parental psychological distress or family functioning. TBI in early childhood has long-term consequences for academic achievement and school performance and behavior. Higher quality early and later home environments predict better school outcomes for both children with TBI and children with OI. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. What Are the Long-Term Economic Costs of Psychological Problems during Childhood? Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has established evidence of a strong link between poor physical health during childhood (and even in utero) and health and economic outcomes much later in adulthood. But much less is known about the long-term economic consequences of psychological conditions experienced during childhood, although childhood psychological…

  11. FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is paralysis? What is paraplegia? What is tetraplegia? What is a “complete” spinal cord injury? What ... What is paralysis? What is paraplegia? What is tetraplegia? What is a “complete” spinal cord injury? What ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and ...

  13. Repetitive Stress Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Repetitive Stress Injuries KidsHealth / For Teens / Repetitive Stress Injuries What's ... t had any problems since. What Are Repetitive Stress Injuries? Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are injuries that ...

  14. Family adaptation 18 months after traumatic brain injury in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancin, Terry; Wade, Shari L; Walz, Nicolay C; Yeates, Keith Owen; Taylor, H Gerry

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine family adaptation to a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in young children during the first 18-month postinjury, when compared with children who had an orthopedic injury. A concurrent cohort/prospective research design was used with repeated assessments of children aged 3 to 6 years with TBI or orthopedic injury requiring hospitalization and their families. Shortly after injury and at 6-, 12-, and 18-month postinjury, parents of 99 children with TBI (20 severe, 64 moderate, 15 mild) and 117 with orthopedic injury completed standardized assessments of family functioning, parental distress and coping, injury-related burden, and noninjury-related parent stressors and resources. Mixed models analyses examined group differences in parental burden and distress adjusted for race and social demographic factors. Both moderate and severe TBI were associated with higher levels of injury-related stress than orthopedic injury, with stress levels diminishing over time in all groups. Severe TBI was also associated with greater psychological distress on the Brief Symptom Inventory but not with more depressive symptoms. Family functioning and social resources moderated the relationship of TBI severity to injury-related burden and caregiver distress, respectively. Lower child adaptive skills were associated with poorer family outcome but group differences remained even when controlling for this effect. Severe TBI in young children has adverse consequences for parents and families during the first 18-month postinjury. The consequences lessen over time for many families and vary as a function of social resources.

  15. Determinants of Unintentional Leaks During CPAP Treatment in OSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebret, Marius; Arnol, Nathalie; Martinot, Jean-Benoît; Lambert, Loïc; Tamisier, Renaud; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Borel, Jean-Christian

    2018-04-01

    Unintentional leakage from the mouth or around the mask may lead to cessation of CPAP treatment; however, the causes of unintentional leaks are poorly understood. The objectives of this study were (1) to identify determining factors of unintentional leakage and (2) to determine the effect of the type of mask (nasal/oronasal) used on unintentional leakage. Seventy-four polysomnograms from patients with OSA syndrome treated with auto-CPAP were analyzed (23 women; 56 ± 13 years; BMI, 32.9 kg/m 2 (range, 29.0-38.0 kg/m 2 ). Polysomnographic recordings were obtained under auto-CPAP, and mandibular behavior was measured with a magnetic sensor. After sleep and respiratory scoring, polysomnographic signals were computed as mean values over nonoverlapping 10-s intervals. The presence/absence of unintentional leakage was dichotomized for each 10-s interval (yes/no). Univariate and multivariate conditional regression models estimated the risk of unintentional leaks during an interval "T" based on the explanatory variables from the previous interval "T-1." A sensitivity analysis for the type of mask was then conducted. The univariate analysis showed that mandibular lowering (mouth opening), a high level of CPAP, body position (other than supine), and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep increased the risk of unintentional leaks and microarousal decreased it. In the multivariate analysis, the same variables remained independently associated with an increased risk of unintentional leakage. The sensitivity analysis showed that oronasal masks reduced the risk of unintentional leaks in cases of mouth opening and REM sleep. Mouth opening, CPAP level, sleep position, and REM sleep independently contribute to unintentional leakage. These results provide a strong rationale for the definition of phenotypes and the individual management of leaks during CPAP treatment. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dementia resulting from traumatic brain injury: what is the pathology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Sharon; Scher, Ann I; Perl, Daniel P; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2012-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is among the earliest illnesses described in human history and remains a major source of morbidity and mortality in the modern era. It is estimated that 2% of the US population lives with long-term disabilities due to a prior TBI, and incidence and prevalence rates are even higher in developing countries. One of the most feared long-term consequences of TBIs is dementia, as multiple epidemiologic studies show that experiencing a TBI in early or midlife is associated with an increased risk of dementia in late life. The best data indicate that moderate and severe TBIs increase risk of dementia between 2- and 4-fold. It is less clear whether mild TBIs such as brief concussions result in increased dementia risk, in part because mild head injuries are often not well documented and retrospective studies have recall bias. However, it has been observed for many years that multiple mild TBIs as experienced by professional boxers are associated with a high risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a type of dementia with distinctive clinical and pathologic features. The recent recognition that CTE is common in retired professional football and hockey players has rekindled interest in this condition, as has the recognition that military personnel also experience high rates of mild TBIs and may have a similar syndrome. It is presently unknown whether dementia in TBI survivors is pathophysiologically similar to Alzheimer disease, CTE, or some other entity. Such information is critical for developing preventive and treatment strategies for a common cause of acquired dementia. Herein, we will review the epidemiologic data linking TBI and dementia, existing clinical and pathologic data, and will identify areas where future research is needed.

  17. Long-Term Neuropsychological Profiles and Their Role as Mediators of Adaptive Functioning after Traumatic Brain Injury in Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treble-Barna, Amery; Zang, Huaiyu; Zhang, Nanhua; Taylor, H Gerry; Yeates, Keith Owen; Wade, Shari

    2017-01-15

    The objectives of the study were to characterize long-term neuropsychological outcomes following traumatic brain injury (TBI) sustained during early childhood, and determine whether identified neuropsychological impairments mediated the effect of TBI on long-term adaptive functioning. Participants included 16 children with severe TBI, 42 children with moderate TBI, and 72 children with orthopedic injuries (OI) sustained between ages 3 and 7 years. Children completed neuropsychological tests and caregivers completed a structured interview of child adaptive functioning at 6.9 (±1.10) years post-injury. Profile analysis and multiple mediator modeling were employed. Children with severe TBI demonstrated poorer fluid reasoning and inhibitory control than both children with moderate TBI and OI, as well as slower processing speed than the OI group. Both fluid reasoning and processing speed were significant independent mediators of the effect of severe TBI on adaptive functioning. No neuropsychological measure significantly mediated the effect of moderate TBI on adaptive functioning. Children sustaining early severe TBI demonstrate persisting neuropsychological impairments into adolescence and young adulthood. The impact of severe TBI on children's long-term adaptive functioning is mediated in part by its effects on fluid reasoning and processing speed.

  18. Involving Parents in Indicated Early Intervention for Childhood PTSD Following Accidental Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobham, Vanessa E.; March, Sonja; De Young, Alexandra; Leeson, Fiona; Nixon, Reginald; McDermott, Brett; Kenardy, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Accidental injuries represent the most common type of traumatic event to which a youth is likely to be exposed. While the majority of youth who experience an accidental injury will recover spontaneously, a significant proportion will go on to develop Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). And yet, there is little published treatment outcome…

  19. Risk Factors for Acute Unintentional Poisoning among Children Aged 1–5 Years in the Rural Community of Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Kavinda Chandimal Dayasiri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute poisoning in children is a major preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in both developed and developing countries. However, there is a wide variation in patterns of poisoning and related risk factors across different geographic regions globally. This hospital based case-control study identifies the risk factors of acute unintentional poisoning among children aged 1−5 years of the rural community in a developing Asian country. Methods. This hospital based case-control study included 600 children. Each group comprised three hundred children and all children were recruited at Anuradhapura Teaching Hospital, Sri Lanka, over two years (from February 2012 to January 2014. The two groups were compared to identify the effect of 23 proposed risk factors for unintentional poisoning using multivariate analysis in a binary logistic regression model. Results. Multivariate analysis identified eight risk factors which were significantly associated with unintentional poisoning. The strongest risk factors were inadequate supervision (95% CI: 15.4–52.6, employed mother (95% CI: 2.9–17.5, parental concern of lack of family support (95% CI: 3.65–83.3, and unsafe storage of household poisons (95% CI: 1.5–4.9. Conclusions. Since inadequate supervision, unsafe storage, and unsafe environment are the strongest risk factors for childhood unintentional poisoning, the effect of community education to enhance vigilance, safe storage, and assurance of safe environment should be evaluated.

  20. Quality-of-life after brain injury in childhood: time, not severity, is the significant factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatteo, Carol A; Hanna, Steven E; Yousefi-Nooraie, Reza; Lin, Chia-Yu A; Mahoney, William J; Law, Mary C; McCauley, Dayle

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of acquired brain injury (ABI) on the long-term quality-of-life (QoL) in children and youth. The objectives of this study were to illustrate the long-term QoL trajectories at 5 years post-ABI. The QoL of children between 5-18 years (n = 94) admitted to McMaster Children's Hospital with ABI were assessed longitudinally for a minimum of 5 years post-injury using the Child Health Questionnaire. Independent t-tests were used to examine differences in QoL between the study cohort and a normative sample at different time points. Mixed-effects models were used to identify predictors for QoL. The QoL of children with ABI was significantly poorer (p time points except at baseline. The CHQ physical summary score (PHSS) showed a significant decline immediately after injury and a significant recovery at 8 months post-injury; while the CHQ psychosocial summary score (PSSS) showed a significant immediate decline, which remained over the course of the study. Pre-morbid school record, time post-injury and mechanism of injury significantly predicted the CHQ PSSS. QoL is impacted by ABI regardless of severity. This impact is further affected by time post-injury.

  1. Children's Unintentional Injury In Cultural Context | Pfeffer | IFE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 'developmental niche' comprises three major subsystems that function together and interact with each other. These are (1) the physical and social setting in which the child lives, (2) the psychology of the caretakers and (3) customs of child-care. Risk and protective factors in the physical and social setting are discussed ...

  2. Family Adaptation 18 Months After Traumatic Brain Injury in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancin, Terry; Wade, Shari L.; Walz, Nicolay C.; Yeates, Keith Owen; Taylor, H. Gerry

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine family adaptation to a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in young children during the first 18-month postinjury, when compared with children who had an orthopedic injury. Methods A concurrent cohort/prospective research design was used with repeated assessments of children aged 3 to 6 years with TBI or orthopedic injury requiring hospitalization and their families. Shortly after injury and at 6-, 12-, and 18-month postinjury, parents of 99 children with TBI (20 severe, 64 moderate, 15 mild) and 117 with orthopedic injury completed standardized assessments of family functioning, parental distress and coping, injury-related burden, and noninjury-related parent stressors and resources. Mixed models analyses examined group differences in parental burden and distress adjusted for race and social demographic factors. Results Both moderate and severe TBI were associated with higher levels of injury-related stress than orthopedic injury, with stress levels diminishing over time in all groups. Severe TBI was also associated with greater psychological distress on the Brief Symptom Inventory but not with more depressive symptoms. Family functioning and social resources moderated the relationship of TBI severity to injury-related burden and caregiver distress, respectively. Lower child adaptive skills were associated with poorer family outcome but group differences remained even when controlling for this effect. Conclusions Severe TBI in young children has adverse consequences for parents and families during the first 18-month postinjury. The consequences lessen over time for many families and vary as a function of social resources. PMID:20431399

  3. Management of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: What's In and What's Out?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Benjamin Todd; Naclerio, Emily; Sherman, Seth L

    2017-01-01

    Sports medicine physicians have a keen clinical and research interest in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The biomechanical, biologic, and clinical data researchers generate, help drive injury management and prevention practices globally. The current concepts in ACL injury and surgery are being shaped by technological advances, expansion in basic science research, resurging interest in ACL preservation, and expanding efforts regarding injury prevention. As new methods are being developed in this field, the primary goal of safely improving patient outcomes will be a unifying principle. With this review, we provide an overview of topics currently in controversy or debate, and we identify paradigm shifts in the understanding, management, and prevention of ACL tears. PMID:28966380

  4. Management of anterior cruciate ligament injury? What's in and what's out?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Todd Raines

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sports medicine physicians have a keen clinical and research interest in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL. The biomechanical, biologic, and clinical data researchers generate, help drive injury management and prevention practices globally. The current concepts in ACL injury and surgery are being shaped by technological advances, expansion in basic science research, resurging interest in ACL preservation, and expanding efforts regarding injury prevention. As new methods are being developed in this field, the primary goal of safely improving patient outcomes will be a unifying principle. With this review, we provide an overview of topics currently in controversy or debate, and we identify paradigm shifts in the understanding, management, and prevention of ACL tears.

  5. Childhood trauma exposure and toxic stress: what the PNP needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornor, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Trauma exposure in childhood is a major public health problem that can result in lifelong mental and physical health consequences. Pediatric nurse practitioners must improve their skills in the identification of trauma exposure in children and their interventions with these children. This continuing education article will describe childhood trauma exposure (adverse childhood experiences) and toxic stress and their effects on the developing brain and body. Adverse childhood experiences include a unique set of trauma exposures. The adverse childhood experiences or trauma discussed in this continuing education offering will include childhood exposure to emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional neglect, physical neglect, domestic violence, household substance abuse, household mental illness, parental separation or divorce, and a criminal household member. Thorough and efficient methods of screening for trauma exposure will be discussed. Appropriate intervention after identification of trauma exposure will be explored. Copyright © 2015 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. INDIAN CHILDHOOD AND OTHER CHILDHOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alceu Zoia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to show how children of the Indian community Terena, from North Mato Grosso, live, how they are educated, and what are the conceptions of childhood among the members of this community. Taking childhood in various contexts, we seek to analyze how this education process has been carried out.

  7. Evidence for unintentional emotional contagion beyond dyads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Dezecache

    Full Text Available Little is known about the spread of emotions beyond dyads. Yet, it is of importance for explaining the emergence of crowd behaviors. Here, we experimentally addressed whether emotional homogeneity within a crowd might result from a cascade of local emotional transmissions where the perception of another's emotional expression produces, in the observer's face and body, sufficient information to allow for the transmission of the emotion to a third party. We reproduced a minimal element of a crowd situation and recorded the facial electromyographic activity and the skin conductance response of an individual C observing the face of an individual B watching an individual A displaying either joy or fear full body expressions. Critically, individual B did not know that she was being watched. We show that emotions of joy and fear displayed by A were spontaneously transmitted to C through B, even when the emotional information available in B's faces could not be explicitly recognized. These findings demonstrate that one is tuned to react to others' emotional signals and to unintentionally produce subtle but sufficient emotional cues to induce emotional states in others. This phenomenon could be the mark of a spontaneous cooperative behavior whose function is to communicate survival-value information to conspecifics.

  8. Hemipelvectomy, a lifesaving operation in severe open pelvic injury in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkowitz, G; Phillips, T; Coren, C; Spero, C; Glassberg, K; Tolete-Velcek, F

    1985-09-01

    Near-complete traumatic hemipelvectomy probably carries an extremely high mortality rate. The usual techniques which have been used to control major hemorrhage associated with pelvic fractures such as transperitoneal vascular ligation, intra-arterial embolization, and packing are not applicable (14). Successful management requires prompt recognition of the nature of this injury so that surgical efforts may be directed at resuscitation and expeditious operative completion of the traumatic amputation. When this decision is made appropriately, the dual goals of control of hemorrhage and prevention of sepsis can be achieved. We report the management of a 7-year-old boy who sustained this injury after being struck by a tractor-trailer. In spite of massive resuscitation, hemorrhage could not be controlled and the child remained in shock. When it was recognized that he had sustained an incomplete traumatic left hemipelvectomy, it was surgically completed, permitting prompt control of the hemorrhage and restoration of hemodynamic stability. Intestinal and urinary diversion allowed an uneventful postoperative recovery without significant infection. Although hemipelvectomy appears to be a radical procedure in children with major pelvic injuries, it may be lifesaving and should therefore be considered in those with severe unilateral pelvic injury and uncontrollable hemorrhage. The potential for physical rehabilitation in the group of young, mostly male patients who have survived this injury appears to be unexpectedly good.

  9. Keeping Children Active: What You Can Do to Fight Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Rae

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about childhood obesity and explores ways to fight this condition. The author shares some activities to get children moving to positively impact childhood obesity. These include: "Stand Up/Sit Down;" "Quick Clean-Up;" and "Get Ready Spaghetti."

  10. Stigma perspective of siblings of children with a major childhood burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehna, Carlee

    2013-10-01

    To understand the stigma perspective of siblings of children with major burn injury. A mixed method, qualitative-dominant study was conducted. The life story method was used for the qualitative portion. Only narratives from those family members describing the sibling's appearance change were used (N = 18 participants). Stigma experienced by siblings was first described by parents or noninjured siblings; they described how the sibling with changed appearance was stared at, ridiculed, or teased when they entered a new social situation. Only when specifically asked did the children with burn injury talk about their problems, saying, "This always happens when I go somewhere new." Children with changed appearance focused on normalizing their lives in a positive way. Oftentimes, it was a parent or noninjured sibling who would describe manifestations of stigma and ways they tried to protect the child with burn injury. ©2013 The Author(s) ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  11. Crime, Violence and Injury in S

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unintentional injury to intentional injury in the home and school, alcohol-related injury and, finally the psycho-social impact of trauma and violence. The chapters are authored ... The discussion on intentional injury is subdivided into child maltreatment, sexual violence, bullying, violence in schools, gang involvement, children ...

  12. Functional plasticity in childhood brain disorders: when, what, how, and whom to assess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Maureen; Spiegler, Brenda J; Simic, Nevena; Sinopoli, Katia J; Wilkinson, Amy; Yeates, Keith Owen; Taylor, H Gerry; Bigler, Erin D; Fletcher, Jack M

    2014-12-01

    At every point in the lifespan, the brain balances malleable processes representing neural plasticity that promote change with homeostatic processes that promote stability. Whether a child develops typically or with brain injury, his or her neural and behavioral outcome is constructed through transactions between plastic and homeostatic processes and the environment. In clinical research with children in whom the developing brain has been malformed or injured, behavioral outcomes provide an index of the result of plasticity, homeostasis, and environmental transactions. When should we assess outcome in relation to age at brain insult, time since brain insult, and age of the child at testing? What should we measure? Functions involving reacting to the past and predicting the future, as well as social-affective skills, are important. How should we assess outcome? Information from performance variability, direct measures and informants, overt and covert measures, and laboratory and ecological measures should be considered. In whom are we assessing outcome? Assessment should be cognizant of individual differences in gene, socio-economic status (SES), parenting, nutrition, and interpersonal supports, which are moderators that interact with other factors influencing functional outcome.

  13. Executive functions and theory of mind as predictors of social adjustment in childhood traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kristen E; Fountain-Zaragoza, Stephanie; Dennis, Maureen; Taylor, H Gerry; Bigler, Erin D; Rubin, Kenneth; Vannatta, Kathryn; Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Stancin, Terry; Yeates, Keith Owen

    2014-11-15

    This study examined whether executive function and theory of mind mediate the effects of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) on social adjustment, relative to children with orthopedic injury (OI). Participants included 19 children with severe TBI, 41 children with complicated mild/moderate TBI, and 57 children with OI. They completed measures of executive function, as well as cognitive, affective, and conative theory of mind. Parents provided ratings of children's social adjustment. Children with severe TBI performed more poorly than children with OI on executive function and theory of mind tasks and were rated by parents as having more behavioral symptoms and worse communication and social skills. Executive function and theory of mind were positively correlated with social skills and communication skills, and negatively correlated with behavioral symptoms. In multiple mediator models, theory of mind and executive function were not significant direct predictors of any measure of social adjustment, but mediated the association between injury and adjustment for children with severe TBI. Theory of mind was a significant independent mediator when predicting social skills, but executive function was not. TBI in children, particularly severe injury, is associated with poor social adjustment. The impact of TBI on children's social adjustment is likely mediated by its effects on executive function and theory of mind.

  14. Childhood Burn Injuries in Children in Dar es Salaam: Patterns and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted in the three city hospitals of Dar es Salaam and two national referral hospitals to describe the pattern of burn injuries and to determine victims\\' and guardians\\' perceptions of the causes and prevention of burns. The study included all injured children younger than 18 years attending Mwananyamala, ...

  15. [Pressure-related analysis of compression therapy after burn injuries in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, T; Keserü, M; Krenzer-Scheidemantel, G; Höcht, B

    2008-08-01

    Burns and scalds are among the most common traumas in childhood and more than often lead to hypertrophic scarring. Compression therapy is one of the main concepts in the prophylaxis and therapy for hypertrophic scars. However, the mode of action and the optimum value for pressure are still unknown. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of measuring the pressure under compression garments with a simple pressure measuring device. Pressure generation occurred by an air-filled balloon connected to a piezoresistive pressure sensor, which showed the pressure as a value of voltage. Calibration was possible with pnumber of patients will follow.

  16. What's wrong with me? seeking a coherent understanding of recovery after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Deborah L; Martin, Rachelle; Surgenor, Lois J; Siegert, Richard J; Hay-Smith, E Jean C

    2017-09-01

    Qualitative research examining experiences of recovering from mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is limited. Findings from quantitative studies regarding predictors of persisting symptoms are inconsistent with limited attention directed to capturing broad perspectives and priorities of the wider stakeholders. More flexible research approaches may help advance the field. We used a mixed method design to generate patient perspectives of MTBI recovery, integrating these with quantitative investigation to isolate factors that might contribute to divergent MTBI outcomes. The qualitative component reported here involved semi-structured interviews with selected participants (n = 10) from the quantitative study cohort, sampling both recovered and non-recovered adult MTBI participants. Interviews focused on participants' general description and understandings of their recovery and perceptions of what helped or hindered this. Data were analyzed using general thematic analysis. Participants regardless of recovery status identified the importance of having a coherent understanding of their injury and recovery. Factors facilitating coherence included social support, validation, reassurance, accessing credible evidence-based information and having a pathway to wellness. Findings suggested that coherence could be a helpful umbrella construct worthy of examination in future MTBI research. This construct appears broad and able to cope with the complexity of individual experiences after injury. Implications for rehabilitation Sense of coherence may be a helpful umbrella construct that can facilitate resilience and positive recovery beliefs and expectations after mild traumatic brain injury. Reassurance, validation, and social support appear important and may facilitate injury recovery. Focus on the experiences of people recovering from mild traumatic brain injury may help to refine recovery models and understandings and thus provide more effective intervention targets.

  17. Direct and indirect forms of childhood maltreatment and nonsuicidal self-injury among clinically-referred children and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armiento, Jenna; Hamza, Chloe A; Stewart, Shannon L; Leschied, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Although exposure to direct forms of childhood maltreatment is among the most widely studied risk factors for nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), research on NSSI has largely overlooked the role of exposure to indirect forms of child maltreatment (i.e., witnessing domestic violence). To address this gap in the literature, the present study examined associations among both direct and indirect forms of child maltreatment and NSSI among clinically-referred children and youth. Data was collected using the interRAI Child and Youth Mental Health Assessment (ChYMH) at ten mental health agencies. The ChYMH is a comprehensive standardized clinical assessment tool completed by trained assessors using multiple sources. The study included a convenience sample of 747 children and youth (68% male) between ages 8-18 with complex mental health histories referred for inpatient or outpatient care in Ontario, Canada. Univariate chi-square analyses indicated positive associations with NSSI and both direct (i.e., physical, sexual) and indirect child maltreatment (i.e., witnessing domestic violence). In a binary multivariate logistic regression analysis controlling for participant age and sex, only exposure to indirect child maltreatment emerged as multivariate predictor of NSSI. The sample was limited to only 10 mental health agencies and only consenting parents/guardians referred to mental health services suggesting the study may not be generalizable to all clinical samples. The present study provides evidence that witnessing domestic violence in childhood is an important risk factor for NSSI. Clinical relevance includes implications for clinicians to develop targeted intervention and prevention strategies for NSSI for children who have witnessed domestic violence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonfatal, unintentional, non--fire-related carbon monoxide exposures--United States, 2004-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-22

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless, nonirritating gas that is produced through the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. Sources of CO include combustion devices (e.g., boilers and furnaces), motor-vehicle exhaust, generators and other gasoline or diesel-powered engines, gas space heaters, woodstoves, gas stoves, fireplaces, tobacco smoke, and various occupational sources. CO poisoning is a leading cause of unintentional poisoning deaths in the United States; it was responsible for approximately 450 deaths each year during 1999-2004 and an estimated 15,200 emergency department (ED) visits each year during 2001-2003. Health effects of CO exposure can range from viral-like symptoms (e.g., fatigue, dizziness, headache, confusion, and nausea) to more severe conditions (e.g., disorientation, unconsciousness, long-term neurologic disabilities, coma, cardiorespiratory failure, and death). CO poisoning often is misdiagnosed and underdetected because of the nonspecific nature of symptoms. To update a previously published report and provide national estimates of CO-related ED visits during 2004-2006, CDC analyzed data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System--All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) database. During 2004-2006, an estimated average of 20,636 ED visits for nonfatal, unintentional, non-fire-related CO exposures occurred each year. Approximately 73% of these exposures occurred in homes, and 41% occurred during winter months (December-February). Prevention efforts targeting residential and seasonal CO exposures can substantially reduce CO-related morbidity.

  19. Neuroimaging for non-accidental head injury in childhood: A proposed protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaspan, T.; Griffiths, P.D.; McConachie, N.S.; Punt, J.A.G.

    2003-01-01

    Non-accidental head injury (NAHI) is a major cause of neurological disability and death during infancy. Radiological imaging plays a crucial role in evaluating craniospinal injury, both for guiding medical management and the forensic aspects of abusive trauma. The damage sustained is varied, complex and may be accompanied by an evolving pattern of brain injury secondary to a cascade of metabolic and physiological derangements. Regrettably, many cases are poorly or incompletely evaluated leading to diagnostic errors and difficulties in executing subsequent child care or criminal proceedings. It is evident, from cases referred to the authors, that imaging protocols for NAHI are lacking (or only loosely adhered to, if present) in many centres throughout the U.K. Future research in this field will also be hampered if there is a lack of consistent and reliable radiological data. There is no nationally agreed protocol for imaging NAHI. We propose such a protocol, based upon a wide experience in the medical management of child abuse and extensive involvement in the medicolegal aspects of NAHI. Jaspan, T., et al. (2003). Clinical Radiology58, 44--53

  20. Involving parents in indicated early intervention for childhood PTSD following accidental injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobham, Vanessa E; March, Sonja; De Young, Alexandra; Leeson, Fiona; Nixon, Reginald; McDermott, Brett; Kenardy, Justin

    2012-12-01

    Accidental injuries represent the most common type of traumatic event to which a youth is likely to be exposed. While the majority of youth who experience an accidental injury will recover spontaneously, a significant proportion will go on to develop Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). And yet, there is little published treatment outcome research in this area. This review focuses on two key issues within the child PTSD literature--namely the role of parents in treatment and the timing of intervention. The issue of parental involvement in the treatment of child PTSD is a question that is increasingly being recognized as important. In addition, the need to find a balance between providing early intervention to at risk youth while avoiding providing treatment to those youth who will recover spontaneously has yet to be addressed. This paper outlines the rationale for and the development of a trauma-focused CBT protocol with separate parent and child programs, for use with children and adolescents experiencing PTSD following an accidental injury. The protocol is embedded within an indicated intervention framework, allowing for the early identification of youth at risk within a medical setting. Two case studies are presented in order to illustrate key issues raised in the review, implementation of the interventions, and the challenges involved.

  1. Neuroimaging for non-accidental head injury in childhood: A proposed protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspan, T.; Griffiths, P.D.; McConachie, N.S.; Punt, J.A.G

    2003-01-01

    Non-accidental head injury (NAHI) is a major cause of neurological disability and death during infancy. Radiological imaging plays a crucial role in evaluating craniospinal injury, both for guiding medical management and the forensic aspects of abusive trauma. The damage sustained is varied, complex and may be accompanied by an evolving pattern of brain injury secondary to a cascade of metabolic and physiological derangements. Regrettably, many cases are poorly or incompletely evaluated leading to diagnostic errors and difficulties in executing subsequent child care or criminal proceedings. It is evident, from cases referred to the authors, that imaging protocols for NAHI are lacking (or only loosely adhered to, if present) in many centres throughout the U.K. Future research in this field will also be hampered if there is a lack of consistent and reliable radiological data. There is no nationally agreed protocol for imaging NAHI. We propose such a protocol, based upon a wide experience in the medical management of child abuse and extensive involvement in the medicolegal aspects of NAHI. Jaspan, T., et al. (2003). Clinical Radiology58, 44--53.

  2. Unintentional eating. What determines goal-incongruent chocolate consumption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Julia L; Johnston, Marie; Campbell, Neil

    2010-04-01

    Overeating can be automatically triggered by the presence of palatable food. When presented with an opportunity to consume unlimited chocolate under the guise of a consumer study, chocolate consumption in individuals (n=62) with healthy dietary intentions could be predicted from a psychological measure of cognitive inhibition. Individuals who were less able to suppress goal-incongruent responses in an established inhibitory task: (a) ate more chocolate and (b) had a higher body mass index than others suggesting that these individuals were less able to exert dietary control in the presence of palatable but intention-incongruent foods. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions KidsHealth / For Parents / Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions What's in this article? Flatfeet Toe Walking ...

  4. The jungle book of neuropsychology: Disentangling the influence of feral childhood from adult brain injury in order to provide effective rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, C J; James, A I W

    2018-03-01

    This article considers the complexities of neuropsychological assessment and rehabilitation in brain injury when the client is illiterate, is from a foreign culture with English as a second language, and reports highly atypical childhood feral experiences prior to injury. MC was a 63-year-old woman referred for neuropsychological rehabilitation with a diagnosis of suspected St Louis encephalitis and global cognitive impairment. In formulating her clinical presentation, consideration was given to a reported history of feral childhood living with monkeys in the Colombian jungle and subsequent physical and emotional abuse. MC participated in comprehensive neuropsychological assessment and then targeted rehabilitation. Neuroimaging documented relatively focal damage in the right temporal lobe. MC's family described her as "the same but worse"; assessment and formulation indicated an exacerbation of attentional, pragmatic, arousal and executive weaknesses but with new memory and emotion recognition impairments. Rehabilitation techniques for communication and executive difficulties were successful despite the complexities of the case. The importance of carefully considered assessment and formulation in understanding MC's presentation is discussed. To the authors' knowledge, this is the only case of neuropsychological assessment and rehabilitation in brain injury involving a history of feral childhood.

  5. Interventions Aimed at the Prevention of Childhood Injuries in the Indigenous Populations in Canada, Australia and New Zealand in the Last 20 Years: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margeson, Alyssa; Gray, Selena

    2017-06-02

    Globally, Indigenous children are found to be at a significantly higher risk of injury compared to non-Indigenous children. It has been suggested that mainstream injury prevention strategies are ineffective within Indigenous communities. The aim of this review is to identify existing interventions aimed at preventing injury in Indigenous children in the hope that it guides future strategies. To the best of the authors' knowledge, no prior systematic reviews exist looking at interventions specifically aimed at preventing injury in Indigenous child populations in the three chosen countries. Electronic databases were systematically searched for relevant childhood interventions aimed at the prevention of injuries in Indigenous populations based in Canada, Australia and New Zealand from 1996 to 2016. A manual search of the reference lists of relevant articles and a manual search of relevant websites were also completed. After 191 records were screened, six interventions were identified meeting the criteria for inclusion. Eligible papers underwent a quality appraisal using adapted assessment checklists and key information was extracted. Findings were then synthesized using a narrative approach. The interventions mainly promoted child safety through activities focusing on education and awareness. Only three of the six studies measured changes in injury hospitalization rates, all but one evaluation reporting a significant decrease. Studies which measured awareness all demonstrated positive changes. Results suggest that interventions delivered in a culturally appropriate manner acted as a main success factor. Barriers identified as hindering intervention success included lack of cohesion within the intervention due to staff turnover and lack of experienced staff with Indigenous knowledge. This review revealed a limited amount of evaluated interventions for the prevention of Indigenous childhood injuries. Conclusive evidence of the effectiveness of existing interventions is

  6. How to Prevent Injuries in Alpine Ski Racing: What Do We Know and Where Do We Go from Here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spörri, Jörg; Kröll, Josef; Gilgien, Matthias; Müller, Erich

    2017-04-01

    Alpine ski racing is known to be a sport with a high risk of injury and a high proportion of time-loss injuries. In recent years, substantial research efforts with regard to injury epidemiology, injury etiology, potential prevention measures, and measures' evaluation have been undertaken. Therefore, the aims of this review of the literature were (i) to provide a comprehensive overview of what is known about the aforementioned four steps of injury prevention research in the context of alpine ski racing; and (ii) to derive potential perspectives for future research. In total, 38 injury risk factors were previously reported in literature; however, a direct relation to injury risk was proven for only five factors: insufficient core strength/core strength imbalance, sex (depending on type of injury), high skill level, unfavorable genetic predisposition, and the combination of highly shaped, short and wide skis. Moreover, only one prevention measure (i.e. the combination of less-shaped and longer skis with reduced profile width) has demonstrated a positive impact on injury risk. Thus, current knowledge deficits are mainly related to verifying the evidence of widely discussed injury risk factors and assessing the effectiveness of reasonable prevention ideas. Nevertheless, the existing knowledge should be proactively communicated and systematically implemented by sport federations and sport practitioners.

  7. Preventing Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blog Skip breadcrumb navigation Preventing Knee Injuries Knee injuries in children and adolescent athletes may be the result of ... occur in childhood sports, but with any knee injury in a growing child there is a possibility of a fracture related ...

  8. Childhood obesity: a risk factor for injuries observed at a level-1 trauma center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Ankur R.; Michalsky, Marc P.; Teich, Steven; Groner, Jonathon I.; Caniano, Donna A.; Schuster, Dara P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Obesity is an independent risk factor in trauma-related morbidity in adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of obesity in the pediatric trauma population. Methods All patients (6-20 years) between January 2004 and July 2007 were retrospectively reviewed and defined as non-obese (body mass index [BMI] trauma patients, obesity may be a risk factor for sustaining an extremity fracture requiring operative intervention and having a higher risk for certain complications (ie, deep venous thrombosis [DVT] and decubitus ulcers) despite having a lower incidence of intracranial and intraabdominal injuries. Results are similar to reports examining the effect(s) of obesity on the adult population. PMID:19635312

  9. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Genotypes and Parenting Influence on Long-Term Executive Functioning After Moderate to Severe Early Childhood Traumatic Brain Injury: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowski, Brad G; Treble-Barna, Amery; Zang, Huaiyu; Zhang, Nanhua; Martin, Lisa J; Yeates, Keith Owen; Taylor, H Gerry; Wade, Shari L

    To examine catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) rs4680 genotypes as moderators of the effects of parenting style on postinjury changes in parent behavior ratings of executive dysfunction following moderate to severe early childhood traumatic brain injury. Research was conducted in an outpatient setting. Participants included children admitted to hospital with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (n = 55) or orthopedic injuries (n = 70) between ages 3 and 7 years. Prospective cohort followed over 7 years postinjury. Parenting Practices Questionnaire and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning obtained at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months, and 3.5 and 6.8 years postinjury. DNA was collected from saliva samples, purified using the Oragene (DNA Genotek, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) OG-500 self-collection tubes, and analyzed using TaqMan (Applied Biosystems, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, Massachusetts) assay protocols to identify the COMT rs4680 polymorphism. Linear mixed models revealed a significant genotype × parenting style × time interaction (F = 5.72, P = .02), which suggested that the adverse effects of authoritarian parenting on postinjury development of executive functioning were buffered by the presence of the COMT AA genotype (lower enzyme activity, higher dopamine levels). There were no significant associations of executive functioning with the interaction between genotype and authoritative or permissive parenting ratings. The lower activity COMT rs4680 genotype may buffer the negative effect of authoritarian parenting on long-term executive functioning following injury in early childhood. The findings provide preliminary evidence for associations of parenting style with executive dysfunction in children and for a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as contributors to decreases in these problems after traumatic injuries in children. Further investigation is warranted to understand the interplay among genetic and

  10. You Are What You Eat? Meal Type, Socio-Economic Status and Cognitive Ability in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stumm, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    The current study tests if the type of children's daily main meal (slow versus fast food) mediates the association of socioeconomic status (SES) with cognitive ability and cognitive growth in childhood. A Scottish birth cohort (Growing Up in Scotland) was assessed at ages 3 (N = 4512) and 5 years (N = 3833) on cognitive ability (i.e. vocabulary…

  11. Prevention of childhood obesity - what type of evidence should we consider relevant?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doak, C; Heitmann, B L; Summerbell, C

    2009-01-01

    Two reviews, one by Summerbell et al. and the other by Doak et al. came to very different conclusions about the effectiveness of childhood obesity interventions. The aim of this commentary is to assess the extent to which inclusion and exclusion criteria, and the definition of effective outcomes...

  12. What Does Economics Tell Us about Early Childhood Policy? Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, M. Rebecca; Karoly, Lynn A.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in neuroscience, developmental psychology, and program evaluation have been combined to develop a unified framework that provides evidence-based guidance related to early childhood policy. This research shows how insights from the field of economics-- human capital theory and monetary payoffs--also contribute to that framework.…

  13. What's on Our Bookshelves? The Diversity of Children's Literature in Early Childhood Classroom Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Thomas; Knezek, Suzanne M.; Quinn, Margaret; Bingham, Gary E.; Girardeau, Kristy; Starks, Francheska

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate representations of diversity in books included in early childhood classroom libraries. The authors hope to contribute to ongoing, critical conversations in the field by providing preliminary baseline data that verify and underscore the need for increased critical attention toward the books selected for…

  14. Professionalism in Early Childhood Education and Care in Ethiopia: What Are We Talking About?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigistu, Kassahun

    2013-01-01

    Despite claims about the significance of early childhood education in improving later outcomes in an individual's life, this stage of development has not received sufficient attention by education systems across the world. Until recently, early education or preschool education did not come under the purview of the formal education system in most…

  15. Caregiver ratings of long-term executive dysfunction and attention problems after early childhood traumatic brain injury: family functioning is important.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowski, Brad G; Taylor, H Gerry; Yeates, Keith Owen; Walz, Nicolay C; Stancin, Terry; Wade, Shari L

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the relationship of family and parenting factors to long-term executive dysfunction and attention problems after early childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI). We hypothesized that the magnitude of executive dysfunction and attention problems would be moderated by family and parenting factors. A multicenter, prospective cohort study that included an orthopedic injury (OI) reference group. Three tertiary academic children's hospital medical centers and one general medical center. Children, ages 3-7 years, hospitalized for OI, moderate TBI, or severe TBI. METHODS AND OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Parental ratings of family functioning and parenting styles were obtained 18 months after the injury occurred. The main outcome measurements, which were parental ratings of children's executive function and attention, were performed at least 24 months after the injury occurred (mean, 39 months; range, 25-63 months). Group comparisons were conducted with use of t-tests, χ(2) analysis, analysis of variance, and Pearson and Spearman correlations. Regression analysis was used to examine associations of the outcomes with family functioning and parenting styles and to test moderating effects of these factors on group differences. Participants with severe TBI demonstrated increased executive dysfunction and attention problems compared with those who sustained moderate TBI or OI. Lower levels of family dysfunction were associated with better executive function and attention across groups but did not moderate group differences. However, attention deficits after severe TBI were exacerbated under conditions of more permissive parenting relative to attention deficits after OIs. Executive function and attention problems persisted on a long-term basis (>24 months) after early childhood TBI, and positive global family functioning and nonpermissive parenting were associated with better outcomes. Better characterization of the optimal family environment for recovery from early childhood

  16. Injury prevention and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Sleet

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Injuries are one of the most under-recognized public health problems facing the world today. With more than 5 million deaths every year, violence and injuries account for 9% of global mortality, as many deaths as from HIV, Malaria and Tuberculosis combined. Eight of the 15 leading causes of death for people ages 15 to 29 years are injury-related: road traffic injuries, suicides, homicides, drowning, burns, war injuries, poisonings and falls. For every death due to war, there are three deaths due to homicide and five deaths due to suicide. However, most violence happens to people behind closed doors and results not in death, but often in years of physical and emotional suffering [1]. Injuries can be classified by intent: unintentional or intentional. Traffic injuries, fire-related injuries, falls, drowning, and poisonings are most often classified as unintentional injuries; injuries due to assault, selfinflicted violence such as suicide, and war are classified as intentional injuries, or violence. Worldwide, governments and public and private partners are increasingly aware of the strains that unintentional injuries and violence place on societies. In response they are strengthening data collection systems, improving services for victims and survivors, and increasing prevention efforts [1].

  17. Outcome analysis and outcome predictors of traumatic head injury in childhood: Analysis of 454 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahloul, Mabrouk; Chaari, Anis; Chabchoub, Imen; Medhyoub, Fatma; Dammak, Hassen; Kallel, Hatem; Ksibi, Hichem; Haddar, Sondes; Rekik, Noureddine; Chelly, Hedi; Bouaziz, Mounir

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine factors associated with poor outcome in children suffering traumatic head injury (HI). Materials and Methods: A retrospective study over an 8-year period including 454 children with traumatic HI admitted in the Intensive Care Unit of a university hospital (Sfax-Tunisia). Basic demographic, clinical, biological and radiological data were recorded on admission and during the ICU stay. Prognosis was defined according Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) performed after hospital discharge by ICU and pediatric physicians. Results: There were 313 male (68.9%) and 141 female patients. Mean age (±SD) was 7.2±3.8 years, the main cause of trauma was traffic accidents (69.4%). Mean Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score was 8±3, mean injury severity score (ISS) was 26.4±8.6, mean pediatric trauma score (PTS) was 4±2 and mean pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) was 11.1±8. The GOS performed within a mean delay of 7 months after hospital discharge was as follow: 82 deaths (18.3%), 5 vegetative states (1.1%), 15 severe disabilities (3.3%), 71 moderate disabilities (15.6%) and 281 good recoveries (61.9%). Multivariate analysis showed that factors associated with poor outcome (death, vegetative state or severe disability) were: PRISM ≥24 (P=0.03; OR: 5.75); GCS ≤8 (P=0.04; OR:2.42); Cerebral edema (P=0.03; OR:2.23); lesion type VI according to Traumatic Coma Data Bank Classification (P=0.002; OR:55.95); Hypoxemia (P=0.02; OR:2.97) and sodium level >145 mmol/l (P=0.04; OR: 4.41). Conclusions: A significant proportion of children admitted with HI were found to have moderate disability at follow-up. We think that improving prehospital care, establishing trauma centers and making efforts to prevent motor vehicle crashes should improve the prognosis of HI in children. PMID:21769206

  18. Verbal ability and language outcome following traumatic brain injury in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Louise M; Anderson, Vicki; Barton, Sarah; Babl, Franz E; Catroppa, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    To investigate language outcomes of TBI in preschool-aged children. Competent early language skills are pivotal for the future development of literacy skills. While previous research has reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI) places children at risk of language impairments, the majority of these studies have been conducted with school-aged children. Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. Children aged 4 to 6 years who had sustained a mild (N = 19) or moderate/severe (N = 16) TBI prior to 3 years of age and a control group (N = 20) of typically developing children matched for age, gender, and socioeconomic status. The Wechsler Preschool and Primary School Scale of Intelligence, Third Edition, measured Verbal IQ. The Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Preschool version and the Bus Story Test measured language skills. More severely injured children displayed greater impairments in verbal intellectual abilities and language skills compared with children with mild TBI and uninjured children. Children with mild TBI performed similarly to children in the control group. Language appears vulnerable to TBI and should be investigated as a matter of course in clinical assessments of TBI recovery.

  19. 20 CFR 10.113 - What should the employer do when an employee dies from a work-related injury or disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... dies from a work-related injury or disease? 10.113 Section 10.113 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS... Notices and Claims for Injury, Disease, and Death-Employer's Actions § 10.113 What should the employer do when an employee dies from a work-related injury or disease? (a) The employer shall immediately report...

  20. Firearm injuries to children in Cape Town, South Africa: impact of the 2004 Firearms Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, N M; Colville, J G; van der Heyde, Y; van As, A B

    2013-07-31

    Before the introduction of the Firearms Control Act in 2004, the epidemiology of childhood firearm injuries from 1991 to 2001 in Cape Town, South Africa, was reported. This study analyses current data as a comparator to assess the impact of the Act. Firearm injuries seen at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town, from 2001 to 2010 were respectively reviewed. Data recorded included the patients' folder numbers, gender, date of birth, age, date of presentation, date discharged and inpatient stay, firearm type, number of shots, circumstances, injury sites, injury type, treatment, resulting morbidities and survival. These data were compared with the 1991 - 2001 data. One hundred and sixty-three children presented with firearm injuries during this period. The results showed a decrease in incidence from 2001 to 2010. Older children and males had a higher incidence than younger children and females. Most injuries were to an extremity and were unintentional. Mortality had reduced significantly from the previous study (6% to 2.6%), as did the total number of inpatient days (1 063 to 617). Compared with the earlier study, this study showed a significant reduction in the number of children presenting with a firearm-related injury. Mortality and inpatient stay were also significantly reduced. The study shows the impact that the Firearms Control Act has had in terms of paediatric firearm-related injury and provides evidence that the medical profession can play an important role in reducing violence.

  1. Characteristics of unintentional drowning deaths in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Joseph; Li, Guohua

    2017-12-08

    The reported prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has increased markedly in the past two decades. Recent research indicates that children with ASD are at a substantially increased risk of injury mortality, particularly from unintentional drowning. The purpose of this study was to explore the circumstances of fatal unintentional drowning incidents involving children with ASD under 15 years of age. During January 2000 through May 2017, US newspapers reported a total of 23 fatal drowning incidents involving 18 boys and 5 girls with ASD. Age of victims ranged from 3 to 14 years (mean = 7.7 ± 2.9 years). These drowning incidents most commonly occurred in ponds (52.2%), followed by rivers (13.0%), and lakes (13.0%). For 11 incidents with location data available, the distance between victim residence and the water body where drowning occurred averaged 290.7 m (± 231.5 m). About three-quarters (73.3%) of the drowning incidents occurred in the afternoon hours from 12:00 to 18:59. Wandering was the most commonly reported activity that led to drowning, accounting for 73.9% of the incidents. Fatal drowning in children with ASD typically occur in water bodies near the victims' homes in the afternoon hours precipitated by wandering. Multifaceted intervention programs are urgently needed to reduce the excess risk of drowning in children with ASD.

  2. Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Programs Press Room Social Media Publications Injury Center Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... in this area has been referred to as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). ACEs can be prevented. Learn ...

  3. What has the ECRHS told us about the childhood risks of asthma, allergy and lung function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanes, C

    2008-10-01

    Few studies investigate how environmental factors in childhood may influence adult respiratory health. The European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) is a longitudinal multi-centre study of Western world adults, including retrospective assessment of early life factors. Analyses of the ECRHS showed both beneficial and harmful long-term effects of childhood factors on adult asthma, allergy and lung function. Childhood pets were associated with less adult atopy and hay fever; beneficial effects were also indicated for growing up on a farm and for early exposure to other children. The findings have contributed to further development of the hygiene hypothesis and further understanding of the mechanisms relating microbial stimulation to allergy; however, the public health consequences may be limited. Harmful effects of early life factors on adult asthma and lung function were indicated for severe respiratory infections early in life, parental smoking and long-term dog keeping. Intervention with regard to parental smoking and vaccination against common lower airways infections may improve respiratory health in the population. Thus, early life environment had permanent beneficial and adverse effects on adult respiratory health. The multi-centre structure of the ECRHS, the large sample size, the extensive information about each participant and follow-up until the age of 56 years, have given the basis for convincing conclusions, and made possible publication of unsuspected findings in spite of the problems related to adult recall of childhood events. The ECRHS have contributed substantially to increased knowledge about the early life origins of allergy and obstructive pulmonary disease, providing a basis for prevention.

  4. What factors may contribute to sex differences in childhood obesity prevalence in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Vivian Hc; Min, Jungwon; Xue, Hong; Du, Shufa; Xu, Fei; Wang, Huijun; Wang, Youfa

    2018-02-26

    Previous studies in China showed large sex differences in childhood overweight and obesity (OW/OB) rates. However, limited research has examined the cause of these sex differences. The present study aimed to examine individual and parental/familial factors associated with sex differences in childhood OW/OB rates in China. Variables associated with child weight status, beliefs and behaviours, and obesity-related parenting practices were selected to examine their sex differences and association with a sex difference in child OW/OB outcomes using logistic regression analysis. Cross-sectional data analysis using the 2011 China Health and Nutrition Survey. Children aged 6-17 years (n 1544) and their parents. Overall child OW/OB prevalence was 16·8 %. Adolescent boys (AB; 12-17 years) were about twice as likely to be overweight/obese as adolescent girls (AG; 15·5 v. 8·4 %, Psex differences in childhood obesity may be related to the sex disparities in weight-related beliefs and behaviours among children and their parents in China.

  5. Self-perceptions of young adults who survived severe childhood burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, William; Robert, Rhonda S; Thomas, Christopher R; Holzer, Charles E; Blakeney, Patricia; Meyer, Walter J

    2013-01-01

    significantly lower self-concept scores on the TSCS2 physical scale are consistent with the physical disfigurement and handicaps common with major burn injuries, and a strong indication of this group's perception of the first impression made when interacting with others. The survivors seem to feel worthwhile within the contexts of family and friends. Although the major limitation of this study using the TSCS2 is the lack of a matched reference population to compare the burn survivors, the TSCS2 does help in gaining insight into the self-esteem issues of the burn survivor population.

  6. [What are the determinants of childhood obesity? : A literature review as part of the project "Nationwide Monitoring of Childhood Obesity Determinants"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiher, Johannes; Varnaccia, Gianni; Jordan, Susanne; Lange, Cornelia

    2016-11-01

    Obesity can impair health even in childhood and unfold negative health consequences through an individual's lifespan. In Germany, to date, a systematic and periodically updated synopsis of the multifaceted determinants of childhood obesity is lacking. In this paper, we present the results of a systematic literature review on childhood obesity determinants, which was conducted over the course of the implementation of nationwide monitoring. The review was carried out in three steps. Initially, a search for etiological models of childhood obesity was conducted. Based on these results, a systematic review of reviews on childhood obesity determinants was carried out. Finally, the results were verified by taking international guidelines on childhood obesity into account. In total, 21 etiological models, 75 reviews and 7 guidelines were identified. Over 60 determinants were extracted from these publications and were summarized into the following categories: nutritional behavior, physical activity behavior, sleeping pattern, biological determinants and diseases, prenatal and early childhood determinants, psycho-social determinants, food environment, moveability/walkability, setting and social environment, health promotion and prevention, socioeconomic, demographic, and sociocultural determinants. This review demonstrates the complex patterns of childhood obesity determinants in correspondence with a socio-ecological approach. The review will form the basis for the monitoring-system "Nationwide Monitoring of Childhood Obesity Determinants", which will be implemented at the Robert Koch Institute by the end of 2017.

  7. [Child abuse and violence as reasons for injuries in childhood: results of a monitoring of children and adolescents in South Brandenburg (Germany)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerdts, L; Ellsässer, G; Führer, S; Erler, T

    2010-07-01

    During childhood injuries are one of the most common reasons for a consultation, second only to infectious diseases. Not as rare as aspected these injuries are caused by maltreatment. The aim of this study is to show the frequency of non-accidental injuries (NAI) in the patient group from a pediatric hospital in East Germany. Over a 12-month period all cases of injured children who needed to be hospitalized for treatment were registered. In a computer based questionnaire various parameters, such as age, sex, social status, and accident details were documented. A total of 573 injured children and adolescents needed inpatient treatment. In 86.7% of the cases injuries resulted from an accident. In 8.6% of all cases a connection to violence could be found mostly in the form of head and soft tissue injuries. The findings show the importance of a detailed and specific anamnesis and physical exploration of children with trauma. Recognition of maltreated children does not only apply to pediatricians, but also to physicians of several specializations.

  8. Child development and pediatric sport and recreational injuries by age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwebel, David C; Brezausek, Carl M

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, 8.6 million children were treated for unintentional injuries in American emergency departments. Child engagement in sports and recreation offers many health benefits but also exposure to injury risks. In this analysis, we consider possible developmental risk factors in a review of age, sex, and incidence of 39 sport and recreational injuries. To assess (1) how the incidence of 39 sport and recreational injuries changed through each year of child and adolescent development, ages 1 to 18 years, and (2) sex differences. Design : Descriptive epidemiology study. Emergency department visits across the United States, as reported in the 2001-2008 National Electronic Injury Surveillance System database. Data represent population-wide emergency department visits in the United States. Main Outcome Measure(s) : Pediatric sport- and recreation-related injuries requiring treatment in hospital emergency departments. Almost 37 pediatric sport or recreational injuries are treated hourly in the United States. The incidence of sport- and recreation-related injuries peaks at widely different ages. Team-sport injuries tend to peak in the middle teen years, playground injuries peak in the early elementary ages and then drop off slowly, and bicycling injuries peak in the preteen years but are a common cause of injury throughout childhood and adolescence. Bowling injuries peaked at the earliest age (4 years), and injuries linked to camping and personal watercraft peaked at the oldest age (18 years). The 5 most common causes of sport and recreational injuries across development, in order, were basketball, football, bicycling, playgrounds, and soccer. Sex disparities were common in the incidence of pediatric sport and recreational injuries. Both biological and sociocultural factors likely influence the developmental aspects of pediatric sport and recreational injury risk. Biologically, changes in perception, cognition, and motor control might influence injury risk. Socioculturally

  9. Concomitant rib fractures and minor liver or spleen injuries in blunt trauma: what is the potential for missed diaphragmatic injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plurad, David S; Nielsen, Jamison S; Hancock, James; Navaran, Prashanth; Green, Donald J; Lam, Lydia; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2010-04-01

    Nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt liver or spleen injuries (LSI) is widely accepted, but diaphragmatic injuries (DI) can be elusive. We hypothesize that rib fractures and minor LSI (RF+ minor LSI) are associated with DI. Patients with blunt injury undergoing exploratory laparotomy between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2007, were identified from our registry. The association between injury variables and DI was examined with logistic regression. Organ Injury Scores of the liver and spleen of Grade I/II were defined as "minor." A potentially nonoperative (PNO) patient had a rib fracture and minor LSI but no bowel injury or hypotension (systolic blood pressure less than 90 mmHg). The incidence of DI was 7.5 per cent (53 of 705) overall but 20 per cent (seven of 35) in patients with RF + minor LSI. Nineteen PNO patients had four (21.1%) DIs. RF + LSI (3.26 [1.74-6.12], P < 0.001) and motor vehicle collisions (4.93 [2.36-10.32], P < 0.001) were independently associated with DI. The incidence of laparotomy in all critically ill blunt injury patients (n = 2177) decreased significantly (P = 0.003). RF + minor LSI are associated with DI even when there are no other operative injuries. Because NOM is increasingly accepted, the potential for missed DI exists. When high-quality imaging is not available or is equivocal, further studies should be considered.

  10. Childhood Vaccines: What They Are and Why Your Child Needs Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause more serious complications, such as brain damage, hearing loss, or blindness. Children should get the MCV4 vaccine ... What You Should KnowOccupational Exposure to LeadRead Article >>Occupational Exposure to Lead Visit our interactive symptom checker ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ...

  12. What childhood obesity prevention programmes work? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Cai, L; Wu, Y; Wilson, R F; Weston, C; Fawole, O; Bleich, S N; Cheskin, L J; Showell, N N; Lau, B D; Chiu, D T; Zhang, A; Segal, J

    2015-07-01

    Previous reviews of childhood obesity prevention have focused largely on schools and findings have been inconsistent. Funded by the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the National Institutes of Health, we systematically evaluated the effectiveness of childhood obesity prevention programmes conducted in high-income countries and implemented in various settings. We searched MEDLINE®, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL®, ClinicalTrials.gov and the Cochrane Library from inception through 22 April 2013 for relevant studies, including randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental studies and natural experiments, targeting diet, physical activity or both, and conducted in children aged 2-18 in high-income countries. Two reviewers independently abstracted the data. The strength of evidence (SOE) supporting interventions was graded for each study setting (e.g. home, school). Meta-analyses were performed on studies judged sufficiently similar and appropriate to pool using random effect models. This paper reported our findings on various adiposity-related outcomes. We identified 147 articles (139 intervention studies) of which 115 studies were primarily school based, although other settings could have been involved. Most were conducted in the United States and within the past decade. SOE was high for physical activity-only interventions delivered in schools with home involvement or combined diet-physical activity interventions delivered in schools with both home and community components. SOE was moderate for school-based interventions targeting either diet or physical activity, combined interventions delivered in schools with home or community components or combined interventions delivered in the community with a school component. SOE was low for combined interventions in childcare or home settings. Evidence was insufficient for other interventions. In conclusion, at least moderately strong evidence supports the effectiveness of school-based interventions

  13. What childhood obesity prevention programmes work? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Cai, L.; Wu, Y.; Wilson, R. F.; Weston, C.; Fawole, O.; Bleich, S. N.; Cheskin, L. J.; Showell, N. N.; Lau, B. D.; Chiu, D. T.; Zhang, A.; Segal, J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Previous reviews of childhood obesity prevention have focused largely on schools and findings have been inconsistent. Funded by the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the National Institutes of Health, we systematically evaluated the effectiveness of childhood obesity prevention programmes conducted in high-income countries and implemented in various settings. We searched MEDLINE®, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL®, ClinicalTrials.gov and the Cochrane Library from inception through 22 April 2013 for relevant studies, including randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental studies and natural experiments, targeting diet, physical activity or both, and conducted in children aged 2–18 in high-income countries. Two reviewers independently abstracted the data. The strength of evidence (SOE) supporting interventions was graded for each study setting (e.g. home, school). Meta-analyses were performed on studies judged sufficiently similar and appropriate to pool using random effect models. This paper reported our findings on various adiposity-related outcomes. We identified 147 articles (139 intervention studies) of which 115 studies were primarily school based, although other settings could have been involved. Most were conducted in the United States and within the past decade. SOE was high for physical activity-only interventions delivered in schools with home involvement or combined diet–physical activity interventions delivered in schools with both home and community components. SOE was moderate for school-based interventions targeting either diet or physical activity, combined interventions delivered in schools with home or community components or combined interventions delivered in the community with a school component. SOE was low for combined interventions in childcare or home settings. Evidence was insufficient for other interventions. In conclusion, at least moderately strong evidence supports the effectiveness of school

  14. Meta-analysis of the Unintentional Death of Children Aged 0 to 5 Years in China Between 1995 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Baoning; Yu, Jian'er

    2017-02-18

    The aim of this study was to identify the primary cause of and a means by which to prevent the unintentional injury and death of children aged 0 to 5 years in China. A systematic review of literature published in this area between 1995 and 2015, accessible via Chongqing VIP, Wanfang, CNKI, and PubMed databases, in addition to other electronic databases and related magazines and professional information, was conducted. The data were retrieved using Cochrane Systematic review methods. All information was judged using the Jadad method. A meta-analysis was carried out on homogeneous studies. RevMan 5.3 software was used to analyze the gathered information. A total of 125 related pieces of literature were retrieved. Of the 14 that met the inclusion criteria, 6 were of moderate quality and 8 of general quality. The meta-analysis showed that in a comparison of unintentional injury and death of male and female children, the odds ratio was [1.73 to 1.95] for a 95% confidence interval (P China. Considering the significant difference in the latter comparison, developing and implementing methods to reduce the unintentional injury and death of children in rural areas should receive greater attention.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  15. What Does Attending Early Childhood Program Mean for Child Health in India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Dipanwita; Sarkar, Jayanta

    2017-11-01

    The health impact of attending early childhood development programs in developing countries remains largely unknown. In this study, we focus on the health consequences of attending preschool programs in India. Using a unique longitudinal dataset, we allow for heterogeneity in the impact of preschool across the distribution of health outcomes while controlling for time-invariant unobservables. We detect unique temporal variation in the effect of preschool attendance - growth of preschool attendees is slower than non-attendees in various parts of the distributions of several anthropometric measures when evaluated in the early years between ages 1 and 5. This effect is likely to reverse in the longer term at age 8. The early years' adverse effect can be explained in part by over-attendance in the form of long daily hours, excessive attendance days, and early entry. The findings are insensitive to nutritional incentives like free meals provided in public schools. The growth-retarding effect remains robust for weight-for-age z-scores, implying that the impact of preschool attendance is not only heterogeneous, but differs across dimensions of health status. Our study highlights the need for strengthening the delivery of childhood programs in developing countries in order to prevent adverse health effects in the critical years. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... numbness in the arms or legs. Loss of consciousness. Seizures. What causes a head injury? There are ... Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight ...

  17. Relation of child, caregiver, and environmental characteristics to childhood injury in an urban Aboriginal cohort in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Katherine; Burgess, Leonie; Falster, Kathleen; Banks, Emily; Möller, Holger; Ivers, Rebecca; Cowell, Chris; Isaac, Vivian; Kalucy, Deanna; Fernando, Peter; Woodall, Cheryl; Clapham, Kathleen

    2018-04-01

    Despite being disproportionately affected by injury, little is known about factors associated with injury in Aboriginal children. We investigated factors associated with injury among urban Aboriginal children attending four Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in New South Wales, Australia. We examined characteristics of caregiver-reported child injury, and calculated prevalence ratios of 'ever-injury' by child, family, and environmental factors. Among children in the cohort, 29% (n=373/1,303) had ever broken a bone, been knocked out, required stitches or been hospitalised for a burn or poisoning; 40-78% of first injuries occurred at home and 60-91% were treated in hospital. Reported ever-injury was significantly lower (prevalence ratio ≤0.80) among children who were female, younger, whose caregiver had low psychological distress and had not been imprisoned, whose family experienced few major life events, and who hadn't experienced alcohol misuse in the household or theft in the community, compared to other cohort members. In this urban Aboriginal child cohort, injury was common and associated with measures of family and community vulnerability. Implications for public health: Prevention efforts targeting upstream injury determinants and Aboriginal children living in vulnerable families may reduce child injury. Existing broad-based intervention programs for vulnerable families may present opportunities to deliver targeted injury prevention. © 2017 The Authors.

  18. Childhood Head and Neck Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid Association ® www.thyroid.org Childhood Head & Neck Irradiation What is the thyroid gland? The thyroid gland ... Thyroid Association ® www.thyroid.org Childhood Head & Neck Irradiation Thyroid nodules (see Thyroid Nodule brochure) • Thyroid nodules ...

  19. A review of childhood admission with perforating ocular injuries in a hospital in north-west India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaison S

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of perforating ocular injuries in children below the age of fifteen years was conducted. Eighty patients (eighty-nine eyes were included in this study. Male children were more susceptible to ocular injury as compared to females (p = < 0.01. Children of the school-going age were the most affected (73.8%. Majority of the injuries occurred in the sports field (p = < 0.01. Playing with bow and arrow, and gillidandaFNx01 accounted for majority of the sport injuries (47.2%. Sixty-eight percent of the perforated eyes had no light perception at the end of treatment. Health education on the preventive aspects of ocular injuries in schools as well as through mass media should reduce the incidence of visual loss due to ocular injuries.

  20. Neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury: what we know about mechanisms, assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, R; Morreale, A; Donadio, V; Boriani, S; Maraldi, N; Plazzi, G; Liguori, R

    2013-12-01

    In biology, it is easy to understand how a damaged functional system may generate wrong signals, but why this should happen when the system is disconnected is less clear. For this reason, among other pain syndromes, neuropathic pain (NP) following spinal cord injury (SCI) leaves most questions unanswered. Our purpose is to review current knowledge on NP after SCI, focusing on the mechanisms, assessment and management of the syndrome. The mechanisms responsible for NP following SCI are poorly understood: NP is classically considered a "central pain syndrome" but recent evidence from experimental models reveals a possible "peripheral sensitization". Assessment of NP following SCI is well-established: in addition to clinical evaluation and self-reported scales, many neurophysiological, radiological and microscopic investigations may be performed. The management of NP following SCI is very difficult: evidence of effective drugs is lacking and alternative new treatment approaches yield different outcomes. Recently clinical and instrumental tools have increased our knowledge on NP, suggesting that the discovery of new treatment agents will depend on an explanation of what changes after SCI: future research must point in this direction.

  1. Group or Individual treatment: What is More Effective in Childhood and Juvenile Obesity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Garcia Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the objective was to compare the efficacy of individual treatment (consulting and group treatment combined with individualized care, in childhood and juvenile obesity situations. Methodology: The study was carried out in 2 different places: in the Nutrition Clinic of the Integrated Health Clinic of UNIARA and in another clinical school. In both places there was a treatment with individual consultations, however, in the Integrated Health Clinic of UNIARA treatment was also done in group care. The target individuals were composed of children and adolescents of both sexes who participated in the consultations, however, only patients who were above the 85th percentile for BMI, according to the international reference population (NCHS, 2000, were included in the sample which was composed of 58 individuals. The choice of clinical records occurred at random in both places. Results: the most effective program in the positive change in dietary habits was group together with individual treatment, where 20 patients (68.96% showed some change in eating behavior. In individual treatment, 11 patients (37.93% showed some change in dietary habits existing before treatment. There was a reduction in the rate of obesity of 24% for patients in groups, however, both types of treatment were favorable to changes in dietary habits and weight reduction. The findings showed that the strategy of individualized care together with group care is an alternative for the treatment of overweight.

  2. What Lies in the Gutter of a Traumatic Past: Infancia clandestina [Clandestine Childhood], Animated Comics, and the Representation of Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Ghiggia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay focuses on the animated comics in the representation of violence in Benjamín Ávila’s Infancia clandestina [Clandestine Childhood] (2011, a cinematic narrative of the seventies in Argentina. Drawing from animation and comic studies and adopting a formalist approach, the following analysis proposes ways in which the remediation of comics in the film underscores traumatic aspects of state terror and revolutionary violence and the problematic intergenerational transmission of memory of the 1970s–1980s militancy. Specifically, I comment on how the switch from photographic film to the animated frames draws attention to the blank space between the frames and thereby hints at the traumatic in what is left out, repressed, or silenced. While the gaps resist the forward motion of closure, paradoxically they allow for the suture of the frames/fragments in a postmemorial narrative, although not without a trace of the traumatic. Finally, extending the concept of the gutter as a liminal space, I analyze the connection between the animated scenes representing violence and the testimonial and documentary elements placed in the closing titles, a connection that asserts the autobiographical component of the film and enacts the conflictive character of intergenerational memory.

  3. What is the status of soccer injuries among female players? A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... be seen with midfielders that sustain the most injuries due to their high work rate. Future direction into specific areas of research has been identified to increase the body of evidence concerning the type and mechanism of female soccer injuries. Keywords: Female, soccer injuries, ankle inversion sprains, ACL sprains ...

  4. Successful childhood obesity management in primary care in Canada: what are the odds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kuhle

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. The management of a child presenting with obesity in a primary care setting can be viewed as a multi-step behavioral process with many perceived and actual barriers for families and primary care providers. In order to achieve the goal of behavior change and, ultimately, clinically meaningful weight management outcomes in a child who is considered obese, all steps in this process should ideally be completed. We sought to review the evidence for completing each step, and to estimate the population effect of secondary prevention of childhood obesity in Canada.Methods. Data from the 2009/2010 Canadian Community Health Survey and from a review of the literature were used to estimate the probabilities for completion of each step. A flow chart based on these probabilities was used to determine the proportion of children with obesity that would undergo and achieve clinically meaningful weight management outcomes each year in Canada.Results. We estimated that the probability of a child in Canada who presents with obesity achieving clinically meaningful weight management outcomes through secondary prevention in primary care is around 0.6% per year, with a range from 0.01% to 7.2% per year. The lack of accessible and effective weight management programs appeared to be the most important bottleneck in the process.Conclusions. In order to make progress towards supporting effective pediatric obesity management, efforts should focus on population-based primary prevention and a systems approach to change our obesogenic society, alongside the allocation of resources toward weight management approaches that are comprehensively offered, equitably distributed and robustly evaluated.

  5. Prevalence of child injuries in Mbale region, Eastern Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The rate of unintentional child injuries in sub-Saharan Africa is at 53.1 per 100,000, The highest for low income regions, data on these injuries and associated factors among children in Uganda is very scanty. Most child injuries are related to the way of life in rural communities typically burns from charcoal ...

  6. Unintentional Cannabis Ingestion in Children: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, John R; Smith, Nishelle E; Moulin, Aimee K

    2017-11-01

    To analyze published reports of unintentional cannabis ingestions in children to determine presenting signs and symptoms, route of exposure, treatment, and outcome. PubMed, OpenGrey, and Google Scholar were systematically searched. Articles were selected, reviewed, and graded using Oxford Center for Evidence-Based Medicine guidelines. Of 3316 articles, 44 were included (3582 children age ≤12 years). We found no high quality (Oxford Center for Evidence-Based Medicine level I or II) studies and 10 level III studies documenting lethargy as the most common presenting sign and confirming increasing incidence of unintentional ingestion in states having decriminalized medical and recreational cannabis. We identified 16 level IV case series, and 28 level V case reports with 114 children, mean age 25.2 ± 18.7 months, range 8 months to 12 years, and 50 female children (44%). The most common ingestion (n = 43, 38%) was cannabis resin, followed by cookies and joints (both n = 15, 13%). Other exposures included passive smoke, medical cannabis, candies, beverages, and hemp oil. Lethargy was the most common presenting sign (n = 81, 71%) followed by ataxia (n = 16, 14%). Tachycardia, mydriasis, and hypotonia were also commonly observed. All cases were cared for in the emergency department or admitted, and mean length of stay was 27.1 ± 27.0 hours. Twenty (18%) were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit, and 7 (6%) were intubated. Unintentional cannabis ingestion by children is a serious public health concern and is well-documented in numerous studies and case reports. Clinicians should consider cannabis toxicity in any child with sudden onset of lethargy or ataxia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Preventing Children's Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dealing With Sports Injuries Concussions: What to Do Sports and Concussions Burner (Stinger) Concussions: Alex's Story Compulsive Exercise Repetitive Stress Injuries View more Partner Message About Us Contact ...

  8. What Discourses Relating to the Purpose of Early Childhood Are Shaping the Work of Early Childhood Practitioners in Three Different Contexts: UK, Bhutan and Fiji?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Margaret; Alexander, Elise; Pedey, Karma; Tausere-Tiko, Lavinia

    2018-01-01

    We explore the way dominant political discourses are perceived to influence developing professionalisation of early childhood in three contexts. The UK is strongly influenced by the neoliberal agenda which positions managerialism, bureaucracy, accountability and control as necessary to drive quality improvement. Bhutan has been exposed to western…

  9. Occupational injury among hospital patient-care workers: what is the association with workplace verbal abuse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbath, Erika L; Hurtado, David A; Okechukwu, Cassandra A; Tamers, Sara L; Nelson, Candace; Kim, Seung-Sup; Wagner, Gregory; Sorenson, Glorian

    2014-02-01

    To test the association between workplace abuse exposure and injury risk among hospital workers. We hypothesized that exposed workers would have higher injury rates than unexposed workers. Survey of direct-care workers (n = 1,497) in two hospitals. Exposure to workplace abuse was assessed through self-report; occupational injury reports were extracted from employee records. We tested associations between non-physical workplace violence and injury using log-binomial regression and multilevel modeling. Adjusted prevalence ratio (PR) for injury associated with being yelled at was 1.52 (95% CI 1.19, 1.95); for experiencing hostile/offensive gestures 1.43 (1.11, 1.82); and for being sworn at 1.41 (1.09, 1.81). In analyses by injury subtypes, musculoskeletal injuries were more strongly associated with abuse than were acute traumatic injuries. Associations operated on group and individual levels and were most consistently associated with abuse perpetrated by patients. Exposure to workplace abuse may be a risk factor for injuries among hospital workers. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Influences on and measures of unintentional group synchrony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Ellamil

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Many instances of large-scale coordination occur in real-life social situations without the explicit awareness of the individuals involved. While the majority of research to date has examined dyadic interactions – those between two individuals – during intentional or deliberate coordination, the present review surveys the handful of recent studies investigating behavioral and physiological synchrony across groups of more than two people when coordination was not an explicit goal. Both minimal (e.g., visual information, shared location and naturalistic (e.g., choir singing part, family relationship group interactions appear to promote unintentional group synchrony although they have so far only been studied separately. State differences in unintentional group synchrony, or the relative presence of coordination in various conditions, have tended to be assessed differently, such as using correlation-type relationships, compared to its temporal dynamics, or changes over time in the degree of coordination, which appear to be best captured using phase differences. Simultaneously evaluating behavioral, physiological, and social responses as well systematically comparing different synchrony measures could further our understanding of the influences on and measures of group synchrony, allowing us to move away from studying individual persons responding to static laboratory stimuli and towards investigating collective experiences in natural, dynamic social interactions.

  11. Unintentionality of affective attention across visual processing stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andero eUusberg

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Affective attention involves bottom-up perceptual selection that prioritizes motivationally significant stimuli. To clarify the extent to which this process is automatic, we investigated the dependence of affective attention on the intention to process emotional meaning. Affective attention was manipulated by presenting IAPS images with variable arousal and intentionality by requiring participants to make affective and non-affective evaluations. Polytomous rather than binary decisions were required from the participants in order to elicit relatively deep emotional processing. The temporal dynamics of prioritized processing were assessed using Early Posterior Negativity (EPN, 175-300 ms as well as P3-like (P3, 300 – 500 ms and Slow Wave (SW, 500 – 1500 ms portions of the Late Positive Potential. All analysed components were differentially sensitive to stimulus categories suggesting that they indeed reflect distinct stages of motivational significance encoding. The intention to perceive emotional meaning had no effect on EPN, an additive effect on P3, and an interactive effect on SW. We concluded that affective attention went from completely unintentional during the EPN to partially unintentional during P3 and SW where top-down signals, respectively, complemented and modulated bottom-up differences in stimulus prioritization. The findings were interpreted in light of two-stage models of visual perception by associating the EPN with large-capacity initial relevance detection and the P3 as well as SW with capacity-limited consolidation and elaboration of affective stimuli.

  12. Playground injuries in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeini H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hassan Sadeghi Naeini1, Kent Lindqvist2, Hamid Reza Jafari3, Amir Hossein Mirlohi4, Koustuv Dalal2,51Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran; 2Division of Social Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 3Environmental Planning Department, Graduate Environment Faculty, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran; 4Apadana Research Center, Isfahan, Iran; 5Division of Public Health Science, School of Life Sciences, University of Skovde, SwedenBackground: Rapid urbanization and unplanned population development can be detrimental to the safety of citizens, with children being a particularly vulnerable social group. In this review, we assess childhood playground injuries and suggest safety mechanisms which could be incorporated into playground planning.Methods: Inclusion criteria were “children” as the focus group, “playground” as the main field of study, and “unintentional injury” and “safety” as the concepts of study. The keywords used for the PubMed search were “playground”, “children”, and “injury”. Initially we accessed 182 articles. After screening according to inclusion criteria, 86 articles were found, and after reading the abstracts and then the full text, 14 articles were finally included for analysis. The papers reviewed included four case-control studies, three case studies, three descriptive studies, two interventional studies, one retrospective study, one cross-sectional study, and one systematic review.Results: Playground-related fractures were the most common accidents among children, underscoring the importance of safety promotion and injury prevention in playgrounds, low-risk equipment and playing hours (week days associated with higher risk, implementation of standards, preventing falls and fall-related fractures, and addressing concerns of parents about unsafe neighborhoods. With the exception of one study, all of the

  13. Overuse wrist injuries in young athletes: What do sports physicians consider important signals and functional limitations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kox, Laura S.; Kuijer, P. Paul F. M.; Opperman, Jip; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Maas, Mario; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2018-01-01

    This study's objective was to collect items from experienced sports physicians, relating to the presence and severity of overuse wrist injuries in young athletes, for developing a measurement instrument for signals of overuse wrist injury. Seven Dutch elite sports physicians involved in guidance and

  14. Sport accidents in childhood.

    OpenAIRE

    Sahlin, Y

    1990-01-01

    Injuries among children during sporting activities are common. This study is a one year study including children between five and fourteen years of age who sustained their injuries during sporting activities and were treated at Trondheim Regional and University Hospital. Sport accidents account for 27 per cent of all childhood accidents in this age group. Fifty-three per cent of the injured were boys, and 47 per cent were girls. The boys sustained more severe injuries than the girls. Soccer c...

  15. Long-Term Outcomes Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury in Childhood and Adolescence: A Nationwide Swedish Cohort Study of a Wide Range of Medical and Social Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariaslan, Amir; Sharp, David J; D'Onofrio, Brian M; Larsson, Henrik; Fazel, Seena

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of disability and mortality in children and young adults worldwide. It remains unclear, however, how TBI in childhood and adolescence is associated with adult mortality, psychiatric morbidity, and social outcomes. In a Swedish birth cohort between 1973 and 1985 of 1,143,470 individuals, we identified all those who had sustained at least one TBI (n = 104,290 or 9.1%) up to age 25 y and their unaffected siblings (n = 68,268) using patient registers. We subsequently assessed these individuals for the following outcomes using multiple national registries: disability pension, specialist diagnoses of psychiatric disorders and psychiatric inpatient hospitalisation, premature mortality (before age 41 y), low educational attainment (not having achieved secondary school qualifications), and receiving means-tested welfare benefits. We used logistic and Cox regression models to quantify the association between TBI and specified adverse outcomes on the individual level. We further estimated population attributable fractions (PAF) for each outcome measure. We also compared differentially exposed siblings to account for unobserved genetic and environmental confounding. In addition to relative risk estimates, we examined absolute risks by calculating prevalence and Kaplan-Meier estimates. In complementary analyses, we tested whether the findings were moderated by injury severity, recurrence, and age at first injury (ages 0-4, 5-9, 6-10, 15-19, and 20-24 y). TBI exposure was associated with elevated risks of impaired adult functioning across all outcome measures. After a median follow-up period of 8 y from age 26 y, we found that TBI contributed to absolute risks of over 10% for specialist diagnoses of psychiatric disorders and low educational attainment, approximately 5% for disability pension, and 2% for premature mortality. The highest relative risks, adjusted for sex, birth year, and birth order, were found for psychiatric

  16. Long-Term Outcomes Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury in Childhood and Adolescence: A Nationwide Swedish Cohort Study of a Wide Range of Medical and Social Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Sariaslan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is the leading cause of disability and mortality in children and young adults worldwide. It remains unclear, however, how TBI in childhood and adolescence is associated with adult mortality, psychiatric morbidity, and social outcomes.In a Swedish birth cohort between 1973 and 1985 of 1,143,470 individuals, we identified all those who had sustained at least one TBI (n = 104,290 or 9.1% up to age 25 y and their unaffected siblings (n = 68,268 using patient registers. We subsequently assessed these individuals for the following outcomes using multiple national registries: disability pension, specialist diagnoses of psychiatric disorders and psychiatric inpatient hospitalisation, premature mortality (before age 41 y, low educational attainment (not having achieved secondary school qualifications, and receiving means-tested welfare benefits. We used logistic and Cox regression models to quantify the association between TBI and specified adverse outcomes on the individual level. We further estimated population attributable fractions (PAF for each outcome measure. We also compared differentially exposed siblings to account for unobserved genetic and environmental confounding. In addition to relative risk estimates, we examined absolute risks by calculating prevalence and Kaplan-Meier estimates. In complementary analyses, we tested whether the findings were moderated by injury severity, recurrence, and age at first injury (ages 0-4, 5-9, 6-10, 15-19, and 20-24 y. TBI exposure was associated with elevated risks of impaired adult functioning across all outcome measures. After a median follow-up period of 8 y from age 26 y, we found that TBI contributed to absolute risks of over 10% for specialist diagnoses of psychiatric disorders and low educational attainment, approximately 5% for disability pension, and 2% for premature mortality. The highest relative risks, adjusted for sex, birth year, and birth order, were found for

  17. Epidemiology of traumatic spinal cord injury in childhood and adolescence in Galicia, Spain: report of the last 26-years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canosa-Hermida, E; Mora-Boga, R; Cabrera-Sarmiento, J J; Ferreiro-Velasco, M E; Salvador-de la Barrera, S; Rodríguez-Sotillo, A; Montoto-Marqués, A

    2017-10-23

    To analyze the characteristics of traumatic spinal cord injury in children of Galicia (Spain). Descriptive and retrospective study. Data extracted from the internal registry of the Spinal Cord Injury Unit and the patient's medical records, between March 1988 and December 2014. patients aged ≤ 17 years with a traumatic spinal cord injury. Total patients, percentages, incidence, ASIA scale results and improvement. A total of 68 patients were included. The incidence was 5.6 cases/1,000,000 inhabitants/year. The mean age was 14.4 years (median: 16). Only 25% were younger than 15. Male patients accounted for 73.5% of the total. The main cause were traffic accidents (60.3%; n = 41), being higher (77.8%) in children ≤ 10 years. Other etiologies included falls (19.1%), diving accidents (16.2%) and other causes (4.4%). Eleven patients (16.2%) had injuries classified as SCIWORA, 8 (72.7%) of them aged ≤ 10 years. The mean age of the SCIWORA group was 7.5 years versus 15.7 years in the non-SCIWORA group (P < 0.001). Half (50%) of these patients had a complete spinal cord injury and, of these, 64.6% were paraplegic. Traumatic spinal cord injuries are rare in children, and most cases occur between 15 and 17 years. Unlike in adults, SCIs in children mostly involve the thoracic spine. Most patients aged ≤ 10 years have SCIWORA. The most common etiology continues to be traffic accidents, although sports accidents prevail among adolescent patients.

  18. Screening for childhood adversity: the what and when of identifying individuals at risk for lifespan health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Kate Ryan; Robles, Theodore F; Bower, Julienne E; Carroll, Judith E

    2018-03-30

    Existing research on childhood adversity and health risk across the lifespan lacks specificity regarding which types of exposures to assess and when. The purpose of this study was to contribute to an empirically-supported framework to guide practitioners interested in identifying youth who may be at greatest risk for a lifelong trajectory of health disparities. We also sought to identify the point in childhood at which screening for adversity exposure would capture the largest group of at risk individuals for triage to prevention and intervention services. Participants (n = 4036) collected as part of the Midlife in the United States study reported their medical status and history including physical (cardiovascular disease, hypertension, obesity, diabetes, cancer) and mental health (depression, substance use problems, sleep problems). Participants indicated whether they were exposed to 7 adversities at any point in childhood and their age of exposure to 19 additional lifetime adversities before the age of 18. Parent drug abuse, dropping out or failing out of school, being fired from a job, and sexual assault during childhood exhibited the largest effect sizes on health in adulthood, which were comparable to the effects of childhood maltreatment. Childhood adversity screening in early adolescence may identify the largest proportion of youth at risk for negative health trajectories. The results of this descriptive analysis provide an empirical framework to guide screening for childhood adversity in pediatric populations. We discuss the implications of these observations in the context of prevention science and practice.

  19. Childhood Traumatic Grief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is Child Trauma? About Child Trauma Trauma Types Populations at Risk Treatments and Practices Treatments That Work Screening and Assessment Psychological First Aid and SPR Core Curriculum on Childhood Trauma Trauma-Informed Care Trauma-Informed ...

  20. Childhood Vaccine Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Childhood Vaccine Schedule Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents ... please turn Javascript on. When to Vaccinate What Vaccine Why Birth (or any age if not previously ...

  1. What Risk Factors Are Associated With Musculoskeletal Injury in US Army Rangers? A Prospective Prognostic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyhen, Deydre S; Shaffer, Scott W; Butler, Robert J; Goffar, Stephen L; Kiesel, Kyle B; Rhon, Daniel I; Williamson, Jared N; Plisky, Phillip J

    2015-09-01

    Musculoskeletal injury is the most common reason that soldiers are medically not ready to deploy. Understanding intrinsic risk factors that may place an elite soldier at risk of musculoskeletal injury may be beneficial in preventing musculoskeletal injury and maintaining operational military readiness. Findings from this population may also be useful as hypothesis-generating work for particular civilian settings such as law enforcement officers (SWAT teams), firefighters (smoke jumpers), or others in physically demanding professions. The purposes of this study were (1) to examine whether using baseline measures of self-report and physical performance can identify musculoskeletal injury risk; and (2) to determine whether a combination of predictors would enhance the accuracy for determining future musculoskeletal injury risk in US Army Rangers. Our study was a planned secondary analysis from a prospective cohort examining how baseline factors predict musculoskeletal injury. Baseline predictors associated with musculoskeletal injury were collected using surveys and physical performance measures. Survey data included demographic variables, injury history, and biopsychosocial questions. Physical performance measures included ankle dorsiflexion, Functional Movement Screen, lower and upper quarter Y-balance test, hop testing, pain provocation, and the Army Physical Fitness Test (consisting of a 2-mile run and 2 minutes of sit-ups and push-ups). A total of 320 Rangers were invited to enroll and 211 participated (66%). Occurrence of musculoskeletal injury was tracked for 1 year using monthly injury surveillance surveys, medical record reviews, and a query of the Department of Defense healthcare utilization database. Injury surveillance data were available on 100% of the subjects. Receiver operator characteristic curves and accuracy statistics were calculated to identify predictors of interest. A logistic regression equation was then calculated to find the most pertinent

  2. Unintentional Exposure to Online Sexual Content and Sexual Behavior Intentions Among College Students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingwen; Jemmott, John B

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the relations of unintentional exposure to Internet sexual content to intentions for sex and condom use and potential mediators of these relations, including attitudes, norms, and self-efficacy, among college students in China. A sample of 524 Chinese college students completed an online questionnaire. Mediation path analyses were conducted to test the theory of planned behavior as a model of the relations between unintentional exposure and intentions to have sex and use condoms. On average, students reported being unintentionally exposed to Internet sexual content about 3 to 4 times during the past month. Unintentional exposure was indirectly associated with intention to have sex, mediated through descriptive and injunctive norms. Descriptive norm was a stronger mediator for females than males. In contrast, unintentional exposure was unrelated to condom-use intention and mediators. The theory of planned behavior provides a model for the development of Internet-based interventions with these students. © 2014 APJPH.

  3. Working hours associated with unintentional sleep at work among airline pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Cristina Marqueze

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE Tto identify factors associated with unintentional sleep at work of airline pilots. METHODS This is a cross-sectional epidemiological study conducted with 1,235 Brazilian airline pilots, who work national or international flights. Data collection has been performed online. We carried out a bivariate and multiple logistic regression analysis, having as dependent variable unintentional sleep at work. The independent variables were related to biodemographic data, characteristics of the work, lifestyle, and aspects of sleep. RESULTS The prevalence of unintentional sleep while flying the airplane was 57.8%. The factors associated with unintentional sleep at work were: flying for more than 65 hours a month, frequent technical delays, greater need for recovery after work, work ability below optimal, insufficient sleep, and excessive sleepiness. CONCLUSIONS The occurrence of unintentional sleep at work of airline pilots is associated with factors related to the organization of the work and health.

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_ ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  7. Unintentional falls in older adults: a methodological historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speechley, Mark

    2011-03-01

    PubMed lists over 6,000 references (700 reviews) on unintentional falls in older adults. This article traces key methodological milestones in the application of epidemiologic methods since the earliest publications in the late 1940s. Within the context of advances in case definition, sampling, measurement, research design, and statistical analysis, the article reviews estimates of frequency of occurrence, risk factor associations, morbidity and mortality consequences, demonstration of the multiple risk factor theory of falls using fall prevention interventions, and the challenges of fall risk prediction models. Methodological explanations are provided for observed heterogeneities, and the case is presented for moving beyond undifferentiated lists of risk factors by focusing on balance and gait as the factors through which the mechanistic effects of distal risk factors can be understood. Moreover, the case is made to advance our statistical analyses by looking at interactions among intrinsic risk factors and between intrinsic, extrinsic, and environmental factors.

  8. Psychology in the realm of sport injury : What it is all about

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Pedro Henrique Garcia Lopes de; Olmedilla, Aurelio; Rubio, Víctor J.; Palou, Pere

    2014-01-01

    Sport injuries are a constant in physical activity and sport and represent, to a greater or lesser degree, an obstacle that most athletes have to face and which could have an impact on economical, occupational and educational aspects, as well as on physical and psychological health. Traditionally, sport injury was deemed the result of biomechanical forces exerted on the body and sustained during participation in sport activity, under which perspective the athlete is considered merely...

  9. [Injuries of ligaments and tendons of foot and ankle : What every radiologist should know].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierfelder, K M; Gemescu, I N; Weber, M-A; Meier, R

    2018-04-13

    Injuries of the ligaments and tendons of the ankle and foot are among the most common musculoskeletal injuries. A correct and precise description of the pathology and possible accompanying injuries is essential for treatment planning by trauma and orthopedic surgeons. While X‑ray is used to exclude fractures, ultrasound is a very useful tool to assess the ligaments and tendons. For the radiologist, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is invaluable regarding the correct assessment of (partial) ruptures, as well as for evaluating accompanying injuries. The aim of the present overview is to provide the most relevant facts for radiologists regarding injuries of ligaments and tendons of the ankle and foot. A description of expected MRI findings and possible pitfalls are presented. For each ligament complex or tendon, we review the anatomy, followed by relevant facts on biomechanics and typical findings in case of injury. The lateral and medial ligament complex, syndesmosis, spring ligament complex, and the Lisfranc ligament are shown in detail. The Achilles tendon and the peroneal tendons are also discussed.

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  11. Prevalence of driver physical factors leading to unintentional lane departure crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchino, Jessica B; Zuby, David S

    2017-07-04

    Some lane-keeping assist systems in development and production provide autonomous braking and steering to correct unintentional lane drift but otherwise require drivers to fully control their vehicles. The goal of this study was to quantify the proportion of drivers involved in unintentional lane drift crashes who would be unable to regain control of their vehicles to inform the design of such systems. The NHTSA's National Motor Vehicle Crash Causation Survey collected in-depth, on-scene data for a nationally representative sample of 5,470 U.S. police-reported passenger vehicle crashes during 2005-2007 that occurred between 6 a.m. and midnight and for which emergency medical services were dispatched. The physical states of drivers involved in the 631 lane drift crashes in the sample, which represented 259,034 crashes nationally, were characterized. Thirty-four percent of drivers who crashed because they drifted from their lanes were sleeping or otherwise incapacitated. These drivers would be unlikely to regain full control of their vehicles if an active safety system prevented their initial drift. An additional 13% of these drivers had a nonincapacitating medical issue, blood alcohol concentration (BAC) ≥ 0.08%, or other physical factor that may not allow them to regain full vehicle control. When crashes involved serious or fatal injuries, 42% of drivers who drifted were sleeping or otherwise incapacitated, and an additional 14% were impacted by a nonincapacitating medical issue, BAC ≥ 0.08%, or other physical factor. Designers of active safety systems that provide autonomous lateral control should consider that a substantial proportion of drivers at risk of lane drift crashes are incapacitated. Systems that provide only transient corrective action may not ultimately prevent lane departure crashes for these drivers, and drivers who do avoid lane drift crashes because of these systems may be at high risk of other types of crashes when they attempt to regain

  12. Years of life lost because of premature death due to intentional and unintentional accidents in Ghazvin province from 2004 till 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Jafari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accidents are the second cause of death in Iran and one of the significant challenges in public health. They can affect people in all ages. In this study, we try to calculate years of life lost due to intentional and unintentional injuries, which is considered as one of the main indicators for prioritizing public health problems.  Methods: This study is a practical cross sectional survey research HSR (health system research that uses secondary analysis on the death data of Ghazvin province. The calculations also take into account the WHO standards in age group, sex and years of life lost (YLL due to death.  Results: This study showed that the unintentional accidents were the leading cause of death based on YLL from 2004 until 2008 in Ghazvin province. The number of deaths due to intentional and unintentional accidents was 3796 deaths as of which 2954 (77.8% was male and 842 (22.2% female. In general three quarter of the YLL due to early death relates to accidents for males and less than a quarter relates to accidents for females. Between 2004 until 2008, the maximum number of years of life lost (YLL in both sexes is for the age group of 15 to 49.  Conclusion: Considering the high level of years of life lost (YLL due to accident in this province, especially in men, more appropriate interventions for the more risk prone age groups and male in general need to be taken into account.

  13. Violence and injuries in South Africa: prioritising an agenda for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedat, Mohamed; Van Niekerk, Ashley; Jewkes, Rachel; Suffla, Shahnaaz; Ratele, Kopano

    2009-09-19

    Violence and injuries are the second leading cause of death and lost disability-adjusted life years in South Africa. The overall injury death rate of 157.8 per 100,000 population is nearly twice the global average, and the rate of homicide of women by intimate partners is six times the global average. With a focus on homicide, and violence against women and children, we review the magnitude, contexts of occurrence, and patterns of violence, and refer to traffic-related and other unintentional injuries. The social dynamics that support violence are widespread poverty, unemployment, and income inequality; patriarchal notions of masculinity that valourise toughness, risk-taking, and defence of honour; exposure to abuse in childhood and weak parenting; access to firearms; widespread alcohol misuse; and weaknesses in the mechanisms of law enforcement. Although there have been advances in development of services for victims of violence, innovation from non-governmental organisations, and evidence from research, there has been a conspicuous absence of government stewardship and leadership. Successful prevention of violence and injury is contingent on identification by the government of violence as a strategic priority and development of an intersectoral plan based on empirically driven programmes and policies.

  14. Smartphones as assistive technology following traumatic brain injury: a preliminary study of what helps and what hinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Dana; Sinclair, Kelly; Seabrook, Elizabeth; McKay, Adam; Ponsford, Jennie

    2017-11-01

    Smartphones have great potential as a convenient, multifunction tool to support cognition and independence following traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, there has been limited investigation of their helpful and less helpful aspects for people with TBI. We aimed to investigate patterns of smartphone use amongst individuals with TBI, identify potential barriers to use, and examine the relationships between smartphone use and daily functioning. Twenty-nine participants with TBI and 33 non-injured participants completed the Smartphone Survey, and measures of subjective and objective cognitive functioning, mood, and community integration. Smartphone use was equally common in both groups, and patterns of app use were similar. More participants with TBI than the comparison group listed using their smartphone as a memory aid as its main benefit. Difficulty in learning how to use the smartphone was identified by participants with TBI, however only 10% had been shown how to use it by a clinician. Those with poorer subjective cognitive function used memory/organisational apps more frequently; and higher communication app use with better social integration, in participants with TBI. These findings suggest that smartphones have potential in improving independence following TBI, but receiving support in using them is vital. Implications for Rehabilitation Smartphones are accessible, acceptable, convenient devices for most individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI), and are perceived as a useful memory and organizational aid as well as having multiple other helpful functions. Use of communication apps such as text messages and social media is associated with better social and community integration in people with TBI. Direct instruction on how to use smartphone apps is more important for people with TBI than for non-injured individuals. Developers of apps designed for this population should prioritize ease of app use, large displays, and availability of technical support

  15. Childhood MDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Myeloma Awareness Month Help Us Find a Cure Childhood MDS Childhood MDS Print Glossary To access information about coping ... be the same treatment approach for the disorder. Childhood MDS Subtypes Subtypes of primary childhood MDS are ...

  16. World Report on Child Injury Prevention: Opportunity for scaling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unintentional injuries accounted for almost 90% of these child injury deaths. Beyond these fatalities, there are several thousand children who have survived with varying degrees of disability. While many prevention programmes have been shown to be effective, much more awareness and political commitment is needed in ...

  17. Pattern of Fingertip injuries Amongst Patients Admitted at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    78.4% of injuries took place at home and all were unintentional or accidental. The fingers most commonly involved were the little finger (26.5 %), the middle finger (20.4%) and the thumb (16.3%). Majority were soft tissue injuries (74.5%) with a smaller number undergoing some degree of amputation (25.5%). Most patients ...

  18. Percutaneous injuries in doctors in the School of Medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Percutaneous injuries are defined as occupation-related, unintentional injuries that break the integrity of the skin, and ... Health, “Management of Occupational Exposures to HIV, HBV, HCV and. Recommendations for PEP ... Internal Medicine, Medical Microbiology, Neurology, Oncotherapy,. Paediatrics, Pharmacology and ...

  19. Costing injuries in South Africa: preliminary results and challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa has extremely high incidence rates of fatal and non-fatal injuries due to interpersonal violence, motor vehicle crashes (many involving pedestrians), burns, falls and other unintentional injuries. The direct costs associated with the medical treatment, rehabilitation and administration of these victims run into ...

  20. Injury Prevention and Performance Enhancement in 101st Airbourne Soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    a predictor of ankle injuries in high school basketball players. Clin J Sport Med, 2000. 10(4): p. 239-244. 5. McKeon PO and Hertel J: Spatiotemporal...Wang HK, Chen CH, Shiang TY, Jan MH, and Lin KH: Risk-factor analysis of high school basketball -player ankle injuries : a prospective controlled cohort...musculoskeletal injury prevention research as a necessary focus. Unintentional musculoskeletal and overuse injuries during tactical operations training

  1. Risk factors for unintentional poisoning in children aged 1-3 years in NSW Australia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmertmann, Marcia; Williamson, Ann; Black, Deborah; Wilson, Leigh

    2013-05-24

    Unintentional poisoning in young children is an important public health issue. Age pattern studies have demonstrated that children aged 1-3 years have the highest levels of poisoning risk among children aged 0-4 years, yet little research has been conducted regarding risk factors specific to this three-year age group and the methodologies employed varied greatly. The purpose of the current study is to investigate a broad range of potential risk factors for unintentional poisoning in children aged 1-3 years using appropriate methodologies. Four groups of children, one case group (children who had experienced a poisoning event) and three control groups (children who had been 'injured', 'sick' or who were 'healthy'), and their mothers (mother-child dyads) were enrolled into a case-control study. All mother-child dyads participated in a 1.5-hour child developmental screening and observation, with mothers responding to a series of questionnaires at home. Data were analysed as three case-control pairs with multivariate analyses used to control for age and sex differences between child cases and controls. Five risk factors were included in the final multivariate models for one or more case-control pairs. All three models found that children whose mothers used more positive control in their interactions during a structured task had higher odds of poisoning. Two models showed that maternal psychiatric distress increased poisoning risk (poisoning-injury and poisoning-healthy). Individual models identified the following variables as risk factors: less proximal maternal supervision during risk taking activities (poisoning-injury), medicinal substances stored in more accessible locations in bathrooms (poisoning-sick) and lower total parenting stress (poisoning-healthy). The findings of this study indicate that the nature of the caregiver-child relationship and caregiver attributes play an important role in influencing poisoning risk. Further research is warranted to explore the

  2. Stereotype activation is unintentional: Behavioural and event-related potenials evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Yang, Ya-Ping; Tan, Chen-Hao; Zhao, Xiang-Xia; Liu, Yong-He; Lin, Chong-De

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a priming Stroop paradigm was used to determine whether stereotype activation is unintentional. Priming conditions (priming/no-priming) and the relationship between priming and target (consistent/inconsistent/no-relation) were the independent variables; accuracy, reaction time and N400 amplitude were used as dependent variables. The reaction time revealed that stereotype activation is, to some extent, unintentional. Furthermore, the event-related potenial (ERP) results showed that N400 amplitude was larger for inconsistent conditions than for consistent conditions. This result supported the notion that stereotype activation is an unintentional and automatic process. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  3. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury: What Physical and Sport Educators Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Natasha P.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among children and youth suggests that increased awareness, attention, and training must be disseminated to frontline personnel. Physical and sport educators have an increased chance of identifying students who are currently engaging in NSSI because of the nature of their work. This…

  4. What to Do with 15 Years of Injury Data from a College Guide Training Diploma Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jeff S.

    2017-01-01

    The outdoor leadership field is maturing in its understanding of activity safety and objective measures of risk exposure. Patterns of injury, relative exposure between related activities, and risk profiles per user group are only just beginning to accumulate academic findings from which a collective understanding of managing adventure-based risk…

  5. Acute kidney injury: what part do toll-like receptors play?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallés PG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Patricia G Vallés,1,2 Andrea Gil Lorenzo,2 Victoria Bocanegra,2 Roberto Vallés3 1Área de Fisiopatología, Departamento de Patología, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza, Argentina; 2National Council of Scientific and Technical Research of Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 3Instituto de Inmunología Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza, Argentina Abstract: The innate immune system plays an important role as a first response to tissue injury. This first response is carried out via germline-encoded receptors. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are the first identified and best studied family of pattern recognition receptors. TLRs are expressed on a variety of cell types, including epithelial cells, endothelia, dendritic cells, monocytes/macrophages, and B- and T-cells. TLRs initiate innate immune responses and concurrently shape the subsequent adaptive immune response. They are sensors of both pathogens, through the exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, and tissue injury, through the endogenous danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. TLR signaling is critical in defending against invading microorganisms; however, sustained receptor activation is also implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Ischemic kidney injury involves early TLR-driven immunopathology, and the resolution of inflammation is needed for rapid regeneration of injured tubule cells. Notably, the activation of TLRs also has been implicated in epithelial repair. This review focuses on the role of TLRs and their endogenous ligands within the inflammatory response of acute kidney injury. Keywords: toll-like receptors, pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, ischemic kidney injury

  6. Strategies for Playground Injury Prevention: An Overview of a Playground Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Heather; Hudson, Susan D.; Thompson, Donna

    2010-01-01

    Preventing injuries to children, especially debilitating and life threatening, requires an awareness of where these types of injuries occur during the school days. This review examines falls from playground equipment, events that have been identified as the leading causes of nonfatal unintentional injuries for children. Thus, the issue of…

  7. Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infections, and Deafness Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss On this page: What are vestibular aqueducts? How ... How are enlarged vestibular aqueducts related to childhood hearing loss? Research suggests that most children with enlarged vestibular ...

  8. Early Childhood Educators Working with Children Who Have Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Parents: What Does the Literature Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloughessy, Kathy; Waniganayake, Manjula

    2014-01-01

    Early childhood (EC) educators are expected to cater for all types of families from diverse backgrounds. Research involving EC educators and the spaces they create indicate the dominance of heteronormative practices. This silences programmes, policies, experiences and interactions that could reflect and support children with parents who identify…

  9. Anticholinergic syndrome following an unintentional overdose of scopolamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela E Corallo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Carmela E Corallo1, Ann Whitfield2, Adeline Wu21Department of Pharmacy, The Alfred, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 2Intensive Care Unit, Box Hill Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Scopolamine hydrobromide (hyoscine is an antimuscarinic drug which is primarily used in the prophylaxis and treatment of motion sickness and as a premedication to dry bronchial and salivary secretions. In acute overdosage, the main clinical problem is central nervous system (CNS depression. In Australia, tablets containing scopolamine hydrobromide 0.3 mg are available over the counter in packs of ten. The recommended dose for adults is one to two tablets as a single dose, repeated four to six hours later, if required. The maximum dose stated on the pack is four tablets over a 24-hour period with a caution regarding drowsiness and blurred vision. We describe a patient who presented with symptoms of anticholinergic syndrome secondary to an unintentional overdose of scopolamine. Whilst at work, the patient noticed that he had forgotten his prescribed medication, domperidone, at home; a friend gave him some travel sickness medication which contained scopolamine for relief of nausea. On a previous occasion, he had experienced a similar, less severe reaction with another anticholinergic agent, loperamide. This report highlights the need to consider nonprescription products, ie, over the counter medications, herbal/nutritional supplements as causes of anticholinergic syndrome when a patient presents with symptoms suggestive of this diagnosis.Keywords: domperidone, scopolamine, nonprescription drugs, toxicity, anticholinergic syndrome

  10. Caesarean delivery complicated by unintentional subdural block and conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsharkawy, Hesham; Khanna, Ashish K; Barsoum, Sabri

    2013-01-01

    Combined spinal epidural (CSE) can provide excellent labor analgesia. Subdural block is also a potential but rare complication of attempted epidural placement during a CSE procedure, which may present as a block that is usually patchy in nature, with a component of sensory and/or motor deficit and a variable duration of action. In addition, a conversion disorder or a functional neurological disorder has been described with epidural and spinal anesthesia in obstetric patients. In this clinical report, we describe a 33-year-old G4P3 at 40 weeks gestation that received an unintentional subdural block as part of her labor analgesia and after an uneventful caesarean delivery presented with a conversion disorder. The rarity of the association between a subdural block and a conversion disorder complicated by the fact that the neurological deficit produced by the subdural block and that produced by a conversion disorder are similar in distribution made the clinical presentation and diagnosis a challenge for the obstetric anesthesia team. A functional neurological disorder of this nature complicating a subdural block in an obstetric anesthesia clinical practice has not been described so far.

  11. Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue ... Healthier Kids • Healthier Kids Home • Our Programs • Childhood Obesity Introduction Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is childhood obesity an issue ...

  12. Head Injury in the Elderly: What Are the Outcomes of Neurosurgical Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Kathrin Joanna; Jeyaretna, Deva Sanjeeva; Enki, Doyo Gragn; Whitfield, Peter C

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies show that an increasing proportion of those presenting with head trauma are elderly. This study details the outcomes of elderly patients with head trauma admitted to a regional United Kingdom neurosurgical unit. The notes and imaging were reviewed of all patients with head injury aged ≥75 years, admitted from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2010, including mortality data up to at least 2 years after discharge. Outcomes comprised death as an inpatient, by 30 days and 1 year after discharge; Glasgow Outcome Score; discharge Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score; recurrence; readmission; reoperation; and complication. A total of 263 patients were admitted: 26 with acute subdural hematoma (ASDH); 175 with chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH); and 46 with mixed subdural collections (ACSDH). Sixteen patients had other head injury diagnoses. Patients with ASDH had a significantly lower survival rate than did those with CSDH or ACSDH: the odds of inpatient death for patients with ASDH was 15.38 (vs. those with CSDH). For all subdural hematomas (SDHs), low American Society of Anesthesiologists score was an independent predictor of early death. Death at 1 year was predicted by head injury severity measured by admission GCS score (P = 0.028), long anesthetic (P = 0.002), and the presence of bilateral SDH (P = 0.002). Unfavorable Glasgow Outcome Scale score (1-3) was predicted by age greater than 85 years (P = 0.029); larger depth of subdural (P neurosurgery after head injury have SDHs. Our results are better than many previously reported; however, the rate of death for those with ASDH is still high. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Traumatic brain injury and post-acute decline: what role does environmental enrichment play? A scoping review

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    Diana eFrasca

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. While a number of studies provide evidence of neural and cognitive decline in traumatic brain injury (TBI survivors during the post-acute stages of injury, there is a dearth of research on the possible mechanisms underlying this decline. The purposes of this paper, therefore, are to (1 examine evidence that environmental enrichment (EE can influence long-term outcome following TBI, and (2 examine the nature of post-acute environments, whether they vary in degree of EE, and what impact these variations have on outcomes.Methods. We conducted a scoping review to identify studies on EE in animals and humans, and post-discharge experiences that relate to barriers to recovery.Results. Ninety-six articles that met inclusion criteria demonstrated the benefits of EE on brain and behaviour in healthy and brain-injured animals and humans. Nineteen papers on post-discharge experiences provided evidence that variables such as insurance coverage, financial and social support, home therapy, and transition from hospital to home, also play a vital role in regaining independence. Conclusion. There is evidence to suggest that lack of EE, whether from lack of resources or limited ability to engage in such environments, may play a role in post-recovery cognitive and neural decline. Maximizing EE in the post-acute stages of TBI may improve long-term outcomes for the individual, their family and society.

  14. [Acute and overuse injuries in soccer - what about the evidence level?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelm, J; Ludwig, O; Ahlhelm, F; Andre, B; Hopp, S

    2014-12-01

    Over the last years, several studies on harmful events (h. e.) in soccer have been published. The aim was to develop a ranking of these studies according to their evidence, and to analyse the data with respect to the number of study participants, athletes' status, gender distribution, and genesis of harmful events in soccer. Between 1976 and 2011, the data bases MEDLINE, EBMR, and SPOTLIT were scanned by the keywords/combinations: soccer, acute injuries, overuse injuries, training, and match. In doing so, 644 initially potential relevant articles were found. On the basis of the QUORUM standard, 78 potentially relevant articles were filtered out, and an EVIDENCE BASED LEVEL (EBL) was assigned. The results were rated according to importance and shown descriptively, because the heterogeneity of the study inhibited meta-analytical evaluation. 23 % of the publications could be assigned to EBL 2a - 2c, 27 % to EBL 3a and 3b, and 50 % to EBL 4 and 5. The studies comprised altogether 22 294 male and 2375 female athletes; 87 % of the male and 29 % of the female were professional athletes. 7 usable publications with a total of 8011 h. e. in men and 6 publications with 1055 h. e. in women dealt with contact/non-contact genesis of h. e.. 46 % male (72 % female) athletes suffered from h. e. caused by contact events, and 54 % male (28 % female) athletes suffered from h. e. caused by non-contact events. The distribution of acute and overuse injuries was analysed in 9969 h. e. in men (11 publications), and in 624 h. e. in women (5 publications). On average, the number of acute injuries (90 % male, 86 % female) was much higher than that of overuse injuries. The prevalence of h. e. with respect to training or match playing was analysed in 11 studies with 10 078 h. e. in men, and in 4 studies with 546 harmful events in women. 35 % of men's h. e. occurred during training and 65 % during matches, whereas 60 % of the

  15. Pattern of injury mortality by age-group in children aged 0–14 years in Scotland, 2002–2006, and its implications for prevention

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    Stone David H

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the epidemiology of injuries in children is essential for the planning, implementation and evaluation of preventive measures but recent epidemiological information on injuries in children both in general and by age-group in Scotland is scarce. This study examines the recent pattern of childhood mortality from injury by age-group in Scotland and considers its implications for prevention. Methods Routine mortality data for the period 2002–2006 were obtained from the General Register Office for Scotland and were analysed in terms of number of deaths, mean annual mortality rates per 100,000 population, leading causes of death, and causes of injury death. Mid-year population estimates were used as the denominator. Chi-square tests were used to determine statistical significance. Results 186 children aged 0–14 died from an injury in Scotland during 2002–06 (MR 4.3 per 100,000. Injuries were the leading cause of death in 1–14, 5–9 and 10–14 year-olds (causing 25%, 29% and 32% of all deaths respectively. The leading individual causes of injury death (0–14 years were pedestrian and non-pedestrian road-traffic injuries and assault/homicide but there was variation by age-group. Assault/homicide, fire and suffocation caused most injury deaths in young children; road-traffic injuries in older ones. Collectively, intentional injuries were a bigger threat to the lives of under-15s than any single cause of unintentional injury. The mortality rate from assault/homicide was highest in infants ( Conclusion Injuries continue to be a leading cause of death in childhood in Scotland. Variation in causes of injury death by age-group is important when targeting preventive efforts. In particular, the threats of assault/homicide in infants, fire in 1–4 year-olds, pedestrian injury in 5–14 year-olds, and suicide in 10–14 year-olds need urgent consideration for preventive action.

  16. Contributing Factors for Acute Illness/Injury from Childhood Pesticide Exposure in North Carolina, USA, 2007–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmalla Barros

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Between 2007 and 2013, there were 685 events with evidence of a relationship between pesticide exposure and acute illness/injury among persons less than 18 years old in North Carolina (United States. Median age of children affected was 4.3 years (range: 0.2–17.9. Distribution by gender was similar across all age groups. One fatality and four high severity events were observed. The greatest proportion (42% of events had ocular exposures, followed by dermal (25% and inhalation (18% exposures. When more than one route of exposure occurred, dermal and ocular routes were the most common (46%. Almost all events took place indoors and 32 events involved contact with pets. Insecticides (53% and insect repellants (31% were the most frequent agents contributing to these events. Manual application of pesticides contributed to the greatest number of events (25%, while application through a pressurized can and use of a trigger pump were involved in 21% and 15% of events, respectively. Additional contributors were due to inappropriate storage of pesticides and improper use of the pesticide. These contributing factors can be removed or minimized if pesticides are stored outside the residence or out of the reach of children and pets, and adequate ventilation is ensured whenever pesticides are applied.

  17. What the Dynamic Systems Approach Can Offer for Understanding Development: An Example of Mid-childhood Reaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golenia, Laura; Schoemaker, Marina M; Otten, Egbert; Mouton, Leonora J; Bongers, Raoul M

    2017-01-01

    The Dynamic Systems Approach (DSA) to development has been shown to be a promising theory to understand developmental changes. In this perspective, we use the example of mid-childhood (6- to 10-years of age) reaching to show how using the DSA can advance the understanding of development. Mid-childhood is an important developmental period that has often been overshadowed by the focus on the acquisition of reaching during infancy. This underrepresentation of mid-childhood studies is unjustified, as earlier studies showed that important developmental changes in mid-childhood reaching occur that refine the skill of reaching. We review these studies here for the first time and show that different studies revealed different developmental trends, such as non-monotonic and linear trends, for variables such as movement time and accuracy at target. Unfortunately, proposed explanations for these developmental changes have been tailored to individual studies, limiting their scope. Also, explanations were focused on a single component or process in the system that supposedly causes developmental changes. Here, we propose that the DSA can offer an overarching explanation for developmental changes in this research field. According to the DSA, motor behavior emerges from interactions of multiple components entailed by the person, environment, and task. Changes in all these components can potentially contribute to the emerging behavior. We show how the principles of change of the DSA can be used as an overarching framework by applying these principles not only to development, but also the behavior itself. This underlines its applicability to other fields of development.

  18. Health status and behavior among middle-school children in a midwest community: what are the underpinnings of childhood obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Taylor F; Gurm, Roopa; Goldberg, Caren S; DuRussel-Weston, Jean; Kline-Rogers, Eva; Palma-Davis, LaVaughn; Aaronson, Susan; Fitzgerald, Catherine M; Mitchell, Lindsey R; Rogers, Bruce; Bruenger, Patricia; Jackson, Elizabeth A; Eagle, Kim A

    2010-12-01

    Childhood obesity is one of the nation's foremost health challenges. How much of this is due to lifestyle choices? The objective of the study was to determine health behaviors that contribute to obesity in sixth-grade children. To assess which health habits contribute to childhood obesity, we studied body mass index, blood pressure, lipid profile, glucose, and heart rate recovery after a 3-minute step test among sixth-grade children enrolled in a school-based intervention study from 2004 to 2009, comparing health behaviors and physiologic markers in obese versus nonobese children. Univariate associations with obesity (P values≤.10) were entered into a stepwise logistic regression to identify independent predictors. Among 1,003 sixth graders (55% white, 15% African American; average age 11.5 years), 150 (15%) were obese. Obese students had higher levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and recovery heart rates. They consumed more regular soda and school lunches but were less likely to engage in physical activities. Obese students were more likely to watch TV≥2 hours per day. Independent predictors were watching TV or video games (odds ratio [OR] 1.19, 95% CI 1.06-1.33) and school lunch consumption (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.02-1.64); moderate exercise was protective (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.98). Obesity is present in 15% of our sixth graders and is associated with major differences in cardiovascular risk factors. Opportunities to improve childhood health should emphasize programs that increase physical activity, reduce recreational screen time, and improve nutritional value of school lunches. Whether genetic or not, childhood obesity can be attacked. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. We have the programme, what next? Planning the implementation of an injury prevention programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Alex; Lloyd, David G; Gabbe, Belinda J; Cook, Jill; Finch, Caroline F

    2017-08-01

    The impact of any injury prevention programme is a function of the programme and its implementation. However, real world implementation of injury prevention programmes is challenging. Lower limb injuries (LLIs) are common in community Australian football (community-AF) and it is likely that many could be prevented by implementing exercise-based warm-up programmes for players. This paper describes a systematic, evidence-informed approach used to develop the implementation plan for a LLI prevention programme in community-AF in Victoria, Australia. An ecological approach, using Step 5 of the Intervention Mapping health promotion programme planning protocol, was taken. An implementation advisory group was established to ensure the implementation plan and associated strategies were relevant to the local context. Coaches were identified as the primary programme adopters and implementers within an ecological system including players, other coaches, first-aid providers, and club and league administrators. Social Cognitive Theory was used to identify likely determinants of programme reach, adoption and implementation among coaches (eg, knowledge, beliefs, skills and environment). Diffusion of Innovations theory, the Implementation Drivers framework and available research evidence were used to identify potential implementation strategies including the use of multiple communication channels, programme resources, coach education and mentoring. A strategic evidence-informed approach to implementing interventions will help maximise their population impact. The approach to implementation planning described in this study relied on an effective researcher-practitioner partnership and active engagement of stakeholders. The identified implementation strategies were informed by theory, evidence and an in-depth understanding of the implementation context. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. A kinematic study on (unintentional imitation in bottlenose dolphins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa eSartori

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of observing other’s movements on subsequent performance in bottlenose dolphins. The imitative ability of non-human animals has intrigued a number of researchers. So far, however, studies in dolphins have been confined to intentional imitation concerned with the explicit request to imitate other agents. In the absence of instruction to imitate, do dolphins (unintentionally replicate other’s movement features? To test this, dolphins were filmed while reaching and touching a stimulus before and after observing another dolphin (i.e., model performing the same action. All videos were reviewed and segmented in order to extract the relevant movements. A marker was inserted post-hoc via software on the videos upon the anatomical landmark of interest (i.e. rostrum and was tracked throughout the time course of the movement sequence. The movement was analyzed using an in-house software developed to perform two-dimensional (2D post-hoc kinematic analysis. The results indicate that dolphins’ kinematics is sensitive to other’s movement features. Movements performed for the ‘visuomotor priming’ condition were characterized by a kinematic pattern similar to that performed by the observed dolphin (i.e., model. Addressing the issue of spontaneous imitation in bottlenose dolphins might allow ascertaining whether the potential or impulse to produce an imitative action is generated, not just when they intend to imitate, but whenever they watch another conspecific’s behavior. In closing, this will clarify whether motor representational capacity is a by-product of factors specific to humans or whether more general characteristics such as processes of associative learning prompted by high level of encephalization could help to explain the evolution of this ability.

  1. Brain injury in very preterm children and neurosensory and cognitive disabilities during childhood: the EPIPAGE cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Marret

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of motor and cognitive/learning deficiencies and overall disabilities in very preterm (VPT children and their relations to gestational age (GA and brain lesions. DESIGN SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: EPIPAGE is a longitudinal population-based cohort study of children born before 33 weeks' gestation (WG in 9 French regions in 1997-1998. Cumulating data from all follow up stages, neurodevelopmental outcomes were available for 90% of the 2480 VPT survivors at 8 years. Main outcomes were association of motor and cognitive deficiencies and existence of at least one deficiency (motor, cognitive, behavioral/psychiatric, epileptic, visual, and/or hearing deficiencies in three GA groups (24-26, 27-28, and 29-32WG and four groups of brain lesions (none, minor, moderate, or severe. RESULTS: VPT had high rates of motor (14% and cognitive (31% deficiencies. Only 6% had an isolated motor deficiency, 23% an isolated cognitive one and 8% both types. This rate reached 20% among extremely preterm. Psychiatric disorders and epilepsy were observed in 6% and 2% of children, respectively. The risks of at least one severe or moderate deficiency were 11 and 29%. These risks increased as GA decreased; only 36% of children born extremely preterm had no reported deficiency. Among children with major white matter injury (WMI, deficiency rates reached 71% at 24-26WG, 88% at 27-28WG, and 80% at 29-32WG; more than 40% had associated motor and cognitive deficiencies. By contrast, isolated cognitive deficiency was the most frequent problem among children without major lesions. CONCLUSIONS: In VPT, the lower the GA, the higher the neurodisability rate. Cerebral palsy is common. Impaired cognitive development is more frequent. Its occurrence in case without WMI or early motor disorders makes long-term follow up necessary. The strong association between motor impairments, when they exist, and later cognitive dysfunction supports the hypothesis

  2. To What Extent Do Neighborhood Differences Mediate Racial Disparities in Participation After Spinal Cord Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botticello, Amanda L; Boninger, Mike; Charlifue, Susan; Chen, Yuying; Fyffe, Denise; Heinemann, Allen; Hoffman, Jeanne M; Jette, Alan; Kalpakjian, Claire; Rohrbach, Tanya

    2016-10-01

    To examine the role of residential neighborhood characteristics in accounting for race disparities in participation among a large sample of community-living adults with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Secondary analysis of cross-sectional survey data from the national Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems (SCIMS) database linked with national survey and spatial data. SCIMS database participants enrolled at 10 collaborating centers active in follow-up between 2000 and 2014. The sample consisted of persons with SCI (N=6892) in 5441 Census tracts from 50 states and the District of Columbia. Not applicable. The Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique was used to measure full participation across 4 domains: physical independence, mobility, occupation, and social integration. Racial minority groups had lower odds of reporting full participation relative to whites across all domains, suggesting that blacks and Hispanics are at risk for poorer community reintegration after SCI. Neighborhood characteristics, notably differences in socioeconomic advantage, reduced race group differences in the odds of full occupational and social integration, suggesting that the race disparities in community reintegration after SCI are partially attributable to variation in the economic characteristics of the places where people live. This investigation suggests that addressing disadvantage at the neighborhood level may modify gaps in community participation after medical rehabilitation and provides further support for the role of the environment in the experience of disability. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cell therapy for spinal cord injuries: what is really going on?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Nicolas; Franklin, Robin J M; Jeffery, Nick D

    2014-12-01

    During the last two decades, many experiments have examined the ability of cell transplants to ameliorate the loss of function after spinal cord injuries, with the hope of developing interventions to benefit patients. Although many reports suggest positive effects, there is growing concern over the quality of the available preclinical data. It is therefore important to ask whether this worldwide investigative process is close to defining a cell transplant protocol that could be translated into human patients with a realistic chance of success. This review systematically examines the strength of the preclinical evidence and outlines mechanisms by which transplanted cells may mediate their effects in spinal cord injuries. First, we examined changes in voluntary movements in the forelimb associated with cell transplants after partial cervical lesions. Second, we examined the efficacy of transplanted cells to restore electrophysiological conduction across a complete thoracic lesion. We postulated that cell therapies found to be successful in both models could reasonably have potential to treat human patients. We conclude that although there are data to support a beneficial effect of cell transplantation, most reports provide only weak evidence because of deficits in experimental design. The mechanisms by which transplanted cells mediate their functional effects remain unclear. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Cardiovascular Dysfunction Following Burn Injury: What We Have Learned from Rat and Mouse Models

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    Ashley N. Guillory

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe burn profoundly affects organs both proximal and distal to the actual burn site. Cardiovascular dysfunction is a well-documented phenomenon that increases morbidity and mortality following a massive thermal trauma. Beginning immediately post-burn, during the ebb phase, cardiac function is severely depressed. By 48 h post-injury, cardiac function rebounds and the post-burn myocardium becomes tachycardic and hyperinflammatory. While current clinical trials are investigating a variety of drugs targeted at reducing aspects of the post-burn hypermetabolic response such as heart rate and cardiac work, there is still a paucity of knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms that induce cardiac dysfunction in the severely burned. There are many animal models of burn injury, from rodents, to sheep or swine, but the majority of burn related cardiovascular investigations have occurred in rat and mouse models. This literature review consolidates the data supporting the prevalent role that β-adrenergic receptors play in mediating post-burn cardiac dysfunction and the idea that pharmacological modulation of this receptor family is a viable therapeutic target for resolving burn-induced cardiac deficits.

  5. Bodygraphic Injury Surveillance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Toshiki; Kitamura, Koji; Nishida, Yoshihumi; Motomura, Yoichi; Takano, Tachio; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi

    This paper proposes a new technology,``a bodygraphic injury surveillance system (BISS)'' that not only accumulates accident situation data but also represents injury data based on a human body coordinate system in a standardized and multilayered way. Standardized and multilayered representation of injury enables accumulation, retrieval, sharing, statistical analysis, and modeling causalities of injury across different fields such as medicine, engineering, and industry. To confirm the effectiveness of the developed system, the authors collected 3,685 children's injury data in cooperation with a hospital. As new analyses based on the developed BISS, this paper shows bodygraphically statistical analysis and childhood injury modeling using the developed BISS and Bayesian network technology.

  6. Heinrich Events: An Unintentional Discovery And Possible Consequences For The Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, H.

    2017-12-01

    Heinrich Events: An Unintentional Discovery And Its Possible Consequences For The FutureIn the mid 80ties an environmental impact assessment in relation to deep-sea dumping of medium-to-high level radioactive waste was carried out in the eastern margins of the Mid Atlantic Ridge next to the Bay of Biscaye. In one of the box corers recovered for radionuclide analysis a volcanic rock was found that triggered interest because of an unexpected geochemical feature on its surface. Subsequent investigations on the bordering sediment layer revealed hints on a massive ice rafting event possibly released from rapidly collapsing circum-Atlantic ice shields. The search for more of these events in numerous sediment cores exhibited a total of 11 layers since the end of the Saalian/Illinoian glaciation (OIS 6/5 to 2/1). The six events identified in the period OIS 4 to 2 indicated oceanographic conditions in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean that were different to those that prevailed during most time of this glacial period. Later, several authors proposed mechanisms that could have triggered the collapses, e.g. the Binge-Purge model (MacAyeal, 1993) or, access of relatively warm water to the grounding lines in conjunction with isostatic movements (Bassis, 2017). One of the consequences of rapid ice shield collapses is sea level rise. Paleo data report rates of up to several meters per century over a period of several centuries. The process described by Bassis et al. resembles to what nowadays can be observed along the ice margins of Greenland and the Antarctic where (man-made) warmed ocean water attacks the grounding lines. If this initiates something similar to a Heinrich event this is of widespread consequence for coasts, from displacement of populations to marine pollution. Thus, research on past Heinrich Events is important for understanding the future developments of the existing ice shields and climate change.

  7. Peer Bullying During Early Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Hatice UYSAL; Çağlayan DİNÇER

    2012-01-01

    Peer bullying during early childhood is discussed along with the literature reviewed in this article with the purpose of drawing attention to peer bullying during early childhood and its significance, and contributing to studies which are few in number in Turkey. Peer bullying during early childhood was considered with its definition and types, people who play key roles in peer bullying, factors (gender, age, parents, and friendship) that relate to peer bullying, and what should be done befor...

  8. INTRODUCTION A fall is a sudden, unintentional change in position ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    result in a psychological trauma known as fear of falling21,22. Major injuries also occurred more amongst the females than the males with all the fractures occurring amongst the females. Postmenopausal, women have been known to be at increased risk of having fractures resulting from hormone related osteoporosis.

  9. Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Javascript in your browser. Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot What Is a Sesamoid? A sesamoid is a ... contributing factor. Types of Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot There are three types of sesamoid injuries in ...

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Child Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living HIV / AIDS Injury, Violence & Safety Motor Vehicle Safety Obesity Prescription Drug Overdoses Teen Pregnancy Tobacco ... Child Injury Prevention Protect the Ones You Love Color Me Safe Child Injury: What You Need to ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago play_arrow What is ... What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising new ...

  12. What do health consumers want to know about childhood vaccination? An evaluation of data from an Australian medicines call centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mus, Marnix; Kreijkamp-Kaspers, Sanne; McGuire, Treasure; Deckx, Laura; van Driel, Mieke

    2017-02-01

    Immunisation is crucial to population health. This study aimed to identify the information needs and concerns of health consumers regarding childhood vaccination. We analysed 1,342 calls concerning childhood vaccination to an Australian pharmacist-operated medicines call centre (MCC). Data were available from September 2002 until June 2010. We identified key themes and compared these for callers from high and low immunisation coverage areas. Most calls related to safety concerns (60.4%), with many questions about vaccine constituents (31.6%). In low immunisation areas, a higher level of concern persisted about vaccine preservatives (mercury and thiomersal) despite their removal from vaccines in 2000. Of specific vaccines, the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine raised most questions (29.9%). Common motivations to call the MCC were 'inadequate information' (54%), 'second opinion' (21%) 'conflicting information' (9%) and 'worrying symptom' (6%). The consistent number of vaccine-related calls, particularly about safety, demonstrates an information gap that can contribute to vaccination hesitancy. Health professionals need to know their local immunisation rate and associated carer concerns, to proactively address these information-related barriers to vaccination. © 2016 The Authors.

  13. Differences in Poisoning Mortality in the United States, 2003–2007: Epidemiology of Poisoning Deaths Classified as Unintentional, Suicide or Homicide

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    Sana Muazzam

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Poisoning, specifically unintentional poisoning, is a major public health problem in the United States (U.S.. Published literature that presents epidemiology of all forms of poisoning mortalities (i.e., unintentional, suicide, homicide together is limited. This report presents data and summarizes the evidence on poisoning mortality by demographic and geographic characteristics to describe the burden of poisoning mortality and the differences among sub-populations in the U.S. for a 5-year period.Methods: Using mortality data from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System, we presented the age-specific and age-adjusted unintentional and intentional (suicide, homicide poisoning mortality rates by sex, age, race, and state of residence for the most recent years (2003–2007 of available data. Annual percentage changes in deaths and rates were calculated, and linear regression using natural log were used for time-trend analysis.Results: There were 121,367 (rate¼8.18 per 100,000 unintentional poisoning deaths. Overall, the unintentional poisoning mortality rate increased by 46.9%, from 6.7 per 100,000 in 2003 to 9.8 per100.000 in 2007, with the highest mortality rate among those aged 40–59 (rate¼15.36, males(rate¼11.02 and whites (rate¼8.68. New Mexico (rate¼18.2 had the highest rate. Unintentional poisoning mortality rate increased significantly among both sexes, and all racial groups except blacks (p,0.05 time-related trend for rate. Among a total of 29,469 (rate¼1.97 suicidal poisoning deaths, the rate increased by 9.9%, from 1.9 per 100,000 in 2003 to 2.1 per 100,000 in 2007, with the highest rate among those aged 40–59 (rate¼3.92, males (rate¼2.20 and whites (rate¼2.24. Nevada(rate¼3.9 had the highest rate. Mortality rate increased significantly among females and whites only (p,0.05 time-related trend for rate. There were 463 (rate¼0.03 homicidal poisoning

  14. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Eye Injuries KidsHealth / For Parents / Eye Injuries What's in ... sand, dirt, and other foreign bodies on the eye surface) Wash your hands thoroughly before touching the ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What ... Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_ ...

  18. A crisis in the marketplace: how food marketing contributes to childhood obesity and what can be done.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jennifer L; Pomeranz, Jennifer L; Lobstein, Tim; Brownell, Kelly D

    2009-01-01

    Reducing food marketing to children has been proposed as one means for addressing the global crisis of childhood obesity, but significant social, legal, financial, and public perception barriers stand in the way. The scientific literature documents that food marketing to children is (a) massive; (b) expanding in number of venues (product placements, video games, the Internet, cell phones, etc.); (c) composed almost entirely of messages for nutrient-poor, calorie-dense foods; (d) having harmful effects; and (e) increasingly global and hence difficult to regulate by individual countries. The food industry, governmental bodies, and advocacy groups have proposed a variety of plans for altering the marketing landscape. This article reviews existing knowledge of the impact of marketing and addresses the value of various legal, legislative, regulatory, and industry-based approaches to change.

  19. School's out … now what? Objective estimates of afterschool sedentary time and physical activity from childhood to adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickel, Eric E; Belton, Sarahjane

    2016-08-01

    To describe the change in afterschool levels of sedentary time and physical activity from childhood to adolescence. Longitudinal. 375 youth (50% boys) from the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (United States) provided accelerometer data at 9 (2000/01) and 15 yrs (2006/07). Average time spent in sedentary, light, moderate, vigorous, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA; minh(-1)) was reported across the afterschool period (15:00-22:00) and separately across whole days. Mean comparisons were conducted to report between- and within-group differences in afterschool data. Analysis of covariance was used to determine the effect of sex, ethnicity, and baseline body mass index (BMI) on the 6-yr change in afterschool sedentary time and MVPA before and after adjusting for covariates (baseline afterschool sedentary/MVPA time, change in non-afterschool sedentary/MVPA time, difference in afterschool wear time, and socioeconomic status). From 9 to 15 yrs, sedentary time increased and activity decreased during the afterschool period. After covariate adjustment, the decline in afterschool MVPA was significantly greater among girls, compared to boys (B coefficient (95%CI)=-0.94 (-1.47, -0.40)), and among overweight/obese youth, compared to youth with normal BMI values (B coefficient (95%CI)=-0.65 (-1.22, -0.08)). During the transition from childhood to adolescence, afterschool activity (minh(-1)) decreases while sedentary time increases. Programs are needed throughout this period that promote the maintenance of activity or encourage additional activity with age. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. What Is Hip-Hop-Based Education Doing in "Nice" Fields Such as Early Childhood and Elementary Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Bettina L.

    2015-01-01

    Hip-Hop-Based Education (HHBE) has resulted in many positive educational outcomes, ranging from teaching academic skills to teaching critical reflection at secondary levels. Given what HHBE initiatives have accomplished, it is troubling that there is an absence of attention to these methods in education programs for elementary and early childhood…

  1. Seizure related accidents and injuries in childhood Acidentes e lesões associados às crises epilépticas na infância

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Helena Buffo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Several studies show that the risk of accidents involving patients with epilepsy is much higher compared to the general population. The objective of this study was to identify the frequency and type of seizure related injuries in children diagnosed with epilepsy. In addition we also assessed possible risk factors associated with this seizure related accidents in childhood. This study was conducted at the pediatric epilepsy clinic of Unicamp, from January 2005 to August 2006. We evaluated 100 consecutive children with epilepsy. Parents were interviewed by one of the authors using a structured questionnaire that included questions about seizure related accidents and related injuries. Forty-four patients reported seizure related accidents. Eighteen patients needed medical assistance at an emergency room due the severity of their seizure related accident. Forty patients reported having a seizure related accident prevented by a bystander. Another 14 patients reported avoiding a seizure related accident by luck alone. Contusions and lacerations were the most common type of lesion associated with seizures. Patients with symptomatic/probable symptomatic epilepsy and those using higher numbers of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs were at greater risk for seizure related accidents (pVários estudos mostram que o risco de acidentes envolvendo pacientes com epilepsia é muito maior do que na população geral. O objetivo desse estudo foi identificar a freqüência e tipo de acidentes relacionados a crises epilépticas em crianças com diagnóstico de epilepsia. Além disso, também avaliamos os fatores de risco associados às crises epilépticas na infância. Esse estudo foi realizado em nosso ambulatorio de epilepsia infantil da Unicamp, no período de janeiro de 2005 a agosto de 2006. Avaliamos 100 pacientes consecutivos. Os pacientes foram entrevistados por um dos autores, utilizando-se um questionário sobre acidentes e lesões associadas às crises epil

  2. Traumatic Stress, Depression, and Recovery: Child and Parent Responses After Emergency Medical Care for Unintentional Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Bakker, Anne; Marsac, Meghan L.; Fein, Joel A.; Winston, Flaura Koplin

    2015-01-01

    To assess psychological symptoms in injured children (aged 8-17 years) and their parents after emergency department (ED) care to examine the relationship between posttraumatic stress and depression symptoms, co-occurrence of symptoms within families, and the relationship of these symptoms to

  3. What are the Differences in Injury Proportions Between Different Populations of Runners? : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluitenberg, Bas; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Diercks, Ron; van der Worp, Henk

    Background Many runners suffer from injuries. No information on high-risk populations is available so far though. Objectives The aims of this study were to systematically review injury proportions in different populations of runners and to compare injury locations between these populations. Data

  4. Towards a National Injury Costing System?:Lessons from a Public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa has extremely high incidence rates of fatal and non-fatal injuries due to interpersonal violence, pedestrian–motor vehicle collisions, burns, falls and other unintentional causes. While the actual cost associated with these injuries remains relatively unknown, the estimated direct cost of the medical treatment, ...

  5. Missed and Missing Cases of Abusive Injuries: The Magnitude and the Measurement of the Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, David L.; Castillo, Edward M.; Kuelbs, Cynthia; Cox, Susan A.; Lindsay, Suzanne P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors' objective is to describe the disparity between the case-fatality rates for inflicted versus unintentional injuries of children, and to emphasize its utility as a way of estimating the effectiveness of the ascertainment of inflicted injuries of children. Method: Determination, comparison, and explanation of the…

  6. What is the prevalence of senior-athlete rotator cuff injuries and are they associated with pain and dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Patrick J; Prasad, Amitesh; Francis, Kimberly A

    2014-08-01

    Older individuals with rotator cuff injuries may have difficulties not only with activities of daily living, but also with sports activities. (1) How frequent and severe are rotator cuff abnormalities, as identified by ultrasound, in senior athletes? (2) To what degree does the severity of ultrasound-identified rotator cuff pathology correlate with pain and shoulder dysfunction? We assessed pain and shoulder function in 141 elite athletes older than 60 years of age (median age, 70 years; range 60-84) at the Senior Olympics who volunteered to participate. An ultrasound evaluation of the rotator cuff of the dominant shoulder was performed by an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist in all of these elite athletes. We then determined the relationship between ultrasound findings and shoulder pain and shoulder function as assessed with the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores. There were 20 shoulders with a normal cuff (14.2% [20 of 141], of which 5% [one of 20] were painful), 23 with tendinosis (16.3% [23 of 141], of which 30% [six of 20] were painful), 68 with a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear (48.2% [68 of 141], of which 32% [20 of 63] were painful), and 30 with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear (21.3% [30 of 141], of which 25% [seven of 28] were painful). Only 5% of athletes (one of 20) with a normal cuff on ultrasound evaluation reported shoulder pain, whereas 30% of athletes (33 of 111) with any degree of rotator cuff damage on ultrasound evaluation reported shoulder pain, This resulted in an odds ratio of 8.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-62.5). The proportion of patients who had pain was not different in those with different severities of rotator cuff pathology. Neither the ASES nor the DASH was different in those with different severities. The frequency of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in senior athletes was 21.3% (30 of 141). Pain was a predictor of rotator cuff injury but not of its

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ... advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  11. Father-Child Interactions and Children's Risk of Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    StGeorge, Jennifer; Fletcher, Richard; Freeman, Emily; Paquette, Daniel; Dumont, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Unintentional injury is an important cause of infant and child hospitalisation and parents play a key role in reducing children's risk-taking behaviour. Studies show that maternal and paternal parenting and supervision of children differ, but there is little research showing how fathers' parenting may influence children's tendency to engage in…

  12. The incidence of injury presentations to emergency departments: what we don't know can hurt us.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meaney, S

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of injury presentations to emergency departments in the Republic of Ireland has not been established. Data were collected relating to all injuries that presented on every eighth day in July-December 2005 to the three hospitals in Cork City. In total, 2,967 injury presentations were recorded. The total, male and female age-adjusted rate of injury presentations was 11,322, 13,933 and 8,550 per 100,000, respectively. The peak male rate was among 15-29 year-olds (26,735 per 100,000), 2.5 times the female rate in the same age range (10,719 per 100,000). The peak female rate was among over 85 year-olds (18,543 per 100,000). Place of injury, activity at time of injury and underlying substance\\/object causing injury were unspecified for 44%, 46% and 43% of recorded injuries. Improving the recording of injury data needs to be prioritised in Irish emergency departments ideally in conjunction with the development of a national injury surveillance system.

  13. The unintentional and unconscious exposure to radon (and other natural radionuclides)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.

    1998-01-01

    The radon programmes for dwellings (remediation of the risk and prevention of the risk) as well as radon programmes for workplaces in the Czech Republic are described. To implementation radiation protection against natural radiation sources on workplaces with unintentional and unconscious exposure to these sources of radiation is a new, but interesting and important task which need new approaches, time staff and effort

  14. Unintentional arterial puncture during cephalic vein cannulation: case report and anatomical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, P.; Keller, C.; Colvin, J.; Colvin, H.; Rieder, J.; Maurer, H.; Moriggl, B.

    2004-01-01

    The cephalic antebrachial vein is often used for venous access. However, superficial radial arteries of the forearm are known and unintentional arterial puncture can result from attempts to cannulate the lateral veins of the arm. Accidental puncture of a superficial radial artery during peripheral

  15. Reexamining the association between child access prevention gun laws and unintentional shooting deaths of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, D W; Starnes, M

    2000-12-01

    A previous study estimated that child access prevention (CAP) laws, which hold adults criminally liable for unsafe firearm storage in the environment of children, were associated with a 23% decline in unintentional firearm mortality rates among children. To reassess the effects of CAP laws and more fully examine the consistency of the estimated law effects across states. A pooled time-series study of unintentional firearm mortality among children from 1979 through 1997. Setting. The 50 states and the District of Columbia. All children laws enacted before 1998 were aggregated, the laws were associated with a 17% decline unintentional firearm death rates among children. The laws' effects were not equal across states. Florida's CAP law was associated with a 51% decline; however, there were no statistically significant aggregate or state-specific law effects in the other 14 states with CAP laws. Florida's CAP law-1 of only 3 such laws allowing felony prosecution of violators-appears to have significantly reduced unintentional firearm deaths to children. However, there is no evidence of effects in the other 14 states with CAP laws.

  16. Firearm availability and suicide, homicide, and unintentional firearm deaths among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah; Hemenway, David

    2002-03-01

    In the United States, more than 45,000 women died from gun violence over the last decade. To determine whether measures of firearm availability are related to rates of suicide, homicide, and unintentional firearm deaths among women in the United States. Pooled cross-sectional time series data on suicide, homicide, and unintentional firearm deaths (1988-1997) were used to estimate the association between the rate of violent death among women and four proxies of firearm availability. Two proxies came from survey reports of household firearm ownership rates; two were derived from mortality statistics. United States, 1988-1997. The increased rate of suicide and homicide in states with high gun levels was accounted for primarily by significantly elevated firearm suicide and firearm homicide rates. Unintentional firearm death rates were also increased in states with more guns. At the regional level, qualitatively similar results were obtained. Between 1988 and 1997, the suicide, homicide, and unintentional firearm death rates among women were disproportionately higher in states where guns were more prevalent. The elevated rates of violent death in states with more guns was not entirely explained by a state's poverty or urbanization and was driven primarily by lethal firearm violence, not by lethal nonfirearm violence.

  17. Unintentional Power Plays: Interpersonal Contextual Impacts in Child-Centred Participatory Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett-Swan, Jenna K.; Sargeant, Jonathon

    2018-01-01

    Background: Approaches to conducting research with children afford them varying degrees of participatory power. Despite children's varying roles within research, more needs to be understood about the influences of unintentional power plays and, in particular, interactions between participant and non-participants on children's participation in…

  18. Reducing Unintentional Plagiarism amongst International Students in the Biological Sciences: An Embedded Academic Writing Development Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divan, Aysha; Bowman, Marion; Seabourne, Anna

    2015-01-01

    There is general agreement in the literature that international students are more likely to plagiarise compared to their native speaker peers and, in many instances, plagiarism is unintentional. In this article we describe the effectiveness of an academic writing development programme embedded into a Biological Sciences Taught Masters course…

  19. Injury differences in the return-to-work process following a work-related injury: What is the role of return-to-work self-efficacy?

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVER CHARLES BLACK

    2018-01-01

    This thesis investigated the role of self-efficacy in the return-to-work process following a work-related injury. It also contributed knowledge towards understanding the measurement of return-to-work self-efficacy, the relationships between the determinants of return-to-work self-efficacy and actual return-to-work self-efficacy, and the relationship between return-to-work self-efficacy and a sustained return-to-work, across different injury types. The findings from this thesis have direct imp...

  20. The empathy impulse: A multinomial model of intentional and unintentional empathy for pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, C Daryl; Spring, Victoria L; Todd, Andrew R

    2017-04-01

    Empathy for pain is often described as automatic. Here, we used implicit measurement and multinomial modeling to formally quantify unintentional empathy for pain: empathy that occurs despite intentions to the contrary. We developed the pain identification task (PIT), a sequential priming task wherein participants judge the painfulness of target experiences while trying to avoid the influence of prime experiences. Using multinomial modeling, we distinguished 3 component processes underlying PIT performance: empathy toward target stimuli (Intentional Empathy), empathy toward prime stimuli (Unintentional Empathy), and bias to judge target stimuli as painful (Response Bias). In Experiment 1, imposing a fast (vs. slow) response deadline uniquely reduced Intentional Empathy. In Experiment 2, inducing imagine-self (vs. imagine-other) perspective-taking uniquely increased Unintentional Empathy. In Experiment 3, Intentional and Unintentional Empathy were stronger toward targets with typical (vs. atypical) pain outcomes, suggesting that outcome information matters and that effects on the PIT are not reducible to affective priming. Typicality of pain outcomes more weakly affected task performance when target stimuli were merely categorized rather than judged for painfulness, suggesting that effects on the latter are not reducible to semantic priming. In Experiment 4, Unintentional Empathy was stronger for participants who engaged in costly donation to cancer charities, but this parameter was also high for those who donated to an objectively worse but socially more popular charity, suggesting that overly high empathy may facilitate maladaptive altruism. Theoretical and practical applications of our modeling approach for understanding variation in empathy are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Young adult's own and parental social characteristics predict injury morbidity: a register-based follow-up of 135,000 men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remes, Hanna; Martikainen, Pekka

    2015-04-28

    Sociodemographic differences in injury mortality are well-established, but population-level studies on social patterns of injury morbidity remain few in numbers, particularly among young adults. Yet injuries are the leading cause of mortality, morbidity and disability among young people. Studies among children have shown steep social gradients in severe injuries, but less is known on the social patterning of injuries in late adolescence and early adulthood, when young people are in the process of becoming independent adults. This study examines how young adults' current living arrangements, education, main economic activity, and parental social background are associated with hospital-treated injuries in late adolescence and early adulthood. The study uses prospective, individual-level data gathered from several administrative sources. From a representative 11% sample of the total Finnish population, we included young people between ages 17-29 years during the follow-up (N = 134,938). We used incidence rates and Cox proportional hazards models to study hospital-treated injuries and poisonings in 1998-2008. Higher rates of injury were found among young adults living alone, single mothers, the lower educated and the non-employed, as well as those with lower parental social background, experience of childhood family changes or living with a single parent, and those who had left the parental home at a young age. Injury risks were consistently higher among young adults with lower education, but current living arrangements and main economic activity showed some age-related nuances in the associations: both earlier and later than average transitions in education, employment, and family formation associated with increased injury risks. The social differentials were strongest in poisonings, intentional self-harm, and assaults, but social patterns were also found in falls, traffic-related injuries and other unintentional injuries, underlining the existence of multiple

  2. Overuse injuries in running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Rasmussen, Sten; Jørgensen, Jens Erik

    2016-01-01

    What is an overuse injury in running? This question is a corner stone of clinical documentation and research based evidence.......What is an overuse injury in running? This question is a corner stone of clinical documentation and research based evidence....

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work ... cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types of illnesses and disabilities Spinal cord injury Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a pediatric ... your health on a daily basis. Living with spinal cord injury — your questions answered top What are pediatric ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OTR/L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, ... the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  6. Taking back a little of what you have lost: the meaning of using an Environmental Control System (ECS) for people with high cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonck, Michele; Nolan, Maeve; Chard, Gill

    2017-09-22

    Assistive technologies have deep and personal meanings for people with disabilities. This study sought to provide an in-depth exploration of the subjective meaning of Environmental Control System (ECS) use for people with high cervical spinal cord injury. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was used to explore the personal meaning of ECS. In-depth interviews with five participants were analyzed according to recommended IPA guidelines to produce a rich phenomenological account of lived experience. This study identified two overarching themes, one of which was the subject of an earlier publication. This paper focuses on the second theme "taking back a little of what you have lost" and its two main components "reclaiming a little doing" and "feeling enabled". Doing everyday things, being less dependent on others and feeling safer and less needy all contributed to participants experience of regaining something important of what had been lost. A nuanced range of meanings, demonstrating how "a little can mean a lot" emerged from this study. For those with high cervical spinal cord injury, "reclaiming a little doing" resulted in subtle, but subjectively significant, improvements in identity, relationships and well-being, while "feeling enabled" was both enjoyable and empowering and led to an increased sense of safety and reduced neediness. The potentially powerful impact on individuals with life-altering injuries of reclaiming a little of what they had lost, supports the value of more widespread access to and provision of ECS. Implications for rehabilitation While ECS use produces only a "little" objective change in activity levels, it subjectively means "a lot" to people with high level injuries. ECS enable people to "do" everyday things as well help in supporting them to "feel" less dependent and needy. Using ECS facilitates much more than functional tasks and a sense of security. It helps promote positive self-perception and continuity of being. It is

  7. Effects of Incomplete Ionization on Ga2O3 Power Device: Unintentional Donor with Energy 110 meV (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0367 EFFECTS OF INCOMPLETE IONIZATION ON Β-Ga2O3 POWER DEVICE: UNINTENTIONAL DONOR WITH ENERGY 110 meV (PREPRINT...EFFECTS OF INCOMPLETE IONIZATION ON Β-Ga2O3 POWER DEVICE: UNINTENTIONAL DONOR WITH ENERGY 110 meV (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-11-D-5801...found to have a donor energy of 110 meV. The existence of the unintentional donor is confirmed by temperature dependent admittance spectroscopy

  8. Early Care and Education--What It Costs. Volume 2. Budget Series: Full-Day, Year-Round Early Childhood Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Care, Inc., 2007

    2007-01-01

    The research on early childhood education is clear: Programs must be of high quality to produce positive outcomes for children. This policy brief is the second in our series aimed at identifying the core components of successful early childhood programs and the costs associated with each component. In this case, we examine the costs of full-day,…

  9. Psychological morbidity and return to work after injury: multicentre cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Denise; Dhiman, Paula; Kellezi, Blerina; Coupland, Carol; Whitehead, Jessica; Beckett, Kate; Christie, Nicola; Sleney, Judith; Barnes, Jo; Joseph, Stephen; Morriss, Richard

    2017-08-01

    The benefits of work for physical, psychological, and financial wellbeing are well documented. Return to work (RTW) after unintentional injury is often delayed, and psychological morbidity may contribute to this delay. The impact of psychological morbidity on RTW after a wide range of unintentional injuries in the UK has not been adequately quantified. To quantify the role of psychological factors, including anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic distress, on RTW following unintentional injuries. A longitudinal multicentre prospective study was undertaken in Nottingham, Bristol, Leicester, and Guildford, UK. Participants ( n = 273) were 16-69-year-olds admitted to hospital following unintentional injury, who were in paid employment prior to injury. They were surveyed at baseline, then at 1, 2, 4, and 12 months following injury; demographic data were collected along with injury characteristics, psychological morbidity, and RTW status. Associations between demographic, injury and psychological factors, and RTW between 2 and 12 months after injury were quantified using random effects logistic regression. The odds of RTW between 2 and 12 months after injury reduced as depression scores early in the recovery period (1 month after injury) increased (odds ratio [OR] 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.79 to 0.95) and as length of hospital stay increased (OR 0.91, 95% CI] = 0.86 to 0.96). For those experiencing threatening life events following injury (OR 0.27, 95% CI = 0.10 to 0.72) and with higher scores on the Crisis Support Scale (OR 0.93, 95% CI] = 0.88 to 0.99), the odds of RTW between 2 and 12 months after injury were lower. Multiple imputation analysis found similar results, but those relating to crisis support did not remain statistically significant. Primary care professionals can identify patients at risk of delayed RTW who may benefit from management of psychological morbidity and support to RTW. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  10. Injurious falls and subsequent adverse drug events among elderly - a Swedish population-based matched case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rausch, C.; Laflamme, L.; de Rooij, S. E.; Bültmann, U.; Möller, J.

    2017-01-01

    Fall injuries are stressful and painful and they have a range of serious consequences for older people. While there is some clinical evidence of unintentional poisoning by medication following a severe fall injuries, population-based studies on that association are lacking. This is investigated in

  11. Injurious falls and subsequent adverse drug events among elderly - a Swedish population-based matched case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rausch, C; Laflamme, L; de Rooij, S E; Bültmann, U; Möller, J

    2017-01-01

    Background: Fall injuries are stressful and painful and they have a range of serious consequences for older people. While there is some clinical evidence of unintentional poisoning by medication following a severe fall injuries, population-based studies on that association are lacking. This is

  12. [Trend and current characteristics of road traffic injury in children based on data from the National Injury Surveillance System in China from 2006 to 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Pengpeng; Deng, Xiao; Gao, Xin; Wang, Yuan; Er, Yuliang; Ji, Cuirong; Jin, Ye; Yang, Chao; Duan, Leilei; Wang, Linhong

    2015-01-01

    To understand the trend and current characteristics of children engaged in road traffic injury. Data was from the Nation Injury Surveillance System (NISS) and the results of the study would provide basis for corresponding intervention strategies and decision-making. Descriptive analysis was applied to display the trend of child road traffic injury from 2006 and 2013 and also to depict the general information, injuries event and clinical characteristics of child road traffic injuries in 2013. The number of child road traffic injuries increased from 2006 to 2013 and ranking the second cause of child unintentional injuries during these years. However, the proportion of child road traffic injuries among child unintentional injuries decreased in the same period. In 2013, sex ratio appeared as 1.82, with 17- year-old age group accounting for 10.86% . Injuries caused by motor traffic vehicles accounted for 66.44% , with July/August, weekends and 17-18 PM as the peak period or time. Transportation related injuries accounted for 65.42% , with 73.53% as bruise. 33.81% of the injury involved in the head but 76.42% of injuries were minor, while 74.86% went home after the treatment. Child road traffic injury should not be ignored. Age and sex differences should be taken into account when carrying out education programs on child road traffic safety. Male students at senior high school or preschool were target groups when carrying out child road traffic injury intervention programs.

  13. Managing eye injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Mutie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on what you found during the eye examination, classify the injury as a non-mechanical injury (chemical or thermal injury, a non-globe injury (orbital or adnexal injury or as a mechanical globe injury. In the case of mechanical globe injuries, it is important to classify the injury according to the Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology System (BETTS and write it down in the patient’s notes; this will help to ensure that everyone involved in caring for the patient will have a consistent understanding of the type of injury. The resulting uniformity of terminology also helps with research, making it possible to compare data and do audits of injuries – which is essential for prevention.

  14. Firearm injuries in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Katherine A; Dahlberg, Linda L; Haileyesus, Tadesse; Annest, Joseph L

    2015-10-01

    This paper examines the epidemiology of fatal and nonfatal firearm violence in the United States. Trends over two decades in homicide, assault, self-directed and unintentional firearm injuries are described along with current demographic characteristics of victimization and health impact. Fatal firearm injury data were obtained from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS). Nonfatal firearm injury data were obtained from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). Trends were tested using Joinpoint regression analyses. CDC Cost of Injury modules were used to estimate costs associated with firearm deaths and injuries. More than 32,000 persons die and over 67,000 persons are injured by firearms each year. Case fatality rates are highest for self-harm related firearm injuries, followed by assault-related injuries. Males, racial/ethnic minority populations, and young Americans (with the exception of firearm suicide) are disproportionately affected. The severity of such injuries is distributed relatively evenly across outcomes from outpatient treatment to hospitalization to death. Firearm injuries result in over $48 billion in medical and work loss costs annually, particularly fatal firearm injuries. From 1993 to 1999, rates of firearm violence declined significantly. Declines were seen in both fatal and nonfatal firearm violence and across all types of intent. While unintentional firearm deaths continued to decline from 2000 to 2012, firearm suicides increased and nonfatal firearm assaults increased to their highest level since 1995. Firearm injuries are an important public health problem in the United States, contributing substantially each year to premature death, illness, and disability. Understanding the nature and impact of the problem is only a first step toward preventing firearm violence. A science-driven approach to understand risk and protective factors and identify effective solutions is key to achieving measurable reductions in firearm

  15. What should an ideal spinal injury classification system consist of? A methodological review and conceptual proposal for future classifications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middendorp, J.J. van; Audige, L.; Hanson, B.; Chapman, J.R.; Hosman, A.J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Since Bohler published the first categorization of spinal injuries based on plain radiographic examinations in 1929, numerous classifications have been proposed. Despite all these efforts, however, only a few have been tested for reliability and validity. This methodological, conceptual review

  16. Factors associated with state variations in homicide, suicide, and unintentional firearm deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James H; Thompson, Amy J; Dake, Joseph A

    2004-08-01

    This study examined the relationship of 16 variables with homicide, suicide, and unintentional firearm deaths. This cross-sectional analysis, using adjusted partial correlation coefficients, found that state-level firearm homicide rates significantly varied by the prevalence of firearms and by percent of the population which was African American. Whereas, state-level variations in firearm suicide mortality significantly varied by firearm prevalence, per capita alcohol consumption, percent of the population which was African American, and level of urbanization. None of the variables were significantly (p < or = .05) related to state-level variations in unintentional firearm mortality. Furthermore, state gun laws had only a limited effect on firearm-related homicide deaths. Although the current study cannot determine causation, firearm mortality in its various forms is most commonly related to the prevalence of firearms and the percent of the population that is African American.

  17. New onset epilepsy following unintentional durotomy in a patient on anti-psychiatric medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    West M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We would like to present a rare case report describing a case in which new-onset tonic-clonic seizures occurred following an unintentional durotomy during lumbar discectomy and decompression. Unintentional durotomy is a frequent complication of spinal surgical procedures, with a rate as high as 17%. To our knowledge a case of new onset epilepsy has never been reported in the literature. Although dural tears during surgery and CSF hypovolaemia are thought to be the main contributing factors, one postulates on the effects of anti-psychiatric medication with epileptogenic properties. Amisulpride and Olanzapine can lower seizure threshold and should be used with caution in patients previously diagnosed with epilepsy. However manufacturers do not state that in cases where the seizure threshold is already lowered by CSF hypotension, new onset epilepsy might be commoner. Finally, strong caution and aggressive post-operative monitoring is advised for patients with CSF hypotension in combination with possible epileptogenic medication.

  18. Unintentional dural puncture with a Tuohy needle increases risk of chronic headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Christopher Allen-John; Weyker, Paul David; Zhang, Li; Stanley, Susan; Coyle, D Tyler; Tang, Timothy; Smiley, Richard M; Flood, Pamela

    2012-07-01

    Neuraxial analgesia is chosen by almost half of women who give birth in the United States. Unintentional dural puncture is the most common complication of this pain management technique, occurring in 0.4% to 6% of parturients. Severe positional headaches develop acutely in 70% to 80% of these parturients. Acute postdural puncture headaches are well known, but few studies have investigated long-term sequelae. We investigated the incidence of and risk factors for chronic headache and chronic back pain in parturients who experienced unintentional dural puncture with a 17-gauge Tuohy needle compared with matched controls. In a case control design, 40 parturients who sustained unintentional dural puncture with a 17-gauge Tuohy needle over an 18-month period and 40 controls matched for age, weight, and time of delivery were recruited by telephone and 2 validated questionnaires were administered assessing headache and back pain symptoms 12 to 24 months after delivery. The incidence of chronic headaches in the study group (28%) was significantly higher than in the matched controls (5%) (OR = 7, P = 0.0129). Subjects who experienced dural punctures were more likely than controls to report chronic back pain (OR = 4, P = 0.0250), but treatment with an epidural blood patch was not a risk factor for chronic back pain. Patients who incur unintentional dural punctures with large-gauge needles are surprisingly likely to continue to suffer chronic headaches. Treatment with an epidural blood patch does not enhance the risk of chronic back pain. The pathophysiology underlying these symptoms and the best treatment for this syndrome are not known.

  19. Cognitive aging and the distinction between intentional and unintentional mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seli, Paul; Maillet, David; Smilek, Daniel; Oakman, Jonathan M; Schacter, Daniel L

    2017-06-01

    A growing number of studies have reported age-related reductions in the frequency of mind wandering. Here, at both the trait (Study 1) and state (Study 2) levels, we reexamined this association while distinguishing between intentional (deliberate) and unintentional (spontaneous) mind wandering. Based on research demonstrating age-accompanied deficits in executive functioning, we expected to observe increases in unintentional mind wandering with increasing age. Moreover, because aging is associated with increased task motivation, we reasoned that older adults might be more engaged in their tasks, and hence, show a more pronounced decline in intentional mind wandering relative to young adults. In both studies, we found that older adults did indeed report lower rates of intentional mind wandering compared with young adults. However, contrary to our expectations, we also found that older adults reported lower rates of unintentional mind wandering (Studies 1 and 2). We discuss the implications of these findings for theories of age-related declines in mind wandering. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Retrospective evaluation of healing of periapical lesions after unintentional extrusion of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiriz, Levent; Hazar Bodrumlu, Ebru

    2017-11-10

    During the apexification procedure for teeth with open apices, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) may be unintentionally extruded. The aim of the present study was the retrospective evaluation of the healing of periapical lesions in permanent incisor teeth with open apices after the unintentional extrusion of MTA. The clinical and radiographic records of 55 maxillary permanent central teeth treated by MTA apexification were evaluated. Filled teeth with unintentionally extruded MTA were selected as group 1 (n = 21), whereas the teeth with no MTA extrusion were selected as group 2 (n = 34). For each tooth, the clinical and radiographic records from a 3-year follow-up were investigated. Complete healing (CH) was observed in 19 teeth (90.4%) in group 1, whereas the same type of healing was observed in all 34 teeth (100%) in group 2 (p>0.05). At the 6-month follow-up appointment, 25 teeth (73.5%) showed CH in group 2, whereas 15 teeth (71.4%) showed CH at the 1-year follow-up in group 1 (pMTA extrusion was reduced in 17 teeth (85%) (pMTA does not prevent the healing of periapical lesions, but may be a delaying factor for periapical healing.

  1. Eradicated unintentional incorporated donor-type impurities of ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiuhua; Li, Binghui; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Shen, Dezhen

    2018-03-01

    Impurity control is essential for semiconductor doping. Through the systematic analysis of pollution sources, we determined that the residual electrons of as-grown unintentional doped zinc oxide (ZnO) films were derived from the unintentional incorporation of silicon, which grown by molecular beam epitaxy. At the same time, it was determined that unforeseen donor-type impurities (boron, carbon, chlorine and fluorine) were introduced during the nitrogen doping process. By subjecting the sources of the contamination to a surface passivation process, these donor-type impurities are controlled at a tolerable level. The residual electrons concentration of the unintentional doped ZnO film was lowered to 1 × 1015 cm-3, and the mobility was 155 cm2/V.s. Nitrogen-doped ZnO films exhibited p-type conductivity, with a hole concentration of 2 × 1016 cm-3 and a mobility of 10 cm2/V.s. Our results provide a pure foundation for further research on p-type doping of ZnO.

  2. Benzodiazepines: a major component in unintentional prescription drug overdoses with opioid analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jann, Michael; Kennedy, William Klugh; Lopez, Gaylord

    2014-02-01

    The misuse and abuse of prescription medications in the United States continues to increase despite interventions by health care professionals, regulatory, and law enforcement agencies. Opioid analgesics are the leading class of prescription drugs that have caused unintentional overdose deaths. Benzodiazepines when taken alone are relatively safe agents in overdose. However, a 5-fold increase in deaths attributed to benzodiazepines occurred from 1999 to 2009. Emergency department visits related to opioid analgesics increased by 111% followed by benzodiazepines 89%. During 2003 to 2009, the 2 prescriptions drugs with the highest increase in death rates were oxycodone 264.6% and alprazolam 233.8%. Therefore, benzodiazepines have a significant impact on prescription drug unintentional overdoses second only to the opioid analgesics. The combination prescribing of benzodiazepines and opioid analgesics commonly takes place. The pharmacokinetic drug interactions between benzodiazepines and opioid analgesics are complex. The pharmacodynamic actions of these agents differ as their combined effects produce significant respiratory depression. Physician and pharmacy shopping by patients occurs, and prescription drug-monitoring programs can provide important information on benzodiazepine and opioid analgesic prescribing patterns and patient usage. Health care professionals need to inform patients and work closely with regulatory agencies and legislatures to stem the increasing fatalities from prescription drug unintentional overdoses.

  3. Preventing gun injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossen, Eric J; Lewis, Brenna; Hoffman, Benjamin D

    2015-02-01

    Firearms are involved in the injury and death of a large number of children each year from both intentional and unintentional causes. Gun ownership in homes with children is common, and pediatricians should incorporate evidence-based means to discuss firearms and protect children from gun-related injuries and violence. Safe storage of guns, including unloaded guns locked and stored separately from ammunition, can decrease risks to children, and effective tools are available that pediatricians can use in clinical settings to help decrease children's access to firearms. Furthermore, several community-based interventions led by pediatricians have effectively reduced firearm-related injury risks to children. Educational programs that focus on children's behavior around guns have not proven effective. © American Academy of Pediatrics, 2015. All rights reserved.

  4. Application of highly silicon-doped marker layers in the investigation of unintentional doping in GaN on sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    To provide a route to the assessment of the impact of inclined facets on unintentional n-type doping during the growth of c-plane GaN on sapphire, thin (100 nm), highly Si-doped (at 10 19 cm -3 ) marker layers have been incorporated into a GaN epitaxial layer grown by a method involving a transition from initial three-dimensional island growth to later, two-dimensional, planar growth. Imaging of the completed epitaxial layer in cross-section by scanning capacitance microscopy reveals the shapes of the islands, which were present during the early stages of growth and the relationship between the facets present and the incorporation of unintentional dopants. The results show that unintentional dopants are mostly incorporated on facets inclined to the [0 0 0 1] direction, and suggest that gaseous impurities present in the MOVPE reactor are one source of dopant species. -- Research highlights: →Scanning capacitance microscopy has been used to study unintentional doping in GaN epilayers. →Highly doped marker layers provide the means to track the growth and coalescence of the islands, which form the epilayer, and how this relates to the incorporation of unintentional dopants. →The results suggest that the presence of facets inclined to (0 0 0 1) is important in the incorporation of unintentional dopants.

  5. Working hours associated with unintentional sleep at work among airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marqueze, Elaine Cristina; Nicola, Ana Carolina B; Diniz, Dag Hammarskjoeld M D; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2017-06-26

    Tto identify factors associated with unintentional sleep at work of airline pilots. This is a cross-sectional epidemiological study conducted with 1,235 Brazilian airline pilots, who work national or international flights. Data collection has been performed online. We carried out a bivariate and multiple logistic regression analysis, having as dependent variable unintentional sleep at work. The independent variables were related to biodemographic data, characteristics of the work, lifestyle, and aspects of sleep. The prevalence of unintentional sleep while flying the airplane was 57.8%. The factors associated with unintentional sleep at work were: flying for more than 65 hours a month, frequent technical delays, greater need for recovery after work, work ability below optimal, insufficient sleep, and excessive sleepiness. The occurrence of unintentional sleep at work of airline pilots is associated with factors related to the organization of the work and health. Identificar fatores associados aos cochilos não intencionais durante as jornadas de trabalho de pilotos da aviação regular. Estudo epidemiológico transversal conduzido com 1.235 pilotos brasileiros de avião do transporte aéreo regular, que realizavam voos nacionais ou internacionais, sendo a coleta de dados realizada on-line. Foi realizada análise de regressão logística bivariada e múltipla, tendo como variável dependente o cochilo não intencional durante o horário de trabalho. As variáveis independentes foram relacionadas a dados biodemográficos, características do trabalho, estilo de vida e aspectos do sono. A prevalência do cochilo não intencional enquanto pilotava o avião foi de 57,8%. Os fatores associados ao cochilo não intencional foram: voar por mais de 65 horas por mês, atrasos técnicos frequentes, maior necessidade de recuperação após o trabalho, capacidade para o trabalho inferior à ótima, sono insuficiente e sonolência excessiva. A ocorrência do cochilo n

  6. Staff-reported antecedents to aggression in a post-acute brain injury treatment programme: What are they and what implications do they have for treatment?

    OpenAIRE

    Giles, Gordon Muir; Scott, Karen; Manchester, David

    2013-01-01

    Research in psychiatric settings has found that staff attribute the majority of inpatient aggression to immediate environmental stressors. We sought to determine if staff working with persons with brain injury-related severe and chronic impairment make similar causal attributions. If immediate environmental stressors precipitate the majority of aggressive incidents in this client group, it is possible an increased focus on the management of factors that initiate client aggression may be helpf...

  7. Risk and prognostic factors of inpatient mortality associated with unintentional insecticide and herbicide poisonings: a retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Chien Chien

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pesticide poisoning is an important public health problem worldwide. The study aimed to determine the risk of all-cause and cause-specific inpatient mortality and to identify prognostic factors for inpatient mortality associated with unintentional insecticide and herbicide pesticide poisonings. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 3,986 inpatients recruited at hospitalization between 1999 and 2008 in Taiwan. We used the International Classification of Disease, 9th ed., Clinical Modification external causes of injury codes to classify poisoning agents into accidental poisoning by insecticides and herbicides. Comparisons in mortality rates were made between insecticide poisoning patients and herbicide poisoning patients by using the Cox proportional hazards models to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs. RESULTS: There were 168 deaths during 21,583 person-days of follow-up evaluation (7.8 per 1,000 person-days. The major causes of mortality for insecticide poisonings were the toxic effect of organophosphate and coma, and the major causes of mortality for herbicide poisonings were the toxic effect of other pesticides and the toxic effect of organophosphate. The mortality for herbicide exposure was fourfold higher than that for insecticide exposure. The factors associated with inpatient mortality were herbicide poisonings (HR = 4.58, 95% CI 3.29 to 6.37 and receiving mechanical ventilation treatment (HR = 3.85, 95% CI 2.73 to 5.42. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that herbicides stand out as the dominant agent for poisoning-related fatalities. The control of and limiting access to herbicide agents and developing appropriate therapeutic regimens, including emergency care, should be priorities.

  8. What Is a Pediatric Neurosurgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Neurosurgeon? Page Content Article Body If your child ... childhood and adolescence. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Neurosurgeons Have? Pediatric neurosurgeons are medical doctors who ...

  9. Childhood fatalities in new Mexico: medical examiner-investigated cases, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, Sarah L

    2013-05-01

    To better understand risk factors and populations at risk of childhood fatalities, a review of all records of childhood deaths (≤19 years) between 2000 and 2010 from New Mexico's statewide medical examiner was conducted. Annually, 313-383 childhood deaths were investigated (3820 total). Males and American Indians were overrepresented (62% and 20.4% of deaths, respectively). The most common manner of death was natural (44.8%), followed by accidental (31.4%), homicide (8.8%), suicide (8.8%), and undetermined (4.1%). Infants under 1 year of age accounted for 41.4% of deaths. Motor vehicle crashes were responsible for the majority of accidental deaths (69%), followed by unintentional overdoses (6.9%), and drowning (5.3%). Gunshot wounds, either intentional or unintentional, caused 10.7% of childhood deaths. Complete medico-legal investigation of childhood fatalities is needed to provide public health agencies with adequate data to evaluate and prevent childhood deaths. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Identifying the factors and root causes associated with the unintentional usage of an adrenaline auto-injector in Japanese children and their caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kemal; Nakagawa, Tomoko; Sugiura, Shiro; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Ito, Komei

    2018-03-05

    The unintentional usage of adrenaline auto-injectors may cause injury to caregivers or patients. To prevent such incidents, we assessed the causative factors of these incidents. The Anaphylaxis Working Group of the Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology requested that society members register cases in which adrenaline auto-injectors were unintentionally used. One hundred cases were reported from June 2015 to March 2016. We identified the root causes of 70 child and 25 adult cases, separately. The incidents occurred with repeated prescriptions as well as the first prescription. Three cases resulted in a failure to administer an adrenaline auto-injector to children with anaphylaxis. Four caregivers used it with improper application (epilepsy or enteritis). Among the child cases, the median age at the time of the incident was 5.5 years (range, 2-14 years). Five children injected the adrenaline auto-injector on their own body trunk. Twenty children were not the allergic patients themselves. Improper management protocol of the device and the child's development were concomitantly involved in most of the cases. A variety of human behaviors were identified as the root causes in the adult cases. At least 34 cases were associated with mix-ups between the actual and training device. Health workers should provide sufficient education regarding safety use of adrenaline auto-injector for caregivers tailored to their experience levels at both first and repeated prescriptions. Such education must cover anticipatory behavior based on normal child development. Devices should also be further improved to prevent such incidents. Copyright © 2018 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Child injury surveillance capabilities in NSW: informing policy and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Mitchell

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Injury is one of the most common reasons why a child is hospitalised. Information gained from injury surveillance activities provides an estimate of the injury burden, describes injury event circumstances, can be used to monitor injury trends over time, and is used to design and evaluate injury prevention activities. This perspective article provides an overview of child injury surveillance capabilities within New South Wales (NSW, Australia, following a stocktake of population-based injury-related data collections using the Evaluation Framework for Injury Surveillance Systems. Information about childhood injury in NSW is obtained from multiple administrative data collections that were not specifically designed to conduct injury surveillance. Obtaining good information for child injury surveillance in NSW will involve better coordination of information from agencies that record information about childhood injury. Regular reporting about childhood injury to provide a comprehensive profile of injuries of children and young people in the state should be considered, along with the provision and/or linkage of child injury information from multiple data collections. This could support the development of a suite of injury performance indicators to monitor childhood injury reduction strategies across NSW.

  12. Deaths and hospital admissions as a result of home injuries among young and middle-aged New Zealand adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, Bridget; Chelimo, Carol; Robinson, Elizabeth; Ameratunga, Shanthi

    2011-12-16

    New Zealand lacks a comprehensive national profile of home injuries, this information is necessary to develop effective targeted injury prevention initiatives. This study describes the epidemiology of unintentional home injuries resulting in death or admission to hospital among young and middle-age New Zealanders. Cases were selected from Ministry of Health public hospital discharge (2000-2009) and mortality data (1998-2007), and included all 20-64 year olds where the place of injury occurrence was classified as 'home'. Only initial hospitalisations with a stay of 24 hours or longer were included. The circumstances of injury were coded according to the ICD-10 external cause categories. Mean annual rates of death or hospitalisation were calculated using census and intercensal denominator data. On average 4000 young and middle-age adults are admitted to hospital and 60 die annually as a result of unintentional injuries sustained at home. Overall, mortality rates were highest amongst males, older adults (50 to 64 years), and Māori. The leading causes of unintentional home injury deaths were poisoning, falls, and burns. Hospitalisation rates were highest among males, the older age groups (> 40 years), and Maori. As age increased so did the incidence of hospital admission. The leading contributors resulting in admission to hospital were falls, cutting or piercing, overexertion, and poisoning. Injuries due to falls had the highest median length of hospital stay and in-hospital mortality rate. As deprivation increased so did the frequency of hospital admissions due to fall and cutting or piercing injuries. Poisonings and falls are the leading causes of unintentional home injury death among young and middle-aged New Zealanders. In addition, falls are a significant contributor to home injury resulting in admission to hospital. The large numbers of home injuries occurring each year in New Zealand, mean that even moderately successful injury prevention interventions could

  13. Childhood height, adult height, and the risk of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Lise Geisler; Aarestrup, Julie; Gamborg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: We previously showed that childhood height is positively associated with prostate cancer risk. It is, however, unknown whether childhood height exerts its effects independently of or through adult height. We investigated whether and to what extent childhood height has a direct effect on ...

  14. Injury-related visits and comorbid conditions among homeless persons presenting to emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammig, Bart; Jozkowski, Kristen; Jones, Ches

    2014-04-01

    The authors examined the clinical characteristics of homeless patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs) in the United States, with a focus on unintentional and intentional injury events and related comorbid conditions. The study included a nationally representative sample of patients presenting to EDs with data obtained from the 2007 through 2010 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). Descriptive and analytical epidemiologic analyses were employed to examine injuries among homeless patients. Homeless persons made 603,000 visits annually to EDs, 55% of which were for injuries, with the majority related to unintentional (52%) and self-inflicted (23%) injuries. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that homeless patients had a higher odds of presenting with injuries related to unintentional (odds ratio [OR]=1.4. 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.1 to 1.9), self-inflicted (OR=6.0, 95% CI=3.7 to 9.5), and assault (OR=3.0, 95% CI=1.5 to 5.9) injuries. A better understanding of the injuries affecting homeless populations may provide medical and public health professionals insight into more effective ways to intervene and limit further morbidity and mortality related to specific injury outcomes. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  15. Worldwide Prevalence and Trends in Unintentional Drug Overdose: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Silvia S; Sampson, Laura; Cerdá, Magdalena; Galea, Sandro

    2015-11-01

    Drug overdose is an important, yet an inadequately understood, public health problem. Global attention to unintentional drug overdose has been limited by comparison with the scope of the problem. There has been a substantial increase in drug overdose incidence and prevalence in several countries worldwide over the past decade, contributing to both increased costs and mortality. The aim of this study was to systematically synthesize the peer-reviewed literature to document the global epidemiological profile of unintentional drug overdoses and the prevalence, time trends, mortality rates, and correlates of drug overdoses. We searched different combinations of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms in PubMed for articles published from 1980 until July 2013, and we organized these results in tabular spreadsheets and compared them. We restricted the search to English-language articles that deal with unintentional overdose, focusing on 1 or more of the following key constructs: prevalence, time trends, mortality rates, and correlates. The term "overdose" as a MeSH major topic yielded 1076 publications. In addition, we searched the following combinations of nonmajor MeSH terms: "street drugs" and "overdose" yielded 180, "death" and "overdose" yielded 114, and "poisoning" and "drug users" yielded 17. There was some overlap among the searches. Based on the search and inclusion and exclusion criteria, we selected a total of 169 relevant articles for this article based on a close review of abstracts. We found wide variability in lifetime prevalence of experiencing a nonfatal overdose or witnessing an overdose, and in mortality rates attributable to overdose. Lifetime prevalence of witnessed overdose among drug users (n = 17 samples) ranged from 50% to 96%, with a mean of 73.3%, a median of 70%, and a standard deviation of 14.1%. Lifetime prevalence of drug users personally experiencing a nonfatal overdose (n = 27 samples), ranged from 16.6% to 68.0% with a mean of 45

  16. Source, Managemnt and Quantification of Unintentional POPs (PCDDD/Fs) in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charitra Sah, Ram

    2010-05-01

    The aim to prepare and present this paper is to highlight the source, management and quantification of the unintentional POPs in an unindustrialized least developing landlocked small country Nepal. The methodology adopted for this is the review of the relevant research documents and national initiative towards addressing this issues complemented with sharing of the first hand experience from the implementation of the POPs management activities undertaken by our organization. Nepal is a small country of size 147181 sq.km but having large sources of POPs including unintentional POPs (PCDD/Fs) mainly because of weak enforcement of the existing environment related laws, standards and international commitment including POPs Convention. Country became homes to about 75 tons of Obsolete Pesticide since last 30 years including about 44 percent (33 tons out of 75) are of known POPs. These obsolete pesticides including identified POPs have been poorly stored in some about 25 locations throughout the country. The major warehouse accommodating about 50 tons at Amlekhgunj has been located just in front of a high school where about 1000 children are being studying and found to have some health related problem due to the gasses emission from the warehouse as well as school playground field contaminated with these POPs pesticides. The playground soil contamination has been found from routine examination of the soil samples. In addition to pesticides including POPs were used in the agriculture and public health field in the past, there are several other practices as well as anthropogenic activities producing PCDD/Fs. The annual inventory of countrywide emission of unintentional POPs was estimated to be 312.55 g TEQ for Nepal (MOE 2004). This is very high for a country like Nepal least developing in terms of industrial and economy. This estimation was based on the UNEP Toolkit which has included the broad categories of waste such as waste incineration, ferrous and non ferrous metal

  17. Staff-reported antecedents to aggression in a post-acute brain injury treatment programme: what are they and what implications do they have for treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Gordon Muir; Scott, Karen; Manchester, David

    2013-01-01

    Research in psychiatric settings has found that staff attribute the majority of in-patient aggression to immediate environmental stressors. We sought to determine if staff working with persons with brain injury-related severe and chronic impairment make similar causal attributions. If immediate environmental stressors precipitate the majority of aggressive incidents in this client group, it is possible an increased focus on the management of factors that initiate client aggression may be helpful. The research was conducted in a low-demand treatment programme for individuals with chronic cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury. Over a six-week period, 63 staff and a research assistant reported on 508 aggressive incidents. Staff views as to the causes of client aggression were elicited within 72 hours of observing an aggressive incident. Staff descriptions of causes were categorised using qualitative methods and analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Aggression towards staff was predominantly preceded by (a) actions that interrupted or redirected a client behaviour, (b) an activity demand, or (c) a physical intrusion. The majority of aggressive incidents appeared hostile/angry in nature and were not considered by staff to be pre-meditated. Common treatment approaches can be usefully augmented by a renewed focus on interventions aimed at reducing antecedents that provoke aggression. Possible approaches for achieving this are considered.

  18. The Hidden Tragedy of Rivers: A Decade of Unintentional Fatal Drowning in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E Peden

    Full Text Available Describe unintentional drowning deaths in rivers, creeks and streams (rivers in Australia and identify risk factors to inform prevention.This study is a cross-sectional, total population audit of all unintentional fatal drownings in Australian rivers between 1-July-2002 and 30-June-2012 using Australian coronial data. A modified Bonferroni test has been applied, deeming statistical significance p<0.03 and p<0.04 respectively.Rivers (n = 770; 26.6% were the leading location among the 2,892 people who died from unintentional fatal drowning. This is a rate of 0.37/100,000 people / annum. Within river drowning deaths common groups include; males (80.4%, adults (85.3%, adults who have consumed alcohol (25.5%, people who fell in (21.3%, people involved in non-aquatic transport incidents (18.2% and locals (74.0%. Children were 1.75 times more likely than adults (p<0.04 to drown in rivers as a result of a fall and adults 1.50 times more likely to drown in rivers as a result of watercraft incidents when compared to children. When compared to males, females were 2.27 and 4.45 times respectively more likely to drown in rivers as a result of incidents involving non-aquatic transport (p<0.04 and being swept away by floodwaters (p<0.04. Males were 2.66 and 4.27 times respectively more likely to drown in rivers as a result of watercraft incidents (p<0.04 and as a result of jumping in (p<0.04 when compared to females.While rivers are the leading location for drowning in Australia, little is understood about the risks. This study has identified key groups (males, adults, locals and activities. While males were more likely to drown, the risk profile for females differed.

  19. [Economic crisis, poverty and childhood. What are the expected short- and long-term effects for the "children of the crisis"? SESPAS report 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Manuel; García-Gómez, Pilar; Zunzunegui, María-Victoria

    2014-06-01

    The way a person will develop over the lifespan is largely determined by the first few years of life. A substantial share of the inequalities in health and socioeconomic status observed in adult life originate during childhood (and even while in utero). In this paper, we first review the literature on the impact of childhood conditions throughout the life cycle. We next discuss some of the social and biological mechanisms behind the transmission of the effects of poverty during the prenatal period, childhood, and adulthood. We then analyze several international experiences aimed at reducing intergenerational transmission of poverty. The article ends with some critical thoughts and policy recommendations to avoid the possible long-term effects of the current crisis on the health and socioeconomic status of the "children of the crisis" in Spain. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. The association between pediatric injury risks and parenting behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaques, M L; Weaver, T L; Weaver, N L; Willoughby, L

    2018-03-01

    Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death in children ages 1-18 years. Many of these injuries to young children occur in their own homes. Although research has explored injury risk prevention strategies, historically, much of this research has focused on environmental changes and teaching safety practices. Currently, there appears to be a gap in current research exploring how parenting influences children's risk of injury. Mothers (n = 119) of children 5 years and younger were recruited from a paediatric clinic as a part of a larger study and completed measures of parenting challenges, developmentally sensitive parenting, child neglect, parental efficacy, and risk of potential injury situations. Hierarchical logistic regression was used to explore the extent to which developmentally insensitive parenting behaviours put parents at higher risk for behaviours that lead to unintentional injury in children and whether developmentally sensitive parenting behaviours protects children from injury. The association between demographic characteristics and injury risk behaviours was also examined. Parents who reported more frequent insensitive parenting behaviours (i.e., yelling, spanking, and putting child in time out) were more likely to report putting their child in an incorrect car seat or taking their child out of a car seat while the car is still moving. In addition, younger parents were at greater risk of storing cleaners and medications unsafely. Results from this study highlight the importance of supporting younger mothers and educating parents on effective parenting strategies when trying to prevent unintentional injury risks. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. What is the best internal fixation in pelvic fracture models with open-book injury and anterior sacroiliac joint disruption?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail H. Dilogo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The best operative management for open-book pelvic injury with anterior sacroiliac disruption (OTA/AO B1.1 classification is still debated. This biomechanical study aimed to find the best internal fixation technique for such injury. Methods: Open-book injury with anterior sacroiliac joint disruption was simulated on 25 artificial pelvic bones. Twenty five artificial pelvic bones were divided into 5 groups (n=5 /group and fixated with five different fixation techniques: 1. 1SP+1IS; 2. 2SP; 3. 2SP+2SIP; 4. 1SP+2IS S1, and 5. 1SP+1IS S1+S2. Biomechanical properties of each fixation technique were assessed using Tensilon® RTF-1310 to measure the resistance to translation and load to failure. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Bonferroni test.Results: The highest mean load to failure of axial forces (1490.36 N was achieved by the fixation technique using one symphyseal plate and two iliosacral screws located at S1 dan S2. The addition of one iliosacral screw significantly increased the mean load to failure for axial compression (p<0.05.Conclusion: The addition of sacroiliac joint posterior fixation, either with plate or screw, will increase the fixation biomechanical strength. Single symphyseal plate and two iliosacral screws on S1 and S2 provided the best mechanical resistance to axial loading. Thus, it can be concluded that such fixation technique is best for open-book pelvic injury with anterior sacroiliac disruption.

  2. Medial joint line bone bruising at MRI complicating acute ankle inversion injury: What is its clinical significance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, V.O.; Moran, D.E.; Shine, S.; Eustace, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the incidence and clinical significance of medial joint line bone bruising following acute ankle inversion injury. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients who underwent ankle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 2 weeks of acute ankle inversion injury were included in this prospective study. Integrity of the lateral collateral ligament complex, presence of medial joint line bone bruising, tibio-talar joint effusion, and soft-tissue swelling were documented. Clinical follow-up at 6 months was carried out to determine the impact of injury on length of time out of work, delay in return to normal walking, delay in return to sports activity, and persistence of medial joint line pain. Results: Thirty-seven patients had tears of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL). Twenty-six patients had medial joint line bone bruising with altered marrow signal at the medial aspect of the talus and congruent surface of the medial malleolus. A complete ATFL tear was seen in 92% of the patients with medial joint line bone bruising (p = 0.05). Patients with an ATFL tear and medial joint line bone bruising had a longer delay in return to normal walking (p = 0.0002), longer delay in return to sports activity (p = 0.0001), and persistent medial joint line pain (p = 0.0003). There was no statistically significant difference in outcome for the eight patients without ATFL tears. Conclusion: Medial joint line bone bruising following an acute ankle inversion injury was significantly associated with a complete ATFL tear, longer delay in the return to normal walking and sports activity, as well as persistent medial joint line pain. Its presence should prompt detailed assessment of the lateral collateral ligament complex, particularly the ATFL

  3. Factors affecting increased risk for substance use disorders following traumatic brain injury: What we can learn from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Steven F; Cannella, Lee Anne; Razmpour, Roshanak; Lutton, Evan; Raghupathi, Ramesh; Rawls, Scott M; Ramirez, Servio H

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have helped identify multiple factors affecting increased risk for substance use disorders (SUDs) following traumatic brain injury (TBI). These factors include age at the time of injury, repetitive injury and TBI severity, neurocircuits, neurotransmitter systems, neuroinflammation, and sex differences. This review will address each of these factors by discussing 1) the clinical and preclinical data identifying patient populations at greatest risk for SUDs post-TBI, 2) TBI-related neuropathology in discrete brain regions heavily implicated in SUDs, and 3) the effects of TBI on molecular mechanisms that may drive substance abuse behavior, like dopaminergic and glutamatergic transmission or neuroimmune signaling in mesolimbic regions of the brain. Although these studies have laid the groundwork for identifying factors that affect risk of SUDs post-TBI, additional studies are required. Notably, preclinical models have been shown to recapitulate many of the behavioral, cellular, and neurochemical features of SUDs and TBI. Therefore, these models are well suited for answering important questions that remain in future investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Making waves in the brain: What are oscillations, and why modulating them makes sense for brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr ePevzner

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI can result in persistent cognitive, behavioral and emotional deficits. However, the vast majority of patients are not chronically hospitalized; rather they have to manage their disabilities once they are discharged to home. Promoting recovery to pre-injury level is important from a patient care as well as a societal perspective. Electrical neuromodulation is one approach that has shown promise in alleviating symptoms associated with neurological disorders such as in Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy. Consistent with this perspective, both animal and clinical studies have revealed that TBI alters physiological oscillatory rhythms. More recently several studies demonstrated that low frequency stimulation improves cognitive outcome in models of TBI. Specifically, stimulation of the septohippocampal circuit in the theta frequency entrained oscillations and improved spatial learning following traumatic brain injury. In order to evaluate the potential of electrical deep brain stimulation for clinical translation we review the basic neurophysiology of oscillations, their role in cognition and how they are changed post-TBI. Furthermore, we highlight several factors for future pre-clinical and clinical studies to consider, with the hope that it will promote a hypothesis driven approach to subsequent experimental designs and ultimately successful translation to improve outcome in patients with TBI.

  5. Mechanisms of injuries in World Cup Snowboard Cross: a systematic video analysis of 19 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Arnhild; Bere, Tone; Bahr, Roald; Kristianslund, Eirik; Nordsletten, Lars

    2011-12-01

    Snowboard cross (SBX) became an official Olympic sport in 2006. This discipline includes manoeuvring several obstacles while competing in heats. It is common for the riders to collide, making this sport both exciting and at risk of injuries. Although a recent study from the 2010 Olympic Games has shown that the injury risk was high, little is known about the injury mechanisms. To qualitatively describe the injury situation and mechanism of injuries in World Cup Snowboard Cross. Descriptive video analysis. Nineteen video recordings of SBX injuries reported through the International Ski Federation Injury Surveillance System for four World Cup seasons (2006 to 2010) were obtained. Five experts in the field of sports medicine, snowboard and biomechanics performed analyses of each case to describe the injury mechanism in detail (riding situation and rider behaviour). Injuries occurred at jumping (n=13), bank turning (n=5) or rollers (n=1). The primary cause of the injuries was a technical error at take-off resulting in a too high jump and subsequent flat-landing. The rider was then unable to recover leading to fall at the time of injury. Injuries at bank turn was characterised by a pattern where the rider in a balanced position lost control due to unintentional contact with another rider. Jumping appeared to be the most challenging obstacle in SBX, where a technical error at take-off was the primary cause of the injuries. The second most common inciting event was unintentional board contact between riders at bank turning.

  6. Missed Opportunities to Keep Children Safe? National Survey of Injury Prevention Activities of Children's Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael Craig; Mulvaney, Caroline; Timblin, Clare; Stewart, Jane; Coupland, Carol A.; Deave, Toity; Hayes, Mike; Kendrick, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the activities undertaken by children's centres to prevent unintentional injuries in the under-fives and, in particular, the prevention of falls, poisoning and scalds. Design: A questionnaire was posted to managers of 851 children's centres, using stratified cluster sampling. The questionnaire included questions on injury…

  7. Unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning hospitalization and emergency department counts and rates by county, year, and fire-relatedness among California residents,2000-2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This dataset contains case counts, rates, and confidence intervals of unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning (CO) inpatient hospitalizations and emergency...

  8. Sleep, Sleep Disorders, and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. What We Know and What We Need to Know: Findings from a National Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickwire, Emerson M; Williams, Scott G; Roth, Thomas; Capaldi, Vincent F; Jaffe, Michael; Moline, Margaret; Motamedi, Gholam K; Morgan, Gregory W; Mysliwiec, Vincent; Germain, Anne; Pazdan, Renee M; Ferziger, Reuven; Balkin, Thomas J; MacDonald, Margaret E; Macek, Thomas A; Yochelson, Michael R; Scharf, Steven M; Lettieri, Christopher J

    2016-04-01

    Disturbed sleep is one of the most common complaints following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and worsens morbidity and long-term sequelae. Further, sleep and TBI share neurophysiologic underpinnings with direct relevance to recovery from TBI. As such, disturbed sleep and clinical sleep disorders represent modifiable treatment targets to improve outcomes in TBI. This paper presents key findings from a national working group on sleep and TBI, with a specific focus on the testing and development of sleep-related therapeutic interventions for mild TBI (mTBI). First, mTBI and sleep physiology are briefly reviewed. Next, essential empirical and clinical questions and knowledge gaps are addressed. Finally, actionable recommendations are offered to guide active and efficient collaboration between academic, industry, and governmental stakeholders.

  9. What?s a Weed? Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviour of Park Visitors about Weeds

    OpenAIRE

    Ansong, Michael; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity globally degrading natural areas of high conservation value. But what are our attitudes about weeds and their management including weeds in national parks? Do we know what a weed is? Do we consider weeds a problem? Do we support their management? Are we unintentionally spreading weeds in parks? To answer these questions, we surveyed visitors entering a large popular national park near the city of Brisbane, Australia. Park visitors were knowledgeable ab...

  10. An unusual case of penetrating head injury in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Tanweer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Penetrating head injuries can be the result of numerous intentional or unintentional events, including missile wounds, stab wounds, and motor vehicle or occupational accidents (nails, screw-drivers. Penetrating head injuries in children constitute only a small part of the total number of traumatic head injuries seen in casualty. We report a case of neuro-trauma who was operated in our institution. Patient, 4 years male presented in casualty on 15/01/09 with a iron rod penetrating into the skull.

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow ... recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_ ... Counseling About Media Donate Contact Us Terms of Use Site Map Privacy Statement 312-284-2525 info@ ...

  13. Spinal Injury: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EmergencyManual/WhatToDoInMedicalEmergency/Default.aspx?id=258&terms=spinal+injuries. Accessed Jan. 8, 2015. Marx JA, et al. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... What are the chances of regaining feeling and mobility after a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How ... advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. ...

  17. Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... back) no matter how it was treated the first time. Treatment options for recurrent childhood craniopharyngioma depend on the type of treatment that was given when the tumor was first diagnosed and the needs of the child. Treatment ...

  18. Childhood Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. ... blood cells help your body fight infection. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  19. Friendships in Childhood and Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwell, Catherine L.; Schmidt, Michelle E.

    2011-01-01

    Highly readable and comprehensive, this volume explores the significance of friendship for social, emotional, and cognitive development from early childhood through adolescence. The authors trace how friendships change as children age and what specific functions these relationships play in promoting adjustment and well-being. Compelling topics…

  20. Unintentional selection, unanticipated insights: introductions, stocking and the evolutionary ecology of fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, J A

    2014-12-01

    Natural environmental change has produced countless opportunities for species to disperse into and persist in habitats where they previously did not exist. Introduction and stocking programmes have facilitated similar sorts of colonization opportunities across considerably greater geographical scales and often in much shorter periods of time. Even though the mechanism of colonization differs, the result can be the same: evolutionary change in the colonizing population in response to novel selection pressures. As a consequence, some human-mediated fish transfers have unintentionally yielded novel research opportunities to study how phenotypes and genes interact with their environment and affect ecological and evolutionary change. The primary purpose here is to explore how work, directly or indirectly involved with human-mediated transfers, has unintentionally yielded novel research and research opportunities in fish ecology and evolution. Insights have produced new knowledge or altered previously held perceptions on topics such as local adaptation, rate of evolutionary change, phenotypic plasticity, alternative reproductive strategies, population structure and colonization probability. Well-documented stocking programmes, especially in terms of history, numbers and original population sources, can provide highly fertile ground for generating further insights on the ecology and evolution of fishes and of the factors likely to influence the success of conservation-based, restoration programmes. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. Effectiveness of the cigarette ignition propensity standard in preventing unintentional residential fires in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Hillel R; Christiani, David C; Orav, E John; Dockery, Douglas W; Connolly, Gregory N

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated the Massachusetts Fire Safe Cigarette Law's (FSCL's) effectiveness in preventing residential fires. We examined unintentional residential fires reported to the Massachusetts Fire Incident Reporting System from 2004 to 2010. We analyzed FSCL effect on the likelihood of cigarette- versus noncigarette-caused fires and effect modification by fire scenario factors by using an interrupted time series regression model. We analyzed the effect of FSCL on monthly fire rates with Poisson regression. Cigarettes caused 1629 unintentional residential fires during the study period. The FSCL was associated with a 28% (95% confidence interval = 12%, 41%) reduction in the odds of cigarette- versus noncigarette-caused fires, although not in analyses restricted to casualty fires, with smaller sample size. The largest reductions were among fires in which human factors were involved; that were first ignited on furniture, bedding, or soft goods; that occurred in living areas; or that occurred in the summer or winter. The FSCL appears to have decreased the likelihood of cigarette-caused residential fires, particularly in scenarios for which the ignition propensity standard was developed. Current standards should be adopted, and the need for strengthening should be considered.

  2. Prognostic significance of unintentional body weight loss in colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Hung; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Huang, Cheng Yi; Huang, Yun-Ching; Chin, Chih-Chien

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether unintentional body weight loss (BWL) provides additional clinical information in terms of tumor progression and prognosis in non-metastatic colon cancer. In the present study, a total of 2,406 consecutive colon cancer patients without metastasis were retrospectively enrolled. Unintentional BWL was defined as loss of >5% of body weight within the last 6-12 months, or defined subjectively upon fulfillment of at least two of the following: Evidence of change in clothing size and corroboration of the reported weight loss by family or friend. This category was recorded as present ('with') or absent ('without'). Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the correlation between BWL and the tumor characteristics and post-operative outcomes of patients with colon cancer. The Cox regression model was used to determine the association of BWL with long-term survival of colon cancer patients. A significant association between BWL and tumor location [right vs. left: Odds ratio (OR)=1.62; Pcolon cancer is not just a symptom, but it is also correlated with tumor location, size and depth, and is a prognostic factor for poor outcomes including overall survival and tumor relapse.

  3. What neuroimaging should be performed in children in whom inflicted brain injury (iBI) is suspected? A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, A.M.; Rajaram, S.; Mann, M.; Tempest, V.; Farewell, D.; Gawne-Cain, M.L.; Jaspan, T.; Maguire, S.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the optimal neuroradiological investigation strategy to identify inflicted brain injury (iBI). Materials and methods: A systematic review of studies published between 1970-2008 in any language was conducted, searching 20 databases and four websites, using over 100 keywords/phrases, supplemented by hand-searching of references. All studies underwent two independent reviews (with disagreements adjudicated by a third reviewer) by trained reviewers from paediatrics, paediatric neuroradiology and related disciplines, using standardized critical appraisal tools, and strict inclusion/exclusion criteria. We included primary studies that evaluated the diagnostic yield of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in addition to initial computed tomography (CT), or follow-up CT or ultrasound in children with suspected iBI. Results: Of the 320 studies reviewed, 18 met the inclusion criteria, reflecting data on 367 children with iBI and 12 were published since 1998. When an MRI was conducted in addition to an abnormal early CT examination, additional information was found in 25% (95% CI: 18.3-33.16%) of children. The additional findings included further subdural haematoma, subarachnoid haemorrhage, shearing injury, ischaemia, and infarction; it also contributed to dating of injuries. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) further enhanced the delineation of ischaemic changes, and assisted in prognosis. Repeat CT studies varied in timing and quality, and none were compared to the addition of an early MRI/DWI. Conclusions: In an acutely ill child, the optimal imaging strategy involves initial CT, followed by early MRI and DWI if early CT examination is abnormal, or there are ongoing clinical concerns. The role of repeat CT imaging, if early MRI is performed, is unclear, as is the place for MRI/DWI if initial CT examination is normal in an otherwise well child.

  4. Brain Injury in Neonates with Complex Congenital Heart Disease: What Is the Predictive Value of MRI in the Fetal Period?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossard-Racine, M; du Plessis, A; Vezina, G; Robertson, R; Donofrio, M; Tworetzky, W; Limperopoulos, C

    2016-07-01

    Brain injury in neonates with congenital heart disease is an important predictor of adverse neurodevelopmental outcome. Impaired brain development in congenital heart disease may have a prenatal origin, but the sensitivity and specificity of fetal brain MR imaging for predicting neonatal brain lesions are currently unknown. We sought to determine the value of conventional fetal MR imaging for predicting abnormal findings on neonatal preoperative MR imaging in neonates with complex congenital heart disease. MR imaging studies were performed in 103 fetuses with confirmed congenital heart disease (mean gestational age, 31.57 ± 3.86 weeks) and were repeated postnatally before cardiac surgery (mean age, 6.8 ± 12.2 days). Each MR imaging study was read by a pediatric neuroradiologist. Brain abnormalities were detected in 17/103 (16%) fetuses by fetal MR imaging and in 33/103 (32%) neonates by neonatal MR imaging. Only 9/33 studies with abnormal neonatal findings were preceded by abnormal findings on fetal MR imaging. The sensitivity and specificity of conventional fetal brain MR imaging for predicting neonatal brain abnormalities were 27% and 89%, respectively. Brain abnormalities detected by in utero MR imaging in fetuses with congenital heart disease are associated with higher risk of postnatal preoperative brain injury. However, a substantial proportion of anomalies on postnatal MR imaging were not present on fetal MR imaging; this result is likely due to the limitations of conventional fetal MR imaging and the emergence of new lesions that occurred after the fetal studies. Postnatal brain MR imaging studies are needed to confirm the presence of injury before open heart surgery. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Application of highly silicon-doped marker layers in the investigation of unintentional doping in GaN on sapphire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, R A

    2010-12-01

    To provide a route to the assessment of the impact of inclined facets on unintentional n-type doping during the growth of c-plane GaN on sapphire, thin (100 nm), highly Si-doped (at 10¹⁹ cm⁻³) marker layers have been incorporated into a GaN epitaxial layer grown by a method involving a transition from initial three-dimensional island growth to later, two-dimensional, planar growth. Imaging of the completed epitaxial layer in cross-section by scanning capacitance microscopy reveals the shapes of the islands, which were present during the early stages of growth and the relationship between the facets present and the incorporation of unintentional dopants. The results show that unintentional dopants are mostly incorporated on facets inclined to the [0001] direction, and suggest that gaseous impurities present in the MOVPE reactor are one source of dopant species. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord ... by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About ... By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  7. Preventing playground injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuselli, Pamela; Yanchar, Natalie L

    2012-06-01

    With concerns increasing around childhood obesity and inactivity, playgrounds offer a chance for children to be active. But playgrounds also have risks, with injuries from falls being the most common. Research has shown that playground injuries can be reduced by lowering the heights of play equipment and using soft, deep surfaces to cushion falls. The Canadian Standards Association has published voluntary standards for playgrounds to address these risks for several years. Parents can further reduce injury risks by following simple playground strategies. This statement outlines the burden of playground injuries. It also provides parents and health care providers with opportunities to reduce injury incidence and severity through education and advocacy, and to implement evidence-informed safety standards and safer play strategies in local playgrounds. This document replaces a previous Canadian Paediatric Society position statement published in 2002.

  8. Objective Neuropsychological Deficits in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: What Remains Beyond Symptom Similarity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Pineau

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study intends to characterize the neuropsychological profile in persons with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI using objective measures of cognitive performance. A neuropsychological battery of tests for attention, memory and executive functions was administered to four groups: PTSD (n = 25, mTBI (n = 19, subjects with two formal diagnoses: Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI/PTSD (n = 6 and controls (n = 25. Confounding variables, such as medical, developmental or neurological antecedents, were controlled and measures of co-morbid conditions, such as depression and anxiety, were considered. The PTSD and mTBI/PTSD groups reported more anxiety and depressive symptoms. They also presented more cognitive deficits than the mTBI group. Since the two PTSD groups differ in severity of PTSD symptoms but not in severity of depression and anxiety symptoms, the PTSD condition could not be considered as the unique factor affecting the results. The findings underline the importance of controlling for confounding medical and psychological co-morbidities in the evaluation and treatment of PTSD populations, especially when a concomitant mTBI is also suspected.

  9. Childhood depression: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima NNR

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nádia Nara Rolim Lima,1 Vânia Barbosa do Nascimento,1 Sionara Melo Figueiredo de Carvalho,1 Luiz Carlos de Abreu,1,3 Modesto Leite Rolim Neto,2 Aline Quental Brasil,2 Francisco Telésforo Celestino Junior,2 Gislene Farias de Oliveira,2 Alberto Olavo Advíncula Reis3 1Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Departamento de Medicina. Universidade Federal do Ceará, UFC, Barbalha, Ceará, Brazil; 3Departamento de Saúde Materno Infantil, Faculdade de Saúde Pública, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: As an important public health issue, childhood depression deserves special attention, considering the serious and lasting consequences of the disease to child development. Taking this into consideration, the present study was based on the following question: what practical contributions to clinicians and researchers does the current literature on childhood depression have to offer? The objective of the present study was to conduct a systematic review of articles regarding childhood depression. To accomplish this purpose, a systematic review of articles on childhood depression, published from January 1, 2010 to November 24, 2012, on MEDLINE and SciELO databases was carried out. Search terms were “depression” (medical subject headings [MeSH], “child” (MeSH, and "childhood depression" (keyword. Of the 180 retrieved studies, 25 met the eligibility criteria. Retrieved studies covered a wide range of aspects regarding childhood depression, such as diagnosis, treatment, prevention and prognosis. Recent scientific literature regarding childhood depression converge to, directly or indirectly, highlight the negative impacts of depressive disorders to the children's quality of life. Unfortunately, the retrieved studies show that childhood depression commonly grows in a background of vulnerability and poverty, where individual and familiar needs

  10. Acute kidney injury in idiopathic nephrotic syndrome of childhood is a major risk factor for the development of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Afshan; Tresa, Vina; Lanewala, Ali Asghar; Hashmi, Seema; Ali, Irshad; Khatri, Sabeeta; Mubarak, Muhammed

    2017-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important complication of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) and is associated with adverse outcomes, especially the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to determine the clinical profile of children with INS who developed AKI and its short-term outcome. This prospective study was conducted from March 2014 to October 2015. A total of 119 children of INS (age: 2-18 years) fulfilling the pediatric RIFLE criteria for the diagnosis of AKI were enrolled and followed up for 3 months to determine the outcome. Factors predisposing to CKD were studied. The mean age at presentation was 8.8 ± 3.59 years and males were 74 (62.2%). At presentation, 61 (51.3%) children were in Risk category, 43 (36.1%) in Injury category, and 15 (12.6%) in Failure category. Most of them (41.2%) had steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) on histopathology (33.6%). Infections were the major predisposing factor for AKI in 67 (56.3%) cases. Drug toxicity was the next common, found in 52 (43.7%) children. A total of 65 (54.6%) children recovered from AKI, while 54 (45.4%) did not. CKD developed in 49 (41.2%) non-recovered cases and 5 (4.2%) children succumbed to acute illness. SRNS, cyclosporine use, FSGS on histology, and drug toxicity were significant factors associated with the development of CKD. AKI associated with INS is a reversible condition in most cases but it can progress to CKD, especially among those who have SRNS, FSGS, and drug toxicity.

  11. What shapes 7-year-olds? subjective well-being? Prospective analysis of early childhood and parenting using the Growing Up in Scotland study

    OpenAIRE

    Parkes, Alison; Sweeting, Helen; Wight, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Research on predictors of young children?s psychosocial well-being currently relies on adult-reported outcomes. This study investigated whether early family circumstances and parenting predict 7-year-olds? subjective well-being. Methods Information on supportive friendships, liking school and life satisfaction was obtained from 7-year-olds in one Growing Up in Scotland birth cohort in 2012?2013 (N?=?2869). Mothers provided information on early childhood factors from 10 to 34?months, p...

  12. What shapes 7-year-olds' subjective well-being? Prospective analysis of early childhood and parenting using the Growing Up in Scotland study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Alison; Sweeting, Helen; Wight, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Research on predictors of young children's psychosocial well-being currently relies on adult-reported outcomes. This study investigated whether early family circumstances and parenting predict 7-year-olds' subjective well-being. Information on supportive friendships, liking school and life satisfaction was obtained from 7-year-olds in one Growing Up in Scotland birth cohort in 2012-2013 (N = 2869). Mothers provided information on early childhood factors from 10 to 34 months, parenting (dysfunctional parenting, home learning and protectiveness) from 46 to 70 months, and 7-year-olds' adjustment. Multivariable path models explored associations between early childhood factors, parenting and 7-year-olds' subjective well-being. Supplementary analyses compared findings with those for mother-reported adjustment. In a model of early childhood factors, maternal distress predicted less supportive friendships and lower life satisfaction (coefficients -0.12), poverty predicted less supportive friendships (-0.09) and remote location predicted all outcomes (-0.20 to -0.27). In a model with parenting added, dysfunctional parenting predicted all outcomes (-10 to -0.16), home learning predicted liking school (0.11) and life satisfaction (0.08), and protectiveness predicted life satisfaction (0.08). Effects of maternal distress were fully mediated, largely via dysfunctional parenting, while home learning mediated negative effects of low maternal education. Direct effects of poverty and remote location remained. Findings for mother-reported child adjustment were broadly similar. Unique prospective data show parenting and early childhood impact 7-year-olds' subjective well-being. They underline the benefits for children of targeting parental mental health and dysfunctional parenting, and helping parents develop skills to support children at home and school.

  13. Childhood adversity, mental health, and violent crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer-Smyth, Kathleen; Cornelius, Monica E; Pickelsimer, E Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Little is understood about childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI) and lifetime violent crime perpetration. The purpose was to evaluate TBI before the age of 15 years and other childhood environmental factors, mental health, and lifetime history of committing a violent crime. A cross-sectional study of 636 male and female offenders from a southeastern state prison population was conducted using Chi-squared tests, t tests, and logistic regression to determine factors associated with ever committing a violent crime. Committing a violent crime was associated with male gender, younger age, greater childhood sexual abuse (CSA), greater childhood emotional abuse, no TBI by the age of 15 years, and greater neighborhood adversity during childhood. Although TBI has been related to violent and nonviolent crime, this study showed that absence of TBI by the age of 15 years was associated with lifetime violent crime when adjusting for CSA, childhood emotional abuse, and neighborhood adversity during childhood. This builds upon neurobehavioral development literature suggesting that CSA and the stress of violence exposure without direct physical victimization may play a more critical role in lifetime violent criminal behavior than childhood TBI. Violence risk reduction must occur during childhood focusing on decreasing adversity, especially violence exposure as a witness as well as a direct victim.

  14. Injuries are not accidents: towards a culture of prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Escobar, Francisco Javier; Gutiérrez, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Injuries are the result of an acute exposure to exhort of energy or a consequence of a deficiency in a vital element that exceeds physiological thresholds resulting threatens life. They are classified as intentional or unintentional. Injuries are considered a global health issue because they cause more than 5 million deaths per year worldwide and they are an important contributor to the burden of disease, especially affecting people of low socioeconomic status in low- and middle-income countries. A common misconception exists where injuries are thought to be the same as accidents; however, accidents are largely used as chance events, without taken in consideration that all these are preventable. This review discusses injuries and accidents in the context of road traffic and emphasizes injuries as preventable events. An understanding of the essence of injuries enables the standardization of terminology in public use and facilitates the development of a culture of prevention among all of us.

  15. Subclinical hypothyroidism in childhood.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Grady, M J

    2012-02-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) is defined as an elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in association with a normal total or free thyroxine (T4) or triiodothyronine (T3). It is frequently encountered in both neonatology and general paediatric practice; however, its clinical significance is widely debated. Currently there is no broad consensus on the investigation and treatment of these patients; specifically who to treat and what cut-off level of TSH should be used. This paper reviews the available evidence regarding investigation, treatments and outcomes reported for childhood SH.

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow ...

  17. Injury Prevention Research

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-01

    Research provides the knowledge that we need to understand what is possible, what is not, and the best way to proceed in our intervention efforts.  Created: 9/1/2009 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 9/1/2009.

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  19. Childhood obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitmann, Berit L; Koplan, Jeffrey; Lissner, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Despite progress toward assuring the health of today's young population, the 21(st) century began with an epidemic of childhood obesity. There is general agreement that the situation must be addressed by means of primary prevention, but relatively little is known about how to intervene effectively....... The evidence behind the assumption that childhood obesity can be prevented was discussed critically in this roundtable symposium. Overall, there was general agreement that action is needed and that the worldwide epidemic itself is sufficient evidence for action. As the poet, writer, and scholar Wittner Bynner...

  20. Childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, M A; Shield, J P H

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity continues to increase worldwide. Its presence is associated with significant adverse effects on health including an increased propensity to type II diabetes, cardiovascular, respiratory, and liver disease. In the vast majority of children, obesity is lifestyle-related, yet there is a dearth of evidence on how to best develop effective prevention and treatment strategies. This review outlines the importance of childhood and adolescent growth on long-term health, the definitions used to define obesity in children (along with up-to-date prevalence data), causes and consequences, and aspects of prevention and management.