WorldWideScience

Sample records for childhood malaria treatment

  1. Parents' perceptions, attitudes and acceptability of treatment of childhood malaria with artemisinin combination therapies in ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjei, G O; Darkwah, A K; Goka, B Q;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little information on sociocultural and contextual factors that may influence attitudes of patients to new treatments, such as artemisinin combination therapies (ACT). METHODS: Semi-structured questionnaires and focus group discussions were used to assess views of parents of...... children with uncomplicated malaria treated with ACT in a low socio-economic area in Accra, Ghana. RESULTS: The majority of parents reported a favourable experience, in terms of perceived i) rapidity of symptom resolution, compared to their previous experience of other therapies for childhood malaria, or...... explanations. Although care-seeking practices for childhood malaria were considered appropriate, perceived or real barriers to accessible health care were also important factors in the decision to seek treatment. Household dynamics and perceived inequities at the care-provider-patient interface were identified...

  2. Malaria Treatment (United States)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov Malaria Treatment (United States) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Treatment of Malaria: Guidelines For Clinicians (United States) Download PDF version of Parts 1-3 ...

  3. The role of shops in the treatment and prevention of childhood malaria on the coast of Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, R W; Peshu, N; Forster, D; Mwenesi, H; Marsh, K

    1992-01-01

    A community survey of 388 mothers in a rural and peri-urban population surrounding a district hospital on the coast of Kenya revealed that the preferred choice of treatment for childhood febrile illnesses was with proprietary drugs bought over the counter at shops and kiosks (72% of interviews). 67% of the mothers who reported using shops claimed they would buy chloroquine-based drugs. Preventative measures such as mosquito nets were uncommon (6.2%), but the use of commercial pyrethrum mosquito coils was reported more frequently (46.4%). Separate investigations of treatment given to 394 children before presentation at hospital with severe and mild malaria was consistent with the reports in the community of high usage of shop-bought anti-malarials and anti-pyretics. The involvement of the private sector in peripheral health care delivery for malaria is discussed. PMID:1412642

  4. Childhood malaria in the Niger delta area of Nigeria:mothers/care givers 'perception,definition and treatment practices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Idogun ES; Airauhi LU

    2009-01-01

    Objective:The objective of the study was to evaluate mothers/care givers perception of malaria,their treat-ment practices and the effects on the outcome of malaria.Methods:Four hundred and sixty children were en-rolled and their mothers/care givers interviewed.The children were screened for malaria parasitaemia and there after,blood specimens were obtained for biochemical and haematological evaluation from those children who met the criteria and tested positive to P.falciparum parasites.Packed cell volume,electrolytes,urea, creatinine,plasma glucose,and serum bilirubin were analyzed.Results:A total of 460 children were studied, 233 (50.7%)males and 227 (49.3%)females.Mild malaria cases were 112 (24.3%)and severe malaria 348 (75.7%).Those who presented early 106 (23.0%)and those who presented late 354 (77.0%).Per-ception and definition of malaria as well as the treatment seeking behaviors vary significantly with the level of education of the mothers and care givers.Those without formal education 68 (51.9%)wrongly perceived that the etiology of malaria can only be diagnosed by native doctors compared to those with primary six education 61 (26.5%)and junior secondary education 10 (10.1%).Only 43 (9.3%)gave the correct dose of chloro-quine syrup to their sick children,while 32 (7.0%)gave at sub optimal doses.Conclusion:Wrong percep-tion of malaria especially the complicated malaria and wrong treatment practices are major contributory factors to the high mortality and morbidity of malaria in Nigeria.There is therefore a need for health education to cor-rect the wrong ideas about the cause and treatment practices of malaria as part of malaria control programme.

  5. Improving childhood malaria treatment and referral practices by training patent medicine vendors in rural south-east Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Uzochukwu Benjamin SC; Okeke Theodora A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children under five years of age in Nigeria. Most of the early treatments for fever and malaria occur through self-medication with anti-malarials bought over-the-counter (OTC) from untrained drug vendors. Self-medication through drug vendors can be ineffective, with increased risks of drug toxicity and development of drug resistance. Global malaria control initiatives highlights the potential role of drug vendo...

  6. Improving childhood malaria treatment and referral practices by training patent medicine vendors in rural south-east Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzochukwu Benjamin SC

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children under five years of age in Nigeria. Most of the early treatments for fever and malaria occur through self-medication with anti-malarials bought over-the-counter (OTC from untrained drug vendors. Self-medication through drug vendors can be ineffective, with increased risks of drug toxicity and development of drug resistance. Global malaria control initiatives highlights the potential role of drug vendors to improve access to early effective malaria treatment, which underscores the need for interventions to improve treatment obtained from these outlets. This study aimed to determine the feasibility and impact of training rural drug vendors on community-based malaria treatment and advice with referral of severe cases to a health facility. Methods A drug vendor-training programme was carried out between 2003 and 2005 in Ugwuogo-Nike, a rural community in south-east Nigeria. A total of 16 drug vendors were trained and monitored for eight months. The programme was evaluated to measure changes in drug vendor practice and knowledge using exit interviews. In addition, home visits were conducted to measure compliance with referral. Results The intervention achieved major improvements in drug selling and referral practices and knowledge. Exit interviews confirmed significant increases in appropriate anti-malarial drug dispensing, correct history questions asked and advice given. Improvements in malaria knowledge was established and 80% compliance with referred cases was observed during the study period, Conclusion The remarkable change in knowledge and practices observed indicates that training of drug vendors, as a means of communication in the community, is feasible and strongly supports their inclusion in control strategies aimed at improving prompt effective treatment of malaria with referral of severe cases.

  7. Malaria diagnosis and treatment under the strategy of the integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI): relevance of laboratory support from the rapid immunochromatographic tests of ICT Malaria P.f/P.v and OptiMal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarimo, D S; Minjas, J N; Bygbjerg, I C

    2001-01-01

    The algorithm developed for the integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) provides guidelines for the treatment of paediatric malaria. In areas where malaria is endemic, for example, the IMCI strategy may indicate that children who present with fever, a recent history of fever and/or pallor...... and by using two rapid immunochromatographic tests (RIT) for the diagnosis of malaria (ICT Malaria P.f/P.v and OptiMal. At the time they were tested, each of these children had been targeted for antimalarial treatment (following the IMCI strategy) because of fever and/or pallor. Only 70% of the 395...... sensitivity of 93.0% and a specificity of 15.5% whereas pallor had a sensitivity of 72.2% and a specificity of 50.8%. The RIT both had very high corresponding sensitivities (of 100.0% for the ICT and 94.0% for OptiMal) but the specificity of the ICT (74.0%) was significantly lower than that for OptiMal (100...

  8. Imported childhood malaria: the Dublin experience, 1999-2006.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leahy, T R

    2009-09-01

    Imported childhood malaria has never been studied in Ireland. We aimed to document the incidence and species of malaria in children presenting to paediatric hospitals in Dublin and to examine management and outcome measures.

  9. Malaria diagnosis and treatment under the strategy of the integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI): relevance of laboratory support from the rapid immunochromatographic tests of ICT Malaria P.f/P.v and OptiMal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarimo, D S; Minjas, J N; Bygbjerg, I C

    2001-07-01

    The algorithm developed for the integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) provides guidelines for the treatment of paediatric malaria. In areas where malaria is endemic, for example, the IMCI strategy may indicate that children who present with fever, a recent history of fever and/or pallor should receive antimalarial chemotherapy. In many holo-endemic areas, it is unclear whether laboratory tests to confirm that such signs are the result of malaria would be very relevant or useful. Children from a holo-endemic region of Tanzania were therefore checked for malarial parasites by microscopy and by using two rapid immunochromatographic tests (RIT) for the diagnosis of malaria (ICT Malaria P.f/P.v and OptiMal. At the time they were tested, each of these children had been targeted for antimalarial treatment (following the IMCI strategy) because of fever and/or pallor. Only 70% of the 395 children classified to receive antimalarial drugs by the IMCI algorithm had malarial parasitaemias (68.4% had Plasmodium falciparum trophozoites, 1.3% only P. falciparum gametocytes, 0.3% P. ovale and 0.3% P. malariae). As indicators of P. falciparum trophozoites in the peripheral blood, fever had a sensitivity of 93.0% and a specificity of 15.5% whereas pallor had a sensitivity of 72.2% and a specificity of 50.8%. The RIT both had very high corresponding sensitivities (of 100.0% for the ICT and 94.0% for OptiMal) but the specificity of the ICT (74.0%) was significantly lower than that for OptiMal (100.0%). Fever and pallor were significantly associated with the P. falciparum asexual parasitaemias that equalled or exceeded the threshold intensity (2000/microl) that has the optimum sensitivity and specificity for the definition of a malarial episode. Diagnostic likelihood ratios (DLR) showed that a positive result in the OptiMal test (DLR = infinity) was a better indication of malaria than a positive result in the ICT (DLR = 3.85). In fact, OptiMal had diagnostic reliability (0

  10. Patterns of treatment for childhood malaria among caregivers and health care providers in Turbo, Colombia = Pautas de tratamiento para la malaria infantil entre los cuidadores y profesionales de la salud en Turbo, Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    López de Mesa, Ysabel Polanco

    2012-01-01

    Malaria represents a major cause of death among children in many areas of the world, especially in tropical countries. Colombia constitutes a malaria endemic country in 90% of its territory. This study, undertaken in Turbo (Antioquia), examined care-seeking patterns and barriers to appropriate treatment for Colombian children with fever and /or convulsions, two key symptoms of malaria. The study focused on community perceptions of and responses to febrile illness, using illness narratives as ...

  11. Severe childhood malaria syndromes defined by plasma proteome profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Burté

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM and severe malarial anemia (SMA are the most serious life-threatening clinical syndromes of Plasmodium falciparum infection in childhood. Therefore it is important to understand the pathology underlying the development of CM and SMA, as opposed to uncomplicated malaria (UM. Different host responses to infection are likely to be reflected in plasma proteome-patterns that associate with clinical status and therefore provide indicators of the pathogenesis of these syndromes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Plasma and comprehensive clinical data for discovery and validation cohorts were obtained as part of a prospective case-control study of severe childhood malaria at the main tertiary hospital of the city of Ibadan, an urban and densely populated holoendemic malaria area in Nigeria. A total of 946 children participated in this study. Plasma was subjected to high-throughput proteomic profiling. Statistical pattern-recognition methods were used to find proteome-patterns that defined disease groups. Plasma proteome-patterns accurately distinguished children with CM and with SMA from those with UM, and from healthy or severely ill malaria-negative children. CONCLUSIONS: We report that an accurate definition of the major childhood malaria syndromes can be achieved using plasma proteome-patterns. Our proteomic data can be exploited to understand the pathogenesis of the different childhood severe malaria syndromes.

  12. UK malaria treatment guidelines 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, David G; Shingadia, Delane; Bell, David J; Beeching, Nicholas J; Whitty, Christopher J M; Chiodini, Peter L

    2016-06-01

    . Most patients treated for P. falciparum malaria should be admitted to hospital for at least 24 h as patients can deteriorate suddenly, especially early in the course of treatment. In specialised units seeing large numbers of patients, outpatient treatment may be considered if specific protocols for patient selection and follow up are in place. 10. Uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria should be treated with an artemisinin combination therapy (Grade 1A). Artemether-lumefantrine (Riamet(®)) is the drug of choice (Grade 2C) and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (Eurartesim(®)) is an alternative. Quinine or atovaquone-proguanil (Malarone(®)) can be used if an ACT is not available. Quinine is highly effective but poorly-tolerated in prolonged treatment and should be used in combination with an additional drug, usually oral doxycycline. 11. Severe falciparum malaria, or infections complicated by a relatively high parasite count (more than 2% of red blood cells parasitized) should be treated with intravenous therapy until the patient is well enough to continue with oral treatment. Severe malaria is a rare complication of P. vivax or P. knowlesi infection and also requires parenteral therapy. 12. The treatment of choice for severe or complicated malaria in adults and children is intravenous artesunate (Grade 1A). Intravenous artesunate is unlicensed in the EU but is available in many centres. The alternative is intravenous quinine, which should be started immediately if artesunate is not available (Grade 1A). Patients treated with intravenous quinine require careful monitoring for hypoglycemia. 13. Patients with severe or complicated malaria should be managed in a high-dependency or intensive care environment. They may require haemodynamic support and management of: acute respiratory distress syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, acute kidney injury, seizures, and severe intercurrent infections including Gram-negative bacteraemia/septicaemia. 14. Children with

  13. Patterns of treatment for childhood malaria among caregivers and health care providers in Turbo, Colombia = Pautas de tratamiento para la malaria infantil entre los cuidadores y profesionales de la salud en Turbo, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López de Mesa, Ysabel Polanco

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Malaria represents a major cause of death among children in many areas of the world, especially in tropical countries. Colombia constitutes a malaria endemic country in 90% of its territory. This study, undertaken in Turbo (Antioquia, examined care-seeking patterns and barriers to appropriate treatment for Colombian children with fever and /or convulsions, two key symptoms of malaria. The study focused on community perceptions of and responses to febrile illness, using illness narratives as the primary data collection vehicle. The researcher used semi-structured interviews for health narratives with caregivers and health providers. Analyses of 67 illness narratives collected in the course of the study indicated that caregivers, the majority of which are mothers, recognize fever and treat it promptly. They identified fever, chills, headache, vomiting, and weakness as the most frequent symptoms of malaria. Synchronic and diachronic analyses showed that most treatments begin at home. Common home treatments include baths with herbs and use of anti-pyretic drugs. Neither caregivers nor traditional healers conceptualized malaria as a disease that La malaria representa una causa importante de muerte infantil en muchas áreas del mundo, especialmente en países tropicales. Colombia es considerado como un país endémico para malaria en el 90% de su territorio. Este estudio, llevado a cabo en la localidad de Turbo (Antioquia, exploró los patrones de cuidados y las barreras para el tratamiento apropiado en niños colombianos con fiebre y/o convulsiones, dos síntomas claves de la malaria. El estudio se concentró en las percepciones y respuestas de la comunidad ante la enfermedad febril, utilizando narrativas de la enfermedad como vehículo principal de la recolección de datos. El investigador usó entrevistas semi-estructuradas para las narrativas de enfermedad con los cuidadores de los niños y con los proveedores la salud. El análisis de 67

  14. Childhood vitiligo: Treatment paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrinder Jit Kanwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood vitiligo differs from the adults by showing a higher incidence in females, segmental vitiligo being more common and less frequent association with other systemic autoimmune and endocrine disorders.Childhood vitiligo is often associated with a marked psychosocial and long lasting effect on the self-esteem of the affected children and their parents, hence an adequate treatment is very essential. Treatment of vitiligo is indeed a tough challenge for the dermatologists′ more so in the background of childhood vitiligo. Although multiple therapeutic modalities are available in the therapeutic armamentarium, not all can be used in children. This brief report updates regarding various therapies available in the treatment of childhood vitiligo.

  15. Treatment of severe malaria.

    OpenAIRE

    Warrell, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    In the treatment of severe Plasmodium falciparum infection antimalarial drugs should, ideally, be given by controlled rate intravenous infusion until the patient is able to swallow tablets. In cases where infection has been acquired in a chloroquine resistant area, and where it has broken through chloroquine prophylaxis or where the geographical origin or species are uncertain, quinine is the treatment of choice. When access to parenteral quinine is likely to be delayed, parenteral quinidine ...

  16. Malaria treatment services in Nigeria: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin SC Uzochukwu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria remains a major Public Health problem in Nigeria and causes death and illness in children and adults, especially pregnant women. Malaria case management remains a vital component of the malaria control strategies. This entails early diagnosis and prompt treatment with effective antimalarial medicines. The objectives of this review is to enable health professionals to understand the magnitude of malaria treatment services in Nigeria, to improve knowledge for rational malaria management within different health system contexts with a view to improving access to malaria treatment. The review therefore looks at the following areas: clinical disease and epidemiology; the burden of malaria in Nigeria; objectives of treatment; antimalarial treatment policy; malaria diagnosis, treatment strategies/ National responses; treatment sources. The review concludes that for improved malaria treatment services in Nigeria, there is an urgent need to develop adequate strategies that will ensure better access to medicines by getting evidence-based and effective medicines to the people who need them, whether by reducing their costs, promoting equity in access, improving their distribution, increasing their efficacy and acceptability, or slowing down the development of antimicrobial resistance.

  17. Illness-related practices for the management of childhood malaria among the Bwatiye people of north-eastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kauna K

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide range of childhood illnesses are accompanied by fever,, including malaria. Child mortality due to malaria has been attributed to poor health service delivery system and ignorance. An assessment of a mother's ability to recognize malaria in children under-five was carried out among the Bwatiye, a poorly-served minority ethnic group in north-eastern Nigeria. Methods A three-stage research design involving interviews, participatory observation and laboratory tests was used to seek information from 186 Bwatiye mothers about their illness-related experiences with childhood fevers. Results Mothers classified malaria into male (fever that persists for longer than three days and female (fever that goes away within three days and had a system of determining when febrile illness would not be regarded as malaria. Most often, malaria would be ignored in the first 2 days before seeking active treatment. Self-medication was the preferred option. Treatment practices and sources of help were influenced by local beliefs, the parity of the mother and previous experience with child mortality. Conclusion The need to educate mothers to suspect malaria in every case of febrile illness and take appropriate action in order to expose the underlying "evil" will be more acceptable than an insistence on replacing local knowledge with biological epidemiology of malaria. The challenge facing health workers is to identify and exploit local beliefs about aetiology in effecting management procedures among culturally different peoples, who may not accept the concept of biological epidemiology.

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Ependymoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... without radiation therapy . Childhood ependymoma, anaplastic ependymoma, or RELA fusion–positive ependymoma Treatment of newly diagnosed childhood ... Grade II), anaplastic ependymoma (WHO Grade III), or RELA fusion–positive ependymoma is: Surgery . After surgery, the ...

  19. Advances in the Treatment of Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Castelli, Francesco; Lina Rachele TOMASONI; Matteelli, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Malaria still claims a heavy toll of deaths and disabilities even at the beginning of the third millennium. The inappropriate sequential use of drug monotherapy in the past has facilitated the spread of drug-resistant P. falciparum, and to a lesser extend P. vivax, strains in most of the malaria endemic areas, rendering most anti-malarial ineffective. In the last decade, a new combination strategy based on artemisinin derivatives (ACT) has become the standard of treatment for most P. falcipar...

  20. Nanotechnology applied to the treatment of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado

    2010-03-18

    Despite the fact that we live in an era of advanced technology and innovation, infectious diseases, like malaria, continue to be one of the greatest health challenges worldwide. The main drawbacks of conventional malaria chemotherapy are the development of multiple drug resistance and the non-specific targeting to intracellular parasites, resulting in high dose requirements and subsequent intolerable toxicity. Nanosized carriers have been receiving special attention with the aim of minimizing the side effects of drug therapy, such as poor bioavailability and the selectivity of drugs. Several nanosized delivery systems have already proved their effectiveness in animal models for the treatment and prophylaxis of malaria. A number of strategies to deliver antimalarials using nanocarriers and the mechanisms that facilitate their targeting to Plasmodium spp.-infected cells are discussed in this review. Taking into account the peculiarities of malaria parasites, the focus is placed particularly on lipid-based (e.g., liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles and nano and microemulsions) and polymer-based nanocarriers (nanocapsules and nanospheres). This review emphasizes the main requirements for developing new nanotechnology-based carriers as a promising choice in malaria treatment, especially in the case of severe cerebral malaria. PMID:19914313

  1. Pattern and predictors of neurological morbidities among childhood cerebral malaria survivors in central Sudan

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    Adil Mergani

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusion: Neurological sequelae are common due to childhood cerebral malaria in central Sudan. Their prediction at admission, clinical presentation and laboratory findings may guide clinical intervention and proper management that may decrease morbidity and improve CM consequences.

  2. Early Childhood Malaria Prevention and Children's Patterns of School Leaving in the Gambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuilkowski, Stephanie S.; Jukes, Matthew C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Early childhood malaria is often fatal, but its impact on the development and education of survivors has not received much attention. Malaria impacts cognitive development in a number of ways that may impact later educational participation. Aims: In this study, we examine the long-term educational effects of preventing early childhood…

  3. Investigating the Important Correlates of Maternal Education and Childhood Malaria Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Njau, Joseph D; Stephenson, Rob; Menon, Manoj P.; Kachur, S Patrick; McFarland, Deborah A

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between maternal education and child health has intrigued researchers for decades. This study explored the interaction between maternal education and childhood malaria infection. Cross-sectional survey data from three African countries were used. Descriptive analysis and multivariate logistic regression models were completed in line with identified correlates. Marginal effects and Oaxaca decomposition analysis on maternal education and childhood malaria infection were also es...

  4. The influence of the Gilgel-Gibe hydroelectric dam in Ethiopia on caregivers' knowledge, perceptions and health-seeking behaviour towards childhood malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duchateau Luc

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria remains the most important public health problem in tropical and subtropical areas. Mothers' or caregivers' ability to recognize childhood malaria-related morbidity is crucial as knowledge, attitudes and health seeking behavior of caregivers towards childhood malaria could influence response to signs of the disease. Methods A total of 1,003 caregivers in 'at-risk' villages in close proximity to the Gilgel-Gibe hydroelectric dam in south-western Ethiopia, and 953 caregivers in 'control' villages further away from the dam were surveyed using structured questionnaires to assess their knowledge, perceptions and health seeking behaviour about childhood malaria. Results Malaria (busa was ranked as the most serious health problem. Caregivers perceived childhood malaria as a preventable ('at-risk' 96%, 'control' 86% and treatable ('at-risk' 98% and 'control' 96% disease. Most caregivers correctly associated the typical clinical manifestations with malaria attacks. The use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs was mentioned as a personal protective measure, whereas the role of indoor residual spraying (IRS in malaria prevention and control was under-recognized. Most of the caregivers would prefer to seek treatment in health-care services in the event of malaria and reported the use of recommended anti-malarials. Conclusion Health education to improve knowledge, perceptions and health-seeking behaviour related to malaria is equally important for caregivers in 'at risk' villages and caregivers in 'control' villages as minimal differences seen between both groups. Concluding, there may be a need of more than one generation after the introduction of the dam before differences can be noticed. Secondly, differences in prevalence between 'control' and 'at-risk' villages may not be sufficient to influence knowledge and behaviour.

  5. Combo Treatment Protects Pregnant Women, Fetuses from Malaria in Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_157683.html Combo Treatment Protects Pregnant Women, Fetuses From Malaria in Study Findings suggest ... used to treat malaria in adults also protects pregnant women and their fetuses from the disease, according ...

  6. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, A.K.; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Magnussen, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether traditional birth attendants, drug-shop vendors, community reproductive-health workers, or adolescent peer mobilizers could administer intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp) for malaria with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine to pregnant women. METHODS: A non-randomized comm......OBJECTIVE: To assess whether traditional birth attendants, drug-shop vendors, community reproductive-health workers, or adolescent peer mobilizers could administer intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp) for malaria with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine to pregnant women. METHODS: A non......-randomized community trial was implemented in 21 community clusters (intervention) and four clusters where health units provided routine IPTp (control). The primary outcome measures were access and adherence to IPTp, number of malaria episodes, prevalence of anaemia, and birth weight. Numbers of live births, abortions......, still births, and maternal and child deaths were secondary endpoints. FINDINGS: 1404 (67.5%) of 2081 with the new delivery system received two doses of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine versus 281 (39.9%) of 704 with health units (P < 0.0001). The prevalence of malaria episodes decreased from 906 (49.5%) of...

  7. Patent Medicine Sellers: How Can They Help Control Childhood Malaria?

    OpenAIRE

    Akuse, Rosamund M.; Edwin E Eseigbe; Abubakar Ahmed**; Brieger, William R

    2010-01-01

    Roll Back Malaria Initiative encourages participation of private health providers in malaria control because mothers seek care for sick children from them. This study investigated Patent Medicine Sellers (PMS) management of presumptive malaria in children in order to identify how they can assist malaria control. A cross-sectional survey of 491 PMS in Kaduna, Nigeria, was done using interviews and observation of shop activities. Most (80%) customers bought drugs without prescriptions. Only 29....

  8. [Treatment of syphilis with malaria or heat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhave, J P

    2016-01-01

    Until the end of the Second World War, syphilis was a common sexually transmitted infection. This stigmatising infectious disease caused mental decline, paralysis and eventually death. The history of syphilis was given public attention because of 'malaria therapy', which had been applied from the First World War onwards in patients with paralytic dementia. In 1917, the Austrian physician Julius Wagner-Jauregg (1857-1940) induced fever in these patients by infecting them with malaria parasites; in 1927, he received the Nobel Prize for his discovery of the healing properties of malarial fever. One source, not cited anywhere, is an interview that the American bacteriologist and science writer/medical journalist Paul de Kruif conducted with Wagner-Jauregg in 1930. The reporting of this meeting, and De Kruif's later involvement in the mechanical heat treatment of patients with syphilis, form the inspiration for this article. When penicillin became available, both treatments became obsolete. PMID:27165455

  9. Sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine versus amodiaquine for treating uncomplicated childhood malaria in Gabon: A randomized trial to guide national policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durand Rémy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Gabon, following the adoption of amodiaquine/artesunate combination (AQ/AS as first-line treatment of malaria and of sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP for preventive intermittent treatment of pregnant women, a clinical trial of SP versus AQ was conducted in a sub-urban area. This is the first study carried out in Gabon following the WHO guidelines. Methods A random comparison of the efficacy of AQ (10 mg/kg/day × 3 d and a single dose of SP (25 mg/kg of sulphadoxine/1.25 mg/kg of pyrimethamine was performed in children under five years of age, with uncomplicated falciparum malaria, using the 28-day WHO therapeutic efficacy test. In addition, molecular genotyping was performed to distinguish recrudescence from reinfection and to determine the frequency of the dhps K540E mutation, as a molecular marker to predict SP-treatment failure. Results The day-28 PCR-adjusted treatment failures for SP and AQ were 11.6% (8/69; 95% IC: 5.5–22.1 and 28.2% (20/71; 95% CI: 17.7–38.7, respectively This indicated that SP was significantly superior to AQ (P = 0.019 in the treatment of uncomplicated childhood malaria and for preventing recurrent infections. Both treatments were safe and well-tolerated, with no serious adverse reactions recorded. The dhps K540E mutation was not found among the 76 parasite isolates tested. Conclusion The level of AQ-resistance observed in the present study may compromise efficacy and duration of use of the AQ/AS combination, the new first-line malaria treatment. Gabonese policy-makers need to plan country-wide and close surveillance of AQ/AS efficacy to determine whether, and for how long, these new recommendations for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria remain valid.

  10. Doxycycline for Malaria Chemoprophylaxis and Treatment: Report from the CDC Expert Meeting on Malaria Chemoprophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Kathrine R.; Magill, Alan J; Parise, Monica E.; Arguin, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    Doxycycline, a synthetically derived tetracycline, is a partially efficacious causal prophylactic (liver stage of Plasmodium) drug and a slow acting blood schizontocidal agent highly effective for the prevention of malaria. When used in conjunction with a fast acting schizontocidal agent, it is also highly effective for malaria treatment. Doxycycline is especially useful as a prophylaxis in areas with chloroquine and multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Although not recommended ...

  11. Patent Medicine Sellers: How Can They Help Control Childhood Malaria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosamund M. Akuse

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Roll Back Malaria Initiative encourages participation of private health providers in malaria control because mothers seek care for sick children from them. This study investigated Patent Medicine Sellers (PMS management of presumptive malaria in children in order to identify how they can assist malaria control. A cross-sectional survey of 491 PMS in Kaduna, Nigeria, was done using interviews and observation of shop activities. Most (80% customers bought drugs without prescriptions. Only 29.5% were given instructions about doses. Between 40–100% doses of recommended antimalarials were incorrect. Some (22% PMS did not ask questions about illness for which they were consulted. Most children treated in shops received injections. PMS facilitate homecare but have deficiencies in knowledge and practice. Interventions must focus on training them to accurately determine doses, give advice about drug administration, use oral medication, and ask about illness. Training should be made a prerequisite for registering and reregistering shops.

  12. Patent medicine sellers: how can they help control childhood malaria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuse, Rosamund M; Eseigbe, Edwin E; Ahmed, Abubakar; Brieger, William R

    2010-01-01

    Roll Back Malaria Initiative encourages participation of private health providers in malaria control because mothers seek care for sick children from them. This study investigated Patent Medicine Sellers (PMS) management of presumptive malaria in children in order to identify how they can assist malaria control. A cross-sectional survey of 491 PMS in Kaduna, Nigeria, was done using interviews and observation of shop activities. Most (80%) customers bought drugs without prescriptions. Only 29.5% were given instructions about doses. Between 40-100% doses of recommended antimalarials were incorrect. Some (22%) PMS did not ask questions about illness for which they were consulted. Most children treated in shops received injections. PMS facilitate homecare but have deficiencies in knowledge and practice. Interventions must focus on training them to accurately determine doses, give advice about drug administration, use oral medication, and ask about illness. Training should be made a prerequisite for registering and reregistering shops. PMID:22332020

  13. Association between early childhood exposure to malaria and children’s pre-school development: evidence from the Zambia early childhood development project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fink Günther

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite major progress made over the past 10 years, malaria remains one of the primary causes of ill health in developing countries in general, and in sub-Saharan Africa in particular. Whilst a large literature has documented the frequency and severity of malaria infections for children under-five years, relatively little evidence is available regarding the impact of early childhood malaria exposure on subsequent child development. Methods The objective of the study was to assess the associations between early childhood exposure to malaria and pre-school development. Child assessment data for 1,410 children in 70 clusters collected through the 2010 Zambian Early Childhood Development Project was linked with malaria parasite prevalence data from the 2006 Zambia Malaria Indicator Survey. Linear and logistic models were used to estimate the effect of early childhood exposure to malaria on anthropometric outcomes as well as on a range of cognitive and behavioural development measures. Results No statistically significant associations were found between parasite exposure and children’s height and weight. Exposure to the malaria parasite was, however, associated with lower ability to cope with cognitive tasks administered by interviewers (z-score difference −1.11, 95% CI −2.43–0.20, as well as decreased overall socio-emotional development as assessed by parents (z-score difference −1.55, 95% CI −3.13–0.02. No associations were found between malaria exposure and receptive vocabulary or fine-motor skills. Conclusions The results presented in this paper suggest potentially large developmental consequences of early childhood exposure to malaria. Continued efforts to lower the burden of malaria will not only reduce under-five mortality, but may also have positive returns in terms of the long-term well-being of exposed cohorts.

  14. Malaria parasitemia and childhood diarrhea in a peri-urban area of Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten; Jakobsen, M S; Mølbak, Kare;

    1999-01-01

    To examine the association between diarrhea in early childhood and malaria parasitemia, we conducted a nested case-control study in Guinea-Bissau of 297 children with diarrhea and a similar number of children without diarrhea matched for age, season, and residential area. There were no associations...... between diarrhea and parasite rate, parasite density, or clinical malaria. However, anti-malarials were easily available and frequently used, which was reflected by a 0.7% prevalence of children with a parasite density > 100/200 leukocytes. Thus, the findings do not preclude that diarrhea may be a sign of...

  15. Modelling malaria treatment practices in Bangladesh using spatial statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Haque Ubydul; Scott Lauren M; Hashizume Masahiro; Fisher Emily; Haque Rashidul; Yamamoto Taro; Glass Gregory E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Malaria treatment-seeking practices vary worldwide and Bangladesh is no exception. Individuals from 88 villages in Rajasthali were asked about their treatment-seeking practices. A portion of these households preferred malaria treatment from the National Control Programme, but still a large number of households continued to use drug vendors and approximately one fourth of the individuals surveyed relied exclusively on non-control programme treatments. The risks of low-contr...

  16. Defining childhood severe falciparum malaria for intervention studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Bejon

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical trials of interventions designed to prevent severe falciparum malaria in children require a clear endpoint. The internationally accepted definition of severe malaria is sensitive, and appropriate for clinical purposes. However, this definition includes individuals with severe nonmalarial disease and coincident parasitaemia, so may lack specificity in vaccine trials. Although there is no "gold standard" individual test for severe malaria, malaria-attributable fractions (MAFs can be estimated among groups of children using a logistic model, which we use to test the suitability of various case definitions as trial endpoints. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 4,583 blood samples were taken from well children in cross-sectional surveys and from 1,361 children admitted to a Kenyan District hospital with severe disease. Among children under 2 y old with severe disease and over 2,500 parasites per microliter of blood, the MAFs were above 85% in moderate- and low-transmission areas, but only 61% in a high-transmission area. HIV and malnutrition were not associated with reduced MAFs, but gastroenteritis with severe dehydration (defined by reduced skin turgor, lower respiratory tract infection (clinician's final diagnosis, meningitis (on cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] examination, and bacteraemia were associated with reduced MAFs. The overall MAF was 85% (95% confidence interval [CI] 83.8%-86.1% without excluding these conditions, 89% (95% CI 88.4%-90.2% after exclusions, and 95% (95% CI 94.0%-95.5% when a threshold of 2,500 parasites/mul was also applied. Applying a threshold and exclusion criteria reduced sensitivity to 80% (95% CI 77%-83%. CONCLUSIONS: The specificity of a case definition for severe malaria is improved by applying a parasite density threshold and by excluding children with meningitis, lower respiratory tract infection (clinician's diagnosis, bacteraemia, and gastroenteritis with severe dehydration, but not by excluding

  17. Implementing intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mubyazi, Godfrey Martin; Magnussen, Pascal; Goodman, Catherine;

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Implementing Intermittent Preventive Treatment for malaria in Pregnancy (IPTp) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) through antenatal care (ANC) clinics is recommended for malaria endemic countries. Vast biomedical literature on malaria prevention focuses more on the epidemiological...... coverage of the recommended interventions. OBJECTIVE: To review literature on policy advances, achievements, constraints and challenges to malaria IPTp implementation, emphasising on its operational feasibility in the context of health-care financing, provision and uptake, resource constraints and...... accessing ANC; myths and other discriminatory socio-cultural values on pregnancy; target users, perceptions and attitudes towards SP, malaria, and quality of ANC; supply and cost of SP at health facilities; understaffing and demoralised staff; ambiguity and impracticability of user-fee exemption policy...

  18. Treatment of Childhood Obesity: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniford, Leanne J.; Breckon, Jeff D.; Copeland, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood obesity trends have increased dramatically over the past three decade's. The purpose of this quantitative systematic review is to provide an update of the evidence, illustrating the efficacy of childhood obesity treatment, considering whether treatment fidelity has been measured and/or reported and whether this related to the treatment…

  19. A long-duration dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitor (DSM265) for prevention and treatment of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Margaret A; Lotharius, Julie; Marsh, Kennan; White, John; Dayan, Anthony; White, Karen L; Njoroge, Jacqueline W; El Mazouni, Farah; Lao, Yanbin; Kokkonda, Sreekanth; Tomchick, Diana R; Deng, Xiaoyi; Laird, Trevor; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; March, Sandra; Ng, Caroline L; Fidock, David A; Wittlin, Sergio; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria; Benito, Francisco Javier Gamo; Alonso, Laura Maria Sanz; Martinez, Maria Santos; Jimenez-Diaz, Maria Belen; Bazaga, Santiago Ferrer; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Haselden, John N; Louttit, James; Cui, Yi; Sridhar, Arun; Zeeman, Anna-Marie; Kocken, Clemens; Sauerwein, Robert; Dechering, Koen; Avery, Vicky M; Duffy, Sandra; Delves, Michael; Sinden, Robert; Ruecker, Andrea; Wickham, Kristina S; Rochford, Rosemary; Gahagen, Janet; Iyer, Lalitha; Riccio, Ed; Mirsalis, Jon; Bathhurst, Ian; Rueckle, Thomas; Ding, Xavier; Campo, Brice; Leroy, Didier; Rogers, M John; Rathod, Pradipsinh K; Burrows, Jeremy N; Charman, Susan A

    2015-07-15

    Malaria is one of the most significant causes of childhood mortality, but disease control efforts are threatened by resistance of the Plasmodium parasite to current therapies. Continued progress in combating malaria requires development of new, easy to administer drug combinations with broad-ranging activity against all manifestations of the disease. DSM265, a triazolopyrimidine-based inhibitor of the pyrimidine biosynthetic enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH), is the first DHODH inhibitor to reach clinical development for treatment of malaria. We describe studies profiling the biological activity, pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties, and safety of DSM265, which supported its advancement to human trials. DSM265 is highly selective toward DHODH of the malaria parasite Plasmodium, efficacious against both blood and liver stages of P. falciparum, and active against drug-resistant parasite isolates. Favorable pharmacokinetic properties of DSM265 are predicted to provide therapeutic concentrations for more than 8 days after a single oral dose in the range of 200 to 400 mg. DSM265 was well tolerated in repeat-dose and cardiovascular safety studies in mice and dogs, was not mutagenic, and was inactive against panels of human enzymes/receptors. The excellent safety profile, blood- and liver-stage activity, and predicted long half-life in humans position DSM265 as a new potential drug combination partner for either single-dose treatment or once-weekly chemoprevention. DSM265 has advantages over current treatment options that are dosed daily or are inactive against the parasite liver stage. PMID:26180101

  20. Nonpharmacologic Treatments for Childhood Constipation : Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabbers, Merit M.; Boluyt, Nicole; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the evidence and assess the reported quality of studies concerning nonpharmacologic treatments for childhood constipation, including fiber, fluid, physical movement, prebiotics, probiotics, behavioral therapy, multidisciplinary treatment, and forms of alternative medicine. ME

  1. Mothers' perceptions and knowledge on childhood malaria in the holendemic Kibaha district, Tanzania: implications for malaria control and the IMCI strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarimo, D S; Lwihula, G K; Minjas, J N;

    2000-01-01

    Prior to an intervention on improving the quality of malaria case management, we assessed mothers' abilities to recognize nonsevere and severe/complicated malaria in children when a child has fever with other physiological and behavioural symptoms associated with malaria. Malaria was mentioned as...... diagnosis and treatment (89.4%). Poor outcome of treatment was ascribed to incorrect diagnosis and prescription, noncompliance at home and ineffective drugs (62.1%). Most mothers (86.6%) would take antipyretic measures first when a child has fever, and subsequently the majority (92.9%) would seek care at a...

  2. Estimates of adherence to treatment of vivax malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Eduardo D; Rodrigues, Luiz Carlos S; Vieira, José Luiz F

    2014-01-01

    Background The relation between therapeutic failure and non-adherence to treatment of malaria has been clearly established. Several measures have been used to estimate adherence to Plasmodium vivax therapy, but few protocols have been validated to ensure reliability of the estimates of adherence. The objective of this study was to validate a five-item-reported-questionnaire derived from original Morisky four-item scale to estimate adherence to P. vivax malaria therapy. Methods A five-item-rep...

  3. Mannitol as adjunct therapy for childhood cerebral malaria in Uganda: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byarugaba Justus S

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several reports have suggested that raised intracranial pressure (ICP is a major contributor to death among children with cerebral malaria. Mannitol, an osmotic diuretic, effectively lowers ICP and is used to treat post-traumatic raised ICP. It is not clear whether intravenous mannitol given to children with cerebral malaria improves clinical outcome. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of mannitol as adjunct therapy on the clinical outcome of children with cerebral malaria. Methods This randomized double-blind placebo controlled clinical trial was carried out at the Emergency Paediatric ward of Mulago Hospital, Uganda's national referral and teaching hospital. One hundred and fifty six children aged 6 to 60 months with cerebral malaria were randomized to either one dose of mannitol 1 g/kg or placebo, in addition to intravenous quinine. Main outcome measures included coma recovery time; time to sit unsupported, begin oral intake; duration of hospitalization; death and adverse effects. Results Time to regain consciousness (p = 0.11, sit unsupported (p = 0.81, time to start oral intake (p = 0.13 and total coma duration (p = 0.07 were similar in both groups. There was no significant difference in the mortality between the placebo (13/80 or 16.3% and mannitol (10/76 or 13.2% groups: RR = 1.2 (CI 0.5–2.7. No adverse effects were observed after administration of mannitol. Conclusion Mannitol had no significant impact on clinical outcome of cerebral malaria. It is difficult to recommend intravenous mannitol as adjunct therapy for childhood cerebral malaria. Clinical registration number ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT00113854

  4. Seeking treatment for symptomatic malaria in Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siba Peter

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria places a significant burden on the limited resources of many low income countries. Knowing more about why and where people seek treatment will enable policy makers to better allocate the limited resources. This study aims to better understand what influences treatment-seeking behaviour for malaria in one such low-income country context, Papua New Guinea (PNG. Methods Two culturally, linguistically and demographically different regions in PNG were selected as study sites. A cross sectional household survey was undertaken in both sites resulting in the collection of data on 928 individuals who reported suffering from malaria in the previous four weeks. A probit model was then used to identify the factors determining whether or not people sought treatment for presumptive malaria. Multinomial logit models also assisted in identifying the factors that determined where people sought treatments. Results Results in this study build upon findings from other studies. For example, while distance in PNG has previously been seen as the primary factor in influencing whether any sort of treatment will be sought, in this study cultural influences and whether it was the first, second or even third treatment for a particular episode of malaria were also important. In addition, although formal health care facilities were the most popular treatment sources, it was also found that traditional healers were a common choice. In turn, the reasons why participants chose a particular type of treatment differed according to the whether they were seeking an initial or subsequent treatments. Conclusions Simply bringing health services closer to where people live may not always result in a greater use of formal health care facilities. Policy makers in PNG need to consider within-country variation in treatment-seeking behaviour, the important role of traditional healers and also ensure that the community fully understands the potential implications

  5. Brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor at the Radiotherapy Department of the A.C.Camargo Hospital between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival, in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferential technique to each clinical situation. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were Gold198, Cesium137 and Iridium192. The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40 Gy to 60 Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20 Gy to 40 Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% (13/21 patients) and 72,2% (13/18 patients) respectively. (author)

  6. Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupasquier, Isabelle

    1989-01-01

    Malaria, the greatest pandemia in the world, claims an estimated one million lives each year in Africa alone. While it may still be said that for the most part malaria is found in what is known as the world's poverty belt, cases are now frequently diagnosed in western countries. Due to resistant strains of malaria which have developed because of…

  7. ADVANCES IN THE TREATMENT OF MALARIA

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Castelli; Lina Rachele TOMASONI; Matteelli, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Malaria still claims a heavy toll of deaths and disabilities even at the beginning of the third millennium. The inappropriate sequential use of drug monotherapy in the past has facilitated the spread of drug-resistant P. falciparum, and to a lesser extend P. vivax, strains in most of the malaria endemic areas, rendering most anti-malarial ineffective. In the last decade, a new combination strategy based on artemisinin derivatives (ACT) has be...

  8. Effect of a community-based delivery of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy on treatment seeking for malaria at health units in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, A K; Schultz Hansen, K; Bygbjerg, I C;

    2008-01-01

    community had sought malaria treatment (70.3%), suggesting the possibility that the novel approach had a positive impact on care seeking for malaria. Similarly, utilization of antenatal care, insecticide-treated nets and delivery care by women in the community was high. The total costs per woman receiving...... benefited from malaria treatment and other services at health units. However, the costs for accessing malaria treatment and other services are high and could be a limiting factor in mitigating the burden of malaria in Uganda....

  9. Reviewing the literature on access to prompt and effective malaria treatment in Kenya: implications for meeting the Abuja targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetteh Gladys

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective case management is central to reducing malaria mortality and morbidity worldwide, but only a minority of those affected by malaria, have access to prompt effective treatment. In Kenya, the Division of Malaria Control is committed to ensuring that 80 percent of childhood fevers are treated with effective anti-malarial medicines within 24 hours of fever onset, but this target is largely unmet. This review aimed to document evidence on access to effective malaria treatment in Kenya, identify factors that influence access, and make recommendations on how to improve prompt access to effective malaria treatment. Since treatment-seeking patterns for malaria are similar in many settings in sub-Saharan Africa, the findings presented in this review have important lessons for other malaria endemic countries. Methods Internet searches were conducted in PUBMED (MEDLINE and HINARI databases using specific search terms and strategies. Grey literature was obtained by soliciting reports from individual researchers working in the treatment-seeking field, from websites of major organizations involved in malaria control and from international reports. Results The review indicated that malaria treatment-seeking occurs mostly in the informal sector; that most fevers are treated, but treatment is often ineffective. Irrational drug use was identified as a problem in most studies, but determinants of this behaviour were not documented. Availability of non-recommended medicines over-the-counter and the presence of substandard anti-malarials in the market are well documented. Demand side determinants of access include perception of illness causes, severity and timing of treatment, perceptions of treatment efficacy, simplicity of regimens and ability to pay. Supply side determinants include distance to health facilities, availability of medicines, prescribing and dispensing practices and quality of medicines. Policy level factors are around

  10. Treatment of Newly Diagnosed and Recurrent Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment of Newly Diagnosed and Recurrent Childhood Brain Tumors The brain is made of different kinds of cells . Childhood ... following: What You Need To Know About™ Brain Tumors Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium (PBTC) For more childhood cancer information ...

  11. MALARIA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard-Fabian Schumacher

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on childhood specific aspects of malaria, especially in resource-poor settings. We summarise the actual knowledge in the field of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention. These aspects are important as malaria is responsible for almost a quarter of all child death in sub-Saharan Africa. Malaria control is thus one key intervention to reduce childhood mortality, especially as malaria is also an important risk factor for other severe infections, namely bacteraemia. In children symptoms are more varied and often mimic other common childhood illness, particularly gastroenteritis, meningitis/encephalitis, or pneumonia. Fever is the key symptom, but the characteristic regular tertian and quartan patterns are rarely observed. There are no pathognomonic features for severe malaria in this age group. The well known clinical (fever, impaired consciousness, seizures, vomiting, respiratory distress and laboratory (severe anaemia, thrombocytopenia, hypoglycaemia, metabolic acidosis, and hyperlactataemia features of severe falciparum malaria in children, are equally typical for severe sepsis. Appropriate therapy (considering species, resistance patterns and individual patient factors – possibly a drug combination of an artemisinin derivative with a long-acting antimalarial drug - reduces treatment duration to only three days and should be urgently started. While waiting for the results of ongoing vaccine trials, all effort should be made to better implement other malaria-control measures like the use of treated bed-nets and new chemoprophylaxis regimens.

  12. MALARIA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard-Fabian Schumacher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    This review is focused on childhood specific aspects of malaria, especially in resource-poor settings. We summarise the actual knowledge in the field of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention.

    These aspects are important as malaria is responsible for almost a quarter of all child death in sub-Saharan Africa. Malaria control is thus one key intervention to reduce childhood mortality, especially as malaria is also an important risk factor for other severe infections, namely bacteraemia.

    In children symptoms are more varied and often mimic other common childhood illness, particularly gastroenteritis, meningitis/encephalitis, or pneumonia. Fever is the key symptom, but the characteristic regular tertian and quartan patterns are rarely observed. There are no pathognomonic features for severe malaria in this age group. The well known clinical (fever, impaired consciousness, seizures, vomiting, respiratory distress and laboratory (severe anaemia, thrombocytopenia, hypoglycaemia, metabolic acidosis, and hyperlactataemia features of severe falciparum malaria in children, are equally typical for severe sepsis.

    Appropriate therapy (considering species, resistance patterns and individual patient factors – possibly a drug combination of an artemisinin derivative with a long-acting antimalarial drug - reduces treatment duration to only three days and should be urgently started.

    While waiting for the results of ongoing vaccine trials, all effort should be made to better implement other malaria-control measures like the use of treated bed-nets and new chemoprophylaxis regimens.

  13. Treatment of falciparum malaria in the age of drug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Shanks G

    2006-01-01

    The growing problem of drug resistance has greatly complicated the treatment for falciparum malaria. Whereaschloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine could once cure most infections, this is no longer true and requiresexamination of alternative regimens. Not all treatment failures are drug resistant and other issues such asexpired antimalarials and patient compliance need to be considered. Continuation of a failing treatment policyafter drug resistance is established suppresses infections rat...

  14. Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Prevention (CDC) web site for information about travel health concerns for international locations before you go. Prevention ... in the evening, when mosquitoes are typically more active. Medicine is also ... malaria? If you plan to travel to a country where malaria is common, you' ...

  15. Artemether-lumefantrine treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achieving adequate antimalarial drug exposure is essential for curing malaria. Day 7 blood or plasma lumefantrine concentrations provide a simple measure of drug exposure that correlates well with artemether-lumefantrine efficacy. However, the 'therapeutic' day 7 lumefantrine......-lumefantrine for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria, to define therapeutic day 7 lumefantrine concentrations and identify patient factors that substantially alter these concentrations. A systematic review of PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar, ClinicalTrials.gov and conference proceedings identified all...... achieve day 7 lumefantrine concentrations ≥200 ng/ml and high cure rates in most uncomplicated malaria patients. Three groups are at increased risk of treatment failure: very young children (particularly those underweight-for-age); patients with high parasitemias; and patients in very low transmission...

  16. Modelling malaria treatment practices in Bangladesh using spatial statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque Ubydul

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria treatment-seeking practices vary worldwide and Bangladesh is no exception. Individuals from 88 villages in Rajasthali were asked about their treatment-seeking practices. A portion of these households preferred malaria treatment from the National Control Programme, but still a large number of households continued to use drug vendors and approximately one fourth of the individuals surveyed relied exclusively on non-control programme treatments. The risks of low-control programme usage include incomplete malaria treatment, possible misuse of anti-malarial drugs, and an increased potential for drug resistance. Methods The spatial patterns of treatment-seeking practices were first examined using hot-spot analysis (Local Getis-Ord Gi statistic and then modelled using regression. Ordinary least squares (OLS regression identified key factors explaining more than 80% of the variation in control programme and vendor treatment preferences. Geographically weighted regression (GWR was then used to assess where each factor was a strong predictor of treatment-seeking preferences. Results Several factors including tribal affiliation, housing materials, household densities, education levels, and proximity to the regional urban centre, were found to be effective predictors of malaria treatment-seeking preferences. The predictive strength of each of these factors, however, varied across the study area. While education, for example, was a strong predictor in some villages, it was less important for predicting treatment-seeking outcomes in other villages. Conclusion Understanding where each factor is a strong predictor of treatment-seeking outcomes may help in planning targeted interventions aimed at increasing control programme usage. Suggested strategies include providing additional training for the Building Resources across Communities (BRAC health workers, implementing educational programmes, and addressing economic factors.

  17. Malaria (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Malaria KidsHealth > For Parents > Malaria Print A A A ... Prevention Diagnosis and Treatment en español Malaria About Malaria Malaria is a common infection in hot, tropical ...

  18. The role of private drug vendors as malaria treatment providers in selected malaria endemic areas of Sri Lanka

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajakaruna, R S; Weerasinghe, M; Alifrangis, M;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The involvement of private drug vendors in malaria treatment is particularly high in developing countries and understanding their practices and knowledge about antimalarials and malaria treatment will aid in devising strategies to increase the correct use of antimalarials...... and improve adherence to the government's malaria drug policy. Results of a study on the knowledge and practices of the private drug vendors conducted in seven districts in Sri Lanka, mostly in malarious areas are presented. METHODS: Data on awareness of government's malaria drug policy, practice of...... issuing antimalarials, knowledge about malaria and antimalarial drugs were collected from the drug vendors using pre-tested questionnaire in vernacular language. Data were statistically analysed using Stata 8.2. Chi-square test was carried out for individual explanatory variables and a logistic regression...

  19. Maternal diagnosis and treatment of children's fever in an endemic malaria zone of Uganda: implications for the malaria control programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubanga, R G; Norman, S; Ewbank, D; Karamagi, C

    1997-10-14

    of the fever. There is need to educate mothers to suspect malaria first in every case of febrile illness, just like the doctors do, and about the first line drugs for the treatment of malaria. PMID:9352002

  20. Artesdiaquine and Primaquine combined treatment is more effective for Malaria vivax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoso Santoso

    2012-07-01

    samping   Abstract Background: Malaria treatment in Souh Sumatra has been using artesdiaquine since 2009 for falciparum and vivax malaria. This study is aimed to examine the comparison of the effectiveness of anti-malaria drugs artesdiaquine and its side effects between falciparum malaria and vivax malaria treatment. Methods: This consecutive sampling quasi experimental research was conducted during February to June 2010 in a district of South Sumatra (Indonesia. Diagnosis based on peripheral blood smear plasmodium finding. All patients positive for Plasmodium were observed for 28 days: 0-3 (D0 to 3th (D3, 7th (D7, 14th (D14, 21th (D21 and 28th day (D28. Therapy of artesdiaquine on D0 to D2, while primaquine was only gives on D0. The observations of side effects were done on D0 to D3. The assessments of drug efficacy were immediately after D28. Results: Twenty three falciparum malaria patients and and twelve  vivax malaria patients were included as study subjects Initial clinical symptoms of chills, headache, dizziness, anorexia, and muscle aches were found in falciparum malaria subjects and vivax malaria subjects were 91.3% and 50% respectively. The results showed anti-malaria drugs artesdiaquine had 100% efficacy of vivax malaria patients however for falciparum malaria acquired was only 87%. Artesdiaquine side effects consisted of itching, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain, were more prevalent in patients with falciparum malaria than vivax malaria. Conclusion: The number of malaria vivax patients less clinical symptoms occurred than falciparum malaria. The effectiveness of artesdiaquine anti malaria drugs combination for vivax malaria was better than falciparum malaria. (Health Science Indones 2010; 1: 26 - 32

  1. Determinants of delay in seeking malaria treatment for children under-five years in parts of South Eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuocha, Uchechukwu Madukaku; Okpanma, Austin C; Nwakwuo, Geoffrey Chima; Dozie, Ikechukwu Nosike Simplicius

    2014-12-01

    One of the components of the current WHO strategy to fight malaria is early recognition and prompt and appropriate treatment. We investigated determinants of delay in seeking early and appropriate malaria treatment for children (0-5 years) in Ohaji/Egbema, South Eastern Nigeria. Data was collected using structured pre-tested questionnaires elicited in the local language (Igbo) to 738 consenting mothers within the child bearing age (15-49 years). About twenty-two percent (22%) of the respondents sought treatment within 24 h for their children with malaria and were excluded from further investigation. More than half of the remaining respondents (51.5%) delayed in seeking treatment because they had to watch their children for some days, while 21.4% were due to financial difficulties. The age, parity, marital status/type of marriage and educational attainment of the mothers including family social-economic status were found to be statistically related to delay in seeking appropriate treatment (P < 0.05). Wrong first line treatment choices by the respondents also contributed to this delay. These results underscore the need to improve awareness of mothers and caregivers on the need and ways of seeking early, appropriate and effective treatment for their children who have malaria. This is very important if the WHO strategy of early recognition, prompt and appropriate treatment is to be effective so as to sufficiently reduce mortality and morbidity due to malaria among children in endemic rural areas. It will also aid in the proper management and treatment of other childhood febrile illnesses. PMID:24729003

  2. Treatment of severe falciparum malaria: quinine versus artesunate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh Patel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria is the most important disease of human being. More than 40% of the world’s population is considered to be at risk of exposure of this disease. Malaria infection has been increasing over recent years due to combination of factors including increasing resistance of malarial parasite. Most of the strains of P. falciparum are now resistance to conventional drugs like chloroquine in many areas. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of quinine and artesunate in treatment of P. falciparum malaria. Methods: This is hospital based prospective study, conducted amongst 35 randomly selected patients of severe P. falciparum malaria. Patients with any contraindications of either drug were excluded to avoid bias. Standard statistical tests were applied for qualitative as well as quantitative data. Results: As per the study end point results of difference of mortality in patients receiving either drug was not significant (p > 0.75, but difference in clinical parameters like fever clearance time (p <0.01, parasite clearance time (p < 0.001 and coma resolution time (p < 0.001 were significant among patients receiving artesunate. There were no any significant differences in adverse effects of both the drugs. Mortality was same in both arms taking either drug. Conclusions: Artesunate is as good as quinine in mortality aspect but artesunate is superior in fever clearance time (FCT & parasite clearance time (PCT. Coma resolution time is faster with quinine as compared to artesunate. There are no significant adverse effects of either drug. So artesunate is equivalent or superior for treatment for severe falciparum malaria. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(1.000: 30-36

  3. Intermittent Preventive Treatment to Reduce the Burden of Malaria in Children: New Evidence on Integration and Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Konaté, AT; Yaro, JB; Ouédraogo, AZ; Diarra, A.; Gansané, A; Soulama, I.; Kangoyé, DT; Kaboré, Y; Ouédraogo, E.; Ouédraogo, A.; Tiono, AB; Ouédraogo, IN; Chandramohan, D; Cousens, S; Milligan, PJ

    2011-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Malaria accounts for one in five of all childhood deaths in Africa and of the one million annual malarial deaths world-wide, over 75% occur in African children under 5 years old. Malaria also causes severe morbidity in children, such as anemia, low birth weight, and neurological problems, which compromise the health and development of millions of children living in malaria endemic areas. As much of the impact of malaria on African children can be effectively preven...

  4. Late deaths after treatment for childhood cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkins, M M; Kingston, J. E.; Kinnier Wilson, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation of 749 deaths occurring among 4082 patients surviving at least five years after the diagnosis of childhood cancer in Britain before 1971 has been undertaken. Of the 738 with sufficient information the numbers of deaths attributable to the following causes were: recurrent tumour, 550 (74%), a second primary tumour, 61 (8%), a medical condition related to treatment of the tumour, 49 (7%), an traumatic death unrelated to the tumour or its treatment, 34 (5%), finally, any other c...

  5. Prevention and treatment practices and implications for malaria control in Mukono District Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, A K; Bygbjerg, I C; Magnussen, P

    2008-01-01

    Available data in Uganda indicate a resurgence of malaria morbidity and mortality countrywide. This study assessed the burden of malaria, treatment and prevention practices in order initiate a policy debate on the scaling-up of current interventions. A triangulation of methods using a cross......-sectional survey and key informant interviews was used to assess self-reported malaria at a household level in Mukono District, Uganda. A total of 5583 households were surveyed, and a high proportion (2897, 51.9%) reported a person with malaria two weeks prior to the survey. Only 546 households (9.8%) owned and...... used insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) for malaria prevention. Similarly, only a few households (86, 1.5%) used indoor residual spraying. Self-treatment with home-stocked drugs was high, yet there was low awareness of the effectiveness of expired drugs on malaria treatment. Self-reported malaria was...

  6. [Current drugs for the treatment of tropical malaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernex, M; Jaquet, C; Mittelholzer, M L; Reber, R; Stürchler, D

    1991-01-22

    The occurrence in the early 60's of stable resistance to chloroquine among Plasmodium falciparum strains in the Amazonas and on the Thai-Cambodian border has been a shock for all malariologists. This led to the search for new antimalarials without cross resistance with chloroquine. For each new drug, one of the major concerns was to define how rapidly parasites would develop resistance to this compound. Drug combinations were taken into consideration so as to achieve a delay in the appearance of resistance. The decision to test a triple combination has led to the development of Fansimef, a fixed combination with tablets containing 250 mg mefloquine, 500 mg sulfadoxine and 25 mg pyrimethamine. A very relevant delay in the development of resistance was found both in-vivo--in the P. berghei model--and in-vitro using P. falciparum. Fansimef has also been under investigations for malaria. Controlled clinical trials were performed in Africa, South America and South East Asia. The documentation for this new indication will be submitted to registration authorities in 1991. A preference alternative to continuous chemoprophylaxis is stand-by malaria treatment for travellers to regions where the malaria risk is relatively low. Stand-by treatment is under investigations in France and in Switzerland. In the search for alternative remedies against drug resistant P. falciparum malaria our attention was directed to Yingzhaosu, a new sesquiterpene peroxide of plant origin from traditional Chinese medicine. A short and convenient synthesis of this ring system gave access to a variety of structural analogues of Yingzhaosu.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1998081

  7. The Potential Contribution of Mass Treatment to the Control of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Lucy C Okell; Griffin, Jamie T.; Immo Kleinschmidt; T Déirdre Hollingsworth; Churcher, Thomas S.; White, Michael J.; Teun Bousema; Drakeley, Chris J; Azra C Ghani

    2011-01-01

    Mass treatment as a means to reducing P. falciparum malaria transmission was used during the first global malaria eradication campaign and is increasingly being considered for current control programmes. We used a previously developed mathematical transmission model to explore both the short and long-term impact of possible mass treatment strategies in different scenarios of endemic transmission. Mass treatment is predicted to provide a longer-term benefit in areas with lower malaria transmis...

  8. Treatment Strategies in Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    StephaniePuget

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The surgical management of craniopharyngioma in children has been one of the most controversial topics in pediatric neurosurgery. In theory, based on its benign histology total surgical excision could provide a cure. However, the therapeutic goals for pediatric craniopharyngioma are not only the cure of the disease but also the preservation of function. It has been widely established that in some particular cases total excision could leads to inacceptable damages, especially those linked to hypothalamic functions. During the last 15 years, we observed worldwide a growing advocacy for less-invasive pediatric craniopharyngioma resection supported by international consensus conferences. The state-of-the-art in the surgical management of some craniopharyngioma is now turning to multi-modality treatment strategies (combination surgery and radiotherapy aiming to limit morbidiy. Recent literature and our own experience helped to develop risk-adapted treatment strategies at initial diagnosis, respecting hypothalamic structures to provide optimal quality of life for these children. Following new algorithms of treatment, preliminary results with intention to spare the hypothalamus seem to be encouraging but the long-term clinical outcome in terms of post irradiation complications and relapse management is currently unknown.

  9. On the effects of malaria treatment on parasite drug resistance--probability modelling of genotyped malaria infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, Cletus Kwa; Thorburn, Daniel; Ghilagaber, Gebrenegus; Gil, Pedro; Björkman, Anders

    2013-01-01

    We compare the frequency of resistant genes of malaria parasites before treatment and at first malaria incidence after treatment. The data come from a clinical trial at two health facilities in Tanzania and concerns single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at three positions believed to be related to resistance to malaria treatment. A problem is that mixed infections are common, which both obscures the underlying frequency of alleles at each locus as well as the associations between loci in samples where alleles are mixed. We use combinatorics and quite involved probability methods to handle multiple infections and multiple haplotypes. The infection with the different haplotypes seemed to be independent of each other. We showed that at two of the three studied SNPs, the proportion of resistant genes had increased after treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine alone but when treated in combination with artesunate, no effect was noticed. First recurrences of malaria associated more with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine alone as treatment than when in combination with artesunate. We also found that the recruited children had two different ongoing malaria infections where the parasites had different gene types. PMID:24127546

  10. Behavioural aspects of travellers in their use of malaria presumptive treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Schlagenhauf, P.; Steffen, R.; Tschopp, A.; P. Van Damme; Mittelholzer, M. L.; Leuenberger, H; Reinke, C.

    1995-01-01

    The use of stand-by treatment for malaria by travellers depends on their knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. We examined the behavioural aspects of a cohort of travellers from Switzerland to low-risk malarial areas who, on recruitment, were provided with a kit containing medication for stand-by treatment, guidelines on the diagnosis of malaria, and materials for collection of blood samples for later confirmation of malaria. All subjects were urged to seek medical advice at the first signs of ...

  11. Childhood obesity treatment and prevention. Psychological perspectives of clinical approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Catena Quattropani; Teresa Buccheri

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This work focuses on clinical psychologist’ presence within childhood obesity prevention programmes in several countries. Method: The Authors collected articles considering psychological, biological and social aspects linked to childhood obesity. Results: Studies reveal that childhood obesity prevention programmes are based on biological, medical and educational aspects; clinical psychologists up until now have been engaged almost exclusively in the treatment of obesity. Conclusion...

  12. Childhood obesity treatment and prevention. Psychological perspectives of clinical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Catena Quattropani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This work focuses on clinical psychologist’ presence within childhood obesity prevention programmes in several countries. Method: The Authors collected articles considering psychological, biological and social aspects linked to childhood obesity. Results: Studies reveal that childhood obesity prevention programmes are based on biological, medical and educational aspects; clinical psychologists up until now have been engaged almost exclusively in the treatment of obesity. Conclusions: There is a clear need to consider psychological aspects (emotional, cognitive and relational related to the childhood obesity’s causes and involve psychologists in its prevention projects. Keywords: childhood obesity, overweight, multidisciplinary approach, clinical psychology, prevention, treatment

  13. Awareness and Treatment Seeking Behaviour of People Affected With Malaria in Coastal South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Unnikrishnan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria is a serious global health challenge. Mangalore, Karnataka, India is an endemic area for malaria and there has not been much research on this area. Thus it has been felt that this study will provide an insight into efficacy of the cur­rent malaria control programs and identifying targets for future educational campaigns and provide guidance for existing pro­grams.Methods: The study was community based descriptive study and the data were collected by interviewing the subjects who had malaria infections in the last 12 months. The study duration was 24 months.Results: Two hundred and five individuals >= 15 years of age and who had at least 1 episode of malaria in the past 12 months were interviewed. Within the study population, 80.5% of the subjects correctly identified mosquitoes as the source of malaria. Seventy one percent of the interviewed subject completed the full course of medicine prescribed to them. Eighty one percent of the respondent said that no health education was given to them regarding prevention of malaria majority of the respondents spent between $10 to $30 for treatment of malaria.Conclusions: The malaria awareness campaign should be intensified as not all the people are aware to   the cause of malaria and compliance to the treatment has to be increased by sensitizing the patients. 

  14. Reduced Efficacy of Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria in Malnourished Children▿

    OpenAIRE

    Danquah, Ina; Dietz, Ekkehart; Zanger, Philipp; Reither, Klaus; Ziniel, Peter; Bienzle, Ulrich; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.

    2009-01-01

    Intermittent preventive treatment in infants with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTi-SP) reduces malaria episodes by 20 to 59% across Africa. This protective efficacy, however, may be affected by the high frequency of malnutrition in African infants. We analyzed the impact of malnutrition as defined by anthropometry on the incidence of malaria and on the protective efficacy of IPTi in a cohort of 1,200 children in northern Ghana, where malaria is hyperendemic. These children received IPTi-SP or ...

  15. Community perceptions of malaria and malaria treatment behaviour in a rural district of Ghana: implications for artemisinin combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boahen Owusu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ was introduced in Ghana as the first line drug for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in 2004. We report the perceptions of malaria and malaria treatment behaviour, the community awareness of and perceptions about AS-AQ two years after the introduction of this ACT treatment for malaria. Methods Two surveys were conducted; a cross-sectional survey of 729 randomly selected household heads (urban-362, rural-367 and 282 women with children Results Majority of respondents ( > 75% in the sampled survey mentioned mosquito bites as the cause of malaria. Other causes mentioned include environmental factors (e.g. dirty surroundings and standing in the sun. Close to 60% of the household heads and 40% of the care-givers interviewed did not know about AS-AQ. The community respondents who knew about and had ever taken AS-AQ perceived it to be a good drug; although they mentioned they had experienced some side effects including headaches and body weakness. Co-blistered AS-AQ was available in all the government health facilities in the study area. Different formulations of ACTs were however found in urban chemical shops but not in rural chemical stores where monotherapy antimalarials were predominant. Conclusion The knowledge of fever as a symptom of malaria is high among the study population. The awareness of AS-AQ therapy and its side-effect was low in the study area. Community education and sensitization, targeting all categories of the population, has to be intensified to ensure an efficient implementation process.

  16. Treatment of fevers prior to introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in registered drug shops in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Mbonye, AK; Lal, S; Cundill, B; Hansen, KS; Clarke, S.; Magnussen, P

    2013-01-01

    Background: Since drug shops play an important role in treatment of fever, introducing rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria at drug shops may have the potential of targeting anti-malarial drugs to those with malaria parasites and improve rational drug use. As part of a cluster randomized trial to examine impact on appropriate treatment of malaria in drug shops in Uganda and adherence to current malaria treatment policy guidelines, a survey was conducted to estimate baseline prevalence of...

  17. Malaria, environmental change, and an [corrected] historical epidemiology of childhood 'cold fevers': popular interpretations from southwestern Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles-Vernick, Tamara; Traoré, Abdoulaye; Sirima, Sodiomon B

    2011-05-01

    We examine how southwestern Burkina Faso populations interpret political ecological and social change for the past 40 years to assert a changing epidemiology of childhood "cold fevers"-malaria-like illnesses. Lay knowledge about "cold fevers" is historically produced, reflecting political economic, social, ecological and biomedical changes, and the historical consciousness of people living with these illnesses. While informants insisted that dislocations wrought by a post-colonial irrigation scheme increased cold fevers, they offered different explanations for their increased incidence and intensity. This historical epidemiology of cold fevers may influence parents' care decisions, but global public health interventions are rapidly changing therapeutic access. PMID:21507704

  18. Hepatosplenomegaly is associated with low regulatory and Th2 responses to schistosome antigens in childhood schistosomiasis and malaria coinfection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Shona; Jones, Francis M.; Mwatha, Joseph K.;

    2008-01-01

    to immunological inflammation. For a cohort of school-age children, whole-blood cultures were stimulated with S. mansoni soluble egg antigen (SEA) or soluble worm antigen (SWA). Responses to SWA were found to be predominantly Th2 cytokines; however, they were not significantly associated with either...... in response to stimulation with SEA were high, and a negative association between presentation with hepatomegaly and the levels of the regulatory cytokines interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor beta(1) suggests that a possible mechanism for childhood hepatomegaly in areas where both malaria...

  19. Possible treatment failure of artemether-lumefantrine in an Italian traveler with uncomplicated falciparum malaria.

    OpenAIRE

    Ernestina Carla Repetto; Claudio Giacomazzi; Antonio Traverso

    2011-01-01

    Artemisinin-combination therapies (ACTs) are recommended for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in endemic areas with multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum. We report a case of possible artemether-lumefantrine failure in an Italian traveler with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria imported from Democratic Republic of Congo.

  20. Intravenous artesunate reduces parasite clearance time, duration of intensive care, and hospital treatment in patients with severe malaria in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurth, Florian; Develoux, Michel; Mechain, Matthieu; Clerinx, Jan; Antinori, Spinello; Gjørup, Ida E; Gascon, Joaquím; Mørch, Kristine; Nicastri, Emanuele; Ramharter, Michael; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Visser, Leo; Rolling, Thierry; Zanger, Philipp; Calleri, Guido; Salas-Coronas, Joaquín; Nielsen, Henrik Ib; Just-Nübling, Gudrun; Neumayr, Andreas; Hachfeld, Anna; Schmid, Matthias L; Antonini, Pietro; Pongratz, Peter; Kern, Peter; Saraiva da Cunha, José; Soriano-Arandes, Antoni; Schunk, Mirjam; Suttorp, Norbert; Hatz, Christoph; Zoller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous artesunate improves survival in severe malaria, but clinical trial data from nonendemic countries are scarce. The TropNet severe malaria database was analyzed to compare outcomes of artesunate vs quinine treatment. Artesunate reduced parasite clearance time and duration of intensive...... care unit and hospital treatment in European patients with imported severe malaria....

  1. Free treatment, rapid malaria diagnostic tests and malaria village workers can hasten progress toward achieving the malaria related millennium development goals: the Médecins Sans Frontières experience from Chad, Sierra-Leone and Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Tayler-Smith

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Halving the burden of malaria by 2015 and ensuring that 80% of people with malaria receive treatment is among the health related targets of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs. Despite political momentum toward achieving this target, progress is slow and many with malaria (particularly in poor and rural communities in Africa are still without access to effective treatment. Finding ways to improve access to anti-malarial treatment in Africa is essential to achieve the malaria related and other MDG targets. During its work in Chad, Sierra Leone and Mali in the period 2004 to 2008, Médecins Sans Frontières showed that it was possible to significantly improve access to effective malaria treatment through: i the removal of health centre level user fees for essential healthcare for vulnerable population groups, ii the introduction of free community based treatment for children using malaria village workers to diagnose and treat simple malaria in communities where geographical and financial barriers limited access to effective malaria care, iii the improved diagnosis and treatment of malaria using rapid diagnosis tests and artemisinin based combination therapy, at both health facilities and in the community. This paper describes and discusses these strategies and their related impact.

  2. Appropriating "malaria": local responses to malaria treatment and prevention in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado, Stefanie; Manderson, Lenore; Obrist, Brigit; Tanner, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    A continuing dilemma for medical and public health professionals is the apparent lack of fit between global and local knowledge systems and technologies. This is illustrated in relationship to malaria, with implications in the management of the disease. Ethnographic research was conducted from 2003-2005 in urban Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire, on community understandings of malaria and the relationship of this to its prevention and control. Malaria is referred to locally as palu, reflecting the incorporation of malaria into a local illness taxonomy. Although the labeling of malaria-related symptoms as palu has wide currency, preventive measures such as bed nets, as advocated by public health authorities, have not been accepted readily or evenly. Drawing on theoretical understandings of the introduction, transfer, and appropriation of concepts and material objects, we examine the processes of localization in relation to malaria in Abidjan, and in doing so, highlight the challenges for health professionals seeking to scale-up public health interventions. PMID:21218358

  3. Osteonecrosis - complication at oncological treatment in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteonecrosis is one of serious complications at oncological treatment of children. The etiopathogenesis has not been completely elucidated, mostly it has a multifactorial character. The incidence is in 1,5 - 9,3 % range. ON affects predominantly the weight bearing joints. It affects mostly the patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and those at adolescent age. The course of disease is unpredictable. The changes at early stages can be reversible, but at some patients the disease progresses and can lead to a disability. At Children oncology clinic of Children teaching hospital in Bratislava during the years 1992 - 2008 we identified 12 patients affected by ON out of 146 children with ALL (8,2 %), 1 out of 42 with NHL (2,4 %) and 1 out of 42 with HL (2,4 %). The age at diagnosis of malignity: 4y7m - 17y, the age at diagnosis ON: 10y5m - 19y. Further course: regression - 2 patients, stabilised state - 6 patients, progression - 3 patients. 3 patients were lost from our follow up. The treatment was conservative, with the exception of one patient, who had to undergo surgery due to the progression of disease. To avoid the risk of inducing ON during the treatment of oncological patient in childhood it is important to optimalize the therapeutical protocols and to diagnose this complication early. (author)

  4. Pyronaridine for treatment of Plasmodium ovale and Plasmodium malariae infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Ringwald, P; Bickii, J; Same-Ekobo, A.; Basco, L K

    1997-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of oral pyronaridine was assessed in 22 symptomatic Cameroonian patients infected with Plasmodium ovale or Plasmodium malariae. All patients were cured on or before day 4. In vitro drug assays confirmed the sensitivity of P. ovale and P. malariae isolates to chloroquine and pyronaridine.

  5. Malaria treatment-seeking behaviour and drug prescription practices in an area of low transmission in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndyomugyenyi, Richard; Magnussen, Pascal; Clarke, Siân

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of malaria and treatment-seeking behaviour was investigated in an area of low transmission in Uganda to help health services to plan for appropriate interventions to control malaria. Although knowledge of malaria symptoms, preventive methods and malaria risks was widespread, few were...... actually using insecticide-treated nets. Many patients (25%) had received treatment prior to visiting a health facility, with drug shops and general stores being the main sources of treatment. Some shops dispensed quinine, a second-line drug recommended for complicated malaria. Prescription practices of...

  6. Emerging drug -resistance and guidelines for treatment of malaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing prevalence of multi-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria worldwide is a serious public health threat to the global control of malaria, especially in poor countries like Pakistan. In many countries chloroquine-resistance is a huge problem, accounting for more than 90% of malaria cases. In Pakistan, resistance to chloroquine is on the rise and reported in up to 16- 62% of Plasmodium falciparum. Four to 25% of Plasmodium falciparum also reported to be resistant to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and several cases of delayed parasite clearance have been observed in patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria treated with quinine. In this article we have introduced the concept of artemisinin- based combination therapy (ACT) and emphasize the use of empiric combination therapy for all patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria to prevent development of drug resistance and to obtain additive and synergistic killing of parasite. (author)

  7. Implementing intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnancy:review of prospects, achievements, challenges and agenda for research

    OpenAIRE

    Mubyazi, Godfrey Martin; Magnussen, Pascal; Goodman, Catherine; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Kitua, Andrew Yona; Olsen, Oystein Evjen; Byskov, Jens; Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Bloch, Paul

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Implementing Intermittent Preventive Treatment for malaria in Pregnancy (IPTp) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) through antenatal care (ANC) clinics is recommended for malaria endemic countries. Vast biomedical literature on malaria prevention focuses more on the epidemiological and cost-effectiveness analyses of the randomised controlled trials carried out in selected geographical settings. Such studies fail to elucidate the economic, psychosocial, managerial, organization a...

  8. Brachytherapy on treatment of childhood rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were: to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferencial technique to each clinical situation. Seventeen patients were female and four male with a median age of five years (range of 3 months to 15 years). Seven children showed head and neck tumors, seven in extremities, five genital, one perineal and one in trunk. Four patients were group II, fifteen group III and two group IV according the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS) classification. The histologic type presented eighteen embryonary rhabdomyosarcoma, one alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and in two patients was not possible to be determined. The therapeutic approach included induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy to the primary site in association or not with surgical ressection and maintenance chemotherapy. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were: Gold198, Cesium137 and Iridium192. The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40Gy to 60Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20Gy to 40Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% ((13(21)) patients) and 72.2% ((13(18)) patients) respectively. Staging and age showed statistic significance for survival. Distant metastasis occurred in seven patients (33.3%), mainly to the lungs. Patients treated with total radiation dose higher than 45Gy showed more incidence of

  9. Improving childhood obesity treatment using new technologies: the ETIOBE System

    OpenAIRE

    Baños Rivera, Rosa María; Cebolla i Martí, Ausiàs Josep; Botella Arbona, Cristina; García Palacios, Azucena; Oliver, Elia; Zaragozá, Irene; Alcañiz, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Childhood obesity is an increasing public health problem in western culture. Sedentary lifestyles and an “obesogenic environment” are the main influences on children leading to an increase in obesity. The objective of this paper is to describe an e-health platform for the treatment and prevention of childhood obesity called ETIOBE. This e-health platform is an e-therapy system for the treatment of obesity, aimed at improving treatment adherence and promoting the mechanisms of self-control...

  10. Evaluation of medication adherence methods in the treatment of malaria in Rwandan infants

    OpenAIRE

    Stichele Robert; Vrijens Bernard; Kips Jan G; Kayumba Pierre; Twagirumukiza Marc; Vervaet Chris; Remon Jean; Van Bortel M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To compare three methods for evaluating treatment adherence in a 7-day controlled treatment period for malaria in children in Rwanda. Methods Fifty-six children (< 5 years) with malaria were recruited at the University Hospital of Butare, Rwanda. Patients were treated with quinine sulfate, taste-masked, pellets during seven days: three days in hospital (in-patient) followed by a four-day out-patient period. Three methods to evaluate medication adherence among patients were...

  11. Modeling the Impact of Intermittent Preventative Treatment on the Spread of Drug-Resistant Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Prudhomme O'Meara, Wendy; Smith, David L; McKenzie, F. Ellis

    2006-01-01

    Background Treatment of asymptomatic individuals, regardless of their malaria infection status, with regularly spaced therapeutic doses of antimalarial drugs has been proposed as a method for reducing malaria morbidity and mortality. This strategy, called intermittent preventive treatment (IPT), is currently employed for pregnant women and is being studied for infants (IPTi) as well. As with any drug-based intervention strategy, it is important to understand how implementation may affect the ...

  12. Intermittent Preventive Treatment to Reduce the Burden of Malaria in Children: New Evidence on Integration and Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Bojang, KA; Akor, F.; Conteh, L; Webb, E.; Bittaye, O; Conway, DJ; Jasseh, M; Wiseman, V; Milligan, PJ; Greenwood, B.

    2011-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background In sub-Saharan Africa, malaria kills 800,000 people, the majority of whom are children, every year. Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) of malaria is an effective malaria control strategy. IPT involves administration of antimalarial drugs at defined time intervals to individuals regardless of whether they are known to be infected with malaria to prevent morbidity and mortality from the infection. IPT was initially recommended for pregnant women (IPTp) who are g...

  13. Community response to artemisinin-based combination therapy for childhood malaria: a case study from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyato Daniel J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New malaria treatment guidelines in Tanzania have led to the large-scale deployment of artemether-lumefantrine (Coartem®, popularly known as ALu or dawa mseto. Very little is known about how people in malaria endemic areas interpret policy makers' decision to replace existing anti-malarials, such as sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP with "new" treatment regimens, such as ALu or other formulations of ACT. This study was conducted to examine community level understandings and interpretations of ALu's efficacy and side-effects. The paper specifically examines the perceived efficacy of ALu as articulated by the mothers of young children diagnosed with malaria and prescribed ALu. Methods Participant observation, six focus group discussions in two large villages, followed by interviews with a random sample of 110 mothers of children less than five years of age, who were diagnosed with malaria and prescribed ALu. Additionally, observations were conducted in two village dispensaries involving interactions between mothers/caretakers and health care providers. Results While more than two-thirds of the mothers had an overall negative disposition toward SP, 97.5% of them spoke favourably about ALu, emphasizing it's ability to help their children to rapidly recover from malaria, without undesirable side-effects. 62.5% of the mothers reported that they were spending less money dealing with malaria than previously when their child was treated with SP. 88% of the mothers had waited for 48 hours or more after the onset of fever before taking their child to the dispensary. Mothers' knowledge and reporting of ALu's dosage was, in many cases, inconsistent with the recommended dosage schedule for children. Conclusion Deployment of ALu has significantly changed community level perceptions of anti-malarial treatment. However, mothers continue to delay seeking care before accessing ALu, limiting the impact of highly subsidized rollout of the drug

  14. Deployment of early diagnosis and mefloquine-artesunate treatment of falciparum malaria in Thailand: the Tak Malaria Initiative.

    OpenAIRE

    Carrara, VI; Sirilak, S; Thonglairuam, J; Rojanawatsirivet, C; Proux, S.; Gilbos, V; Brockman, A.; Ashley, EA; McGready, R.; Krudsood, S; Leemingsawat, S; Looareesuwan, S; Singhasivanon, P.; White, N; Nosten, F.

    2006-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis and treatment with artesunate-mefloquine combination therapy (MAS) have reduced the transmission of falciparum malaria dramatically and halted the progression of mefloquine resistance in camps for displaced persons along the Thai-Burmese border, an area of low and seasonal transmission of multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. We extended the same combination drug strategy to all other communities (estimated population 450,000) living in five border districts of...

  15. Mannitol as adjunct therapy for childhood cerebral malaria in Uganda: A randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Byarugaba Justus S; Ndeezi Grace; Namutangula Beatrice; Tumwine James K

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Several reports have suggested that raised intracranial pressure (ICP) is a major contributor to death among children with cerebral malaria. Mannitol, an osmotic diuretic, effectively lowers ICP and is used to treat post-traumatic raised ICP. It is not clear whether intravenous mannitol given to children with cerebral malaria improves clinical outcome. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of mannitol as adjunct therapy on the clinical outcome of children...

  16. Efficacy of Chloroquine for the Treatment of Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Rosa Elena Mejia; Banegas, Engels Ilich; Mendoza, Meisy; Diaz, Cesar; Bucheli, Sandra Tamara Mancero; Fontecha, Gustavo A.; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Goldman, Ira; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Zambrano, Jose Orlinder Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is officially used for the primary treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Honduras. In this study, the therapeutic efficacy of CQ for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in the municipality of Puerto Lempira, Gracias a Dios, Honduras was evaluated using the Pan American Health Organization—World Health Organization protocol with a follow-up of 28 days. Sixty-eight patients from 6 months to 60 years of age microscopically diagnosed with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria were included in the final analysis. All patients who were treated with CQ (25 mg/kg over 3 days) cleared parasitemia by day 3 and acquired no new P. falciparum infection within 28 days of follow-up. All the parasite samples sequenced for CQ resistance mutations (pfcrt) showed only the CQ-sensitive genotype (CVMNK). This finding shows that CQ remains highly efficacious for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in Gracias a Dios, Honduras. PMID:23458957

  17. Modelling the impact of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria on selection pressure for drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cissé Badara

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT is a promising intervention for malaria control, although there are concerns about its impact on drug resistance. Methods The key model inputs are age-specific values for a baseline anti-malarial dosing rate, b parasite prevalence, and c proportion of those treated with anti-malarials (outside IPT who are infected. These are used to estimate the immediate effect of IPT on the genetic coefficient of selection (s. The scenarios modelled were year round IPT to infants in rural southern Tanzania, and three doses at monthly intervals of seasonal IPT in Senegal. Results In the simulated Tanzanian setting, the model suggests a high selection pressure for drug resistance, but that IPTi would only increase this by a small amount (4.4%. The percent change in s is larger if parasites are more concentrated in infants, or if baseline drug dosing is less common or less specific. If children aged up to five years are included in the Tanzanian scenario then the predicted increase in s rises to 31%. The Senegalese seasonal IPT scenario, in children up to five years, results in a predicted increase in s of 16%. Conclusion There is a risk that the useful life of drugs will be shortened if IPT is implemented over a wide childhood age range. On the other hand, IPT delivered only to infants is unlikely to appreciably shorten the useful life of the drug used.

  18. NFC as a Childhood Obesity Treatment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Hellín, P; Fontecha, J; Hervás, R; Bravo, J

    2015-09-01

    Childhood Obesity is associated with a wide range of serious health complications and constitutes an increased risk of premature syndromes, including diabetes or heart diseases. Its treatment seems to be complicated. So, in order to help parents we have developed a system that will try to make easier the process of choosing foodstuff for overweight and obese children at the supermarket. To interact with the system, Near Field Communication mobile phones and tags are used. Those tags would have nutritional information such as energy or fat contain of each product. When the interaction takes place, the system will generate an alert determining if the product is adequate for the user diet or not. Decision will be influenced by specific prescript diets, which would have been previously generated by the system based on user profile parameters. At the same time the diet is established, the shopping list would be generated automatically. Therefore, the user could download and print both things at home easily by the PC application. The system also takes into account physical activity of the user. Children mobile phone includes an accelerometer that will detect and collect user activities in order to modify calorical requirements and, if necessary, to change physical activity too. In the future, it would be possible to extend this project system for adults, managing diets not just for obese and overweight, but also to diabetic or celiac people. PMID:26254253

  19. Cholelithiasis after treatment for childhood cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, H.; Schell, M.; Pui, C.H. (St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA))

    1991-03-01

    The authors evaluated the risk of development of cholelithiasis in 6050 patients treated at a single hospital for various childhood cancers with different therapeutic modalities, including chemotherapy, surgery, radiation therapy, and bone marrow transplantation, from 1963 to 1989. Patients with underlying chronic hemolytic anemia or preexisting gallstones were excluded. Nine female and seven male patients with a median age of 12.4 years (range, 1.2 to 22.8 years) at diagnosis of primary cancer had gallstones develop 3 months to 17.3 years (median, 3.1 years) after therapy was initiated. Cumulative risks of 0.42% at 10 years and 1.03% at 18 years after diagnosis substantially exceed those reported for the general population of this age group. Treatment-related factors significantly associated with an increased risk of cholelithiasis were ileal conduit, parenteral nutrition, abdominal surgery, and abdominal radiation therapy (relative risks and 95% confidence intervals = 61.6 (27.9-135.9), 23.0 (9.8-54.1), 15.1 (7.1-32.2), and 7.4 (3.2-17.0), respectively). There was no correlation with the type of cancer, nor was the frequency of conventional predisposing features (e.g., family history, obesity, use of oral contraceptives, and pregnancy) any higher among the affected patients in this study than in the general population. Patients with cancer who have risk factors identified here should be monitored for the development of gallstones.

  20. Cholelithiasis after treatment for childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors evaluated the risk of development of cholelithiasis in 6050 patients treated at a single hospital for various childhood cancers with different therapeutic modalities, including chemotherapy, surgery, radiation therapy, and bone marrow transplantation, from 1963 to 1989. Patients with underlying chronic hemolytic anemia or preexisting gallstones were excluded. Nine female and seven male patients with a median age of 12.4 years (range, 1.2 to 22.8 years) at diagnosis of primary cancer had gallstones develop 3 months to 17.3 years (median, 3.1 years) after therapy was initiated. Cumulative risks of 0.42% at 10 years and 1.03% at 18 years after diagnosis substantially exceed those reported for the general population of this age group. Treatment-related factors significantly associated with an increased risk of cholelithiasis were ileal conduit, parenteral nutrition, abdominal surgery, and abdominal radiation therapy (relative risks and 95% confidence intervals = 61.6 [27.9-135.9], 23.0 [9.8-54.1], 15.1 [7.1-32.2], and 7.4 [3.2-17.0], respectively). There was no correlation with the type of cancer, nor was the frequency of conventional predisposing features (e.g., family history, obesity, use of oral contraceptives, and pregnancy) any higher among the affected patients in this study than in the general population. Patients with cancer who have risk factors identified here should be monitored for the development of gallstones

  1. Preventing childhood malaria in Africa by protecting adults from mosquitoes with insecticide-treated nets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerry F Killeen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria prevention in Africa merits particular attention as the world strives toward a better life for the poorest. Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs represent a practical means to prevent malaria in Africa, so scaling up coverage to at least 80% of young children and pregnant women by 2010 is integral to the Millennium Development Goals (MDG. Targeting individual protection to vulnerable groups is an accepted priority, but community-level impacts of broader population coverage are largely ignored even though they may be just as important. We therefore estimated coverage thresholds for entire populations at which individual- and community-level protection are equivalent, representing rational targets for ITN coverage beyond vulnerable groups. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using field-parameterized malaria transmission models, we show that high (80% use but exclusively targeted coverage of young children and pregnant women (representing <20% of the population will deliver limited protection and equity for these vulnerable groups. In contrast, relatively modest coverage (35%-65% use, with this threshold depending on ecological scenario and net quality of all adults and children, rather than just vulnerable groups, can achieve equitable community-wide benefits equivalent to or greater than personal protection. CONCLUSIONS: Coverage of entire populations will be required to accomplish large reductions of the malaria burden in Africa. While coverage of vulnerable groups should still be prioritized, the equitable and communal benefits of wide-scale ITN use by older children and adults should be explicitly promoted and evaluated by national malaria control programmes. ITN use by the majority of entire populations could protect all children in such communities, even those not actually covered by achieving existing personal protection targets of the MDG, Roll Back Malaria Partnership, or the US President's Malaria Initiative.

  2. Treatment of fevers prior to introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in registered drug shops in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K.; Lal, Sham; Cundill, Bonnie;

    2013-01-01

    to examine impact on appropriate treatment of malaria in drug shops in Uganda and adherence to current malaria treatment policy guidelines, a survey was conducted to estimate baseline prevalence of, and factors associated with, appropriate treatment of malaria to enable effective design and implementation...... questionnaire to capture data on drug shops (n=65) including provider characteristics, knowledge on treatment of malaria, previous training received, type of drugs stocked, reported drug sales, and record keeping practices; and a patient questionnaire to capture data from febrile patients (n=540) exiting drug...... management and lack of knowledge that Coartem(R) was the recommended first-line treatment for malaria. There is urgent need for interventions to improve treatment of malaria at these outlets....

  3. Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Treatment Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid Cancer Understanding Children's Cancer Anxiety Around Procedures Childhood Cancer Statistics Late ...

  4. Malaria treatment perceptions, practices and influences on provider behaviour: comparing hospitals and non-hospitals in south-east Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dike Nkem

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People seek treatment for malaria from a wide range of providers ranging from itinerant drug sellers to hospitals. However, there are lots of problems with treatment provision. Hence, factors influencing treatment provision in hospitals and non-hospitals require further investigation in order to remedy the situation. Objectives To examine the knowledge, pattern of treatment provision and factors influencing the behaviour of hospitals and non-hospitals in the treatment of malaria, so as to identify loci for interventions to improve treatment of the disease. Methods A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 225 providers from hospitals and non-hospitals about their malaria treatment practices and factors that influence their provision of malaria treatment services in south-east Nigeria. The data from hospitals and other providers were compared for systematic differences. Results 73.5% of hospitals used microscopy to diagnose malaria and only 34.5.1% of non-hospitals did (p Conclusion There are many challenges to appropriate provision of malaria treatment services, although challenges are less in hospitals compared to other types of non-hospitals. Improving proper diagnosis of malaria and improving the knowledge of providers about malaria are interventions that could be used to improve malaria treatment provision.

  5. Prospective evaluation of artemether-lumefantrine for the treatment of non-falciparum and mixed-species malaria in Gabon

    OpenAIRE

    Mombo-Ngoma Ghyslain; Kleine Christian; Basra Arti; Würbel Heike; Diop Daisy A; Capan Mesküre; Adegnika Ayola A; Kurth Florian; Mordmüller Benjamin; Joanny Fanny; Kremsner Peter G; Ramharter Michael; Bélard Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The recommendation of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria is supported by a plethora of high quality clinical trials. However, their recommendation for the treatment of mixed-species malaria and the large-scale use for the treatment of non-falciparum malaria in endemic regions is based on anecdotal rather than systematic clinical evidence. Methods This study prospectively observed the efficacy of artemether-lum...

  6. Childhood trauma and treatment outcome in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Sibel; Tasdelen Durak, Rumeysa; Ozyildirim, Ilker; Ince, Ezgi; Sar, Vedat

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential influence of childhood trauma on clinical presentation, psychiatric comorbidity, and long-term treatment outcome of bipolar disorder. A total of 135 consecutive patients with bipolar disorder type I were recruited from an ongoing prospective follow-up project. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders were administered to all participants. Response to long-term treatment was determined from the records of life charts of the prospective follow-up project. There were no significant differences in childhood trauma scores between groups with good and poor responses to long-term lithium treatment. Poor responders to long-term anticonvulsant treatment, however, had elevated emotional and physical abuse scores. Lifetime diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was associated with poor response to lithium treatment and antidepressant use but not with response to treatment with anticonvulsants. Total childhood trauma scores were related to the total number of lifetime comorbid psychiatric disorders, antidepressant use, and the presence of psychotic features. There were significant correlations between all types of childhood abuse and the total number of lifetime comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. Whereas physical neglect was related to the mean severity of the mood episodes and psychotic features, emotional neglect was related to suicide attempts. A history of childhood trauma or PTSD may be a poor prognostic factor in the long-term treatment of bipolar disorder. Whereas abusive experiences in childhood seem to lead to nosological fragmentation (comorbidity), childhood neglect tends to contribute to the severity of the mood episodes. PMID:26683845

  7. Medicinal Plants Used by Various Tribes of Bangladesh for Treatment of Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Rahmatullah; Shahadat Hossan; Afsana Khatun; Syeda Seraj; Rownak Jahan

    2012-01-01

    It has been estimated that 300–500 million malaria infections occur on an annual basis and causes fatality to millions of human beings. Most of the drugs used for treatment of malaria have developed drug-resistant parasites or have serious side effects. Plant kingdom has throughout the centuries proved to be efficient source of efficacious malarial drugs like quinine and artemisinin. Since these drugs have already developed or in the process of developing drug resistance, it is important to c...

  8. Impact of mass distribution of free long-lasting insecticidal nets on childhood malaria morbidity: The Togo National Integrated Child Health Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sodahlon Yao K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An evaluation of the short-term impact on childhood malaria morbidity of mass distribution of free long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs to households with children aged 9-59 months as part of the Togo National Integrated Child Health Campaign. Methods The prevalence of anaemia and malaria in children aged zero to 59 months was measured during two cross-sectional household cluster-sample surveys conducted during the peak malaria transmission, three months before (Sept 2004, n = 2521 and nine months after the campaign (Sept 2005, n = 2813 in three districts representative of Togo's three epidemiological malaria transmission regions: southern tropical coastal plains (Yoto, central fertile highlands (Ogou and northern semi-arid savannah (Tone. Results In households with children 65% in all 3 districts. Reported ITN use by children during the previous night was 35.9%, 43.8% and 80.6% in Yoto, Ogou and Tone, respectively. Rainfall patterns were comparable in both years. The overall prevalence of moderate to severe anaemia (Hb The effect was predominantly seen in children aged 18-59 months and in the two southern districts: PR (95% CI for moderate to severe anaemia and clinical malaria: Yoto 0.62 (0.44-0.88 and 0.49 (0.35-0.75; Ogou 0.54 (0.37-0.79 and 0.85 (0.57-1.27, respectively. Similar reductions occurred in children Conclusions A marked reduction in childhood malaria associated morbidity was observed in the year following mass distribution of free LLINs in two of the three districts in Togo. Sub-national level impact evaluations will contribute to a better understanding of the impact of expanding national malaria control efforts.

  9. Improving quality of malaria treatment services: assessing inequities in consumers' perceptions and providers' behaviour in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obikeze Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information about quality of malaria treatment services of different healthcare providers is needed to know how to improve the treatment of malaria since inappropriate service provision leads to increased burden of malaria. Hence, the study determined the technical and perceived quality of malaria treatment services of different types of providers in three urban and three rural areas in southeast Nigeria. Methods Questionnaire was used to interview randomly selected healthcare providers about the technical quality of their malaria treatment services. Exit polls were used to obtain information about perceived quality from consumers. A socio-economic status (SES index and comparison of data between urban and rural areas was used to examine socio-economic status and geographic differences in quality of services. Results The lowest technical quality of services was found from patent medicine dealers. Conversely, public and private hospitals as well as primary healthcare centres had the highest quality of services. Householders were least satisfied with quality of services of patent medicine dealers and pharmacy shops and were mostly satisfied with services rendered by public and private hospitals. The urbanites were more satisfied with the overall quality of services than the rural dwellers. Conclusion These findings provide areas for interventions to equitably improve the quality of malaria treatment services, especially for patent medicine dealers and pharmacy shops, that are two of the most common providers of malaria treatment especially with the current change of first line drugs from the relatively inexpensive drugs to the expensive artemisinin-based combination therapy, so as to decrease inappropriate drug prescribing, use, costs and resistance to artemisinin-based combination therapy.

  10. Malaria diagnosis and treatment administered by teachers in primary schools in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, P; Ndawi, B; Sheshe, A K;

    2001-01-01

    number of malaria cases (cases/1000 registered school children) diagnosed and treated by school teachers was 159 (67) in 1995, 324 (124) in 1996, 348 (128) in 1997 and 339 (108) in 1998. Children in grades 1-4 (age 7-13) accounted for 64.6% of cases. Symptoms and oral temperature were recorded for 1258.......4% were found positive. Among children who fulfilled the algorithm criteria 75.0% had a positive blood slide. With little training and regular supervision it was feasible for school teachers to make a presumptive diagnosis of malaria. We conclude that teachers can play a major role in school health......A school health programme in Mwera Division, Pangani District included treatment of malaria attacks occurring in children during school time. A combination of symptoms (headache, muscle/joint pains, feeling feverish) and oral temperature > or = 37.5 degrees C was used for the diagnosis of malaria...

  11. Artesunate: The Best Drug in the Treatment of Severe and Complicated Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qigui Li

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes progress in treating severe and complicated malaria, which are global problems, claiming at least one million lives annually, and have been accompanied by advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of severe malaria complications. New drugs such as intravenous artesunate (AS and intramuscular artemether (AM are improving outcomes and decreasing malaria deaths. Trials comparing AM to the traditional parenteral drug, quinine, have not demonstrated however convincing evidence of a mortality advantage for AM. The South East Asian Quinine Artesunate Malaria Trials (SEAQUAMAT, a multicenter, randomized, open-label study comparing AS with quinine showed that parenteral AS was shown to be associated with a 35% reduction in the risk of mortality compare to quinine, and is now the recommended treatment by the WHO for severe and complicated malaria in low-transmission areas and in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, with almost all the benefit reported in those with high parasite counts. Artesunate is a semisynthetic derivative of artemisinin whose water solubility facilitates absorption and provides an advantage over other artemisinins because it can be formulated as oral, rectal, intramuscular, and intravenous preparations. Artesunate is rapidly hydrolyzed to dihydroartemisinin, which is the most active schizonticidal metabolite. Injectable AS results in a more rapid systemic availability of AS compared with intramuscular AM. This pharmacokinetic advantage may provide a clinical advantage in the treatments of severe and complicated malaria.

  12. Efficacy of artemether-lumefantrine as a treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium vivax malaria in eastern Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Tajeldin M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT is the treatment of choice for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in most areas of the world, where malaria is endemic, including Sudan. However, few published data are available on the use of ACT for treatment of P. vivax malaria. Methods This study was conducted at a health centre in Kassala, eastern Sudan, from October to December 2011. Patients with uncomplicated P. vivax malaria received artemether-lumefantrine (AL tablets (containing 20mg artemether and 120 mg lumefantrine and were monitored for 28 days. Results Out of the 43 cases enrolled in this study, 38 completed the 28-day follow-up. Their mean age was 25.1 years (SD: 1.5. On day 3 following AL treatment, all of the patients were afebrile and aparasitaemic. By day 28, all 38 patients exhibited adequate clinical and parasitological responses to AL treatment. The cure rate was 100% and 88.4% for the per protocol analysis andfor the intention to treat analysis, respectively. Mild adverse effects (nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dizziness and/or rash that resolved spontaneously were observed in four (10.5% of the patients. Conclusion AL combination therapy was fully effective for treatment of P. vivax malaria in the study in eastern Sudan. Trial registration Trial. Gov: NCT01625871

  13. Salmeterol in the treatment of childhood asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.P.H. Vaessen-Verberne (Anja)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAsthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Although mortality rates in the Netherlands and other Western European countries are low, astlmm causes a great deal of morbidity and school absence. Incidence rates in our country are about 10% and recent epidemiologic studies show

  14. Feasibility and coverage of implementing intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnant women contacting private or public clinics in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mubyazi, Godfrey M; Magnussen, Pascal; Byskov, Jens;

    2013-01-01

    Evidence on healthcare managers' experience on operational feasibility of malaria intermittent preventive treatment for malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) using sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) in Africa is systematically inadequate. This paper elucidates the perspectives of District Council Health M...... Management Team (CHMT)s regarding the feasibility of IPTp with SP strategy, including its acceptability and ability of district health care systems to cope with the contemporary and potential challenges.......Evidence on healthcare managers' experience on operational feasibility of malaria intermittent preventive treatment for malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) using sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) in Africa is systematically inadequate. This paper elucidates the perspectives of District Council Health...

  15. Therapeutic Efficacy of Artemether-Lumefantrine for the Treatment of Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Northern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Gebremedhin Kinfu; Solomon Gebre-Selassie; Nigus Fikrie

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Multidrug resistance of Plasmodium falciparum is spreading throughout Africa. This has posed major challenges to malaria control in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of artemether-lumefantrine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in North Ethiopia. Methods. This prospective study was undertaken during August–November 2009 on 71 malaria patients that fulfilled the inclusion criteria set by the WHO. Patient...

  16. Self-reported fever, treatment actions and malaria infection prevalence in the northern states of Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelgadir Tareg M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidemiology of fevers and their management in areas of low malaria transmission in Africa is not well understood. The characteristics of fever, its treatment and association with infection prevalence from a national household sample survey in the northern states of Sudan, an area that represents historically low parasite prevalence, are examined in this study. Methods In October-November 2009, a cluster sample cross-sectional household malaria indicator survey was undertaken in the 15 northern states of the Sudan. Data on household assets and individual level information on age, sex, whether the individual had a fever in the last 14 days and on the day of survey, actions taken to treat the fever including diagnostic services and drugs used and their sources were collected. Consenting household members were asked to provide a finger-prick blood sample and examined for malaria parasitaemia using a rapid diagnostic test (RDT. All proportions and odds ratios were weighted and adjusted for clustering. Results Of 26,471 respondents 19% (n = 5,299 reported a history of fever within the last two weeks prior to the survey and 8% had fever on the day of the survey. Only 39% (n = 2,035 of individuals with fever in last two weeks took any action, of which 43% (n = 875 were treated with anti-malarials. About 44% (n = 382 of malaria treatments were done using the nationally recommended first-line therapy artesunate+sulphadoxine-pryrimethamine (AS+SP and 13% (n = 122 with non-recommended chloroquine or SP. Importantly 33.9% (n = 296 of all malaria treatments included artemether monotherapy, which is internationally banned for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria. About 53% of fevers had some form of parasitological diagnosis before treatment. On the day of survey, 21,988 individuals provided a finger-prick blood sample and only 1.8% were found positive for Plasmodium falciparum. Infection prevalence was higher among individuals who

  17. Exploring provider and community responses to the new malaria diagnostic and treatment regime in Solomon Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wini Lyndes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improvements in availability and accessibility of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT for malaria treatment and the emergence of multi-drug-resistant parasites have prompted many countries to adopt ACT as the first-line drug. In 2009, Solomon Islands (SI likewise implemented new national treatment guidelines for malaria. The ACT, Coartem® (artemether-lumefantrine is now the primary pharmacotherapy in SI for Plasmodium falciparum malaria, Plasmodium vivax malaria or mixed infections. Targeted treatment is also recommended in the new treatment regime through maintenance of quality microscopy services and the introduction of Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDTs. Ascertaining the factors that influence community and provider acceptance of and adherence to the new treatment regime will be vital to improving the effectiveness of this intervention and reducing the risk of development of drug resistance. Methods In order to understand community and prescriber perceptions and acceptability of the new diagnostic and treatment interventions, 12 focus group discussions (FGDs and 12 key informant interviews (KII were carried out in rural and urban villages of Malaita Province, Solomon Islands four months subsequent to roll out of these interventions. Results Lack of access to microscopy or distrust in the accuracy of diagnostic tools were reported by some participants as reasons for the ongoing practice of presumptive treatment of malaria. Lack of confidence in RDT accuracy has negatively impacted its acceptability. Coartem® had good acceptability among most participants, however, some rural participants questioned its effectiveness due to lack of side effects and the larger quantity of tablets required to be taken. Storing of left over medication for subsequent fever episodes was reported as common. Conclusion To address these issues, further training and supportive supervision of healthcare workers will be essential, as will the

  18. A cost-effectiveness analysis of artemether lumefantrine for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Zambia

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    Hawela Moonga

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria remains a leading cause of morbidity, mortality and non-fatal disability in Zambia, especially among children, pregnant women and the poor. Data gathered by the National Malaria Control Centre has shown that recently observed widespread treatment failure of SP and chloroquine precipitated a surge in malaria-related morbidity and mortality. As a result, the Government has recently replaced chloroquine and SP with combination therapy as first-line treatment for malaria. Despite the acclaimed therapeutic advantages of ACTs over monotherapies with SP and CQ, the cost of ACTs is much greater, raising concerns about affordability in many poor countries such as Zambia. This study evaluates the cost-effectiveness analysis of artemether-lumefantrine, a version of ACTs adopted in Zambia in mid 2004. Methods Using data gathered from patients presenting at public health facilities with suspected malaria, the costs and effects of using ACTs versus SP as first-line treatment for malaria were estimated. The study was conducted in six district sites. Treatment success and reduction in demand for second line treatment constituted the main effectiveness outcomes. The study gathered data on the efficacy of, and compliance to, AL and SP treatment from a random sample of patients. Costs are based on estimated drug, labour, operational and capital inputs. Drug costs were based on dosages and unit prices provided by the Ministry of Health and the manufacturer (Norvatis. Findings The results suggest that AL produces successful treatment at less cost than SP, implying that AL is more cost-effective. While it is acknowledged that implementing national ACT program will require considerable resources, the study demonstrates that the health gains (treatment success from every dollar spent are significantly greater if AL is used rather than SP. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is estimated to be US$4.10. When the costs of second line

  19. [Dietetic indications for obesity treatment in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miggiano, G A D; Santoro, C

    2004-10-01

    A growing organism needs to have a steady availability of nutrients, in suitable quantities and in correct ratios, in order to achieve its genetic potential. Overweight and obesity in growing individuals may conceal lack of one or more nutrients. Obesity in childhood is the consequence of an excess of calories compared with the energetic waste because of the interlacing of genetic factors, metabolic factors (cellularity of the adipose tissue, deficit of thermogenesis), excessive food intake, alteration of some neuro-endocrine mechanisms which regulate bodily weight (set point theory), lack of suitable physical exercise; therefore a complicity of endogenous, exogenous, biological, psychological and social factors to which we cannot ascribe singularly a primary role. It is however necessary to start, since the first year of a child's life, a food education program as the latest acquisition shows that degenerative pathologies of metabolism start in a very precocious age and unbalanced nutrition starts since childhood. The most suitable therapeutic approach is that which takes in consideration all the aspects of obesity. This requires an intervention on several aspects: food, psychological mechanisms which sometimes are the cause of hypernutrition, attitude towards physical exercise, and also family and social behaviors concerning the patient. The traditional diet approach towards childhood obesity is based on balanced hypochaloric diets which provide about 1200-1800 kcal per day, distributed in 4 or 5 daily meals. The correct meal division educates the child to self-control and it is advantageous from a metabolic point of view because it avoids both high instability of glyco-insulin, caused by an excess of food, and because improving thermogenesis, induced by the diet, the result will consist in an increase of energetic waste. For the main meals it is advantageous to apply to a main course. PMID:15702660

  20. Improving Childhood Obesity Treatment Using New Technologies: The ETIOBE System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baños, Rosa M; Cebolla, Ausias; Botella, Cristina; García-Palacios, Azucena; Oliver, Elia; Zaragoza, Irene; Alcaniz, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Childhood obesity is an increasing public health problem in western culture. Sedentary lifestyles and an "obesogenic environment" are the main influences on children leading to an increase in obesity. The objective of this paper is to describe an e-health platform for the treatment and prevention of childhood obesity called ETIOBE. This e-health platform is an e-therapy system for the treatment of obesity, aimed at improving treatment adherence and promoting the mechanisms of self-control in patients, to obtain weight loss maintenance and to prevent relapse by establishing healthy lifestyle habits. ETIOBE is composed of three different applications, the Clinician Support System (CSS), the Home Support System (HSS) and the Mobile Support System (MSS). The use of new Information and Communication (ICT) technologies can help clinicians to improve the effectiveness of weight loss treatments, especially in the case of children, and to achieve designated treatment goals. PMID:21559232

  1. Effect of a community-based delivery of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy on treatment seeking for malaria at health units in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony; Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Bygbjerg, Ib;

    2008-01-01

    whether traditional birth attendants, drug-shop vendors, community reproductive health workers and adolescent peer mobilizers can administer IPTp with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) to pregnant women, reach those at greatest risk of malaria, and increase access and compliance with IPTp. Study design: An...... intervention study compared the delivery of IPTp in the community with routine delivery of IPTp at health units. The primary outcome measures were the proportion of adolescents and primigravidae accessed, and the proportion of women who received two doses of SP. The study also assessed the effect of the...... intervention on access to malaria treatment, antenatal care, other services and related costs. Results: More women (67.5%) received two doses of SP through the community approach compared with health units (39.9%; P<0.0001). Women who accessed IPTp in the community were at an earlier stage of pregnancy (21...

  2. Travel medicine physician adherence to guidelines for the emergency self treatment of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Gerard T; Walden, Lucas M; Townend, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have examined emergency self treatment (EST) antimalarial prescribing patterns. 110 physician-members of the Travel Medicine Society of Ireland and British Global and Travel Health Association participated in this study. There was a trend towards the prescription of EST for travel to remote low-risk malaria areas; for long-term residents living in low-risk areas; and for frequent travellers to low-risk areas. This study provides insights into the use of EST in travellers' malaria. PMID:27279126

  3. Comparison of chloroquine with artesunate in the treatment of cerebral malaria in Ghanaian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goka, B Q; Adabayeri, V; Ofori-Adjei, E;

    2001-01-01

    .8), between the two groups. The results suggest that syrup chloroquine and intramuscular/oral artesunate currently give comparable clinical responses in the treatment of cerebral malaria in Ghana. Possible reasons for this are discussed, and suggestions are made for future antimalarial drug policy....

  4. Glucocorticoid Treatment in Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome : weighting the cornerstone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Teeninga (Nynke)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractUnderstanding which factors influence relapse patterns in childhood nephrotic syndrome is clinically very relevant and could aid in developing new treatment strategies. Clinicians are continuously challenged to reduce relapse rates and at the same time to avoid glucocorticoid toxicity. B

  5. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe;

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 1980...

  6. Malaria Matters

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-04-18

    This podcast gives an overview of malaria, including prevention and treatment, and what CDC is doing to help control and prevent malaria globally.  Created: 4/18/2008 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 4/18/2008.

  7. Modelling the epidemiological impact of intermittent preventive treatment against malaria in infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Ross

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trials of intermittent preventive treatment against malaria in infants (IPTi using sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP have shown a positive, albeit variable, protective efficacy against clinical malaria episodes. The impact of IPTi in different epidemiological settings and over time is unknown and predictions are hampered by the lack of knowledge about how IPTi works. We investigated mechanisms proposed for the action of IPTi and made predictions of the likely impact on morbidity and mortality. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a comprehensive, individual-based, stochastic model of malaria epidemiology to simulate recently published trials of IPTi using SP with site-specific characteristics as inputs. This baseline model was then modified to represent hypotheses concerning the duration of action of SP, the temporal pattern of fevers caused by individual infections, potential benefits of avoiding fevers on immunity and the effect of sub-therapeutic levels of SP on parasite dynamics. The baseline model reproduced the pattern of results reasonably well. None of the models based on alternative hypotheses improved the fit between the model predictions and observed data. Predictions suggest that IPTi would have a beneficial effect across a range of transmission intensities. IPTi was predicted to avert a greater number of episodes where IPTi coverage was higher, the health system treatment coverage lower, and for drugs which were more efficacious and had longer prophylactic periods. The predicted cumulative benefits were proportionately slightly greater for severe malaria episodes and malaria-attributable mortality than for acute episodes in the settings modelled. Modest increased susceptibility was predicted between doses and following the last dose, but these were outweighed by the cumulative benefits. The impact on transmission intensity was negligible. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of trial results can be accounted for by differences between

  8. Rural-Urban Differences in Household Treatment-Seeking Behaviour for Suspected Malaria in Children at Bata District, Equatorial Guinea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Romay-Barja

    Full Text Available Malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children under five years old in Equatorial Guinea. However, little is known about the community management of malaria and treatment-seeking patterns. We aimed to assess symptoms of children with reported malaria and treatment-seeking behaviour of their caretakers in rural and urban areas in the Bata District.A cross-sectional study was conducted in the district of Bata and 440 houses were selected from 18 rural villages and 26 urban neighbourhoods. Differences between rural and urban caregivers and children with reported malaria were assessed through the chi-squared test for independence of categorical variables and the t-Student or the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test for normally or not-normally distributed continuous variables, respectively.Differences between rural and urban households were observed in caregiver treatment-seeking patterns. Fever was the main symptom associated with malaria in both areas. Malaria was treated first at home, particularly in rural areas. The second step was to seek treatment outside the home, mainly at hospital and Health Centre for rural households and at hospital and private clinic for urban ones. Artemether monotherapy was the antimalarial treatment prescribed most often. Households waited for more than 24 hours before seeking treatment outside and delays were longest in rural areas. The total cost of treatment was higher in urban than in rural areas in Bata.The delays in seeking treatment, the type of malaria therapy received and the cost of treatment are the principal problems found in Bata District. Important steps for reducing malaria morbidity and mortality in this area are to provide sufficient supplies of effective antimalarial drugs and to improve malaria treatment skills in households and in both public and private sectors.

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of chloroquine for treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria cases in Halaba district, South Ethiopia

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    Bacha Ketema

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroquine is an anti-malarial drug being used to treat Plasmodium vivax malaria cases in Ethiopia. However, emergence of chloroquine resistant strains of the parasite has challenged the current efficacy of the drug. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of chloroquine against P. vivax strains in one of the malaria endemic areas of Ethiopia, namely Halaba district, located in South Nations and Nationalities Peoples Region (SNNPR of South Ethiopia Results Among 87 malaria patients enrolled in the study, only 80 of them completed the 28-days follow-up. Seven of them dropped from the study for different reasons. Among those study participants that completed their follow-up, 69 were classified under the category of adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR. However, the remaining 11 cases were considered as under treatment failure mainly due to recurrence of parasitemia on day 7 (four patients, day 14 (six patients, and day 21 (one patient. The age of all cases of treatment failures was found to be less than 20 years. The load of parasitemia of patients with treatment failure on day of admission (4709.4/μl was higher than day of recurrence (372.37/μl. Parasite reduction ratio (PRR of treatment failure cases was 12.6/μl. Conclusion This report revealed the rise in treatment failure (13% [95% CI = 0.074 - 0.217] as compared to earlier reports from Ethiopia. It signals the spreading of chloroquine resistant P. vivax (CRPv strains to malaria endemic areas of Ethiopia. It is recommended that all concerned bodies should act aggressively before further expansion of the current drug resistant malaria.

  10. The economic value of an improved malaria treatment programme in Zambia: results from a contingent valuation survey

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    Rehnberg Clas

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zambia is facing a double crisis of increasing malaria burden and dwindling capacity to deal with the endemic malaria burden. The pursuit of sustainable but equity mechanisms for financing malaria programmes is a subject of crucial policy discussion. This requires that comprehensive accounting of the economic impact of the various malaria programmes. Information on the economic value of programmes is essential in soliciting appropriate funding allocations for malaria control. Aims and objectives This paper specifically seeks to elicit a measure of the economic benefits of an improved malaria treatment programme in Zambia. The paper also studies the equity implications in malaria treatment given that demand or malaria treatment is determined by household socio-economic status. Methods A contingent valuation survey of about 300 Zambian households was conducted in four districts. Willingness-to-pay (WTP was elicited for an improved treatment programme for malaria in order to generate a measure of the economic benefits of the programme. The payment card method was used in eliciting WTP bids. Findings The study reports that malaria treatment has significant economic benefits to society. The total economic benefits of an improved treatment programme were estimated at an equivalent of US$ 77 million per annum, representing about 1.8% of Zambia's GDP. The study also reports the theoretically anticipated association between WTP and several socio-economic factors. Our income elasticity of demand is positive and similar in magnitude to estimates reported in similar studies. Finally, from an equity standpoint, the constraints imposed by income and socio-economic status are discussed.

  11. Malaria treatment in the retail sector: Knowledge and practices of drug sellers in rural Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makemba Ahmed M

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout Africa, the private retail sector has been recognised as an important source of antimalarial treatment, complementing formal health services. However, the quality of advice and treatment at private outlets is a widespread concern, especially with the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs. As a result, ACTs are often deployed exclusively through public health facilities, potentially leading to poorer access among parts of the population. This research aimed at assessing the performance of the retail sector in rural Tanzania. Such information is urgently required to improve and broaden delivery channels for life-saving drugs. Methods During a comprehensive shop census in the districts of Kilombero and Ulanga, Tanzania, we interviewed 489 shopkeepers about their knowledge of malaria and malaria treatment. A complementary mystery shoppers study was conducted in 118 retail outlets in order to assess the vendors' drug selling practices. Both studies included drug stores as well as general shops. Results Shopkeepers in drug stores were able to name more malaria symptoms and were more knowledgeable about malaria treatment than their peers in general shops. In drug stores, 52% mentioned the correct child-dosage of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP compared to only 3% in general shops. In drug stores, mystery shoppers were more likely to receive an appropriate treatment (OR = 9.6, but at an approximately seven times higher price. Overall, adults were more often sold an antimalarial than children (OR = 11.3. On the other hand, general shopkeepers were often ready to refer especially children to a higher level if they felt unable to manage the case. Conclusion The quality of malaria case-management in the retail sector is not satisfactory. Drug stores should be supported and empowered to provide correct malaria-treatment with drugs they are allowed to dispense. At the same time, the role of general shops

  12. Retail sector distribution chains for malaria treatment in the developing world: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanson Kara G

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many low-income countries, the retail sector plays an important role in the treatment of malaria and is increasingly being considered as a channel for improving medicine availability. Retailers are the last link in a distribution chain and their supply sources are likely to have an important influence on the availability, quality and price of malaria treatment. This article presents the findings of a systematic literature review on the retail sector distribution chain for malaria treatment in low and middle-income countries. Methods Publication databases were searched using key terms relevant to the distribution chain serving all types of anti-malarial retailers. Organizations involved in malaria treatment and distribution chain related activities were contacted to identify unpublished studies. Results A total of 32 references distributed across 12 developing countries were identified. The distribution chain had a pyramid shape with numerous suppliers at the bottom and fewer at the top. The chain supplying rural and less-formal outlets was made of more levels than that serving urban and more formal outlets. Wholesale markets tended to be relatively concentrated, especially at the top of the chain where few importers accounted for most of the anti-malarial volumes sold. Wholesale price mark-ups varied across chain levels, ranging from 27% to 99% at the top of the chain, 8% at intermediate level (one study only and 2% to 67% at the level supplying retailers directly. Retail mark-ups tended to be higher, and varied across outlet types, ranging from 3% to 566% in pharmacies, 29% to 669% in drug shops and 100% to 233% in general shops. Information on pricing determinants was very limited. Conclusions Evidence on the distribution chain for retail sector malaria treatment was mainly descriptive and lacked representative data on a national scale. These are important limitations in the advent of the Affordable Medicine Facility for

  13. Malaria treatment in the retail sector: Knowledge and practices of drug sellers in rural Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Manuel W; Dillip, Angel; Lengeler, Christian; Obrist, Brigit; Msechu, June J; Makemba, Ahmed M; Mshana, Christopher; Schulze, Alexander; Mshinda, Hassan

    2008-01-01

    Background Throughout Africa, the private retail sector has been recognised as an important source of antimalarial treatment, complementing formal health services. However, the quality of advice and treatment at private outlets is a widespread concern, especially with the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). As a result, ACTs are often deployed exclusively through public health facilities, potentially leading to poorer access among parts of the population. This research aimed at assessing the performance of the retail sector in rural Tanzania. Such information is urgently required to improve and broaden delivery channels for life-saving drugs. Methods During a comprehensive shop census in the districts of Kilombero and Ulanga, Tanzania, we interviewed 489 shopkeepers about their knowledge of malaria and malaria treatment. A complementary mystery shoppers study was conducted in 118 retail outlets in order to assess the vendors' drug selling practices. Both studies included drug stores as well as general shops. Results Shopkeepers in drug stores were able to name more malaria symptoms and were more knowledgeable about malaria treatment than their peers in general shops. In drug stores, 52% mentioned the correct child-dosage of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) compared to only 3% in general shops. In drug stores, mystery shoppers were more likely to receive an appropriate treatment (OR = 9.6), but at an approximately seven times higher price. Overall, adults were more often sold an antimalarial than children (OR = 11.3). On the other hand, general shopkeepers were often ready to refer especially children to a higher level if they felt unable to manage the case. Conclusion The quality of malaria case-management in the retail sector is not satisfactory. Drug stores should be supported and empowered to provide correct malaria-treatment with drugs they are allowed to dispense. At the same time, the role of general shops as first contact points

  14. Secondary osteosarcoma arising after treatment for childhood hematologic malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, Atsushi; Hatori, Masahito; Hosaka, Masami; Watanuki, Munenori; Itoi, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    Secondary osteosarcoma arising after the treatment of hematologic malignancies other than Hodgkin's lymphoma is rare. We report two cases of secondary osteosarcoma arising after treatment for childhood hematologic malignancies (non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and lymphoblastic leukemia). A 10-year-old boy, at the age of 3, was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. He received chemotherapy, radiation, and bone-marrow transplantation and then was in complete remission. At 6 years, he complained of incr...

  15. Fever treatment in the absence of malaria transmission in an urban informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochola Sam

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sub-Saharan Africa, knowledge of malaria transmission across rapidly proliferating urban centres and recommendations for its prevention or management remain poorly defined. This paper presents the results of an investigation into infection prevalence and treatment of recent febrile events among a slum population in Nairobi, Kenya. Methods In July 2008, a community-based malaria parasite prevalence survey was conducted in Korogocho slum, which forms part of the Nairobi Urban Health and Demographic Surveillance system. Interviewers visited 1,069 participants at home and collected data on reported fevers experienced over the preceding 14 days and details on the treatment of these episodes. Each participant was tested for malaria parasite presence with Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT and microscopy. Descriptive analyses were performed to assess the period prevalence of reported fever episodes and treatment behaviour. Results Of the 1,069 participants visited, 983 (92% consented to be tested. Three were positive for Plasmodium falciparum using RDT; however, all were confirmed negative on microscopy. Microscopic examination of all 953 readable slides showed zero prevalence. Overall, from the 1,004 participants who have data on fever, 170 fever episodes were reported giving a relatively high period prevalence (16.9%, 95% CI:13.9%–20.5% and higher among children below five years (20.1%, 95%CI:13.8%–27.8%. Of the fever episodes with treatment information 54.3% (95%CI:46.3%–62.2% were treated as malaria using mainly sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine or amodiaquine, including those managed at a formal health facility. Only four episodes were managed using the nationally recommended first-line treatment, artemether-lumefantrine. Conclusion The study could not demonstrate any evidence of malaria in Korogocho, a slum in the centre of Nairobi. Fever was a common complaint and often treated as malaria with anti-malarial drugs. Strategies

  16. A Cluster Randomised Trial Introducing Rapid Diagnostic Tests into Registered Drug Shops in Uganda: Impact on Appropriate Treatment of Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Mbonye, AK; Magnussen, P; Lal, S; Hansen, KS; Cundill, B; Chandler, C.; Clarke, SE

    2015-01-01

    Background Inappropriate treatment of malaria is widely reported particularly in areas where there is poor access to health facilities and self-treatment of fevers with anti-malarial drugs bought in shops is the most common form of care-seeking. The main objective of the study was to examine the impact of introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria (mRDTs) in registered drug shops in Uganda, with the aim to increase appropriate treatment of malaria with artemisinin-based combination therap...

  17. Is chloroquine still effective for the treatment of vivax malaria in children in northern punjab of pakistan?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Every year more than one billion persons in the world suffer from malaria. It kills about 1-3 million people in the world per year. In Pakistan estimated burden of malaria is 1.6 million cases each year. As most of people belong to poor socioeconomic group, it is essential that cost effective remedial measures must be taken. Moreover judicious use of antimalarials is required to avoid development of resistance. Objective: To determine the frequency of types of malaria and frequency of cases responding to chloroquine as first line treatment in vivax malaria in children of Northern Punjab of Pakistan. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: From Jun 2011 to Sept 2012 at Combined Military Hospital Gujranwala in children reporting from surrounding areas both rural and urban with clinical suspicion of malaria. Materials and Methods: During the study period, 175 children were admitted with clinical suspicion of malaria. Out of which 102 were smear positive for malarial parasites, 13 cases were excluded from the study as they lost to follow up, leaving a total of 89 children in the study. Patients under study remained admitted till the fever settled and malarial parasites were negative on smear. Chloroquine was used as first line treatment in cases with vivax malaria. On discharge from hospital, parents of children were advised fortnightly follow up for 28 days. Results: Out of 89 children approx 54% were males and 46% were females. Mean age of participants was 5.91 years. The minimum age was 1 year and maximum 11 years (SD +- 3.09) out of the 89 cases, 84 (94.3%) had vivax malaria, 2 (2.24%) had falciparum malaria and 3 (3.37%) had mixed infection. Our study showed that 79 (94%) cases of vivax malaria fully responded to chloroquine, 5 (6%) cases treated with Chloroquine reported with relapse. Conclusion: Chloroquine is still the drug of choice in vivax malaria. (author)

  18. Cost analysis of school-based intermittent screening and treatment of malaria in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukes Matthew CH

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The control of malaria in schools is receiving increasing attention, but there remains currently no consensus as to the optimal intervention strategy. This paper analyses the costs of intermittent screening and treatment (IST of malaria in schools, implemented as part of a cluster-randomized controlled trial on the Kenyan coast. Methods Financial and economic costs were estimated using an ingredients approach whereby all resources required in the delivery of IST are quantified and valued. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to investigate how programme variation affects costs and to identify potential cost savings in the future implementation of IST. Results The estimated financial cost of IST per child screened is US$ 6.61 (economic cost US$ 6.24. Key contributors to cost were salary costs (36% and malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDT (22%. Almost half (47% of the intervention cost comprises redeployment of existing resources including health worker time and use of hospital vehicles. Sensitivity analysis identified changes to intervention delivery that can reduce programme costs by 40%, including use of alternative RDTs and removal of supervised treatment. Cost-effectiveness is also likely to be highly sensitive to the proportion of children found to be RDT-positive. Conclusion In the current context, school-based IST is a relatively expensive malaria intervention, but reducing the complexity of delivery can result in considerable savings in the cost of intervention. (Costs are reported in US$ 2010.

  19. Stroke in Childhood and New Treatment Modalities

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Herguner

    2003-01-01

    The risk factors for stroke in chidren are very different from those leading to stroke in adults. In recent years, several potential treatments for various specific stroke syndromes have been made. In this article, the risk factors and new treatment modalities for stroke in children and adolescents are reviewed. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(3.000): 177-198

  20. Stroke in Childhood and New Treatment Modalities

    OpenAIRE

    Hergüner, Özlem

    2003-01-01

    The risk factors for stroke in chidren are very different from those leading to stroke in adults. In recent years, several potential treatments for various specific stroke syndromes have been made. In this article, the risk factors and new treatment modalities for stroke in children and adolescents are reviewed.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy in southern Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Sicuri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria in pregnancy is a public health problem for endemic countries. Economic evaluations of malaria preventive strategies in pregnancy are needed to guide health policies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This analysis was carried out in the context of a trial of malaria intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP, where both intervention groups received an insecticide treated net through the antenatal clinic (ANC in Mozambique. The cost-effectiveness of IPTp-SP on maternal clinical malaria and neonatal survival was estimated. Correlation and threshold analyses were undertaken to assess the main factors affecting the economic outcomes and the cut-off values beyond which the intervention is no longer cost-effective. In 2007 US$, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER for maternal malaria was 41.46 US$ (95% CI 20.5, 96.7 per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY averted. The ICER per DALY averted due to the reduction in neonatal mortality was 1.08 US$ (95% CI 0.43, 3.48. The ICER including both the effect on the mother and on the newborn was 1.02 US$ (95% CI 0.42, 3.21 per DALY averted. Efficacy was the main factor affecting the economic evaluation of IPTp-SP. The intervention remained cost-effective with an increase in drug cost per dose up to 11 times in the case of maternal malaria and 183 times in the case of neonatal mortality. CONCLUSIONS: IPTp-SP was highly cost-effective for both prevention of maternal malaria and reduction of neonatal mortality in Mozambique. These findings are likely to hold for other settings where IPTp-SP is implemented through ANC visits. The intervention remained cost-effective even with a significant increase in drug and other intervention costs. Improvements in the protective efficacy of the intervention would increase its cost-effectiveness. Provision of IPTp with a more effective, although more expensive drug than SP may still remain a cost-effective public

  2. Herbal remedy in the treatment of malaria: cross sectional survey of residents of Lagos State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idowu, E T; Mafe, M A; Otubanjo, O A; Adeneye, A K

    2006-06-01

    Semi structured questionnaires. designed to capture information on the type. composition, method of preparation. dosage, mode of administration. and frequency of use of herbal preparations in malaria treatment, were administered to 1,593 adults of the 3 main ethnic groups and a forth group comprising other smaller ethnic groups designated as "others", all resident in Lagos metropolis in a cross sectional survey. The 1,593 respondents were made up of 892 males and 701 females and their ages ranged from 19 to 60 years. A high percentage in all the ethnic groups especially the Yorubas admitted to the use of herbs in treating malaria [Yoruba (69%), Hausa (47%). others (32%) and Igbo (30%)1. Effectiveness of herbs in treating malaria episodes featured as the major factor for their use. as claimed by the majority (>50%) of the respondents in each of the ethnic groups, while cost consideration was the next most important factor. Other factors mentioned included the absence of side effect in herbal use. to avoid the itchy side effect and ineffectiveness of chloroquine and some other anti-malarials. An appreciable percentage across the ethnic groups had no idea of the constituents of the herbal remedies they use for treating their malaria episodes since they buy these from traditional herbalists. Varied combinations of these herbs in combination with different types of fruits and other substances are claimed to be used, the main ones of which are Azardiracha indica and pineapple. A large majority of respondents in all the ethnic groups claimed to use the same herbs for the treatment and prevention of malaria and great improvement is experienced after use [Hausas (90%). Igbos (83%). Yorubas (77%) and the others (88%)]. There is usually no specific dose or dose regimen. however a high proportion in all the ethnic groups use herbal preparation thrice a day and a few of the respondents take unspecified measures at arbitrary intervals. The lack of standards in the use of these

  3. Parental Infertility, Fertility Treatment, and Childhood Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Laura O; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia H; Kesmodel, Ulrik S;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A few studies have indicated an increased risk of epilepsy in children conceived by fertility treatment possibly due to characteristics of the infertile couple rather than the treatment. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between parental infertility, fertility treatment......, and epilepsy in the offspring, including the subtypes of epilepsy; idiopathic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy. METHODS: This cohort included all pregnancies resulting in liveborn singletons from the Aarhus Birth Cohort, Denmark (1995-2013). Information on time to pregnancy and fertility...... treatment was obtained from pregnancy questionnaires in early pregnancy. Children developing epilepsy were identified from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Prescription Registry until 2013. Data were analysed using Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for potential...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage I Stage I is divided into stages IA and IB: In stage IA , the tumor is low grade (likely to grow ... tumor does not place any vital organs in danger. Hormone therapy Hormone therapy is a cancer treatment ...

  5. Treatment Options for Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage I Stage I is divided into stages IA and IB: In stage IA , the tumor is low grade (likely to grow ... tumor does not place any vital organs in danger. Hormone therapy Hormone therapy is a cancer treatment ...

  6. Behavioral Treatment for Common Childhood Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Hodson, Gary; Mathews, Judith R.; MacDonald, G. Wayne; McNeill, Gillian; Grantmyre, Jane

    1984-01-01

    Parents often consult family physicians about child rearing, child development, and school-related problems. Behavioral treatment is one method of dealing with such concerns. It involves identifying problems with a child's behavior, working to resolve them by rewarding desirable behavior and withholding rewards for undesirable behavior, and evaluating the outcome. Before treatment begins, it is necessary to establish that the parents feel the child's behavior is a problem; that the child can ...

  7. Recommendations for treatment of childhood non-severe pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Gavin B; Campbell, Harry; Dowell, Scott F; Graham, Stephen M; Klugman, Keith P; Mulholland, E Kim; Steinhoff, Mark; Weber, Martin W; Qazi, Shamim

    2009-03-01

    WHO recommendations for early antimicrobial treatment of childhood pneumonia have been effective in reducing childhood mortality, but the last major revision was over 10 years ago. The emergence of antimicrobial resistance, new pneumonia pathogens, and new drugs have prompted WHO to assemble an international panel to review the literature on childhood pneumonia and to develop evidence-based recommendations for the empirical treatment of non-severe pneumonia among children managed by first-level health providers. Treatment should target the bacterial causes most likely to lead to severe disease, including Streptoccocus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. The best first-line agent is amoxicillin, given twice daily for 3-5 days, although co-trimoxazole may be an alternative in some settings. Treatment failure should be defined in a child who develops signs warranting immediate referral or who does not have a decrease in respiratory rate after 48-72 h of therapy. If failure occurs, and no indication for immediate referral exists, possible explanations for failure should be systematically determined, including non-adherence to therapy and alternative diagnoses. If failure of the first-line agent remains a possible explanation, suitable second-line agents include high-dose amoxicillin-clavulanic acid with or without an affordable macrolide for children over 3 years of age. PMID:19246022

  8. Medicinal Plants Used in Mali for the Treatment of Malaria and Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidara, Mahamane; Bourdy, Geneviève; De Tommasi, Nunziatina; Braca, Alessandra; Traore, Korotoumou; Giani, Sergio; Sanogo, Rokia

    2016-03-01

    Today, ethno-pharmacology is a very important resource in order to discover new therapies for the current diseases. Moreover, another good justification for the ethno-pharmacological approach is to obtain new, effective, less expensive and simple therapies, limiting at the same time the cost of pharmaceutical research. Two major anti-malarial drugs widely used today, i.e. quinine and artemisinin, came respectively from Peruvian and Chinese ancestral treatments reported in the traditional medicines. In this contest, there is an urgent need for the discovery of new drugs, due to the critical epidemiological situation of this disease and to the growth of resistances. In Mali, malaria and liver diseases remain one of the leading public health problems. Many medicinal plants are often used, in local traditional medicine, for the treatment at the same time of malaria and liver diseases, including hepatic syndromes, jaundice, hepatitis and other hepatic disorders. Moreover, in the local language Bamanan, the word "Sumaya" is used both for malaria and some liver diseases. In addition, we noted that some of the improved traditional phytomedicines produced by the Department of Traditional Medicine are prescribed by modern doctors both for malaria and liver diseases. In this review, pharmacological, toxicological and phytochemical data on Argemone mexicana L. (Papaveraceae), Cochlospermum tinctorium Perr. ex A. Rich (Cochlospermaceae), Combretum micranthum G.Don (Combretaceae), Entada africana Guillet Perr. (Mimosaceae), Erythrina senegalensis A. DC (Fabaceae), Mitragyna inermis (Willd) Kuntze (Rubiaceae), Nauclea latifolia Smith syn. Sarcocephalus latifolius (Smith) Bruce (Rubiaceae), Securidaca longepedunculata Fresen (Polygalaceae), Trichilia emetica Vahl. (Meliaceae), and Vernonia colorata (Willd) Drake (Asteraceae) are reported. Some of the collected data could be used to improve the actual herbal drugs and to propose new phytomedicines for the management of malaria and

  9. Community participation for malaria elimination in tafea province, vanuatu: part ii. social and cultural aspects of treatment-seeking behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riley Ian

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early diagnosis and prompt effective case management are important components of any malaria elimination strategy. Tafea Province, Vanuatu has a rich history of traditional practices and beliefs, which have been integrated with missionary efforts and the introduction of modern constructions of health. Gaining a detailed knowledge of community perceptions of malarial symptomatology and treatment-seeking behaviours is essential in guiding effective community participation strategies for malaria control and elimination. Method An ethnographic study involving nine focus group discussions (FGD, 12 key informant interviews (KII and seven participatory workshops were carried out on Tanna Island, Vanuatu. Villages in areas of high and low malaria transmission risk were selected. Four ni-Vanuatu research officers, including two from Tanna, were trained and employed to conduct the research. Data underwent thematic analysis to examine treatment-seeking behaviour and community perceptions of malaria. Results Malaria was perceived to be a serious, but relatively new condition, and in most communities, identified as being apparent only after independence in 1980. Severe fever in the presence of other key symptoms triggered a diagnosis of malaria by individuals. Use of traditional or home practices was common: perceived vulnerability of patient and previous experience with malaria impacted on the time taken to seek treatment at a health facility. Barriers to health care access and reasons for delay in care-seeking included the availability of health worker and poor community infrastructure. Conclusion Due to programme success of achieving low malaria transmission, Tafea province has been identified for elimination of malaria by 2012 in the Government of Vanuatu Malaria Action Plans (MAP. An effective malaria elimination programme requires interactions between the community and its leaders, malaria workers and health providers for success in

  10. The detection and treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria: Time for change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosten F

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In most countries where malaria is endemic, P. falciparum malaria is on the rise. This is primarily due to the spread of drug-resistant strains. Drug resistance is mediated by spontaneous changes in the parasite genome that allow resistant parasites to escape the action of the drugs. The spread of drug resistance increases the transmission of malaria parasites. The consequences for the populations at risk are profound both in terms of consequences for health and economy. In order to halt the progression of drug resistance, we need to change the way antimalarials are used. As in tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS, we must use a combination of drugs for the treatment of malaria. Taking into account the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the various anti-malarial agents, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT seems to be the best option. This strategy should be used in conjunction with early diagnosis and appropriate vector control measures to achieve reduction in the emergence and spread of drug resistance.

  11. Clustering of malaria treatment failure (TF) in Daraweesh: hints for host genetic susceptibility to TF with emphasis on immune-modulating SNPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giha, Hayder A; ElGhazali, Gehad; Nasr, Amre;

    2010-01-01

    In malaria, drug resistance and treatment failure (TF) are not synonymous, although are escalating together. Over 9 years of surveillances for malaria morbidity and TF in Daraweesh village in eastern Sudan (1991-2004), 136 donors (15-78 years) from 43 households, treated for 278 malaria episodes...

  12. Eradicating malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breman, Joel G

    2009-01-01

    The renewed interest in malaria research and control is based on the intolerable toll this disease takes on young children and pregnant women in Africa and other vulnerable populations; 150 to 300 children die each hour from malaria amounting to 1 to 2 million deaths yearly. Malaria-induced neurologic impairment, anemia, hypoglycemia, and low birth weight imperil normal development and survival. Resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to drugs and Anopheles mosquitoes to insecticides has stimulated discovery and development of artemisinin-based combination treatments (ACTs) and other drugs, long-lasting insecticide-treated bednets (with synthetic pyrethroids) and a search for non-toxic, long-lasting, affordable insecticides for indoor residual spraying (IRS). Malaria vaccine development and testing are progressing rapidly and a recombinant protein (RTS,S/AS02A) directed against the circumsporozoite protein is soon to be in Phase 3 trials. Support for malaria control, research, and advocacy through the Global Fund for HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the U.S. President's Malaria Initiative, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, WHO and other organizations is resulting in decreasing morbidity and mortality in many malarious countries. Sustainability of effective programs through training and institution strengthening will be the key to malaria elimination coupled with improved surveillance and targeted research. PMID:19544698

  13. Factors contributing to poor treatment outcomes in childhood atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Anna; Smith, Saxon D

    2015-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disease of the skin and is the most common paediatric dermatological condition. While no cure is available, it can be treated effectively if adherence to a therapeutic plan is maintained. Poor adherence to treatment is common in AD and can lead to treatment failure, which has significant impacts on the patient, family and society. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify factors that contribute to poor treatment adherence in childhood AD and to identify possible strategies to remedy these. Identified factors leading to poor treatment adherence include: complexity of treatment regimen, lack of knowledge, impaired quality of life, dissatisfaction with treatment strategies, infrequent follow up, corticosteroid phobia and the use of complementary and alternative medicine. Effective strategies to increase treatment adherence include: caregiver education and utilisation of education adjuncts, optimisation of the patient/caregiver-clinician relationship, early and frequent follow up and improvement of patient and caregiver quality of life. PMID:25817780

  14. Clonazepam Treatment of Pathologic Childhood Aerophagia with Psychological Stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Jin-Bok; Kim, Jun Sik; Ahn, Byung Hoon; Jung, Chul-Ho; Lee, Young Hwan; Kam, Sin

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of pathologic aerophagia has rarely been discussed in the literature. In this retrospective study, the authors investigated the effects of clonazepam on the management of pathologic childhood aerophagia (PCA) with psychological stresses (PS), but not with mental retardation. Data from 22 consecutive PCA patients with PS (aged 2 to 10 yr), who had been followed up for over 1 yr, were reviewed. On the basis of videolaryngoscopic views, the authors observed that the pathologyof aer...

  15. Early childhood educators' recognition and treatment of violence against children

    OpenAIRE

    Pogačar, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The thesis analyses violence against children and early childhood educators' recognition of violence against children and their treatment. The theoretical part defines different types of violence which are: physical, mental, and sexual violence, child neglect, and economic violence. Definitions as well as signs of a certain type of violence are presented. The author also describes the role of practitioners in recognition of violence against children and the legislation that defines their ...

  16. The Behavioral Treatment of Childhood Nocturnal Enuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Notes that of the treatments attempted for nocturnal enuresis, pharmacotherapy, individual psychotherapy, and behavioral conditioning, the most effective is behavioral conditioning with a urine alarm. Reviews the enuresis literature and provides recommendations for use of the urine alarm approach. (Author/ABB)

  17. Tafenoquine and its potential in the treatment and relapse prevention of Plasmodium vivax malaria: the evidence to date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebstie, Yehenew A; Abay, Solomon M; Tadesse, Wondmagegn T; Ejigu, Dawit A

    2016-01-01

    Despite declining global malaria incidence, the disease continues to be a threat to people living in endemic regions. In 2015, an estimated 214 million new malaria cases and 438,000 deaths due to malaria were recorded. Plasmodium vivax is the second most common cause of malaria next to Plasmodium falciparum. Vivax malaria is prevalent especially in Southeast Asia and the Horn of Africa, with enormous challenges in controlling the disease. Some of the challenges faced by vivax malaria-endemic countries include limited access to effective drugs treating liver stages of the parasite (schizonts and hypnozoites), emergence/spread of drug resistance, and misperception of vivax malaria as nonlethal. Primaquine, the only 8-aminoquinoline derivative approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, is intended to clear intrahepatic hypnozoites of P. vivax (radical cure). However, poor adherence to a prolonged treatment course, drug-induced hemolysis in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and the emergence of resistance make it imperative to look for alternative drugs. Therefore, this review focuses on data accrued to date on tafenoquine and gives insight on the potential role of the drug in preventing relapse and radical cure of patients with vivax malaria. PMID:27528800

  18. Challenges and New Treatment in Childhood Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sobhani Shahmirzadi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Constipation is a debilitating condition that is often associated with different abdominal problem. It can cause distress for the child and family and can result in emotional disturbance and family problem. Based on the current algorhytm, the treatment of chronic constipation consists of 4 important phases, 1: education, 2: disimpaction, 3: prevention of re-accumulation of feces and 4: follow up. Challenges in treatment are related to many issues: a    Discussing the importance of problem for parents, b    Family concern about safety and side effects of drugs, c    Adherence to long term treatment, which is often crucial but unacceptable by family, d    Amelioration of withdrawal behavior in toddlers group which don’t understand the facts, e    Planning a appropriate diet for constipation which is again unacceptable by children, f     Cost of treatment g    Anismus Besides of known treatment consist of various drugs:   Biofeedback is one of the approaches that have proven benefits but with less emphasis and introduction, so application of this obsolete method needs further works. Tegaserod, a selective agonist that acts at 5-HT4 receptors and increases small bowel transit, stimulates intestinal secretion and inhibits visceral afferent responses has proven effective in the treatment of chronic constipation in adults.  In children with hard stools, 5-HT4 agonist might benefit children with constipation and tendency to form hard stools, and large rectal masses. The role of this promising new agent in pediatric constipation has to be established in future studies. Pre and Probiotics:  Non-digestible oligosaccharides consist mainly of fructooligosaccharides (FOS. FOS reduces fecal pH, increases the water, holding capacity of stool and fecal weight and decreases intestinal transit time. Furthermore, it has prebiotic effects by selectively stimulating the growth of probiotics bacteria, such as bifidobacteria. Surgery

  19. Behavioral treatment for common childhood problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, G; Mathews, J R; Macdonald, G W; McNeill, G; Grantmyre, J

    1984-01-01

    Parents often consult family physicians about child rearing, child development, and school-related problems. Behavioral treatment is one method of dealing with such concerns. It involves identifying problems with a child's behavior, working to resolve them by rewarding desirable behavior and withholding rewards for undesirable behavior, and evaluating the outcome. Before treatment begins, it is necessary to establish that the parents feel the child's behavior is a problem; that the child can voluntarily control the behavior; that at least one parent or primary caretaker can benefit from instruction in how to modify behavior, and that the behavior to be changed is not just one facet of a larger family problem. Both parents and physicians may find self-help books and printed handouts very useful. Referral to specialized services may be appropriate for complex or recalcitrant problems. PMID:21283501

  20. The effect of drug packaging on patients' compliance with treatment for Plasmodium vivax malaria in China.

    OpenAIRE

    Qingjun, L.; Jihui, D.; Laiyi, T.; Xiangjun, Z.; Jun, L; Hay, A.; Shires, S; Navaratnam, V

    1998-01-01

    A study conducted in 1994 showed that the use of blister packs containing antimalarial drugs significantly increased patients' compliance, compared with traditional means of dispensing drugs in a paper envelope. The present study assessed patients' compliance and compared the difference between 3-day chloroquine and 8-day primaquine courses of treatment for vivax malaria. The level of real compliance was determined by making the drugs with phenobarbital, and measuring its level in the blood f...

  1. Enhanced Transmission of Drug-Resistant Parasites to Mosquitoes following Drug Treatment in Rodent Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Andrew S.; Huijben, Silvie; Paaijmans, Krijn P.; Sim, Derek G.; Chan, Brian H. K.; Nelson, William A.; Read, Andrew F.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of drug resistant Plasmodium parasites is a major challenge to effective malaria control. In theory, competitive interactions between sensitive parasites and resistant parasites within infections are a major determinant of the rate at which parasite evolution undermines drug efficacy. Competitive suppression of resistant parasites in untreated hosts slows the spread of resistance; competitive release following treatment enhances it. Here we report that for the murine model Plasm...

  2. Drug treatment of malaria infections can reduce levels of protection transferred to offspring via maternal immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Staszewski, Vincent; Reece, Sarah E; O'Donnell, Aidan J.; Cunningham, Emma J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Maternally transferred immunity can have a fundamental effect on the ability of offspring to deal with infection. However, levels of antibodies in adults can vary both quantitatively and qualitatively between individuals and during the course of infection. How infection dynamics and their modification by drug treatment might affect the protection transferred to offspring remains poorly understood. Using the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi, we demonstrate that curing dams part way ...

  3. Ototoxicity of artemether/lumefantrine in the treatment of falciparum malaria: a randomized trial

    OpenAIRE

    Krause Eike; Girma Tsinuel; Mamo Yoseph; Berens-Riha Nicole; Miranda Isabel; Eshetu Teferi; Gürkov Robert; Schmidt Michael; Hempel John-Martin; Löscher Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Due to increasing drug resistance, artemisinin-based combination chemotherapy (ACT) has become the first-line treatment of falciparum malaria in many endemic countries. However, irreversible ototoxicity associated with artemether/lumefantrine (AL) has been reported recently and suggested to be a serious limitation in the use of ACT. The aim of the study was to compare ototoxicity, tolerability, and efficacy of ACT with that of quinine and atovaquone/proguanil in the treatm...

  4. Artemether–lumefantrine in the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrhardt, Stephan; Meyer, Christian G.

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization strongly recommends artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) regimens for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria cases in endemic areas. Among the combinations of compounds that are available at present, excellent results have been obtained for the artemisinin derivative artemether, in a combination galenic preparation with lumefantrine (artemether–lumefantrine, AL). Here, the pharmacological properties and the therapeutic options of both...

  5. The impact of anthelmintic treatment intervention on malaria infection and anaemia in school and preschool children in Magu district, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinung'hi, Safari M.; Magnussen, Pascal; Kishamawe, Coleman; Todd, Jim; Vennervald, Birgitte J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some studies have suggested that helminth infections increase the risk of malaria infection and are associated with increased number of malaria attacks and anaemia. Thus interventions to control helminth infections may have an impact on incidence of clinical malaria and anaemia. The...... current study assessed the impact of two anthelmintic treatment approaches on malaria infection and on anaemia in school and pre-school children in Magu district, Tanzania. METHODS: A total of 765 children were enrolled into a prospective randomized anthelmintic intervention trial following a baseline...... study of 1546 children. Enrolled children were randomized to receive either repeated treatment with praziquantel and albendazole four times a year (intervention group, 394 children) or single dose treatment with praziquantel and albendazole once a year (control group, 371 children). Follow up...

  6. Radium treatment for hemangioma in early childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1920 and 1959, a total of 14 647 children younger than 18 months were treated at Radiumhemmet with ionizing radiation for skin hemangioma. Seventy-two percent of the children were treated with radium needles or tubes, which were put into glass capsules and then applied to the hemangioma. The absorbed doses to different organs have been measured in a tissue equivalent phantom, representing a 6-month-old child. For a standard treatment of 8 Gy to the hemangioma the mean absorbed doses to the brain, eye lens, parotid gland, thyroid, breast anlage and gonads from 28 different treatment areas were 0.03-0.2 Gy. The mean absorbed dose to the organs in younger (<2 months) and older (14-18 months) children were up to 50% higher (0.04-0.1 Gy) and 33% lower (0.02-0.06 Gy) respectively, than for a 6-month-old child. The uncertainty in organ absorbed doses for each patient depended mostly on the estimation of the distance between the applicator and the site. (orig.)

  7. N'Dribala (Cochlospermum planchonii) versus chloroquine for treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit-Vical, F; Valentin, A; Da, B; Dakuyo, Z; Descamps, L; Mallié, M

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the efficacy of oral N'Dribala (tuberous roots decoction of Cochlospermum planchonii Hook) treatment versus chloroquine in non-severe malaria. The study included 85 patients with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum infection in Banfora, Burkina Faso. Forty-six patients that received N'Dribala beverage were compared to 21 patients treated with chloroquine. All patients were monitored with clinical examination and a parasitemia control by Giemsa-stained thick films. N'Dribala appeared safe and statistically as efficient as chloroquine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. At day 5 (D5), 57% of chloroquine-treated and 52% of N'Dribala-treated patients were cured with no detectable parasitemia (parasite density (Pd): 0) and more than 90% of whole patients were asymptomatic. N'Dribala is easily available in this country, cheap, without significant side effects and efficient with a clearly demonstrated activity on Plasmodium falciparum blood stages. This study enhances the traditional use of the Cochlospermum planchonii as alternative therapy for treatment of non-severe malaria. PMID:14522441

  8. Early loss of teeth after treatment for childhood leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: only few reports of effects of radiotherapy in childhood on the dental apparatus are available in the literature. The basis for early loss of teeth appears to be a reduction of the root surface area after radiation exposure. These effects in the periodontium are a consequence of combined radiochemotherapy usually applied for treatment of childhood neoplasia. Chemotherapy alone also results in changes of periodontal development. Case report: a 33-year-old patient is reported, who, at the age of 11 years, received high-dose chemotherapy and radiotherapy of neuroaxis and cranium for acute lymphatic leukemia with relapse. The patient consulted the Implant Section of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery because of severe dental changes and tooth loss despite adequate dental care and oral hygiene. Radiation doses given to the superior maxilla and mandible at the age of 11 were estimated to be in the range of 8-25 Gy. Conclusion: intense, life-long dental care and follow-up of patients cured from malignant disease in childhood must hence be postulated in order to minimize dental treatment sequelae by supportive measures, but also to initiate timely adequate dental and prosthetic management. (orig.)

  9. A village treatment center for malaria: community response in Sri Lanka

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konradsen, F; Amerasinghe, P H; Perera, D;

    2000-01-01

    communities, it is important to know the rationale for people's malaria treatment-seeking behavior. The present study provides insights into the reasons for people's preferences for different types of healthcare facilities and describes variation of these preferences within a rural community in Sri Lanka. The...... government facilities. The treatment center did not improve the response time in seeking treatment for young children, but the delay for adults was reduced by 1-2 days. Mothers with small children often preferred the government facilities since they wanted a more qualified opinion than available from the...

  10. Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... healthy liver are important for survivors of childhood cancer. Pancreas Radiation therapy increases the risk of pancreatic late ... are important for survivors of childhood cancer. Childhood cancer survivors with liver ... Pancreas Radiation therapy increases the risk of pancreatic late ...

  11. Comparative Efficacy of Quinine and Artesunate in the Treatment of Severe Malaria : A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigil Haroon, Kalpesh Amichandwala, Mahesah G. Solu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of head to head studies of quinine and artesunate in Indian patients. A consensus onthe best treatment for severe malaria is lacking. To compare the efficacy of quinine and artesunate insevere falciparum malaria. This is a prospective randomized controlled, opened-labeled trial, conductedin a tertiary care center in western India. Thiry-five patients above the age of 18 years, with asexualforms of plasmodium falciparum in the peripheral smear and satisfying the WHO criteria for severemalaria, formed the study population. On randomization 18 received quinine and 17 artesunate. Theend points of the study were parasite clearance time (PCT, fever clearance time (FCT, coma resolutiontime (CRT, adverse effects of the drugs and death. The FCT (p 0.023 and PCT (p=0.04 were lowerwith artesunate. The CRT was lower with quinine (p 0.03. One patient in each arm succumbed to theillness (p 0.96. There was no side effect warranting a crossover to the other arm. Thus, quinine is asgood as artesunate in the treatment of severe falciparum malaria.

  12. A Comparative Study of Dihydroartemisinin Compounds in Treatment of Uncomplicated Falciparum Malaria in Kampong of Cambodia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jian-ping(宋建平); Duong Socheat; Suou Seila

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the safety and efficacy of two compounds of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) Artekin and Artekin (T) in the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Methods: The regimen of 8-tablet for 2 days of Artekin and Artekin (T) were applied to 100 patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria, who were randomly divided into two groups. Each group contained 50 cases. The cure rate, the mean parasites clearance time, the mean fever clearance and side-effects were observed to assess the safety and efficacy of the compounds used. Results: The mean parasites clearance time was 31.7±9.0 hours in the Artekin group and 32.8±8.8 hours in Artekin (T) group respectively;the mean fever clearance time was 12.7±7.2 hours in Artekin group and 16.5±7.9 hours in Artekin (T) group; there were no recrudescence case in both groups within the 28 days of follow-up,the cure rates in Artekin group and Artekin (T) groups were 100%. It indicated that the tolerability of both compounds were very good, the side-effects such as nausea, abdominal pain were mild and self-limited. Conclusion: The study preliminarily indicated that the DHA and PQ compounds were of high efficacy, rapid acting and low toxicity. Artekin is very promising as a cheap, simple, effective treatment for multi-resistance malaria in Cambodia.

  13. Determinants of delay in malaria treatment-seeking behaviour for under-five children in south-west Ethiopia: a case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Deribew Amare; Deribe Kebede; Getahun Alemayehu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Prompt diagnosis and timely treatment of malaria within 24 hours after onset of first symptoms can reduce illness progression to severe stages and therefore, decrease mortality. The reason why mothers/caretakers delay in malaria diagnosis and treatment for under-five children is not well studied in Ethiopia. The objective of this study was to assess determinants of malaria treatment delay in under-five children in three districts of south-west Ethiopia. Methods A case cont...

  14. Vendor-to-vendor education to improve malaria treatment by private drug outlets in Bungoma District, Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Makama Sammy; Shabahang Jennifer; Tavrow Paula

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Private outlets are the main suppliers of uncomplicated malaria treatment in Africa. However, they are so numerous that they are difficult for governments to influence and regulate. This study's objective was to evaluate a low-cost outreach education (vendor-to-vendor) programme to improve the private sector's compliance with malaria guidelines in Bungoma district, Kenya. The cornerstone of the programme was the district's training of 73 wholesalers who were equipped with ...

  15. Update on the efficacy, effectiveness and safety of artemether–lumefantrine combination therapy for treatment of uncomplicated malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Byakika-Kibwika, P; Lamorde, M.; Mayanja-Kizza, H.; Merry, C.; Colebunders, R.; Van geertruyden, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Artemether–lumefantrine is one of the artemisisnin-based combination therapies recommended for treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria. The drug combination is highly efficacious against sensitive and multidrug resistant falciparum malaria. It offers the advantage of rapid clearance of parasites by artemether and the slower elimination of residual parasites by lumefantrine. The combination can be used in all populations except pregnant mothers in the first trimester where...

  16. Individual, facility and policy level influences on national coverage estimates for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy in Tanzania.

    OpenAIRE

    Schellenberg Joanna; Sedekia Yovitha; Bruce Jane; Mponda Hadji; Jones Caroline; Nathan Rose; Marchant Tanya; Mshinda Hassan; Hanson Kara

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Delivery of two doses of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) is a key strategy to reduce the burden of malaria in pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa. However, different settings have reported coverage levels well below the target 80%. Antenatal implementation guidelines in Tanzania recommend IPTp first dose to be given at the second antenatal visit, and second dose at the third visit. This investigation measured coverage of IPTp at national le...

  17. Local perceptions of intermittent screening and treatment for malaria in school children on the south coast of Kenya.

    OpenAIRE

    Okello George; Ndegwa Sarah N; Halliday Katherine E; Hanson Kara; Brooker Simon J; Jones Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The intermittent screening and treatment (IST) of school children for malaria is one possible intervention strategy that could help reduce the burden of malaria among school children. Future implementation of IST will not only depend on its efficacy and cost-effectiveness but also on its acceptability to parents of the children who receive IST, as well as those responsible for its delivery. This study was conducted alongside a cluster-randomized trial to investigate local ...

  18. Treatment guided by rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in Tanzanian children: safety and alternative bacterial diagnoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sykes Alma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WHO guidelines for the treatment of young children with suspected malaria have recently changed from presumptive treatment to anti-malarial treatment guided by a blood slide or malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT. However, there is limited evidence of the safety of this policy in routine outpatient settings in Africa. Methods Children 3-59 months of age with a non-severe febrile illness and no obvious cause were enrolled over a period of one year in a malaria endemic area of Tanzania. Treatment was determined by the results of a clinical examination and RDT result, and blood culture and serum lactate were also collected. RDT-negative children were followed up over 14 days. Results Over the course of one year, 965 children were enrolled; 158 (16.4% were RDT-positive and treated with artemether-lumefantrine and 807 (83.4% were RDT-negative and treated with non-anti-malarial medicines. Compared with RDT-positives, RDT-negative children were on average younger with a lower axillary temperature and more likely to have a history of cough or difficulty in breathing. Six (0.6% children became RDT-positive after enrolment, all of whom were PCR-negative for Plasmodium falciparum DNA at enrolment. In addition, 12 (1.2% children were admitted to hospital, one with possible malaria, none of whom died. A bacterial pathogen was identified in 9/965 (0.9% children, eight of whom were RDT-negative and one was RDT-positive, but slide-negative. Excluding three children with Salmonella typhi, all of the children with bacteraemia were ≤12 months of age. Compared to double-read research slide results RDTs had a sensitivity of 97.8% (95%CI 96.9-98.7 and specificity of 96.3% (95%CI 96.3-98.4. Conclusions Use of RDTs to direct the use of anti-malarial drugs in young children did not result in any missed diagnoses of malaria although new infections soon after a consultation with a negative RDT result may undermine confidence in results. Invasive

  19. Pharmacogenetics Influence Treatment Efficacy in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devidsen, M.L.; Dalhoff, K.; Schmiegelow, K.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics covers the genetic variation affecting pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. and their influence on drug-response phenotypes. The genetic variation includes an estimated 15 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and is a key determinator for the interindividual differences...... treatment response. In the future, high-throughput, low-cost, genetic platforms will allow screening of hundreds or thousands of targeted SNPs to give a combined gene-dosage effect ( = individual SNP risk profile), which may allow pharmacogenetic-based individualization of treatment Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...... in treatment resistance and toxic side effects. As most childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment protocols include up to 13 different chemotherapeutic agents, the impact of individual SNPs has been difficult to evaluate. So far Focus has mainly been on the widely used glucocorticosteroids...

  20. A non-inferiority, individually randomized trial of intermittent screening and treatment versus intermittent preventive treatment in the control of malaria in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tagbor, Harry; Cairns, Matthew; Bojang, Kalifa; Coulibaly, Sheick Oumar; Kayentao, Kassoum; Williams, John; Abubakar, Ismaela; Akor, Francis; Mohammed, Khalifa; Bationo, Richard; Dabira, Edgar; Soulama, Alamissa; Djimdé, Moussa; Guirou, Etienne; Awine, Timothy; Quaye, Stephen; Njie, Fanta; Ordi, Jaume; Doumbo, Ogobara; Hodgson, Abraham; Oduro, Abraham; Meshnick, Steven; Taylor, Steve; Magnussen, Pascal; Ter Kuile, Feiko; Woukeu, Arouna; Milligan, Paul; Chandramohan, Daniel; Greenwood, Brian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP) in pregnancy is threatened in parts of Africa by the emergence and spread of resistance to SP. Intermittent screening with a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and treatment of positive women......-AL performed as well as IPTp-SP. In the absence of an effective alternative medication to SP for IPTp, ISTp-AL is a potential alternative to IPTp in areas where SP resistance is high. It may also have a role in areas where malaria transmission is low and for the prevention of malaria in HIV positive women...

  1. A non-inferiority, individually randomized trial of intermittent screening and treatment versus intermittent preventive treatment in the control of malaria in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tagbor, Harry; Cairns, Matthew; Bojang, Kalifa;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP) in pregnancy is threatened in parts of Africa by the emergence and spread of resistance to SP. Intermittent screening with a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and treatment of positive women...... malaria parasitemia between routine antenatal clinics (310 vs 182 episodes, rate difference: 49.4 per 1,000 pregnancies [95% CI 30.5, 68.3], but the number of hospital admissions for malaria was similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Despite low levels of resistance to SP in the study areas, ISTp...

  2. Continued efficacy of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine as second line treatment for malaria in children in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Aaby, Peter;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (S/P) is widely used for treatment of failures following the first line treatment for malaria in Africa. In Guinea-Bissau, it has been recommended as second line therapy by the National Malaria Programme since 1996. In order to monitor any change of the in vi...... second line treatment for uncomplicated malaria has remained unchanged in spite of a relatively high level of genetic markers associated with Plasmodium falciparum resistance to S/P previously found in the area.......BACKGROUND: Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (S/P) is widely used for treatment of failures following the first line treatment for malaria in Africa. In Guinea-Bissau, it has been recommended as second line therapy by the National Malaria Programme since 1996. In order to monitor any change of the in vivo...... sensitivity, the efficacy of S/P was studied immediately before the introduction of the drug and 6-9 years later. METHODS: Children participating in clinical in vivo studies were given S/P if having late clinical treatment failure following the treatment with quinine, chloroquine, or amodiaquine...

  3. Improvements in access to malaria treatment in Tanzania following community, retail sector and health facility interventions -- a user perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obrist Brigit

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ACCESS programme aims at understanding and improving access to prompt and effective malaria treatment. Between 2004 and 2008 the programme implemented a social marketing campaign for improved treatment-seeking. To improve access to treatment in the private retail sector a new class of outlets known as accredited drug dispensing outlets (ADDO was created in Tanzania in 2006. Tanzania changed its first-line treatment for malaria from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP to artemether-lumefantrine (ALu in 2007 and subsidized ALu was made available in both health facilities and ADDOs. The effect of these interventions on understanding and treatment of malaria was studied in rural Tanzania. The data also enabled an investigation of the determinants of access to treatment. Methods Three treatment-seeking surveys were conducted in 2004, 2006 and 2008 in the rural areas of the Ifakara demographic surveillance system (DSS and in Ifakara town. Each survey included approximately 150 people who had suffered a fever case in the previous 14 days. Results Treatment-seeking and awareness of malaria was already high at baseline, but various improvements were seen between 2004 and 2008, namely: better understanding causes of malaria (from 62% to 84%; an increase in health facility attendance as first treatment option for patients older than five years (27% to 52%; higher treatment coverage with anti-malarials (86% to 96% and more timely use of anti-malarials (80% to 93-97% treatments taken within 24 hrs. Unfortunately, the change of treatment policy led to a low availability of ALu in the private sector and, therefore, to a drop in the proportion of patients taking a recommended malaria treatment (85% to 53%. The availability of outlets (health facilities or drug shops is the most important determinant of whether patients receive prompt and effective treatment, whereas affordability and accessibility contribute to a lesser extent. Conclusions An

  4. Estimated financial and human resources requirements for the treatment of malaria in Malawi

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    Rudatsikira Emmanuel

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria fever is a common medical presentation and diagnosis in Malawi. The national malaria policy supports self-diagnosis and self-medication for uncomplicated malaria with first line anti-malaria drugs. While a qualitative appreciation of the burden of malaria on the health system is recognized, there is limited quantitative estimation of the burden malaria exacts on the health system, especially with regard to human resources and financial burden on Malawi. Methods The burden of malaria was assessed based on estimated incidence rates for a high endemic country of which Malawi is one. Data on the available human resources and financial resources committed towards malaria from official Malawi government documents and programme reports were obtained. The amount of human and financial resources that would be required to treat 65% or 85% of symptomatic malaria cases as per the Roll Back Malaria partnership and the US President's Malaria Initiative targets. Results Based on a malaria incidence rate of 1.4 episodes per year per person it was estimated that there would be 3.71 million symptomatic episodes of malaria among children Conclusion Malaria exacts a heavy toll on the health system in Malawi. The national recommendation of self-medication with first-line drug for uncomplicated malaria is justified as there are not enough clinicians to provide clinical care for all cases. The Malawi Ministry of Health's promotion of malaria drug prescription including other lower cadre health workers may be justified.

  5. Intermittent screening and treatment versus intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: a randomised controlled non-inferiority trial.

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    Harry Tagbor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp may be compromised by the spread of resistance to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP across Africa. But little information exists on alternative drugs for IPTp or alternative strategies for the prevention of malaria in pregnancy. Therefore, we have investigated whether screening with a rapid diagnostic test and treatment of those who are positive (IST at routine antenatal clinic attendances is as effective and as safe as SP-IPTp in pregnant women. METHODS AND FINDINGS: During antenatal clinic sessions in six health facilities in Ghana held between March 2007 and September 2007, 3333 pregnant women who satisfied inclusion criteria were randomised into three intervention arms (1 standard SP-IPTp, (2 IST and treatment with SP or (3 IST and treatment with amodiaquine+artesunate (AQ+AS. All women received a long-lasting insecticide treated net. Study women had a maximum of three scheduled follow-up visits following enrollment. Haemoglobin concentration and peripheral parasitaemia were assessed between 36 and 40 weeks of gestation. Birth weight was measured at delivery or within 72 hours for babies delivered at home. Parasite prevalence at enrollment in primigravidae and in multigravidae was 29.6% and 10.2% respectively. At 36-40 weeks of gestation the prevalence of asymptomatic parasitaemia was 12.1% in study women overall and was very similar in all treatment groups. The risk of third trimester severe anaemia or low birth weight did not differ significantly between the three treatment groups regardless of gravidity. IST with AQ+AS or SP was not inferior to SP-IPTp in reducing the risk of low birth weight (RD  =  -1.17[95%CI; -4.39-1.02] for IST-SP vs. SP-IPTp and RD = 0.78[95%CI; -2.11-3.68] for IST-AQAS vs. SP-IPTp; third trimester severe anaemia (RD = 0.29[95%CI; -0.69-1.30] for IST-SP vs. SP-IPTp and RD  =  -0.36[95%CI;-1.12-0.44] for IST-AQAS vs

  6. Different doses of amodiaquine and chloroquine for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in children in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Ursing, Johan; Poulsen, Anja;

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare different doses of chloroquine (CQ) and amodiaquine (AQ) for the treatment of falciparum malaria in children. Children with Plasmodium falciparum monoinfection were allocated by block randomisation to treatment with CQ 50/kg mg or 25 mg/kg or AQ 15 mg...... is not superior to treatment with CQ 50 mg/kg. However, 25 mg/kg of CQ is less efficient. As an interim option, Guinea-Bissau could change the recommended first-line treatment of uncomplicated malaria to CQ 50 mg/kg, reserving AQ as a partner drug for a future combination therapy....

  7. Food Allergy in childhood: phenotypes, prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-García, Silvia; Cipriani, Francesca; Ricci, Giampaolo

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of food allergy in childhood increased in the last decades, especially in Westernized countries where this phenomenon has been indicated as a second wave of the allergic epidemic. In parallel, scientific interest also increased with the effort to explain the reasons of this sudden rise and to identify potential protective and risk factors. A great attention has been focused on early exposures to allergenic foods, as well as on other nutritional factors or supplements that may influence the immune system in a positive direction. Both interventions on maternal diet before birth or during breastfeeding and then directly on infant nutrition have been investigated. Furthermore, the natural history of food allergy also seems to be changing over time; IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy and egg allergy seem to be more frequently a persistent rather than a transient disease in childhood, as described in the last years. Food avoidance and the emergency drugs in case of an adverse event, such as epinephrine self-injector, are currently the first-line treatment in patients with food allergies, with a resulting impairment in the quality of life and social behaviour. During the last decade, oral immunotherapy emerged as an optional treatment with remarkable results, offering a novel perspective in the treatment for and management of food allergy. PMID:26595763

  8. Azithromycin-chloroquine and the intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy

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    Greenwood Brian

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the high malaria-transmission settings of sub-Saharan Africa, malaria in pregnancy is an important cause of maternal, perinatal and neonatal morbidity. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP reduces the incidence of low birth-weight, pre-term delivery, intrauterine growth-retardation and maternal anaemia. However, the public health benefits of IPTp are declining due to SP resistance. The combination of azithromycin and chloroquine is a potential alternative to SP for IPTp. This review summarizes key in vitro and in vivo evidence of azithromycin and chloroquine activity against Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, as well as the anticipated secondary benefits that may result from their combined use in IPTp, including the cure and prevention of many sexually transmitted diseases. Drug costs and the necessity for external financing are discussed along with a range of issues related to drug resistance and surveillance. Several scientific and programmatic questions of interest to policymakers and programme managers are also presented that would need to be addressed before azithromycin-chloroquine could be adopted for use in IPTp.

  9. Randomized controlled trial of a good practice approach to treatment of childhood obesity in Malaysia: Malaysian childhood obesity treatment trial (MASCOT)

    OpenAIRE

    Wafa, S.W.; Talib, R.A.; Hamzaid, N.H.; McColl, J. H.; Rajikan, R.; Ng, L.O.; Ramli, A.H.; Reilly, J J

    2011-01-01

    Context. Few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions for the treatment of childhood obesity have taken place outside the Western world. Aim. To test whether a good practice intervention for the treatment of childhood obesity would have a greater impact on weight status and other outcomes than a control condition in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Methods. Assessor-blinded RCT of a treatment intervention in 107 obese 7- to 11-year olds. The intervention was relatively low intensity (8 hou...

  10. Experiences with radiation treatment of soft tissue tumours in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors review the trends in the treatment of soft tissue tumours in childhood mainly after radiation treatment which is an integral part of the combined therapy. During the last 9 years 23 children with soft tissue tumours were treated with radiotherapy. It was found that in this type of tumours only moderate results could be achieved. This necessitates the early diagnosis and the early start of the combined treatment method. In the authors' material the 2 years survival was 16,6%. The radiotherapy improves the results only if it is based on adequate radiobiological and radiophysical planning ensuring the use of adequate doses and radiation sources. (author) 18 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tables

  11. Side effects of treatment in childhood acute leukemia, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated delayed neurotoxicities in treatment of childhood acute leukemia. Of 28 patients treated over 2 years who were examined on computed tomography of brain scans, 7 patients had abnormal findings. These abnormalities included two cases of leukoencephalopathy, three cases of intracranial calcifications, and two of ventricular dilatation. These patients were under 6 years old at the onset of disease, especially under 3 years old. Also, delayed neurotoxicities developed after relapse of leukemia, especially CNS relapse. It was considered that these were caused by cranial irradiation, intravenous methotrexate injection, intrathecal methotrexate, and sometimes high-dose Ara-C therapy, etc. Most of the cases of leukoencephalopathy were associated with treatment of intermediate-dose or high-dose methotrexate after relapse. These abnormalities must be carefully considered in the treatment of younger children with leukemia and patients with relapse. (author)

  12. Potential impact of host immunity on malaria treatment outcome in Tanzanian children infected with Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevold, Anders; Nkya, Watoky M M M; Theisen, Michael;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In malaria endemic areas children may recover from malaria after chemotherapy in spite of harbouring genotypically drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. This phenomenon suggests that there is a synergy between drug treatment and acquired immunity. This hypothesis was examined in an area...... parasite resistant haplotypes, while the IgG responses to none of the other 11 malaria antigens were not significantly associated with ACPR. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that GLURP-specific IgG antibodies in this setting contribute to clearance of drug-resistant infections and support the hypothesis...... of moderately intense transmission of P. falciparum in Tanzania during a drug trail with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) or amodiaquine (AQ). METHODS: One hundred children with uncomplicated malaria were treated with either SP or AQ and followed for 28 days. Mutations in parasite genes related to SP...

  13. What determines providers' stated preference for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangham-Jefferies, Lindsay; Hanson, Kara; Mbacham, Wilfred; Onwujekwe, Obinna; Wiseman, Virginia

    2014-03-01

    As agents for their patients, providers often make treatment decisions on behalf of patients, and their choices can affect health outcomes. However, providers operate within a network of relationships and are agents not only for their patients, but also other health sector actors, such as their employer, the Ministry of Health, and pharmaceutical suppliers. Providers' stated preferences for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria were examined to determine what factors predict their choice of treatment in the absence of information and institutional constraints, such as the stock of medicines or the patient's ability to pay. 518 providers working at non-profit health facilities and for-profit pharmacies and drug stores in Yaoundé and Bamenda in Cameroon and in Enugu State in Nigeria were surveyed between July and December 2009 to elicit the antimalarial they prefer to supply for uncomplicated malaria. Multilevel modelling was used to determine the effect of financial and non-financial incentives on their preference, while controlling for information and institutional constraints, and accounting for the clustering of providers within facilities and geographic areas. 69% of providers stated a preference for artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT), which is the recommended treatment for uncomplicated malaria in Cameroon and Nigeria. A preference for ACT was significantly associated with working at a for-profit facility, reporting that patients prefer ACT, and working at facilities that obtain antimalarials from drug company representatives. Preferences were similar among colleagues within a facility, and among providers working in the same locality. Knowing the government recommends ACT was a significant predictor, though having access to clinical guidelines was not sufficient. Providers are agents serving multiple principals and their preferences over alternative antimalarials were influenced by patients, drug company representatives, and other providers working at the

  14. Potential impact of host immunity on malaria treatment outcome in Tanzanian children infected with Plasmodium falciparum

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    Theander Thor G

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In malaria endemic areas children may recover from malaria after chemotherapy in spite of harbouring genotypically drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. This phenomenon suggests that there is a synergy between drug treatment and acquired immunity. This hypothesis was examined in an area of moderately intense transmission of P. falciparum in Tanzania during a drug trail with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP or amodiaquine (AQ. Methods One hundred children with uncomplicated malaria were treated with either SP or AQ and followed for 28 days. Mutations in parasite genes related to SP and AQ-resistance as well as human sickle cell trait and alpha-thalassaemia were determined using PCR and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (SSOP-ELISA, and IgG antibody responses to a panel of P. falciparum antigens were assessed and related to treatment outcome. Results Parasitological or clinical treatment failure (TF was observed in 68% and 38% of children receiving SP or AQ, respectively. In those with adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR compared to children with TF, and for both treatment regimens, prevalence and levels of anti-Glutamate-rich Protein (GLURP-specific IgG antibodies were significantly higher (P Conclusion These findings suggest that GLURP-specific IgG antibodies in this setting contribute to clearance of drug-resistant infections and support the hypothesis that acquired immunity enhances the clinical efficacy of drug therapy. The results should be confirmed in larger scale with greater sample size and with variation in transmission intensity.

  15. Utilization of traditional healers for treatment of malaria among female residents in Makurdi city and its environs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JomboGTA; MbaawuagaEM; DenenAkaaP; DaudaAM; EyongKI; AkosuJT; EtukumanaEA

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To ascertain the role of traditional healers in malaria treatment and its impact on control of the disease. Methods:The study was cross-sectional in nature. Test-run structured and semi-structured questionnaires were either interviewer or self administered to adult women aged 18 years old and above. House holds were selected using systematic random sampling methods. Information such as age, educational level, marital status, occupation and methods of malaria treatment were obtained. Focused group discussions about beliefs and perceptions on utilization of traditional healers and in depth discussions on treatment and control of malaria were also carried out. Results: Of the 2 075 respondents studied, 49.7% (n=1 031) utilized traditional healers for treatment of malaria, including 16.7%(n=172) utilizing traditional healers strictly while 83.3%(n=859) combining it with other treatment methods such as hospital/clinic, pharmacy/chemist shop, herbs or spiritual healing. The major contributors to utilization of traditional healers were:illiteracy and ignorance, poverty, unemployment/underemployment and slow pace of the comprehensive package implementation of the“roll back malaria”(RBM) programme initiate in the community. Conclusions:Health education should be intensified while adequate facilities put in place to commence home management of malaria and probable free distribution of the artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT).

  16. Artemether-Lumefantrine Combination Therapy for Treatment of Uncomplicated Malaria: The Potential for Complex Interactions with Antiretroviral Drugs in HIV-Infected Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Pauline Byakika-Kibwika; Mohammed Lamorde; Harriet Mayanja-Kizza; Saye Khoo; Concepta Merry; Jean-Pierre Van geertruyden

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of malaria in HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) poses significant challenges. Artemether-lumefantrine (AL) is one of the artemisisnin-based combination therapies recommended for treatment of malaria. The drug combination is highly efficacious against sensitive and multidrug resistant falciparum malaria. Both artemether and lumefantrine are metabolized by hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes which metabolize the protease inhibitors (PIs) and nonnucle...

  17. Malaria og graviditet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, A L; Rønn, A M; Langhoff-Roos, J;

    1992-01-01

    protection against malaria and insect repellents. As a rule, malaria is treated with chloroquine. In cases of Falciparum malaria in whom chloroquine resistance is suspected, treatment with mefloquine may be employed although this should only be employed in cases of dire necessity in pregnant patients during...

  18. A Cluster Randomised Trial Introducing Rapid Diagnostic Tests into Registered Drug Shops in Uganda: Impact on Appropriate Treatment of Malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony K Mbonye

    Full Text Available Inappropriate treatment of malaria is widely reported particularly in areas where there is poor access to health facilities and self-treatment of fevers with anti-malarial drugs bought in shops is the most common form of care-seeking. The main objective of the study was to examine the impact of introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria (mRDTs in registered drug shops in Uganda, with the aim to increase appropriate treatment of malaria with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT in patients seeking treatment for fever in drug shops.A cluster-randomized trial of introducing mRDTs in registered drug shops was implemented in 20 geographical clusters of drug shops in Mukono district, central Uganda. Ten clusters were randomly allocated to the intervention (diagnostic confirmation of malaria by mRDT followed by ACT and ten clusters to the control arm (presumptive treatment of fevers with ACT. Treatment decisions by providers were validated by microscopy on a reference blood slide collected at the time of consultation. The primary outcome was the proportion of febrile patients receiving appropriate treatment with ACT defined as: malaria patients with microscopically-confirmed presence of parasites in a peripheral blood smear receiving ACT or rectal artesunate, and patients with no malaria parasites not given ACT.A total of 15,517 eligible patients (8672 intervention and 6845 control received treatment for fever between January-December 2011. The proportion of febrile patients who received appropriate ACT treatment was 72·9% versus 33·7% in the control arm; a difference of 36·1% (95% CI: 21·3 - 50·9, p<0·001. The majority of patients with fever in the intervention arm accepted to purchase an mRDT (97·8%, of whom 58·5% tested mRDT-positive. Drug shop vendors adhered to the mRDT results, reducing over-treatment of malaria by 72·6% (95% CI: 46·7- 98·4, p<0·001 compared to drug shop vendors using presumptive diagnosis (control arm

  19. A trial of intermittent preventive treatment and home-based management of malaria in a rural area of The Gambia

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    Webb Emily L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individual malaria interventions provide only partial protection in most epidemiological situations. Thus, there is a need to investigate whether combining interventions provides added benefit in reducing mortality and morbidity from malaria. The potential benefits of combining IPT in children (IPTc with home management of malaria (HMM was investigated. Methods During the 2008 malaria transmission season, 1,277 children under five years of age resident in villages within the rural Farafenni demographic surveillance system (DSS in North Bank Region, The Gambia were randomized to receive monthly IPTc with a single dose of sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP plus three doses of amodiaquine (AQ or SP and AQ placebos given by village health workers (VHWs on three occasions during the months of September, October and November, in a double-blind trial. Children in all study villages who developed an acute febrile illness suggestive of malaria were treated by VHWs who had been taught how to manage malaria with artemether-lumefantrine (Coartem™. The primary aims of the project were to determine whether IPTc added significant benefit to HMM and whether VHWs could effectively combine the delivery of both interventions. Results The incidence of clinical attacks of malaria was very low in both study groups. The incidence rate of malaria in children who received IPTc was 0.44 clinical attacks per 1,000 child months at risk while that for control children was 1.32 per 1,000 child months at risk, a protective efficacy of 66% (95% CI -23% to 96%; p = 0.35. The mean (standard deviation haemoglobin concentration at the end of the malaria transmission season was similar in the two treatment groups: 10.2 (1.6 g/dL in the IPTc group compared to 10.3 (1.5 g/dL in the placebo group. Coverage with IPTc was high, with 94% of children receiving all three treatments during the study period. Conclusion Due to the very low incidence of malaria, no firm

  20. Assessment and treatment of childhood topographical disorientation: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsdon, Ruth; Nickels, Lyndsey; Coltheart, Max; Joy, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Topographical disorientation refers to individuals who are unable to find their way around large-scale environments in a normal manner. Childhood topographical disorientation is rarely investigated or reported. Treatment of topographical disorientation is also rare with only one reported treatment study in an adult (Davis & Coltheart, 1999) and no known description of treatment in a child. This paper reports a detailed case analysis of CA, a 6-year-old child with topographical disorientation, and a description of a treatment programme focused on training orientation in the school environment. Assessment of CA revealed mild to moderate visual agnosia in conjunction with severe impairments in general spatial learning and memory, topographical new learning and memory, and a total inability to learn new topographical routes. CA was also unable to use a mental image of his environment, a simple visual plan of his environment or a simple visual map, but was able to follow verbally mediated topographical instructions. The treatment programme focused on improving CA's topographical orientation in the school environment. The programme first involved training in recognition of major school buildings and landmarks and then focused on practical training in route finding along commonly used routes in the school environment. Clear benefits from treatment were evident. The assessment and treatment methods employed provide practical and useful ideas for management of this condition in other children. PMID:17178605

  1. Immunity and infectious morbidity in childhood ALL treatment : the benefits of intensity reduction

    OpenAIRE

    van Tilburg, C M

    2011-01-01

    With current childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment protocols the cure rate approaches 90%. In the 10 percent of case fatalities, 2 major challenges stand out: incurable relapses of ALL and (infectious) deaths-in-remission. Thus, reducing toxicity is becoming an important goal to further improve childhood ALL survival. The Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG) ALL 10 protocol was designed to investigate whether a reduction of chemotherapeutic treatment intensity after a standa...

  2. Family involvement in the treatment of childhood obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Helle Nergaard; Madsen, Svend Aage Lykke; Michaelsen, Kim F.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to assess the impacts of a family-based childhood obesity treatment on anthropometry and predictors of dropout and successful weight loss. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The 18-month treatment consisted of a intensive period (IP) including physical exercise......, nutritional guidance, family psychotherapy, child group sessions and a 1-year follow-up (FU). RESULTS: One hundred children (10-12 years old, >140% of median weight-for-height) participated. The 81 children completing the IP decreased significantly from 2.9 to 2.6 body mass index (BMI) standard deviation...... score (SDS) units (p children completing the FU had a further decrease of 0.2 BMI SDS units (p = 0.003). Weight loss was less in children from immigrant families. Drop-out was higher if the mother...

  3. Botulinum Toxin Treatment for Limb Spasticity in Childhood Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Vito; Testa, Gianluca; Restivo, Domenico A.; Cannavò, Luca; Condorelli, Giuseppe; Portinaro, Nicola M.; Sessa, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    CP is the most common cause of chronic disability in childhood occurring in 2–2.5/1000 births. It is a severe disorder and a significant number of patients present cognitive delay and difficulty in walking. The use of botulinum toxin (BTX) has become a popular treatment for CP especially for spastic and dystonic muscles while avoiding deformity and pain. Moreover, the combination of physiotherapy, casting, orthotics and injection of BTX may delay or decrease the need for surgical intervention while reserving single-event, multi-level surgery for fixed musculotendinous contractures and bony deformities in older children. This report highlights the utility of BTX in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. We include techniques for administration, side effects, and possible resistance as well as specific use in the upper and lower limbs muscles. PMID:26924985

  4. Malaria risk and access to prevention and treatment in the paddies of the Kilombero Valley, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obrist Brigit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Kilombero Valley is a highly malaria-endemic agricultural area in south-eastern Tanzania. Seasonal flooding of the valley is favourable to malaria transmission. During the farming season, many households move to distant field sites (shamba in Swahili in the fertile river floodplain for the cultivation of rice. In the shamba, people live for several months in temporary shelters, far from the nearest health services. This study assessed the impact of seasonal movements to remote fields on malaria risk and treatment-seeking behaviour. Methods A longitudinal study followed approximately 100 randomly selected farming households over six months. Every household was visited monthly and whereabouts of household members, activities in the fields, fever cases and treatment seeking for recent fever episodes were recorded. Results Fever incidence rates were lower in the shamba compared to the villages and moving to the shamba did not increase the risk of having a fever episode. Children aged 1–4 years, who usually spend a considerable amount of time in the shamba with their caretakers, were more likely to have a fever than adults (odds ratio = 4.47, 95% confidence interval 2.35–8.51. Protection with mosquito nets in the fields was extremely good (98% usage but home-stocking of antimalarials was uncommon. Despite the long distances to health services, 55.8% (37.9–72.8 of the fever episodes were treated at a health facility, while home-management was less common (37%, 17.4–50.5. Conclusion Living in the shamba does not appear to result in a higher fever-risk. Mosquito nets usage and treatment of fever in health facilities reflect awareness of malaria. Inability to obtain drugs in the fields may contribute to less irrational use of drugs but may pose an additional burden on poor farming households. A comprehensive approach is needed to improve access to treatment while at the same time assuring rational use of medicines and

  5. Intermittent preventive treatment for the prevention of malaria during pregnancy in high transmission areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massougbodji Achille

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malaria in pregnancy is one of the major causes of maternal morbidity and adverse birth outcomes. In high transmission areas, its prevention has recently changed, moving from a weekly or bimonthly chemoprophylaxis to intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp. IPTp consists in the administration of a single curative dose of an efficacious anti-malarial drug at least twice during pregnancy – regardless of whether the woman is infected or not. The drug is administered under supervision during antenatal care visits. Sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is the drug currently recommended by the WHO. While SP-IPTp seems an adequate strategy, there are many issues still to be explored to optimize it. This paper reviewed data on IPTp efficacy and discussed how to improve it. In particular, the determination of both the optimal number of doses and time of administration of the drug is essential, and this has not yet been done. As both foetal growth and deleterious effects of malaria are maximum in late pregnancy women should particularly be protected during this period. Monitoring of IPTp efficacy should be applied to all women, and not only to primi- and secondigravidae, as it has not been definitively established that multigravidae are not at risk for malaria morbidity and mortality. In HIV-positive women, there is an urgent need for specific information on drug administration patterns (need for higher doses, possible interference with sulpha-based prophylaxis of opportunistic infections. Because of the growing level of resistance of parasites to SP, alternative drugs for IPTp are urgently needed. Mefloquine is presently one of the most attractive options because of its long half life, high efficacy in sub-Saharan Africa and safety during pregnancy. Also, efforts should be made to increase IPTp coverage by improving the practices of health care workers, the motivation of women and their perception of malaria complications in pregnancy. Because IPTp

  6. THE IMPACT OF DDT SPRAYING AND MALARIA TREATMENT ON THE MALARIA TRANSMISSION IN A HYPO-ENDEMIC AREA OF SOUTH KALIMANTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gandahusada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Dari tahun 1979 sampai dengan 1981 dilaksanakan penelitian epidemiologi malaria disuatu daerah hypo-endemis di Kalimantan Selatan. Sebagian dari penelitian yang dilaporkan di sini, menilai hasil pe­nyemprotan rumah dengan DDT yang dilaksanakan secara rutin oleh Dinas Kesehatan Propinsi serta menilai intervensi yang diadakan atas dasar epidemiologi setempat. Daerah transmigrasi Batutungku di­semprot  secara rutin dan hasilnya dibandingkan dengan Panyipatan, suatu desa yang tidak disemprot. Hasil surveillance menunjukkan bahwa incidence rate tiap tahun selama tiga tahun penelitian di kedua daerah turunnya sama : di Batutungku dari 10,20/00 menjadi 8,70/00 pada tahun 1980 dan 5,30/00 pada tahun 1981, dan di Panyipatan dari 16,60/00 menjadi 14,60/00 pada tahun 1980 dan 7,70/00 pada tahun 1981. Fluktuasi kepadatan An. nigerrimus dan An. peditaeniatus, dua species anopheles yang paling banyak tertangkap di daerah penelitian, juga tidak menunjukkan adanya perbedaan di kedua dae­rah. Dengan incidence rate dan data entomologis ini, dibuktikan bahwa penyemprotan rumah-rumah di Batutungku tidak efektif. Bahwa di kedua daerah incidence rate tiap tahun menurun, disebabkan oleh ''radical treatment' yang dimulai di kedua daerah sejak Oktober 1979. ''Mass treatment "di dua R W di Batutungku di mana incidence malaria per bulan lebih tinggi daripada lain-lain R W, dapat menekan malaria transmisi.

  7. Malaria vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Some have argued that the vaccine against malaria developed by Manuel Pattaroyo, a Colombian scientist, is being tested prematurely in humans and that it is unlikely to be successful. While the Pattaroyo vaccine has been shown to confer protection against the relatively mild malaria found in Colombia, doubts exist over whether it will be effective in Africa. Encouraging first results, however, are emerging from field tests in Tanzania. The vaccine triggered a strong new immune response, even in individuals previously exposed to malaria. Additional steps must be taken to establish its impact upon mortality and morbidity. Five major trials are underway around the world. The creator estimates that the first ever effective malaria vaccine could be available for widespread use within five years and he has no intention of securing a patent for the discovery. In another development, malaria specialists from 35 African countries convened at an international workshop in Zimbabwe to compare notes. Participants disparaged financial outlays for the fight against malaria equivalent to 2% of total AIDS funding as insufficient; noted intercountry differences in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment; and found information exchange between anglophone and francophone doctors to be generally poor. PMID:12287671

  8. Evaluation of medication adherence methods in the treatment of malaria in Rwandan infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stichele Robert

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To compare three methods for evaluating treatment adherence in a 7-day controlled treatment period for malaria in children in Rwanda. Methods Fifty-six children ( Results Medication adherence data were available for 54 of the 56 patients. Manual pill count and patient self-report yielded a medication adherence of 100% for the in- and out-patient treatment periods. Based on electronic pill-box monitoring, medication adherence during the seven-day treatment period was 90.5 ± 8.3%. Based on electronic pill-box monitoring inpatient medication adherence (99.3 ± 2.7% was markedly higher (p Conclusion Health workers' medication adherence was good. However, a significant lower medication adherence was observed for consumers' adherence in the outpatient setting. This was only detected by electronic pill-box monitoring. Therefore, this latter method is more accurate than the two other methods used in this study.

  9. Impact of Childhood Trauma on Treatment Outcome in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cara C.; Simons, Anne D.; Nguyen, Lananh J.; Murakami, Jessica L.; Reid, Mark W.; Silva, Susan G.; March, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The impact of childhood trauma was examined in 427 adolescents (54% girls, 74% Caucasian, mean = 14.6, SD = 1.5) with major depressive disorder participating in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). Method: TADS compared the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), fluoxetine (FLX), their combination (COMB),…

  10. Health Care Seeking Behavior among Caregivers of Sick Children Who Had Cerebral Malaria in Northwestern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Eseigbe, Edwin E.; Anyiam, Jane O.; Ogunrinde, Gboye O.; Wammanda, Robinson D.; Zoaka, Hassan A.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a significant cause of childhood morbidity in our region. The challenges of effective management include time and quality of treatment. The study appraised the health care seeking behavior of caregivers of sick children who developed cerebral malaria, in Zaria, northwestern Nigeria. Caregivers indentified were parents 29 (87.9%) and grandparents 4 (12.1%). Most of them were in the upper social classes. Health care options utilized before presentation at our facility were f...

  11. Application of mobile-technology for disease and treatment monitoring of malaria in the "Better Border Healthcare Programme"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meankaew Pongthep

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of integrating the use of cell-phones into a routine malaria prevention and control programme, to improve the management of malaria cases among an under-served population in a border area. The module for disease and treatment monitoring of malaria (DTMM consisted of case investigation and case follow-up for treatment compliance and patients' symptoms. Methods The module combining web-based and mobile technologies was developed as a proof of concept, in an attempt to replace the existing manual, paper-based activities that malaria staff used in treating and caring for malaria patients in the villages for which they were responsible. After a patient was detected and registered onto the system, case-investigation and treatment details were recorded into the malaria database. A follow-up schedule was generated, and the patient's status was updated when the malaria staff conducted their routine home visits, using mobile phones loaded with the follow-up application module. The module also generated text and graph messages for a summary of malaria cases and basic statistics, and automatically fed to predetermined malaria personnel for situation analysis. Following standard public-health practices, access to the patient database was strictly limited to authorized personnel in charge of patient case management. Results The DTMM module was developed and implemented at the trial site in late November 2008, and was fully functioning in 2009. The system captured 534 malaria patients in 2009. Compared to paper-based data in 2004-2008, the mobile-phone-based case follow-up rates by malaria staff improved significantly. The follow-up rates for both Thai and migrant patients were about 94-99% on Day 7 (Plasmodium falciparum and Day 14 (Plasmodium vivax and maintained at 84-93% on Day 90. Adherence to anti-malarial drug therapy, based on self-reporting, showed high completion

  12. Consumers stated and revealed preferences for community health workers and other strategies for the provision of timely and appropriate treatment of malaria in southeast Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Elvis

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The African Heads of State meeting in Abuja, Nigeria on Roll Back Malaria adopted effective treatment of malaria nearer the home as one of the strategies for malaria control in Africa. A potentially effective strategy for bringing early, appropriate and low cost treatment of malaria closer to the home is through the use of community health workers (CHWs. There is paucity of information about people's actual preferences for CHWs and how stated preferences relates to revealed preferences for both the CHW strategy and other strategies for improving the timeliness of malaria treatment in not only Nigeria but in many malaria endemic countries. Objectives To determine peoples' stated and actual preferences for different strategies for improving the timeliness and appropriateness of treatment of malaria before and after the implementation of a community health workers (CHW strategy in their community. Methods A prospective study was undertaken in a rural malaria holo-endemic Nigerian community. A questionnaire was used to collect information on health-seeking from householders before (first survey and after (second survey implementation of a CHW malaria treatement strategy. Results The consumers mostly preferred the CHW strategy over self-treatment in the homes and other strategies of treatment. The use of community health workers (CHWs increased from 0% to 26.1% (p Conclusion Community health workers can be used to improve and ensure timely and appropriate treatment of malaria. The CHW strategy could also be sustained since it was preferred and used by consumers over self-treatment in the homes as well as other strategies for improving treatment. Hence, the CHW strategy is a feasible and promising method of improving home-management of uncomplicated malaria.

  13. Meningioma as second malignant neoplasm after oncological treatment during childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 38 patients (18 female/20 male) with childhood meningioma were recruited from the German registry HIT-Endo (1989-2009). In 5 cases meningioma occurred as second malignant neoplasm (SMN). Histologies were confirmed by reference assessment in all cases (SMN: 2 WHO I, 1 WHO II, 2 WHO III). The SMNs were diagnosed at a median age of 12.4 years with a median latency of 10.2 years after primary malignancy (PMN; 4 brain tumors, 1 lymphoblastic leukemia; median age at diagnosis 2.7 years). Meningioma occurred as SMN in the irradiated field of PMN (range 12-54 Gy). The outcome after treatment of SMN meningioma (surgery/irradiation) was favorable in terms of psychosocial status and functional capacity in 4 of 5 patients (1 death). We conclude that survivors of childhood cancer who were exposed to radiation therapy at young age harbor the risk of developing meningioma as a SMN at a particularly short latency period in case of high dose exposure. (orig.)

  14. Potential impact of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT on spread of drug-resistant malaria.

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    Wendy Prudhomme O'Meara

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Treatment of asymptomatic individuals, regardless of their malaria infection status, with regularly spaced therapeutic doses of antimalarial drugs has been proposed as a method for reducing malaria morbidity and mortality. This strategy, called intermittent preventive treatment (IPT, is currently employed for pregnant women and is being studied for infants (IPTi as well. As with any drug-based intervention strategy, it is important to understand how implementation may affect the spread of drug-resistant parasites. This is a difficult issue to address experimentally because of the limited size and duration of IPTi trials as well as the intractability of distinguishing the spread of resistance due to conventional treatment of malaria episodes versus that due to IPTi when the same drug is used in both contexts. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a mathematical model, we evaluated the possible impact of treating individuals with antimalarial drugs at regular intervals regardless of their infection status. We translated individual treatment strategies and drug pharmacokinetics into parasite population dynamic effects and show that immunity, treatment rate, drug decay kinetics, and presumptive treatment rate are important factors in the spread of drug-resistant parasites. Our model predicts that partially resistant parasites are more likely to spread in low-transmission areas, but fully resistant parasites are more likely to spread under conditions of high transmission, which is consistent with some epidemiological observations. We were also able to distinguish between spread of resistance due to treatment of symptomatic infections and that due to IPTi. We showed that IPTi could accelerate the spread of resistant parasites, but this effect was only likely to be significant in areas of low or unstable transmission. CONCLUSIONS: The results presented here demonstrate the importance of considering both the half-life of a drug and the existing level

  15. Treatment and prevention of malaria in pregnancy in the private health sector in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Buregyeya, Esther; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malaria in pregnancy is a major public health problem in Uganda; and it is the leading cause of anaemia among pregnant women and low birth weight in infants. Previous studies have noted poor quality of care in the private sector. Thus there is need to explore ways of improving quality.......03 were the factors that most influenced correct treatment of fever in pregnancy. CONCLUSION: Treatment of fever during pregnancy was poor in this study setting. These data highlight the need to develop interventions to improve patient safety and quality of care for pregnant women in the private health......, pharmacy or private clinic. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire targeting one provider who was found on duty in each selected private health facility and consented to the study. The main variables were: provider characteristics, previous training received, type of drugs stocked, treatment...

  16. Parent-Only Treatment for Childhood Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Boutelle, Kerri N.; Cafri, Guy; Crow, Scott J.

    2010-01-01

    Parent-only (PO) treatments for childhood obesity are feasible, more cost-effective and potentially easier to disseminate. The objective of this study was to determine whether a PO treatment is not inferior to a parent + child (PC) treatment for childhood obesity. Eighty parent–child dyads with an 8–12 year old overweight or obese child (>85th BMI-P) were recruited and randomized into PO or PC treatment for childhood obesity. Parents or parent–child dyads attended 5-month treatment groups. Ch...

  17. An Economic Evaluation of the Posttreatment Prophylactic Effect of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine Versus Artemether-Lumefantrine for First-Line Treatment of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Across Different Transmission Settings in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeil, Johannes; Borrmann, Steffen; Bassat, Quique; Mulenga, Modest; Talisuna, Ambrose; Tozan, Yesim

    2015-11-01

    Malaria disproportionately affects young children. Clinical trials in African children showed that dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) is an effective antimalarial and has a longer posttreatment prophylactic (PTP) effect against reinfections than other artemisinin-based combination therapies, including artemether-lumefantrine (AL). Using a previously developed Markov model and individual patient data from a multicenter African drug efficacy trial, we assessed the economic value of the PTP effect of DP versus AL in pediatric malaria patients from health-care provider's perspective in low-to-moderate and moderate-to-high transmission settings under different drug co-payment scenarios. In low-to-moderate transmission settings, first-line treatment with DP was highly cost-effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of US$5 (95% confidence interval [CI] = -76 to 196) per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted. In moderate-to-high transmission settings, DP first-line treatment led to a mean cost saving of US$1.09 (95% CI = -0.88 to 3.85) and averted 0.05 (95% CI = -0.08 to 0.22) DALYs per child per year. Our results suggested that DP might be superior to AL for first-line treatment of uncomplicated childhood malaria across a range of transmission settings in Africa. PMID:26240155

  18. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REVIEW OF MALARIA WITH REFERENCE TO CAUSALITY ANALYSIS, TREATMENT MONITORING AND OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kembhavi Ravindra

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Primary objective of the study was to assess causality analysis by patient profile, clinical and laboratory assessment. Secondary objective was to assess the Treatment patterns, clinical outcome, and outcome determinants leading to mortality. 150 Patients, diagnosed as malaria and admitted in medicine ward at Tertiary Care Center were enrolled over a period of 8 months after written informed consent. Their demographics as age, sex, and habitat and blood Investigations, especially parasite index (PI, gametocyte study, hemoglobin, platelet count were noted. Treatment of patients and their progress and outcome was noted .Descriptive statistics was used for analysis. Out of 150 patients 127 (85 % were males and 23 (15 % were females. Young age and lower socio-economic class was more affected. 88 % patients showed typical symptoms. Artesunate (88 % was most commonly used followed by Chloroquine (12 %. Cure rate was 93 %. Majority (73 % patients had parasitic index up to 3 %. 40 (26.68 % patients showed parasitic index between 4 – 14 %. 93 Patients (62 % had platelet count up to one lakh. P. Vivax infection (64 % was most common followed by P. Falciparum (29 % and mixed infection (7 %. Young age, lower income group, and mobility are risk factor for malaria. Low Hb, thrombocytopenia, high parasite index, old age, co morbid conditions are poor prognostic factors.Keywords:

  19. In vivo antimalarial activity of extracts of Tanzanian medicinal plants used for the treatment of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nondo, Ramadhani S O; Erasto, Paul; Moshi, Mainen J; Zacharia, Abdallah; Masimba, Pax J; Kidukuli, Abdul W

    2016-01-01

    Plants used in traditional medicine have been the source of a number of currently used antimalarial medicines and continue to be a promising resource for the discovery of new classes of antimalarial compounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo antimalarial activity of four plants; Erythrina schliebenii Harms, Holarrhena pubescens Buch-Ham, Phyllanthus nummulariifolius Poir, and Caesalpinia bonducella (L.) Flem used for treatment of malaria in Tanzania. In vivo antimalarial activity was assessed using the 4-day suppressive antimalarial assay. Mice were infected by injection via tail vein with 2 × 10(7) erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Extracts were administered orally, once daily, for a total of four daily doses from the day of infection. Chloroquine (10 mg/kg/day) and solvent (5 mL/kg/day) were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The extracts of C. bonducella, E. schliebenii, H. pubescens, and P. nummulariifolius exhibited dose-dependent suppression of parasite growth in vivo in mice, with the highest suppression being by C. bonducella extract. While each of the plant extracts has potential to yield useful antimalarial compounds, the dichloromethane root extract of C. bonducella seems to be the most promising for isolation of active antimalarial compound(s). In vivo antimalarial activity presented in this study supports traditional uses of C. bonducella roots, E. schliebenii stem barks, H. pubescens roots, and P. nummulariifolius for treatment of malaria. PMID:27144154

  20. Childhood opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaes, Franz; Dharmalingam, Backialakshmi

    2016-06-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) is a rare and primarily immune-mediated disease in children and adults. The main symptoms include opsoclonus, myoclonus and ataxia. In children, the symptoms also include irritability, and, over a long-term course, learning and behavioural disturbances. OMS can be idiopathic, parainfectious or occur as a paraneoplastic (tumour-associated) syndrome. Paraneoplastic OMS in children is almost exclusively associated with neuroblastoma, whereas in adults, small cell lung cancer and breast cancer are the main underlying tumours. An autoimmune pathophysiology is suspected because childhood OMS patients have functionally active autoantibodies, proinflammatory changes in the cytokine network and immunotherapy responses. Children appear to respond regularly to immunosuppressive treatment. However, although the neurological symptoms show a good response, most children continue to show neuropsychological disturbances. PMID:27095464

  1. A Comparative Study of Dihydroartemisinin Compounds in Treatment of Uncomplicated Falciparum Malaria in Kampong of Cambodia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONGJian-ping; DuongSocheattffu

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To compare the safety and efficacy of two compounds of dihydroartemisinin (DHA)-Artekin and Artekin(T)in the treatement of uncomplicated falciparum malaria.Methods:The regiment of 8-tablet for 2 days of Artekin and Artekin(T) were applied to 100 patients with uncompli-cated falciparum malaria,who were radomly divided into two groups.Each group contained 50 cases.The cure rate ,the mean parasites clearance time,the mean fever clearance and side-effects were observed to assess the safety and efficacy of the compunds used.Results:The mean parasites clearance time was 31.7±9.0 hours in the Artekin group and 32.8±8.8 hours in Artekin(T) group respectively; the mean fever clearance time was 12.7±7.2 hours in Artekin group and 16.5±7.9 hours in Artekin(T) group; there were no recrudescence case in both groups within the 28 days of follow-up ,the cure rates in Artekin group and Artekin(T)groups were 100%.It indicated that the tolerability of both compunds were very good,the side-effects such as nausea,abdominal pain were mild and self-limited.Conclusion:The study preliminarily indicated that the DHA and PQ compounds were of high efficacy,rapid acting and low toxici-ty.Artekin is very promising as a cheap,simple,effective treatment for multi-resistance malaria in Cam-bodia.

  2. Space-time clustering of childhood malaria at the household level: a dynamic cohort in a Mali village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouattara Amed

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spatial and temporal heterogeneities in the risk of malaria have led the WHO to recommend fine-scale stratification of the epidemiological situation, making it possible to set up actions and clinical or basic researches targeting high-risk zones. Before initiating such studies it is necessary to define local patterns of malaria transmission and infection (in time and in space in order to facilitate selection of the appropriate study population and the intervention allocation. The aim of this study was to identify, spatially and temporally, high-risk zones of malaria, at the household level (resolution of 1 to 3 m. Methods This study took place in a Malian village with hyperendemic seasonal transmission as part of Mali-Tulane Tropical Medicine Research Center (NIAID/NIH. The study design was a dynamic cohort (22 surveys, from June 1996 to June 2001 on about 1300 children (Plasmodium falciparum, P. malariae and P. ovale infection and P. falciparum gametocyte carriage by means of time series and Kulldorff's scan statistic for space-time cluster detection. Results The time series analysis determined that malaria parasitemia (primarily P. falciparum was persistently present throughout the population with the expected seasonal variability pattern and a downward temporal trend. We identified six high-risk clusters of P. falciparum infection, some of which persisted despite an overall tendency towards a decrease in risk. The first high-risk cluster of P. falciparum infection (rate ratio = 14.161 was detected from September 1996 to October 1996, in the north of the village. Conclusion This study showed that, although infection proportions tended to decrease, high-risk zones persisted in the village particularly near temporal backwaters. Analysis of this heterogeneity at the household scale by GIS methods lead to target preventive actions more accurately on the high-risk zones identified. This mapping of malaria risk makes it possible

  3. Inadequate Diagnosis and Treatment of Malaria Among Travelers Returning from Africa During the Ebola Epidemic--United States, 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kathrine R; Cullen, Karen A; Koumans, Emilia H; Arguin, Paul M

    2016-01-22

    Among 1,683 persons in the United States who developed malaria following international travel during 2012, more than half acquired disease in one of 16 countries in West Africa. Since March 2014, West Africa has experienced the world's largest epidemic of Ebola virus disease (Ebola), primarily affecting Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia; in 2014, approximately 20,000 Ebola cases were reported. Both Ebola and malaria are often characterized by fever and malaise and can be clinically indistinguishable, especially early in the course of disease. Immediate laboratory testing is critical for diagnosis of both Ebola and malaria, so that appropriate lifesaving treatment can be initiated. CDC recommends prompt malaria testing of patients with fever and history of travel to an area that is endemic for malaria, using blood smear microscopy, with results available within a few hours. Empiric treatment of malaria is not recommended by CDC. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing is recommended to diagnose Ebola. During the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, CDC received reports of delayed laboratory testing for malaria in travelers returning to the United States because of infection control concerns related to Ebola. CDC reviewed documented calls to its malaria consultation service and selected three patient cases to present as examples of deficiencies in the evaluation and treatment of malaria among travelers returning from Africa during the Ebola epidemic. PMID:26796654

  4. Understanding and improving access to prompt and effective malaria treatment and care in rural Tanzania: the ACCESS Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Sandra

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prompt access to effective treatment is central in the fight against malaria. However, a variety of interlinked factors at household and health system level influence access to timely and appropriate treatment and care. Furthermore, access may be influenced by global and national health policies. As a consequence, many malaria episodes in highly endemic countries are not treated appropriately. Project The ACCESS Programme aims at understanding and improving access to prompt and effective malaria treatment and care in a rural Tanzanian setting. The programme's strategy is based on a set of integrated interventions, including social marketing for improved care seeking at community level as well as strengthening of quality of care at health facilities. This is complemented by a project that aims to improve the performance of drug stores. The interventions are accompanied by a comprehensive set of monitoring and evaluation activities measuring the programme's performance and (health impact. Baseline data demonstrated heterogeneity in the availability of malaria treatment, unavailability of medicines and treatment providers in certain areas as well as quality problems with regard to drugs and services. Conclusion The ACCESS Programme is a combination of multiple complementary interventions with a strong evaluation component. With this approach, ACCESS aims to contribute to the development of a more comprehensive access framework and to inform and support public health professionals and policy-makers in the delivery of improved health services.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of malaria in peripheral health facilities in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndyomugyenyi, Richard; Magnussen, Pascal; Clarke, Siân

    2007-01-01

    villages. A malaria case was defined as any slide-confirmed parasitaemia in a person with an axillary temperature = 37.5°C or a history of fever within the last 24 hrs and no signs suggestive of other diseases. Results Cases of malaria were significantly more likely to report joint pains, headache......, vomiting and abdominal pains. However, due to the low prevalence of malaria, the predictive values of these individual signs alone, or in combination, were poor. Only 24.8% of 1627 patients had malaria according to case definition and > 75% of patients were unnecessarily treated for malaria and few slide...

  6. Malaria's deadly grip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Joseph D; Rowe, J Alexandra; Higgins, Matthew K;

    2013-01-01

    domain composition. This grouping reflects functional specialization of PfEMP1 proteins for different human host and microvascular binding niches and appears to be maintained by gene recombination hierarchies. Inone extreme, a specific PfEMP1 variant is associated with placental binding and malaria...... during pregnancy, while other PfEMP1 subtypes appear to be specialized for infection of malaria naïve hosts. Here, we discuss recent findings on the origins and evolution of the var gene family, the structure-function of PfEMP1 proteins, and a distinct subset of PfEMP1 variants that have been associated...... with severe childhood malaria....

  7. Malaria Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Malaria Research NIAID Role in Malaria Research Basic Biology Prevention ... Labs​ Malaria Research Program Services for Researchers Featured Research Ancient Immune Mechanism Identified That Controls Malaria in ...

  8. The Impact of Integrated Community Case Management of Childhood Diseases Interventions to Prevent Malaria Fever in Children Less than Five Years Old in Bauchi State of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abegunde, Dele; Orobaton, Nosa

    2016-01-01

    Background Malaria accounts for about 300,000 childhood deaths and 30% of under-five year old mortality in Nigeria annually. We assessed the impact of intervention strategies that integrated Patent Medicines Vendors into community case management of childhood-diseases, improved access to artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) and distributed bed nets to households. We explored the influence of household socioeconomic characteristics on the impact of the interventions on fever in the under-five year olds in Bauchi State Nigeria. Methods A cross-sectional case-controlled, interventional study, which sampled 3077 and 2737 under-5 year olds from 1,588 and 1601 households in pre- and post-intervention periods respectively, was conducted from 2013 to 2015. Difference-in-differences and logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the impact attributable to the interventions: integrated community case management of childhood illness which introduced trained public and private sector health providers and the possession of nets on the prevalence of fever. Results Two-week prevalence of fever among under-fives declined from 56.6% at pre-intervention to 42.5% at post-intervention. Fever-prevention fraction attributable to nets was statistically significant (OR = 0.217, 95% CI: 0.08–0.33). Children in the intervention group had significantly fewer incidence of fever than children in the control group had (OR = 0.765, 95% CI: 0.67–0.87). Although being in the intervention group significantly provided 23.5% protection against fever (95% CI: 0.13–0.33), the post-intervention likelihood of fever was also significantly less than at pre-intervention (OR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.50–0.65). The intervention protection fraction against fever was statistically significant at 43.4% (OR = 0.434, 95% CI: 0.36–0.50). Logistic regression showed that the odds of fever were lower in households with nets (OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.60–0.88), among children whose mothers had higher

  9. Impact of intermittent screening and treatment for malaria among school children in Kenya: a cluster randomised trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E Halliday

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Improving the health of school-aged children can yield substantial benefits for cognitive development and educational achievement. However, there is limited experimental evidence of the benefits of alternative school-based malaria interventions or how the impacts of interventions vary according to intensity of malaria transmission. We investigated the effect of intermittent screening and treatment (IST for malaria on the health and education of school children in an area of low to moderate malaria transmission. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cluster randomised trial was implemented with 5,233 children in 101 government primary schools on the south coast of Kenya in 2010-2012. The intervention was delivered to children randomly selected from classes 1 and 5 who were followed up for 24 months. Once a school term, children were screened by public health workers using malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs, and children (with or without malaria symptoms found to be RDT-positive were treated with a six dose regimen of artemether-lumefantrine (AL. Given the nature of the intervention, the trial was not blinded. The primary outcomes were anaemia and sustained attention. Secondary outcomes were malaria parasitaemia and educational achievement. Data were analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. During the intervention period, an average of 88.3% children in intervention schools were screened at each round, of whom 17.5% were RDT-positive. 80.3% of children in the control and 80.2% in the intervention group were followed-up at 24 months. No impact of the malaria IST intervention was observed for prevalence of anaemia at either 12 or 24 months (adjusted risk ratio [Adj.RR]: 1.03, 95% CI 0.93-1.13, p = 0.621 and Adj.RR: 1.00, 95% CI 0.90-1.11, p = 0.953 respectively, or on prevalence of P. falciparum infection or scores of classroom attention. No effect of IST was observed on educational achievement in the older class, but an apparent negative

  10. Investigation of Hydrogen Sulfide Gas as a Treatment against P. falciparum, Murine Cerebral Malaria, and the Importance of Thiolation State in the Development of Cerebral Malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellavalle, Brian; Staalsoe, Trine; Kurtzhals, Jørgen Anders; Hempel, Casper

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a potentially fatal cerebrovascular disease of complex pathogenesis caused by Plasmodium falciparum. Hydrogen sulfide (HS) is a physiological gas, similar to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, involved in cellular metabolism, vascular tension, inflammation, and cell death....... HS treatment has shown promising results as a therapy for cardio- and neuro- pathology. This study investigates the effects of fast (NaHS) and slow (GYY4137) HS-releasing drugs on the growth and metabolism of P. falciparum and the development of P. berghei ANKA CM. Moreover, we investigate the role...

  11. Childhood obesity treatment: targeting parents exclusively v. parents and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Moria; Kaufman, Vered; Shahar, Danit R

    2006-05-01

    There is a consensus that interventions to prevent and treat childhood obesity should involve the family; however, the extent of the child's involvement has received little attention. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the relative efficacy of treating childhood obesity via a family-based health-centred intervention, targeting parents alone v. parents and obese children together. Thirty-two families with obese children of 6-11 years of age were randomised into groups, in which participants were provided for 6 months a comprehensive educational and behavioural programme for a healthy lifestyle. These groups differed in their main agent of change: parents-only v. the parents and the obese child. In both groups, parents were encouraged to foster authoritative parenting styles (parents are both firm and supportive; assume a leadership role in the environmental change with appropriate granting of child's autonomy). Only the intervention aimed at parents-only resulted in a significant reduction in the percentage overweight at the end of the programme (P=0.02) as well as at the 1-year follow-up meeting. The differences between groups at both times were significant (Panalysis shows that the level of attendance in sessions explained 28 % of the variability in the children's weight status change, the treatment group explained another 10 %, and the improvement in the obesogenic load explained 11 % of the variability. These results suggest that omitting the obese child from active participation in the health-centred programme may be beneficial for weight loss and for the promotion of a healthy lifestyle among obese children. PMID:16611394

  12. Impact of combining intermittent preventive treatment with home management of malaria in children less than 10 years in a rural area of Senegal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tine, Roger C.K.; Faye, Babacar; Ndour, Cheikh T.;

    2011-01-01

    Current malaria control strategies recommend (i) early case detection using rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) and treatment with artemisinin combination therapy (ACT), (ii) pre-referral rectal artesunate, (iii) intermittent preventive treatment and (iv) impregnated bed nets. However, these individual ...

  13. A Randomized,Controlled Trial of Artemisinin-piperaquine vs Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine Phosphate in Treatment of Falciparum Malaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Trieu; Nguyen; Trung; 谈博; Dang; Van; Phuc; 宋健平

    2009-01-01

    Objective:The study aimed to evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of dihydroartemisininpiperaquine phosphate(Artekin) and artemisinin-piperaquine(Artequick) in the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria.Methods:A total of 103 uncomplicated falciparum malaria patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to two groups:52 cases in the Artequick group,and 51 cases in the Artekin group.The patients in the Artequick group were administered with Artequick,twice in 24 h,whereas the patients in the...

  14. 150例疟疾患者救治临床分析%Treatment of 150 patients with malaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹洋; 冯曼玲; 王非; 栗绍刚; 田小军; 王磊; 李小丽; 谷俊朝

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the features of malaria and the problems and countermeasures in the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of malaria. Methods Clinical data of 150 patients with malaria treated in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Results Among 150 patients with malaria, 22 were misdiagnosed, accounting for 14.67%. Multiple organ dysfunction involved central nervous system, blood system, digestive system, respiratory system, kidney and other important organs or systems with diverse and complex clinical symptoms. The choice and use of antimalarial drugs, antipyretic treatment, hormone therapy and the monitoring of water, electrolyte, acid-base balance, insulin levels and blood sugar should be paid due attention in the treatment of malaria. Conclusions Early diagnosis and differential diagnosis of malaria play an important role in the treatment of patients with malaria. It is crucial to pay much attention to multiple organ damage, and timely differentiate and properly treat the complications of malaria.%目的 探讨疟疾诊断、鉴别及临床治疗中存在的问题、特点及对策.方法 对我院2001-2010年150例疟疾患者的临床资料进行回顾性分析.结果 150例疟疾患者中,确诊前误诊22例,占14.67%.多脏器功能不全涉及中枢神经、血液、消化、呼吸、肾脏及其他多个重要脏器或系统,临床症状复杂多样.治疗上应注意抗疟疾药物的选择和使用、退热治疗和激素的使用,以及水、电解质和酸碱平衡、胰岛素水平和血糖水平的监测.结论 疟疾的早期诊断和鉴别在患者救治中发挥重要作用;确诊后,应关注多脏器功能受损情况,及时识别和合理治疗并发症是关键.

  15. Post-treatment haemolysis in severe imported malaria after intravenous artesunate: case report of three patients with hyperparasitaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolling Thierry

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parenteral artesunate has been shown to be a superior treatment option compared to parenteral quinine in adults and children with severe malaria. Little evidence, however, is available on long-term safety. Recently, cases of late-onset haemolysis after parenteral treatment with artesunate have been reported in European travellers with imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Therefore, an extended follow-up of adult patients treated for severe imported malaria was started in August 2011 at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf. Until January 2012, three patients with hyperparasitaemia (range: 14-21% were included for analysis. In all three patients, delayed haemolysis was detected in the second week after the first dose of intravenous artesunate. Reticulocyte production index remained inadequately low in the 7 – 14 days following the first dose of artesunate despite rapid parasite clearance. Post-treatment haemolysis after parenteral artesunate may be of clinical relevance in particular in imported severe malaria characterized by high parasite levels. Extended follow-up of at least 30 days including controls of haematological parameters after artesunate treatment seems to be indicated. Further investigations are needed to assess frequency and pathophysiological background of this complication.

  16. Paracetamol versus placebo in treatment of non-severe malaria in children in Guinea-Bissau: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Ursing, Johan; Rodrigues, Amabelia;

    2011-01-01

    The current guidelines for treatment of malaria include paracetamol to children with fever. No convincing evidence for the beneficial effects of this practice exists. Studies show that time to parasite clearance is significantly longer in children treated with paracetamol, which questions the...

  17. Protective Efficacy of Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria in Infants (IPTi) Using Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine and Parasite Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T. Griffin; M. Cairns; A.C. Ghani; C. Roper; D. Schellenberg; I. Carneiro; R.D. Newman; M.P. Grobusch; B. Greenwood; D. Chandramohan; R.D. Gosling

    2010-01-01

    Background: Intermittent Preventive Treatment of malaria in infants using sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP-IPTi) is recommended by WHO for implementation in settings where resistance to SP is not high. Here we examine the relationship between the protective efficacy of SP-IPTi and measures of SP resist

  18. Prolonged Selection of pfmdr1 Polymorphisms After Treatment of Falciparum Malaria With Artemether-Lumefantrine in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Baliraine, Frederick N.; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    We compared the prevalence of key pfmdr1 alleles between pretreatment Plasmodium falciparum parasite isolates and parasites that emerged after treatment of uncomplicated malaria in a longitudinal cohort of Ugandan children. The pfmdr1 86N, 184F, and 1246D alleles were selected after treatment with artemether-lumefantrine, but not after artesunate-amodiaquine or amodiaquine-sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. Remarkably, selection persisted in infections presenting up to about 60 days after treatment w...

  19. Effects of childhood malignancy treatment on quality of life: Preliminary results of the QOLOP project

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blatný, Marek; Kepák, T.; Jelínek, Martin; Slezáčková, Alena; Vlčková, I.; Navrátilová, P.; Pilát, M.; Kárová, Š.; Hrstková, H.; Štěrba, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2008), s. 10-15 R&D Projects: GA ČR 406/07/1384 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : cancer * quality of life * childhood Subject RIV: AN - Psychology http://www.spao.eu/archive/2008/spao2008_effects_of_childhood_malignancy_treatment_on_quality_of_life.pdf

  20. Increasing use of artemisinin-based combination therapy for treatment of malaria infection in Nigerian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igboeli NU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed at describing the pattern of outpatient antimalarial drug prescribing in a secondary and a tertiary hospital, and to assess adherence to the National Antimalarial Treatment Guideline (ATG. Methods: An audit of antimalarial prescription files from the two health facilities for a period of six months in 2008 was conducted. Semi structured questionnaires were used to collect information from the doctors and pharmacists on their awareness and knowledge of the National Antimalarial Treatment Guideline. Results: Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs were the most prescribed antimalarials. Overall, 81.4% of the total prescriptions contained ACTs, out of which 56.8% were artemether-lumefantrine. However, adherence to the drugs indicated by national guideline within the DU90% was 38.5% for the tertiary and 66.7 % for the secondary hospital. The standard practice of prescribing with generic name was still not adhered to as evidenced in the understudied hospitals. The percentage of health care providers that were aware of the ATG was 88.2% for doctors and 85.1% for pharmacists. However, 13.3% and 52.2% of doctors and pharmacists respectively could not properly list the drugs specified in the guideline. Amodiaquine was the most commonly preferred option for managing children aged 0 – 3 months with malaria infection against the indicated oral quinine.Conclusion: This study showed an increased use of artemisinin-based combination therapy for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria compared previous reports in Nigeria. This study also highlights the need for periodic in-service quality assurance among health professionals with monitoring of adherence to and assessment of knowledge of clinical guidelines to ensure the practice of evidence based medicine.

  1. Perception of chloroquine efficacy and alternative treatments for uncomplicated malaria in children in a holoendemic area of Tanzania: implications for the change of treatment policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarimo, D S; Minjas, J N; Bygbjerg, I C

    2001-01-01

    reasons for non-response to antimalarial treatment, and only 50% were aware that CQ could fail to treat malaria, and 57.1% knew alternative treatment options, namely quinine (52.2%) and S/P (20.5%). Generally, decreased efficacy of CQ had been noticed, and quinine was prescribed for both suspected and...

  2. The relationship between the Plasmodium falciparum parasite ratio in childhood and climate estimates of malaria transmission in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hay Simon I

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum morbid and fatal risks are considerably higher in areas supporting parasite prevalence ≥25%, when compared with low transmission areas supporting parasite prevalence below 25%. Recent descriptions of the health impacts of malaria in Africa are based upon categorical descriptions of a climate-driven fuzzy model of suitability (FCS for stable transmission developed by the Mapping Malaria Risk in Africa collaboration (MARA. Methods An electronic and national search was undertaken to identify community-based parasite prevalence surveys in Kenya. Data from these surveys were matched using ArcView 3.2 to extract spatially congruent estimates of the FCS values generated by the MARA model. Levels of agreement between three classes used during recent continental burden estimations of parasite prevalence (0%, >0 – 0 – Results Two hundred and seventeen independent parasite prevalence surveys undertaken since 1980 were identified during the search. Overall agreement between the three classes of parasite prevalence and FCS was weak although significant (k = 0.367, p Conclusion Using the MARA model to categorically distinguish populations at differing intensities of malaria transmission in Kenya may under-represent those who are exposed to stable, endemic transmission and over-represent those at no risk. The MARA approach to defining FCS values of suitability for stable transmission represents our only contemporary continental level map of malaria in Africa but there is a need to redefine Africa's population at risk in accordance with both climatic and non-climatic determinants of P. falciparum transmission intensity to provide a more informed approach to estimating the morbid and fatal consequences of infection across the continent.

  3. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF MALARIA IN ENDEMIC AREAS

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    Beatrice Autino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Malaria infection is still to be considered a major public health problem in those 106 countries where the risk of contracting the infection with one or more of the Plasmodium species exists. According to estimates from the World Health Organization, over 200 million cases and about 655.000 deaths have occurred in 2010. Estimating the real health and social burden of the disease is a difficult task, because many of the malaria endemic countries have limited diagnostic resources, especially in rural settings where conditions with similar clinical picture may coexist in the same geographical areas. Moreover, asymptomatic parasitaemia may occur in high transmission areas after childhood, when anti-malaria semi-immunity occurs. Malaria endemicity and control activities are very complex issues, that are influenced by factors related to the host, to the parasite, to the vector, to the environment and to the health system capacity to fully implement available anti-malaria weapons such as rapid diagnostic tests, artemisinin-based combination treatment, impregnated bed-nets and insecticide residual spraying while waiting for an effective vaccine to be made available.

  4. Adherence and uptake of artemisinin-based combination treatments for uncomplicated malaria: a qualitative study in northern Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Chatio

    Full Text Available Based on the recommendations of the World Health Organization in 2004, Ghana changed her antimalarial drug policy from mono-therapy to Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy (ACTs. The country is currently using three first line drugs artesunate-amodiaquine, artemether-lumefantrine and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Despite this policy, little or no qualitative studies have been conducted to establish the factors influencing adherence to the new treatment for malaria. This study explored factors influencing adherence to the use of ACTs in northern Ghana.This was a qualitative study comprising forty (40 in-depth interviews with patients with malaria who visited selected public and private health facilities and received ACTs. Systematic sampling technique was used to select participants who were given ACTs for the interviews. Nvivo 9 software was used to code the data into themes for further analysis.The study revealed very important differences in knowledge about ACTs. As expected, the less or illiterates could not mention the type of ACT they would prefer to use for treating their malaria. The educated ones had a good knowledge on ACTs and preferred artemether-lumefantrinee in treating their malaria. The reason was that the drug was good and it had minimal or no side effects. Individual attitudes toward the use of medications and the side effects associated with the use of these ACTs were found to be the main factors affecting adherence to the use of ACTs. Perceived cure of illness after the initial dose greatly affected adherence. Other factors such as forgetfulness and lack of information also influenced patient adherence to ACTs use.Individual knowledge, attitudes and behaviors greatly influence patients' adherence to ACTs use. Since ACTs take a number of days to complete, continuous education by health professionals could improve on adherence to ACTs use by patients with malaria.

  5. Changes in lipidemia during chronic care treatment of childhood obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tenna Ruest Haarmark; Gamborg, Michael; Fonvig, Cilius Esmann;

    2012-01-01

    Childhood obesity and related co-morbidities are increasing. This intervention study assessed the associations between weight changes and lipidemia in obese children and adolescents.......Childhood obesity and related co-morbidities are increasing. This intervention study assessed the associations between weight changes and lipidemia in obese children and adolescents....

  6. Effectiveness of Provider and Community Interventions to Improve Treatment of Uncomplicated Malaria in Nigeria: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obinna Onwujekwe

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization recommends that malaria be confirmed by parasitological diagnosis before treatment using Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy (ACT. Despite this, many health workers in malaria endemic countries continue to diagnose malaria based on symptoms alone. This study evaluates interventions to help bridge this gap between guidelines and provider practice. A stratified cluster-randomized trial in 42 communities in Enugu state compared 3 scenarios: Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDTs with basic instruction (control; RDTs with provider training (provider arm; and RDTs with provider training plus a school-based community intervention (provider-school arm. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients treated according to guidelines, a composite indicator requiring patients to be tested for malaria and given treatment consistent with the test result. The primary outcome was evaluated among 4946 (93% of the 5311 patients invited to participate. A total of 40 communities (12 in control, 14 per intervention arm were included in the analysis. There was no evidence of differences between the three arms in terms of our composite indicator (p = 0.36: stratified risk difference was 14% (95% CI -8.3%, 35.8%; p = 0.26 in the provider arm and 1% (95% CI -21.1%, 22.9%; p = 0.19 in the provider-school arm, compared with control. The level of testing was low across all arms (34% in control; 48% provider arm; 37% provider-school arm; p = 0.47. Presumptive treatment of uncomplicated malaria remains an ingrained behaviour that is difficult to change. With or without extensive supporting interventions, levels of testing in this study remained critically low. Governments and researchers must continue to explore alternative ways of encouraging providers to deliver appropriate treatment and avoid the misuse of valuable medicines.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01350752.

  7. The detection and treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria: Time for change

    OpenAIRE

    Nosten F.; Ashley E

    2004-01-01

    In most countries where malaria is endemic, P. falciparum malaria is on the rise. This is primarily due to the spread of drug-resistant strains. Drug resistance is mediated by spontaneous changes in the parasite genome that allow resistant parasites to escape the action of the drugs. The spread of drug resistance increases the transmission of malaria parasites. The consequences for the populations at risk are profound both in terms of consequences for health and economy. In order to halt the ...

  8. Varying efficacy of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in infants in two similar trials: public health implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz Sergi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment (IPTi with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP in infants resulted in different estimates of clinical malaria protection in two trials that used the same protocol in Ifakara, Tanzania, and Manhiça, Mozambique. Understanding the reasons for the discrepant results will help to elucidate the action mechanism of this intervention, which is essential for rational policy formulation. Methods A comparative analysis of two IPTi trials that used the same study design, follow-up, intervention, procedures and assessment of outcomes, in Tanzania and Mozambique was undertaken. Children were randomised to receive either SP or placebo administered 3 times alongside routine vaccinations delivered through the Expanded Program on Immunisation (EPI. Characteristics of the two areas and efficacy on clinical malaria after each dose were compared. Results The most relevant difference was in ITN's use ; 68% in Ifakara and zero in Manhiça. In Ifakara, IPTi was associated with a 53% (95% CI 14.0; 74.1 reduction in the risk of clinical malaria between the second and the third dose; during the same period there was no significant effect in Manhiça. Similarly, protection against malaria episodes was maintained in Ifakara during 6 months after dose 3, but no effect of IPTi was observed in Manhiça. Conclusion The high ITN coverage in Ifakara is the most likely explanation for the difference in IPTi efficacy on clinical malaria. Combination of IPTi and ITNs may be the most cost-effective tool for malaria control currently available, and needs to be explored in current and future studies. Trial Registration Manhiça study registration number: NCT00209795 Ifakara study registration number: NCT88523834

  9. Improvements in access to malaria treatment in Tanzania after switch to artemisinin combination therapy and the introduction of accredited drug dispensing outlets - a provider perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Dillip Angel; Goodman Catherine; Hetzel Manuel W; Alba Sandra; Liana Jafari; Mshinda Hassan; Lengeler Christian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background To improve access to treatment in the private retail sector a new class of outlets known as accredited drug dispensing outlets (ADDO) was created in Tanzania. Tanzania changed its first-line treatment for malaria from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) to artemether-lumefantrine (ALu) in 2007. Subsidized ALu was made available in both health facilities and ADDOs. The effect of these interventions on access to malaria treatment was studied in rural Tanzania. Methods The study ...

  10. Safety and efficacy of re-treatments with pyronaridine-artesunate in African patients with malaria: a substudy of the WANECAM randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sagara, Issaka; Beavogui, Abdoul Habib; Zongo, Issaka; Soulama, Issiaka; Borghini-Fuhrer, Isabelle; Fofana, Bakary; Camara, Daouda; Somé, Anyirékun F; Coulibaly, Aboubacar S; Traore, Oumar B.; Dara, Niawanlou; Kabore, Moïse J T; Thera, Ismaila; Compaore, Yves D; Sylla, Malick Minkael

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Sparse data on the safety of pyronaridine-artesunate after repeated treatment of malaria episodes restrict its clinical use. We therefore compared the safety of pyronaridine-artesunate after treatment of the first episode of malaria versus re-treatment in a substudy analysis. Methods This planned substudy analysis of the randomised, open-label West African Network for Clinical Trials of Antimalarial Drugs (WANECAM) phase 3b/4 trial was done at six health facilities in Mali,...

  11. Health workers’ compliance to rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) to guide malaria treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kabaghe, Alinune N.; Visser, Benjamin J; Spijker, Rene; Phiri, Kamija S.; Grobusch, Martin P.; van Vugt, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization recommends malaria to be confirmed by either microscopy or a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) before treatment. The correct use of RDTs in resource-limited settings facilitates basing treatment onto a confirmed diagnosis; contributes to speeding up considering a correct alternative diagnosis, and prevents overprescription of anti-malarial drugs, reduces costs and avoids unnecessary exposure to adverse drug effects. This review aims to evaluate health worker...

  12. Malaria prevalence, severity and treatment outcome in relation to day 7 lumefantrine plasma concentration in pregnant women

    OpenAIRE

    Mutagonda, Ritah F.; Kamuhabwa, Appolinary A. R.; Minzi, Omary M. S.; Massawe, Siriel N; Maganda, Betty A; Aklillu, Eleni

    2016-01-01

    Background Day 7 plasma concentrations of lumefantrine (LF) can serve as a marker to predict malaria treatment outcome in different study populations. Two main cut-off points (175 and 280 ng/ml) are used to indicate plasma concentrations of LF, below which treatment failure is anticipated. However, there is limited data on the cumulative risk of recurrent parasitaemia (RP) in relation to day 7 LF plasma concentrations in pregnant women. This study describes the prevalence, severity, factors i...

  13. Relevance of undetectably rare resistant malaria parasites in treatment failure: experimental evidence from Plasmodium chabaudi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijben, Silvie; Chan, Brian H K; Read, Andrew F

    2015-06-01

    Resistant malaria parasites are frequently found in mixed infections with drug-sensitive parasites. Particularly early in the evolutionary process, the frequency of these resistant mutants can be extremely low and below the level of molecular detection. We tested whether the rarity of resistance in infections impacted the health outcomes of treatment failure and the potential for onward transmission of resistance. Mixed infections of different ratios of resistant and susceptible Plasmodium chabaudi parasites were inoculated in laboratory mice and dynamics tracked during the course of infection using highly sensitive genotype-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Frequencies of resistant parasites ranged from 10% to 0.003% at the onset of treatment. We found that the rarer the resistant parasites were, the lower the likelihood of their onward transmission, but the worse the treatment failure was in terms of parasite numbers and disease severity. Strikingly, drug resistant parasites had the biggest impact on health outcomes when they were too rare to be detected by any molecular methods currently available for field samples. Indeed, in the field, these treatment failures would not even have been attributed to resistance. PMID:25940195

  14. CD36 selection of 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum associated with severe childhood malaria results in reduced VAR4 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hviid Lars

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A subset of the Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1SM is involved in the cytoadherence of P. falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBC contributing to the pathogenesis of severe disease among young children in malaria endemic areas. The PfEMP1SM are encoded by group A var genes that are composed of a more constrained range of amino acid sequences than groups B and C var genes encoding PfEMP1UM associated with uncomplicated malaria. Also, unlike var genes from groups B and C, those from group A do not have sequences consistent with CD36 binding – a major cytoadhesion phenotype of P. falciparum isolates. Methods A 3D7 PfEMP1SM sub-line (3D7SM expressing VAR4 (PFD1235w/MAL8P1.207 was selected for binding to CD36. The protein expression of this parasite line was monitored by surface staining of iRBC using VAR4-specific antibodies. The serological phenotype of the 3D7SM parasites was determined by flow cytometry using malaria semi-immune and immune plasma and transcription of the 59 var genes in 3D7 were analysed by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR using var-specific primers. Results A selection-induced increased adhesion of 3D7SM iRBC to CD36 resulted in a reduced var4 transcription and VAR4 surface expression. Conclusion VAR4 is not involved in CD36 adhesion. The current findings are consistent with the notion that CD36 adhesion is not associated with particular virulent parasite phenotypes, such as those believed to be exhibited by VAR4 expressing parasites.

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of malaria in peripheral health facilities in Uganda: findings from an area of low transmission in south-western Uganda

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    Clarke Siân

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early recognition of symptoms and signs perceived as malaria are important for effective case management, as few laboratories are available at peripheral health facilities. The validity and reliability of clinical signs and symptoms used by health workers to diagnose malaria were assessed in an area of low transmission in south-western Uganda. Methods The study had two components: 1 passive case detection where all patients attending the out patient clininc with a febrile illness were included and 2 a longitudinal active malaria case detection survey was conducted in selected villages. A malaria case was defined as any slide-confirmed parasitaemia in a person with an axillary temperature ≥ 37.5°C or a history of fever within the last 24 hrs and no signs suggestive of other diseases. Results Cases of malaria were significantly more likely to report joint pains, headache, vomiting and abdominal pains. However, due to the low prevalence of malaria, the predictive values of these individual signs alone, or in combination, were poor. Only 24.8% of 1627 patients had malaria according to case definition and > 75% of patients were unnecessarily treated for malaria and few slide negative cases received alternative treatment. Conclusion In low-transmission areas, more attention needs to be paid to differential diagnosis of febrile illnesses In view of suggested changes in anti-malarial drug policy, introducing costly artemisinin combination therapy accurate, rapid diagnostic tools are necessary to target treatment to people in need.

  16. Impact of combining intermittent preventive treatment with home management of malaria in children less than 10 years in a rural area of Senegal: a cluster randomized trial

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    Tine Roger CK

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current malaria control strategies recommend (i early case detection using rapid diagnostic tests (RDT and treatment with artemisinin combination therapy (ACT, (ii pre-referral rectal artesunate, (iii intermittent preventive treatment and (iv impregnated bed nets. However, these individual malaria control interventions provide only partial protection in most epidemiological situations. Therefore, there is a need to investigate the potential benefits of integrating several malaria interventions to reduce malaria prevalence and morbidity. Methods A randomized controlled trial was carried out to assess the impact of combining seasonal intermittent preventive treatment in children (IPTc with home-based management of malaria (HMM by community health workers (CHWs in Senegal. Eight CHWs in eight villages covered by the Bonconto health post, (South Eastern part of Senegal were trained to diagnose malaria using RDT, provide prompt treatment with artemether-lumefantrine for uncomplicated malaria cases and pre-referral rectal artesunate for complicated malaria occurring in children under 10 years. Four CHWs were randomized to also administer monthly IPTc as single dose of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP plus three doses of amodiaquine (AQ in the malaria transmission season, October and November 2010. Primary end point was incidence of single episode of malaria attacks over 8 weeks of follow up. Secondary end points included prevalence of malaria parasitaemia, and prevalence of anaemia at the end of the transmission season. Primary analysis was by intention to treat. The study protocol was approved by the Senegalese National Ethical Committee (approval 0027/MSP/DS/CNRS, 18/03/2010. Results A total of 1,000 children were enrolled. The incidence of malaria episodes was 7.1/100 child months at risk [95% CI (3.7-13.7] in communities with IPTc + HMM compared to 35.6/100 child months at risk [95% CI (26.7-47.4] in communities with only HMM (a

  17. Chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Osogbo Nigeria: efficacy of amodiaquine + sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and chloroquine + chlorpheniramine for treatment

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    TO Ogungbamigbe

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Chloroquine (CQ resistance in Plasmodium falciparum contributes to increasing malaria-attributable morbidity and mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa. Despite a change in drug policy, continued prescription of CQ did not abate. Therefore the therapeutic efficacy of CQ in uncomplicated falciparum malaria patients was assessed in a standard 28-day protocol in 116 children aged between six and 120 months in Osogbo, Southwest Nigeria. Parasitological and clinical assessments of response to treatment showed that 72 (62.1% of the patients were cured and 44 (37.9% failed the CQ treatment. High initial parasite density and young age were independent predictors for early treatment failure. Out of the 44 patients that failed CQ, 24 received amodiaquine + sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (AQ+SP and 20 received chlorpheniramine + chloroquine (CH+CQ combinations. Mean fever clearance time in those treated with AQ+SP was not significantly different from those treated with CH+CQ (p = 0.05. There was no significant difference in the mean parasite density of the two groups. The cure rate for AQ+SP group was 92% while those of CH+CQ was 85%. There was a significant difference in parasite clearance time (p = 0.01 between the two groups. The 38% treatment failure for CQ reported in this study is higher than the 10% recommended by World Health Organization in other to effect change in antimalarial treatment policy. Hence we conclude that CQ can no more be solely relied upon for the treatment of falciparum malaria in Osogbo, Nigeria. AQ+SP and CH+CQ are effective in the treatment of acute uncomplicated malaria and may be considered as useful alternative drugs in the absence of artemisinin-based combination therapies.

  18. Comparative assessment of two Artemisinin based combination Therapies in the treatment of Uncomplicated Malaria among University students in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okonta Matthew J

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In line with the recommendation of artemisininbased combination therapy (ACT by WHO in the effective treatment of uncomplicated malaria, African nations including Nigeria changed their malaria treatment policy to combination therapies. To date, about 15 African nations adopted artesunate /amodiaquine (AA as their first line agent while Nigeria adopted artemether /lumefantrine (AL. Objective: The objective of this study is to compare the treatment outcome among patients treated with AA to those treated with AL for acute uncomplicated malaria. Method: The study was conducted at Nnamdi Azikiwe University campuses using quantitative methods. Two hundered and ninety six patients were randomly allocated to one of two treatment group- AA and AL with 148 patients per group. All the patients were educated about the drugs and adherence. Adherence and treatment outcomes including parasite clearance and the drugs’ effects on biochemical parameters among others were assessed by follow up visits on third, seventh, fourteenth and twenty eighth-day post treatment. Data were analysed using Cox Regression model on SPSS 17.0. Result: Both drugs were well adhered to and tolerated. One case of Steven Johnson-like reaction was observed with AL. Fever resolution and parasite clearance was similar in both groups with adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR by day 28 for AL and AA being 70.3% and 85.1% respectively. Conclusion: Our findings is in favour of higher efficacy of AA with respect to their ACPR. More controlled studies will be needed to ascertain the adoption of AL as first line drug in malaria treatment in Nigeria.

  19. Whole plant extracts versus single compounds for the treatment of malaria: synergy and positive interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Colin W

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In traditional medicine whole plants or mixtures of plants are used rather than isolated compounds. There is evidence that crude plant extracts often have greater in vitro or/and in vivo antiplasmodial activity than isolated constituents at an equivalent dose. The aim of this paper is to review positive interactions between components of whole plant extracts, which may explain this. Methods Narrative review. Results There is evidence for several different types of positive interactions between different components of medicinal plants used in the treatment of malaria. Pharmacodynamic synergy has been demonstrated between the Cinchona alkaloids and between various plant extracts traditionally combined. Pharmacokinetic interactions occur, for example between constituents of Artemisia annua tea so that its artemisinin is more rapidly absorbed than the pure drug. Some plant extracts may have an immunomodulatory effect as well as a direct antiplasmodial effect. Several extracts contain multidrug resistance inhibitors, although none of these has been tested clinically in malaria. Some plant constituents are added mainly to attenuate the side-effects of others, for example ginger to prevent nausea. Conclusions More clinical research is needed on all types of interaction between plant constituents. This could include clinical trials of combinations of pure compounds (such as artemisinin + curcumin + piperine and of combinations of herbal remedies (such as Artemisia annua leaves + Curcuma longa root + Piper nigum seeds. The former may enhance the activity of existing pharmaceutical preparations, and the latter may improve the effectiveness of existing herbal remedies for use in remote areas where modern drugs are unavailable.

  20. Decline of placental malaria in southern Ghana after the implementation of intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy

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    Eggelte Teunis A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP has been adopted as policy by many countries in sub-Saharan Africa. However, data on the post-implementation effectiveness of this measure are scarce. Methods Clinical and parasitological parameters were assessed among women delivering at a district hospital in rural southern Ghana in the year 2000 when pyrimethamine chemoprophylaxis was recommended (n = 839 and in 2006 (n = 226, approximately one year after the implementation of IPTp-SP. Examinations were performed in an identical manner in 2000 and 2006 including the detection of placental Plasmodium falciparum infection by microscopy, histidine-rich protein 2, and PCR. Results In 2006, 77% of the women reported to have taken IPTp-SP at least once (26%, twice; 24%, thrice. In 2006 as compared to 2000, placental P. falciparum infection was reduced by 43–57% (P P = 0.0009, and median birth weight was 130 g higher (P = 0.02. In 2006, likewise, women who had taken ≥ 1 dose of IPTp-SP revealed less infection and anaemia and their children tended to have higher birth weights as compared to women who had not used IPTp-SP. However, placental P. falciparum infection was still observed in 11% (microscopy to 26% (PCR of those women who had taken three doses of IPTp-SP. Conclusion In southern Ghana, placental malaria and maternal anaemia have declined substantially and birth weight has increased after the implementation of IPTp-SP. Likely, these effects can further be increased by improving IPTp-SP coverage and adherence. However, the remnant prevalence of infection in women having taken three doses of IPTp-SP suggests that additional antimalarial measures are needed to prevent malaria in pregnancy in this region.

  1. Low referral completion of rapid diagnostic test-negative patients in community-based treatment of malaria in Sierra Leone

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    Reid Tony

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is hyper-endemic and a major public health problem in Sierra Leone. To provide malaria treatment closer to the community, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF launched a community-based project where Community Malaria Volunteers (CMVs tested and treated febrile children and pregnant women for malaria using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs. RDT-negative patients and severely ill patients were referred to health facilities. This study sought to determine the referral rate and compliance of patients referred by the CMVs. Methods In MSF's operational area in Bo and Pujehun districts, Sierra Leone, a retrospective analysis of referral records was carried out for a period of three months. All referral records from CMVs and referral health structures were reviewed, compared and matched for personal data. The eligible study population included febrile children between three and 59 months and pregnant women in their second or third trimester with fever who were noted as having received a referral advice in the CMV recording form. Results The study results showed a total referral rate of almost 15%. During the study period 36 out of 2,459 (1.5% referred patients completed their referral. There was a significant difference in referral compliance between patients with fever but a negative RDT and patients with signs of severe malaria. Less than 1% (21/2,442 of the RDT-negative patients with fever completed their referral compared to 88.2% (15/17 of the patients with severe malaria (RR = 0.010 95% CI 0.006 - 0.015. Conclusions In this community-based malaria programme, RDT-negative patients with fever were referred to a health structure for further diagnosis and care with a disappointingly low rate of referral completion. This raises concerns whether use of CMVs, with referral as backup in RDT-negative cases, provides adequate care for febrile children and pregnant women. To improve the referral completion in MSF's community-based malaria

  2. Routine delivery of artemisinin-based combination treatment at fixed health facilities reduces malaria prevalence in Tanzania: an observational study

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    Khatib Rashid A

    2012-04-01

    fixed health facilities only modestly reduced asexual parasitaemia prevalence. ACT is effective for treatment of uncomplicated malaria and should have substantial public health impact on morbidity and mortality, but is unlikely to reduce malaria transmission substantially in much of sub-Saharan Africa where individuals are rapidly re-infected.

  3. Treatment of imported severe malaria with artesunate instead of quinine--more evidence needed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Cramer; R. López-Vélez; G.D. Burchard; M.P. Grobusch; P.J. de Vries

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and fast acting anti-malarials are essential to treat severe malaria. Quinine has been the only option for parenteral therapy until recently. While current evidence shows that intravenous artesunate is more effective than quinine in treating severe malaria in endemic countries, some questions

  4. Determinants of delay in malaria treatment-seeking behaviour for under-five children in south-west Ethiopia: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deribew Amare

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prompt diagnosis and timely treatment of malaria within 24 hours after onset of first symptoms can reduce illness progression to severe stages and therefore, decrease mortality. The reason why mothers/caretakers delay in malaria diagnosis and treatment for under-five children is not well studied in Ethiopia. The objective of this study was to assess determinants of malaria treatment delay in under-five children in three districts of south-west Ethiopia. Methods A case control study was conducted from March 15 to April 20, 2010. Cases were under-five children who had clinical malaria and sought treatment after 24 hours of developing sign and symptom, and controls were under-five children who had clinical malaria and sought treatment within 24 hours of developing sign and symptom of malaria. Data were collected by trained enumerators using structured questionnaire. Data were entered in to Epi Info version 6.04 and analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. To identify determinants, multiple logistic regression was done. Results A total of 155 mothers of cases and 155 mothers of controls were interviewed. Mothers of children who were in a monogamous marriage (OR = 3.41, 95% CI: 1.39, 8.34, who complained about the side effects of anti-malarial drugs (OR = 4.96, 95% CI: 1.21, 20.36, who had no history of child death (OR = 3.50, 95% CI: 1.82, 6.42 and who complained about the higher cost of transportation to reach the health institutions (OR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.17, 3.45 were more likely to be late for the treatment of malaria in under-five children. Conclusion Effective malaria control programmes should address reducing delayed presentation of children for treatment. Efforts to reduce delay should address transport cost, decentralization of services and increasing awareness of the community on early diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Artesunate + amodiaquine versus artemether-lumefantrine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Colombian Pacific region: a noninferiority trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando De la Hoz Restrepo; Alexandra Porras Ramírez; Alejandro Rico Mendoza; Freddy Córdoba; Diana Patricia Rojas

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In Colombia, there are no published studies for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria comparing artemisinin combination therapies. Hence, it is intended to demonstrate the non-inferior efficacy/safety profiles of artesunate + amodiaquine versus artemether-lumefantrine treatments. METHODS: A randomized, controlled, open-label, noninferiority (Δ≤5%) clinical trial was performed in adults with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria using the 28‑day World Health ...

  6. Enhanced transmission of drug-resistant parasites to mosquitoes following drug treatment in rodent malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Bell

    Full Text Available The evolution of drug resistant Plasmodium parasites is a major challenge to effective malaria control. In theory, competitive interactions between sensitive parasites and resistant parasites within infections are a major determinant of the rate at which parasite evolution undermines drug efficacy. Competitive suppression of resistant parasites in untreated hosts slows the spread of resistance; competitive release following treatment enhances it. Here we report that for the murine model Plasmodium chabaudi, co-infection with drug-sensitive parasites can prevent the transmission of initially rare resistant parasites to mosquitoes. Removal of drug-sensitive parasites following chemotherapy enabled resistant parasites to transmit to mosquitoes as successfully as sensitive parasites in the absence of treatment. We also show that the genetic composition of gametocyte populations in host venous blood accurately reflects the genetic composition of gametocytes taken up by mosquitoes. Our data demonstrate that, at least for this mouse model, aggressive chemotherapy leads to very effective transmission of highly resistant parasites that are present in an infection, the very parasites which undermine the long term efficacy of front-line drugs.

  7. Responding to the challenge of antimalarial drug resistance by routine monitoring to update national malaria treatment policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Lasse S; Ringwald, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    of rational and updated malaria treatment policies, but defining and updating such policies requires a sufficient volume of high-quality drug-resistance data collected at national and regional levels. Three main tools are used for drug resistance monitoring, including therapeutic efficacy tests, in......Reduced sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum to formerly recommended cheap and well-known antimalarial drugs places an increasing burden on malaria control programs and national health systems in endemic countries. The high costs of the new artemisinin-based combination treatments underline the use...... additional information about changing patterns of resistance. However, some of the tests are technically demanding, and thus there is a need for more resources for training and capacity building in endemic countries to be able to adequately respond to the challenge of drug resistance....

  8. A case of an avoidable admission to an Ebola treatment unit with malaria and an associated heat illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Andrew T; Schoonbaert, I; Trinick, T; Phillips, A; Marion, D

    2016-06-01

    We present a 27-year old British nurse admitted to the Kerry Town Ebola Treatment Unit, Sierra Leone, with symptoms fitting suspect-Ebola virus disease (EVD) case criteria. A diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria and heat illness was ultimately made, both of which could have been prevented through employing simple measures not utilised in this case. The dual pathology of her presentation was atypical for either disease meaning EVD could not be immediately excluded. She remained isolated in the red zone until 72 h from symptom onset. This case highlights why force protection measures are important to reduce the incidence of both malaria and heat illness in deployed military and civilian populations. These prevention measures are particularly pertinent during the current EVD epidemic where presenting with these pathologies requires clinical assessment in the 'red zone' of an Ebola treatment unit. PMID:26141211

  9. Competitive facilitation of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in pregnant women who receive preventive treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Harrington, W. E.; Mutabingwa, T.K.; Muehlenbachs, A; Sorensen, B.; Bolla, M. C.; Fried, M; Duffy, P E

    2009-01-01

    Intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) is used to prevent Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However, parasites resistant to the IPTp drug sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) have emerged worldwide, and infections with mixed resistant and susceptible parasites are exacerbated by pyrimethamine in mice. In a prospective delivery cohort in Muheza, Tanzania, we examined the effects of SP IPTp on parasite resistance alleles, parasite diversity, level of parasitemia, and inflammation in the p...

  10. Population Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Artemether and Lumefantrine during Combination Treatment in Children with Uncomplicated Falciparum Malaria in Tanzania▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hietala, Sofia Friberg; Mårtensson, Andreas; Ngasala, Billy; Dahlström, Sabina; Lindegårdh, Niklas; Annerberg, Anna; Premji, Zul; Färnert, Anna; Gil, Pedro; Björkman, Anders; Ashton, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The combination of artemether (ARM) and lumefantrine is currently the first-line treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in mainland Tanzania. While the exposure to lumefantrine has been associated with the probability of adequate clinical and parasitological cure, increasing exposure to artemether and the active metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA) has been shown to decrease the parasite clearance time. The aim of this analysis was to describe the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics o...

  11. Randomized Comparison of Artemether-Benflumetol and Artesunate-Mefloquine in Treatment of MultidrugResistant Falciparum Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Van Vugt, M.; Brockman, A.; Gemperli, B.; Luxemburger, C.; Gathmann, I; Royce, C.; Slight, Thra; Looareesuwan, S; White, N J; Nosten, F

    1998-01-01

    An open, randomized comparison of artemether-benflumetol (CGP 56 697; Novartis) with artesunate-mefloquine was conducted in 617 patients with acute uncomplicated multidrug-resistant falciparum malaria on the western border of Thailand. Both treatments rapidly and reliably cleared fever and parasitemia, and there was no significant difference in the initial therapeutic response parameters. Parasite genotyping was used to distinguish recrudescences from new infections. The 63-day cure rate for ...

  12. Health information, treatment, and worker productivity: Experimental evidence from malaria testing and treatment among Nigerian sugarcane cutters

    OpenAIRE

    Dillon, Andrew; Friedman, Jed; Serneels, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural and other physically demanding sectors are important sources of growth in developing countries but prevalent diseases such as malaria adversely impact the productivity, labor supply, and choice of job tasks among workers by reducing physical capacity. This study identifies the impact of malaria on worker earnings, labor supply, and daily productivity by randomizing the tempora...

  13. Factors related to under-diagnosis and under-treatment of childhood asthma in metropolitan France.

    OpenAIRE

    Annesi-Maesano Isabella; Sterlin Carla; Caillaud Denis; de Blay Fréderic; Lavaud François; Charpin Denis; Raherisson Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Under-diagnosis and under-treatment of childhood asthma were investigated in France using data collected during the 6 Cities Study, the French contribution to the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Methods 7,781 schoolchildren aged between 9 and 10 years underwent a medical visit including skin prick tests to common allergens and exercise test for Exercise-Induced Asthma (EIA) and their parents filled in a standardized questionnaire on asthma, manage...

  14. The efficacy of artemether in the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elhassan, I M; Satti, G H; Ali, A E;

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy of artemether (a qinghaosu derivative) administered intramuscularly for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria was compared to quinine in an open randomized trial including 54 patients in eastern Sudan, where chloroquine resistance is common. The artemether treatment (5 d...... intramuscular regimen) was effective and the drug was well tolerated. All patients had cleared the parasitaemia and were free of symptoms 48 h after initiation of treatment. The parasite clearance time was comparable in patients receiving artemether and quinine. No side effect was reported by patients receiving...

  15. Recent advances in novel heterocyclic scaffolds for the treatment of drug-resistant malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sahil; Singh, Rajesh K; Patial, Babita; Goyal, Sachin; Bhardwaj, T R

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem all over the world, particularly in tropical and subtropical countries due to the development of resistance and most deadly infection is caused by Plasmodium falciparum. There is a direct need for the discovery of new drugs with unique structures and mechanism of action to treat sensitive and drug-resistant strains of various plasmodia for radical cure of this disease. Traditional compounds such as quinine and related derivatives represent a major source for the development of new drugs. This review presents recent modifications of 4-aminoquinoline and 8-aminoquinolone rings as leads to novel active molecules which are under clinical trials. The review also encompasses the other heterocyclic compounds emerged as potential antimalarial agents with promising results such as acridinediones and acridinone analogues, pyridines and quinolones as antimalarials. Miscellaneous heterocyclics such as tetroxane derivatives, indole derivatives, imidazolopiperazine derivatives, biscationic choline-based compounds and polymer-linked combined antimalarial drugs are also discussed. At last brief introduction to heterocyclics in natural products is also reviewed. Most of them have been under clinical trials and found to be promising in the treatment of drug-resistant strains of Plasmodium and others can be explored for the same purpose. PMID:25775094

  16. Access to prompt and effective malaria treatment in the Kilombero Valley, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Hetzel, Manuel Wolf-Werner

    2007-01-01

    Malaria is the most important parasitic infection in humans, causing an estimated one million deaths annually. Most cases occur in young children in sub-Saharan Africa, supporting the vicious circle of disease and poverty. Current control strategies have so far failed to reduce the disease in most parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITN) are effective in preventing malaria episodes and efficacious drugs (such as artemisinin-based combination therapies or ACTs) exis...

  17. Gametocyte clearance dynamics following oral artesunate treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Malian children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djimde, Abdoulaye A.; Maiga, Amelia W.; Ouologuem, Dinkorma; Fofana, Bakary; Sagara, Issaka; Dembele, Demba; Toure, Sekou; Sanogo, Kassim; Dama, Souleymane; Sidibe, Bakary; Doumbo, Ogobara K.

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapies decrease Plasmodium gametocyte carriage. However, the role of artesunate in monotherapy in vivo, the mechanisms involved, and the utility of gametocyte carriage as a potential tool for the surveillance of antimalarial resistance are poorly understood. In 2010–2011, we conducted an open-label, prospective efficacy study of artesunate as monotherapy in children 1–10 years of age with uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Bougoula-Hameau, Mali. Standard oral doses of artesunate were administered for 7 days and patients were followed up for 28 days. The data were compared to a similar study conducted in 2002–2004. Of 100 children enrolled in the 2010–2011 study, 92 were analyzed and compared to 217 children enrolled in the 2002–2004 study. The proportion of gametocyte carriers was unchanged at the end of treatment (23% at baseline vs. 24% on day 7, p = 1.0) and did not significantly decline until day 21 of follow-up (23% vs. 6%, p = 0.003). The mean gametocyte density at inclusion remained unchanged at the end of treatment (12 gametocytes/μL vs. 16 gametocytes/μL, p = 0.6). Overall, 46% of the 71 initial non-carriers had gametocytes detected by day 7. Similar results were found in the 2002–2004 study. In both studies, although gametocyte carriage significantly decreased by the end of the 28-day follow-up, artesunate did not clear mature gametocytes during treatment and did not prevent the appearance of new stage V gametocytes as assessed by light microscopy. Baseline gametocyte carriage was significantly higher 6 years after the deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapies in this setting. PMID:26839003

  18. Gametocyte clearance dynamics following oral artesunate treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Malian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djimde Abdoulaye A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Artemisinin-based combination therapies decrease Plasmodium gametocyte carriage. However, the role of artesunate in monotherapy in vivo, the mechanisms involved, and the utility of gametocyte carriage as a potential tool for the surveillance of antimalarial resistance are poorly understood. In 2010–2011, we conducted an open-label, prospective efficacy study of artesunate as monotherapy in children 1–10 years of age with uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Bougoula-Hameau, Mali. Standard oral doses of artesunate were administered for 7 days and patients were followed up for 28 days. The data were compared to a similar study conducted in 2002–2004. Of 100 children enrolled in the 2010–2011 study, 92 were analyzed and compared to 217 children enrolled in the 2002–2004 study. The proportion of gametocyte carriers was unchanged at the end of treatment (23% at baseline vs. 24% on day 7, p = 1.0 and did not significantly decline until day 21 of follow-up (23% vs. 6%, p = 0.003. The mean gametocyte density at inclusion remained unchanged at the end of treatment (12 gametocytes/μL vs. 16 gametocytes/μL, p = 0.6. Overall, 46% of the 71 initial non-carriers had gametocytes detected by day 7. Similar results were found in the 2002–2004 study. In both studies, although gametocyte carriage significantly decreased by the end of the 28-day follow-up, artesunate did not clear mature gametocytes during treatment and did not prevent the appearance of new stage V gametocytes as assessed by light microscopy. Baseline gametocyte carriage was significantly higher 6 years after the deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapies in this setting.

  19. Update on the efficacy, effectiveness and safety of artemether–lumefantrine combination therapy for treatment of uncomplicated malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Byakika-Kibwika

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Pauline Byakika-Kibwika1,2, Mohammed Lamorde1,2, Harriet Mayanja-Kizza1, Concepta Merry1,2, Bob Colebunders3,4, Jean-Pierre Van geertruyden4,51Infectious Diseases Institute and Infectious Diseases Network for Treatment and Research in Africa (INTERACT, Faculty of Medicine, Makerere University, Kampala Uganda; 2Trinity College Dublin, Ireland; 3Dienst Clinical Sciences, Instituut voor Tropische Geneeskunde, Antwerp, Belgium; 4International Health, Epidemiology en Social Medicine, Universiteit Antwerpen, Antwerp, Belgium; 5Epidemiology Unit, Dienst Parasitologie, Instituut voor Tropische Geneeskunde, Antwerp, BelgiumAbstract: Artemether–lumefantrine is one of the artemisisnin-based combination therapies recommended for treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria. The drug combination is highly efficacious against sensitive and multidrug resistant falciparum malaria. It offers the advantage of rapid clearance of parasites by artemether and the slower elimination of residual parasites by lumefantrine. The combination can be used in all populations except pregnant mothers in the first trimester where safety is still uncertain. There are still concerns about safety and pharmacokinetics of the drug combination in children, especially infants, pregnant mothers and drug interactions with mainly non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors used for HIV therapy.Keywords: artemether–lumefantrine, efficacy, effectiveness, safety, malaria

  20. The efficacy of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine alone and in combination with chloroquine for malaria treatment in rural Eastern Sudan: the interrelation between resistance, age and gametocytogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A-Elbasit, Ishraga E; Elbashir, Mustafa I; Khalil, Insaf F;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of sulfadoxine-pyremethamine (SP)+chloroquine (CQ) combination treatment against falciparum malaria with SP treatment alone. METHOD: In-vivo study of 254 patients with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in rural eastern Sudan, where the population is semi......-immune. RESULTS: Sulfadoxine-pyremethamine treatment alone cured 68.3% (41/60) and SP+CQ cured 63.4% (123/194). Early and late treatment failures occurred in both treatment groups. Host age (as a marker for immunity) and parasite gametocytogenesis (as a marker for transmissibility) were significantly associated...

  1. Risk factors for treatment related mortality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Åsberg, Ann; Heyman, Mats;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of major improvements in the cure rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 2-4% of patients still die from treatment related complications. PROCEDURE: We investigated the pattern of treatment related deaths (TRDs) and possible risk factors in the NOPHO ALL-92 and...

  2. Risk factors for treatment related mortality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Åsberg, Ann; Heyman, Mats;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of major improvements in the cure rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 2-4% of patients still die from treatment related complications. PROCEDURE: We investigated the pattern of treatment related deaths (TRDs) and possible risk factors in the NOPHO ALL-92 and...... towards patients at risk. Pediatr Blood Cancer. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc....

  3. Friends or foes ? : predictors of treatment outcome of cognitieve behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liber, Juliëtte Margo

    2008-01-01

    The present dissertation had as its central focus the prediction of outcome of the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders. In the present study a selection of variables that were thought to have prognostic validity for successful cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) outcome were explored in a popu

  4. Random versus Blocked Practice in Treatment for Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Edwin; Farinella, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative effects of random vs. blocked practice schedules in treatment for childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Although there have been repeated suggestions in the literature to use random practice in CAS treatment, no systematic studies exist that have directly compared random with blocked practice in this population.…

  5. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Haemoglobin Drop after Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine Use for Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria during Pregnancy in Ghana – A Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Owusu, Ruth; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Mahama, Emmanuel; Awini, Elizabeth; Anyorigiya, Thomas; Dosoo, David; Amu, Alberta; Jakpa, Gabriel; Ofei, Emmanuel; Segbaya, Sylvester; Oduro, Abraham Rexford; Gyapong, Margaret; Hodgson, Abraham; Bart-Plange, Constance; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Background Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (SP) is still the only recommended antimalarial for use in intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) in some malaria endemic countries including Ghana. SP has the potential to cause acute haemolysis in G6PD deficient people resulting in significant haemoglobin (Hb) drop but there is limited data on post SP-IPTp Hb drop. This study determined the difference, if any in proportions of women with significant acute haemoglobin drop b...

  6. Obstacles to prompt and effective malaria treatment lead to low community-coverage in two rural districts of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillip Angel

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is still a leading child killer in sub-Saharan Africa. Yet, access to prompt and effective malaria treatment, a mainstay of any malaria control strategy, is sub-optimal in many settings. Little is known about obstacles to treatment and community-effectiveness of case-management strategies. This research quantified treatment seeking behaviour and access to treatment in a highly endemic rural Tanzanian community. The aim was to provide a better understanding of obstacles to treatment access in order to develop practical and cost-effective interventions. Methods We conducted community-based treatment-seeking surveys including 226 recent fever episodes in 2004 and 2005. The local Demographic Surveillance System provided additional household information. A census of drug retailers and health facilities provided data on availability and location of treatment sources. Results After intensive health education, the biomedical concept of malaria has largely been adopted by the community. 87.5% (78.2–93.8 of the fever cases in children and 80.7% (68.1–90.0 in adults were treated with one of the recommended antimalarials (at the time SP, amodiaquine or quinine. However, only 22.5% (13.9–33.2 of the children and 10.5% (4.0–21.5 of the adults received prompt and appropriate antimalarial treatment. Health facility attendance increased the odds of receiving an antimalarial (OR = 7.7 but did not have an influence on correct dosage. The exemption system for under-fives in public health facilities was not functioning and drug expenditures for children were as high in health facilities as with private retailers. Conclusion A clear preference for modern medicine was reflected in the frequent use of antimalarials. Yet, quality of case-management was far from satisfactory as was the functioning of the exemption mechanism for the main risk group. Private drug retailers played a central role by complementing existing formal health

  7. Oral iron supplements for children in malaria-endemic areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, Ami; Okebe, Joseph; Yahav, Dafna; Paul, Mical

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron-deficiency anaemia is common during childhood. Iron administration has been claimed to increase the risk of malaria. Objectives To evaluate the effects and safety of iron supplementation, with or without folic acid, in children living in areas with hyperendemic or holoendemic malaria transmission. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (up to August 2015) and LILACS (up to February 2015). We also checked the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) and World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) up to February 2015. We contacted the primary investigators of all included trials, ongoing trials, and those awaiting assessment to ask for unpublished data and further trials. We scanned references of included trials, pertinent reviews, and previous meta-analyses for additional references. Selection criteria We included individually randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster RCTs conducted in hyperendemic and holoendemic malaria regions or that reported on any malaria-related outcomes that included children younger than 18 years of age. We included trials that compared orally administered iron, iron with folic acid, and iron with antimalarial treatment versus placebo or no treatment. We included trials of iron supplementation or fortification interventions if they provided at least 80% of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for prevention of anaemia by age. Antihelminthics could be administered to either group, and micronutrients had to be administered equally to both groups. Data collection and analysis The primary outcomes were clinical malaria, severe malaria, and death from any cause. We assessed the risk of bias in included trials with domain-based evaluation and assessed the quality of the evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment

  8. Associations between maternal helminth and malaria infections in pregnancy, and clinical malaria in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndibazza, Juliet; Webb, Emily L; Lule, Swaib;

    2013-01-01

    Background. Helminth and malaria coinfections are common in the tropics. We investigated the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to these parasites might influence susceptibility to infections such as malaria in childhood.Methods. In a birth cohort of 2,345 mother-child pairs in Uganda, maternal...... helminth and malaria infection status was determined during pregnancy, and childhood malaria episodes recorded from birth to age five years. We examined associations between maternal infections and malaria in the offspring.Results. Common maternal infections were hookworm (45%), Mansonella perstans (21......%), Schistosoma mansoni (18%), and Plasmodium falciparum (11%). At age 5 years, 69% of the children were still under follow-up. The incidence of malaria was 34 episodes per 100 child-years, and the mean prevalence of asymptomatic malaria at annual visits was 5.4%. Maternal hookworm and M. perstans infections were...

  9. Ethical considerations in the treatment of childhood obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Perryman, Mandy

    2015-01-01

    Mandy L Perryman,1 Kara A Sidoti,2 1Department of Leadership and Counselor Education, University of Mississippi, MS, USA; 2Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, VA, USA Abstract: Rates of obesity in children and adolescents appear to be stabilizing, though the prevalence of extreme obesity in this population remains fairly consistent at 4%. Childhood obesity contributes to serious health complications, such as hypertension, orthopedic problems, hormonal imbalances, and adult obesity. Psychological, ...

  10. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH INTRAVENOUS QUININE, INTRAMUSCULAR ARTEMETHER AND INTRAVENOUS ARTESUNATE FOR THE TREATMENT OF SEVERE MALARIA IN THAILAND

    OpenAIRE

    Krudsood, Srivicha; Wilairatana, Polrat; Vannaphan, Suparp; Treeprasertsuk, Sombat; Silachamroon, Udomsak; Phomrattanaprapin, Weerapong; Gourdeuk, Victor R; Brittenham, Gary M.; Looareesuwan, Sornchai

    2003-01-01

    We prospectively studied 803 Thai patients admitted to the Bangkok Hospital for Tropical Diseases to assess the safety, tolerability and effectiveness of treatments for strictly defined P. falciparum malaria. Patients were assigned to one of five treatment groups: (i) a 5-day course of intravenous artesunate in a total dose of 600 mg, Group Aiv; (ii) intravenous artesunate as in Group Aiv followed by mefloquine, 25 mg/kg, Group Aiv+M; (iii) a 3-day course of intramuscular artemether in a tota...

  11. The Effect of Cotrimoxazole Prophylactic Treatment on Malaria, Birth Outcomes, and Postpartum CD4 Count in HIV-Infected Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Anna; Hudgens, Michael G.; Van Rie, Annelies; King, Caroline C.; Ellington, Sascha; Chome, Nelecy; Turner, Abigail Norris; Kacheche, Zebrone; Jamieson, Denise J.; Chasela, Charles; van der Horst, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Background. Limited data exist on cotrimoxazole prophylactic treatment (CPT) in pregnant women, including protection against malaria versus standard intermittent preventive therapy with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp). Methods. Using observational data we examined the effect of CPT in HIV-infected pregnant women on malaria during pregnancy, low birth weight and preterm birth using proportional hazards, logistic, and log binomial regression, respectively. We used linear regression to assess effect of CPT on CD4 count. Results. Data from 468 CPT-exposed and 768 CPT-unexposed women were analyzed. CPT was associated with protection against malaria versus IPTp (hazard ratio: 0.35, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.20, 0.60). After adjustment for time period this effect was not statistically significant (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.28, 1.52). Among women receiving and not receiving CPT, rates of low birth weight (7.1% versus 7.6%) and preterm birth (23.5% versus 23.6%) were similar. CPT was associated with lower CD4 counts 24 weeks postpartum in women receiving (−77.6 cells/μL, 95% CI: −125.2, −30.1) and not receiving antiretrovirals (−33.7 cells/μL, 95% CI: −58.6, −8.8). Conclusions. Compared to IPTp, CPT provided comparable protection against malaria in HIV-infected pregnant women and against preterm birth or low birth weight. Possible implications of CPT-associated lower CD4 postpartum warrant further examination. PMID:24363547

  12. The Effect of Cotrimoxazole Prophylactic Treatment on Malaria, Birth Outcomes, and Postpartum CD4 Count in HIV-Infected Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dow

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Limited data exist on cotrimoxazole prophylactic treatment (CPT in pregnant women, including protection against malaria versus standard intermittent preventive therapy with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp. Methods. Using observational data we examined the effect of CPT in HIV-infected pregnant women on malaria during pregnancy, low birth weight and preterm birth using proportional hazards, logistic, and log binomial regression, respectively. We used linear regression to assess effect of CPT on CD4 count. Results. Data from 468 CPT-exposed and 768 CPT-unexposed women were analyzed. CPT was associated with protection against malaria versus IPTp (hazard ratio: 0.35, 95% Confidence Interval (CI: 0.20, 0.60. After adjustment for time period this effect was not statistically significant (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.28, 1.52. Among women receiving and not receiving CPT, rates of low birth weight (7.1% versus 7.6% and preterm birth (23.5% versus 23.6% were similar. CPT was associated with lower CD4 counts 24 weeks postpartum in women receiving (−77.6 cells/μL, 95% CI: −125.2, −30.1 and not receiving antiretrovirals (−33.7 cells/μL, 95% CI: −58.6, −8.8. Conclusions. Compared to IPTp, CPT provided comparable protection against malaria in HIV-infected pregnant women and against preterm birth or low birth weight. Possible implications of CPT-associated lower CD4 postpartum warrant further examination.

  13. The potential impact of improving appropriate treatment for fever on malaria and non-malarial febrile illness management in under-5s: a decision-tree modelling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Bhargavi Rao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As international funding for malaria programmes plateaus, limited resources must be rationally managed for malaria and non-malarial febrile illnesses (NMFI. Given widespread unnecessary treatment of NMFI with first-line antimalarial Artemisinin Combination Therapies (ACTs, our aim was to estimate the effect of health-systems factors on rates of appropriate treatment for fever and on use of ACTs. METHODS: A decision-tree tool was developed to investigate the impact of improving aspects of the fever care-pathway and also evaluate the impact in Tanzania of the revised WHO malaria guidelines advocating diagnostic-led management. RESULTS: Model outputs using baseline parameters suggest 49% malaria cases attending a clinic would receive ACTs (95% Uncertainty Interval:40.6-59.2% but that 44% (95% UI:35-54.8% NMFI cases would also receive ACTs. Provision of 100% ACT stock predicted a 28.9% increase in malaria cases treated with ACT, but also an increase in overtreatment of NMFI, with 70% NMFI cases (95% UI:56.4-79.2% projected to receive ACTs, and thus an overall 13% reduction (95% UI:5-21.6% in correct management of febrile cases. Modelling increased availability or use of diagnostics had little effect on malaria management outputs, but may significantly reduce NMFI overtreatment. The model predicts the early rollout of revised WHO guidelines in Tanzania may have led to a 35% decrease (95% UI:31.2-39.8% in NMFI overtreatment, but also a 19.5% reduction (95% UI:11-27.2%, in malaria cases receiving ACTs, due to a potential fourfold decrease in cases that were untested or tested false-negative (42.5% vs.8.9% and so untreated. DISCUSSION: Modelling multi-pronged intervention strategies proved most effective to improve malaria treatment without increasing NMFI overtreatment. As malaria transmission declines, health system interventions must be guided by whether the management priority is an increase in malaria cases receiving ACTs (reducing the

  14. Efficacy and tolerability of four antimalarial combinations in the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faye Oumar

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In view of the high level of chloroquine resistance in many countries, WHO has recommended the use of combination therapy with artemisinin derivatives in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum. Four antimalarial drug combinations, artesunate plus amodiaquine (Arsucam®, artesunate plus mefloquine (Artequin®, artemether plus lumefantrine (Coartem®; four doses and six doses, and amodiaquine plus sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, were studied in five health districts in Senegal. Methods This is a descriptive, analytical, open, randomized study to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of these four antimalarial combinations in the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria using the 2002 WHO protocol. Results All drug combinations demonstrated good efficacy. On day 28, all combinations resulted in an excellent clinical and parasitological response rate of 100% after correction for PCR results, except for the four-dose artemether-lumefantrine regimen (96.4%. Follow-up of approximately 10% of each treatment group on day 42 demonstrated an efficacy of 100%. The combinations were well tolerated clinically and biologically. No unexpected side-effect was observed and all side-effects disappeared at the end of treatment. No serious side-effect requiring premature termination of treatment was observed. Conclusion The four combinations are effective and well-tolerated.

  15. Malaria in Africa Can Be Eliminated

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Carlos C.; Richard W Steketee

    2011-01-01

    A concerted effort to control malaria in Africa has produced dramatic reductions in childhood death in the past decade. This early success has prompted the global community to commit to eradication of malaria deaths and eventually all transmission. Evidence suggests that this is a feasible goal using currently available interventions, augmented with newer tools such as vaccines, which are in development. Malaria deaths are entirely preventable now, and our sustained political and financial co...

  16. Antibodies to malaria vaccine candidates are associated with chloroquine or sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine treatment efficacy in children in an endemic area of Burkina Faso

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diarra, Amidou; Nebie, Issa; Tiono, Alfred;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patient immune status is thought to affect the efficacy of anti-malarial chemotherapy. This is a subject of some importance, since evidence of immunity-related interactions may influence our use of chemotherapy in populations with drug resistance, as well as assessment of the...... value of suboptimal vaccines. The study aim was to investigate relationship between antibodies and anti-malarial drug treatment outcomes. METHODS: Some 248 children aged 0.5 and 15 years were recruited prior to the high malaria transmission season. Venous blood (5 ml) was obtained from each child to...... measure antibody levels to selected malaria antigens, using ELISA. Blood smears were also performed to assess drug efficacy and malaria infection prevalence. Children were actively followed up to record clinical malaria cases. RESULTS: IgG levels to MSP3 were always higher in the successfully treated...

  17. Oral zinc and common childhood infections--An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, Sudha; Mathisen, Maria; Strand, Tor A

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient important for growth and for normal function of the immune system. Many children in developing countries have inadequate zinc nutrition. Routine zinc supplementation reduces the risk of respiratory infections and diarrhea, the two leading causes of morbidity and mortality in young children worldwide. In childhood diarrhea oral zinc also reduces illness duration and risk of persistent episodes. Oral zinc is therefore recommended for the treatment of acute diarrhea in young children. The results from the studies that have measured the therapeutic effect of zinc on acute respiratory infections, however, are conflicting. Moreover, the results of therapeutic zinc for childhood malaria also are so far not promising.This paper gives a brief outline of the current evidence from clinical trials on therapeutic effect of oral zinc on childhood respiratory infections, pneumonia and malaria and also of new evidence of the effect on serious bacterial illness in young infants. PMID:24906347

  18. Pretreatment blood concentrations of chloroquine in patients with malaria infection: relation to response to treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quashie, Neils Ben; Akanmori, Bartholomew D; Goka, Bamenla Q;

    2005-01-01

    malaria infection in Ghana, we hypothesized that the 'added effect' of the pretreatment ingested drug to the full dose given at the hospital may be responsible for the low proportion of RIII type of resistance observed. To ascertain this, pretreatment blood levels of chloroquine were correlated with...... of malaria in children in Ghana, in the presence of chloroquine resistance.......Resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine has been reported in many areas in Ghana. Most of these reports, which are from hospital-based studies, indicate RI and RII rather than RIII type of resistance. Since high pretreatment levels of chloroquine have also been measured in patients with...

  19. Radioactive Iodine for Thyrotoxicosis in Childhood and Adolescence: Treatment and Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Namwongprom, Sirianong; Unachak, Kevalee; Dejkhamron, Prapai; Ua-apisitwong, Supoj; Ekmahachai, Molrudee

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the outcome of radioiodine treatment in thyrotoxicosis in childhood and adolescence. Methods: This was a retrospective study of 27 patients (ages 7.2- 19.8 years) with a diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis who received iodine-131 (I-131) treatment from January 2007 to December 2011 in the Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University. Gender, duration of antithyroid drug (ATD) treatment, 24-hour I...

  20. [Malaria in Iraq].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamo, F J

    2001-01-01

    Malaria control campaign started in Iraq in 1957. This made the country largely free of the disease. Since 1991, following the recent war, Iraq has been affected by serious epidemic of P. vivax malaria that started in 3 autonomous governorates and soon involved other parts of the country. There were 49,840 malaria cases in the country in 1995. The national malaria programme personnel did their best to contain and control the epidemic. Active and passive case detection and treatment were introduced. Free of charge drugs are provided at all levels in the endemic area. Vector control includes environmental management, distribution of Gambusia fish, larviciding, indoor residual spraying with pyrithroids. A total of 4134 malaria cases were recorded in the country in 1999. PMID:11548316

  1. Treatment Options for Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors and Childhood Pineoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children. See the PDQ summary on Adult Central Nervous System Tumors Treatment for more information on the treatment of adults. There are different types of CNS embryonal tumors. Enlarge Anatomy of the inside of the brain, showing the ...

  2. Modeling social transmission dynamics of unhealthy behaviors for evaluating prevention and treatment interventions on childhood obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah M Frerichs

    Full Text Available Research evidence indicates that obesity has spread through social networks, but lever points for interventions based on overlapping networks are not well studied. The objective of our research was to construct and parameterize a system dynamics model of the social transmission of behaviors through adult and youth influence in order to explore hypotheses and identify plausible lever points for future childhood obesity intervention research. Our objectives were: (1 to assess the sensitivity of childhood overweight and obesity prevalence to peer and adult social transmission rates, and (2 to test the effect of combinations of prevention and treatment interventions on the prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity. To address the first objective, we conducted two-way sensitivity analyses of adult-to-child and child-to-child social transmission in relation to childhood overweight and obesity prevalence. For the second objective, alternative combinations of prevention and treatment interventions were tested by varying model parameters of social transmission and weight loss behavior rates. Our results indicated child overweight and obesity prevalence might be slightly more sensitive to the same relative change in the adult-to-child compared to the child-to-child social transmission rate. In our simulations, alternatives with treatment alone, compared to prevention alone, reduced the prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity more after 10 years (1.2-1.8% and 0.2-1.0% greater reduction when targeted at children and adults respectively. Also, as the impact of adult interventions on children was increased, the rank of six alternatives that included adults became better (i.e., resulting in lower 10 year childhood overweight and obesity prevalence than alternatives that only involved children. The findings imply that social transmission dynamics should be considered when designing both prevention and treatment intervention approaches. Finally

  3. Treatment-seeking for febrile illness in north-east India: an epidemiological study in the malaria endemic zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahanta Jagadish

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper studies the determinants of utilization of health care services, especially for treatment of febrile illness in the malaria endemic area of north-east India. Methods An area served by two districts of Upper Assam representing people living in malaria endemic area was selected for household survey. A sample of 1,989 households, in which at least one member of household suffered from febrile illness during last three months and received treatment from health service providers, were selected randomly and interviewed by using the structured questionnaire. The individual characteristics of patients including social indicators, area of residence and distance of health service centers has been used to discriminate or group the patients with respect to their initial and final choice of service providers. Results Of 1,989 surveyed households, initial choice of treatment-seeking for febrile illness was self-medication (17.8%, traditional healer (Vaidya(39.2%, government (29.3% and private (13.7% health services. Multinomial logistic regression (MLR analysis exhibits the influence of occupation, area of residence and ethnicity on choice of health service providers. The traditional system of medicine was commonly used by the people living in remote areas compared with towns. As all the febrile cases finally received treatment either from government or private health service providers, the odds (Multivariate Rate Ratio was almost three-times higher in favour of government services for lower households income people compared to private. Conclusion The study indicates the popular use of self-medication and traditional system especially in remote areas, which may be the main cause of delay in diagnosis of malaria. The malaria training given to the paramedical staff to assist the health care delivery needs to be intensified and expanded in north-east India. The people who are economically poor and living in remote areas mainly

  4. Imported malaria in children: A national surveillance in the Netherlands and a review of European studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); R. Pereira (Rob Rodrigues); B.J. Brabin (Bernard John); N.G. Hartwig (Nico)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Falciparum malaria or malaria tropica is one of the leading causes of childhood mortality worldwide. Malaria-related deaths occur mainly in sub-Saharan Africa, where an estimated 365 million clinical cases of Plasmodium falciparum malaria occur each year. In Europe, imported

  5. Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer Genomics Research Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: An Overview In 2016, it ... Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer .) The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study ( CCSS ), funded by the National ...

  6. Availability of antimalarial drugs and evaluation of the attitude and practices for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in bangui, central african republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manirakiza, Alexandre; Njuimo, Siméon Pierre; Le Faou, Alain; Malvy, Denis; Millet, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    National malaria management policy is based upon the availability of effective and affordable antimalarial drugs. This study was undertaken to evaluate the quality of the treatment of uncomplicated malaria cases in Bangui, an area with multidrug-resistant parasites, at a time preceding implementation of a new therapeutic policy relying on the artemisinin derivative combined treatment artemether-lumefantrine. A cross-sectional study was carried out in Bangui city to assess availability of antimalarial drugs and the performances of health workers in the management of uncomplicated malaria. Availability of drugs was recorded in all drugs wholesalers (n = 3), all pharmacies in health facilities (n = 14), private drugstores (n = 15), and in 60 non-official drug shops randomly chosen in the city. Despite a limited efficacy at the time of the survey, chloroquine remained widely available in the official and nonofficial markets. Artemisinin derivatives used in monotherapy or in combination were commonly sold. In health care facilities, 93% of the uncomplicated malaria cases were treated in the absence of any laboratory confirmation and the officially recommended treatment, amodiaquine-sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, was seldom prescribed. Thus, the national guidelines for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria are not followed by health professionals in Bangui. Its use should be implemented while a control of importation of drug has to be reinforced. PMID:20339579

  7. A new strategy and its effect on adherence to intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Yanow, Stephanie; Birungi, Josephine;

    2013-01-01

    Few women in Uganda access intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP). Previous studies have shown that high costs, frequent stock-out of drugs, supplies and poor quality of care are the greatest hindrance for women to access health servic....... In order to increase adherence to IPTp, we conceptualised an intervention that offset delivery care costs through providing a mama kit, created awareness on health benefits of IPTp and built trust between the provider and the client....

  8. Potential role of acyclic nucleoside phosphonates in the treatment of malaria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janeba, Zlatko; Hocková, Dana; Keough, D. T.; Guddat, L. W.

    Nerja: -, 2014. [Zing Drug Discovery Conference 2014 /4./. 17.02.2014-20.02.2014, Nerja] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/11/0108 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ANPs * prodrugs * malaria Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  9. Deployment of ACT antimalarials for treatment of malaria: challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Toby

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Following a long period when the effectiveness of existing mono-therapies for antimalarials was steadily declining with no clear alternative, most malaria-endemic countries in Africa and Asia have adopted artemisinin combination therapy (ACT as antimalarial drug policy. Several ACT drugs exist and others are in the pipeline. If properly targeted, they have the potential to reduce mortality from malaria substantially. The major challenge now is to get the drugs to the right people. Current evidence suggests that most of those who need the drugs do not get them. Simultaneously, a high proportion of those who are given antimalarials do not in fact have malaria. Financial and other barriers mean that, in many settings, the majority of those with malaria, particularly the poorest, do not access formal healthcare, so the provision of free antimalarials via this route has only limited impact. The higher cost of ACT creates a market for fake drugs. Addressing these problems is now a priority. This review outlines current evidence, possible solutions and research priorities.

  10. Uveitis in childhood : Complications and treatment with emphasis on juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijssens, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the development of complications in childhood uveitis and to evaluate the treatment options for these mostly sight-threatening conditions with emphasis on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis. The second aim was to investigate whi

  11. Threat Related Selective Attention Predicts Treatment Success in Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legerstee, Jeroen S.; Tulen, Joke H. M.; Kallen, Victor L.; Dieleman, Gwen C.; Treffers, Philip D. A.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2009-01-01

    Threat-related selective attention was found to predict the success of the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders through administering a pictorial dot-probe task to 131 children with anxiety disorders prior to cognitive behavioral therapy. The diagnostic status of the subjects was evaluated with a semistructured clinical interview at both pre-…

  12. Imagery rescripting as a stand-alone treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder related to childhood abuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Raabe; T. Ehring; L. Marquenie; M. Olff; M. Kindt

    2015-01-01

    Objective This case series tested the feasibility and explored the efficacy of Imagery Rescripting (ImRs) as a stand-alone treatment for PTSD related to childhood physical and/or sexual abuse (CA). Method Participants (6 women and 2 men) were patients with PTSD related to CA who entered an 8 week tr

  13. Healing Childhood Ear Infections: Prevention, Home Care, and Alternative Treatment. 2nd Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael A.

    This book describes current controversy in medical journals over existing treatments for chronic childhood earaches. It suggests that the causes of otitis media are a series of events which flourish when poor nutrition occurs, noting that careful attention to diet and nutrition to prevent food allergies, and the use of acupressure, homeopathic…

  14. Immunity and infectious morbidity in childhood ALL treatment : the benefits of intensity reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tilburg, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    With current childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment protocols the cure rate approaches 90%. In the 10 percent of case fatalities, 2 major challenges stand out: incurable relapses of ALL and (infectious) deaths-in-remission. Thus, reducing toxicity is becoming an important goal to fur

  15. Childhood leukaemia: Radiological changes caused by the disease and by treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological changes caused by acute lymphatic leukaemia in childhood, and by the treatment of this condition, are described for the individual organ systems. Of particular importance are changes in the skeleton, thoracic organs, kidneys, gastro-intestinal tract and central nervous system. Changes in the skeleton and mediastinal tumours are important for the initial diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. Moving Forward in Childhood Obesity Treatment: A Call for Translational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, P. M.; Dugdill, L.; Murphy, R.; Knowles, Z.; Cable, N. T.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity is one of the most serious challenges of the 21st century and it is vital that evidence-based treatment approaches can be translated into practice to meet public health needs. Yet policy-makers cannot afford to wait for the results of lengthy trials before "probably efficacious" interventions are made available to the public, and…

  17. Efficacy of integrated school based de-worming and prompt malaria treatment on helminths -Plasmodium falciparum co-infections: A 33 months follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadukura Vivian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The geographical congruency in distribution of helminths and Plasmodium falciparum makes polyparasitism a common phenomenon in Sub Saharan Africa. The devastating effects of helminths-Plasmodium co-infections on primary school health have raised global interest for integrated control. However little is known on the feasibility, timing and efficacy of integrated helminths-Plasmodium control strategies. A study was conducted in Zimbabwe to evaluate the efficacy of repeated combined school based antihelminthic and prompt malaria treatment. Methods A cohort of primary schoolchildren (5-17 years received combined Praziquantel, albendazole treatment at baseline, and again during 6, 12 and 33 months follow up surveys and sustained prompt malaria treatment. Sustained prompt malaria treatment was carried out throughout the study period. Children's infection status with helminths, Plasmodium and helminths-Plasmodium co-infections was determined by parasitological examinations at baseline and at each treatment point. The prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, STH, malaria, helminths-Plasmodium co-infections and helminths infection intensities before and after treatment were analysed. Results Longitudinal data showed that two rounds of combined Praziquantel and albendazole treatment for schistosomiasis and STHs at 6 monthly intervals and sustained prompt malaria treatment significantly reduced the overall prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, hookworms and P. falciparum infection in primary schoolchildren by 73.5%, 70.8%, 67.3% and 58.8% respectively (p P. f + schistosomes, and P. f + STHs + schistosomes co-infections were reduced by 68.0%, 84.2%, and 90.7%, respectively. The absence of anti-helminthic treatment between the 12 mth and 33 mth follow-up surveys resulted in the sharp increase in STHs + schistosomes co-infection from 3.3% at 12 months follow up survey to 10.7%, slightly more than the baseline level (10.3% while other

  18. Growth after treatment of solid tumours in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined 90 survivors of childhood solid tumours diagnosed in our hospital between 1960 and 1976. Their ages at the time of this study ranged from 12.2 to 41.5 years. Adult standing height was usually normal. However, final standing height was less than expected in the females, and sitting height was below the normal mean in the males. The males who had received both chemotheraphy and radiation therapy to the spine had a greater decrement in sitting height, but we did not find any association between radiation therapy to the spine without chemotherapy and subsequent total growth of the spine as measured by sitting height. We conclude that these children generally do not experience any major growth disturbances. (au)

  19. Study of the Prescription Practices for Malaria Treatment and Prophylaxis among Government and Private Medical Practitioners in Bhavnagar City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Pandya

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objectives of the stud were 1to compare the prescription practices of government and private medical practitioners in malaria treatment and prophylaxis in light of guidelines prescribed by NIMR and NVBDCP; and 2 to document the mechanism used by Gujarat's health department to disseminate information regarding changes in treatment guidelines for malaria Methods: Out of 68 government doctors 34 doctors were randomly selected to obtain detail for this study. 2 areas with comparative low API Sardarnagar and Chitra were selected and 2 areas with more API Kaliyabid and Vadva were selected for this study. Doctors of private sector serving in above area were selected randomly by lottery method. Total 54 private practitioners were selected for the study which gives 9, 15, 30 private practitioners of MD, MBBS, AYUSH respectively. Results: A total of 88 medical practitioners were interviewed for this study who were allied with general treatment of fever cases. Out of 88 medical practitioners 34 (38.64% work in Government and 54 (61.37% work in private sectors. out of 34 government doctors most of 85.29% (n=29 were prescribe antimalarials according to guideline for 14 days only 41.86% (n=18 AYUSH were follow drug policy which was much less than the allopathic practitioners who prescribe according to guideline 70.97% (n=22 of MBBS and 85.71%(n=12 of MD. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(4.000: 399-401

  20. Randomized trial of piperaquine with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine or dihydroartemisinin for malaria intermittent preventive treatment in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badara Cisse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The long terminal half life of piperaquine makes it suitable for intermittent preventive treatment for malaria but no studies of its use for prevention have been done in Africa. We did a cluster randomized trial to determine whether piperaquine in combination with either dihydroartemisin (DHA or sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is as effective, and better tolerated, than SP plus amodiaquine (AQ, when used for intermittent preventive treatment in children delivered by community health workers in a rural area of Senegal. METHODS: Treatments were delivered to children 3-59 months of age in their homes once per month during the transmission season by community health workers. 33 health workers, each covering about 60 children, were randomized to deliver either SP+AQ, DHA+PQ or SP+PQ. Primary endpoints were the incidence of attacks of clinical malaria, and the incidence of adverse events. RESULTS: 1893 children were enrolled. Coverage of monthly rounds and compliance with daily doses was similar in all groups; 90% of children received at least 2 monthly doses. Piperaquine combinations were better tolerated than SP+AQ with a significantly lower risk of common, mild adverse events. 103 episodes of clinical malaria were recorded during the course of the trial. 68 children had malaria with parasitaemia >3000/microL, 29/671 (4.3% in the SP+AQ group, compared with 22/604 (3.6% in the DHA+PQ group (risk difference 0.47%, 95%CI -2.3%,+3.3%, and 17/618 (2.8% in the SP+PQ group (risk difference 1.2%, 95%CI -1.3%,+3.6%. Prevalences of parasitaemia and the proportion of children carrying Pfdhfr and Pfdhps mutations associated with resistance to SP were very low in all groups at the end of the transmission season. CONCLUSIONS: Seasonal IPT with SP+PQ in children is highly effective and well tolerated; the combination of two long-acting drugs is likely to impede the emergence of resistant parasites. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00529620.

  1. Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the tumor responds to treatment. Newly Diagnosed CNS Teratomas Treatment of newly diagnosed mature and immature central nervous system (CNS) teratomas may include the following: Surgery to remove as ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children. See the PDQ summary on Adult Central Nervous System Tumors Treatment for more information on the treatment of adults. There are different types of CNS embryonal tumors. Enlarge Anatomy of the inside of the brain, showing the ...

  3. Friends or foes ?: predictors of treatment outcome of cognitieve behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Liber, Juliëtte Margo

    2008-01-01

    The present dissertation had as its central focus the prediction of outcome of the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders. In the present study a selection of variables that were thought to have prognostic validity for successful cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) outcome were explored in a population of children with anxiety disorders. Eligible for participation were children aged 8-12 years (n = 133) attending primary education and diagnosed with Separation Anxiety Disorder (SAD), Gener...

  4. Do health workers’ preferences influence their practices? Assessment of providers’ attitude and personal use of new treatment recommendations for management of uncomplicated malaria, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanja Irene M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to growing antimalarial drug resistance, Tanzania changed malaria treatment policies twice within a decade. First in 2001 chloroquine (CQ was replaced by sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP for management of uncomplicated malaria and by late 2006, SP was replaced by artemether-lumefantrine (AL. We assessed health workers’ attitudes and personal practices following the first treatment policy change, at six months post-change and two years later. Methods Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted in 2002 and 2004 among healthcare workers in three districts in South-East Tanzania using semi-structured questionnaires. Attitudes were assessed by enquiring which antimalarial was considered most suitable for the management of uncomplicated malaria for the three patient categories: i children below 5; ii older children and adults; and iii pregnant women. Practice was ascertained by asking which antimalarial was used in the last malaria episode by the health worker him/herself and/or dependants. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with reported attitudes and practices towards the new treatment recommendations. Results A total of 400 health workers were interviewed; 254 and 146 in the first and second surveys, respectively. SP was less preferred antimalarial in hospitals and private health facilities (p Conclusion Following changes in malaria treatment recommendations, most health workers did not prefer the new antimalarial drug, and their preferences worsened over time. However, many of them still used the newly recommended drug for management of their own or family members’ malaria episode. This indicates that, other factors than providers’ attitude may have more influence in their personal treatment practices.

  5. Translating research into policy: lessons learned from eclampsia treatment and malaria control in three southern African countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matinhure Sheillah

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the process of knowledge translation in low- and middle-income countries. We studied policymaking processes in Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe to understand the factors affecting the use of research evidence in national policy development, with a particular focus on the findings from randomized control trials (RCTs. We examined two cases: the use of magnesium sulphate (MgSO4 in the treatment of eclampsia in pregnancy (a clinical case; and the use of insecticide treated bed nets and indoor residual household spraying for malaria vector control (a public health case. Methods We used a qualitative case-study methodology to explore the policy making process. We carried out key informants interviews with a range of research and policy stakeholders in each country, reviewed documents and developed timelines of key events. Using an iterative approach, we undertook a thematic analysis of the data. Findings Prior experience of particular interventions, local champions, stakeholders and international networks, and the involvement of researchers in policy development were important in knowledge translation for both case studies. Key differences across the two case studies included the nature of the evidence, with clear evidence of efficacy for MgSO4 and ongoing debate regarding the efficacy of bed nets compared with spraying; local researcher involvement in international evidence production, which was stronger for MgSO4 than for malaria vector control; and a long-standing culture of evidence-based health care within obstetrics. Other differences were the importance of bureaucratic processes for clinical regulatory approval of MgSO4, and regional networks and political interests for malaria control. In contrast to treatment policies for eclampsia, a diverse group of stakeholders with varied interests, differing in their use and interpretation of evidence, was involved in malaria policy decisions in the three

  6. Phytochemical screening and in vivo antimalarial activity of extracts from three medicinal plants used in malaria treatment in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankole, A E; Adekunle, A A; Sowemimo, A A; Umebese, C E; Abiodun, O; Gbotosho, G O

    2016-01-01

    The use of plant to meet health-care needs has greatly increased worldwide in the recent times. The search for new plant-derived bioactive agents that can be explored for the treatment of drug-resistant malaria infection is urgently needed. Thus, we evaluated the antimalarial activity of three medicinal plants used in Nigerian folklore for the treatment of malaria infection. A modified Peter's 4-day suppressive test was used to evaluate the antimalarial activity of the plant extracts in a mouse model of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium berghei ANKA strain. Animals were treated with 250, 500, or 800 mg/kg of aqueous extract. It was observed that of all the three plants studied, Markhamia tomentosa showed the highest chemosuppression of parasites of 73 % followed by Polyalthia longifolia (53 %) at day 4. All the doses tested were well tolerated. Percentage suppression of parasite growth on day 4 post-infection ranged from 1 to 73 % in mice infected with P. berghei and treated with extracts when compared with chloroquine diphosphate, the standard reference drug which had a chemosuppression of 90 %. The percentage survival of mice that received extract ranged from 0 to 60 % (increased as the dose increases to 800 mg/kg). Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of tannins, saponins, and phenolic compounds in all the three plants tested. PMID:26391173

  7. Evaluation of Recurrent Parasitemia after Artemether-Lumefantrine Treatment for Uncomplicated Malaria in Children in Western Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Woodring, Joseph V.; Ogutu, Bernhards; Schnabel, David; John N Waitumbi; Olsen, Cara H; Walsh, Douglas S.; Heppner, D. Gray; Polhemus, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    From April 2005 to April 2006, a phase 2 malaria vaccine trial in Kenya enrolled 400 children aged 12–47 months. Each received mixed supervised and unsupervised artemether-lumefantrine for uncomplicated malaria, using a standard six-dose regimen, by weight. Children were followed for detection of parasitemia and clinical malaria. A median of two negative malaria blood films occurred during every recurrent parasitemia (RP) episode, suggesting reinfection over late recrudescence. Median time to...

  8. The School Psychologist's Primer on Childhood Depression: A Review of Research Regarding Epidemiology, Etiology, Assessment, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, Matthew A.; Stifel, Skye W. F.; O'Malley, Meagan; Jimerson, Shane R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide school psychologists with a synthesis of important information regarding the epidemiology, etiology, assessment, and treatment of childhood depression. A review of the recent research and relevant literature is summarized reflecting the contemporary knowledge regarding depression during childhood and…

  9. Experimental Evaluations of Two Strategies to Improve Reading Achievement in Kenya: Enhanced Literacy Instruction and Treatment of Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukes, Matthew; Dubeck, Margaret; Brooker, Simon; Wolf, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    There is less quality evidence on how malaria may affect cognitive abilities and educational achievement or on how schools can tackle the problem of malaria among school children. A randomised trial among Sri Lankan children showed that weekly malaria chemoprophylaxis with chloroquine can improve school examination scores. The Health and Literacy…

  10. MedlinePlus: Childhood Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... well. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention publishes a schedule for childhood vaccines. Although some of ... and Caregivers (08/11/2016, Food and Drug Administration) Malaria Vaccine Protection Short-Lived in Young Children ( ...

  11. Active case detection, treatment of falciparum malaria with combined chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and vivax malaria with chloroquine and molecular markers of anti-malarial resistance in the Republic of Vanuatu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers William O

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum was first described in the Republic of Vanuatu in the early 1980s. In 1991, the Vanuatu Ministry of Health instituted new treatment guidelines for uncomplicated P. falciparum infection consisting of chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine combination therapy. Chloroquine remains the recommended treatment for Plasmodium vivax. Methods In 2005, cross-sectional blood surveys at 45 sites on Malo Island were conducted and 4,060 adults and children screened for malaria. Of those screened, 203 volunteer study subjects without malaria at the time of screening were followed for 13 weeks to observe peak seasonal incidence of infection. Another 54 subjects with malaria were followed over a 28-day period to determine efficacy of anti-malarial therapy; chloroquine alone for P. vivax and chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for P. falciparum infections. Results The overall prevalence of parasitaemia by mass blood screening was 6%, equally divided between P. falciparum and P. vivax. Twenty percent and 23% of participants with patent P. vivax and P. falciparum parasitaemia, respectively, were febrile at the time of screening. In the incidence study cohort, after 2,303 person-weeks of follow-up, the incidence density of malaria was 1.3 cases per person-year with P. vivax predominating. Among individuals participating in the clinical trial, the 28-day chloroquine P. vivax cure rate was 100%. The 28-day chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine P. falciparum cure rate was 97%. The single treatment failure, confirmed by merozoite surface protein-2 genotyping, was classified as a day 28 late parasitological treatment failure. All P. falciparum isolates carried the Thr-76 pfcrt mutant allele and the double Asn-108 + Arg-59 dhfr mutant alleles. Dhps mutant alleles were not detected in the study sample. Conclusion Peak seasonal malaria prevalence on Malo Island reached hypoendemic levels during the study

  12. Treatment of Childhood Psoriasis with Phototherapy and Photochemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Lara Corrales; Sabrina Ramnarine; Perla Lansang

    2013-01-01

    Phototherapy and photochemotherapy are well-described treatment modalities for psoriasis in adults. Like many other treatments, the experience and long-term safety of their use in children is limited. We conducted a literature search and identified publications reporting the use of phototherapy and photochemotherapy in pediatric populations. This article summarizes the existing literature on this topic. Although many studies report good improvement with these treatment modalities, long-term s...

  13. Vendor-to-vendor education to improve malaria treatment by private drug outlets in Bungoma District, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makama Sammy

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Private outlets are the main suppliers of uncomplicated malaria treatment in Africa. However, they are so numerous that they are difficult for governments to influence and regulate. This study's objective was to evaluate a low-cost outreach education (vendor-to-vendor programme to improve the private sector's compliance with malaria guidelines in Bungoma district, Kenya. The cornerstone of the programme was the district's training of 73 wholesalers who were equipped with customized job aids for distribution to small retailers. Methods Six months after training the wholesalers, the programme was evaluated using mystery shoppers. The shoppers posed as caretakers of sick children needing medication at 252 drug outlets. Afterwards, supervisors assessed the outlets' knowledge, drug stocks, and prices. Results The intervention seems to have had a significant impact on stocking patterns, malaria knowledge and prescribing practices of shops/kiosks, but not consistently on other types of outlets. About 32% of shops receiving job aids prescribed to mystery shoppers the approved first-line drug, sulfadoxine-pyremethamine, as compared to only 3% of the control shops. In the first six months, it is estimated that 500 outlets were reached, at a cost of about $8000. Conclusions Changing private sector knowledge and practices is widely acknowledged to be slow and difficult. The vendor-to-vendor programme seems a feasible district-level strategy for achieving significant improvements in knowledge and practices of shops/kiosks. However, alternate strategies will be needed to influence pharmacies and clinics. Overall, the impact will be only moderate unless national policies and programmes are also introduced.

  14. Vendor-to-vendor education to improve malaria treatment by private drug outlets in Bungoma District, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavrow, Paula; Shabahang, Jennifer; Makama, Sammy

    2003-01-01

    Background Private outlets are the main suppliers of uncomplicated malaria treatment in Africa. However, they are so numerous that they are difficult for governments to influence and regulate. This study's objective was to evaluate a low-cost outreach education (vendor-to-vendor) programme to improve the private sector's compliance with malaria guidelines in Bungoma district, Kenya. The cornerstone of the programme was the district's training of 73 wholesalers who were equipped with customized job aids for distribution to small retailers. Methods Six months after training the wholesalers, the programme was evaluated using mystery shoppers. The shoppers posed as caretakers of sick children needing medication at 252 drug outlets. Afterwards, supervisors assessed the outlets' knowledge, drug stocks, and prices. Results The intervention seems to have had a significant impact on stocking patterns, malaria knowledge and prescribing practices of shops/kiosks, but not consistently on other types of outlets. About 32% of shops receiving job aids prescribed to mystery shoppers the approved first-line drug, sulfadoxine-pyremethamine, as compared to only 3% of the control shops. In the first six months, it is estimated that 500 outlets were reached, at a cost of about $8000. Conclusions Changing private sector knowledge and practices is widely acknowledged to be slow and difficult. The vendor-to-vendor programme seems a feasible district-level strategy for achieving significant improvements in knowledge and practices of shops/kiosks. However, alternate strategies will be needed to influence pharmacies and clinics. Overall, the impact will be only moderate unless national policies and programmes are also introduced. PMID:12812525

  15. Community screening and treatment of asymptomatic carriers of Plasmodium falciparum with artemether-lumefantrine to reduce malaria disease burden: a modelling and simulation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubben David

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asymptomatic carriers of Plasmodium falciparum serve as a reservoir of parasites for malaria transmission. Identification and treatment of asymptomatic carriers within a region may reduce the parasite reservoir and influence malaria transmission in that area. Methods Using computer simulation, this analysis explored the impact of community screening campaigns (CSC followed by systematic treatment of P. falciparum asymptomatic carriers (AC with artemether-lumefantrine (AL on disease transmission. The model created by Okell et al (originally designed to explore the impact of the introduction of treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapy on malaria endemicity was modified to represent CSC and treatment of AC with AL, with the addition of malaria vector seasonality. The age grouping, relative distribution of age in a region, and degree of heterogeneity in disease transmission were maintained. The number and frequency of CSC and their relative timing were explored in terms of their effect on malaria incidence. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the factors with the greatest impact on the model predictions. Results The simulation showed that the intervention that had the largest effect was performed in an area with high endemicity (entomological inoculation rate, EIR > 200; however, the rate of infection returned to its normal level in the subsequent year, unless the intervention was repeated. In areas with low disease burden (EIR Conclusions Community screening and treatment of asymptomatic carriers with AL may reduce malaria transmission significantly. The initial level of disease intensity has the greatest impact on the potential magnitude and duration of malaria reduction. When combined with other interventions (e.g. long-lasting insecticide-treated nets, rapid diagnostic tests, prompt diagnosis and treatment, and, where appropriate, indoor residual spraying the effect of this intervention can be

  16. Fertility treatment and risk of childhood and adolescent mental disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Bjørn; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Hvidtjørn, Dorte;

    2013-01-01

    To assess the mental health of children born after fertility treatment by comparing their risk of mental disorders with that of spontaneously conceived children.......To assess the mental health of children born after fertility treatment by comparing their risk of mental disorders with that of spontaneously conceived children....

  17. Factors associated with chloroquine induced pruritus during malaria treatment in Mozambican University students Factores asociados a la aparición de prurito por cloroquina durante el tratamiento de la malaria en estudiantes universitarios de Mozambique

    OpenAIRE

    Helena Gama; Aldo Ismael; Felicidade Sitoi; André Matola; Henrique Barros; Nuno Lunet

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: It has been suggested that reductions in chloroquine use may be followed by a resurgence of chloroquine-susceptible falciparum malaria, and chloroquine might once again be an effective treatment choice, which renews the importance of aspects related to its use and misuse. Therefore, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of chloroquine-induced pruritus and to identify risk factors for its occurrence in Mozambican University students. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted a...

  18. Bayesian spatio-temporal modelling of the relationship between mortality and malaria transmission in rural western Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Amek, Nyaguara Ombek

    2013-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) still bears the highest burden of the global mortality despite recent dramatic decreases. The majority of these deaths occur in children younger than 5 years and malaria infection is thought to be a leading cause of these deaths. Because of this belief, many studies have documented the effects of malaria transmission on childhood, but everyone living in malaria endemic areas is exposed to malaria parasites and is at risk of dying of malaria or malaria related causes. ...

  19. Cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postels, Douglas G; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-01-01

    Malaria, the most significant parasitic disease of man, kills approximately one million people per year. Half of these deaths occur in those with cerebral malaria (CM). The World Health Organization (WHO) defines CM as an otherwise unexplained coma in a patient with malarial parasitemia. Worldwide, CM occurs primarily in African children and Asian adults, with the vast majority (greater than 90%) of cases occurring in children 5 years old or younger in sub-Saharan Africa. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex and involves infected erythrocyte sequestration, cerebral inflammation, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. A recently characterized malarial retinopathy is visual evidence of Plasmodium falciparum's pathophysiological processes occurring in the affected patient. Treatment consists of supportive care and antimalarial administration. Thus far, adjuvant therapies have not been shown to improve mortality rates or neurological outcomes in children with CM. For those who survive CM, residual neurological abnormalities are common. Epilepsy, cognitive impairment, behavioral disorders, and gross neurological deficits which include motor, sensory, and language impairments are frequent sequelae. Primary prevention strategies, including bed nets, vaccine development, and chemoprophylaxis, are in varied states of development and implementation. Continuing efforts to find successful primary prevention options and strategies to decrease neurological sequelae are needed. PMID:23829902

  20. Surveillance considerations for malaria elimination

    OpenAIRE

    Barclay Victoria C; Smith Rachel A; Findeis Jill L

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Constant malaria monitoring and surveillance systems have been highlighted as critical for malaria elimination. The absence of robust monitoring and surveillance systems able to respond to outbreaks in a timely manner undeniably contributed to the failure of the last global attempt to eradicate malaria. Today, technological advances could allow for rapid detection of focal outbreaks and improved deployment of diagnostic and treatment supplies to areas needing support. However, optimi...

  1. Malaria during pregnancy in Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Rulisa, S.

    2014-01-01

    It appears that malaria in Rwanda is not a major contributor to adverse outcomes of pregnancy anymore from a public health perspective but it can still give problems in individual patients, also in areas of low malaria transmission. This thesis shows that for individual cases the current treatment options are safe and sufficient but it remains of utmost important to closely follow pregnant women. Although most of malaria infected women will develop symptoms and seek help, active monitoring du...

  2. MODERN TREATMENT METHODS OF PRIMARY CHILDHOOD DENTAL CARIES

    OpenAIRE

    Ekimov, E.; Fedotova, O.

    2015-01-01

    He uniqueness of tooth enamel focal demineralization (primary caries) is that it is the only form of tooth decay, which can be treated conservatively without any surgical treatment and filling. Therefore, the integral task in dentistry is to study all the possibilities of diagnosis and to increase the effectiveness of conservative treatment [10]. To determine the dental health of children in Omsk we carried out a dental check-up of 1682 schoolchildren from 7 to 12 years of age. In addition to...

  3. Treatment for childhood psoriasis%儿童银屑病的治疗现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄丹; 顾恒; 陈崑

    2010-01-01

    银屑病是一种常见的主要侵犯皮肤、并可累及关节的慢性炎症性疾病.儿童银屑病治疗时要注意选择合适的方法,充分考虑药物的安全性和有效性.一般局部治疗即可控制病情,中重度的各型银屑病需考虑系统治疗.随着分子生物学的发展,生物治疗被考虑用于儿童银屑病.近年来,健康教育也成为儿童银屑病治疗的重要部分.%Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory disorder of the skin, which can also affect joints. It is important to choose appropriate strategy to treat childhood psoriasis with the consideration of safety and effectiveness of drugs. Generally, topical treatment is sufficient to control psoriasis, while systemic treatment is reserved for moderate to severe psoriasis. Recently, with the development of molecular biology,biological therapies have been considered in the treatment of childhood psoriasis. Also, health education has become an important part of treatment for childhood psoriasis.

  4. Coverage of intermittent prevention treatment with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine among pregnant women and congenital malaria in Côte d'Ivoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eholie Serge P

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization (WHO recommends using insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs and intermittent preventive treatment with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPT-SP to prevent malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. Data on IPT-SP coverage and factors associated with placental malaria parasitaemia and low birth weight (LBW are scarce in Côte d'Ivoire. Methods A multicentre, cross-sectional survey was conducted in Côte d'Ivoire from March to September 2008 at six urban and semi-urban antenatal clinics. Standardized forms were used to collect the demographic information and medical histories of women and their offspring. IPT-SP coverage (≥2 doses as well as placental and congenital malaria prevalence parasitaemia were estimated. Regression logistics were used to study factors associated with placental malaria and LBW (birth weight of alive babies Results Overall, 2,044 women with a median age of 24 years were included in this study. Among them 1017 (49.8% received ≥2 doses of IPT-SP and 694 (34.0% received one dose. A total of 99 mothers (4.8% had placental malaria, and of them, four cases of congenital malaria were diagnosed. Factors that protected from maternal placental malaria parasitaemia were the use of one dose (adjusted odds ratio (aOR, 0.32; 95%CI: 0.19-0.55 or ≥2 doses IPT-SP (aOR: 0.18; 95%CI: 0.10-0.32; the use of ITNs (aOR: 0.47; 95%CI: 0.27-0.82. LBW was associated with primigravidity and placental malaria parasitaemia. Conclusion IPT-SP decreases the rate of placental malaria parasitaemia and has a strong dose effect. Despite relatively successful IPT-SP coverage in Côte d'Ivoire, substantial commitments from national authorities are urgently required for such public health campaigns. Strategies, such as providing IPT-SP free of charge and directly observing treatment, should be implemented to increase the use of IPT-SP as well as other prophylactic methods.

  5. Preliminary pharmaceutical development of antimalarial–antibiotic cotherapy as a pre-referral paediatric treatment of fever in malaria endemic areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaubert, Alexandra; Kauss, Tina; Marchivie, Mathieu; Ba, Boubakar B.; Lembege, Martine; Fawaz, Fawaz; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Lafarge, Xavier; Lindegardh, Niklas; Fabre, Jean-Louis; White, Nicholas J.; Olliaro, Piero L.; Millet, Pascal; Gaudin, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Artemether (AM) plus azithromycin (AZ) rectal co-formulations were studied to provide pre-referral treatment for children with severe febrile illnesses in malaria-endemic areas. The target profile required that such product should be cheap, easy to administer by non-medically qualified persons, rapidly effective against both malaria and bacterial infections. Analytical and pharmacotechnical development, followed by in vitro and in vivo evaluation, were conducted for various AMAZ coformulations. Of the formulations tested, stability was highest for dry solid forms and bioavailability for hard gelatin capsules; AM release from AMAZ rectodispersible tablet was suboptimal due to a modification of its micro-crystalline structure. PMID:24726300

  6. Preliminary pharmaceutical development of antimalarial-antibiotic cotherapy as a pre-referral paediatric treatment of fever in malaria endemic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaubert, Alexandra; Kauss, Tina; Marchivie, Mathieu; Ba, Boubakar B; Lembege, Martine; Fawaz, Fawaz; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Lafarge, Xavier; Lindegardh, Niklas; Fabre, Jean-Louis; White, Nicholas J; Olliaro, Piero L; Millet, Pascal; Grislain, Luc; Gaudin, Karen

    2014-07-01

    Artemether (AM) plus azithromycin (AZ) rectal co-formulations were studied to provide pre-referral treatment for children with severe febrile illnesses in malaria-endemic areas. The target profile required that such product should be cheap, easy to administer by non-medically qualified persons, rapidly effective against both malaria and bacterial infections. Analytical and pharmacotechnical development, followed by in vitro and in vivo evaluation, were conducted for various AMAZ coformulations. Of the formulations tested, stability was highest for dry solid forms and bioavailability for hard gelatin capsules; AM release from AMAZ rectodispersible tablet was suboptimal due to a modification of its micro-crystalline structure. PMID:24726300

  7. Promising medical treatment for childhood psycho-cognitive problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parvaneh Karimzadeh; Sepideh Tabarestani

    2010-01-01

    Subclinical electroencephalogram discharges in children with psycho-cognitive problems are not uncommon. However, the clinical importance and relationship to cognitive deficits, as well as indications for medical treatment, are not well understood. Transient cognitive impairment, which accompanies electroencephalogram discharges, could negatively influence cognitive abilities over time. Studies have suggested that treatment with antiepileptic drugs normalizes electroencephalogram results, thereby preventing electrical paroxysmal discharges that could be harmful to the developing brain. Physicians should attempt to differentiate between corresponding factors, such as subtle seizures, nature of underlying etiology, stable cognitive deficits,seizure-inducing effects, and potential side effects of antiepileptic drugs prior to initiation of medical treatment for definitive diagnosis of transient cognitive impairment and its consequences. Therefore,appropriate criteria for patient selection and proper guidelines for medical therapy, should be addressed in future studies.

  8. Efficacy and safety of Camosunate for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Uyagu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In Nigeria, nearly 110 million clinical cases of malaria are diagnosed per year, thus being a major public health problem. The problems of resistance resulted in the introduction of the artemisinin based combinations (ACT by the WHO. Artesunate and amodiaquine (AS+AQ is at present the world’s second most widely used ACT. This study is an assessment of the efficacy and safety of Camosunate (a brand of AS+AQ; Geneith Pharmaceutical Ltd., Oshodi, Lagos in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria conducted at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH. A cross-sectional assessment of the efficacy and safety of Camosunate was conducted over a period of one year using 120 patients selected after stratification, by random sampling technique. All recruited patients had slide-proven uncom- plicated malaria and were followed up for 28 days on commencement of Camosunate. Data was collected using a structured interviewer- administered questionnaire and was analysed using SPSS version 15. The overall efficacy of Camosunate was found to be 95.8%. Treatment was well tolerated as testified by the fact that there was no case withdrawal due to adverse drug reaction (ADR or treatment emergent signs and symptoms (TESS. Also no evidence of toxicity was recorded. Camosunate is highly efficacious and well tolerated in this area of Nigeria and justifies its use as a first line treatment for uncomplicated malaria.

  9. Developing artemisinin based drug combinations for the treatment of drug resistant falciparum malaria: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olliaro P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of drug resistant malaria represents a considerable challenge to controlling malaria. To date, malaria control has relied heavily on a comparatively small number of chemically related drugs, belonging to either the quinoline or the antifolate groups. Only recently have the artemisinin derivatives been used but mostly in south east Asia. Experience has shown that resistance eventually curtails the life-span of antimalarial drugs. Controlling resistance is key to ensuring that the investment put into developing new antimalarial drugs is not wasted. Current efforts focus on research into new compounds with novel mechanisms of action, and on measures to prevent or delay resistance when drugs are introduced. Drug discovery and development are long, risky and costly ventures. Antimalarial drug development has traditionally been slow but now various private and public institutions are at work to discover and develop new compounds. Today, the antimalarial development pipeline is looking reasonably healthy. Most development relies on the quinoline, antifolate and artemisinin compounds. There is a pressing need to have effective, easy to use, affordable drugs that will last a long time. Drug combinations that have independent modes of action are seen as a way of enhancing efficacy while ensuring mutual protection against resistance. Most research work has focused on the use of artesunate combined with currently used standard drugs, namely, mefloquine, amodiaquine, sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, and chloroquine. There is clear evidence that combinations improve efficacy without increasing toxicity. However, the absolute cure rates that are achieved by combinations vary widely and depend on the level of resistance of the standard drug. From these studies, further work is underway to produce fixed dose combinations that will be packaged in blister packs. This review will summarise current antimalarial drug developments and outline recent

  10. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of intravenous artesunate during severe malaria treatment in Ugandan adults

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byakika-Kibwika, Pauline

    2012-04-27

    AbstractBackgroundSevere malaria is a medical emergency with high mortality. Prompt achievement of therapeutic concentrations of highly effective anti-malarial drugs reduces the risk of death. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of intravenous artesunate in Ugandan adults with severe malaria.MethodsFourteen adults with severe falciparum malaria requiring parenteral therapy were treated with 2.4 mg\\/kg intravenous artesunate. Blood samples were collected after the initial dose and plasma concentrations of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin measured by solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The study was approved by the Makerere University Faculty of Medicine Research and Ethics Committee (Ref2010-015) and Uganda National Council of Science and Technology (HS605) and registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01122134).ResultsAll study participants achieved prompt resolution of symptoms and complete parasite clearance with median (range) parasite clearance time of 17 (8–24) hours. Median (range) maximal artesunate concentration (Cmax) was 3260 (1020–164000) ng\\/mL, terminal elimination half-life (T1\\/2) was 0.25 (0.1-1.8) hours and total artesunate exposure (AUC) was 727 (290–111256) ng·h\\/mL. Median (range) dihydroartemisinin Cmax was 3140 (1670–9530) ng\\/mL, with Tmax of 0.14 (0.6 – 6.07) hours and T1\\/2 of 1.31 (0.8–2.8) hours. Dihydroartemisinin AUC was 3492 (2183–6338) ng·h\\/mL. None of the participants reported adverse events.ConclusionsPlasma concentrations of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin were achieved rapidly with rapid and complete symptom resolution and parasite clearance with no adverse events.

  11. Primary care providers' knowledge, practices, and perceived barriers to the treatment and prevention of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivack, Jordan G; Swietlik, Maggie; Alessandrini, Evaline; Faith, Myles S

    2010-07-01

    This study evaluated primary care providers' (PCPs, pediatricians, and nurse practitioners) knowledge, current practices, and perceived barriers to childhood obesity prevention and treatment, with an emphasis on first-year well-child care visits. A questionnaire was distributed to 192 PCPs in the primary care network at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) addressing (i) knowledge of obesity and American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines, (ii) anticipatory guidance practices at well visits regarding nutrition and exercise, and (iii) perceived barriers to childhood obesity treatment and prevention. Eighty pediatricians and seven nurse practitioners responded, and a minority correctly identified the definition (26%) and prevalence (9%) of childhood overweight and AAP guidelines for exercise (39%) and juice consumption (44%). Most PCPs (81%) spent 11-20 min per well visit during the first 2 years, and 79% discussed diet, nutrition, and exercise for > or =3 min. Although >95% of PCPs discussed juice, fruits and vegetables, sippy cups, and finger foods during the first year, over 35% never discussed fast food, TV, or candy, and 55% never discussed exercise. Few rated current resources as adequate to treat or prevent childhood obesity. Over 90% rated the following barriers for obesity prevention and treatment as important or very important: parent is not motivated, child is not motivated, parents are overweight, families often have fast food, watch too much TV, and do not get enough exercise. In conclusion, there is much room to improve PCPs' knowledge of obesity and AAP guidelines. Although PCPs rate fast-food consumption, TV viewing, and lack of exercise as important treatment barriers, many never discussed these topics during the first year. PMID:19910934

  12. Maltreatment in early childhood: a scoping review of prevention, detection and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Lefio Celedón; Helia Silva Bustos; Katherinne Rivas Castro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To identify and synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of interventions for universal prevention, detection and treatment of early childhood maltreatment (0-4 years). Design. Scoping Review. Data sources. MEDLINE, LILACS, PsycINFO, Psyclist, SciELO, ISI Web of Knowledge, Science Direct, EBSCO, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, DARE, Google Scholar and UNICEF Base. Methods. A variety of keywords were used to identify quantitative experimental and observational studies on ...

  13. Host genome variations and risk of infections during induction treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata; Lausen, Birgitte;

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate association of host genomic variation and risk of infections during treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Methods: We explored association of 34 000 singlenucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related primarily to pharmacogenomics and immune function...... to risk of infections among 69 ALL patients on induction therapy. Results: Forty-eight (70%) patients experienced infectious events including 23 with positive blood cultures. Infectious events and positive blood cultures were associated significantly with 24 and 21 SNPs, respectively (P

  14. Medicinal plants in the treatment of respiratoty diseases in childhood: a view from popular knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Karla Rafaella Menezes Araújo; Marta Regina Kerntopf; Dayanne Rakelly de Oliveira; Irwin Rose Alencar de Menezes; Francisco Elizaudo de Brito Júnior

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the popular knowledge regarding the usage of medicinal plants in the treatment of respiratory diseases in childhood. Exploratory descriptive study of qualitative nature, performed in Juazeiro do Norte/CE with twenty-two mothers and/or the ones responsible for the children patients of the Health Family Strategy. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews in the months of June and July, 2011. Collective Subject Discourse to Data analysis technique was used....

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a laboratory and used as drugs. Steroid therapy is used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Phototherapy Phototherapy is a cancer treatment that uses a drug and a certain type of laser light to kill cancer cells. A drug that ...

  16. Treatment Options for Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a laboratory and used as drugs. Steroid therapy is used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Phototherapy Phototherapy is a cancer treatment that uses a drug and a certain type of laser light to kill cancer cells. A drug that ...

  17. Salvage treatment for childhood ependymoma after surgery only: Pitfalls of omitting 'at once' adjuvant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To discuss the results obtained by giving adjuvant treatment for childhood ependymoma (EPD) at relapse after complete surgery only. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2002, 63 children older than 3 years old entered the first Italian Association for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology protocol for EPD (group A), and another 14 patients were referred after relapsing after more tumor excisions only (group B). Prognostic factors were homogeneously matched in the two groups. We report on the outcome of group B. Results: Mean time to first local progression in group B had been 14 months. Tumors originated in the posterior fossa (PF) in 10 children and were supratentorial (ST) in 4; 11 had first been completely excised (NED) and 3 had residual disease (ED). Diagnoses were classic EPD in 9 patients, anaplastic in 5. Eight children were referred NED and 6 ED after two or more operations, 5 had cranial nerve palsy, 1 had recurrent meningitis, and 2 had persistent hydrocephalus. All received radiotherapy (RT) to tumor bed and 5 also had pre-RT chemotherapy. Six of 14 patients (6/10 with PF tumors) had a further relapse a mean 6 months after the last surgery; 4 of 6 died: progression-free survival and overall survival at 4 years after referral were 54.4% and 77%, respectively. Considering only PF tumors and setting time 0 as at the last surgery for group B, progression-free survival and overall survival were 32% and 50% for group B and 52% (p < 0.20)/70% (p < 0.29) for the 46 patients in group A with PF tumors. Local control was 32% in group B and 70.5% in group A (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Relapsers after surgery only, especially if with PF-EPD, do worse than those treated after first diagnosis; subsequent surgery for tumor relapse has severe neurologic sequelae

  18. Late effects of treatment in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall aim of this study was a comprehensive assessment of the nature and severity of the late effects of treatment in a group of children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. In the absence of damage preceding treatment, late effects could be ascribed to treatment. Cranial irradiation, methotrexate, L-asparaginase and cytosine arabinoside are therapeutic modalities most likely to cause injury to the central nervous system. Survivors of childhood leukaemia also showed an increase in weight-for-height during and after therapy which appeared to be the consequence of a loss in statural growth as well as increasing weight-for-age. Assessment of endocrine function in leukaemia survivors indicated abnormalities in the regulation of growth hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone in some patients. Survivors of childhood leukaemia were shown to have an intellectual deficit compared with their siblings and a high incidence of visual-perceptual defects. The intellectual effects of lower doses of cranial irradiation are as yet unknown. A variety of minor neurological abnormalities were detected among leukaemia survivors and thought to be related to preceding central nervous system 'prophylactic' chemotherapy and irradiation. A new instrument, the functional deficit score, was derived to reflect overall outcome in survivors of childhood leukaemia. With few exceptions, leukaemia survivors in this study had received 2400 rads of deep x-ray therapy as cranial irradiation. This dosage has since been reduced world-wide. Current cranial irradiation 'prophylaxis' consists of 1800 rad of megavoltage radiotherapy

  19. Risperidone as a treatment for childhood habitual behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Omranifard, Victoria; Najafi, Mostafa; Sharbafchi, Mohammad Reza; Emami, Parisa; Maracy, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adding risperidone to the general behavioral treatment of masturbation in children 3-7 years old. Methods: A 4 week randomized clinical controlled trial was designed in year 2009. Samples have been chosen from children who have been referred to the Child and Adolescence Psychiatric Clinic of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Ninety children were recruited at the study and randomly allocated into the risperidone and contro...

  20. Recognition, perceptions and treatment practices for severe malaria in rural Tanzania: implications for accessing rectal artesunate as a pre-referral.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Warsame

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Preparatory to a community trial investigating how best to deliver rectal artesunate as pre-referral treatment for severe malaria; local understanding, perceptions of signs/symptoms of severe malaria and treatment-seeking patterns for and barriers to seeking biomedical treatment were investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 19 key informant interviews, 12 in-depth interviews and 14 focus group discussions targeting care-givers, opinion leaders, and formal and informal health care providers were conducted. Monthly fever episodes and danger signs or symptoms associated with severe malaria among under-fives were recorded. Respondents recognized convulsions, altered consciousness and coma, and were aware of their risks if not treated. But, these symptoms were perceived to be caused by supernatural forces, and traditional healers were identified as primary care providers. With some delay, mothers eventually visited a health facility when convulsions were part of the illness, despite pressures against this. Although vomiting and failure to eat/suck/drink were associated with malaria, they were not considered as indicators of danger signs unless combined with another more severe symptom. Study communities were familiar with rectal application of medicines. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Communities' recognition and awareness of major symptoms of severe malaria could encourage action, but perceptions of their causes and poor discrimination of other danger signs - vomiting and failure to feed - might impede early treatment. An effective health education targeting parents/guardians, decision-makers/advisors, and formal and informal care providers might be a prerequisite for successful introduction of rectal artemisinins as an emergency treatment. Role of traditional healers in delivering such medication to the community should be explored.

  1. Adherence to intermittent preventive treatment for malaria with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and outcome of pregnancy among parturients in South East Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyebuchi AK

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Azubike Kanario Onyebuchi,1 Lucky Osaheni Lawani,2 Chukwuemeka Anthony Iyoke,3 Chukwudi Robinson Onoh,1 Nwabunike Ekene Okeke4 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Nigeria; 2School of Postgraduate Studies, Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mile Four Catholic Hospital, Abakaliki, Nigeria Background: Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria for pregnant women (IPTp is a very important strategy for the control of malaria in pregnancy in malaria-endemic tropical countries, where mosquito bites easily occur during evening outdoor activities. Issues related to provision, cost, and acceptability may affect the use of IPTp in some developing countries. The aim of the study was to assess the uptake and adherence to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine-based intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy and the relationship of IPTp use to pregnancy outcomes in two major obstetric centers in South East Nigeria. Methods: This was a prospective descriptive study involving women who received antenatal and delivery services. All recruited women were followed-up from booking until delivery, and statistical analysis was done with Epi Info version 7. Results: A total of 516 parturients were studied. The mean gestational age at booking was 21.8±6.9 weeks while the mean number of antenatal visits throughout the pregnancy was 5.5±3.1. The rate of uptake of at least one dose of prescribed IPTp was 72.1% (367/516. Of the 367 who took prescribed IPTp, adherence to second doses of IPTp was 59.7% (219/367, and only 4.9% (18/367 took a third dose. Clinical malaria occurred in 85% (127/149 of women who did not receive IPTp at all compared to 20.5% of those who received at least one dose of IPTp. All those who had clinical malaria despite IPTp had only one

  2. Plasmodium falciparum associated with severe childhood malaria preferentially expresses PfEMP1 encoded by group A var genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anja T R; Magistrado, Pamela; Sharp, Sarah;

    2004-01-01

    Parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSAs) like the var gene-encoded Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family are responsible for antigenic variation and infected red blood cell (RBC) cytoadhesion in P. falciparum malaria. Parasites causing severe malaria in......(SM) to identify PfEMP1 responsible for the VSA(SM) phenotype. Expression of VSA(SM) was accompanied by up-regulation of Group A var genes. The most prominently up-regulated Group A gene (PFD1235w/MAL7P1.1) was translated into a protein expressed on the infected RBC surface. The proteins encoded by Group...

  3. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: the effect of new delivery approaches on access and compliance rates in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Magnussen, Pascal; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether traditional birth attendants, drug-shop vendors, community reproductive health workers and adolescent peer mobilizers can administer intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) with sulfadoxine-pyremethamine to pregnant women, and reach those most at risk of malaria and...... proportion of women who completed two doses of sulfadoxine-pyremethamine. RESULTS: Two thousand seven hundred and eighty-five pregnant women (78% of those in the study area) participated. With new approaches, 92.4% of the women received IPT during the second trimester as recommended by the policy, vs. 76.......1% at health units, P < 0.0001. Of the women who received two doses of sulfadoxine-pyremethamine, 39.9% were at health units (control) vs. 67.5% through new approaches (P < 0.0001). Women using the new approaches also accessed IPT early: the mean gestational age when receiving the first dose of...

  4. Medulloblastoma in childhood: long-term results of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-one children under the age of 15 years with verified medulloblastoma were treated at Addenbrookes Hospital from 1940 to 1976. In addition to surgical treatment, all received high dose irradiation to the whole neuraxis. Nine were still alive in 1979, of whom eight were examined. All these patients showed some residual problems, but five were leading active lives and had only minor physical disability. There was evidence of disturbance in growth, with shortening of the spine in relation to the limbs, in all the children. The height centile was lower than expected from parental height in four and one was severely dwarfed. Growth hormone secretion in response to exercise was, however, normal in five of six patients tested. Three children also showed failure of growth of the jaw sufficiently severe to be a cosmetic problem. Frank mental retardation was present in three children. A raised resting TSH level was found in two children, one of whom had a multinodular goiter. Of the three children with severe problems, two had been treated when under two years of age. Long-term follow-up of children who survive medulloblastoma is clearly necessary and consideration should perhaps be given to revision of current treatment regimes in very young children

  5. Exchange Transfusion in Severe Falciparum Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Dongare, Harshad Chandrakant; Khatib, Khalid Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is endemic in India with the incidence of P. falciparum Malaria increasing gradually over the last decade. Severe malaria is an acute disease, caused by P. falciparum, but increasingly also by P. vivax with major signs of organ dysfunction and/or high levels of parasitaemia (>10%) in blood smear. Use of exchange transfusion with antimalarial drug therapy as an additional modality of treatment in severe Falciparum malaria is controversial and is unclear. We report a case of severe mala...

  6. Relapsing malaria infection acquired in Kenya.

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, J E; Bia, F. J.; Miller, K.; McPhedran, P.

    1987-01-01

    An American physician-traveler to East Africa presented with manifestations of cerebral malaria and was treated with intravenous quinidine for chloroquine-resistant falciparum malaria. He later relapsed with Plasmodium ovale infection, despite previous primaquine therapy. Treatment of chloroquine-resistant malaria is discussed. The difficulty in diagnosing P. ovale infections and the predominance of this malaria species over P. vivax in East Africa are reviewed. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3

  7. Congenital malaria in a neonate: case report with a comprehensive review on differential diagnosis, treatment and prevention in Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Preeti; Majumdar, Kaushik; Sharma, Sunita; Chauhan, Richa; Chandra, Jagdish

    2015-06-01

    Although malaria in pregnancy, lactation and congenital malaria can be a disease burden in the endemic zones of Africa and Indian sub-continent, it is still epidemiologically less investigated in India. As it may lead to considerable maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, awareness and timely intervention is necessary for desirable outcome and prevention of the condition. Very few reports of congenital malaria are available in the literature from an endemic country like India. Herein we describe a case of congenital malaria from north India in a 21-day neonate. Clinical presentation of this condition in the neonate may offer a considerable diagnostic challenge, and differentiation from vector borne malaria in infants may be important from the management point of view. Hence a review of the differential diagnosis, management and prevention of congenital malaria has been attempted in the Indian perspective. PMID:26064034

  8. Safety and efficacy of re-treatments with pyronaridine-artesunate in African patients with malaria: a substudy of the WANECAM randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, Issaka; Beavogui, Abdoul Habib; Zongo, Issaka; Soulama, Issiaka; Borghini-Fuhrer, Isabelle; Fofana, Bakary; Camara, Daouda; Somé, Anyirékun F; Coulibaly, Aboubacar S; Traore, Oumar B; Dara, Niawanlou; Kabore, Moïse J T; Thera, Ismaila; Compaore, Yves D; Sylla, Malick Minkael; Nikiema, Frederic; Diallo, Mamadou Saliou; Dicko, Alassane; Gil, Jose Pedro; Borrmann, Steffen; Duparc, Stephan; Miller, Robert M; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Shin, Jangsik; Bjorkman, Anders; Ouedraogo, Jean-Bosco; Sirima, Sodiomon B; Djimdé, Abdoulaye A

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Sparse data on the safety of pyronaridine-artesunate after repeated treatment of malaria episodes restrict its clinical use. We therefore compared the safety of pyronaridine-artesunate after treatment of the first episode of malaria versus re-treatment in a substudy analysis. Methods This planned substudy analysis of the randomised, open-label West African Network for Clinical Trials of Antimalarial Drugs (WANECAM) phase 3b/4 trial was done at six health facilities in Mali, Burkina Faso, and Guinea in patients (aged ≥6 months and bodyweight ≥5 kg) with uncomplicated microscopically confirmed Plasmodium spp malaria (parasite density <200 000 per μL blood) and fever or history of fever. The primary safety endpoint was incidence of hepatotoxicity: alanine aminotransferase of greater than five times the upper limit of normal (ULN) or Hy's criteria (alanine aminotransferase or aspartate aminotransferase greater than three times the ULN and total bilirubin more than twice the ULN) after treatment of the first episode of malaria and re-treatment (≥28 days after first treatment) with pyronaridine-artesunate. Pyronaridine-artesunate efficacy was compared with artemether-lumefantrine with the adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR) in an intention-to-treat analysis. WANECAM is registered with PACTR.org, number PACTR201105000286876. Findings Following first treatment, 13 (1%) of 996 patients had hepatotoxicity (including one [<1%] possible Hy's law case) versus two (1%) of 311 patients on re-treatment (neither a Hy's law case). No evidence was found that pyronaridine-artesunate re-treatment increased safety risk based on laboratory values, reported adverse event frequencies, or electrocardiograph findings. For all first treatment or re-treatment episodes, pyronaridine-artesunate (n=673) day 28 crude ACPR was 92·7% (95% CI 91·0–94·3) versus 80·4% (77·8–83·0) for artemether-lumefantrine (n=671). After exclusion of patients

  9. Malaria during pregnancy in Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Rulisa

    2014-01-01

    It appears that malaria in Rwanda is not a major contributor to adverse outcomes of pregnancy anymore from a public health perspective but it can still give problems in individual patients, also in areas of low malaria transmission. This thesis shows that for individual cases the current treatment o

  10. Cardiac damage after treatment of childhood cancer: A long-term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With improved childhood cancer cure rate, long term sequelae are becoming an important factor of quality of life. Signs of cardiovascular disease are frequently found in long term survivors of cancer. Cardiac damage may be related to irradiation and chemotherapy. We have evaluated simultaneous influence of a series of independent variables on the late cardiac damage in childhood cancer survivors in Slovenia and identified groups at the highest risk. 211 long-term survivors of different childhood cancers, at least five years after treatment were included in the study. The evaluation included history, physical examination, electrocardiograpy, exercise testing and echocardiograpy. For analysis of risk factors, beside univariate analysis, multivariate classification tree analysis statistical method was used. Patients treated latest, from 1989–98 are at highest risk for any injury to the heart (73%). Among those treated earlier are at the highest risk those with Hodgkin's disease treated with irradiation above 30 Gy and those treated for sarcoma. Among specific forms of injury, patients treated with radiation to the heart area are at highest risk of injury to the valves. Patients treated with large doses of anthracyclines or concomitantly with anthracyclines and alkylating agents are at highest risk of systolic function defect and enlarged heart chambers. Those treated with anthracyclines are at highest risk of diastolic function defect. The time period of the patient's treatment is emerged as an important risk factor for injury of the heart

  11. [Commemorative lecture of receiving Imamura Memorial Prize. Studies on prevention and treatment of childhood tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, I

    1999-11-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of 394 patients who were treated for active tuberculosis (TB) at our hospital from 1976 to 1997. We had started early BCG vaccination campaign in Osaka Prefecture from 1995 and the coverage of BCG vaccination in infants rose up to about 90%. From that experience, we studied the current situations and measures on prevention and treatment of childhood tuberculosis. Pulmonary TB in children is successfully treated with 6-month standard short-course chemotherapy using isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide daily for 2 months, followed by isoniazid and rifampin daily for 4 months. Prognosis of childhood tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is poor, early diagnosis and prevention of TBM is important. In order to promote TB control and eliminate childhood TB, especially in infants, the following is necessary; 1) early detection and treatment of adult TB patients, source of infection, 2) prompt and appropriate contact examination and chemoprophylaxis, 3) BCG vaccination during early infancy, 4) protection from MDR-TB are most important. PMID:10599214

  12. Analysis on the childhood and adolescent differentiated thyroid cancer: clinical features and radioiodine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Children with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) frequently present with more extensive disease than adults. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical features of child-hood and adolescent DTC and evaluate the outcome and safety of radioiodine treatment. Methods: The records of 38 childhood and adolescent DTC cases, with 28 females and 10 males (mean age: 16.4 years) were reviewed. At diagnosis, all had metastatic lesions with 38 at regional lymph nodes, 15 at lung, 2 at brain and bone. Twenty-three had a total thyroidectomy, 7 had subtotal thyroidectomy, 5 had lobectomy, and 3 had other treatment. All received post-operative radioiodine therapy. All had follow-up for at least one year. Results: At the time of follow-up, all were survive (with a median follow-up of 5.13 years). Four-teen patients had no evidence of disease, 16 had partial remission, and 8 were stable disease. Conclusions: DTC of the thyroid in childhood and adolescent has high risks of residual/recurrence and metastasis. Post-thyroidectomy oral administration of radioiodine was an effective and safety adjuvant therapy for outcomes. (authors)

  13. Sociocultural and Structural Factors Contributing to Delays in Treatment for Children with Severe Malaria: A Qualitative Study in Southwestern Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Sundararajan, Radhika; Mwanga-Amumpaire, Juliet; Adrama, Harriet; Tumuhairwe, Jackline; Mbabazi, Sheilla; Mworozi, Kenneth; Carroll, Ryan; Bangsberg, David; Boum II, Yap; Ware, Norma C.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a leading cause of pediatric mortality, and Uganda has among the highest incidences in the world. Increased morbidity and mortality are associated with delays to care. This qualitative study sought to characterize barriers to prompt allopathic care for children hospitalized with severe malaria in the endemic region of southwestern Uganda. Minimally structured, qualitative interviews were conducted with guardians of children admitted to a regional hospital with severe malaria. Using...

  14. Impact of intermittent screening and treatment for malaria among school children in Kenya: a cluster randomised trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Halliday, Katherine E.; George Okello; Turner, Elizabeth L.; Kiambo Njagi; Carlos Mcharo; Juddy Kengo; Elizabeth Allen; Dubeck, Margaret M; Matthew C H Jukes; Brooker, Simon J.

    2014-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Every year, more than 200 million cases of malaria occur worldwide and more than 600,000 people, mostly children living in sub-Saharan Africa, die from this mosquito-borne parasitic infection. Malaria can be prevented by controlling the night-biting mosquitoes that transmit Plasmodium parasites and by sleeping under insecticide-treated nets to avoid mosquito bites. Infection with malaria parasites causes recurring flu-like symptoms and needs to be treated promptly ...

  15. Drugs for preventing malaria in pregnant women in endemic areas: any drug regimen versus placebo or no treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Radeva-Petrova, Denitsa; Kayentao, Kassoum; Feiko O ter Kuile; Sinclair, David; Garner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Pregnancy increases the risk of malaria and this is associated with poor health outcomes for both the mother and the infant, especially during the first or second pregnancy. To reduce these effects, the World Health Organization recommends that pregnant women living in malaria endemic areas sleep under insecticide-treated bednets, are treated for malaria illness and anaemia, and receive chemoprevention with an effective antimalarial drug during the second and third trimesters. Obje...

  16. Tetracyclines in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Tiphaine; Madamet, Marylin; Pradines, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Malaria, a parasite vector-borne disease, is one of the greatest health threats in tropical regions, despite the availability of malaria chemoprophylaxis. The emergence and rapid extension of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to various anti-malarial drugs has gradually limited the number of potential malaria therapeutics available to clinicians. In this context, doxycycline, a synthetically derived tetracycline, constitutes an interesting alternative for malaria treatment and prophylaxis. Doxycycline is a slow-acting blood schizontocidal agent that is highly effective at preventing malaria. In areas with chloroquine and multidrug-resistant P. falciparum parasites, doxycycline has already been successfully used in combination with quinine to treat malaria, and it has been proven to be effective and well-tolerated. Although not recommended for pregnant women and children younger than 8 years of age, severe adverse effects are rarely reported. In addition, resistance to doxycycline is rarely described. Prophylactic and clinical failures of doxycycline have been associated with both inadequate doses and poor patient compliance. The effects of tetracyclines on parasites are not completely understood. A better comprehension of the mechanisms underlying drug resistance would facilitate the identification of molecular markers of resistance to predict and survey the emergence of resistance. PMID:26555664

  17. Prevalence of malaria parasites among blood donors in Kaduna, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas D. Garba

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The prevalence of malaria parasites among blood donors was 7.5% Blood donors should be routinely screened for malaria parasites and the blood marked negative or positive as the case may be. Recipients of malaria parasites positive blood should be given prophylactic treatment to prevent transfusion related malaria (TRM. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2112-2119

  18. Factors related to under-diagnosis and under-treatment of childhood asthma in metropolitan France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annesi-Maesano Isabella

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Under-diagnosis and under-treatment of childhood asthma were investigated in France using data collected during the 6 Cities Study, the French contribution to the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Methods 7,781 schoolchildren aged between 9 and 10 years underwent a medical visit including skin prick tests to common allergens and exercise test for Exercise-Induced Asthma (EIA and their parents filled in a standardized questionnaire on asthma, management, treatment and potential risk factors. Results 903 children reported asthma (11.6%, 377 without a doctor’s diagnosis. Of the 526 participants with a diagnosis of asthma confirmed by a doctor (58.2%, 353 were treated and 76 were not treated during the year preceding the investigation despite their diagnosis. The information on the treatment was missing for the rest of individuals diagnosed with asthma (n = 97. Having a treatment was significantly associated with severe asthma and with the presence of other respiratory and allergic stigmata (atopic eczema, rhinitis, positive skin allergy tests, and EIA. In addition, having a treatment did not correspond to a good control of the disease. Similarly, children with asthma-like symptoms but without doctor-diagnosed asthma had asthma less well controlled than children with diagnosed asthma. They were also more exposed to passive smoking and traffic but had fewer pets. In contrast, diagnosed children reported more frequently a small weight at birth and a preterm birth. Conclusions In France, childhood asthma is still under-diagnosed and under-treated and environmental factors play a role in these phenomena.

  19. Artemether-lumefantrine treatment failure despite adequate lumefantrine day 7 concentration in a traveller with Plasmodium falciparum malaria after returning from Tanzania.

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    Färnert Anna; Ursing Johan; Tolfvenstam Thomas; Rono Josea; Karlsson Lillemor; Sparrelid Elda; Lindegårdh Niklas

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Artemether-lumefantrine is currently first-line therapy of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in many countries. This report describes a treatment failure despite adequate drug concentrations in a traveller returning from sub-Saharan Africa. Genotyping confirmed recrudescence and suggested reduced sensitivity. Potential sub-optimal effect of artemether-lumefantrine highlights the need to follow non-immune individuals the weeks after treatment.

  20. Artemether–lumefantrine treatment failure despite adequate lumefantrine day 7 concentration in a traveller with Plasmodium falciparum malaria after returning from Tanzania

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    Färnert Anna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Artemether-lumefantrine is currently first-line therapy of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in many countries. This report describes a treatment failure despite adequate drug concentrations in a traveller returning from sub-Saharan Africa. Genotyping confirmed recrudescence and suggested reduced sensitivity. Potential sub-optimal effect of artemether-lumefantrine highlights the need to follow non-immune individuals the weeks after treatment.

  1. Position of anticholinergic drugs in the treatment of childhood asthma

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    Stojković-Anđelković Anđelka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticholinergic drugs block muscarinic effect of acetylcholine on the receptors of postjunctional membranes and so inhibit the answer of the postganglionic parasympathetic nerve. The loss of M2 muscarinic receptors function occurs in asthmatics and it contributes to bronchial hyperresponsiveness and it is not a chronic feature of asthma, instead it characterizes asthma exacerbation. The loss of M2 muscarinic receptor function in children and adults happens during antigen bronchoprovocation or during exposition of asthmatics to ozone. After inhalation, ipratropium bromide (IB can be found in a small quantity in circulation and it links less readily to muscarinic receptors on airway smooth muscles as related to its absorption after intravenous application. In the stepwise approach of asthma inhaled anticholinergics is recommended if the symptoms of the disease cannot be adequately controlled by a regular inhalation of antiinflammatory drugs with β2-agonist and oral steroids. The improvement of the airway inspiratory capacity is more elevated than the improvement of FEV1 after inhalation of IB. IB has similar effect as salbutamol and it is recommended to control a stable chronic obstructive disease. During our numerous investigations and up-to-date experience in the usage of 5-7 μg/kg/body mass of IB repeated every 4-6 hours in combination with salbutamol, we did not notice adverse effects of the drug in infants. IB is recommended for hospital treatment of children. .

  2. Perceptions of childhood diarrhoea and its treatment in rural Zimbabwe.

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    de Zoysa, I; Carson, D; Feachem, R; Kirkwood, B; Lindsay-Smith, E; Loewenson, R

    1984-01-01

    In the course of a study on the acceptability and feasibility of home-based oral rehydration therapy in rural Zimbabwe, information was collected on attitudes and beliefs about diarrhoea and on action taken in response to an episode of diarrhoea in a child. Diarrhoea was found to be a perceived threat at community and family level and numerous possible causes of diarrhoea were described which were assigned to two broad classes: (1) 'physical' causes, such as a polluted environment, diet and teething and (2) 'social and spiritual' causes such as those associated with a depressed fontanelle. These domains were not, however, mutually exclusive; 76% of the described episodes of diarrhoea were attributed to 'physical' causes, 15% to 'social and spiritual' causes and 8% to a combination of both. Reported utilization rates of the formal health services were unexpectedly high. In contrast, we recorded a low demand for indigenous herbalists (n'angas). Home management was common and comprised the administration of indigenous herbal remedies, of sugar and salt solutions, of over-the-counter drugs or of enemas. These remedies were given on their own or alongside the treatment prescribed by a health worker. A number of variables were examined to assess their influence on health-seeking behaviour: perceived cause and severity of the illness, socio-demographic characteristics of the respondent or child and accessibility of the health services.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6505741

  3. Antibodies to malaria vaccine candidates are associated with chloroquine or sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine treatment efficacy in children in an endemic area of Burkina Faso

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    Diarra Amidou

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient immune status is thought to affect the efficacy of anti-malarial chemotherapy. This is a subject of some importance, since evidence of immunity-related interactions may influence our use of chemotherapy in populations with drug resistance, as well as assessment of the value of suboptimal vaccines. The study aim was to investigate relationship between antibodies and anti-malarial drug treatment outcomes. Methods Some 248 children aged 0.5 and 15 years were recruited prior to the high malaria transmission season. Venous blood (5 ml was obtained from each child to measure antibody levels to selected malaria antigens, using ELISA. Blood smears were also performed to assess drug efficacy and malaria infection prevalence. Children were actively followed up to record clinical malaria cases. Results IgG levels to MSP3 were always higher in the successfully treated group than in the group with treatment failure. The same observation was made for GLURP but the reverse observation was noticed for MSP1-19. Cytophilic and non-cytophilic antibodies were significantly associated with protection against all three antigens, except for IgG4 to MSP1-19 and GLURP. Conclusion Acquired anti-malarial antibodies may play an important role in the efficacy of anti-malarial drugs in younger children more susceptible to the disease.

  4. Improved traditional phytomedicines in current use for the clinical treatment of malaria.

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    Willcox, Merlin

    2011-04-01

    Phytomedicines and "green pharmacies" are promoted by some NGOs and governments as part of their efforts to control malaria. "Improved traditional medicines" (ITMs) are standardised as regards preparation and dose, although not always according to the concentration of active compounds. A systematic literature search revealed that six such phytomedicines are currently government-approved in at least one country and used on a relatively large scale nationally or internationally: Artemisia annua L. (Asteraceae), Cinchona bark (Rubiaceae), Cryptolepis sanguinolenta (Lindl.) Schltr. (Apocynaceae), "Ayush-64", "Malarial-5" and Cochlospermum planchonii Hook. f. ex Planch. (Bixaceae). One further ITM has been developed and is in the process of being approved: Argemone mexicana decoction. Their development, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical trials are reviewed, as well as priorities for future research. PMID:21204042

  5. Coverage, adherence and costs of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in children employing different delivery strategies in Jasikan, Ghana.

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    Edith Patouillard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in children (IPTc involves the administration of a course of anti-malarial drugs at specified time intervals to children at risk of malaria regardless of whether or not they are known to be infected. IPTc provides a high level of protection against uncomplicated and severe malaria, with monthly sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine plus amodiaquine (SP&AQ and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine plus piperaquine being the most efficacious regimens. A key challenge is the identification of a cost-effective delivery strategy. METHODS: A community randomized trial was undertaken in Jasikan district, Ghana to assess IPTc effectiveness and costs using SP&AQ delivered in three different ways. Twelve villages were randomly selected to receive IPTc from village health workers (VHWs or facility-based nurses working at health centres' outpatient departments (OPD or EPI outreach clinics. Children aged 3 to 59 months-old received one IPT course (three doses in May, June, September and October. Effectiveness was measured in terms of children covered and adherent to a course and delivery costs were calculated in financial and economic terms using an ingredient approach from the provider perspective. RESULTS: The economic cost per child receiving at least the first dose of all 4 courses was US$4.58 when IPTc was delivered by VHWs, US$4.93 by OPD nurses and US$ 5.65 by EPI nurses. The unit economic cost of receiving all 3 doses of all 4 courses was US$7.56 and US$8.51 when IPTc was delivered by VHWs or facility-based nurses respectively. The main cost driver for the VHW delivery was supervision, reflecting resources used for travelling to more remote communities rather than more intense supervision, and for OPD and EPI delivery, it was the opportunity cost of the time spent by nurses in dispensing IPTc. CONCLUSIONS: VHWs achieve higher IPTc coverage and adherence at lower costs than facility-based nurses in Jasikan district

  6. Individual, facility and policy level influences on national coverage estimates for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy in Tanzania

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    Schellenberg Joanna

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delivery of two doses of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp is a key strategy to reduce the burden of malaria in pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa. However, different settings have reported coverage levels well below the target 80%. Antenatal implementation guidelines in Tanzania recommend IPTp first dose to be given at the second antenatal visit, and second dose at the third visit. This investigation measured coverage of IPTp at national level in Tanzania and examined the role of individual, facility, and policy level influences on achieved coverage. Methods Three national household and linked reproductive and child health (RCH facility surveys were conducted July-August 2005, 2006, and 2007 in 210 clusters sampled using two-stage cluster sampling from 21 randomly selected districts. Female residents who reported a livebirth in the previous year were asked questions about malaria prevention during that pregnancy and individual characteristics including education, pregnancy history, and marital status. The RCH facility serving each cluster was also surveyed, and information collected about drug stocks, health education delivery, and the timing of antenatal care delivery by clinic users. Results The national IPTp coverage had declined over the survey period being 71% for first dose in 2005 falling to 65% in 2007 (χ2 2.9, p = 0.05, and 38% for second dose in 2005 but 30% in 2007 (χ2 4.4, p = 0.01. There was no evidence of any individual factors being associated with second dose coverage beyond living in an urban area. Availability of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine at RCH had decreased year on year from 85% of clinics in stock in 2005 to 60% in 2007 (χ2 20.6, p Conclusion There is scope to improve IPTp first and second dose coverage at national scale within existing systems by improving stock at RCH, and by revising the existing guidelines to recommend delivery of IPTp after quickening, rather than

  7. Use of integrated malaria management reduces malaria in Kenya.

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    Bernard A Okech

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During an entomological survey in preparation for malaria control interventions in Mwea division, the number of malaria cases at the Kimbimbi sub-district hospital was in a steady decline. The underlying factors for this reduction were unknown and needed to be identified before any malaria intervention tools were deployed in the area. We therefore set out to investigate the potential factors that could have contributed to the decline of malaria cases in the hospital by analyzing the malaria control knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP that the residents in Mwea applied in an integrated fashion, also known as integrated malaria management (IMM. METHODS: Integrated Malaria Management was assessed among community members of Mwea division, central Kenya using KAP survey. The KAP study evaluated community members' malaria disease management practices at the home and hospitals, personal protection measures used at the household level and malaria transmission prevention methods relating to vector control. Concurrently, we also passively examined the prevalence of malaria parasite infection via outpatient admission records at the major referral hospital in the area. In addition we studied the mosquito vector population dynamics, the malaria sporozoite infection status and entomological inoculation rates (EIR over an 8 month period in 6 villages to determine the risk of malaria transmission in the entire division. RESULTS: A total of 389 households in Mwea division were interviewed in the KAP study while 90 houses were surveyed in the entomological study. Ninety eight percent of the households knew about malaria disease while approximately 70% of households knew its symptoms and methods to manage it. Ninety seven percent of the interviewed households went to a health center for malaria diagnosis and treatment. Similarly a higher proportion (81% used anti-malarial medicines bought from local pharmacies. Almost 90% of households reported

  8. Malaria treatment failures after artemisinin-based therapy in three expatriates: could improved manufacturer information help to decrease the risk of treatment failure ?

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    Loutan Louis

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-containing therapies are highly effective against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Insufficient numbers of tablets and inadequate package inserts result in sub-optimal dosing and possible treatment failure. This study reports the case of three, non-immune, expatriate workers with P. falciparum acquired in Africa, who failed to respond to artemisinin-based therapy. Sub-therapeutic dosing in accordance with the manufacturers' recommendations was the probable cause. Method Manufacturers information and drug content included in twenty-five artemisinin-containing specialities were reviewed. Results A substantial number of manufacturers do not follow current WHO recommendations regarding treatment duration and doses. Conclusion This study shows that drug packaging and their inserts should be improved.

  9. Hemozoin Inhibition and Control of Clinical Malaria

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    Chibueze Peter Ihekwereme

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria has a negative impact on health and social and economic life of residents of endemic countries. The ultimate goals of designing new treatment for malaria are to prevent clinical infection, reduce morbidity, and decrease mortality. There are great advances in the understanding of the parasite-host interaction through studies by various scientists. In some of these studies, attempts were made to evaluate the roles of malaria pigment or toxins in the pathogenesis of malaria. Hemozoin is a key metabolite associated with severe malaria anemia (SMA, immunosuppression, and cytokine dysfunction. Targeting of this pigment may be necessary in the design of new therapeutic products against malaria. In this review, the roles of hemozoin in the morbidity and mortality of malaria are highlighted as an essential target in the quest for effective control of clinical malaria.

  10. The potential role of Punica granatum treatment on murine malaria-induced hepatic injury and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, Taghreed A; Mubaraki, Murad A; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Dkhil, Mohamed A

    2016-04-01

    Malaria is a health burden disease where the world harnessed the power of expertise and innovation to understand the biology of the parasite and the pathogenesis of the disease as well as to discover effective drugs. However, the treatment of malaria remains a challenging task and inadequate to address today's perplexing problem, the emergence of resistant strains. Historically, traditional medicine has been a mainstay for remediation and still retains its importance with the presence of potent natural products. Pomegranate has been used as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory against a range of diseases. Therefore, pomegranate peel extract (PPE) was used in this study to examine its effect on Plasmodium chabaudi-induced hepatic inflammation. Animals were allocated into three groups: a vehicle control group, a group infected with 10(6) P. chabaudi-parasitized erythrocytes and a pomegranate-treated group infected with 10(6) P. chabaudi-parasitized erythrocytes. This group received 100 μl of 300 mg/kg PPE after infection. The results showed the effectiveness of PPE on reversing the anaemic signs that have been provoked by P. chabaudi infection through instating the haemoglobin concentration and erythrocyte count back to normal values. Moreover, PPE exhibited hepatoprotective activities upon histopathological examination and liver function tests. These data were further confirmed by the significant reduction of the hepatic oxidative markers, glutathione, nitric oxide and malondialdehyde, in mice infected with P. chabaudi. Based on these outcomes, pomegranate could be used as a hepatoprotective agent against P. chabaudi-induced hepatic injury. However, further studies are needed in order to determine the mode of action of pomegranate upon infection. PMID:26670312

  11. The evil circle of poverty: a qualitative study of malaria and disability

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    Ingstad Benedicte

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article discusses the link between disability and malaria in a poor rural setting. Global malaria programmes and rehabilitation programmes are organized as vertical and separate programmes, and as such they focus on prevention, cure and control, and disability respectively. When looking at specific conditions and illnesses, the impairing long-term consequences of illness incidents during childhood are not questioned. Methods The study design was ethnographic with an open, exploratory approach. Data were collected in Mangochi District in Malawi through qualitative in-depth interviews and participant observation. Results Despite a local-based health service system, people living in poor rural areas are confronted with a multitude of barriers when accessing malaria prevention and treatment. Lack of skilled health personnel and equipment add to the general burden of poverty: insufficient knowledge about health care, problems connected to accessing the health facility in time, insufficient initiatives to prevent malaria attacks, and a general lack of attention to the long term disabling effects of a malaria attack. Conclusions This study points to the importance of building malaria programmes, research and statistics that take into consideration the consequences of permanent impairment after a malaria attack, as well as the context of poverty in which they often occur. In order to do so, one needs to develop methods for detecting people whose disabilities are a direct result of not having received health services after a malaria episode. This may be done through qualitative approaches in local communities and should also be supplemented by suitable surveys in order to estimate the problem on a larger scale.

  12. An in-depth study of patent medicine sellers' perspectives on malaria in a rural Nigerian community

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    Okeke, Theodora A; Uzochukwu, Benjamin SC; Okafor, Henrietta U

    2006-01-01

    Background Malaria remains a major cause of mortality among under five children in Nigeria. Most of the early treatments for fever and malaria occur through self-medication with antimalarial drugs bought from medicine sellers. These have led to increasing calls for interventions to improve treatment obtained in these outlets. However, information about the current practices of these medicine sellers is needed before such interventions. This study aims to determine the medicine sellers' perspectives on malaria and the determinants that underlie their dispensing patterns of antimalarial drugs. Methods The study was conducted in Ugwugo-Nike, a rural community in south-east Nigeria. It involved in-depth interviews with 13 patent medicine sellers. Results A majority of the medicine sellers were not trained health professionals and malaria is recognized as a major health problem by them. There is poor knowledge and poor dispensing behaviour in relation to childhood malaria episodes. Although referral of severe malaria is common, there are those who will not refer. Verbal advice is rarely given to the care-givers. Conclusion More action research and interventions to improve prescription and referral practices and giving verbal advice to care-givers is recommended. Ways to integrate the drug sellers in the health system are also recommended. PMID:17078875

  13. An in-depth study of patent medicine sellers' perspectives on malaria in a rural Nigerian community

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    Okafor Henrietta U

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria remains a major cause of mortality among under five children in Nigeria. Most of the early treatments for fever and malaria occur through self-medication with antimalarial drugs bought from medicine sellers. These have led to increasing calls for interventions to improve treatment obtained in these outlets. However, information about the current practices of these medicine sellers is needed before such interventions. This study aims to determine the medicine sellers' perspectives on malaria and the determinants that underlie their dispensing patterns of antimalarial drugs. Methods The study was conducted in Ugwugo-Nike, a rural community in south-east Nigeria. It involved in-depth interviews with 13 patent medicine sellers. Results A majority of the medicine sellers were not trained health professionals and malaria is recognized as a major health problem by them. There is poor knowledge and poor dispensing behaviour in relation to childhood malaria episodes. Although referral of severe malaria is common, there are those who will not refer. Verbal advice is rarely given to the care-givers. Conclusion More action research and interventions to improve prescription and referral practices and giving verbal advice to care-givers is recommended. Ways to integrate the drug sellers in the health system are also recommended.

  14. Respondent-driven sampling on the Thailand-Cambodia border. II. Knowledge, perception, practice and treatment-seeking behaviour of migrants in malaria endemic zones

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    Kaewkungwal Jaranit

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population movements along the Thailand-Cambodia border, particularly among highly mobile and hard-to-access migrant groups from Cambodia and Myanmar, are assumed to play a key role in the spread of artemisinin resistance. Data on treatment-seeking behaviours, knowledge and perceptions about malaria, and use of preventive measures is lacking as characteristics of this population prevent them from being represented in routine surveillance and the lack of a sampling frame makes reliable surveys challenging. Methods A survey of migrant populations from Cambodia and Myanmar was implemented in five selected rural locations in Thailand along the Thai-Cambodian border using respondent driven sampling (RDS to determine demographic characteristics of the population, migratory patterns, knowledge about malaria, and health-care -seeking behaviours. Results The majority of migrants from Myanmar are long-term residents (98% with no plans to move back to Myanmar, understand spoken Thai (77% and can therefore benefit from health messages in Thai, have Thai health insurance (99% and accessed public health services in Thailand (63% for their last illness. In comparison, the majority of Cambodian migrants are short-term (72%. Of the short-term Cambodian migrants, 92% work in agriculture, 18% speak Thai, 3.4% have Thai health insurance, and the majority returned to Cambodia for treatment (45%, self-treated (11%, or did not seek treatment for their last illness (27%. Conclusion Most highly mobile migrants along the Thai-Cambodia border are not accessing health messages or health treatment in Thailand, increasing their risk of malaria and facilitating the spread of potentially resistant Plasmodium falciparum as they return to Cambodia to seek treatment. Reaching out to highly mobile migrants with health messaging they can understand and malaria diagnosis and treatment services they can access is imperative in the effort to contain the spread of

  15. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy with mefloquine in HIV-negative women: a multicentre randomized controlled trial.

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    Raquel González

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is recommended by WHO to prevent malaria in African pregnant women. The spread of SP parasite resistance has raised concerns regarding long-term use for IPT. Mefloquine (MQ is the most promising of available alternatives to SP based on safety profile, long half-life, and high efficacy in Africa. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of MQ for IPTp compared to those of SP in HIV-negative women. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 4,749 pregnant women were enrolled in an open-label randomized clinical trial conducted in Benin, Gabon, Mozambique, and Tanzania comparing two-dose MQ or SP for IPTp and MQ tolerability of two different regimens. The study arms were: (1 SP, (2 single dose MQ (15 mg/kg, and (3 split-dose MQ in the context of long lasting insecticide treated nets. There was no difference on low birth weight prevalence (primary study outcome between groups (360/2,778 [13.0%] for MQ group and 177/1,398 (12.7% for SP group; risk ratio [RR], 1.02 (95% CI 0.86-1.22; p=0.80 in the ITT analysis. Women receiving MQ had reduced risks of parasitemia (63/1,372 [4.6%] in the SP group and 88/2,737 [3.2%] in the MQ group; RR, 0.70 [95% CI 0.51-0.96]; p=0.03 and anemia at delivery (609/1,380 [44.1%] in the SP group and 1,110/2743 [40.5%] in the MQ group; RR, 0.92 [95% CI 0.85-0.99]; p=0.03, and reduced incidence of clinical malaria (96/551.8 malaria episodes person/year [PYAR] in the SP group and 130/1,103.2 episodes PYAR in the MQ group; RR, 0.67 [95% CI 0.52-0.88]; p=0.004 and all-cause outpatient attendances during pregnancy (850/557.8 outpatients visits PYAR in the SP group and 1,480/1,110.1 visits PYAR in the MQ group; RR, 0.86 [0.78-0.95]; p=0.003. There were no differences in the prevalence of placental infection and adverse pregnancy outcomes between groups. Tolerability was poorer in the two MQ groups compared to SP. The most frequently reported

  16. Factors associated with chloroquine induced pruritus during malaria treatment in Mozambican University students Factores asociados a la aparición de prurito por cloroquina durante el tratamiento de la malaria en estudiantes universitarios de Mozambique

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    Helena Gama

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has been suggested that reductions in chloroquine use may be followed by a resurgence of chloroquine-susceptible falciparum malaria, and chloroquine might once again be an effective treatment choice, which renews the importance of aspects related to its use and misuse. Therefore, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of chloroquine-induced pruritus and to identify risk factors for its occurrence in Mozambican University students. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at a private University in Maputo. Students were approached in the classrooms to complete a self-administered questionnaire covering sociodemographic characteristics, number of previous malaria episodes, utilization of antimalarial drugs, and life prevalence of chloroquine induced pruritus. Results: Among 795 respondents, 77.4% (601/777 reported at least one malaria episode and 73.2% (542/740 had used chloroquine before. The life-prevalence of chloroquine-induced pruritus was 30.1% (158/525. Pruritus tended to be more frequent when chloroquine was used for treatment compared with prophylaxis only (31.2% vs. 10.3%, pIntroducción: Se ha sugerido que la reducción en el uso de la cloroquina puede derivar en el resurgimiento de la malaria falciparum sensible a la cloroquina, por lo que ésta puede volver a ser un tratamiento efectivo de elección, renovando la importancia de aspectos relacionados con su uso y su mal uso. Se pretende estimar la prevalencia de prurito inducido por cloroquina e identificar los factores de riesgo asociados a su ocurrencia en estudiantes universitarios de Mozambique. Métodos: Se realizó una encuesta transversal en una Universidad privada de Mozambique. Los estudiantes fueron abordados en las aulas para completar un cuestionario autoadministrado, que contenía datos sociodemográficos e información sobre el número de episodios previos de malaria, la utilización de fármacos antipalúdicos y la prevalencia de prurito inducido por

  17. Safety of the methylene blue plus chloroquine combination in the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in young children of Burkina Faso [ISRCTN27290841

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    Meissner, Peter E; Mandi, Germain; Witte, Steffen; Coulibaly, Boubacar; Mansmann, Ulrich; Rengelshausen, Jens; Schiek, Wolfgang; Jahn, Albrecht; Sanon, Mamadou; Tapsoba, Théophile; Walter-Sack, Ingeborg; Mikus, Gerd; Burhenne, Jürgen; Riedel, Klaus-Dieter; Schirmer, Heiner; Kouyaté, Bocar; Müller, Olaf

    2005-01-01

    Background Safe, effective and affordable drug combinations against falciparum malaria are urgently needed for the poor populations in malaria endemic countries. Methylene blue (MB) combined with chloroquine (CQ) has been considered as one promising new regimen. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of CQ-MB in African children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Secondary objectives were to assess the efficacy and the acceptance of CQ-MB in a rural population of West Africa. Methods In this hospital-based randomized controlled trial, 226 children (6–59 months) with uncomplicated falciparum malaria were treated in Burkina Faso. The children were 4:1 randomized to CQ-MB (n = 181; 25 mg/kg CQ and 12 mg/kg MB over three days) or CQ (n = 45; 25 mg/kg over three days) respectively. The primary outcome was the incidence of severe haemolysis or other serious adverse events (SAEs). Efficacy outcomes were defined according to the WHO 2003 classification system. Patients were hospitalized for four days and followed up until day 14. Results No differences in the incidence of SAEs and other adverse events were observed between children treated with CQ-MB (including 24 cases of G6PD deficiency) compared to children treated with CQ. There was no case of severe haemolysis and also no significant difference in mean haemoglobin between study groups. Treatment failure rates were 53.7% (95% CI [37.4%; 69.3%]) in the CQ group compared to 44.0% (95% CI [36.3%; 51.9%]) in the CQ-MB group. Conclusion MB is safe for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria, even in G6PD deficient African children. However, the efficacy of the CQ-MB combination has not been sufficient at the MB dose used in this study. Future studies need to assess the efficacy of MB at higher doses and in combination with appropriate partner drugs. PMID:16179085

  18. Childhood Obesity

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    Aydın, Ahmet; Koca, Fahrettin; Fıçıcıoğlu, Can; Çam, Halit; Mıkla, Şerare

    1995-01-01

    Management of childhood obesity and its early and late complications are among the most difficult problems confronted by pediatricians and practitioners The purpose of this review is to provide information for the evaluation and treatment of childhood obesity Key nbsp;words: nbsp;Child Obesity Etiology Management Complications

  19. Rural-urban differences in maternal responses to childhood fever in South East Nigeria.

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    Benjamin S C Uzochukwu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Childhood fevers due to malaria remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality among under-five children in Nigeria. The degree of vulnerability perceived by mothers will affect their perception of the severity and threat of their child's fever and the patterns of health care use. This study was undertaken to compare maternal responses to childhood fever in urban and rural areas of Enugu, south east Nigeria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Data was collected with pre-tested interviewer-administered questionnaires from 276 and 124 urban and rural households respectively. In each household, only one woman aged 15-49 years who had lived in each of the urban and rural communities for at least one year and had at least one child less than 5 years old was interviewed. Malaria was mentioned as the commonest cause of childhood fevers. Rural mothers were more likely to recognize danger signs and symptoms than urban mothers. Rural mothers use more of informal than formal health services, and there is more home management of the fever with urban than rural mothers. Chloroquine, ACT, SP and Paracetamol are the main drugs given at home for childhood fevers, but the rural mothers were more likely to use leftover drugs from previous treatment to treat the fevers than urban mothers. The urban respondents were also more likely to use a preventive measure. Urban mothers sought actions faster than rural mothers and the total cost of treatment was also higher in urban areas. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both urban and rural mothers are aware that malaria is the major cause of childhood fevers. Although rural mothers recognize childhood fever and danger signs better than urban mothers, the urban mothers' responses to fever seem to be better than that for rural mothers. These responses and differences may be important for geographical targeting by policy makers for malaria interventions.

  20. Adolescent Substance Use in the Multimodal Treatment Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (MTA) as a Function of Childhood ADHD, Random Assignment to Childhood Treatments, and Subsequent Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Brooke S. G.; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Swanson, James M.; Pelham, William E.; Hechtman, Lily; Hoza, Betsy; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Wigal, Timothy; Abikoff, Howard B.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Jensen, Peter S.; Wells, Karen C.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Gibbons, Robert D.; Howard, Andrea; Houck, Patricia R.; Hur, Kwan; Lu, Bo; Marcus, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine long-term effects on substance use and substance use disorder (SUD), up to 8 years after childhood enrollment, of the randomly assigned 14-month treatments in the multisite Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (MTA; n = 436); to test whether medication at follow-up, cumulative…

  1. CD36 selection of 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum associated with severe childhood malaria results in reduced VAR4 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magistrado, Pamela; Staalsoe, Trine; Theander, Thor; Hviid, Lars; Jensen, Anja

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A subset of the Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1SM) is involved in the cytoadherence of P. falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBC) contributing to the pathogenesis of severe disease among young children in malaria endemic areas. The PfEMP1SM are...... encoded by group A var genes that are composed of a more constrained range of amino acid sequences than groups B and C var genes encoding PfEMP1UM associated with uncomplicated malaria. Also, unlike var genes from groups B and C, those from group A do not have sequences consistent with CD36 binding - a...... phenotype of the 3D7SM parasites was determined by flow cytometry using malaria semi-immune and immune plasma and transcription of the 59 var genes in 3D7 were analysed by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using var-specific primers. RESULTS: A selection...

  2. A randomized, open-label, comparative efficacy trial of artemether-lumefantrine suspension versus artemether-lumefantrine tablets for treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in children in western Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Akhwale Willis S; Obonyo Charles O; Juma Elizabeth A; Ogutu Bernhards R

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Artemether/lumefantrine (AL) has been adopted as the treatment of choice for uncomplicated malaria in Kenya and other countries in the region. Six-dose artemether/lumefantrine tablets are highly effective and safe for the treatment of infants and children weighing between five and 25 kg with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However, oral paediatric formulations are urgently needed, as the tablets are difficult to administer to young children, who cannot swallow...

  3. Artemether-Lumefantrine Combination Therapy for Treatment of Uncomplicated Malaria: The Potential for Complex Interactions with Antiretroviral Drugs in HIV-Infected Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Byakika-Kibwika

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of malaria in HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART poses significant challenges. Artemether-lumefantrine (AL is one of the artemisisnin-based combination therapies recommended for treatment of malaria. The drug combination is highly efficacious against sensitive and multidrug resistant falciparum malaria. Both artemether and lumefantrine are metabolized by hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450 enzymes which metabolize the protease inhibitors (PIs and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs used for HIV treatment. Coadministration of NNRTIs and PIs with AL could potentially cause complex pharmacokinetic drug interactions. NNRTI by inducing CYP450 3A4 enzyme and PIs by inhibiting CYP450 3A4 enzymes could influence both artemether and lumefantrine concentrations and their active metabolites dihydroartemisinin and desbutyl-lumefantrine, predisposing patients to poor treatment response, toxicity, and risk for development of resistance. There are scanty data on these interactions and their consequences. Pharmacokinetic studies to evaluate these interactions in the target populations are urgently needed.

  4. Bedtime problems and night wakings: treatment of behavioral insomnia of childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Melisa

    2010-11-01

    Bedtime problems and frequent night wakings are common sleep problems in infants and toddlers, affecting 20 to 30% of young children. Such problems, categorized as behavioral insomnia of childhood (BIC), lead to insufficient sleep, which contributes to multiple domains of child dysfunction. Behavioral treatments of BIC, such as extinction and positive routines are introduced, and supporting evidence is reviewed. Critical factors in developing a successful treatment plan include conducting a detailed assessment, collaboratively developing a plan that starts where the family is, and providing support between sessions. A case of a 3-year-old girl with BIC illustrates how treatment helped her to develop healthy sleep habits and taught her to sleep independently via graduated and standard extinction. PMID:20865768

  5. The Influence of Familial Predisposition to Cardiovascular Complications upon Childhood Obesity Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Louise A; Bøjsøe, Christine; Kloppenborg, Julie T;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to investigate whether a familial predisposition to obesity related cardiovascular complications was associated with the degree of obesity at baseline and/or changes in the degree of obesity during a multidisciplinary childhood obesity treatment program. METHODS: The study...... included 1421 obese children (634 boys) with a median age of 11.5 years (range 3.1-17.9 years), enrolled in treatment for 0.04 to 5.90 years (median 1.3 years) at the Children's Obesity Clinic, Denmark. At baseline, weight and height were measured, body mass index (BMI) standard deviation score (SDS......) calculated, and self-reported information on familial predisposition to obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), thromboembolic events, and dyslipidaemia were obtained. A familial predisposition included events in biological parents, siblings, grandparents, uncles, and aunts. The treatment...

  6. Hearing 25 years after surgical treatment of otitis media with effusion in early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khodaverdi, M; Jørgensen, G; Lange, T; Stangerup, SE; Drozdziewizc, D; Tos, M; Bonding, P; Cayé-Thomasen, P

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the long-term hearing following surgical treatment of chronic OME in early childhood (myringotomy or ventilation tube) and to determine the impact of the occurrence and the extension of specific eardrum pathology on the hearing level. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 1977-1978, 224...... age- and gender-matched normative data set. For the determination of the impact of specific eardrum pathology on the hearing, multiple linear regression modelling was used in adjustment for age and concomitant eardrum pathologies. RESULTS: Long-term hearing after chronic OME and associated treatment......B), but not in tubed ears, for which only high frequencies were affected. Conversely, tensa atrophy is associated with an overall hearing loss in tubed ears (3-4dB), but not in myringotomised ears, for which only high frequencies were affected. CONCLUSIONS: Hearing 25 years after surgical treatment of...

  7. A Behavioral Perspective of Childhood Trauma and Attachment Issues: Toward Alternative Treatment Approaches for Children with a History of Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Walter; Golden, Jeannie A.

    2009-01-01

    Attachment theory provides a useful conceptual framework for understanding trauma and the treatment of children who have been abused. This article examines childhood trauma and attachment issues from the perspective of behavior analysis, and provides a theoretical basis for two alternative treatment models for previously abused children and their…

  8. Malaria and Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov Malaria and Travelers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... may be at risk for infection. Determine if malaria transmission occurs at the destinations Obtain a detailed ...

  9. Stress Moderates the Effect of Childhood Trauma and Adversity on Recent Drinking in Treatment-seeking Alcohol-dependent Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Sarah F.; Businelle, Michael S.; Suris, Alina; Walker, Robrina; Rao, Uma; North, Carol S.; Xiao, Hong; Adinoff, Bryon

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study sought to clarify the relationship between childhood trauma and adversity with later alcohol consumption and the moderating effects of adult psychosocial stress. Method Seventy-seven recently abstinent alcohol-dependent men attending residential treatment programs were assessed. Childhood trauma/adversity was assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), drinks per drinking day (DDD) with the TimeLine Follow Back, and chronic psychosocial stress with the UCLA Stress Interview. Drinking and stress were retrospectively assessed for six months prior to the present treatment episode. Direct associations between childhood trauma/adversity and alcohol consumption and the moderating effects of recent psychosocial stress were assessed. All measures were considered as continuous variables. Results Pretreatment drinking severity (DDD) was associated with CTQ Total score (p = .009) and the Emotional Abuse (p < .001) and Physical Abuse (p < .01) subscales. UCLA Total Stress significantly moderated the effects of CTQ Total score on drinking severity (p = .04). Whereas higher CTQ scores were significantly associated with a greater amount of pretreatment drinking in participants with high UCLA stress scores (p = .01), CTQ scores were not associated with the amount of drinking in those with low UCLA stress scores (p = .63). Conclusions Childhood trauma predicts drinking severity in alcohol-dependent men and this effect is stronger in participants with ongoing stress in adult life. These findings suggest that early childhood trauma/adversity may sensitize stress-response systems. PMID:24635549

  10. Treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria with mefloquine alone or in combination with i.v. quinine at the Department of Communicable and Tropical Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen 1982-1988

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, P; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    1990-01-01

    At the Department of Communicable and Tropical Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, mefloquine has been used since 1982 for the treatment of patients with suspected or verified chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistant P. falciparum malaria. Eighty-one patients treated with mefloquine are...... found safe and effective for the treatment of P. falciparum malaria and is recommended for treatment of worldwide acquired P. falciparum malaria, although patients should be monitored closely to disclose resistance....... reviewed. Forty patients had complicated malaria; 18 were initially treated with IV quinine. Mefloquine dose for adults was 1,500 mg in one dose or divided in two with six hourly intervals. Mild gastrointestinal side effects were common; in 10 patients, the medication had to be repeated because of vomiting...

  11. Safety and efficacy of lumefantrine-artemether (Coartem® for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Zambian adults

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    Mulenga Modest

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Zambia, unacceptably high resistance to commonly used antimalarial drugs prompted the choice of artemether-lumefantrine (AL as first line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Although the safety and efficacy of AL have been extensively documented, no clinical trials had been carried out in Zambia. Methods Nine hundred seventy one adult patients with uncomplicated malaria were randomized to either sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP(486 or AL (485 and followed up for 45 days. Outcome of treatment was defined according to the standard WHO classification. Recurrent parasitaemia were genotyped to distinguish between recrudescence and new infection. Results Fever at day 3 was significantly lower (AL: 0.9%; 4/455; SP: 3,5%; 15/433; p = 0.007 and the mean haemoglobin at day 45 significantly higher (AL: 134 g/l; SP 130 g/l; p = 0.02 in the AL group. Almost all clinical symptoms cleared faster with AL. Early treatment failure was significantly higher in the SP (25/464 than in the AL (2/463 (OR: 13.1 95% CI: 3.08–55.50; P Conclusion In Zambia, the new first line regimen AL is far more efficacious than SP in treating uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in adults. Data on safety and efficacy of AL in pregnant women are urgently needed.

  12. Pityriasis Lichenoides in Childhood: Review of Clinical Presentation and Treatment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Lauren; Antonov, Nina K; Lauren, Christine T; Morel, Kimberly D; Garzon, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    Pityriasis lichenoides (PL) is a skin condition of unclear etiology that occurs not uncommonly in childhood. It is often classified into the acute form, pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta (PLEVA), and the chronic form, pityriasis lichenoides chronica (PLC). We performed a comprehensive review of the English-language literature using the PubMed database of all cases of childhood PL reported from 1962 to 2014 and summarized the epidemiology, clinical features, treatment options, and prognosis of this condition in children. The proposed etiologies are discussed, including its association with infectious agents, medications, and immunizations and evidence for PL as a lymphoproliferative disorder. We found an average age of PL onset of 6.5 years, with a slight (61%) male predominance. We also found that PLEVA and PLC tend to occur with equal frequency and that, in many cases, there is clinical and histopathologic overlap between the two phenotypes. When systemic therapy is indicated, we propose that oral erythromycin and narrowband ultraviolet B phototherapy should be first-line treatment options for children with PL since they have been shown to be effective and well tolerated. In most cases, PL follows a benign course with no greater risk of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, although given the rare case reports of transformation, long-term follow-up of these patients is recommended. PMID:25816855

  13. Fertility treatment and the risk of childhood and adolescent mental disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Bjørn; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2013-01-01

    embryos were used in the treatments. Limitations, reason for caution The study did not include information on parental psychiatric history and since it is well known that mental disorders run in families, this could explain our findings if children conceived after OI/IUI were born by parents with a higher......Abstract Study question We compared the risk of mental disorders in childhood and adolescence between children born after fertility treatments with in vitro fertilization (IVF), intra cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) or ovulation induction (OI) with or without insemination (IUI) and children born...... after spontaneously conception. Summary answer We found an increased risk of mental disorders in children born after OI/IUI, while children born after IVF/ICSI were found to have overall comparable risk with children conceived spontaneously. What is known already Several follow-up studies have been...

  14. The combined effect of determinants on coverage of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy in the Kilombero Valley, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellenberg Joanna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy (IPTp at routine antenatal care (ANC clinics is an important and efficacious intervention to reduce adverse health outcomes of malaria infections during pregnancy. However, coverage for the recommended two IPTp doses is still far below the 80% target in Tanzania. This paper investigates the combined impact of pregnant women's timing of ANC attendance, health workers' IPTp delivery and different delivery schedules of national IPTp guidelines on IPTp coverage. Methods Data on pregnant women's ANC attendance and health workers' IPTp delivery were collected from ANC card records during structured exit interviews with ANC attendees and through semi-structured interviews with health workers in south-eastern Tanzania. Women's timing of ANC visits and health worker's timing of IPTp delivery were analyzed in relation to the different national IPTp schedules and the outcome on IPTp coverage was modelled. Results Among all women eligible for IPTp, 79% received a first dose of IPTp and 27% were given a second dose. Although pregnant women initiated ANC attendance late, their timing was in line with the national guidelines recommending IPTp delivery between 20-24 weeks and 28-32 weeks of gestation. Only 15% of the women delayed to the extent of being too late to be eligible for a first dose of IPTp. Less than 1% of women started ANC attendance after 32 weeks of gestation. During the second IPTp delivery period health workers delivered IPTp to significantly less women than during the first one (55% vs. 73% contributing to low second dose coverage. Simplified IPTp guidelines for front-line health workers as recommended by WHO could lead to a 20 percentage point increase in IPTp coverage. Conclusions This study suggests that facility and policy factors are greater barriers to IPTp coverage than women's timing of ANC attendance. To maximize the benefit of the IPTp intervention, revision of

  15. Reduced risk of malaria parasitemia following household screening and treatment: a cross-sectional and longitudinal cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine G Sutcliffe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In regions of declining malaria transmission, new strategies for control are needed to reduce transmission and achieve elimination. Artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT is active against immature gametocytes and can reduce the risk of transmission. We sought to determine whether household screening and treatment of infected individuals provides protection against infection for household members. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study was conducted in two areas in Southern Province, Zambia in 2007 and 2008/2009. To determine the impact of proactive case detection, households were randomly selected either to join a longitudinal cohort, in which participants were repeatedly screened throughout the year and those infected treated with artemether-lumefantrine, or a cross-sectional survey, in which participants were visited only once. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted throughout the year. The prevalence of RDT positivity was compared between the longitudinal and cross-sectional households at baseline and during follow-up using multilevel logistic regression. In the 2007 study area, 174 and 156 participants enrolled in the cross-sectional and longitudinal groups, respectively. In the 2008/2009 study area, 917 and 234 participants enrolled in the cross-sectional and longitudinal groups, respectively. In both study areas, participants and households in the longitudinal and cross-sectional groups were similar on demographic characteristics and prevalence of RDT positivity at baseline (2007: OR = 0.97; 95% CI:0.46, 2.03 | 2008/2009: OR = 1.28; 95% CI:0.44, 3.79. After baseline, the prevalence of RDT positivity was significantly lower in longitudinal compared to cross-sectional households in both study areas (2007: OR = 0.44; 95% CI:0.20, 0.96 | 2008/2009: OR = 0.16; 95% CI:0.05, 0.55. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Proactive case detection, consisting of screening household members with an RDT and treating those positive with

  16. The role of anti-malarial drugs in eliminating malaria.

    OpenAIRE

    White, NJ

    2008-01-01

    Effective anti-malarial drug treatment reduces malaria transmission. This alone can reduce the incidence and prevalence of malaria, although the effects are greater in areas of low transmission where a greater proportion of the infectious reservoir is symptomatic and receives anti-malarial treatment. Effective treatment has greater effects on the transmission of falciparum malaria, where gametocytogenesis is delayed, compared with the other human malarias in which peak gametocytaemia and tran...

  17. The role of anti-malarial drugs in eliminating malaria

    OpenAIRE

    White Nicholas J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Effective anti-malarial drug treatment reduces malaria transmission. This alone can reduce the incidence and prevalence of malaria, although the effects are greater in areas of low transmission where a greater proportion of the infectious reservoir is symptomatic and receives anti-malarial treatment. Effective treatment has greater effects on the transmission of falciparum malaria, where gametocytogenesis is delayed, compared with the other human malarias in which peak gametocytaemia...

  18. Prevalence of Malaria and Treatment Seeking Behaviours among Pregnant Women in Postconflict Internally Displaced Persons' Camps in Gulu District

    OpenAIRE

    Obol James Henry; Kitara David Lagoro; Christopher Garimoi Orach

    2012-01-01

    Background. Malaria is a serious health problem that contributes greatly to morbidity and mortality in Uganda. It mainly affects pregnant women and children under 5 years of age. Malaria accounts for 9–14% of inpatient deaths in public and private not-for-profit health facilities in Uganda. Methods. A cross-sectional study using quantitative data collection technique was carried out in Gulu district IDP camps. Proportion to size cluster sampling method was used to determine the numbers of pre...

  19. New emerging drug-resistant malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2010-01-01

    Viroj WiwanitkitWiwanitkit House, Bangkhae, Bangkok ThailandDate of preparation: 20th August 2008Conflict of interest: None declaredClinical question: What is the best treatment for artemisinin-resistant malaria?Results: There is still no better treatment than the presently used artemisinin-based combination therapies. A new antimalarial drug for this problem needs to be found.Implementation: Pitfalls to avoid when treating drug-resistant malaria:Keywords: malaria, drug resistance

  20. Systemic Retinoid Treatment in Childhood Psoriasis: Experience of 19 Mayıs Univer

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    Müge Güler Özden

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Severe psoriasis in childhood has a significant morbidity and can warrant the use of systemic agents, although there are very little information in this group. We aimed to show the results of acitretin treatment in children with severe psoriasis, in this study.Material and Method: We have retrospectively reviewed the notes of all 18 children treated with acitretin at Ondokuz Mayıs University Hospital. Patients’ responses to treatment, total treatment durations and acitretine dosage were recorded. Additionally, the laboratory results during the whole follow-up period and bone surveys for 3 patients who received long term treatment were evaluated.Results: Of the 18 patients reviewed, 2 (%11.1 responded with clearance of psoriasis, 10 (%55.5 responded well with small residual plaques. Two patients needed two courses of acitretine (11 and 12 months, 1 patient needed three courses for 15 months and 1 needed 5 courses for 24 months. Two patients stopped treatment due to mucocutaneous side effects at 4th and 5th months. There were no other adverse events.Conclusion: We propose that when carefully monitored, acitretine is a safe and efficacious treatment option for severe psoriasis in children.

  1. Cerebral Malaria in Children: a Case Report

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    K Keshavarz

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria is an acute and chronic illness characterized by paroxysms of fever, chills, sweating, fatigue, anemia, and splenomegaly. Most malarial deaths occur in infants and young children. Plasmodium falciparum causes the most severe form of malaria and is associated with more intense parasitemia. A manifestation of severe disease most common in young children includes cerebral malaria. Mortality rate of cerebral malaria is 20 to 40%. Malaria acquired in P. falciparum areas with known chloroquine resistance or where there is any malaria hotline should generally be treated with drugs other than chloroquine. In this paper we introduce a case of cerebral malaria from Zahedan/Iran. Case report: A 13-year old girl is presented with fever, jaundice, pallor and seizure. She was treated initially with chloroquine and premaquine. During treatment she developed convulsions with decreased level of consciousness. Suspecting chloroquine resistance this was substituted by quinine. After three days, she recovered completely and blood smear was free of parasites

  2. Childhood and Adult Trauma Experiences of Incarcerated Persons and Their Relationship to Adult Behavioral Health Problems and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Rates of childhood and adult trauma are high among incarcerated persons. In addition to criminality, childhood trauma is associated with the risk for emotional disorders (e.g., depression and anxiety and co-morbid conditions such as alcohol and drug abuse and antisocial behaviors in adulthood. This paper develops rates of childhood and adult trauma and examines the impact of age-of-onset and type-specific trauma on emotional problems and behavior for a sample of incarcerated males (N~4,000. Prevalence estimates for types of trauma were constructed by age at time of trauma, race and types of behavioral health treatment received while incarcerated. HLM models were used to explore the association between childhood and adult trauma and depression, anxiety, substance use, interpersonal problems, and aggression problems (each model estimated separately and controlling for age, gender, race, time incarcerated, and index offense. Rates of physical, sexual, and emotional trauma were higher in childhood than adulthood and ranged from 44.7% (physical trauma in childhood to 4.5% (sexual trauma in adulthood. Trauma exposure was found to be strongly associated with a wide range of behavioral problems and clinical symptoms. Given the sheer numbers of incarcerated men and the strength of these associations, targeted intervention is critical.

  3. Within-Host Selection of Drug Resistance in a Mouse Model of Repeated Incomplete Malaria Treatment: Comparison between Atovaquone and Pyrimethamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuralitha, Suci; Siregar, Josephine E; Syafruddin, Din; Roelands, Jessica; Verhoef, Jan; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Marzuki, Sangkot

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary selection of malaria parasites within individual hosts is an important factor in the emergence of drug resistance but is still not well understood. We have examined the selection process for drug resistance in the mouse malaria agent Plasmodium berghei and compared the dynamics of the selection for atovaquone and pyrimethamine. Resistance to these drugs has been shown to be associated with genetic lesions in the dihydrofolate reductase gene in the case of pyrimethamine and in the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene for atovaquone. A mouse malaria model for the selection of drug resistance, based on repeated incomplete treatment (RICT) with a therapeutic dose of antimalarial drugs, was established. The number of treatment cycles for the development of stable resistance to atovaquone (2.47 ± 0.70; n = 19) was found to be significantly lower than for pyrimethamine (5.44 ± 1.46; n = 16; P < 0.0001), even when the parental P. berghei Leiden strain was cloned prior to the resistance selection. Similar results were obtained with P. berghei Edinburgh. Mutational changes underlying the resistance were identified to be S110N in dihydrofolate reductase for pyrimethamine and Y268N, Y268C, Y268S, L271V-K272R, and G280D in cytochrome b for atovaquone. These results are consistent with the rate of mitochondrial DNA mutation being higher than that in the nucleus and suggest that mutation leading to pyrimethamine resistance is not a rare event. PMID:26503662

  4. The Association of K76T Mutation in Pfcrt Gene and Chloroquine Treatment Failure in Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in a Cohort of Nigerian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, R. A.; Hassan, S. W.; Ladan, M. J.; Nma Jiya, M.; Abubakar, M. K.; Nata`Ala, U.

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of K76T mutation in Pfcrt gene and chloroquine treatment failure following reports that the efficacy of chloroquine in the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Africa is seriously compromised by high levels of drug resistance. The occurrence of mutation on codon 76 of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (Pfcrt) gene has been associated with development of resistance to chloroquine. We investigated the association of K76T mutation in Pfcrt gene in malaria-infected blood samples from a cohort of Nigerian children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria treated with chloroquine and its association with clinical (in vivo) resistance. The Pfcrt T76 allele was very significantly associated with resistance to chloroquine (Fischer exact test: p = 0.0001). We conclude that K76T mutation in Pfcrt gene is significantly associated with chloroquine resistance and that it could be used as a population marker for chloroquine resistance in this part of the country

  5. A community-based delivery system of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy and its effect on use of essential maternity care at health units in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Bygbjerg, I C; Magnussen, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    -randomised community trial assessed a new delivery system of IPTp through traditional birth attendants, drug shop vendors, community reproductive health workers and adolescent peer mobilisers (the intervention) compared with IPTp at health units (control). The study enrolled a total of 2081 pregnant women with the new......Community delivery of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) is one potential option that could mitigate malaria in pregnancy. However, there is concern that this approach may lead to complacency among women with low access to essential care at health units. A non...... approaches. Data on care-seeking practices before and after the intervention were collected. The majority of women with the new approaches accessed IPTp in the second trimester and adhered to two doses of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) (1404/2081; 67.5%). Antenatal care (four recommended visits) increased...

  6. Etiology, Treatment and Prevention of Obesity in Childhood and Adolescence: A Decade in Review

    OpenAIRE

    Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Childhood obesity has become an epidemic on a worldwide scale. This article gives an overview of the progress made in childhood and adolescent obesity research in the last decade, with a particular emphasis on the transdisciplinary and complex nature of the problem. The following topics are addressed: 1) current definitions of childhood and adolescent overweight and obesity; 2) demography of childhood and adolescent obesity both in the US and globally; 3) current topics in the physiology of f...

  7. A randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Peru.

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    Tanilu Grande

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multi-drug resistant falciparum malaria is an important health problem in the Peruvian Amazon region. We carried out a randomised open label clinical trial comparing mefloquine-artesunate, the current first line treatment in this region, with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Between July 2003 and July 2005, 522 patients with P. falciparum uncomplicated malaria were recruited, randomized (260 with mefloquine-artesunate and 262 with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, treated and followed up for 63 days. PCR-adjusted adequate clinical and parasitological response, estimated by Kaplan Meier survival and Per Protocol analysis, was extremely high for both drugs (99.6% for mefloquine-artesunate and 98.4% and for dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (RR: 0.99, 95%CI [0.97-1.01], Fisher Exact p = 0.21. All recrudescences were late parasitological failures. Overall, gametocytes were cleared faster in the mefloquine-artesunate group (28 vs 35 days and new gametocytes tended to appear more frequently in patients treated with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (day 7: 8 (3.6% vs 2 (0.9%, RR: 3.84, 95%CI [0.82-17.87]. Adverse events such as anxiety and insomnia were significantly more frequent in the mefloquine-artesunate group, both in adults and children. CONCLUSION: Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine is as effective as mefloquine-artesunate in treating uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria but it is better tolerated and more affordable than mefloquine-artesunate (US$1.0 versus US$18.65 on the local market. Therefore, it should be considered as a potential candidate for the first line treatment of P. falciparum malaria in Peru. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00373607.

  8. Therapeutic efficacy trial of artemisinin-based combination therapy for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria and investigation of mutations in k13 propeller domain in Togo, 2012–2013

    OpenAIRE

    Dorkenoo, Améyo M.; Yehadji, Degninou; Agbo, Yao M.; Layibo, Yao; Agbeko, Foli; Adjeloh, Poukpessi; Yakpa, Kossi; Sossou, Efoe; Awokou, Fantchè; Ringwald, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Background Since 2005, the Togo National Malaria Control Programme has recommended two different formulations of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), artesunate–amodiaquine (ASAQ) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL), for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Regular efficacy monitoring of these two combinations is conducted every 2 or 3 years. This paper reports the latest efficacy assessment results and the investigation of mutations in the k13 propeller domain. Methods The study was ...

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of childhood intussusception using rea-time ultrasonography and saline enema: preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosis and successful reduction of intussusception using realtime ultrasonography and saline enema was reported in 2 cases of ileocolic childhood intussusception. The principle of this saline enema is the same with barium enema in terms of hydrostatic reduction. But barium and fluoroscopy were replaced by warm normal saline and realtime ultrasonography. Characteristic ultrasonographic findings of intussusception prior to and during the saline enema were well demonstrated. Reduction process of intussusception could be traced by real time scan along the course of the colon and successful reduction could be confirmed by ultrasonography alone. Ultrasonographic evidences of successful reduction were loss of echogenic mass with rapid turbulent flow of saline in cecum and absence of target sign in ultrasonography after evaluation of saline. This new method not only is free from radiation exposure and risk of barium peritonitis but also shows characteristic ultrasonographic findings of intussusception as specific as barium enema. Therefore it is expected that hydrostatic saline enema with reatime ultrasonography can replace the barium enema as a treatment of choice of childhood intussusception

  10. Characteristics and Outcomes of Second Malignant Neoplasms after Childhood Cancer Treatment: Multi-Center Retrospective Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kyung-Nam; Yoo, Keon Hee; Im, Ho Joon; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe; Kim, Hyo Sun; Han, Jung Woo; Yoon, Jong Hyung; Park, Hyeon Jin; Park, Byung-Kiu; Baek, Hee Jo; Kook, Hoon; Lee, Jun Ah; Lee, Jae Min; Lee, Kwang Chul; Kim, Soon Ki; Park, Meerim; Lee, Young-Ho; Lyu, Chuhl Joo; Seo, Jong Jin

    2016-08-01

    This retrospective study investigated the clinical characteristics and outcomes of second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) in survivors of childhood cancer from multiple institutions in Korea. A total of 102 patients from 11 institutions who developed SMN after childhood cancer treatment between 1998 and 2011 were retrospectively enrolled. The most common primary malignant neoplasms (PMNs) were central nervous system (CNS) tumors (n = 17), followed by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 16), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 13), and osteosarcoma (n = 12). The most common SMNs were therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MNs; acute myeloid leukemia [AML], 29 cases; myelodysplastic syndrome [MDS], 12 cases), followed by thyroid carcinomas (n = 15) and CNS tumors (n = 10). The median latency period was 4.9 years (range, 0.5-18.5 years). Among 45 patients with solid tumors defined as an SMN, 15 (33%) developed the lesion in a field previously subjected to radiation. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate of patients with an SMN was 45% with a median follow-up time of 8.6 years. Patients with AML, MDS, and CNS tumors exhibited the poorest outcomes with 5-year OS rates of 18%, 33%, and 32%, respectively, whereas those with second osteosarcoma showed comparable outcomes (64%) to patients with primary counterpart and those with second thyroid carcinoma had a 100% OS rate. Further therapeutic efforts are recommended to improve the survival outcomes in patients with SMNs, especially in cases with t-MNs and CNS tumors. PMID:27478336

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of childhood intussusception using rea-time ultrasonography and saline enema: preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Goo; Choi, B. I.; Yeon, K. M.; Kim, J. W. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1982-12-15

    Diagnosis and successful reduction of intussusception using realtime ultrasonography and saline enema was reported in 2 cases of ileocolic childhood intussusception. The principle of this saline enema is the same with barium enema in terms of hydrostatic reduction. But barium and fluoroscopy were replaced by warm normal saline and realtime ultrasonography. Characteristic ultrasonographic findings of intussusception prior to and during the saline enema were well demonstrated. Reduction process of intussusception could be traced by real time scan along the course of the colon and successful reduction could be confirmed by ultrasonography alone. Ultrasonographic evidences of successful reduction were loss of echogenic mass with rapid turbulent flow of saline in cecum and absence of target sign in ultrasonography after evaluation of saline. This new method not only is free from radiation exposure and risk of barium peritonitis but also shows characteristic ultrasonographic findings of intussusception as specific as barium enema. Therefore it is expected that hydrostatic saline enema with reatime ultrasonography can replace the barium enema as a treatment of choice of childhood intussusception

  12. Comparative study of the efficacy and tolerability of dihydroartemisinin - piperaquine - trimethoprim versus artemether - lumefantrine in the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Cameroon, Ivory Coast and Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavo William

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ACT recommended by WHO is very effective and well-tolerated. However, these combinations need to be administered for three days, which may limit adherence to treatment. The combination of dihydroartemisinin - piperaquine phosphate - trimethoprim (Artecom®, Odypharm Ltd, which involves treatment over two days, appears to be a good alternative, particularly in malaria-endemic areas. This study intends to compare the efficacy and tolerability of the combination dihydroartemisinin - piperaquine phosphate - trimethoprim (DPT versus artemether - lumefantrine (AL in the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Cameroon, Ivory Coast and Senegal. Methods This was a randomized, controlled, open-label clinical trial with a 28-day follow-up period comparing DPT to AL as the reference drug. The study involved patients of at least two years of age, suffering from acute, uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria with fever. The WHO 2003 protocol was used. Results A total of 418 patients were included in the study and divided into two treatment groups: 212 in the DPT group and 206 in the AL group. The data analysis involved the 403 subjects who correctly followed the protocol (per protocol analysis, i.e. 206 (51.1% in the DPT group and 197 (48.9% in the AL group. The recovery rate at D14 was 100% in both treatment groups. The recovery rate at D28 was 99% in the DPT and AL groups before and after PCR results with one-sided 97.5% Confidence Interval of the rates difference > -1.90%. More than 96% of patients who received DPT were apyrexial 48 hours after treatment compared to 83.5% in the AL group (p Conclusion The overall efficacy and tolerability of DPT are similar to those of AL. The ease of taking DPT and its short treatment course (two days may help to improve adherence to treatment. Taken together, these findings make this medicinal product a treatment of choice for the effective management of malaria in Africa.

  13. Etiology, Treatment, and Prevention of Obesity in Childhood and Adolescence: A Decade in Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Childhood obesity has become an epidemic on a worldwide scale. This article gives an overview of the progress made in childhood and adolescent obesity research in the last decade, with a particular emphasis on the transdisciplinary and complex nature of the problem. The following topics are addressed: (1) current definitions of childhood and…

  14. Childhood Tuberculosis in a Sub-Saharan Tertiary Facility: Epidemiology and Factors Associated with Treatment Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsiona, Christian; Fueza, Serge Bisuta; Kokolomami, Jack; Bolie, Grace; Lumbala, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Childhood tuberculosis (TB) is a diagnostic challenge in developing countries, and patient outcome can be influenced by certain factors. We report the disease course, clinical profile and factors associated with treatment outcome in a tertiary facility of Kinshasa. Documentary and analytical studies were conducted using clinical and exploratory data for children aged up to 15 years who were admitted to the University Clinics of Kinshasa for TB. Data are presented as frequencies and averages, and binary and logistic regression analyses were performed. Of 283 children with TB, 82 (29.0%) had smear-negative TB, 40 (14.1%) had smear-positive TB, 159 (56.1%) had extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB), 2 (0.7%) had multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), 167 (59.0%) completed treatment, 30 (10.6%) were cured, 7 (2.5%) failed treatment, 4 (1.4%) died, 55 (19.4%) were transferred to health centers nearest their home, and 20 (7.0%) were defaulters. In the binary analysis, reported TB contacts (p = 0.048), type of TB (p = 0.000), HIV status (p = 0.050), Ziehl-Nielsen test result (p = 0.000), Lowenstein culture (p = 0.004) and chest X-ray (p = 0.057) were associated with outcome. In the logistic regression, none of these factors was a significant predictor of outcome. Tertiary level care facilities must improve the diagnosis and care of patients with childhood TB, which justifies the development of alternative diagnostic techniques and the assessment of other factors that potentially affect outcome. PMID:27101146

  15. New dosimetry for childhood skin hemangioma treatments with 226Ra needles or tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The Stockholm Hemangioma Cohort is important for evaluation of late effects after exposure to ionizing radiation during childhood. Dose estimates in this cohort were based on both measurements and calculations using an old treatment planning system. Methods: We compare previously published and calculated dose estimates with new ones, obtained by Monte Carlo simulations, which mimic the hemangioma treatments with 226Ra needles and tubes. The distances between the 226Ra sources and the thyroid and breasts, respectively, were reassessed. Result: The Monte Carlo calculations showed significantly lower dose values than those obtained earlier. The differences depended both on the modeling of the sources and on further individualized distances from the sources. The mean value of the new calculated doses was 25% of the old breast doses and 46% of the old thyroid doses. Conclusion: New dosimetry for hemangioma treatments gives significantly lower organ doses for the few cases receiving the highest absorbed dose values. This implies that radiation risk estimates will increase and have to be recalculated. For retrospective studies it is now possible to calculate organ doses from radium treatments using modern treatment planning systems by modeling the source geometry carefully and apply the TG-43 formalism. It is important to be aware of the large uncertainties in calculated absorbed dose values

  16. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF UNCOMPLICATED AND SEVERE MALARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Bartoloni

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The first symptoms of malaria, common to all the different malaria species, are nonspecific and mimic a flu-like syndrome. Although fever represents the cardinal feature, clinical findings in malaria are extremely diverse and may range in severity from mild headache to serious complications leading to death, particularly in falciparum malaria. As the progression to these complications can be rapid, any malaria patient must be assessed and treated rapidly, and frequent observations are needed to look for early signs of systemic complications. In fact, severe malaria is a life threatening but treatable disease.  The protean and nonspecific clinical findings occurring in malaria (fever, malaise, headache, myalgias, jaundice and sometimes gastrointestinal symptoms of nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea may lead physicians who see malaria infrequently to a wrong diagnosis, such as influenza (particularly during the seasonal epidemic flu, dengue, gastroenteritis, typhoid fever, viral hepatitis, encephalitis. Physicians should be aware that malaria is not a clinical diagnosis but must be diagnosed, or excluded, by performing microscopic examination of blood films. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment are then crucial to prevent morbidity and fatal outcomes. Although Plasmodium falciparum malaria is the major cause of severe malaria and death, increasing evidence has recently emerged that Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi can also be severe and even fatal.

  17. Predictors of health worker performance after Integrated Management of Childhood Illness training in Benin: a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Steinhardt, Laura C.; Onikpo, Faustin; Kouamé, Julien; Piercefield, Emily; Lama, Marcel; Deming, Michael S.; Rowe, Alexander K

    2015-01-01

    Background Correct treatment of potentially life-threatening illnesses (PLTIs) in children under 5 years, such as malaria, pneumonia, and diarrhea, can substantially reduce mortality. The Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) strategy has been shown to improve treatment of child illnesses, but multiple studies have shown that gaps in health worker performance remain after training. To better understand factors related to health worker performance, we analyzed 9,330 patient consult...

  18. A fixed-dose 24-hour regimen of artesunate plus sulfamethoxypyrazine-pyrimethamine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in eastern Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Ishag; Magzoub, Mamoun; Osman, Maha E;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Artemisinin-based combination therapy is increasingly being adopted as first-line antimalarial therapy. The choice of appropriate therapy depends on efficacy, cost, side effects, and simplicity of administration. METHODS: the efficacy of fixed co-formulated (f) artesunate...... the patients. CONCLUSION: both regimens of AS+SMP were effective and safe for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in eastern Sudan. Due to its simplicity, the fixed dose one-day treatment regimen may improve compliance and therefore may be the preferred choice....

  19. Price Subsidies, Diagnostic Tests, and Targeting of Malaria Treatment: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Dupas, Pascaline; Cohen, Jessica; Schaner, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Both under- and over-treatment of communicable diseases are public bads. But efforts to decrease one run the risk of increasing the other. Using rich experimental data on household treatment- seeking behavior in Kenya, we study the implications of this trade-off for subsidizing life-saving antimalarials sold over-the-counter at retail drug outlets. We show that a very high subsidy (such as the one under consideration by the international community) dramatically increases access, but nearly on...

  20. Outcome of treatment in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with rearrangements of the 11q23 chromosomal region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pui, CH; Gaynon, PS; Boyett, JM; Chessells, JM; Baruchel, A; Kamps, W; Silverman, LB; Biondi, A; Harms, DO; Vilmer, E; Schrappe, M; Camitta, B

    2002-01-01

    Background The prognosis and optimum treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) with abnormalities of chromosomal band 11q23 are controversial. We aimed to identify prognostic factors that might help in planning future therapy, and to assess the effectiveness of haemopoietic stem-cel

  1. Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE) in childhood: rapid resolution after intravenous immunoglobulins treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, P; Le Pira, A; Greco, F; Vitaliti, G; Smilari, P L; Parano, E; Falsaperla, R

    2014-01-01

    Three young patients with Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE) are reported. Some weeks following an upper tract infection, the children after a short period of recovery, showed acute onset of symmetric weakness of the lower limbs with difficulty in standing by and walking. The distal muscle weakness had a rapid progression with involvement of the cranial nerve, and then with severe impairment of the consciousness till to coma in one of the three children. BBE is a rare and often underdiagnosed affection in childhood. Common neuro-immune pathogenesis, overlap of clinical signs and strict correlation among BBE with Fisher syndrome and Guillain-Barrè syndrome lead to think that these affections represent an unique spectrum with different central and peripheral involvement. In these children, treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins resulted in a progressive and rapid resolution of the clinical features. PMID:25268095

  2. Efficacy of fixed-dose combination artesunate-amodiaquine versus artemether-lumefantrine for uncomplicated childhood Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Democratic Republic of Congo: a randomized non-inferiority trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espié Emmanuelle

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2005, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC adopted artesunate and amodiaquine (ASAQ as first-line anti-malarial treatment. In order to compare the efficacy of the fixed-dose formulation ASAQ versus artemether-lumefantrine (AL, a randomized, non-inferiority open-label trial was conducted in Katanga. Methods Children aged six and 59 months with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria were enrolled and randomly allocated into one of the two regimens. The risk of recurrent parasitaemia by day 42, both unadjusted and adjusted by PCR genotyping to distinguish recrudescence from new infection, was analysed. Results Between April 2008 and March 2009, 301 children were included: 156 with ASAQ and 145 with AL. No early treatment failures were reported. Among the 256 patients followed-up at day 42, 32 patients developed late clinical or parasitological failure (9.9% (13/131 in the ASAQ group and 15.2% (19/125 in the AL group. After PCR correction, cure rates were 98.3% (95%CI, 94.1-99.8 in the ASAQ group and 99.1% (95%CI, 94.9-99.9 in the AL group (difference −0.7%, one sided 95% CI −3.1. Kaplan-Meier PCR-adjusted cure rates were similar. Both treatment regimens were generally well tolerated. Conclusion Both ASAQ and AL are highly effective and currently adequate as the first-line treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in this area of Katanga, DRC. However, in a very large country, such as DRC, and because of possible emergence of resistance from other endemic regions, surveillance of efficacy of artemisinin-based combination treatments, including other evaluations of the resistance of ASAQ, need to be done in other provinces. Trial registration The protocol was registered with the clinicaltrials.gov, open clinical trial registry under the identifier number NCT01567423.

  3. Systemic and cerebral vascular endothelial growth factor levels increase in murine cerebral malaria along with increased calpain and caspase activity and can be reduced by erythropoietin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper eHempel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of cerebral malaria includes compromised microvascular perfusion, increased inflammation, cytoadhesion and endothelial activation. These events cause blood-brain barrier disruption and neuropathology and can be associated with the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF signalling pathway. We studied this pathway in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA causing murine cerebral malaria with or without the use of erythropoietin as adjunct therapy. ELISA and western blotting was used for quantification of VEGF and relevant proteins in brain and plasma. Cerebral malaria increased levels of VEGF in brain and plasma and decreased plasma levels of soluble VEGF receptor 2. Erythropoietin treatment normalised VEGF receptor 2 levels and reduced brain VEGF levels. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α was significantly upregulated whereas cerebral HIF-2α and erythropoietin levels remained unchanged. Furthermore, we noticed increased caspase-3 and calpain activity in terminally ill mice, as measured by protease-specific cleavage of α-spectrin and p35. In conclusion, we detected increased cerebral and systemic VEGF as well as HIF-1α, which in the brain were reduced to normal in erythropoietin-treated mice. Also caspase and calpain activity was reduced markedly in erythropoietin-treated mice.

  4. Maltreatment in early childhood: a scoping review of prevention, detection and treatment

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    Luis Lefio Celedón

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To identify and synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of interventions for universal prevention, detection and treatment of early childhood maltreatment (0-4 years. Design. Scoping Review. Data sources. MEDLINE, LILACS, PsycINFO, Psyclist, SciELO, ISI Web of Knowledge, Science Direct, EBSCO, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, DARE, Google Scholar and UNICEF Base. Methods. A variety of keywords were used to identify quantitative experimental and observational studies on detection, prevention and treatment strategies in different situations of child maltreatment. Sexual abuse was excluded. The search spanned from 2002 to 2012, in English and Spanish. Results. Of 105 articles, 36 met the selection criteria. In prevention, the best evaluated strategies were parenting programs based on cognitive or cognitive-behavioral approach and interactive learning strategies. In detection, only two instruments were identified with optimum specificity and positive predictive value. In treatment, a variety of treatment strategies were identified with favorable effects on behavioral, functional and psycho affective indicators. The population relevance of these interventions is unclear, as the differential effectiveness of these therapeutic approaches. Conclusions. There are many child maltreatment prevention strategies at the individual and family level. The instruments used for detection are not reliable for use at the collective level. Insofar as therapy, not enough evidence was found both in quality and quantity to favor one intervention over another. It is recommended to understand the problem from the public health perspective and to generate multisectoral and interdisciplinary approaches.

  5. Clinical use of a modified release methylphenidate in the treatment of childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takon, Inyang

    2011-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed neurobehavioural disorder in childhood, affecting over 5% of children worldwide. As well as the core symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity, patients often exhibit learning difficulties and impairment in social functioning. The frequency of referral is higher for boys than for girls (about 2:1), and girls are generally older at the time of referral.Pharmacological therapy is considered the first-line treatment for patients with severe ADHD and severe impairment. Stimulant medications are licensed in the UK for the management of ADHD in school-age children and young people, and are effective in controlling ADHD symptoms.While immediate-release preparations of methylphenidate (MPH) have proven effective in the treatment of ADHD, there are a number of problems associated with their use, most notably compliance, stigma and medication diversion. Modified release preparations are now available that overcome the need for multiple daily dosing, and which offer different MPH release profiles, thereby enabling the physician to match the medication to the patient's particular requirements.This review describes the diagnosis, referral and treatment pathways for patients with ADHD in the UK and the practical considerations when initiating pharmacological treatment. The clinical experience of treating ADHD with a modified-release MPH preparation (Equasym XL®) is illustrated with case studies. PMID:21962224

  6. Clinical use of a modified release methylphenidate in the treatment of childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takon Inyang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is the most commonly diagnosed neurobehavioural disorder in childhood, affecting over 5% of children worldwide. As well as the core symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity, patients often exhibit learning difficulties and impairment in social functioning. The frequency of referral is higher for boys than for girls (about 2:1, and girls are generally older at the time of referral. Pharmacological therapy is considered the first-line treatment for patients with severe ADHD and severe impairment. Stimulant medications are licensed in the UK for the management of ADHD in school-age children and young people, and are effective in controlling ADHD symptoms. While immediate-release preparations of methylphenidate (MPH have proven effective in the treatment of ADHD, there are a number of problems associated with their use, most notably compliance, stigma and medication diversion. Modified release preparations are now available that overcome the need for multiple daily dosing, and which offer different MPH release profiles, thereby enabling the physician to match the medication to the patient's particular requirements. This review describes the diagnosis, referral and treatment pathways for patients with ADHD in the UK and the practical considerations when initiating pharmacological treatment. The clinical experience of treating ADHD with a modified-release MPH preparation (Equasym XL® is illustrated with case studies.

  7. Protective efficacy of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in infants (IPTi using sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and parasite resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie T Griffin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intermittent Preventive Treatment of malaria in infants using sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP-IPTi is recommended by WHO for implementation in settings where resistance to SP is not high. Here we examine the relationship between the protective efficacy of SP-IPTi and measures of SP resistance. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analysed the relationship between protective efficacy reported in the 7 SP-IPTi trials and contemporaneous data from 6 in vivo efficacy studies using SP and 7 molecular studies reporting frequency of dhfr triple and dhps double mutations within 50 km of the trial sites. We found a borderline significant association between frequency of the dhfr triple mutation and protective efficacy to 12 months of age of SP-IPTi. This association is significantly biased due to differences between studies, namely number of doses of SP given and follow up times. However, fitting a simple probabilistic model to determine the relationship between the frequency of the dhfr triple, dhps double and dhfr/dhps quintuple mutations associated with resistance to SP and protective efficacy, we found a significant inverse relationship between the dhfr triple mutation frequency alone and the dhfr/dhps quintuple mutations and efficacy at 35 days post the 9 month dose and up to 12 months of age respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A significant relationship was found between the frequency of the dhfr triple mutation and SP-IPTi protective efficacy at 35 days post the 9 month dose. An association between the protective efficacy to 12 months of age and dhfr triple and dhfr/dhps quintuple mutations was found but should be viewed with caution due to bias. It was not possible to define a more definite relationship based on the data available from these trials.

  8. Efficacy and Safety of Pyronaridine-Artesunate for Treatment of Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Western Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leang, Rithea; Canavati, Sara E; Khim, Nimol; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Borghini Fuhrer, Isabelle; Kim, Saorin; Denis, Mey Bouth; Heng, Pisal; Tol, Bunkea; Huy, Rekol; Duparc, Stephan; Dondorp, Arjen M; Menard, Didier; Ringwald, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Pyronaridine-artesunate efficacy for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria was assessed in an area of artemisinin resistance in western Cambodia. This nonrandomized, single-arm, observational study was conducted between 2014 and 2015. Eligible patients were adults or children with microscopically confirmed P. falciparum infection and fever. Patients received pyronaridine-artesunate once daily for 3 days, dosed according to body weight. The primary outcome was an adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR) on day 42, estimated by using Kaplan-Meier analysis, PCR adjusted to exclude reinfection. One hundred twenty-three patients were enrolled. Day 42 PCR-crude ACPRs were 87.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 79.7 to 92.6%) for the overall study, 89.8% (95% CI, 78.8 to 95.3%) for Pursat, and 82.1% (95% CI, 68.4 to 90.2%) for Pailin. Day 42 PCR-adjusted ACPRs were 87.9% (95% CI, 80.6 to 93.2%) for the overall study, 89.8% (95% CI, 78.8 to 95.3%) for Pursat, and 84.0% (95% CI, 70.6 to 91.7%) for Pailin (P = 0.353 by a log rank test). Day 28 PCR-crude and -adjusted ACPRs were 93.2% (95% CI, 82.9 to 97.4%) and 88.1% (95% CI, 75.3 to 94.5%) for Pursat and Pailin, respectively. A significantly lower proportion of patients achieved day 3 parasite clearance in Pailin (56.4% [95% CI, 43.9 to 69.6%]) than in Pursat (86.7% [95% CI, 76.8 to 93.8%]; P = 0.0019). Fever clearance was also extended at Pailin versus Pursat (P Cambodia despite high efficacy elsewhere in Asia and Africa. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT02389439.). PMID:26926629

  9. Impact monitoring of the national scale up of zinc treatment for childhood diarrhea in Bangladesh: repeat ecologic surveys.

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    Charles P Larson

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zinc treatment of childhood diarrhea has the potential to save 400,000 under-five lives per year in lesser developed countries. In 2004 the World Health Organization (WHO/UNICEF revised their clinical management of childhood diarrhea guidelines to include zinc. The aim of this study was to monitor the impact of the first national campaign to scale up zinc treatment of childhood diarrhea in Bangladesh. METHODS/FINDINGS: Between September 2006 to October 2008 seven repeated ecologic surveys were carried out in four representative population strata: mega-city urban slum and urban nonslum, municipal, and rural. Households of approximately 3,200 children with an active or recent case of diarrhea were enrolled in each survey round. Caretaker awareness of zinc as a treatment for childhood diarrhea by 10 mo following the mass media launch was attained in 90%, 74%, 66%, and 50% of urban nonslum, municipal, urban slum, and rural populations, respectively. By 23 mo into the campaign, approximately 25% of urban nonslum, 20% of municipal and urban slum, and 10% of rural under-five children were receiving zinc for the treatment of diarrhea. The scale-up campaign had no adverse effect on the use of oral rehydration salt (ORS. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term monitoring of scale-up programs identifies important gaps in coverage and provides the information necessary to document that intended outcomes are being attained and unintended consequences avoided. The scale-up of zinc treatment of childhood diarrhea rapidly attained widespread awareness, but actual use has lagged behind. Disparities in zinc coverage favoring higher income, urban households were identified, but these were gradually diminished over the two years of follow-up monitoring. The scale up campaign has not had any adverse effect on the use of ORS. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  10. Safety of the methylene blue plus chloroquine combination in the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in young children of Burkina Faso [ISRCTN27290841

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    Walter-Sack Ingeborg

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safe, effective and affordable drug combinations against falciparum malaria are urgently needed for the poor populations in malaria endemic countries. Methylene blue (MB combined with chloroquine (CQ has been considered as one promising new regimen. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of CQ-MB in African children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Secondary objectives were to assess the efficacy and the acceptance of CQ-MB in a rural population of West Africa. Methods In this hospital-based randomized controlled trial, 226 children (6–59 months with uncomplicated falciparum malaria were treated in Burkina Faso. The children were 4:1 randomized to CQ-MB (n = 181; 25 mg/kg CQ and 12 mg/kg MB over three days or CQ (n = 45; 25 mg/kg over three days respectively. The primary outcome was the incidence of severe haemolysis or other serious adverse events (SAEs. Efficacy outcomes were defined according to the WHO 2003 classification system. Patients were hospitalized for four days and followed up until day 14. Results No differences in the incidence of SAEs and other adverse events were observed between children treated with CQ-MB (including 24 cases of G6PD deficiency compared to children treated with CQ. There was no case of severe haemolysis and also no significant difference in mean haemoglobin between study groups. Treatment failure rates were 53.7% (95% CI [37.4%; 69.3%] in the CQ group compared to 44.0% (95% CI [36.3%; 51.9%] in the CQ-MB group. Conclusion MB is safe for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria, even in G6PD deficient African children. However, the efficacy of the CQ-MB combination has not been sufficient at the MB dose used in this study. Future studies need to assess the efficacy of MB at higher doses and in combination with appropriate partner drugs.

  11. Efficacy of artemether-lumefantrine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Northeast Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Assefa Mulu; Berhanu Geresu; Yeshiwork Beyene; Muluneh Ademe

    2015-01-01

    Background: The impact of resistance to antimalarials is insidious and unless efficacy studies are conducted, resistance may go unrecognized. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of artemether/lumefantrine, for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum infections in Kemisie Health Center, Northeast Ethiopia. Methods: Artemether/lumefantrine efficacy study was conducted in Kemisie Health Center, Northeast Ethiopia from September, 2012 to May, 2013. The study participa...

  12. [Current management of imported severe malaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venanzi, E; López-Vélez, R

    2016-09-01

    Severe malaria is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency with great impact worldwide for incidence and mortality. The clinical presentation of severe malaria can be very polymorphic and rapidly progressing. Therefore a correct diagnosis and an early and adequate antiparasitic and support therapy are essential. This paper attempts to outline the diagnosis frame and the treatment of severe malaria for adults, paediatric patients and for pregnant. PMID:27608318

  13. Addressing Prediabetes in Childhood Obesity Treatment Programs: Support from Research and Current Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grow, H. Mollie; Fernandez, Cristina; Lukasiewicz, Gloria J.; Rhodes, Erinn T.; Shaffer, Laura A.; Sweeney, Brooke; Woolford, Susan J.; Estrada, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and prediabetes have increased in prevalence among overweight and obese children, with significant implications for long-term health. There is little published evidence on the best approaches to care of prediabetes among overweight youth or the current practices used across pediatric weight management programs. Methods: This article reviews the literature and summarizes current practices for screening, diagnosis, and treatment of prediabetes at childhood obesity treatment centers. Findings regarding current practice were based on responses to an online survey from 28 pediatric weight management programs at 25 children's hospitals in 2012. Based on the literature reviewed, and empiric data, consensus support statements on prediabetes care and T2DM prevention were developed among representatives of these 25 children's hospitals' obesity clinics. Results: The evidence reviewed demonstrates that current T2DM and prediabetes diagnostic parameters are derived from adult-based studies with little understanding of clinical outcomes among youth. Very limited evidence exists on preventing progression of prediabetes. Some evidence suggests that a significant proportion of obese youth with prediabetes will revert to normoglycemia without pharmacological management. Evidence supports lifestyle modification for children with prediabetes, but further study of specific lifestyle changes and pharmacological treatments is needed. Conclusion: Evidence to guide management of prediabetes in children is limited. Current practice patterns of pediatric weight management programs show areas of variability in practice, reflecting the limited evidence base. More research is needed to guide clinical care for overweight youth with prediabetes. PMID:25055134

  14. The results of the treatment of childhood medulloblastoma with radiotherapy at Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital in 1994–2000

    OpenAIRE

    Rutkauskienė, Giedrė; Labanauskas, Liutauras; Jaruševičius, Laimonas

    2006-01-01

    Medulloblastoma, a primitive neuroectodermal tumor growing in cerebellum, is one of the most sensitive to radiation therapy childhood brain tumors, therefore, this method of treatments is justly considered to be the standard for the treatment of medulloblastoma. The outcome of this malignant brain tumor differs in standard and high-risk groups of patients. The aim of the work was to evaluate the survival rate for children with medulloblastoma according to two risk groups. Patients and...

  15. Increased access to care and appropriateness of treatment at private sector drug shops with integrated management of malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea: a quasi-experimental study in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phyllis Awor

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Drug shops are a major source of care for children in low income countries but they provide sub-standard care. We assessed the feasibility and effect on quality of care of introducing diagnostics and pre-packaged paediatric-dosage drugs for malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea at drug shops in Uganda. METHODS: We adopted and implemented the integrated community case management (iCCM intervention within registered drug shops. Attendants were trained to perform malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs in each fever case and count respiratory rate in each case of cough with fast/difficult breathing, before dispensing recommended treatment. Using a quasi-experimental design in one intervention and one non-intervention district, we conducted before and after exit interviews for drug seller practices and household surveys for treatment-seeking practices in May-June 2011 and May-June 2012. Survey adjusted generalized linear models and difference-in-difference analysis was used. RESULTS: 3759 (1604 before/2155 after household interviews and 943 (163 before/780 after exit interviews were conducted with caretakers of children under-5. At baseline, no child at a drug shop received any diagnostic testing before treatment in both districts. After the intervention, while no child in the non-intervention district received a diagnostic test, 87.7% (95% CI 79.0-96.4 of children with fever at the intervention district drug shops had a parasitological diagnosis of malaria, prior to treatment. The prevalence ratios of the effect of the intervention on treatment of cough and fast breathing with amoxicillin and diarrhoea with ORS/zinc at the drug shop were 2.8 (2.0-3.9, and 12.8 (4.2-38.6 respectively. From the household survey, the prevalence ratio of the intervention effect on use of RDTs was 3.2 (1.9-5.4; Artemisinin Combination Therapy for malaria was 0.74 (0.65-0.84, and ORS/zinc for diarrhoea was 2.3 (1.2-4.7. CONCLUSION: iCCM can be utilized to improve

  16. Treatment-seeking behaviour for malaria in children under five years of age: implication for home management in rural areas with high seasonal transmission in Sudan

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    Ahmed Eldirdieri

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective management of malaria in children under the age of 5 requires mothers to seek, obtain, and use medication appropriately. This is linked to timely decision, accessibility, correct use of the drugs and follow-up. The aim of the study is to identify the basis on which fever was recognized and classified and exploring factors involved in selection of different treatment options. Methods Data was obtained by interviewing 96 mothers who had brought their febrile children to selected health facilities, conduction of 10 focus group discussions with mothers at village level as well as by observation. Results A high score of mothers' knowledge and recognition of fever/malaria was recorded. Mothers usually start care at home and, within an average of three days, they shift to health workers if there was no response. The main health-seeking behaviour is to consult the nearest health facility or health personnel together with using traditional medicine or herbs. There are also health workers who visit patients at home. The majority of mothers with febrile children reported taking drugs before visiting a health facility. The choice between the available options determined by the availability of health facilities, user fees, satisfaction with services, difficulty to reach the facilities and believe in traditional medicine. Conclusion Mothers usually go through different treatment option before consulting health facilities ending with obvious delay in seeking care. As early effective treatment is the main theme of the control programme, implementation of malaria home management strategy is urgently needed to improve the ongoing practice.

  17. Kompliceret malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, A M; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Jacobsen, E

    1989-01-01

    An increasing number of cases of malaria, imported to Denmark, are caused by Plasmodium falciparum and severe and complicated cases are more often seen. In the Department of Infectious Diseases, Rigshospitalet, 23 out of 32 cases, hospitalized from 1.1-30.6.1988, i.e. 72%, were caused by P...

  18. Malaria Prophylaxis: A Comprehensive Review

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    Rosario Russo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The flow of international travellers to and from malaria-endemic areas, especially Africa, has increased in recent years. Apart from the very high morbidity and mortality burden imposed on malaria-endemic areas, imported malaria is the main cause of fever possibly causing severe disease and death in travellers coming from tropical and subtropical areas, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa. The importance of behavioural preventive measures (bed nets, repellents, etc., adequate chemoprophylaxis and, in selected circumstances, stand-by emergency treatment may not be overemphasized. However, no prophylactic regimen may offer complete protection. Expert advice is needed to tailor prophylactic advice according to traveller (age, baseline clinical conditions, etc. and travel (destination, season, etc. characteristics in order to reduce malaria risk.

  19. Erythropoietin treatment alleviates ultrastructural myelin changes induced by murine cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hyttel, Poul; Staalsø, Trine;

    2012-01-01

    , adjunctive therapy, which is not available at present. Previously, erythropoietin (EPO) was reported to significantly improve the survival and outcome in a murine CM model. The study objectives were to assess myelin thickness and ultrastructural morphology in the corpus callosum in murine CM and to adress...... for electron microscopy. Myelin sheaths in the corpus callosum were analysed with transmission electron microscopy and stereology. RESULTS: The infection caused clinical CM, which was counteracted by EPO. The total number of myelinated axons was identical in the four groups and mice with CM did not......, perivascular oedemas and intracerebral haemorrhages. CONCLUSIONS: EPO treatment reduced clinical signs of CM and reduced cerebral pathology. Murine CM does not reduce the general thickness of myelin sheaths in the corpus callosum....

  20. Sub-optimal delivery of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnancy in Nigeria: influence of provider factors

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    Onoka Chima A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The level of access to intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnancy (IPTp in Nigeria is still low despite relatively high antenatal care coverage in the study area. This paper presents information on provider factors that affect the delivery of IPTp in Nigeria. Methods Data were collected from heads of maternal health units of 28 public and six private health facilities offering antenatal care (ANC services in two districts in Enugu State, south-east Nigeria. Provider knowledge of guidelines for IPTp was assessed with regard to four components: the drug used for IPTp, time of first dose administration, of second dose administration, and the strategy for sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP administration (directly observed treatment, DOT. Provider practices regarding IPTp and facility-related factors that may explain observations such as availability of SP and water were also examined. Results Only five (14.7% of all 34 providers had correct knowledge of all four recommendations for provision of IPTp. None of them was a private provider. DOT strategy was practiced in only one and six private and public providers respectively. Overall, 22 providers supplied women with SP in the facility and women were allowed to take it at home. The most common reason for doing so amongst public providers was that women were required to come for antenatal care on empty stomachs to enhance the validity of manual fundal height estimation. Two private providers did not think it was necessary to use the DOT strategy because they assumed that women would take their drugs at home. Availability of SP and water in the facility, and concerns about side effects were not considered impediments to delivery of IPTp. Conclusion There was low level of knowledge of the guidelines for implementation of IPTp by all providers, especially those in the private sector. This had negative effects such as non-practice of DOT strategy by most of the providers

  1. Incomplete depletion and rapid regeneration of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells following anti-CD25 treatment in malaria-infected mice

    OpenAIRE

    Couper, Kevin N.; Blount, Daniel G.; de Souza, J. Brian; Suffia, Isabelle; Belkaid, Yasmine; Riley, Eleanor M.

    2007-01-01

    Investigation of the role of regulatory T cells (Treg) in model systems is facilitated by their depletion using anti-CD25 antibodies, but there has been considerable debate about the effectiveness of this strategy. Here, we have compared the depletion and repopulation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg in uninfected and malaria-infected mice using 7D4 and/or PC61 anti-CD25 antibodies. We find that numbers and percentages of CD25hi cells, but not Foxp3+ cells, are transiently reduced after 7D4 treatment ...

  2. Nanotecnologia farmacêutica aplicada ao tratamento da malária Application of pharmaceutical nanotechnology to the treatment of malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Figueira Pimentel

    2007-12-01

    malaria scenario though the world, and to show the nanotechnology as a promising alternative for malaria control and treatment.

  3. Artemether for severe malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Esu, Ekpereonne; Effa, Emmanuel E; Opie, Oko N; Uwaoma, Amirahobu; Meremikwu, Martin M

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2011 the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended parenteral artesunate in preference to quinine as first-line treatment for people with severe malaria. Prior to this recommendation, many countries, particularly in Africa, had begun to use artemether, an alternative artemisinin derivative. This review evaluates intramuscular artemether compared with both quinine and artesunate. Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of intramuscular artemether versus any other parentera...

  4. Hyperfractionated cranio-spinal irradiation in the complex treatment of inoperable pinealoblastoma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a rare case of brain pineal neoplasm in 14 years old girl - pinealobastoma - brain primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). The tumor in the pineal region causes occlusive hydrocephaly, not cured following ventriculostomy of the 3rd ventricle. After liquor-draining valve (ventriculo-peritoneal drain) was applied hyperfractionated cranio-spinal irradiation (cranio-spinal irradiation), which was needed due to the high risk of leptomeningeal and spinal liquor metastases. Unfavorable prognosis requires postoperative hyperfractionated cranio-spinal irradiation twice daily whit daily dose of 1,5 Gy in 6 hours interval to total dose of 36 Gy in CNS and spinal; at second step boost - hyperfractionated in 6 hours interval to total dose 48 Gy in the ventricles and of 58-60 Gy in pineal tumor. In addition to cranio-spinal irradiation was applied Dexometasone 1 amp. daily i.m. and Ecomer 3 x 1-2 caps, daily per os. Hyperfractionated cranio-spinal irradiation was required in pinealobastoma with hydrocephaly, followed by chemotherapy after ventriculo-peritoneat liquor drain and biopsy. This complex treatment approach significantly improves free of disease survival through minimization of local leptomeningeal and spinal recurrences. (authors) Key words: PINEALOBASTOMA IN CHILDHOOD. PNET. HYPER-FRACTIONATED CRANIO-SPINAL IRRADIATION. COMPLEX TREATMENT. CHEMOTHERAPY

  5. Brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma treatment; Braquiterapia no tratamento do rabdomiossarcoma da infancia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos

    1995-07-01

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor at the Radiotherapy Department of the A.C.Camargo Hospital between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival, in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferential technique to each clinical situation. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were Gold{sup 198}, Cesium{sup 137} and Iridium{sup 192}. The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40 Gy to 60 Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20 Gy to 40 Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% (13/21 patients) and 72,2% (13/18 patients) respectively. (author)

  6. Megacolon in adulthood after surgical treatment of Hirschsprung's disease in early childhood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph R. Werner; Bertram Wiedenmann; Hubert M(o)nnikes; Gisela Stoltenburg-Didinger; Henning Weidemann; Christoph Benckert; Marco Schmidtmann; Ivo R. van der Voort; Viola Andresen; Burghard F. Klapp; Peter Neuhaus

    2005-01-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HD) is a disorder associated with congenital malformation of the enteric nervous system with segmental aganglionosis. Prevailing therapy includes a resection of the affected part of the bowel. However, patients often do not obtain complete functional improvement after surgical treatment. We present the case of a 25-year-old woman who had surgical treatment of HD in early childhood. After that procedure she had clinical features of constipation for years in the end,passing of stool once a week, requiring laxatives and enemas. We diagnosed an incomplete resection of the aganglionic bowel via rectal biopsy and resected the remaining aganglionic segment. Two months after surgery the patient's bowel function improved to a frequency of 1-4 stools per day. We conclude that regular follow-up is required to identify HD patients with persistent alterations of bowel function after surgery. In patients presenting with constipation, recognition of a remaining aganglionic segment or other alterations of the enteric nervous system should be aimed at in an early stage.

  7. Safety, efficacy and population pharmacokinetics of fixed-dose combination of artesunate-mefloquine in the treatment of acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neena Valecha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: India has switched over to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT for the treatment of acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and the ACT used in the national programme is artesunate + sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. Since the efficacy of ACT is dependent also on the partner drug, there is a need to evaluate and deploy multiple ACTs. Methods: This multicentre, single-arm, open-label clinical trial was carried out to assess the efficacy, safety and population pharmacokinetics of a fixed dose combination (FDC artesunate mefloquine (ASMQ in P. falciparum infected, Indian adults at Panjim, Goa, and Mangalore, Karnataka between December 2007 and November 2008. Results: A total of 77 patients (males 74 were screened and enrolled: 42 at Goa and 35 at Mangalore with a median age of 25 yr (range 18-55 yr. One patient failed in treatment on D53, a PCR proven new infection, seven developed recurrent vivax parasitaemia and 11 did not have a parasitological endpoint. By per protocol analysis, the D63 cure rate was 58/59 (98.3; 95% C.I. 90.9-99.9%, and 58/58, with PCR correction. ASMQ was welltolerated and no serious adverse events were reported. Interpretation & conclusion: The study showed that the ASMQ FDC was efficacious and well-tolerated for the treatment of acute, uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in highly endemic, chloroquine resistant areas of Goa and Mangalore. It is a viable option for India.

  8. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: a Delphi consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Escherich, Gabriele; Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Halsey, Christina; Hough, Rachael; Jeha, Sima; Kato, Motohiro; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Möricke, Anja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Piette, Caroline; Putti, Maria Caterina; Raetz, Elizabeth; Silverman, Lewis B; Skinner, Roderick; Tuckuviene, Ruta; van der Sluis, Inge; Zapotocka, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14 toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall assessment of outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment, these expert opinion-based definitions will allow reliable comparisons of frequencies and severities of acute toxic effects across treatment protocols, and facilitate international research on cause, guidelines for treatment adaptation, preventive strategies, and development of consensus algorithms for reporting on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment. PMID:27299279

  9. Focused Screening and Treatment (FSAT: a PCR-based strategy to detect malaria parasite carriers and contain drug resistant P. falciparum, Pailin, Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hoyer

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in Pailin province, along the border between Thailand and Cambodia, have become resistant to artemisinin derivatives. To better define the epidemiology of P. falciparum populations and to assess the risk of the possible spread of these parasites outside Pailin, a new epidemiological tool named "Focused Screening and Treatment" (FSAT, based on active molecular detection of asymptomatic parasite carriers was introduced in 2010. Cross-sectional malariometric surveys using PCR were carried out in 20 out of 109 villages in Pailin province. Individuals detected as P. falciparum carriers were treated with atovaquone-proguanil combination plus a single dose of primaquine if the patient was non-G6PD deficient. Interviews were conducted to elicit history of cross-border travel that might contribute to the spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites. After directly observed treatment, patients were followed up and re-examined on day 7 and day 28. Among 6931 individuals screened, prevalence of P. falciparum carriers was less than 1%, of whom 96% were asymptomatic. Only 1.6% of the individuals had a travel history or plans to go outside Cambodia, with none of those tested being positive for P. falciparum. Retrospective analysis, using 2010 routine surveillance data, showed significant differences in the prevalence of asymptomatic carriers discovered by FSAT between villages classified as "high risk" and "low risk" based on malaria incidence data. All positive individuals treated and followed-up until day 28 were cured. No mutant-type allele related to atovaquone resistance was found. FSAT is a potentially useful tool to detect, treat and track clusters of asymptomatic carriers of P. falciparum along with providing valuable epidemiological information regarding cross-border movements of potential malaria parasite carriers and parasite gene flow.

  10. Hidden burden of malaria in Indian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Vinod P

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malaria is endemic in India with an estimated 70-100 million cases each year (1.6-1.8 million reported by NVBDCP; of this 50-55% are Plasmodium vivax and 45-50% Plasmodium falciparum. A recent study on malaria in pregnancy reported from undivided Madhya Pradesh state (includes Chhattisgarh state, that an estimated over 220,000 pregnant women contract malaria infection each year. Malaria in pregnancy caused- abortions 34.5%; stillbirths 9%; and maternal deaths 0.45%. Bulk of this tragic outcome can be averted by following the Roll Back Malaria/WHO recommendations of the use of malaria prevention i.e. indoor residual spraying (IRS/insecticide-treated bed nets (ITN preferably long-lasting treated bed nets (LLIN; intermittent preventive therapy (IPT; early diagnosis, prompt and complete treatment using microscopic/malaria rapid diagnostics test (RDT and case management. High incidence in pregnancy has arisen because of malaria surveillance lacking coverage, lack of age and sex wise data, staff shortages, and intermittent preventive treatment (IPT applicable in high transmission states/pockets is not included in the national drug policy- an essential component of fighting malaria in pregnancy in African settings. Inadequate surveillance and gross under-reporting has been highlighted time and again for over three decades. As a result the huge problem of malaria in pregnancy reported occasionally by researchers has remained hidden. Malaria in pregnancy may quicken severity in patients with drug resistant parasites, anaemia, endemic poverty, and malnutrition. There is, therefore, urgent need to streamline malaria control strategies to make a difference in tackling this grim scenario in human health.

  11. Important advances in malaria vaccine research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Jadhav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is one of the most widespread parasitic infection in Asian countries affecting the poor of the poor. In an effort to develop an effective vaccine for the treatment of malaria, various attempts are being made worldwide. If successful, such a vaccine can be effective for treatment of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. This would also be able to avoid complications such as drug resistance, resistance to insecticides, nonadherence to the treatment schedule, and eventually high cost of treatment in the resource-limited settings. In the current compilation, the details from the literature were collected by using PubMed and Medline as search engines and searched for terms such as malaria, vaccine, and malaria treatment. This review collates and provides glimpses of the information on the recent malaria vaccine development. The reader will be taken through the historical perspective followed by the approaches to the malaria vaccine development from pre-erythrocytic stage vaccines, asexual stage vaccines, transmission blocking vaccines, etc. Looking at the current scenario of the malaria and treatment strategies, it is an absolute need of an hour that an effective malaria vaccine should be developed. This would bring a revolutionary breakthrough in the treatment modalities especially when there is increasing emergence of resistance to existing drug therapy. It would be of great purpose to serve those living in malaria endemic region and also for travelers which are nonimmune and coming to malaria endemic region. As infection by P. vivax is more prevalent in India and other Asian subcontinent and is often prominent in areas where elimination is being attempted, special consideration is required of the role of vaccines in blocking transmission, regardless of the stages being targeted. Development of vaccines is feasible but with the support of private sector and government organization in terms of regulatory and most importantly

  12. Malaria transmission and disease burden in Assam: challenges and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Dev, V; Sharma, V. P.; Hojai, D.

    2009-01-01

    Malaria is major public health illness in Assam and 30–40% of the population is estimated to be at high-risk. Despite decades of attempted control interventions, malaria transmission is perennial and persistent in most parts of the state mostly transmitted by Anopheles minimus. Malaria outbreaks are returning associated with high rise in Plasmodium falciparum and attributable death cases. Therapeutic efficacy investigations for treatment of malaria revealed that chloroquine resistance was wid...

  13. Bacterial Coinfections in Travelers with Malaria: Rationale for Antibiotic Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sandlund, Johanna; Naucler, Pontus; Dashti, Saduddin; Shokri, Akhar; Eriksson, Sara; Hjertqvist, Marika; Karlsson, Lillemor; Capraru, Teodor; Färnert, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Malaria predisposes children in areas where malaria is endemic to concurrent bacteremia, often with severe outcomes. The importance of bacterial coinfections in patients diagnosed with malaria in nonendemic settings has, however, not been reported. A retrospective analysis of microbiology data was performed in 755 travelers diagnosed with malaria in Sweden. Bacterial cultures from blood and other locations were correlated to clinical outcome and antibiotic treatment. Blood cultures were drawn...

  14. From strategy development to routine implementation: the cost of Intermittent Preventive Treatment in Infants for malaria control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner Marcel

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achieving the Millennium Development Goals for health requires a massive scaling-up of interventions in Sub Saharan Africa. Intermittent Preventive Treatment in infants (IPTi is a promising new tool for malaria control. Although efficacy information is available for many interventions, there is a dearth of data on the resources required for scaling up of health interventions. Method We worked in partnership with the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MoHSW to develop an IPTi strategy that could be implemented and managed by routine health services. We tracked health system and other costs of (1 developing the strategy and (2 maintaining routine implementation of the strategy in five districts in southern Tanzania. Financial costs were extracted and summarized from a costing template and semi-structured interviews were conducted with key informants to record time and resources spent on IPTi activities. Results The estimated financial cost to start-up and run IPTi in the whole of Tanzania in 2005 was US$1,486,284. Start-up costs of US$36,363 were incurred at the national level, mainly on the development of Behaviour Change Communication (BCC materials, stakeholders' meetings and other consultations. The annual running cost at national level for intervention management and monitoring and drug purchase was estimated at US$459,096. Start-up costs at the district level were US$7,885 per district, mainly expenditure on training. Annual running costs were US$170 per district, mainly for printing of BCC materials. There was no incremental financial expenditure needed to deliver the intervention in health facilities as supplies were delivered alongside routine vaccinations and available health workers performed the activities without working overtime. The economic cost was estimated at 23 US cents per IPTi dose delivered. Conclusion The costs presented here show the order of magnitude of expenditures needed to initiate and to

  15. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, chlorproguanil-dapsone with artesunate and post-treatment haemolysis in African children treated for uncomplicated malaria

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    Van Malderen Carine

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a leading cause of mortality, particularly in sub-Saharan African children. Prompt and efficacious treatment is important as patients may progress within a few hours to severe and possibly fatal disease. Chlorproguanil-dapsone-artesunate (CDA was a promising artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT, but its development was prematurely stopped because of safety concerns secondary to its associated risk of haemolytic anaemia in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD-deficient individuals. The objective of the study was to assess whether CDA treatment and G6PD deficiency are risk factors for a post-treatment haemoglobin drop in African children Methods This case–control study was performed in the context of a larger multicentre randomized clinical trial comparing safety and efficacy of four different ACT in children with uncomplicated malaria. Children, who after treatment experienced a haemoglobin drop ≥2 g/dl (cases within the first four days (days 0, 1, 2, and 3, were compared with those without an Hb drop (controls. Cases and controls were matched for study site, sex, age and baseline haemoglobin measurements. Data were analysed using a conditional logistic regression model. Results G6PD deficiency prevalence, homo- or hemizygous, was 8.5% (10/117 in cases and 6.8% (16/234 in controls (p = 0.56. The risk of a Hb drop ≥2 g/dl was not associated with either G6PD deficiency (adjusted odds ratio (AOR: 0.81; p = 0.76 or CDA treatment (AOR: 1.28; p = 0.37 alone. However, patients having both risk factors tended to have higher odds (AOR: 11.13; p = 0.25 of experiencing a Hb drop ≥2 g/dl within the first four days after treatment, however this finding was not statistically significant, mainly because G6PD deficient patients treated with CDA were very few. In non-G6PD deficient individuals, the proportion of cases was similar between treatment groups while in G6PD-deficient individuals

  16. Improvements in access to malaria treatment in Tanzania after switch to artemisinin combination therapy and the introduction of accredited drug dispensing outlets - a provider perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillip Angel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve access to treatment in the private retail sector a new class of outlets known as accredited drug dispensing outlets (ADDO was created in Tanzania. Tanzania changed its first-line treatment for malaria from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP to artemether-lumefantrine (ALu in 2007. Subsidized ALu was made available in both health facilities and ADDOs. The effect of these interventions on access to malaria treatment was studied in rural Tanzania. Methods The study was carried out in the villages of Kilombero and Ulanga Demographic Surveillance System (DSS and in Ifakara town. Data collection consisted of: 1 yearly censuses of shops selling drugs; 2 collection of monthly data on availability of anti-malarials in public health facilities; and 3 retail audits to measure anti-malarial sales volumes in all public, mission and private outlets. The data were complemented with DSS population data. Results Between 2004 and 2008 access to malaria treatment greatly improved and the number of anti-malarial treatment doses dispensed increased by 78%. Particular improvements were observed in the availability (from 0.24 shops per 1,000 people in 2004 to 0.39 in 2008 and accessibility (from 71% of households within 5 km of a shop in 2004 to 87% in 2008 of drug shops. Despite no improvements in affordability this resulted in an increase of the market share from 49% of anti-malarial sales 2005 to 59% in 2008. The change of treatment policy from SP to ALu led to severe stock-outs of SP in health facilities in the months leading up to the introduction of ALu (only 40% months in stock, but these were compensated by the wide availability of SP in shops. After the introduction of ALu stock levels of the drug were relatively high in public health facilities (over 80% months in stock, but the drug could only be found in 30% of drug shops and in no general shops. This resulted in a low overall utilization of the drug (19% of all anti

  17. Clinical tolerability of artesunate-amodiaquine versus comparator treatments for uncomplicated falciparum malaria: an individual-patient analysis of eight randomized controlled trials in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwang Julien

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The widespread use of artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ for treating uncomplicated malaria makes it important to gather and analyse information on its tolerability. Methods An individual-patient tolerability analysis was conducted using data from eight randomized controlled clinical trials conducted at 17 sites in nine sub-Saharan countries comparing ASAQ to other anti-malarial treatments. All patients who received at least one dose of the study drug were included in the analysis. Differences in adverse event (AE and treatment emergent adverse event (TEAE were analysed by Day 28. Results Of the 6,179 patients enrolled (74% Conclusion ASAQ was comparatively well-tolerated. Safety information is important, and must be collected and analysed in a standardized way. TEAEs are a more objective measure of treatment-induced toxicity.

  18. A study of treatment seeking behaviour for malaria and its management in febrile children in rural part of desert, Rajasthan, Indi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P. Yada

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: For management of malaria, there is a need to give attention on specificgroup of people like children <5 yr of age in the community. They are unable to explain theirfeelings about severity of illness and effects of treatment on health and they are dependent onothers for their health care, therefore, it is the mother who can seek, obtain, and use medicationappropriately. This is directly linked to the level of education, socioeconomic status, timely decision,accessibility of health facility, correct use of drugs and their follow-up. The present study wasundertaken with the aim to know the basis on which malaria was recognized and classified andexploring factors involved in the selection of different treatment options in the desert populationof Rajasthan.Methods: Interview and observation techniques were used for data collection in 15 villages ofRamgarh PHC in Jaisalmer district of Rajasthan state, India. A total of 164 mothers were interviewedand observations were made by the investigators in the group discussions who utilized healthfacility for the febrile children <5 yr of age.Results: More than 93.3% mothers started taking care at home for their febrile children andwatched for improvement on an average up to 72 h. When they thought there was no hope tomanage the case at their level, they shifted their febrile children to the nearest health facility suchas sub-centre/PHC/private health practitioner. Utilization of health facility was linked with theage of the child, with younger children (<24 months of age being significantly more likely to beutilized nearby health facility than 24–59 months children. Children judged as severely ill by theirmothers utilized health facility significantly more often than those not thought to be severely ill.Mothers from households where the household heads had a primary or secondary education weremore likely to utilize health facility than those household heads having no education

  19. Rapid reemergence of T cells into peripheral circulation following treatment of severe and uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Kurtzhals, J A; Goka, B Q;

    1997-01-01

    Frequencies and absolute numbers of peripheral T-cell subsets were monitored closely following acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria in 22 Ghanaian children from an area of hyperendemicity for seasonal malaria transmission. The children presented with cerebral or uncomplicated malaria (CM or UM, re...

  20. Adherence to a Six-Dose Regimen of Artemether-Lumefantrine for Treatment of Uncomplicated Plasmodium Falciparum Malaria in Uganda.

    OpenAIRE

    Fogg, Carole; Bajunirwe, Francis; Piola, Patrice; Biraro, Samuel; Checchi, Francesco; Kiguli, James; Namiiro, Proscovia; Musabe, Joy; Kyomugisha, Agnes; Guthmann, Jean-Paul

    2004-01-01

    Measuring baseline levels of adherence and identifying risk factors for non-adherence are important steps before the introduction of new antimalarials. In Mbarara in southwestern Uganda, we assessed adherence to artemether-lumefantrine (Coartem) in its latest World Health Organization blister formulation. Patients with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria were prescribed artemether-lumefantrine and received an explanation of how to take the following five doses at home. A tablet count ...

  1. Transdermal Glyceryl Trinitrate as an Effective Adjunctive Treatment with Artemether for Late-Stage Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Orjuela-Sánchez, Pamela; Ong, Peng Kai; Zanini, Graziela M.; Melchior, Benoît; Martins, Yuri C.; Meays, Diana; Frangos, John A.; Carvalho, Leonardo J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is associated with low nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, cerebrovascular constriction, occlusion, and hypoperfusion. Administration of exogenous NO partially prevents the neurological syndrome and associated vascular pathology in an experimental CM (ECM) mouse model. In this study, we evaluated the effects of transdermal glyceryl trinitrate in preventing ECM and, in combination with artemether, rescuing late-stage ECM mice from mortality. The glyceryl trinitrate and/or ...

  2. Study of Factors Influencing Treatment Adherence in Childhood Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in a Tertiary Healthcare Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Antony

    2016-01-01

    Background: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common childhood mental health disorder. Treatment has shown to improve both short and long-term prognosis. Hence, study of factors leading to nonadherence is undertaken. Objective: The objective was to know the rate of nonadherence and factors affecting nonadherence. Setting and Design: Cross-sectional follow-up study at child guidance clinic in a tertiary health care facility. Materials and Methods: Forty children with a diagn...

  3. Early childhood caries update: A review of causes, diagnoses, and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colak, Hakan; Dülgergil, Coruh T; Dalli, Mehmet; Hamidi, Mehmet Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Dental caries (decay) is an international public health challenge, especially amongst young children. Early childhood caries (ECC) is a serious public health problem in both developing and industrialized countries. ECC can begin early in life, progresses rapidly in those who are at high risk, and often goes untreated. Its consequences can affect the immediate and long-term quality of life of the child's family and can have significant social and economic consequences beyond the immediate family as well. ECC can be a particularly virulent form of caries, beginning soon after dental eruption, developing on smooth surfaces, progressing rapidly, and having a lasting detrimental impact on the dentition. Children experiencing caries as infants or toddlers have a much greater probability of subsequent caries in both the primary and permanent dentitions. The relationship between breastfeeding and ECC is likely to be complex and confounded by many biological variables, such as mutans streptococci, enamel hypoplasia, intake of sugars, as well as social variables, such as parental education and socioeconomic status, which may affect oral health. Unlike other infectious diseases, tooth decay is not self-limiting. Decayed teeth require professional treatment to remove infection and restore tooth function. In this review, we give detailed information about ECC, from its diagnosis to management. PMID:23633832

  4. Sociocultural and structural factors contributing to delays in treatment for children with severe malaria: a qualitative study in southwestern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Radhika; Mwanga-Amumpaire, Juliet; Adrama, Harriet; Tumuhairwe, Jackline; Mbabazi, Sheilla; Mworozi, Kenneth; Carroll, Ryan; Bangsberg, David; Boum, Yap; Ware, Norma C

    2015-05-01

    Malaria is a leading cause of pediatric mortality, and Uganda has among the highest incidences in the world. Increased morbidity and mortality are associated with delays to care. This qualitative study sought to characterize barriers to prompt allopathic care for children hospitalized with severe malaria in the endemic region of southwestern Uganda. Minimally structured, qualitative interviews were conducted with guardians of children admitted to a regional hospital with severe malaria. Using an inductive and content analytic approach, transcripts were analyzed to identify and define categories that explain delayed care. These categories represented two broad themes: sociocultural and structural factors. Sociocultural factors were 1) interviewee's distinctions of "traditional" versus "hospital" illnesses, which were mutually exclusive and 2) generational conflict, where deference to one's elders, who recommended traditional medicine, was expected. Structural factors were 1) inadequate distribution of health-care resources, 2) impoverishment limiting escalation of care, and 3) financial impact of illness on household economies. These factors perpetuate a cycle of illness, debt, and poverty consistent with a model of structural violence. Our findings inform a number of potential interventions that could alleviate the burden of this preventable, but often fatal, illness. Such interventions could be beneficial in similarly endemic, low-resource settings. PMID:25802438

  5. The recent malaria situation in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, S M B; Rahman, M M; Ahmed, Z; Siddique, M M

    2003-01-01

    This is a retrospective study on 7,005 cases of malaria treated in a base hospital during the period 1998 to 2001. The aim of the study is to analyze the patterns, complications and mortality rates of malaria and its response to standard anti-malarial drugs. Diagnosis of malaria was made from identification of parasites on Giemsa stained thick and thin blood slides among the febrile cases and the clinical (unspecified) malaria was diagnosed as per WHO criteria. Malaria cases accounted for 136.17 per thousand-hospital admissions. Out of 7,005 malaria cases, 54.22% were falciparum, 26.18% were vivax and 12.02% were mixed infections. The most common complications of falciparum malaria were cerebral malaria (2.80%), malarial hepatitis (1.55%), acute pneumonia and/or pulmonary edema (0.22%), acute renal failure (0.13%), algid malaria (0.13%) and black water fever (0.06%). Most of the cases (66.98%) responded (S-response) well to chloroquine. Among the rest, 11.99% required quinine, 9.79% required artemether and 0.08% required both mefloquine and artemether. The total mortality rate was 0.30% but it was 9.25% and 6.17% among complicated malaria and cerebral malaria cases, respectively. Prognosis appeared better on early recognition of complications and initiation of prompt, effective treatment and adequate nursing care. Most mortality was due to complicated falciparum malaria and the emergence of drug resistance. PMID:19238662

  6. Determinants of early childhood morbidity and proper treatment responses in Vietnam: results from the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, 2000–2011

    OpenAIRE

    Hwa-Young Lee; Nguyen Huy; Sugy Choi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite significant achievements in health indicators during previous decades, Vietnam lags behind other developing countries in reducing common early childhood illnesses, such as diarrhea and respiratory infections. To date, there has been little research into factors that contribute to the prevalence and treatment of childhood morbidity in Vietnam. Objective: This study examines the determinants of diarrhea and ‘illness with a cough’ and treatments for each of the conditions amo...

  7. Antioxidant defence-related genetic variants are not associated with higher risk of secondary thyroid cancer after treatment of malignancy in childhood or adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodusek Ana Lina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is one of the most common secondary cancers after treatment of malignancy in childhood or adolescence. Thyroid gland is very sensitive to the carcinogenic effect of ionizing radiation, especially in children. Imbalance between pro- and anti-oxidant factors may play a role in thyroid carcinogenesis. Our study aimed to assess the relationship between genetic variability of antioxidant defence-related genes and the risk of secondary thyroid cancer after treatment of malignancy in childhood or adolescence.

  8. Impact of changing drug treatment and malaria endemicity on the heritability of malaria phenotypes in a longitudinal family-based cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Cheikh Loucoubar; Bronner Goncalves; Adama Tall; Cheikh Sokhna; Jean-François Trape; Fatoumata Diène Sarr; Joseph Faye; Abdoulaye Badiane; Alioune Badara Ly; Aliou Diop; Avner Bar-Hen; Jean-François Bureau; Anavaj Sakuntabhai; Richard Paul

    2011-01-01

    Despite considerable success of genome wide association (GWA) studies in identifying causal variants for many human diseases, their success in unraveling the genetic basis to complex diseases has been more mitigated. Pathogen population structure may impact upon the infectious phenotype, especially with the intense short-term selective pressure that drug treatment exerts on pathogens. Rigorous analysis that accounts for repeated measures and disentangles the influence of genetic and environme...

  9. Brachytherapy as Part of the Multidisciplinary Treatment of Childhood Rhabdomyosarcomas of the Orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Rhabdomyosarcomas in the orbit form a major challenge in terms of cure without severe side effects in childhood cancer. Our specifically developed approach consists of applying brachytherapy to the tumor area using a mold. Analysis of its results for 20 patients was performed. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients were referred for brachytherapy if complete remission was not reached after chemotherapy (Group I) and 7 in case of relapse (Group II). In total, 20 patients were treated between 1991 and 2007. Four were female and 16 male; their ages varied from 1.1 to 16.5 years, with an average of 8.5 years. After macroscopically radical tumor resection, molds with holes drilled to hold flexible catheters were placed into the orbit. The dose to the clinical target volume was 40-50 Gy. Results: Three patients of Group I and 1 patient of Group II developed local recurrence and underwent exenteration. The progression-free survival in Group I is 71.9% (95% CI 0.44-1.0), in Group II 85.7% (95% CI 0.60-1.0), the overall 5-year survival rate of the entire group is 92% (95% CI 0.76-1.0). During treatment, no serious side effects were observed. The late complications encountered in this series were cataract in 2 patients, 1 of whom also developed mild retinopathy. Two patients with ptosis needed surgical correction. No facial asymmetries or bone growth anomalies were observed. Conclusions: This entire procedure of brachytherapy with a mold offers a tailor-made treatment for orbital rhabdomyosarcomas with only few signs of late toxicity.

  10. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy with mefloquine in HIV-infected women receiving cotrimoxazole prophylaxis: a multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel González

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is recommended for malaria prevention in HIV-negative pregnant women, but it is contraindicated in HIV-infected women taking daily cotrimoxazole prophylaxis (CTXp because of potential added risk of adverse effects associated with taking two antifolate drugs simultaneously. We studied the safety and efficacy of mefloquine (MQ in women receiving CTXp and long-lasting insecticide treated nets (LLITNs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 1,071 HIV-infected women from Kenya, Mozambique, and Tanzania were randomized to receive either three doses of IPTp-MQ (15 mg/kg or placebo given at least one month apart; all received CTXp and a LLITN. IPTp-MQ was associated with reduced rates of maternal parasitemia (risk ratio [RR], 0.47 [95% CI 0.27-0.82]; p=0.008, placental malaria (RR, 0.52 [95% CI 0.29-0.90]; p=0.021, and reduced incidence of non-obstetric hospital admissions (RR, 0.59 [95% CI 0.37-0.95]; p=0.031 in the intention to treat (ITT analysis. There were no differences in the prevalence of adverse pregnancy outcomes between groups. Drug tolerability was poorer in the MQ group compared to the control group (29.6% referred dizziness and 23.9% vomiting after the first IPTp-MQ administration. HIV viral load at delivery was higher in the MQ group compared to the control group (p=0.048 in the ATP analysis. The frequency of perinatal mother to child transmission of HIV was increased in women who received MQ (RR, 1.95 [95% CI 1.14-3.33]; p=0.015. The main limitation of the latter finding relates to the exploratory nature of this part of the analysis. CONCLUSIONS: An effective antimalarial added to CTXp and LLITNs in HIV-infected pregnant women can improve malaria prevention, as well as maternal health through reduction in hospital admissions. However, MQ was not well tolerated, limiting its potential for IPTp and indicating the need to find alternatives with

  11. Clinical Research on Treatment of Hyperkinetic Syndrome of Childhood by Electroacupuncture plus Acupoint Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yao-chi; KUAI Le

    2003-01-01

    Objective To observe the clinical therapeu tic effect of hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood treated by electroacupuncture plus acupoint application. Method Sixty-five cases with hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood were treated by electroacupuncture plus acupoint application (electroacupuncture group); 53 cases were treated by acupuncture (acupuncture group) and 53 cases were treated by Ritalin (west drug group). The above three groups were compared with each other in therapeutic effect. Results The effective rate of treating hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood by electroacupuncture plus acupoint application was 87.7%; the effective rate in west drug group was 86.8% and in acupuncture group was 77.4%. A comparison among the three groups showed there was no significant difference in clinical ther apeutic effect ( P > 0.05 ). Conclusion Electroacupuncture plus acupoint application was an effective therapy of hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood.

  12. Malaria related knowledge, practices and behaviour of people in Nepal

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    A.B. Joshi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The information on malaria related knowledge, practices and behaviour of the people of Nepal living in malaria endemic areas are essential to develop behavioural change communication messages and for producing policy to prevent and control malaria in the country. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge, practices and behaviour of the people living in malaria endemic districts and relate with malaria control policy in Nepal. Methods: The paper utilizes data from a cross-sectional study of 1330 households conducted during December 2004 to April 2005 in rural areas of Jhapa, Kailali and Kanchanpur districts. The method used includes structured questionnaire and focus group discussions. Results: The results revealed that 40% respondents were illiterates. Eighty-six percent respondents have heard about malaria but only 50% responded fever with chills as the sign and symptom of malaria. Seventy-three percent responded that mosquito bite causes malaria transmission and 74% respondents considered that malaria is the fatal disease but very few have knowledge that the treatment of malaria in time can save life. More than 50% did not have information on availability of free treatment of malaria in Nepal. Still 16% were found consulting traditional healers for the treatment. The outside sleeping habit was found in almost one fourth of the population mainly in summer season indicating no knowledge about prevention of malaria. Although bednet use practice was higher, only 4% had knowledge on insecticide impregnated bednets and 23% of them practicing it. Issues regarding the proper and regular use of bednets, the quality of the bednet and use of free treatment provided by the government, since these districts are reporting high incidence of malaria.Interpretation & conclusion: Health education must be taken into account for communities in malaria endemic areas to produce desired outcomes in malaria control.

  13. [Current malaria situation in Turkmenistan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amangel'diev, K A

    2001-01-01

    from tertian malaria, which is the most dangerous from the epidemiological point of view since the main vectors in Turkmenistan, are highly susceptible to P. vivax infection. The particular dangerous phenomenon is the higher incidence of imported tertian malaria in rural areas where sick people and those who carry the parasite come into close contact with highly susceptible vectors. Thus, the risk that new malaria outbreaks will occur and the disease will become reestablished in the country is very high. It is also influenced by major changes in water use in the country, which have aggravated the mosquito situation. In the area around the Karakum canal and river basins, 17 large reservoirs have been constructed, with very extensive filtration ponds around them, which have become breeding ground's for malaria mosquitoes. There are 1219 water areas without any economic significance in the country, covering a total area of 1054 ha, which require regular treatment with insecticides. With assistance from the WHO European Regional Office, Dr. Guido Sabatinelli in particular, Turkmenistan has developed a plan for preventive malaria control measures for 1999-2001, which has been approved in a decree issued by the Ministry of Health and Medical Industry. The material support received has made it possible to provide large-scale prophylaxis for people who suffered from malaria in 1997-1999, seasonal treatment for people living near the active foci of the disease and interseasonal prophylaxis for people visiting these areas. Seasonal treatment with Dellaguil was made in 4,590 people living in the active foci of malaria infection, and 2,281 fixed-term military personnel belonging to the units stationed in the active foci of malaria infection. In all foci of infection, every person with malaria or carrying the parasite underwent epidemiological investigation and all cases were entered in health clinic records. In 1999, four seminars were held to train 75 specialists from all

  14. Important advances in malaria vaccine research

    OpenAIRE

    Priyanka Jadhav; Ritesh Shah; Manoj Jadhav

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most widespread parasitic infection in Asian countries affecting the poor of the poor. In an effort to develop an effective vaccine for the treatment of malaria, various attempts are being made worldwide. If successful, such a vaccine can be effective for treatment of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. This would also be able to avoid complications such as drug resistance, resistance to insecticides, nonadherence to the treatment schedule, and eventually hi...

  15. Prevalence of malaria and use of malaria risk reduction measures among resettled pregnant women in South Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dræbel, Tania; Gueth Kueil, Bill; Meyrowitsch, Dan Wolf

    2013-01-01

    treatment (OR ¼ 3.20, 95% CI 1.26–8.16; p ¼ 0.015). Conclusions: The results suggest that educational attainment need not be very advanced to affect practices of malaria prevention and treatment. Primary school attendance was a stronger predictor for use of malaria risk reduction measures than any of the...... other selected background characteristics. Educational attainment, information and communication about malaria prevention and control play a pivotal role in increasing and improving use of malaria risk reduction measures.......Background: The study assessed aspects of malaria infection, prevention and treatment in a population of resettled pregnant women in South Sudan. Methods: During April and May 2008, a cross-sectional study was carried out to estimate malaria prevalence and to assess the use of malaria risk...

  16. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of artemether-lumefantrine in the treatment of acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Nigerian infants and children

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    de Palacios Patricia

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The six-dose regimen of artemether-lumefantrine (AL is now considered the gold standard for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. There are few reports evaluating co-artemether in very young Nigerian infants and children. Results of the evaluation of the six-dose regimen in very young infants and children in Nigeria are presented in this report. Methods As part of a larger African study, this open label, non-comparative trial, assessed the efficacy and safety of six-dose regimen of AL tablets in 103 Nigerian infants and children weighing between five and 25 kg suffering from acute uncomplicated malaria. Treatment was administered under supervision over three days with children as in-patients. 12-lead ECG tracings were taken pre-treatment and at day 3. Results Ninety-three infants and children completed the study as stipulated by the protocol. Mean fever and parasite clearance times for the intent to treat population (ITT were 24.9 h ± (1.28 and 26 h ± (4.14 and the corresponding figures for the per-protocol population (PP were 19.24 h ± 13.9 and 25.62 h ± 11.25 respectively. Day 14 cure rates for the ITT and PP were 95.1% and 100% respectively while day 28 cure rates were 91.3% and 95.7% respectively. The overall PCR corrected day 28 cure rate was 95.1% for the ITT. The six-dose regimen of AL was well tolerated with no drug-related serious adverse events. Although six patients recorded a QTc prolongation of > 60 ms on D3 over D0 recording, no patient recorded a QTc interval > 500 ms. Conclusion The six-dose regimen of AL tablets is safe and effective for the treatment of acute uncomplicated malaria in Nigerian infants and children weighing between five and 25 kg. Trial registration NCT00709969

  17. Anti-bacterial activity of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: comparative in vitro study of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, mefloquine, and azithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mombo-Ngoma Ghyslain

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is recommended for the prevention of malaria in pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa. Increasing drug resistance necessitates the urgent evaluation of alternative drugs. Currently, the most promising candidates in clinical development are mefloquine and azithromycin. Besides the anti-malarial activity, SP is also a potent antibiotic and incurs significant anti-microbial activity when given as IPTp - though systematic clinical evaluation of this action is still lacking. Methods In this study, the intrinsic anti-bacterial activity of mefloquine and azithromycin was assessed in comparison to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine against bacterial pathogens with clinical importance in pregnancy in a standard microdilution assay. Results SP was highly active against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. All tested Gram-positive bacteria, except Enterococcus faecalis, were sensitive to azithromycin. Additionally, azithromycin was active against Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Mefloquine showed good activity against pneumococci but lower in vitro action against all other tested pathogens. Conclusion These data indicate important differences in the spectrum of anti-bacterial activity for the evaluated anti-malarial drugs. Given the large scale use of IPTp in Africa, the need for prospective clinical trials evaluating the impact of antibiotic activity of anti-malarials on maternal and foetal health and on the risk of promoting specific drug resistance of bacterial pathogens is discussed.

  18. Understanding Interpretations of and Responses to Childhood Fever in the Chikhwawa District of Malawi.

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    Victoria L Ewing

    Full Text Available Universal access to, and community uptake of malaria prevention and treatment strategies are critical to achieving current targets for malaria reduction. Each step in the treatment-seeking pathway must be considered in order to establish where opportunities for successful engagement and treatment occur. We describe local classifications of childhood febrile illnesses, present an overview of treatment-seeking, beginning with recognition of illness, and suggest how interventions could be used to target the barriers experienced.Qualitative data were collected between September 2010 and February 2011. A total of 12 Focus Group Discussions and 22 Critical Incident Interviews were conducted with primary caregivers who had reported a recent febrile episode for one of their children.The phrase 'kutentha thupi', or 'hot body' was used to describe fever, the most frequently mentioned causes of which were malungo (translated as 'malaria', mauka, nyankhwa and (mtsempho. Differentiating the cause was challenging because these illnesses were described as having many similar non-specific symptoms, despite considerable differences in the perceived mechanisms of illness. Malungo was widely understood to be caused by mosquitoes. Commonly described symptoms included: fever, weakness, vomiting, diarrhoea and coughing. These symptoms matched well with the biomedical definition of malaria, although they also overlapped with symptoms of other illnesses in both the biomedical model and local illness classifications. In addition, malungo was used interchangeably to describe malaria and fever in general. Caregivers engaged in a three-phased approach to treatment seeking. Phase 1-Assessment; Phase 2-Seeking care outside the home; Phase 3-Evaluation of treatment response. Within this paper, the three-phased approach is explored to identify potential interventions to target barriers to appropriate treatment. Community engagement and health promotion, the provision of

  19. Early loss of teeth after treatment for childhood leukemia; Fruehzeitiger Zahnverlust nach Leukaemiebehandlung im Kindesalter. Fallbericht und Literaturuebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, T.; Doerr, W.; Lesche, A.; Lehmann, D. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Medizinische Fakultaet der Technischen Univ. Dresden (Germany); Koy, S. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie, Medizinische Fakultaet der Technischen Univ. Dresden (Germany)

    2004-06-01

    Background: only few reports of effects of radiotherapy in childhood on the dental apparatus are available in the literature. The basis for early loss of teeth appears to be a reduction of the root surface area after radiation exposure. These effects in the periodontium are a consequence of combined radiochemotherapy usually applied for treatment of childhood neoplasia. Chemotherapy alone also results in changes of periodontal development. Case report: a 33-year-old patient is reported, who, at the age of 11 years, received high-dose chemotherapy and radiotherapy of neuroaxis and cranium for acute lymphatic leukemia with relapse. The patient consulted the Implant Section of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery because of severe dental changes and tooth loss despite adequate dental care and oral hygiene. Radiation doses given to the superior maxilla and mandible at the age of 11 were estimated to be in the range of 8-25 Gy. Conclusion: intense, life-long dental care and follow-up of patients cured from malignant disease in childhood must hence be postulated in order to minimize dental treatment sequelae by supportive measures, but also to initiate timely adequate dental and prosthetic management. (orig.)

  20. [Current malaria situation in Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gockchinar, T; Kalipsi, S

    2001-01-01

    are important in transmitting the diseases. The districts where malaria cases occur are the places where population moves are rapid, agriculture is the main occupation, the increase in the population is high and the education/cultural level is low. Within years, the districts with high malaria cases also differ. Before 1990 Cucurova and Amikova were the places that showed the highest incidence of malaria. Since 1990, the number of cases from south-eastern Anatolia has started to rise. The main reasons for this change are a comprehensive malaria prevention programme, regional development, developed agricultural systems, and lower population movements. The 1999 statistical data indicate that 83 and 17% of all malaria cases are observed in the GAP and other districts, respectively. The distribution of malaria cases in Turkey differs by months and climatic conditions. The incidence of malaria starts to rise in March, reaching its peak in July, August and September, begins to fall in October. In other words, the number of malaria cases is lowest in winter and reaches its peak in summer and autumn. This is not due to the parasite itself, but a climatic change is a main reason. In the past years the comprehensive malaria prevention programme has started bearing its fruits. Within the WHO Roll Back Malaria strategies, Turkey has started to implement its national malaria control projects, the meeting held on March 22, 2000, coordinated the country's international cooperation for this purpose. The meeting considered the aim of the project to be introduced into other organizations. In this regards, the target for 2002 is to halve the incidence of malaria as compared to 1999. The middle--and long-term incidence of malaria will be lowered to even smaller figures. The objectives of this project are as follows: to integrate malaria services with primary health care services to prove more effective studies; to develop early diagnosis and treatment systems, to provide better