WorldWideScience

Sample records for childhood health care

  1. Separate and Cumulative Effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences in Predicting Adult Health and Health Care Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Mariette J.; Walker, John R.; Naimark, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Objectives of this population-based study were: (1) to examine the relative contribution of childhood abuse and other adverse childhood experiences to poor adult health and increased health care utilization and (2) to examine the cumulative effects of adverse childhood experiences on adult health and health care utilization. Methods:…

  2. Separate and Cumulative Effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences in Predicting Adult Health and Health Care Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Mariette J.; Walker, John R.; Naimark, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Objectives of this population-based study were: (1) to examine the relative contribution of childhood abuse and other adverse childhood experiences to poor adult health and increased health care utilization and (2) to examine the cumulative effects of adverse childhood experiences on adult health and health care utilization. Methods:…

  3. Primary health care staff's perception of childhood tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Stephanie; Rose, Michala Vaaben; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diagnosing tuberculosis in children remains a great challenge in developing countries. Health staff working in the front line of the health service delivery system has a major responsibility for timely identification and referral of suspected cases of childhood tuberculosis. This study...... explored primary health care staff’s perception, challenges and needs pertaining to the identification of children with tuberculosis in Muheza district in Tanzania. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study that included 13 semi-structured interviews and 3 focus group discussions with a total of 29 health...... staff purposively sampled from primary health care facilities. Analysis was performed in accordance with the principles of a phenomenological analysis. Results: Primary health care staff perceived childhood tuberculosis to be uncommon in the society and tuberculosis was rarely considered as a likely...

  4. Primary health care staff's perception of childhood tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Stephanie; Rose, Michala Vaaben; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diagnosing tuberculosis in children remains a great challenge in developing countries. Health staff working in the front line of the health service delivery system has a major responsibility for timely identification and referral of suspected cases of childhood tuberculosis. This study...... explored primary health care staff’s perception, challenges and needs pertaining to the identification of children with tuberculosis in Muheza district in Tanzania. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study that included 13 semi-structured interviews and 3 focus group discussions with a total of 29 health...... staff purposively sampled from primary health care facilities. Analysis was performed in accordance with the principles of a phenomenological analysis. Results: Primary health care staff perceived childhood tuberculosis to be uncommon in the society and tuberculosis was rarely considered as a likely...

  5. Adverse childhood experiences and trauma informed care: the future of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral, Resmiye; Ramirez, Marizen; Coohey, Carol; Nakada, Stephanie; Walz, Amy; Kuntz, Angela; Benoit, Jenna; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are related to short- and long-term negative physical and mental health consequences among children and adults. Studies of the last three decades on ACEs and traumatic stress have emphasized their impact and the importance of preventing and addressing trauma across all service systems utilizing universal systemic approaches. Current developments on the implementation of trauma informed care (TIC) in a variety of service systems call for the surveillance of trauma, resiliency, functional capacity, and health impact of ACEs. Despite such efforts in adult medical care, early identification of childhood trauma in children still remains a significant public health need. This article reviews childhood adversity and traumatic toxic stress, presents epidemiologic data on the prevalence of ACEs and their physical and mental health impacts, and discusses intervention modalities for prevention.

  6. Redesigning Health Care Practices to Address Childhood Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierman, Arthur H; Beck, Andrew F; Chung, Esther K; Tschudy, Megan M; Coker, Tumaini R; Mistry, Kamila B; Siegel, Benjamin; Chamberlain, Lisa J; Conroy, Kathleen; Federico, Steven G; Flanagan, Patricia J; Garg, Arvin; Gitterman, Benjamin A; Grace, Aimee M; Gross, Rachel S; Hole, Michael K; Klass, Perri; Kraft, Colleen; Kuo, Alice; Lewis, Gena; Lobach, Katherine S; Long, Dayna; Ma, Christine T; Messito, Mary; Navsaria, Dipesh; Northrip, Kimberley R; Osman, Cynthia; Sadof, Matthew D; Schickedanz, Adam B; Cox, Joanne

    2016-04-01

    Child poverty in the United States is widespread and has serious negative effects on the health and well-being of children throughout their life course. Child health providers are considering ways to redesign their practices in order to mitigate the negative effects of poverty on children and support the efforts of families to lift themselves out of poverty. To do so, practices need to adopt effective methods to identify poverty-related social determinants of health and provide effective interventions to address them. Identification of needs can be accomplished with a variety of established screening tools. Interventions may include resource directories, best maintained in collaboration with local/regional public health, community, and/or professional organizations; programs embedded in the practice (eg, Reach Out and Read, Healthy Steps for Young Children, Medical-Legal Partnership, Health Leads); and collaboration with home visiting programs. Changes to health care financing are needed to support the delivery of these enhanced services, and active advocacy by child health providers continues to be important in effecting change. We highlight the ongoing work of the Health Care Delivery Subcommittee of the Academic Pediatric Association Task Force on Child Poverty in defining the ways in which child health care practice can be adapted to improve the approach to addressing child poverty.

  7. Health-care providers' perspectives on childhood cancer treatment in Manado, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostert, S; Gunawan, S; van Dongen, J A P; van de Ven, P M; Sitaresmi, M N; Wolters, E E; Veerman, A J P; Mantik, M; Kaspers, G J L

    2013-11-01

    Childhood cancer survival in low-income countries is low. Our study investigated health-care providers' perspectives on childhood cancer treatment in Indonesia. Their health beliefs and attitudes toward parental financial difficulties, protocol adherence, parental education, and communication were explored. A self-administered questionnaire was filled in by 222 health-care providers (156 doctors, 51 nurses, 6 social workers, 9 administrators) Health of children with cancer is beyond doctor's control and determined by luck, fate or God according to 35% of health-care providers, 30% were uncertain about this statement, and 35% disagreed. Combination of chemotherapy and alternative treatment is best to achieve cure according to 15% of health-care providers, 50% were uncertain, and 35% disagreed. Prosperous parents adhere better with treatment (67%). Doctors adhere better with cancer treatment for prosperous patients (55%). When dealing with poor families, less elaborate explanation is given (62%), more difficult vocabulary is used (49%), and less cooperation is offered (46%). Reasons for non-adherence with treatment protocol were as follows: financial difficulties parents (82%), side-effects (77%), lack of motivation parents (75%), and inadequate drugs supply at pharmacy (70%). Information about cancer and treatment makes parents more afraid or depressed about future, and parents prefer not to know according to 27% of health-care providers, 20% were uncertain, and 53% disagreed. Communication with parents is hindered by differences in status and social hierarchical structures (83%). Health-care providers' beliefs about childhood cancer treatment are characterized by much uncertainty and contradiction. This likely affects adherence of health-care providers, parents, and childhood cancer treatment outcome. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Health Care Seeking Behavior for Common Childhood Illnesses in Jeldu District, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolola, Tufa; Gezahegn, Takele; Addisie, Mesfin

    2016-01-01

    Even though health care seeking interventions potentially reduce child mortality from easily treatable diseases, significant numbers of children die without ever reaching a health facility or due to delays in seeking care in Ethiopia. This study aimed to assess health care seeking behavior for common childhood illnesses and associated factors. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Jeldu District from January to February 2011. A systematic sampling method was used for sample selection. Data were collected from 422 caregivers with under-five children who experienced diseases within six weeks before the survey. Interviewer administered structured and pre-tested questionnaire which were used to collect data. Data entry and cleaning were carried out using Epi Info version 3.5.1 and analyzed using SPSS version 16. Descriptive analysis was done to determine the magnitude of health care seeking behavior. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify associated factors. A total of 422 caregivers of under-five children were participated in the study giving an overall response rate of 97.5%. Three hundred fifteen (74.6%) children sought care from health facilities for all conditions. However, only 55.4% of them were taken to health facilities as first source treatment during their illness and prompt care was also very low (13.7%). Marital status of the caregivers (AOR = 2.84; 95%CI: 1.62-4.98), number of symptoms experienced by the child (AOR = 2.04; 95%CI: 1.24-3.36) and perceived severity of the illness (AOR = 3.20; 95%CI: 1.96-5.22) were predictors of health care seeking behavior. Health care seeking behavior for childhood illnesses was delayed and decision to seek care from health facilities was influenced by worsening of the illnesses. Thus, community level promotion of prompt health care seeking is essential to enhance the health care seeking behavior for child hood illnesses in the locality.

  9. Ending neglect: providing effective childhood tuberculosis training for health care workers in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olotu, R.; Talbot, E. A.; Cronin, B. J.; Christopher, R.; Mkomwa, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Setting: Health care facilities in Dar es Salaam, Pwani, and Arusha, Tanzania. Objective: To assess health care worker (HCW) knowledge and practices 1 year after specialized training in childhood tuberculosis (TB). Design: Using a standardized survey, we interviewed a convenience sample of HCWs providing both general and specialized care to children. Results: We interviewed 117 HCWs in TB clinics, maternal and child health clinics, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinics, out-patient departments, and pediatric in-patient wards at 12 facilities. A total of 81 HCWs (62% of nurses, 74% of clinicians) reported having attended the national childhood TB training course. Most HCWs responded correctly to questions on childhood TB diagnosis, treatment, and TB-HIV co-management, regardless of training history. Most HCWs reported that they routinely obtain chest radiographs, HIV testing, and a TB contact history when evaluating children for TB. Less than half of HCWs reported routinely obtaining sputum for mycobacterial culture or performing a tuberculin skin test. Three times as many trained as untrained HCWs reported having ever prescribed isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) to a child (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In general, levels of childhood TB knowledge were high and practices were in accordance with national guidance. Specific gaps in diagnosis, treatment and use of IPT were identified for future focused training. PMID:26400701

  10. Opportunities to Strengthen Childhood Obesity Prevention in Two Mexican Health Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cespedes, Elizabeth; Andrade, Gloria Oliva Martínez; Rodríguez-Oliveros, Guadalupe; Perez-Cuevas, Ricardo; González-Unzaga, Marco A.; Trejo, Amalia Benitez; Haines, Jess; Gillman, Matthew W.; Taveras, Elsie M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine Mexican caregivers’ perceptions of the role of primary care in childhood obesity management, understand the barriers and facilitators of behavior change, and identify opportunities to strengthen obesity prevention and treatment in clinical settings. Methods We conducted 52 in-depth interviews with parents and caregivers of overweight and obese children age 2–5 years in 4 Ministry of Health (public, low SES) and 4 Social Security Institute (insured, higher SES) primary care clinics in Mexico City and did systematic thematic analysis. Results In both health systems, caregivers acknowledged childhood overweight but not its adverse health consequences. Although the majority of parents had not received nutrition or physical activity recommendations from health providers, many were open to clinician guidance. Despite knowledge of healthful nutrition and physical activity, parents identified several barriers to change including child feeding occurring in the context of competing priorities (work schedules, spouses’ food preferences), and cultural norms (heavy as healthy, food as nurturance) that take precedence over adherence to dietary guidelines. Physical activity, while viewed favorably, is not a structured part of most preschooler’s routines as reported by parents. Conclusions The likelihood of success for clinic-based obesity prevention among Mexican preschoolers will be higher by addressing contextual barriers such as cultural norms regarding children’s weight and support of family members for behavior change. Similarities in caregivers’ perceptions across 2 health systems highlight the possibility of developing comprehensive interventions for the population as a whole. PMID:25530836

  11. Opportunities to Strengthen Childhood Obesity Prevention in Two Mexican Health Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cespedes, Elizabeth; Andrade, Gloria Oliva Martínez; Rodríguez-Oliveros, Guadalupe; Perez-Cuevas, Ricardo; González-Unzaga, Marco A; Trejo, Amalia Benitez; Haines, Jess; Gillman, Matthew W; Taveras, Elsie M

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Mexican caregivers' perceptions of the role of primary care in childhood obesity management, understand the barriers and facilitators of behavior change, and identify opportunities to strengthen obesity prevention and treatment in clinical settings. We conducted 52 in-depth interviews with parents and caregivers of overweight and obese children age 2-5 years in 4 Ministry of Health (public, low SES) and 4 Social Security Institute (insured, higher SES) primary care clinics in Mexico City and did systematic thematic analysis. In both health systems, caregivers acknowledged childhood overweight but not its adverse health consequences. Although the majority of parents had not received nutrition or physical activity recommendations from health providers, many were open to clinician guidance. Despite knowledge of healthful nutrition and physical activity, parents identified several barriers to change including child feeding occurring in the context of competing priorities (work schedules, spouses' food preferences), and cultural norms (heavy as healthy, food as nurturance) that take precedence over adherence to dietary guidelines. Physical activity, while viewed favorably, is not a structured part of most preschooler's routines as reported by parents. The likelihood of success for clinic-based obesity prevention among Mexican preschoolers will be higher by addressing contextual barriers such as cultural norms regarding children's weight and support of family members for behavior change. Similarities in caregivers' perceptions across 2 health systems highlight the possibility of developing comprehensive interventions for the population as a whole.

  12. The emotional and behavioural functioning of siblings of children with special health care needs across childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallo, Rebecca; Roberts, Rachel; Emerson, Eric; Wood, Catherine; Gavidia-Payne, Susana

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the emotional and behavioural functioning of siblings of children with special health care needs identified in the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). Of the 106 siblings identified, 15-52% had emotional and behavioural difficulties in the at-risk or clinical range on the parent-reported Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) subscales when aged 4-5 (wave 1), 6-7 (wave 2), 8-9 (wave 3) and 10-11 years (wave 4). After controlling for differences in socio-economic position, siblings had significantly higher difficulties on all subscales than their peers without a brother or sister with a special health care need at most time points. Latent growth modelling revealed little change in emotional and behavioural symptoms for siblings across childhood, while behavioural symptoms decreased for their peers. These findings suggest that some siblings are at heightened risk of emotional and behavioural difficulties across childhood, underscoring the importance of assessing and promoting the wellbeing of all family members when providing services to children with special health care needs.

  13. Primary care interventions to reduce childhood obesity and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption: Food for thought for oral health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Diane; Moultrie, Nicolette M; Sites, Elsbeth; Crawford, Patricia B

    2017-06-01

    Childhood obesity remains a significant threat to America's children. Health care leaders have increasingly called upon oral health professionals to integrate healthy weight promotion and enhanced sugar-sweetened beverage counseling into their professional practices. The aim of this scoping review is to examine recent evidence regarding the effectiveness of primary care childhood obesity interventions that have potential for adoption by oral health professionals. Medine, and PubMed were searched from 2010 to 2016 for review articles and studies reporting patient outcomes or policy outcomes relevant to primary care childhood obesity interventions for children ages 2-11 years. Additional articles were accessed through relevant websites, journals, and references. Our screening criteria included interventions that could be adopted by oral health professionals. Forty-two articles met inclusion criteria. Effective interventions fell into four domains: family-based programs, motivational interviewing, office-based practice tools, and policy interventions. Despite strong evidence linking the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages to childhood obesity, our review did not find evidence of primary care programs effectively targeting and reducing childhood sugary drinks. Effective primary care interventions for addressing childhood obesity have been identified, although only short-term effectiveness has been demonstrated. Dissemination of these practices as well as further research and advocacy are needed. Childhood obesity and poor oral health share many common risk factors. Additional research should focus on the benefits and feasibility of widespread interdisciplinary medical-oral health collaboration in addressing the two most prevalent diseases of childhood. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  14. Antenatal Health Care and Postnatal Dental Check-Ups Prevent Early Childhood Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Yukie; Mori, Yukako; Tamaoka, Izumi

    2016-01-01

    The first stage of early childhood caries (ECC) is infection by mutans streptococci, of which the primary infection source is the child's mother. Early intervention programs including antenatal and postnatal phases are effective for reducing ECC. This study was conducted to assess the respective effects of antenatal health care and postnatal care such as regular dental check-ups on reducing ECC among 3-year-old Japanese children. This nested case-control study of 155 three-year-old children (49.0% boys) was conducted at a dental clinic that provides collaborative health services with the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic, Okayama. Child characteristics and the mothers' antenatal data were collected retrospectively from the dental charts. They were divided into two groups: caries-free children (n = 77) and children without ECC (n = 78). Most of the children (81.9%) received regular check-ups with topical fluoride application. Most of the mothers reported morning sickness during pregnancy (81.3%), normal delivery (72.9%), and used antenatal health care (80.6%). Over half (55.5%) were primigravida. Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidential interval (95% CI) were computed to assess the strength of association using logistic regression analysis. Receiving antenatal health care (AOR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.30-8.24) and child's having regular check-ups (AOR, 3.42; 95% CI, 1.35-8.69) were significantly associated with caries-free status among three-year old children. For ECC prevention, antenatal health care is as effective as regular check-ups up to three years of age. The results of this retrospective study demonstrate that maternal health education during pregnancy is effective for ECC prevention.

  15. Exploring health stakeholders' perceptions on moving towards comprehensive primary health care to address childhood malnutrition in Iran: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikia Udoy

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the multifaceted aspect of child malnutrition, a comprehensive approach, taking social factors into account, has been frequently recommended in health literature. The Alma-Ata declaration explicitly outlined comprehensive primary health care as an approach that addresses the social, economic and political causes of poor health and nutrition. Iran as a signatory country to the Alma Ata Declaration has established primary health care since 1979 with significant progress on many health indicators during the last three decades. However, the primary health care system is still challenged to reduce inequity in conditions such as child malnutrition which trace back to social factors. This study aimed to explore the perceptions of the Iranian health stakeholders with respect to the Iranian primary health care performance and actions to move towards a comprehensive approach in addressing childhood malnutrition. Health stakeholders are defined as those who affect or can be affected by health system, for example health policy-makers, health providers or health service recipients. Methods Stakeholder analysis approach was undertaken using a qualitative research method. Different levels of stakeholders, including health policy-makers, health providers and community members were interviewed as either individuals or focus groups. Qualitative content analysis was used to interpret and compare/contrast the viewpoints of the study participants. Results The results demonstrated that fundamental differences exist in the perceptions of different health stakeholders in the understanding of comprehensive notion and action. Health policy-makers mainly believed in the need for a secure health management environment and the necessity for a whole of the government approach to enhance collaborative action. Community health workers, on the other hand, indicated that staff motivation, advocacy and involvement are the main challenges need to be

  16. Long-term socioeconomic consequences and health care costs of childhood and adolescent-onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennum, Poul; Christensen, Jakob; Ibsen, Rikke; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2016-07-01

    To estimate long-term socioeconomic consequences and health care costs of epilepsy with onset in childhood and adolescence. A historical prospective cohort study of Danish individuals with epilepsy, age up to 20 years at time of diagnosis between January 1981 and December 2012. Information about marital status, parenthood, educational level, employment status, income, use of the health care system, and cost of medicine was obtained from nationwide administrative and health registers. We identified 12,756 and 28,319 people with diagnosed with epilepsy, ages 0-5 and 6-20 years at onset, respectively. Using follow-up data for a maximum of 30 years, 1,394 of those ages 0-5 years at onset were compared with 2,897 controls persons without epilepsy, and 10,195 of those ages 6-20 years at onset were compared with 20,678 controls without epilepsy. Compared with people without the epilepsy, those with epilepsy tended to have a lower level of education, to be less likely to be married, to be more likely to live alone, and to have higher divorce and unemployment rates, lower employment rates, and people with epilepsy were more likely to receive disability pension and social security. Income was lower from employment, which in part was compensated by social security, sick pay, disability pension and unemployment benefit, sick pay (public-funded), disability pension, and other public transfers. Predicted health care costs 30 years after epilepsy onset were significantly higher among persons with epilepsy onset at 0-5 and 6-20 years, including costs for outpatient and inpatient services (hospital services), emergency room use, primary health care sector (general practice), and use of medication. The long-term negative effects on all aspects of health care and social domains, including marital status, parental socioeconomic status, educational level, employment status, and use of welfare benefits compared with controls without epilepsy calls for increased awareness on

  17. Chronic disease in childhood and adolescence: continuity of care in the Health Care Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Vanessa Medeiros da; Silva, Maria Elizabete de Amorim; Fernandes, Leiliane Teixeira Bento; Viera, Claudia Silveira; Reichert, Altamira Pereira da Silva; Collet, Neusa

    2017-06-12

    To evaluate the continuity of care for children and adolescents with chronic diseases in the health care network. This qualitative study was conducted between February and October 2013 with 12 families, six health managers, and 14 health professionals from different health care services in a municipality of the state of Paraíba, Brazil, using focal groups, semi-structured interviews, and medical record consultation. The data were analyzed by triangulation and thematic analysis. Two categories were created: "health care management" and "(dis)continuity of care." We found gaps in the system, including poor data recording aimed to facilitate follow-up and guide the planning actions as well as sporadic and discoordinate services with a limited flow of information, which hinders follow-up over time. Continuity of care in the health care network is limited and creates the need to develop strategies to improve these services. Analisar a continuidade do cuidado à criança/adolescente com doença crônica na rede de atenção à saúde. Pesquisa qualitativa realizada entre fevereiro e outubro de 2013 com 12 familiares, seis gestores e 14 profissionais de saúde de diferentes serviços da rede de saúde de um município da Paraíba através das técnicas de grupo focal, entrevista semiestruturada e consulta a prontuários. A triangulação dos dados e a análise temática subsidiaram a interpretação dos dados. Foram construídas duas categorias: "Gestão da atenção à saúde" e "(Des)continuidade do cuidado". Constataram-se lacunas como a ausência de cadastro para favorecer o acompanhamento e nortear o planejamento de ações; atendimento pontual e desarticulado entre os serviços com fragilidade no fluxo de informações, que obstaculizam o seguimento ao longo do tempo. A continuidade do cuidado na rede de atenção à saúde está fragilizada e há necessidade do desenvolvimento de estratégias que a favoreçam.

  18. Acute childhood morbidities in rural Wardha: some epidemiological correlates and health care seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, P R; Dongre, A R; Sinha, N; Garg, B S

    2009-08-01

    that anemia and mother's poor educational status are predictors of childhood morbidity. Nutritional anemia and mother's poor educational status are the most important risk factors of acute childhood morbidity. There is need to revitalize existing health care delivery and child health programs in rural India with emphasis on immediate correction of nutritional anemia.

  19. Independent effect of physical workload and childhood socioeconomic status on low back pain among health care workers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Clausen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the independent effect of physical workload and childhood socioeconomic status (CSES) on low back pain (LBP) and LBP-related sickness absence among female health care workers. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The role of physical worklo...

  20. Effect of Population Socioeconomic and Health System Factors on Medical Care of Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplin, Deirdre A; Smith, Ken R; Ness, Kirsten K; Hanson, Heidi A; Smith, Stephanie M; Nathan, Paul C; Hudson, Melissa M; Leisenring, Wendy M; Robison, Leslie L; Oeffinger, Kevin C

    2017-03-01

    To determine the independent contribution of population socioeconomic and health system factors on childhood cancer survivors' medical care and screening. 7899 childhood cancer survivors in the United States and Canada enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Population-level factors were derived from U.S. Area Health Resource File or 201 Canadian Census. Health service utilization and individual-level factors were self-reported. Multivariable logistic regression was used to calculate the effect of population factors on medical care (any care vs. no care; risk-based care vs. general care) and indicated echocardiogram or mammogram, adjusting for individual sociodemographic and health status. After adjusting for individual factors, population factors had a nominal impact on childhood cancer survivors' medical care and screening. Higher population median income was associated with risk-based survivor-focused care versus general care (odds ratio [OR] 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.09) among all participants, but not among U.S. residents only (OR 1.03, 95% CI, 0.99-1.07). For U.S. residents, the number of CCSS centers within the geographic area was associated with greater odds of receiving risk-based survivor-focused medical care (OR 1.12, 95% CI, 1.04-1.20). Areas with higher median income had higher rates of echocardiogram screening among survivors at risk of cardiomyopathy (for every $10,000 increase in median income, there is a 12% increase in odds of echocardiogram screening; 95% CI 1.05-1.20). A positive relationship was identified between greater number of physicians and surgeons in the county of residence and recommended echocardiogram (for every additional 1000 physicians and surgeons: OR 1.12, 95% CI, 1.01-1.23). We found no association between population-level factors and mammography screening. Population socioeconomic disparities moderately affect childhood cancer survivors' risk-based medical care and screening after accounting

  1. Less Than One-Third of Caretakers Sought Formal Health Care Facilities for Common Childhood Illnesses in Ethiopia: Evidence from the 2011 Ethiopian Demographic Health Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achamyelesh Gebretsadik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Most of the childhood illnesses can be proven with effective interventions. However, countless children die needlessly in developing countries due to the failure of their guardians to seek care timely. The aim of this study was to assess health care seeking behavior of caretakers of children under the age of five years for treatment of common childhood illnesses. Methods. Further analysis of the Ethiopian 2011 demographic and health survey was done. All children under the age of five reported to have been ill from the three common childhood illnesses and their caretakers were included in the analysis. A complex sample logistic regression model was employed to determine factors associated with the health care seeking behavior of caretakers. Result. A total of 2,842 caregivers who reported that their index child had at least one of the three common childhood illnesses in the two weeks preceding the survey were captured, of which 849 (29.87%; 95% CI: 28, 32% sought formal health care facilities. Conclusion and Recommendation. In Ethiopia health care seeking behavior of caretakers for common childhood illnesses is low. Increasing mass media exposure can possibly improve the health seeking behavior of caretakers.

  2. Childhood immunizations in China: disparities in health care access in children born to North Korean refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun Jung; Han, Seung Hyun; Kim, Hyerang; Finkelstein, Julia L

    2016-04-13

    Childhood immunization rates are at an all-time high globally, and national data for China suggests close to universal coverage. Refugees from North Korea and their children may have more limited health care access in China due to their legal status. However, there is no data on immunization rates or barriers to coverage in this population. This study was conducted to determine the rates and correlates of immunizations in children (≥1 year) born to North Korean refugees in Yanbien, China. Child immunization data was obtained from vaccination cards and caregiver self-report for 7 vaccines and 1:3:3:3:1 series. Age-appropriate vaccination rates of refugee children were compared to Chinese and migrant children using a goodness-of-fit test. Logistic regression was used to determine correlates of immunization coverage for each vaccine and the 1:3:3:3:1 series. Age-appropriate immunization coverage rates were significantly lower in children born to North Korean refugees (12.1-97.8 %), compared to Chinese (99 %) and migrant (95 %) children. Increased father's age and having a sibling predicted significantly lower vaccination rates. Children born to North Korean refugees had significantly lower immunization rates, compared to Chinese or migrant children. Further research is needed to examine barriers of health care access in this high-risk population.

  3. Barriers to adopting and implementing an oral health programme for managing early childhood caries through primary health care providers in Lima, Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pesaressi, E.; Villena, R.S.; Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Mulder, J.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To identify barriers to participation in a primary oral health care programme aimed at preventing early childhood caries, as perceived by nurses. METHODS: Of a total of 140 randomly selected nurses employed in 40 government health centres in Lima, 123 completed a pre-tested questionnaire

  4. Barriers to adopting and implementing an oral health programme for managing early childhood caries through primary health care providers in Lima, Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pesaressi, E.; Villena, R.S.; Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Mulder, J.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To identify barriers to participation in a primary oral health care programme aimed at preventing early childhood caries, as perceived by nurses. METHODS: Of a total of 140 randomly selected nurses employed in 40 government health centres in Lima, 123 completed a pre-tested

  5. Increased asthma risk and asthma-related health care complications associated with childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Mary Helen; Zhou, Hui; Takayanagi, Miwa; Jacobsen, Steven J; Koebnick, Corinna

    2013-10-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic condition of childhood, yet the relationship between obesity and asthma risk and the impact of obesity on clinical asthma outcomes are not well understood. For this population-based, longitudinal study, demographic and clinical data were extracted from administrative and electronic health records of 623,358 patients aged 6-19 years who were enrolled in the Kaiser Permanente Southern California health plan in 2007-2011. Crude asthma incidence ranged from 16.9 per 1,000 person-years among normal-weight youth to 22.3 per 1,000 person-years among extremely obese youth. The adjusted risks of asthma for overweight, moderately obese, and extremely obese youth relative to those of normal weight youth were 1.16 (95% confidence interval: 1.13, 1.20), 1.23 (95% confidence interval: 1.19, 1.28), and 1.37 (95% confidence interval: 1.32, 1.42), respectively (Ptrend obesity and asthma risk was strongest in Asian/Pacific Islanders and in the youngest girls (aged 6-10 years), compared with other groups. Among youth who developed asthma, those who were moderately or extremely obese had more frequent asthma exacerbations requiring emergency department services and/or treatment with oral corticosteroids. In conclusion, obese youth are not only more likely to develop asthma, but they may be more likely to have severe asthma, resulting in a greater need for health care utilization and aggressive asthma treatment.

  6. The mental models of vaccination, trust in health care system and parental attitudes towards childhood vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Gjorgjievski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Many contradictory notions have been appearing in the area of health care in recent years, including those related to attitudes towards vaccination. On the basis of their understanding of the phenomenon some parents oppose to the vaccination. The purpose of this study was to compare mental models of laymen with expert models and examine the correlation of the mental models of vaccination and the trust in doctors and healthcare system with the parental attitudes on childhood vaccination. In doing so, we have considered the demographic characteristics of the parents and cultural differences between parents from Slovenia and Macedonia. We were also interested in the role of compulsory and optional vaccination, because in the latter the behavioral intention is expressed more clearly. The methods used in our study of mental models was based on the approach of Morgan, Fischhoff, Bostrom and Atman (2002 which has three phases: (1 obtaining expert mental models, (2 getting mental models of the laymen (e.g., parents and (3 comparison of both mental models. Expert models of vaccination were obtained from five doctors from Slovenia and five doctors from Macedonia. Laymen models of vaccination were obtained in structured interviews with 33 parents from Slovenia and 30 from Macedonia. Based on comparisons of expert and laymental models it can be concluded that the mental models of vaccination from parents of one-year old children differ from expert mental models. Most parents, both Macedonian and Slovenian, have also responded that they have greater confidence in the doctors rather than the healthcare system, mainly due to positive experiences with the selected pediatrician. In some Slovenian parents, a tendency to identify compulsory vaccination with force was noticed.

  7. A review of primary care interventions to improve health outcomes in adult survivors of adverse childhood experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotana, Laurel M; Dobson, Keith S; Pusch, Dennis; Josephson, Trevor

    2016-06-01

    Research has consistently demonstrated a link between the experience of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and adult health conditions, including mental and physical health problems. While a focus on the prevention or mitigation of adversity in childhood is an important direction of many programs, many individuals do not access support services until adulthood, when health problems may be fairly engrained. It is not clear which interventions have the strongest evidence base to support the many adults who present to services with a history of ACEs. The current review examines the evidence base for psychosocial interventions for adults with a history of ACEs. The review focuses on interventions that may be provided in primary care, as that is the setting where most patients will first present and are most likely to receive treatment. A systematic review of the literature was completed using PsycInfo and PubMed databases, with 99 studies identified that met inclusion and exclusion criteria. These studies evaluated a range of interventions with varying levels of supportive evidence. Overall, cognitive-behavioral therapies (CBT) have the most evidence for improving health problems - in particular, improving mental health and reducing health-risk behaviors - in adults with a history of ACEs. Expressive writing and mindfulness-based therapies also show promise, whereas other treatments have less supportive evidence. Limitations of the current literature base are discussed and research directions for the field are provided.

  8. Spirituality in childhood cancer care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima NN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nádia Nara Rolim Lima,1 Vânia Barbosa do Nascimento,1 Sionara Melo Figueiredo de Carvalho,1 Modesto Leite Rolim Neto,2 Marcial Moreno Moreira,2 Aline Quental Brasil,2 Francisco Telésforo Celestino Junior,2 Gislene Farias de Oliveira,2 Alberto Olavo Advíncula Reis3 1Health Sciences Postgraduate Program, ABC Region Medical School, Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Department of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Barbalha, Ceará, Brazil; 3Public Health Postgraduate Program, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: To deal with the suffering caused by childhood cancer, patients and their families use different coping strategies, among which, spirituality appears a way of minimizing possible damage. In this context, the purpose of the present study was to analyze the influence of spirituality in childhood cancer care, involving biopsychosocial aspects of the child, the family, and the health care team facing the disease. To accomplish this purpose, a nonsystematic review of literature of articles on national and international electronic databases (Scientific Electronic Library Online [SciELO], PubMed, and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature [LILACS] was conducted using the search terms “spirituality,” “child psychology,” “child,” and “cancer,” as well as on other available resources. After the search, 20 articles met the eligibility criteria and were included in the final sample. Our review showed that the relation between spirituality and health has lately become a subject of growing interest among researchers, as a positive influence of spirituality in the people's welfare was noted. Studies that were retrieved using the mentioned search strategy in electronic databases, independently assessed by the authors according to the systematic review, showed that spirituality emerges as a driving force that helps pediatric patients and their families in coping with cancer. Health care workers

  9. Experiences of primary health care nurses in implementing integrated management of childhood illnesses strategy at selected clinics of Limpopo Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vhuromu, E N; Davhana-Maselesele, M

    2009-09-01

    Treatment of the under five years is a national priority as an attempt in curbing deaths and deformities affecting children. Primary health care was implemented in the clinics in order to help in the treatment of illnesses affecting the community, including children. As a result of childhood illnesses; the World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nation Children's Fund (UNICEF) came up with Integrated Management of Childhood illnesses (IMCI) strategy to enhance treatment of such illnesses in developing countries. Primary health care nurses (PHCNS) in Limpopo Province were also trained to implement the strategy. This study is intended to explore and describe the experiences of PHCNS in implementing the IMCI strategy at selected clinics in Vhembe District in the Limpopo Province. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design was used. In-depth interviews were conducted with PHCNS who are IMCI trained and have implemented the strategy for a period of not less than two years. Data analysis was done through using Tesch 's method of open coding for qualitative analysis. Findings revealed that PHCNS had difficulty in rendering IMCI services due to lack of resources and poor working conditions. Recommendations address the difficulties experienced by PHCNS when implementing the IMCI strategy.

  10. Experiences of primary health care nurses in implementing integrated management of childhood illnesses strategy at selected clinics of Limpopo Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Vhuromu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of the under five years is a national priority as an attempt in curbing deaths and deformities affecting children. Primary health care was implemented in the clinics in order to help in the treatment of illnesses affecting the community, including children. As a result of childhood illnesses; the World Health Organization (WHO and United Nation Children's Fund (UNICEF came up with Integrated Management of Childhood illnesses (IMCI strategy to enhance treatment of such illnesses in developing countries. Primary health care nurses (PHCNS in Limpopo province were also trained to implement the strategy. This study is intended to explore and describe the experiences of PHCNS in implementing the IMCI strategy at selected clinics in Vhembe District in the Limpopo Province. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design was used. In-depth interviews were conducted with PHCNS who are IMCI trained and have implemented the strategy for a period of not less than two years. Data analysis was done through using Tesch’s method of open coding for qualitative analysis. Findings revealed that PHCNS had difficulty in rendering IMCI services due to lack of resources and poor working conditions. Recommendations address the difficulties experienced by PHCNS when implementing the IMCI strategy.

  11. [Preliminary results of a therapeutic program for childhood obesity in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temboury Molina, M C; Sacristán Martín, A; San Frutos Fernández, M A; Rodríguez Alfaro, F; Llorente González, R

    1993-05-01

    The high prevalence of childhood obesity in our society, its adverse consequences in the psychosocial development of the child, together with its risk of persistence into adulthood, prompted us to carry out this treatment program in our Primary Care Unit. It is based fundamentally on four aspects: diet, physical exercise, psychological and family support. Thirty children, between 4 and 14 years of age, were controlled for 11 months. These children's personal and family characteristics, their habits and psychological aspects were described. An average reduction of the IMC of 2.50 was obtained. The best results were obtained in children with two or more siblings, with a good adherence to the diet and with adequate family support. Sex, obesity of other family members, initial age, previous habits, etc., were not found to be influential. The importance of prevention and family collaboration is emphasized.

  12. Long-term socioeconomic consequences and health care costs of childhood and adolescent-onset epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Christensen, Jakob; Ibsen, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    the epilepsy, those with epilepsy tended to have a lower level of education, to be less likely to be married, to be more likely to live alone, and to have higher divorce and unemployment rates, lower employment rates, and people with epilepsy were more likely to receive disability pension and social security...... persons with epilepsy onset at 0-5 and 6-20 years, including costs for outpatient and inpatient services (hospital services), emergency room use, primary health care sector (general practice), and use of medication. SIGNIFICANCE: The long-term negative effects on all aspects of health care and social...

  13. Oral health during pregnancy and early childhood: barriers to care and how to address them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Dana

    2010-09-01

    This brief supplements recommendations developed by the California Dental Association Foundation and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists that recommended practice guidelines during the perinatal period. This brief addresses the importance and safety of oral health care during pregnancy and outlines some of the multiple system-level barriers that make it difficult for many women to access oral health services, as well as offers specific strategies for mitigating these barriers.

  14. Declines with Age in Childhood Asthma Symptoms and Health Care Use: An Adjustment for Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yi-An; Song, Peter X. K.; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Asthma is a variable condition with an apparent tendency for a natural decline in asthma symptoms and health care use occurring as children age. As a result, asthma interventions using a pre-post design may overestimate the intervention effect when no proper control group is available. Objectives: Investigate patterns of natural decline…

  15. Acceptability – a neglected dimension of access to health care: findings from a study on childhood convulsions in rural Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillip Angel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acceptability is a poorly conceptualized dimension of access to health care. Using a study on childhood convulsion in rural Tanzania, we examined social acceptability from a user perspective. The study design is based on the premise that a match between health providers’ and clients’ understanding of disease is an important dimension of social acceptability, especially in trans-cultural communication, for example if childhood convulsions are not linked with malaria and local treatment practices are mostly preferred. The study was linked to health interventions with the objective of bridging the gap between local and biomedical understanding of convulsions. Methods The study combined classical ethnography with the cultural epidemiology approach using EMIC (Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue tool. EMIC interviews were conducted in a 2007/08 convulsion study (n = 88 and results were compared with those of an earlier 2004/06 convulsion study (n = 135. Earlier studies on convulsion in the area were also examined to explore longer-term changes in treatment practices. Results The match between local and biomedical understanding of convulsions was already high in the 2004/06 study. Specific improvements were noted in form of (1 46% point increase among those who reported use of mosquito nets to prevent convulsion (2 13% point decrease among caregivers who associated convulsion with ‘evil eye and sorcery’, 3 14% point increase in prompt use of health facility and 416% point decrease among those who did not use health facility at all. Such changes can be partly attributed to interventions which explicitly aimed at increasing the match between local and biomedical understanding of malaria. Caregivers, mostly mothers, did not seek advice on where to take an ill child. This indicates that treatment at health facility has become socially acceptable for severe febrile with convulsion. Conclusion As an important dimension

  16. Acceptability--a neglected dimension of access to health care: findings from a study on childhood convulsions in rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillip, Angel; Alba, Sandra; Mshana, Christopher; Hetzel, Manuel W; Lengeler, Christian; Mayumana, Iddy; Schulze, Alexander; Mshinda, Hassan; Weiss, Mitchell G; Obrist, Brigit

    2012-05-09

    Acceptability is a poorly conceptualized dimension of access to health care. Using a study on childhood convulsion in rural Tanzania, we examined social acceptability from a user perspective. The study design is based on the premise that a match between health providers' and clients' understanding of disease is an important dimension of social acceptability, especially in trans-cultural communication, for example if childhood convulsions are not linked with malaria and local treatment practices are mostly preferred. The study was linked to health interventions with the objective of bridging the gap between local and biomedical understanding of convulsions. The study combined classical ethnography with the cultural epidemiology approach using EMIC (Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue) tool. EMIC interviews were conducted in a 2007/08 convulsion study (n = 88) and results were compared with those of an earlier 2004/06 convulsion study (n = 135). Earlier studies on convulsion in the area were also examined to explore longer-term changes in treatment practices. The match between local and biomedical understanding of convulsions was already high in the 2004/06 study. Specific improvements were noted in form of (1) 46% point increase among those who reported use of mosquito nets to prevent convulsion (2) 13% point decrease among caregivers who associated convulsion with 'evil eye and sorcery', 3) 14% point increase in prompt use of health facility and 4)16% point decrease among those who did not use health facility at all. Such changes can be partly attributed to interventions which explicitly aimed at increasing the match between local and biomedical understanding of malaria. Caregivers, mostly mothers, did not seek advice on where to take an ill child. This indicates that treatment at health facility has become socially acceptable for severe febrile with convulsion. As an important dimension of access to health care 'social acceptability' seems relevant in studying

  17. Managing parental groups during early childhood: New challenges faced by Swedish child health-care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Åsa; Pia, Lundqvist; Eva, Drevenhorn; Inger, Hallström

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe child health centre (CHC) nurses' views of managing parental groups during early childhood. All 311 CHC nurses working within the Swedish CHC system in one county were asked to complete a web-based questionnaire. Findings showed that although the CHC nurses were experienced, several found group leadership challenging and difficult. The need for specialized groups for young parents, single parents and parents whose first language was not Swedish was identified by 57% of the nurses. The CHC nurses found the participation of fathers in their parental groups to be low (an estimate of 10-20%), and 30% of the nurses made special efforts to make the fathers participate. Education in group dynamics and group leadership can strengthen CHC nurses in managing parental groups. It is recommended that specialized parental groups are organized by a few family centres so CHC nurses can develop their skill in managing such groups.

  18. Adverse childhood experiences, mental health, and quality of life of Chilean girls placed in foster care: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Annina; Kohler, Stefanie; Ruf-Leuschner, Martina; Landolt, Markus A

    2016-03-01

    In Latin America, little research has been conducted regarding exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), mental health, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among foster children. This study examined the association between ACEs and mental health, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and HRQoL in Chilean foster girls relative to age-matched Chilean family girls. Data were obtained from 27 Chilean foster girls and 27 Chilean girls ages 6 to 17 years living in family homes. Standardized self- and proxy-report measures were used. Foster girls reported more ACEs than controls in terms of familial and nonfamilial sexual abuse and both emotional and physical neglect. Girls living in foster care had a significantly higher rate of PTSD, displayed greater behavioral and emotional problems, and reported a lower HRQoL. Analysis confirmed the well-known cumulative risk hypothesis by demonstrating a significant positive association between the number of ACEs and PTSD symptom severity and a significant negative association with HRQoL. Chilean foster girls endured more ACEs that impair mental health and HRQoL than age-matched peers living with their families. These findings have implications for out-of-home care services in Latin America, highlighting the need to implement not only appropriate trauma-focused treatments but also appropriate prevention strategies. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Behavioral counseling to prevent childhood obesity – study protocol of a pragmatic trial in maternity and child health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustila Taina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevention is considered effective in combating the obesity epidemic. Prenatal environment may increase offspring's risk for obesity. A child starts to adopt food preferences and other behavioral habits affecting weight gain during preschool years. We report the study protocol of a pragmatic lifestyle intervention aiming at primary prevention of childhood obesity. Methods/Design A non-randomized controlled pragmatic trial in maternity and child health care clinics. The control group was recruited among families who visited the same clinics one year earlier. Eligibility criteria was mother at risk for gestational diabetes: body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2, macrosomic newborn in any previous pregnancy, immediate family history of diabetes and/or age ≥ 40 years. All maternity clinics in town involved in recruitment. The gestational intervention consisted of individual counseling on diet and physical activity by a public health nurse, and of two group counseling sessions. Intervention continues until offspring’s age of five years. An option to participate a group counseling at child’s age 1 to 2 years was offered. The intervention includes advice on healthy diet, physical activity, sedentary behavior and sleeping pattern. The main outcome measure is offspring BMI z-score and its changes by the age of six years. Discussion Early childhood is a critical time period for prevention of obesity. Pragmatic trials targeting this period are necessary in order to find effective obesity prevention programs feasible in normal health care practice. Trial registration Clinical Trials gov NCT00970710

  20. Response to cotrimoxazole in the management of childhood pneumonia in first-level health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorani, Q A; Qazi, S A; Rasmussen, Z A; Rehman, G N; Khan, S S; Muhammadullah, I; Mohammad, Y K; Sher, G A; Munir, N H

    2006-08-01

    Reports of high levels of antimicrobial resistance to cotrimoxazole in children with non-severe pneumonia (NSP) have prompted calls for a change to amoxicillin in the therapeutic guidelines at the first-level health care facility (FLHF). FLHFs lack data about the use of World Health Organization (WHO) acute respiratory infection (ARI) standard case management (SCM). To apply ARI SCM guidelines at the FLHF, assess clinical outcome of NSP with oral cotrimoxazole and determine the risk factors influencing treatment outcome. Health care workers (HCWs) at 14 health centres managed children aged 2-59 months with NSP according to ARI SCM guidelines. The primary outcome was treatment failure, including change of antibiotic therapy and loss to follow-up. Of 949 children enrolled, 110 (11.6%) failed therapy with oral cotrimoxazole. Clinical failure was significantly higher among children presenting with a fast respiratory rate of > or = 15 breaths/min above normal for age and wheezing on examination. To treat children with NSP at the FLHF, oral cotrimoxazole is an acceptable treatment choice in view of the efficacy, cost and ease of use. In children with wheezing and signs of pneumonia, the decision to use antibiotic therapy should be made after a trial of bronchodilator therapy.

  1. Utilization of health care services for childhood morbidity and associated factors in India: a national cross-sectional household survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashekhar T Sreeramareddy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Information about utilization of health services and associated factors are useful for improving service delivery to achieve universal health coverage. METHODS: Data on a sample of ever-married women from India Demographic and Health survey 2005-06 was used. Mothers of children aged 0-59 months were asked about child's illnesses and type of health facilities where treatment was given during 15 days prior to the survey date. Type of health facilities were grouped as informal provider, public provider and private provider. Factors associated with utilization of health services for diarrhea and fever/cough was assessed according to Andersen's health behavior model. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were done considering sampling weights for complex sampling design. RESULTS: A total of 48,679 of ever-married women reported that 9.1% 14.8% and 17.67% of their children had diarrhea, fever and cough respectively. Nearly one-third of the children with diarrhea and fever/cough did not receive any treatment. Two-thirds of children who received treatment were from private health care providers (HCPs. Among predisposing factors, children aged 1-2 years and those born at health facility (public/private were more likely to be taken to any type of HCP during illness. Among enabling factors, as compared to poorer household, wealthier households were 2.5 times more likely to choose private HCPs for any illness. Children in rural areas were likely to be taken to any type of HCP for diarrhea but rural children were less likely to utilize private HCP for fever/cough. 'Need' factors i.e. children having severe symptoms were 2-3 times more likely to be taken to any type of HCP. CONCLUSION: Private HCPs were preferred for treatment of childhood illnesses. Involvement of private HCPs may be considered while planning child health programs. Health insurance scheme for childhood illnesses may to protect economically weaker sections from out

  2. Promising Practices in Early Childhood Mental Health. Systems of Care: Promising Practices in Children's Mental Health, 2001 Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Jennifer S.; Jivanjee, Pauline; Koroloff, Nancy; Doerfler, Andrea; Garcia, Maria

    Part of a series designed to provide guidance for communities interested in building systems of care for children with emotional disturbances, this volume addresses mental health services for very young children and their families. A literature review was conducted, and four Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families Program…

  3. Effect of residence on mothers' health care seeking behavior for common childhood illness in Northwest Ethiopia: a community based comparative cross--sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelaw, Yalemzewod Assefa; Biks, Gashaw Andargie; Alene, Kefyalew Addis

    2014-10-08

    Children are at higher risk of acquiring infections and developing severe disease. This study assessed the health care seeking behavior and associated factors of urban and rural mothers for common childhood illness in Northwest Ethiopia. A comparative community based cross-sectional study was conducted among urban and rural mothers living in the district. A multistage sampling technique was used to select the study participants. A pre-tested and structured questioner via interview was used to collect the data. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify associated factors. Odds ratio with 95% CI was computed to assess the strength of the associations. A total of 827 (274 urban and 553 rural) mothers were interviewed. Among these, 79.3% (95% CI: (76.5%, 82.06%)) of the mothers were sought health care in the district. Health care seeking behavior was higher among urban mothers (84.6%) than rural mothers (76.7%). Marital status, completion health extension package, and sex of child were significantly associated with health care seeking behavior of urban mothers. Whereas age of child, age and occupation of mothers, educational level of fathers, wealth quintile, and type of reported illness were significantly associated with rural mothers. Perceived severity of illness was significantly associated with both urban and rural mothers for health care seeking behavior. The overall health seeking behaviors of mothers for common childhood illness was high. However, urban mothers seek health care more than rural. Socio Economic position and types of reported illness has an effect for health seeking behavior of rural mothers. Whereas child sex preference and graduation status for health extension package has an effect for health care seeking behavior of urban mothers. Work on strengthen accessibility of health care services in the rural mothers and increase awareness of mothers about the disadvantage of sex preferences will improve the health care seek behavior of

  4. Childhood and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    From, Ditte-Marie

    understanding that is characterized by a somewhat larger complexity. The aim of this paper is to present some of the main discussions of my Ph.D.-project on childhood and health understandings by asking the overall question: Does family orientated health promoting programmes help bend the obesity curve......During the past decades, the number of overweight and obese individuals has increased throughout the Danish population. This fact has led to a strong political focus on health promotion especially among children and adolescents to prevent further escalation. The prevailing political point of view...... and a need to act before the so-called obesity epidemic becomes uncontrollable. Governmental health priorities are reproduced in local council family programmes where children and their parents are offered a chance to gain inspiration and knowledge about a healthier lifestyle and are provided tools to re...

  5. Health lifestyles in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollborn, Stefanie; James-Hawkins, Laurie; Lawrence, Elizabeth; Fomby, Paula

    2014-12-01

    This study integrates two important developments, the concept of health lifestyles (which has focused on adults and adolescents) and the increased attention to early childhood. We introduce the concept of children's health lifestyles, identifying differences from adult health lifestyles and articulating intergenerational transmission and socialization processes shaping children's health lifestyles. Using the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (2001-2007; N ≈ 6,150), latent class analyses identify predominant health lifestyles among U.S. preschoolers. Five distinct empirical patterns representing health lifestyles emerge, two capturing low and medium levels of overall risk across domains and three capturing domain-specific risks. Social background predicts children's health lifestyles, but lower household resources often explain these relationships. Across kindergarten measures of cognition, behavior, and health, preschool health lifestyles predict children's development even after controlling for social disadvantage and concurrent household resources. Further research on health lifestyles throughout childhood is warranted.

  6. Linking Traumatic Childhood Experiences to the Physical Health of Korean Adolescents in Out-of-Home Care through Depression and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunah; Chung, Ick-Joong; Chun, JongSerl; Nho, Choong Rai; Woo, Seokjin

    2017-02-17

    The main purpose of this study is to assess whether the physical health of Korean adolescents in out-of-home care is affected directly by traumatic childhood experiences and/or indirectly through depression and anxiety. Study participants are 460 adolescents who are included in the first and second wave of the Panel Study on Korean Children in Out-of-Home Care. The data are analyzed using structural equation modeling. Our structural model finds no direct effects of traumatic experiences on physical health. Among the two types of trauma experiences, namely, family instability and violence experiences, only violence experiences affect physical health indirectly through depression and anxiety. Based on the results, practice implications for Korean adolescents in care are discussed.

  7. Can smartphones and tablets improve the management of childhood illness in Tanzania? A qualitative study from a primary health care worker's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Amani Flexson; Rambaud-Althaus, Clotilde; Swai, Ndeniria; Kahama-Maro, Judith; Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valerie; Pfeiffer, Constanze

    2015-04-02

    The impact of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) strategy has been less than anticipated because of poor uptake. Electronic algorithms have the potential to improve quality of health care in children. However, feasibility studies about the use of electronic protocols on mobile devices over time are limited. This study investigated constraining as well as facilitating factors that influence the uptake of a new electronic Algorithm for Management of Childhood Illness (ALMANACH) among primary health workers in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. A qualitative approach was applied using in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with altogether 40 primary health care workers from 6 public primary health facilities in the three municipalities of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Health worker's perceptions related to factors facilitating or constraining the uptake of the electronic ALMANACH were identified. In general, the ALMANACH was assessed positively. The majority of the respondents felt comfortable to use the devices and stated that patient's trust was not affected. Most health workers said that the ALMANACH simplified their work, reduced antibiotic prescription and gave correct classification and treatment for common causes of childhood illnesses. Few HWs reported technical challenges using the devices and complained about having had difficulties in typing. Majority of the respondents stated that the devices increased the consultation duration compared to routine practice. In addition, health system barriers such as lack of staff, lack of medicine and lack of financial motivation were identified as key reasons for the low uptake of the devices. The ALMANACH built on electronic devices was perceived to be a powerful and useful tool. However, health system challenges influenced the uptake of the devices in the selected health facilities.

  8. Childhood Obesity Is a Chronic Disease Demanding Specific Health Care - a Position Statement from the Childhood Obesity Task Force (COTF) of the European Association for the Study of Obesity (EASO)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farpour-Lambert, Nathalie J; Baker, Jennifer L; Hassapidou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity is one of the greatest health challenges of the 21st century. The EASO COTF is convinced that classifying obesity as a chronic disease in children and adolescents is a crucial step for increasing individual and societal awareness, and for improving early diagnosis and intervention....... Such a classification will enhance the development of novel preventive and treatment approaches, health care policies and systems, and the education of healthcare workers. The management of obesity prior to the appearance of co-morbidities may prevent their escalation into significant medical and psychosocial problems......, and reduce their economic and societal impact. Childhood is a unique window of opportunity to influence lifetime effects on health, quality of life, prevention of non-communicable chronic diseases and disabilities. The Convention on the Rights of the Child by UNICEF states that parties shall strive to ensure...

  9. Childhood Obesity Is a Chronic Disease Demanding Specific Health Care - a Position Statement from the Childhood Obesity Task Force (COTF of the European Association for the Study of Obesity (EASO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie J. Farpour-Lambert

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Childhood obesity is one of the greatest health challenges of the 21st century. The EASO COTF is convinced that classifying obesity as a chronic disease in children and adolescents is a crucial step for increasing individual and societal awareness, and for improving early diagnosis and intervention. Such a classification will enhance the development of novel preventive and treatment approaches, health care policies and systems, and the education of healthcare workers. The management of obesity prior to the appearance of co-morbidities may prevent their escalation into significant medical and psychosocial problems, and reduce their economic and societal impact. Childhood is a unique window of opportunity to influence lifetime effects on health, quality of life, prevention of non-communicable chronic diseases and disabilities. The Convention on the Rights of the Child by UNICEF states that parties shall strive to ensure that no child is deprived of his or her right of access to health care services. The EASO COTF is aiming to address these issues via educational activities for health care workers, identification of research agendas, and the promotion of collaborations among clinicians, researchers, health institutions, organizations and states across Europe.

  10. Childhood obesity trends from primary care electronic health records in England between 1994 and 2013: population-based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsveld, C.H.M. van; Gulliford, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to use primary care electronic health records to evaluate the prevalence of overweight and obesity in 2-15-year-old children in England and compare trends over the last two decades. DESIGN: Cohort study of primary care electronic health records. SETTING: 375 general

  11. Childhood obesity trends from primary care electronic health records in England between 1994 and 2013: population-based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsveld, C.H.M. van; Gulliford, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to use primary care electronic health records to evaluate the prevalence of overweight and obesity in 2-15-year-old children in England and compare trends over the last two decades. DESIGN: Cohort study of primary care electronic health records. SETTING: 375 general pract

  12. Beverage intake and obesity in early childhood: evidence form primary health care clients in Northwest Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, E; Bejarano, I; Rodríguez, A

    2015-12-07

    Sugar sweetened beverages (SSB) are thought to play an important role in weight gain. We examined the relationship between the intake of caloric and noncaloric beverages (SSB and water) and the nutritional status of children. In 2014, we randomly selected 16 public health clinics in four cities of Northwest Argentina and conducted a survey among mothers of children 0-6 years of age. Children's beverage intake was ascertained by 24-h dietary recall provided by the mothers. Children's weight and height measures were obtained from clinic's registries. We calculated the body mass index using the International Obesity Task Force standards. The analysis included 562 children 25 months to 6 years of age with normal or above normal nutritional status. Children's beverage consumption was as follows, water 81.8%, carbonated soft drinks (CSD) 49.7%, coffee/tea/cocoa 44.0%, artificial fruit drinks 35.6%, flavored water 17.9%, natural fruit juice 14.5%. In multivariate logistic regression models the likelihood of being obese v. being overweight or having normal weight doubled with an intake of one to five glasses of CSD (OR=2.2) and increased by more than three-fold with an intake of more than five glasses (OR=3.5). Drinking more than five glasses of water decreased the likelihood of being obese by less than half (OR=0.3). The percentage of children drinking more than five glasses of other beverages was low (3.3-0.9%) and regression models did not yield significant results. The study contributed evidence for reducing children's CSD intake and for promoting water consumption, together with the implementation of comprehensive regulatory public health policies.

  13. Exploring the Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences in Soldiers Seeking Behavioral Health Care During a Combat Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applewhite, Larry; Arincorayan, Derrick; Adams, Barry

    2016-10-01

    This exploratory study examines the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) in soldiers who sought behavioral health support during a combat deployment. We conducted a secondary analysis of data extracted from two studies on the basis of retrospective reviews of behavioral health records of soldiers deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. Of 162 clinical samples, 135 (83%) reported at least one type of childhood adversity. ACE scores ranged from 0 to 9 with a mean of 3 (standard deviation = 2.4) and mode of 0. A total of 65 (40%) experienced four or more ACEs. Parental divorce or separation was the most frequently reported childhood experience and was associated with witnessing domestic violence, having a member of the household abuse substances, and being physically and psychologically abused as a child. A sizeable proportion lived with a household member who had been in prison. Soldiers with an extensive history of ACEs may benefit from additional mentoring from frontline leaders and prevention measures instituted by unit behavioral health personnel. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  14. 小儿肥胖与围生期保健的关系研究进展%Childhood Obesity and Perinatal Health Care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏艳花

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the incidence of childhood obesity is increasing significantly.The etiology and pathogenesis of childhood obesity are complex and diverse.Pediatric disorders associated with obesity have been increasing as well.Obesity can disturb glucose and lipid metabolisms.In some cases, childhood obesity can extend into adolescent obesity and adult obesity.Obesity underlies all chronic diseases, such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, and hypertension, which seriously affect the health and growth of children.This article reviews the etiology of childhood obesity in assoication with perinatal health care.%近年来,小儿肥胖的发生率明显增加,病因及发病机制十分复杂,而且呈多样性.随之而来的与小儿肥胖相关的疾病也日渐增多.肥胖可引起糖、脂代谢紊乱,而且有一部分小儿肥胖可延伸为青春期肥胖和成人期肥胖,肥胖又是一切慢性病的根源,如糖尿病、冠状动脉粥样硬化性心脏病、高血压等,严重影响小儿的健康成长.现就小儿肥胖的病因机制与围生期保健予以阐述.

  15. Childhood obesity, parental duties of care and strategies for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Elise Jane

    2012-09-01

    Childhood obesity is an increasingly serious issue which causes significant health problems among children. There are numerous causes of childhood obesity. However, the ultimate responsibility for the problems and costs associated with an obese child should be attributed to that child's parents. Parents owe a duty of care to their child and, when their child is obese, have arguably breached that duty. However, if parents were required to pay their child damages, this would arguably be problematic and of little utility. Rather, intervention strategies should be implemented which seek to treat and prevent childhood obesity and to address the identified causes of childhood obesity.

  16. Nurturing care: promoting early childhood development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Pia R; Lye, Stephen J; Proulx, Kerrie; Yousafzai, Aisha K; Matthews, Stephen G; Vaivada, Tyler; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael; Rao, Nirmala; Ip, Patrick; Fernald, Lia C H; MacMillan, Harriet; Hanson, Mark; Wachs, Theodore D; Yao, Haogen; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Cerezo, Adrian; Leckman, James F; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2017-01-07

    The UN Sustainable Development Goals provide a historic opportunity to implement interventions, at scale, to promote early childhood development. Although the evidence base for the importance of early childhood development has grown, the research is distributed across sectors, populations, and settings, with diversity noted in both scope and focus. We provide a comprehensive updated analysis of early childhood development interventions across the five sectors of health, nutrition, education, child protection, and social protection. Our review concludes that to make interventions successful, smart, and sustainable, they need to be implemented as multi-sectoral intervention packages anchored in nurturing care. The recommendations emphasise that intervention packages should be applied at developmentally appropriate times during the life course, target multiple risks, and build on existing delivery platforms for feasibility of scale-up. While interventions will continue to improve with the growth of developmental science, the evidence now strongly suggests that parents, caregivers, and families need to be supported in providing nurturing care and protection in order for young children to achieve their developmental potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence of childhood and early adolescence mental disorders among children attending primary health care centers in Mosul, Iraq: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Jawadi Asma A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children and adolescents are more vulnerable to the affects of war and violence than adults. At the time of initiation of this study, nothing was known about the prevalence of childhood and early adolescence mental disorders. The aim of the present study is to measure the point prevalence of mental disorders among children of 1–15 years age in the city of Mosul, Iraq. Methods A cross-sectional study design was adopted. Four primary health care centers were chosen consecutively as a study setting. The subjects of the present study were mothers who came to the primary health care center for vaccination of their children. The chosen mothers were included by systematic sampling randomization. All children (aged 1–15 that each mother had were considered in the interview and examination. Results Out of 3079 children assessed, 1152 have childhood mental disorders, giving a point prevalence of 37.4%, with a male to female ratio of to 1.22:1. The top 10 disorders among the examined children are post-traumatic stress disorder (10.5%, enuresis (6%, separation anxiety disorder (4.3%, specific phobia (3.3% stuttering and refusal to attend school (3.2% each, learning and conduct disorders (2.5% each, stereotypic movement (2.3% and feeding disorder in infancy or early childhood (2.0%. Overall, the highest prevalence of mental disorders was among children 10–15 years old (49.2% while the lowest was among 1–5 year olds (29.1%. Boys are more affected than girls (40.2% and 33.2%, respectively. Conclusion Childhood mental disorders are a common condition highly prevalent amongst the children and early adolescents in Mosul. Data from the present study mirrors the size of the problem in local community. Several points deserve attention, the most important of which include giving care at the community level, educating the public on mental health, involving communities and families, monitoring community mental health indicators, and

  18. Childhood cancer survivor care: development of the Passport for Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplack, David G; Fordis, Michael; Landier, Wendy; Bhatia, Smita; Hudson, Melissa M; Horowitz, Marc E

    2014-12-01

    Survivors of childhood cancer are at risk of long-term adverse effects and late effects of the disease and/or its treatment. In response to national recommendations to improve evidence-based follow-up care, a web-based support system for clinical decision making, the Passport for Care (PFC), was developed for use at the point of care to produce screening recommendations individualized to the survivor. To date, the PFC has been implemented in over half of the nearly 200 clinics affiliated with the Children's Oncology Group across the USA. Most clinician users report that the PFC has been integrated into clinic workflows, and that it fosters improved conversations with survivors about the potential late effects a survivor might experience and about the screening and/or behavioural interventions recommended to improve health status. Furthermore, clinicians using the PFC have indicated that they adhered more closely to follow-up care guidelines. Perspectives on the challenges encountered and lessons learned during the development and deployment of the PFC are reviewed and contrasted with other nationwide approaches to the provision of guidance on survivor follow-up care; furthermore, the implications for the care of childhood cancer survivors are discussed.

  19. Decline in rotavirus hospitalizations and health care visits for childhood diarrhea following rotavirus vaccination in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Catherine; Armero Guardado, Julio A; Alberto, Patricia; Rodriguez Araujo, David S; Mena, Carlos; Cuellar, Elizabeth; Nolasco, Jenny Brenda; De Oliveira, Lucia Helena; Pastor, Desiree; Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D; Patel, Manish M

    2011-01-01

    A recent postlicensure study from El Salvador showed that the monovalent rotavirus vaccine conferred 76% protection against rotavirus hospitalizations. We further examined the impact of rotavirus vaccination on the national burden of childhood diarrhea to help assess the total public health benefits of vaccination. We compared all-cause diarrhea and rotavirus-specific hospitalization rates during prevaccine year 2006, with postvaccine years 2008 and 2009 in children El Salvador. Important age-related changes in diarrheal incidence emphasize the need for ongoing rotavirus surveillance after vaccine introduction.

  20. Health insurance coverage, care accessibility and affordability for adult survivors of childhood cancer: a cross-sectional study of a nationally representative database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlthau, Karen A; Nipp, Ryan D; Shui, Amy; Srichankij, Sean; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Galbraith, Alison A; Park, Elyse R

    2016-12-01

    We describe national patterns of health insurance coverage and care accessibility and affordability in a national sample of adult childhood cancer survivors (CCS) compared to adults without cancer. Using data from the 2010-2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), we selected a sample of all CCS age 21 to 65 years old and a 1:3 matched sample of controls without a history of cancer. We examined insurance coverage, care accessibility and affordability in CCS and controls. We tested for differences in the groups in bivariate analyses and multivariable logistic regression models. Of all respondents age 21-65 in the full NHIS sample, 443 (0.35 %) were CCS. Fewer CCS were insured (76.4 %) compared to controls (81.4 %, p = 0.067). Significantly more CCS reported delaying medical care (24.7 vs 13.0 %), needing but not getting medical care in the previous 12 months (20.0 vs 10.0 %), and having trouble paying medical bills (40.3 vs 19.7 %) compared to controls (p health care accessibility and affordability. These analyses support the development of policies to assure that CCS have access to affordable services. Efforts to improve access to high-quality and affordable insurance for CCS may help reduce the gaps in getting medical care and problems with affordability. Health care providers should be aware that such problems exist and should discuss affordability and ability to obtain care with patients.

  1. Foster Care and Child Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDavid, Lolita M

    2015-10-01

    Children in foster care need more from health providers than routine well-child care. The changes in legislation that were designed to prevent children from languishing in foster care also necessitate a plan that works with the child, the biological family, and the foster family in ensuring the best outcome for the child. This approach acknowledges that most foster children will return to the biological family. Recent research on the effect of adverse childhood experiences across all socioeconomic categories points to the need for specifically designed, focused, and coordinated health and mental health services for children in foster care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Junior Doctors of Health©: an interprofessional service-learning project addressing childhood obesity and encouraging health care career choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buff, Scotty M; Gibbs, Pamella Y; Oubré, O'karsamaa L; Ariail, Jane C; Blue, Amy V; Greenberg, Raymond S

    2011-01-01

    While much literature describes programmatic success of clinical service-learning opportunities, this initiative integrates student learning across a comprehensive discipline set (Dental Medicine, Graduate Studies, Health Administration, Medicine, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, and Physician Assistant), providing preventive health education and role modeling to low-income elementary-school children. Junior Doctors of Health© (JDOH), a health education curriculum taught by Medical University of South Carolina students, addresses childhood obesity and encourages child interest in health professional (HP) and biomedical science (BS) careers. Of the 78 surveyed HP/BS students, over 80% agreed JDOH was worthwhile for their professional development, increased their appreciation and ability as an interprofessional team member, improved their understanding and interest in underserved communities, and provided them with valuable childhood-obesity prevention information. With the increased need for childhood-obesity prevention and team building among students of various health and science professions, recommendations are offered to others interested in creating or collaborating to build similar service-learning initiatives.

  3. Childhood maltreatment history, posttraumatic relational sequelae, and prenatal care utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Sue Anne; Seng, Julia

    2013-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that childhood maltreatment history would be associated with inadequate prenatal care utilization. A post-hoc analysis of a prospective cohort study of the effects of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on pregnancy outcomes. Recruitment took place via prenatal clinics from three academic health systems in southeast Michigan. This analysis included 467 diverse, nulliparous, English-speaking adult women expecting their first infants. Data were gathered from structured telephone interviews at two time points in pregnancy and from prenatal medical records. Contrary to our hypothesis, history of childhood maltreatment was associated with better likelihood of using adequate prenatal care. Risk for inadequate prenatal care occurred in association with the posttraumatic stress and interpersonal sensitivity that can result from maltreatment, with low alliance with the maternity care provider, and with public insurance coverage. Prior mental health treatment was associated with using adequate prenatal care. When childhood maltreatment survivors were resilient or had used mental health treatment, they were more likely to utilize adequate prenatal care. The maternity care relationship or service delivery model (e.g., no continuity of care) as well as structural factors may adversely affect utilization among PTSD-affected survivors. Since inadequate care was associated with adverse outcomes, further studies of these modifiable factors are warranted. © 2013 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  4. Childhood and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    From, Ditte-Marie

    and a need to act before the so-called obesity epidemic becomes uncontrollable. Governmental health priorities are reproduced in local council family programmes where children and their parents are offered a chance to gain inspiration and knowledge about a healthier lifestyle and are provided tools to re...

  5. Factors associated with dental care utilization in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawikarta, Denise; Chen, Yang; Carsley, Sarah; Birken, Catherine S; Parkin, Patricia C; Schroth, Robert J; Maguire, Jonathon L

    2014-06-01

    To identify sociodemographic, dietary, and biological factors associated with families who do not receive dental care in early childhood and to identify risk factors associated with having cavities among children who receive early dental care. A cross-sectional study of healthy Canadian children seen for primary health care between September 2011 and January 2013 was conducted through the TARGet Kids! practice-based research network in Toronto, Canada. Adjusted logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with children who were not seen by a dentist in early childhood and to determine risk factors associated with having dental cavities among children who received early dental care. Of the 2505 children included in the analysis, cavities. Among healthy urban children seen by a primary care provider, those most susceptible to cavities were least likely to receive early dental care. These findings support the need for publicly funded universal early preventive dental care and underscore the importance for primary care physicians to promote dental care in early childhood. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Negative attitude of highly educated parents and health care workers towards future vaccinations in the Dutch childhood vaccination program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, E; Schönbeck, Y; De Melker, H; Van Essen, G A; Sanders, E A M

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether further expansion of the Dutch childhood vaccination program with other vaccines will be accepted and whom should be targeted in educational strategies. AIM: To determine attitudes of parents towards possible future vaccinations for their children and the behavioura

  7. Negative attitude of highly educated parents and health care workers towards future vaccinations in the Dutch childhood vaccination program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, E; Schönbeck, Y; De Melker, H; Van Essen, G A; Sanders, E A M

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether further expansion of the Dutch childhood vaccination program with other vaccines will be accepted and whom should be targeted in educational strategies. AIM: To determine attitudes of parents towards possible future vaccinations for their children and the

  8. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    payment for health care services; a widely used strategy to supplement ... and opportunities for sustainable health care financing for low income communities in sub-. Saharan ..... funding and rising costs for health care services, More so, evidence from research studies have ... provider payment method has the potential to.

  9. Multiple childcare arrangements and health outcomes in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jen-Hao

    2013-04-01

    This study examined the associations between multiple childcare arrangements and young children's health problems. This study used three waves of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort, collected from a nationally representative sample of children when they were 9 months old, 2 years old, and 4 years old (N = 7,150). 'Multiple childcare arrangements' was defined and measured by the number of non-parental childcare arrangements that occurred on a regular basis. During each wave of the data collection, the mother reported the number of regular childcare arrangements by three types: relative care, non-relative care, and center-based care. These numbers were summed to calculate the total number of arrangements. The mother also reported the incidence of ear infections, gastrointestinal illnesses, asthma diagnosis, and unintentional injuries of the child. Random effects and fixed effects regression models were used to estimate the association between the number of childcare arrangements and measures of early childhood health problems. Increases in the total number of childcare arrangements were associated with an elevated risk of ear infections, gastrointestinal illnesses, and diagnosed asthma in children. Further analysis indicates that increases in both the number of center-based care and non-relative care (but not relative care) arrangements can lead to a greater chance of health problems in young children. Multiple childcare arrangements are associated with communicable illness and diagnosed asthma in early childhood and appear to be a risk factor for health problems in early childhood.

  10. Effect of adopting integrated management of childhood illness guidelines on drug use at a primary health care center: A case study from Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza A El Mahalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI is a cost- effective strategy that improves the quality of care through the use of evidence- based management protocols for the most common causes of childhood death and illness. Evidence- based clinical guidelines are critical to promoting rational use of medicines. Despite the large number of studies that assessed process and outcome of care delivered to children utilizing IMCI protocol, there is a scarcity of studies that assessed the effect of adopting IMCI on the drug use. Aims: To examine the impact of adopting IMCI guidelines on drug use at one of the primary health care (PHC centers, Alexandria, Egypt. Settings and Design: Retrospective cohort study, conducted in clinic "A" not adopting IMCI guidelines and clinic "B" adopting IMCI guidelines at one of the PHC centers in Alexandria, Egypt for the period from January-- end of June 2010. Materials and Methods: A data collection sheet was designed to collect the required variables (based on WHO/ INRUD selected drug use indicators from the medical records of children under five years. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS version 16 was used. Percentages, means, and standard deviations were measured. Chi square, t, and Fisher′s exact tests were applied. Results: Correct drug choice, dose, dosage form, route of administration were significantly higher in the clinic adopting IMCI {clinic B} (89.3%, 87.3%, 91.3%, and 91.3%, respectively than in the clinic not adopting it {clinic A} (78% each. Non pharmacological remedies prescribed were significantly higher in clinic B than A (64.7% vs 4.6%. Average no of drugs/ encounter was lower in clinic B than A (0.93± 0.2 vs 1.37 ± 0.6 and the difference between clinics was statistically significant. Difference between clinics regarding percentages of drugs prescribed by generic name, antibiotics prescribed, drugs prescribed from essential drug list, and drugs prescribed out of stock was

  11. Health Behaviors of Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Ford

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been a dramatic increase in the number of childhood cancer survivors living to an old age due to improved cancer treatments. However, these survivors are at risk of numerous late effects as a result of their cancer therapy. Engaging in protective health behaviors and limiting health damaging behaviors are vitally important for these survivors given their increased risks. We reviewed the literature on childhood cancer survivors’ health behaviors by searching for published data and conference proceedings. We examine the prevalence of a variety of health behaviors among childhood cancer survivors, identify significant risk factors, and describe health behavior interventions for survivors.

  12. Health care operations management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, M.W.; Hans, Elias W.; Kolisch, R.

    2012-01-01

    Health care operations management has become a major topic for health care service providers and society. Operations research already has and further will make considerable contributions for the effective and efficient delivery of health care services. This special issue collects seven carefully

  13. Seeking Balance in Motion: The Role of Spontaneous Free Play in Promoting Social and Emotional Health in Early Childhood Care and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewes, Jane

    2014-01-01

    There is accumulating scientific evidence of the potential of play and playfulness to enhance human capacity to respond to adversity and cope with the stresses of everyday life. In play we build a repertoire of adaptive, flexible responses to unexpected events, in an environment separated from the real consequences of those events. Playfulness helps us maintain social and emotional equilibrium in times of rapid change and stress. Through play, we experience flow-A feeling of being taken to another place, out of time, where we have controlled of the world. This paper argues that spontaneous free play, controlled and directed by children and understood from the child's perspective, contributes to children's subjective experience of well-being, building a foundation for life-long social and emotional health. The paradoxical nature of young children's spontaneous free play is explored. Adaptability, control, flexibility, resilience and balance result from the experience of uncertainty, unpredictability, novelty and non-productivity. These essential dimensions of young children's spontaneous free play typically produce play which is experienced by adults as chaotic, nonsensical and disruptive. The article concludes with a preliminary discussion of the challenges and possibilities of providing for spontaneous free play indoors, in early childhood care and education programs.

  14. Seeking Balance in Motion: The Role of Spontaneous Free Play in Promoting Social and Emotional Health in Early Childhood Care and Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Hewes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating scientific evidence of the potential of play and playfulness to enhance human capacity to respond to adversity and cope with the stresses of everyday life. In play we build a repertoire of adaptive, flexible responses to unexpected events, in an environment separated from the real consequences of those events. Playfulness helps us maintain social and emotional equilibrium in times of rapid change and stress. Through play, we experience flow—A feeling of being taken to another place, out of time, where we have controlled of the world. This paper argues that spontaneous free play, controlled and directed by children and understood from the child’s perspective, contributes to children’s subjective experience of well-being, building a foundation for life-long social and emotional health. The paradoxical nature of young children’s spontaneous free play is explored. Adaptability, control, flexibility, resilience and balance result from the experience of uncertainty, unpredictability, novelty and non-productivity. These essential dimensions of young children’s spontaneous free play typically produce play which is experienced by adults as chaotic, nonsensical and disruptive. The article concludes with a preliminary discussion of the challenges and possibilities of providing for spontaneous free play indoors, in early childhood care and education programs.

  15. National Health Care Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  16. Health Care Issues for Children and Adolescents in Foster Care and Kinship Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Children and adolescents who enter foster care often do so with complicated and serious medical, mental health, developmental, oral health, and psychosocial problems rooted in their history of childhood trauma. Ideally, health care for this population is provided in a pediatric medical home by physicians who are familiar with the sequelae of childhood trauma and adversity. As youth with special health care needs, children and adolescents in foster care require more frequent monitoring of their health status, and pediatricians have a critical role in ensuring the well-being of children in out-of-home care through the provision of high-quality pediatric health services, health care coordination, and advocacy on their behalves. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. The impact of pre- and postnatal exposures on allergy related diseases in childhood: a controlled multicentre intervention study in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dotterud Christian Kvikne

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmental factors such as tobacco exposure, indoor climate and diet are known to be involved in the development of allergy related diseases. The aim was to determine the impact of altered exposure to these factors during pregnancy and infancy on the incidence of allergy related diseases at 2 years of age. Methods Children from a non-selected population of mothers were recruited to a controlled, multicenter intervention study in primary health care. The interventions were an increased maternal and infant intake of n-3 PUFAs and oily fish, reduced parental smoking, and reduced indoor dampness during pregnancy and the children’s first 2 years of life. Questionnaires on baseline data and exposures, and health were collected at 2 years of age. Results The prevalence of smoking amongst the mothers and fathers was approximately halved at 2 years of age in the intervention cohort compared to the control cohort. The intake of n-3 PUFA supplement and oily fish among the children in the intervention cohort was increased. There was no significant change for indoor dampness. The odds ratio for the incidence of asthma was 0.72 (95% CI, 0.55-0.93; NNTb 53, and 0.75 for the use of asthma medication (95% CI, 0.58-0.96. The odds ratio for asthma among girls was 0.41 (95% CI 0.24-0.70; NNTb 32, and for boys 0.93 (95% CI 0.68-1.26. There were no significant change for wheeze and atopic dermatitis. Conclusion Reduced tobacco exposure and increased intake of oily fish during pregnancy and early childhood may be effective in reducing the incidence of asthma at 2 years of age. The differential impact in boys and girls indicates that the pathophysiology of asthma may depend on the sex of the children. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN28090297.

  18. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    Department of Community Health & Primary Care, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, P.M.B. ... the child's health, culturally based beliefs and ..... immunization safety as this was a rural ... Charles SW, Olalekan AU, Peter MN,.

  19. Knowledge and skills of primary health care workers trained on integrated management of neonatal and childhood illness: Follow-up assessment 3 years after the training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Venkatachalam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The primary health care workers of a district in northern India were trained in the year 2006 for Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness (IMNCI using two different training methods: conventional 8-day training and new interrupted 5-day training. Knowledge and skills may decline over a period of time. Rate of decline may be associated with the type of training. A study was thus conducted to see the retention of knowledge and skills in the two training groups, 3 years after the initial training. Materials and Methods: This study was done in the Panchkula district of Haryana state in northern India. In the year 2006, 50 primary health care workers were given new interrupted 5-day training and another 35 workers were given conventional 8-day training on IMNCI. Knowledge and skills of the same workers were evaluated in the year 2009, using the same methodology and tools as were used in the year 2006. Data analysis was done to see the extent of decline in knowledge and skills in these 3 years and whether decline was more in any particular training group. Results: Compared to post-training score in the year 2006, composite knowledge and skill scores for Auxilliary Nurse Midwives (ANMs and Anganwari workers (AWWs together declined significantly in the year 2009 from 74.6 to 58.0 in 8-day training group and from 73.2 to 57.0 in 5-day training group (P < 0.001. Follow-up composite scores in the two training groups were similar. Whereas the decline was more for knowledge scores in 8-day training group and for skill score in 5-day training group, the pattern of decline was inconsistent for different health conditions and among ANMs and AWWs. Conclusion: Long-term retention of knowledge and skills in 5-day group was equivalent to that in 8-day training group. Refresher trainings may boost up the decline in the knowledge and skills.

  20. Teamwork in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Natalie; Aannestad, Liv K; Smoldt, Robert K; Cortese, Denis A

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that maintaining and improving the health of the population, and doing so in a financially sustainable manner, requires the coordination of acute medical care with long-term care, and social support services, that is, team-based care. Despite a growing body of evidence on the benefits of team-based care, the health care ecosystem remains "resistant" to a broader implementation of such care models. This resistance is a function of both system-wide and organizational barriers, which result primarily from fragmentation in reimbursement for health care services, regulatory restrictions, and the siloed nature of health professional education. To promote the broader adoption of team-based care models, the health care system must transition to pay for value reimbursement, as well as break down the educational silos and move toward team-based and value-based education of health professionals.

  1. Childhood Obesity and the Right to Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ó Cathaoir, Katharina Eva

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is now a global health epidemic, yet the obligations of states to prevent obesity through fulfillment of the right to health have received limited consideration. This article examines the childhood obesity recommendations of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (the...... committee on the CRC), the Special Rapporteur on the right to health, and the UN High Commissioner on Human Rights. It suggests how their engagement might be strengthened. It concludes that the final report of the World Health Organization’s Commission on Ending Childhood Obesity could provide the committee...... on the CRC with a more systematic basis for advising and assessing preventive measures taken by states. Moreover, while the interim report envisages a central role for states in childhood obesity prevention, it pays inadequate attention to their obligations under international human rights law. It is hoped...

  2. Childhood Obesity and the Right to Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ó Cathaoir, Katharina Eva

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is now a global health epidemic, yet the obligations of states to prevent obesity through fulfillment of the right to health have received limited consideration. This article examines the childhood obesity recommendations of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (the...... committee on the CRC), the Special Rapporteur on the right to health, and the UN High Commissioner on Human Rights. It suggests how their engagement might be strengthened. It concludes that the final report of the World Health Organization’s Commission on Ending Childhood Obesity could provide the committee...... on the CRC with a more systematic basis for advising and assessing preventive measures taken by states. Moreover, while the interim report envisages a central role for states in childhood obesity prevention, it pays inadequate attention to their obligations under international human rights law. It is hoped...

  3. Factors associated with dental care utilization in early childhood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darmawikarta, Denise; Chen, Yang; Carsley, Sarah; Birken, Catherine S; Parkin, Patricia C; Schroth, Robert J; Maguire, Jonathon L

    2014-01-01

    To identify sociodemographic, dietary, and biological factors associated with families who do not receive dental care in early childhood and to identify risk factors associated with having cavities...

  4. Prevalence of Childhood and Adolescent Overweight and Obesity from 2003 to 2010 in an Integrated Health Care Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Gee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An observational study of the Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC BMI coding distributions was conducted to ascertain the trends in overweight and obesity prevalence among KPNC members aged 2–19 between the periods of 2003–2005 and 2009-2010. A decrease in the prevalence of overweight (−11.1% change and obesity (−3.6% change and an increase in the prevalence of healthy weight (+2.7% change were demonstrated. Children aged 2–5 had the greatest improvement in obesity prevalence (−11.5% change. Adolescents aged 12–19 were the only age group to not show a decrease in obesity prevalence. Of the racial and ethnic groups, Hispanics/Latinos had the highest prevalence of obesity across all age groups. The KPNC prevalence of overweight and obesity compares favorably to external benchmarks, although differences in methodologies limit our ability to draw conclusions. Physician counseling as well as weight management programs and sociodemographic factors may have contributed to the overall improvements in BMI in the KPNC population. Physician training, practice tools, automated BMI reminders and performance feedback improved the frequency and quality of physician counseling. BMI screening and counseling at urgent visits, in addition to well-child care visits, increased the reach and dose of physician counseling.

  5. The Influence of Setting on Care Coordination for Childhood Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, R Patrick; Stoll, Shelley C; Bryant-Stephens, Tyra; Janevic, Mary R; Lara, Marielena; Ohadike, Yvonne U; Persky, Victoria; Ramos-Valencia, Gilberto; Uyeda, Kimberly; Malveaux, Floyd J

    2015-11-01

    Asthma affects 7.1 million children in the United States, disproportionately burdening African American and Latino children. Barriers to asthma control include insufficient patient education and fragmented care. Care coordination represents a compelling approach to improve quality of care and address disparities in asthma. The sites of The Merck Childhood Asthma Network Care Coordination Programs implemented different models of care coordination to suit specific settings-school district, clinic or health care system, and community-and organizational structures. A variety of qualitative data sources were analyzed to determine the role setting played in the manifestation of care coordination at each site. There were inherent strengths and challenges of implementing care coordination in each of the settings, and each site used unique strategies to deliver their programs. The relationship between the lead implementing unit and entities that provided (1) access to the priority population and (2) clinical services to program participants played a critical role in the structure of the programs. The level of support and infrastructure provided by these entities to the lead implementing unit influenced how participants were identified and how asthma care coordinators were integrated into the clinical care team.

  6. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    catastrophic health expenditures (CHE) and risk of being impoverished as a result of cost of care were assessed. Statistical ... Impact and contributors to cost of managing long term conditions in a ... sectors is ongoing, it has become clear that.

  7. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. ... This is one of the factors that determine whether or ..... Expired vaccines found in fridge / cold box .... date vaccine temperature monitoring charts. were stored on refrigerator door ...

  8. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    This was a cross-sectional, multi clinic study involving 265 mothers whose children had erupted at least a tooth and attending the ... parents, health care workers and personal experiences were the sources of beliefs ..... Ethiopians abroad.

  9. Health care utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Christian Bøtcher; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Serritzlew, Søren

    An important task in governing health services is to control costs. The literatures on both costcontainment and supplier induced demand focus on the effects of economic incentives on health care costs, but insights from these literatures have never been integrated. This paper asks how economic cost...... make health professionals provide more of this service to each patient, but that lower user payment (unexpectedly) does not necessarily mean higher total cost or a stronger association between the number of patients per supplier and the health care utilization. This implies that incentives...... are important, but that economics cannot alone explain the differences in health care utilization....

  10. Equity in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa-Salas, Virginia; Tricas-Sauras, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    It has long been known that a segment of the population enjoys distinctly better health status and higher quality of health care than others. To solve this problem, prioritization is unavoidable, and the question is how priorities should be set. Rational priority setting would seek equity amongst the whole population, the extent to which people receive equal care for equal needs. Equity in health care is an ethical imperative not only because of the intrinsic worth of good health, or the value that society places on good health, but because, without good health, people would be unable to enjoy life's other sources of happiness. This paper also argues the importance of the health care's efficiency, but at the same time, it highlights how any innovation and rationalization undertaken in the provision of the health system should be achieved from the consideration of human dignity, making the person prevail over economic criteria. Therefore, the underlying principles on which this health care equity paper is based are fundamental human rights. The main aim is to ensure the implementation of these essential rights by those carrying out public duties. Viewed from this angle, equity in health care means equality: equality in access to services and treatment, and equality in the quality of care provided. As a result, this paper attempts to address both human dignity and efficiency through the context of equity to reconcile them in the middle ground.

  11. Lean health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Henry C; Masterson, David J

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Lean management are being adopted more widely in health care as a way of improving quality and safety while controlling costs. The authors, who are chief executive officers of rural North Carolina hospitals, explain how their organizations are using Lean principles to improve quality and safety of health care delivery.

  12. Health care marketing management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, P D

    1979-01-01

    Health Care Marketing Management is the process of understanding the needs and the wats of a target market. Its purpose is to provide a viewpoint from which to integrate the analysis, planning, implementation (or organization) and control of the health care delivery system.

  13. Indian Health Service: Find Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Human Services Indian Health Service The Federal Health Program for American Indians and Alaska Natives Feedback ... Forgot Password IHS Home Find Health Care Find Health Care IMPORTANT If you are having a health ...

  14. Evaluation of the overweight/obese child--practical tips for the primary health care provider: recommendations from the Childhood Obesity Task Force of the European Association for the Study of Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer L; Farpour-Lambert, Nathalie J; Nowicka, Paulina

    2010-01-01

    in the primary care setting. The tips and tools provided are based on data from the recent body of work that has been published in this field, official statements of several scientific societies along with expert opinion provided by the members of the Childhood Obesity Task Force (COTF) of the European......The prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents is on the rise. The majority of overweight or obese children are treated by primary health care providers including paediatricians, family practitioners, dieticians, nurses, and school health services - and not by specialists. The majority...... of obese children have no underlying medical disorder causing their obesity yet a significant proportion might suffer from obesity-related co-morbidities. This text is aimed at providing simple and practical tools for the identification and management of children with or at risk of overweight and obesity...

  15. Evaluation of the overweight/obese child--practical tips for the primary health care provider: recommendations from the Childhood Obesity Task Force of the European Association for the Study of Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer L; Farpour-Lambert, Nathalie J; Nowicka, Paulina

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents is on the rise. The majority of overweight or obese children are treated by primary health care providers including paediatricians, family practitioners, dieticians, nurses, and school health services - and not by specialists. The majority...... in the primary care setting. The tips and tools provided are based on data from the recent body of work that has been published in this field, official statements of several scientific societies along with expert opinion provided by the members of the Childhood Obesity Task Force (COTF) of the European...... Association for the Study of Obesity (EASO). We have attempted to use an evidence-based approach while allowing flexibility for the practicing clinician in domains where evidence is currently lacking and ensuring that treating the obese child involves the entire family as well....

  16. Primary Care Pathway for Childhood Asthma: Protocol for a Randomized Cluster-Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Asthma is the most common chronic condition in children. For many, the disease is inadequately controlled, which can burden the lives of children and their families as well as the health care system. Improved use of the best available scientific evidence by primary care practitioners could reduce the need for hospital care and improve quality of life and asthma control, thereby reducing overall costs to society and families. Objective The Primary Care Pathway for Childhood Asthma a...

  17. Benchmarking HIV health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria; Reekie, Joanne; Mocroft, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: State-of-the-art care involving the utilisation of multiple health care interventions is the basis for an optimal long-term clinical prognosis for HIV-patients. We evaluated health care for HIV-patients based on four key indicators. METHODS: Four indicators of health care were...... assessed: Compliance with current guidelines on initiation of 1) combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), 2) chemoprophylaxis, 3) frequency of laboratory monitoring, and 4) virological response to cART (proportion of patients with HIV-RNA 90% of time on cART). RESULTS: 7097 Euro...... to North, patients from other regions had significantly lower odds of virological response; the difference was most pronounced for East and Argentina (adjusted OR 0.16[95%CI 0.11-0.23, p HIV health care utilization...

  18. Insights on Caring for Early Childhood Professionals and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Kevin James

    2007-01-01

    Caring is the core value that empowers families and early childhood professionals. This article articulates the meaning and power of caring in the lives of children and families. It also explores family, professional, and community strategies for creating caring and nurturing children and families. In particular, insights that show that caring is…

  19. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lifestyle Changes and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer among. Immigrants in the United .... food rich in red meat, animal fat, sugars and refined of CRC in Africa .... region to improve health care delivery and secure the is obtainable in the UK, ...

  20. Environmental Quality Index and Childhood Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood mental disorders affect between 13%-20% of children in the United States (US) annually and impact the child, family, and community. Literature suggests associations exist between environmental and children’s mental health such as air pollution with autism and ADHD...

  1. Resilient health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollnagel, E.; Braithwaite, J.; Wears, R. L.

    engineering's unique approach emphasises the usefulness of performance variability, and that successes and failures have the same aetiology. This book contains contributions from acknowledged international experts in health care, organisational studies and patient safety, as well as resilience engineering......Health care is everywhere under tremendous pressure with regard to efficiency, safety, and economic viability - to say nothing of having to meet various political agendas - and has responded by eagerly adopting techniques that have been useful in other industries, such as quality management, lean...... production, and high reliability. This has on the whole been met with limited success because health care as a non-trivial and multifaceted system differs significantly from most traditional industries. In order to allow health care systems to perform as expected and required, it is necessary to have...

  2. Your Health Care Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  3. Managed health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtiss, F R

    1989-04-01

    The fundamental components of managed-care plans are described; the development of managed-care programs is discussed; and the impact of managed care on pharmacy services and the price, quality, and accessibility of health care are reviewed. Health care can be considered to be managed when at least one of the following fundamental components is present: prospective pricing, "UCR" (usual, customary, and reasonable) pricing of services, peer review, mandatory use review, benefit redesign, capitation payments, channeling, quality criteria, and health promotion. The managed-care industry consists of health maintenance organizations (HMOs), preferred provider organizations (PPOs), and managed fee-for-service plans. Managed-care reimbursement principles involve transferring some or all of the impetus for controlling use of services to the health-care provider. Means by which this is done include prospective pricing, services bundling, price discounts and negotiated fees, and capitation financing and reimbursement. Financial risk-sharing arrangements with providers--including hospitals, physicians, pharmacies, and home-care companies--are necessary for any managed-care plan to attain true control over its service costs. Use-review and use-management services are also fundamental to containing health-care spending. These include retrospective, concurrent, and prospective reviews of the necessity and appropriateness of medical services. Use management, like services bundling and prospective pricing, has been more effective in reducing costs of hospital inpatient services than costs associated with ambulatory care. Per case payments and services bundling have made individual charges for items irrelevant to hospital revenue. This has forced hospital pharmacy managers to become more sensitive to cost management. Drug formularies, improved productivity, and use of prescribing protocols are means by which hospital pharmacies have controlled costs. However, since shorter hospital

  4. Identifying health care quality attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsaran-Fowdar, Roshnee R

    2005-01-01

    Evaluating health care quality is important for consumers, health care providers, and society. Developing a measure of health care service quality is an important precursor to systems and organizations that value health care quality. SERVQUAL has been proposed as a broad-based measure of service quality that may be applicable to health care settings. Results from a study described in this paper verify SERVQUAL dimensions, but demonstrate additional dimensions that are specific to health care settings.

  5. A Nordic Perspective on Early Childhood Education and Care Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karila, Kirsti

    2012-01-01

    The national policies and historical roots of early childhood education (ECE) vary from society to society. In the Nordic countries, early childhood education and care (ECEC) policies have been built in the context of the welfare state. As such, they are closely connected to other welfare policy areas such as social policy, family policy and…

  6. Mercury and health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustagi Neeti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is toxic heavy metal. It has many characteristic features. Health care organizations have used mercury in many forms since time immemorial. The main uses of mercury are in dental amalgam, sphygmomanometers, and thermometers. The mercury once released into the environment can remain for a longer period. Both acute and chronic poisoning can be caused by it. Half of the mercury found in the atmosphere is human generated and health care contributes the substantial part to it. The world has awakened to the harmful effects of mercury. The World Health Organization and United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP have issued guidelines for the countries′ health care sector to become mercury free. UNEP has formed mercury partnerships between governments and other stakeholders as one approach to reducing risks to human health and the environment from the release of mercury and its compounds to the environment. Many hospitals are mercury free now.

  7. Mercury and health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Neeti; Singh, Ritesh

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is toxic heavy metal. It has many characteristic features. Health care organizations have used mercury in many forms since time immemorial. The main uses of mercury are in dental amalgam, sphygmomanometers, and thermometers. The mercury once released into the environment can remain for a longer period. Both acute and chronic poisoning can be caused by it. Half of the mercury found in the atmosphere is human generated and health care contributes the substantial part to it. The world has awakened to the harmful effects of mercury. The World Health Organization and United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) have issued guidelines for the countries’ health care sector to become mercury free. UNEP has formed mercury partnerships between governments and other stakeholders as one approach to reducing risks to human health and the environment from the release of mercury and its compounds to the environment. Many hospitals are mercury free now. PMID:21120080

  8. Mercury and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Neeti; Singh, Ritesh

    2010-08-01

    Mercury is toxic heavy metal. It has many characteristic features. Health care organizations have used mercury in many forms since time immemorial. The main uses of mercury are in dental amalgam, sphygmomanometers, and thermometers. The mercury once released into the environment can remain for a longer period. Both acute and chronic poisoning can be caused by it. Half of the mercury found in the atmosphere is human generated and health care contributes the substantial part to it. The world has awakened to the harmful effects of mercury. The World Health Organization and United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) have issued guidelines for the countries' health care sector to become mercury free. UNEP has formed mercury partnerships between governments and other stakeholders as one approach to reducing risks to human health and the environment from the release of mercury and its compounds to the environment. Many hospitals are mercury free now.

  9. Academic Performance and Type of Early Childhood Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Simonsen, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    This is one of the few studies that estimates the effects of type of childhood care on academic achievement at higher grade levels by linking day care registers and educational registers. We use entire birth cohorts of ethnic Danish children, enrolled in either center based day care or family day...

  10. Health care technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Clifford

    1994-12-01

    The role of technology in the cost of health care is a primary issue in current debates concerning national health care reform. The broad scope of studies for understanding technological impacts is known as technology assessment. Technology policy makers can improve their decision making by becoming more aware, and taking greater advantage, of key trends in health care technology assessment (HCTA). HCTA is the systematic evaluation of the properties, impacts, and other attributes of health care technologies, including: technical performance; clinical safety and efficacy/effectiveness; cost-effectiveness and other economic attributes; appropriate circumstances/indications for use; and social, legal, ethical, and political impacts. The main purpose of HCTA is to inform technology-related policy making in health care. Among the important trends in HCTA are: (1) proliferation of HCTA groups in the public and private sectors; (2) higher standards for scientific evidence concerning technologies; (3) methodological development in cost analyses, health-related quality of life measurement, and consolidation of available scientific evidence (e.g., meta-analysis); (4) emphasis on improved data on how well technologies work in routine practice and for traditionally under-represented patient groups; (5) development of priority-setting methods; (6) greater reliance on medical informatics to support and disseminate HCTA findings.

  11. Primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitai, A

    1986-07-01

    Development of primary care in Japan in still relatively unorganized and unstructured. As mentioned above, the author describes some strengths and weaknesses of the Japanese primary care system. In addressing the weaknesses the following suggestions are offered for the Japanese primary care delivery system: Increase the number of emergency rooms for all day, especially on holidays and at night. Introduce an appointment system. Introduce an open system of hospitals. Coordinate with public hospitals and primary care clinics. Organize the referral system between private practitioners and community hospitals. Increase the number of paramedical staff. Strengthen group practice among primary care physicians. Increase the establishment of departments of primary care practice with government financial incentives to medical schools and teaching hospitals. Develop a more active and direct teaching role for primary care practice or family practice at undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels. Improve and maintain present health insurance payment method, shifting from quantity of care to quality and continuity of care. Introduce formal continuing education. Introduce formal training programs of primary care and strengthen ambulatory care teaching programs.

  12. Organizing Rural Health Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    The liberalization of health care in the course of three decades of ‘reform and opening up’ has given people in rural China access to a diverse range of treatment options, but the health care system has also been marred by accusations of price hikes, fake pharmaceuticals, and medical malpractice....... This chapter offers an ethnographic description of health as an issue in a Hebei township and it focuses on a popular and a statist response to the perceived inadequacy of the rural health care system. The revival of religious practices in rural China is obviously motivated by many factors, but in the township...... in question, various forms of healing play a significant role in religious movements and the rising cost of medical services as well as a general distrust of formal medical institutions seem to be part of the reason why people choose to follow spirit mediums and religious movements that offer alternative...

  13. The Nordic perspective on early childhood education and care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström, Stig; Einarsdottier, Johanna; Pramling Samuelsson, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    as a positive societal view on ECEC. The section Development of ECEC pedagogies in Nordic countries discusses the basic educational ideas for each country and gives an account of how early childhood services and education have progressed in recent decades. Following this, the section Guidelines for ECEC......This chapter discusses a number of central dimensions and dilemmas of early childhood education and care (ECEC) in the Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The two first sections, Early Childhood Education and Care an integrated part of the welfare system, democracy...

  14. Health care in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van; Schers, H.J.; Timmermans, A.

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes Dutch experiences of health care reform--in particular in primary care--with emphasis on lessons for current United States health care reforms. Recent major innovations were the introduction of private insurance based on the principles of primary care-led health care and

  15. Health care reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marušič Dorjan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In large systems, such as health care, reforms are underway constantly. The article presents a definition of health care reform and factors that influence its success. The factors being discussed range from knowledgeable personnel, the role of involvement of international experts and all stakeholders in the country, the importance of electoral mandate and governmental support, leadership and clear and transparent communication. The goals set need to be clear, and it is helpful to have good data and analytical support in the process. Despite all debates and experiences, it is impossible to clearly define the best approach to tackle health care reform due to a different configuration of governance structure, political will and state of the economy in a country.

  16. Health care reforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marušič, Dorjan; Prevolnik Rupel, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    In large systems, such as health care, reforms are underway constantly. The article presents a definition of health care reform and factors that influence its success. The factors being discussed range from knowledgeable personnel, the role of involvement of international experts and all stakeholders in the country, the importance of electoral mandate and governmental support, leadership and clear and transparent communication. The goals set need to be clear, and it is helpful to have good data and analytical support in the process. Despite all debates and experiences, it is impossible to clearly define the best approach to tackle health care reform due to a different configuration of governance structure, political will and state of the economy in a country.

  17. Resilient health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollnagel, E.; Braithwaite, J.; Wears, R. L.

    production, and high reliability. This has on the whole been met with limited success because health care as a non-trivial and multifaceted system differs significantly from most traditional industries. In order to allow health care systems to perform as expected and required, it is necessary to have......Health care is everywhere under tremendous pressure with regard to efficiency, safety, and economic viability - to say nothing of having to meet various political agendas - and has responded by eagerly adopting techniques that have been useful in other industries, such as quality management, lean...... concepts and methods that are able to cope with this complexity. Resilience engineering provides that capacity because its focus is on a system's overall ability to sustain required operations under both expected and unexpected conditions rather than on individual features or qualities. Resilience...

  18. Low parent health literacy is associated with 'obesogenic' infant care behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, EunSeok; Besse, Jennifer Lee

    2015-04-01

    Implications for practice and research: Obesogenic infant care behaviours may increase childhood obesity, and predict obesity and related health risks in adulthood. Poor parent health literacy predicts poor child health outcomes including childhood obesity. Nurses should assess parent health literacy and provide appropriate support to prevent obesogenic infant care behaviours. Future research could focus on evaluating parent educational programmes tailored to health literacy level and effectiveness on reducing obesogenic care behaviours.

  19. Health care need

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Andreas; Hope, Tony; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    2006-01-01

    The argument that scarce health care resources should be distributed so that patients in 'need' are given priority for treatment is rarely contested. In this paper, we argue that if need is to play a significant role in distributive decisions it is crucial that what is meant by need can...... be precisely articulated. Following a discussion of the general features of health care need, we propose three principal interpretations of need, each of which focuses on separate intuitions. Although this account may not be a completely exhaustive reflection of what people mean when they refer to need...

  20. Burnout and health care utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C N; Manning, M R

    1995-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between burnout and health care utilization of 238 employed adults. Burnout was measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory and health care utilization by insurance company records regarding these employees' health care costs and number of times they accessed health care services over a one year period. ANOVAs were conducted using Golembiewski and Munzenrider's approach to define the burnout phase. Significant differences in health care costs were found.

  1. Nutrition and oral health considerations in children with special health care needs: implications for oral health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moursi, Amr M; Fernandez, Jill B; Daronch, Marcia; Zee, Lena; Jones, Cassandra L

    2010-01-01

    Children with special health care needs are at increased risk for oral diseases. The purpose of this article was to discuss: nutritional and oral health factors routinely observed in most chronic childhood disorders; dietary modifications associated with select systemic disorders and how they may impact oral health in children; and the following factors common to chronic disorders associated with diet modifications-decreased appetite and increased nutritional risk; frequency of food intake; parental overindulgence; long-term use of cariogenic medications; and xerostomia. Characteristics of childhood disorders that require dietary modifications (congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, cancer, AIDS/HIV, diabetes mellitus, and phenylketonuria) are summarized. In addition, healthy dietary modifications and oral health recommendations are suggested. Implementation of these recommendations can assist the dentist and dental team as they join physicians and nutritionists in delivering the best possible care to children with special health care needs.

  2. Academic Performance and Type of Early Childhood Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Simonsen, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    This is one of the few studies that estimates the effects of type of childhood care on academic achievement at higher grade levels by linking day care registers and educational registers. We use entire birth cohorts of ethnic Danish children, enrolled in either center based day care or family day...... care at age 2. Exploiting variation across municipalities in guaranteed access to center based care as an instrument for type of care our results show that center based day care improves grades in Danish language in the final year of compulsory school with around 0.2 standard deviations....

  3. Nursing care community health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Acosta-Salazar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Process Nursing Care (PAE is a systematic tool that facilitates the scientificity of care in community practice nurse, the application of scientific method in community practice, allows nursing to provide care in logical, systematic and comprehensive reassessing interventions to achieve the proposed results. It began with the valuation of Marjory Gordon Functional Patterns and then at the stage of diagnosis and planning North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA, Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC is interrelate. It is a descriptive and prospective study. Diagnosis was made by applying the instruments measuring scale of the socio-demographic characteristics, symptom questionnaire for early detection of mental disorders in the community and appreciation for functional patterns. The PAE includes more frequent diagnoses, criteria outcomes, indicators, interventions and activities to manage community issues. alteration was evidenced in patterns: Adaptation and Stress Tolerance, Self-perception-Self-concept-, Role-Relationships, sleep and rest and Perception and Health Management. A standardized NANDA-NIC-NOC can provide inter care holistic care from the perspective of community mental health with a degree of scientific nature that frames the professional work projecting the individual, family and community care.

  4. Information in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeda, Tadashi A.

    The report stresses the fact that while there is unity in the continuum of medicine, information in health care is markedly different from information in medical education and research. This difference is described as an anomaly in that it appears to deviate in excess of normal variation from needs common to research and education. In substance,…

  5. Child Care and Cortisol across Early Childhood: Context Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Daniel; Blair, Clancy; Ursache, Alexandra; Wiloughy, Michael; Garrett-Peters, Patricia; Veron-Feagans, Lynne; Bratsch-Hines, Mary; Mills-Koonce, W. Roger; Granger, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    A considerable body of literature suggests that children's child-care experiences may impact adrenocortical functioning in early childhood. Yet emerging findings also suggest that the magnitude and sometimes the direction of child-care effects on development may be markedly different for children from higher risk contexts. Using data from a large…

  6. Child Care and Cortisol across Early Childhood: Context Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Daniel; Blair, Clancy; Ursache, Alexandra; Wiloughy, Michael; Garrett-Peters, Patricia; Veron-Feagans, Lynne; Bratsch-Hines, Mary; Mills-Koonce, W. Roger; Granger, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    A considerable body of literature suggests that children's child-care experiences may impact adrenocortical functioning in early childhood. Yet emerging findings also suggest that the magnitude and sometimes the direction of child-care effects on development may be markedly different for children from higher risk contexts. Using data from a large…

  7. Knowledge, attitude, and practices of oral health care in prevention of early childhood caries among parents of children in Belagavi city: A Questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H P Suma Sogi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the existing knowledge, attitude, and practices of “oral health care” in the prevention of early childhood caries (ECCs among parents of children in Belagavi city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the outpatient Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, KLE VK Institute of Dental Sciences, Belagavi, Karnataka. Institutional Ethical Clearance was obtained. The study was conducted during the month of April 2014 to October 2014 after taking prior informed consent from the 218 parents. Inclusion criteria were parents getting their children treated for dental caries and who were willing to participate. Parents who could not read and write were excluded from the study. The self-administered, close-ended questionnaire was written in English. It was then translated in local languages, i.e. Kannada and Marathi, and a pilot study was conducted on 10 parents to check for its feasibility and any changes if required were done. Results: The response rate was 100% as all 218 parents completed the questionnaire. Of 218 parents, 116 were mothers and 102 were fathers. The overall mean knowledge score was 69.5%. The overall mean attitude score was 53.5%. The overall attitude toward prevention of ECC was not in accordance to knowledge. The overall mean of “good” practices and “bad” practices score was 33.5% and 18.5%, respectively. Good knowledge and attitude toward oral health do not necessarily produce good practices.

  8. Flourishing in health care

    OpenAIRE

    Edgar, Andrew Robert; Pattison, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to offer an account of ‘flourishing’ that is relevant to health care provision, both in terms of the flourishing of the individual patient and carer, and in terms of the flourishing of the caring institution. It is argued that, unlike related concepts such as ‘happiness’, ‘well-being’ or ‘quality of life’, ‘flourishing’ uniquely has the power to capture the importance of the vulnerability of human being. Drawing on the likes of Heidegger and Nussbaum, it is argued...

  9. Children's rights to health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, D W

    2001-04-01

    This paper will explore the application of an account of justice in health and health care to the special case of children. It is tempting to hold that children require no special treatment in an account of just health care; justice requires guaranteeing access to at least basic health care services to all persons, whatever their age group, within the constraints of a society's resources. However, I will argue that for a number of reasons we need to address what justice requires specifically for children from the health care system, even if the answer must be embedded within a general account of justice in health and health care.

  10. Childhood Diabesity: International Applications for Health Education and Health Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon-Perez, Helda; Kotkin-Jaszi, Suzanne; Perez, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Health policy has a direct impact on health education initiatives, health care delivery, resource allocation, and quality of life. Increasing rates in the epidemics of obesity and obesity-dependent diabetes mellitus (aka diabesity) suggest that health policy changes should be included in health education and disease prevention strategies. Health…

  11. Adverse childhood experiences and health anxiety in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Sarah J; McMillan, Katherine A; Wright, Kristi D; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2014-03-01

    Childhood experiences are thought to predispose a person to the development of health anxiety later in life. However, there is a lack of research investigating the influence of specific adverse experiences (e.g., childhood abuse, household dysfunction) on this condition. The current study examined the cumulative influence of multiple types of childhood adversities on health anxiety in adulthood. Adults 18-59 years of age (N=264) completed a battery of measures to assess adverse childhood experiences, health anxiety, and associated constructs (i.e., negative affect and trait anxiety). Significant associations were observed between adverse childhood experiences, health anxiety, and associated constructs. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicted that adverse childhood experiences were predictive of health anxiety in adulthood; however, the unique contribution of these experience were no longer significant following the inclusion of the other variables of interest. Subsequently, mediation analyses indicated that both negative affect and trait anxiety independently mediated the relationship between adverse childhood experiences and health anxiety in adulthood. Increased exposure to adverse childhood experiences is associated with higher levels of health anxiety in adulthood; this relationship is mediated through negative affect and trait anxiety. Findings support the long-term negative impact of cumulative adverse childhood experiences and emphasize the importance of addressing negative affect and trait anxiety in efforts to prevent and treat health anxiety.

  12. Toddlers in Nordic Early Childhood Education and Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ole Henrik; Greve, Anne

    2018-01-01

    -called Nordic model represents a uni ed system of early childhood education and care (ECEC). This chapter underlines the distinctive shared characteristics of the Nordic approach to play and learning, and care and education, where participation, democracy, respect for other cultures and religions...... and the possibility of achieving a healthy and stimulating childhood comprise the key elements. Furthermore, the chapter demonstrates some of the challenges when attempting to ensure quality childcare and education. The Nordic pedagogic tradition is seen as re ecting both social development and the culture...

  13. Transition guidelines: An important step in the future care for childhood cancer survivors. A comprehensive definition as groundwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, R L; van der Pal, H J H; Levitt, G A; Skinner, R; Kremer, L C M; Brown, M C; Bárdi, E; Windsor, R; Michel, G; Frey, E

    2016-02-01

    Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are essential to ensure that childhood cancer survivors at risk of chronic health conditions receive effective long-term follow-up care. However, adult survivors of childhood cancer are not always engaged in recommended health promotion and follow-up practices, as many centres do not have a formal transition programme that prepares survivors and their families for successful transfer from child-centred to adult-oriented healthcare. The need for a specific pan-European guideline for the transition of care for childhood cancer survivors has been recognised. The first step is to define the concept of transition of care for survivors of childhood cancer based on existing evidence.

  14. EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE & EDUCATION: AN ICT PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar Mishra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st century, technology serves to reinforce the educational bedrock of any country. Technology has revolutionized the teaching learning process by integrating different source of knowledge - clearly visible from primary to post-tertiary level. This paper examines the introduction of ICT in early childhood years centred on the relationship of ICT with the cognitive, emotional and social development of children. The paper discusses various aspects of the ongoing debate around ICT usage in the early years and tries to answer some of the relevant issues namely, the rationale for early introduction of ICT, the perceived risks and benefits involved in its usage, the role of the parents, and fostering appropriate application of ICT in the early childhood classrooms.

  15. Early modifiable risk factors for childhood and adolescent mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Cherry

    2015-01-01

    Childhood and adolescent mental health is a major public health concern. Childhood behavioral problems and low self-esteem can predispose children to future depression. Mental health issues often emerge in adolescence making examination of potential early modifiable risk factors for these three mental health indicators crucial. Potential risk factors for mental health issues often reflect findings from Western settings where confounding by low socioeconomic position may occur, making it diffi...

  16. Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation: Common Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Mary-alayne; Spence, Christine M.; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.

    2015-01-01

    As the field of early childhood mental health continues to expand and evolve, the evidence base is growing, and early childhood mental health consultation is viewed as a promising practice. However, there continues to be a need for further research, with particular attention given to the utility and effectiveness of this approach with infants and…

  17. Betting against health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, C

    1996-06-20

    Health care firms of all types helped fuel the biggest short-selling frenzy in the New York Stock Exchange's history, recently hitting a record 2.2 billion shares. While some analysts say this means nothing, the fact is that many investors are "shorting" the stock; in other words, they're betting against it. What appears as a lack of confidence may be nothing more than a simple quirk of Wall Street. Good, bad or indifferent, selling short is no tall tale.

  18. Health care engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Frize, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Part II of Health Care Engineering begins with statistics on the occurrence of medical errors and adverse events, and includes some technological solutions. A chapter on electronic medical records follows. The knowledge management process divided into four steps is described; this includes a discussion on data acquisition, storage, and retrieval. The next two chapters discuss the other three steps of the knowledge management process (knowledge discovery, knowledge translation, knowledge integration and sharing). The last chapter briefly discusses usability studies and clinical trials.This two-

  19. Compassionate Pedagogy: The Ethics of Care in Early Childhood Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    This article builds upon an earlier attempt (Taggart 2011) to articulate a rationale for professional training in early childhood education and care (ECEC) which is "ethical" as opposed to one which is purely instrumental or rooted in a patriarchal notion of women's supposed unique suitability. The argument proposes that a feminist…

  20. Early Childhood Care and Education: Objectives and Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Alastair

    This report describes an international study of objectives and issues in early childhood care and education (ECCE). The study was carried out by the Center for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI), an organization created by the Council of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development to study educational issues of concern to…

  1. Quality Matters in Early Childhood Education and Care: Slovak Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguma, Miho; Litjens, Ineke; Makowiecki, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Early childhood education and care (ECEC) is a topic of increased policy interest in the Slovak Republic where improving quality in the ECEC sector is a subject of growing importance. The OECD has identified five effective policy levers to encourage quality in the sector: 1) quality goals and regulations; 2) curriculum and guidelines; 3)…

  2. Practitioners' Constructions of Love in Early Childhood Education and Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Sarah Bernadette

    2017-01-01

    Love is rarely mentioned in Early Childhood Education and Care and there is no agreed definition for love in this context. In order to explore love in settings practitioner views on the topic should be sought. Unstructured interviews were carried out with senior practitioners in five contrasting settings. A range of qualitative methods were…

  3. FastStats: Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography Pap Tests Disability ... Care National Study of Long-Term Care Providers Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Centers for Medicare and Medicaid ...

  4. Personal Care in Learning Health Care Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Franklin G; Kim, Scott Y H

    2015-12-01

    The idea of a "learning health care system"--one that systematically integrates clinical research with medical care--has received considerable attention recently. Some commentators argue that under certain conditions pragmatic comparative effectiveness randomized trials can be conducted ethically within the context of a learning health care system without the informed consent of patients for research participation. In this article, we challenge this perspective and contend that conducting randomized trials of individual treatment options without consent is neither necessary nor desirable to promote and sustain learning health care systems. Our argument draws on the normative conception of personal care developed by Charles Fried in a landmark 1974 book on the ethics of randomized controlled trials.

  5. Reforming the health care system: implications for health care marketers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrochuk, M A; Javalgi, R G

    1996-01-01

    Health care reform has become the dominant domestic policy issue in the United States. President Clinton, and the Democratic leaders in the House and Senate have all proposed legislation to reform the system. Regardless of the plan which is ultimately enacted, health care delivery will be radically changed. Health care marketers, given their perspective, have a unique opportunity to ensure their own institutions' success. Organizational, managerial, and marketing strategies can be employed to deal with the changes which will occur. Marketers can utilize personal strategies to remain proactive and successful during an era of health care reform. As outlined in this article, responding to the health care reform changes requires strategic urgency and action. However, the strategies proposed are practical regardless of the version of health care reform legislation which is ultimately enacted.

  6. Occupational Health for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health care workers are exposed to many job hazards. These can include Infections Needle injuries Back injuries ... prevention practices. They can reduce your risk of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, ...

  7. The effect of prenatal and postnatal care on childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seipel, Michael M O; Shafer, Kevin

    2013-07-01

    Childhood obesity continues to be a major public health problem in the United States. If this problem is unresolved, some children will be at risk for disorders such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and cancer and will become a high economic and social burden for society. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, Child and Young Adult sample (N = 6,643), this study examined the relationship between the effect of pre- and postnatal characteristics and obesity. The findings of this study show that the probability of childhood obesity can be lessened if pregnant women do not smoke and do not gain significant pregnancy-related weight. Moreover, breast feeding and health insurance were also found to be correlated to avoiding childhood obesity.

  8. A primary health-care intervention on pre- and postnatal risk factor behavior to prevent childhood allergy. The Prevention of Allergy among Children in Trondheim (PACT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenssen Jon A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a primary prevention intervention program on risk behavior for allergic diseases among children up to 2 years of age. The setting was in ordinary pre- and postnatal primary health care in Trondheim, Norway. Methods The Prevention of Allergy among Children in Trondheim, Norway (PACT study invited all pregnant women and parents to children up to 2 years of age in the community to participate in a non-randomized, controlled, multiple life-style intervention study. Interventional topics was increased dietary intake of cod liver oil and oily fish for women during pregnancy and for infants during the first 2 years of life, reduced parental smoking and reduced indoor dampness. A control cohort was established prior to the intervention cohort with "follow up as usual". Questionnaires were completed in pregnancy, 6 weeks after birth and at 1 and 2 years of age. Trends in exposure and behavior are described. Results Intake of oily fish and cod liver oil increased statistically significantly among women and infants in the intervention cohort compared to the control cohort. There was a low postnatal smoking prevalence in both cohorts, with a trend towards a decreasing smoking prevalence in the control cohort. There was no change in indoor dampness or in behavior related to non- intervened life-style factors. Conclusions The dietary intervention seemed to be successful. The observed reduced smoking behavior could not be attributed to the intervention program, and the latter had no effect on indoor dampness. Trial registrations (Current Controlled Trials registration number: ISRCTN28090297

  9. The German health care system and health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, K

    1998-02-01

    This article presents a structured survey of the German health care and health insurance system, and analyzes major developments of current German health policy. The German statutory health insurance system has been known as a system that provides all citizens with ready access to comprehensive high quality medical care at a cost the country considered socially acceptable. However, an increasing concern for rapidly rising health care expenditure led to a number of cost-containment measures since 1977. The aim was to bring the growth of health care expenditure in line with the growth of wages and salaries of the sickness fund members. The recent health care reforms of 1989 and 1993 yielded only short-term reductions of health care expenditure, with increases in the subsequent years. 'Stability of the contribution rate' is the uppermost political objective of current health care reform initiatives. Options under discussion include reductions in the benefit package and increases of patients' co-payments. The article concludes with the possible consequences of the 1997 health care reform of which the major part became effective 1 July 1997.

  10. Parental care in Childhood and Obesity in Adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vámosi, Marianne; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of the study was to examine if parental antipathy and neglect during childhood were associated with obesity in adulthood. From the Danish Twin Registry 146 adult same-sexed twin pairs discordant for Body Mass Index (BMI) were identified. Criteria for being discordant were...... that one of the twins should have a BMI between 20 and 25 kg/m² (normal weight) and the co-twin a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m² (obesity). In total 236 out of 289 (81.7%) eligible twin individuals participated in an interview and a physical examination. A part of the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse, the parental....... Paternal neglect and antipathy were not related with adult obesity. The study demonstrates that experience in childhood maternal antipathy and neglect may contribute to the development of obesity at age 20 and later in adulthood....

  11. Accountability in Health Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbæk, Karsten; Byrkjeflot, Haldor

    2016-01-01

    The debate on accountability within the public sector has been lively in the past decade. Significant progress has been made in developing conceptual frameworks and typologies for characterizing different features and functions of accountability. However, there is a lack of sector specific...... adjustment of such frameworks. In this article we present a framework for analyzing accountability within health care. The paper makes use of the concept of "accountability regime" to signify the combination of different accountability forms, directions and functions at any given point in time. We show...... that reforms can introduce new forms of accountability, change existing accountability relations or change the relative importance of different accountability forms. They may also change the dominant direction and shift the balance between different functions of accountability. We further suggest...

  12. Federalism and Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Alan Tarr

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available President Barack Obama proposed a major overhaul of the American healthsystem, and in 2010 the U.S. Congress enacted his proposal, the PatientProtection and Affordable Care Act. Opponents of the Act challenged itsconstitutionality in federal court, claiming that it exceeds the powers grantedto the federal government under the Commerce Clause and the NecessaryProper Clause of the federal Constitution. Some courts have upheldthe law, but others have agreed with the critics, in particular ruling thatthe provision requiring citizens to buy health insurance is unconstitutional.Eventually the U.S. Supreme Court will rule on the issue. This article tracesthe controversy, surveys the interpretation of pertinent constitutional provisionsin past cases, analyzes the constitutional arguments presented byproponents and opponents of the Act, and concludes that the Act is constitutional.

  13. Health and Disability: Partnerships in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Jane; McDonald, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with intellectual disability, their health status remains poor. Inequalities in health outcomes are manifest in higher morbidity and rates of premature death. Contributing factors include the barriers encountered in accessing and receiving high-quality health care.…

  14. Health and Disability: Partnerships in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Jane; McDonald, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with intellectual disability, their health status remains poor. Inequalities in health outcomes are manifest in higher morbidity and rates of premature death. Contributing factors include the barriers encountered in accessing and receiving high-quality health care.…

  15. Flourishing in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Andrew; Pattison, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to offer an account of 'flourishing' that is relevant to health care provision, both in terms of the flourishing of the individual patient and carer, and in terms of the flourishing of the caring institution. It is argued that, unlike related concepts such as 'happiness', 'well-being' or 'quality of life', 'flourishing' uniquely has the power to capture the importance of the vulnerability of human being. Drawing on the likes of Heidegger and Nussbaum, it is argued that humans are at once beings who are autonomous and thereby capable of making sense of their lives, but also subject to the contingencies of their bodies and environments. To flourish requires that one engages, imaginatively and creatively, with those contingencies. The experience of illness, highlighting the vulnerability of the human being, thereby becomes an important experience, stimulating reflection in order to make sense of one's life as a narrative. To flourish, it is argued, is to tell a story of one's life, realistically engaging with vulnerability and suffering, and thus creating a framework through which one can meaningful and constructively go on with one's life.

  16. Spiritual Care Education of Health Care Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donia Baldacchino

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nurses and health care professionals should have an active role in meeting the spiritual needs of patients in collaboration with the family and the chaplain. Literature criticizes the impaired holistic care because the spiritual dimension is often overlooked by health care professionals. This could be due to feelings of incompetence due to lack of education on spiritual care; lack of inter-professional education (IPE; work overload; lack of time; different cultures; lack of attention to personal spirituality; ethical issues and unwillingness to deliver spiritual care. Literature defines spiritual care as recognizing, respecting, and meeting patients’ spiritual needs; facilitating participation in religious rituals; communicating through listening and talking with clients; being with the patient by caring, supporting, and showing empathy; promoting a sense of well-being by helping them to find meaning and purpose in their illness and overall life; and referring them to other professionals, including the chaplain/pastor. This paper outlines the systematic mode of intra-professional theoretical education on spiritual care and its integration into their clinical practice; supported by role modeling. Examples will be given from the author’s creative and innovative ways of teaching spiritual care to undergraduate and post-graduate students. The essence of spiritual care is being in doing whereby personal spirituality and therapeutic use of self contribute towards effective holistic care. While taking into consideration the factors that may inhibit and enhance the delivery of spiritual care, recommendations are proposed to the education, clinical, and management sectors for further research and personal spirituality to ameliorate patient holistic care.

  17. [Health care insurance for Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, O P; Lindner, M E; van Esch, J P L; van Vugt, M; Rinke de Wit, T F

    2007-12-01

    Long-term substantial development aid has not prevented many African countries from being caught in a vicious circle in health care: the demand for care is high, but the overburdened public supply of low quality care is not aligned with this demand. The majority of Africans therefore pay for health care in cash, an expensive and least solidarity-based option. This article describes an innovative approach whereby supply and demand of health care can be better aligned, health care can be seen as a value chain and health insurance serves as the overarching mechanism. Providing premium subsidies for patients who seek health care through private, collective African health insurance schemes stimulates the demand side. The supply of care improves by investing in medical knowledge, administrative systems and health care infrastructure. This initiative comes from the Health Insurance Fund, a unique collaboration of public and private sectors. In 2006 the Fund received Euro 100 million from the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs to implement insurance programmes in Africa. PharmAccess Foundation is the Fund's implementing partner and presents its first experiences in Africa.

  18. Integrating Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation with the Pyramid Model. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Deborah F.; Kaufmann, Roxane K.

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of states and communities are implementing the Pyramid Model in early care and education settings, and in many of these places there are also early childhood mental health consultation (ECMHC) programs operating. This policy brief provides an overview of ECMHC, how it can support the implementation of the Pyramid Model and the…

  19. Dimensiones culturales en el proceso de atención primaria infantil: perspectivas de las madres Cultural dimensions of the childhood primary health care delivery from the mothers' perceptions in the Araucania-Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Alarcón-Muñoz

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Explorar las dimensiones culturales en el proceso de atención primaria infantil desde la perspectiva de las madres que acuden a centros de salud primaria en la región de la Araucania, Chile. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio cualitativo realizado durante el año 2003 en la zona de mayor índice de etnicidad del país. Los participantes fueron 94 madres mapuches y no mapuches a quienes se le aplicó una entrevista en profundidad. RESULTADOS: Tres dimensiones culturales surgieron del análisis: a modelos explicativos de enfermedad asociados a factores culturales, político-económicos, y ambientales; b itinerario terapéutico que combina recursos de los sistemas indígena, popular y biomédico; y c falta de competencia cultural del sistema de atención. CONCLUSIONES: Las madres conciben las enfermedades infantiles articulando componentes mágico-religiosos, y naturales (frío, calor, humedad. La atención de salud infantil enfrenta un importante desafío comunicacional en la superación de barreras sociales y lingüísticas entre madres y personal de salud.OBJECTIVE: To explore the cultural dimensions of the childhood primary health care delivery process from the mothers' perceptions in the Araucania region of Chile. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Qualitative study performed in the year 2003 within the zone with the highest ethnicity rate of the country. Ninety four Mapuche and non-Mapuche mothers agreed to be in depth interviewed. RESULTS: The analysis drew three cultural dimensions: a Explanatory models of disease were associated with cultural, political-economy, and environmental factors; b The therapeutic itinerary blends indigenous, popular, and biomedical resources and; c Health care delivery process lacks of cultural competence. CONCLUSIONS: The mothers explain their children diseases articulating religious, magic, and natural (hot, cold, humidity causes. The main challenge of the primary healthcare delivery process is to overcome the

  20. Avoiding Childhood Obesity (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-01-31

    Maintaining a healthy weight in childhood can prevent many health-related problems later in life. In this podcast, Dr. Jackson Sekhobo discusses the importance of avoiding obesity in childhood.  Created: 1/31/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 1/31/2013.

  1. Avoiding Childhood Obesity (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-01-31

    Maintaining a healthy weight in childhood can prevent many health-related problems later in life. This podcast discusses what can be done to prevent childhood obesity.  Created: 1/31/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 1/31/2013.

  2. A course on the transition to adult care of patients with childhood-onset chronic illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagood, James S; Lenker, Claire V; Thrasher, Staci

    2005-04-01

    Children with special health care needs born today have a 90% chance of surviving into adulthood, making their transition to adult systems of care an issue that will affect almost all physicians. However, many adult generalists and specialists are not familiar with the management of chronic diseases that begin in childhood. While the public health system has made transition to appropriate adult care a priority, and many specialty organizations have endorsed this concept, there are no published studies addressing how the concept of transition can be taught to medical students or residents. The authors describe a one-week course for medical students, begun in 2001 at their institution, that addresses the transition for youth with special health care needs, emphasizing patient and family-centered care, cultural competence, and decision making in end-of-life issues. Cystic fibrosis, a common genetic disease with increasing life expectancy, is used as the model for the course. Involvement of interdisciplinary faculty, interviews with youth with special health care needs and family caregivers, readings from academic and nonacademic literature, and group discussions are presented as teaching methods. Key insights based on experience with the course are the need to include the voices of patients and families, the use of faculty from various professions and specialties to model interdisciplinary care, and the insight that problems specific to transition offer into contemporary health care financing. Future studies should measure the impact of such courses on students' knowledge of transition issues, and determine essential information required for physicians in practice.

  3. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Department of Health Policy and Management, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine and University ... 86 (21%) had primary school education, 210 (51.3%) were married, and 357 (87.3%) were employed. ...... patient satisfaction and behavioral intentions in. 5. .... Psychological Assessment 1995; 7 (3):309-319.

  4. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2Department of Community Health, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria. ... public health problem that can lead to a great burden of disability in the community. ..... women. Equally worthy of note, is the fact that a higher proportion of females ...

  5. Vitamin D status and childhood health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn Ho Shin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is an essential component of bone and mineral metabolism; its deficiency causes growth retardation and skeletal deformities in children and osteomalacia and osteoporosis in adults. Hypovi­ taminosis D (vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency is observed not only in adults but also in infants, children, and adolescents. Previous studies suggest that sufficient serum vitamin D levels should be maintained in order to enhance normal calcification of the growth plate and bone mineralization. Moreover, emerging evidence supports an association between 25­hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D levels and immune function, respiratory diseases, obesity, metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, infection, allergy, cancers, and cardiovascular diseases in pediatric and adolescent populations. The risk factors for vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency in the pediatric population are season (winter, insufficient time spent outdoors, ethnicity (non­white, older age, more advanced stage of puberty, obesity, low milk consumption, low socioeconomic status, and female gender. It is recommended that all infants, children, and adolescents have a minimum daily intake of 400 IU (10 μg of vitamin D. Since the vitamin D status of the newborn is highly related to maternal vitamin D levels, optimal vitamin D levels in the mother during pregnancy should be maintained. In conclusion, given the important role of vitamin D in childhood health, more time spent in outdoor activity (for sunlight exposure and vitamin D supplementation may be necessary for optimal health in infants, children, and adolescents.

  6. Foster care and healing from complex childhood trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkey, Heather; Szilagyi, Moira

    2014-10-01

    Children enter foster care with many forms of adversity and trauma beyond maltreatment that impact their short- and long-term physical, mental, and developmental health and their adaptation to their new care environment. Applying an understanding of the impact of toxic stress on the developing brain and body allows the health care provider to understand findings in this vulnerable population. Complex trauma alters immune response, neurodevelopment, and the genome, resulting in predictable and significant cognitive, behavioral, and physical consequences. Pediatric care of children in foster care must be trauma informed to meet their medical, mental health, and developmental needs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Health promotion innovation in primary health care

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra McManus

    2013-01-01

    Previously, the main focus of primary health care practices was to diagnose and treat patients. The identification of risk factors for disease and the prevention of chronic conditions have become a part of everyday practice. This paper provides an argument for training primary health care (PHC) practitioners in health promotion, while encouraging them to embrace innovation within their practice to streamline the treatment process and improve patient outcomes. Electronic modes of communication...

  8. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    be used to design policies and programmes to help workers identify environmental health risks, and improve their ... and his/her co-workers, who are subject to (SHE) departments and the Staff Clinic. It ... television and internet sources.

  9. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    Cervical cancer remains a major public health challenge in developing countries ... relation to knowledge on cervical cancer, primary level of education ... Latin America and Southeast Asia. ... practices such as level of awareness, educational.

  10. Late Cardiac Events after Childhood Cancer: Methodological Aspects of the Pan-European Study PanCareSurFup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijen, Elizabeth A. M.; Font-Gonzalez, Anna; van Dalen, Elvira C.; van der Pal, Helena J. H.; Reulen, Raoul C.; Winter, David L.; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Haupt, Riccardo; Alessi, Daniela; Byrne, Julianne; Bardi, Edit; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Grabow, Desiree; Garwicz, Stanislaw; Jankovic, Momcilo; Levitt, Gill A.; Skinner, Roderick; Zadravec Zaletel, Lorna; Hjorth, Lars; Tissing, Wim J. E.; de Vathaire, Florent; Hawkins, Mike M.; Kremer, Leontien C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Childhood cancer survivors are at high risk of long-term adverse effects of cancer and its treatment, including cardiac events. The pan-European PanCareSurFup study determined the incidence and risk factors for cardiac events among childhood cancer survivors. The aim of this article is to describe the methodology of the cardiac cohort and nested case-control study within PanCareSurFup. Methods Eight data providers in Europe participating in PanCareSurFup identified and validated symptomatic cardiac events in their cohorts of childhood cancer survivors. Data on symptomatic heart failure, ischemia, pericarditis, valvular disease and arrhythmia were collected and graded according to the Criteria for Adverse Events. Detailed treatment data, data on potential confounders, lifestyle related risk factors and general health problems were collected. Results The PanCareSurFup cardiac cohort consisted of 59,915 5-year childhood cancer survivors with malignancies diagnosed between 1940 and 2009 and classified according to the International Classification of Childhood Cancer 3. Different strategies were used to identify cardiac events such as record linkage to population/ hospital or regional based databases, and patient- and general practitioner-based questionnaires. Conclusion The cardiac study of the European collaborative research project PanCareSurFup will provide the largest cohort of 5-year childhood cancer survivors with systematically ascertained and validated data on symptomatic cardiac events. The result of this study can provide information to minimize the burden of cardiac events in childhood cancer survivors by tailoring the follow-up of childhood cancer survivors at high risk of cardiac adverse events, transferring this knowledge into evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and providing a platform for future research studies in childhood cancer patients.  PMID:27643694

  11. Employer-sponsored health insurance coverage limitations: results from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Anne C; Kuhlthau, Karen; Pajolek, Hannah; Leisenring, Wendy; Armstrong, Greg T; Robison, Leslie L; Park, Elyse R

    2013-02-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) will expand health insurance options for cancer survivors in the USA. It is unclear how this legislation will affect their access to employer-sponsored health insurance (ESI). We describe the health insurance experiences for survivors of childhood cancer with and without ESI. We conducted a series of qualitative interviews with 32 adult survivors from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study to assess their employment-related concerns and decisions regarding health insurance coverage. Interviews were performed from August to December 2009 and were recorded, transcribed, and content analyzed using NVivo 8. Uninsured survivors described ongoing employment limitations, such as being employed at part-time capacity, which affected their access to ESI coverage. These survivors acknowledged they could not afford insurance without employer support. Survivors on ESI had previously been denied health insurance due to their preexisting health conditions until they obtained coverage through an employer. Survivors feared losing their ESI coverage, which created a disincentive to making career transitions. Others reported worries about insurance rescission if their cancer history was discovered. Survivors on ESI reported financial barriers in their ability to pay for health care. Childhood cancer survivors face barriers to obtaining ESI. While ACA provisions may mitigate insurance barriers for cancer survivors, many will still face cost barriers to affording health care without employer support.

  12. Diaspora, disease, and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Jeannette Y; Zanni, Guido R

    2007-03-01

    When groups of people relocate from their homelands to other nations, especially if the movement is involuntary, minority populations are created in the countries that receive them. The issues related to these diaspora and diasporic communities--any groups that have been dispersed outside their traditional homelands--are financial, social, historical, political, or religious. In health care, issues include heritable diseases, cultural barriers, patients' health care beliefs, and unique disease presentations. In long-term care, many residents and health care providers have relocated to the United States from other countries.

  13. Allying health care and housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Lillian

    2005-01-01

    There is a wealth of evidence that health is inextricably linked to housing. For instance, research has shown that those in substandard housing have poorer health outcomes than other groups, and they often must forgo costly medication in order to pay for housing. Further, the health care and housing concerns faced by the underserved often compound one another--people with poor health often have trouble maintaining housing, and those with substandard homes, in turn, often have trouble maintaining their health. Three groups are especially vulnerable to the health care risks associated with housing issues: children, seniors, and the chronically homeless. As the research suggests, substandard housing is a contributing factor to the U.S. health care crisis. Therefore, as part of its efforts to reform the nation's health care system, the ministry should address housing issues as well. Seven Catholic health systems are doing this through the Strategic Health Care Partnership. The partnership, in collaboration with Mercy Housing, enables the seven organizations to work together to create healthy communities. The partnership's key goal is to increase access to affordable housing and health care. Just providing homes often is not enough, however. A holistic approach, through which supportive services are offered to the underserved, is most effective.

  14. Childhood Development Cross Culturally:Implications for Designing Childhood Obesity Interventions and Providing Culturally Competent Care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiying Ling; PhD.MS.RN.Vicki Hines-Martin; PhD.CNS.RN.FAAN Hong Ji; MSN

    2013-01-01

    United States is experiencing significant growth in its foreign -born population , especially Chinese American population comprising of 1.2% of the U.S.population.Many healthcare providers are challenged in their efforts to provide culturally competent healthcare to this population. To provide culturally competent healthcare ,healthcare providers should understand variations in cultural at-tributes that impact health. One group in which cultural variation holds great influence is that of children. Culture influences a child's be-havior,development and health. This article provides a cross -cultural,comparative examination of important cultural influences on child behaviors development and health in China and the U. S.Using the findings about these two populations ,interventions for childhood obesity cross culturally are addressed through the analysis of a U. S.based Children's Obesity Program. The author suggests that uniquely different approaches to childhood obesity intervention research are needed based upon the cultural differences identified within this paper.

  15. Anal Health Care Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jason; McLemore, Elisabeth; Tejirian, Talar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that countless patients suffer from anal problems, there tends to be a lack of understanding of anal health care. Unfortunately, this leads to incorrect diagnoses and treatments. When treating a patient with an anal complaint, the primary goals are to first diagnose the etiology of the symptoms correctly, then to provide an effective and appropriate treatment strategy. The first step in this process is to take an accurate history and physical examination. Specific questions include details about bowel habits, anal hygiene, and fiber supplementation. Specific components of the physical examination include an external anal examination, a digital rectal examination, and anoscopy if appropriate. Common diagnoses include pruritus ani, anal fissures, hemorrhoids, anal abscess or fistula, fecal incontinence, and anal skin tags. However, each problem presents differently and requires a different approach for management. It is of paramount importance that the correct diagnosis is reached. Common errors include an inaccurate diagnosis of hemorrhoids when other pathology is present and subsequent treatment with a steroid product, which is harmful to the anal area. Most of these problems can be avoided by improving bowel habits. Adequate fiber intake with 30 g to 40 g daily is important for many reasons, including improving the quality of stool and preventing colorectal and anal diseases. In this Special Report, we provide an overview of commonly encountered anal problems, their presentation, initial treatment options, and recommendations for referral to specialists. PMID:27723447

  16. Anal Health Care Basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jason; Mclemore, Elisabeth; Tejirian, Talar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that countless patients suffer from anal problems, there tends to be a lack of understanding of anal health care. Unfortunately, this leads to incorrect diagnoses and treatments. When treating a patient with an anal complaint, the primary goals are to first diagnose the etiology of the symptoms correctly, then to provide an effective and appropriate treatment strategy.The first step in this process is to take an accurate history and physical examination. Specific questions include details about bowel habits, anal hygiene, and fiber supplementation. Specific components of the physical examination include an external anal examination, a digital rectal examination, and anoscopy if appropriate.Common diagnoses include pruritus ani, anal fissures, hemorrhoids, anal abscess or fistula, fecal incontinence, and anal skin tags. However, each problem presents differently and requires a different approach for management. It is of paramount importance that the correct diagnosis is reached. Common errors include an inaccurate diagnosis of hemorrhoids when other pathology is present and subsequent treatment with a steroid product, which is harmful to the anal area.Most of these problems can be avoided by improving bowel habits. Adequate fiber intake with 30 g to 40 g daily is important for many reasons, including improving the quality of stool and preventing colorectal and anal diseases.In this Special Report, we provide an overview of commonly encountered anal problems, their presentation, initial treatment options, and recommendations for referral to specialists.

  17. Health care's service fanatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlino, James I; Raman, Ananth

    2013-05-01

    The Cleveland Clinic has long had a reputation for medical excellence. But in 2009 the CEO acknowledged that patients did not think much of their experience there and decided to act. Since then the Clinic has leaped to the top tier of patient-satisfaction surveys, and it now draws hospital executives from around the world who want to study its practices. The Clinic's journey also holds Lessons for organizations outside health care that must suddenly compete by creating a superior customer experience. The authors, one of whom was critical to steering the hospital's transformation, detail the processes that allowed the Clinic to excel at patient satisfaction without jeopardizing its traditional strengths. Hospital leaders: Publicized the problem internally. Seeing the hospital's dismal service scores shocked employees into recognizing that serious flaws existed. Worked to understand patients' needs. Management commissioned studies to get at the root causes of dissatisfaction. Made everyone a caregiver. An enterprisewide program trained everyone, from physicians to janitors, to put the patient first. Increased employee engagement. The Clinic instituted a "caregiver celebration" program and redoubled other motivational efforts. Established new processes. For example, any patient, for any reason, can now make a same-day appointment with a single call. Set patients' expectations. Printed and online materials educate patients about their stays--before they're admitted. Operating a truly patient-centered organization, the authors conclude, isn't a program; it's a way of life.

  18. Male reproductive health after childhood cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lähteenmäki, P M; Arola, M; Suominen, J

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-five male patients were investigated to elucidate the correlation of semen parameters and other related parameters in the assessment of spermatogenesis after childhood cancer treatment.......Twenty-five male patients were investigated to elucidate the correlation of semen parameters and other related parameters in the assessment of spermatogenesis after childhood cancer treatment....

  19. Teens, technology, and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanza, Francesco; Hauser, Diane

    2014-09-01

    Teens are avid users of new technologies and social media. Nearly 95% of US adolescents are online at least occasionally. Health care professionals and organizations that work with teens should identify online health information that is both accurate and teen friendly. Early studies indicate that some of the new health technology tools are acceptable to teens, particularly texting, computer-based psychosocial screening, and online interventions. Technology is being used to provide sexual health education, medication reminders for contraception, and information on locally available health care services. This article reviews early and emerging studies of technology use to promote teen health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Protecting Family Interests: An Interview Study with Foreign-Born Parents Struggling On in Childhood Cancer Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernilla Pergert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweden's population is gradually changing to become more multiethnic and diverse and that applies also for recipients of health care, including childhood cancer care. A holistic view on the sick child in the context of its family has always been a cornerstone in childhood cancer care in Sweden. The purpose of this study was to gain knowledge about the experiences and main concern of foreign-born parents in the context of paediatric cancer care. Interviews were performed with eleven foreign-born parents and data were analysed using a classic grounded theory approach. Foreign-born parents often feel in a position of powerless dependence, but family interests are protected in their approaches to interaction with healthcare staff, through cooperation, contesting, and reluctant resigning. Healthcare staff need to listen to foreign-born parents and deal with their concerns seriously to prevent powerless-dependence and work for trustful cooperation in the common fight against childhood cancer.

  1. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    Tobacco is a risk factor Organization (WHO) at World Health Assembly for six of the ... information. Stata statistical software version 11 was used to describe the data and determine ... Only 5% of respondents ever received training on tobacco control. .... Pharmacist. 54. 23.2 .... and dental students surveyed in Lagos by .15.

  2. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    2012-05-01

    May 1, 2012 ... quality service delivery as perceived by the respondents', however it remains ... However, there remain the problems of inequities in tertiary ... unrelenting struggle in financing health households to the financial risk ... other things improve efficiency in utilization of Using a cross-sectional approach, this study.

  3. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    eligible patients as they emerged from the pharmacy with their ... compare proportions while student's t-test was used to compare .... preference between the free and B.I. health services in an LGA in ... and training manual for the development.

  4. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study assessed the knowledge and practice of disease surveillance and notification ... for active surveillance especially if an outbreak Health workers play a key role in .... ethical clearance was obtained from the ethics and Eighty one percent of .... Salami S. Knowledge of disease notification among New York: John Wiley ...

  5. Careseeking for childhood diarrhoea at the primary level of care in communities in Cross River State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpo, Oluranti

    2016-12-01

    Risk factors for care-seeking choices for childhood diarrhea in Nigeria are poorly understood. They are essential to the control of childhood illnesses because diarrhea is an important cause of childhood mortality. This study explored the contributors to care-seeking choices in Cross River State, Nigeria. Caregivers of children aged 0-59months in 1240 randomly selected households in Cross River State were involved in this cross-sectional study. Questionnaires were used to collect information on demographics, knowledge of illness, and care-seeking patterns, and observed associations were explored using logistic regression. Care was given at home (50.4%, n=142; as recommended), at the health center (27%, n=76), and at the local drug store (19.1%, n=54). Main reasons for care sought were health education (31.9%, n=94), treatment cost (18%, n=53), and experiences (16.6%, n=49). Caregivers living in the mainly urban area of Calabar Municipality [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=2.81 (1.26-6.26)] and the mainly rural area of Obanliku [AOR=3.59 (1.94-6.64)], were more likely to give home treatment. Choice of treatment was only associated with area of residence. Influencers of care-seeking behavior, especially for childhood diarrhea, are complex and need to be better understood to encourage enhanced care for young children with diarrhea.

  6. Prevalence and Health Care–Seeking Behavior for Childhood Diarrheal Disease in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdur Razzaque Sarker MHE, MSS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In Bangladesh, the burden of diarrheal diseases is significant among children <5 years old. The objective of this study is to capture the prevalence of and health care–seeking behavior for childhood diarrheal diseases (CDDs and to identify the factors associated with CDDs at a population level in Bangladesh. We use a logistic regression approach to model careseeking based on individual characteristics. The overall diarrhea prevalence among children <5 years old was found to be 5.71%. Some factors found to significantly influence the health care–seeking pattern were age and sex of the children, nutritional score, age and education of mothers, wealth index, and access to electronic media. The health care service could be improved through working in partnership with public facilities, private health care practitioners, and community-based organizations, so that all strata of the population get equitable access in cases of childhood diarrhoea.

  7. The Relationship between Teacher Qualification and the Quality of the Early Childhood Care and Learning Environment. Campbell Systematic Reviews 2017:1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Matthew; Garvis, Susanne; Fleming, Christopher; Wong, Gabriel T. W.

    2017-01-01

    Poor quality early childhood education and care (ECEC) can be detrimental to the development of children as it could lead to poor social, emotional, educational, health, economic, and behavioural outcomes. The lack of consensus as to the strength of the relationship between teacher qualification and the quality of the early childhood learning…

  8. Hope for health and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempsey, William E

    2015-02-01

    Virtually all activities of health care are motivated at some level by hope. Patients hope for a cure; for relief from pain; for a return home. Physicians hope to prevent illness in their patients; to make the correct diagnosis when illness presents itself; that their prescribed treatments will be effective. Researchers hope to learn more about the causes of illness; to discover new and more effective treatments; to understand how treatments work. Ultimately, all who work in health care hope to offer their patients hope. In this paper, I offer a brief analysis of hope, considering the definitions of Hobbes, Locke, Hume and Thomas Aquinas. I then differentiate shallow and deep hope and show how hope in health care can remain shallow. Next, I explore what a philosophy of deep hope in health care might look like, drawing important points from Ernst Bloch and Gabriel Marcel. Finally, I suggest some implications of this philosophy of hope for patients, physicians, and researchers.

  9. mPneumonia: Development of an Innovative mHealth Application for Diagnosing and Treating Childhood Pneumonia and Other Childhood Illnesses in Low-Resource Settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Sarah Ginsburg

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of death in children worldwide. Each year, pneumonia kills an estimated 935,000 children under five years of age, with most of these deaths occurring in developing countries. The current approach for pneumonia diagnosis in low-resource settings--using the World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI paper-based protocols and relying on a health care provider's ability to manually count respiratory rate--has proven inadequate. Furthermore, hypoxemia--a diagnostic indicator of the presence and severity of pneumonia often associated with an increased risk of death--is not assessed because pulse oximetry is frequently not available in low-resource settings. In an effort to address childhood pneumonia mortality and improve frontline health care providers' ability to diagnose, classify, and manage pneumonia and other childhood illnesses, PATH collaborated with the University of Washington to develop "mPneumonia," an innovative mobile health application using an Android tablet. mPneumonia integrates a digital version of the IMCI algorithm with a software-based breath counter and a pediatric pulse oximeter. We conducted a design-stage usability field test of mPneumonia in Ghana, with the goal of creating a user-friendly diagnostic and management tool for childhood pneumonia and other childhood illnesses that would improve diagnostic accuracy and facilitate adherence by health care providers to established guidelines in low-resource settings. The results of the field test provided valuable information for understanding the usability and acceptability of mPneumonia among health care providers, and identifying approaches to iterate and improve. This critical feedback helped ascertain the common failure modes related to the user interface design, navigation, and accessibility of mPneumonia and the modifications required to improve user experience and create a tool aimed at decreasing

  10. Asthma Symptoms in Early Childhood: A public health perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.D. Hafkamp-De Groen (Esther)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis focuses on asthma symptoms in early childhood. From a public health perspective, we aim to improve health and health-related quality of life through the prevention of asthma symptoms and by signaling, counselling or management of children who are at a high r

  11. Asthma Symptoms in Early Childhood: A public health perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.D. Hafkamp-De Groen (Esther)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis focuses on asthma symptoms in early childhood. From a public health perspective, we aim to improve health and health-related quality of life through the prevention of asthma symptoms and by signaling, counselling or management of children who are at a high r

  12. [A Maternal Health Care System Based on Mobile Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xin; Zeng, Weijie; Li, Chengwei; Xue, Junwei; Wu, Xiuyong; Liu, Yinjia; Wan, Yuxin; Zhang, Yiru; Ji, Yurong; Wu, Lei; Yang, Yongzhe; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Bin; Huang, Yueshan; Wu, Kai

    2016-02-01

    Wearable devices are used in the new design of the maternal health care system to detect electrocardiogram and oxygen saturation signal while smart terminals are used to achieve assessments and input maternal clinical information. All the results combined with biochemical analysis from hospital are uploaded to cloud server by mobile Internet. Machine learning algorithms are used for data mining of all information of subjects. This system can achieve the assessment and care of maternal physical health as well as mental health. Moreover, the system can send the results and health guidance to smart terminals.

  13. Promoting Health in Early Childhood Environments: A Health-Promotion Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minniss, Fiona Rowe; Wardrope, Cheryl; Johnston, Donni; Kendall, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the mechanisms by which a health-promotion intervention might influence the health-promoting behaviours of staff members working in early childhood centres. The intervention was an ecological health-promotion initiative that was implemented within four early childhood centres in South-East Queensland, Australia. In-depth,…

  14. Finding Health Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have been diagnosed with cancer, finding a doctor and treatment facility for your cancer care is an important step to getting the best treatment possible. Learn tips for choosing a doctor and treatment facility to manage your cancer care.

  15. Developmental health of infants and children subsequent to foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruskas, Delilah

    2010-11-01

    every day, the United States child welfare system is entrusted with the care of over 400,000 children through foster care. The majority of children entering this social setting are infants, the most developmentally vulnerable. bronfenbrenner's human health ecology model and Bowlby's attachment theory are used to delineate the social setting of foster care and its impact on developmental health, and elucidates the relationship between childhood experiences and the overall continuum of health. Additionally, the notion of inherited genes and environmental influences or epigenetics toward gene expression will be explored. research points out that what happens in childhood matters; the consequences of not addressing childhood adversity and the associated risk factors of foster care increase a child's risk for poor developmental health and other major illnesses noted later in life such as cardiac disease, depression, and even premature death. Healthcare providers and others charged with caring for this vulnerable population who understand the social setting of foster care and its impact on developmental health may help identify and treat developmental problems earlier, thus potentially reducing long-term effects of abuse and neglect. improvement plans that promote best practice for child welfare must include those that directly address the unique developmental needs of all infants and children in foster care itself. Such plans will ensure that foster care as an intervention to protect vulnerable children at risk does not create more harm by reducing the associated risks and maximizing benefits while in foster care, and ensures that those born genetically vulnerable and disproportionately susceptible to poor outcomes in adversity are also protected and provided opportunities that promote optimal developmental health.

  16. Conscientious objection in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuře Josef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with conscientious objection in health care, addressing the problems of scope, verification and limitation of such refusal, paying attention to ideological agendas hidden behind the right of conscience where the claimed refusal can cause harm or where such a claim is an attempt to impose certain moral values on society or an excuse for not providing health care. The nature of conscientious objection will be investigated and an ethical analysis of conscientious objection will be conducted. Finally some suggestions for health care policy will be proposed.

  17. Home Health Care Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all Home Health Agencies that have been registered with Medicare. The list includes addresses, phone numbers, and quality measure ratings for each agency.

  18. Adherence and health care costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuga AO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aurel O Iuga,1,2 Maura J McGuire3,4 1Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2Johns Hopkins University, 3Johns Hopkins Community Physicians, 4Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Medication nonadherence is an important public health consideration, affecting health outcomes and overall health care costs. This review considers the most recent developments in adherence research with a focus on the impact of medication adherence on health care costs in the US health system. We describe the magnitude of the nonadherence problem and related costs, with an extensive discussion of the mechanisms underlying the impact of nonadherence on costs. Specifically, we summarize the impact of nonadherence on health care costs in several chronic diseases, such as diabetes and asthma. A brief analysis of existing research study designs, along with suggestions for future research focus, is provided. Finally, given the ongoing changes in the US health care system, we also address some of the most relevant and current trends in health care, including pharmacist-led medication therapy management and electronic (e-prescribing. Keywords: patient, medication, adherence, compliance, nonadherence, noncompliance, cost

  19. Adverse childhood experiences: assessing the impact on health and school engagement and the mitigating role of resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethell, Christina D; Newacheck, Paul; Hawes, Eva; Halfon, Neal

    2014-12-01

    The ongoing longitudinal Adverse Childhood Experiences Study of adults has found significant associations between chronic conditions; quality of life and life expectancy in adulthood; and the trauma and stress associated with adverse childhood experiences, including physical or emotional abuse or neglect, deprivation, or exposure to violence. Less is known about the population-based epidemiology of adverse childhood experiences among US children. Using the 2011-12 National Survey of Children's Health, we assessed the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences and associations between them and factors affecting children's development and lifelong health. After we adjusted for confounding factors, we found lower rates of school engagement and higher rates of chronic disease among children with adverse childhood experiences. Our findings suggest that building resilience-defined in the survey as "staying calm and in control when faced with a challenge," for children ages 6-17-can ameliorate the negative impact of adverse childhood experiences. We found higher rates of school engagement among children with adverse childhood experiences who demonstrated resilience, as well as higher rates of resilience among children with such experiences who received care in a family-centered medical home. We recommend a coordinated effort to fill knowledge gaps and translate existing knowledge about adverse childhood experiences and resilience into national, state, and local policies, with a focus on addressing childhood trauma in health systems as they evolve during ongoing reform.

  20. American Health Care Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Association Responds to Ruling on Injunction Delaying CMS Implementation of Arbitration Rule AHCA/NCAL Elects New ... Information Technology Integrity Medicaid Medicare Patient Privacy and Security Survey and Regulatory Therapy Services Workforce Events Calendar ...

  1. 8 ways to cut health care costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health care provider if you can switch to generic medicines. They have the same active ingredient, but ... Trust for America's Health. A Healthy America 2013: Strategies to Move From Sick Care to Health Care ...

  2. Health Care Analysis Using Hadoop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Dhotre

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Electronic Medical Records EMRs are the primary sources to study the enhancement of health and medical care. The rapid development in science and medical technology has produced various methods to detect verify prevent and treat diseases. This has led to the generation of big health-care data and difficulties in processing and managing data. To capture all the information about a patient and to get a more detailed and complete view for insight into care coordination and management decisions big data technologies can be used. A more detailed and complete picture about patients and populations can be identified along with patients at risk before any health issue arises. Optimal strategies to commercialize treatments and the next generation of health care treatments can be identified and developed by it.

  3. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    birth attendants, and if there is a proper division of labour amongst the three tiers of the health system. 3 ... Obstetric. Care,. Traditional. Birth. Attendants,. Maternal. Mortality,. Neonatal ..... interview believed that sudden onset of labor and.

  4. Will Boeing Change Health Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempniak, Marty

    2015-12-01

    Big employers like Boeing and Intel are directly contracting with hospitals in an effort to control health care prices. Some hospital CEOs see direct contracting as the future, while others wonder how they can participate.

  5. Early childhood health promotion and its life course health consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyer, Bernard; Ma, Sai; Grason, Holly; Frick, Kevin D; Perry, Deborah F; Sharkey, Alyssa; McIntosh, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    To explore whether health promotion efforts targeted at preschool-age children can improve health across the life span and improve future economic returns to society. We selected 4 health topics to review-tobacco exposure, unintentional injury, obesity, and mental health-because they are clinically and epidemiologically significant, and represent the complex nature of health problems in this early period of life. The peer-reviewed literature was searched to assess the level of evidence for short- and long-term health impacts of health promotion and disease prevention interventions for children from before birth to age 5. This review sought to document the monetary burden of poor child health, the cost implications of preventing and treating child health problems, and the net benefit of the interventions. The evidence is compelling that these 4 topics-tobacco exposure, unintentional injury, obesity, and mental health-constitute a significant burden on the health of children and are the early antecedents of significant health problems across the life span. The evidence for the cost consequences of these problems is strong, although more uneven than the epidemiological data. The available evidence for the effectiveness of interventions in this age group was strongest in the case of preventing tobacco exposure and injuries, was limited to smaller-scale clinical interventions in the case of mental health, and was least available for efforts to prevent obesity among preschoolers. Currently available research justifies the implementation of health interventions in the prenatal to preschool period-especially to reduce tobacco exposure and prevent injuries. There is an urgent need for carefully targeted, rigorous research to examine the longitudinal causal relationships and provide stronger economic data to help policy makers make the case that the entire society will benefit from wise investment in improving the health of preschool-age children and their families.

  6. [Corruption and health care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasović Šušnjara, Ivana

    2014-06-01

    Corruption is a global problem that takes special place in health care system. A large number of participants in the health care system and numerous interactions among them provide an opportunity for various forms of corruption, be it bribery, theft, bureaucratic corruption or incorrect information. Even though it is difficult to measure the amount of corruption in medicine, there are tools that allow forming of the frames for possible interventions.

  7. Maternal history of adoption or foster care placement in childhood: a risk factor for preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublitz, Margaret H; Rodriguez, Daniel; Polly Gobin, Asi; Waldemore, Marissa; Magee, Susanna; Stroud, Laura R

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the impact of maternal history of adoption or foster care placement in childhood on the risk for preterm birth (PTB), controlling for other known risk factors for PTB. Participants were 302 pregnant women from a low-income, diverse sample drawn from 2 intensive prospective studies of maternal mood and behavior and fetal and infant development. Gestational age was determined by best obstetric estimate. Maternal history of adoption or foster care placement prior to age 18 years was determined by maternal report. Other maternal characteristics, including maternal medical conditions, psychosocial characteristics, and health behaviors, were measured during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. The odds of delivering preterm (gestational age foster care placement compared with women who were never placed out of the home during childhood. This association remained significant after adjusting for other known risk factors for PTB including maternal medical conditions, psychosocial characteristics, and negative health behaviors in pregnancy. Findings suggest that a history of adoption/foster care placement is an important risk factor for PTB and may be comparable with other established risk factors for PTB including prior history of PTB, body mass index, African-American race, and advanced maternal age. More studies are needed to understand why women with placement histories may be at increased risk to deliver preterm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Health and health care in Vietnam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flessa, S

    2003-05-01

    The South East Asian state of Vietnam is currently undergoing a transition from a centralised socialism to a so-called socialist market economy strongly promoting the private sector. For the last 17 years economy experienced an impressive growth. If the assumption is true that economic growth is positively correlated with the health status of the population, the strengthened economy of Vietnam must go along with an improved health situation and health care system of this country. The following paper evaluates this assumption. It is demonstrated that there is indeed a strongly positive correlation between health and development in many aspects. However, it becomes obvious that economic growth is definitely accompanied by increasing regional and social disparity challenging the health care policy of Vietnam and her international partners.

  9. [Interprofessional teamwork in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Conny H

    2010-01-01

    Providing health care requires the integrative co-operation of physicians, nurses and other professionals in the health care sector. The success of such interprofessional teamwork does not only rely on the team members' task knowledge, but also on their teamwork-related knowledge, their skills and attitudes. In this paper a theoretical framework for team effectiveness is developed and used to identify factors improving team success. Within this context interprofessional team composition is perceived as a characteristic of team diversity, which needs to be perceived as a chance for better patient care in order to be used effectively.

  10. Long-term follow-up study and long-term care of childhood cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Jin Park

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The number of long-term survivors is increasing in the western countries due to remarkable improvements in the treatment of childhood cancer. The long-term complications of childhood cancer survivors in these countries were brought to light by the childhood cancer survivor studies. In Korea, the 5-year survival rate of childhood cancer patients is approaching 70%; therefore, it is extremely important to undertake similar long-term follow-up studies and comprehensive long-term care for our population. On the basis of the experiences of childhood cancer survivorship care of the western countries and the current Korean status of childhood cancer survivors, long-term follow-up study and long-term care systems need to be established in Korea in the near future. This system might contribute to the improvement of the quality of life of childhood cancer survivors through effective intervention strategies.

  11. Disparities in children's oral health and access to dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouradian, W E; Wehr, E; Crall, J J

    Dental caries can be prevented by a combination of community, professional, and individual measures including water fluoridation, professionally applied topical fluorides and dental sealants, and use of fluoride toothpastes. Yet, tooth decay is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Dental care is the most prevalent unmet health need in US children with wide disparities existing in oral health and access to care. Only 1 in 5 children covered by Medicaid received preventive oral care for which they are eligible. Children from low income and minority families have poorer oral health outcomes, fewer dental visits, and fewer protective sealants. Water fluoridation is the most effective measure in preventing caries, but only 62% of water supplies are fluoridated, and lack of fluoridation may disproportionately affect poor and minority children. Childhood oral disease has significant medical and financial consequences that may not be appreciated because of the separation of medicine and dentistry. The infectious nature of dental caries, its early onset, and the potential of early interventions require an emphasis on preventive oral care in primary pediatric care to complement existing dental services. However, many pediatricians lack critical knowledge to promote oral health. We recommend financial incentives for prioritizing Medicaid Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment dental services; managed care accountability; integration of medical and dental professional training, clinical care, and research; and national leadership. JAMA. 2000;284:2625-2631.

  12. Babesiosis for Health Care Providers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-25

    This podcast will educate health care providers on diagnosing babesiosis and providing patients at risk with tick bite prevention messages.  Created: 4/25/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria.   Date Released: 4/25/2012.

  13. Levinas, justice and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nortvedt, P

    2003-01-01

    In this paper I argue that the metaphysical ethics of Emmanuel Levinas captures some essential moral intuitions that are central to health care. However, there is an ongoing discussion about the relevance of ethical metaphysics for normative ethics and in particular on the question of the relationship between justice and individualized care. In this paper I take part in this debate and I argue that Levinas' idea of an ethics of the Other that guides politics and justice can shed important light on issues that are central to priorities in health care. In fact, the ethics of Levinas in seeking the foundation of normativity itself, captures the ethical core and central values of health care.

  14. Health promotion innovation in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra McManus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, the main focus of primary health care practices was to diagnose and treat patients. The identification of risk factors for disease and the prevention of chronic conditions have become a part of everyday practice. This paper provides an argument for training primary health care (PHC practitioners in health promotion, while encouraging them to embrace innovation within their practice to streamline the treatment process and improve patient outcomes. Electronic modes of communication, education and training are now commonplace in many medical practices. The PHC sector has a small window of opportunity in which to become leaders within the current model of continuity of care by establishing their role as innovators in the prevention, treatment and management of disease. Not only will this make their own jobs easier, it has the potential to significantly impact patient outcomes.

  15. Rural migration and health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase; Jensen, Marit Vatn

    This literature study focuses on possible links between access to health services and migration in rural areas. Why do people move to or from rural areas or why do they stay? What determines where people settle? And, in this context, do local health care services play an important or minor role......, or no role at all? First, the paper reports on key findings from rural migration studies, in order to shed light on two migration trends: urbanization and counter-urbanization. Then we take a closer look on settlement preferences in rural areas, including the impact of health care facilities. Finally, we end...... up with a more deepgoing review of the relatively small number of studies, which explicitly deal with settlement preferences related to access to health care....

  16. Rural migration and health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase; Jensen, Marit Vatn

    This literature study focuses on possible links between access to health services and migration in rural areas. Why do people move to or from rural areas or why do they stay? What determines where people settle? And, in this context, do local health care services play an important or minor role......, or no role at all? First, the paper reports on key findings from rural migration studies, in order to shed light on two migration trends: urbanization and counter-urbanization. Then we take a closer look on settlement preferences in rural areas, including the impact of health care facilities. Finally, we end...... up with a more deepgoing review of the relatively small number of studies, which explicitly deal with settlement preferences related to access to health care....

  17. DOD Health Care: Domestic Health Care for Female Servicemembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    and rubella); • medical readiness laboratory tests, such as a human immunodeficiency virus test and results current within the past 24 months...established in order to provide for medical recovery from childbirth and to allow additional time to prepare family care plans and child care. However...164.530(c). The Department of Health and Human Services does not consider restructuring of hospitals and doctors’ offices, such as providing

  18. [Animal health and primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, M

    1983-01-01

    As part of the primary care strategy, the Governments of the Americas have included the agricultural and animal health sectors among the public health activities of the Plan of Action. This means that both sectors--agricultural and veterinary--must be guided in their work by a multidisciplinary and multisectoral approach, with full community participation. Hence, it is certain that both the study of veterinary medicine and the practice of the profession in the Region will have to be reoriented so that they may be more fully integrated with the primary care strategy. The reorientation of animal health activities is the subject of this paper. There can be no doubt that animal health has a vital part to play in improving the quality of human life and that veterinary practice itself offers excellent opportunities for building a sense of personal and community responsibility for the promotion, care, and restoration of health. Through their contact with the rural population while caring for their livestock (an integral part of the rural socioeconomic structures), the veterinarian and animal health assistant establish close bonds of trust not only with farmers, but with their families and the entire community as well; they are thus well placed to enlist community participation in a variety of veterinary public health activities such as zoonoses control, hygiene programs, and so forth. While the goal of the Plan of action is to extend primary care to the entire population, the lack of material and human resources requires that priority attention be given to the needs of the more vulnerable groups, including the extremely poor living in rural and urban areas. These are the groups at greatest risk from the zoonoses still present in the Americas. In the face of these facts, it is clear that primary care in the animal health field should be based on the application in each country of proven, effective, appropriate technology by personnel who, whether new or retrained, are well

  19. Marketing occupational health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, M J; Harris, J C

    1981-01-01

    A very basic part of marketing success is determining areas of your business in which you have a competitive advantage. In drafting a marketing plan for the Denver Clinic, the competitive advantages group practices have in the area of occupational health were quickly realized. This competitive edge is presented along with the Denver Clinic's marketing strategies and plans to capitalize on occupational healthcare advantages.

  20. Health Care Wide Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Hazards (Lack of) PPE Slips/Trips/Falls Stress Tuberculosis Universal Precautions Workplace Violence Use of Medical Lasers Health Effects Use ... Needlesticks Noise Mercury Inappropriate PPE Slips/Trips/Falls ... of Universal Precautions Workplace Violence For more information, see Other Healthcare Wide ...

  1. Health Care Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jane L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The first of eight articles discusses the current state of the sensitive but unclassified information controversy. A series of six articles then explores the use of integrated information systems in the area of health services. Current trends in document management are provided in the last article. (CLB)

  2. Childhood obesity: bringing children's rights discourse to public health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, Julie

    2008-05-01

    Childhood obesity is widely understood as a public health issue, but is not commonly understood from a legal perspective. Children's rights discourse can add significant empowerment to public health-based policy, which alone lacks effectiveness in the face of commercial and other counteracting influences. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child has the potential to be used by advocates for children's health to facilitate child health policies pertaining to the issue of childhood obesity. This is because children's rights, as defined in the articles of the convention, establish the essential conditions required by children to achieve optimal health and wellbeing. A rights-based approach may improve children's welfare by encouraging a less fragmented approach to the issue of childhood obesity. The articles of the convention can be used as a template for interdisciplinary collaboration, with a more coherent outcome possible. By articulating childhood obesity as a children's rights issue--not just a public health issue--a more effective strategy for addressing the problem can be developed and implemented.

  3. Health promotion and primary health care: examining the discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Rachelle

    2015-01-01

    The health promotion discourse is comprised of assumptions about health and health care that are compatible with primary health care. An examination of the health promotion discourse illustrates how assumptions of health can help to inform primary health care. Despite health promotion being a good fit for primary health care, this analysis demonstrates that the scope in which it is being implemented in primary health care settings is limited. The health promotion discourse appears largely compatible with primary health care-in theory and in the health care practices that follow. The aim of this article is to contribute to the advancement of theoretical understanding of the health promotion discourse, and the relevance of health promotion to primary health care.

  4. Chiropractic care and public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Claire; Rubinstein, Sidney M; Côté, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    through the lifespan, and effective participation in community health issues. The questions that are addressed include: Is spinal manipulative therapy for neck and low-back pain a public health problem? What is the role of chiropractic care in prevention or reduction of musculoskeletal injuries...... in children? What ways can doctors of chiropractic stay updated on evidence-based information about vaccines and immunization throughout the lifespan? Can smoking cessation be a prevention strategy for back pain? Does chiropractic have relevance within the VA Health Care System for chronic pain and comorbid...... of prevention and public health? What role do citizen-doctors of chiropractic have in organizing community action on health-related matters? How can our future chiropractic graduates become socially responsible agents of change?...

  5. A right to health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadis, Pavlos

    2012-01-01

    What does it mean to say that there is a right to health care? Health care is part of a cooperative project that organizes finite resources. How are these resources to be distributed? This essay discusses three rival theories. The first two, a utilitarian theory and an interst theory, are both instrumental, in that they collapse rights to good states of affairs. A third theory, offered by Thomas Pogge, locates the question within an institutional legal context and distinguishes between a right to health care that results in claimable duties and other dimensions of health policy that do not. Pogge's argument relies on a list of "basic needs," which itself, however, relies on some kind of instrumental reasoning. The essay offers a reconstruction of Pogge's argument to bring it in line with a political conception of a right to health care. Health is a matter of equal liberty and equal citizenship, given our common human vulnerability. If we are to live as equal members in a political community, then our institutions need to create processes by which we are protected from the kinds of suffering that would make it impossible for us to live as equal members.

  6. The Indian Health Service Early Childhood Caries Collaborative: A Five-year Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricks, Timothy L; Phipps, Kathy R; Bruerd, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess a national initiative's effect on prevalence of early childhood caries and untreated decay in zero- to five-year-old Indian/Alaska Native preschool children. The Indian Health Service (IHS) conducted a five-year Early Childhood Caries Collaborative from October 1, 2009 to September 30, 2014. The program used educational materials and routine communication with the 322 IHS and United States tribal dental programs, with an emphasis on early access to care, dental sealanth, fluoride varnish, and interim therapeutic restorations (ITRs). Prevalence and untreated decay data were obtained through the nationwide oral health survey (2010 and 2014). Data were also collected on access to care, sealants, fluoride, and ITRs. The number of zero- to five-year-olds with a dental visit increased seven percent: dental sealants placed increased 65 percent; and fluoride varnish applications increased 161.2 percent. Between 2010 and 2014, the percentage of one- to two-year-olds with decay experience and untreated decay declined, but the difference was not statistically significant. Early childhood caries prevention strategies, such as early access to dental care, sealants, fluoride varnish, and interim therapeutic restorations, demonstrated some initial improvement in the oral health status of zero- to five-year-old Indian/Alaska Native children.

  7. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Damian Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population.

  8. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  9. Nanotechnology in health care

    CERN Document Server

    Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2012-01-01

    Nanomedicine: Emerging Field of Nanotechnology to Human HealthNanomedicines: Impacts in Ocular Delivery and TargetingImmuno-Nanosystems to CNS Pathologies: State of the Art PEGylated Zinc Protoporphyrin: A Micelle-Forming Polymeric Drug for Cancer TherapyORMOSIL Nanoparticles: Nanomedicine Approach for Drug/Gene Delivery to the BrainMagnetic Nanoparticles: A Versatile System for Therapeutic and Imaging SystemNanobiotechnology: A New Generation of Biomedicine Application of Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery and Targeting to LungsAptamers and Nanomedicine in C

  10. Access to Health Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-11-09

    This podcast is based on the November, 2010 CDC Vital Signs report which indicates that more than one in four adults 18-64 years old (about 50 million) report being uninsured for at least part of the past 12 months, and focuses on the growing number of middle-income adults and those with a chronic illness or disability who have no health insurance.  Created: 11/9/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/9/2010.

  11. Health Care Procedure Considerations and Individualized Health Care Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2011-01-01

    Teachers need to maintain a safe, healthy environment for all their students in order to promote learning. However, there are additional considerations when students require health care procedures, such as tube feeding or clean intermittent catheterization. Teachers must effectively monitor their students and understand their roles and…

  12. Social responsibility in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjaša

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Research Question (RQ: What is socially responsible behavior in the Slovenian health care system, where we have three main entities which they are actively involved in so called health care system. Purpose: Through the article, I would like for all three entities in the health sector to present, what is socially responsible behavior, which contributes to improving mutual cooperation for each of them and the wider society. Method: The results I achieved by studying domestic and foreign literature, laws and regulations that define social responsibility to the other two entities in the health care and the integration of literature in practice. Results: Each social responsibility within the organization, starting with superiors or managers, whose activities transferred the positive impact of social responsibility on employees and therefore the wider society. Society: By being aware of our role in society or position in the health system, any individual with a positive socially responsible actions have a positive impact on the wider community and to improve the benefits, at least in theoretical terms. Originality: I have not registered any discussions that would include mutual social responsibility - related conduct that contributes to the overall satisfaction of all. Most are present in one entity in health and his social responsibility in the internal and external environment, where they performance. Limitations/Future Research: Accessibility of data nature, from which it was evident social responsibility to other entities in the health system. The lack of literature covering social responsibility in Slovenia.

  13. Innovation in Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Alok D; Schroeder, Gregory D; West, Michael E; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-02-01

    As reimbursement transitions from a volume-based to a value-based system, innovation in health care delivery will be needed. The process of innovation begins with framing the problem that needs to be solved along with the strategic vision that has to be achieved. Similar to scientific testing, a hypothesis is generated for a new solution to a problem. Innovation requires conducting a disciplined form of experimentation and then learning from the process. This manuscript will discuss the different types of innovation, and the key steps necessary for successful innovation in the health care field.

  14. [Violence on health care workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavò, M; Fusaro, N; Colaiuda, F; Rescigno, G; Fioravanti, M

    2017-01-01

    The Emergency Department (ED) is vulnerable for workplace violence, but little is known about this and its consequences. Objectives of this study were presence, characteristics and effects of violence from patients and visitors on health care workers in an Emergency Department (ED). This study was about the Accident and Emergency Department, S. Pertini Hospital, (ASL RMB, Rome, Italy). Data were collected from November 2014 to January 2015 on frequency and type of violent behavior in the past five years experienced by staff members and their level of stress by an ad hoc questionnaire for the evaluation of violent events in health activities (QVS) and a questionnaire on perceived work-related stress (QES). Of the 58 eligible workers, 51 completed the interview. Health care workers were regularly exposed to violence with a consequent severe underreporting to work authorities and only a minor reporting to the police. A diffuse belief that workplace violence is a normal part of the work was also identified. Aggressors were usually patients or their relatives and were mainly males. Health care workers may suffer physical and emotional harm. Emergency Department health care workers are at risk of experiencing workplace violence and should have specific training and support in the management of violent situations focused on early identification, communication strategies, and de-escalation techniques.

  15. Counseling role of primary care physicians in preventing early childhood caries in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zifeng; Yu, Dongsheng; Zhou, Lijie; Yang, Jing; Lu, Jiaxuan; Lu, Hui; Zhao, Wei

    2014-12-01

    The dental health of preschool children with congenital heart disease (CHD) is usually poor, which may contribute to the development of infective endocarditis (IE). Primary care physicians play an important role in providing access to preventive dental services, particularly for preschool children. The object of this study was to provide epidemiologic evidence for the impact of primary care physicians' (PCP's) counseling role on early childhood caries in children with CHD in Guangzhou, China, which might guide future caries prevention to decrease the risk of IE in children with CHD. A hospital-based, case-control study was performed, which contained 100 children with newly diagnosed early childhood caries and 100 matched (sex and age) children without dental caries. All of the subjects were diagnosed with CHD at birth and recruited from Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute from 2012 through 2013. A conditional multivariate logistic-regression model was used to assess the associations between PCPs' role and early childhood caries with a significance level of 5%. Our findings revealed that mother's education level (OR = 0.36, CL = 0.14-0.92) and knowledge, being educated on the relationship between CHD and infective endocarditis (OR = 0.48, CL = 0.25-0.94) and the impact of oral health on infective endocarditis (OR = 0.37, CL = 0.18-0.79) by the PCP were associated with early childhood caries. PCPs played an important role in preventing early childhood caries among preschool children with CHD in Guangzhou, China.

  16. Health selection and the process of social stratification: the effect of childhood health on socioeconomic attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Steven A

    2006-12-01

    This study investigates whether childhood health acts as a mechanism through which socioeconomic status is transferred across generations. The study uses data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to track siblings and to estimate fixed-effects models that account for unobserved heterogeneity at the family level. The results demonstrate that disadvantaged social background is associated with poor childhood health. Subsequently, poor health in childhood has significant, direct, and large adverse effects on educational attainment and wealth accumulation. In addition, childhood health appears to have indirect effects on occupational standing, earnings, and wealth via educational attainment and adult health status. The results further show that socioeconomic health gradients are best understood as being embedded within larger processes of social stratification.

  17. CLINICAL PROFILE OF CHILDHOOD POISONING IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poornima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Accidents including poisoning are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among children in the west. Poisoning, while never accounting for a large number of accidental deaths, have acquired prominence now because they have not decreased at the same rate as the infectious diseases. METHODS An observational study was done in Department of Paediatrics KIMS Bangalore to know the incidence and pattern of childhood poisoning, to know the morbidity and mortality resulting from childhood poisoning. 86 children aged between 0-18 years were admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit with history of poisoning during the 2-year period of the study (Nov 13-Nov 15 were included. Diagnosis of poisoning was made on the basis of history and examination findings, Relevant investigations were done and Profile of patients with poisoning, their symptoms, type of poisoning and outcome were analysed. RESULTS The average duration of stay in the hospital was 2.7 days. Poisoning was accidental in 80 (93% patients whereas suicidal intent was present in only 6 (7% patients. Total 5 (5.8% patients died of which 4 were due to insecticide and pesticide poisoning and one was due to kerosene poisoning. CONCLUSION In the present study the probable reason for higher incidence of poisoning by insecticides & pesticides could be the involvement of higher age group and more involvement of adolescent children.

  18. Early Childhood Dental Caries: A Rising Dental Public Health Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Grace Felix

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to examine the literature and review the risk factors and disparities contributing to early childhood caries (ECC), which is a major health problem among preschoolers in the United States of America. A search was conducted using MEDLINE, PubMed, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Library databases and the key terms…

  19. Screening for Childhood Mental Health Problems: Outcomes and Early Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essex, Marilyn J.; Kraemer, Helena C.; Slattery, Marcia J.; Burk, Linnea R.; Boyce, W. Thomas; Woodward, Hermi R.; Kupfer, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Many childhood psychiatric problems are transient. Consequently, screening procedures to accurately identify children with problems unlikely to remit and thus, in need of intervention, are of major public health concern. This study aimed to develop a universal school-based screening procedure based on the answers to three questions:…

  20. Early Childhood Dental Caries: A Rising Dental Public Health Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Grace Felix

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to examine the literature and review the risk factors and disparities contributing to early childhood caries (ECC), which is a major health problem among preschoolers in the United States of America. A search was conducted using MEDLINE, PubMed, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Library databases and the key terms…

  1. Early-Childhood Poverty and Adult Attainment, Behavior, and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Greg J.; Ziol-Guest, Kathleen M.; Kalil, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    This article assesses the consequences of poverty between a child's prenatal year and 5th birthday for several adult achievement, health, and behavior outcomes, measured as late as age 37. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (1,589) and controlling for economic conditions in middle childhood and adolescence, as well as demographic…

  2. Health care for under-fives in Ile-Ife, South-West Nigeria: Effect of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI strategy on growth and development of under-fives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufunke M. Ebuehi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study obtained information on key growth promotion and developmental household and community health practices in Community-Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (C-IMCI and non-C-IMCI in local government areas (LGAs in Osun State, Nigeria, to determine the differences that existed, between these LGAs.Method: A cross-sectional comparative study to compare Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI key growth promotion and development health practices in two LGAs in Osun State was conducted using quantitative and qualitative techniques. Data analysis was done using Epi Info version 6.0 for the quantitative survey and a content analysis method for the qualitative survey. The subjects were mothers or caregivers of children 0–59 months of age, and their index children.Results: Findings revealed that the IMCI key growth and development health practices were generally better rated in the CIMCI-compliant LGA than in the non-CIMCI compliant LGA. Breastfeeding practice was widespread in both LGAs. However, the exclusive breastfeeding (EBF rate among children under six months was higher in the compliant LGA (66.7% than in the non-compliant LGA (25%. More caregivers (59.7% from the non-compliant LGA introduced complementary feeds earlier than six months. Growth monitoring activities revealed that there were more underweight children (19.1% in the non-compliant LGA. Community Resource Persons (CORPs and health workers were the most popular sources of information on IMCI key practices in the compliant LGA, while in the non-compliant LGA the traditional healers, elders and, to a lesser extent, health workers provided information on these key practices.Conclusion: The IMCI strategy, if well implemented, is an effective and low-cost intervention that is useful in achieving optimal growth, development and survival of Nigerian children.

  3. Health care for under-fives in Ile-Ife, South-West Nigeria: Effect of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI strategy on growth and development of under-fives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufunke M. Ebuehi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study obtained information on key growth promotion and developmental household and community health practices in Community-Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (C-IMCI and non-C-IMCI in local government areas (LGAs in Osun State, Nigeria, to determine the differences that existed, between these LGAs.Method: A cross-sectional comparative study to compare Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI key growth promotion and development health practices in two LGAs in Osun State was conducted using quantitative and qualitative techniques. Data analysis was done using Epi Info version 6.0 for the quantitative survey and a content analysis method for the qualitative survey. The subjects were mothers or caregivers of children 0–59 months of age, and their index children.Results: Findings revealed that the IMCI key growth and development health practices were generally better rated in the CIMCI-compliant LGA than in the non-CIMCI compliant LGA. Breastfeeding practice was widespread in both LGAs. However, the exclusive breastfeeding (EBF rate among children under six months was higher in the compliant LGA (66.7% than in the non-compliant LGA (25%. More caregivers (59.7% from the non-compliant LGA introduced complementary feeds earlier than six months. Growth monitoring activities revealed that there were more underweight children (19.1% in the non-compliant LGA. Community Resource Persons (CORPs and health workers were the most popular sources of information on IMCI key practices in the compliant LGA, while in the non-compliant LGA the traditional healers, elders and, to a lesser extent, health workers provided information on these key practices.Conclusion: The IMCI strategy, if well implemented, is an effective and low-cost intervention that is useful in achieving optimal growth, development and survival of Nigerian children.

  4. Intercultural Health Care and Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Artiklen har fokus på undervisning, planlægning, udvikling og evaluering af et internationalt tværfagligt valgfag Intercultural Health Care and Welfare, der udbydes på Det Sundhedsfaglige og Teknologiske Fakultet på Professionshøjskolen Metropol. Ifølge den tysk-amerikanske professor Iris Varner og...

  5. Relationship marketing in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, H C; Fleming, D; Mangold, W G; LaForge, R W

    1994-01-01

    Building relationships with patients is critical to the success of many health care organizations. The authors profile the relationship marketing program for a hospital's cardiac center and discuss the key strategic aspects that account for its success: a focus on a specific hospital service, an integrated marketing communication strategy, a specially designed database, and the continuous tracking of results.

  6. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    availability and affordability of ACTs in Secondary Health Care (SHC) facilities in Lagos State and ... percent (37.5%) of the hospitals did not have the drug in stock at the time of visit and drugs had been out of .... Only one in the community pharmacies as single dose .... funding and international competitive bidding for.

  7. [Integrated health care at Nuremberg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Männl, V

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports in detail on a project of Integrated Health Care in cardiology at Nuremberg, Germany. Information on the structure of the contract, the participants, the agreed claiming of benefits and provision of services are provided as well as relevant figures and contact data.

  8. Health care insolvency and bankruptcy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelsman, L; Speiser, M; Maltz, A; Kirpalani, S

    1998-08-01

    Bankruptcy is an event that is often considered a business' worst nightmare. Debt, lawyers, and the U.S. government can lead to the eventual destruction of a business. This article shows how declaring bankruptcy can be a helpful instrument in continuing a successful venture in the health care marketplace.

  9. primary health care in nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    2014-07-31

    Jul 31, 2014 ... Key Words: Primary Health Care, Strategies for implementation, Constraints, Alma Ata Declaration, Nigeria. 4th June, 2014. Accepted: ... including family planning; immunization against the ... evolved to meet the challenges associated with these diversities. .... and urban areas in Nigeria with the intention of.

  10. The Chinese Health Care System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Østerdal, Lars Peter; Yu, Yi

    In the present paper we describe the structure of the Chinese health care system and sketch its future development. We analyse issues of provider incentives and the actual burden sharing between government, enterprises and people. We further aim to identify a number of current problems and link...

  11. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26 (1) 96-107 ... obesity. Specific criteria for MetS developed by. 19 of hypertension. .... Triglycerides 150 mg/dL or more or on Christians 329 (96.2%); and lower grade income.

  12. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4 and optimal use. In Nigeria, despite the The main objective of this study is therefore to .... Islam. Others. 185. 205. 5. 46.8. 51.9. 1.3. Utilization (use) of PHC Services and educational qualifications and of low socio-economic .... other zones except in the south-east region. .... primary health care interventions, the evidence is.

  13. Lower Costs, Better Care- Reforming Our Health Care Delivery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Affordable Care Act includes tools to improve the quality of health care that can also lower costs for taxpayers and patients. This means avoiding costly...

  14. Latino families, primary care, and childhood obesity: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arauz Boudreau, Alexy D; Kurowski, Daniel S; Gonzalez, Wanda I; Dimond, Melissa A; Oreskovic, Nicolas M

    2013-03-01

    Few successful treatment modalities exist to address childhood obesity. Given Latinos' strong identity with family, a family-focused intervention may be able to control Latino childhood obesity. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a family-centered, primary care-based approach to control childhood obesity through lifestyle choices. Randomized waitlist controlled trial in which control participants received the intervention 6 months after the intervention group. Forty-one Latino children with BMI >85%, aged 9-12 years, and their caregivers were recruited from an urban community health center located in a predominantly low-income community. Children and their caregivers received 6 weeks of interactive group classes followed by 6 months of culturally sensitive monthly in-person or phone coaching to empower families to incorporate learned lifestyles and to address both family and social barriers to making changes. Caregiver report on child and child self-reported health-related quality of life (HRQoL); metabolic markers of obesity; BMI; and accelerometer-based physical activity were measured July 2010-November 2011 and compared with post-intervention assessments conducted at 6 months and as a function of condition assignment. Data were analyzed in 2012. Average attendance rate to each group class was 79%. Socio-environmental and family factors, along with knowledge, were cited as barriers to changing lifestyles to control obesity. Caregiver proxy and child self-reported HRQoL improved for both groups with a larger but not nonsignificant difference among intervention vs control group children (p=0.33). No differences were found between intervention and control children for metabolic markers of obesity, BMI, or physical activity. Latino families are willing to participate in group classes and health coaching to control childhood obesity. It may be necessary for primary care to partner with community initiatives to address childhood obesity in a more intense

  15. Managed consumerism in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C

    2005-01-01

    The future of market-oriented health policy and practice lies in "managed consumerism," a blend of the patient-centric focus of consumer-driven health care and the provider-centric focus of managed competition. The optimal locus of incentives will vary among health services according to the nature of the illness, the clinical technology, and the extent of discretion in utilization. A competitive market will manifest a variety of comprehensive and limited benefit designs, broad and narrow contractual networks, and single-and multispecialty provider organizations.

  16. Health care technology as a policy issue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banta, H.D.

    1994-01-01

    Health care technology has become an increasingly visible issue in many countries, primarily because of the rising costs of health care. In addition, many questions concerning quality of care are being raised. Health care technology assessment has been seen as an aid in addressing questions

  17. Health Care Challenges in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Davari

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available All health systems across the world have faced new challenges, which is primarily referable to increasing the cost of health care services as well as growing demands for new and expensive health technologies. The aim of this study is to analyse the main challenges facing the Iranian health system. A review of available governmental and relevant publications about Iranian health care system was undertaken to assess the direction of future healthcare policy. Electronic news agencies, newspapers, and parliament’s electronic news also reviewed to realise policy-makers points of view about the health system. Healthcare services in Iran have had a great success in primary healthcare services in last 25 years, which is mainly attributable to National Health Networks policy. Between 1979 and 2003, average life expectancy at birth increased from 57 to 70 and infant mortality rate fell from 104 to 26 per thousand live births. Active vaccination system, very good distribution and coverage, free end point services, family planning, maternal teaching, and primary referral system are of strong advantages of health networks in Iran. However, the healthcare system is now subject to a range of new pressures that must be addressed. Many of these pressures are common to all health services (rising consumer demands and expectations for expensive new technologies, changing disease patterns, and resources shortage, but some are largely specific to Iran. Financial fairness contribution of the population to health system, responsiveness of health system, overusing new technologies, inadequate integration of health services, and inequitable distribution of the resources are of the main challenges of health system in Iran. In addition, considering demographic changes of the Iranian population in recent decades, which made Iranian population young, potential pressures due to an aging population will reveal in coming years. Many of these pressures relate to policies and

  18. Preserving community in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, E J; Emanuel, L L

    1997-02-01

    There are two prominent trends in health care today: first, increasing demands for accountabilty, and second, increasing provision of care through managed care organizations. These trends promote the question: What form of account-ability is appropriate to managed care plans? Accountability is the process by which a party justifies its actions and policies. Components of accountability include parties that can be held or hold others accountable, domains and content areas being assessed, and procedures of assessment. Traditionally, the professional model of accountability has operated in medical care. In this model, physicians establish the standards of accountability and hold each other accountable through professional organizations. This form of accountability seems outdated and inapplicable to managed care plans. The alternatives are the economic and the political models of accountability. In the economic model, medicine becomes more like a commodity, and "exit" (consumers changing providers for reasons of cost and quality) is the dominant procedure of accountability. In the political model, medicine becomes more like a community good, and "voice" (citizens communicating their views in public forums or on policy committees, or in elections for representatives) is the dominant procedure of accountability. The economic model's advantages affirm American individualism, make minimal demands on consumers, and use a powerful incentive, money. Its disadvantages undermine health care as a nonmarket good, undermine individual autonomy, undermine good medical practice, impose significant demands on consumers to be informed, sustain differentials of power, and use indirect procedures of accountability. The political model's advantages affirm health care as a matter of justice, permit selecting domains other than price and quality for accountability, reinforce good medical practice, and equalize power between patients and physicians. Its disadvantages include inefficiency in

  19. Towards health in all policies for childhood obesity prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Anna-Marie; Kremers, Stef P J; Gubbels, Jessica S; Raat, Hein; de Vries, Nanne K; Jansen, Maria W J

    2013-01-01

    The childhood obesity epidemic can be best tackled by means of an integrated approach, which is enabled by integrated public health policies, or Health in All Policies. Integrated policies are developed through intersectoral collaboration between local government policy makers from health and nonhealth sectors. Such intersectoral collaboration has been proved to be difficult. In this study, we investigated which resources influence intersectoral collaboration. The behavior change wheel framework was used to categorize motivation-, capability-, and opportunity-related resources for intersectoral collaboration. In-depth interviews were held with eight officials representing 10 non-health policy sectors within a local government. Results showed that health and non-health policy sectors did not share policy goals, which decreased motivation for intersectoral collaboration. Awareness of the linkage between health and nonhealth policy sectors was limited, and management was not involved in creating such awareness, which reduced the capability for intersectoral collaboration. Insufficient organizational resources and structures reduced opportunities for intersectoral collaboration. To stimulate intersectoral collaboration to prevent childhood obesity, we recommend that public health professionals should reframe health goals in the terminology of nonhealth policy sectors, that municipal department managers should increase awareness of public health in non-health policy sectors, and that flatter organizational structures should be established.

  20. Towards Health in All Policies for Childhood Obesity Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Marie Hendriks

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The childhood obesity epidemic can be best tackled by means of an integrated approach, which is enabled by integrated public health policies, or Health in All Policies. Integrated policies are developed through intersectoral collaboration between local government policy makers from health and nonhealth sectors. Such intersectoral collaboration has been proved to be difficult. In this study, we investigated which resources influence intersectoral collaboration. The behavior change wheel framework was used to categorize motivation-, capability-, and opportunity-related resources for intersectoral collaboration. In-depth interviews were held with eight officials representing 10 non-health policy sectors within a local government. Results showed that health and non-health policy sectors did not share policy goals, which decreased motivation for intersectoral collaboration. Awareness of the linkage between health and nonhealth policy sectors was limited, and management was not involved in creating such awareness, which reduced the capability for intersectoral collaboration. Insufficient organizational resources and structures reduced opportunities for intersectoral collaboration. To stimulate intersectoral collaboration to prevent childhood obesity, we recommend that public health professionals should reframe health goals in the terminology of nonhealth policy sectors, that municipal department managers should increase awareness of public health in non-health policy sectors, and that flatter organizational structures should be established.

  1. Financing the health care Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J C

    2000-01-01

    Internet-related health care firms have accelerated through the life cycle of capital finance and organizational destiny, including venture capital funding, public stock offerings, and consolidation, in the wake of heightened competition and earnings disappointments. Venture capital flooded into the e-health sector, rising from $3 million in the first quarter of 1998 to $335 million two years later. Twenty-six e-health firms went public in eighteen months, raising $1.53 billion at initial public offering (IPO) and with post-IPO share price appreciation greater than 100 percent for eighteen firms. The technology-sector crash hit the e-health sector especially hard, driving share prices down by more than 80 percent for twenty-one firms. The industry now faces an extended period of consolidation between e-health and conventional firms.

  2. Vitamin D and bone health in childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzenberg, T; Jones, G

    2013-02-01

    Vitamin D plays a key role in bone metabolism. The link between vitamin D deficiency and rickets is well understood. However, subclinical vitamin D deficiency may also be detrimental to bone health in childhood. Its effects on bone mineralization have the potential to result in lower peak bone mass being attained, which could in turn contribute to increased fracture risk in both childhood and older adult life. As vitamin D deficiency is common globally, any detrimental effects of vitamin D deficiency on bone health are likely to have substantial public health implications. This review describes the current literature relevant to vitamin D and bone health in childhood and adolescence, with a particular emphasis on evaluating the emerging evidence for the impact of subclinical vitamin D deficiency on bone health and the effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation. The evidence suggests that subclinical vitamin D deficiency does affect bone acquisition, potentially beginning in utero and extending into adolescence. However, the effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation for improving bone health in situations of subclinical deficiency remains unclear, particularly in early life where there are few trials with bone density outcomes. The available evidence suggests that benefits are likely to be greatest in or even restricted to children with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at least below 50 nmol/L and possibly even lower than this. Trials of sufficient duration in deficient pregnant mothers, infants, and children are urgently required to address critical evidence gaps.

  3. Health and medical care in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodes, R M; Kloos, H

    1988-10-01

    12% respectively. Infectious diseases dominate the medical scene in Ethiopia. In 1984, tuberculosis accounted for 11.2% of hospital admissions and 12.2% of deaths. The leading cause of childhood mortality in 1984 was diarrhea (45%). Malaria, trypanosomiasis, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and meningococcal meningitis are endemic. Intestinal parasitism is rampant, and the nationwide prevalence of leprosy is 3/1000. Venereal diseases were the 9th most common cause of hospital outpatient visits in 1984, but AIDS is rare. The leading noninfectious diseases are rheumatic and syphilitic heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hepatoma, and elephantiasis. Ethiopia has the highest number of cases of nonfilarial elephantiasis -- an estimated 350,000 cases -- in the world. Aside from a large influx of money, the most necessary changes to improve the health system are lowering the salaries of doctors and nurses, reorienting physician training toward primary health care, increasing the quality of existing health services, more efficient management, and better coordination between the Ministry of Health and the voluntary organizations.

  4. Do race, neglect, and childhood poverty predict physical health in adulthood? A multilevel prospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nikulina, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Childhood neglect and poverty often co-occur and both have been linked to poor physical health outcomes. In addition, Blacks have higher rates of childhood poverty and tend to have worse health than Whites. This paper examines the unique and interacting effects of childhood neglect, race, and family and neighborhood poverty on adult physical health outcomes. This prospective cohort design study uses a sample (N = 675) of court-substantiated cases of childhood neglect and matched controls foll...

  5. Quality of Care for Childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in a Managed Care Medicaid Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zima, Bonnie T.; Bussing, Regina; Tang, Lingqi; Zhang, Lily; Ettner, Susan; Belin, Thomas R.; Wells, Kenneth B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether clinical severity is greater among children receiving attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) care in primary care compared with those in specialty mental health clinics, and to examine how care processes and clinical outcomes vary by sector across three 6-month time intervals. Method: This was a longitudinal…

  6. What is the health care product?

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, K R; Grover, R

    1992-06-01

    Because of the current competitive environment, health care providers (hospitals, HMOs, physicians, and others) are constantly searching for better products and better means for delivering them. The health care product is often loosely defined as a service. The authors develop a more precise definition of the health care product, product line, and product mix. A bundle-of-elements concept is presented for the health care product. These conceptualizations help to address how health care providers can segment their market and position, promote, and price their products. Though the authors focus on hospitals, the concepts and procedures developed are applicable to other health care organizations.

  7. Childhood and adolescence: challenges in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Saurabh Rambiharilal; Shrivastava, Prateek Saurabh; Ramasamy, Jegadeesh

    2013-05-01

    Mental health is an integral and essential component of health. The World Health Organization (WHO) constitution states: "Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity." More than 450 million people suffer from mental disorders worldwide. In India, mental health services, especially for children and adolescents, are limited both in terms of number of facilities as well as trained professionals. The majority of mental health services are restricted to urban areas, that is, medical colleges or regional mental health institutes. Mere presence of a treatment facility does not guarantee that all children/adolescents suffering from mental illness will utilize such services. In fact, most of the time there is a significant delay from the patient side in accessing mental health services either because of lack of awareness or associated stigma. It is high time to promote positive mental health in children, adolescents and their parents through health education. Parental counseling is of utmost importance in order to avoid the delay in treatment seeking.

  8. Sustainable Professional Learning for Early Childhood Educators: Lessons from an Australia-Wide Mental Health Promotion Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askell-Williams, Helen; Murray-Harvey, Rosalind

    2016-01-01

    New policy initiatives, such as those concerned with promoting young children's positive mental health, highlight the need for good quality professional education in the early childhood education and care sector. However, although a wealth of literature exists from the school sector, little is known about professional education in early childhood…

  9. An Overview of Research in Ireland Pertaining to Early Childhood Education and Care 1990-2003

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The Centre for early Childhood Development and Education (CECDE) was launched in 2002 by the Minister for Education and Science and is jointly managed by the Dublin Institute of Technology and St. Patrick’s College. The remit of the CECDE is to develop, co-ordinate and enhance early childhood care and education in Ireland. The 3 objectives of the CECDE are to: > To develop a quality framework for early childhood education, > To develop targeted interventions on a pilot basis for childre...

  10. Health Care Access among Latinos: Implications for Social and Health Care Reforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine, health care access is defined as "the degree to which people are able to obtain appropriate care from the health care system in a timely manner." Two key components of health care access are medical insurance and having access to a usual source of health care. Recent national data show that 34% of Latino…

  11. Do race, neglect, and childhood poverty predict physical health in adulthood? A multilevel prospective analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikulina, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Childhood neglect and poverty often co-occur and both have been linked to poor physical health outcomes. In addition, Blacks have higher rates of childhood poverty and tend to have worse health than Whites. This paper examines the unique and interacting effects of childhood neglect, race, and family and neighborhood poverty on adult physical health outcomes. This prospective cohort design study uses a sample (N = 675) of court-substantiated cases of childhood neglect and matched controls followed into adulthood (Mage = 41). Health indicators (C-Reactive Protein [CRP], hypertension, and pulmonary functioning) were assessed through blood collection and measurements by a registered nurse. Data were analyzed using hierarchical linear models to control for clustering of participants in childhood neighborhoods. Main effects showed that growing up Black predicted CRP and hypertension elevations, despite controlling for neglect and childhood family and neighborhood poverty and their interactions. Multivariate results showed that race and childhood adversities interacted to predict adult health outcomes. Childhood family poverty predicted increased risk for hypertension for Blacks, not Whites. In contrast, among Whites, childhood neglect predicted elevated CRP. Childhood neighborhood poverty interacted with childhood family poverty to predict pulmonary functioning in adulthood. Gender differences in health indicators were also observed. The effects of childhood neglect, childhood poverty, and growing up Black in the United States are manifest in physical health outcomes assessed 30 years later. Implications are discussed. PMID:24189205

  12. Do race, neglect, and childhood poverty predict physical health in adulthood? A multilevel prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikulina, Valentina; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2014-03-01

    Childhood neglect and poverty often co-occur and both have been linked to poor physical health outcomes. In addition, Blacks have higher rates of childhood poverty and tend to have worse health than Whites. This paper examines the unique and interacting effects of childhood neglect, race, and family and neighborhood poverty on adult physical health outcomes. This prospective cohort design study uses a sample (N=675) of court-substantiated cases of childhood neglect and matched controls followed into adulthood (M(age)=41). Health indicators (C-Reactive Protein [CRP], hypertension, and pulmonary functioning) were assessed through blood collection and measurements by a registered nurse. Data were analyzed using hierarchical linear models to control for clustering of participants in childhood neighborhoods. Main effects showed that growing up Black predicted CRP and hypertension elevations, despite controlling for neglect and childhood family and neighborhood poverty and their interactions. Multivariate results showed that race and childhood adversities interacted to predict adult health outcomes. Childhood family poverty predicted increased risk for hypertension for Blacks, not Whites. In contrast, among Whites, childhood neglect predicted elevated CRP. Childhood neighborhood poverty interacted with childhood family poverty to predict pulmonary functioning in adulthood. Gender differences in health indicators were also observed. The effects of childhood neglect, childhood poverty, and growing up Black in the United States are manifest in physical health outcomes assessed 30 years later. Implications are discussed.

  13. Factors influencing consumer satisfaction with health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Satish P; Deshpande, Samir S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that impact consumer satisfaction with health care. This is a secondary analysis of the Center for Studying Health System Change's 2010 Health Tracking Household Survey. Regression analysis was used to examine the impact of treatment issues, financial issues, family-related issues, sources of health care information, location, and demographics-related factors on satisfaction with health care. The study involved 12280 subjects, 56% of whom were very satisfied with their health care, whereas 66% were very satisfied with their primary care physician. Fourteen percent of the subjects had no health insurance; 34% of the subjects got their health care information from the Web. Satisfaction with primary care physician, general health status, promptness of visit to doctor, insurance type, medical cost per family, annual income, persons in family, health care information from friends, and age significantly impacted satisfaction with health care. The regression models accounted for 23% of the variance in health care satisfaction. Satisfaction with primary care physicians, health insurance, and general health status are the 3 most significant indicators of an individual's satisfaction with health care.

  14. Factors affecting health seeking behavior for common childhood illnesses in Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webair, Hana Hasan; Bin-Gouth, Abdulla Salim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Appropriate medical care seeking could prevent a significant number of child deaths and complications due to ill health. This study aims to determine factors affecting health seeking behavior (HSB) for childhood illnesses, thereby improving child survival. Methods A cross sectional study was carried out from January 11 to April 2, 2012. A total of 212 caretakers of children under the age of 5 years participated. Caretakers who visited the vaccination unit in the Shehair Health Center during the study period and had a child with a history of diarrhea, fever, cough, and/or difficulty of breathing during the last 14 days were included. The data were collected by interviewing caretakers and the answers were reported in pretested structured questionnaires. Results Medical care was sought for about half of the sick children (n=109, 51.42%). Seeking medical care was frequently initiated for illnesses that did not improve or worsened. The major reasons for not seeking medical care were “illness was mild” (n=40, 38.83%) and “illness is not for medical treatment” (n=32, 31.07%). The caretakers sought medical care significantly more when they had a higher level of school education (POR [prevalence odds ratio] 5.85, 95% CI [confidence interval]: 2.34–14.61), when the illness was perceived as severe (POR 5.39, 95% CI: 2.81–10.33), and when the child had difficulty of breathing (POR 2.93, 95% CI: 1.10–7.80). Conclusion For the preventable childhood illnesses with existing interventions, appropriate HSB prevalence is low. Symptom type, caretakers’ education, and perception of illness severity are the predictors of HSB. Educational improvement of the mothers, introduction of community based integrated management of childhood illness, and in-depth research are imperative to improve mothers’ HSB. PMID:24187490

  15. Life Course Outcomes on Mental and Physical Health: The Impact of Foster Care on Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Tammy W.; Soman, Laurie A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. We compared the prevalence rates of mental health and physical health problems between adults with histories of childhood foster care and those without. Methods. We used 2003–2005 California Health Interview Survey data (n = 70 456) to test our hypothesis that adults with childhood histories of foster care will report higher rates of mental and physical health concerns, including those that affect the ability to work, than will those without. Results. Adults with a history of childhood foster care had more than twice the odds of receiving Social Security Disability Insurance because they were unable to work owing to mental or physical health problems for the past year, even after stratifying by age and adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Conclusions. Childhood foster care may be a sentinel event, signaling the increased risk of adulthood mental and physical health problems. A mental and physical health care delivery program that includes screening and treatment and ensures follow-up for children and youths who have had contact with the foster care system may decrease these individuals’ disproportionately high prevalence of poor outcomes throughout their adulthood. PMID:22390519

  16. Mental Health, Wellness, and Childhood Overweight/Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Russell-Mayhew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood obesity is a growing concern, and while progress has been made to understand the association between multiple biological factors (i.e., genetics, nutrition, exercise etc., little is known about the relationship between mental health and childhood obesity. In this paper, we offer a review of current evidence about the association between mental health and childhood obesity. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed, English-language studies published between January 2000 and January 2011 was undertaken and resulted in 759 unique records, of which 345 full-text articles were retrieved and 131 articles were included. A theoretical model is proposed to organize the paper and reflect the current state of the literature and includes psychological factors (i.e., depression and anxiety, self-esteem, body dissatisfaction, eating disordered symptoms, and emotional problems; psychosocial mediating variables (i.e., weight-based teasing and concern about weight and shape, and wellness factors (i.e., quality of life and resiliency/protective factors. We conclude with a number of recommendations to support the creation of solutions to the rise in childhood obesity rates that do not further marginalize overweight and obese children and youth and that can potentially improve the well-being of all children and youth regardless of their weight status.

  17. Childhood obesity: a life-long health risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthias BARTON*

    2012-01-01

    Childhood obesity has become major health concern for physicians,parents,and health agencies around the world.Childhood obesity is associated with an increased risk for other diseases not only during youth but also later in life,including diabetes,arterial hypertension,coronary artery disease,and fatty liver disease.Importantly,obesity accelerates atherosclerosis progression already in children and young adults.With regard to pathophysiological changes in the vasculature,the striking similarities between physiological changes related to aging and obesity-related abnormalities are compatible with the concept that obesity causes “premature” vascular aging.This article reviews factors underlying the accelerated vascular disease development due to obesity.It also highlights the importance of recognizing childhood obesity as a disease condition and its permissive role in aggravating the development of other diseases.The importance of childhood obesity for disease susceptibility later in life,and the need for prevention and treatment are also discussed.

  18. Mental health, wellness, and childhood overweight/obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell-Mayhew, Shelly; McVey, Gail; Bardick, Angela; Ireland, Alana

    2012-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a growing concern, and while progress has been made to understand the association between multiple biological factors (i.e., genetics, nutrition, exercise etc.), little is known about the relationship between mental health and childhood obesity. In this paper, we offer a review of current evidence about the association between mental health and childhood obesity. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed, English-language studies published between January 2000 and January 2011 was undertaken and resulted in 759 unique records, of which 345 full-text articles were retrieved and 131 articles were included. A theoretical model is proposed to organize the paper and reflect the current state of the literature and includes psychological factors (i.e., depression and anxiety, self-esteem, body dissatisfaction, eating disordered symptoms, and emotional problems); psychosocial mediating variables (i.e., weight-based teasing and concern about weight and shape), and wellness factors (i.e., quality of life and resiliency/protective factors). We conclude with a number of recommendations to support the creation of solutions to the rise in childhood obesity rates that do not further marginalize overweight and obese children and youth and that can potentially improve the well-being of all children and youth regardless of their weight status.

  19. Health care organization drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, J P; Dempsey, J

    1992-09-01

    Health care managers are being required to respond to the growing concerns of the public about alcohol and drug use in the health care workplace. To this end, the following recommendations are offered. A drug testing policy should be developed with input from and support of employees and unions. "For cause" testing should be used because it results in more definitive results and better employee acceptance. Unless there are compelling reasons for random testing, "for cause" testing is the preferable method. All levels of employees and the medical staff should be subject to the drug-testing policy. Rehabilitation rather than punishment should be emphasized in dealing with employees with alcohol and drug problems.

  20. The Chinese Health Care System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Østerdal, Lars Peter; Yu, Yi

    In the present paper we describe the structure of the Chinese health care system and sketch its future development. We analyse issues of provider incentives and the actual burden sharing between government, enterprises and people. We further aim to identify a number of current problems and link...... these to a discussion of future challenges in the form of an aging population, increased privatization and increased inequity...

  1. Early Childhood Education and Care in Europe: Tackling Social and Cultural Inequalities. France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallourd, Pierre, Comp.

    2008-01-01

    This contribution from France is based on recently-published documents and in particular on the "Report on the Public Infancy Service for Early Childhood," published in February 2007 by a department of the Prime Minister's Office, the Centre of Strategic Analysis, Social Affairs Section and "Early Childhood Education and Care, a…

  2. Global Initiatives for Early Childhood Care and Education: Global Guidelines and Global Guidelines Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trube, Mary Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This report focuses on the Association for Childhood Education International's (ACEI) Global Guidelines (GG) and Global Guidelines Assessment (GGA), which were developed in response to and in keeping with the prominence that the issue of quality early childhood care, development, and education has reached globally. Further, the paper positions the…

  3. The Quality of Early Childhood Educators: Children's Interaction in Greek Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentzou, Konstantina; Sakellariou, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Though quality in early childhood education and care has attracted last decades enormous research interest there is still not a unanimous agreement about its definition. Yet, almost all definitions attempted include interaction, group size, adult:child ratio and early childhood educators' level of education, as important indices of quality.…

  4. Constructions of Social Inclusion within Australian Early Childhood Education and Care Policy Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sandie; Turner, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Social inclusion discourses have been powerful in informing early childhood policy contexts, both internationally and in Australia (the context of the current study) for the past decade or so. But little research has examined the productive aspects of social inclusion discourses particularly within early childhood education and care (ECEC) policy…

  5. Constructions of Social Inclusion within Australian Early Childhood Education and Care Policy Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sandie; Turner, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Social inclusion discourses have been powerful in informing early childhood policy contexts, both internationally and in Australia (the context of the current study) for the past decade or so. But little research has examined the productive aspects of social inclusion discourses particularly within early childhood education and care (ECEC) policy…

  6. Patterns of care seeking during episodes of childhood diarrhea and its relation to preventive care patterns: national integrated monitoring and evaluation survey (IMES of family health. Islamic republic of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Esmail Motlagh

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: According to this national survey, our health system needs to integrate all the levels of prevention, especially the Integrated Management of Child Illnesses (IMCI programs with a family physician project. Futher more, there is a great need for empowering the referral system and gate keeping in all referral levels, to make efficient national integrated programs.

  7. Prepuce health and childhood circumcision: Choices in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abara, Emmanuel O.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Worldwide, almost 100% of boys are born with penises with a “hood” called prepuce or foreskin. In the course of the boy’s life, the prepuce can be circumcised, can become affected by diseased (e.g., phimosis), or a can become infected and hurt the neonate (and his sexual partner) in adulthood. The objectives of this report are to: 1) review the state, function, fate, and care of the prepuce in childhood, with focus on the neonate, in Canada; 2) understand the current practice of childhood male circumcision in terms of age, indications, performers, techniques, outcomes, and education; and 3) consider ways to sustain a good healthcare professional-parental dialogue for safe practices that are accessible, acceptable, and culturally sensitive in the care of the prepuce. Methods: A literature review was carried out in the English language through the major databases: PubMed (MEDLINE), EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science (WOS) Core Collection, LILAC, WHO/UNAIDS, Clinical Trials (www.clinicaltrials.gov), Google Scholar, and grey literature. Search words included: prepuce, diseases of prepuce, prepuce in the neonate, prepuce in the neonate in Canada, male circumcision, childhood male circumcision, neonatal circumcision, neonatal circumcision in Canada, complications of neonatal circumcision in Canada, and circumcision adverse events. Results: From 1970–1999, three of 10 Canadian newborn males were circumcised for religious, cultural, and medical reasons. The rest of the neonates, if alive, are living with their prepuce; <4% expected to require treatment for afflictions of the prepuce at some point. There are several providers of circumcision with different levels of training and competencies and using a diversity of devices and techniques. Neonatal and childhood circumcision in Canada is carried out to fulfill parental wishes, as well as for medical, religious, and cultural reasons. Appropriate informed consent and education regarding

  8. Microenterprise in health care and health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, A A

    1998-01-01

    Over the last decade, development aid has increasingly used a more collaborative model, with donors and recipients both contributing ideas, methods and goals. Though many examples of collateral aid projects exist in agriculture, business administration and banking, few have found their way into health care and health education, a typically donor-dominated model. The following case report describes a collateral project in health care education. This case report analyzes data-inducing project proposals, personal interviews and project reports obtained through standard archival research methods. The setting for this joint project was the collaboration between international nongovernmental (NGO) aid foundations and the faculty of a major sub-Saharan African Medical School's Department of Anesthesia. The initial goal of this project was to improve record keeping for all anesthetic records, both in the operating theatres and outside. Analysis of the data was performed using ethnographic methods of constant comparative analysis. The purpose of the analysis was to critically evaluate both the goals and their results in the Department of Anesthesiology. The findings of this analysis suggested that results included not only quality assurance and improvement programs in the department but also advances in the use of critical incidents as teaching tools, hospital-wide drug and equipment utilization information and the initiation of an outreach program to district hospitals throughout the country for similar projects.

  9. Microenterprise in health care and health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the last decade, development aid has increasingly used a more collaborative model, with donors and recipients both contributing ideas, methods and goals. Though many examples of collateral aid projects exist in agriculture, business administration and banking, few have found their way into health care and health education, a typically donor-dominated model. The following case report describes a collateral project in health care education. This case report analyzes data-inducing project proposals, personal interviews and project reports obtained through standard archival research methods. The setting for this joint project was the collaboration between international nongovernmental (NGO) aid foundations and the faculty of a major sub-Saharan African Medical School's Department of Anesthesia. The initial goal of this project was to improve record keeping for all anesthetic records, both in the operating theatres and outside. Analysis of the data was performed using ethnographic methods of constant comparative analysis. The purpose of the analysis was to critically evaluate both the goals and their results in the Department of Anesthesiology. The findings of this analysis suggested that results included not only quality assurance and improvement programs in the department but also advances in the use of critical incidents as teaching tools, hospital-wide drug and equipment utilization information and the initiation of an outreach program to district hospitals throughout the country for similar projects. PMID:10604789

  10. Early childhood feeding: assessing knowledge, attitude, and practices of multi-ethnic child-care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Marjorie R; Alvarez, Karina P

    2010-03-01

    Early childhood is a critical period for shaping and influencing feeding and lifestyle behaviors that have implications for future weight and health. With more women in the workforce, families have become reliant on child care. Thus, the child-feeding relationship has become a shared responsibility between the parent and child-care provider. Little is known about the impact of child-care providers on development of early childhood feeding behaviors and subsequent risk for obesity, especially in the Hispanic ethnic group. This research examined child-feeding attitudes, practices, and knowledge of multi-ethnic home-based and center-based child-care providers. Questionnaires were completed by a convenience sample of 72 providers, 50 of whom completed a pre- and post-test on child-feeding knowledge after receiving a 90-minute class based on Satter's division of responsibility feeding model during the spring of 2008. Results indicate many providers had practices consistent with this model. However, substantial differences were reported by Hispanic providers, who were statistically more likely to encourage children to finish meals before dessert, prepare foods they perceived as well-liked by children, coach children to eat foods perceived as appropriate, and not eat with children during meals. A substantial increase in knowledge from 73% correct at pretest to 82% at post-test was noted, with a substantial increase in knowledge on five of 13 questions. However, knowledge was not always congruent with behavior. This study points to differences among providers based on ethnicity, and strongly recommends recruiting Hispanic child-care providers to participate in educational programs and community efforts to prevent obesity.

  11. Maternal health care utilisation in Teso District

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antenatal clinic visits, the level of utilisation of maternal health care, to identify the main service .... number of antenatal care visits which have impact .... to or experience with modern health services may ..... diet/nutrition ..... Human Fertility.

  12. Passion in today's health care leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2005-01-01

    Passion in today's health care leaders is essential as health care organizations face increasing demands for survival. Leaders in health care have been educated, selected, promoted, and retained based on their analytical and creativity skills. Today's health care leaders must also have emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is primal for passion. Emotional intelligence, which leads to passion, is crucial to the survivability of today's health care organizations. In order for health care organizations to go from good to great, the leader must inspire followers through passion. This article encourages health care leaders to gain awareness of emotional intelligence and to use emotional intelligence as part of their leadership to inspire passion. Through passion, leaders and followers become more motivated to accomplish the health care mission of serving others.

  13. The Cultural Geography of Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesler, Wilbert M.

    1987-01-01

    This article shows how health care delivery is related to cultural or human geography. This is accomplished by describing health care delivery in terms of 12 popular themes of cultural geography. (JDH)

  14. Medicaid Adult Health Care Quality Measures

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Affordable Care Act (Section 1139B) requires the Secretary of HHS to identify and publish a core set of health care quality measures for adult Medicaid...

  15. Family social environment in childhood and self-rated health in young adulthood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roustit, Christelle; Campoy, Eric; Renahy, Emilie; King, Gary; Parizot, Isabelle; Chauvin, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    ... adulthood and to assess the role of family functioning during childhood as a potential mediating factor in explaining the association between family breakup in childhood and self-reported health in young adulthood...

  16. [The coordination of care in health centres].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribardière, Olivia

    2016-06-01

    Health centres are structurally designed to facilitate the coordination of care. However, evolutions in society have resulted in forms of consumption of health care which are not necessarily compatible with efficient care coordination. On a local level, teams are nevertheless organising and structuring themselves to offer the right form of care, to the right patient and at the right time.

  17. The right to preventive health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conly, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    The right to health care is a right to care that (a) is not too costly to the provider, considering the benefits it conveys, and (b) is effective in bringing about the level of health needed for a good human life, not necessarily the best health possible. These considerations suggest that, where possible, society has an obligation to provide preventive health care, which is both low cost and effective, and that health care regulations should promote citizens' engagement in reasonable preventive health care practices.

  18. BELIEFS AND PRACTICES AMONG MOTHERS REGARDING DIET DURING CHILDHOOD ILLNESS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL, VISAKHAPATNAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Malnutrition is the most widespread condition affecting the health of the children. Scarcity of suitable foods, lack of purchasing power of the family as well as traditional beliefs and taboos about what the baby should eat, often lead to an insufficient balanced diet, resulting in malnutrition. Culturally related food restriction and reduction in feeding frequency during common childhood illnesses further contributes to the burden of malnutrition and thus to childhood morbidity and mortality. METHODOLOGY : A hospital based, cross sectional descriptive study was conducted among 100 ill children less than 5 years age attending outpatient department of pediatrics in a tertiary care hospital, Visakhapatnam. A semi structured, pretested interview schedule was ad ministered after taking prior consent from mothers. Results were analyzed by using MS Excel. Data was represented as frequencies, percentages and p<0.05 was taken as statistically significant. RESULTS : Among 100 study subjects, 62% were boys and 38% were g irls. Thirty percent of children in the study had Grade IV malnutrition (IAP classification. 38% of the mothers had education up to high school. Most of them were Hindu by religion (70%, and housewives by occupation (71%. Most of them belonged to grade III socio - economic status according to modified B G Prasad classification. During illness, one fourth of mothers in group A (children < 6 months and group B (7 – 24 months decreased breast feeding and in group C (2 - 5 years, 35% mothers made the consiste ncy of food thinner than usual. Belief on hot and cold foods concept was among 34% mothers. Level of education of mothers didn’t show any significant difference in keeping beliefs regarding hot and cold properties of foods. CONCLUSION : False beliefs and pr actices like food restriction during child’s ill health was observed in our study. Appropriate nutritional education to care givers, during common childhood

  19. Factors affecting health seeking behavior for common childhood illnesses in Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webair HH

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hana Hasan Webair, Abdulla Salim Bin-Gouth Department of Family Medicine, Hadhramout University of Science and Technology, Almukalla, Hadhramout, Yemen Introduction: Appropriate medical care seeking could prevent a significant number of child deaths and complications due to ill health. This study aims to determine factors affecting health seeking behavior (HSB for childhood illnesses, thereby improving child survival. Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out from January 11 to April 2, 2012. A total of 212 caretakers of children under the age of 5 years participated. Caretakers who visited the vaccination unit in the Shehair Health Center during the study period and had a child with a history of diarrhea, fever, cough, and/or difficulty of breathing during the last 14 days were included. The data were collected by interviewing caretakers and the answers were reported in pretested structured questionnaires. Results: Medical care was sought for about half of the sick children (n=109, 51.42%. Seeking medical care was frequently initiated for illnesses that did not improve or worsened. The major reasons for not seeking medical care were "illness was mild" (n=40, 38.83% and "illness is not for medical treatment" (n=32, 31.07%. The caretakers sought medical care significantly more when they had a higher level of school education (POR [prevalence odds ratio] 5.85, 95% CI [confidence interval]: 2.34–14.61, when the illness was perceived as severe (POR 5.39, 95% CI: 2.81–10.33, and when the child had difficulty of breathing (POR 2.93, 95% CI: 1.10–7.80. Conclusion: For the preventable childhood illnesses with existing interventions, appropriate HSB prevalence is low. Symptom type, caretakers' education, and perception of illness severity are the predictors of HSB. Educational improvement of the mothers, introduction of community based integrated management of childhood illness, and in-depth research are imperative to improve mothers' HSB

  20. Health care reform and care at the behavioral health--primary care interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druss, Benjamin G; Mauer, Barbara J

    2010-11-01

    The historic passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in March 2010 offers the potential to address long-standing deficits in quality and integration of services at the interface between behavioral health and primary care. Many of the efforts to reform the care delivery system will come in the form of demonstration projects, which, if successful, will become models for the broader health system. This article reviews two of the programs that might have a particular impact on care on the two sides of that interface: Medicaid and Medicare patient-centered medical home demonstration projects and expansion of a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration program that colocates primary care services in community mental health settings. The authors provide an overview of key supporting factors, including new financing mechanisms, quality assessment metrics, information technology infrastructure, and technical support, that will be important for ensuring that initiatives achieve their potential for improving care.

  1. Women's health care: from whom and why?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den

    1997-01-01

    Differences are investigated between female practice populations of female general practitioners providing women's health care and of women and men general practitioners providing regular health care. Women's health care in the Netherlands is provided in the general practice "Aletta" and is based

  2. Reforms of health care system in Romania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bara, AC; van den Heuvel, WJA; Maarse, JAM; Bara, Ana Claudia; Maarse, Johannes A.M.

    Aim. To describe health care reforms and analyze the transition of the health care system in Romania in the 1989-2001 period. Method. We analyzed policy documents, political intentions and objectives of health care reform, described new legislation, and presented changes in financial resources of

  3. Reforms of health care system in Romania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bara, AC; van den Heuvel, WJA; Maarse, JAM; Bara, Ana Claudia; Maarse, Johannes A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Aim. To describe health care reforms and analyze the transition of the health care system in Romania in the 1989-2001 period. Method. We analyzed policy documents, political intentions and objectives of health care reform, described new legislation, and presented changes in financial resources of th

  4. Teaching Health Care in Introductory Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Health care is one of the economy's biggest industries, so it is natural that the health care industry should play some role in the teaching of introductory economics. There are many ways that health care can appear in such a context: in the teaching of microeconomics, as a macroeconomic issue, to learn about social welfare, and even to learn how…

  5. How to achieve care coordination inside health care organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim; C. Becker, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how health care organizations can achieve care coordination internally is essential because it is difficult to achieve, but essential for high quality and efficient health care delivery. This article offers an answer by providing a synthesis of knowledge about coordination from...

  6. Beneficence, justice, and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, J Paul

    2014-03-01

    This paper argues that societal duties of health promotion are underwritten (at least in large part) by a principle of beneficence. Further, this principle generates duties of justice that correlate with rights, not merely "imperfect" duties of charity or generosity. To support this argument, I draw on a useful distinction from bioethics and on a somewhat neglected approach to social obligation from political philosophy. The distinction is that between general and specific beneficence; and the approach from political philosophy has at times been called equality of concern. After clarifying the distinction and setting out the basis of the equality of concern view, I argue that the result is a justice-based principle of "specific" beneficence that should be reflected in a society's health policy. I then draw on this account to criticize, refine, and extend some prominent health care policy proposals from the bioethics literature.

  7. Childhood social circumstances and health behaviour in midlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Godtfredsen, Nina S; Prescott, Eva

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that the association between social disadvantage in childhood and adult mortality could come about through processes related to the family environment in which the child is raised. This study examines the relationship of fathers' social class with health behaviour in middle...... age and assesses the potential mediating role of cognitive function, educational status and social integration in young adulthood in these relationships....

  8. Longitudinal associations between self-regulation and health across childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bub, Kristen L; Robinson, Leah E; Curtis, David S

    2016-11-01

    There is some evidence to suggest that one's ability to delay gratification is associated with a lower body mass index (BMI) and slower overall weight gain. Less is known about the role that a broader set of self-regulatory skills, including attention focusing, inhibitory control, and impulsivity, might play in fostering not only a healthy weight but also better overall health and health-related behaviors such as sleep. Participants in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development were followed from birth through age 15 beginning in 1991. Self-regulation was assessed when children were 4.5 years old, whereas health-related outcomes were assessed regularly between toddlerhood and adolescence. Structural equation modeling was used to test direct associations between self-regulation and either physical health or sleep in childhood and adolescence. Findings suggest that there are long-term benefits of self-regulation, indexed by multiple dimensions, for children's health-related outcomes. Children with better self-regulatory skills demonstrated smaller increases in standardized BMI scores and maintained greater mother-reported health across childhood and adolescence. Furthermore, better self-regulation predicted fewer sleep problems and longer sleep duration when children were 8 and 11 but not when they were 15. Early self-regulation, marked by numerous skills, appears to have long-term benefits for children's health-related outcomes. These findings provide some evidence that targeting childhood self-regulatory skills for improvement may help reduce poor health-related outcomes later in life and offer important insight into potential avenues for intervention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Childhood Immunization: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF Immunizations for Preterm Babies (American Academy of Pediatrics) Also in Spanish Recommended Immunizations for Children from 7 Through 18 ... Children Immunizations: Active vs. Passive (American Academy of Pediatrics) ... Foundation) Also in Spanish Vaccination: An Act of Love (Pan American Health ...

  10. Rural health care in Mexico?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañedo, L

    1974-09-27

    A very large percentage of Mexico's population living in rural areas lacks resources for health care. Any new effort to provide such care must emphasize the health of the infant population because of the high percentage of infants in the country. Plans made at the national level have not been correlated with the conditions that exist in rural areas. For example, the majority of university programs are oriented toward urban medical practice, and the construction of more schools of medicine to solve the problem of doctors in rural areas is based on a mistaken premise. This problem has not been solved even in developed countries such as the United States where, as in Mexico, graduates in medicine migrate to the cities where optimal conditions are met for practicing the type of medicine for which they have been trained. Furthermore, it is both expensive and illogical to maintain urban doctors in rural areas where they cannot practice their profession for lack of resources; to do so is to deny the purpose of their education (27). Conventional schools of medicine, for reasons of investment and of structure, should teach only very selected groups of students who, on finishing their training, are fully capacitated to practice specialized medicine. A different system is required if we are to provide adequate health care in the rural communities. A system such as that described herein, adapted to the real need of rural communities, would avoid the necessity to create dysfunctional bureaucracies and would not destroy those institutions which have proved useful in the past. This study should be considered as one of the many pilot programs that should be initiated in order to determine the type of program that would best solve the problem of health care in rural Mexico. Other programs already being considered at the National Autonomous University of Mexico include the A36 plan of the Faculty of Medicine, now in operation; the work of C. Biro carried out in Netzahualcoyotl City

  11. Childhood eye care services in South Darfur State of Sudan: Learner and parent perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif H. Alrasheed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Most causes of childhood visual impairment are either treatable or preventable. Eye health education plays an important role in reducing avoidable causes of visual impairment as well as to help ensure a healthy and educated community. The main objective of this study was to assess the Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of the students and their parents on childhood eye services and barriers for accessing child eye care.Methods: The study was conducted in South Darfur State of Sudan between January and February 2015. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used to collect data from eight secondary schools. Four schools for boys and four schools for girls were randomly selected from a list of 21 districts of South Darfur State and the Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices surveys were conducted with the students to collect quantitative data. In addition, seven focus group discussions were conducted with the children’s parents to collect qualitative data.Results: The majority (57.5% of the students reported that they knew about refractive error; however, 33.07% reported never hearing about refractive error. About 70.3% of the respondents believed that uncorrected refractive error leads to visual impairment, 21% believed refractive error did not cause visual impairment and 30.5% reported that wearing spectacles was not effective in the treatment of refractive error. With regard to the information about eye healthcare, 88.1% of the participants reported they did not have enough information about eye care. The reported need for more information about prevention, treatment and symptoms was 34.0%, 31.4% and 17.5%, respectively. With regard to barriers, 80.6% of the students reported never having had their eyes tested. The most cited barriers were cost, fear of wearing spectacles and fear of an eye examination. In addition, 72.6% of students reported that their health insurance did not cover eye care services. Most (53.6% of the parents

  12. Injuries in Norwegian Early Childhood and Care (ECEC Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Johan Sando

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Children’s play and exploration involves risk and a possibility for being injured. Early childhood and care institutions (ECECs should provide children with physical challenges in a safe environment. Over the past years, the attention towards playground safety and injuries in ECECs has increased. Norwegian practitioners have a liberal approach to children’s risk taking in play, raising questions on injury prevalence in Norwegian ECECs. The aim for this study was to gain knowledge about the injury prevalence and characteristics of the injuries in Norwegian ECECs. Managers from 2105 institutions completed an electronic questionnaire retrospectively asking the managers to report injuries and accidents the past year. The results indicate that injuries are rare in Norwegian ECECs, and that most of the injuries are minor and do not require a follow-up from professional medical personnel. The moderate and severe injuries are very rare, and often mishaps. There are some indications that boys experience injuries more often than girls do. The main cause of moderate injuries is falling, both outdoors and indoors.

  13. A Call for Onto-Epistemological Diversity in Early Childhood Education and Care: Centering Global South Conceptualizations of Childhood/s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Michelle Salazar; Saavedra, Cinthya M.

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we call for onto-epistemological diversity in the field of early childhood education and care (ECEC). Specifically, we discuss the need to center the brilliance of children and communities of color, which we argue, can be facilitated by foregrounding global south perspectives, such as Black and Chicana feminisms. Mainstream…

  14. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health and Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Sarahn M; Bryant, Allison S

    2017-03-01

    A health disparity is defined as an increased burden of an adverse health outcome or health determinant within a specific subset of the population. There are well-documented racial and ethnic disparities throughout health care at the patient, provider, and health care system levels. As the minority populations within the United States grow to record numbers, it is increasingly important to invest in efforts to characterize, understand, and end racial and ethnic disparities in health care. Inequities in health outcomes and care pose real threats to the entire nation's well-being. Eliminating health disparities is fundamental to the well-being, productivity, and viability of the entire nation.

  15. Developing health care workforces for uncertain futures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Des

    2015-04-01

    Conventional approaches to health care workforce planning are notoriously unreliable. In part, this is due to the uncertainty of the future health milieu. An approach to health care workforce planning that accommodates this uncertainty is not only possible but can also generate intelligence on which planning and consequent development can be reliably based. Drawing on the experience of Health Workforce New Zealand, the author outlines some of the approaches being used in New Zealand. Instead of relying simply on health care data, which provides a picture of current circumstances in health systems, the author argues that workforce planning should rely on health care intelligence--looking beyond the numbers to build understanding of how to achieve desired outcomes. As health care systems throughout the world respond to challenges such as reform efforts, aging populations of patients and providers, and maldistribution of physicians (to name a few), New Zealand's experience may offer a model for rethinking workforce planning to truly meet health care needs.

  16. Transition to Adult Health Care for Adolescents with Spina Bifida: Research Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Susan M.; Macnee, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The increasing survival of children and young people with congenital disabilities such as spina bifida (SB) provides a challenge to health care systems globally about how best to respond to the multitude of health, developmental, and psychosocial needs of those affected by this complex disorder across the lifespan, not just in childhood and…

  17. Transition to Adult Health Care for Adolescents with Spina Bifida: Research Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Susan M.; Macnee, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The increasing survival of children and young people with congenital disabilities such as spina bifida (SB) provides a challenge to health care systems globally about how best to respond to the multitude of health, developmental, and psychosocial needs of those affected by this complex disorder across the lifespan, not just in childhood and…

  18. Health-care access as a social determinant of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGibbon, Elizabeth; Etowa, Josephine; McPherson, Charmaine

    2008-09-01

    The social determinants of health (SDH) are recognized as important indicators of health and well-being. Health-care services (primary, secondary, tertiary care) have not until recently been considered an SDH. Inequities in access to health care are changing this view. These inequities include barriers faced by certain population groups at point of care, such as the lack of cultural competence of health-care providers. The authors show how a social justice perspective can help nurses understand how to link inequities in access to poorer health outcomes, and they call on nurses to break the cycle of oppression that contributes to these inequities.

  19. Physical Health Problems and Barriers to Optimal Health Care Among Children in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Stephanie Anne; Fortin, Kristine

    2015-10-01

    Children and adolescents in foster care placement represent a unique population with special health care needs, often resulting from pre-placement early adversity and neglected, unaddressed health care needs. High rates of all health problems, including acute and/or chronic physical, mental, and developmental issues prevail. Disparities in health status and access to health care are observed. This article summarizes the physical health problems of children in foster care, who are predisposed to poor health outcomes when complex care needs are unaddressed. Despite recognition of the significant burden of health care need among this unique population, barriers to effective and optimal health care delivery remain. Legislative solutions to overcome obstacles to health care delivery for children in foster care are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Changes in lipidemia during chronic care treatment of childhood obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tenna Ruest Haarmark; Gamborg, Michael; Fonvig, Cilius Esmann

    2012-01-01

    Childhood obesity and related co-morbidities are increasing. This intervention study assessed the associations between weight changes and lipidemia in obese children and adolescents.......Childhood obesity and related co-morbidities are increasing. This intervention study assessed the associations between weight changes and lipidemia in obese children and adolescents....

  1. Childhood Obesity in Primary Care : Not yet General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.D. Paulis (Winifred)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe prevalence of childhood obesity has at least doubled the last 30 years. Childhood obesity is associated with an increased likelihood to develop adult obesity, which translates into increased risk for chronic diseases, including diabetes mellitus type 2, cardiovascular disease and

  2. Childhood Obesity in Primary Care : Not yet General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.D. Paulis (Winifred)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe prevalence of childhood obesity has at least doubled the last 30 years. Childhood obesity is associated with an increased likelihood to develop adult obesity, which translates into increased risk for chronic diseases, including diabetes mellitus type 2, cardiovascular disease and

  3. What is Good Quality of Health Care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magne Nylenna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A diversity of definitions of quality exists, that frequently contain aspects of complexity, relativity and subjectivity. This paper provides an overview of key components in the quality debate within health care, including different perspectives and dimensions of the quality of care. Definitions of the quality of health care reflect the characteristics of health services, and are useful for measurements and quality improvement. Over time the patient perspective of quality has gotten increasing weight, and in quality improvement there has been a shift from individual responsibility for doctors and health care personnel to systems thinking. We argue that the quality approach in health care should be more standardized and that health care-specific definitions of quality should be used when the relationship between physician professionalism and quality is investigated.Keywords: quality, health care, systems thinking, patient perspective, outcome, indicator, measurement, improvement.

  4. Integrated occupational health care at sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Olaf Chresten

    2011-01-01

    Workplace Health Promotion is the combined efforts of employers, employees and society to improve the health and well-being of people at work. Integrated maritime health care can be defined as the total maritime health care function that includes the prevention of health risks from harmful...... exposures during life at sea and work place health promotion. SEAHEALTH and some of the shipping companies have already added workplace health promotion to occupational health care programs. The purpose of this article is to reinforce this trend by adding some international perspectives and by providing...

  5. Health care: a brave new world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrisette, Shelley; Oberman, William D; Watts, Allison D; Beck, Joseph B

    2015-03-01

    The current U.S. health care system, with both rising costs and demands, is unsustainable. The combination of a sense of individual entitlement to health care and limited acceptance of individual responsibility with respect to personal health has contributed to a system which overspends and underperforms. This sense of entitlement has its roots in a perceived right to health care. Beginning with the so-called moral right to health care (all life is sacred), the issue of who provides health care has evolved as individual rights have trumped societal rights. The concept of government providing some level of health care ranges from limited government intervention, a 'negative right to health care' (e.g., prevention of a socially-caused, preventable health hazard), to various forms of a 'positive right to health care'. The latter ranges from a decent minimum level of care to the best possible health care with access for all. We clarify the concept of legal rights as an entitlement to health care and present distributive and social justice counter arguments to present health care as a privilege that can be provided/earned/altered/revoked by governments. We propose that unlike a 'right', which is unconditional, a 'privilege' has limitations. Going forward, expectations about what will be made available should be lowered while taking personal responsibility for one's health must for elevated. To have access to health care in the future will mean some loss of personal rights (e.g., unhealthy behaviors) and an increase in personal responsibility for gaining or maintaining one's health.

  6. Challenges for health care development in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojić, Rajko; Bilas, Vlatka; Franc, Sanja

    2012-09-01

    The main aim of the research done in this paper was to establish key challenges and perspectives for health care development in the Republic of Croatia in the next two decades. Empirical research was conducted in the form of semi-structured interviews involving 49 subjects, representatives of health care professionals from both, public and private sectors, health insurance companies, pharmaceutical companies, drug wholesalers, and non-governmental organisations (patient associations). The results have shown that key challenges and problems of Croatian health care can be divided into three groups: functioning of health care systems, health care personnel, and external factors. Research has shown that key challenges related to the functioning of health care are inefficiency, financial unviability, inadequate infrastructure, and the lack of system transparency. Poor governance is another limiting factor. With regard to health care personnel, they face the problems of low salaries, which then lead to migration challenges and a potential shortage of health care personnel. The following external factors are deemed to be among the most significant challenges: ageing population, bad living habits, and an increase in the number of chronic diseases. However, problems caused by the global financial crisis and consequential macroeconomic situation must not be neglected. Guidelines for responding to challenges identified in this research are the backbone for developing a strategy for health care development in the Republic of Croatia. Long-term vision, strategy, policies, and a regulatory framework are all necessary preconditions for an efficient health care system and more quality health services.

  7. Mental health integration: normalizing team care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss-Brennan, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the impact of integrating mental health into primary health care. Mental Health Integration (MHI) within Intermountain Healthcare has changed the culture of primary health care by standardizing a team-based care process that includes mental health as a normal part of the routine medical encounter. Using a quantitative statistical analysis of qualitative reports (mixed methods study), the study reports on health outcomes associated with MHI for patients and staff. Researchers interviewed 59 patients and 50 staff to evaluate the impact of MHI on depression care. Patients receiving MHI reported an improved relationship with caregivers (P approach to improve outcomes.

  8. Prenatal Care for Adolescents and attributes of Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Barbaro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: evaluate prenatal care for adolescents in health units, in accordance with the attributes of Primary Health Care (PHC guidelines. METHOD: quantitative study conducted with health professionals, using the Primary Care Assessment Tool-Brazil to assess the presence and extent of PHC attributes. RESULTS: for all the participating units, the attribute Access scored =6.6; the attributes Longitudinality, Coordination (integration of care, Coordination (information systems and Integrality scored =6.6, and the Essential Score =6.6. Comparing basic units with family health units, the attribute scores were equally distributed; Accessibility scored =6.6, the others attributes scored =6.6; however, in the basic units, the Essential Score was =6.6 and, in the family health units, =6.6. CONCLUSION: expanding the coverage of family health units and the training of professionals can be considered strategies to qualify health care.

  9. The health care costs of smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.M. Barendregt (Jan); L.G.A. Bonneux (Luc); P.J. van der Maas (Paul)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Although smoking cessation is desirable from a public health perspective, its consequences with respect to health care costs are still debated. Smokers have more disease than nonsmokers, but nonsmokers live longer and can incur more health costs

  10. Health Care Access Among Deaf People

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    .... The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in global health...

  11. Health Care Information System (HCIS) Data File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data was derived from the Health Care Information System (HCIS), which contains Medicare Part A (Inpatient, Skilled Nursing Facility, Home Health Agency (Part A...

  12. Childhood bruxism: Related factors and impact on oral health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Lívia Azeredo Alves; Castilho, Thuanny; Marinho, Marcello; Fraga, Renato Silva; Antunes, Leonardo Santos

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess childhood bruxism relating associated factors and the bruxism's impact on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). A case-control study was performed with 3- to 6-year-old children obtained from public preschools in Brazil. The case and control groups had 21 and 40 children, respectively. Associations between bruxism and respiratory problems (p = 0.04, OR: 0.33, CI: 0.09 to 1.14), dental wear (p 0.05). The association between presence and absence of impact with bruxism or other variables showed no statistical relationship (p > 0.05). It could be concluded that childhood bruxism is related to respiratory problems, dental wear, dental caries, and malocclusion. Despite being a topic that demands special care in dentistry, bruxism does not significantly affect the OHRQoL.

  13. Technology in health care logistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Pelle; Wallin, Michael

    In most of the developed countries hospitals are facing a major challenge – they have to provide more health care using the same resources. Due to the demographic trend and the increasing share of the population being in a more health-demanding age, the hospitals will have to deal with more...... presents an analytical model that can analyse the logistical system using a holistic approach, and explore the possibility of using technology to improve the current system. A logistical system is one of the different flows happening at a hospital. Included in the analytical model is a performance...... assessment tool, which has been designed to assess the performance of the logistical system, thereby pinpointing where the system is performing poorly. Additionally the model and tool makes it possible to evaluate various technologies that can be used to improve and optimise the existing system...

  14. Markov Models in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Cesar Sato

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Markov Chains provide support for problems involving decision on uncertainties through a continuous period of time. The greater availability and access to processing power through computers allow that these models can be used more often to represent clinical structures. Markov models consider the patients in a discrete state of health, and the events represent the transition from one state to another. The possibility of modeling repetitive events and time dependence of probabilities and utilities associated permits a more accurate representation of the evaluated clinical structure. These templates can be used for economic evaluation in health care taking into account the evaluation of costs and clinical outcomes, especially for evaluation of chronic diseases. This article provides a review of the use of modeling within the clinical context and the advantages of the possibility of including time for this type of study.

  15. Medicine and health care: implications for health sciences library practice.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The American health care system is experiencing a period of unprecedented change. This paper identifies and discusses the major changes in patient care, research, control of the health care system, and medical education, and their implications for health sciences librarians. These changes have resulted in new demands for effective information delivery and a broader health sciences library clientele. There are both challenges and opportunities for health sciences librarians as they respond to ...

  16. Multiculturalism, Medicine and Health Part I: Multicultural Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, R.

    1988-01-01

    Culturally sensitive health care is not a matter of simple formulas or prescriptions that provide a single definitive answer: rather, it requires understanding of the principles on which health care is based and the manner in which culture may influence those principles. This series of six articles will examine influences that ethnic and cultural background may have on health and health care. Part I outlines the development, importance and relevance of multicultural health care. The author stresses the importance of understanding community needs, cultures and beliefs; the active interest and participation of the patient in his or her own health care; the importance of a good physician-patient relationship; and the benefit of an open-minded approach by physicians and other health-care workers to the delivery of health-care services. PMID:21253247

  17. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    socio-demographic factors such as accommodation pattern and toilet facility. Childhood morbidity and ... our environment are diarrhea diseases, pneumonia,. Urban slums pose ..... households as predictors of nutritional. Sci Med 2007; 65: ...

  18. Equity in health care utilization in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    One of the most extensive Chilean health care reforms occurred in July 2005, when the Regime of Explicit Health Guarantees (AUGE) became effective. This reform guarantees coverage for a specific set of health conditions. Thus, the purpose of this study is to provide timely evidence for policy makers to understand the current distribution and equity of health care utilization in Chile. The authors analyzed secondary data from the National Socioeconomic Survey (CASEN) for the years 1992–2009 and the 2006 Satisfaction and Out-of-Pocket Payment Survey to assess equity in health care utilization using two different approaches. First, we used a two-part model to estimate factors associated with the utilization of health care. Second, we decomposed income-related inequalities in medical care use into contributions of need and non-need factors and estimated a horizontal inequity index. Findings of this empirical study include evidence of inequities in the Chilean health care system that are beneficial to the better-off. We also identified some key factors, including education and health care payment, which affect the utilization of health care services. Results of this study could help researchers and policy makers identify targets for improving equity in health care utilization and strengthening availability of health care services accordingly. PMID:23937894

  19. Latex allergy in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Virtič

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of natural rubber latex medical gloves in the last three decades has caused an increase in latex allergy. The majority of risk groups for allergy development include health care workers, workers in the rubber industry, atopic individuals and children with congenital malformations. Three types of pathological reactions can occur in people using latex medical gloves: irritant contact dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis and immediate hypersensitivity. The latex allergy is caused by constituent components of latex gloves and added powders; there are also numerous latex allergens involved in cross-reactivity between latex and fruits and vegetables, the so-called latex-fruit syndrome. The diagnosis is based on an accurate history of exposure, clinical presentation and confirmatory in vivo and in vitro tests. Prevention is the easiest, most effective and least expensive way to avoid latex allergy. Powder-free latex gloves with reduced levels of proteins and chemicals, and synthetic gloves for allergic workers must be provided in the work environment. There are already many health care institutions around the world where all latex products have been replaced by synthetic material products.

  20. Achieving better health care outcomes for children in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Robin; Noonan, Kathleen; Rubin, David

    2009-04-01

    This article reviews the challenges health care systems face as they attempt to improve health care outcomes for children in foster care. It discusses several of the promising health care strategies occurring outside the perimeter of child welfare and identifies some of the key impasses in working alongside efforts in child welfare reform. The authors posit that the greatest impasse in establishing a reasonable quality of health care for these children is placement instability, in which children move frequently among multiple homes and in and out of the child welfare system. The authors propose potential strategies in which efforts to improve placement stability can serve as a vehicle for multidisciplinary reform across the health care system.

  1. Childhood Predictors of Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder : Results from the World Health Organization World Mental Health Survey Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lara, Carmen; Fayyad, John; de Graaf, Ron; Kessler, Ronald C.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Angermeyer, Matthias; Demytteneare, Koen; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Haro, Josep Maria; Jin, Robert; Karam, Elie G.; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Mora, Maria Elena Medina; Ormel, Johan; Posada-Villa, Jose; Sampson, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although it is known that childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often persists into adulthood, childhood predictors of this persistence have not been widely studied. Methods: Childhood history of ADHD and adult ADHD were assessed in 10 countries in the World Health Or

  2. Childhood Predictors of Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Results from the World Health Organization World Mental Health Survey Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lara, C.; Fayyad, J.; de Graaf, R.; Kessler, R.C.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, S.; Angermeyer, M.; Demytteneare, K.; De Girolamo, G.; Haro, J.M.; Jin, R.; Karam, E.G.; Lepine, J.P.; Mora, M.E.M.; Ormel, J.; Posada-Villa, J.; Sampson, N.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although it is known that childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often persists into adulthood, childhood predictors of this persistence have not been widely studied. Methods: Childhood history of ADHD and adult ADHD were assessed in 10 countries in the World Health Or

  3. Towards malecentric communication: sensitizing health professionals to the realities of male childhood sexual abuse survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teram, Eli; Stalker, Carol; Hovey, Angela; Schachter, Candice; Lasiuk, Gerri

    2006-06-01

    This article extends earlier reports of an ongoing qualitative inquiry on childhood sexual abuse survivors' experiences with health professionals. In this paper, we aim to enhance understanding of male survivors' experience. While male and female participants express similar anxieties and fears about their encounters with health professionals, there are gender-based differences related to the perceptions of victimhood and manhood; guilt and shame; homophobia; disclosure of abuse; and the expression of vulnerability. The implications of these differences for sensitive health care practice are analyzed within the context of gender relationships and the differential socialization of men. Malecentric communication is proposed as a method for addressing the specific experiences of male survivors in their encounters with health professionals.

  4. Health Care, Capabilities, and AI Assistive Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Scenarios involving the introduction of artificially intelligent (AI) assistive technologies in health care practices raise several ethical issues. In this paper, I discuss four objections to introducing AI assistive technologies in health care practices as replacements of human care. I analyse them

  5. Introduction: Studying Health and Health Care in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, S.; Krause, K.

    2014-01-01

    This introduction delineates and discusses the field of social, cultural, and historical studies of health and health care in Ghana. Health and health care are viewed as significant nexuses of social and cultural processes. This overview of studies, mainly from Anglophone medical anthropology, focus

  6. Strengthening of primary health care: Key to deliver inclusive health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Yeravdekar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inequity and poverty are the root causes of ill health. Access to quality health services on an affordable and equitable basis in many parts of the country remains an unfulfilled aspiration. Disparity in health care is interpreted as compromise in ′Right to Life.′ It is imperative to define ′essential health care,′ which should be made available to all citizens to facilitate inclusivity in health care. The suggested methods for this include optimal utilization of public resources and increasing public spending on health care. Capacity building through training, especially training of paramedical personnel, is proposed as an essential ingredient, to reduce cost, especially in tertiary care. Another aspect which is considered very important is improvement in delivery system of health care. Increasing the role of ′family physician′ in health care delivery system will improve preventive care and reduce cost of tertiary care. These observations underlie the relevance and role of Primary health care as a key to deliver inclusive health care. The advantages of a primary health care model for health service delivery are greater access to needed services; better quality of care; a greater focus on prevention; early management of health problems; and cumulative improvements in health and lower morbidity as a result of primary health care delivery.

  7. Using appreciative inquiry to transform health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkovski, Suza; Schmied, Virginia; Vickers, Margaret; Jackson, Debra

    2013-08-01

    Amid tremendous changes in contemporary health care stimulated by shifts in social, economic and political environments, health care managers are challenged to provide new structures and processes to continually improve health service delivery. The general public and the media are becoming less tolerant of poor levels of health care, and health care professionals need to be involved and supported to bring about positive change in health care. Appreciative inquiry (AI) is a philosophy and method for promoting transformational change, shifting from a traditional problem-based orientation to a more strength-based approach to change, that focuses on affirmation, appreciation and positive dialog. This paper discusses how an innovative participatory approach such as AI may be used to promote workforce engagement and organizational learning, and facilitate positive organizational change in a health care context.

  8. The development of socio-economic health differences in childhood: results of the Dutch longitudinal PIAMA birth cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Henriette A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with higher socio-economic status (SES are generally in better health. Less is known about when these socio-economic health differences set in during childhood and how they develop over time. The goal of this study was to prospectively study the development of socio-economic health differences in the Netherlands, and to investigate possible explanations for socio-economic variation in childhood health. Methods Data from the Dutch Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy (PIAMA birth cohort study were used for the analyses. The PIAMA study followed 3,963 Dutch children during their first eight years of life. Common childhood health problems (i.e. eczema, asthma symptoms, general health, frequent respiratory infections, overweight, and obesity were assessed annually using questionnaires. Maternal educational level was used to indicate SES. Possible explanatory lifestyle determinants (breastfeeding, smoking during pregnancy, smoking during the first three months, and day-care centre attendance and biological determinants (maternal age at birth, birthweight, and older siblings were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results This study shows that socio-economic differences in a broad range of health problems are already present early in life, and persist during childhood. Children from families with low socio-economic backgrounds experience more asthma symptoms (odds ratio (OR 1.27; 95% Confidence Interval (CI 1.08-1.49, poorer general health (OR 1.36; 95% CI 1.16-1.60, more frequent respiratory infections (OR 1.57; 95% CI 1.35-1.83, more overweight (OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.16-1.73, and more obesity (OR 2.82; 95% CI 1.80-4.41. The most important contributors to the observed childhood socio-economic health disparities are socio-economic differences in maternal age at birth, breastfeeding, and day-care centre attendance. Conclusions Socio-economic health disparities already occur very early in life. Socio

  9. Health Literacy Scale and Causal Model of Childhood Overweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarakamhang, Ungsinun; Intarakamhang, Patrawut

    2017-01-28

    WHO focuses on developing health literacy (HL) referring to cognitive and social skills. Our objectives were to develop a scale for evaluating the HL level of Thai childhood overweight, and develop a path model of health behavior (HB) for preventing obesity. A cross-sectional study. This research used a mixed method. Overall, 2,000 school students were aged 9 to 14 yr collected by stratified random sampling from all parts of Thailand in 2014. Data were analyzed by CFA, LISREL. Reliability of HL and HB scale ranged 0.62 to 0.82 and factor loading ranged 0.33 to 0.80, the subjects had low level of HL (60.0%) and fair level of HB (58.4%), and the path model of HB, could be influenced by HL from three paths. Path 1 started from the health knowledge and understanding that directly influenced the eating behavior (effect sized - β was 0.13, Phealth knowledge and understanding that influenced managing their health conditions, media literacy, and making appropriate health-related decision β=0.07, 0.98, and 0.05, respectively. Path 3 the accessing the information and services that influenced communicating for added skills, media literacy, and making appropriate health-related decision β=0.63, 0.93, 0.98, and 0.05. Finally, basic level of HL measured from health knowledge and understanding and accessing the information and services that influenced HB through interactive, and critical level β= 0.76, 0.97, and 0.55, respectively. HL Scale for Thai childhood overweight should be implemented as a screening tool developing HL by the public policy for health promotion.

  10. Low income/socio-economic status in early childhood and physical health in later childhood/adolescence: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Nick; Thanh, Tu Mai; Louise, Séguin

    2013-04-01

    To systematically review the literature on the relationship between early childhood low income/socioeconomic status (SES) and physical health in later childhood/adolescence, to identify gaps in the literature and to suggest new avenues for research. A systematic search of electronic databases from their start date to November 2011 was conducted to identify prospective longitudinal studies in industrialized countries with a measure of low income/SES in the first 5 years of life and physical health outcomes in later childhood or adolescence. STROBE criteria were used to assess study quality. Risk estimates were expressed as odds ratios with 95 % confidence intervals where possible. Heterogeneity of studies precluded meta-analysis. Nine studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Significant associations of early childhood low income/SES with activity-limiting illness, parent-reported poor health status, acute and recurrent infections, increasing BMI percentile and hospitalization were reported. Results for parent-reported asthma were less consistent: there was a significant association with low income/SES in early childhood in 2 studies but null findings in 3 others. This systematic review of the association of early childhood low income/SES with physical health status in later childhood and adolescence shows that, in contrast to the extensive literature on the impact of poor childhood social circumstances on adult health, the evidence base is limited. The literature points to some associations of early low income/SES with later poor health status, but many key research questions remain unanswered. Implications for further research are considered.

  11. Telementoring Primary Care Clinicians to Improve Geriatric Mental Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Elisa; Hasselberg, Michael; Conwell, Yeates; Weiss, Linda; Padrón, Norma A; Tiernan, Erin; Karuza, Jurgis; Donath, Jeremy; Pagán, José A

    2017-01-20

    Health care delivery and payment systems are moving rapidly toward value-based care. To be successful in this new environment, providers must consistently deliver high-quality, evidence-based, and coordinated care to patients. This study assesses whether Project ECHO(®) (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) GEMH (geriatric mental health)-a remote learning and mentoring program-is an effective strategy to address geriatric mental health challenges in rural and underserved communities. Thirty-three teleECHO clinic sessions connecting a team of specialists to 54 primary care and case management spoke sites (approximately 154 participants) were conducted in 10 New York counties from late 2014 to early 2016. The curriculum consisted of case presentations and didactic lessons on best practices related to geriatric mental health care. Twenty-six interviews with program participants were conducted to explore changes in geriatric mental health care knowledge and treatment practices. Health insurance claims data were analyzed to assess changes in health care utilization and costs before and after program implementation. Findings from interviews suggest that the program led to improvements in clinician geriatric mental health care knowledge and treatment practices. Claims data analysis suggests that emergency room costs decreased for patients with mental health diagnoses. Patients without a mental health diagnosis had more outpatient visits and higher prescription and outpatient costs. Telementoring programs such as Project ECHO GEMH may effectively build the capacity of frontline clinicians to deliver high-quality, evidence-based care to older adults with mental health conditions and may contribute to the transformation of health care delivery systems from volume to value.

  12. Differences between health care systems and the single European health care market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Došenovič Bonča

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The following paper analyses the possibilities of forming a single European health care market. This aim is achieved by studying the impact of the differing organisational features of individual European health care systems on the efficiency of health care provision, by examining the relationship between the inputs used to produce health care services and the population’s health status in the analysedcountries and by exploring the link between the quantity of health care services and the health status. The authors hypothesise that the efficiency and organisation of health care systems determine the possibilities of forming an efficient single European health care market. The empirical methodology employed in this paper isdata envelopment analysis (DEA. The results show that differences between health care systems and in the ownership types of health care providers are not so large as to prevent the formation of a single European health care market. However, the formation of a single European health care market would reveal the characteristicsof health care systems in such a way that citizens would be in favour of the public sector in health care and the national health service model.

  13. Dual loyalty in prison health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont, Jörg; Stöver, Heino; Wolff, Hans

    2012-03-01

    Despite the dissemination of principles of medical ethics in prisons, formulated and advocated by numerous international organizations, health care professionals in prisons all over the world continue to infringe these principles because of perceived or real dual loyalty to patients and prison authorities. Health care professionals and nonmedical prison staff need greater awareness of and training in medical ethics and prisoner human rights. All parties should accept integration of prison health services with public health services. Health care workers in prison should act exclusively as caregivers, and medical tasks required by the prosecution, court, or security system should be carried out by medical professionals not involved in the care of prisoners.

  14. Dual Loyalty in Prison Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöver, Heino; Wolff, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Despite the dissemination of principles of medical ethics in prisons, formulated and advocated by numerous international organizations, health care professionals in prisons all over the world continue to infringe these principles because of perceived or real dual loyalty to patients and prison authorities. Health care professionals and nonmedical prison staff need greater awareness of and training in medical ethics and prisoner human rights. All parties should accept integration of prison health services with public health services. Health care workers in prison should act exclusively as caregivers, and medical tasks required by the prosecution, court, or security system should be carried out by medical professionals not involved in the care of prisoners. PMID:22390510

  15. Counseling role of primary care physicians in preventing early childhood caries in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zifeng; Yu, Dongsheng; Zhou, Lijie; Yang, Jing; Lu, Jiaxuan; Lu, Hui; Zhao, Wei

    2014-12-01

    The dental health of preschool children with congenital heart disease (CHD) is usually poor, which may contribute to the development of infective endocarditis (IE).Primary care physicians play an important role in providing access to preventive dental services, particularly for preschool children. The object of this study was to provide epidemiologic evidence for the impact of primary care physicians’ (PCP’s) counseling role on early childhood caries in children with CHD in Guangzhou, China, which might guide future caries prevention to decrease the risk of IE in children with CHD. A hospital-based,case-control study was performed, which contained 100 children with newly diagnosed early childhood caries and 100 matched (sex and age) children without dental caries. All of the subjects were diagnosed with CHD at birth and recruited from Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute from 2012 through 2013. A conditional multivariate logistic-regression model was used to assess the associations between PCPs’ role and early childhood caries with a significance level of 5%. Our findings revealed that mother's education level (OR = 0.36,CL = 0.14–0.92) and knowledge, being educated on the relationship between CHD and infective endocarditis (OR = 0.48, CL = 0.25–0.94) and the impact of oral health on infective endocarditis (OR = 0.37, CL = 0.18–0.79) by the PCP were associated with early childhood caries. PCPs played an important role in preventing early childhood caries among preschool children with CHD in Guangzhou, China.

  16. Counseling Role of Primary Care Physicians in Preventing Early Childhood Caries in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zifeng Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dental health of preschool children with congenital heart disease (CHD is usually poor, which may contribute to the development of infective endocarditis (IE. Primary care physicians play an important role in providing access to preventive dental services, particularly for preschool children. The object of this study was to provide epidemiologic evidence for the impact of primary care physicians’ (PCP’s counseling role on early childhood caries in children with CHD in Guangzhou, China, which might guide future caries prevention to decrease the risk of IE in children with CHD. A hospital-based, case-control study was performed, which contained 100 children with newly diagnosed early childhood caries and 100 matched (sex and age children without dental caries. All of the subjects were diagnosed with CHD at birth and recruited from Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute from 2012 through 2013. A conditional multivariate logistic-regression model was used to assess the associations between PCPs’ role and early childhood caries with a significance level of 5%. Our findings revealed that mother’s education level (OR = 0.36, CL = 0.14–0.92 and knowledge, being educated on the relationship between CHD and infective endocarditis (OR = 0.48, CL = 0.25–0.94 and the impact of oral health on infective endocarditis (OR = 0.37, CL = 0.18–0.79 by the PCP were associated with early childhood caries. PCPs played an important role in preventing early childhood caries among preschool children with CHD in Guangzhou, China.

  17. Integrated primary health care in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawaine Powell Davies

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To fulfil its role of coordinating health care, primary health care needs to be well integrated, internally and with other health and related services. In Australia, primary health care services are divided between public and private sectors, are responsible to different levels of government and work under a variety of funding arrangements, with no overarching policy to provide a common frame of reference for their activities. Description of policy: Over the past decade, coordination of service provision has been improved by changes to the funding of private medical and allied health services for chronic conditions, by the development in some states of voluntary networks of services and by local initiatives, although these have had little impact on coordination of planning. Integrated primary health care centres are being established nationally and in some states, but these are too recent for their impact to be assessed. Reforms being considered by the federal government include bringing primary health care under one level of government with a national primary health care policy, establishing regional organisations to coordinate health planning, trialling voluntary registration of patients with general practices and reforming funding systems. If adopted, these could greatly improve integration within primary health care. Discussion: Careful change management and realistic expectations will be needed. Also other challenges remain, in particular the need for developing a more population and community oriented primary health care.

  18. Incentives of Health Care Expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eero Siljander

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The incentives of health care expenditure (HCE have been a topic of discussion in the USA (Obama reforms and in Europe (adjustment to debt crisis. There are competing views of institutional versus GDP (unit income elasticity and productivity related factors of growth of expenditure. However ageing of populations, technology change and economic incentives related to institutions are also key drivers of growth according to the OECD and EU’s AWG committee. Simulation models have been developed to forecast the growth of social expenditure (including HCEs to 2050. In this article we take a historical perspective to look at the institutional structures and their relationship to HCE growth. When controlling for age structure, price developments, doctor density and in-patient and public shares of expenditures, we find that fee-for-service in primary care, is according to the results, in at least 20 percent more costly than capitation or salary remuneration. Capitation and salary (or wage remuneration are at same cost levels in primary care. However we did not find the cost lowering effect for gatekeeping which could have been expected based on previous literature. Global budgeting 30 (partly DRG based percent less costly in specialized care than other reimbursement schemes like open contracting or volume based reimbursement. However the public integration of purchaser and provider cost seems to result to about 20 higher than public reimbursement or public contracting. Increasing the number of doctors or public financing share results in increased HCEs. Therefore expanding public reimbursement share of health services seems to lead to higher HCE. On the contrary, the in-patient share reduced expenditures. Compared to the previous literature, the finding on institutional dummies is in line with similar modeling papers. However the results for public expansion of services is a contrary one to previous works on the subject. The median lag length of

  19. Association between proximity to a health center and early childhood mortality in Madagascar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saori Kashima

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between proximity to a health center and early childhood mortality in Madagascar, and to assess the influence of household wealth, maternal educational attainment, and maternal health on the effects of distance. METHODS: From birth records of subjects in the Demographic and Health Survey, we identified 12565 singleton births from January 2004 to August 2009. After excluding 220 births that lacked global positioning system information for exposure assessment, odds ratios (ORs and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs for neonatal mortality and infant mortality were estimated using multilevel logistic regression models, with 12345 subjects (level 1, nested within 584 village locations (level 2, and in turn nested within 22 regions (level 3. We additionally stratified the subjects by the birth order. We estimated predicted probabilities of each outcome by a three-level model including cross-level interactions between proximity to a health center and household wealth, maternal educational attainment, and maternal anemia. RESULTS: Compared with those who lived >1.5-3.0 km from a health center, the risks for neonatal mortality and infant mortality tended to increase among those who lived further than 5.0 km from a health center; the adjusted ORs for neonatal mortality and infant mortality for those who lived >5.0-10.0 km away from a health center were 1.36 (95% CI: 0.92-2.01 and 1.42 (95% CI: 1.06-1.90, respectively. The positive associations were more pronounced among the second or later child. The distance effects were not modified by household wealth status, maternal educational attainment, or maternal health status. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that distance from a health center is a risk factor for early childhood mortality (primarily, infant mortality in Madagascar by using a large-scale nationally representative dataset. The accessibility to health care in remote areas would be a key factor to achieve

  20. The new architects of health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Leonard D

    2007-01-01

    Rising health care costs have been an issue for decades, yet federal-level health care reform hasn't happened. Support for reform, however, has changed. Purchasers fear that health care cost growth is becoming unaffordable. Research on costs and quality is questioning value. International comparisons rank the United States low on important health system performance measures. Yet it is not these factors but the unsustainable costs of Medicare and Medicaid that will narrow the window for health care stakeholders to shape policy. Unless the health care system is effectively reformed, sometime after the 2008 election, budget hawks and national security experts will eventually combine forces to cut health spending, ultimately determining health policy for the nation.

  1. Forecasting the health care future. Futurescan 2001 and its implications for health care marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    In his new book, futurist Russell C. Coile Jr. presents predictions about seven aspects of health care for the next five years. Aided by a panel of health care experts, he analyzes likely developments in health care consumerism, technology, managed care, and other areas that raise a number of issues for health care marketers. Even if only a few of these predictions come true, marketers will be forced to rethink some of their techniques to adapt to this rapidly changing environment.

  2. Ethics, Politics, and Religion in Public Health Care: A Manifesto for Health Care Chaplains in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasair, Simon

    2016-03-01

    Health care chaplaincy positions in Canada are significantly threatened due to widespread health care cutbacks. Yet the current time also presents a significant opportunity for spiritual care providers. This article argues that religion and spirituality in Canada are undergoing significant changes. The question for Canadian health care chaplains is, then: how well equipped are they to understand these changes in health care settings and to engage them? This article attempts to go part way toward an answer.

  3. Evolution of US Health Care Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Helm Ii, Standiford; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2017-03-01

    Major health policy creation or changes, including governmental and private policies affecting health care delivery are based on health care reform(s). Health care reform has been a global issue over the years and the United States has seen proposals for multiple reforms over the years. A successful, health care proposal in the United States with involvement of the federal government was the short-lived establishment of the first system of national medical care in the South. In the 20th century, the United States was influenced by progressivism leading to the initiation of efforts to achieve universal coverage, supported by a Republican presidential candidate, Theodore Roosevelt. In 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt, a Democrat, included a publicly funded health care program while drafting provisions to Social Security legislation, which was eliminated from the final legislation. Subsequently, multiple proposals were introduced, starting in 1949 with President Harry S Truman who proposed universal health care; the proposal by Lyndon B. Johnson with Social Security Act in 1965 which created Medicare and Medicaid; proposals by Ted Kennedy and President Richard Nixon that promoted variations of universal health care. presidential candidate Jimmy Carter also proposed universal health care. This was followed by an effort by President Bill Clinton and headed by first lady Hillary Clinton in 1993, but was not enacted into law. Finally, the election of President Barack Obama and control of both houses of Congress by the Democrats led to the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), often referred to as "ObamaCare" was signed into law in March 2010. Since then, the ACA, or Obamacare, has become a centerpiece of political campaigning. The Republicans now control the presidency and both houses of Congress and are attempting to repeal and replace the ACA. Key words: Health care reform, Affordable Care Act (ACA), Obamacare, Medicare, Medicaid, American Health Care Act.

  4. Pneumonia's second wind? A case study of the global health network for childhood pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlan, David

    2016-04-01

    Advocacy, policy, research and intervention efforts against childhood pneumonia have lagged behind other health issues, including malaria, measles and tuberculosis. Accelerating progress on the issue began in 2008, following decades of efforts by individuals and organizations to address the leading cause of childhood mortality and establish a global health network. This article traces the history of this network's formation and evolution to identify lessons for other global health issues. Through document review and interviews with current, former and potential network members, this case study identifies five distinct eras of activity against childhood pneumonia: a period of isolation (post WWII to 1984), the duration of WHO's Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) Programme (1984-1995), Integrated Management of Childhood illness's (IMCI) early years (1995-2003), a brief period of network re-emergence (2003-2008) and recent accelerating progress (2008 on). Analysis of these eras reveals the critical importance of building a shared identity in order to form an effective network and take advantage of emerging opportunities. During the ARI era, an initial network formed around a relatively narrow shared identity focused on community-level care. The shift to IMCI led to the partial dissolution of this network, stalled progress on addressing pneumonia in communities and missed opportunities. Frustrated with lack of progress on the issue, actors began forming a network and shared identity that included a broad spectrum of those whose interests overlap with pneumonia. As the network coalesced and expanded, its members coordinated and collaborated on conducting and sharing research on severity and tractability, crafting comprehensive strategies and conducting advocacy. These network activities exerted indirect influence leading to increased attention, funding, policies and some implementation.

  5. Health Care Access among Deaf People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in…

  6. Special Issue: The Family and Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, William J., Ed.; McCubbin, Hamilton I., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses research and interventions related to family health care. Topics include health promotion; risk behaviors; vulnerability and illness onset; choosing health care systems; stress; caregiving and coping; family counseling; and family responses to Alzheimer's Disease, pediatric cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, and obesity. (JAC)

  7. Global health and primary care research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beasley, John W.; Starfield, Barbara; van Weel, Chris; Rosser, Walter W.; Haq, Cynthia L.

    2007-01-01

    A strong primary health care system is essential to provide effective and efficient health care in both resource-rich and resource-poor countries. Although a direct link has not been proven, we can reasonably expect better economic status when the health of the population is improved. Research in pr

  8. Global health and primary care research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beasley, J.W.; Starfield, B.; Weel, C. van; Rosser, W.W.; Haq, C.L.

    2007-01-01

    A strong primary health care system is essential to provide effective and efficient health care in both resource-rich and resource-poor countries. Although a direct link has not been proven, we can reasonably expect better economic status when the health of the population is improved. Research in pr

  9. Global health and primary care research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beasley, J.W.; Starfield, B.; Weel, C. van; Rosser, W.W.; Haq, C.L.

    2007-01-01

    A strong primary health care system is essential to provide effective and efficient health care in both resource-rich and resource-poor countries. Although a direct link has not been proven, we can reasonably expect better economic status when the health of the population is improved. Research in

  10. Health care of youth aging out of foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Youth transitioning out of foster care face significant medical and mental health care needs. Unfortunately, these youth rarely receive the services they need because of lack of health insurance. Through many policies and programs, the federal government has taken steps to support older youth in foster care and those aging out. The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Pub L No. 110-354) requires states to work with youth to develop a transition plan that addresses issues such as health insurance. In addition, beginning in 2014, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (Pub L No. 111-148) makes youth aging out of foster care eligible for Medicaid coverage until age 26 years, regardless of income. Pediatricians can support youth aging out of foster care by working collaboratively with the child welfare agency in their state to ensure that the ongoing health needs of transitioning youth are met.

  11. Health care law versus constitutional law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, the Supreme Court's ruling on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, is a landmark decision - both for constitutional law and for health care law and policy. Others will study its implications for constitutional limits on a range of federal powers beyond health care. This article considers to what extent the decision is also about health care law, properly conceived. Under one view, health care law is the subdiscipline that inquires how courts and government actors take account of the special features of medicine that make legal or policy issues especially problematic - rather than regarding health care delivery and finance more generically, like most any other economic or social enterprise. Viewed this way, the opinions from the Court's conservative justices are mainly about general constitutional law principles. In contrast, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's dissenting opinion for the four more liberal justices is just as much about health care law as it is about constitutional law. Her opinion gives detailed attention to the unique features of health care finance and delivery in order to inform her analysis of constitutional precedents and principles. Thus, the Court's multiple opinions give a vivid depiction of the compelling contrasts between communal versus individualistic conceptions of caring for those in need, and between health care and health insurance as ordinary commodities versus ones that merit special economic, social, and legal status.

  12. Children with Special Health Care Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by their families. "These children are at a disadvantage in the health care system, because important medical ... Care For You American College of Emergency Phycisians Copyright © American College of Emergency Physicians 2017 Privacy Policy ...

  13. Patient Perspectives on Improving Oral Health-Care Practices Among People Living with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabiun, Serena; Fox, Jane E.; McCluskey, Amanda; Guevara, Ernesto; Verdecias, Niko; Jeanty, Yves; DeMayo, Michael; Mofidi, Mahyar

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the impact on oral health-care knowledge, attitudes, and practices among 39 people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) participating in a national initiative aimed at increasing access to oral health care. Personal values and childhood dental experiences, beliefs about the importance of oral health in relation to HIV health, and concerns for appearance and self-esteem were found to be determinants of oral health knowledge and practice. Program participation resulted in better hygiene practices, improved self-esteem and appearance, relief of pain, and better physical and emotional health. In-depth exploration of the causes for these changes revealed a desire to continue with dental care due to the dental staff and environmental setting, and a desire to maintain overall HIV health, including oral health. Our findings emphasize the importance of addressing both personal values and contextual factors in providing oral health-care services to PLWHA. PMID:22547879

  14. Oral Health Knowledge, Past Oral Health Behaviors, and Barriers to Preventive Oral Care of Head Start Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay remains the most common chronic disease of childhood. The CincySmiles Foundation (CSF) developed an instrument to evaluate Head Start parents' knowledge of oral health care practices and to identify barriers Head Start parents face when seeking dental treatment for their children. Data from Head Start parents (n = 675) across 3…

  15. Oral Health Knowledge, Past Oral Health Behaviors, and Barriers to Preventive Oral Care of Head Start Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay remains the most common chronic disease of childhood. The CincySmiles Foundation (CSF) developed an instrument to evaluate Head Start parents' knowledge of oral health care practices and to identify barriers Head Start parents face when seeking dental treatment for their children. Data from Head Start parents (n = 675) across 3…

  16. Food Reciprocity and Sustainability in Early Childhood Care and Education in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a perspective from early childhood care and education in Aotearoa New Zealand. It draws from the data of four recent studies to demonstrate pedagogical practices informed by Indigenous (Maori) perspectives. Maori values, such as "manaakitanga" (caring, hospitality, generosity) and "whanaungatanga"…

  17. Stability and Patterns of Classroom Quality in German Early Childhood Education and Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuger, Susanne; Kluczniok, Katharina; Kaplan, David; Rossbach, Hans-Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Many education systems worldwide have dedicated a significant amount of resources to improve quality levels in early childhood education and care. Research can contribute to this goal by providing information about conditions of high-quality education and care and reasons for changes in the quality provided to children. This study therefore…

  18. Food Reciprocity and Sustainability in Early Childhood Care and Education in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a perspective from early childhood care and education in Aotearoa New Zealand. It draws from the data of four recent studies to demonstrate pedagogical practices informed by Indigenous (Maori) perspectives. Maori values, such as "manaakitanga" (caring, hospitality, generosity) and "whanaungatanga"…

  19. The Influence of Immigration Status on Early Childhood Education and Care Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joy Pastan; Kahn, Jessica M.

    2011-01-01

    Early childhood education and care has become the norm for children in the United States and most European countries. In the United States, immigrant children, a growing demographic, are under-enrolled, particularly in formal settings. This research revealed that younger children of immigrant mothers were less likely to be in non-parental care,…

  20. Distributed leadership in health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günzel-Jensen, Franziska; Jain, Ajay K.; Kjeldsen, Anne Mette

    2016-01-01

    Management and health care literature is increasingly preoccupied with leadership as a collective social process, and related leadership concepts such as distributed leadership have therefore recently gained momentum. This paper investigates how formal, i.e. transformational, transactional...... and empowering, leadership styles affect employees’ perceived agency in distributed leadership, and whether these associations are mediated by employees’ perceived organizational efficacy. Based on large-scale survey data from a study at one of Scandinavia’s largest public hospitals (N = 1,147), our results show...... that all leadership styles had a significant positive impact on employees’ perceived agency in distributed leadership. Further, organizational efficacy related negatively to employees’ perceived agency in distributed leadership; however a mediatory impact of this on the formal leadership styles...

  1. Spirulina in health care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Archana; Zacharia, Anish J; Jarouliya, Urmila; Bhadauriya, Pratiksha; Prasad, G B K S; Bisen, P S

    2008-10-01

    Spirulina is a photosynthetic, filamentous, spiral-shaped and multicellular edible microbe. It is the nature's richest and most complete source of nutrition. Spirulina has a unique blend of nutrients that no single source can offer. The alga contains a wide spectrum of prophylactic and therapeutic nutrients that include B-complex vitamins, minerals, proteins, gamma-linolenic acid and the super anti-oxidants such as beta-carotene, vitamin E, trace elements and a number of unexplored bioactive compounds. Because of its apparent ability to stimulate whole human physiology, Spirulina exhibits therapeutic functions such as antioxidant, anti-bacterial, antiviral, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and anti-diabetic and plethora of beneficial functions. Spirulina consumption appears to promote the growth of intestinal micro flora as well. The review discusses the potential of Spirulina in health care management.

  2. Understanding a Value Chain in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Alok D; Schroeder, Gregory D; West, Michael E; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2015-10-01

    As the US health care system transitions toward a value-based system, providers and health care organizations will have to closely scrutinize their current processes of care. To do this, a value chain analysis can be performed to ensure that only the most efficient steps are followed in patient care. Ultimately this will produce a higher quality or equal quality product for less cost by eliminating wasteful steps along the way.

  3. Implementing TQM in the health care sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motwani, J; Sower, V E; Brashier, L W

    1996-01-01

    This article examines the issue of implementing TQM/CQI programs in the health care industry by grouping the prescriptive literature into four research streams. Based on the literature, a strategic programming model for implementing TQM/CQI in the health care industry is suggested. Finally, issues relating to TQM in the health care sector, which need to be addressed within each research stream in the future, are provided.

  4. Blogging and the health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvey, Donna; Alderman, Barbara; Todd, Andrew D

    2009-01-01

    The use of blogs in the workplace has emerged as a communication tool that can rapidly and simultaneously connect managers with their employees, customers, their peers, and other key stakeholders. Nowhere is this connection more critical than in health care, especially because of the uncertainty surrounding health care reform and the need for managers to have access to timely and authentic information. However, most health care managers have been slow to join the blogging bandwagon. This article examines the phenomenon of blogging and offers a list of blogs that every health care manager should read and why. This article also presents a simplified step-by-step process to set up a blog.

  5. Attending Unintended Transformations of Health Care Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wentzer, Helle; Bygholm, Ann

    2007-01-01

    of theories on human-computer interaction and IT-mediated communication, different empirical studies of IT implementation in health care are analyzed. The outcome is an analytical discernment between different relations of communication and levels of interaction with IT in health care infrastructure....... These relations and levels are synthesized into a framework for identifying tensions and potential problems in the mediation of health care with the IT system. These problems are also known as unexpected adverse consequences, UACs, from IT implementation into clinical health care practices. Results: This paper...

  6. Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Series Urinary Tract Imaging Urodynamic Testing Virtual Colonoscopy Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals) Serologic tests for celiac disease provide an effective first step in identifying candidates ...

  7. The influence of contextual information on lay judgments of childhood mental health concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jessecae K; De Los Reyes, Andres; Wallerstein, Alexa

    2014-12-01

    Decisions about whether a person is in need of mental health care are often made by laypeople with no training in the identification of mental health concerns. For example, the parent of a child displaying problematic behavior has to decide whether this behavior is likely related to mental health concerns and necessitates professional care. The process of identifying mental health concerns is made more complicated by the rich background of real-world environmental factors or contexts in which concerns can present-contexts that might or might not relate to the presence of mental health concerns. We investigated whether laypeople use contextual information to make judgments regarding childhood mental health disorder symptoms. In Experiment 1, we demonstrated that laypeople's judgments of the likelihood of a mental disorder are influenced by non-diagnostic contextual information that surrounds symptoms of the disorder. In Experiment 2, we demonstrated that providing a causal origin for such disorder symptoms accentuates the use of context, regardless of the nature of the causal process (i.e., environmental vs. biological). These findings indicate that contextual influences on judgments about mental health concerns may reflect a more general set of mental reasoning processes than indicated by previous work focused on clinicians' judgments. Consequently, these findings have important implications for how we think about the influence of contextual information on decision making more generally as well as for improving our ability to both reliably identify children in need of mental health care and increase children's access to such care. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. 76 FR 68198 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... Administration Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage... designated as primary medical care, mental health, and dental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) as... seven health professional types (primary medical care, dental, psychiatric, vision care,...

  9. Screening for Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) in an Integrated Pediatric Care Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purewal, Sukhdip K.; Bucci, Monica; Wang, Lisa Gutiérrez; Koita, Kadiatou; Marques, Sara Silvério; Oh, Debora; Harris, Nadine Burke

    2016-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are stressful or traumatic events that place children at risk of negative health, mental health, and behavioral outcomes. The Center for Youth Wellness (CYW), working in partnership with the Bayview Child Health Center (BCHC), pioneered ACE screening for children and adolescents. This article describes the…

  10. Impact of bullying in childhood on adult health, wealth, crime, and social outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolke, Dieter; Copeland, William E; Angold, Adrian; Costello, E Jane

    2013-10-01

    Bullying is a serious problem for schools, parents, and public-policymakers alike. Bullying creates risks of health and social problems in childhood, but it is unclear if such risks extend into adulthood. A large cohort of children was assessed for bullying involvement in childhood and then followed up in young adulthood in an assessment of health, risky or illegal behavior, wealth, and social relationships. Victims of childhood bullying, including those that bullied others (bully-victims), were at increased risk of poor health, wealth, and social-relationship outcomes in adulthood even after we controlled for family hardship and childhood psychiatric disorders. In contrast, pure bullies were not at increased risk of poor outcomes in adulthood once other family and childhood risk factors were taken into account. Being bullied is not a harmless rite of passage but throws a long shadow over affected people's lives. Interventions in childhood are likely to reduce long-term health and social costs.

  11. Introduction: Studying Health and Health Care in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    De Geest, S.; Krause, K

    2014-01-01

    This introduction delineates and discusses the field of social, cultural, and historical studies of health and health care in Ghana. Health and health care are viewed as significant nexuses of social and cultural processes. This overview of studies, mainly from Anglophone medical anthropology, focuses on developments around "traditional" medicine and various themes relating to biomedicine, including hospital ethnography, pharmaceuticals, health insurance, reproductive technology, and HIV/AIDS...

  12. Integrating mental health into primary health care in Zambia: a care provider's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwanza Jason

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the 1991 reforms of the health system in Zambia, mental health is still given low priority. This is evident from the fragmented manner in which mental health services are provided in the country and the limited budget allocations, with mental health services receiving 0.4% of the total health budget. Most of the mental health services provided are curative in nature and based in tertiary health institutions. At primary health care level, there is either absence of, or fragmented health services. Aims The aim of this paper was to explore health providers' views about mental health integration into primary health care. Methods A mixed methods, structured survey was conducted of 111 health service providers in primary health care centres, drawn from one urban setting (Lusaka and one rural setting (Mumbwa. Results There is strong support for integrating mental health into primary health care from care providers, as a way of facilitating early detection and intervention for mental health problems. Participants believed that this would contribute to the reduction of stigma and the promotion of human rights for people with mental health problems. However, health providers felt they require basic training in order to enhance their knowledge and skills in providing health care to people with mental health problems. Recommendations It is recommended that health care providers should be provided with basic training in mental health in order to enhance their knowledge and skills to enable them provide mental health care to patients seeking help at primary health care level. Conclusion Integrating mental health services into primary health care is critical to improving and promoting the mental health of the population in Zambia.

  13. Childhood abuse history, posttraumatic stress disorder, postpartum mental health and bonding: A prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Julia S.; Sperlich, Mickey; Low, Lisa Kane; Ronis, David L.; Muzik, Maria; Liberzon, Israel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Research is needed that prospectively characterizes the intergenerational pattern of effects of childhood maltreatment and lifetime posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on women’s mental health in pregnancy and on postpartum mental health and bonding outcomes. This prospective study included 566 nulliparous women in 3 cohorts: PTSD-positive, trauma-exposed resilient, and non-exposed to trauma. Methods Standardized telephone interviews with women who were less than 28 gestational weeks ascertained trauma history, PTSD diagnosis, and depression diagnosis. A six-week postpartum interview reassessed interim trauma, labor experience, PTSD, depression, and bonding outcomes. Results Regression modeling indicates posttraumatic stress in pregnancy, alone, or comorbid with depression, is associated with postpartum depression (R2=.204, P<.001). Postpartum depression alone, or comorbid with posttraumatic stress, was associated with impaired bonding (R2=.195, P<.001). In both models, higher quality of life ratings in pregnancy were associated with better outcomes, while reported dissociation in labor was a risk for worse outcomes. The effect of a history of childhood maltreatment on both postpartum mental health and bonding outcomes was mediated by pre-existing mental health status. Discussion Pregnancy represents an opportune time to interrupt the pattern of intergenerational transmission of abuse and psychiatric vulnerability. Further dyadic research is warranted beyond six weeks postpartum. Trauma-informed interventions for women who enter care with abuse-related PTSD or depression should be developed and tested. PMID:23374491

  14. Consumer-driven health care marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, R L

    1997-01-01

    In this article, a health care marketing executive takes an opposing view: That the consumer will not only continue to exercise choice but also, at annual renewal time, veto power. In part, that is because the consumers are feeling the rising cost of health care much more directly than in the past, through ever-higher premiums, deductibles and copayments. As they assumed more of the burden of medical care delivery, consumers are becoming more knowledgeable about and discriminating toward the health care system and provider plans they are offered. They understand--as does their employer--that no longer are all health care plans alike or at parity with each other. The consumer is also demanding greater access to freedom of provider choice, quality of health care coverage.

  15. The Italian health-care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, George; Taroni, Francesco; Donatini, Andrea

    2005-09-01

    Italy's national health service is statutorily required to guarantee the uniform provision of comprehensive care throughout the country. However, this is complicated by the fact that, constitutionally, responsibility for health care is shared between the central government and the 20 regions. There are large and growing differences in regional health service organisation and provision. Public health-care expenditure has absorbed a relatively low share of gross domestic product, although in the last 25 years it has consistently exceeded central government forecasts. Changes in payment systems, particularly for hospital care, have helped to encourage organisational appropriateness and may have contributed to containing expenditure. Tax sources used to finance the Servizio Sanitario Nazionale (SSN) have become somewhat more regressive. The limited evidence on vertical equity suggests that the SSN ensures equal access to primary care but lower income groups face barriers to specialist care. The health status of Italians has improved and compares favourably with that in other countries, although regional disparities persist.

  16. The digital transformation of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coile, R C

    2000-01-01

    The arrival of the Internet offers the opportunity to fundamentally reinvent medicine and health care delivery. The "e-health" era is nothing less than the digital transformation of the practice of medicine, as well as the business side of the health industry. Health care is only now arriving in the "Information Economy." The Internet is the next frontier of health care. Health care consumers are flooding into cyberspace, and an Internet-based industry of health information providers is springing up to serve them. Internet technology may rank with antibiotics, genetics, and computers as among the most important changes for medical care delivery. Utilizing e-health strategies will expand exponentially in the next five years, as America's health care executives shift to applying IS/IT (information systems/information technology) to the fundamental business and clinical processes of the health care enterprise. Internet-savvy physician executives will provide a bridge between medicine and management in the adoption of e-health technology.

  17. Ethnic differentials in parental health seeking for childhood illness in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teerawichitchainan, Bussarawan; Phillips, James F

    2008-03-01

    Vietnam's sustained investment in primary healthcare since the onset of socialism has lowered infant and childhood mortality rates and improved life expectancy, exceeding progress achieved in other poor countries with comparable levels of income per capita. The recent introduction of user fees for primary healthcare services has generated concern that economic policies may have adversely affected health-seeking behavior and health outcomes of the poor, particularly among impoverished families who are members of socially marginalized minority groups. This paper examines this debate by analyzing parental recall of illness and care-seeking for sick children under the age of 5 years recorded by the 2001-2002 Vietnam National Health Survey. We estimate statistical models of the determinants of parental recall of incidence and response to illness among their children. Ethnic minority parents less frequently reported their children to have been sick than Kinh and Chinese parents. When they recognize an illness episode, minority parents are less likely to seek care -- whether professional consultation or self-prescribed care -- than non-minority parents. Ethnic differentials are evident in all geographic and income levels, although adverse effects of minority status are most pronounced among poor households in remote areas. Regression estimates of the effects of ethnicity and maternal education on health decisions are pronounced even when poverty effects are controlled, suggesting that social equity may have been under-emphasized in Vietnam's early health policy deliberations. Policies extending free healthcare to poor communes affect parental decisions to seek professional care or self-prescribed care among better-off parents without affecting parental decision making among the poor. Early health initiatives for the poor may therefore have failed to offset equity problems confronting impoverished ethnic minority families.

  18. A health services framework of spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daaleman, Timothy P

    2012-12-01

    To introduce a health services framework of spiritual care that addresses the empirical and applied issues surrounding spirituality and nursing practice. Despite over 20 years of study, the concept of spirituality is still under development, which limits application to nursing practice. Three studies using a health services framework are reviewed: (1) a survey study of dying patients and family that describes the providers, types and outcomes of spiritual care; (2) an exploratory study of the process of spiritual care; and (3) a multi-level study of the structure and outcomes of spiritual care in long-term care facilities. Spiritual care recipients identify family or friends (41%), clergy (17%) and health care providers (29%) as spiritual care providers. The most frequently reported type of spiritual care was help in coping with illness (87%). Just over half (55%) were satisfied with the care that they received. The processes of spiritual care involved: (1) presence, (2) opening eyes, and; (3) co-creating, which was a mutual and fluid activity between patients, family members and care providers. In long term care facilities, decedents who received spiritual care were perceived as receiving better overall care in the last month of life, when compared with those decedents who did not receive spiritual care. A health services framework provides a holistic view of spiritual care, one that is consistent with integrated nursing models. By focusing on the structure, process and outcome elements of spiritual care within organisational settings, nursing management can develop feasible approaches to implement, improve and evaluate the delivery of this unique type of care. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Female farmworkers' health during pregnancy: health care providers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Maureen A; Flocks, Joan D; Economos, Jeannie; McCauley, Linda A

    2013-07-01

    Pregnant farmworkers and their fetuses are at increased risk of negative health outcomes due to environmental and occupational factors at their workplaces. Health care providers who serve farm communities can positively affect workers' health through the informed care they deliver. Yet, interviews with rural health care providers reveal limited knowledge about agricultural work or occupational and environmental health risks during pregnancy. Professional associations, government organizations, academic institutions, and practice settings must renew their efforts to ensure that environmental and occupational health education, especially as it relates to women and their children, is incorporated into academic and practice environments.

  20. Challenges for the German Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, C F; Riemer-Hommel, P

    2012-06-01

    The German Health Care System (GHCS) faces many challenges among which an aging population and economic problems are just a few. The GHCS traditionally emphasised equity, universal coverage, ready access, free choice, high numbers of providers and technological equipment; however, real competition among health-care providers and insurance companies is lacking. Mainly in response to demographic changes and economic challenges, health-care reforms have focused on cost containment and to a lesser degree also quality issues. In contrast, generational accounting, priorisation and rationing issues have thus far been completely neglected. The paper discusses three important areas of health care in Germany, namely the funding process, hospital management and ambulatory care, with a focus on cost control mechanisms and quality improving measures as the variables of interest. Health Information Technology (HIT) has been identified as an important quality improvement tool. Health Indicators have been introduced as possible instruments for the priorisation debate.

  1. Mind the gap: gender differences in child special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Valerie; Rieker, Patricia P

    2012-07-01

    The gendered nature of special health care needs in childhood is an important yet understudied area. Although gendered differences in the prevalence of special health care needs have been documented, there is less knowledge about the factors which contribute to those differences. Two research questions guide this inquiry. First, is the gender gap consistent across child special health care need indicators? Second, to what extent is the gender gap in special health care needs driven by behavioral conditions? We use multiple indicators from the U.S. National Survey of Children's Health to expand our understanding about the dynamic relationship between gender and childhood health. There are clear gender differences in the prevalence of special health care needs. Boys are more likely than girls to have special health care needs overall and on the five separate components examined (medication, more care than typical, limitations, special therapies, and educational or behavioral problem). This gender gap is dynamic and varies by indicator; while behavioral conditions play a role, it remains even after controlling for behavioral conditions. The reasons for the gender differences appear to be both biological and social but much remains unknown about this pattern.

  2. Toward a 21st-century health care system: Recommendations for health care reform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Arrow (Kenneth); A. Auerbach (Alan); J. Bertko (John); L.P. Casalino (Lawrence Peter); F.J. Crosson (Francis); A. Enthoven (Alain); E. Falcone; R.C. Feldman; V.R. Fuchs (Victor); A.M. Garber (Alan); M.R. Gold (Marthe Rachel); D.A. Goldman; G.K. Hadfield (Gillian); M.A. Hall (Mark Ann); R.I. Horwitz (Ralph); M. Hooven; P.D. Jacobson (Peter); T.S. Jost (Timothy Stoltzfus); L.J. Kotlikoff; J. Levin (Jonathan); S. Levine (Sharon); R. Levy; K. Linscott; H.S. Luft; R. Mashal; D. McFadden (Daniel); D. Mechanic (David); D. Meltzer (David); J.P. Newhouse (Joseph); R.G. Noll (Roger); J.B. Pietzsch (Jan Benjamin); P. Pizzo (Philip); R.D. Reischauer (Robert); S. Rosenbaum (Sara); W. Sage (William); L.D. Schaeffer (Leonard Daniel); E. Sheen; B.N. Silber (Bernie Michael); J. Skinner (Jonathan Robert); S.M. Shortell (Stephen); S.O. Thier (Samuel); S. Tunis (Sean); L. Wulsin Jr.; P. Yock (Paul); G.B. Nun; S. Bryan (Stirling); O. Luxenburg (Osnat); W.P.M.M. van de Ven (Wynand); J. Cooper (Jim)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe coverage, cost, and quality problems of the U.S. health care system are evident. Sustainable health care reform must go beyond financing expanded access to care to substantially changing the organization and delivery of care. The FRESH-Thinking Project (www.fresh-thinking.org) held a

  3. Toward a 21st-century health care system: Recommendations for health care reform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Arrow (Kenneth); A. Auerbach (Alan); J. Bertko (John); L.P. Casalino (Lawrence Peter); F.J. Crosson (Francis); A. Enthoven (Alain); E. Falcone; R.C. Feldman; V.R. Fuchs (Victor); A.M. Garber (Alan); M.R. Gold (Marthe Rachel); D.A. Goldman; G.K. Hadfield (Gillian); M.A. Hall (Mark Ann); R.I. Horwitz (Ralph); M. Hooven; P.D. Jacobson (Peter); T.S. Jost (Timothy Stoltzfus); L.J. Kotlikoff; J. Levin (Jonathan); S. Levine (Sharon); R. Levy; K. Linscott; H.S. Luft; R. Mashal; D. McFadden (Daniel); D. Mechanic (David); D. Meltzer (David); J.P. Newhouse (Joseph); R.G. Noll (Roger); J.B. Pietzsch (Jan Benjamin); P. Pizzo (Philip); R.D. Reischauer (Robert); S. Rosenbaum (Sara); W. Sage (William); L.D. Schaeffer (Leonard Daniel); E. Sheen; B.N. Silber (Bernie Michael); J. Skinner (Jonathan Robert); S.M. Shortell (Stephen); S.O. Thier (Samuel); S. Tunis (Sean); L. Wulsin Jr.; P. Yock (Paul); G.B. Nun; S. Bryan (Stirling); O. Luxenburg (Osnat); W.P.M.M. van de Ven (Wynand); J. Cooper (Jim)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe coverage, cost, and quality problems of the U.S. health care system are evident. Sustainable health care reform must go beyond financing expanded access to care to substantially changing the organization and delivery of care. The FRESH-Thinking Project (www.fresh-thinking.org) held a

  4. Health care services, information systems & sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovenga, Evelyn J S

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * many competing characteristics within national health systems * national primary information and knowledge flows between health care entities * the role of information technologies in assisting health organizations become sustainable enterprises * the business of maintaining healthy populations for any nation * desirable e-health strategy objectives.

  5. Integrating Community Health Workers (CHWs) into Health Care Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Julianne; Razi, Sima; Emery, Kyle; Quattrone, Westleigh; Tardif-Douglin, Miriam

    2017-04-08

    Health care organizations increasingly employ community health workers (CHWs) to help address growing provider shortages, improve patient outcomes, and increase access to culturally sensitive care among traditionally inaccessible or disenfranchised patient populations. Scholarly interest in CHWs has grown in recent decades, but researchers tend to focus on how CHWs affect patient outcomes rather than whether and how CHWs fit into the existing health care workforce. This paper focuses on the factors that facilitate and impede the integration of the CHWs into health care organizations, and strategies that organizations and their staff develop to overcome barriers to CHW integration. We use qualitative evaluation data from 13 awardees that received Health Care Innovation Awards from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to enhance the quality of health care, improve health outcomes, and reduce the cost of care using programs involving CHWs. We find that organizational capacity, support for CHWs, clarity about health care roles, and clinical workflow drive CHW integration. We conclude with practical recommendations for health care organizations interested in employing CHWs.

  6. Childhood Health Status and Adulthood Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity in Rural China: Are They Related?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are among the top health problems of the Chinese population. Although mounting evidence suggests that early childhood health status has an enduring effect on late life chronic morbidity, no study so far has analyzed the issue in China. Using nationally representative data from the 2013 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS, a Probit model and Two-Stage Residual Inclusion estimation estimator were applied to analyze the relationship between childhood health status and adulthood cardiovascular disease in rural China. Good childhood health was associated with reduced risk of adult CVDs. Given the long-term effects of childhood health on adulthood health later on, health policy and programs to improve the health status and well-being of Chinese populations over the entire life cycle, especially in persons’ early life, are expected to be effective and successful.

  7. Family social environment in childhood and self-rated health in young adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roustit Christelle

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family social support, as a form of social capital, contributes to social health disparities at different age of life. In a life-course epidemiological perspective, the aims of our study were to examine the association between self-reported family social environment during childhood and self-reported health in young adulthood and to assess the role of family functioning during childhood as a potential mediating factor in explaining the association between family breakup in childhood and self-reported health in young adulthood. Methods We analyzed data from the first wave of the Health, Inequalities and Social Ruptures Survey (SIRS, a longitudinal health and socio-epidemiological survey of a random sample of 3000 households initiated in the Paris metropolitan area in 2005. Sample-weighted logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the association between the quality of family social environment in childhood and self-rated health (overall health, physical health and psychological well-being in young adults (n = 1006. We used structural equation model to explore the mediating role of the quality of family functioning in childhood in the association between family breakup in childhood and self-rated health in young adulthood. Results The multivariate results support an association between a negative family social environment in childhood and poor self-perceived health in adulthood. The association found between parental separation or divorce in childhood and poor self-perceived health in adulthood was mediated by parent-child relationships and by having witnessed interparental violence during childhood. Conclusion These results argue for interventions that enhance family cohesion, particularly after family disruptions during childhood, to promote health in young adulthood.

  8. [Measuring health literacy can improve communication in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørgaard, Ole; Sørensen, Kristine; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Kayser, Lars

    2014-01-06

    A tool for measuring health literacy is desirable when tailoring health care services to individual patients. Existing tools measure the functional aspects of health literacy whereas newly developed tools have a broader scope and measure people's knowledge, motivation and competences to access, understand, appraise and apply health information. Two novel, international health literacy questionnaires have been translated and are being validated in a Danish context. The final questionnaires may assist Danish health professionals in shaping communication with patients and reduce health disparities.

  9. Gender and communication style in general practice: differences between women's health care and regular health care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Bensing, J.M.; Kerssens, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Objectives: differences were investigated between general practitioners providing women's health care (4 women) and general practitioners providing regular health care (8 women and 8 men). Expectations were formulated on the basis of the principles of women's health care and literature about gender

  10. Can health care teams improve primary care practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grumbach, Kevin; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2004-03-10

    In health care settings, individuals from different disciplines come together to care for patients. Although these groups of health care personnel are generally called teams, they need to earn true team status by demonstrating teamwork. Developing health care teams requires attention to 2 central questions: who is on the team and how do team members work together? This article chiefly focuses on the second question. Cohesive health care teams have 5 key characteristics: clear goals with measurable outcomes, clinical and administrative systems, division of labor, training of all team members, and effective communication. Two organizations are described that demonstrate these components: a private primary care practice in Bangor, Me, and Kaiser Permanente's Georgia region primary care sites. Research on patient care teams suggests that teams with greater cohesiveness are associated with better clinical outcome measures and higher patient satisfaction. In addition, medical settings in which physicians and nonphysician professionals work together as teams can demonstrate improved patient outcomes. A number of barriers to team formation exist, chiefly related to the challenges of human relationships and personalities. Taking small steps toward team development may improve the work environment in primary care practices.

  11. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. ... of research findings, reviews, theories and information on all aspects of public health. ... health planning and management, health policy, health care financing, public health nutrition, ...

  12. Rethinking the status of early childhood care and education (ECCE) in rural and urban areas of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goduka, I

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the current status of, and to determine the need for, early childhood care and education in South Africa. The study included an assessment of the training needs of child carers and other individuals interested in working with young children in urban and rural areas of the region. A total of 373 African men and women with varied occupations and educational attainment were recruited in the study. A survey methodology was employed to obtain desired information. The study showed that families and communities, who have previously responded to the needs of young children including education, health, and nutrition, could no longer meet these needs because of social and economic dynamics. Training, training centers, infrastructure, and the integration of African culture in early childhood are perceived to be compelling needs. Several recommendations for policy and programs are presented.

  13. Childhood Abuse and Mental Health Indicators among Ethnically Diverse Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsam, Kimberly F.; Lehavot, Keren; Beadnell, Blair; Circo, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Prior research has established that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people experience higher rates of childhood abuse than heterosexuals. However, there has been little research on the mental health impact of these experiences or how race/ethnicity might influence prevalence and mental health impact of childhood abuse in this…

  14. Health-related quality of life in adult survivors of childhood sarcoidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; Svendsen, Claus Bo; Hoffmann, Anne Lisbeth

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To describe health-related quality of life (hrQOL) in adult subjects who had sarcoidosis in childhood. METHODS: Forty-six children (24 boys), all ethnic Danes......AIM: To describe health-related quality of life (hrQOL) in adult subjects who had sarcoidosis in childhood. METHODS: Forty-six children (24 boys), all ethnic Danes...

  15. Early Childhood Education: Pathways to Better Health. Preschool Policy Brief Issue 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman-Krauss, Allison; Barnett, W. Steven

    2013-01-01

    The potential health benefits of early childhood education programs are quite large, especially for children living in poverty. In this report, authors Allison Friedman-Krauss and Steve Barnett set out the evidence regarding the short and long term health benefits to children from early childhood education programs, identify the features of…

  16. Online Health Care Communication in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Normann; Agger Nielsen, Jeppe; Kim, Soonhee

    2013-01-01

    This paper brings forward five propositions on the use of online communication in health care, its potential impacts on efficiency and effectiveness in health care, and which role government should play in moving forward the use of online communication. In the paper, each of the five propositions...

  17. Catastrophic payments for health care in Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.K.A. van Doorslaer (Eddy); O.A. O'Donnell (Owen); R.P. Rannan-Eliya (Ravi); A. Somanathan (Aparnaa); S.R. Adhikari (Shiva Raj); C.C. Garg (Charu); D. Harbianto (Deni); A.N. Herrin (Alejandro); M.N. Huq (Mohammed); S. Ibragimova (Shamsia); A. Karan (Anup); T-J. Lee (Tae-Jin); G.M. Leung (Gabriel); J-F.R. Lu (Jui-fen Rachel); C.W. Ng (Ng); B.R. Pande (Badri Raj); R. Racelis (Rachel); S. Tao (Tao); K. Tin (Keith); K. Tisayaticom (Kanjana); L. Trisnantoro (Laksono); C. Vasavid (Vasavid); Y. Zhao (Yuxin)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractOut-of-pocket (OOP) payments are the principal means of financing health care throughout much of Asia. We estimate the magnitude and distribution of OOP payments for health care in fourteen countries and territories accounting for 81% of the Asian population. We focus on payments that ar

  18. Total quality management in behavioral health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluyter, G V

    1998-01-01

    The literature on total quality management or continuous quality improvement in the behavioral health care field is just beginning to emerge. Although most of the evidence on its effectiveness remains anecdotal, it seems clear that it can work in behavioral health care organizations with strong leadership support and a long-term commitment.

  19. Segmenting the mental health care market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, T R; Warren, W E; Stevens, R E

    1990-03-01

    The authors report the results of a segmentation study of the mental health care market. A random sample of 387 residents of a western city were interviewed by telephone. Cluster analysis of the data identified six market segments. Each is described according to the mental health care services to which it is most sensitive. Implications for targeting the segments are discussed.

  20. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2015-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children's health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children's health.…

  1. Catastrophic payments for health care in Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.K.A. van Doorslaer (Eddy); O.A. O'Donnell (Owen); R.P. Rannan-Eliya (Ravi); A. Somanathan (Aparnaa); S.R. Adhikari (Shiva Raj); C.C. Garg (Charu); D. Harbianto (Deni); A.N. Herrin (Alejandro); M.N. Huq (Mohammed); S. Ibragimova (Shamsia); A. Karan (Anup); T-J. Lee (Tae-Jin); G.M. Leung (Gabriel); J-F.R. Lu (Jui-fen Rachel); C.W. Ng (Ng); B.R. Pande (Badri Raj); R. Racelis (Rachel); S. Tao (Tao); K. Tin (Keith); K. Tisayaticom (Kanjana); L. Trisnantoro (Laksono); C. Vasavid (Vasavid); Y. Zhao (Yuxin)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractOut-of-pocket (OOP) payments are the principal means of financing health care throughout much of Asia. We estimate the magnitude and distribution of OOP payments for health care in fourteen countries and territories accounting for 81% of the Asian population. We focus on payments that ar

  2. Implementing the learning health care system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, R.; Barten, D.J.; Hek, K.; Nielen, M.; Prins, M.; Zwaanswijk, M.; Bakker, D. de

    2014-01-01

    Background: As computerisation of primary care facilities is rapidly increasing, a wealth of data is created in routinely recorded electronic health records (EHRs). This data can be used to create a true learning health care system, in which routinely available data are processed and analysed in ord

  3. Dutch health care performance report 2008.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westert, G.P.; Berg, M.J. van den; Koolman, X.; Verkleij, H.

    2008-01-01

    This is the second national report on the performance of the Dutch health care system. Its focus is on quality, access and costs in 2006/7. The Dutch Health Care Performance Report presents a broad picture based on 110 indicators. Where possible, comparisons in time and between countries are

  4. Transdisciplinarity in Health Care: A Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bewer, Vanessa

    2017-05-26

    To analyze the concept of transdisciplinarity and provide an enhanced definition of transdisciplinarity in health care. The term transdisciplinarity is increasingly prevalent in health care research and has been identified as important to improving the effectiveness and efficiency in health care. However, the term continues to be misappropriated and poorly understood by researchers and clinicians alike which hinders its potential use and impact. Walker and Avant's (2005) method of concept analysis was used as a framework for the study of the concept. The databases PubMed, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, PsycInfo and ERIC were used searching the terms transdisciplinarity, transdisciplinary, interdisciplinary and interdisciplinarity. Transdisciplinarity in health care involves transcending of disciplinary boundaries, a sharing of knowledge, skills and decision-making, a focus on real-world problems and the inclusion of multiple stakeholders including patients, their families and their communities. An enhanced definition of transdisciplinarity in health care emerged from this concept analysis that may provide clarity and direction for health care providers. Nurses, and other health care providers, can look to this definition to understand transdisciplinary health care teams as opposed to multidisciplinary, and interdisciplinary ones. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Quality systems in Dutch health care institutions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casparie, A.F.; Sluijs, E.M.; Wagner, C.; Bakker, D.H. de

    1997-01-01

    The implementation of quality systems in Dutch health care was supervised by a national committee during 1990-1995. To monitor the progress of implementation a large survey was conducted in the beginning of 1995. The survey enclosed all subsectors in health care. A postal questionnaire-derived fr

  6. Does lean cure variability in health care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roemeling, Oskar; Land, Martin; Ahaus, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – This research investigates the roles that employee-initiated Lean improvement projects play in health care. Lean ideas are introduced to improve flow in health care. Although variability is detrimental to flow performance, it is unclear whether Lean initiatives set out to reduce this varia

  7. Why Health Care Needs Design Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutz, Eva; Ammentorp, Jette; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2015-01-01

    . Furthermore, the data reveal that pediatric patients display a radically different play pattern than children who are not in hospital. The inquiry takes an interdisciplinary approach; it has obvious health care-related objectives and seeks to meet the urgent need for new methods within health care to optimize...

  8. Improving primary health care through technological innovation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.; Hutten, J.B.F.

    1989-01-01

    As a result of policy changes and developments on the demand side, the importance of technology in primary health care will grow fast. An approach to the implementation of new technologies in primary health care is presented in this article. First we describe the main problems in Dutch primary healt

  9. Primary care NPs: Leaders in population health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartwout, Kathryn D

    2016-08-18

    A 2012 Institute of Medicine report calls primary and public healthcare workers to action, tasking them with working together to improve population health outcomes. A Practical Playbook released in 2014 enables this public health/primary care integration. Primary care NPs are in an excellent position to lead the charge and make this integration happen.

  10. Online Health Care Communication in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Normann; Agger Nielsen, Jeppe; Kim, Soonhee

    2013-01-01

    This paper brings forward five propositions on the use of online communication in health care, its potential impacts on efficiency and effectiveness in health care, and which role government should play in moving forward the use of online communication. In the paper, each of the five propositions...

  11. Appropriate reserves in the health care sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, D.W.; Helden, G.J. van

    1999-01-01

    Organizations in the health care sector are increasingly managed and judged on the basis of economic criteria. At the same time they are faced with growing risks which necessitate ‘appropriate’ reserves. Various major risks are mentioned in this paper. Health care organizations are allowed to form p

  12. Effect of adverse childhood experiences on physical health in adulthood: Results of a study conducted in Baghdad city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameel F Al-Shawi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have revealed a powerful relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs and physical and mental health in adulthood. Literature documents the conversion of traumatic emotional experiences in childhood into organic disease later in life. Objective: The aim was to estimate the effect of childhood experiences on the physical health of adults in Baghdad city. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2013 to January 2014. The study sample was drawn from Baghdad city. Multistage sampling techniques were used in choosing 13 primary health care centers and eight colleges of three universities in Baghdad. In addition, teachers of seven primary schools and two secondary schools were chosen by a convenient method. Childhood experiences were measured by applying a modified standardized ACEs-International Questionnaire form and with questions for bonding to family and parental monitoring. Physical health assessment was measured by a modified questionnaire derived from Health Appraisal Questionnaire of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The questionnaire includes questions on cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, tumor, respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases. Results: Logistic regression model showed that a higher level of bonding to family (fourth quartile is expected to reduce the risk of chronic physical diseases by almost the half (odds ratio = 0.57 and exposure to a high level of household dysfunction and abuse (fourth quartile is expected to increase the risk of chronic physical diseases by 81%. Conclusion: Childhood experiences play a major role in the determination of health outcomes in adulthood, and early prevention of ACEs. Encouraging strong family bonding can promote physical health in later life.

  13. Changing trends in health care tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppan, Corinne M; Karuppan, Muthu

    2010-01-01

    Despite much coverage in the popular press, only anecdotal evidence is available on medical tourists. At first sight, they seemed confined to small and narrowly defined consumer segments: individuals seeking bargains in cosmetic surgery or uninsured and financially distressed individuals in desperate need of medical care. The study reported in this article is the first empirical investigation of the medical tourism consumer market. It provides the demographic profile, motivations, and value perceptions of health care consumers who traveled abroad specifically to receive medical care. The findings suggest a much broader market of educated and savvy health care consumers than previously thought. In the backdrop of the health care reform, the article concludes with implications for health care providers.

  14. Increased health care utilisation in international adoptees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Heidi Jeannet; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Kragstrup, Jakob;

    2015-01-01

    after adoption. Our study aimed to theassess health-care utilisation of international adoptees inprimary and secondary care for somatic and psychiatricdiagnoses in a late post-adoption period. Is there an increaseduse of the health-care system in this period, evenwhen increased morbidity in the group...... of allservices in primary care, while in secondary care only fewareas showed an increased long-term morbidity. Conclusion: International adoptees use medical servicesin primary care at a higher rate than non-adoptees someyears after adoption. Excess use of services in secondarycare is also present, but only......Introduction: Several studies have documented thatinternational adoptees have an increased occurrence ofhealth problems and contacts to the health-care systemafter arriving to their new country of residence. This maybe explained by pre-adoption adversities, especially for theperiod immediately...

  15. Care and education: Towards a new paradigm in early childhood education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström, Stig

    2006-01-01

    This paper identifies a contradiction thar exist amongst Danish child-care workers between care as medium for children's well-being and development and teaching as a medium for children's learning. This contradiction is often expressed as care versus learning and care/preschool versus school....... This paper propose that this is a false contradiction thar can keep early childhood education in a romantic child-centred position. Instead, the paper identifies a unity of care, teaching, and upbringing as a starting point for children's well-being, learning, development, and Bilding. Because the concept...

  16. Informing the debate on oral health care for older people: a qualitative study of older people's views on oral health and oral health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borreani, E; Jones, K; Scambler, S; Gallagher, J E

    2010-03-01

    Older people represent a growing and diverse section of the population. As age increases, people are more likely to experience health and mobility problems and be at higher risk of developing oral disease. Nevertheless, few older people utilise primary oral healthcare services. It is therefore important to understand the value older people place on oral health and dental services to inform providers and planners of oral health care. This research was conducted as part of a study to identify potential ways of minimising barriers to oral health care in older people. To explore perceptions of oral health and oral healthcare services amongst older people living in a socially deprived inner city area and how these are related to service utilisation. A qualitative approach was utilised to explore the range of issues related to older people's perceptions of oral health and their views on health care. This involved a combination of focus groups and semi-structured individual interviews with older people and their carers. Data analysis was conducted using the Framework approach. * Thirty-nine older people and/or their carers participated in focus groups. * Oral health perception: Oral health was associated with the presence of natural teeth, the absence of pain, practical/social functioning, preferably supported by positive assessment by a dentist. * Oral health life-course: Older people have a long and complex dental history. Past negative experiences with oral health care, especially in childhood, strongly influenced present attitudes towards dentistry and dental personnel. * Citizenship and right to health care: There was a strong perception that, as 'British citizens', older people should have a right to free health care and that the National Health Service (NHS) should support them in this phase of their life. The oral health life-course of older people is an important influence on their perceptions of oral health and dental attendance. They consider oral health of

  17. [Evaluation of the effectiveness of health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnad, L

    1990-01-01

    During the last two decades, the economic aspects of health care acquired an outstanding attentiveness in all developed countries. Simultaneously, the methods have been searched for a more intensive and perfect application of internal health sources, i.e. manpower, materials and money. New approaches in evaluating health care efficacy (conception of health provision as a branch of national economy) have been made. In accord with them, the efficiency of either individual or partial health actions such as health care programs, preventive measures, diagnostical and curative procedures etc.) is measured. All these questions are the up to date topic for Health care of Czechoslovakia which now is far to dispose of sources comparable with the majority of economically developed countries in Europe. At present, they are approximately similar in supplying 1 person health care needs with 500-1000 dol. a year and even more in several countries, whereas Czechoslovakia spends about 200 dol. on health needs of 1 inhabitant a year. This fact is closely connected with relatively low efficacy of our economy incapable to produce the sufficient sources for providing health care on one hand, and on the other it is due both to the budgetary politics as practiced now and the conception of national product division. The shortage in Health care sources is manifested mainly in retardation of material and technical base of health service altogether with low levelled renumeration of health workers consequential in psychologic, social and political problems. The consequences of this condition are reflected negatively in a level of health service provision. This is as far important as the czechoslovac population health status viewed from the so-called strategic health indices (averaged life expectancy, specific mortality, occurrence of cardiovascular diseases and malignancies etc.) is not favourable due to a number of factors, and its improvement will require considerable efforts from both the

  18. Cognitive systems engineering in health care

    CERN Document Server

    Bisantz, Ann M; Fairbanks, Rollin J

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive Engineering for Better Health Care Systems, Ann M. Bisantz, Rollin J. Fairbanks, and Catherine M. BurnsThe Role of Cognitive Engineering in Improving Clinical Decision Support, Anne Miller and Laura MilitelloTeam Cognitive Work Analysis as an Approach for Understanding Teamwork in Health Care, Catherine M. BurnsCognitive Engineering Design of an Emergency Department Information System, Theresa K. Guarrera, Nicolette M. McGeorge, Lindsey N. Clark, David T. LaVergne, Zachary A. Hettinger, Rollin J. Fairbanks, and Ann M. BisantzDisplays for Health Care Teams: A Conceptual Framework and Design Methodology, Avi ParushInformation Modeling for Cognitive Work in a Health Care System, Priyadarshini R. PennathurSupport for ICU Clinician Cognitive Work through CSE, Christopher Nemeth, Shilo Anders, Jeffrey Brown, Anna Grome, Beth Crandall, and Jeremy PamplinMatching Cognitive Aids and the "Real Work" of Health Care in Support of Surgical Microsystem Teamwork, Sarah Henrickson Parker and Shawna J. PerryEngageme...

  19. Future developments in health care performance management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crema M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Maria Crema, Chiara Verbano Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Vicenza, Italy Abstract: This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance. Keywords: health care, lean management, clinical risk management, quality, health care processes

  20. Digital signature technology for health care applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H A; Wang, Y Z; Wang, S

    2001-03-01

    The personal computer and the Internet have provided many useful services to both health care professionals and the general public. However, security remains a key factor that could limit their further growth potential. We reviewed and assessed the potential use of the cryptographic technique to resolve security issues. We also analyzed services available in the current market environment and determined their viability in supporting health care applications. While the cryptographic application has a great potential in protecting security of health care information transmitted over the Internet, a nationwide security infrastructure is needed to support deployment of the technology. Although desirable, it could be cost prohibitive to build a national system to be dedicated for the health care purpose. A hybrid approach that involves the government's development of a dedicated security infrastructure for health care providers and the use of commercial off-the-shelf products and services by the general public offers the most cost-effective and viable approach.

  1. Redistributive effects in public health care financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honekamp, Ivonne; Possenriede, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    This article focuses on the redistributive effects of different measures to finance public health insurance. We analyse the implications of different financing options for public health insurance on the redistribution of income from good to bad health risks and from high-income to low-income individuals. The financing options considered are either income-related (namely income taxes, payroll taxes, and indirect taxes), health-related (co-insurance, deductibles, and no-claim), or neither (flat fee). We show that governments who treat access to health care as a basic right for everyone should consider redistributive effects when reforming health care financing.

  2. [Health advocacy in child care: literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Raquel Dully; Mello, Débora Falleiros; Silva, Marta Angélica Iossi; Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena

    2011-01-01

    This narrative literature review aimed to identify the publications about health law, in the ambit of child health care. The databases LILACS and MEDLINE were searched, between 2004 and 2009. Thirteen articles were analyzed, and three themes were identified: Emphasis on knowledge, abilities and attitudes for the development of competencies; Partnerships as an imperative; Health and Law: intersectorial relationship. The studies about the practice of health law are relevant to our reality, especially in primary health care, pointing out for the possibilities of its applicability in the role of the nurses acting in the family health strategy, with families and children.

  3. Medicaid Managed Care Model of Primary Care and Health Care Management for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Theodore A.; Walsh, Kevin K.

    2006-01-01

    Lack of sufficient accessible community-based health care services for individuals with developmental disabilities has led to disparities in health outcomes and an overreliance on expensive models of care delivered in hospitals and other safety net or state-subsidized providers. A functioning community-based primary health care model, with an…

  4. Processes of Categorisation and the Politics of Belonging in Early Childhood Education and Care: An Infant's Experience in Multi-Age Family Day Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratigos, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Belonging is emerging as an important concept for early childhood education and care. However, it is one that requires further theorisation beyond everyday or romanticised understandings. The politics of belonging provides a potentially productive focus for thinking about belonging in early childhood education and care because of its attention to…

  5. [Transforming health systems based on primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Arenas, Luis; Salinas-Escudero, Guillermo; Granados-García, Víctor; Martínez-Valverde, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Access to health services is a social basic determinant of health in Mexico unlike what happens in developed countries. The demand for health services is focused on primary care, but the design meets only the supply of hospital care services. So it generates a dissonance between the needs and the effective design of health services. In addition, the term affiliation refers to population contributing or in the recruitment process, that has been counted as members of these social security institutions (SS) and Popular Insurance (SP). In the case of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) three of four contributors are in contact with health services; while in the SP, this indicator does not exist. Moreover, the access gap between health services is found in the health care packages so that members of the SS and SP do not have same type of coverage. The question is: which model of health care system want the Mexicans? Primary care represents the first choice for increasing the health systems performance, as well as to fulfill their function of social protection: universal access and coverage based on needs, regardless whether it is a public or private health insurance. A central aspect for development of this component is the definition of the first contact with the health system through the creation of a primary health care team, led by a general practitioner as the responsible of a multidisciplinary health team. The process addresses the concepts of primary care nursing, consumption of inputs (mainly medical drugs), maintenance and general services. Adopting a comprehensive strategy that will benefit all Mexicans equally and without discrimination, this primary care system could be financed with a total operating cost of approximately $ 22,809 million by year.

  6. Chinese health care system and clinical epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuelian; Gregersen, Hans; Yuan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    China has gone through a comprehensive health care insurance reform since 2003 and achieved universal health insurance coverage in 2011. The new health care insurance system provides China with a huge opportunity for the development of health care and medical research when its rich medical resources are fully unfolded. In this study, we review the Chinese health care system and its implication for medical research, especially within clinical epidemiology. First, we briefly review the population register system, the distribution of the urban and rural population in China, and the development of the Chinese health care system after 1949. In the following sections, we describe the current Chinese health care delivery system and the current health insurance system. We then focus on the construction of the Chinese health information system as well as several existing registers and research projects on health data. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and challenges of the health care system in regard to clinical epidemiology research. China now has three main insurance schemes. The Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) covers urban employees and retired employees. The Urban Residence Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) covers urban residents, including children, students, elderly people without previous employment, and unemployed people. The New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS) covers rural residents. The Chinese Government has made efforts to build up health information data, including electronic medical records. The establishment of universal health care insurance with linkage to medical records will provide potentially huge research opportunities in the future. However, constructing a complete register system at a nationwide level is challenging. In the future, China will demand increased capacity of researchers and data managers, in particular within clinical epidemiology, to explore the rich resources. PMID:28356772

  7. Poverty dynamics and parental mental health: Determinants of childhood mental health in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimons, Emla; Goodman, Alissa; Kelly, Elaine; Smith, James P

    2017-02-01

    Using data from the British Millennium Cohort Study (MCS), an ongoing longitudinal study of a cohort of 18,827 children born in the UK in 2000-2001, we investigate important correlates of mental health issues during childhood. MCS respondents were sampled at birth, at age 9 months, and then when they were 3, 5, 7 and 11 years old. Each sweep contains detailed information on the family's SES, parenting activities, developmental indicators, parental relationship status, and indicators of parental mental health. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and the related Rutter scale were used to identify behavioral and emotional problems in children. In this paper, childhood problems are separated into four domains: hyperactivity, emotional symptoms, conduct problems, and peer problems. We focus on two aspects of this relationship at ages 5 and 11-the role of temporary and persistent poverty and the role of temporary and persistent mental health problems of mothers and fathers. At ages 11 and 5, without other controls in the model, persistent and transitory poverty have strong estimated associations with all four domains, with somewhat stronger estimated effects for persistent poverty. After a set of controls are added, we document that both persistent levels of poverty and transitions into poverty are strongly associated with levels of and transitions into childhood mental health problems. Similarly, sustained levels and transitions into mothers' mental health problems are strongly associated with levels and transitions into children's mental health problems. This is much less so for fathers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Education and Health Care Policies in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziblim Abukari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Education and health care policies in Ghana since independence have been universalist in approach providing free universal health care and free basic and tertiary education until the early 1980s. Precipitated primarily by a severe drought, stagnant economic growth, mismanagement, and political instability, Ghana undertook major economic reforms with prodding from the World Bank and International Monetary Fund in a bid to salvage the economy. These economic measures included cost recovery and cutback spending in education and health sectors. However, in recent years, purposive targeted interventions have been pursued to address inequalities in education and health care. These new programs include the Education Capitation Grant, school feeding program, and the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS, which are propelling Ghana toward the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. The prospects of these programs in addressing disparities in access to education and health care in the country and recommendations for improved delivery are discussed.

  9. Health care for prisoners in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, John P; Joseph, Patrice; Pape, Jean William; Binswanger, Ingrid A

    2010-09-21

    Prisoners have disproportionate health care needs. Meeting those needs in a prison environment is challenging, especially in such resource-poor countries as Haiti. Even so, before the January 2010 earthquake, local and international organizations, in collaboration with the Haitian government, had been making significant progress to provide for the health needs of prisoners. The effort screened and identified prisoners for infectious disease, initiated appropriate care and treatment, and prepared prisoners for release to the community. Not only is it possible to establish an adequate prison health care program in a resource-poor country, it is necessary. Without adequate management of prisoners' health needs, especially for such infectious diseases as HIV and tuberculosis, disease burden increases. Infectious disease can spread among prisoners and impact the public's health. Recovery for postearthquake Haiti, as any nation rebuilding following natural disaster or conflict, requires respect for rule of law. This includes humane detention and the delivery of justice and adequate health care for prisoners.

  10. Childhood poverty and health: cumulative risk exposure and stress dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gary W; Kim, Pilyoung

    2007-11-01

    A massive literature documents the inverse association between poverty or low socioeconomic status and health, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this robust relation. We examined longitudinal relations between duration of poverty exposure since birth, cumulative risk exposure, and physiological stress in two hundred seven 13-year-olds. Chronic stress was assessed by basal blood pressure and overnight cortisol levels; stress regulation was assessed by cardiovascular reactivity to a standard acute stressor and recovery after exposure to this stressor. Cumulative risk exposure was measured by multiple physical (e.g., substandard housing) and social (e.g., family turmoil) risk factors. The greater the number of years spent living in poverty, the more elevated was overnight cortisol and the more dysregulated was the cardiovascular response (i.e., muted reactivity). Cardiovascular recovery was not affected by duration of poverty exposure. Unlike the duration of poverty exposure, concurrent poverty (i.e., during adolescence) did not affect these physiological stress outcomes. The effects of childhood poverty on stress dysregulation are largely explained by cumulative risk exposure accompanying childhood poverty.

  11. [Renewing primary health care in the Americas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macinko, James; Montenegro, Hernán; Nebot Adell, Carme; Etienne, Carissa

    2007-01-01

    At the 2003 meeting of the Directing Council of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the PAHO Member States issued a mandate to strengthen primary health care (Resolution CD44. R6). The mandate led in 2005 to the document "Renewing Primary Health Care in the Americas. A Position Paper of the Pan American Health Organization/WHO [World Health Organization]," and it culminated in the Declaration of Montevideo, an agreement among the governments of the Region of the Americas to renew their commitment to primary health care (PHC). Scientific data have shown that PHC, regarded as the basis of all the health systems in the Region, is a key component of effective health systems and can be adapted to the range of diverse social, cultural, and economic conditions that exist. The new, global health paradigm has given rise to changes in the population's health care needs. Health services and systems must adapt to address these changes. Building on the legacy of the International Conference on Primary Health Care, held in 1978 in Alma-Ata (Kazakhstan, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics), PAHO proposes a group of strategies critical to adopting PHC-based health care systems based on the principles of equity, solidarity, and the right to the highest possible standard of health. The main objective of the strategies is to develop and/or strengthen PHC-based health systems in the entire Region of the Americas. A substantial effort will be required on the part of health professionals, citizens, governments, associations, and agencies. This document explains the strategies that must be employed at the national, subregional, Regional, and global levels.

  12. Community care in practice: social work in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymbery, M; Millward, A

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the establishment of social work within primary health care settings in Great Britain, following the passage of the National Health Service and Community Care Act in 1990. Although the improvement of relationships between social workers and primary health care teams has been promoted for a number of years, the advent of formal policies for community care has made this a priority for both social services and health. This paper presents interim findings from the evaluation of three pilot projects in Nottinghamshire, Great Britain. These findings are analysed from three linked perspectives. The first is the extent to which structures and organisations have worked effectively together to promote the location of social workers within health care settings. The second is the impact of professional and cultural factors on the work of the social worker in these settings. The third is the effect of interpersonal relationships on the success of the project. The paper will conclude that there is significant learning from each of these perspectives which can be applied to the future location of social workers to primary health care.

  13. Subjective experienced health as a driver of health care behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, S.; Stalpers, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the key role of the subjective experience of health as the driver of health related behavior. Individuals vary greatly in terms of behaviors related to health. Insights into these interindividual differences are of great importance for all parties involved in health care, includ

  14. Play and playfulness in early childhood education and care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singer E.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Play and playfulness are basic features in early childhood education. The elements of play are pleasure, a sense of freedom, and the co-construction of shared meaning through the use of rules or rhythms. Play and learning are closely related in early childhood. But when the focus on the educational benefits of play becomes too strong, the most essential feature of play is lost: children’s pleasure. Young children in group settings often have to adapt to the teachers’ demands related to security, hygiene, and social norms and values. But the playfulness of the teachers helps to overcome differences in power in the caregiver-child relationship and prevents young children from becoming overburdened with strict rules and group discipline. Play and playfulness are a resource of shared pleasure and creativity in learning processes.

  15. The Right to Health Care and Health Insurance Law

    OpenAIRE

    井上, 英夫

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to consider the legality of decision for medical treatment expenses under Health Insurance Law. The following issues are discussed: The right to health and Connstitution of Japan; The right to health and Medical Social Security Law; History and concept of Health Insurance Law; Health Insurance Law and the right to self-determination and freedom of medical treatment selection; Care of acupuncture and moxa cautery and medical teratment expenses under Health Insuranc...

  16. [Information in health care: the use of SIAB by the professional teams of Family Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolino, Janaína Souza; Scochi, Maria José

    2010-06-01

    The remarkable expansion of Family Health Care Program and the discussion of issues related to the amount of the collected data stimulated the need for designing an information system that embraced the complex organization of basic health care. So, in 1998, the Basic Health Care Information System (SI4B) was founded. This research aimed to investigate the use of SIAB by the professional teams of the Family Health Care. A questionnaire was applied to 75 professionals belonging to 10 teams which were observed, one week each. The study evidenced that the Family Health Care teams that participated in this research have not used the available information for planning or assessing their health care services, and so, they have missed the opportunity of using the available information for health care local needs.

  17. Cautioning Health-Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schut, Henk; Boerner, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Science and practice seem deeply stuck in the so-called stage theory of grief. Health-care professionals continue to “prescribe” stages. Basically, this perspective endorses the idea that bereaved people go through a set pattern of specific reactions over time following the death of a loved one. It has frequently been interpreted prescriptively, as a progression that bereaved persons must follow in order to adapt to loss. It is of paramount importance to assess stage theory, not least in view of the current status of the maladaptive “persistent complex bereavement-related disorder” as a category for further research in DSM-5. We therefore review the status and value of this approach. It has remained hugely influential among researchers as well as practitioners across recent decades, but there has also been forceful opposition. Major concerns include the absence of sound empirical evidence, conceptual clarity, or explanatory potential. It lacks practical utility for the design or allocation of treatment services, and it does not help identification of those at risk or with complications in the grieving process. Most disturbingly, the expectation that bereaved persons will, even should, go through stages of grieving can be harmful to those who do not. Following such lines of reasoning, we argue that stage theory should be discarded by all concerned (including bereaved persons themselves); at best, it should be relegated to the realms of history. There are alternative models that better represent grieving processes. We develop guidelines to enhance such a move beyond the stage approach in both theory and practice. PMID:28355991

  18. The Long Arm of Childhood: Preschool Associations with Adolescent Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabol, Terri J.; Hoyt, Lindsay Till

    2017-01-01

    The current study examines the extent to which participation in preschool at age 4 is associated with blood pressure, body mass index, and awakening cortisol at age 15. We capitalize on data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development to examine differences in adolescent health…

  19. Adverse childhood experiences among children placed in and adopted from foster care: Evidence from a nationally representative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Kristin; Wildeman, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    Despite good reason to believe that children in foster care are disproportionately exposed to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), relatively little research considers exposure to ACEs among this group of vulnerable children. In this article, we use data from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH), a nationally representative sample of non-institutionalized children ages 0-17 in the United States, to estimate the association between foster care placement and exposure to an array of ACEs. In adjusted logistic regression models, we find that children placed in foster care or adopted from foster care, compared to their counterparts, were more likely to experience parental divorce or separation, parental death, parental incarceration, parental abuse, violence exposure, household member mental illness, and household member substance abuse. These children were also more likely to experience ACEs than children across different thresholds of socioeconomic disadvantage (e.g., children in households with incomes below the poverty line) and across different family structures (e.g., children in single-mother families). These results advance our understanding of how children in foster care, an already vulnerable population, are disproportionately exposed to ACEs. This exposure, given the link between ACEs and health, may have implications for children's health and wellbeing throughout the life course. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Total quality management in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, S C

    1994-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM), continuous quality improvement (CQI) and quality control are terms that are becoming very familiar to workers in the health care environment. The purpose of this article is to discuss these terms and the concepts they describe. The origins of TQM and the keen interest in its application to the health care environment today are addressed. In other environments, TQM has shown significant increases in productivity while increasing effectiveness. Its application to the health care environment is the provision of the best possible care through continuously improving service to meet or exceed the needs and expectations of the customer. The customer in the health care environment could be the patient, staff, physician and community serviced by the hospital. Characteristics of the new organizational structure are reviewed. Established techniques and processes are commonly used to identify process-improvement opportunities to assist the manager in continuously evaluating quality trends.

  1. How Health Care Complexity Leads to Cooperation and Affects the Autonomy of Health Care Professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, Eric; Broekhuis, Manda; Stoffels, Renee; Jaspers, Frans

    2008-01-01

    Health professionals increasingly face patients with complex health problems and this pressurizes them to cooperate. The authors have analyzed how the complexity of health care problems relates to two types of cooperation: consultation and multidisciplinary teamwork (MTW). Moreover, they have

  2. Comparing Early Childhood Education and Care from a Rights-based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ancheta Arrabal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper pretends to examine how the equal right to quality education and care in the phase of early childhood is developed in different policies, particularly within the processes for the inclusion of children in situations of social risk and exclusion in the European systems of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC. Extracted from the findings of the author’s PhD, the following pages include some of the main characteristics, as well as the outcomes and the conclusions of the study, which are briefly described, comprising the structure of a comparison on the ECEC policies between three representative countries in Europe. The work attended to the previous studies on early childhood describing ECEC throughout western European societies, to analyse their impact in equity of opportunity considering ECEC as the long life learning base, and discussing its implications for the inter-generational exclusion, in searching policy recommendations to enhance ECEC and child well-being. 

  3. Integrated Community Case Management of Childhood Illness in Ethiopia: Implementation Strength and Quality of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathan P.; Amouzou, Agbessi; Tafesse, Mengistu; Hazel, Elizabeth; Legesse, Hailemariam; Degefie, Tedbabe; Victora, Cesar G.; Black, Robert E.; Bryce, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Ethiopia has scaled up integrated community case management of childhood illness (iCCM) in most regions. We assessed the strength of iCCM implementation and the quality of care provided by health extension workers (HEWs). Data collectors observed HEWs' consultations with sick children and carried out gold standard re-examinations. Nearly all HEWs received training and supervision, and essential commodities were available. HEWs provided correct case management for 64% of children. The proportions of children correctly managed for pneumonia, diarrhea, and malnutrition were 72%, 79%, and 59%, respectively. Only 34% of children with severe illness were correctly managed. Health posts saw an average of 16 sick children in the previous 1 month. These results show that iCCM can be implemented at scale and that community-based HEWs can correctly manage multiple illnesses. However, to increase the chances of impact on child mortality, management of severe illness and use of iCCM services must be improved. PMID:24799369

  4. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines “health care provider” as: (1) A doctor of medicine... providing health care services. (b) Others “capable of providing health care services” include only:...

  5. Organizational Learning in Health Care Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savithiri Ratnapalan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The process of collective education in an organization that has the capacity to impact an organization’s operations, performance and outcomes is called organizational learning. In health care organizations, patient care is provided through one or more visible and invisible teams. These teams are composed of experts and novices from diverse backgrounds working together to provide coordinated care. The number of teams involved in providing care and the possibility of breakdowns in communication and coordinated care increases in direct proportion to sophisticated technology and treatment strategies of complex disease processes. Safe patient care is facilitated by individual professional learning; inter-professional team learning and system based organizational learning, which encompass modified context specific learning by multiple teams and team members in a health care organization. Organizational learning in health care systems is central to managing the learning requirements in complex interconnected dynamic systems where all have to know common background knowledge along with shared meta-knowledge of roles and responsibilities to execute their assigned functions, communicate and transfer the flow of pertinent information and collectively provide safe patient care. Organizational learning in health care is not a onetime intervention, but a continuing organizational phenomenon that occurs through formal and informal learning which has reciprocal association with organizational change. As such, organizational changes elicit organizational learning and organizational learning implements new knowledge and practices to create organizational changes.

  6. Using mHealth to Improve Usage of Antenatal Care, Postnatal Care, and Immunization: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Watterson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile health (mHealth technologies have been implemented in many low- and middle-income countries to address challenges in maternal and child health. Many of these technologies attempt to influence patients’, caretakers’, or health workers’ behavior. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the literature to determine what evidence exists for the effectiveness of mHealth tools to increase the coverage and use of antenatal care (ANC, postnatal care (PNC, and childhood immunizations through behavior change in low- and middle-income countries. The full text of 53 articles was reviewed and 10 articles were identified that met all inclusion criteria. The majority of studies used text or voice message reminders to influence patient behavior change (80%, n=8 and most were conducted in African countries (80%, n=8. All studies showed at least some evidence of effectiveness at changing behavior to improve antenatal care attendance, postnatal care attendance, or childhood immunization rates. However, many of the studies were observational and further rigorous evaluation of mHealth programs is needed in a broader variety of settings.

  7. Using mHealth to Improve Usage of Antenatal Care, Postnatal Care, and Immunization: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Jessica L; Walsh, Julia; Madeka, Isheeta

    2015-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) technologies have been implemented in many low- and middle-income countries to address challenges in maternal and child health. Many of these technologies attempt to influence patients', caretakers', or health workers' behavior. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the literature to determine what evidence exists for the effectiveness of mHealth tools to increase the coverage and use of antenatal care (ANC), postnatal care (PNC), and childhood immunizations through behavior change in low- and middle-income countries. The full text of 53 articles was reviewed and 10 articles were identified that met all inclusion criteria. The majority of studies used text or voice message reminders to influence patient behavior change (80%, n = 8) and most were conducted in African countries (80%, n = 8). All studies showed at least some evidence of effectiveness at changing behavior to improve antenatal care attendance, postnatal care attendance, or childhood immunization rates. However, many of the studies were observational and further rigorous evaluation of mHealth programs is needed in a broader variety of settings.

  8. The Influence of Health Behaviours in Childhood on Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiuyun; Ohinmaa, Arto; Veugelers, Paul J

    2016-12-02

    Attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents is a global public health burden. Identification of health-related behavioral risk factors including diet quality and physical and sedentary activities for ADHD is important for prioritizing behavioral intervention strategies to improve mental health. This study aimed to examine the association of diet quality, physical activity, and sedentary behaviours in childhood with ADHD throughout adolescence. We linked data from grade five students aged primarily 10 and 11 years old who participated in a population-based lifestyle survey in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia with their administrative health care data. We applied negative binomial regression methods to examine the associations between health behaviours and ADHD. Of the 4875 students, 9.7% had one or more diagnoses of ADHD between the ages of 10/11 and 18 years. The number of primary diagnoses with ADHD was statistically significantly lower among students with better diet quality, higher levels of physical activity, and those that spent less time playing computers and video games (p health promotion programs aiming to improve children's diets and active lifestyles may also reduce the public health burden of ADHD.

  9. The Influence of Health Behaviours in Childhood on Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder in Adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuyun Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in children and adolescents is a global public health burden. Identification of health-related behavioral risk factors including diet quality and physical and sedentary activities for ADHD is important for prioritizing behavioral intervention strategies to improve mental health. This study aimed to examine the association of diet quality, physical activity, and sedentary behaviours in childhood with ADHD throughout adolescence. We linked data from grade five students aged primarily 10 and 11 years old who participated in a population-based lifestyle survey in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia with their administrative health care data. We applied negative binomial regression methods to examine the associations between health behaviours and ADHD. Of the 4875 students, 9.7% had one or more diagnoses of ADHD between the ages of 10/11 and 18 years. The number of primary diagnoses with ADHD was statistically significantly lower among students with better diet quality, higher levels of physical activity, and those that spent less time playing computers and video games (p < 0.05. These findings suggest that health promotion programs aiming to improve children’s diets and active lifestyles may also reduce the public health burden of ADHD.

  10. The "childhood obesity epidemic": health crisis or social construction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Tina

    2010-03-01

    There has been a meteoric rise over the past two decades in the medical research and media coverage of the so-called global childhood obesity epidemic. Recently, in response to this phenomenon, there has been a spate of books and articles in the fields of critical sociology and cultural studies that have argued that this "epidemic" is socially constructed, what Natalie Boero (2007) dubs a "postmodern epidemic." As an anthropologist who has studied child nutrition and obesity in relation to poverty and the school environment, I am concerned about both the lack of reflexivity among medical researchers as well as critical scholars' treatment of the problem as entirely socially constructed. In this article I present both sides of this debate and then discuss how wee can attempt to navigate a middle course that recognizes this health issue but also offers alternative approaches to those set by the biomedical agenda.

  11. Improving educational preparation for transcultural health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Var, R M

    1998-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that the health care needs of people from black and ethnic minority groups in England are not being met. A growing number of initiatives are being undertaken to remedy the situation. Many of them are focused on health care delivery at local and national levels. However, unless the preparation of health care professionals in the area of multi-cultural health care is appropriate and effective, a great deal of corrective action will continue to have to be taken. Despite 1997 having been the European Year Against Racism, it is still necessary to consider what educational preparation should be like. The article draws on identified inadequacies in health care provision as well as examples of initiatives taken to improve care provision. The author identifies deficiencies in educational preparation and proposes a range of actions to be taken. The article is focused on nursing, midwifery and health visiting education in England, but is deemed to be relevant to all health care professionals not only in Europe but other continents, as they become increasingly international and multi-ethnic.

  12. [Aspects of economic responsibility in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauke, Eugen

    2007-01-01

    According to the final consensus of a panel of intense discussions, the health care system should/can not be excluded from the economic laws of efficiency. Appropriate adaptation of various methods and instruments of economics make these tools applicable for use in the health care system. Due to errors in the implementation of economic methods, though, the question arises who is economically responsible in the health care system. The answer is found at three different levels of the health care system. The physician plays a leading role, both personally and professionally, in being primarily responsible for the direct medical treatment of the patient. The physician's dependence, however, on the health care system reduces his independence, which markedly affects his decision-making and treatment. Management of and in health care institutions is largely independent of the profession learned. Managers and physicians acting as managers must be appropriately and duly educated in the necessary specific talents and knowledge. The organisation of a health care system should also be reserved for trained specialists where the physicians as well as other professionals are obliged to acquire the skills necessary.

  13. Telemedicine and competitive change in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMay, C L

    1997-01-01

    Telemedicine--the delivery of health care services to the underserved through communications technologies--has the potential to bring medical care to remote areas where health care is either inadequate or nonexistent. Telemedicine can be something as simple as a phone call, a network transmission of a radiograph or other diagnostic image, or, much more advanced, realtime video surgical consultations from anywhere on the globe. Telemedicine programs operate throughout Europe, Japan, and Australia. International programs, for profit and nonprofit, serve Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. The United States is also a major telemedicine developer, principally through government agencies such as the Department of Defense and the Office of Rural Health Policy, and, to a lesser extent, the private sector. But telemedicine in the United States has yet to prove itself economically viable, and it faces a number of political and regulatory barriers. Even more significantly, telemedicine's potential to increase overall health care spending by increasing access to health care has deterred private industry from investing heavily in it. In the short term, telemedicine's most important contribution to health care may be raising fundamental questions about United States health care policy.

  14. Promoting coordination in Norwegian health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor I. Romøren

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: The Norwegian health care system is well organized within its two main sectors - primary health and long term care on the one hand, and hospitals and specialist services on the other. However, the relation between them lacks mediating structures.Policy practice: Enhancing coordination between primary and secondary health care has been central in Norwegian health care policy the last decade. In 2003 a committee was appointed to identify coordination problems and proposed a lot of practical and organisational recommendations. It relied on an approach challenging primary and secondary health care in shared geographical regions to take action. However, these proposals were not implemented. In 2008 a new Minister of Health and Care worked out plans under the key term "Coordination Reform". These reform plans superseded and expanded the previous policy initiatives concerning cooperation, but represented also a shift in focus to a regulative and centralised strategy, including new health legislation, structural reforms and use of economic incentives that are now about to be implemented.Discussion: The article analyses the perspectives and proposals of the previous and the recent reform initiatives in Norway and discusses them in relation to integrated care measures implemented in Denmark and Sweden.

  15. Promoting coordination in Norwegian health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor I. Romøren

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: The Norwegian health care system is well organized within its two main sectors - primary health and long term care on the one hand, and hospitals and specialist services on the other. However, the relation between them lacks mediating structures. Policy practice: Enhancing coordination between primary and secondary health care has been central in Norwegian health care policy the last decade. In 2003 a committee was appointed to identify coordination problems and proposed a lot of practical and organisational recommendations. It relied on an approach challenging primary and secondary health care in shared geographical regions to take action. However, these proposals were not implemented. In 2008 a new Minister of Health and Care worked out plans under the key term "Coordination Reform". These reform plans superseded and expanded the previous policy initiatives concerning cooperation, but represented also a shift in focus to a regulative and centralised strategy, including new health legislation, structural reforms and use of economic incentives that are now about to be implemented. Discussion: The article analyses the perspectives and proposals of the previous and the recent reform initiatives in Norway and discusses them in relation to integrated care measures implemented in Denmark and Sweden.

  16. Brief oral health promotion intervention among parents of young children to reduce early childhood dental decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe untreated dental decay affects a child’s growth, body weight, quality of life as well as cognitive development, and the effects extend beyond the child to the family, the community and the health care system. Early health behavioural factors, including dietary practices and eating patterns, can play a major role in the initiation and development of oral diseases, particularly dental caries. The parent/caregiver, usually the mother, has a critical role in the adoption of protective health care behaviours and parental feeding practices strongly influence children’s eating behaviours. This study will test if an early oral health promotion intervention through the use of brief motivational interviewing (MI) and anticipatory guidance (AG) approaches can reduce the incidence of early childhood dental decay and obesity. Methods The study will be a randomised controlled study with parents and their new-born child/ren who are seen at 6–12 weeks of age by a child/community health nurse. Consenting parents will complete a questionnaire on oral health knowledge, behaviours, self-efficacy, oral health fatalism, parenting stress, prenatal and peri-natal health and socio-demographic factors at study commencement and at 12 and 36 months. Each child–parent pair will be allocated to an intervention or a standard care group, using a computer-generated random blocks. The standard group will be managed through the standard early oral health screening program; “lift the lip”. The intervention group will be provided with tailored oral health counselling by oral health consultants trained in MI and AG. Participating children will be examined at 24, and 36 months for the occurrence of dental decay and have their height and weight recorded. Dietary information obtained from a food frequency chart will be used to determine food and dietary patterns. Data analysis will use intention to treat and per protocol analysis and will use tests of independent

  17. Brief oral health promotion intervention among parents of young children to reduce early childhood dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrow, Peter; Raheb, Joseph; Miller, Margaret

    2013-03-20

    Severe untreated dental decay affects a child's growth, body weight, quality of life as well as cognitive development, and the effects extend beyond the child to the family, the community and the health care system. Early health behavioural factors, including dietary practices and eating patterns, can play a major role in the initiation and development of oral diseases, particularly dental caries. The parent/caregiver, usually the mother, has a critical role in the adoption of protective health care behaviours and parental feeding practices strongly influence children's eating behaviours. This study will test if an early oral health promotion intervention through the use of brief motivational interviewing (MI) and anticipatory guidance (AG) approaches can reduce the incidence of early childhood dental decay and obesity. The study will be a randomised controlled study with parents and their new-born child/ren who are seen at 6-12 weeks of age by a child/community health nurse. Consenting parents will complete a questionnaire on oral health knowledge, behaviours, self-efficacy, oral health fatalism, parenting stress, prenatal and peri-natal health and socio-demographic factors at study commencement and at 12 and 36 months. Each child-parent pair will be allocated to an intervention or a standard care group, using a computer-generated random blocks. The standard group will be managed through the standard early oral health screening program; "lift the lip". The intervention group will be provided with tailored oral health counselling by oral health consultants trained in MI and AG.Participating children will be examined at 24, and 36 months for the occurrence of dental decay and have their height and weight recorded. Dietary information obtained from a food frequency chart will be used to determine food and dietary patterns. Data analysis will use intention to treat and per protocol analysis and will use tests of independent proportions and means. Multivariate

  18. Ethical thinking and discrimination in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Mlinšek

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available RQ: Personal excellence of nursing focusing on self-transcendence and achievements is crucial for achieving excellence in health care. The question is whether there is unequal treatment of patients despite high ethical standards placed in health care.Purpose: Professional nurses code is a guide in assessing their ethical performance. People are different amongst each other, but have the same rights in the health system, which should be provided by health care services. The need to overcome inequalities has become a cornerstone of excellence in health care.Method: A small quantitative survey of nurses was conducted in one of the departments in a Slovenian hospital. To analyse the results, we used frequency statistics, Spearman's rank correlation test and chi-square test. Results: Providers of health care services are aware of the importance of ethics in its formation. Professional Code is relatively well known; 8.4 % of the respondents were not sure if they clearly define the principles of respect for equality. Discrimination, caused by providers of health care, is of a less extent. Ethical awareness among health care providers does not affect identification with the profession. The education level ofnursing personnel and the perception of discrimination based on religious affiliation influenced one another. Education has no influence on the perception of discrimination based on other circumstances.Organization: Health care organizations should integrate hygieneethical thinking among its strategic goals. Quality is not only quantifying the data. Personal excellence of health care providers, which is difficult to measure, is the basic building block of organizational excellence and patient satisfaction.Originality: There are not many research studies on perceptionsof discrimination in health care. The article raises the sensitive issue that we should talk more about.Limitations: The survey was conducted on a small sample size. Further research

  19. A Message to Health Care Professionals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-11

    This podcast features teens who urge US health care professionals to talk to teen patients about pregnancy and contraception.  Created: 10/11/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Reproductive Health (DRH).   Date Released: 10/11/2011.

  20. Towards safe information technology in health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.C.M. Aarts (Jos)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHealth information technology is widely accepted to increase patient safety and reduce medical errors. The widespread implementation makes evident that health information technology has become of a complex sociotechnical system that is health care. Design and implementation may result in

  1. Towards safe information technology in health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.C.M. Aarts (Jos)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHealth information technology is widely accepted to increase patient safety and reduce medical errors. The widespread implementation makes evident that health information technology has become of a complex sociotechnical system that is health care. Design and implementation may result in

  2. Anger in the UK Armed Forces: strong association with mental health, childhood antisocial behavior, and combat role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rona, Roberto J; Jones, Margaret; Hull, Lisa; MacManus, Deirdre; Fear, Nicola T; Wessely, Simon

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the strength of the association of several mental health problems, childhood difficulties, and combat role with anger, as well as the contribution of these factors to explain anger assessed by population attributable fraction (PAF). A total of 9885 UK service personnel, some of them deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, participated in the study. There was a strong or intermediate association between cases and subthreshold cases of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, psychological distress, multiple physical symptoms and alcohol misuse, having a combat role, childhood adversity, and childhood antisocial behavior with anger. The PAF for any mental health problem and combat role and childhood difficulties was 0.64 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.56-0.70) and increased to 0.77 (95% CI, 0.69-0.83) if subthreshold cases were included. Anger is a frequent component of mental disorders; health care professionals need to be aware of the interference of anger in the management of mental illness and that anger infrequently presents as an isolated phenomenon.

  3. Disrupting incrementalism in health care innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Farzad; Zenios, Stefanos

    2011-08-01

    To build enabling innovation frameworks for health care entrepreneurs to better identify, evaluate, and pursue entrepreneurial opportunities. Powerful frameworks have been developed to enable entrepreneurs and investors identify which opportunity areas are worth pursuing and which start-up ideas have the potential to succeed. These frameworks, however, have not been clearly defined and interpreted for innovations in health care. Having a better understanding of the process of innovation in health care allows physician entrepreneurs to innovate more successfully. A review of academic literature was conducted. Concepts and frameworks related to technology innovation were analyzed. A new set of health care specific frameworks was developed. These frameworks were then applied to innovations in various health care subsectors. Health care entrepreneurs would greatly benefit from distinguishing between incremental and disruptive innovations. The US regulatory and reimbursement systems favor incrementalism with a greater chance of success for established players. Small companies and individual groups, however, are more likely to thrive if they adopt a disruptive strategy. Disruption in health care occurs through various mechanisms as detailed in this article. While the main mechanism of disruption might vary across different health care subsectors, it is shown that disruptive innovations consistently require a component of contrarian interpretation to guarantee considerable payoff. If health care entrepreneurs choose to adopt an incrementalist approach, they need to build the risk of disruption into their models and also ascertain that they have a very strong intellectual property (IP) position to weather competition from established players. On the contrary, if they choose to pursue disruption in the market, albeit the competition will be less severe, they need to recognize that the regulatory and reimbursement hurdles are going to be very high. Thus, they would benefit

  4. Optimization of preventive health care facility locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGregor S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preventive health care programs can save lives and contribute to a better quality of life by diagnosing serious medical conditions early. The Preventive Health Care Facility Location (PHCFL problem is to identify optimal locations for preventive health care facilities so as to maximize participation. When identifying locations for preventive health care facilities, we need to consider the characteristics of the preventive health care services. First, people should have more flexibility to select service locations. Second, each preventive health care facility needs to have a minimum number of clients in order to retain accreditation. Results This paper presents a new methodology for solving the PHCFL problem. In order to capture the characteristics of preventive health care services, we define a new accessibility measurement that combines the two-step floating catchment area method, distance factor, and the Huff-based competitive model. We assume that the accessibility of preventive health care services is a major determinant for participation in the service. Based on the new accessibility measurement, the PHCFL problem is formalized as a bi-objective model based on efficiency and coverage. The bi-objective model is solved using the Interchange algorithm. In order to accelerate the solving process, we implement the Interchange algorithm by building two new data structures, which captures the spatial structure of the PHCFL problem. In addition, in order to measure the spatial barrier between clients and preventive health care facilities accurately and dynamically, this paper estimates travelling distance and travelling time by calling the Google Maps Application Programming Interface (API. Conclusions Experiments based on a real application for the Alberta breast cancer screening program show that our work can increase the accessibility of breast cancer screening services in the province.

  5. Health care as a universal right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Rui; Nunes, Sofia B; Rego, Guilhermina

    2017-01-01

    Most developed societies recognise the existence of a basic right of access to health care of appropriate quality, considering it a positive welfare right. It can even be one of the most important achievements of pluralistic and secular societies. The main objective of this study is to suggest the foundations for a universal right to health care, meaning the right of access to health care of appropriate quality. A second objective is to propose the necessary tools so that access to health care is viable in a specific commonwealth in accordance with available resources. To find this balance between an existing variable geometry and the actual level of resources of each specific commonwealth, the authors suggest the compatibility between Norman Daniels' "accountability for reasonableness" and the integrated view of health of the World Health Organisation through the "equal opportunity function". The equal opportunity function appears to be an ethically acceptable solution for the existing variable geometry because it allows for different levels of provision and promotes an ethical rationing fully respecting accountability for reasonableness. The basic right of access to health care of appropriate quality is a fundamental humanitarian principle that should be enjoyed by all citizens of all countries, and the international community should recognise the obligation to promote these ideals by any means available. Indeed, although social rights such as health care demand citizens' solidarity to be enjoyed, only with the universalisation of social rights will humanity be more equal in the future.

  6. The Employer-Led Health Care Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Patricia A; Mecklenburg, Robert S; Martin, Lindsay A

    2015-01-01

    To tame its soaring health care costs, intel tried many popular approaches: "consumer-driven health care" offerings such as high-deductible/low-premium plans, on-site clinics and employee wellness programs. But by 2009 intel realized that those programs alone would not enable the company to solve the problem, because they didn't affect its root cause: the steadily rising cost of the care employees and their families were receiving. Intel projected that its health care expenditures would hit a whopping $1 billion by 2012. So the company decided to try a novel approach. As a large purchaser of health services and with expertise in quality improvement and supplier management, intel was uniquely positioned to drive transformation in its local health care market. The company decided that it would manage the quality and cost of its health care suppliers with the same rigor it applied to its equipment suppliers by monitoring quality and cost. It spearheaded a collaborative effort in Portland, Oregon, that included two health systems, a plan administrator, and a major government employer. So far the Portland collaborative has reduced treatment costs for certain medical conditions by 24% to 49%, improved patient satisfaction, and eliminated over 10,000 hours worth of waste in the two health systems' business processes.

  7. Telecommunications, health care, and legal liability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Chris

    1990-06-01

    Regulation of health care telecommunications is fragmented in Canada. Further neither the legislative nor the administrative nor the judicial processes have managed to respond successfully to the impact of telecommunications technology. The result is a legal environment that is necessarily speculative for both telecommunications service providers and health care personnel and facilities. Critical issues include ensuring confidentiality for sensitive patient records and health information liability of telecommunications service providers for inaccurate transmission liability of health care providers for use or non-use of telecommunications services. Limitation of legal liability for both telecommunications and health care service providers is likely to be most effective when based on contract but the creation of the necessary contracts is potentially unduly cumbersome both legally and practically. 1. CONSTITUTIONAL ASPECTS Telecommunications systems that are empowered to operate or connect cross provincial or international boundaries are subject to federal regulation bu the scheme is incomplete in respect of a system set up as a provincial agency. Health care on the other hand is very much a matter of provincial rather than federal authority as a matter of strict law but the fiscal strength of the federal government enables it to provide money to the provinces for financing health care and to4 use this as a device for securing compliance with certain federal standards. Nevertheless the political willingness of the federal health authorities to impose standards on the provinces

  8. Confronting trade-offs in health care: Harvard Pilgrim Health Care's organizational ethics program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, James E; Cochran, David

    2007-01-01

    Patients, providers, and policy leaders need a new moral compass to guide them in the turbulent U.S. health care system. Task forces have proposed excellent ethical codes, but these have been seen as too abstract to provide guidance at the front lines. Harvard Pilgrim Health Care's ten-year experience with an organizational ethics program suggests ways in which health care organizations can strengthen transparency, consumer focus, and overall ethical performance and contribute to the national health policy dialogue.

  9. Challenges in mental health care in the Family Health Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consuelo Helena Aires de Freitas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the practice of mental health care performed by healthcare professionals from the Family Health Strategy in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Methods: This is a critical and reflective study conducted in six Basic Health Units in Fortaleza-Ce. The study subjects were 12 health workers of the following professions: doctor, nurse, community health agents and technical and/or nursing assistant. Semi-structured interviews, systematic observationand questionnaire were used for data collection. The empirical analysis was based on an understanding of the discourses through critical hermeneutics. Results: It was evident that the mental health services are developed by some health workers in the ESF, such as, matrix support, relational technologies, home visits and community group therapy. However, there is still deficiency in training/coaching by most professionals in primary care, due to anenduring model of pathological or curative health care. Conclusion: Mental health care is still occasionally held by some workers in primary care. However, some progresses are already present as matrix support, relational technologies in health care, home visits andcommunity therapy.

  10. Effective Early Childhood Care and Education: Successful Approaches and Didactic Strategies for Fostering Child Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kaspar

    2015-01-01

    This research article attempts to determine strategies that can be used to support children's cognitive and social-emotional development in early childhood care and education programs. By synthesizing empirical evidence about pedagogical techniques that promote children's competencies, the article aims to identify those characteristics of programs…

  11. Family Income Dynamics, Early Childhood Education and Care, and Early Child Behavior Problems in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachrisson, Henrik D.; Dearing, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The sociopolitical context of Norway includes low poverty rates and universal access to subsidized and regulated Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC). In this context, the association between family income dynamics and changes in early child behavior problems was investigated, as well as whether high-quality ECEC buffers children from the…

  12. Early Childhood Education and Care in Europe: Tackling Social and Cultural Inequalities. Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibokiene, Grazina

    2008-01-01

    In Lithuania early childhood education and care embraces children of the age from one to seven and is an integrated part of the education system. According to Lithuanian education classification, it belongs to the zero level of education. Though defined as pre-school education yet this stage is composed of two parts--pre-school education of…

  13. Child Sexual Abuse in Early-Childhood Care and Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Freda

    2014-01-01

    When the author was adviser to the Australian Minister for Education for writing the national Safe Schools Framework (2003), meetings were held with early-childhood care and education administrators from all state, Catholic and independent sectors. Their unexpected message was that educators were facing new problems, those of child sexual abuse in…

  14. Immigrant Parents' Perspectives on Early Childhood Education and Care Practices in the Finnish Multicultural Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastikka, Anna-Leena; Lipponen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Although the number of immigrant families is increasing in Finland, the research on their perspectives on early childhood and care (ECEC) services is scarce. The objective of this small-scale case study was to increase the understanding of immigrant families' perspectives on ECEC practices. Through the qualitative content analysis of…

  15. Early Childhood Education and Care in the Netherlands : Quality, Curriculum, and Relations with Child Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, P.L.

    2014-01-01

    The studies reported in this dissertation are part of the national cohort study pre-COOL to evaluate the developmental and educational effects of early childhood education and care (ECEC) provisions in the Netherlands. More specifically, we evaluated the quality of a large representative sample of E

  16. Associations between structural quality aspects and process quality in Dutch early childhood education and care settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, P.L.; Leseman, P.P.M.; Verhagen, J.; Mulder, H.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between structural quality and process quality in early childhood education and care (ECEC) has been addressed in several studies. However, the findings are not conclusive. The present study was conducted in the Netherlands, which has a strongly regulated mid-quality ECEC system reg

  17. Early Childhood Education and Care in China: History, Current Trends and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaofei; Melhuish, Edward C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of early childhood education and care (ECEC) in China. The historical context from 1900 is summarised, and then developments from the 1980s up to the present kindergarten expansion movement, starting in 2010, are covered in detail. The review shows that ECEC development in China has undergone great changes both…

  18. Finnish Media Literacy Education Policies and Best Practices in Early Childhood Education and Care since 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, Leena

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to describe Finnish media literacy policies and good media education practices in early childhood education and care. This article will focus on describing two central action lines related to the Children and Media Program, initiated by the Division for Cultural Policy of the Ministry of Education and Culture in 2004.…

  19. The Worldwide Expansion of Early Childhood Care and Education, 1985-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotipka, Christine Min; Rabling, Brenda Jarillo; Sugawara, Minako; Tongliemnak, Pumsaran

    2017-01-01

    Although early childhood care and education (ECCE) enrollments have expanded significantly around the world since the 1960s, little is known about the economic, social, and cultural drivers explaining this growth. Using country fixed effects and a sample of 117 countries, this study explores three predictors framing the growth of ECCE enrollments…

  20. Healing Childhood Ear Infections: Prevention, Home Care, and Alternative Treatment. 2nd Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael A.

    This book describes current controversy in medical journals over existing treatments for chronic childhood earaches. It suggests that the causes of otitis media are a series of events which flourish when poor nutrition occurs, noting that careful attention to diet and nutrition to prevent food allergies, and the use of acupressure, homeopathic…