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Sample records for childhood asthma incidence

  1. Body mass index trajectory classes and incident asthma in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rzehak, Peter; Wijga, Alet H; Keil, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The causal link between body mass index (BMI) or obesity and asthma in children is still being debated. Analyses of large longitudinal studies with a sufficient number of incident cases and in which the time-dependent processes of both excess weight and asthma development can be validly analyzed...

  2. Childhood Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for long periods of time before having an asthma attack. The symptoms of asthma can be confused with ... pollen and other environmental allergens can trigger an asthma attack. In some children, asthma can be caused by ...

  3. Body mass index trajectory classes and incident asthma in childhood: results from 8 European Birth Cohorts--a Global Allergy and Asthma European Network initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzehak, Peter; Wijga, Alet H; Keil, Thomas; Eller, Esben; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Smit, Henriette A; Weyler, Joost; Dom, Sandra; Sunyer, Jordi; Mendez, Michelle; Torrent, Maties; Vall, Oriol; Bauer, Carl-Peter; Berdel, Dietrich; Schaaf, Beate; Chen, Chih-Mei; Bergström, Anna; Fantini, Maria P; Mommers, Monique; Wahn, Ulrich; Lau, Susanne; Heinrich, Joachim

    2013-06-01

    The causal link between body mass index (BMI) or obesity and asthma in children is still being debated. Analyses of large longitudinal studies with a sufficient number of incident cases and in which the time-dependent processes of both excess weight and asthma development can be validly analyzed are lacking. We sought to investigate whether the course of BMI predicts incident asthma in childhood. Data from 12,050 subjects of 8 European birth cohorts on asthma and allergies were combined. BMI and doctor-diagnosed asthma were modeled during the first 6 years of life with latent growth mixture modeling and discrete time hazard models. Subpopulations of children were identified with similar standardized BMI trajectories according to age- and sex-specific "World Health Organization (WHO) child growth standards" and "WHO growth standards for school aged children and adolescents" for children up to age 5 years and older than 5 years, respectively (BMI-SDS). These types of growth profiles were analyzed as predictors for incident asthma. Children with a rapid BMI-SDS gain in the first 2 years of life had a higher risk for incident asthma up to age 6 years than children with a less pronounced weight gain slope in early childhood. The hazard ratio was 1.3 (95% CI, 1.1-1.5) after adjustment for birth weight, weight-for-length at birth, gestational age, sex, maternal smoking in pregnancy, breast-feeding, and family history of asthma or allergies. A rapid BMI gain at 2 to 6 years of age in addition to rapid gain in the first 2 years of life did not significantly enhance the risk of asthma. Rapid growth in BMI during the first 2 years of life increases the risk of asthma up to age 6 years. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Determinants of the incidence of childhood asthma: a two-stage case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Marie-Josée; Rey, Evelyne; Malo, Jean-Luc; Perreault, Sylvie; Beauchesne, Marie-France; Forget, Amélie; Blais, Lucie

    2009-01-15

    Extensive literature exists on potential risk factors for childhood asthma. To the authors' knowledge, no investigators have yet attempted to disentangle the effects of those determinants within a single study setting. The authors aimed to evaluate the independent effects of 47 potential determinants (from the prenatal, perinatal, and childhood periods) of asthma development in children within the first 10 years of life. From a Canadian birth cohort of 26,265 children (1990-2002), a 2-stage case-control study was conducted. In the first stage, 20 controls per case were selected from 3 administrative databases. In the second stage, selected mothers were mailed questionnaires for assessment of additional determinants. Increased risks of childhood asthma were found for > or =1 previous diagnosis of bronchopulmonary disease and atopic dermatitis in the child, oxygen administration after birth, prescription of antibiotics within the first 6 months of life, male gender, asthma during pregnancy, use of antibiotics during pregnancy, maternal receipt of social aid, paternal asthma, and asthma in siblings. Protective effects included use of intranasal corticosteroids during pregnancy, having a wood-burning fireplace, having pets in the home prior to the index date, breastfeeding, and day-care attendance. This study allowed the authors to identify, within a single setting, the most influential determinants of childhood asthma among 47 predictors assessed for the prenatal, perinatal, and childhood periods.

  5. Childhood Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... appropriate diagnosis, education and treatment. Should my child exercise? Once a child's asthma is controlled, (usually with the help of proper medications) exercise should become part of his or her daily ...

  6. Exposure to Mobile Source Air Pollution in Early-life and Childhood Asthma Incidence: The Kaiser Air Pollution and Pediatric Asthma Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Audrey Flak; Strickland, Matthew J; Klein, Mitchel; Zhai, Xinxin; Bates, Josephine T; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn; Hansen, Craig; Russell, Armistead G; Tolbert, Paige E; Darrow, Lyndsey A

    2018-01-01

    Early-life exposure to traffic-related air pollution exacerbates childhood asthma, but it is unclear what role it plays in asthma development. The association between exposure to primary mobile source pollutants during pregnancy and during infancy and asthma incidence by ages 2 through 6 was examined in the Kaiser Air Pollution and Pediatric Asthma Study, a racially diverse birth cohort of 24,608 children born between 2000 and 2010 and insured by Kaiser Permanente Georgia. We estimated concentrations of mobile source fine particulate matter (PM2.5, µg/m), nitrogen oxides (NOX, ppb), and carbon monoxide (CO, ppm) at the maternal and child residence using a Research LINE source dispersion model for near-surface releases. Asthma was defined using diagnoses and medication dispensings from medical records. We used binomial generalized linear regression to model the impact of exposure continuously and by quintiles on asthma risk. Controlling for covariates and modeling log-transformed exposure, a 2.7-fold increase in first year of life PM2.5 was associated with an absolute 4.1% (95% confidence interval, 1.6%, 6.6%) increase in risk of asthma by age 5. Quintile analysis showed an increase in risk from the first to second quintile, but similar risk across quintiles 2-5. Risk differences increased with follow-up age. Results were similar for NOX and CO and for exposure during pregnancy and the first year of life owing to high correlation. Results provide limited evidence for an association of early-life mobile source air pollution with childhood asthma incidence with a steeper concentration-response relationship observed at lower levels of exposure.

  7. Childhood asthma and physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lochte, Lene; Nielsen, Kim G; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood asthma is a global problem affecting the respiratory health of children. Physical activity (PA) plays a role in the relationship between asthma and respiratory health. We hypothesized that a low level of PA would be associated with asthma in children and adolescents....... The objectives of our study were to (1) summarize the evidence available on associations between PA and asthma prevalence in children and adolescents and (2) assess the role of PA in new-onset or incident asthma among children and adolescents. METHODS: We searched Medline, the Cochrane Library, and Embase......: We retrieved 1,571 titles and selected 11 articles describing three cohort and eight cross-sectional studies for inclusion. A meta-analysis of the cohort studies revealed a risk of new-onset asthma in children with low PA (OR [95 % CI] 1.32 [0.95; 1.84] [random effects] and 1.35 [1.13; 1.62] [fixed...

  8. Childhood asthma and anthropogenic CO2 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dosanjh A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Amrita DosanjhPediatric Pulmonologist, San Diego, California, USATrends in the incidence of childhood asthma worldwide have paralleled the sharp increase in carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions, over at least the last two decades. The prevalence of asthma in the United States has quadrupled over the last 20 years in part due to climate-related factors. In a report released by Harvard Medical School and the Center for Health and the Global Environment, it was noted that there was an increase in asthma incidence of 160% from 1980–1994 among preschool children.  

  9. Gender difference of childhood overweight and obesity in predicting the risk of incident asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y C; Dong, G H; Lin, K C; Lee, Y L

    2013-03-01

    The aims of our meta-analysis were (i) to quantify the predictability of childhood overweight and obesity on the risk of incident asthma; and (ii) to evaluate the gender difference on this relationship. The selection criteria included prospective cohort paediatric studies which use age- and sex-specific body mass index (BMI) as a measure of childhood overweight and the primary outcome of incident asthma. A total of 1,027 studies were initially identified through online database searches, and finally 6 studies met the inclusion criteria. The combined result of reported relative risk from the 6 included studies revealed that overweight children conferred increased risks of incident asthma as compared with non-overweight children (relative risk, 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.37). The relationship was further elevated for obesity vs. non-obesity (relative risk, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.16-3.50). A dose-responsiveness of elevated BMI on asthma incidence was observed (P for trend, 0.004). Obese boys had a significantly larger effect than obese girls (relative risk, boys: 2.47; 95% CI, 1.57-3.87; girls: 1.25; 95% CI, 0.51-3.03), with significant dose-dependent effect. Proposed mechanisms of gender difference could be through pulmonary mechanics, sleep disordered breathing and leptin. Further research might be needed to better understand the exact mechanism of gender difference on the obesity-asthma relationship. © 2012 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  10. Environmental tobacco smoke and childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Jin Song

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS has become an important worldwide public health issue. Children are particularly vulnerable to ETS because they are still developing. ETS exposure causes a wide range of adverse health effects on childhood asthma. There is convincing evidence that ETS exposure is causally associated with an increased prevalence of asthma, increased severity of asthma and worsening asthma control in children who already have the disease, even though a causal relationship with asthma onset is not yet established for asthma incidence. Mechanisms underlying these adverse effects of ETS are not clearly elucidated but e studies on this issue suggest that genetic susceptibility, impaired lung function, and augmented airway inflammation and remodeling may be involved. Children with asthma are just as likely to be exposed to ETS as children in general and there is no risk-free level of exposure. Therefore, providing a smoke-free environment may be of particular importance to the asthmatic children exposed to ETS who have adverse asthma outcomes, as well as to children with genetic susceptibility who are at increased risk of developing asthma upon exposure to ETS in early childhood.

  11. GSTP1 and TNF Gene Variants and Associations between Air Pollution and Incident Childhood Asthma : The Traffic, Asthma and Genetics (TAG) Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacIntyre, Elaina A.; Brauer, Michael; Melen, Erik; Bauer, Carl Peter; Bauer, Mario; Berdel, Dietrich; Bergstroem, Anna; Brunekreef, Bert; Chan-Yeung, Moira; Kluemper, Claudia; Fuertes, Elaine; Gehring, Ulrike; Gref, Anna; Heinrich, Joachim; Herbarth, Olf; Kerkhof, Marjan; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Kozyrskyj, Anita L.; Pershagen, Goran; Postma, Dirkje S.; Thiering, Elisabeth; Tiesler, Carla M. T.; Carlsten, Christopher

    Background: Genetics may partially explain observed heterogeneity in associations between traffic-related air pollution and incident asthma. Objective: Our aim was to investigate the impact of gene variants associated with oxidative stress and inflammation on associations between air pollution and

  12. Acute severe childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of South. African children, affecting 10-20% of the population. Correct treatment of chronic asthma with regular anti- inflammatory controller therapy prevents symptoms, asthma exacerbations, hospitalisation and mortality. Modern treatment of asthma focuses on an assessment of.

  13. Japanese Guideline for Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Nishimuta

    2011-01-01

    JAGL differs from the Global Initiative for Asthma Guideline (GINA in that the former emphasizes long-term management of childhood asthma based on asthma severity and early diagnosis and intervention at <2 years and 2–5 years of age. However, a management method, including step-up or step-down of long-term management agents based on the status of asthma symptoms, is easy to understand and thus JAGL is suitable for routine medical treatment. JAGL also introduced treatment and management using a control test for children, recommending treatment and management aimed at complete control through avoiding exacerbation factors and appropriate use of antiinflammatory agents.

  14. Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL Past Issues / Fall ... HEAL is seeking ways to reduce the nation's childhood asthma challenge. Even before Hurricane Katrina swept through ...

  15. Childhood asthma | Levin | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... seasonal variation in symptoms. Asthma is on the increase in both developed and developing countries, in both rural and urban communities. The first part of this series aims to give a brief overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology and diagnosis of childhood asthma. Keywords: childhood asthma, asthma, paediatric, ...

  16. Treating childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    asthma is under control for at least three months, consider reducing the therapy. Apply extra cautious when reducing therapy (even if good control is achieved) in children who have experienced previous life-threatening asthma, or who have concomitant severe food allergies /anaphylaxis due to the increased risks of severe ...

  17. Home environment and childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, M G; O'Connor, T; Kelleher, C; Mitchell, E B; Loftus, B G

    1994-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood asthma has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. The reasons for the increase are unclear but many authors suggest that changes in the home environment favourable to proliferation of the house dust mite are to blame. Our study aimed to compare home environment of children with asthma and controls. A questionnaire on home environment was administered to the parents of 134 children with asthma and 118 controls. Detailed studies of home temperature, humidity and dust mite allergen (DERp1) levels were performed in 20 homes (10 from each group). The questionnaire response rate was 86%. There were no significant differences between asthma and control homes with respect to social class, type of housing, smoking habits, pets, insulation, home heating, bedding, carpeting and domestic cleaning habits. A first degree family history of atopy was obtained in 42% of asthmatic families and in 16% of controls. Temperature, humidity and dust mite allergen levels were similar in both groups. The majority gave readings exceeding recommended norms. Values for DERp1 were above thresholds by a factor of 5 in 48%. Home environment does not significantly differ in children with or without asthma. The home environment is now generally mite friendly, and large segments of the childhood population are now exposed to high levels of DERp1. This may account for the increasing prevalence as more and more children with an atopic background develop overt symptoms in response to high levels of allergen load.

  18. Diagnosis of childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    House dust mite, cat, dog, and even horse allergens are brought into the classroom on the clothing of class mates, and sensitise asthmatic children. The clinical history must always include questions on associated allergic conditions such as eczema and allergic rhinitis, and a family history of allergies, as asthma commonly.

  19. Managing Asthma in Pregnancy (MAP) trial: FeNO levels and childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morten, Matthew; Collison, Adam; Murphy, Vanessa E; Barker, Daniel; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Attia, John; Meredith, Joseph; Powell, Heather; Robinson, Paul D; Sly, Peter D; Gibson, Peter G; Mattes, Joerg

    2018-03-07

    The single-centre double-blind, randomised controlled Managing Asthma in Pregnancy (MAP) trial in Newcastle, Australia, compared a treatment algorithm using the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in combination with asthma symptoms (FeNO group) against a treatment algorithm using clinical symptoms only (clinical group) in pregnant asthmatic women (ANZ Clinical Trials Registry, number 12607000561482). The primary outcome was a 50% reduction in asthma exacerbations during pregnancy in the FeNO group. However, the effect of FeNO-guided management on the development of asthma in the offspring is unknown. We sought to investigate the effect of FeNO-guided asthma management during pregnancy on asthma incidence in childhood. 179 mothers consented to participate in the Growing Into Asthma (GIA) double-blind follow-up study with the primary aim to determine the effect of FeNO-guided asthma management on childhood asthma incidence. 140 children (78%) were followed up at 4 to 6 years of age. FeNO-guided as compared to symptoms only based approach significantly reduced doctor diagnosed asthma (25·9% versus 43·2%; odds ratio [OR] 0.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.22 to 0.96, p=0.04). Furthermore frequent wheeze (OR 0.27; CI 0.09 to 0.87, p=0.03), use of short-acting beta agonists (OR 0.49; CI 0.25 to 0.97; p=0.04), and emergency department visits for asthma (OR 0.17, CI 0.04 to 0.76; p=0.02) in the past 12 months were less common in children born to mothers from the FeNO group. Doctor diagnosed asthma was associated with common risk alleles for early-onset asthma at gene locus 17q21 (p=0·01 for rs8069176; p=0·03 for rs8076131), and higher airways resistance (p=0·02) and FeNO levels (p=0·03). A causal mediation analysis suggested natural indirect effects of FeNO-guided asthma management on childhood asthma through "any use" and "time to first change in dose" of inhaled corticosteroids during the MAP trial (OR 0.83; CI 0.59 to 0.99 and OR 0.90, CI 0.70 to 1

  20. [Epidemiological survey of childhood asthma in Kunming City, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhi-Ye; Duan, Jing; Zhang, Quan; Cao, Zhi-Lan; Dai, Mei; Xiong, Jing-Jing; Mo, Ya-Xiong; Lu, Ping

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the prevalence of childhood asthma, and to find the distribution characteristics, precipitating factors, diagnosis and treatment status, and to provide scientific data for improving the prevention and management of asthma in children in Kunming City, China. Children were selected by random cluster sampling. A standardized preliminary questionnaire was used for screening out possible patients in the survey. Diagnosis of asthma was confirmed by diagnostic criteria in suspected asthmatic children. Asthmatic children were further asked for past diagnosis and treatment with the questionnaire of asthma in children. The total asthma incidence rate was 1.40%. The prevalence of asthma in male and female children was 1.89% and 0.88% respectively (Pasthma (1.69%) than that of school-age children (6-14 years old, 1.21%). In all asthmatic children, 51.3% were previously diagnosed with classical asthma or cough variant asthma, 26.0% were suffered attacks from December to February, and 54.0% were suffered attacks at midnight or dawn. Respiratory tract infection (87.3%) was the most common triggers of asthma exacerbation. Antibiotics were used in 80.0%, bronchodilators in 66.0%, inhaled corticosteroid in 64.0%. A peak flow meter for monitoring lung function was used in 17% of asthmatic children over 5 years old. The prevalence of asthma is associated with age and gender in children aged 0-14 years old in Kunming City. Acute asthma attack occurs mostly in winter and at midnight or dawn. Respiratory tract infection is the most common trigger of asthma exacerbation. Nearly a half of patients with asthma had not been diagnosed with asthma in the early stage. Most asthmatic children use antibiotics and only two-thirds use bronchodilators or inhaled corticosteroid in the treatment. The treatment and management of asthma in children awaits improvement as well.

  1. Optimizing inhalation therapy in childhood asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Reina

    2016-01-01

    Childhood asthma is a common chronic disease, featured by inflammation of the airways and episodic bronchoconstriction. Exercise is an important trigger for bronchoconstriction in asthmatic children. They experience this symptom, limiting participation in play and sports, as the most bothersome

  2. Risk of psoriasis in patients with childhood asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, A; Khalid, U; Gislason, G H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis and asthma are disorders driven by inflammation. Psoriasis may carry an increased risk of asthma, but the reverse relationship has not been investigated. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the risk of psoriasis in subjects with childhood asthma in a nationwide Danish cohort. METHODS......, concomitant medication and comorbidity were estimated by Poisson regression models. RESULTS: There were 21,725 cases of childhood asthma and 6586 incident cases of psoriasis. There were 5697 and 889 incident cases of mild and severe psoriasis, respectively. The incidence rates of overall, mild and severe...... psoriasis were 4.49, 3.88 and 0.61 for the reference population, and 5.95, 5.18 and 0.83 for subjects with childhood asthma, respectively. The IRRs for overall, mild and severe psoriasis were 3.94 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.16-7.17], 5.03 (95% CI 2.48-10.21) and 2.27 (95% CI 0.61-8.42) for patients...

  3. Cough During Infancy and Subsequent Childhood Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Eyal; Rothers, Janet; Stern, Debra A.; Morgan, Wayne J.; Halonen, Marilyn; Wright, Anne L.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Wheezing in infancy has been associated with subsequent asthma, but whether cough similarly influences asthma risk has been little studied. We sought to determine whether prolonged cough and cough without cold in the first year of life are associated with childhood asthma. METHODS Participants in the Infant Immune Study, a non-selected birth cohort, were surveyed 7 times in the first 9 months of life regarding presence of wheeze and cough. Cough for more than 28 days was defined as prolonged. Parents were asked at 1 year if the child ever coughed without a cold. Asthma was defined as parental report of physician diagnosis of asthma, with symptoms or medication use between 2–9 years. Logistic regression was used to assess adjusted odds for asthma associated with cough characteristics. RESULTS 24% (97) of children experienced prolonged cough and 23% (95) cough without cold in the first 9 months, respectively. Prolonged cough was associated with increased risk of asthma relative to brief cough (OR 3.57, CI: 1.88, 6.76), with the risk being particularly high among children of asthmatic mothers. Cough without cold (OR 3.13, 95% CI: 1.76, 5.57) was also independently associated with risk of childhood asthma. Both relations persisted after adjustment for wheeze and total IgE at age 1. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Prolonged cough in infancy and cough without cold are associated with childhood asthma, independent of infant wheeze. These findings suggest that characteristics of cough in infancy are early markers of asthma susceptibility, particularly among children with maternal asthma. PMID:26011047

  4. Relationship between childhood asthma and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the correlation between childhood asthma and Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods: A total of 80 children with asthma who were treated in our hospital from May 2012 to May 2015 were selected as the research subjects, and 40 cases of healthy children were selected as control group, the Helicobacter pylori infection of the two groups of patients were compared, the double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the serum Helicobacter pylori-IgG, Helicobacter pylori-CagAIgG, IL-4, Helicobacter pylori, IFN-γ and IL-1β, etc., and the correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma was analyzed. Results: The positive rates of Helicobacter pylori infection in asthma group and children in attack stage were significantly higher than those in control group and children in remission stage (P<0.05. The positive rates of serum Helicobacter pylori-IgG and Helicobacter pylori-CagAIgG in asthma group and children in attack stage were significantly lower than those in control group and children in remission stage (P<0.05. The serum levels of IFN-γ in asthma group and children in attack stage were significantly lower than those in control group and children in remission stage, IL-4 and IL-1β levels in the former were significantly higher than those in the latter (P<0.05. Helicobacter pylori infection positive had significant positive correlation with IL-1β concentration (r=0.75, P<0.05. Conclusions: Helicobacter pylori infection in children has significant positive correlation with the incidence of asthma, suggesting that Helicobacter pylori infection has a certain protective effect on childhood asthma, but persistent Helicobacter pylori infection in children with asthma can aggravate the immune disorder, which is the main reason for the difficulty of treatment of asthma.

  5. Japanese guidelines for childhood asthma 2017

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    Hirokazu Arakawa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Diseases 2017 (JAGL 2017 includes a minor revision of the Japanese Pediatric Guideline for the Treatment and Management of Asthma 2012 (JPGL 2012 by the Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology. The section on child asthma in JAGL 2017 provides information on how to diagnose asthma between infancy and adolescence (0–15 years of age. It makes recommendations for best practices in the management of childhood asthma, including management of acute exacerbations and non-pharmacological and pharmacological management. This guideline will be of interest to non-specialist physicians involved in the care of children with asthma. JAGL differs from the Global Initiative for Asthma Guideline in that JAGL emphasizes diagnosis and early intervention of children with asthma at <2 years or 2–5 years of age. The first choice of treatment depends on the severity and frequency of symptoms. Pharmacological management, including step-up or step-down of drugs used for long-term management based on the status of asthma control levels, is easy to understand; thus, this guideline is suitable for the routine medical care of children with asthma. JAGL also recommends using a control test in children, so that the physician aims for complete control by avoiding exacerbating factors and appropriately using anti-inflammatory drugs (for example, inhaled corticosteroids and leukotriene receptor antagonists.

  6. DNA methylation levels associated with race and childhood asthma severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Marcia A; Ciaccio, Christina E; Gigliotti, Nicole M; Rezaiekhaligh, Mo; Siedlik, Jacob A; Kennedy, Kevin; Barnes, Charles S

    2017-10-01

    Asthma is a common chronic childhood disease worldwide. Socioeconomic status, genetic predisposition and environmental factors contribute to its incidence and severity. A disproportionate number of children with asthma are economically disadvantaged and live in substandard housing with potential indoor environmental exposures such as cockroaches, dust mites, rodents and molds. These exposures may manifest through epigenetic mechanisms that can lead to changes in relevant gene expression. We examined the association of global DNA methylation levels with socioeconomic status, asthma severity and race/ethnicity. We measured global DNA methylation in peripheral blood of children with asthma enrolled in the Kansas City Safe and Healthy Homes Program. Inclusion criteria included residing in the same home for a minimum of 4 days per week and total family income of less than 80% of the Kansas City median family income. DNA methylation levels were quantified by an immunoassay that assessed the percentage of 5-methylcytosine. Our results indicate that overall, African American children had higher levels of global DNA methylation than children of other races/ethnicities (p = 0.029). This difference was more pronounced when socioeconomic status and asthma severity were coupled with race/ethnicity (p = 0.042) where low-income, African American children with persistent asthma had significantly elevated methylation levels relative to other races/ethnicities in the same context (p = 0.006, Hedges g = 1.14). Our study demonstrates a significant interaction effect among global DNA methylation levels, asthma severity, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.

  7. Childhood Asthma: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim M. van Aalderen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many children suffer from recurrent coughing, wheezing and chest tightness. In preschool children one third of all children have these symptoms before the age of six, but only 40% of these wheezing preschoolers will continue to have asthma. In older school-aged children the majority of the children have asthma. Quality of life is affected by asthma control. Sleep disruption and exercised induced airflow limitation have a negative impact on participation in sports and social activities, and may influence family life. The goal of asthma therapy is to achieve asthma control, but only a limited number of patients are able to reach total control. This may be due to an incorrect diagnosis, co-morbidities or poor inhalation technique, but in the majority of cases non-adherence is the main reason for therapy failures. However, partnership with the parents and the child is important in order to set individually chosen goals of therapy and may be of help to improve control. Non-pharmacological measures aim at avoiding tobacco smoke, and when a child is sensitised, to avoid allergens. In pharmacological management international guidelines such as the GINA guideline and the British Guideline on the Management of Asthma are leading.

  8. Thai pediatricians' current practice toward childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalaporn, Harutai; Chawalitdamrong, Pongpan; Preutthipan, Aroonwan

    2018-04-01

    Childhood asthma is a substantial health burden in Thailand. Due to a lack of pediatric respiratory specialists (pediatric pulmonologists and allergists; RS), most Thai children are cared for by general pediatricians (pediatric primary care providers (PCP)). We investigated whether current practices of Thai pediatricians complied with asthma guidelines and compared practices (diagnosis and treatments) provided by PCP and RS. A cross-sectional study was conducted using electronic surveys including four case scenarios of different asthma phenotypes distributed to Thai pediatricians. Asthma diagnosis and management were evaluated for compliance with standard guidelines. The practices of PCP and RS were compared. From 800 surveys distributed, there were 405 respondents (51%). Most respondents (81%) were PCP, who preferred to use clinical diagnosis rather than laboratory investigations to diagnose asthma. For acute asthmatic attacks, 58% of the pediatricians prescribed a systemic corticosteroid. For uncontrolled asthma, 89% of the pediatricians prescribed at least one controller. For exercise-induced bronchospasm, 55% of the pediatricians chose an inhaled bronchodilator, while 38% chose a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA). For virus-induced wheeze, 40% of the respondents chose an LTRA, while 15% chose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). PCP prescribed more oral bronchodilators (31% vs. 18%, p = 0.02), antibiotics (20% vs. 6%, p attack. Most of the Thai pediatricians' practices toward diagnosis and treatment of acute asthmatic attack and uncontrolled asthma conform to the guidelines. PCP prescribed more oral bronchodilators, antibiotics, and antihistamines than RS.

  9. Childhood asthma and student performance at school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taras, Howard; Potts-Datema, William

    2005-10-01

    To better understand what is known about the association between childhood asthma, school attendance, and academic outcomes, the authors reviewed published studies investigating this topic. Tables with brief descriptions of each study's research methodology and outcomes are included. Research reveals evidence that rates of absenteeism are higher among students with asthma. The exact magnitude of absenteeism is difficult to ascertain. However, the studies have helped to identify characteristics of children with asthma that are most likely to be associated with the highest absenteeism rates. Some interventions to improve rates of absenteeism among school-aged children with asthma show promise, but it cannot yet be concluded that students who adhere to medical routines for controlling asthma will as a result increase their rates of attendance. Studies thus far have shown that there is either only a weak or nonexistent association between asthma and school achievement. Further studies are required to verify if certain subpopulations of children with asthma (eg, those with severe and ongoing symptoms, those with disturbed sleep, kindergarten children) are at higher risk for poor school achievement.

  10. Risk factors associated with childhood asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeed, R.; Rajar, U.D.M.

    2008-01-01

    To identify the risk factors associated with childhood asthma, in children attending Isra University Hospital, Hyderabad. The study included 398 age-matched children (200 asthmatic and 198 non-asthmatic). Information was collected concerning their familial history of atopy, birth weight, environment, breastfeeding, disease and treatment history. Odds ratio was calculated for determining the risk. The children were aged between 12 months and 8 years and 60% were male. The asthmatic children were hospitalized more frequently than the non-asthmatic children (p < 0.0001). Most of the asthmatic children lived in the urban areas of Hyderabad (odd ratio (OR) 16.7, 95% CI = 3.1-14.6, p < 0.0001), had a parental history of asthma (OR 26.8, 95% CI = 10.8-68.2, p < 0.0001) or allergic rhinitis (OR 4, 95% CI 1.2-13.4, p= 0.01), 38.5% had at least one person who smoked, and were weaned earlier than the non-asthmatic children (OR =12.4, 95% CI 1.3-4.4, p < 0.01). Childhood asthma was strongly associated with a family history of asthma and allergic rhinitis, the urban place of residence, having smokers as parents and early weaning from maternal breast milk. The results highlight the need to educate the parents about the risk of smoking and early weaning in the development of asthma. (author)

  11. Clinical characteristics of childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-01-19

    Jan 19, 1991 ... which the child first experienced a wheezing episode. The occurrence of other atopic symptoms (eczema; hayfever; angio-oedema; urticaria; reactions to food; bee-sting; drugs; etc.) was noted, as well as the presence or absence of a family history of asthma or any of these other conditions in flrst- and.

  12. Distribution of severity of asthma in childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, Silvia de Magalhães; Cunha, Sergio Souza da; Barreto, Maurício Lima; Cruz, Álvaro Augusto

    2010-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Estimar a distribuição dos padrões de gravidade da asma em uma amostra populacional de crianças em Salvador (BA). MÉTODOS: Questionário epidemiológico (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood - ISAAC) foi aplicado juntamente com questionário elaborado com base em critérios de gravidade adotados na prática clínica (Global Initiative for Asthma - GINA) em 417 crianças de 5 a 12 anos com sintomas de asma nos últimos 12 meses. Com base nas questões do ISAAC, as crianças...

  13. Distribution of severity of asthma in childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, Silvia de Magalhães; Cunha, Sérgio Souza da; Barreto, Mauricio Lima; Cruz Filho, Álvaro Augusto Souza da

    2010-01-01

    p. 417-423 Objetivo: Estimar a distribuição dos padrões de gravidade da asma em uma amostra populacional de crianças em Salvador (BA). Métodos: Questionário epidemiológico (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood - ISAAC) foi aplicado juntamente com questionário elaborado com base em critérios de gravidade adotados na prática clínica (Global Initiative for Asthma - GINA) em 417 crianças de 5 a 12 anos com sintomas de asma nos últimos 12 meses. Com base nas questões d...

  14. Adherence with Preventive Medication in Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Burgess

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Suboptimal adherence with preventive medication is common and often unrecognised as a cause of poor asthma control. A number of risk factors for nonadherence have emerged from well-conducted studies. Unfortunately, patient report a physician's estimation of adherence and knowledge of these risk factors may not assist in determining whether non-adherence is a significant factor. Electronic monitoring devices are likely to be more frequently used to remind patients to take medication, as a strategy to motivate patients to maintain adherence, and a tool to evaluate adherence in subjects with poor disease control. The aim of this paper is to review non-adherence with preventive medication in childhood asthma, its impact on asthma control, methods of evaluating non-adherence, risk factors for suboptimal adherence, and strategies to enhance adherence.

  15. Maternal obesity and childhood wheezing and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Franca; Popovic, Maja

    2017-03-01

    Obesity represents one of the major public health problems worldwide, with an increased prevalence also among women of reproductive age. Maternal pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity are important risk factors for a number of maternal and foetal/neonatal complications. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the most recent evidence regarding the associations between pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity and wheezing and asthma in childhood. Potential mechanisms, mediators and confounding factors involved in these associations are also discussed. Despite the relatively large body of studies examining these associations and taking into account main confounders and potential mediators, the causal relationship between maternal obesity and wheezing and asthma in childhood is still uncertain. This uncertainty is not trivial, as any prevention strategy aimed at reducing the burden of these conditions would necessarily imply better understanding of the factors that are in the causal chain. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Traffic, asthma and genetics : combining international birth cohort data to examine genetics as a mediator of traffic-related air pollution's impact on childhood asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacIntyre, Elaina A.; Carlsten, Christopher; MacNutt, Meaghan; Fuertes, Elaine; Melen, Eric; Tiesler, Carla M. T.; Gehring, Ulrike; Kraemer, Ursula; Kluemper, Claudia; Kerkhof, Marjan; Chan-Yeung, Moira; Kozyrskyj, Anita L.; Berdel, Dietrich; Bauer, Carl Peter; Herbarth, Olf; Bauer, Mario; Schaaf, Beate; Koletzko, Sibylle; Pershagen, Goran; Brunekreef, Bert; Heinrich, Joachim; Brauer, Michael

    Associations between traffic-related air pollution and incident childhood asthma can be strengthened by analysis of gene-environment interactions, but studies have typically been limited by lack of study power. We combined data from six birth cohorts on: asthma, eczema and allergic rhinitis to 7/8

  17. Prenatal Exposure to Nicotine and Childhood Asthma: Role of Nicotine Acetylcholine Receptors, Neuropeptides and Fibronectin Expression in Lung

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roman, Jesse

    2006-01-01

    ...). This is particularly true in infancy and in childhood where ETS exposure is associated with a higher incidence or prevalence of asthma, and with measures of decreased flow in the airways, bronchial...

  18. Respiratory viral infections and early asthma in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jae-Won

    2006-12-01

    Respiratory viral infections profoundly influence the disease activity of wheezing illnesses and asthma in early childhood. Viral bronchiolitis shares many features with asthma and a subset of children develop recurrent wheezing after their initial illness. Recently mechanisms for virus-induced exacerbations of childhood asthma are beginning to be focused on and defined. Viruses cause systemic immune activation and also produce local inflammation. These factors are likely to affect airway pathogenesis leading to airway narrowing, an increase in mucus production, and eventually bronchospasm, and airway obstruction. These new insights related to the pathogenesis and disease activity are likely to provide new targets for the therapy and prevention of early asthma in childhood.

  19. Perinatal Programming of Childhood Asthma: Early Fetal Size, Growth Trajectory during Infancy, and Childhood Asthma Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Turner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The “fetal origins hypothesis” or concept of “developmental programming” suggests that faltering fetal growth and subsequent catch-up growth are implicated in the aetiology of cardiovascular disease. Associations between reduced birth weight, rapid postnatal weight gain, and asthma suggest that there are fetal origins to respiratory disease. The present paper first summarises the literature relating birth weight and post natal growth trajectories to asthma outcomes. Second, issues regarding the interpretation of antenatal fetal ultrasound measurements are discussed. Finally, recent reports linking antenatal measurement and growth trajectory to early childhood asthma outcomes are discussed. Understanding the nature and timing of factors which influence antenatal growth may give important insight into the antecedents of early-onset asthma with implications for interventions.

  20. Perinatal programming of childhood asthma: early fetal size, growth trajectory during infancy, and childhood asthma outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The "fetal origins hypothesis" or concept of "developmental programming" suggests that faltering fetal growth and subsequent catch-up growth are implicated in the aetiology of cardiovascular disease. Associations between reduced birth weight, rapid postnatal weight gain, and asthma suggest that there are fetal origins to respiratory disease. The present paper first summarises the literature relating birth weight and post natal growth trajectories to asthma outcomes. Second, issues regarding the interpretation of antenatal fetal ultrasound measurements are discussed. Finally, recent reports linking antenatal measurement and growth trajectory to early childhood asthma outcomes are discussed. Understanding the nature and timing of factors which influence antenatal growth may give important insight into the antecedents of early-onset asthma with implications for interventions.

  1. Preeclampsia Associates with Asthma, Allergy, and Eczema in Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Jakob; Sevelsted, Astrid; Anderson, Ulrik D

    2017-01-01

    RATIONALE: Preeclampsia reflects an unusual increase in systemic inflammation during pregnancy. OBJECTIVES: We studied associations between preeclampsia and asthma, allergy, and eczema in Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood2000 (COPSAC2000) and in national registries. METHODS: C...... of preeclampsia. CONCLUSIONS: Preeclampsia is a shared prenatal risk factor for asthma, eczema, and allergy in childhood pointing toward in utero immune programming of the child....

  2. Effects of Childhood Asthma on the Development of Obesity among School-aged Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhanghua; Salam, Muhammad T; Alderete, Tanya L; Habre, Rima; Bastain, Theresa M; Berhane, Kiros; Gilliland, Frank D

    2017-05-01

    Asthma and obesity often occur together in children. It is unknown whether asthma contributes to the childhood obesity epidemic. We aimed to investigate the effects of asthma and asthma medication use on the development of childhood obesity. The primary analysis was conducted among 2,171 nonobese children who were 5-8 years of age at study enrollment in the Southern California Children's Health Study (CHS) and were followed for up to 10 years. A replication analysis was performed in an independent sample of 2,684 CHS children followed from a mean age of 9.7 to 17.8 years. Height and weight were measured annually to classify children into normal, overweight, and obese categories. Asthma status was ascertained by parent- or self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma. Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to assess associations of asthma history with obesity incidence during follow-up. We found that children with a diagnosis of asthma at cohort entry were at 51% increased risk of developing obesity during childhood and adolescence compared with children without asthma at baseline (hazard ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.10) after adjusting for confounders. Use of asthma rescue medications at cohort entry reduced the risk of developing obesity (hazard ratio, 0.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.96). In addition, the significant association between a history of asthma and an increased risk of developing obesity was replicated in an independent CHS sample. Children with asthma may be at higher risk of obesity. Asthma rescue medication use appeared to reduce obesity risk independent of physical activity.

  3. Incidence and risk factors for exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases among pregnant women. Acute exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy have an unfavorable impact on pregnancy outcome. This review provides an overview of current knowledge of incidence, mechanisms, and risk factors for acute exacerbations of asthma...

  4. Obesity increases the prevalence and the incidence of asthma and worsens asthma severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, R; Moreira, P; Padrão, P; Teixeira, V H; Carvalho, P; Delgado, L; Moreira, A

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to explore the association between obesity and asthma prevalence, incidence and severity. The study included 32,644 adults, 52.6% female, from a representative sample of the 4th Portuguese National Health Survey. The following asthma definitions were used: ever asthma (ever medical doctor asthma diagnosis), current asthma (asthma within the last 12 months), current persistent asthma (required asthma medication within the last 12 months), current severe asthma (attending an emergency department because of asthma within the last 12 months), and incident asthma (asthma diagnosis within the last 12 months). Body mass index was calculated based on self-reported weight and height and categorised according to WHO classification. Logistic regression models adjusted for confounders were performed. Prevalence of ever asthma was 5.3%, current asthma 3.5%, current persistent asthma 3.0%, current severe asthma 1.4%, and incident asthma 0.2%. Prevalence of obesity was 16%, overweight 37.6%, normal weight 44.6% and underweight 0.2%. Being overweight, obesity class I and II, and obesity class III were associated with an OR (95% CI) with ever asthma 1.22 (1.21-1.24), 1.39 (1.36-1.41), 3.24 (3.08-3.40) respectively; current asthma 1.16 (1.14-1.18), 1.86 (1.82-1.90), 4.73 (4.49-4.98) respectively; current persistent asthma 1.08 (1.06-1.10), 2.06 (2.01-2.10), 5.24 (4.96-5.53), and current severe asthma 1.36 (1.32-1.40), 1.50 (1.45-1.55) and 3.70 (3.46-3.95), respectively. Considering the incidence of asthma, obesity more than quadrupled the odds (OR = 4.46, 95% CI 4.30, 4.62). Obesity is associated in a dose dependent way with an increase of prevalent and incident asthma, and it seems to increase the odds of a more persistent and severe asthma phenotype independently of socio-demographic determinants, physical activity, and dietary patterns. Our results provide rational for future lifestyle intervention studies for weight reduction in the obesity-asthma phenotype. Copyright

  5. Psychosocial factors and incident asthma hospital admissions in the EPIC-Norfolk cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, N W J; Surtees, P G; Wareham, N J; Harrison, B D W

    2007-05-01

    Case series and case-control studies have shown high rates of psychosocial and behavioural risk factors amongst patients admitted to hospital with severe asthma. General population studies have shown associations between psychosocial factors and prevalent asthma but few have investigated incident asthma outcomes. Data on psychosocial factors and asthma hospital admissions were available for 20 854 participants, aged 41-80 years, in the Norfolk cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer study. Postal assessments included details of physical functioning, mood disorder history, social adversity and social support. A total of 686 asthma hospital admissions were recorded. Psychosocial factors present at baseline, including current mood disorders, adverse circumstances in childhood, the impact of life events experienced during adulthood and negative perceived support from a close confidant, were associated with increased rates of hospital admission independent of age, sex, indicators of socio-economic status, physical functional health, and obesity. Restricted to those participants who reported lifetime doctor-diagnosed asthma at baseline, the reported impact of adverse life events experienced in adulthood, and both confiding and negative aspects of support quality, were associated with asthma hospital admission. The magnitude of these associations was comparable to those involving indicators of socio-economic status and physical health. These results show that psychosocial factors are associated with incident asthma hospital admissions and highlight the potential importance of taking account of psychosocial factors, including availability and quality of support networks, in guiding long-term asthma management.

  6. Breastfeeding and the risk of childhood asthma: A two-stage instrumental variable analysis to address endogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nivita D

    2017-09-01

    Several explanations for the inconsistent results on the effects of breastfeeding on childhood asthma have been suggested. The purpose of this study was to investigate one unexplored explanation, which is the presence of a potential endogenous relationship between breastfeeding and childhood asthma. Endogeneity exists when an explanatory variable is correlated with the error term for reasons such as selection bias, reverse causality, and unmeasured confounders. Unadjusted endogeneity will bias the effect of breastfeeding on childhood asthma. To investigate potential endogeneity, a cross-sectional study of breastfeeding practices and incidence of childhood asthma in 87 pediatric patients in Georgia, the USA, was conducted using generalized linear modeling and a two-stage instrumental variable analysis. First, the relationship between breastfeeding and childhood asthma was analyzed without considering endogeneity. Second, tests for presence of endogeneity were performed and having detected endogeneity between breastfeeding and childhood asthma, a two-stage instrumental variable analysis was performed. The first stage of this analysis estimated the duration of breastfeeding and the second-stage estimated the risk of childhood asthma. When endogeneity was not taken into account, duration of breastfeeding was found to significantly increase the risk of childhood asthma (relative risk ratio [RR]=2.020, 95% confidence interval [CI]: [1.143-3.570]). After adjusting for endogeneity, duration of breastfeeding significantly reduced the risk of childhood asthma (RR=0.003, 95% CI: [0.000-0.240]). The findings suggest that researchers should consider evaluating how the presence of endogeneity could affect the relationship between duration of breastfeeding and the risk of childhood asthma. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  7. [Epidemiological survey of childhood asthma in Hefei City, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Mei; Ni, Chen; Pan, Jia-Hua; Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Li-Lin

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the cumulative prevalence rate, distribution characteristics, epidemic seasons, predisposing factors and current treatment situation of childhood asthma in Hefei City, China. In the investigation, stratified cluster random sampling as well as centralized access and separate home visits were applied, and primary screening forms were filled out. Further confirmation was sought in the primary positive cases, according to the diagnostic criteria for asthma. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the cumulative prevalence rate, current treatment situation and predisposing factors for childhood asthma as well as the distribution characteristics of asthma in children of different ages and sexes. The cumulative prevalence rate of childhood asthma was 5.92%, and there was no significant difference between males and females (6.33% vs 5.42%; P>0.05). The cumulative prevalence rate was highest (8.25%) in children aged 3-6 years. Of the children with acute asthma attack, 42.0% suffered attacks during periods of seasonal transition, and 34.4% suffered attacks at midnight. Among the 552 children with a confirmed diagnosis of asthma, 533 (96.6%) developed asthma due to respiratory tract infection and 312 (56.5%) due to weather change. Most asthmatic children (513/552, 92.9%) received treatment with antibiotics, and 492 asthmatic children (89.1%) were treated with systemic hormones. The cumulative prevalence rate of childhood asthma is 5.92% in Hefei, and the peak age of onset is 3-6 years. Acute asthma attack occurs mostly during periods of seasonal transition and at midnight. Respiratory tract infection and weather change are the main predisposing factors for childhood asthma. Antibiotics and systemic hormones are still widely used in the treatment of asthma.

  8. Body Mass Index Development and Asthma Throughout Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, Sandra; Magnusson, Jessica; Kull, Inger; Andersson, Niklas; Bottai, Matteo; Besharat Pour, Mohsen; Melén, Erik; Bergström, Anna

    2017-07-15

    Several studies have found an association between overweight and asthma, yet the temporal relationship between their onsets remains unclear. We investigated the development of body mass index (BMI) from birth to adolescence among 2,818 children with and without asthma from a Swedish birth cohort study, the BAMSE (a Swedish acronym for "children, allergy, milieu, Stockholm, epidemiology") Project, during 1994-2013. Measured weight and height were available at 13 time points throughout childhood. Asthma phenotypes (transient, persistent, and late-onset) were defined by timing of onset and remission. Quantile regression was used to analyze percentiles of BMI, and generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the association between asthma phenotypes and the risk of high BMI. Among females, BMI development differed between children with and without asthma, with the highest BMI being seen among females with persistent asthma. The difference existed throughout childhood but increased with age. For example, females with persistent asthma had 2.33 times' (95% confidence interval: 1.21, 4.49) greater odds of having a BMI above the 85th percentile at age ≥15 years than females without asthma. Among males, no clear associations between asthma and BMI were observed. In this study, persistent asthma was associated with high BMI throughout childhood among females, whereas no consistent association was observed among males. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

  9. Full-chain health impact assessment of traffic-related air pollution and childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khreis, Haneen; de Hoogh, Kees; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2018-05-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease in children. Traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) may be an important exposure contributing to its development. In the UK, Bradford is a deprived city suffering from childhood asthma rates higher than national and regional averages and TRAP is of particular concern to the local communities. We estimated the burden of childhood asthma attributable to air pollution and specifically TRAP in Bradford. Air pollution exposures were estimated using a newly developed full-chain exposure assessment model and an existing land-use regression model (LUR). We estimated childhood population exposure to NO x and, by conversion, NO 2 at the smallest census area level using a newly developed full-chain model knitting together distinct traffic (SATURN), vehicle emission (COPERT) and atmospheric dispersion (ADMS-Urban) models. We compared these estimates with measurements and estimates from ESCAPE's LUR model. Using the UK incidence rate for childhood asthma, meta-analytical exposure-response functions, and estimates from the two exposure models, we estimated annual number of asthma cases attributable to NO 2 and NO x in Bradford, and annual number of asthma cases specifically attributable to traffic. The annual average census tract levels of NO 2 and NO x estimated using the full-chain model were 15.41 and 25.68 μg/m 3 , respectively. On average, 2.75 μg/m 3 NO 2 and 4.59 μg/m 3 NO x were specifically contributed by traffic, without minor roads and cold starts. The annual average census tract levels of NO 2 and NO x estimated using the LUR model were 21.93 and 35.60 μg/m 3 , respectively. The results indicated that up to 687 (or 38% of all) annual childhood asthma cases in Bradford may be attributable to air pollution. Up to 109 cases (6%) and 219 cases (12%) may be specifically attributable to TRAP, with and without minor roads and cold starts, respectively. This is the first study undertaking full-chain health impact assessment

  10. Preterm birth, infant weight gain, and childhood asthma risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenschein-van der Voort, Agnes M M; Arends, Lidia R; de Jongste, Johan C

    2014-01-01

    birth cohort studies to determine the associations of birth and infant growth characteristics with the risks of preschool wheezing (1-4 years) and school-age asthma (5-10 years). METHODS: First, we performed an adjusted 1-stage random-effect meta-analysis to assess the combined associations...... of gestational age, birth weight, and infant weight gain with childhood asthma. Second, we performed an adjusted 2-stage random-effect meta-analysis to assess the associations of preterm birth (gestational age childhood asthma outcomes. RESULTS: Younger gestational...... age at birth and higher infant weight gain were independently associated with higher risks of preschool wheezing and school-age asthma (P childhood asthma were explained by gestational age at birth. Compared with term-born children with normal...

  11. Johns Hopkins Center for Childhood Asthma in the Urban Environment

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The long term goals of the Center for Childhood Asthma in the Urban Environment are to examine how exposures to environmental pollutants and allergens may relate to...

  12. Asthma Symptoms in Early Childhood: A public health perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.D. Hafkamp-De Groen (Esther)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis focuses on asthma symptoms in early childhood. From a public health perspective, we aim to improve health and health-related quality of life through the prevention of asthma symptoms and by signaling, counselling or management of children who are at a high

  13. Childhood Asthma: A Clinical Study in Southern Nigeria | Okoh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common recognized trigger factor for exacerbation of asthmatic symptoms was extreme cold seen in 29 (72.5%) patients, while the most common identified early childhood risk factor for development of asthma was a positive family history of asthma in 21 (52.5%) patients. Thirty five of the subjects (87.5%) had mild ...

  14. Comorbidities of asthma during childhood : possibly important, yet poorly studied

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, E. P.; Duiverman, E. J.; Brand, P. L. P.

    Asthma in adults is associated with comorbidities such as obesity, gastro-oesophageal reflux, dysfunctional breathing and mental disorders. Herein, we provide an overview of the current state of evidence on these comorbidities in childhood asthma. The prevalence, known mechanisms and possible

  15. Comparing Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) criteria with the Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) and Asthma Control Test (ACT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolen, B.B.; Pijnenburg, M.W.; Brackel, H.J.; Landstra, A.M.; Berg, N.J. van den; Merkus, P.J.F.M.; Hop, W.C.J.; Vaessen-Verberne, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Several tools are useful in detecting uncontrolled asthma in children. The aim of this study was to compare Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines with the Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) and the Asthma Control Test (ACT) in detecting uncontrolled asthma in children. 145 children with

  16. Adverse childhood experience and asthma onset: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Exley

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Adverse childhood experiences such as abuse and neglect are associated with subsequent immune dysregulation. Some studies show an association between adverse childhood experiences and asthma onset, although significant disparity in results exists in the published literature. We aimed to review available studies employing a prospective design that investigates associations between adverse childhood experience and asthma. A search protocol was developed and studies were drawn from four electronic journal databases. Studies were selected in accordance with pre-set inclusion criteria and relevant data were extracted. 12 studies, assessing data from a total of 31 524 individuals, were identified that investigate the impact of a range of adverse childhood experiences on the likelihood of developing asthma. Evidence suggests that chronic stress exposure and maternal distress in pregnancy operate synergistically with known triggers such as traffic-related air pollution to increase asthma risk. Chronic stress in early life is associated with an increased risk of asthma onset. There is evidence that adverse childhood experience increases the impact of traffic-related air pollution and inconsistent evidence that adverse childhood experience has an independent effect on asthma onset.

  17. Adverse childhood experience and asthma onset: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Daniel; Norman, Alyson; Hyland, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Adverse childhood experiences such as abuse and neglect are associated with subsequent immune dysregulation. Some studies show an association between adverse childhood experiences and asthma onset, although significant disparity in results exists in the published literature. We aimed to review available studies employing a prospective design that investigates associations between adverse childhood experience and asthma. A search protocol was developed and studies were drawn from four electronic journal databases. Studies were selected in accordance with pre-set inclusion criteria and relevant data were extracted. 12 studies, assessing data from a total of 31 524 individuals, were identified that investigate the impact of a range of adverse childhood experiences on the likelihood of developing asthma. Evidence suggests that chronic stress exposure and maternal distress in pregnancy operate synergistically with known triggers such as traffic-related air pollution to increase asthma risk. Chronic stress in early life is associated with an increased risk of asthma onset. There is evidence that adverse childhood experience increases the impact of traffic-related air pollution and inconsistent evidence that adverse childhood experience has an independent effect on asthma onset. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  18. Treatment of childhood asthma. Options and rationale for inhaled therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C V; Everard, M L

    1998-02-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest the prevalence of asthma is increasing, though some remain sceptical as to the magnitude or indeed the presence of an increase. However, despite improved diagnosis and the availability of the potent drugs now available there remains considerable respiratory morbidity associated with asthma. It is clear from a number of studies that failure to deliver drugs to the lungs when using inhaler devices is a factor contributing to this high level of morbidity. Failure of drug delivery may result from the prescribing of inappropriate devices, failure to use devices appropriately or failure to comply with a treatment regimen. For most of the currently available forms of asthma therapy there are significant advantages to be gained from administering them in aerosol form. The benefits to be derived from administering these drugs as an aerosol include a rapid onset of action for drugs such as beta-agonists and a low incidence of systemic effects from drugs such as beta-agonists and corticosteroids. Over the past 25 years our understanding of the nature of asthma has changed. Though this has been reflected in the emphasis on inhaled corticosteroid therapy in recent guidelines, it has not been reflected in the range of inhaler devices available. Manufacturers continue to place drugs such as corticosteroids in the same devices as short acting beta-agonists even though the requirements for these different drug classes are very different. It is likely that this contributes to suboptimal therapeutic responses with inhaled corticosteroids. However, the variability associated with current delivery systems is relatively small compared with the variability introduced by poor compliance. There is no work currently available to indicate how the use of cheap disposable devises which do not incorporate any form of positive feedback influence compliance with inhaled steroids. Optimising aerosolised drug delivery in childhood involves consideration of the class

  19. Inhibition of Common Cold-Induced Aggravation of Childhood Asthma by Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists

    OpenAIRE

    Shigemi Yoshihara; Hironobu Fukuda; Toshio Abe; Mitsuhiro Nishida; Yumi Yamada; Noriko Kanno; Osamu Arisaka

    2012-01-01

    Background: : Virus infection is an important risk factor for aggravation of childhood asthma. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of drugs on aggravation of asthma induced by a common cold. Methods: : Asthma control was examined in a survey of 1,014 Japanese pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. The occurrence of common cold, asthma control, and drugs used for asthma control were investigated using a modified Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) for patients aged

  20. Smoke exposure as a risk factor for asthma in childhood: a review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Giuliana; Antona, Roberta; Malizia, Velia; Montalbano, Laura; Corsello, Giovanni; La Grutta, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic multifactorial disease that affects >300 million people worldwide. Outdoor and indoor pollution exposure has been associated with respiratory health effects in adults and children. Smoking still represents a huge public health problem and millions of children suffer the detrimental effects of passive smoke exposure. This study was designed to review the current evidences on exposure to passive smoke as a risk factor for asthma onset in childhood. A review of the most recent studies on this topic was undertaken to provide evidence about the magnitude of the effect of passive smoking on the risk of incidence of asthma in children. The effects of passive smoking are different depending on individual and environmental factors. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is one of the most important indoor air pollutants and can interact with other air pollutants in eliciting respiratory outcomes during childhood. The increased risk of respiratory outcomes in children exposed to prenatal and early postnatal passive smoke might be caused by an adverse effect on both the immune system and the structural and functional development of the lung; this may explain the subsequent increased risk of incident asthma. The magnitude of the exposure is quite difficult to precisely quantify because it is significantly influenced by the child's daily activities. Because exposure to ETS is a likely cause for asthma onset in childhood, there is a strong need to prevent infants and children from breathing air contaminated with tobacco smoke.

  1. Respiratory Viral Infections and Early Asthma in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Won Oh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory viral infections profoundly influence the disease activity of wheezing illnesses and asthma in early childhood. Viral bronchiolitis shares many features with asthma and a subset of children develop recurrent wheezing after their initial illness. Recently mechanisms for virus-induced exacerbations of childhood asthma are beginning to be focused on and defined. Viruses cause systemic immune activation and also produce local inflammation. These factors are likely to affect airway pathogenesis leading to airway narrowing, an increase in mucus production, and eventually bronchospasm, and airway obstruction. These new insights related to the pathogenesis and disease activity are likely to provide new targets for the therapy and prevention of early asthma in childhood.

  2. Prevalence of childhood asthma in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Shigemi; Munkhbayarlakh, Sonomjants; Makino, Sohei; Ito, Clyde; Logii, Narantsetseg; Dashdemberel, Sarangerel; Sagara, Hironori; Fukuda, Takeshi; Arisaka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a common but important chronic disease in children in all over the world. To take measures against prevalence of childhood asthma, many researchers have surveyed the actual statuses of childhood asthma in developed countries, but in most Asia-Pacific developing countries including Mongolia such surveys have never been sufficiently conducted until now. We have thought that this survey, though performed in 2009, will give important and meaningful information even now in taking measures to prevent prevailing bronchial asthma in children in Mongolia or the countries under similar statuses. The asthma prevalence and patient background information in Mongolian children aged 6-7 living in Ulaanbaatar were examined using a written questionnaire modified for their parents from that prepared by the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC). The estimated prevalence of asthma in Mongolian children was 20.9%. The following 3 risk factors were found to be related to asthma: (1) having allergic rhinitis symptoms, (2) mothers' smoking, and (3) history of severe respiratory infection before 1-year-old. The asthma prevalence in Mongolian children was higher than that in the world and Asia-Pacific countries reported by ISAAC. The higher prevalence was probably attributable to households' (especially mothers) smoking in draft-free houses designed for the cold area and severe air-pollution due to rapid industrialization and urbanization in Mongolia. Smoking prohibition in the mother (including family members) and a reduction of exposure to air pollutants are urgently needed to prevent developing childhood asthma. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of living in a farming environment with asthma incidence in Canadian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Marc A; Beach, Jeremy; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this population-based 14-year follow-up study was to examine the effect of living in a farm environment on asthma incidence in children. A total of 10,941 children of ages 0 to 11 years who were free of asthma and wheeze at the baseline (1994-1995) in the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth were considered in the study. Children's living environment was classified, based on interviewer's observation, into three categories: non-rural, rural non-farming, and farming. An incidence of asthma was obtained from health-professional diagnosed asthma reported either by the person most knowledgeable for children under 15 years or by the children themselves if they were of ages 16 years and over. The 14-year cumulative incidence of asthma among children living in farming environments was 10.18%, which was significantly lower than that observed for children living in rural non-farming (13.12%) and non-rural environments (16.50%). After adjusting for age group, number of older siblings, allergy, parental history of asthma, dwelling in need of repairs and SES index, a dose-response relationship was observed with children living in rural non-farming and farming environments having significantly reduced risk of asthma [hazard ratio (HR): 0.77; 95% confidence interval (CI): (0.60, 1.00); p = 0.047 and HR: 0.56; 95% CI: (0.41,0.77); p living in non-rural environments. This cohort study provides further evidence that living in a farming environment during childhood is protective of asthma incidence in adolescence and adulthood and this finding provides further support for the hygiene hypothesis.

  4. Prematurity, atopy, and childhood asthma in Puerto Ricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Ramratnam, Sima K; Brehm, John M; Han, Yueh-Ying; Boutaoui, Nadia; Forno, Erick; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Alvarez, María; Colón-Semidey, Angel; Canino, Glorisa; Celedón, Juan C

    2014-02-01

    Puerto Rican children share a disproportionate burden of prematurity and asthma in the United States. Little is known about prematurity and childhood asthma in Puerto Rican subjects. We sought to examine whether prematurity is associated with asthma in Puerto Rican children. We performed a case-control study of 678 children aged 6 to 14 years with (n = 351) and without (n = 327) asthma living in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Prematurity was defined by parental report for our primary analysis. In a secondary analysis, we only included children whose parents reported prematurity that required admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. Asthma was defined as physician-diagnosed asthma and wheeze in the prior year. We used logistic regression for analysis. All multivariate models were adjusted for age, sex, household income, atopy (≥1 positive IgE level to common allergens), maternal history of asthma, and early-life exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. In a multivariate analysis there was a significant interaction between prematurity and atopy on asthma (P = .006). In an analysis stratified by atopy, prematurity was associated with a nearly 5-fold increased odds of asthma in atopic children (adjusted odds ratio, 4.7; 95% CI, 1.5-14.3; P = .007). In contrast, there was no significant association between prematurity and asthma in nonatopic children. Similar results were obtained in our analysis of prematurity requiring admission to the neonatal intensive care unit and asthma. Our results suggest that atopy modifies the estimated effect of prematurity on asthma in Puerto Rican children. Prematurity might explain, in part, the high prevalence of atopic asthma in this ethnic group. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Urban Environment and Childhood Asthma (URECA birth cohort study: design, methods, and study population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandel Megan T

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence and morbidity of wheezing illnesses and childhood asthma is especially high in poor urban areas. This paper describes the study design, methods, and population of the Urban Environment and Childhood Asthma (URECA study, which was established to investigate the immunologic causes of asthma among inner-city children. Methods and Results URECA is an observational prospective study that enrolled pregnant women in central urban areas of Baltimore, Boston, New York City, and St. Louis and is following their offspring from birth through age 7 years. The birth cohort consists of 560 inner-city children who have at least one parent with an allergic disease or asthma, and all families live in areas in which at least 20% of the population has incomes below the poverty line. In addition, 49 inner-city children with no parental history of allergies or asthma were enrolled. The primary hypothesis is that specific urban exposures in early life promote a unique pattern of immune development (impaired antiviral and increased Th2 responses that increases the risk of recurrent wheezing and allergic sensitization in early childhood, and of asthma by age 7 years. To track immune development, cytokine responses of blood mononuclear cells stimulated ex vivo are measured at birth and then annually. Environmental assessments include allergen and endotoxin levels in house dust, pre- and postnatal maternal stress, and indoor air nicotine and nitrogen dioxide. Nasal mucous samples are collected from the children during respiratory illnesses and analyzed for respiratory viruses. The complex interactions between environmental exposures and immune development will be assessed with respect to recurrent wheeze at age 3 years and asthma at age 7 years. Conclusion The overall goal of the URECA study is to develop a better understanding of how specific urban exposures affect immune development to promote wheezing illnesses and asthma.

  6. Prevalence of childhood asthma in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigemi Yoshihara

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The asthma prevalence in Mongolian children was higher than that in the world and Asia–Pacific countries reported by ISAAC. The higher prevalence was probably attributable to households' (especially mothers smoking in draft-free houses designed for the cold area and severe air-pollution due to rapid industrialization and urbanization in Mongolia. Smoking prohibition in the mother (including family members and a reduction of exposure to air pollutants are urgently needed to prevent developing childhood asthma.

  7. Parental Perceptions and Practices toward Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani K. Abu-Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Parental perceptions and practices are important for improving the asthma outcomes in children; indeed, evidence shows that parents of asthmatic children harbor considerable misperceptions of the disease. Objective. To investigate the perceptions and practices of parents toward asthma and its management in Saudi children. Methods. Using a self-administered questionnaire, a two-stage cross-sectional survey of parents of children aged between 3 and 15 years, was conducted from schools located in Riyadh province in central Saudi Arabia. Results. During the study interval, 2000 parents were asked to participate in the study; 1450 parents responded, of whom 600 (41.4% reported that their children had asthma, dyspnea, or chest allergy (recurrent wheezing or coughing, while 478 (32.9% of the parents reported that their children were diagnosed earlier with asthma by a physician. Therefore, the final statistical analyses were performed with 600 participants. Furthermore, 321 (53.5% respondents believed that asthma is solely a hereditary disease. Interestingly, 361 (60.3% were concerned about side effects of inhaled corticosteroids and 192 (32% about the development of dependency on asthma medications. Almost 76% of parents had previously visited a pediatric emergency department during an asthma attack. Conclusions. Parents had misperceptions regarding asthma and exhibited ineffective practices in its management. Therefore, improving asthma care and compliance requires added parental education.

  8. Parental Perceptions and Practices toward Childhood Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Shaheen, Amani K; Nofal, Abdullah; Heena, Humariya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction . Parental perceptions and practices are important for improving the asthma outcomes in children; indeed, evidence shows that parents of asthmatic children harbor considerable misperceptions of the disease. Objective. To investigate the perceptions and practices of parents toward asthma and its management in Saudi children. Methods . Using a self-administered questionnaire, a two-stage cross-sectional survey of parents of children aged between 3 and 15 years, was conducted from schools located in Riyadh province in central Saudi Arabia. Results . During the study interval, 2000 parents were asked to participate in the study; 1450 parents responded, of whom 600 (41.4%) reported that their children had asthma, dyspnea, or chest allergy (recurrent wheezing or coughing), while 478 (32.9%) of the parents reported that their children were diagnosed earlier with asthma by a physician. Therefore, the final statistical analyses were performed with 600 participants. Furthermore, 321 (53.5%) respondents believed that asthma is solely a hereditary disease. Interestingly, 361 (60.3%) were concerned about side effects of inhaled corticosteroids and 192 (32%) about the development of dependency on asthma medications. Almost 76% of parents had previously visited a pediatric emergency department during an asthma attack. Conclusions . Parents had misperceptions regarding asthma and exhibited ineffective practices in its management. Therefore, improving asthma care and compliance requires added parental education.

  9. Asthma and allergic rhinitis in childhood: what's new.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrorilli, Carla; Posa, Daniela; Cipriani, Francesca; Caffarelli, Carlo

    2016-12-01

    Novel approaches are currently offered for the diagnostic workup and therapeutic management of allergic rhinitis and asthma. New predictive biomarkers of allergy and asthma are available. Primary and secondary prevention, earlier intervention, and modification of the natural history of allergic rhinitis and asthma are being intensively investigated. This review highlights advances in the understanding of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of atopic airway diseases in childhood, as well as prenatal and early-life risk factors and strategies for prevention. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Association of Allergic Rhinitis and Sinusitis with Childhood Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnakkannan, Selva Kumar; Singh, Meenu; Das, Rashmi Ranjan; Mathew, Joseph L; Saxena, Akshay Kumar

    2017-01-15

    To study the point prevalence of allergic rhinitis and sinusitis in childhood asthma and to examine the relationship among them. In 250 children (age allergic rhinitis was diagnosed by clinical plus nasal eosinophilia criteria, and sinusitis was diagnosed clinically plus confirmation by computerized tomography scan. The point prevalence of allergic rhinitis was 13.6%, and of sinusitis was 2%. On multivariate analysis, allergic rhinitis, sinusitis, and family history were significantly associated with asthma severity. Allergic rhinitis is common in childhood asthama, but sinusitis is rare.

  11. Childhood asthma in low income countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Marianne Stubbe; Nantanda, Rebecca; Tumwine, James K

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia has hitherto been considered the key cause of the high respiratory morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age (under-5s) in low-income countries, while asthma has not been stated as a significant reason. This paper explores the definitions and concepts...... of pneumonia and asthma/wheezing/bronchiolitis and examines whether asthma in under-5s may be confused with pneumonia. Over-diagnosing of bacterial pneumonia can be suspected from the limited association between clinical pneumonia and confirmatory test results such as chest x-ray and microbiological findings...... and poor treatment results using antibiotics. Moreover, children diagnosed with recurrent pneumonia in infancy were often later diagnosed with asthma. Recent studies showed a 10-15% prevalence of preschool asthma in low-income countries, although under-5s with long-term cough and difficulty breathing...

  12. Incident asthma and Mycoplasma pneumoniae: A nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jun-Jun; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies investigating the relationship between Mycoplasma pneumoniae and incident asthma in the general population have been inconclusive. We conducted a nationwide cohort study to clarify this relationship. Using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan, we identified 1591 patients with M pneumoniae infection (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code 4830) given diagnoses between 2000 and 2008. We then frequency matched 6364 patients without M pneumoniae infection from the general population according to age, sex, and index year. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to determine the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of the occurrence of asthma in the M pneumoniae cohort compared with that in the non-M pneumoniae cohort. Regardless of comorbidities and the use of antibiotic or steroid therapies, patients with M pneumonia infection had a higher risk of incident asthma than those without it. The aHR of asthma was 3.35 (95% CI, 2.71-4.15) for the M pneumoniae cohort, with a significantly higher risk when patients were stratified by age, sex, follow-up time, and comorbidities, including allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, or allergic conjunctivitis. Patients with M pneumoniae infection had a higher risk of having early-onset (age, incident cases of early-onset and late-onset asthma are closely related to M pneumoniae infection, even in nonatopic patients. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Incidence and long-term outcome of severe asthma-COPD overlap compared to asthma and COPD alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baarnes, Camilla Boslev; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Tjønneland, Anne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Incidence and prognosis for severe asthma-COPD overlap is poorly characterized. We investigated incidence and long-term outcome for patients with asthma-COPD overlap compared to asthma and COPD alone. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 57,053 adults (aged 50-64 years) enrolled in the D...

  14. Incidence of childhood psychiatric disorders in India

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Savita; Kohli, Adarsh; Kapoor, Mehak; Pradhan, Basant

    2009-01-01

    Background: Studies on incidence of childhood mental disorders are extremely rare globally and there are none from India. Incidence studies though more difficult and time consuming, provide invaluable information on the pattern and causes of occurrence of mental disorders allowing opportunity for early intervention and primary prevention. Aim: This study aimed at estimating the incidence of psychiatric disorders in school children. Materials and Methods: A representative sample of school chil...

  15. Community violence and urban childhood asthma: a multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternthal, M J; Jun, H-J; Earls, F; Wright, R J

    2010-12-01

    We examined the association between community violence exposure and childhood asthma risk in a multilevel, multimethod, longitudinal study controlling for individual- and neighbourhood-level confounders and pathway variables. Analyses included 2,071 children aged 0-9 yrs at enrolment from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. Multilevel logistic regression models estimated the likelihood of asthma, controlling for individual-level (child's age, sex, race/ethnicity, maternal asthma, socioeconomic status and family violence in the home) and neighbourhood-level confounders (concentrated disadvantage, collective efficacy and social disorder), and pathway variables (maternal smoking, breastfeeding). In adjusted analyses, medium (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.17-2.19) and high levels (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.12-2.18) of community violence were associated with increased asthma risk, relative to low levels. The increased asthma risk remained for African Americans when models included community violence and all other individual-level covariates, but attenuated to borderline nonsignificance when further adjusting for collective efficacy. Community violence is associated with asthma risk when controlling for individual- and neighborhood-level confounders. Neither community violence, nor the other individual-level factors, fully accounted for the excess asthma burden among African Americans. These data suggest that public health interventions outside the biomedical model may be needed to reduce asthma in disadvantaged populations.

  16. Clinically remitted childhood asthma is associated with airflow obstruction in middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Keitaro; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Yamane, Takashi; Nakashima, Taku; Haruta, Yoshinori; Hattori, Noboru; Yokoyama, Akihito; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2017-01-01

    While adult asthma has been shown to be a risk factor for COPD, the effect of remitted childhood asthma on adult lung function has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to examine whether remitted childhood asthma is a risk factor for airflow obstruction in a middle-aged general population. A total of 9896 participants (range: 35-60 years) from five healthcare centres were included in the study. The participants were classified into four categories based on the presence or absence of physician-diagnosed childhood/adulthood asthma and asthma symptoms as follows: healthy controls (n = 9154), remitted childhood asthma (n = 287), adulthood-onset asthma (n = 354) and childhood-adulthood asthma (n = 101). The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was similar in both the participants with remitted childhood asthma and healthy controls. The prevalence of airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 )/forced vital capacity (FVC) childhood asthma, those with adult-onset asthma and those with childhood-adulthood asthma (5.2%, 14.4% and 16.8%, respectively) compared with healthy controls (2.2%). Multivariate logistic regression showed that remitted childhood asthma was independently associated with airflow obstruction. Among the participants with remitted childhood asthma, ever-smokers had significantly lower FEV 1 /FVC than never-smokers. Clinically remitted childhood asthma is associated with airflow obstruction in middle-aged adults. Smoking and remitted childhood asthma may be additive factors for the development of airflow obstruction. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  17. The PCDH1 gene and asthma in early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Li J; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that variants in the protocadherin-1 (PCDH1) gene, which is important for cell-cell adhesion, are associated with asthma, bronchial, hyperresponsiveness and atopic dermatitis in school children. Our aim was to associate common variants of the PCDH1 gene with longit......Previous studies have suggested that variants in the protocadherin-1 (PCDH1) gene, which is important for cell-cell adhesion, are associated with asthma, bronchial, hyperresponsiveness and atopic dermatitis in school children. Our aim was to associate common variants of the PCDH1 gene...... with longitudinally assessed asthma phenotypes and atopic dermatitis in early childhood. We analysed eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms in PCDH1 from 411 children born to asthmatic mothers from the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood birth cohort. Asthma and atopic dermatitis were diagnosed...... prospectively to the age of 7 years and asthma was categorised by temporal pattern: transient early respiratory symptoms, persistent symptoms and late-onset symptoms. Bronchial responsiveness was measured at age 6 years. We used additive genetic models. Kaplan-Meier plots revealed early onset in hetero...

  18. Effect of asthma severity on symptom perception in childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L.B. Cabral

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Individual ability to perceive airway obstruction varies substantially. The factors influencing the perception of asthma are probably numerous and not well established in children. The present study was designed to examine the influence of asthma severity, use of preventive medication, age and gender on the association between respiratory symptoms (RS and peak expiratory flow (PEF rates in asthmatic children. We followed 92 asthmatic children, aged 6 to 16 years, for five months. Symptom scores were recorded daily and PEF was measured twice a day. The correlations among variables at the within-person level over time were analyzed for each child and for the pooled data by multivariate analysis. After pooling the data, there was a significant (P<0.05 correlation between each symptom and PEF; 60% of the children were accurate perceivers (defined by a statistically significant correlation between symptoms and PEF across time for diurnal symptoms and 37% for nocturnal symptoms. The accuracy of perception was independent of asthma severity, age, gender or the use of preventive medication. Symptom perception is inaccurate in a substantial number of asthmatic children, independently of clinical severity, age, gender or use of preventive medication. It is not clear why some asthmatic patients are capable of accurately perceiving the severity of airway obstruction while others are not.

  19. Parental Perceptions and Practices toward Childhood Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Shaheen, Amani K.; Nofal, Abdullah; Heena, Humariya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Parental perceptions and practices are important for improving the asthma outcomes in children; indeed, evidence shows that parents of asthmatic children harbor considerable misperceptions of the disease. Objective. To investigate the perceptions and practices of parents toward asthma and its management in Saudi children. Methods. Using a self-administered questionnaire, a two-stage cross-sectional survey of parents of children aged between 3 and 15 years, was conducted from sch...

  20. Increase in hospital admissions for acute childhood asthma in Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine whether hospital admissions for acute childhood asthma were rising in Cape Town in line with the experience of other countries, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital's records for the period 1978 - 1990 were analysed. These were compared with total admissions for non-surgical causes and lower ...

  1. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction : clinical studies in childhood asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. Hofstra (Winfried)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAt present, astluna is regarded as a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, In susceptible individuals, asthma causes symptoms, that are usually associated with variable, but often reversible airflow obstmction. Astlulla is the most conunon lung disease in childhood, with

  2. How much do school teachers know about childhood asthma in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-10

    Mar 10, 2017 ... (Govender and Gray)13 The questionnaire was pre-tested in a pilot study among teachers in a school different from those selected for the study for content and face validity of the questions. The AKQ has four parts thus: Part one with 11 questions assess general knowledge about childhood asthma; part.

  3. Maternal propensity for infections and risk of childhood asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Jakob; Sevelsted, Astrid; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maternal use of antibiotics during pregnancy has been associated with the development of asthmatic disorders in the offspring. The human microbiome has been suggested to act as an intermediary in this process. To provide clarification on this theory, we studied the temporal relation...... between maternal use of antibiotics and the risk of childhood asthma. METHODS: According to national registries, during the observation period (1997-2010), 910,301 children were born in Denmark and were included in the analysis. From these registries, data for cases of childhood asthma were obtained based...... on hospital admissions, outpatient attendance at a hospital, or use of inhaled corticosteroids. The effect of timing of maternal antibiotic use on the risk of asthma in the offspring was studied by analysis of maternal antibiotic use in the 80 weeks before pregnancy, during pregnancy, and the 80 weeks after...

  4. Prematurity and prescription asthma medication from childhood to young adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Anne Louise; Hansen, Bo Moelholm; Mathiasen, Rene

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preterm birth is associated with increased risk of asthma-like symptoms and purchase of prescription asthma medication in childhood. We investigated whether this association persists into adulthood and whether it is affected by accounting for neonatal respiratory morbidity (acute...... respiratory disease and bronchopulmonary dysplasia). METHODS: A national cohort of all infants born in Denmark in the period 1980-2009 was included in this register study. Data on purchase of asthma medication (combination of inhaled β-2 agonists and other drugs for obstructive airway disease) in 2010......-2011 were obtained from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Associations between gestational age (GA), neonatal respiratory morbidity and a cross-sectional evaluation of asthma medication purchase were explored by multivariate logistic regressions. RESULTS: A full dataset was obtained on 1...

  5. General practitioners' knowledge of childhood asthma in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, V P; Shah, A; Malhotra, A; Dewanwala, A; Taneja, D K; Gupta, V K; Ingle, G K

    2008-06-01

    To assess knowledge of childhood asthma among general practitioners (GPs) in Delhi, India. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 157 GPs were interviewed using a validated questionnaire, including six questions of local and social relevance. A response rate of 78.5% was obtained. Although the GPs who participated in the study had adequate knowledge of the importance of appropriate treatment, the safety of inhalers/oral steroids and the role of medicines in the prevention of frequent asthma attacks, the majority lacked knowledge of symptomatology, exercise-induced asthma and inhaled corticosteroids. GPs with >5 years of practice were more likely to have significantly less knowledge about preventive drugs, certain aspects of treatment of acute asthma and misconceptions, such as 'drinking milk increases mucus production' or 'children with asthma should not consume dairy products, chilled drinks, sour or chilled food'. On the other hand, GPs with < or =5 of practice had misconceptions such as 'children with asthma have abnormally sensitive airways' and 'asthmatic children develop dependence on inhalers'. The gaps in knowledge about asthma and its management highlight the need to design well-structured educational strategies for health professionals.

  6. Allergic sensitization to cat in childhood as major predictor of incident respiratory allergy in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, T; Wölke, G; Ring, J; Wichmann, H-E; Heinrich, J

    2007-11-01

    Little is known on the predictive value of sensitization to specific aeroallergens in children with respect to asthma and hay fever incidence in young adulthood. We followed the incidence of asthma and hay fever in children (mean age 11 years) over 9 years, and analyzed the predictive value of sensitization to five common aeroallergens. Three consecutive surveys were conducted in East German school children. Specific IgE antibodies to birch and timothy grass pollen, house dust mite, cat, and cladosporium were measured. In 1207 out of the 2453 children, the 9-year incidence of asthma and hay fever was assessed by reported doctors' diagnoses. For sensitization, diagnostic parameters were determined and logistic regression analyses controlled for relevant confounders. A total of 176/78 incident hay fever/asthma cases occurred equaling a cumulative incidence of 1.93/0.86% per year. Incident asthma was associated with previous sensitization to cat [risk ratio (RR) 3.49, 1.57-7.74] and grass pollen (RR 1.79, 1.01-3.19), whereas incident hay fever was associated with each allergen, with grass pollen (RR 6.00, 4.04-8.90) and cat (RR 5.36, 2.87-9.99) exhibiting the strongest associations. When mutually adjusting for all allergens, sensitization to cat remained significantly associated with asthma and hay fever. The latter was also associated with sensitization to grass pollen. The highest positive predictive values for asthma and hay fever were obtained for cat sensitization (10/49 = 20.4% and 23/49 = 46.9%). Childhood sensitization to cat and grass pollen predicts the incidence of asthma and hay fever in young adulthood. The predictive capacity differs by allergen and manifestation of atopy.

  7. Parental stress and air pollution increase childhood asthma in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qihong; Deng, Linjing; Lu, Chan; Li, Yuguo; Norbäck, Dan

    2018-04-11

    Although air pollution and social stress may independently increase childhood asthma, little is known on their synergistic effect on asthma, particularly in China with high levels of stress and air pollution. To examine associations between exposure to a combination of parental stress and air pollution and asthma prevalence in children. We conducted a cohort study of 2406 preschool children in Changsha (2011-2012). A questionnaire was used to collect children's lifetime prevalence of asthma and their parental stress. Parental socioeconomic and psychosocial stresses were respectively defined in terms of housing size and difficulty concentrating. Children's exposure to ambient air pollutants was estimated using concentrations measured at monitoring stations. Associations between exposure to parental stress and air pollution and childhood asthma were estimated by multiple logistic regression models using odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Life time prevalence of asthma in preschool children (6.7%) was significantly associated with parental socioeconomic and psychosocial stresses with OR (95% CI) respectively 1.48 (1.02-2.16) and 1.64 (1.00-2.71). Asthma was also associated with exposure to air pollutants, with adjusted OR (95% CI) during prenatal and postnatal periods respectively 1.43 (1.10-1.86) and 1.35 (1.02-1.79) for SO 2 and 1.61 (1.19-2.18) and 1.76 (1.19-2.61) for NO 2 . The association with air pollution was significant only in children exposed to high parental stress, the association with parental stress was significant only in children exposed to high air pollution, and the association was the strongest in children exposed to a combination of parental stress and air pollution. Sensitivity analysis showed that the synergistic effects of parental stress and air pollution on childhood asthma were stronger in boys. Parental stress and air pollution were synergistically associated with increased childhood asthma, indicating a common biological

  8. Maternal hypothyroidism in the perinatal period and childhood asthma in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Andersen, Stine Linding; Olsen, Jørn

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing interest in the possible link between maternal hypothyroidism in the perinatal period and childhood asthma risk. We explored this in the present study while accounting for the timing of hypothyroidism diagnosis. Further, we evaluated whether the risk was moderated...... by thyroid hormone treatment during pregnancy. METHODS: We conducted a population-based cohort study using Danish national registers. All liveborn singletons in Denmark from 1998 to 2007 were identified. Maternal hypothyroidism and asthma in the children were defined by data from the Patient Register...... and Prescription Registry. We estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of asthma among children born to hypothyroid mothers versus children born to mothers with no recorded thyroid dysfunction using Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Of 595,669 children, 3,524 children were born to mothers with hypothyroidism...

  9. Physical fitness and amount of asthma and asthma-like symptoms from childhood to adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldberg-Møller, Jørgen; Hancox, Bob; Mikkelsen, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The potential benefits of physical activity on the development of respiratory symptoms are not well known. The present study investigated the longitudinal association between physical fitness and the development of asthma-like symptoms from childhood to adulthood in a longitudinal...... reduced by 2% from early adolescence to young adulthood (ages 9-29 years) by increasing the maximal workload with 1 W/kg. CONCLUSION: This finding provide further evidence of a possible beneficial effect of physical activity in childhood on the development of respiratory symptoms in adulthood and supports...... the notion that the lower levels of physical activity in recent decades may have contributed to an increase in the prevalence of asthma and asthma-like symptoms....

  10. Childhood asthma and indoor woodsmoke from cooking in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schei, Morten A; Hessen, Jens O; Smith, Kirk R; Bruce, Nigel; McCracken, John; Lopez, Victorina

    2004-01-01

    We estimated the prevalence and severity of asthma, and the association with cooking on open wood fires, as preparation for a large-scale randomized field trial on effects of indoor air pollution and child health. This is one of the first systematic studies of asthma and indoor wood-smoke pollution and to our knowledge the first asthma study in a purely indigeneous population in Latin America. The mothers of 1058 children aged 4-6 years were interviewed, using the standardized ISAAC (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood) procedures and questionnaire. The study population is a Mam-speaking (Maya), indigenous group living at relatively high altitude (2000 m) in Western Guatemalan Highlands. We found that asthma prevalence is low among indigenous children in Guatemala, compared to other populations in Latin America. Only 3.3% of the children reported wheezing symptoms in the last 12 months, and 72% wheezing symptoms ever. The majority of the current wheezers had at least one of the criteria for severe asthma. The prevalence of all the symptoms of asthma was higher in children from households that used open fires compared to improved stoves with chimneys. In a logistic regression model, use of open fire for cooking was a significant risk factor for a number of asthma symptoms, with odds ratios varying from 2.0 to 3.5. Among the different cooking technologies (1-improved stove with chimney, 2-mixture of gas and open fire, 3-open fire) trends of higher prevalence with more pollution was found for some of the symptoms. Hence use of open fire for cooking, may be an important risk factor for asthma symptoms and severity.

  11. Periconceptional and Gestational Exposure to Antibiotics and Childhood Asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyuan Chu

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggest that maternal antibiotics exposure during pregnancy may increase the risk of childhood asthma, but the results were inconsistent. Furthermore, most studies did not examine periconception period as an exposure window. We aim to assess the associations between maternal exposure to specific antibiotics before and during pregnancy and the risk of asthma in early childhood.Data from the Collaborative Perinatal Project were used. Maternal exposure to antibiotics before and during pregnancy was recorded at each prenatal visit. A total of 39,907 singleton children were followed up to 7 years of age. Multilevel multiple logistic regression models were used to control for potential confounders and account for multiple pregnancies per woman.Maternal use of penicillin or chloramphenicol was associated with an increased risk of asthma in the offspring (adjusted odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval 1.08-1.36 for penicillin; 1.72 [1.14-2.59] for chloramphenicol. The risk was significantly increased if penicillin or chloramphenicol was used in the 1st trimester (1.09 [1.04-1.13] for penicillin and 1.23 [1.01-1.51] for chloramphenicol.Maternal exposure to certain antibiotics is associated with childhood asthma by 7 years of age. Early pregnancy may be a sensitive window.

  12. Inhibition of Common Cold-Induced Aggravation of Childhood Asthma by Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigemi Yoshihara

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: : These findings showed a high prevalence of common cold in younger patients with childhood asthma and indicated that common cold can induce aggravation of asthma. LTRAs are useful for long-term asthma control in very young patients who develop an asthma attack due to a common cold.

  13. Is ketamine a lifesaving agent in childhood acute severe asthma?

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    Hendaus MA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed A Hendaus,1,2 Fatima A Jomha,3 Ahmed H Alhammadi1,2 1Department of Pediatrics, Section of Academic General Pediatrics, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, 2Department of Clinical Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar, Doha, Qatar; 3School of Pharmacy, Lebanese International University, Khiara, Lebanon Abstract: Children with acute severe asthma exacerbation are at risk of developing respiratory failure. Moreover, conventional aggressive management might be futile in acute severe asthma requiring intubation and invasive ventilation. The aim of this review is to detail evidence on the use of ketamine in childhood asthma exacerbations. A search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases was performed, using different combinations of the following terms: ketamine, asthma, use, exacerbation, and childhood. In addition, we searched the references of the identified articles for additional articles. We then reviewed titles and included studies that were relevant to the topic of interest. Finally, the search was limited to studies published in English and Spanish from 1918 to June 2015. Due to the scarcity in the literature, we included all published articles. The literature reports conflicting results of ketamine use for acute severe asthma in children. Taking into consideration the relatively good safety profile of the drug, ketamine might be a reasonable option in the management of acute severe asthma in children who fail to respond to standard therapy. Furthermore, pediatricians and pediatric emergency clinicians administering ketamine should be knowledgeable about the unique actions of this drug and its potential side effects. Keywords: asthma, ketamine, children

  14. The Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The atopic diseases asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis are the most common chronic diseases in children, and their prevalence has increased recently in industrialized nations. Little is known about the genetic-environmental interaction factors driving such proliferation....... OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationships among genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors in the development of atopic diseases in high-risk children with the aim of developing evidence-based prevention strategies. METHODS: The Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood is a single...

  15. The Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The atopic diseases asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis are the most common chronic diseases in children, and their prevalence has increased recently in industrialized nations. Little is known about the genetic-environmental interaction factors driving such proliferation....... OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationships among genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors in the development of atopic diseases in high-risk children with the aim of developing evidence-based prevention strategies. METHODS: The Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood is a single......-center, birth cohort study of children of asthmatic mothers. Objective assessments begin at birth, with scheduled visits every 6 months and when acute symptoms manifest. Clinical outcomes comprise preasthma, asthma, atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, allergy, lung function, and bronchial responsiveness...

  16. [Evaluation of association between an acute attack of childhood bronchial asthma and Chlamydia pneumoniae infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi; Liu, Xing-Lian; Xing, Fu-Qiang; Yang, Ju-Sheng; Tu, Hong

    2006-04-01

    To identify whether there is an association between an acute attack of childhood bronchial asthma and Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) infection. Serum specific antibodies IgM and IgG to CP were detected by ELISA in 120 asthmatic children with an acute attack and 82 healthy children. Anti-CP IgM was demonstrated in 22 cases (18.3%) and anti-CP IgG was demonstrated in 32 cases (26.7%) out of the 120 asthmatic patients. The incidence of CP infection in asthmatic children was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (3.7%) (P attack of asthma in 15 cases out of the 32 cases with CP infection, but 17 cases required glucocorticoid inhalation treatment together with anti-CP infection treatment (macrolide antibiotics, eg. azithromycin) for remission of asthma attack. There may be a link between an acute attack of childhood asthma and CP infection. It is thus necessary to detect the CP-specific antibodies in asthmatic children for proper treatment.

  17. Influence of climate factors on emergency visits for childhood asthma attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Fukuda, Taiki; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Shou; Watanuki, Satoshi; Eto, Yoshikatsu; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi

    2004-02-01

    Asthma attack shows strong seasonality. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the contribution of climate variables and other seasonal factors on the incidence of emergency visits for childhood asthma in Tokyo, Japan. The number of children who visited emergency rooms at Jikei university hospitals in Tokyo during 1998-2002 (5559 visits) was retrieved retrospectively from files from the Department of Pediatrics, and compared with 45 climate parameters from the Meteorological Agency using multiple regression models with a stepwise backward elimination approach. The number of visits (3.7 +/- 3.1) per night increased significantly when climate conditions showed a rapid decrease from higher barometric pressure, from higher air temperature and from higher humidity, as well as lower wind speed. The best-fit model demonstrated that a 22% variation in the number of visits was explained by a linear relationship with 12 climate variables, which increased to 36% after adjusting for calendar month and day of the week. Moreover, when the number of asthma visits was cut off at nine per night, the area under the receiver operator characteristics curve was 0.91 (95% CI: 0.89-0.94) in the multiple logistic regression model using the same variables. These results suggest that these models might quantify contributions of specific climate conditions and other seasonal factors on the number of emergency visits per night for childhood asthma attack in Tokyo, Japan.

  18. Anemia as a risk factor for childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishnan K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This prospective-(cohort study was conducted to evaluate whether anemia is a risk factor for childhood asthma. Materials and Methods: Two hundred children in the age group of 2-18 years who attended the Outpatient Department with upper respiratory / lower respiratory tract infections were included in this study. One hundred children with anemia were taken as the study group and another 100, age - and sex-matched children without anemia were taken as the control.They were subjected to complete blood count (CBC C-reactive protein (CRP estimation, Mantoux test and chest X-ray. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs were performed on those above six years showing evidence of asthma. Peripheral smear, serum ferritin and serum iron-binding capacity were estimated for all anemic children. Results: Asthma was present in 74 (74% children in the study group and in 33 (33% children in the control group. Iron-deficiency anemia was present in 85 (85% anemia of chronic infection in 20 (20% and the other five (5% had hemolytic anemia. Anemia was found to be a risk factor for childhood asthma. Conclusion: Anemic children were 5.75 times more susceptible to asthmatic attacks when compared with nonanemic children.

  19. Monitoring asthma in childhood: management-related issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart L. Rottier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Management-related issues are an important aspect of monitoring asthma in children in clinical practice. This review summarises the literature on practical aspects of monitoring including adherence to treatment, inhalation technique, ongoing exposure to allergens and irritants, comorbid conditions and side-effects of treatment, as agreed by the European Respiratory Society Task Force on Monitoring Asthma in Childhood. The evidence indicates that it is important to discuss adherence to treatment in a non-confrontational way at every clinic visit, and take into account a patient's illness and medication beliefs. All task force members teach inhalation techniques at least twice when introducing a new inhalation device and then at least annually. Exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke, combustion-derived air pollutants, house dust mites, fungal spores, pollens and pet dander deserve regular attention during follow-up according to most task force members. In addition, allergic rhinitis should be considered as a cause for poor asthma control. Task force members do not screen for gastro-oesophageal reflux and food allergy. Height and weight are generally measured at least annually to identify individuals who are susceptible to adrenal suppression and to calculate body mass index, even though causality between obesity and asthma has not been established. In cases of poor asthma control, before stepping up treatment the above aspects of monitoring deserve closer attention.

  20. Preeclampsia Associates with Asthma, Allergy, and Eczema in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokholm, Jakob; Sevelsted, Astrid; Anderson, Ulrik D; Bisgaard, Hans

    2017-03-01

    Preeclampsia reflects an unusual increase in systemic inflammation during pregnancy. We studied associations between preeclampsia and asthma, allergy, and eczema in Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood 2000 (COPSAC 2000 ) and in national registries. COPSAC 2000 is a high-risk birth cohort of 411 Danish children. Asthma, allergy, and eczema were diagnosed prospectively, and lung function measured at age 1 month and 7 years. Sensitization was evaluated at age 6 months, 18 months, 4 years, and 6 years by skin prick tests and IgE measurements. The register-based cohort included 1.7 million children from Danish national registries in the 35-year period 1977-2012. Children born to mothers with preeclampsia were analyzed regarding risk of asthma, allergy, and eczema. In the COPSAC 2000 cohort, 5.6% (n = 23) were diagnosed with preeclampsia. Preeclampsia was associated with increased risk of treatment with inhaled corticosteroids at age 7 years (adjusted odds ratio, 4.01 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-14.43]; P = 0.0337), increased bronchial responsiveness to methacholine (adjusted β-coefficient log-μmol, -0.80 [95% CI, -1.55 to -0.06]; P = 0.0348), and allergic rhinitis (adjusted odds ratio, 4.83 [95% CI, 1.58-14.78]; P = 0.0057) in the 7-year-old children. Furthermore, the children had an increased risk of sensitization to both aeroallergens and food allergens, and increased amount of total IgE during childhood. In the registry-based cohort, 3.7% (n = 62,728) were born to mothers with preeclampsia. Preeclampsia was associated with increased risk of asthma, eczema, and aeroallergen and food allergy, especially pronounced after a duration of preeclampsia of 14 days or more. Maternal asthma increased the risk of preeclampsia. Preeclampsia is a shared prenatal risk factor for asthma, eczema, and allergy in childhood pointing toward in utero immune programming of the child.

  1. The impact of prenatal exposure to air pollution on childhood wheezing and asthma: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehua, Zhang; Qing, Chang; Shanyan, Gao; Qijun, Wu; Yuhong, Zhao

    2017-11-01

    There has been no clear consensus about whether prenatal exposure to air pollution contributes to the development of wheezing and asthma in children. We conducted a systematic review to analyze the association between exposure to different pollutants during pregnancy and the development of childhood wheezing and asthma. We systematically reviewed epidemiological studies published through June 6, 2017 available in the MEDLINE and Web of Science databases. We included studies that examined the association between prenatal exposure to any air pollutants except tobacco smoke and the incidence or prevalence of "wheezing" or "asthma" from birth to 14 years of age. We extracted key characteristics of each included study using a template of predefined data items. We used the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme checklists to assess the validity of each included study. We conducted overall and subgroup meta-analyses for each summary exposure-outcome association. Pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by using a random effects model. Eighteen studies met our eligibility criteria. There was notable variability in exposure assessment methods. The overall random effects risk estimates (95% CI) of different pollutants were 1.04 (0.94-1.15) aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), 1.04 (1.01-1.07) NO 2 , 1.4 (0.97-2.03) PM 2.5 for childhood wheeze and 1.07 (1.01-1.14) NO 2 , 1 (0.97-1.03) PM 2.5 , 1.02 (0.98-1.07) SO 2 , 1.08 (1.05-1.12) PM 10 for childhood asthma. Minimal heterogeneity was seen for PAH and SO 2 , while some heterogeneity was observed for PM 10 , PM 2.5 and NO 2 . The overall and subgroup risk estimates from the meta-analyses showed statistically significant associations between prenatal exposures to NO 2 , SO 2 , and PM 10 and the risk of wheezing and asthma development in childhood. There is insufficient evidence to show an effect of prenatal exposure to BC, CO, and O 3 on childhood wheezing and asthma. Further studies are needed to

  2. Incidence of childhood primary immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashigawa, Masamune; Maeyama, Takatoshi; Yoshino, Ayako; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Ito, Mitsue; Maji, Tomoaki; Ichimi, Ryouji

    2015-10-01

    There is a discrepancy in the reported incidence of childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) between Europe (2.9-5.3 per 100 000 persons) and Japan (1.91). Ise district is a suitable area in which to conduct epidemiological study because there is little fluctuation in the sociodemographic factors. We performed a retrospective population-based study to clarify the incidence of primary childhood ITP. We calculated person-years for children aged <15 years based on the Ise district demographics between 2002 and 2012. The calculated person-years were 298 533. The number of hospitalized patients in Ise district was 25 (M/F, 14/11) during the study period. The calculated incidence was therefore 8.4 per 100 000 person-years. It is possible that the difference in incidence between the present calculation and that of the European studies is due to variation in accuracy and/or registration criteria between the studies. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  3. Inhibition of common cold-induced aggravation of childhood asthma by leukotriene receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Shigemi; Fukuda, Hironobu; Abe, Toshio; Nishida, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Yumi; Kanno, Noriko; Arisaka, Osamu

    2012-09-01

    Virus infection is an important risk factor for aggravation of childhood asthma. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of drugs on aggravation of asthma induced by a common cold. Asthma control was examined in a survey of 1,014 Japanese pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. The occurrence of common cold, asthma control, and drugs used for asthma control were investigated using a modified Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) for patients aged cold and aggravation of asthma were significantly higher in patients aged cold-induced aggravation was significantly less effective in patients aged cold, asthma control was significantly more effective for those treated with leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs) compared to treatment without LTRAs. Asthma control did not differ between patients who did or did not take inhaled corticosteroids or long-acting β2 stimulants. These findings showed a high prevalence of common cold in younger patients with childhood asthma and indicated that common cold can induce aggravation of asthma. LTRAs are useful for long-term asthma control in very young patients who develop an asthma attack due to a common cold.

  4. Forced Oscillation Technique and Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Mochizuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most infants and preschool children are not able to voluntarily perform the physiological maneuvers required to complete the pulmonary function tests that are used in adults and older children. Recently, commercial devices using forced oscillation technique (FOT suitable for young children have become available. In devices with FOT, an oscillation pressure wave is generated by a loud speaker, is applied to the respiratory system, usually at the mouth, and the resulting pressure-flow relationship is analyzed in terms of impedance (Zrs. Zrs encompasses both resistance (Rrs and reactance (Xrs. Rrs is calculated from pressure and flow signals, and is a measure of central and peripheral airway caliber. Xrs is derived from the pressure in the phase with volume and is related to compliance (Crs and inertance (Irs. These parameters individually indicate the condition of the small and large airways in each patient and indirectly suggest the presence of airway inflammation. It is agreed that the clinical diagnostic capacity of FOT is comparable to that of spirometry. One of the advantages of FOT is that minimal cooperation of the patient is needed and no respiratory maneuvers are required. The use of FOT should be considered in patients in whom spirometry or other pulmonary function tests cannot be performed or in cases where the results of other tests appear to be unreliable. In addition, this approach is effective in assessing bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Considering these qualities, FOT is a useful method to study pulmonary function in preschool children with asthma.

  5. Health-related quality of life in childhood bronchial asthma | Al ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Asthma is a public health problem that adversely affects different aspects of quality of life (QoL). Childhood asthma is common in Egypt and associated with repeated school absenteeism and hospital admission. Objective: To evaluate health-related quality of life (QoL) in children with bronchial asthma in an ...

  6. Rhinovirus Wheezing Illness and Genetic Risk of Childhood-Onset Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calışkan, Minal; Bochkov, Yury A; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil

    2013-01-01

    Background Both genetic variation at the 17q21 locus and virus-induced respiratory wheezing illnesses are associated with the development of asthma. Our aim was to determine the effects of these two factors on the risk of asthma in the Childhood Origins of Asthma (COAST) and the Copenhagen Prospe...

  7. Asthma Symptoms in Early Childhood: A public health perspective [Astmasymptomen bij jonge kinderen: een volksgezondheids perspectief

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafkam-de Groen, E.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on asthma symptoms in early childhood. From a public health perspective, we aim to improve health and health-related quality of life through the prevention of asthma symptoms and by signaling, counselling or management of children who are at a high risk of developing asthma. The

  8. Childhood overweight and asthma symptoms, the role of pro-inflammatory proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, M. B. M.; Brunekreef, B.; de Jongste, J. C.; Kerkhof, M.; Smit, H. A.; Postma, D. S.; Gehring, U.; Wijga, A. H.

    Background Systemic inflammation is suggested as a mechanism by which overweight might induce asthma. However, few studies have linked childhood overweight, inflammation and asthma. Objective To study the association between body mass index (BMI), asthma symptoms and pro-inflammatory proteins.

  9. The association between ambient temperature and childhood asthma: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Crooks, James Lewis; Davies, Janet Mary; Khan, Al Fazal; Hu, Wenbiao; Tong, Shilu

    2017-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to review available information on the association between ambient temperature and childhood asthma, and to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms of this relationship. A systematic review was conducted based on the papers retrieved from four databases, including PubMed, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, and Scopus. Papers examining the association of absolute temperature or temperature variation with childhood asthma published from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2016 were included. Thirteen papers have quantified the effect of absolute temperature on childhood asthma, and six papers have examined the effect of intra- or inter-day temperature variation on childhood asthma. All studies were conducted in urban areas. Aeroallergen sensitizations were only considered in the analyses of one study. Discrepancy existed in the significance of the relationship between absolute temperature and childhood asthma, and also in the shape of this relationship (i.e. linear or non-linear) and whether temperature effects were lagged. Increasing evidence is suggesting non-linear relationship between absolute temperature and childhood asthma. Future research should investigate the burden of childhood asthma specifically attributable to extreme temperatures and temperature variation using advanced statistical approach, particularly in rural areas, after properly considering aeroallergens and air pollution. Projecting future burden of childhood asthma under climate change scenarios is also warranted.

  10. The association between ambient temperature and childhood asthma: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Crooks, James Lewis; Davies, Janet Mary; Khan, Al Fazal; Hu, Wenbiao; Tong, Shilu

    2018-03-01

    The objectives of this study are to review available information on the association between ambient temperature and childhood asthma, and to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms of this relationship. A systematic review was conducted based on the papers retrieved from four databases, including PubMed, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, and Scopus. Papers examining the association of absolute temperature or temperature variation with childhood asthma published from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2016 were included. Thirteen papers have quantified the effect of absolute temperature on childhood asthma, and six papers have examined the effect of intra- or inter-day temperature variation on childhood asthma. All studies were conducted in urban areas. Aeroallergen sensitizations were only considered in the analyses of one study. Discrepancy existed in the significance of the relationship between absolute temperature and childhood asthma, and also in the shape of this relationship (i.e. linear or non-linear) and whether temperature effects were lagged. Increasing evidence is suggesting non-linear relationship between absolute temperature and childhood asthma. Future research should investigate the burden of childhood asthma specifically attributable to extreme temperatures and temperature variation using advanced statistical approach, particularly in rural areas, after properly considering aeroallergens and air pollution. Projecting future burden of childhood asthma under climate change scenarios is also warranted.

  11. Ambient particulate pollution and the world-wide prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema in children: Phase One of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, H.R.; Ruggles, R.; Pandey, K.D.; Kapetanakis, V.; Brunekreef, B.; Lai, C.K.; Strachan, D.P.; Weiland, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of ambient particulate matter on variation in childhood prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema. METHODS: Prevalences of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema obtained in Phase One of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood

  12. Early Exposure to Dogs and Farm Animals and the Risk of Childhood Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Tove; Lundholm, Cecilia; Örtqvist, Anne K; Fall, Katja; Fang, Fang; Hedhammar, Åke; Kämpe, Olle; Ingelsson, Erik; Almqvist, Catarina

    2015-11-01

    The association between early exposure to animals and childhood asthma is not clear, and previous studies have yielded contradictory results. To determine whether exposure to dogs and farm animals confers a risk of asthma. In a nationwide cohort study, the association between early exposure to dogs and farm animals and the risk of asthma was evaluated and included all children born in Sweden from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2010 (N = 1,011,051), using registry data on dog and farm registration, asthma medication, diagnosis, and confounders for parents and their children. The association was assessed as the odds ratio (OR) for a current diagnosis of asthma at age 6 years for school-aged children and as the hazard ratio (HR) for incident asthma at ages 1 to 5 years for preschool-aged children. Data were analyzed from January 1, 2007, to September 30, 2012. Living with a dog or farm animal. Childhood asthma diagnosis and medication used. Of the 1,011,051 children born during the study period, 376,638 preschool-aged (53,460 [14.2%] exposed to dogs and 1729 [0.5%] exposed to farm animals) and 276,298 school-aged children (22,629 [8.2%] exposed to dogs and 958 [0.3%] exposed to farm animals) were included in the analyses. Of these, 18,799 children (5.0%) in the preschool-aged children's cohort experienced an asthmatic event before baseline, and 28,511 cases of asthma and 906,071 years at risk were recorded during follow-up (incidence rate, 3.1 cases per 1000 years at risk). In the school-aged children's cohort, 11,585 children (4.2%) experienced an asthmatic event during the seventh year of life. Dog exposure during the first year of life was associated with a decreased risk of asthma in school-aged children (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.81-0.93) and in preschool-aged children 3 years or older (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.83-0.99) but not in children younger than 3 years (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.00-1.07). Results were comparable when analyzing only first-born children. Farm animal

  13. Parents' childhood socioeconomic circumstances are associated with their children's asthma outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Edith; Shalowitz, Madeleine U; Story, Rachel E; Ehrlich, Katherine B; Manczak, Erika M; Ham, Paula J; Le, Van; Miller, Gregory E

    2017-09-01

    Previous literature documents associations between low socioeconomic status (SES) and poor health outcomes, including asthma. However, this literature has largely focused on the effects of current family circumstances. We sought to test an intergenerational hypothesis, that the childhood SES that parents experience will be associated with asthma outcomes in their children, independent of effects of current family SES. Second, we aimed to test whether this association is in part due to difficulties in current parent-child relationships. This was an observational study, whereby 150 parents were interviewed about their childhood SES and their children (physician-diagnosed asthma, ages 9-17 years) were interviewed about current family stress. Asthma control was assessed by parent report and child report (primary outcome), and blood was collected from children to measure cytokine production relevant to asthma (secondary outcomes). To the degree that parents had lower childhood SES, their offspring showed worse asthma outcomes across multiple indicators. This included lower asthma control scores (parent and child report, Ps asthma control and greater cytokine production in children. These results suggest the potential "long reach" of low SES across generations, and the importance of expanding theories of how the social environment can affect childhood asthma to include characteristics of earlier generations. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Asthma Status and Risk of Incident Myocardial Infarction: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Duk Won; Wi, Chung-Il; Kim, Eun Na; Hagan, John; Roger, Veronique; Manemann, Sheila; Lahr, Brian; Ryu, Euijung; Juhn, Young J

    2016-01-01

    The role of asthma status and characteristics of asthma in the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) are poorly understood. We determined whether asthma and its characteristics are associated with risk of MI. The study was designed as a population-based retrospective case-control study, which included all eligible incident MI cases between November 1, 2002, and May 31, 2006, and their matched controls. Asthma was ascertained using predetermined criteria. Active (current) asthma was defined as the occurrence of asthma-related episodes (asthma symptoms, use of asthma medications, unscheduled medical or emergency department visit, or hospitalization for asthma) within 1 year before MI index date. There were 543 eligible incident MI cases during the study period. Of the 543 MI cases, 81 (15%) had a history of asthma before index date of MI, whereas 52 of 543 controls (10%) had such a history (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.06-2.66) adjusting for risk factors for MI and comorbid conditions (excluding chronic obstructive lung disease). Although inactive asthma did not increase the risk of MI, individuals with active asthma had a higher odds of MI, compared with those without asthma (adjusted OR: 3.18; 95% CI: 1.57-6.44) without controlling for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). After adjusting for COPD, although asthma overall was no longer statistically significant (adjusted OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 0.84-2.15), active asthma still was associated (adjusted OR: 2.33, 95% CI: 1.12-4.82). Active asthma is an unrecognized risk factor for MI. Further studies are needed to assess the role of asthma control and medications in the risk of MI. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Asthma trajectories in early childhood: identifying modifiable factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Panico

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are conflicting views as to whether childhood wheezing represents several discreet entities or a single but variable disease. Classification has centered on phenotypes often derived using subjective criteria, small samples, and/or with little data for young children. This is particularly problematic as asthmatic features appear to be entrenched by age 6/7. In this paper we aim to: identify longitudinal trajectories of wheeze and other atopic symptoms in early childhood; characterize the resulting trajectories by the socio-economic background of children; and identify potentially modifiable processes in infancy correlated with these trajectories. DATA AND METHODS: The Millennium Cohort Study is a large, representative birth cohort of British children born in 2000-2002. Our analytical sample includes 11,632 children with data on key variables (wheeze in the last year; ever hay-fever and/or eczema reported by the main carers at age 3, 5 and 7 using a validated tool, the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood module. We employ longitudinal Latent Class Analysis, a clustering methodology which identifies classes underlying the observed population heterogeneity. RESULTS: Our model distinguished four latent trajectories: a trajectory with both low levels of wheeze and other atopic symptoms (54% of the sample; a trajectory with low levels of wheeze but high prevalence of other atopic symptoms (29%; a trajectory with high prevalence of both wheeze and other atopic symptoms (9%; and a trajectory with high levels of wheeze but low levels of other atopic symptoms (8%. These groups differed in terms of socio-economic markers and potential intervenable factors, including household damp and breastfeeding initiation. CONCLUSION: Using data-driven techniques, we derived four trajectories of asthmatic symptoms in early childhood in a large, population based sample. These groups differ in terms of their socio-economic profiles

  16. Asthma trajectories in early childhood: identifying modifiable factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, Lidia; Stuart, Beth; Bartley, Mel; Kelly, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    There are conflicting views as to whether childhood wheezing represents several discreet entities or a single but variable disease. Classification has centered on phenotypes often derived using subjective criteria, small samples, and/or with little data for young children. This is particularly problematic as asthmatic features appear to be entrenched by age 6/7. In this paper we aim to: identify longitudinal trajectories of wheeze and other atopic symptoms in early childhood; characterize the resulting trajectories by the socio-economic background of children; and identify potentially modifiable processes in infancy correlated with these trajectories. The Millennium Cohort Study is a large, representative birth cohort of British children born in 2000-2002. Our analytical sample includes 11,632 children with data on key variables (wheeze in the last year; ever hay-fever and/or eczema) reported by the main carers at age 3, 5 and 7 using a validated tool, the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood module. We employ longitudinal Latent Class Analysis, a clustering methodology which identifies classes underlying the observed population heterogeneity. Our model distinguished four latent trajectories: a trajectory with both low levels of wheeze and other atopic symptoms (54% of the sample); a trajectory with low levels of wheeze but high prevalence of other atopic symptoms (29%); a trajectory with high prevalence of both wheeze and other atopic symptoms (9%); and a trajectory with high levels of wheeze but low levels of other atopic symptoms (8%). These groups differed in terms of socio-economic markers and potential intervenable factors, including household damp and breastfeeding initiation. Using data-driven techniques, we derived four trajectories of asthmatic symptoms in early childhood in a large, population based sample. These groups differ in terms of their socio-economic profiles. We identified correlated intervenable pathways in infancy

  17. Gestational Medication Use, Birth Conditions, and Early Postnatal Exposures for Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Ching Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to explore (1 whether gestational medication use, mode of delivery, and early postnatal exposure correlate with childhood asthma, (2 the dose responsiveness of such exposure, and (3 their links to early- and late-onset asthma. We conducted a matched case-control study based on the Taiwan Children Health Study, which was a nationwide survey that recruited 12-to-14-year-old school children in 14 communities. 579 mothers of the participants were interviewed by telephone. Exclusive breastfeeding protected children from asthma. Notably, childhood asthma was significantly associated with maternal medication use during pregnancy, vacuum use during vaginal delivery, recurrent respiratory tract infections, hospitalization, main caregiver cared for other children, and early daycare attendance. Exposure to these factors led to dose responsiveness in relationships to asthma. Most of the exposures revealed a greater impact on early-onset asthma, except for vacuum use and daycare attendance.

  18. Use of Antibiotics during pregnancy increases the risk of Asthma in early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Simonsen, Jacob; Jensen, Signe Marie

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the hypothesis that mother's use of antibiotics in pregnancy could influence asthma and eczema in early life. STUDY DESIGN: Subjects were included from the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood cohort of children born of mothers with asthma (N = 411). Severe...... verified eczema. All children were followed to age 5 years in a cohort study design. RESULTS: The Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood data showed increased risk of asthma exacerbation (hazard ratio 1.98 [95% CI 1.08-3.63]) if mothers had used antibiotics during third trimester. The Danish...... National Birth Cohort confirmed increased risk of asthma hospitalization (hazard ratio 1.17 [1.00-1.36]), and inhaled corticosteroids (1.18 [1.10-1.27]) in the children if mothers used antibiotics any time during pregnancy. In the subgroup of mothers using antibiotics for nonrespiratory infection...

  19. The neonatal methylome as a gatekeeper in the trajectory to childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Avery; Vercelli, Donata

    2017-04-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous group of conditions that typically begin in early life and result in recurrent, reversible bronchial obstruction. The role played by epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of childhood asthma is understood only in part. Here we discuss asthma epigenetics within a developmental perspective based on our recent demonstration that the epigenetic trajectory to childhood asthma begins at birth. We next discuss how this trajectory may be affected by prenatal environmental exposures. Finally, we examine in vitro studies that model the impact of asthma-associated exposures on the epigenome. All of these studies specifically surveyed human DNA methylation and involved a genome-wide component. In combination, their results broaden our understanding of asthma pathogenesis and the role the methylome plays in this process.

  20. Self-efficacy and childhood asthma : an investigation of psychological factors

    OpenAIRE

    Slater, Joanne Tracy

    2001-01-01

    Childhood asthma is a chronic condition affecting up to one in every seven children. Self-management programs have been developed to help improve children's abilities to both manage and cope with their asthma. If these programs are to be fully effective, an understanding of the psychological factors that influence children's sense of competence to manage their condition is required. This study aimed to identify psychological variables that may influence children's asthma sel...

  1. Lifetime secondhand smoke exposure and childhood and adolescent asthma : findings from the PIAMA cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milanzi, Edith B.; Brunekreef, Bert; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Wijga, Alet H.; van Rossem, Lenie; Vonk, Judith M.; Smit, Henriette A.; Gehring, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Background: Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure is a modifiable risk factor associated with childhood asthma. Associations with adolescent asthma and the relevance of the timing and patterns of exposure are unclear. Knowledge of critical windows of exposure is important for targeted interventions.

  2. Lifetime secondhand smoke exposure and childhood and adolescent asthma : findings from the PIAMA cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milanzi, Edith B; Brunekreef, Bert; Koppelman, Gerard H; Wijga, Alet H; van Rossem, Lenie; Vonk, Judith M; Smit, Henriëtte A; Gehring, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure is a modifiable risk factor associated with childhood asthma. Associations with adolescent asthma and the relevance of the timing and patterns of exposure are unclear. Knowledge of critical windows of exposure is important for targeted interventions.

  3. An evaluation of parental knowledge of childhood asthma in a family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1997-01-01

    Jan 1, 1997 ... Childhood asthma is a common chronic condition in both developed1 and developing communities.2 .... and 29 families had pets such as dogs, cats and birds. Forty-three per cent of parents had had a ... While half of the parents knew that breast-feeding delayed the onset of asthma, about two-thirds knew ...

  4. The association of sedentary lifestyle with childhood asthma. The role of nurse as educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantaki, E; Priftis, K N; Antonogeorgos, G; Papoutsakis, C; Drakouli, M; Matziou, V

    2014-01-01

    To provide a summary of the existing published knowledge on the association between sedentary lifestyle and childhood asthma. Twelve years ago, the first longitudinal studies carried out in children showed a relationship between physical activity and asthma. Several epidemiological studies confirmed these findings, with sedentary lifestyle predicting the onset of asthma. A systematic review of epidemiological studies was conducted within the MEDLINE database. Epidemiological studies on children subjects, published in English were included in the review. A comprehensive literature search yielded 50 studies for further consideration. Following the application of the eligibility criteria, we identified 11 studies. A positive association and an excess risk of asthma during childhood were revealed to sedentary lifestyle. The findings proved the association between childhood asthma and sedentary lifestyle. The correlation between bronchial asthma and sedentary life during childhood and identifying whether preventable or treatable risk factors exist needs to be determined. Further research on the topic is essential for safer and standardised conclusions. Asthma can be controlled when managed properly. The role of the nurse as an educator should establish and maintain a relationship with patients in order to help them manage their disease. The steps towards asthma management will help paediatric patients to guide their approach to the condition. Copyright © 2013 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Prolonged recovery from exercise-induced asthma with increasing age in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, W. B.; Sterk, P. J.; Neijens, H. J.; Kouwenberg, J. M.; Duiverman, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    It has been suggested that children with asthma recover more quickly from exercise-induced bronchoconstriction than adults. On the basis of clinical observation we hypothesized that recovery rate from exercise-induced asthma (EIA) in childhood also decreases with age. In 14 children (aged 7-12

  6. Food diversity in infancy and the risk of childhood asthma and allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaru, Bright I; Takkinen, Hanna-Mari; Kaila, Minna; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Ahonen, Suvi; Pekkanen, Juha; Simell, Olli; Veijola, Riitta; Ilonen, Jorma; Hyöty, Heikki; Knip, Mikael; Virtanen, Suvi M

    2014-04-01

    Recently, the bacterial diversity of the intestinal flora and the diversity of various environmental factors during infancy have been linked to the development of allergies in childhood. Food is an important environmental exposure, but the role of food diversity in the development of asthma and allergies in childhood is poorly defined. We studied the associations between food diversity during the first year of life and the development of asthma and allergies by age 5 years. In a Finnish birth cohort we analyzed data on 3142 consecutively born children. We studied food diversity at 3, 4, 6, and 12 months of age. Asthma, wheeze, atopic eczema, and allergic rhinitis were measured by using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire at age 5 years. By 3 and 4 months of age, food diversity was not associated with any of the allergic end points. By 6 months of age, less food diversity was associated with increased risk of allergic rhinitis but not with the other end points. By 12 months of age, less food diversity was associated with increased risk of any asthma, atopic asthma, wheeze, and allergic rhinitis. Less food diversity during the first year of life might increase the risk of asthma and allergies in childhood. The mechanisms for this association are unclear, but increased dietary antigen exposure might contribute to this link. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Phthalate esters and childhood asthma: A systematic review and congener-specific meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Chieh; Chen, Chi-Hsien; Guo, Yue Leon

    2017-10-01

    Exposure to phthalate esters (PAEs) has been associated with childhood asthma, but the congener-specific effects of PAEs on childhood asthma were unclear. We aimed to systematically review and meta-analyze observational studies on the associations between specific effects of PAEs and the risk of childhood asthma. Relevant studies were identified by searching three databases up to October 20, 2016. The reference lists of the retrieved articles were also reviewed. We included observational studies that reported risk estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between phthalate exposure and the risk of childhood asthma. Fixed-effects models were generally applied to calculate pooled risk estimates. When heterogeneity was present, random-effects models were applied. A total of nine studies featuring 43 data points were included in our final meta-analyses. Results indicated that the benzyl butyl phthalate (BBzP) exposure had a significant association with the risk of childhood asthma. The Odd Ratios (ORs) were from 1.39 to 1.41 for different combination strategies. Subgroup analyses by different exposure period or samples used showed that prenatal exposure to BBzP had a stronger association with the risk of childhood asthma (OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.09-1.75), compared to those with postnatal exposure. Besides, the association was evident when the phthalate exposure was measured from dust samples. The OR for the associations between di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) in dust and childhood asthma was 2.71 (95% CI = 1.39-5.28), and 2.08 (95% CI = 1.10-3.92) for BBzP. Our study suggested a positive association between DEHP and BBzP exposure and childhood asthma. Future studies are warranted to identify the underlying mechanisms of the association. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Indoor environmental factors associated with wheezing illness and asthma in South Korean children: phase III of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Yoomi; Hahm, Myung-Il; Ahn, Kangmo; Kim, Jihyun; Kim, Woo Kyung; Lee, So-Yeon; Park, Yong Mean; Han, Man Yong; Lee, Kee-Jae; Kwon, Ho-Jang

    2014-11-01

    The relationship between exposure to indoor environmental pollutants and incidence of asthma and wheezing illness in children is unclear. This study aimed to clarify this relationship by identifying the risk factors associated with these conditions in South Korean children aged 6-7 years. The parents or guardians of 3810 children aged 6-7 years who had participated in the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood and met the study criteria completed validated questionnaires regarding their children's asthma and wheezing illness, risk factors and exposure to indoor pollutants. The data were subjected to chi-square and multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify the factors significantly associated with asthma and wheezing illness. Parental history of allergic disease (odds ratio [OR]: 1.729; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.447-2.066), living on the basement or semi-basement floor (OR: 1.891; 95% CI: 1.194-2.996) and living in housing that had been remodeled within the last 12 months (OR: 1.376; 95% CI: 1.101-1.720) were found to be significantly associated with wheezing illness. Parental history of allergic disease (OR: 2.189; 95% CI: 1.483-3.231), male sex (OR: 1.971; 95% CI: 1.369-2.838) and positive skin prick test (SPT) result (OR: 1.583; 95% CI: 1.804-3.698) were found to be significantly associated with current asthma. Although the risk factors for current asthma appear to be more related to the non-modifiable risk factors like sex, parental history of allergic diseases, SPT, the two groups are associated with exposure to modifiable indoor environmental factors.

  9. Variations in the prevalence of childhood asthma and wheeze in MeDALL cohorts in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora P. Uphoff

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available While there is evidence for variations in prevalence rates of childhood wheeze and asthma between countries, longitudinal, individual-level data are needed to understand these differences. The aim of this study was to examine variations in prevalence rates of childhood asthma, wheeze and wheeze with asthma in Europe. We analysed datasets from 10 MeDALL (Mechanisms of the Development of ALLergy cohorts in eight countries, representing 26 663 children, to calculate prevalence rates of wheeze and asthma by child age and wheeze with asthma at age 4 years. Harmonised variables included outcomes parent-reported wheeze and parent-reported doctor-diagnosed asthma, and covariates maternal education, parental smoking, pets, parental asthma, doctor-diagnosed allergic rhinitis, doctor-diagnosed eczema and wheeze severity. At age 4 years, asthma prevalence varied from 1.72% in Germany to 13.48% in England and the prevalence of wheeze varied from 9.82% in Greece to 55.37% in Spain. Adjusted estimates of the proportion of 4-year-old children with wheeze diagnosed with asthma remained highest in England (38.14%, 95% CI 31.38–44.90% and lowest in Spain (15.94%, 95% CI 6.16–25.71%. The large differences in prevalence rates of asthma, wheeze and wheeze with asthma at age 4 years between European cohorts may indicate that childhood asthma is more readily diagnosed in some countries while going unrecognised elsewhere.

  10. Genome-Wide Interaction Analysis of Air Pollution Exposure and Childhood Asthma with Functional Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gref, Anna; Merid, Simon K; Gruzieva, Olena; Ballereau, Stéphane; Becker, Allan; Bellander, Tom; Bergström, Anna; Bossé, Yohan; Bottai, Matteo; Chan-Yeung, Moira; Fuertes, Elaine; Ierodiakonou, Despo; Jiang, Ruiwei; Joly, Stéphane; Jones, Meaghan; Kobor, Michael S; Korek, Michal; Kozyrskyj, Anita L; Kumar, Ashish; Lemonnier, Nathanaël; MacIntyre, Elaina; Ménard, Camille; Nickle, David; Obeidat, Ma'en; Pellet, Johann; Standl, Marie; Sääf, Annika; Söderhäll, Cilla; Tiesler, Carla M T; van den Berge, Maarten; Vonk, Judith M; Vora, Hita; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Antó, Josep M; Auffray, Charles; Brauer, Michael; Bousquet, Jean; Brunekreef, Bert; Gauderman, W James; Heinrich, Joachim; Kere, Juha; Koppelman, Gerard H; Postma, Dirkje; Carlsten, Christopher; Pershagen, Göran; Melén, Erik

    2017-05-15

    The evidence supporting an association between traffic-related air pollution exposure and incident childhood asthma is inconsistent and may depend on genetic factors. To identify gene-environment interaction effects on childhood asthma using genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data and air pollution exposure. Identified loci were further analyzed at epigenetic and transcriptomic levels. We used land use regression models to estimate individual air pollution exposure (represented by outdoor NO 2 levels) at the birth address and performed a genome-wide interaction study for doctors' diagnoses of asthma up to 8 years in three European birth cohorts (n = 1,534) with look-up for interaction in two separate North American cohorts, CHS (Children's Health Study) and CAPPS/SAGE (Canadian Asthma Primary Prevention Study/Study of Asthma, Genetics and Environment) (n = 1,602 and 186 subjects, respectively). We assessed expression quantitative trait locus effects in human lung specimens and blood, as well as associations among air pollution exposure, methylation, and transcriptomic patterns. In the European cohorts, 186 SNPs had an interaction P interaction P interaction effect and were found to influence ADCY2 gene expression in peripheral blood (P = 4.50 × 10 -4 ). One other SNP with P interaction in CHS, rs686237, strongly influenced UDP-Gal:betaGlcNAc β-1,4-galactosyltransferase, polypeptide 5 (B4GALT5) expression in lung tissue (P = 1.18 × 10 -17 ). Air pollution exposure was associated with differential discs, large homolog 2 (DLG2) methylation and expression. Our results indicated that gene-environment interactions are important for asthma development and provided supportive evidence for interaction with air pollution for ADCY2, B4GALT5, and DLG2.

  11. Childhood asthma and indoor allergens in Native Americans in New York

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarbell Alice

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to assess the correlation between childhood asthma and potential risk factors, especially exposure to indoor allergens, in a Native American population. Methods A case-control study of St. Regis Mohawk tribe children ages 2–14 years, 25 diagnosed with asthma and 25 controls was conducted. Exposure was assessed based on a personal interview and measurement of mite and cat allergens (Der p 1, Fel d 1 in indoor dust. Results A non-significant increased risk of childhood asthma was associated with self-reported family history of asthma, childhood environmental tobacco smoke exposure, and air pollution. There was a significant protective effect of breastfeeding against current asthma in children less than 14 years (5.2 fold lower risk. About 80% of dust mite and 15% of cat allergen samples were above the threshold values for sensitization of 2 and 1 μg/g, respectively. The association between current asthma and exposure to dust mite and cat allergens was positive but not statistically significant. Conclusion This research identified several potential indoor and outdoor risk factors for asthma in Mohawks homes, of which avoidance may reduce or delay the development of asthma in susceptible individuals.

  12. Asthma prevalence and risk factors in early childhood at Northern Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.T.B.S. Branco

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is the commonest and most important chronic non-infectious disease in childhood and it has become more prevalent in recent years. There is a shortage of studies in relation to early childhood and so, as part of the INAIRCHILD project, this cross-sectional study aimed to assess the prevalence of asthma and its associated risk factors, namely demographic, environmental, psychosocial and clinical factors for infants and preschoolers living in Northern Portugal. Data concerning asthma prevalence were collected through questionnaires based on those from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC-derived, the questionnaires were distributed to 1042 children attending the 17 nurseries involved in the INAIRCHILD project (10 in urban and suburban context, and 7 in rural context. The response rate was 48%. Prevalence of asthma based on symptomatology and odds ratio was calculated. Around 52% of the studied children presented at least one of the respiratory symptoms investigated (wheeze, dyspnea and cough in the absence of upper respiratory infections. The prevalence of asthma was 10.7%, comparable to the figures for Portuguese schoolchildren (6–7 years old reported by the national Directorate-General of Health, thus showing that an early diagnosis might be possible and helpful for the mitigation of childhood asthma. Environmental context (urban, suburban or rural, gender and family asthma history showed clear associations with asthma prevalence, namely non-rural location, male gender, and having an asthmatic parent were found to be risk factors. Keywords: Asthma, Children, Demographic, Environmental, Psychosocial and clinical risk factors

  13. Sociodemographic Factors Mediate Race and Ethnicity-associated Childhood Asthma Health Disparities: a Longitudinal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, David M; Curtis, Laura M; Waite, Katherine; Wolf, Michael S; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2017-11-29

    Race and ethnicity-based disparities in childhood asthma are well established. We characterized the longitudinal effects associated with being African-American/Black or Hispanic/Latino on a range of asthma outcomes, and the extent to which sociodemographic factors, caregiver health literacy, education level, and asthma knowledge mediate these associations. Children ages 8-15 and their caregivers (n = 544) in the Chicago Initiative to Raise Asthma Health Equity (CHIRAH) cohort completed interviews every 3 months for 1.5 years. Health literacy was measured with the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM). Other covariates include sex, age, education level, income, smoke exposure, asthma duration, employment status, and insurance status. We conducted a series of models to evaluate these factors as mediators of the relationship between race/ethnicity and (1) asthma knowledge, (2) asthma-related quality of life, (3) asthma severity, and (4) asthma control based on NAEPP/EPR-3 2007 guidelines. African-American race and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity were significantly associated with all outcomes when compared to Whites. Adjusting for sociodemographic factors resulted in the most significant mediation of racial/ethnic disparities in all outcomes. Health literacy was a partial mediator of race/ethnic disparities in asthma knowledge and asthma-related quality of life. Asthma knowledge remained significantly associated with race and ethnicity, and race remained associated with asthma-related quality of life. African-American race and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity are significantly associated with worse asthma compared to Whites in longitudinal analyses. Sociodemographic factors are potent mediators of these disparities, and should be considered when designing interventions to reduce asthma disparities. Health literacy and education level are partial mediators.

  14. Childhood obesity in relation to poor asthma control and exacerbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadizar, Fariba; Vijverberg, Susanne; Arets, Hubertus; De Boer, Anthonius; Lang, Jason; Kattan, Meyer; Palmer, Colin; Mukhopadhyay, Somnath; Turner, Steve; Van Der Zee, Anke-Hilse Maitland

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship between obesity and asthma severity in children is inconsistent across studies. Objectives: To estimate the association between obesity and poor asthma control/ risk of exacerbations in asthmatic children and adolescents, and to assess whether these associations are

  15. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have asthma if: One or both parents have asthma The child has signs of allergies, including the allergic skin ... asthma, partner with your doctor to manage your asthma or your child's asthma. Children aged 10 or older—and younger ...

  16. Susceptibility Factors Relevant for the Association Between Long-Term Air Pollution Exposure and Incident Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burte, Emilie; Nadif, Rachel; Jacquemin, Bénédicte

    2016-03-01

    In this review, we identified 15 studies in children and 10 studies in adults that assessed the association between long-term exposure to air pollution and incident asthma and that conducted stratified analyses to explore potential susceptibility factors. Overall, adult never-/former smokers seem to be at higher risk of incident asthma due to air pollution. Children without atopy and children from low socioeconomic status families also seem to be at higher risk of incident asthma due to air pollution. While interaction between air pollution and genes involved in the response to oxidative stress pathways have been explored, results are somewhat inconsistent and in need of replication. To evaluate interactions, large sample sizes are necessary, and much more research, including data pooling from existing studies, is needed to further explore susceptibility factors for asthma incidence due to long-term air pollution exposure.

  17. How much do school teachers know about childhood asthma in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-10

    Mar 10, 2017 ... Abstract: Background: Child- hood asthma is affected by events and conditions of the school envi- ronment. Teachers as de-facto caregivers of children with asthma have a major role to play in ensur- ing good asthma control in school. This study set out to determine the level of knowledge of school.

  18. The burden of severe asthma in childhood and adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleming, Louise; Murray, Clare; Bansal, Aruna T

    2015-01-01

    U-BIOPRED aims to characterise paediatric and adult severe asthma using conventional and innovative systems biology approaches. A total of 99 school-age children with severe asthma and 81 preschoolers with severe wheeze were compared with 49 school-age children with mild/moderate asthma and 53 pr...

  19. Cost-benefit analysis of childhood asthma management through school-based clinic programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Teresa; Bame, Sherry I

    2011-04-01

    Asthma is a leading chronic illness among American children. School-based health clinics (SBHCs) reduced expensive ER visits and hospitalizations through better healthcare access and monitoring in select case studies. The purpose of this study was to examine the cost-benefit of SBHC programs in managing childhood asthma nationwide for reduction in medical costs of ER, hospital and outpatient physician care and savings in opportunity social costs of lowing absenteeism and work loss and of future earnings due to premature deaths. Eight public data sources were used to compare costs of delivering primary and preventive care for childhood asthma in the US via SBHC programs, including direct medical and indirect opportunity costs for children and their parents. The costs of nurse staffing for a nationwide SBHC program were estimated at $4.55 billion compared to the estimated medical savings of $1.69 billion, including ER, hospital, and outpatient care. In contrast, estimated total savings for opportunity costs of work loss and premature death were $23.13 billion. Medical savings alone would not offset the expense of implementing a SBHC program for prevention and monitoring childhood asthma. However, even modest estimates of reducing opportunity costs of parents' work loss would be far greater than the expense of this program. Although SBHC programs would not be expected to affect the increasing prevalence of childhood asthma, these programs would be designed to reduce the severity of asthma condition with ongoing monitoring, disease prevention and patient compliance.

  20. The First 1000 Days of Life Factors Associated with "Childhood Asthma Symptoms": Brisa Cohort, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Joelma Ximenes Prado Teixeira; Ribeiro, Cecilia Claudia Costa; Batista, Rosângela Fernandes Lucena; de Britto Alves, Maria Teresa Seabra Soares; Simões, Vanda Maria Ferreira; Padilha, Luana Lopes; Cardoso, Viviane Cunha; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira; Bettiol, Heloisa; Barbieri, Marco Antonio; Silva, Antônio Augusto Moura Da

    2017-11-22

    This prospective study used data from the BRISA Cohort, São Luís, Brazil (n = 1140) and analyzed associations between environmental factors up to the first 1000 days of life and "Childhood Asthma Symptoms". "Childhood Asthma Symptoms" was a latent variable based on the number of wheezing episodes, emergency care visit due to wheezing, diagnosis of asthma and diagnosis of rhinitis. A theoretical model that included prenatal factors (socioeconomic status, pregestational body mass index-BMI, soft drink and junk food consumption), birth factors (gestational age, smoking and diseases during pregnancy, birth weight and type of delivery), first year of life factors (breastfeeding, environmental aeroallergens and respiratory diseases) and BMI z-score in the second year of life, was analyzed by structural equation modeling. High pregestational BMI, high soft drink consumption, cesarean section without labor, chill in the first three months of life, carpeted floor and child's exposure to tobacco were associated with higher values of "Childhood Asthma Symptoms". In contrast, high birth weight, breastfeeding and infant's age were associated with lower values of "Childhood Asthma Symptoms". These findings support the hypothesis that environmental factors that are present before conception and up to the first 1000 days of life are associated with asthma.

  1. Associations between postpartum depressive symptoms and childhood asthma diminish with child age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrskyj, A L; Letourneau, N L; Kang, L J; Salmani, M

    2017-03-01

    Affecting 19% of women, postpartum depression is a major concern to the immediate health of mothers and infants. In the long-term, it has been linked to the development of early-onset asthma at school entry, but only if the depression persists beyond the postnatal period. No studies have tested whether associations with postpartum depressive symptoms and early-onset asthma phenotypes persist into later school age. To determine associations between maternal postpartum depressive symptoms and childhood asthma between the ages of 5-10 by using a nested longitudinal design. Data were drawn from the 1994-2004 administrations of the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, which tracks the health of a nationally representative sample of children in Canada. Child asthma was diagnosed by a health professional, and maternal depressive symptoms were assessed by the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale. Analyses were conducted by using a multilevel modelling approach, in which longitudinal assessments of asthma in 1696 children were nested within the exposure of postpartum depression. Postpartum depressive symptoms had a 1.5-fold significant association with childhood asthma between the ages 6-8. This was independent of male sex, maternal asthma, non-immigrant status, low household socioeconomic status, being firstborn, low birthweight, low family functioning and urban-rural residence, of which the first 4 covariates elevated the risk of asthma. Statistical significance was lost at age 8 when maternal prenatal smoking replaced urban-rural residence as a covariate. At ages 9-10, an association was no longer evident. Women affected by postpartum depressive symptoms are concerned about long-term health effects of their illness on their infants. Although postpartum depressive symptoms were associated with school-age asthma at ages 6 and 7, this association diminished later. Both home and school life stress should be considered in future studies

  2. The association of childhood asthma with mental health and developmental comorbidities in low-income families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Ahmed A; Korgaonkar, Purva

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the relationship of childhood asthma with mental health and developmental indicators in low-income families. Parents/guardians of approximately 400 children, aged 2-14 years, were recruited from a charity hospital serving low income neighborhoods in the outskirts of Karachi, Pakistan. Mothers of children were interviewed in their local language by a trained nurse. Eight self-reported comorbidities were grouped into two constructs based on factor analysis and conveniently labeled as mental health (anxiety, attention and behavioral problems) and developmental problems (learning, developmental delay, hearing impairment, sleep and speech problems). Data were analyzed using multiple logistic regression, adjusted for age, sex, presence of older siblings, number of people in the household, child birth weight, presence of mold, and family history of asthma or hay fever. Children with asthma had 18 times greater odds of mental health problems (adjusted OR = 18.0, 95% CI: 9.2, 35.1) as compared to children without asthma. The odds of developmental problems were more than 14 times greater for children with asthma (adjusted OR = 14.3, 95% CI: 7.8, 26.1) as compared to children without asthma. This study found mental and developmental adverse consequences of childhood asthma in low-income families. Identifying and treating asthma at an early age could reduce the burden of comorbidities in this population.

  3. Association of body mass with pulmonary function in the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tantisira, KG; Litonjua, AA; Weiss, ST; Fuhlbrigge, AL

    2003-01-01

    Background: While increases in body mass index (BMI) have been associated with the incidence and prevalence of asthma, the mechanisms behind this association are unclear. Methods: We hypothesised that BMI would be independently associated with measures of asthma severity in a population of children

  4. Monitoring childhood asthma: Web-based diaries and the asthma control test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorend-van Bergen, S.; Vaessen-Verberne, A.A.; Landstra, A.M.; Brackel, H.J.; Berg, N.J. van den; Caudri, D.; Jongste, J.C. de; Merkus, P.J.F.M.; Pijnenburg, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data from asthma diaries are frequently used as an end point in asthma studies; however, data on the validity of Web-based diaries are scarce. OBJECTIVES: First, we examined the validity of a Web-based diary in assessing asthma control. Second, we determined the cutoff points for

  5. Risk factors for incident asthma and COPD in a cohort of young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traulsen, Lisbet Krogh; Baelum, Jesper; Halling, Anders; Thomsen, Gert; Thilsing, Trine; Sherson, David; Sigsgaard, Torben; Omland, Øyvind; Malling, Tine; Skadhauge, Lars Rauff

    2017-03-07

    The aim of the study was to describe potential shared risk factors for incident asthma and COPD in a population-based, 9-year follow-up study. From a cohort of 1191 individuals, aged 20-44, who participated in baseline survey including spirometry, bronchial challenge, and skin prick test (SPT) 742 subjects (62%) were reexamined at follow-up in 2012-2014. A total of 27 incident cases of asthma and 22 cases of COPD were identified at follow-up corresponding to an incidence rate of 5.8 (95% CI 3.9-8.4) and 3.5 (2.2-5.3) per 1000 person years, respectively. Among the identified COPD cases a total of 12 were Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome (ACOS). Atopy defined by positive SPT was a risk factor for asthma in males (OR 7.54; 95% CI 1.24-45.90), whereas risk factors in females were nasal allergy (3.81; 1.20-12.11), FEV 1 incident asthma and COPD were found. Despite low power when stratifying by sex risk factors for incident asthma and COPD emphasize considerable gender differences. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Comparable risk of childhood asthma after vaginal delivery and emergency caesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Nis; Stokholm, Lonny; Jonsdottir, Fjola

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Caesarean section is thought to be a risk factor for childhood asthma, but this association may be caused by confounding from, for instance, familial factors. To address this problem, we used twin pairs to assess the risk of childhood asthma after emergency caesarean section. METHODS......: The study was a register-based nation-wide matched cohort study using twin pairs to minimise residual confounding. Included were twin pairs in which the first twin was delivered vaginally and the second by emergency caesarean section during the study period from January 1997 through December 2012. RESULTS......: In total, 464 twin pairs (928 twins) were included. In 30 pairs, the first twin (vaginal delivery) was diagnosed with asthma, but the second twin (emergency caesarean section) was not. In 20 pairs, the second twin (emergency caesarean section) was diagnosed with asthma, but the first twin (vaginal delivery...

  7. Low-grade disease activity in early life precedes childhood asthma and allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard

    2016-01-01

    . These highly prevalent disorders are thought to originate from immune distortion in early childhood, but the etiology and heterogeneity of the disease mechanisms are not understood, which hampers preventive initiatives and makes treatment inadequate. The objective of this thesis is to investigate the presence...... of an early life disease activity prior to clinical symptoms to understand the anteceding pathophysiological steps towards childhood asthma and allergy. The thesis is built on seven studies from the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC2000) birth cohort examining biomarkers of disease...... activity in 411 asymptomatic neonates in cord blood (I-II), urine (III), exhaled breath (IV-V) and infant lung function (VI-VII) in relation to the subsequent development of asthma and allergy during the first seven years of life. In papers I-II, we studied cord blood chemokines and 25(OH)-vitamin D, which...

  8. The association between substantiated childhood maltreatment, asthma and lung function: A prospective investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abajobir, Amanuel Alemu; Kisely, Steve; Williams, Gail; Strathearn, Lane; Suresh, Sadasivam; Najman, Jake Moses

    2017-10-01

    Asthma reflects multiple and likely complex causal pathways. We investigate the possibility that childhood maltreatment is one such causal pathway. Childhood maltreatment can be interpreted as a form of early life adversity and like other life adversities may predict a range of negative health outcomes, including asthma. A total of 3762 young adults (52.63% female) from the Mater Hospital-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy (MUSP) participated in this study. MUSP is a prospective Australian birth cohort study of mothers consecutively recruited during their first antenatal clinic visit at Brisbane's Mater Hospital from 1981 to 1983. The study followed both mother-child dyads to the age of 21years after birth. Participants reported whether they had been diagnosed by a physician with asthma by the 21-year follow-up. Trained research assistants also performed gender- and height-standardized lung function tests using a Spirobank G spirometer system attached to a laptop computer. We linked this dataset with data obtained from the child protection services and which comprised all substantiated cases of childhood maltreatment in the MUSP cohort. Substantiations of childhood maltreatment included children in an age range of 0-14years. The experience of any childhood maltreatment, particularly emotional abuse, was independently associated with self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma by the 21-year follow-up. The association was no longer significant after adjustment for a range of confounders and covariates in neglected children. Childhood maltreatment, including multiple events, was not associated with lung function in adjusted models. Childhood maltreatment, including emotional abuse, was associated with lifetime ever asthma. This was in contrast to the absence of an association with objective measures of lung function. More research is indicated on the effect of childhood maltreatment on lung function using objective measures. In the meantime, there should be a

  9. Damp housing, gas stoves, and the burden of childhood asthma in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knibbs, Luke D; Woldeyohannes, Solomon; Marks, Guy B; Cowie, Christine T

    2018-04-16

    To determine the proportion of the national childhood asthma burden associated with exposure to dampness and gas stoves in Australian homes. Comparative risk assessment modelling study. Setting, participants: Australian children aged 14 years or less, 2011. The population attributable fractions (PAFs) and number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for childhood asthma associated with exposure to damp housing and gas stoves. 26.1% of Australian homes have dampness problems and 38.2% have natural gas as the main energy source for cooktop stoves. The PAF for childhood asthma attributable to damp housing was 7.9% (95% CI, 3.2-12.6%), causing 1760 disability-adjusted life years (DALYs; 95% CI, 416-3104 DALYs), or 42 DALYs/100 000 children. The PAF associated with gas stoves was 12.3% (95% CI, 8.9-15.8%), corresponding to 2756 DALYs (95% CI, 1271-4242), or 67 DALYs/100 000 children. If all homes with gas stoves were fitted with high efficiency range hoods to vent gas combustion products outdoors, the PAF and burden estimates were reduced to 3.4% (95% CI, 2.2-4.6%) and 761 DALYs (95% CI, 322-1199). Exposure to damp housing and gas stoves is common in Australia, and is associated with a considerable proportion of the childhood asthma burden. Strategies for reducing exposure to indoor dampness and gas combustion products should be communicated to parents of children with or at risk of asthma.

  10. Childhood overweight/obesity and pediatric asthma: the role of parental perception of child weight status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaad, Salma M A; Paige, Katie N; Teran-Garcia, Margarita; Donovan, Sharon M; Fiese, Barbara H; The Strong Kids Research Team

    2013-09-23

    Childhood obesity and asthma are on the rise in the U.S. Clinical and epidemiological data suggest a link between the two, in which overweight and obese children are at higher risk for asthma. Prevention of childhood obesity is preferred over treatment, however, in order to be receptive to messages, parents must perceive that their child is overweight. Many parents do not accurately assess their child's weight status. Herein, the relation between parental perceptions of child weight status, observed body mass index (BMI) percentiles, and a measure of child feeding practices were explored in the context of asthma, food allergy, or both. Out of the children with asthma or food allergy that were classified as overweight/obese by BMI percentiles, 93% were not perceived as overweight/obese by the parent. Mean scores for concern about child weight were higher in children with both asthma and food allergy than either condition alone, yet there were no significant differences among the groups in terms of pressure to eat and restrictive feeding practices. In summary, parents of children with asthma or food allergy were less likely to recognize their child's overweight/obese status and their feeding practices did not differ from those without asthma and food allergy.

  11. Severe childhood asthma and allergy to furry animals: refined assessment using molecular-based allergy diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konradsen, Jon R; Nordlund, Björn; Onell, Annica; Borres, Magnus P; Grönlund, Hans; Hedlin, Gunilla

    2014-03-01

    Allergy to cats and dogs and polysensitization towards these animals are associated with severe childhood asthma. Molecular-based allergy diagnostics offers new opportunities for improved characterization and has been suggested to be particularly useful in patients with polysensitization and/or severe asthma. The aim was to use extract- and molecular-based allergy diagnostics to compare patterns of IgE sensitization towards aeroallergens in children with problematic severe and controlled asthma. Children with a positive ImmunoCAP towards any furry animal (cat, dog or horse) were recruited from a Nationwide Swedish study on severe childhood asthma. Severe (n = 37, age 13 years) and controlled (n = 28, age 14 years) asthmatics underwent assessment of allergic sensitization by ImmunoCap (kUA /l) and immunosolid-phase allergen chip (ISAC). In addition, Asthma Control Test, spirometry and a methacholine challenge were performed. Children with severe asthma had lower asthma control (p Molecular-based allergy diagnostics revealed a more complex molecular spreading of allergen components in children with the most severe disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Practice Variation in Management of Childhood Asthma Is Associated with Outcome Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbutt, Jane M; Yan, Yan; Strunk, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Although specialist asthma care improves children's asthma outcomes, the impact of primary care management is unknown. To determine whether variation in preventive and acute care for asthma in pediatric practices affects patients' outcomes. For 22 practices, we aggregated 12-month patient data obtained by chart review and parent telephone interviews for 948 children, 3 to 12 years old, diagnosed with asthma to obtain practice-level measures of preventive (≥1 asthma maintenance visit/year) and acute (≥1 acute asthma visit/year) asthma care. Relationships between practice-level measures and individual asthma outcomes (symptom-free days, parental quality of life, emergency department [ED] visits, and hospitalizations) were explored using generalized estimating equations, adjusting for seasonality, specialist care, Medicaid insurance, single-family status, and race. For every 10% increase in the proportion of children in the practice receiving preventive care, symptom-free days per child increased by 7.6 days (P = .02) and ED visits per child decreased by 16.5% (P = .002), with no difference in parental quality of life or hospitalizations. Only the association between more preventive care and fewer ED visits persisted in adjusted analysis (12.2% reduction; P = .03). For every 10% increase in acute care provision, ED visits per child and hospitalizations per child decreased by 18.1% (P = .02) and 16.5% (P asthma care had improved outcomes, both impairment and risk. Persistence of improved risk outcomes in the adjusted analyses suggests that practice-level interventions to increase asthma care may reduce childhood asthma disparities. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Does longer duration of breastfeeding prevent childhood asthma in low-income families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Ahmed A; Racine, Elizabeth F

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship of breastfeeding duration with childhood asthma among low-income families in Karachi, Pakistan. Mothers/caregivers of 200 children with asthma and an equal number of children without asthma were interviewed about breastfeeding duration. Based on the responses, 6 different binary variables were constructed: breastfeeding 3 months or less, 6 months or less, 9 months or less, 12 months or less, 18 months or less, and 24 months or less. Asthma status of the child was determined by clinical examination by a primary care physician. Data was analyzed using multiple logistic regression method, adjusted for age and sex of the child, household income, parental ethnicity, number of older siblings, family history of asthma or hay fever, presence of mold, parental smoking, number of people in the household, and body mass index of the child. The average duration of breastfeeding was 21.4 months (SD = 7.33 months). Breastfeeding for at least 24 months was associated with increased odds of asthma (aOR = 1.77, 95%CI: 0.99, 3.16). Whereas breastfeeding for 12 months or less, and to some extent 18 months or less, was protective against childhood asthma. There was some evidence this protective effect may be delayed in children with a family history of asthma or hay fever. This study found breastfeeding for 12 months or less may have a protective effect against asthma. The protective effect weans down after 18 months, and if continued 24 months or more may place the child at-risk of asthma.

  14. Cardiac asthma in elderly patients: incidence, clinical presentation and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Patrick

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac asthma is common, but has been poorly investigated. The objective was to compare the characteristics and outcome of cardiac asthma with that of classical congestive heart failure (CHF in elderly patients. Methods Prospective study in an 1,800-bed teaching hospital. Results Two hundred and twelve consecutive patients aged ≥ 65 years presenting with dyspnea due to CHF (mean age of 82 ± 8 years were included. Findings of cardiac echocardiography and natriuretic peptides levels were used to confirm CHF. Cardiac asthma patients were defined as a patient with CHF and wheezing reported by attending physician upon admission to the emergency department. The CHF group (n = 137 and the cardiac asthma group (n = 75, differed for tobacco use (34% vs. 59%, p 2 (47 ± 15 vs. 41 ± 11 mmHg, p Conclusion Patients with cardiac asthma represented one third of CHF in elderly patients. They were more hypercapnic and experienced more distal airway obstruction. However, outcomes were similar.

  15. What is meant by control of childhood asthma?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    asthma? Asthma can now be controlled, but assessing control may not be that easy. rOBin J grEEn. Professor and Head: Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Pretoria. Robin Green is Director of Paediatric Pulmonology and Intensive Care Services at Steve Biko Academic Hospital. maX KlEin. Professor ...

  16. Childhood asthma after bacterial colonization of the airway in neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H.; Hermansen, M.N.; Buchvald, F.

    2007-01-01

    Pathological features of the airway in young children with severe recurrent wheeze suggest an association between bacterial colonization and the initiating events of early asthma. We conducted a study to investigate a possible association between bacterial colonization of the hypopharynx in asymp...... in asymptomatic neonates and later development of recurrent wheeze, asthma, and allergy during the first 5 years of life....

  17. Oxidant-antioxidant balance in childhood asthma | Shokry | Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Acute asthma leads to a considerable oxidative stress that is indicated by the high level of malondialdehyde and low level of antioxidant enzymes. Keywords: bronchial asthma, superoxide dismutases (SOD), glutathione peroxidases (Gpx), malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidants. Egypt J Pediatr Allergy Immunol ...

  18. Hyper IgE in Childhood Eczema and Risk of Asthma in Chinese Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chantel; Hon, Kam Lun; Kung, Jeng Sum Charmaine; Pong, Nga Hin; Leung, Ting-Fan; Wong, Chun Kwok

    2016-06-10

    Atopic eczema is a common childhood disease associated with high IgE and eosinophilia. We characterized the clinical features associated with hyper-IgE (defined as IgE > 2000 IU/L) in eczema. Nottingham Eczema Severity Score (NESS), family and personal history of atopy, skin prick test (SPT) for common food and aeroallergens, highest serum IgE ever and eosinophil counts were evaluated in 330 children eczema patients. Childhood-NESS (NESS performed at 10 years of age) were further analyzed. IgE correlated with NESS (spearman coefficient 0.35, p hyper-IgE (n = 163) were associated with male gender (p = 0.002); paternal atopy (p = 0.026); personal history of atopic rhinitis (p = 0.016); asthma (p hyper-IgE was associated with personal history of asthma (exp(B) = 5.12, p = 0.002) and eczema severity during childhood and adolescence (p hyper-IgE. For patients >10years of age, food allergen sensitization was associated with hyper-IgE (p = 0.008). Hyper-IgE is independently associated with asthma, more severe atopy and more severe eczema during childhood and adolescence. IgE > 2000 IU/L may be a tool to aid prognostication of this chronic relapsing dermatologic disease and its progression to asthma.

  19. Mothers, places and risk of hospitalization for childhood asthma: a nationwide study from Sweden: epidemiology of allergic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Sundquist, J; Calling, S; Zöller, B; Sundquist, K

    2013-06-01

    This study examines whether neighbourhood deprivation increases the risk of hospitalization for childhood asthma, after accounting for individual-level maternal socio-demographic characteristics. An open cohort of all singleton children aged 2-11 years was followed between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2006. Childhood residential addresses were geocoded and classified according to the level of neighbourhood deprivation. Data were analysed by multilevel logistic regression, with individual-level characteristics (sex, age, maternal marital status, family income, maternal educational attainment, maternal immigration status, maternal urban/rural status, mobility, maternal asthma history and maternal smoking) at the first level and level of neighbourhood deprivation at the second level. During the study period, among a total of 866,860 children, 17,682 (2.0%) were hospitalized with childhood asthma. Age-adjusted hospital rates for childhood asthma increased with increasing level of neighbourhood deprivation. In the study population, 1.9% and 2.3% of children in the least and most deprived neighbourhoods, respectively, were affected by childhood asthma. Hospital rates of childhood asthma increased with increasing neighbourhood-level deprivation across all individual-level maternal socio-demographic categories, including marital status, educational attainment, urban/rural status, maternal history of asthma and smoking. The odds ratio (OR) for those living in high-deprivation neighbourhoods vs. those living in low-deprivation neighbourhoods was 1.23 (95% confidence interval, 1.16-1.30). High neighbourhood deprivation remained significantly associated with childhood asthma risk after adjustment for maternal socio-demographic characteristics (OR=1.08, p = 0.016). This study is the largest so far on neighbourhood influences on childhood asthma. Our results suggest that neighbourhood characteristics affect the risk of hospitalization for childhood asthma independent of

  20. Childhood Asthma and Allergies in Urban, Semiurban, and Rural Residential Sectors in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Kausel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While rural living protects from asthma and allergies in many countries, results are conflicting in Latin America. We studied the prevalence of asthma and asthma symptoms in children from urban, semiurban, and rural sectors in south Chile. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted in semiurban and rural sectors in the province of Valdivia (n=559 using the ISAAC (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire. Results were compared to prevalence in urban Valdivia (n=3105 by using data from ISAAC III study. Odds ratios (+95% confidence intervals were calculated. No statistical significant differences were found for asthma ever and eczema symptoms stratified by residential sector, but a gradient could be shown for current asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms with urban living having highest and rural living having lowest prevalence. Rural living was inversely associated in a statistical significant way with current asthma (OR: 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2–0.9 and rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms (OR: 0.3; 95% CI: 0.2–0.7 in logistic regression analyses. Rural living seems to protect from asthma and respiratory allergies also in Chile, a South American country facing epidemiological transition. These data would be improved by clinical studies of allergic symptoms observed in studied sectors.

  1. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and incident asthma in adults: the HUNT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Xiao-Mei; Langhammer, Arnulf; Camargo, Carlos A; Chen, Yue

    2012-12-15

    The impact of low vitamin D status on asthma development is unclear. The authors investigated the relation between the baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level and incident asthma in adults, including possible effect modification by allergy status, using allergic rhinitis as a proxy measure. A cohort of 25,616 Norwegian adults aged 19-55 years participated in 2 surveys of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study known as HUNT 2 (1995-1997) and HUNT 3 (2006-2008). Of this cohort, a nested case-control study included 584 new-onset asthma cases and 1,958 nonasthma controls whose baseline serum 25(OH)D levels were measured. After adjustment for potential asthma risk factors, the baseline serum level of 25(OH)D (incident asthma in women, regardless of allergy status. Low vitamin D status was not significantly associated with incident asthma in most adults, but it may have increased risk among men without allergy.

  2. Quintupling Inhaled Glucocorticoids to Prevent Childhood Asthma Exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Daniel J; Bacharier, Leonard B; Mauger, David T; Boehmer, Susan; Beigelman, Avraham; Chmiel, James F; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Gaffin, Jonathan M; Morgan, Wayne J; Peters, Stephen P; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Sheehan, William J; Cabana, Michael D; Holguin, Fernando; Martinez, Fernando D; Pongracic, Jacqueline A; Baxi, Sachin N; Benson, Mindy; Blake, Kathryn; Covar, Ronina; Gentile, Deborah A; Israel, Elliot; Krishnan, Jerry A; Kumar, Harsha V; Lang, Jason E; Lazarus, Stephen C; Lima, John J; Long, Dayna; Ly, Ngoc; Marbin, Jyothi; Moy, James N; Myers, Ross E; Olin, J Tod; Raissy, Hengameh H; Robison, Rachel G; Ross, Kristie; Sorkness, Christine A; Lemanske, Robert F

    2018-03-08

    Asthma exacerbations occur frequently despite the regular use of asthma-controller therapies, such as inhaled glucocorticoids. Clinicians commonly increase the doses of inhaled glucocorticoids at early signs of loss of asthma control. However, data on the safety and efficacy of this strategy in children are limited. We studied 254 children, 5 to 11 years of age, who had mild-to-moderate persistent asthma and had had at least one asthma exacerbation treated with systemic glucocorticoids in the previous year. Children were treated for 48 weeks with maintenance low-dose inhaled glucocorticoids (fluticasone propionate at a dose of 44 μg per inhalation, two inhalations twice daily) and were randomly assigned to either continue the same dose (low-dose group) or use a quintupled dose (high-dose group; fluticasone at a dose of 220 μg per inhalation, two inhalations twice daily) for 7 days at the early signs of loss of asthma control ("yellow zone"). Treatment was provided in a double-blind fashion. The primary outcome was the rate of severe asthma exacerbations treated with systemic glucocorticoids. The rate of severe asthma exacerbations treated with systemic glucocorticoids did not differ significantly between groups (0.48 exacerbations per year in the high-dose group and 0.37 exacerbations per year in the low-dose group; relative rate, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.8 to 2.1; P=0.30). The time to the first exacerbation, the rate of treatment failure, symptom scores, and albuterol use during yellow-zone episodes did not differ significantly between groups. The total glucocorticoid exposure was 16% higher in the high-dose group than in the low-dose group. The difference in linear growth between the high-dose group and the low-dose group was -0.23 cm per year (P=0.06). In children with mild-to-moderate persistent asthma treated with daily inhaled glucocorticoids, quintupling the dose at the early signs of loss of asthma control did not reduce the rate of severe asthma

  3. Childhood asthma under the north face of Mount Everest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangzong; Nafstad, P; Madsen, C; Bjertness, E

    2006-01-01

    We assessed prevalences of symptoms of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic eczema and their associations with environmental exposures among school children living in high altitude and rural Tibet. After watching an asthma symptom video, 2.8% of the children reported ever wheezing at rest and 1.4% ever severe wheezing. Residential dampness problems were the only environmental exposure that was clearly associated with children's symptoms (odds ratios 1.3 to 2.5), even if several other exposures were common. The low symptom prevalences are in accordance with the hypothesis that the western lifestyle in some way increases the risk of asthma.

  4. Review: Childhood and Adolescent Sexual Abuse: Incidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other complications relate to sexually transmitted diseases, unwanted pregnancy and psychological pathologies such as intense anxiety, anger, depression, mood swings, nightmares, phobias and somatisation. This review discusses the apparent low incidence and of sexual abuse in children and adolescents, ...

  5. Wheezing and asthma may be enhanced by broad spectrum antibiotics used in early childhood. Concept and results of a pharmacoepidemiology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrychowski, W; Perera, F; Maugeri, U; Mroz, E; Flak, E; Perzanowski, M; Majewska, R

    2011-04-01

    One of the mechanisms supposed to explain the increasing prevalence of asthma, among children in particular, is the use of antibiotics because they may modify natural microbial exposure and development of the immune system in early childhood. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between the use of various classes of antibiotics (penicillin, cephalosporin and macrolide derivatives) in early childhood and the medical diagnosis of asthma or wheezing reported by mothers over the follow-up after adjustment for potential confounders and respiratory infections. In a population-based sample of 5-year-olds, a part of the ongoing birth cohort study, the standardized interviews on health outcomes, potential confounders (child's gender, maternal atopy, parity, prenatal and postnatal environmental tobacco smoke) and the use of antibiotics were gathered from mothers of 310 children. While the overall use of antibiotics during the early childhood was insignificantly associated with asthma (adjusted OR = 1.65, 95%CI: 0.93 - 2.93), the risk estimates were significant both for macrolide antibiotics (adjusted OR=2.14, 95%CI: 1.16-3.95) and cephalosporins (OR=1.98, 95%CI: 1.14-3.37). The significant excess in IRR (incident risk ratio) of wheezing episodes was related only to the use of macrolide antibiotics (adjusted IRR=1.91, 95%CI: 1.12-3.27). The use of other classes of antibiotics was found not to be associated with the medical diagnosis of asthma or wheezing episodes recorded in the study period. as early childhood use of broad spectrum antibiotics is associated with an increased risk of developing asthma in 5-year-olds, it may be hypothesized that the antibiotic- related suppression of allergic inflammatory responses in the course of treatment may later lead to greater than before atopic immune response in Th2 children or an impairment of Th1 immune responses in early childhood.

  6. Hospital admissions for childhood asthma after smoke-free legislation in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Christopher; Lee, John Tayu; Laverty, Anthony A; Glantz, Stanton A; Majeed, Azeem

    2013-02-01

    To assess whether the implementation of English smoke-free legislation in July 2007 was associated with a reduction in hospital admissions for childhood asthma. Interrupted time series study using Hospital Episodes Statistics data from April 2002 to November 2010. Sample consisted of all children (aged ≤14 years) having an emergency hospital admission with a principle diagnosis of asthma. Before the implementation of the legislation, the admission rate for childhood asthma was increasing by 2.2% per year (adjusted rate ratio 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-1.03). After implementation of the legislation, there was a significant immediate change in the admission rate of -8.9% (adjusted rate ratio 0.91; 95% CI: 0.89-0.93) and change in time trend of -3.4% per year (adjusted rate ratio 0.97; 95% CI: 0.96-0.98). This change was equivalent to 6802 fewer hospital admissions in the first 3 years after implementation. There were similar reductions in asthma admission rates among children from different age, gender, and socioeconomic status groups and among those residing in urban and rural locations. These findings confirm those from a small number of previous studies suggesting that the well-documented population health benefits of comprehensive smoke-free legislation appear to extend to reducing hospital admissions for childhood asthma.

  7. Risk factors for incident asthma and COPD in a cohort of young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Lisbet Krogh; Bælum, Jesper; Halling, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the study was to describe potential shared risk factors for incident asthma and COPD in a population-based, 9-year follow-up study. Methods: From a cohort of 1191 individuals, aged 20-44, who participated in baseline survey including spirometry, bronchial challenge.......06; 1.00-9.40). Risk factors for COPD in males were bronchial hyperresponsiveness (23.13; 1.41-380.50) and FEV1asthma at baseline (5.21; 1.48-18.34). Conclusions: No shared risk factors......, and skin prick test (SPT) 742 subjects (62%) were reexamined at follow-up in 2012-2014. Results: A total of 27 incident cases of asthma and 22 cases of COPD were identified at follow-up corresponding to an incidence rate of 5.8 (95% CI 3.9-8.4) and 3.5 (2.2-5.3) per 1000 person years, respectively. Among...

  8. Incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in Danish and Swedish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Lonny; Simonsen, Jacob; Haerskjold, Ann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that the prevalence of the frequent chronic conditions of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergy has increased substantially for reasons not fully understood. Atopic diseases affect quality of life in both children and their family members. OBJECTIVE: Using...... national registers, we sought to establish up-to-date incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the Danish and Swedish child populations. METHODS: Children born in Denmark from 1997 to 2011 or born in Sweden from 2006 to 2010 participated in this cross......-national, population-based cohort study. Incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the Danish and Swedish child cohorts were ascertained through disease-specific dispensed prescribed medication, specific hospital contacts, or both. RESULTS: In both countries the incidence rate...

  9. Incidence and frequency rates of childhood cancer in Namibia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To estimate the extent of paediatric malignancy in an African country and to compare these findings wjth paediatric cancer rates in other countries. Design. A retrospective descriptive study which calculated incidence and frequency rates from the data obtained from a 6-year survey of childhood cancer in. Namibia.

  10. Siblings, asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema: a worldwide perspective from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, D P; Aït-Khaled, N; Foliaki, S; Mallol, J; Odhiambo, J; Pearce, N; Williams, H C

    2015-01-01

    Associations of larger families with lower prevalences of hay fever, eczema and objective markers of allergic sensitization have been found fairly consistently in affluent countries, but little is known about these relationships in less affluent countries. Questionnaire data for 210,200 children aged 6-7 years from 31 countries, and 337,226 children aged 13-14 years from 52 countries, were collected by Phase Three of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC). Associations of disease symptoms and labels of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema were analysed by numbers of total, older and younger siblings, using mixed (multi-level) logistic regression models to adjust for individual covariates and at the centre level for region, language and national affluence. In both age groups, inverse trends (P national GNI per capita. These global findings on sibship size and childhood asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema suggest at least two distinct trends. Inverse associations with older siblings (observations which prompted the 'hygiene hypothesis' for allergic disease) are mainly a phenomenon of more affluent countries, whereas greater severity of symptoms in larger families is globally more widespread. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical & Experimental Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Food Intolerance and childhood asthma: what is the link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausoleil, Janet L; Fiedler, Joel; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2007-01-01

    Food allergies and asthma are increasing worldwide. It is estimated that approximately 8% of children aged children are egg, milk, peanut, soy, fish, shellfish, and tree nuts. Asthma alone as a manifestation of a food allergy is rare and atypical. Less than 5% of patients experience wheezing without cutaneous or gastrointestinal symptoms during a food challenge. In addition to acute respiratory symptoms, a food allergy may also induce airway hyper-responsiveness beyond the initial reaction. This process can occur in patients who do not demonstrate a decrease in lung function during the reaction. Inhalation of aerosolized food particles can cause respiratory symptoms in selected food-allergic individuals, particularly with fish and shellfish during cooking and aerosolization. However, this has not been demonstrated with the smelling of, or casual contact with, peanut butter. Rarely, food additives such as sulfating agents can cause respiratory reactions. This reaction occurs primarily in patients with underlying asthma, particularly in patients with more severe asthma. In contrast, there is no convincing evidence that tartrazine or monosodium glutamate can induce asthma responses. Although food-induced asthma is rare, it is common for patients and clinicians to perceive that food can trigger asthma. Avoidance of specific foods or additives has not been shown to improve asthma, even in patients who may perceive that a particular food worsens their asthma.However, patients with underlying asthma are more likely to experience a fatal or near-fatal food reaction. Food reactions tend to be more severe or life threatening when they involve the respiratory tract. The presence of a food allergy is a risk factor for the future development of asthma, particularly for children with sensitization to egg protein. The diagnosis of a food allergy includes skin or in vitro testing as an initial study when the history suggests food allergy. While negative testing generally rules out

  12. Influence of childhood growth on asthma and lung function in adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.M. van der Sonnenschein-Voort (Agnes); L.D. Howe (Laura); R. Granell (Raquel); L. Duijts (Liesbeth); J.A.C. Sterne (Jonathan A.C.); K. Tilling (Kate); A.J. Henderson (A. John)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground Low birth weight and rapid infant growth in early infancy are associated with increased risk of childhood asthma, but little is known about the role of postinfancy growth in asthmatic children. Objectives We sought to examine the associations of children's growth patterns with

  13. Maternal food consumption during pregnancy and the longitudinal development of childhood asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willers, Saskia M.; Wijga, Alet H.; Brunekreef, Bert; Kerkhof, Marjan; Gerritsen, Jorrit; Hoekstra, Maarten O.; de Jongste, Johan C.; Smit, Henriette A.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale Maternal diet during pregnancy has the potential to affect airway development and to promote T-helper-2-cell responses during fetal life. This might increase the risk of developing childhood asthma or allergy. Objectives: We investigated the influence of maternal food consumption during

  14. Prenatal and childhood Mediterranean diet and the development of asthma and allergies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzi, Leda; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2009-09-01

    To discuss current evidence about the relation between prenatal and childhood Mediterranean diet, and the development of asthma and allergies in children. Review of the literature. Four recent studies conducted in Mediterranean countries (Spain, Greece) and one conducted in Mexico evaluated the association between childhood Mediterranean diet and asthma outcomes in children. All of the studies reported beneficial associations between a high level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet during childhood and symptoms of asthma or allergic rhinitis. Individual foods or food groups contributing to the protective effect of Mediterranean diet included fish, fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts and cereals, while detrimental components included red meat, margarine and junk food intake. Two studies focused on prenatal Mediterranean diet: the first is a birth cohort in Spain that showed a protective effect of a high adherence to the Mediterranean diet during pregnancy on persistent wheeze, atopic wheeze and atopy at the age of 6.5 years; while the second is a cross-sectional study in Mexico, collecting information more than 6 years after pregnancy, that showed no associations between maternal Mediterranean diet during pregnancy and allergic symptoms in childhood except for current sneezing. Findings from recent studies suggest that a high level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet early in life protects against the development of asthma and atopy in children. Further studies are needed to better understand the mechanisms of this protective effect, to evaluate the most relevant window of exposure, and to address specific components of diet in relation to disease.

  15. Trends in prevalence of childhood and parental asthma in Merseyside, 1991-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koshy, Gibby; Delpisheh, Ali; Brabin, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Background To determine changes in prevalence of parental and childhood asthma in Merseyside between 1991 and 2006. Methods Four standardized cross-sectional respiratory surveys using a parent-completed questionnaire were completed in 1991 (n = 1171), 1993 (n = 2368) 1998 (n = 1964) and in 2006 (n =

  16. The Program for the Prevention of Childhood Asthma: a specialized care program for children with wheezing or asthma in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Pereira, Marilyn; Avila, Jennifer; Solé, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To present the Programa Infantil de Prevenção de Asma (PIPA, Program for the Prevention of Childhood Asthma) and the characteristics of the patients followed in this program. Methods : Implemented in the city of Uruguaiana, Brazil, PIPA has as its target population children and adolescents ( 3 years of age, respectively. Physician-diagnosed asthma was reported in 26.5% and 82.2%, respectively. In the sample as a whole, the prevalence of passive smoking was high (> 36%), occurring during pregnancy in > 15%; > 40% of the patients had been born by cesarean section; and 30% had a mother who had had < 8 years of schooling. Conclusions : A prevention program for children with asthma is an effective strategy for controlling the disease. Knowledge of local epidemiological and environmental characteristics is essential to reducing the prevalence of the severe forms of asthma, to improving the use of health resources, and to preventing pulmonary changes that could lead to COPD in adulthood. PMID:26982040

  17. Evaluation of the associations between childhood asthma and prenatal and perinatal factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Maryam; Mohtashami, Seyyedeh Samaneh; Bemanian, Mohammad Hassan; Moosavi, Seyyed Ali Javad; Moradi Lakeh, Maziar

    2017-06-01

    To identify prenatal and perinatal risk factors for childhood asthma. A retrospective case-control study was undertaken among children aged 7-14 years in Tehran, Iran, between March 2009 and November 2014. Data for children with asthma (Iranian nationality, non-smoking parents, and middle-class socioeconomic status) were compared with those for an equal number of age- and sex-matched non-asthmatic children. Prenatal and perinatal risk factors were evaluated via complete data sheets of maternal pregnancy and delivery. Forward logistic regression analysis was performed. Both groups contained 134 children. Risk of asthma was shown to be associated with maternal history of asthma (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 11.62, 95% confidence interval 1.38-96.93; P=0.024), vaginal bleeding during pregnancy (aOR 3.76, 95% CI 1.86-7.57; P<0.001), antibiotics during pregnancy (aOR 3.19, 95% CI 1.52-6.67; P=0.002), and maternal age 30 years or older (aOR 2.54, 95% CI 1.30-4.95; P=0.006). Breastfeeding was protective against childhood asthma (aOR 0.29, 95% CI 0.151-0.575; P<0.001). History of maternal asthma was the most influential factor on development of childhood asthma, followed by vaginal bleeding during pregnancy, antibiotic exposure in utero, and older maternal age. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  18. Understanding childhood asthma in focus groups: perspectives from mothers of different ethnic backgrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenzie Sheila

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosing childhood asthma is dependent upon parental symptom reporting but there are problems in the use of words and terms. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare understandings of childhood 'asthma' by mothers from three different ethnic backgrounds who have no personal experience of diagnosing asthma. A better understanding of parents' perceptions of an illness by clinicians should improve communication and management of the illness. Method Sixty-six mothers living in east London describing their ethnic backgrounds as Bangladeshi, white English and black Caribbean were recruited to 9 focus groups. Discussion was semi-structured. Three sessions were conducted with each ethnic group. Mothers were shown a video clip of a boy with audible wheeze and cough and then addressed 6 questions. Sessions were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Responses were compared within and between ethnic groups. Results Each session, and ethnic group overall, developed a particular orientation to the discussion. Some mothers described the problem using single signs, while others imitated the sound or made comparisons to other illnesses. Hereditary factors were recognised by some, although all groups were concerned with environmental triggers. Responses about what to do included 'normal illness' strategies, use of health services and calls for complementary treatment. All groups were concerned about using medication every day. Expectations about the quality of life were varied, with recognition that restrictions may be based on parental beliefs about asthma, rather than asthma itself. Conclusion Information from these focus groups suggests mothers know a great deal about childhood asthma even though they have no personal experience of it. Knowledge of how mothers from these ethnic backgrounds perceive asthma may facilitate doctor – patient communication with parents of children experiencing breathing difficulties.

  19. Incidence rates of asthma, rhinitis and eczema symptoms and influential factors in young children in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, M.; Hagerhed-Engman, L.; Sigsgaard, T.

    2008-01-01

    questionnaire based on an ISAAC protocol to all children in the age of 1-6 years. Five years later a follow-up questionnaire was sent to the children that were 1-3 years at baseline. In total, 4779 children (response rate = 73%) participated in both surveys and constitute the study population in this cohort...... period of breast-feeding. Allergic symptoms in parents were also a strong risk factor for incident asthma, as well as for rhinitis and eczema. Conclusion: When comparing incident rates of asthma between different studies it is important to realize that different definitions of the healthy baseline...

  20. Long-term studies of the natural history of asthma in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    limitation associated with asthma already existed at birth or developed along with symptoms. Likewise, the association between the infant's bronchial responsiveness and development of asthma and other wheezy disorders is unclear. Neither primary prevention through manipulation of environmental factors nor......Segmentation of children with asthma and other wheezy disorders remains the main research challenge today, as it was when described 2 centuries ago. Early childhood wheezy disorders follow different temporal trajectories, probably representing different underlying mechanisms (endophenotypes......). Prospective identification of endophenotypes allowing accurate prediction of the clinical course is currently not possible. The variability of the clinical course remains an enigma and difficult to predict. Three of 4 school-aged children with asthma have outgrown disease by midadulthood. The risk...

  1. Relative exposure to swine animal feeding operations and childhood asthma prevalence in an agricultural cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavilonis, Brian T; Sanderson, Wayne T; Merchant, James A

    2013-04-01

    Large swine animal feeding operations (AFOs) have become the model of livestock production throughout the United States. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown an increase in adverse respiratory symptoms among workers at AFOs. However, the impact on communities surrounding these facilities is still being investigated. We evaluated the association between relative environmental exposure to AFOs and the prevalence of prescribed medication for wheeze and/or childhood asthma in rural Iowa. Demographic and health information on 565 children aged 0-17 was obtained from a previous population-based cohort study while data on the AFOs were collected from publically available tax records. We created a metric of each child's relative environmental exposure to swine CAFOs which incorporated the size of the AFO as well as distance and wind direction. We determined the association between self-reported prescription medication for wheeze and/or self-reported physician diagnosed asthma and relative exposure while controlling for recognized risk factors using correlated logistic regression. The prevalence of childhood asthma in the cohort was 11.0% while 22.7% of children had been previously prescribed medication for wheeze or had a lifetime asthma diagnosis. Children with a larger relative environmental exposure to AFOs had a significantly increased odds of both outcomes (OR=1.51, p=0.014 asthma; OR=1.38, p=0.023 asthma or medication for wheeze). When stratified into exposure quartiles a linear trend was observed with asthma or medication for wheeze as the dependent variable but not with asthma alone. This study is the first to investigate children's cumulative relative exposure to smaller AFOs and adds to the growing volume of literature supporting a link between proximity to swine AFOs and adverse respiratory health. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Insulin resistance as a predictor of incident asthma-like symptoms in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, B H; Husemoen, L L N; Hersoug, L-G

    2009-01-01

    of obesity and insulin resistance with the incidence of asthma-like symptoms in adults. METHODS: Out of a random sample of 12 934 persons from a general population, 6784 (52.5%) were included and participated in a health examination in 1999-2001. After 5 years they were re-invited and 4516 (66.......6%) participated at follow-up. At baseline three obesity measures were considered: body mass index, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio. In addition, fasting glucose and insulin were measured for determination of insulin resistance. Information on asthma-like symptoms at baseline and follow-up were...... that of obesity and was independent of sex. CONCLUSION: We found that insulin resistance was associated with an increased risk of developing asthma-like symptoms. This finding supports the hypothesis that obesity and asthma may be linked through inflammatory pathways also involved in insulin resistance....

  3. Early life exposure to ambient air pollution and childhood asthma in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qihong; Lu, Chan; Norbäck, Dan; Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf; Zhang, Yinping; Liu, Weiwei; Yuan, Hong; Sundell, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Early life is suggested to be a critical time in determining subsequent asthma development, but the extent to which the effect of early-life exposure to ambient air pollution on childhood asthma is unclear. We investigated doctor-diagnosed asthma in preschool children due to exposure to ambient air pollution in utero and during the first year of life. In total 2490 children aged 3-6 years participated in a questionnaire study regarding doctor-diagnosed asthma between September 2011 and January 2012 in China. Children's exposure to critical air pollutants, sulfur dioxide (SO2) as proxy of industrial air pollution, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) as proxy of traffic pollution, and particulate matter≤10µm in diameter (PM10) as a mixture, was estimated from the concentrations measured at the ambient air quality monitoring stations by using an inverse distance weighted (IDW) method. Logistic regression analysis was employed to determine the relationship between early-life exposure and childhood asthma in terms of odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Association between early-life exposure to air pollutants and childhood asthma was observed. SO2 and NO2 had significant associations with adjusted OR (95% CI) of 1.45 (1.02-2.07) and 1.74 (1.15-2.62) in utero and 1.62 (1.01-2.60) and 1.90 (1.20-3.00) during the first year for per 50 µg/m(3) and 15 µg/m(3) increase respectively. Exposure to the combined high level of SO2 and NO2 in China significantly elevated the asthmatic risk with adjusted OR (95% CI) of 1.76 (1.18-2.64) in utero and 1.85 (1.22-2.79) during the first year compared to the low level exposure. The associations were higher for males and the younger children aged 3-4 than females and the older children aged 5-6. Early-life exposure to ambient air pollution is associated with childhood asthma during which the level and source of air pollution play important roles. The high level and nature of combined industrial and traffic air pollution in China may

  4. Conception via in vitro fertilization and delivery by Caesarean section are associated with paediatric asthma incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibas, G V; Moschonis, G; Xepapadaki, P; Roumpedaki, E; Androutsos, O; Manios, Y; Papadopoulos, N G

    2013-09-01

    The association between perinatal factors and asthma inception is under rigorous investigation. Nevertheless, evidence of a correlation between asthma, conception via in vitro fertilization (IVF) and delivery through Caesarean section (C-section) is inconclusive. We aimed to assess the relation of asthma incidence with IVF and C-section, after controlling for several potential confounding factors. Parent-reported wheeze in the last 12 months (current), wheeze ever, physician-diagnosed asthma, method of conception, and type of delivery were recorded from questionnaires filled in by the parents of 2016 Greek children aged 9-13, (the Healthy Growth Study population). Some perinatal data were recorded from children's medical records and others were reported by parents; anthropometric measurements were also conducted in children. IVF was correlated with physician-diagnosed asthma (OR = 2.25; 95% CI = 1.11-4.56), but not with current/ever wheeze after adjustment for potential confounding factors. After adjustment, C-section was also associated with asthma (OR = 1.39; 95% CI = 1.04-1.87), but not with current/ever wheeze. When the association of both IVF and C-section with asthma was examined in the same multivariate logistic regression model, it was weakened to borderline significance (OR = 2.04; 95% CI = 1-4.15 and OR = 1.34; 95% CI = 1-1.81 respectively). Conception via IVF and delivery by C-section may predispose children to future asthma development. Either variable could also exert a confounding effect on the link of the other to asthma; this may partially be accountable for inconsistencies in the findings of pertinent studies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Characteristics of near-fatal asthma in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A J; Campbell, D A; Gluyas, P A; Coates, J R; Ruffin, R E; Roder, D M; Latimer, K M; Luke, C G; Frith, P A; Yellowlees, P M

    1995-07-01

    As part of the South Australian asthma mortality survey, we examined 30 cases of near-fatal asthma attacks in children under 15 years of age who were seen over a 3-year period from May 1988 to June 1991. Subjects presented with asthma and either respiratory arrest, PaCO2 above 50 mm Hg, and/or an altered state of consciousness or inability to speak on presentation at a metropolitan Adelaide teaching hospital. A standardized interview and questionnaire was completed with subjects/parents and medical practitioners. Data were reviewed by the assessment panel which made collective judgments based on predetermined criteria. Seventeen patients (57%) were male, 20% were less than 7 years of age, and the majority (53%) were aged between 12 and 15 years. The majority (83%) had severe asthma and only one case (3.3%) had mild asthma. Half of the subjects were waking every night due to asthma and 79% had significant exercise limitation. A quarter of the subjects had a previous ICU admission and 70% had a hospital admission in the last 12 months. Primary care was carried out by a general practitioner in 57% of cases, and 70% of subjects had a crisis plan. Only 46% of those older than 7 years of age had ever used a peak-flow meter. Eighty percent of subjects or their families had high denial scores, and in 73% of cases psychosocial factors were considered to be significant. Eighty percent of cases experienced acute progressive respiratory distress, and 63% of cases delayed seeking medical care.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Poor sleep quality has an adverse effect on childhood asthma control and lung function measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, Youn Ho; Choi, Sun Hee; Jang, Sun Jung; Baek, Ji Hyeon; Jee, Hye Mi; Kim, Mi Ae; Chae, Kyu Young; Han, Man Yong

    2017-08-01

    It is unclear as to whether sleep respiratory breathing disorder (SRBD) is a risk factor for uncontrolled asthma in children. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate whether SRBD may have an adverse effect on childhood asthma control and lung function measures. This was a cross-sectional study of 220 children with well-controlled (n = 108), partly controlled (n = 92), and uncontrolled asthma (n = 20) according to the Global Initiative for Asthma guideline. SRBD was assessed using the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ). The association of SRBD with partly controlled/uncontrolled asthma was investigated on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Of 220 children with asthma, 43 (19.6%) had SRBD: well-controlled, 16.7% (18/108); partly controlled, 21.7% (20/92); and uncontrolled, 25.0% (5/20; P = 0.54). There was a significant difference in forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV 1 /FVC; P = 0.007) and childhood asthma control test (C-ACT) score (P asthma control status, but not in PSQ score (P = 0.18). Children with obstructive sleep apnea (PSQ >0.33) had a lower C-ACT score compared with controls (PSQ ≤0.33; 19.6 ± 5.1 vs 22.0 ± 4.2, P = 0.002). PSQ score was negatively correlated with FEV 1 /FVC (r = -0.16, P = 0.02). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, high PSQ score increased the odds of having partly controlled/uncontrolled asthma by 9.12 (95% CI: 1.04-79.72, P = 0.046) after adjusting for confounding factors. SRBD is an independent risk factor for partly controlled/uncontrolled asthma and has an adverse effect on lung function measures in children. Further research is warranted to determine whether the improvement of sleep quality may also enhance level of asthma control and lung function in children. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. NIAID, NIEHS, NHLBI, and MCAN Workshop Report: The indoor environment and childhood asthma-implications for home environmental intervention in asthma prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Diane R; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Arshad, Syed Hasan; Celedón, Juan C; Chapman, Martin D; Chew, Ginger L; Cook, Donald N; Custovic, Adnan; Gehring, Ulrike; Gern, James E; Johnson, Christine C; Kennedy, Suzanne; Koutrakis, Petros; Leaderer, Brian; Mitchell, Herman; Litonjua, Augusto A; Mueller, Geoffrey A; O'Connor, George T; Ownby, Dennis; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Persky, Victoria; Perzanowski, Matthew S; Ramsey, Clare D; Salo, Päivi M; Schwaninger, Julie M; Sordillo, Joanne E; Spira, Avrum; Suglia, Shakira F; Togias, Alkis; Zeldin, Darryl C; Matsui, Elizabeth C

    2017-10-01

    Environmental exposures have been recognized as critical in the initiation and exacerbation of asthma, one of the most common chronic childhood diseases. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; and Merck Childhood Asthma Network sponsored a joint workshop to discuss the current state of science with respect to the indoor environment and its effects on the development and morbidity of childhood asthma. The workshop included US and international experts with backgrounds in allergy/allergens, immunology, asthma, environmental health, environmental exposures and pollutants, epidemiology, public health, and bioinformatics. Workshop participants provided new insights into the biologic properties of indoor exposures, indoor exposure assessment, and exposure reduction techniques. This informed a primary focus of the workshop: to critically review trials and research relevant to the prevention or control of asthma through environmental intervention. The participants identified important limitations and gaps in scientific methodologies and knowledge and proposed and prioritized areas for future research. The group reviewed socioeconomic and structural challenges to changing environmental exposure and offered recommendations for creative study design to overcome these challenges in trials to improve asthma management. The recommendations of this workshop can serve as guidance for future research in the study of the indoor environment and on environmental interventions as they pertain to the prevention and management of asthma and airway allergies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Childhood asthma after bacterial colonization of the airway in neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Hermansen, Mette Northman; Buchvald, Frederik

    2007-01-01

    Pathological features of the airway in young children with severe recurrent wheeze suggest an association between bacterial colonization and the initiating events of early asthma. We conducted a study to investigate a possible association between bacterial colonization of the hypopharynx in asymp...

  9. Regulatory natural killer cell expression in atopic childhood asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Different subsets of natural killer (NK) cells were found to play a role in pathogenesis of allergy. We sought to investigate the expression of regulatory NK cells (CD56+CD16+CD158+) in atopic children with bronchial asthma in order to outline the value of these cells as biomarkers of disease severity and/or ...

  10. Increase in childhood asthma admissions in an urbanising population

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ga-Rankuwa Hospital, situated on the border of the Gauteng and orth West provinces of South Africa and serving a large black population in various stages of urbanisation. Main outcome measures. Trends in admission numbers and demographic characteristics. Results. Asthma admissions were 2.5 times higher in 1996 ...

  11. What is meant by control of childhood asthma?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    condition,3 objective ways of corroborating patient histories and the physician's assessments are sought. Asthma is ... patients uncovering both subjective and objective evidence of control and in addition focusing on issues that promote ..... a burden of responsibility on doctors and parents that may or may not be easy to.

  12. Seventy Years of Asthma in Italy: Age, Period and Cohort Effects on Incidence and Remission of Self-Reported Asthma from 1940 to 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Pesce

    Full Text Available It is well known that asthma prevalence has been increasing all over the world in the last decades. However, few data are available on temporal trends of incidence and remission of asthma.To evaluate the rates of asthma incidence and remission in Italy from 1940 to 2010.The subjects were randomly sampled from the general Italian population between 1991 and 2010 in the three population-based multicentre studies: ECRHS, ISAYA, and GEIRD. Individual information on the history of asthma (age at onset, age at the last attack, use of drugs for asthma control, co-presence of hay-fever was collected on 35,495 subjects aged 20-84 and born between 1925-1989. Temporal changes in rates of asthma incidence and remission in relation to age, birth cohort and calendar period (APC were modelled using Poisson regression and APC models.The average yearly rate of asthma incidence was 2.6/1000 (3,297 new cases among 1,263,885 person-years. The incidence rates have been linearly increasing, with a percentage increase of +3.9% (95%CI: 3.1-4.5, from 1940 up to the year 1995, when the rates begun to level off. The stabilization of asthma incidence was mainly due to a decrease in the rates of atopic asthma after 1995, while non-atopic asthma has continued to increase. The overall rate of remission was 43.2/1000person-years, and it did not vary significantly across generations, but was associated with atopy, age at asthma onset and duration of the disease.After 50 years of a continuous upward trend, the rates of asthma incidence underwent a substantial stabilization in the late 90s. Despite remarkable improvements in the treatment of asthma, the rate of remission did not change significantly in the last seventy years. Some caveats are required in interpreting our results, given that our estimates are based on self-reported events that could be affected by the recall bias.

  13. Swimming attendance during childhood and development of asthma: Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriani, Federica; Protano, Carmela; Vitali, Matteo; Romano Spica, Vincenzo

    2017-05-01

    The association between asthma and swimming pool attendance has not been demonstrated and currently there are conflicting results. In order to clarify the association between asthma diagnosis in children and swimming pool attendance, and to assess the consistency of the available epidemiological studies, we completed a literature analysis on the relationship between the exposure to disinfection by-products in indoor swimming pools during childhood and asthma diagnosis. Following the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) criteria, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by searching MEDLINE via PubMed, TOXNET, and Scopus databases (from inception to 20 April 2015) using the key word "Asthma" together with "swimming pool", "disinfection by-products", "indoor air pollution" and "children". Inclusion criteria were: English language, a complete analytic study design involving a cohort of children (0-16 years), a well-defined definition of exposure, and the presence of data on effect and variance. Studies on in vivo, in vitro or professional and accidental exposure were excluded. After a screening process, seven reports (n = 5851 subjects) were included out of a total of 2928 references. The reported OR of the association between swimming pool attendance and asthma prevalence ranged from 0.58 to 2.30. The present meta-analysis failed to identify a significant difference in asthma development between children attending swimming pools and controls (OR, 1.084; 95% CI: 0.89-1.31). Swimming in childhood does not increase the likelihood of doctor-diagnosed asthma. Based on this meta-analysis review, the association of the disease with indoor pool attendance is still unclear. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  14. Neighborhood Deprivation and Childhood Asthma Outcomes, Accounting for Insurance Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkoy, Flory L; Stone, Bryan L; Knighton, Andrew J; Fassl, Bernhard A; Johnson, Joseph M; Maloney, Christopher G; Savitz, Lucy A

    2018-01-09

    Collecting social determinants data is challenging. We assigned patients a neighborhood-level social determinant measure, the area of deprivation index (ADI), by using census data. We then assessed the association between neighborhood deprivation and asthma hospitalization outcomes and tested the influence of insurance coverage. A retrospective cohort study of children 2 to 17 years old admitted for asthma at 8 hospitals. An administrative database was used to collect patient data, including hospitalization outcomes and neighborhood deprivation status (ADI scores), which were grouped into quintiles (ADI 1, the least deprived neighborhoods; ADI 5, the most deprived neighborhoods). We used multivariable models, adjusting for covariates, to assess the associations and added a neighborhood deprivation status and insurance coverage interaction term. A total of 2270 children (median age 5 years; 40.6% girls) were admitted for asthma. We noted that higher ADI quintiles were associated with greater length of stay, higher cost, and more asthma readmissions ( P < .05 for most quintiles). Having public insurance was independently associated with greater length of stay (β: 1.171; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.117-1.228; P < .001), higher cost (β: 1.147; 95% CI: 1.093-1.203; P < .001), and higher readmission odds (odds ratio: 1.81; 95% CI: 1.46-2.24; P < .001). There was a significant deprivation-insurance effect modification, with public insurance associated with worse outcomes and private insurance with better outcomes across ADI quintiles ( P < .05 for most combinations). Neighborhood-level ADI measure is associated with asthma hospitalization outcomes. However, insurance coverage modifies this relationship and needs to be considered when using the ADI to identify and address health care disparities. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Vitamin D over the first decade and susceptibility to childhood allergy and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollams, Elysia M; Teo, Shu Mei; Kusel, Merci; Holt, Barbara J; Holt, Kathryn E; Inouye, Michael; De Klerk, Nicholas H; Zhang, Guicheng; Sly, Peter D; Hart, Prue H; Holt, Patrick G

    2017-02-01

    Vitamin D (25(OH)D) deficiency has been implicated as a possible risk factor for asthma development, but studies at selected time points measuring 25(OH)D levels during childhood have yielded conflicting findings. Prospective studies tracking 25(OH)D levels during the initiation phase of asthma in early childhood have not been reported. We sought to elucidate relationships between 25(OH)D levels from birth to age 10 years and susceptibility to allergic sensitization, respiratory tract infections, and asthma. Asthma-, allergy-, and respiratory tract infection-associated phenotypes (including pathogen identification) were characterized in a high-risk birth cohort. Plasma 25(OH)D concentrations were quantified at birth and at clinical follow-ups at the ages of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 10 years, and relationships with clinical outcomes were examined. Cross-sectional analyses demonstrated inverse associations between 25(OH)D concentrations and the risk for concurrent sensitization at age 0.5, 2, and 3 years, and mixed-effects regression demonstrated inverse longitudinal associations of 25(OH)D levels with both sensitization and eczema. Multivariate regression modeling suggested that the number of 25(OH)D-deficient follow-ups was positively associated with risk for asthma/wheeze, eczema, and sensitization at 10 years; adjustment for sensitization (particularly by 2 years) in the asthma/wheeze models reduced 25(OH)D associations with these latter outcomes. 25(OH)D levels were also inversely associated with early nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus species and age of first febrile lower respiratory illness, both of which are known asthma risk factors. 25(OH)D deficiency in early childhood is associated with increased risk for persistent asthma, potentially through modulating susceptibility to early allergic sensitization, upper respiratory tract colonization with bacterial pathogens, or both. These relationships are only evident if 25(OH)D status is

  16. Measurement characteristics of the childhood Asthma-Control Test and a shortened, child-only version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bime, Christian; Gerald, Joe K; Wei, Christine Y; Holbrook, Janet T; Teague, William G; Wise, Robert A; Gerald, Lynn B

    2016-10-20

    The childhood Asthma-Control Test (C-ACT) is validated for assessing asthma control in paediatric asthma. Among children aged 4-11 years, the C-ACT requires the simultaneous presence of both parent and child. There is an unmet need for a tool that can be used to assess asthma control in children when parents or caregivers are not present such as in the school setting. We assessed the psychometric properties and estimated the minimally important difference (MID) of the C-ACT and a modified version, comprising only the child responses (C-ACTc). Asthma patients aged 6-11 years (n=161) from a previously completed multicenter randomised trial were included. Demographic information, spirometry and questionnaire scores were obtained at baseline and during follow-up. Participants or their guardians kept a daily asthma diary. Internal consistency reliabilities of the C-ACT and C-ACTc were 0.76 and 0.67 (Cronbach's α), respectively. Test-retest reliabilities of the C-ACT and C-ACTc were 0.72 and 0.66 (intra-class correlation), respectively. Significant correlations were noted between C-ACT scores and ACQ scores (Spearman's correlation r=-0.56, 95% CI (-0.66, -0.44), Pasthma patients aged 6-11 years, the C-ACT had good psychometric properties. The psychometric properties of a shortened child-only version (C-ACTc), although acceptable, are not as strong.

  17. Complementary and alternative medicine for childhood asthma: an overview of evidence and patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Kam-Lun E; Fung, Ching Ki; Leung, Alexander K C; Leung, Theresa Ngan-Ho; Ng, Daniel K K

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a prevalent childhood atopic disease associated with significant impairment of quality of life. Management relies on avoidance of triggers such as food and aeroallergens, the use of inhaled bronchodilators/corticosteroids and anti-allergic or immune-modulating therapies. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and bronchodilators have been the mainstay of treatment. In China as well as throughout Asia, myths and misconceptions on western medicine and corticosteroids are prevalent and result in non-adherence of treatment. A wide variety of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) are available. Some of these have undergone extensive clinical trials and have been documented to have some therapeutic effects on asthma. Nevertheless, the majority of these treatment modalities is not efficacious and may even be detrimental. This article overviews the evidence for the clinical efficacy of all major CAM modalities. Despite CAM modalities are extensively used by the patients with asthma, very few CAM patents are available. This article also discusses recent patents pertinent to asthma. Only a few patents on herbal medicine for asthma have been evaluated but therapeutic efficacy is not substantially documented. Parents seeking CAM for asthma must consult qualified registered practitioners before using it.

  18. [Association between use of antibacterial agents in the first year of life and childhood asthma: a Meta analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Meng-Yao; Yuan, Yong-Hua; Liu, Li-Mei; Gu, Rong; Zhao, Xiao-Dong

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the association between the use of antibacterial agents in the first years of life and childhood asthma. The Chinese and English databases CNKI, Wanfang Data, VIP, PubMed, and EBSCO were searched for prospective cohort studies on the association between the use of antibacterial agents in the first years of life and childhood asthma. Stata12.0 software was used to analyze the association through a Meta analysis. The articles with a high quality score and adjusted effective values for factors for lower respiratory tract infection were pooled, and a total of 8 studies were included. The results of the Meta analysis showed that the use of antibacterial agents in the first years of life increased the risk of childhood asthma (OR=1.14, 95%CI: 1.10-1.17, Pfirst years of life, those who used more than 4 times had an increased risk of asthma (OR=1.28, 95%CI: 1.19-1.38, Pfirst years of life increases the risk of childhood asthma. High-risk children who use antibacterial agents have an increased risk of asthma. The increased frequency of use of antibacterial agents in the first years of life is associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma, but the detailed dose relationship needs further investigation.

  19. Vitamin D Supplementation for Childhood Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno D Riverin

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that vitamin D plays a role in the pathogenesis of asthma but it is unclear whether supplementation during childhood may improve asthma outcomes.The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of vitamin D supplementation as a treatment or adjunct treatment for asthma.We searched MEDLINE, Embase, CENTRAL, and CINAHL through July 2014.We included RCTs that evaluated vitamin D supplementation in children versus active control or placebo for asthma.One reviewer extracted data and one reviewer verified data accuracy. We qualitatively summarized the main results of efficacy and safety and meta-analyzed data on comparable outcomes across studies. We used GRADE for strength of evidence.Main planned outcomes measures were ED visits and hospitalizations. As secondary outcomes, we examined measures of asthma control, including frequency of asthma exacerbations, asthma symptom scores, measures of lung function, β2-agonist use and daily steroid use, adverse events and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.Eight RCTs (one parallel, one crossover design comprising 573 children aged 3 to 18 years were included. One study (moderate-quality, n = 100 reported significantly less ED visits for children treated with vitamin D. No other studies examined the primary outcome (ED visits and hospitalizations. There was a reduced risk of asthma exacerbations in children receiving vitamin D (low-quality; RR 0.41, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.63, 3 studies, n = 378. There was no significant effect for asthma symptom scores and lung function. The serum 25(OHD level was higher in the vitamin D group at the end of the intervention (low-quality; MD 19.66 nmol/L, 95% CI 5.96 nmol/L to 33.37 nmol/L, 5 studies, n = 167.We identified a high degree of clinical diversity (interventions and outcomes and methodological heterogeneity (sample size and risk of bias in included trials.Randomized controlled trials provide some low

  20. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels and incident asthma in adults; the HUNT study

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, Xiao-Mei; Langhammer, Arnulf; Camargo, Carlos Arthuro; Chen, Yue

    2012-01-01

    The impact of low vitamin D status on asthma development is unclear. The authors investigated the relation between the baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level and incident asthma in adults, including possible effect modification by allergy status, using allergic rhinitis as a proxy measure. A cohort of 25,616 Norwegian adults aged 19–55 years participated in 2 surveys of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study known as HUNT 2 (1995–1997) and HUNT 3 (2006–2008). Of this cohort, a nested cas...

  1. Further statement on the incidence of childhood cancer in Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In March 1999 the Welsh Office asked COMARE to examine two unpublished studies. The first by Busby et al of ''Green Audit'' concluded that there was a significant excess of childhood leukaemia in North Wales associated with residential proximity to the coast. The second study, carried out by Steward et al of the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit (WCISU), did not support this conclusion. We were asked to advise as to whether we considered that there was a real raised incidence of childhood leukaemia near the coast of North Wales and whether further study was required. To do this we initially organised a comparison of the figures quoted by both the Green Audit and WCISU with the database held by the Childhood Cancer Research Group (CCRG) in Oxford. This group maintains the National Registry of Childhood Tumours (NRCT), data for which are supplied from a variety of sources including cancer registries but also directly from medical cancer specialists as well as from death certificates. As a consequence this provides an independent check on much of the data on childhood cancer held by cancer registries in Great Britain and is clinically validated. After carrying out the independent check on the number of cases of childhood leukaemia in these Welsh counties it was immediately apparent that the data held by Green Audit, on which the analysis by Busby et al was based, were incorrect. These data were received from the Welsh Cancer Registry (WCR) in 1995. A further data set was received from WCR in 1996 but was not used in the analysis by Busby et al. In June 1999 we issued a statement to the Welsh Office. In that statement we noted that Dr Busby and his colleagues appeared to have used erroneous data in their study. On the basis of the Steward et al data, COMARE also stated that we found no evidence to support the contention that there is an increased incidence of childhood leukaemia or other childhood cancers amongst the Welsh population living close to the

  2. Do grandmaternal smoking patterns influence the etiology of childhood asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura L; Henderson, John; Northstone, Kate; Pembrey, Marcus; Golding, Jean

    2014-06-01

    Animal data suggest that tobacco smoke exposure of a mother when she is in utero influences DNA methylation patterns in her offspring and that there is an effect on the respiratory system, particularly airway responsiveness. The only study, to our knowledge, in humans suggests that there is a similar effect on asthma. The present study tests whether an association with respiratory problems can be confirmed in a large population study and aims to determine whether in utero exposure of the father has similar effects on his offspring. Information from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children was used to compare the offspring of women and of men who had themselves been exposed to cigarette smoke in utero; separate analyses were performed for children of women smokers and nonsmokers. The outcome measures were trajectories of history of early wheezing, doctor-diagnosed asthma by age 7 years, and results of lung function and methacholine challenge tests at 8 years. A variety of social and environmental factors were taken into account; offspring sexes were examined separately. There was no association with any outcome in relation to maternal prenatal exposure. There was some evidence of an increase in asthma risk with paternal prenatal exposure when the study mother was a nonsmoker (adjusted OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.97-1.41). This was particularly strong for girls (adjusted OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.04-1.86). We did not find that maternal prenatal exposure to her mother's smoking had any effect on her children's respiratory outcomes. There was suggestive evidence of paternal prenatal exposure being associated with asthma and persistent wheezing in the granddaughters.

  3. Low-grade disease activity in early life precedes childhood asthma and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard

    2016-08-01

    Asthma and allergies are today the most common chronic diseases in children and the leading causes of school absences, chronic medication usage, emergency department visits and hospitalizations, which affect all members of the family and represent a significant societal and scientific challenge. These highly prevalent disorders are thought to originate from immune distortion in early childhood, but the etiology and heterogeneity of the disease mechanisms are not understood, which hampers preventive initiatives and makes treatment inadequate. The objective of this thesis is to investigate the presence of an early life disease activity prior to clinical symptoms to understand the anteceding pathophysiological steps towards childhood asthma and allergy. The thesis is built on seven studies from the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC2000) birth cohort examining biomarkers of disease activity in 411 asymptomatic neonates in cord blood (I-II), urine (III), exhaled breath (IV-V) and infant lung function (VI-VII) in relation to the subsequent development of asthma and allergy during the first seven years of life. In papers I-II, we studied cord blood chemokines and 25(OH)-vitamin D, which represent a proxy of the inborn immature immune system, the intrauterine milieu, and the maternal immune health during pregnancy. High levels of the Th2-related chemokine CCL22 and high CCL22/CXCL11 ratio were positively correlated with total IgE level during preschool age (II). This suggests an inborn Th2 skewing of the immune system in healthy newborns subsequently developing elevated total IgE antibodies, which is considered to increase the risk of asthma and allergies later in life. Additionally, deficient cord blood 25(OH)-vitamin D levels were associated with a 2.7-fold increased risk of recurrent wheeze at age 0-7 years (I). Together, these findings support the concept that early life immune programming in the pre-symptomatic era plays an essential role

  4. Management of acute asthma in childhood. A randomized evaluation of beta-adrenergic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, A L; Lipton, J M; Warburton, D; Johnson, L B; Twarog, F J

    1980-05-01

    We examined the efficacy of several beta-adrenergic agents commonly used to treat asthma and evaluated the optimum route of administration. Two hundred and sixty-nine persons aged 5 to 21 years who came to the emergency ward while suffering from acute asthma were treated with either (1) inhalation isoetharine hydrochloride or (2) subcutaneous epinephrine or terbutaline sulfate. Patients were evaluated using clinical scores and pulmonary function tests and were monitored for adverse side effects. Regardless of mode of therapy, the acute attack was either treated successfully, terminated in hospital admission, or required further therapy within 24 hours in a comparable number of patients. Adverse side effects were more common with terbutaline sulfate than with either epinephrine or isoetharine in the doses used. Thus, inhalation of beta-adrenergic agents is as effective as subcutaneous administration in the treatment of acute asthma in childhood.

  5. Low physical fitness in childhood is associated with the development of asthma in young adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F; Lambrechtsen, J; Siersted, H C

    2000-01-01

    Intense physical activity in children may either improve fitness and protect against asthma, or may trigger symptoms. The aim of this study was to determine whether physical fitness in childhood has an impact on the development of asthma. In this prospective, community-based study, 757 (84...... in the subjects at follow-up. During the 10-yr study period, 51 (6.7%) of the previously asymptomatic children developed asthma. These subjects had a lower mean physical fitness in 1985 than their peers: (3.63 versus 3.89 W x kg(-1); p=0.02) in boys and (3.17 versus 3.33 W x kg(-1); p=0.02) in girls. A weak...

  6. Long-term studies of the natural history of asthma in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    limitation associated with asthma already existed at birth or developed along with symptoms. Likewise, the association between the infant's bronchial responsiveness and development of asthma and other wheezy disorders is unclear. Neither primary prevention through manipulation of environmental factors nor...... secondary prevention through the use of inhaled corticosteroids can effectively halt the long-term disease progression in childhood. In conclusion, the natural history of asthma and the associated airway changes is still poorly understood, and we have not managed to translate findings from long-term studies...... into a deeper understanding of the underlying endophenotypes or improved disease management. We propose the need for a translational research approach based on long-term clinical studies of birth cohorts with comprehensive and objective assessments of intermediate phenotypes and environmental exposures combined...

  7. Lifetime secondhand smoke exposure and childhood and adolescent asthma: findings from the PIAMA cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanzi, Edith B; Brunekreef, Bert; Koppelman, Gerard H; Wijga, Alet H; van Rossem, Lenie; Vonk, Judith M; Smit, Henriëtte A; Gehring, Ulrike

    2017-02-23

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure is a modifiable risk factor associated with childhood asthma. Associations with adolescent asthma and the relevance of the timing and patterns of exposure are unclear. Knowledge of critical windows of exposure is important for targeted interventions. We used data until age 17 from 1454 children of the Dutch population-based PIAMA birth cohort. Residential SHS exposure was assessed through parental questionnaires completed at ages 3 months, 1-8 (yearly), 11, 14, and 17 years. Lifetime exposure was determined as; a) time window-specific exposure (prenatal, infancy, preschool, primary school, and secondary school); b) lifetime cumulative exposure; c) longitudinal exposure patterns using latent class growth modeling (LCGM). Generalized estimation equations and logistic regression were used to analyze associations between exposure and asthma at ages 4 to 17 years, adjusting for potential confounders. With all three methods, we consistently found no association between SHS exposure and asthma at ages 4 to 17 years e.g. adjusted overall odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 0.67 (0.41-1.12), 1.00 (0.66-1.51) and 0.67 (0.41-1.11) for prenatal maternal active smoking, infancy, and preschool school time window exposures, respectively. We assessed lifetime SHS exposure using different methods. Different timing and patterns of SHS exposure were not associated with an increased risk of asthma in childhood and adolescence in our study. More longitudinal studies could investigate effects of lifetime SHS exposure on asthma in adolescence and later life.

  8. Validation of the Brazilian version of the childhood asthma control test (c-ACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Suelen G; Sarria, Edgar E; Roncada, Cristian; Stein, Renato T; Pitrez, Paulo M; Mattiello, Rita

    2016-04-01

    Children's perception of their symptoms has proved reliable and relevant to disease management and should be considered when assessing their asthma control. The aim of the study is to validate the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Childhood Asthma Control Test (c-ACT) in children aged 4-11 years. This is a cross-sectional study in children diagnosed with asthma undergoing treatment in a pediatric pulmonology outpatient clinic in Porto Alegre, Brazil. The translation and linguistic adaptation of the instrument were performed in accordance with international recommendations for questionnaire validation. A total of 105 participants were included, aged 4-11 years. all correlations between the total score and items on the questionnaire were significant and obtained values of r ≥ 0.3, and c-ACT means showed statistically significant differences between the GINA categories (P ACT scores than those of uncontrolled asthma group (controlled 22.0 ± 2.9 vs. uncontrolled 16.3 ± 5.3 P ACT scores than those of uncontrolled asthma group (partially controlled 20.0 ± 4.0 vs. uncontrolled 16.3 ± 5.3 P = 0.03). Correlations between the c-ACT total score and spirometry and nitric oxide were poor (r = 0.020; P = 0.866 and r = 0.035; P = 0.753, respectively). Reliability: the α-C coefficient for the c-ACT total score was 0.677 (95%CI 0.573-0763). Sensitivity to change had an effect size of 0.8 and an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.598. No floor or ceiling effects were observed. The Brazilian version of the Childhood Asthma Control Test proved to be valid and reliable in children aged 4-11 years. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A methodology to establish a database to study gene environment interactions for childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCormick Jonathan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-environment interactions are likely to explain some of the heterogeneity in childhood asthma. Here, we describe the methodology and experiences in establishing a database for childhood asthma designed to study gene-environment interactions (PAGES - Paediatric Asthma Gene Environment Study. Methods Children with asthma and under the care of a respiratory paediatrician are being recruited from 15 hospitals between 2008 and 2011. An asthma questionnaire is completed and returned by post. At a routine clinic visit saliva is collected for DNA extraction. Detailed phenotyping in a proportion of children includes spirometry, bronchodilator response (BDR, skin prick reactivity, exhaled nitric oxide and salivary cotinine. Dietary and quality of life questionnaires are completed. Data are entered onto a purpose-built database. Results To date 1045 children have been invited to participate and data collected in 501 (48%. The mean age (SD of participants is 8.6 (3.9 years, 57% male. DNA has been collected in 436 children. Spirometry has been obtained in 172 children, mean % predicted (SD FEV1 97% (15 and median (IQR BDR is 5% (2, 9. There were differences in age, socioeconomic status, severity and %FEV1 between the different centres (p≤0.024. Reasons for non-participation included parents not having time to take part, children not attending clinics and, in a small proportion, refusal to take part. Conclusions It is feasible to establish a national database to study gene-environment interactions within an asthmatic paediatric population; there are barriers to participation and some different characteristics in individuals recruited from different centres. Recruitment to our study continues and is anticipated to extend current understanding of asthma heterogeneity.

  10. Global goods movement and the local burden of childhood asthma in southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Laura; Künzli, Nino; Avol, Ed; Hricko, Andrea M; Lurmann, Fred; Nicholas, Elisa; Gilliland, Frank; Peters, John; McConnell, Rob

    2009-11-01

    As part of a community-based participatory research effort, we estimated the preventable burden of childhood asthma associated with air pollution in the southern California communities of Long Beach and Riverside. We calculated attributable fractions for 2 air pollution reduction scenarios to include assessment of the newly recognized health effects associated with residential proximity to major roads and impact from ship emissions. Approximately 1600 (9%) of all childhood asthma cases in Long Beach and 690 (6%) in Riverside were attributed to traffic proximity. Ship emissions accounted for 1400 (21%) bronchitis episodes and, in more modest proportions, health care visits for asthma. Considerably greater reductions in asthma morbidity could be obtained by reducing nitrogen dioxide and ozone concentrations to levels found in clean coastal communities. Both Long Beach and Riverside have heavy automobile traffic corridors as well as truck traffic and regional pollution originating in the Los Angeles-Long Beach port complex, the largest in the United States. Community-based quantitative risk analyses can improve our understanding of health problems and help promote public health in transportation planning.

  11. Incidence of rhinitis and asthma related to welding in Northern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storaas, Torgeir; Zock, Jan-Paul; Morano, Ana Espinosa; Holm, Mathias; Bjørnsson, Eythor; Forsberg, Bertil; Gislason, Thorarinn; Janson, Christer; Norback, Dan; Omenaas, Ernst; Schlünssen, Vivi; Torén, Kjell; Svanes, Cecilie

    2015-11-01

    Welding-related asthma is well recognised but less is known about rhinitis in relation to welding. The aim here, was to study associations between welding, rhinitis and asthma in a general population sample, and factors influencing selection into and out of a welding occupation.Adult-onset asthma and non-infectious rhinitis were investigated in the international multicentre population-based Respiratory Health in Northern Europe (RHINE) study, including 16,191 responders aged 26-54 years. Ever welding (n=2181), welding >25% of working time (n=747), and welding in stainless steel >6 months (n=173) were assessed by questionnaire. Subjects with rhinitis or asthma onset when aged rhinitis were calculated from year of disease onset, and start and end of welding job. Cox's proportional hazard models adjusting for age, sex, parental education and study centre, and Kaplan-Meier curves were used.Rhinitis incidence was higher among welders (hazard ratio (HR) 1.4, 95% CI 1.3-1.6), consistent in men and women, and across centres (pheterogeneity=0.4). In men, asthma incidence was higher among welders (HR 1.4, 95% CI 1.04-1.97). Quitting welding was indicated higher after adult-onset rhinitis (HR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.3). Adult-onset rhinitis and asthma was higher among welders, consistent across population samples from Northern Europe. No pre-employment selection was found, whereas selection out of welding jobs was suggested. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  12. DNA methylation in childhood asthma: an epigenome-wide meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Cheng-Jian; Söderhäll, Cilla; Bustamante, Mariona; Baïz, Nour; Gruzieva, Olena; Gehring, Ulrike; Mason, Dan; Chatzi, Leda; Basterrechea, Mikel; Llop, Sabrina; Torrent, Maties; Forastiere, Francesco; Fantini, Maria Pia; Carlsen, Karin C Lødrup; Haahtela, Tari; Morin, Andréanne; Kerkhof, Marjan; Merid, Simon Kebede; van Rijkom, Bianca; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Bonder, Marc Jan; Ballereau, Stephane; Vermeulen, Cornelis J; Aguirre-Gamboa, Raul; de Jongste, Johan C; Smit, Henriette A; Kumar, Ashish; Pershagen, Göran; Guerra, Stefano; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Greco, Dario; Reinius, Lovisa; McEachan, Rosemary R C; Azad, Raf; Hovland, Vegard; Mowinckel, Petter; Alenius, Harri; Fyhrquist, Nanna; Lemonnier, Nathanaël; Pellet, Johann; Auffray, Charles; van der Vlies, Pieter; van Diemen, Cleo C; Li, Yang; Wijmenga, Cisca; Netea, Mihai G; Moffatt, Miriam F; Cookson, William O C M; Anto, Josep M; Bousquet, Jean; Laatikainen, Tiina; Laprise, Catherine; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Gori, Davide; Porta, Daniela; Iñiguez, Carmen; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Kogevinas, Manolis; Wright, John; Brunekreef, Bert; Kere, Juha; Nawijn, Martijn C; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Sunyer, Jordi; Melén, Erik; Koppelman, Gerard H

    2018-02-26

    DNA methylation profiles associated with childhood asthma might provide novel insights into disease pathogenesis. We did an epigenome-wide association study to assess methylation profiles associated with childhood asthma. We did a large-scale epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) within the Mechanisms of the Development of ALLergy (MeDALL) project. We examined epigenome-wide methylation using Illumina Infinium Human Methylation450 BeadChips (450K) in whole blood in 207 children with asthma and 610 controls at age 4-5 years, and 185 children with asthma and 546 controls at age 8 years using a cross-sectional case-control design. After identification of differentially methylated CpG sites in the discovery analysis, we did a validation study in children (4-16 years; 247 cases and 2949 controls) from six additional European cohorts and meta-analysed the results. We next investigated whether replicated CpG sites in cord blood predict later asthma in 1316 children. We subsequently investigated cell-type-specific methylation of the identified CpG sites in eosinophils and respiratory epithelial cells and their related gene-expression signatures. We studied cell-type specificity of the asthma association of the replicated CpG sites in 455 respiratory epithelial cell samples, collected by nasal brushing of 16-year-old children as well as in DNA isolated from blood eosinophils (16 with asthma, eight controls [age 2-56 years]) and compared this with whole-blood DNA samples of 74 individuals with asthma and 93 controls (age 1-79 years). Whole-blood transcriptional profiles associated with replicated CpG sites were annotated using RNA-seq data of subsets of peripheral blood mononuclear cells sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. 27 methylated CpG sites were identified in the discovery analysis. 14 of these CpG sites were replicated and passed genome-wide significance (ptranscriptional signatures associated with these CpG sites indicated increased activation of

  13. Investigating the associations between Mediterranean diet, physical activity and living environment with childhood asthma using path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphantonogeorgos, George; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Grigoropoulou, Dimitra; Yfanti, Konstantina; Papoutsakis, Constantina; Papadimitriou, Anastasios; Anthracopoulos, Michael B; Bakoula, Chryssa; Priftis, Kostas N

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of the Mediterranean diet and physical activity with relation to living environment and childhood asthma. 1125 children (529 boys), 10 to 12 years old were recruited either in an urban environment (Athens, n = 700) or rural environment (n = 425) in Greece. A path analytic model was developed to assess the causal relation between urban environment and asthma prevalence (standardized ISAAC questionnaire), through the mediation of the Mediterranean diet (evaluated by the KIDMED food frequency questionnaire) and physical activity (evaluated by the PALQ physical activity questionnaire). The proposed model had a very good fit (χ2/df ratio =1.05, RMSEA=0.007, 90% confidence interval: 0.01 to 0.046, p=0.97, CFI = 0.98). A significant total positive effect was found between urban environment and asthma symptoms (standardized beta= 0.09, penvironment - asthma relation (standardized beta=-0.029, penvironment on childhood asthma.

  14. [Respiratory therapy in childhood asthma. Part 2. Eutonic training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baar, B; Deutsch, J; Götz, M

    1977-01-01

    Children with obstruction mainly due to spasms of bronchial smooth muscle will benefit most from breathing exercises. Attainment of the individual physiological balance of muscular, nervous and psychogenic tensions--the eutonic tension--is of great importance for control of regular unhurried breathing. This will be supported by stimulation of nasal breathing which increases diaphragmatic excursion. The eutonic state is the fundamental basis for success of chest rotations and rhythmic movements to stimulate further relaxation. Awareness of the fact that breaths come by themselves -- "automatically" -- reduces anxiety of shortness of breath. Observations of a group of asthmatic children in a summer camp support this form of treatment of asthma.

  15. Satellite-based Estimates of Ambient Air Pollution and Global Variations in Childhood Asthma Prevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H. Ross; Butland, Barbara K.; Donkelaar, Aaron Matthew Van; Brauer, Michael; Strachan, David P.; Clayton, Tadd; van Dingenen, Rita; Amann, Marcus; Brunekreef, Bert; Cohen, Aaron; hide

    2012-01-01

    Background: The effect of ambient air pollution on global variations and trends in asthma prevalence is unclear. Objectives: Our goal was to investigate community-level associations between asthma prevalence data from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) and satellite-based estimates of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter children per 10% increase in center-level PM2.5 and NO2 was -0.043 [95% confidence interval (CI): -0.139, 0.053] and 0.017 (95% CI: -0.030, 0.064) respectively. For ozone the estimated change in prevalence per parts per billion by volume was -0.116 (95% CI: -0.234, 0.001). Equivalent results for the 6- to 7-year age group (83 centers in 20 countries), though slightly different, were not significantly positive. For the 13- to 14-year age group, change in center-level asthma prevalence over time per 100 children per 10% increase in PM2.5 from Phase One to Phase Three was -0.139 (95% CI: -0.347, 0.068). The corresponding association with ozone (per ppbV) was -0.171 (95% CI: -0.275, -0.067). Conclusion: In contrast to reports from within-community studies of individuals exposed to traffic pollution, we did not find evidence of a positive association between ambient air pollution and asthma prevalence as measured at the community level.

  16. [The role of the microbial environment for the development of childhood asthma and allergies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte

    2013-12-01

    Asthma and allergies are among the most frequent chronic diseases in childhood. Their prevalence has increased during the second half of the twentieth century but seem to stabilize in recent years in many Western European countries such as Switzerland. Although the genetic background is known to have a strong impact on an individual's risk to develop asthma or allergy it seems likely that environmental factors are mostly responsible for the increase in prevalence over time. Much research has been devoted to environmental risk factors promoting the development of asthma and allergies. Yet, there is increasing interest in environmental factors which might protect from the development of these diseases and which might have been reduced along with the development of a "Western lifestyle". The role of environmental allergens, the hygiene hypothesis and the role of the farm environment on the development of asthma and allergies are discussed. An emphasis is put on the microbial environment as encountered in the farming environment which has been shown to confer protection from the development of asthma and allergies. It is likely that among other factors the development of a "Western lifestyle" went along with a marked change of the microbial environment children are exposed to.

  17. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by swelling (inflammation) in the airways. When an asthma attack occurs, the lining of the air passages swells ... or a cough may be the main symptom. Asthma attacks can last for minutes to days. Attacks can ...

  18. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... irritate your airways, like cigarette smoke , perfume, and chalk dust infections, like a cold or the flu exercising breathing in cold air How Is Asthma Diagnosed? If your doctor thinks you have asthma, you'll have to get checked out. One test that helps doctors diagnose asthma is spirometry . ...

  19. Effects of BMI, Fat Mass, and Lean Mass on Asthma in Childhood: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granell, Raquel; Henderson, A. John; Evans, David M.; Smith, George Davey; Ness, Andrew R.; Lewis, Sarah; Palmer, Tom M.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational studies have reported associations between body mass index (BMI) and asthma, but confounding and reverse causality remain plausible explanations. We aim to investigate evidence for a causal effect of BMI on asthma using a Mendelian randomization approach. Methods and Findings We used Mendelian randomization to investigate causal effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on current asthma at age 7½ y in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). A weighted allele score based on 32 independent BMI-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was derived from external data, and associations with BMI, fat mass, lean mass, and asthma were estimated. We derived instrumental variable (IV) estimates of causal risk ratios (RRs). 4,835 children had available data on BMI-associated SNPs, asthma, and BMI. The weighted allele score was strongly associated with BMI, fat mass, and lean mass (all p-valuesBMI on asthma was 1.55 (95% CI 1.16–2.07) per kg/m2, p = 0.003. This effect appeared stronger for non-atopic (1.90, 95% CI 1.19–3.03) than for atopic asthma (1.37, 95% CI 0.89–2.11) though there was little evidence of heterogeneity (p = 0.31). The estimated causal RRs for the effects of fat mass and lean mass on asthma were 1.41 (95% CI 1.11–1.79) per 0.5 kg and 2.25 (95% CI 1.23–4.11) per kg, respectively. The possibility of genetic pleiotropy could not be discounted completely; however, additional IV analyses using FTO variant rs1558902 and the other BMI-related SNPs separately provided similar causal effects with wider confidence intervals. Loss of follow-up was unlikely to bias the estimated effects. Conclusions Higher BMI increases the risk of asthma in mid-childhood. Higher BMI may have contributed to the increase in asthma risk toward the end of the 20th century. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:24983943

  20. Antibiotic sales and the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinitis, and eczema: The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foliaki, Sunia; Nielsen, Sandy Kildegaard; Björkstén, Bengt; Von Mutius, Erika; Cheng, Soo; Pearce, Neil

    2004-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that antibiotic use early in life may increase the subsequent risk of asthma. We have conducted an ecologic analysis of the relationship between antibiotics sales and the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic eczema in 99 centres from 28 countries. Data for antibiotics sales for 28 countries were obtained from the Institute for Medical Statistics (IMS), Health Global Services, UK and converted to defined daily doses (DDD). Data on the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinitis, and eczema in 13-14 year olds were based on the responses to the written and video questionnaires from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC). The analysis was adjusted for gross national product (GNP) as an estimate of the level of affluence. In general, there was a positive association between per capita antibiotics sales and the prevalence of symptoms for asthma, rhinitis, and eczema, but the associations generally became negative once the analyses had been adjusted for GNP. In particular, there were non-significant negative associations between total antibiotics sales and the prevalence of wheeze ever, wheeze in the last 12 months, nose problems with itchy-watery eyes, itchy rash in the last 12 months, and eczema ever. On the other hand there were weak non-significant positive associations for asthma ever, nose problems ever, nose problems in the last 12 months, and itchy rash ever. There was a statistically significant positive association with wheeze at rest as measured by the asthma video questionnaire; however, even this association was weak and would not account for more than a 1% difference in asthma prevalence between countries. These findings are generally not consistent with the hypothesis that antibiotic use increases the risk of asthma, rhinitis, or eczema. If there is a causal association of antibiotic use with asthma risk, it does not appear to explain the international differences in

  1. Updated prevalences of asthma, allergy, and airway symptoms, and a systematic review of trends over time for childhood asthma in Shanghai, China.

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    Chen Huang

    Full Text Available The prevalence of asthma among Shanghai children has increased over time. This increase might be associated with changes in environmental exposures. Investigation of the time-trend of asthma and current prevalences is essential to understanding the causes.To estimate the current prevalences of asthma, allergies and other respiratory symptoms among Shanghai preschool children, and to investigate the time-trend of childhood asthma prevalence of from 1990 to 2011.From April 2011 to April 2012, the CCHH (China, Children, Homes, Health cross-sectional study was conducted in Shanghai. Questionnaires were distributed to 17,898 parents or guardians of preschool children from 72 kindergartens in 5 districts. Previous similar studies were also summarized by a systematic literature review.From a total of 14,884 questionnaires for 3-7 year old children, prevalences of the following diseases and symptoms were calculated: asthma 10.2%, wheeze (ever 28.1%, pneumonia (ever 33.5%, otitis media 11.0%, rhinitis (ever 54.1%, hay fever 12.2%, eczema (ever 22.7%, and food allergy 15.7%. Urban children had higher prevalences of most symptoms than suburban children. The prevalence of asthma has increased significantly, almost five-fold, from 2.1% in 1990 to 10.2% in the present study. The prevalence of asthma in boys was higher than in girls in the present study and in all reviewed studies.Asthma, allergy and airway symptoms are common among preschool children in Shanghai. The prevalence of childhood asthma in Shanghai has increased rapidly from 1990 to 2011.

  2. Reliable assessment of the incidence of childhood autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladjidi, Nathalie; Jutand, Marthe-Aline; Beaubois, Cyrielle; Fernandes, Helder; Jeanpetit, Julien; Coureau, Gaelle; Gilleron, Véronique; Kostrzewa, Aude; Lauroua, Pierre; Jeanne, Michel; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; Leblanc, Thierry; Leverger, Guy; Perel, Yves

    2017-12-01

    Childhood autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare and severe disease characterized by hemolysis and positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). Few epidemiologic indicators are available for the pediatric population. The objective of our study was to reliably estimate the number of AIHA cases in the French Aquitaine region and the incidence of AIHA in patients under 18 years old. In this retrospective study, the capture-recapture method and log-linear model were used for the period 2000-2008 in the Aquitaine region from the following three data sources for the diagnosis of AIHA: the OBS'CEREVANCE database cohort, positive DAT collected from the regional blood bank database, and the French medico-economic information system. A list of 281 different patients was obtained after cross-matching the three databases; 44 AIHA cases were identified in the period 2000-2008; and the total number of cases was estimated to be 48 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 45-55). The calculated incidence of the disease was 0.81/100,000 children under 18 years old per year (95% CI 0.76-0.92). Accurate methods are required for estimating the incidence of AIHA in children. Capture-recapture analysis corrects underreporting and provides optimal completeness. This study highlights a possible under diagnosis of this potentially severe disease in various pediatric settings. AIHA incidence may now be compared with the incidences of other hematological diseases and used for clinical or research purposes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Does migration affect asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema prevalence? Global findings from the international study of asthma and allergies in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Marcos, Luis; Robertson, Colin F; Ross Anderson, H; Ellwood, Philippa; Williams, Hywel C; Wong, Gary Wk

    2014-12-01

    Immigrants to Westernized countries adopt the prevalence of allergic diseases of native populations, yet no data are available on immigrants to low-income or low-disease prevalence countries. We investigated these questions using data from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Standardized questionnaires were completed by 13-14-year-old adolescents and by the parent/guardians of 6-7-year-old children. Questions on the symptom prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema, and a wide range of factors postulated to be associated with these conditions, including birth in or not in the country and age at immigration, were asked. Odds ratios for risk of the three diseases according to immigration status were calculated using generalized linear mixed models. These were adjusted for: world region; language and gross national income; and individual risk factors including gender, maternal education, antibiotic and paracetamol use, maternal smoking, and diet. Effect modification by gross national income and by prevalence was examined. There were 326 691 adolescents from 48 countries and 208 523 children from 31 countries. Immigration was associated with a lower prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema in both age groups than among those born in the country studied, and this association was mainly confined to high-prevalence/affluent countries. This reduced risk was greater in those who had lived fewer years in the host country. Recent migration to high prevalence/affluent countries is associated with a lower prevalence of allergic diseases. The protective pre-migration environment quickly decreases with increasing time in the host country. © The Author 2014; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  4. Multimorbidities of asthma, allergies, and airway illnesses in childhood: Chance or not chance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Huang, Chen; Wang, Xueying; Cai, Jiao; Hu, Yu; Zou, Zhijun; Weschler, Louise B; Shen, Li; Sundell, Jan

    2017-09-01

    We investigated patterns of multimorbidities among asthma, allergies, and respiratory illnesses in preschool children. We investigated multimorbidities of lifetime asthma, allergic rhinitis, eczema, food allergy, pneumonia, and ear infections; and multimorbidities of current (in the last year before the survey) wheeze, dry cough, rhinitis, eczema, and common cold during childhood. We further analyzed whether prevalences of these multimorbidities were due to chance. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 72 kindergartens of Shanghai, China. Parents of preschool children were surveyed with a modified ISAAC questionnaire. Observed prevalences (OPs), expected prevalences (EPs), absolute excess comorbidities (AECs), and relative excess comorbidities (RECs) of various combinations of illnesses were calculated to indicate whether the combined illnesses were related. We analyzed questionnaires for children aged 4-6 years, whose 13,335 questionnaires were the majority of the total 15,266 returned questionnaires (response rate: 85.3%). The studied illnesses were common. For children who had more than three lifetime or current illnesses, OPs tended to be higher than EPs. Most OPs and EPs were higher in boys than in girls, and were higher in children with a family history of atopy (FHA) than in children without FHA. AECs and RECs between boys and girls as well as between children with and without FHA were substantially different. Our findings suggest that multimorbidities among childhood asthma, allergies, and respiratory illnesses are likely not random, but rather share etiology. Specific patterns of childhood asthma multimorbidities perhaps differ between boys and girls and between children with and without FHA.

  5. Household mold and dust allergens: Exposure, sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gent, Janneane F., E-mail: janneane.gent@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Kezik, Julie M., E-mail: julie.colburn@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Hill, Melissa E., E-mail: melissa.hill@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Tsai, Eling, E-mail: tsai.umiami@gmail.com [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Li, De-Wei, E-mail: DeWei.Li@ct.gov [Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Valley Laboratory, 153 Cook Hill Road, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States); Leaderer, Brian P., E-mail: brian.leaderer@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Background: Few studies address concurrent exposures to common household allergens, specific allergen sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity. Objective: To identify levels of allergen exposures that trigger asthma exacerbations in sensitized individuals. Methods: We sampled homes for common indoor allergens (fungi, dust mites (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1) and cockroach (Bla g 1)) for levels associated with respiratory responses among school-aged children with asthma (N=1233) in a month-long study. Blood samples for allergy testing and samples of airborne fungi and settled dust were collected at enrollment. Symptoms and medication use were recorded on calendars. Combined effects of specific allergen sensitization and level of exposure on wheeze, persistent cough, rescue medication use and a 5-level asthma severity score were examined using ordered logistic regression. Results: Children sensitized and exposed to any Penicillium experienced increased risk of wheeze (odds ratio [OR] 2.12 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12, 4.04), persistent cough (OR 2.01 95% CI 1.05, 3.85) and higher asthma severity score (OR 1.99 95% CI 1.06, 3.72) compared to those not sensitized or sensitized but unexposed. Children sensitized and exposed to pet allergen were at significantly increased risk of wheeze (by 39% and 53% for Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g and Can f 1>1.2 {mu}g/g, respectively). Increased rescue medication use was significantly associated with sensitization and exposure to Der p 1>0.10 {mu}g/g (by 47%) and Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g (by 32%). Conclusion: Asthmatic children sensitized and exposed to low levels of common household allergens Penicillium, Der p 1, Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are at significant risk for increased morbidity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Few studies address concurrent allergen exposures, sensitization and asthma morbidity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Children with asthma were tested for sensitivity to common indoor allergens

  6. Household mold and dust allergens: Exposure, sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gent, Janneane F.; Kezik, Julie M.; Hill, Melissa E.; Tsai, Eling; Li, De-Wei; Leaderer, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Few studies address concurrent exposures to common household allergens, specific allergen sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity. Objective: To identify levels of allergen exposures that trigger asthma exacerbations in sensitized individuals. Methods: We sampled homes for common indoor allergens (fungi, dust mites (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1) and cockroach (Bla g 1)) for levels associated with respiratory responses among school-aged children with asthma (N=1233) in a month-long study. Blood samples for allergy testing and samples of airborne fungi and settled dust were collected at enrollment. Symptoms and medication use were recorded on calendars. Combined effects of specific allergen sensitization and level of exposure on wheeze, persistent cough, rescue medication use and a 5-level asthma severity score were examined using ordered logistic regression. Results: Children sensitized and exposed to any Penicillium experienced increased risk of wheeze (odds ratio [OR] 2.12 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12, 4.04), persistent cough (OR 2.01 95% CI 1.05, 3.85) and higher asthma severity score (OR 1.99 95% CI 1.06, 3.72) compared to those not sensitized or sensitized but unexposed. Children sensitized and exposed to pet allergen were at significantly increased risk of wheeze (by 39% and 53% for Fel d 1>0.12 μg/g and Can f 1>1.2 μg/g, respectively). Increased rescue medication use was significantly associated with sensitization and exposure to Der p 1>0.10 μg/g (by 47%) and Fel d 1>0.12 μg/g (by 32%). Conclusion: Asthmatic children sensitized and exposed to low levels of common household allergens Penicillium, Der p 1, Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are at significant risk for increased morbidity. - Highlights: ► Few studies address concurrent allergen exposures, sensitization and asthma morbidity. ► Children with asthma were tested for sensitivity to common indoor allergens. ► Homes were sampled for these allergens and asthma

  7. Childhood Asthma Utilization Rates in a Nonsmoking Population of Utah Compared to State and National Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gren, Lisa H.; Taylor, Brooke; Lyon, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Risk factors, such as parental smoking, are commonly associated with increased asthma symptoms and hospitalizations of children. Deseret Mutual Benefits Administrators (DMBA) is the health insurer for employees of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and their families. Due to religious proscription, employees abstain from alcohol and tobacco use, creating a cohort of children not exposed to parental smoking. Calculation of hospitalization rates for DMBA, Utah, and the US were made in children to compare rates between a nonsmoking population and general populations. Compared to DMBA, rate ratios for asthma hospitalization and emergency department asthma visits were higher for the US and Utah. The incidence of hospital outpatient department and physician office visits was significantly greater for the US population compared to the DMBA. This study demonstrates a decreased need for health services used by children not exposed to second-hand smoke. PMID:22389787

  8. Gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions of childhood asthma: a multifactor dimension reduction approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The importance of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions on asthma is well documented in literature, but a systematic analysis on the interaction between various genetic and environmental factors is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a population-based, case-control study comprised of seventh-grade children from 14 Taiwanese communities. A total of 235 asthmatic cases and 1,310 non-asthmatic controls were selected for DNA collection and genotyping. We examined the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions between 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidative, inflammatory and obesity-related genes, and childhood asthma. Environmental exposures and disease status were obtained from parental questionnaires. The model-free and non-parametrical multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR method was used for the analysis. A three-way gene-gene interaction was elucidated between the gene coding glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP1, the gene coding interleukin-4 receptor alpha chain (IL4Ra and the gene coding insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2 on the risk of lifetime asthma. The testing-balanced accuracy on asthma was 57.83% with a cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10. The interaction of preterm birth and indoor dampness had the highest training-balanced accuracy at 59.09%. Indoor dampness also interacted with many genes, including IL13, beta-2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6. We also used likelihood ratio tests for interaction and chi-square tests to validate our results and all tests showed statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study suggest that GSTP1, INSIG2 and IL4Ra may influence the lifetime asthma susceptibility through gene-gene interactions in schoolchildren. Home dampness combined with each one of the genes STAT6, IL13 and ADRB2 could raise the asthma risk.

  9. Indoor air pollution and childhood asthma: variations between urban and rural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulin, M; Caillaud, D; Annesi-Maesano, I

    2010-12-01

    Health effects of indoor pollution have been investigated overall in urban areas. To compare the potential effect of home air pollutants on asthma in urban and rural houses, two case-control populations, composed of children living in the city (32 asthmatics and 31 controls) and in the countryside (24 asthmatics and 27 controls) were included. During 1 week, nitrogen dioxide, fine particles, and volatile organic compounds (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) were assessed at home. Urban dwellings were found to be more polluted than rural ones, with concentrations up to two times higher. In the whole population, exposure to acetaldehyde and toluene was significantly associated with a higher risk of asthma. In the urban population, the association with toluene was significant in children studied during winter, and with toluene, xylenes, and ethylbenzene when cases were restricted to current asthmatics. In rural settings, a relationship between asthma and formaldehyde exposure was observed (OR = 10.7; 95% CI 1.69-67.61). Our findings suggest that daily continuous exposures to pollutants may be implicated in asthma, even in the case of low exposure, as those found in rural areas. Our results could also indicate a specific effect of indoor pollution in the rural environment. Everyday exposure to indoor pollution was associated with a higher risk of childhood asthma. These findings suggest that even at low concentrations, pollutants could be implicated in asthma and reinforce the importance of establishing guideline values to improve indoor air quality by limiting sources or by optimizing ventilation. Specific effects could occur in rural environments where pollution differs from urban area. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. The incidence of the nephrotic syndrome in childhood in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Ingo; Aydin, Malik; Llamas Lopez, Corinna Elke; Kurylowicz, Lisa; Ganschow, Rainer; Lentze, Michael; Born, Mark

    2018-02-01

    The incidence of childhood nephrotic syndrome (NS) in Germany is not well known. An ESPED-based nationwide collection of epidemiological data of children in 2005 and 2006. The mean age of NS at onset was 5.5 ± 3.7 years. The gender ratio of boys to girls was 1.8:1. The average length of stay was 15.5 ± 11.2 days, with younger children remaining significantly longer in hospital. Steroid-resistance was more common in children ≥8 years (p = 0.023). Focal-segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) was more common in children >10 years (p = 0.029). The ratio of males to females with FSGS was 1:1.9, thus the FSGS risk for girls at onset was 3.3-times greater. Considering the available data, the incidence of NS in Germany is 1.2/100,000 in the population childhood NS.

  11. The bell tolls for the relationship between house dust mite exposure and asthma in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Almqvist

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Prior evidence has suggested a direct relationship between the level of house dust mite (HDM allergen exposure, sensitisation and asthma. A recent cross-sectional study indicated a bell-shaped relationship between HDM exposure and sensitisation [1]. We examined the effects of cumulative HDM allergen exposure during the first 5 years of life on outcomes at age 5 years in Sydney, a high HDM environment. In the Childhood Asthma Prevention Study, bed dust samples collected at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months and then 6-monthly (total 6615 samples until age 5 years were analysed for HDM allergen by ELISA. At five years, 516 children were assessed for wheeze and asthma by questionnaires and spirometry, and 488 for sensitisation by skin test. Time-weighted average HDM allergen concentration was estimated for each individual. The range was divided into quintiles with cut-points being 3,5; 7,8; 13,5 and 23,4 ug Der p 1/g. The association between HDM levels and outcomes was analysed with chi-square test, adjusting for confounders. The figure shows the prevalence of outcomes by quintile of time-weighted average of HDM allergen. In this birth cohort, there is a bell-shaped dose response between HDM levels and sensitisation and asthma. This may reflect tolerance to HDM allergen or be attributable to protection from associated exposures, and prompts further research on the mechanisms.

  12. Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Harold

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma is the most common respiratory disorder in Canada. Despite significant improvement in the diagnosis and management of this disorder, the majority of Canadians with asthma remain poorly controlled. In most patients, however, control can be achieved through the use of avoidance measures and appropriate pharmacological interventions. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs represent the standard of care for the majority of patients. Combination ICS/long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA inhalers are preferred for most adults who fail to achieve control with ICS therapy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy represents a potentially disease-modifying therapy for many patients with asthma, but should only be prescribed by physicians with appropriate training in allergy. Regular monitoring of asthma control, adherence to therapy and inhaler technique are also essential components of asthma management. This article provides a review of current literature and guidelines for the appropriate diagnosis and management of asthma.

  13. Validation of a web-based version of the asthma control test and childhood asthma control test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolen, B.B.; Pijnenburg, M.W.; Brackel, H.J.; Landstra, A.M.; Berg, N.J. van den; Merkus, P.J.F.M.; Hop, W.C.J.; Vaessen-Verberne, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    RATIONALE: Recent guidelines focus on adjusting asthma treatment to the level of asthma control. The availability of a web-based asthma control questionnaire offers the possibility to assess asthma control without the need of outpatient clinic visits. The aim of this study was to evaluate the

  14. Childhood asthma, air quality, and social suffering among Mexican Americans in California's San Joaquin Valley: "Nobody talks to us here".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Norah Anita; Pepper, David

    2009-10-01

    Nearly one in five Mexican American children residing in California's San Joaquin Valley (the Valley) in 2007 had an asthma attack at some point in their life. Numerous epidemiological studies have suggested that compared with other ethnic groups and Latino subgroups residing in the United States, Mexican origin children have the lowest rates of pediatric asthma. Ethnographic research conducted in central California, however, suggests otherwise. Known for its agricultural produce, extreme poverty, and poor air quality, the Valley is a magnet for the Mexican immigrant farm worker population. We conducted an exploratory ethnographic study to examine health disparities, social suffering, and childhood asthma in the Valley. Many Valley residents believe that their children's health concerns are being ignored. Open-ended interviews uncovered a largely rural community suffering not only from the effects of childhood asthma but the inability to have their experiences taken seriously.

  15. Meta-analysis of the association between secondhand smoke exposure and physician-diagnosed childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinuoye, Olaitan; Pell, Jill P; Mackay, Daniel F

    2013-09-01

    Studies suggest an association between secondhand smoke exposure and the development of childhood asthma. Several countries are considering legislation to protect children from exposure. A systematic review was conducted using MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, and Web of Knowledge databases and a random effects meta-analysis was undertaken. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I (2) test. Publication and small study biases were examined visually using a funnel plot and tested formally using Egger test. Univariate and multivariate meta-regression analyses were undertaken, including a subgroup analysis of cohort studies to examine the effect of duration of follow-up. Twenty relevant studies were identified (14 cross-sectional, 4 cohort, and 2 case-control) and provided 31 estimates of effect size. The pooled odds ratio was 1.32 (95% CI: 1.23, 1.42, p effect size estimates were significantly higher for case-control studies (p = .042) and those using self-reported exposure to secondhand smoke (p = .050). There was no evidence of significant publication or small study bias (Egger test, p = .121). There is now consistent evidence of a modest association between secondhand smoke and physician-diagnosed childhood asthma. These results lend support to continued efforts to reduce childhood exposure to secondhand smoke.

  16. The Immunomodulatory Effect of Acupoint Application for Childhood Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Cun Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the evidence on the immunomodulatory effect of acupoint application for childhood asthma. Methods. Five electronic databases through October 2014 were searched. The risk of bias in eligible studies was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration tool. Standardised mean difference (SMD and 95% confidence intervals (CI of random-effects model were calculated. And heterogeneity was assessed using the Cochran Q statistic and quantified with the I2 index. Results. Six studies were included in our review. The aggregated results suggested that acupoint application showed the beneficial effect for childhood asthma in improving IgA (SMD, −0.83; 95% CI −1.14 to −0.52; P<0.00001, IgE (SMD, −0.52; 95% CI −0.76 to −0.29; P<0.001, IgG (SMD, −1.17; 95% CI −1.61 to −0.74; P<0.0001, IL-4 (SMD, −0.57; 95% CI −0.91 to −0.23; P=0.0009, and IFN-γ (SMD, −0.38; 95% CI −0.71 to −0.04; P=0.03 but not IgM (SMD, −0.40; 95% CI −0.98 to 0.18; P=0.18. And the effective dose of acupoint application may be 2–6 hours/time and a total of 3 times within 4 weeks. Conclusions. This review showed the positive evidence that acupoint application had the favorable immunomodulatory effect for childhood asthma. However, more studies with long follow-up are warrant to confirm the current findings.

  17. Prenatal fine particulate exposure and early childhood asthma: Effect of maternal stress and fetal sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alison; Leon Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien; Mathilda Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu; Bose, Sonali; Rosa, Maria José; Kloog, Itai; Wilson, Ander; Schwartz, Joel; Cohen, Sheldon; Coull, Brent A; Wright, Robert O; Wright, Rosalind J

    2017-08-08

    The impact of prenatal ambient air pollution on child asthma may be modified by maternal stress, child sex, and exposure dose and timing. We prospectively examined associations between coexposure to prenatal particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 microns (PM 2.5 ) and maternal stress and childhood asthma (n = 736). Daily PM 2.5 exposure during pregnancy was estimated using a validated satellite-based spatiotemporally resolved prediction model. Prenatal maternal negative life events (NLEs) were dichotomized around the median (high: NLE ≥ 3; low: NLE effect modification by maternal stress and child sex. Bayesian distributed lag interaction models identified a critical window of exposure (19-23 weeks' gestation, cumulative odds ratio, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.03-1.26; per interquartile range [1.7 μg/m 3 ] increase in prenatal PM 2.5 level) during which children concomitantly exposed to prenatal PM 2.5 and maternal stress had increased risk of asthma. No significant association was seen in children born to women reporting low prenatal stress. When examining modifying effects of prenatal stress and fetal sex, we found that boys born to mothers with higher prenatal stress were most vulnerable (19-21 weeks' gestation; cumulative odds ratio, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.15-1.41; per interquartile range increase in PM 2.5 ). Prenatal PM 2.5 exposure during sensitive windows is associated with increased risk of child asthma, especially in boys concurrently exposed to elevated maternal stress. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) Phase Three: a global synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallol, J; Crane, J; von Mutius, E; Odhiambo, J; Keil, U; Stewart, A

    2013-01-01

    This ISAAC Phase Three synthesis provides summarised information on the main findings of the study, regional tables and figures related to the prevalence and severity of current symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema in the main regions of the world. The large number of surveyed children (≈1,200,000), the large number of centres (233) and countries (98) that participated in ISAAC Phase Three makes this study the most comprehensive survey of these diseases ever undertaken. Globally, the prevalence for current asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema in the 13-14-year age group was 14.1%, 14.6% and 7.3%, respectively. In the 6-7-year age group the prevalence for current asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema was 11.7%, 8.5% and 7.9%, respectively. The study shows a wide variability in the prevalence and severity of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema which occurs not just between regions and countries but between centres in the same country and centres in the same city. This study definitively establishes that the prevalence of those diseases can be very high in non-affluent centres with low socioeconomic conditions. The large variability also suggests a crucial role of local environment characteristics to determine the differences in prevalence between one place and another. Thus, ISAAC Phase Three has provided a large body of epidemiological information on asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema in childhood from contrasting environments which is expected to yield new clues about the aetiology of those conditions and reasons for their marked global variability. Copyright © 2012 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term studies of the natural history of asthma in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    secondary prevention through the use of inhaled corticosteroids can effectively halt the long-term disease progression in childhood. In conclusion, the natural history of asthma and the associated airway changes is still poorly understood, and we have not managed to translate findings from long-term studies...... into a deeper understanding of the underlying endophenotypes or improved disease management. We propose the need for a translational research approach based on long-term clinical studies of birth cohorts with comprehensive and objective assessments of intermediate phenotypes and environmental exposures combined...

  20. Prenatal Nitrate Exposure and Childhood Asthma. Influence of Maternal Prenatal Stress and Fetal Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sonali; Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu Mathilda; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien Leon; Di, Qian; Rosa, Maria José; Lee, Alison; Kloog, Itai; Wilson, Ander; Schwartz, Joel; Wright, Robert O; Cohen, Sheldon; Coull, Brent A; Wright, Rosalind J

    2017-12-01

    Impact of ambient pollution upon children's asthma may differ by sex, and exposure dose and timing. Psychosocial stress can also modify pollutant effects. These associations have not been examined for in utero ambient nitrate exposure. We implemented Bayesian-distributed lag interaction models to identify sensitive prenatal windows for the influence of nitrate (NO 3 - ) on child asthma, accounting for effect modification by sex and stress. Analyses included 752 mother-child dyads. Daily ambient NO 3 - exposure during pregnancy was derived using a hybrid chemical transport (Geos-Chem)/land-use regression model and natural log transformed. Prenatal maternal stress was indexed by a negative life events score (high [>2] vs. low [≤2]). The outcome was clinician-diagnosed asthma by age 6 years. Most mothers were Hispanic (54%) or black (29%), had a high school education or less (66%), never smoked (80%), and reported low prenatal stress (58%); 15% of children developed asthma. BDILMs adjusted for maternal age, race, education, prepregnancy obesity, atopy, and smoking status identified two sensitive windows (7-19 and 33-40 wk gestation), during which increased NO 3 - was associated with greater odds of asthma, specifically among boys born to mothers reporting high prenatal stress. Cumulative effects of NO 3 - across pregnancy were also significant in this subgroup (odds ratio = 2.64, 95% confidence interval = 1.27-5.39; per interquartile range increase in ln NO 3 - ). Prenatal NO 3 - exposure during distinct sensitive windows was associated with incident asthma in boys concurrently exposed to high prenatal stress.

  1. [Validation of a Spanish version of the Childhood Asthma Control Test (Sc-ACT) for use in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Yarza, E G; Castro-Rodriguez, J A; Villa Asensi, J R; Garde Garde, J; Hidalgo Bermejo, F J

    2015-08-01

    The Childhood Asthma Control Test (c-ACT) is a validated tool for determining pediatric asthma control. However, it is not validated in the Spanish language in Spain. We evaluated the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Childhood Asthma Control Test (Sc-ACT) for assessing asthma control in children ages 4 to11. This national, multicentre, prospective study was conducted in Spain with asthmatic children and their caregivers. Patients were assessed at 3 visits (Baseline, 2 Weeks, and 4 Months). Clinical variables included: symptoms, exacerbations, FEV1, asthma classification, PAQLQ and PACQLQ questionnaire scores, and asthma control as perceived by physicians, patients and caregivers. The Sc-ACT feasibility, validity, reliability, and sensitivity to change were assessed. A total of 394 children were included; mean (SD) time to complete the Sc-ACT was 5.3 (4.4) minutes. Sc-ACT score was correlated with asthma control as perceived by physician (-0.52), patient (-0.53), and caregiver (-0.51) and with the PAQLQ (0.56) and PACQLQ (0.55) scores. Sc-ACT was found to be significantly related to intensity and frequency of asthma symptoms. Cronbach alpha coefficient α was 0.81 and intraclass correlation coefficient was ≥0.85 for all of the items. The global effect size of Sc-ACT was 0.55. The cutoff point scores of 21 or higher indicated a good asthma control and their MCID was 4 points. The Spanish version of the c-ACT was found to be a reliable and valid questionnaire for evaluating asthma control in Spanish-speaking children ages 4 to 11 in Spain. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. What has the ECRHS told us about the childhood risks of asthma, allergy and lung function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanes, C

    2008-10-01

    Few studies investigate how environmental factors in childhood may influence adult respiratory health. The European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) is a longitudinal multi-centre study of Western world adults, including retrospective assessment of early life factors. Analyses of the ECRHS showed both beneficial and harmful long-term effects of childhood factors on adult asthma, allergy and lung function. Childhood pets were associated with less adult atopy and hay fever; beneficial effects were also indicated for growing up on a farm and for early exposure to other children. The findings have contributed to further development of the hygiene hypothesis and further understanding of the mechanisms relating microbial stimulation to allergy; however, the public health consequences may be limited. Harmful effects of early life factors on adult asthma and lung function were indicated for severe respiratory infections early in life, parental smoking and long-term dog keeping. Intervention with regard to parental smoking and vaccination against common lower airways infections may improve respiratory health in the population. Thus, early life environment had permanent beneficial and adverse effects on adult respiratory health. The multi-centre structure of the ECRHS, the large sample size, the extensive information about each participant and follow-up until the age of 56 years, have given the basis for convincing conclusions, and made possible publication of unsuspected findings in spite of the problems related to adult recall of childhood events. The ECRHS have contributed substantially to increased knowledge about the early life origins of allergy and obstructive pulmonary disease, providing a basis for prevention.

  3. Twenty years of childhood coeliac disease in The Netherlands: A rapidly increasing incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, E.K.; Mearin, M.L.; Franken, H.C.M.; Houwen, R.H.J.; Hirasing, R.A.; Vandenbroucke, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Background - The incidence of coeliac disease varies internationally. Aims - To assess the incidence of childhood coeliac disease in The Netherlands and to study the clinical features and the presence of associated disorders. Subjects - Identified cases of childhood coeliac disease in The

  4. Acute childhood asthma in Galway city from 1985-2005: relationship to air pollution and climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, A; Loftus, B G; Muircheartaigh, I O; Newell, J; Scarrott, C; Jennings, S

    2014-01-01

    We examine the relationship of air pollution and climatic variables to asthma admission rates of children in Galway city over a 21 year period. Paediatric asthma admissions were recorded from 1985-2005, and admission rates per thousand calculated for pre-school (1-4 years), school aged (5-14 years) and all children (1-14 years) on a monthly and annual basis. These data were compared to average monthly and annual climatic variables (rainfall, humidity, sunshine, wind speed and temperature) and black smoke levels for the city. Simple correlation and Poisson Generalized Additive Models (GAM) were used. Admission rates each month are significantly correlated with smoke levels (p = 0.007). Poisson GAM also shows a relationship between admissions and pollution (p = 0.07). Annual smoke levels impact more on admission rates of preschoolers (p = 0.04) than school age children (p = 0.10). These data suggest that air pollution is an important factor in the epidemiology of acute childhood asthma.

  5. Evaluation of factors that allow the clinician to taper inhaled corticosteroids in childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Matsuda

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled corticosteroids are potent and effective treatment agents for controlling symptoms of childhood asthma. However, there are no predictive factors that help to determine which patients with asthma are likely to be tapered off inhaled corticosteroids successfully. We examined whether any factor or combination of factors could help the clinician safely discontinue inhaled steroid therapy. Thirty-six asthmatic children whose symptoms were stable on low-dose beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP were divided by parental choice into two groups: maintenance BDP (n = 11 and no BDP (n = 25. Methacholine inhalation tests were performed at the beginning of the study and after 1 month. Twelve children (48% who had BDP discontinued developed exacerbations after 2–3 months, whereas there were no problems in the maintenance group. The no BDP group was retrospectively divided into two subgroups: exacerbation (+ and (−. The threshold to methacholine in the exacerbation (+ subgroup decreased significantly in advance of clinical symptoms. The two subgroups were analyzed statistically by two-group discriminant function analysis. The change in threshold to methacholine, the dose and potency of drugs, duration of asthma and gender (female correlated with exacerbation. These results suggest that discontinuation of inhaled steroids should be done carefully, even in stable asthmatic children. The methacholine inhalation test, gender, drugs and history may be used as references for discontinuing inhaled steroids.

  6. Acid-Suppressive Drug Use During Pregnancy and the Risk of Childhood Asthma: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tianwen; Wu, Mindan; Liu, Juan; Luo, Man; He, Lulu; Wang, Xiaohui; Wu, Bin; Ying, Songmin; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Wen; Shen, Huahao

    2018-02-01

    The association between acid-suppressive drug exposure during pregnancy and childhood asthma has not been well established. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis on this association to provide further justification for the current studies. We searched PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, EBSCO Information Services, Web of Science, and Google Scholar from inception until June 2017. Observational studies in which researchers assessed acid-suppressive drug use during pregnancy and the risk of childhood asthma were included. Of 556 screened articles, 8 population-based studies were included in the final analyses. When all the studies were pooled, acid-suppressive drug use in pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of asthma in childhood (relative risk [RR] = 1.45; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35-1.56; I 2 = 0%; P < .00001). The overall risk of asthma in childhood increased among proton pump inhibitor users (RR = 1.34; 95% CI 1.18-1.52; I 2 = 46%; P < .00001) and histamine-2 receptor antagonist users (RR = 1.57; 95% CI 1.46-1.69; I 2 = 0%; P < .00001). None of the researchers in the studies in this meta-analysis adjusted for the full panel of known confounders in these associations. The evidence suggests that prenatal, maternal, acid-suppressive drug use is associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma. This information may help clinicians and parents to use caution when deciding whether to take acid-suppressing drugs during pregnancy because of the risk of asthma in offspring. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Greater risk of incident asthma cases in adults with Allergic Rhinitis and Effect of Allergen Immunotherapy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piccillo Giovita

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma and rhinitis are often co-morbid conditions. As rhinitis often precedes asthma it is possible that effective treatment of allergic rhinitis may reduce asthma progression. The aim of our study is to investigate history of allergic rhinitis as a risk factor for asthma and the potential effect of allergen immunotherapy in attenuating the incidence of asthma. Hospital-referred non-asthmatic adults, aged 18–40 years between 1990 and 1991, were retrospectively followed up until January and April 2000. At the end of follow up, available subjects were clinically examined for asthma diagnosis and history of allergen specific immunotherapy, second-hand smoking and the presence of pets in the household. A total of 436 non-asthmatic adults (332 subjects with allergic rhinitis and 104 with no allergic rhinitis nor history of atopy were available for final analyses. The highest OR (odds ratio associated with a diagnosis of asthma at the end of follow-up was for the diagnosis of allergic rhinitis at baseline (OR, 7.8; 95%CI, 3.1–20.0 in the model containing the covariates of rhinitis diagnosis, sex, second-hand smoke exposure, presence of pets at home, family history of allergic disorders, sensitization to Parietaria judaica; grass pollen; house dust mites; Olea europea: orchard; perennial rye; and cat allergens. Female sex, sensitization to Parietaria judaica and the presence of pets in the home were also significantly predictive of new onset asthma in the same model. Treatment with allergen immunotherapy was significantly and inversely related to the development of new onset asthma (OR, 0.53; 95%CI, 0.32–0.86. In the present study we found that allergic rhinitis is an important independent risk factor for asthma. Moreover, treatment with allergen immunotherapy lowers the risk of the development of new asthma cases in adults with allergic rhinitis.

  8. Greater risk of incident asthma cases in adults with Allergic Rhinitis and Effect of Allergen Immunotherapy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polosa, Riccardo; Al-Delaimy, Wael K; Russo, Cristina; Piccillo, Giovita; Sarvà, Maria

    2005-01-01

    Asthma and rhinitis are often co-morbid conditions. As rhinitis often precedes asthma it is possible that effective treatment of allergic rhinitis may reduce asthma progression. The aim of our study is to investigate history of allergic rhinitis as a risk factor for asthma and the potential effect of allergen immunotherapy in attenuating the incidence of asthma. Hospital-referred non-asthmatic adults, aged 18–40 years between 1990 and 1991, were retrospectively followed up until January and April 2000. At the end of follow up, available subjects were clinically examined for asthma diagnosis and history of allergen specific immunotherapy, second-hand smoking and the presence of pets in the household. A total of 436 non-asthmatic adults (332 subjects with allergic rhinitis and 104 with no allergic rhinitis nor history of atopy) were available for final analyses. The highest OR (odds ratio) associated with a diagnosis of asthma at the end of follow-up was for the diagnosis of allergic rhinitis at baseline (OR, 7.8; 95%CI, 3.1–20.0 in the model containing the covariates of rhinitis diagnosis, sex, second-hand smoke exposure, presence of pets at home, family history of allergic disorders, sensitization to Parietaria judaica; grass pollen; house dust mites; Olea europea: orchard; perennial rye; and cat allergens). Female sex, sensitization to Parietaria judaica and the presence of pets in the home were also significantly predictive of new onset asthma in the same model. Treatment with allergen immunotherapy was significantly and inversely related to the development of new onset asthma (OR, 0.53; 95%CI, 0.32–0.86). In the present study we found that allergic rhinitis is an important independent risk factor for asthma. Moreover, treatment with allergen immunotherapy lowers the risk of the development of new asthma cases in adults with allergic rhinitis. PMID:16381607

  9. Epigenetic changes associated with disease progression in a mouse model of childhood allergic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Collison

    2013-07-01

    Development of asthma in childhood is linked to viral infections of the lower respiratory tract in early life, with subsequent chronic exposure to allergens. Progression to persistent asthma is associated with a Th2-biased immunological response and structural remodelling of the airways. The underlying mechanisms are unclear, but could involve epigenetic changes. To investigate this, we employed a recently developed mouse model in which self-limited neonatal infection with a pneumovirus, followed by sensitisation to ovalbumin via the respiratory tract and low-level chronic challenge with aerosolised antigen, leads to development of an asthmatic phenotype. We assessed expression of microRNA by cells in the proximal airways, comparing changes over the period of disease progression, and used target prediction databases to identify genes likely to be up- or downregulated as a consequence of altered regulation of microRNA. In parallel, we assessed DNA methylation in pulmonary CD4+ T cells. We found that a limited number of microRNAs exhibited marked up- or downregulation following early-life infection and sensitisation, for many of which the levels of expression were further changed following chronic challenge with the sensitizing antigen. Targets of these microRNAs included genes involved in immune or inflammatory responses (e.g. Gata3, Kitl and in tissue remodelling (e.g. Igf1, Tgfbr1, as well as genes for various transcription factors and signalling proteins. In pulmonary CD4+ T cells, there was significant demethylation at promoter sites for interleukin-4 and interferon-γ, the latter increasing following chronic challenge. We conclude that, in this model, progression to an asthmatic phenotype is linked to epigenetic regulation of genes associated with inflammation and structural remodelling, and with T-cell commitment to a Th2 immunological response. Epigenetic changes associated with this pattern of gene activation might play a role in the development of childhood

  10. Foetal Exposure to Maternal Passive Smoking Is Associated with Childhood Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis, and Eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We examined the hypothesis that foetal exposure to maternal passive smoking is associated with childhood asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema. Methods. The study was a population-based cross-sectional survey of Hong Kong Chinese children aged ≤14 years carried out in 2005 to 2006. Results. Foetal exposure to maternal passive smoking was significantly associated with wheeze ever (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.58–2.67, current wheeze (OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.48–2.86, allergic rhinitis ever (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.09–1.37, and eczema ever (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.38–1.87. Foetal exposure to maternal active smoking was significantly associated with asthma ever (OR 2.10; 95% CI 1.14–3.84, wheeze ever (OR 2.46; 95% CI 1.27–4.78, and current wheeze (OR 2.74; 95% CI 1.24–6.01 but not with allergic rhinitis ever (OR 1.01; 95% CI 0.70–1.46 or eczema ever (OR 1.38; 95% CI 0.87–2.18. The dose response relationship between wheeze ever and current wheeze with increasing exposure, from no exposure to maternal passive smoking and then to maternal active smoking, further supports causality. Conclusion. There is significant association between foetal exposure to maternal passive smoking and maternal active smoking with childhood asthma and related atopic illnesses. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential causal relationship.

  11. Outdoor particulate matter and childhood asthma admissions in Athens, Greece: a time-series study

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    Roma Eleftheria S

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particulate matter with diameter less than 10 micrometers (PM10 that originates from anthropogenic activities and natural sources may settle in the bronchi and cause adverse effects possibly via oxidative stress in susceptible individuals, such as asthmatic children. This study aimed to investigate the effect of outdoor PM10 concentrations on childhood asthma admissions (CAA in Athens, Greece. Methods Daily counts of CAA from the three Children's Hospitals within the greater Athens' area were obtained from the hospital records during a four-year period (2001-2004, n = 3602 children. Mean daily PM10 concentrations recorded by the air pollution-monitoring network of the greater Athens area were also collected. The relationship between CAA and PM10 concentrations was investigated using the Generalized Linear Models with Poisson distribution and logistic analysis. Results There was a statistically significant (95% CL relationship between CAA and mean daily PM10 concentrations on the day of exposure (+3.8% for 10 μg/m3 increase in PM10 concentrations, while a 1-day lag (+3.4% for 10 μg/m3 increase in PM10 concentrations and a 4-day lag (+4.3% for 10 μg/m3 increase in PM10 concentrations were observed for older asthmatic children (5-14 year-old. High mean daily PM10 concentration (the highest 10%; >65.69 μg/m3 doubled the risk of asthma exacerbations even in younger asthmatic children (0-4 year-old. Conclusions Our results provide evidence of the adverse effect of PM10 on the rates of paediatric asthma exacerbations and hospital admissions. A four-day lag effect between PM10 peak exposure and asthma admissions was also observed in the older age group.

  12. Early eczema and the risk of childhood asthma: a prospective, population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saunes Marit

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe eczema in young children is associated with an increased risk of developing asthma and rhino-conjunctivitis. In the general population, however, most cases of eczema are mild to moderate. In an unselected cohort, we studied the risk of current asthma and the co-existence of allergy-related diseases at 6 years of age among children with and without eczema at 2 years of age. Methods Questionnaires assessing various environmental exposures and health variables were administered at 2 years of age. An identical health questionnaire was completed at 6 years of age. The clinical investigation of a random subsample ascertained eczema diagnoses, and missing data were handled by multiple imputation analyses. Results The estimate for the association between eczema at 2 years and current asthma at 6 years was OR=1.80 (95% CI 1.10-2.96. Four of ten children with eczema at 6 years had the onset of eczema after the age of 2 years, but the co-existence of different allergy-related diseases at 6 years was higher among those with the onset of eczema before 2 years of age. Conclusions Although most cases of eczema in the general population were mild to moderate, early eczema was associated with an increased risk of developing childhood asthma. These findings support the hypothesis of an atopic march in the general population. Trial registration The Prevention of Allergy among Children in Trondheim study has been identified as ISRCTN28090297 in the international Current Controlled Trials database

  13. Relevance of Cat and Dog Sensitization by Skin Prick Testing in Childhood Eczema and Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Kam Lun; Tsang, Kathy Yin Ching; Pong, Nga Hin Henry; Leung, Ting Fan

    2017-01-01

    Household animal dander has been implicated as aeroallergen in childhood atopic diseases. Many parents seek healthcare advice if household pet keeping may be detrimental in atopic eczema (AE), allergic rhinitis and asthma. We investigated if skin sensitization by cat/dog dander was associated with disease severity and quality of life in children with AE. Demographics, skin prick test (SPT) results, disease severity (Nottingham eczema severity score NESS), Children Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI), blood IgE and eosinophil counts of a cohort of AE patients were reviewed. 325 AE patients followed at a pediatric dermatology clinic were evaluated. Personal history of asthma was lowest (20%) in the dog-dander-positive-group but highest (61%) in bothcat- and-dog-dander-positive group (p=0.007). Binomial logistic regression ascertained that catdander sensitization was associated with increasing age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.056; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.006 to 1.109; p=0.029), dust-mite sensitization (aOR, 4.625; 95% CI, 1.444 to 14.815; p=0.010), food-allergen sensitization (aOR, 2.330; 95% CI, 1.259 to 4.310; p=0.007) and keeping-cat-ever (aOR, 7.325; 95% CI, 1.193 to 44.971; p=0.032); whereas dogdander sensitization was associated with dust-mite sensitization (aOR, 9.091; 95% CI, 1.148 to 71.980; p=0.037), food-allergen sensitization (aOR, 3.568; 95% CI, 1.341 to 9.492; p=0.011) and keeping-dog-ever (aOR, 6.809; 95% CI, 2.179 to 21.281; p=0.001). However, neither cat nor dog sensitization were associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis, parental or sibling atopic status, disease severity or quality of life. Physicians should advise parents that there is no direct correlation between AE severity, quality of life, asthma or allergic rhinitis with cutaneous sensitization to cats or dogs. Sensitized patients especially those with concomitant asthma and severe symptoms may consider non-furry alternatives if they plan to have a pet. Highly sensitized

  14. Contributions of incidence and persistence to the prevalence of childhood obesity during the emerging epidemic in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lise Geisler; Baker, Jennifer L; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2012-01-01

    Prevalence of obesity is the result of preceding incidence of newly developed obesity and persistence of obesity. We investigated whether increasing incidence and/or persistence during childhood drove the prevalence of childhood obesity during the emerging epidemic....

  15. An ADAM33 polymorphism associates with progression of preschool wheeze into childhood asthma: a prospective case-control study with replication in a birth cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester M M Klaassen

    Full Text Available The influence of asthma candidate genes on the development from wheeze to asthma in young children still needs to be defined.To link genetic variants in asthma candidate genes to progression of wheeze to persistent wheeze into childhood asthma.In a prospective study, children with recurrent wheeze from the ADEM (Asthma DEtection and Monitoring study were followed until the age of six. At that age a classification (transient wheeze or asthma was based on symptoms, lung function and medication use. In 198 children the relationship between this classification and 30 polymorphisms in 16 asthma candidate genes was assessed by logistic regression. In case of an association based on a p<0.10, replication analysis was performed in an independent birth cohort study (KOALA study, n = 248 included for the present analysis.In the ADEM study, the minor alleles of ADAM33 rs511898 and rs528557 and the ORMDL3/GSDMB rs7216389 polymorphisms were negatively associated, whereas the minor alleles of IL4 rs2243250 and rs2070874 polymorphisms were positively associated with childhood asthma. When replicated in the KOALA study, ADAM33 rs528557 showed a negative association of the CG/GG-genotype with progression of recurrent wheeze into childhood asthma (0.50 (0.26-0.97 p = 0.04 and no association with preschool wheeze.Polymorphisms in ADAM33, ORMDL3/GSDMB and IL4 were associated with childhood asthma in a group of children with recurrent wheeze. The replication of the negative association of the CG/GG-genotype of rs528557 ADAM33 with childhood asthma in an independent birth cohort study confirms that a compromised ADAM33 gene may be implicated in the progression of wheeze into childhood asthma.

  16. Maternal vaginal microflora during pregnancy and the risk of asthma hospitalization and use of antiasthma medication in early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Thorsen, Poul; Jensen, Jørgen Skov

    2002-01-01

    the establishment of the infant flora and, as a consequence, the development of wheezing and allergic diseases. OBJECTIVE: We sought to study the associations between the composition of the maternal vaginal microflora and the development of wheezing and asthma in childhood. METHODS: We performed a population...

  17. REMISSION OF CHILDHOOD ASTHMA AFTER LONG-TERM TREATMENT WITH AN INHALED CORTICOSTEROID (BUDESONIDE) - CAN IT BE ACHIEVED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANESSENZANDVLIET, EE; HUGHES, MD; WAALKENS, HJ; DUIVERMAN, EJ; KERREBIJN, KF

    This study was undertaken in order to determine whether long-term treatment with inhaled corticosteroid can induce a remission in childhood asthma, and to decide when stabilization of airway responsiveness occurred. We therefore carried out, an extended follow-up of 28-36 months in one of two groups

  18. Maternal hemoglobin and hematocrit levels during pregnancy and childhood lung function and asthma. The Generation R Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira de Jesus, S.M.C.B. (Sabrina M. C. B.); H.T. den Dekker (Herman); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); I.K.M. Reiss (Irwin); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); L. Duijts (Liesbeth)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To examine the associations of maternal hemoglobin and hematocrit levels during pregnancy with childhood lung function and asthma, and whether adverse pregnancy outcomes and atopic predisposition modify the associations. Methods: In a population-based prospective cohort study

  19. Exploration of asthma risk by occupation--extended analysis of an incidence study of the Finnish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Antti; Kurppa, Kari; Martikainen, Rami; Karjalainen, Jussi; Klaukka, Timo

    2002-02-01

    The objective of the study was to determine asthma risks at the most-detailed level of occupational classification in a previously described nationwide follow-up study that included the entire employed workforce of Finland. In Finland, persons with clinically verified persistent asthma are registered for medication reimbursement within the national health insurance scheme. Data were combined from three national registers, and all 25- to 59-year-old employed Finns were followed for asthma incidence in 1986-1998. Altogether 49,575 cases were detected. A log-linear model was used to estimate the relative risks of asthma for 275 nonadministrative occupations in comparison with administrative work (33 occupations). A significantly increased risk was found for either men or women in 125 occupations. For the men, the risk was highest among bakers, laundry workers, shoemakers and repairers, tanners, fell mongers and pelt dressers, and metal plating and coating workers. For the women, the risk was highest among shoemakers and repairers, railway and station personnel, jewelry engravers, engineroom crew, molders, round-timber workers. and bakers. The results suggest that the work-related excess of asthma incidence is much more widely spread across the labor force than has been previously thought. A great number of occupations deserves to be targeted for in-depth studies focusing on the determinants of asthma excess and on possibilities for better asthma control among asthmatics working in these occupations. The large work-relatedness of asthma incidence should also raise public health interest because of the economic losses incurred and the potential for prevention.

  20. Childhood Lung Function Predicts Adult Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Asthma-Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Overlap Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Dinh S; Burgess, John A; Lowe, Adrian J; Perret, Jennifer L; Lodge, Caroline J; Bui, Minh; Morrison, Stephen; Thompson, Bruce R; Thomas, Paul S; Giles, Graham G; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Jarvis, Debbie; Abramson, Michael J; Walters, E Haydn; Matheson, Melanie C; Dharmage, Shyamali C

    2017-07-01

    The burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasing, yet there are limited data on early life risk factors. To investigate the role of childhood lung function in adult COPD phenotypes. Prebronchodilator spirometry was performed for a cohort of 7-year-old Tasmanian children (n = 8,583) in 1968 who were resurveyed at 45 years, and a selected subsample (n = 1,389) underwent prebronchodilator and post-bronchodilator spirometry. For this analysis, COPD was spirometrically defined as a post-bronchodilator FEV 1 /FVC less than the lower limit of normal. Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) was defined as the coexistence of both COPD and current asthma. Associations between childhood lung function and asthma/COPD/ACOS were examined using multinomial regression. At 45 years, 959 participants had neither current asthma nor COPD (unaffected), 269 had current asthma alone, 59 had COPD alone, and 68 had ACOS. The reweighted prevalence of asthma alone was 13.5%, COPD alone 4.1%, and ACOS 2.9%. The lowest quartile of FEV 1 at 7 years was associated with ACOS (odds ratio, 2.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-6.52), but not COPD or asthma alone. The lowest quartile of FEV 1 /FVC ratio at 7 years was associated with ACOS (odds ratio, 16.3; 95% confidence interval, 4.7-55.9) and COPD (odds ratio, 5.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-17.4), but not asthma alone. Being in the lowest quartile for lung function at age 7 may have long-term consequences for the development of COPD and ACOS by middle age. Screening of lung function in school age children may identify a high-risk group that could be targeted for intervention. Further research is needed to understand possible modifiers of these associations and develop interventions for children with impaired lung function.

  1. Experiences of Racism and the Incidence of Adult-Onset Asthma in the Black Women’s Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeffrey; O’Connor, George T.; Brown, Timothy A.; Cozier, Yvette C.; Palmer, Julie R.; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic stress resulting from experiences of racism may increase the incidence of adult-onset asthma through effects on the immune system and the airways. We conducted prospective analyses of the relation of experiences of racism with asthma incidence in the Black Women’s Health Study, a prospective cohort of black women in the United States followed since 1995 with mailed biennial questionnaires. Methods: Among 38,142 participants followed from 1997 to 2011, 1,068 reported incident asthma. An everyday racism score was created based on five questions asked in 1997 and 2009 about the frequency in daily life of experiences of racism (eg, poor service in stores), and a lifetime racism score was based on questions about racism on the job, in housing, and by police. We used Cox regression models to derive multivariable incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% CIs for categories of each racism score in relation to incident asthma. Results: The IRRs were 1.45 (95% CI, 1.19-1.78) for the highest compared with the lowest quartile of the 1997 everyday racism score (P for trend racism. Among women who reported the same levels of racism in 1997 and 2009, the IRRs for the highest categories of everyday and lifetime racism were 2.12 (95% CI, 1.55-2.91) and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.20-2.30), respectively. Conclusions: Given the high prevalence of experiences of racism and asthma in black women in the United States, a positive association between racism and asthma is of public health importance. PMID:23887828

  2. Experiences of racism and the incidence of adult-onset asthma in the Black Women's Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coogan, Patricia F; Yu, Jeffrey; O'Connor, George T; Brown, Timothy A; Cozier, Yvette C; Palmer, Julie R; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2014-03-01

    Chronic stress resulting from experiences of racism may increase the incidence of adult-onset asthma through effects on the immune system and the airways. We conducted prospective analyses of the relation of experiences of racism with asthma incidence in the Black Women's Health Study, a prospective cohort of black women in the United States followed since 1995 with mailed biennial questionnaires. Among 38,142 participants followed from 1997 to 2011, 1,068 reported incident asthma. An everyday racism score was created based on five questions asked in 1997 and 2009 about the frequency in daily life of experiences of racism (eg, poor service in stores), and a lifetime racism score was based on questions about racism on the job, in housing, and by police. We used Cox regression models to derive multivariable incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% CIs for categories of each racism score in relation to incident asthma. The IRRs were 1.45 (95% CI, 1.19-1.78) for the highest compared with the lowest quartile of the 1997 everyday racism score (P for trendracism. Among women who reported the same levels of racism in 1997 and 2009, the IRRs for the highest categories of everyday and lifetime racism were 2.12 (95% CI, 1.55-2.91) and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.20-2.30), respectively. Given the high prevalence of experiences of racism and asthma in black women in the United States, a positive association between racism and asthma is of public health importance.

  3. Understanding clinicians' attitudes toward a mobile health strategy to childhood asthma management: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbach, Jessica P; Cushing, Anna; Melvin, Emilie; McGowan, Bryanna; Cloutier, Michelle M; Manice, Melissa

    2017-09-01

    Mobile technology for childhood asthma can provide real-time data to enhance care. What real-time adherence information clinicians want, how they may use it, and if the data meet their clinical needs have not been fully explored. Our goal was to determine whether pediatric primary care and pulmonary clinicians believe if a sensor-based mobile intervention is useful in caring for patients with asthma. We recruited participants from 3 urban, primary care and 1 pulmonary practice from July to September 2015 in Hartford, CT. Forty-one participated in four focus groups, which included a demonstration of the technology. Participants were probed with open-ended questions on the type, frequency, and format of inter-visit patient information they found useful. 41 participants (mean age 49 (±13.7) years) were board-certified clinicians (41% MDs and 20% mid-level practitioners), practiced medicine on an average of 19 (±14) years, were primarily white (59%) and women (78%). Clinicians wanted 1) adherence to prescribed inhaler therapy and 2) data on inhaler technique. Clinicians wanted it at the time of a scheduled clinic visit but also wanted inter-visit alerts for excessive use of rescue therapy. Pulmonologists liked the mobile spirometer's provision of inter-visit lung function data; pediatricians did not share this view. Concerns with data accuracy were raised due to families who shared inhalers, access to smartphones, and protection of health information. Overall, clinicians view an asthma mobile health technology as enhancing the patient-centered medical home. Pediatric primary care clinicians and pulmonologists want different information from a mobile app.

  4. Association of self-efficacy of parents/caregivers with childhood asthma control parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Araújo Gomes

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To verify the association between the self-efficacy of parents/caregivers and control parameters of childhood asthma. Method Cross-sectional study with parents/caregivers of asthmatic children. Data were collected through a sociodemographic questionnaire and the Self-efficacy and their child’s level of asthma control scale: Brazilian version. Results Participation of 216 parents/caregivers in the study. There was a statistically significant association between self-efficacy scores and the following variables: unscheduled physician visit (p=0.001, visit to emergency department (p<0.001, hospital stays in the previous 12 months (p=0.005, physical activity limitation (p=0.003, school days missed (p<0.001, impaired sleep (p<0.001, ability to differentiate crisis medication from control medication (p=0.024, use of spacer (p=0.001, performing oral hygiene after use of inhaled corticosteroids (p=0.003, and knowledge of medication gratuity (p=0.004. Conclusion A significant relationship of the self-efficacy of parents/caregivers of asthmatic children with control parameters and training on the necessary skills to reach this control was demonstrated in the study.

  5. Childhood asthma in Beijing, China: A population-based case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, T.Z.; Niu, S.R.; Lu, B.Y.; Fan, X.E.; Sun, F.Y.; Wang, J.P.; Zhang, Y.W.; Zhang, B.; Owens, P.; Hao, L.Y.; Li, Y.D.; Leaderer, B. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Epidemiology & Public Health

    2002-11-15

    A population-based case-control study was conducted in Shunyi County, People's Republic of China, in January 1999 and March 2001 to investigate the risk factors for childhood asthma. An increased risk of childhood asthma was associated with smoking by relatives in front of the mother while she was pregnant with the child (odds ratio (OR) = 1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.0, 1.6) and with smoking by relatives in front of the child (OR = 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.9). The risk increased with the increasing number of smokers and the total minutes of smoking by relatives in front of both the child and the mother while she was pregnant with the child. An increased risk was observed for use of coal for heating (OR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.9). Those who reported using coal for cooking without ventilation also had an increased risk (OR = 2.3, 95% CI: 1.5, 3.5). An increased risk was observed for those who reported having molds or fungi on the ceilings of their houses (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.9) or inside the child's room (OR 1.8, 95% CI: 1.0, 3.2). An increased risk was also found for those having both a dog and a cat as pets (OR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.3) or for finding both cockroaches and rats inside their houses (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.8).

  6. Breastfeeding and the development of asthma and atopy during childhood: a birth cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Semic-Jusufagic

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Within the context of a population based-birth cohort, we investigated the association between breastfeeding and development of asthma and atopy in childhood. Methods. Children (n=1072 were followed from birth and reviewed at age one, three, five and eight years. Based on the onset and resolution of symptoms, we assigned children into the wheeze phenotypes (never, transient, intermittent, lateonset and persistent. Atopy was determined by skin testing and specific IgE measurement. According to the duration of breastfeeding, participants were assigned as not breastfed, breastfed ≤ four months and breastfed > four months. Results. In a multinomial regression model adjusted for gender, we found that breastfeeding > four months was protective of transient early wheeze (aOR: 0.61, 95% CI 0.41-0.90, p=0.01, with no significant association between breastfeeding and other wheeze phenotypes. In a multivariate model, we found a significant protective effect of breastfeeding >four months on doctor-diagnosed asthma by age eight (aOR 0.59, 95% CI 0.39-0.88, p=0.01. However, we observed a strong trend which failed to reach statistical significance for breastfeeding >four months to increase the risk of atopy at age one year (aOR 2.41, 95% CI 0.94-6.14, p=0.07. There was no significant association between breastfeeding and atopy at any other time point. Conclusion. Breastfeeding may prevent viral-infection induced wheezing illnesses in early childhood (transient early wheezing.

  7. Do fast foods cause asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema? Global findings from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) phase three.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwood, Philippa; Asher, M Innes; García-Marcos, Luis; Williams, Hywel; Keil, Ulrich; Robertson, Colin; Nagel, Gabriele

    2013-04-01

    Certain foods may increase or decrease the risk of developing asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema. We explored the impact of the intake of types of food on these diseases in Phase Three of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Written questionnaires on the symptom prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema and types and frequency of food intake over the past 12 months were completed by 13-14-year-old adolescents and by the parents/guardians of 6-7-year-old children. Prevalence ORs were estimated using logistic regression, adjusting for confounders, and using a random (mixed) effects model. For adolescents and children, a potential protective effect on severe asthma was associated with consumption of fruit ≥3 times per week (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.97; OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.76 to 0.97, respectively). An increased risk of severe asthma in adolescents and children was associated with the consumption of fast food ≥3 times per week (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.49; OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.42, respectively), as well as an increased risk of severe rhinoconjunctivitis and severe eczema. Similar patterns for both ages were observed for regional analyses, and were consistent with gender and affluence categories and with current symptoms of all three conditions. If the association between fast foods and the symptom prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema is causal, then the findings have major public health significance owing to the rising consumption of fast foods globally.

  8. Incidence of childhood pneumonia: facility-based surveillance estimate compared to measured incidence in a South African birth cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, David M; Myer, Landon; Nicol, Mark P; Zar, Heather J

    2015-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is the leading cause of childhood mortality and a major contributor to childhood morbidity, but accurate measurement of pneumonia incidence is challenging. We compared pneumonia incidence using a facility-based surveillance system to estimates from a cohort study conducted contemporaneously in the same community in Cape Town, South Africa. Methods A surveillance system was developed in six public sector primary care clinics and in a regional referral hospital, to detect childhood pneumonia cases. Nurses recorded all children presenting to facilities who met WHO case definitions of pneumonia, and hospital records were reviewed. Estimates of pneumonia incidence and severity were compared with incidence rates based on active surveillance in the Drakenstein Child Health Study. Results From June 2012 until September 2013, the surveillance system detected 306 pneumonia episodes in children under 1 year of age, an incidence of 0.20 episodes/child-year (e/cy) (95% CI 0.17 to 0.22 e/cy). The incidence in the cohort study from the same period was 0.27 e/cy (95% CI 0.23 to 0.32 e/cy). Pneumonia incidence in the surveillance system was almost 30% lower than in the birth cohort; incidence rate ratio 0.72 (95% CI 0.58 to 0.89). In the surveillance system, 18% were severe pneumonia cases, compared to 23% in the birth cohort, rate ratio 0.81 (95% CI 0.55 to 1.18). Conclusions In this setting, facility-based pneumonia surveillance detected fewer cases of pneumonia, and fewer severe cases, compared to the corresponding cohort study. Facility pneumonia surveillance using data collected by local healthcare workers provides a useful estimate of the epidemiology of childhood pneumonia but may underestimate incidence and severity. PMID:26685027

  9. Incidence of childhood pneumonia: facility-based surveillance estimate compared to measured incidence in a South African birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, David M; Myer, Landon; Nicol, Mark P; Zar, Heather J

    2015-12-18

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of childhood mortality and a major contributor to childhood morbidity, but accurate measurement of pneumonia incidence is challenging. We compared pneumonia incidence using a facility-based surveillance system to estimates from a cohort study conducted contemporaneously in the same community in Cape Town, South Africa. A surveillance system was developed in six public sector primary care clinics and in a regional referral hospital, to detect childhood pneumonia cases. Nurses recorded all children presenting to facilities who met WHO case definitions of pneumonia, and hospital records were reviewed. Estimates of pneumonia incidence and severity were compared with incidence rates based on active surveillance in the Drakenstein Child Health Study. From June 2012 until September 2013, the surveillance system detected 306 pneumonia episodes in children under 1 year of age, an incidence of 0.20 episodes/child-year (e/cy) (95% CI 0.17 to 0.22 e/cy). The incidence in the cohort study from the same period was 0.27 e/cy (95% CI 0.23 to 0.32 e/cy). Pneumonia incidence in the surveillance system was almost 30% lower than in the birth cohort; incidence rate ratio 0.72 (95% CI 0.58 to 0.89). In the surveillance system, 18% were severe pneumonia cases, compared to 23% in the birth cohort, rate ratio 0.81 (95% CI 0.55 to 1.18). In this setting, facility-based pneumonia surveillance detected fewer cases of pneumonia, and fewer severe cases, compared to the corresponding cohort study. Facility pneumonia surveillance using data collected by local healthcare workers provides a useful estimate of the epidemiology of childhood pneumonia but may underestimate incidence and severity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Incidence and Risk Factors of Childhood Pneumonia-Like Episodes in Biliran Island, Philippines—A Community-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosai, Hisato; Tamaki, Raita; Saito, Mayuko; Tohma, Kentaro; Alday, Portia Parian; Tan, Alvin Gue; Inobaya, Marianette Tawat; Suzuki, Akira; Kamigaki, Taro; Lupisan, Soccoro; Tallo, Veronica; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is a leading cause of deaths in infants and young children in developing countries, including the Philippines. However, data at the community level remains limited. Our study aimed to estimate incidence and mortality rates and to evaluate risk factors and health-seeking behavior for childhood pneumonia. A household level interview survey was conducted in Biliran Island, the Philippines. Caregivers were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire to check if children had symptoms suggesting pneumonia-like episodes from June 2011 to May 2012. Of 3,327 households visited in total, 3,302 (99.2%) agreed to participate, and 5,249 children less than 5 years of age were included in the study. Incidence rates of pneumonia-like episodes, severe pneumonia-like episodes, and pneumonia-associated mortality were 105, 61, and 0.9 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. History of asthma [hazard ratio (HR): 5.85, 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.83–7.08], low socioeconomic status (SES) (HR: 1.11, 95% CI: 1.02–1.20), and long travel time to the healthcare facility estimated by cost distance analysis (HR: 1.32, 95% CI: 1.09–1.61) were significantly associated with the occurrence of pneumonia-like episodes by the Cox proportional hazards model. For severe pneumonia-like episodes, a history of asthma (HR: 8.39, 95% CI: 6.54–10.77) and low SES (HR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.17–1.45) were significant risk factors. Children who had a long travel time to the hospital were less likely to seek hospital care (Odds ratio: 0.32, 95% CI: 0.19–0.54) when they experienced severe pneumonia-like episodes. Incidence of pediatric pneumonia-like episodes was associated with a history of asthma, SES, and the travel time to healthcare facilities. Travel time was also identified as a strong indicator for health-seeking behavior. Improved access to healthcare facilities is important for early and effective management. Further studies are warranted to understand the causal relationship

  11. Incidence and Risk Factors of Childhood Pneumonia-Like Episodes in Biliran Island, Philippines--A Community-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosai, Hisato; Tamaki, Raita; Saito, Mayuko; Tohma, Kentaro; Alday, Portia Parian; Tan, Alvin Gue; Inobaya, Marianette Tawat; Suzuki, Akira; Kamigaki, Taro; Lupisan, Soccoro; Tallo, Veronica; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is a leading cause of deaths in infants and young children in developing countries, including the Philippines. However, data at the community level remains limited. Our study aimed to estimate incidence and mortality rates and to evaluate risk factors and health-seeking behavior for childhood pneumonia. A household level interview survey was conducted in Biliran Island, the Philippines. Caregivers were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire to check if children had symptoms suggesting pneumonia-like episodes from June 2011 to May 2012. Of 3,327 households visited in total, 3,302 (99.2%) agreed to participate, and 5,249 children less than 5 years of age were included in the study. Incidence rates of pneumonia-like episodes, severe pneumonia-like episodes, and pneumonia-associated mortality were 105, 61, and 0.9 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. History of asthma [hazard ratio (HR): 5.85, 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.83-7.08], low socioeconomic status (SES) (HR: 1.11, 95% CI: 1.02-1.20), and long travel time to the healthcare facility estimated by cost distance analysis (HR: 1.32, 95% CI: 1.09-1.61) were significantly associated with the occurrence of pneumonia-like episodes by the Cox proportional hazards model. For severe pneumonia-like episodes, a history of asthma (HR: 8.39, 95% CI: 6.54-10.77) and low SES (HR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.17-1.45) were significant risk factors. Children who had a long travel time to the hospital were less likely to seek hospital care (Odds ratio: 0.32, 95% CI: 0.19-0.54) when they experienced severe pneumonia-like episodes. Incidence of pediatric pneumonia-like episodes was associated with a history of asthma, SES, and the travel time to healthcare facilities. Travel time was also identified as a strong indicator for health-seeking behavior. Improved access to healthcare facilities is important for early and effective management. Further studies are warranted to understand the causal relationship between asthma

  12. Associations of Genetic Polymorphisms Relevant to Metabolic Pathway of Vitamin D3 with Development and Prognosis of Childhood Bronchial Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Zhansheng; Ma, Tongshuai

    2017-08-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the correlation between genetic polymorphisms relevant to metabolic pathway of vitamin D3 (VD 3 ) and susceptibility to childhood bronchial asthma. Altogether 143 childhood patients with bronchial asthma and 143 healthy children of Chinese Han ethnicity were enrolled in this study. The key single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified by HaploView 4.2 software and selected from previous investigations. Genomic DNAs were isolated from peripheral blood samples by using TaqMan Blood DNA kits. The genotyping of SNPs was performed by TaqMan SNPs genotyping assay. Odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated to evaluate the association between SNPs and susceptibility to bronchial asthma. Statistical analyses were conducted by using SPSS 13.0 software. Rs10766197 of CYP2R1, rs7041 and rs4588 of CG, rs4646536 of CYP27B1, rs2228570, rs7975232, and rs1544410 of VDR, as well as rs1805192 and rs10865710 of PPAR were shown to be significantly associated with increased risk of bronchial asthma. Besides, prognosis of childhood bronchial asthma, which was represented as Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) scoring, was closely linked with CYP2R1 rs10766197, CYP27B1 rs4646536, VDR rs7975232, VDR rs1544410, PPAR rs1805192, and PPAR rs10865710. The haplotype analysis suggested that TA and CG of CG rs7041/rs4588, CA and AG of VDR rs7975232/rs1544410, and CC of PPAR rs1805192/rs10865710 were, respectively, correlated with levels of VD, IL-4, and IL-5. And only haplotypes of VDR showed associations with risk of bronchial asthma during childhood, whereas hardly any significance could be observed between the haplotypes and behavior of quality-of-life (SGRQ) scoring. Significant associations were found between rs10766197 of CYP2R1, rs7041 and rs4588 of CG, rs4646536 of CYP27B1, rs2228570, rs7975232, and rs1544410 of VDR, as well as rs1805192 and rs10865710 of PPAR and susceptibility to and prognosis of

  13. Trends in childhood type 1 diabetes incidence in Europe during 1989-2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patterson, C C; Gyürüs, E; Rosenbauer, J

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe 20-year incidence trends for childhood type 1 diabetes in 23 EURODIAB centres and compare rates of increase in the first (1989-1998) and second (1999-2008) halves of the period.......The aim of the study was to describe 20-year incidence trends for childhood type 1 diabetes in 23 EURODIAB centres and compare rates of increase in the first (1989-1998) and second (1999-2008) halves of the period....

  14. Selective citation in the literature on swimming in chlorinated water and childhood asthma: a network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duyx, Bram; Urlings, Miriam J E; Swaen, Gerard M H; Bouter, Lex M; Zeegers, Maurice P

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge development depends on an unbiased representation of the available evidence. Selective citation may distort this representation. Recently, some controversy emerged regarding the possible impact of swimming on childhood asthma, raising the question about the role of selective citation in this field. Our objective was to assess the occurrence and determinants of selective citation in scientific publications on the relationship between swimming in chlorinated pools and childhood asthma. We identified scientific journal articles on this relationship via a systematic literature search. The following factors were taken into account: study outcome (authors' conclusion, data-based conclusion), other content-related article characteristics (article type, sample size, research quality, specificity), content-unrelated article characteristics (language, publication title, funding source, number of authors, number of affiliations, number of references, journal impact factor), author characteristics (gender, country, affiliation), and citation characteristics (time to citation, authority, self-citation). To assess the impact of these factors on citation, we performed a series of univariate and adjusted random-effects logistic regressions, with potential citation path as unit of analysis. Thirty-six articles were identified in this network, consisting of 570 potential citation paths of which 191 (34%) were realized. There was strong evidence that articles with at least one author in common, cited each other more often than articles that had no common authors (odds ratio (OR) 5.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.1-8.8). Similarly, the chance of being cited was higher for articles that were empirical rather than narrative (OR 4.2, CI 2.6-6.7), that reported a large sample size (OR 5.8, CI 2.9-11.6), and that were written by authors with a high authority within the network (OR 4.1, CI 2.1-8.0). Further, there was some evidence for citation bias: articles that confirmed the

  15. Fish and seafood consumption during pregnancy and the risk of asthma and allergic rhinitis in childhood : a pooled analysis of 18 European and US birth cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stratakis, Nikos; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Oken, Emily; Ballester, Ferran; Barros, Henrique; Basterrechea, Mikel; Cordier, Sylvaine; de Groot, Renate; den Dekker, Herman T; Duijts, Liesbeth; Eggesbø, Merete; Pia Fantini, Maria; Forastiere, Francesco; Gehring, Ulrike; Gielen, Marij; Gori, Davide; Govarts, Eva; Inskip, Hazel M.; Iszatt, Nina; Jansen, Maria; Kelleher, Cecily; Mehegan, John; Moltó-Puigmartí, Carolina; Mommers, Monique; Oliveira, Andreia; Olsen, Sjurdur F; Pelé, Fabienne; Pizzi, Costanza; Porta, Daniela; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Robinson, Sian M; Schoeters, Greet; Strøm, Marin; Sunyer, Jordi; Thijs, Carel; Vrijheid, Martine; Vrijkotte, Tanja G M; Wijga, Alet H; Kogevinas, Manolis; Zeegers, Maurice P; Chatzi, Leda

    2017-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that prenatal exposure to n-3 long-chain fatty acids protects against asthma and other allergy-related diseases later in childhood. The extent to which fish intake in pregnancy protects against child asthma and rhinitis symptoms remains unclear. We aimed to assess

  16. Is there a sex-shift in prevalence of allergic rhinitis and comorbid asthma from childhood to adulthood? A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Froehlich, M.; Pinart, M.; Keller, T.; Reich, A.; Cabieses, B.; Hohmann, C.; Postma, D. S.; Bousquet, J.; Anto, J. M.; Keil, T.; Roll, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Allergic rhinitis and asthma as single entities affect more boys than girls in childhood but more females in adulthood. However, it is unclear if this prevalence sex-shift also occurs in allergic rhinitis and concurrent asthma. Thus, our aim was to compare sex-specific differences in the

  17. Fish and seafood consumption during pregnancy and the risk of asthma and allergic rhinitis in childhood: a pooled analysis of 18 European and US birth cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stratakis, Nikos; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Oken, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that prenatal exposure to n-3 long-chain fatty acids protects against asthma and other allergy-related diseases later in childhood. The extent to which fish intake in pregnancy protects against child asthma and rhinitis symptoms remains unclear. We aimed to asses...

  18. Cooking fuels and prevalence of asthma: a global analysis of phase three of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gary W K; Brunekreef, Bert; Ellwood, Philippa; Anderson, H Ross; Asher, M Innes; Crane, Julian; Lai, Christopher K W

    2013-07-01

    Indoor air pollution from a range of household cooking fuels has been implicated in the development and exacerbation of respiratory diseases. In both rich and poor countries, the effects of cooking fuels on asthma and allergies in childhood are unclear. We investigated the association between asthma and the use of a range of cooking fuels around the world. For phase three of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC), written questionnaires were self-completed at school by secondary school students aged 13-14 years, 244,734 (78%) of whom were then shown a video questionnaire on wheezing symptoms. Parents of children aged 6-7 years completed the written questionnaire at home. We investigated the association between types of cooking fuels and symptoms of asthma using logistic regression. Adjustments were made for sex, region of the world, language, gross national income, maternal education, parental smoking, and six other subject-specific covariates. The ISAAC study is now closed, but researchers can continue to use the instruments for further research. Data were collected between 1999 and 2004. 512,707 primary and secondary school children from 108 centres in 47 countries were included in the analysis. The use of an open fire for cooking was associated with an increased risk of symptoms of asthma and reported asthma in both children aged 6-7 years (odds ratio [OR] for wheeze in the past year, 1·78, 95% CI 1·51-2·10) and those aged 13-14 years (OR 1·20, 95% CI 1·06-1·37). In the final multivariate analyses, ORs for wheeze in the past year and the use of solely an open fire for cooking were 2·17 (95% CI 1·64-2·87) for children aged 6-7 years and 1·35 (1·11-1·64) for children aged 13-14 years. Odds ratios for wheeze in the past year and the use of open fire in combination with other fuels for cooking were 1·51 (1·25-1·81 for children aged 6-7 years and 1·35 (1·15-1·58) for those aged 13-14 years. In both age groups, we

  19. Defining localities of inadequate treatment for childhood asthma: A GIS approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pliskin Joseph S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS has great potential for the management of chronic disease and the analysis of clinical and administrative health care data. Asthma is a chronic disease associated with substantial morbidity, mortality, and health care use. Epidemiologic data from all over the world show an increasing prevalence of asthma morbidity and mortality despite the availability of effective treatment. These facts led to the emergence of strategies developed to improve the quality of asthma care. The objective To develop an efficient tool for quality assurance and chronic disease management using a Geographic Information System (GIS. Geographic location The southern region of Israel. January 1998 – October 2000. Databases Administrative claims data of the largest HMO in Israel: drug dispensing registry, demographic data, Emergency Room visits, and hospitalization data bases. Methods We created a list of six markers for inadequate pharmaceutical treatment of childhood asthma from the Israeli clinical guidelines. We used this list to search the drug dispensing registry to identify asthmatic children who received inadequate treatment and to assess their health care utilization and bad outcomes: emergency room visits and hospitalizations. Using GIS we created thematic maps on which we located the clinics with a high percentage of children for whom the treatment provided was not in adherence with the clinical guidelines. Results 81% of the children were found to have at least one marker for inadequate treatment; 17.5% were found to have more than one marker. Children with markers were found to have statistically significant higher rates of Emergency Room visits, hospitalizations and longer length of stay in hospital compared with children without markers. The maps show in a robust way which clinics provided treatment not in accord with the clinical guidelines. Those clinics have high rates of Emergency Room

  20. Effects of traffic-related air pollution on susceptibility to infantile bronchiolitis and childhood asthma: A cohort study in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Young; Leem, Jong-Han; Kim, Hwan-Cheol; Lamichhane, Dirga Kumar; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Kim, Jeong-Hee; Park, Myung-Sook; Jung, Dal-Young; Ko, Jung-Keun; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Hong, Soo-Jong

    2018-03-01

    This study examined the role of exposure to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) on susceptibility to asthma in children with past episodes of bronchiolitis. The baseline data included 2,627 school children aged 6-14 years who had participated in the longitudinal follow-up survey of the Children's Health and Environmental Research of Korea. Lifetime wheezing, past episodes of bronchiolitis, and doctor-diagnosed asthma were evaluated using an International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire. We used generalized linear regression with binomial distribution to calculate the relative risk (RR) between TRAP, assessed by proximity to a main road and the total length of roads, and asthma. Compared with the subjects who had less than 100 m of road length within 200-m radius from their home, those with more than 500 m of road length had significantly increased odds for infantile bronchiolitis (adjusted OR [aOR]: 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-2.42). Positive exposure-response relationships were found between residential proximity to the main road and asthma (aOR: 1.79, 95% CI: 1.05-3.06; 700 m from a main road, P for the trend = 0.02). Closer residential proximity to the main road (<75 m) and bronchiolitis combined increased the risks of newly diagnosed asthma (adjusted RR: 3.62, 95% CI: 1.07-12.26) compared with those without bronchiolitis and living ≥ 75 m away from the main road. TRAP appeared to be associated with an increased asthma among children with bronchiolitis, indicating the importance of modifying effects of bronchiolitis in asthma pathogenesis.

  1. Incidence of rhinitis and asthma related to welding in Northern Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storaas, T.; Zock, J.P.; Morano, A.E; Holm, M.; Bjornsson, E.; Forsberg, B.; Janson, C.; Norbäck, D.; Omenass, E.; Schlünssen, V.; Torén, K.; Svanes, C.

    2015-01-01

    Welding-related asthma is well recognised but less is known about rhinitis in relation to welding. The aim here, was to study associations between welding, rhinitis and asthma in a general population sample, and factors influencing selection into and out of a welding occupation. Adult-onset asthma

  2. Ambient air pollution and adult asthma incidence in six European cohorts (ESCAPE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacquemin, Bénédicte; Siroux, Valérie; Sanchez, Margaux; Carsin, Anne-Elie; Schikowski, Tamara; Adam, Martin; Bellisario, Valeria; Buschka, Anna; Bono, Roberto; Brunekreef, Bert|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067548180; Cai, Yutong; Cirach, Marta; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Declercq, Christophe; de Marco, Roberto; de Nazelle, Audrey; Ducret-Stich, Regina E; Ferretti, Virginia Valeria; Gerbase, Margaret W; Hardy, Rebecca; Heinrich, Joachim; Janson, Christer; Jarvis, Deborah; Al Kanaani, Zaina; Keidel, Dirk; Kuh, Diana; Le Moual, Nicole; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Marcon, Alessandro; Modig, Lars; Pin, Isabelle; Rochat, Thierry; Schindler, Christian; Sugiri, Dorothea; Stempfelet, Morgane; Temam, Sofia; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Varraso, Raphaëlle; Vienneau, Danielle; Vierkötter, Andrea; Hansell, Anna L; Krämer, Ursula; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Sunyer, Jordi; Künzli, Nino; Kauffmann, Francine

    BACKGROUND: Short-term exposure to air pollution has adverse effects among patients with asthma, but whether long-term exposure to air pollution is a cause of adult-onset asthma is unclear. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the association between air pollution and adult onset asthma. METHODS:

  3. Significant rise of the prevalence and clinical features of childhood asthma in Qingdao China: cluster sampling investigation of 10,082 children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Rongjun; Guan, Renzheng; Liu, Xiaomei; Zhao, Baochun; Guan, Jie; Lu, Ling

    2014-09-26

    Recent investigations suggested that the trend of childhood asthma has been stabilizing or even reversing in some countries. The observation provides contrast to our experience. Thus, the study aimed to investigate the prevalence and clinical features of asthma in children aged 0-14 years in Qingdao China, determine the changes of childhood asthma in China, and discover evidence that can allow better diagnosis and treatment of childhood asthma. A cluster sampling method was used. We randomly extracted the investigation clusters from schools, kindergartens, and communities in Qingdao. Subsequently, we interviewed the members of the clusters using a questionnaire from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) to find children with asthmatic symptoms. After determination by the doctors, more details on the asthmatic children were obtained by asking questions from the National Epidemiology Study of Asthma and Allergies in China questionnaire to obtain more details. We intended to survey 10,800 children. However, the actual number of children was 10,082. The prevalence of asthma in Qingdao children aged 0-14 years was 3.69%. The prevalence among male children was higher than in female (χ2 = 24.53,P attack when they were less than three years old. Moreover, 71.2% once suffered respiratory tract infections. For 95.7% of asthmatic children, the asthma attack was first manifested as cough. Asthmatic children who used inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) only accounted for 46%. The prevalence of asthma in children aged 0-14 years in Qingdao China increased significantly based on data obtained ten years ago (2000). Respiratory tract infections were the most important precursors of asthma attack. The attack was most commonly manifested as cough. The treatment, especially the use of ICS, was more rational. However, a certain difference was found, which has yet to be contrasted with the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) project.

  4. Typical halogenated persistent organic pollutants in indoor dust and the associations with childhood asthma in Shanghai, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Ge; Nie, Zhiqing; Feng, Yan; Wu, Xiaomeng; Yin, Yong; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Halogenated persistent organic pollutants (Hal-POPs) are significant contaminants in the indoor environment that are related to many human diseases. Ingestion of indoor dust is considered the major pathway of Hal-POP exposures, especially for children aged 3–6 years. Alongside a retrospective study on the associations between typical Hal-POP exposure and childhood asthma in Shanghai, indoor dust samples from asthmatic and non-asthmatic children's homes (n = 60, each) were collected. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were measured by GC–MS. BDE-209, PCB-8 and p,p′-DDE were the predominant components in each chemical category. The concentrations of most Hal-POPs were significantly higher in the asthmatic families. The associations between Hal-POP exposure and asthma occurrence were examined by calculating the odds ratios (ORs) using a logistic regression model. A positive association was found between p,p′-DDE in indoor dust and childhood asthma (OR = 1.825, 95%CI: 1.004, 3.317; p = 0.048). The average daily doses of Hal-POP intake were calculated using the method provided by the USEPA. Non-carcinogenic health risks were preliminarily assessed. Our study indicated that exposure to p,p’-DDE via indoor dust may contribute to childhood asthma occurrence. Non-carcinogenic health risks were not found with the intake of Hal-POPs via the ingestion of indoor dust. - Highlights: • Three POP species were measured in indoor dust from the homes of asthmatic and non-asthmatic children. • The concentrations of BDE-47/-99/-209, PCB-8/-49 and p,p’-DDE were significantly higher in the case group. • p,p′-DDE showed positive association with childhood asthma occurrence. • Hal-POP exposure via ingestion of indoor dust was not associated with non-carcinogenic health risks. - The concentrations of select Hal-POPs in dust were determined, and a positive association was found between

  5. PVC--as flooring material--and its association with incident asthma in a Swedish child cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, M; Hägerhed-Engman, L; Kolarik, B; James, P; Lundin, F; Janson, S; Sundell, J; Bornehag, C G

    2010-12-01

    The Dampness in Buildings and Health study (DBH) started in the year 2000 in Värmland, Sweden, with a baseline questionnaire sent to all children (n = 14,077) aged 1-6. Five years later, a follow-up questionnaire was sent to the children who were 1-3 years at baseline. A total of 4779 children participated in both the baseline and the follow-up studies and constitute the study population in this cohort study. The aim of this study was to examine the association between exposure to PVC-flooring in the child's and parent's bedroom in homes of children aged 1-3 and the incidence of asthma, rhinitis, and eczema during the following 5-year period. Adjusted analyses showed that the incidence of asthma among children was associated with PVC-flooring in the child's bedroom (AOR 1.52; 95% CI 0.99-2.35) and in the parent's bedroom (1.46; 0.96-2.23). The found risks were on borderline of significance and should therefore be interpreted with caution. There was further a positive relationship between the number of rooms with PVC-flooring and the cumulative incidence of asthma. PVC-flooring was found to be a stronger risk factor for incident asthma in multifamily homes when compared with single-family houses and in smoking families compared with non-smoking families and in women. These longitudinal data from the DBH study found an association between the presence of PVC-flooring in the home and incident asthma in children. However, earlier results from the DBH study have shown that PVC-flooring is one important source for phthalates in indoor dust, and exposure to such phthalates was found to be associated with asthma and allergy among children. This emphasizes the need for prospective studies that focus on the importance of prenatal and neonatal exposure to phthalates in the development of asthma and allergy in children. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Effects of Triple P parenting intervention on child health outcomes for childhood asthma and eczema: Randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawska, Alina; Mitchell, Amy E; Burgess, Scott; Fraser, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    Childhood chronic health conditions have considerable impact on children. We aimed to test the efficacy of a brief, group-based parenting intervention for improving illness-related child behaviour problems, parents' self-efficacy, quality of life, parents' competence with treatment, and symptom severity. A 2 (intervention vs. care as usual) by 3 (baseline, post-intervention, 6-month follow-up) design was used, with random group assignment. Participants were 107 parents of 2- to 10-year-old children with asthma and/or eczema. Parents completed self-report questionnaires, symptom diaries, and home observations were completed. The intervention comprised two 2-h group discussions based on Triple P. Parents in the intervention group reported (i) fewer eczema-related, but not asthma-related, child behaviour problems; (ii) improved self-efficacy for managing eczema, but not asthma; (iii) better quality of life for parent and family, but not child; (iv) no change in parental treatment competence; (v) reduced symptom severity, particularly for children prescribed corticosteroid-based treatments. Results demonstrate the potential for brief parenting interventions to improve childhood chronic illness management, child health outcomes, and family wellbeing. Effects were stronger for eczema-specific outcomes compared to asthma-specific outcomes. Effects on symptom severity are very promising, and further research examining effects on objective disease severity and treatment adherence is warranted. ACTRN12611000558921. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Maternal hemoglobin and hematocrit levels during pregnancy and childhood lung function and asthma. The Generation R Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira de Jesus, Sabrina M C B; den Dekker, Herman T; de Jongste, Johan C; Reiss, Irwin K; Steegers, Eric A; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Duijts, Liesbeth

    2018-02-01

    To examine the associations of maternal hemoglobin and hematocrit levels during pregnancy with childhood lung function and asthma, and whether adverse pregnancy outcomes and atopic predisposition modify the associations. In a population-based prospective cohort study among 3672 subjects, we measured maternal hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in early pregnancy, and lung function by spirometry and current asthma by questionnaire at age 10 years. Higher maternal hematocrit levels, both continuously and categorized into clinical cut-offs, were associated with lower forced expiratory flow at 75% of forced vital capacity (FEF 75 ) in children (Z-score (95%CI): -0.04 (-0.07, -0.01), per increase of 1 SDS in hematocrit level; Z-score (95%CI) difference: -0.11 (-0.20, -0.03) compared with normal hematocrit levels, respectively), taking lifestyle and socio-economic factors into account. Adverse pregnancy outcomes and atopic predisposition did not modify the results. No associations of maternal hemoglobin and hematocrit with current asthma were observed. Higher maternal hematocrit levels during pregnancy are associated with lower childhood lung function but not with risk of asthma. Adverse pregnancy outcomes and atopic predisposition do not modify these associations. Underlying mechanisms need to be further studied. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Developing asthma in childhood from exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke: insights from a meta-regression Asma na infância por exposição ao tabagismo passivo: compreensão a partir de uma meta-regressão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Vork

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown links between household secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS exposure and induction of childhood asthma. But the true nature of this link remains unclear in many studies. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies published from 1970 to 2005 to uncover consistent patterns of relative risk estimates (RRs, and found substantial heterogeneity within initial summary RRs of 1.48 [95% confidence interval (CI, 1.32-1.65], 1.25 (1.21-1.30, and 1.21 (1.08-1.36, for ever, current, and incident asthma, respectively. Lack of control for type of atopy history (familial or child and child's own smoking status within studies and age category altered summary RRs in separate metaregressions. After adjustments, consistent patterns of association emerged between SHS exposure and childhood asthma induction. Our summary RR of 1.33 (95% CI, 1.14-1.56 from studies of incident asthma among older children (618 years old is 1.27 times the estimate from studies of younger children and higher than estimates from earlier meta-analyses. This showns that exposure duration may be a more important factor than previously understood, and suggests that SHS could be a more fundamental cause of childhood asthma than some previous meta-analyses have indicated.

  9. Proximity to two main sources of industrial outdoor air pollution and emergency department visits for childhood asthma in Edmonton, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Villamizar, Laura A; Rosychuk, Rhonda J; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Villeneuve, Paul J; Rowe, Brian H

    2018-01-22

    Children are recognized to be more susceptible than healthy adults to the effects of air pollution; however, relatively few Canadian studies of children have focused on industrial emissions. We conducted a spatial cross-sectional study to explore associations between emergency department (ED) visits for childhood asthma and residential proximity to two industrial sources of air pollution (coal-fired power plant and petrochemical industry) in Edmonton, Canada. Using administrative health care data for Alberta between 2004 and 2010, we conducted a spatial analysis of disease clusters of count data around these two industrial sources. The distance from children's place of residence to these industrial sources was determined by using the six-character postal code from the children's ED visit. Clusters of cases were identified at the census dissemination area. Negative binomial multivariable spatial regression was used to estimate the risks of clusters in relation to the distance to these industrial sources. The relative risk of ED visits for asthma, calculated using a spatial scan test for events, was 10.4 (p value <0.01) within the power plant area when compared with the outside area. In addition, there was an inverse association of the distance to the power plant (coefficient = -0.01 per km) with asthma visits when multivariable models were used. No asthma clusters were identified around the petrochemical industrial area. Our analyses revealed that there was a cluster of ED visits for asthma among children who lived near the coal-fired power plant just outside Edmonton.

  10. Is childhood wheeze and asthma in Latin America associated with poor hygiene and infection? A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Paul; Cooper, Philip J

    2018-01-01

    Introduction High asthma prevalence in Latin-American cities is thought to be caused by poor hygiene and infections. This contradicts the widely accepted ‘hygiene hypothesis’ for asthma aetiology. Methods Systematic review of observational studies evaluating the association between poor hygiene exposures or infections and asthma/wheeze among Latin-American children aged 4–16 years. MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and CINAHL electronic databases were searched following a predefined strategy to 18 December 2017. We quantified outcomes measured and reported, assessed risk of bias and tabulated the results. Results Forty-five studies included: 6 cohort, 30 cross-sectional and 9 case–control studies. 26 cross-sectional studies were school-based surveys (14 of over 3000 children), whereas 5 case–control studies were hospital/health centre-based. Exposures measured and reported varied substantially between studies, and current wheeze was the most common outcome reported. Data showed selective reporting based on statistical significance (P value <0.05): 17/45 studies did not clearly describe the number of exposures measured and 15/45 studies reported on less than 50% of the exposures measured. Most exposures studied did not show an association with wheeze or asthma, except for a generally increased risk associated with acute respiratory infections in early life. Contradictory associations were observed frequently between different studies. Conclusion Selective reporting is common in observational studies exploring the association between environmental exposures and risk of wheeze/asthma. This, together with the use of different study outcomes (wheeze/asthma) associated with possibly distinct causal mechanisms, complicates inferences about the role of poor hygiene exposures and childhood infections in explaining asthma prevalence in Latin-American children. PMID:29531744

  11. Early incidence of occupational asthma among young bakers, pastry-makers and hairdressers: design of a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémen, Thomas; Coevoet, Vincent; Acouetey, Dovi-Stéphanie; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Guéant-Rodriguez, Rosa-Maria; Paris, Christophe; Zmirou-Navier, Denis

    2010-04-26

    Occupational exposures are thought to be responsible for 10-15% of new-onset asthma cases in adults, with disparities across sectors. Because most of the data are derived from registries and cross-sectional studies, little is known about incidence of occupational asthma (OA) during the first years after inception of exposure. This paper describes the design of a study that focuses on this early asthma onset period among young workers in the bakery, pastry making and hairdressing sectors in order to assess early incidence of OA in these "at risk" occupations according to exposure duration, and to identify risk factors of OA incidence. The study population is composed of subjects who graduated between 2001 and 2006 in these sectors where they experience exposure to organic or inorganic allergenic or irritant compounds (with an objective of 150 subjects by year) and 250 young workers with no specific occupational exposure. A phone interview focusing on respiratory and 'Ear-Nose-Throat' (ENT) work-related symptoms screen subjects considered as "possibly OA cases". Subjects are invited to participate in a medical visit to complete clinical and lung function investigations, including fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) and carbon monoxide (CO) measurements, and to collect blood samples for IgE (Immunoglobulin E) measurements (total IgE and IgE for work-related and common allergens). Markers of oxidative stress and genetic polymorphisms exploration are also assessed. A random sample of 200 "non-cases" (controls) is also visited, following a nested case-control design. This study may allow to describ a latent period between inception of exposure and the rise of the prevalence of asthma symptoms, an information that would be useful for the prevention of OA. Such a time frame would be suited for conducting screening campaigns of this emergent asthma at a stage when occupational hygiene measures and adapted therapeutic interventions might be effective. Clinical trial

  12. Childhood Exposure to Ambient Air Pollutants and the Onset of Asthma: An Administrative Cohort Study in Québec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tétreault, Louis-Francois; Doucet, Marieve; Gamache, Philippe; Fournier, Michel; Brand, Allan; Kosatsky, Tom; Smargiassi, Audrey

    2016-08-01

    Although it is well established that air pollutants can exacerbate asthma, the link with new asthma onset in children is less clear. We assessed the association between the onset of childhood asthma with both time of birth and time-varying exposures to outdoor air pollutants. An open cohort of children born in the province of Québec, Canada, was created using linked medical-administrative databases. New cases of asthma were defined as one hospital discharge with a diagnosis of asthma or two physician claims for asthma within a 2 year period. Annual ozone (O3) levels were estimated at the child's residence for all births 1999-2010, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) levels during 1996-2006 were estimated for births on the Montreal Island. Satellite based concentrations of fine particles (PM2.5) were estimated at a 10 km × 10 km resolution and assigned to residential postal codes throughout the province (1996-2011). Hazard ratios (HRs) were assessed with Cox models for the exposure at the birth address and for the time-dependent exposure. We performed an indirect adjustment for secondhand smoke (SHS). We followed 1,183,865 children (7,752,083 person-years), of whom 162,752 became asthmatic. After controlling for sex and material and social deprivation, HRs for an interquartile range increase in exposure at the birth address to NO2 (5.45 ppb), O3 (3.22 ppb), and PM2.5 (6.50 μg/m3) were 1.04 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.05), 1.11 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.12), and 1.31 (95% CI: 1.28, 1.33), respectively. Effects of O3 and PM2.5 estimated with time-varying Cox models were similar to those estimated using exposure at birth, whereas the effect of NO2 was slightly stronger (HR = 1.07; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.09). Asthma onset in children appears to be associated with residential exposure to PM2.5, O3 and NO2. Tétreault LF, Doucet M, Gamache P, Fournier M, Brand A, Kosatsky T, Smargiassi A. 2016. Childhood exposure to ambient air pollutants and the onset of asthma: an administrative cohort study in Qu

  13. Increased incidence of allergic rhinitis, bronchitis and asthma, in children living near a petrochemical complex with SO2pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Tzu-Ying; Yuan, Tzu-Hsuen; Shie, Ruei-Hao; Chen, Chen-Fang; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to investigate incidence of allergic rhinitis, bronchitis and asthma, in children living near a petrochemical complex with SO 2 pollution obtained by air monitoring stations. A total of 587 children aged 11 to 14 were recruited and classified into high and low exposure groups based on a radius of 10km from the complex. To study the influence of health on children since the operation of complex in 1999 and observe the difference of these diseases' short-term and long-term impact, we obtained the incidence rates of allergic rhinitis (ICD-9: 477), bronchitis (490-491) and asthma (493) from the Taiwan Health Insurance Database for three periods: 1999-2002, 1999-2006, and 1999-2010. Since 2001, the mean and 99th percentile of SO 2 concentrations in the high exposure area have been significantly higher than those in low exposure area. There were significant differences between the high and low exposure groups in the percentage of smoking, alcohol consumption, passive smoking exposure and incense burning habits. The incidence rates of three intervals were 26.9%, 35.7%, 41.7%; 8.3%, 8.8%, 10.2%; 18.5%, 25.0%, 26.9% for allergic rhinitis, bronchitis and asthma in high exposure group. Significant differences were found between groups for allergic rhinitis in all periods, bronchitis in the first two periods, and asthma in the first period using Student's t-test. After we adjusted age, gender, group, living near roads, incense burning and passive smoking exposure, the hazard ratios between exposure groups were 3.05, 2.74, and 1.93 for allergic rhinitis with significant difference in three periods, and 2.53, 1.92 and 1.72 for bronchitis with significant difference in first period and 1.60, 1.28 and 1.29 for asthma with significant difference in first period by Cox regression. The higher incidence of allergic rhinitis was related to boys and living near roads and the higher incidence of asthma was also related to younger children, boys, and passive smoking

  14. The Epidemiology of Childhood Asthma in Red Deer and Medicine Hat, Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A Hessel

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To document the prevalence of asthma among school-aged children in two Alberta communities, to understand host and indoor environmental factors associated with asthma, and to compare these factors between the two communities.

  15. School Nutrition Programs and the Incidence of Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millimet, Daniel L.; Tchernis, Rusty; Husain, Muna

    2010-01-01

    Given the recent rise in childhood obesity, the School Breakfast Program (SBP) and National School Lunch Program (NSLP) have received renewed attention. Using panel data on more than 13,500 primary school students, we assess the relationship between SBP and NSLP participation and (relatively) long-run measures of child weight. After documenting a…

  16. Childhood cancer: Overview of incidence trends and environmental carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahm, S.H.; Devesa, S.S. [National Cancer Inst., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1995-09-01

    An estimated 8000 children 0 to 14 years of age are diagnosed annually with cancer in the United States. Leukemia and brain tumors are the most common childhood malignancies, accounting for 30 and 20% of newly diagnosed cases, respectively. From 1975 to 1978 to 1987 to 1990, cancer among white children increased slightly from 12.8 to 14.1/100,000. Increases are suggested for leukemia, gliomas, and, to a much lesser extent, Wilms` tumor. There are a few well-established environmental causes of childhood cancer such as radiation, chemotherapeutic agents, and diethylstilbestrol. Many other agents such as electromagnetic fields, pesticides, and some parental occupational exposures are suspected of playing roles, but the evidence is not conclusive at this time. Some childhood exposures such as secondhand cigarette smoke may contribute to cancers that develop many years after childhood. For some exposures such as radiation and pesticides data suggest that children may be more susceptible to the carcinogenic effects than similarly exposed adults. 143 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. Breastfeeding is associated with a decreased risk of childhood asthma exacerbations later in life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadizar, Fariba; Vijverberg, Susanne J.H.; Arets, Hubertus G.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/244205698; de Boer, Anthonius|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413636429; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Breastfeeding has been suggested to influence the risk of asthma and asthma severity in children. However, the conclusions from epidemiologic studies are inconsistent. Methods: We used data from 960 children (aged 4-12 years) using regular asthma medication who participated in the PACMAN

  18. Breastfeeding is associated with a decreased risk of childhood asthma exacerbations later in life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadizar, Fariba; Vijverberg, Susanne J. H.; Arets, Hubertus G. M.; de Boer, Anthonius; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Breastfeeding has been suggested to influence the risk of asthma and asthma severity in children. However, the conclusions from epidemiologic studies are inconsistent. Methods: We used data from 960 children (aged 4-12 years) using regular asthma medication who participated in the PACMAN

  19. Changes over time in the relationship between symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema: a global perspective from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, M I; Stewart, A W; Wong, G; Strachan, D P; García-Marcos, L; Anderson, H R

    2012-01-01

    The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) identified trends in the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema over a seven-year period. We hypothesised that environmental influences on the three diseases are different and therefore investigated the correlation over time between trends in the prevalence of these diseases and their combinations at centre and individual level. Centre level analyses were correlations between time trends in the prevalence of symptoms. At an individual level, odds ratios were calculated for associations between symptoms between Phases One and Three. We also investigated potential effect modification in the younger versus older age group; male versus female; and by average Gross National Income per capita (GNI). Both phases were completed in 66 centres in 37 countries for the 6-7 year age group and in 106 centres in 56 countries for the 13-14 year age group. We found that the correlations in time trends were stronger for the older age group than the younger one. Between symptoms of diseases, correlations of time trends were the strongest for rhinoconjunctivitis with eczema and weakest for eczema with asthma. The relationship between the three diseases was generally consistent over the seven-year period, and there was little association found with average GNI. Despite some increase in the proportion of children with symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema, the pattern between the three diseases has not changed much, suggesting that similar factors may be affecting them at a global level. Copyright © 2011 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Diet, occupational exposure and early asthma incidence among bakers, pastry makers and hairdressers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémen Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of occupational asthma (OA is influenced by many determinants. This study aims to assess the combined roles of personal characteristics, including occupational exposure and nutritional habits, on the incidence of OA during the first years at work. Methods A nested case–control study was conducted within a retrospective cohort of young workers in the bakery, pastry-making and hairdressing sectors. Cases were subjects diagnosed as ‘confirmed’ or ‘probable’ OA consecutively to a medical visit (N = 31. Controls were subjects without OA (N = 196. Atopy was defined after blood specific IgE analysis, based on the PhadiatopTM test. Occupational exposure was characterized by standardized questionnaires and diet patterns by a food frequency questionnaire. Results Among bakers and pastry-makers, only atopy is an independent risk factor of OA (OR = 10.07 95%CI [2.76 – 36.65]. Among hairdressers, several variables are associated with OA. Body mass index (unit OR = 1.24 [1.03 – 1.48] and the score of exposure intensity (unit OR = 1.79 [1.05 – 3.05] are independent predictors of OA, but the role of atopy is weak (OR = 4.94 [0.66 – 36.75]. Intake of vitamin A is higher among hairdressers cases (crude p = 0.002, adjusted p = 0.01 after control for body mass index and atopy; the same observation is made for vitamin D (crude p = 0.004, adjusted p = 0.01. Conclusion This study suggests that the influence of several factors on the incidence of OA, including dietary vitamins, might vary across exposure settings.

  1. Diet, occupational exposure and early asthma incidence among bakers, pastry makers and hairdressers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémen, Thomas; Acouetey, Dovi-Stéphanie; Paris, Christophe; Zmirou-Navier, Denis

    2012-05-29

    The natural history of occupational asthma (OA) is influenced by many determinants. This study aims to assess the combined roles of personal characteristics, including occupational exposure and nutritional habits, on the incidence of OA during the first years at work. A nested case-control study was conducted within a retrospective cohort of young workers in the bakery, pastry-making and hairdressing sectors. Cases were subjects diagnosed as 'confirmed' or 'probable' OA consecutively to a medical visit (N = 31). Controls were subjects without OA (N = 196). Atopy was defined after blood specific IgE analysis, based on the PhadiatopTM test. Occupational exposure was characterized by standardized questionnaires and diet patterns by a food frequency questionnaire. Among bakers and pastry-makers, only atopy is an independent risk factor of OA (OR = 10.07 95%CI [2.76 - 36.65]). Among hairdressers, several variables are associated with OA. Body mass index (unit OR = 1.24 [1.03 - 1.48]) and the score of exposure intensity (unit OR = 1.79 [1.05 - 3.05]) are independent predictors of OA, but the role of atopy is weak (OR = 4.94 [0.66 - 36.75]). Intake of vitamin A is higher among hairdressers cases (crude p = 0.002, adjusted p = 0.01 after control for body mass index and atopy); the same observation is made for vitamin D (crude p = 0.004, adjusted p = 0.01). This study suggests that the influence of several factors on the incidence of OA, including dietary vitamins, might vary across exposure settings.

  2. Feeding Bottles Usage and the Prevalence of Childhood Allergy and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Yun Hsu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the association between the length of use of feeding bottles or pacifiers during childhood and the prevalence of respiratory and allergic morbidities. A large-scale questionnaire survey was performed in day care centers and kindergartens (with children’s ages ranging from 2 to 7 years in southern Taiwan, and a total of 14,862 questionnaires completed by parents were finally recruited for data analysis. Effects of using feeding bottles on children’s wheezing/asthma (adjusted OR: 1.05, 95% CI 1.00–1.09, allergic rhinitis (adjusted OR: 1.04, 95% CI 1.00–1.08, and eczema (adjusted OR: 1.07, 95% CI 1.01–1.2 were found. Moreover, significant dose-dependent relationships were further established after an adjustment for confounders was performed that included children’s ages, gender, gestational age, birth weight, length of breastfeeding, the age when first given infant formula or complementary foods, family history, parental educational levels, and smoking status, as well as the problem of indoor water damage. This study was the first to reveal the potential risk of using plastic consumer products such as feeding bottles on the reported health status of preschool children in Asian countries.

  3. Risk factors for incident asthma and COPD in a cohort of young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Lisbet Krogh; Bælum, Jesper; Halling, Anders

    2018-01-01

    the identified COPD cases a total of 12 were Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome (ACOS). Atopy defined by positive SPT was a risk factor for asthma in males (OR 7.54; 95% CI 1.24-45.90), whereas risk factors in females were nasal allergy (3.81; 1.20-12.11), FEV1

  4. Challenges and lessons learned from the translation of evidence-based childhood asthma interventions: a commentary on the MCAN initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohadike, Yvonne U; Malveaux, Floyd J; Lesch, Julie Kennedy

    2011-11-01

    The Merck Childhood Asthma Network (MCAN) used evidence-based interventions (EBIs) for children with asthma to design community-based programs in a wide variety of settings--with varying resource constraints and priorities--that were often determined by the program context. Although challenges were faced, lessons learned strongly suggest that adapting and implementing EBIs is feasible in a variety of settings using a multisite approach. Lessons learned during the MCAN initiative presented unique opportunities to refine best practices that proved to be important to translation of EBIs in community-based settings. The adopted best practices were based on experiential learning during different phases of the project cycle, including monitoring and evaluation, translational research, and implementing policies in local program environments. Throughout this discussion it is important to note the importance of program context in determining the effectiveness of the interventions, opportunities to scale them, their affordability, and the ability to sustain them. Lessons learned from this effort will be important not only to advance science-based approaches to manage childhood asthma but also to assist in closing the gap between intervention development (discovery) and program dissemination and implementation (delivery).

  5. The role of polymorphisms in ADAM33, a disintegrin and metalloprotease 33, in childhood asthma and lung function in two German populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klopp Norman

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ADAM33, the first asthma candidate gene identified by positional cloning, may be associated with childhood asthma, lung function decline and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. However, replication results have been inconclusive in smaller previous study populations probably due to inconsistencies in asthma phenotypes or yet unknown environmental influences. Thus, we tried to further elucidate the role of ADAM33 polymorphisms (SNPs in a genetic analysis of German case control and longitudinal populations. Methods Using MALDI-TOF, ten ADAM33 SNPs were genotyped in 1,872 children from the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood (ISAAC II in a case control setting and further 824 children from the longitudinal cohort Multicentre Study of Allergy (MAS. In both populations the effects of single SNPs and haplotypes were studied and a gene environment analysis with passive smoke exposure was performed using SAS/Genetics. Results No single SNP showed a significant association with doctor's diagnosis of asthma. A trend for somewhat more profound effects of ADAM33 SNPs was observed in individuals with asthma and BHR. Haplotype analyses suggested a minor effect of the ADAM33 haplotype H4 on asthma (p = 0.033 but not on BHR. Associations with non atopic asthma and baseline lung function were identified but no interaction with passive smoke exposure could be detected. Conclusion The originally reported association between ADAM33 polymorphisms and asthma and BHR could not be confirmed. However, our data may suggest a complex role of ADAM33 polymorphisms in asthma ethiology, especially in non atopic asthma.

  6. Secular trends in consultations for asthma in early childhood, the 16 administrative regions of Morocco, 2004-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeq, Mina; Abouqal, Redouane; ElMarnissi, Abdelilah

    2015-09-17

    Little is known about asthma trend in Morocco, particularly in early childhood. Furthermore, when dealing with asthma related environmental risk factors in Morocco, decision-making focus is in one region R9, while 16 regions make up the country. This work aims at studying 9-year trends in consultations for asthma in under-5 children in the 16 individual regions with respect to area and age group. Direct method use, based on the only available national data from the open access files of the ministry of health, standardizing data for three age groups (0-11 ; 12-23 and 24-59 months). We compared age-adjusted rates, stratified by area (urban and rural areas) within each region (Wilcoxon's signed ranks test), and between all regions emphasizing on R9. Secular trends are examined (Kendall's rank correlation test). We also compared directly standardized rates as a rate ratio for two study populations (that of R9 and any region with highest rates). We finally compared rates by age group in selected regions. Secular increase in prevalence rates was shown in both urban and rural Morocco, particularly in urban areas of R10, R14, R16 and R5, and in rural areas of R14 and R16. In urban area of R10 (the highest age-adjusted prevalence rates area) the rates showed secular increase from 6.82 at 95 % CI = [6.44 to 7.19] per 1000 childhood population in 2004 to 20.91 at 95 % CI = [20.26 to 21.56] per 1000 childhood population in 2012 (P = 0.001). Rates were higher in urban than rural Morocco, particularly in R8, R9, R10, R14, R15 ; R6 was an exception. Rates in R10 were 1.63 higher than that in R9 in 2004 and rose to be 2.55 higher in 2012 ; rates in urban area of R14, about 3 times lower than that in R9 in 2004, increased to be similar in 2012. The highest-prevalence age group varied according to region and area. The regions that worth decision making attention are the urban areas of R10 (the highest prevalence rates Moroccan area, showing continuous increase), of R9, of R14

  7. Assessing the impact of air pollution on childhood asthma morbidity: how, when, and what to do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Allison J; Peden, David B

    2018-04-01

    Exposure to air pollutants is linked with poor asthma control in children and represents a potentially modifiable risk factor for impaired lung function, rescue medication use, and increased asthma-related healthcare utilization. Identification of the most relevant pollutants to asthma as well as susceptibility factors and strategies to reduce exposure are needed to improve child health. The current available literature supports the association between pollutants and negative asthma outcomes. Ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and presence of certain gene polymorphisms may impact susceptibility to the negative health effects of air pollution. Improved air quality standards were associated with better asthma outcomes. The link between air pollution and pediatric asthma morbidity is supported by the recent relevant literature. Continued efforts are needed to identify the most vulnerable populations and develop strategies to reduce exposures and improve air quality.

  8. Pneumonia diagnosis in childhood and incidence of leukaemia, lymphoma and brain cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Kirstine Kobberøe; Farkas, Dóra Körmendiné; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: There is an ongoing debate on the possible association between infections in early childhood and subsequent cancer risk, but it remains unclear if a hospital admission for infection is associated with risk of childhood cancer diagnosis. We examined if a hospital-based diagnosis...... of pneumonia was a clinical marker of the three most common childhood cancers. DESIGN: Population-based cohort study. SETTING: Denmark, hospital diagnoses, 1994-2013. METHODS: Using national health registries, we compared the observed incidence of leukaemia, lymphoma and brain cancer among 83 935 children...... with a hospital-based pneumonia diagnosis with that expected among children in the general population. We calculated absolute cancer risks and standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) as a measure of relative risk. RESULTS: The cancer SIRs were substantially increased during the first 6 months of follow-up; lymphoid...

  9. Farm exposure and time trends in early childhood may influence DNA methylation in genes related to asthma and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, S; Busato, F; Genuneit, J; Pekkanen, J; Dalphin, J-C; Riedler, J; Mazaleyrat, N; Weber, J; Karvonen, A M; Hirvonen, M-R; Braun-Fahrländer, C; Lauener, R; von Mutius, E; Kabesch, M; Tost, J

    2013-03-01

    Genetic susceptibility and environmental influences are important contributors to the development of asthma and atopic diseases. Epigenetic mechanisms may facilitate gene by environment interactions in these diseases. We studied the rural birth cohort PASTURE (Protection against allergy: study in rural environments) to investigate (a) whether epigenetic patterns in asthma candidate genes are influenced by farm exposure in general, (b) change over the first years of life, and (c) whether these changes may contribute to the development of asthma. DNA was extracted from cord blood and whole blood collected at the age of 4.5 years in 46 samples per time point. DNA methylation in 23 regions in ten candidate genes (ORMDL1, ORMDL2, ORMDL3, CHI3L1, RAD50, IL13, IL4, STAT6, FOXP3, and RUNX3) was assessed by pyrosequencing, and differences between strata were analyzed by nonparametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests. In cord blood, regions in ORMDL1 and STAT6 were hypomethylated in DNA from farmers' as compared to nonfarmers' children, while regions in RAD50 and IL13 were hypermethylated (lowest P-value (STAT6) = 0.001). Changes in methylation over time occurred in 15 gene regions (lowest P-value (IL13) = 1.57*10(-8)). Interestingly, these differences clustered in the genes highly associated with asthma (ORMDL family) and IgE regulation (RAD50, IL13, and IL4), but not in the T-regulatory genes (FOXP3, RUNX3). In this first pilot study, DNA methylation patterns change significantly in early childhood in specific asthma- and allergy-related genes in peripheral blood cells, and early exposure to farm environment seems to influence methylation patterns in distinct genes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Remission and incidence of obstructive sleep apnea from middle childhood to late adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilsbury, James C; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Rosen, Carol L; Redline, Susan

    2015-01-01

    To study the incidence, remission, and prediction of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) from middle childhood to late adolescence. Longitudinal analysis. The Cleveland Children's Sleep and Health Study, an ethnically mixed, urban, community-based cohort, followed 8 y. There were 490 participants with overnight polysomnography data available at ages 8-11 and 16-19 y. Baseline participant characteristics and health history were ascertained from parent report and US census data. OSA was defined as an obstructive apnea- hypopnea index ≥ 5 or an obstructive apnea index ≥ 1. OSA prevalence was approximately 4% at each examination, but OSA largely did not persist from middle childhood to late adolescence. Habitual snoring and obesity predicted OSA in cross-sectional analyses at each time point. Residence in a disadvantaged neighborhood, African-American race, and premature birth also predicted OSA in middle childhood, whereas male sex, high body mass index, and history of tonsillectomy or adenoidectomy were risk factors among adolescents. Obesity, but not habitual snoring, in middle childhood predicted adolescent OSA. Because OSA in middle childhood usually remitted by adolescence and most adolescent cases were incident cases, criteria other than concern alone over OSA persistence or incidence should be used when making treatment decisions for pediatric OSA. Moreover, OSA's distinct risk factors at each time point underscore the need for alternative risk-factor assessments across pediatric ages. The greater importance of middle childhood obesity compared to snoring in predicting adolescent OSA provides support for screening, preventing, and treating obesity in childhood. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  11. Temporal trends in childhood leukaemia incidence following exposure to radioactive fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeford, Richard; Darby, Sarah C; Murphy, Michael F G

    2010-05-01

    Notably raised rates of childhood leukaemia incidence have been found near some nuclear installations, in particular Sellafield and Dounreay in the United Kingdom, but risk assessments have concluded that the radiation doses estimated to have been received by children or in utero as a result of operations at these installations are much too small to account for the reported increases in incidence. This has led to speculation that the risk of childhood leukaemia arising from internal exposure to radiation following the intake of radioactive material released from nuclear facilities has been substantially underestimated. The radionuclides discharged from many nuclear installations are similar to those released into the global environment by atmospheric nuclear weapons testing, which was at its height in the late-1950s and early-1960s. Measurements of anthropogenic radionuclides in members of the general public resident in the vicinity of Sellafield and Dounreay have found levels that do not differ greatly from those in persons living remote from nuclear installations that are due to ubiquitous exposure to the radioactive debris of nuclear weapons testing. Therefore, if the leukaemia risk to children resulting from deposition within the body of radioactive material discharged from nuclear facilities has been grossly underestimated, then a pronounced excess of childhood leukaemia would have been expected as a consequence of the short period of intense atmospheric weapons testing. We have examined childhood leukaemia incidence in 11 large-scale cancer registries in three continents for which data were available at least as early as 1962. We found no evidence of a wave of excess cases corresponding to the peak of radioactive fallout from atmospheric weapons testing. The absence of a discernible increase in the incidence of childhood leukaemia following the period of maximum exposure to the radioactive debris of this testing weighs heavily against the suggestion that

  12. Ethnic Differences in Incidence and Outcomes of Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banh, Tonny H M; Hussain-Shamsy, Neesha; Patel, Viral; Vasilevska-Ristovska, Jovanka; Borges, Karlota; Sibbald, Cathryn; Lipszyc, Deborah; Brooke, Josefina; Geary, Denis; Langlois, Valerie; Reddon, Michele; Pearl, Rachel; Levin, Leo; Piekut, Monica; Licht, Christoph P B; Radhakrishnan, Seetha; Aitken-Menezes, Kimberly; Harvey, Elizabeth; Hebert, Diane; Piscione, Tino D; Parekh, Rulan S

    2016-10-07

    Ethnic differences in outcomes among children with nephrotic syndrome are unknown. We conducted a longitudinal study at a single regional pediatric center comparing ethnic differences in incidence from 2001 to 2011 census data and longitudinal outcomes, including relapse rates, time to first relapse, frequently relapsing disease, and use of cyclophosphamide. Among 711 children, 24% were European, 33% were South Asian, 10% were East/Southeast Asian, and 33% were of other origins. Over 10 years, the overall incidence increased from 1.99/100,000 to 4.71/100,000 among children ages 1-18 years old. In 2011, South Asians had a higher incidence rate ratio of 6.61 (95% confidence interval, 3.16 to 15.1) compared with Europeans. East/Southeast Asians had a similar incidence rate ratio (0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.13 to 2.94) to Europeans. We determined outcomes in 455 children from the three largest ethnic groups with steroid-sensitive disease over a median of 4 years. South Asian and East/Southeast Asian children had significantly lower odds of frequently relapsing disease at 12 months (South Asian: adjusted odds ratio; 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.39 to 0.77; East/Southeast Asian: adjusted odds ratio; 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.34 to 0.51), fewer subsequent relapses (South Asian: adjusted odds ratio; 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.50 to 0.81; East/Southeast Asian: adjusted odds ratio; 0.47; 95% confidence interval, 0.24 to 0.91), lower risk of a first relapse (South Asian: adjusted hazard ratio, 0.74; 95% confidence interval, 0.67 to 0.83; East/Southeast Asian: adjusted hazard ratio, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.63 to 0.68), and lower use of cyclophosphamide (South Asian: adjusted hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.53 to 1.28; East/Southeast Asian: adjusted hazard ratio, 0.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.41 to 0.71) compared with European children. Despite the higher incidence among South Asians, South and East/Southeast Asian children have significantly

  13. Early incidence of occupational asthma among young bakers, pastry-makers and hairdressers: design of a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guéant-Rodriguez Rosa-Maria

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occupational exposures are thought to be responsible for 10-15% of new-onset asthma cases in adults, with disparities across sectors. Because most of the data are derived from registries and cross-sectional studies, little is known about incidence of occupational asthma (OA during the first years after inception of exposure. This paper describes the design of a study that focuses on this early asthma onset period among young workers in the bakery, pastry making and hairdressing sectors in order to assess early incidence of OA in these "at risk" occupations according to exposure duration, and to identify risk factors of OA incidence. Methods/Design The study population is composed of subjects who graduated between 2001 and 2006 in these sectors where they experience exposure to organic or inorganic allergenic or irritant compounds (with an objective of 150 subjects by year and 250 young workers with no specific occupational exposure. A phone interview focusing on respiratory and 'Ear-Nose-Throat' (ENT work-related symptoms screen subjects considered as "possibly OA cases". Subjects are invited to participate in a medical visit to complete clinical and lung function investigations, including fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO and carbon monoxide (CO measurements, and to collect blood samples for IgE (Immunoglobulin E measurements (total IgE and IgE for work-related and common allergens. Markers of oxidative stress and genetic polymorphisms exploration are also assessed. A random sample of 200 "non-cases" (controls is also visited, following a nested case-control design. Discussion This study may allow to describ a latent period between inception of exposure and the rise of the prevalence of asthma symptoms, an information that would be useful for the prevention of OA. Such a time frame would be suited for conducting screening campaigns of this emergent asthma at a stage when occupational hygiene measures and adapted

  14. The effect of parental social support and acculturation on childhood asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheckner, Bari; Arcoleo, Kimberly; Feldman, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    There exists large ethnic disparities in asthma among Latino children; Puerto Ricans (PRs) are disproportionately affected, while Mexicans have the lowest prevalence and morbidity. Disparities are poorly understood, however, acculturation and social support are suggested to influence asthma control among children. This study investigated the relationship between acculturation, social support and asthma control among PR and Mexican children and their caregivers. Primary caregiver-child dyads (n = 267) of PR (n = 79) and Mexican (n = 188) descent were recruited from clinics at two inner-city hospitals in Bronx, NY and three clinics in Phoenix, AZ. Children were 5-12 years of age and had a confirmed asthma diagnosis. Dyads completed measures of social support, acculturation and asthma control; logistic regression was used for analysis. Mexican children had better asthma control than PR children (p acculturated than Mexican caregivers (p acculturation did not predict control. Across Latino subgroups caregivers' total level of social support predicted better asthma control among children (p management enabling caretakers to better control their children's asthma.

  15. Is parent-child bed-sharing a risk for wheezing and asthma in early childhood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijk, Maartje P C M; Sonnenschein-van der Voort, Agnes M M; Mileva-Seitz, Viara R; Jansen, Pauline W; Verhulst, Frank C; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; de Jongste, Johan C; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Duijts, Liesbeth; Tiemeier, Henning

    2015-03-01

    Household crowding can place young children at risk for respiratory infections which subsequently provoke asthma symptoms. However, crowding might also protect against asthma, in accordance with the hygiene hypothesis. We tested if parent-infant bed-sharing, an important dimension of household crowding, increases or decreases the risk for asthma. In a population-based prospective cohort (N = 6160) we assessed bed-sharing at 2 and 24 months; wheezing between 1 and 6 years of age; and asthma at 6 years of age. Generalised estimating equation models were used to assess repeated measures of wheezing and asthma. We found no association between bed-sharing in early infancy and wheezing or diagnosis of asthma. By contrast, we found a positive association between bed-sharing in toddlerhood and both wheezing (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.15-1.74) and asthma (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.03-2.38). Wheezing was not associated with bed-sharing when using cross-lagged modelling. This study suggests that bed-sharing in toddlerhood is associated with an increased risk of asthma at later ages, and not vice versa. Further studies are needed to explore the underlying causal mechanisms. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  16. Incidence of childhood cancer among Mexican children registered under a public medical insurance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Luna, Roberto; Correa-González, Cecilia; Altamirano-Alvarez, Eduardo; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Cárdenas-Cardós, Rocio; Escamilla-Asian, Gabriela; Olaya-Vargas, Alberto; Bautista-Marquez, Aurora; Aguilar-Romo, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Prior to 2005, 51% of children in Mexico diagnosed with cancer received no standardized optimal multidisciplinary medical care. A government-subsidized national cancer treatment program was therefore created for these patients and a National Cooperative Childhood Cancer Treatment Group was consequently formed for these patients. Pediatric patients with a proven diagnosis of leukemia, lymphoma or solid tumor and who were registered in the Popular Medical Insurance (PMI) program from January 2007 to December 2010, are described in this report. These patients had been enrolled and registered in one of the 49 nationwide certified medical institutions in Mexico. The national incidence and frequency data for childhood cancers were analyzed for the whole program. At the end of a 4-year study, the analysis revealed that 8,936 children from across Mexico had been diagnosed with cancer. The incidence rate for the PMI patients was 150.3/million/year (2010) for children of 0-18 years. The highest age incidence rate was 51.9 between 0 and 4 years and boys were the predominant group for all types of cancer. The leukemia incidence was 75.3/million/year (2010), and an average frequency of 50.75% throughout the 4 years. The overall mortality rate was measured at 5.4/100,000/year (2010). This study demonstrates a high frequency and incidence of childhood cancer and a beneficial impact of the PMI program over the quality of life in these children. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  17. Trends in incidence of occupational asthma, contact dermatitis, noise-induced hearing loss, carpal tunnel syndrome and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders in European countries from 2000 to 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stocks, S. Jill; McNamee, Roseanne; van der Molen, Henk F.; Paris, Christophe; Urban, Pavel; Campo, Giuseppe; Sauni, Riitta; Martínez Jarreta, Begoña; Valenty, Madeleine; Godderis, Lode; Miedinger, David; Jacquetin, Pascal; Gravseth, Hans M.; Bonneterre, Vincent; Telle-Lamberton, Maylis; Bensefa-Colas, Lynda; Faye, Serge; Mylle, Godewina; Wannag, Axel; Samant, Yogindra; Pal, Teake; Scholz-Odermatt, Stefan; Papale, Adriano; Schouteden, Martijn; Colosio, Claudio; Mattioli, Stefano; Agius, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    The European Union (EU) strategy for health and safety at work underlines the need to reduce the incidence of occupational diseases (OD), but European statistics to evaluate this common goal are scarce. We aim to estimate and compare changes in incidence over time for occupational asthma, contact

  18. A population study of childhood maltreatment and asthma diagnosis: differential associations between child protection database versus retrospective self-reported data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kate M; Smith, Don A R; Ellis, Pete M

    2012-10-01

    Despite growing evidence from longitudinal studies of a link between early-life stress and the development of asthma, very few of these examine one of the most severe types of early-life stress: childhood maltreatment. Cross-sectional studies on this topic have relied on retrospective self-reports of maltreatment. This study investigates associations between childhood maltreatment indicated by child protection agency records versus self-reports and lifetime asthma diagnosis in young adults, adjusting for socioeconomic status and mental disorders. A nationally representative general population survey of DSM-IV mental disorders in New Zealand (n = 12,992) obtained information on lifetime diagnoses of chronic physical conditions. Information from a subsample of survey respondents aged 16 to 27 years (n = 1413) was linked with a national child protection database to identify respondents with a history of agency involvement, which was used as a proxy for childhood maltreatment. Retrospective reports of maltreatment were also obtained. Child protection agency history was associated with elevated odds (odds ratio = 2.88 [95% confidence interval = 1.7-4.74]) of a lifetime diagnosis of asthma. After adjusting for a variety of indicators of socioeconomic status, lifetime mental disorders, lifetime smoking, and body mass index, this association remained significantly elevated (odds ratio = 2.26 [95% confidence interval = 1.33-3.83]). Retrospectively self-reported maltreatment in childhood was not associated with asthma. Childhood maltreatment was associated with elevated odds of asthma diagnosis. These findings are consistent with the possibility that early-life stress may be one of the environmental factors that increase the risk of asthma in genetically vulnerable individuals.

  19. Evaluation of genetic susceptibility to childhood allergy and asthma in an African American urban population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudgens Edward E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma and allergy represent complex phenotypes, which disproportionately burden ethnic minorities in the United States. Strong evidence for genomic factors predisposing subjects to asthma/allergy is available. However, methods to utilize this information to identify high risk groups are variable and replication of genetic associations in African Americans is warranted. Methods We evaluated 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP and a deletion corresponding to 11 genes demonstrating association with asthma in the literature, for association with asthma, atopy, testing positive for food allergens, eosinophilia, and total serum IgE among 141 African American children living in Detroit, Michigan. Independent SNP and haplotype associations were investigated for association with each trait, and subsequently assessed in concert using a genetic risk score (GRS. Results Statistically significant associations with asthma were observed for SNPs in GSTM1, MS4A2, and GSTP1 genes, after correction for multiple testing. Chromosome 11 haplotype CTACGAGGCC (corresponding to MS4A2 rs574700, rs1441586, rs556917, rs502581, rs502419 and GSTP1 rs6591256, rs17593068, rs1695, rs1871042, rs947895 was associated with a nearly five-fold increase in the odds of asthma (Odds Ratio (OR = 4.8, p = 0.007. The GRS was significantly associated with a higher odds of asthma (OR = 1.61, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.21, 2.13; p = 0.001. Conclusions Variation in genes associated with asthma in predominantly non-African ethnic groups contributed to increased odds of asthma in this African American study population. Evaluating all significant variants in concert helped to identify the highest risk subset of this group.

  20. Evaluation of clinical data in childhood asthma. Application of a computer file system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fife, D.; Twarog, F.J.; Geha, R.S.

    1983-10-01

    A computer file system was used in our pediatric allergy clinic to assess the value of chest roentgenograms and hemoglobin determinations used in the examination of patients and to correlate exposure to pets and forced hot air with the severity of asthma. Among 889 children with asthma, 20.7% had abnormal chest roentgenographic findings, excluding hyperinflation and peribronchial thickening, and 0.7% had abnormal hemoglobin values. Environmental exposure to pets or forced hot air was not associated with increased severity of asthma, as assessed by five measures of outcome: number of medications administered, requirement for corticosteroids, frequency of clinic visits, frequency of emergency room visits, and frequency of hospitalizations.

  1. Long-acting beta(2)-agonists in management of childhood asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2000-01-01

    This review assesses the evidence regarding the use of long-acting beta(2)-agonists in the management of pediatric asthma. Thirty double-blind, randomized, controlled trials on the effects of formoterol and salmeterol on lung function in asthmatic children were identified. Single doses of inhaled......, long-acting beta(2)-agonists provide effective bronchodilatation and bronchoprotection when used as intermittent, single-dose treatment of asthma in children, but not when used as regular treatment. Future studies should examine the positioning of long-acting beta(2)-agonists as an "as needed" rescue...... medication instead of short-acting beta(2)-agonists for pediatric asthma management....

  2. Evaluation of clinical data in childhood asthma. Application of a computer file system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, D.; Twarog, F.J.; Geha, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    A computer file system was used in our pediatric allergy clinic to assess the value of chest roentgenograms and hemoglobin determinations used in the examination of patients and to correlate exposure to pets and forced hot air with the severity of asthma. Among 889 children with asthma, 20.7% had abnormal chest roentgenographic findings, excluding hyperinflation and peribronchial thickening, and 0.7% had abnormal hemoglobin values. Environmental exposure to pets or forced hot air was not associated with increased severity of asthma, as assessed by five measures of outcome: number of medications administered, requirement for corticosteroids, frequency of clinic visits, frequency of emergency room visits, and frequency of hospitalizations

  3. Residential Radon Exposure and Incidence of Childhood Lymphoma in Texas, 1995–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Erin C.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Danysh, Heather E.; Lubega, Joseph; Langlois, Peter H.; Lupo, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    There is warranted interest in assessing the association between residential radon exposure and the risk of childhood cancer. We sought to evaluate the association between residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma in Texas. The Texas Cancer Registry (n = 2147) provided case information for the period 1995–2011. Denominator data were obtained from the United States Census. Regional arithmetic mean radon concentrations were obtained from the Texas Indoor Radon Survey and linked to residence at diagnosis. Exposure was assessed categorically: ≤25th percentile (reference), >25th to ≤50th percentile, >50th to ≤75th percentile, and >75th percentile. Negative binomial regression generated adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We evaluated lymphoma overall and by subtype: Hodgkin (HL; n = 1248), Non-Hodgkin excluding Burkitt (non-BL NHL; n = 658), Burkitt (BL; n = 241), and Diffuse Large B-cell (DLBCL; n = 315). There was no evidence that residential radon exposure was positively associated with lymphoma overall, HL, or BL. Areas with radon concentrations >75th percentile had a marginal increase in DLBCL incidence (aIRR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.03–2.91). In one of the largest studies of residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma, we found little evidence to suggest a positive or negative association; an observation consistent with previous studies. PMID:26404336

  4. Residential Radon Exposure and Incidence of Childhood Lymphoma in Texas, 1995–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin C. Peckham

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is warranted interest in assessing the association between residential radon exposure and the risk of childhood cancer. We sought to evaluate the association between residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma in Texas. The Texas Cancer Registry (n = 2147 provided case information for the period 1995–2011. Denominator data were obtained from the United States Census. Regional arithmetic mean radon concentrations were obtained from the Texas Indoor Radon Survey and linked to residence at diagnosis. Exposure was assessed categorically: ≤25th percentile (reference, >25th to ≤50th percentile, >50th to ≤75th percentile, and >75th percentile. Negative binomial regression generated adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR and 95% confidence intervals (CI. We evaluated lymphoma overall and by subtype: Hodgkin (HL; n = 1248, Non-Hodgkin excluding Burkitt (non-BL NHL; n = 658, Burkitt (BL; n = 241, and Diffuse Large B-cell (DLBCL; n = 315. There was no evidence that residential radon exposure was positively associated with lymphoma overall, HL, or BL. Areas with radon concentrations >75th percentile had a marginal increase in DLBCL incidence (aIRR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.03–2.91. In one of the largest studies of residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma, we found little evidence to suggest a positive or negative association; an observation consistent with previous studies.

  5. Asthma, tobacco smoke and the indoor environment: a qualitative study of sheltered homeless families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buu, MyMy C; Carter, Laura; Bruce, Janine S; Baca, Elizabeth A; Greenberg, Brian; Chamberlain, Lisa J

    2014-03-01

    Asthma is common in homeless children with an incidence of 28-40%. There are few published studies investigating asthma in homeless children. This study examines the perspectives of both caregivers and shelter staff regarding challenges and opportunities of caring for children with asthma. A focus group of sheltered parents (n = 10) with children who have asthma was conducted to identify barriers to optimal asthma management. Key informant interviews (n = 6) were conducted with shelter staff to discuss the shelter systems and policies to address childhood asthma. Data were audio-recorded and transcribed. A representative analysis team performed qualitative theme analysis. Key themes across 5 domains were identified: asthma education, access to asthma medication and equipment, asthma action plans, structural barriers to asthma management and environmental triggers. Parents identified multiple asthma triggers present in the shelter environment but cited lack of control as a barrier to remediation. Shelter staff desired elimination of asthma triggers but refer to the lack of resources as the primary barrier. Shelter staff favored a smoking ban on shelter property but named challenges to policy implementation. Both parents and staff identified asthma education and increased access to medications would be helpful. Policies to reduce environmental exposures, such as a smoking ban, to asthma triggers has the potential to improve the health of sheltered children with asthma.

  6. Blood lipid levels associate with childhood asthma, airway obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and aeroallergen sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Rebecca K; Stokholm, Jakob; Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of children's blood lipid profiles in relation to asthma are few, and the results are ambiguous. OBJECTIVE: We sought to examine whether the lipid profile is associated with concurrent asthma, altered lung function, and allergic sensitization in children. METHODS: High...... with assessments of lung function, bronchial responsiveness, fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (Feno), and allergic sensitization. Associations between lipid levels and clinical outcomes were adjusted for sex, passive smoking, and body mass index. RESULTS: High levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were...... of increased Feno levels (aβ coefficient, 0.14 log-ppb; 95% CI, -0.02 to 0.30 log-ppb; P = .08). CONCLUSION: The blood lipid profile is associated with asthma, airway obstruction, bronchial responsiveness, and aeroallergen sensitization in 7-year-old children. These findings suggest that asthma and allergy...

  7. Rationale and design of the multiethnic Pharmacogenomics in Childhood Asthma consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farzan, Niloufar; Vijverberg, Susanne J; Andiappan, Anand K

    2017-01-01

    corticosteroid users. Among patients from 13 studies with available data on asthma exacerbations, a third reported exacerbations despite inhaled corticosteroid use. In the future pharmacogenomics studies within the consortium, the pharmacogenomics analyses will be performed separately in each center...

  8. Research Highlights: How to Improve Childhood Asthma Outcomes. A Blueprint for Policy Action

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lara, M

    2002-01-01

    .... Therefore, an effective strategy for reducing the disease must address multiple fronts. This is particularly important for low-income and minority children, who suffer a greater burden from asthma...

  9. Socio-demographic factors related to under-diagnosis of childhood asthma in Upper Silesia, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan E. Zejda

    2017-06-01

    Among non-medical determinants of undiagnosed asthma the age of a child plays a major role. Another factors of importance is the large distance between residence and health centre, and low parental attention at home.

  10. Association of prenatal exposure to acetaminophen and coffee with childhood asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Liew, Zeyan; Olsen, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    PurposeSome studies have suggested that maternal acetaminophen use during pregnancy is associated with asthma in the offspring, and coffee consumption may modify the toxicity of acetaminophen. We aim to examine whether pregnancy maternal acetaminophen use increases the risk for offspring asthma......, and whether such a potential association could be modified by maternal coffee consumption. MethodsWe included 63 652 live-born singletons enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort. Maternal acetaminophen use and coffee consumption during pregnancy were assessed prospectively via the enrolment questionnaire...... and three computer-assisted telephone interviews. Asthma cases were identified by using the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Prescription Registry. We estimated the hazard ratios (HRs) for asthma according to prenatal acetaminophen and coffee exposure using Cox proportional hazards...

  11. Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA): piloting an integrative design for evaluating environmental health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Modem methods in molecular biology and advanced computational tools show promise in elucidating complex interactions that occur between genes and environmental factors in diseases such as asthma; however appropriately designed studies are critical for these methods to...

  12. Maturation of the gut microbiome and risk of asthma in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Jakob; Blaser, Martin J.; Thorsen, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    The composition of the human gut microbiome matures within the first years of life. It has been hypothesized that microbial compositions in this period can cause immune dysregulations and potentially cause asthma. Here we show, by associating gut microbial composition from 16S rRNA gene amplicon...... sequencing during the first year of life with subsequent risk of asthma in 690 participants, that 1-year-old children with an immature microbial composition have an increased risk of asthma at age 5 years. This association is only apparent among children born to asthmatic mothers, suggesting that lacking...... microbial stimulation during the first year of life can trigger their inherited asthma risk. Conversely, adequate maturation of the gut microbiome in this period may protect these pre-disposed children....

  13. Asthma diagnosis in a child and cessation of smoking in the child's home : the PIAMA birth cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijga, Alet H; Schipper, Maarten; Brunekreef, Bert; Koppelman, Gerard H; Gehring, Ulrike

    Second hand smoke (SHS) exposure is associated with increased incidence and severity of childhood asthma. We investigated whether, in turn, asthma diagnosis in a child is associated with cessation of smoking exposure in the child's home. In the PIAMA birth cohort (n=3963), parents reported on

  14. Asthma diagnosis in a child and cessation of smoking in the child's home : the PIAMA birth cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijga, Alet H.; Schipper, Maarten; Brunekreef, Bert; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Gehring, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Second hand smoke (SHS) exposure is associated with increased incidence and severity of childhood asthma. We investigated whether, in turn, asthma diagnosis in a child is associated with cessation of smoking exposure in the child's home. In the PIAMA birth cohort (n = 3963), parents reported on

  15. Socio-demographic factors related to under-diagnosis of childhood asthma in Upper Silesia, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zejda, Jan E; Farnik, Małgorzata; Smółka, Irena; Lawson, Joshua; Brożek, Grzegorz M

    2017-06-07

    Introduction. The presented study of 4,535 children aged 7-17 years in the Upper Silesian region of Poland yielded 186 cases of previously known asthma, and 44 children with newly diagnosed asthma. The aim of the presented study was to identify non-medical factors that could explain why children with a newly established diagnosis ('undiagnosed asthma') had not been diagnosed in the past. Materials and method. The study was performed according to a case-control design. Parents of the children answered questionnaires on socio-economic status and family-related factors. Statistical determinants of undiagnosed asthma were explored using raw (OR) and logistic odds ratios with their 95% confidence intervals (logOR, 95%CI). Results. Children with undiagnosed asthma were younger compared to the group with previously known asthma (11.3±2.1 vs. 12.6±2.5 years; p=0.0008). Newly diagnosed cases were more frequent in children who had less parental attention (less than 1 hour/day spent by parent with child - OR=4.36; 95%CI: 1.76-10.81) and who were not registered with specialized health care (OR=2.20; 95%CI: 0.95-5.06). Results of logistic regression analysis suggest that under-diagnosis of asthma is related to age below 12 years - logOR = 3.59 (95%CI: 1.28-10.36), distance to a health centre > 5 km - logOR = 3.45 (95%CI: 1.05-11.36), time spent with child Conclusion. Among non-medical determinants of undiagnosed asthma the age of a child plays a major role. Another factors of importance is the large distance between residence and health centre, and low parental attention at home.

  16. Gender-age interaction in incidence rates of childhood emotional disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesselhoeft, R; Mortensen, P B; Mors, O

    2014-01-01

    .24-2.43) for boys and 3.77% (95% CI 3.64-3.90) for girls. The pre-pubertal male preponderance was also significant for depressive disorders (F32-F33, p = 0.00144) and anxiety disorders (F40-F42, F93, p separately. CONCLUSIONS: Emotional disorders seem to display a male preponderance before the age of 12...... were incidence rates and cumulative incidences for unipolar depressive disorder (ICD-10: F32-F33), anxiety disorders (ICD-10: F40-F42), and emotional disorders with onset specific to childhood (ICD-10: F93). RESULTS: Pre-pubertal incidence rates for depressive and anxiety disorders were higher for boys......BACKGROUND: The post-pubertal association of female gender with emotional disorder is a robust finding. However, studies exploring the association of gender and emotional disorders before puberty are few and present diverging results. The aim of this study was to present gender-specific incidence...

  17. Childhood leukaemia incidence below the age of 5 years near French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurier, D; Hemon, D; Clavel, J

    2008-01-01

    A recent study indicated an excess risk of leukaemia among children under the age of 5 years living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in Germany. We present results relating to the incidence of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in France for the same age range. These results do not indicate an excess risk of leukaemia in young children living near French nuclear power plants. (note)

  18. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ali, Zarqa; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem, and obesity is associated with a high incidence of asthma and poor asthma control. The aim of the present paper is to systematically review the current knowledge of the effect on overall asthma control of weight reduction in overweight and obese adults with asthma....

  19. Variability in childhood allergy and asthma across ethnicity, language, and residency duration in El Paso, Texas: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Erik R; Gonzales, Melissa; Ross, Mary; Neas, Lucas M

    2009-12-08

    We evaluated the impact of migration to the USA-Mexico border city of El Paso, Texas (USA), parental language preference, and Hispanic ethnicity on childhood asthma to differentiate between its social and environmental determinants. Allergy and asthma prevalence was surveyed among 9797 fourth and fifth grade children enrolled in the El Paso Independent School District. Parents completed a respiratory health questionnaire, in either English or Spanish, and a sub-sample of children received spirometry testing at their school. Here we report asthma and allergy outcomes across ethnicity and El Paso residency duration. Asthma and allergy prevalence increased with longer duration of El Paso residency independent of ethnicity and preferred language. Compared with immigrants who arrived in El Paso after entering first grade (18%), lifelong El Paso residents (68%) had more prevalent allergy (OR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.32 - 2.24), prevalent asthma (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.24 - 2.46), and current asthma (OR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.37 - 2.95). Spirometric measurements (FEV1/FVC and FEF25-75) also declined with increasing duration of El Paso residency (0.16% and 0.35% annual reduction, respectively). These findings suggest that a community-wide environmental exposure in El Paso, delayed pulmonary development, or increased health of immigrants may be associated with allergy and asthma development in children raised there.

  20. Pet ownership is associated with increased risk of non-atopic asthma and reduced risk of atopy in childhood: findings from a UK birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, S M; Granell, R; Westgarth, C; Murray, J; Paul, E; Sterne, J A C; John Henderson, A

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown an inverse association of pet ownership with allergy but inconclusive findings for asthma. To investigate whether pet ownership during pregnancy and childhood was associated with asthma and atopy at the age of 7 in a UK population-based birth cohort. Data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) were used to investigate associations of pet ownership at six time points from pregnancy to the age of 7 with asthma, atopy (grass, house dust mite, and cat skin prick test) and atopic vs. non-atopic asthma at the age of 7 using logistic regression models adjusted for child's sex, maternal history of asthma/atopy, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and family adversity. A total of 3768 children had complete data on pet ownership, asthma, and atopy. Compared with non-ownership, continuous ownership of any pet (before and after the age of 3) was associated with 52% lower odds of atopic asthma [odds ratio (OR) 0.48, 95% CI 0.34-0.68]. Pet ownership tended to be associated with increased risk of non-atopic asthma, particularly rabbits (OR 1.61, 1.04-2.51) and rodents (OR 1.86, 1.15-3.01), comparing continuous vs. non-ownership. Pet ownership was consistently associated with lower odds of sensitization to grass, house dust mite, and cat allergens, but rodent ownership was associated with higher odds of sensitization to rodent allergen. Differential effects of pet ownership on atopic vs. non-atopic asthma were evident for all pet types. Pet ownership during pregnancy and childhood in this birth cohort was consistently associated with a reduced risk of aeroallergen sensitization and atopic asthma at the age of 7, but tended to be associated (particularly for rabbits and rodents) with an increased risk of non-atopic asthma. The opposing effects on atopy vs. non-atopic asthma might be considered by parents when they are deciding whether to acquire a pet. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Distribuição da gravidade da asma na infância Distribution of severity of asthma in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia de Magalhães Simões

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar a distribuição dos padrões de gravidade da asma em uma amostra populacional de crianças em Salvador (BA. MÉTODOS: Questionário epidemiológico (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood - ISAAC foi aplicado juntamente com questionário elaborado com base em critérios de gravidade adotados na prática clínica (Global Initiative for Asthma - GINA em 417 crianças de 5 a 12 anos com sintomas de asma nos últimos 12 meses. Com base nas questões do ISAAC, as crianças foram classificadas em asma grave e não grave. De acordo com os critérios clínicos da GINA, quatro categorias de gravidade foram criadas: intermitente, persistente leve, persistente moderada e grave. RESULTADOS: Noventa crianças (22,3% apresentaram indicadores de gravidade segundo o ISAAC. Com base nos critérios da GINA, havia 143 crianças com asma intermitente, 160 com asma leve persistente, 51 com asma moderada e 43 com asma grave. A concordância entre os dois questionários foi de 81,3%, com índice kappa de 0,5. CONCLUSÕES: A maioria das crianças asmáticas em Salvador possui asma persistente. Há bom nível de concordância na identificação da asma grave, entre a classificação epidemiológica e a clínica.OBJECTIVE: To estimate the distribution of asthma severity in a population-based sample of children from Salvador, Brazil. METHODS: An epidemiologically oriented questionnaire (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood, ISAAC and a questionnaire based on criteria used in clinical practice (The Global Initiative for Asthma, GINA were administered simultaneously to 417 children aged 5 to 12 years who reported symptoms of asthma in the past 12 months. According to the ISAAC instrument, children were classified into severe and non-severe asthma, whereas GINA clinical criteria produced four categories of severity: intermittent, mild persistent, moderate persistent and severe asthma. RESULTS: Ninety children reported

  2. Early incidence of occupational asthma is not accelerated by atopy in the bakery/pastry and hairdressing sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémen, T; Acouetey, D-S; Paris, C; Hannhart, B; Poussel, M; Chenuel, B; Barbaud, A; Zmirou-Navier, D

    2013-07-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) is most likely to develop in the very early years of exposure. To describe the early incidence of OA among bakers/pastry-makers (BP) and hairdressers and to explore the role of atopy. Following a retrospective follow-up design, subjects were invited to undergo telephone interviews. Those who declared work-related respiratory or rhinitis symptoms and a sample group of others were offered a medical visit for OA investigations. Data from interviews and from medical visits were used to estimate the incidence of OA according to increasing durations of exposure. A total of 866 subjects were interviewed (mean age 25.3 years, 43.8% females), of whom 282 underwent a medical visit. Total estimated incidence rates of 'confirmed or probable' OA during the first 12 years of exposure were high in BP (2.63 per 100 person-years [py]) and in hairdressers (0.58/100 py), particularly in the first 4 years. Atopy is a strong risk factor for incidence among BP but, irrespective of the occupational sector, it does not influence the timing of OA symptoms. OA symptoms occur soon after the start of exposure. Our results suggest that atopy does not precipitate the occurrence of symptoms in two different allergen exposure settings.

  3. Impact of omalizumab on medical cost of childhood asthma in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hideki; Iwata, Mihoko; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Ono, Rintaro; Murakami, Yoko; Taba, Naohiko; Honjo, Satoshi; Motomura, Chikako; Odajima, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Omalizumab is effective in children with severe asthma, but its impact on medical cost in Japan is not clear. We evaluated the impact of omalizumab on medical cost by comparing the pre- vs post-omalizumab-initiation medical costs of 12 children with severe asthma who received omalizumab for 2 years, and calculating incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for omalizumab therapy. Health outcome was measured as hospital-free days (HFD). The median total medical costs and medication fee per patient increased significantly after omalizumab initiation because of the high cost of omalizumab. The median hospitalization fee per patient, however, decreased significantly after omalizumab initiation due to reduction in hospitalization. Omalizumab led to an estimated increase of 40.8 HFD per omalizumab responder patient per 2 years. The cost was JPY 20 868 per additional HFD. Omalizumab can therefore reduce hospitalization cost in children with severe asthma in Japan. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  4. Cord blood 25(OH)-vitamin D deficiency and childhood asthma, allergy and eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo L; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Jensen, Pia F

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have suggested an association between maternal vitamin D dietary intake during pregnancy and risk of asthma and allergy in the offspring. However, prospective clinical studies on vitamin D measured in cord blood and development of clinical end-points are sparse...... of recurrent TROLS till age 7 years. Randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy are needed to prove causality.......BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have suggested an association between maternal vitamin D dietary intake during pregnancy and risk of asthma and allergy in the offspring. However, prospective clinical studies on vitamin D measured in cord blood and development of clinical end-points are sparse....... OBJECTIVE: To investigate the interdependence of cord blood 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)-Vitamin D) level and investigator-diagnosed asthma- and allergy-related conditions during preschool-age. METHODS: Cord blood 25(OH)-Vitamin D level was measured in 257 children from the Copenhagen Prospective Studies...

  5. Prenatal vitamin D supplementation reduces risk of asthma/recurrent wheeze in early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Helene M; Chawes, Bo L; Litonjua, Augusto A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We recently published two independent randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy, both indicating a >20% reduced risk of asthma/recurrent wheeze in the offspring by 3 years of age. However, neither reached statistical significance. OBJECTIVE: To perform......) or placebo. All women also received a prenatal vitamin containing 400 IU/d vitamin D3. The primary outcome was asthma/recurrent wheeze from 0-3yrs. Secondary end-points were specific IgE, total IgE, eczema and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). We conducted random effects combined analyses......-points. CONCLUSIONS: This combined analysis shows that vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy results in a significant reduced risk of asthma/recurrent wheeze in the offspring, especially among women with 25(OH)D level ≥ 30 ng/ml at randomization, where the risk was almost halved. Future studies should examine...

  6. Prenatal vitamin D supplementation reduces risk of asthma/recurrent wheeze in early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Helene M; Chawes, Bo L; Litonjua, Augusto A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We recently published two independent randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy, both indicating a >20% reduced risk of asthma/recurrent wheeze in the offspring by 3 years of age. However, neither reached statistical significance. OBJECTIVE: To perform......) or placebo. All women also received a prenatal vitamin containing 400 IU/d vitamin D3. The primary outcome was asthma/recurrent wheeze from 0-3yrs. Secondary end-points were specific IgE, total IgE, eczema and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). We conducted random effects combined analyses...

  7. Epigenetic Mechanisms in Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Avery; Vercelli, Donata

    2016-03-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases are among the most prevalent chronic noncommunicable diseases of childhood, but the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms are poorly understood. Because epigenetic mechanisms link gene regulation to environmental cues and developmental trajectories, their contribution to asthma and allergy pathogenesis is under active investigation. DNA methylation signatures associated with concurrent disease and with the development of asthma during childhood asthma have been identified, but their significance is not easily interpretable. On the other hand, the characterization of early epigenetic predictors of asthma points to a potential role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating the inception of, and the susceptibility to, this disease.

  8. Evaluation of association between exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and childhood asthma control test questionnaire scores in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinellato, Iolanda; Piazza, Michele; Sandri, Marco; Cardinale, Fabio; Peroni, Diego G; Boner, Attilio L; Piacentini, Giorgio L

    2012-03-01

    Asthma control represents a major challenge in the management of asthmatic children; however, correct perception of control is poor. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between subjective answers given to the Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) and objective evaluation of exercise-induced bronchonstriction (EIB) by standardized treadmill exercise challenge. EIB was evaluated by standardized treadmill exercise challenge and related to C-ACT scores in 92 asthmatic children. Of the 92 studied children only six children had a concordance between a positive challenge test (ΔFEV1 ≥ 13%) and a positive response to the exercise-related issue of the C-ACT questionnaire (C-ACT total score ≤ 19). There was no significant association between the degree of EIB and the scores relative to the single question on exercise-related problems while a significant association was found when considering the whole questionnaire with C-ACT total score > 19 (r = -0.40, P asthma. The areas under the ROC curve (AUC) for the sum of the scores of these questions in relationship to a positive response to the exercise test was 0.74. The AUC of the C-ACT total score was 0.76 and 0.55 for the specific question on EIB related problems. The discrimination power of the C-ACT total score in relationship to EIB was moderately good, and C-ACT questionnaire was capable of correctly predicting the absence of EIB in children reporting a global score > 19. However, direct questions on EIB are associated with a high number of false positive and negative responses; better associations are found questioning on the presence on nocturnal symptoms. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Childhood underweight, weight gain during childhood to adolescence/young adulthood and incidence of adult metabolic syndrome in the SUN (Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Adriano M; Beunza, Juan-José; Sanchez-Villegas, Almudena; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A

    2011-07-01

    To assess associations between childhood body weight, weight gain during childhood to adolescence/young adulthood and incidence of adult metabolic syndrome (MetS). A dynamic prospective cohort study (the SUN Project; Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra). Participants were asked to select which of nine body images most closely represented their body shape at ages 5 and 20 years, and it was used as a proxy of BMI. An incident case of MetS was diagnosed according to criteria of the International Diabetes Federation. Associations between childhood body weight, weight gain during childhood to adolescence/young adulthood and incidence of adult MetS were estimated by multiple-adjusted odds ratios and their 95 % confidence intervals. University of Navarra, Spain. The study included 5317 university graduates, followed-up for a median of 6·1 years. The incidence of MetS was 2·9 % (1·7 % in women and 5·1 % in men). Among men, body shape at age 5 years was inversely related to adult MetS (OR = 0·83, 95 % CI 0·72, 0·97), whereas weight gain during childhood to adolescence/young adulthood was directly associated with adult MetS (OR = 1·49, 95 % CI 1·01, 2·18); both childhood underweight (OR = 5·20, 95 % CI 1·87, 14·50) and childhood obesity (OR = 4·66, 95 % CI 1·40, 15·51) increased the likelihood of adult MetS. No association was apparent among women. These results support treating childhood underweight and weight gain during childhood to adolescence/young adulthood as part of comprehensive adult MetS prevention efforts in men.

  10. Incidence of obesity during childhood and adolescence in a large contemporary cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adrienne R; Sherriff, Andrea; Lawlor, Debbie A; Ness, Andrew R; Reilly, John J

    2011-05-01

    Timing of obesity development during childhood and adolescence is unclear, hindering preventive strategies. The primary aim of the present study was to quantify the incidence of overweight and obesity throughout childhood and adolescence in a large contemporary cohort of English children (the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, ALSPAC; children born 1991-1992). A secondary aim was to examine the persistence of overweight and obesity. Longitudinal data on weight and height were collected annually from age 7-15 years in the entire ALSPAC cohort (n=4283), and from 3 to 15 years in a randomly selected subsample of the cohort (n=549; 'Children in Focus' CiF). Incidence of overweight and obesity (BMI (Body mass index) at or above the 85th and 95th centiles relative to U.K. reference data) was calculated. Risk ratios (RR) for overweight and obesity at 15 years based on weight status at 3, 7, and 11 years were also calculated. In the entire cohort, four-year incidence of obesity was higher between ages 7 and 11 years than between 11 and 15 years (5.0% vs. 1.4% respectively). In the CiF sub-sample, four-year incidence of obesity was also highest during mid-childhood (age 7-11years, 6.7%), slightly lower during early childhood (3-7 years, 5.1%) and lowest during adolescence (11-15 years 1.6%). Overweight and obesity at all ages had a strong tendency to persist to age 15 years as indicated by risk ratios (95% CI (Confidence interval)) for overweight and obesity at 15 years from overweight and obesity (relative to healthy weight status) at 3 years (2.4, 1.8-3.1), 7 years (4.6, 3.6-5.8), and 11 years (9.3, 6.5-13.2). Mid-late childhood (around age 7-11 years) may merit greater attention in future obesity prevention interventions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Peak flow variation in childhood asthma : Relationship to symptoms, atopy, airways obstruction and hyperresponsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, PLP; Duiverman, EJ; Postma, DS; Waalkens, HJ; Kerrebijn, KF; vanEssenZandvliet, EEM; Quanjer, PH; Sluiter, HJ; Pouw, EM; Schoonbrood, DFME; Roos, CM; Jansen, HM; DeGooijer, A; Kerstjens, HAM; vanderMark, TW; Koeter, GH; deJong, PM; Sterk, PJ; Weaver, AMJ; Dijkman, JH; Dekhuijzen, PNR; Folgering, HTM; vanHerwaarden, CLA; Overbeek, SE; Bogaard, JM; Hilvering, C; Gans, SJ; Mengelers, HJJ; vanderBruggenBogaarts, BAHA; Kreukniet, J; Kouwenberg, JM; Prinsen, JE; Gerritsen, J; Knol, K; deMonchy, JGR; Dekker, FW; Kaptein, AA; Merkus, PJFM; Pocock, SJ; Hughes, MD; Robinson, NJ; Bleecker, ER; Meyers, DA

    Although home recording of peak expiratory flow (PEF) is considered useful in managing asthma, little is known about the relationship of PEF variation to other indicators of disease activity, We examined the relationship of PEF variation, expressed in various ways, to symptoms, atopy, level of lung

  12. The relationship between negative emotions and acute subjective and objective symptoms of childhood asthma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, S.; Prins, P.J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Examined whether negative emotions influence subjective rather than objective symptoms of asthma, breathlessness, and airways obstruction in 40 asthmatic children (aged 7-18 yrs). The Ss were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 experimental conditions: (1) viewing an emotional film of 10 min; (2) performing

  13. Prenatal and childhood nutrition and the development of asthma and allergy in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willers, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    Since the 1960’s of the last century the prevalence of asthma and allergic disease has increased considerably, especially in the Western world. Prosperity related changes in diet have possibly contributed to this increase. However, the evidence from epidemiological studies for a relation between

  14. High inhaled corticosteroids adherence in childhood asthma : the role of medication beliefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, Ted; Kaptein, Adrian A.; Duiverman, Eric J.; Brand, Paul L.

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to study determinants of adherence in young asthmatic children over a 3-month period, including the role of parental illness and medication perceptions as determinants of adherence. Consecutive 2-6-yr-old children with asthma, using inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), followed-up at our

  15. Protection from childhood asthma and allergy in Alpine farm environments-the GABRIEL Advanced Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illi, S.; Depner, M.; Genuneit, J.; Horak, E.; Loss, G.; Strunz-Lehner, C.; Büchele, G.; Boznanski, A.; Danielewicz, H.; Cullinan, P.; Heederik, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072910542; Braun-Fahrländer, C.; von Mutius, E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Studies on the association of farm environments with asthma and atopy have repeatedly observed a protective effect of farming. However, no single specific farm-related exposure explaining this protective farm effect has consistently been identified. OBJECTIVE We sought to determine

  16. The value of FeNO measurement in asthma management: the motion against FeNO to help manage childhood asthma--reality bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Peter J; Stick, Stephen M

    2008-06-01

    Since exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) was first demonstrated to be raised in asthmatic patients in the early 1990s, there has been a strong interest in its potential role in the diagnosis and management of asthma. This culminated in 2003 when the US Food and Drug Administration cleared the NIOX nitric oxide analyser for clinical application in patients with asthma. The interest in FeNO is based on the assumptions that FeNO is a marker of asthma and asthma control, and that it reflects eosinophilic airway inflammation. However, the literature remains unconvincing and inconclusive. Furthermore, studies which have management algorithms that include FeNO as a guide to asthma treatment have failed to observe any improvement in asthma control compared with the use of standard asthma guidelines. At present, the cost of including FeNO in management guidelines far outweighs any potential benefits.

  17. Severe Asthma in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, Bradley E; Parikh, Neil G; Maharaj, Sheena K

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize, diagnose, evaluate, and treat severe childhood asthma. Understanding the occurrence of the physiologic and clinical presentations of childhood severe asthma, the treatment and response may be predicted by biomarkers, but the patient's response is highly variable. The onset of severe asthma occurs early and is primarily predicted by severity of viral infection and coexistence of the atopic state.

  18. Modeling of regional climate change effects on ground-level ozone and childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Perry E; Knowlton, Kim; Carr, Jessie L; Kinney, Patrick L

    2011-09-01

    The adverse respiratory effects of ground-level ozone are well established. Ozone is the air pollutant most consistently projected to increase under future climate change. To project future pediatric asthma emergency department visits associated with ground-level ozone changes, comparing 1990s to 2020s. This study assessed future numbers of asthma emergency department visits for children aged 0-17 years using (1) baseline New York City metropolitan area emergency department rates; (2) a dose-response relationship between ozone levels and pediatric asthma emergency department visits; and (3) projected daily 8-hour maximum ozone concentrations for the 2020s as simulated by a global-to-regional climate change and atmospheric chemistry model. Sensitivity analyses included population projections and ozone precursor changes. This analysis occurred in 2010. In this model, climate change could cause an increase in regional summer ozone-related asthma emergency department visits for children aged 0-17 years of 7.3% across the New York City metropolitan region by the 2020s. This effect diminished with inclusion of ozone precursor changes. When population growth is included, the projections of morbidity related to ozone are even larger. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the use of regional climate and atmospheric chemistry models make possible the projection of local climate change health effects for specific age groups and specific disease outcomes, such as emergency department visits for asthma. Efforts should be made to improve on this type of modeling to inform local and wider-scale climate change mitigation and adaptation policy. Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Exposure to toxics during pregnancy and childhood and asthma in children: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souheil Hallit

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Environmental factors, pesticides, alcohol and smoking are linked to asthma in children. The association of toxic substances exposure with asthma has not been evaluated. Our objective is to assess such associations among children aged less than 16 years old. This is a cross-sectional study, conducted between January and May 2015, using a sample of Lebanese students from private schools in Beirut and Mount Lebanon. Out of 700 distributed questionnaires, 527 (75.2% were returned to us. Verbal informed consent was also obtained from all parents prior to participating in the study. A significant association was found between waterpipe smoking and diagnosed asthma (p = 0.003; ORa = 13.25; 95% CI 2.472–71.026. Alcohol during pregnancy, waterpipe smoking during pregnancy and parents respiratory problems significantly increased the risk of respiratory problems by approximately 5 times, 6 times and 2 times respectively (p = 0.016; ORa = 4.889; 95% CI 1.339–17.844, p = 0.021; ORa = 6.083; 95% CI 1.314–28.172, p = 0.004; ORa = 1.748; 95% CI 1.197–2.554 respectively. Waterpipe smoking, alcohol during pregnancy, recurrent otitis and humidity at home seem to be significantly correlated with asthma in children. Spreading awareness by health care professionals is needed to permit a reduction of the prevalence of these allergic diseases, especially asthma, in children.

  20. Time in bed, sleep quality and associations with cardiometabolic markers in children : the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berentzen, Nina E.; Smit, Henriette A.; Bekkers, Marga B. M.; Brunekreef, Bert; Koppelman, Gerard H.; De Jongste, Johan C.; Kerkhof, Marjan; Van Rossem, Lenie; Wijga, Alet H.

    We investigated associations of time in bed and multiple sleep quality characteristics with cardiometabolic markers in children. Data from the prevention and incidence of asthma and mite allergy study, a population-based prospective birth-cohort study started in 1996-1997 in the Netherlands, were

  1. ASSESSMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY PM 2.5 SAMPLES FROM TWO CITIES IN GERMANY WITH DIFFERING INCIDENCE OF ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASSESSMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY PM 2.5 SAMPLES FROM TWO CITIES IN GERMANY WITH DIFFERING INCIDENCE OF ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA.LR Bishop, J Heinrich*, MK Selgrade & MI Gilmour. Experimental Toxicology Division, ORD/ NHEERL, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC. *GSF, Neuherberg,...

  2. Childhood Physical Abuse Is Associated with Incident Metabolic Syndrome in Mid-Life Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midei, Aimee J.; Matthews, Karen A.; Chang, Yue-Fang; Bromberger, Joyce T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Previous research has suggested that childhood emotional abuse, physical abuse, and sexual abuse are associated with an increased risk for ischemic heart disease. Our objective was to examine whether childhood abuse predicted incident metabolic syndrome, a precursor to heart disease, in mid-life women. Methods Participants were 342 (114 Black, 228 White) women from the Pittsburgh site of the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN). SWAN included a baseline assessment of premenopausal or early perimenopausal women in midlife (mean age = 45.7), and women were evaluated for presence of the metabolic syndrome over 7 annual follow-up visits. Women were classified as having metabolic syndrome if they met 3 of the following criteria: waist circumference > 88 cm, triglycerides ≥ 150 mg/dl, HDL mid-life women. PMID:22775234

  3. Incidence of childhood leukemia around French nuclear sites between 1990 and 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White-Koning, M.; Hemon, D.; Goubin, A.; Clavel, J.; Laurier, D.; Tirmarche, M.; Jougla, E.

    2006-01-01

    The works presented here constitute the first systematic study of the incidence of childhood leukemia around the whole of French nuclear facilities. Globally, the incidence of childhood leukemia does not diverge significantly of the expected incidence during the period 1990-1998. It does not show a decrease of S.I.R. (standardized incidence ratio) in function of the distance from child's home to the nuclear site whatever be the age. This study represents the first analysis of the incidence of leukemia focusing on 29 French nuclear sites, including the whole of the 19 C.N.P.E. ( nuclear power plants that produce electric power), and is based on incidence data rather than mortality. The period, the age groups and the studied area have been all chosen a priori, that gives a statistical validity to the results. The estimation of population at risk have been made with several different methods of interpolation in order to check the stability of estimations. The different methods of statistical analysis used have lead to extremely close results, reinforcing our confidence in the reliability of our estimations. The excess of leukemia incidence observed at Chinon and Civaux and the deficit observed at Bruyere/Saclay/Fontenay loose their statistical significance when the correction of Bonferroni is applied. So, the global analysis of the 29 sites and the analysis by site have not shown statistically significant difference between the numbers of observed and expected cases. The study of the 19 C.N.P.E. gave same results, even in taken into account their electric power or their year of service. The possibility of confounding factors has been excluded. The power of the study to detect excess incidence and a decrease of S.I.R. with distance from the site was examined under different alternative hypotheses through simulation methods. For values of S.I.R. near the site (0-5 km) between 1.5 and 2 and a risk of error of 5%, the power of the study is between 96% and 100% depending

  4. Technetium /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated albumin lung scans. Use in chronic childhood asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, J.S.; Koch, D.F.; Isenberg, P.D.; Werner, P.

    1976-01-01

    Serial roentgenograms and technetium /sub 99m/Tc macroaggregated albumin lung scans were done simultaneously in 30 bronchodilator-dependent asthmatic children and young adults during both relative remission and attacks of status asthmaticus. When chest roentgenograms showed air trapping and increased peribronchial vascular markings associated with persistent perfusion defects, the children benefited from further laboratory studies and continuous comprehensive therapy. Serial scans provided information about underperfusion that was not discernible either by roentgenograms or by usual blood gas studies. Also, lung scans are easier to obtain in children with long-standing asthma than are detailed pulmonary tests. In our study, technetium /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated albumin scans showed persistent regional perfusion defects in 20 children with chronic asthma during relative remission and exacerbations

  5. Designing clinical trials to address the needs of childhood and adult asthma: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's AsthmaNet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, E Rand; Busse, William W

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute announced its intent to support a new asthma network known as AsthmaNet. This clinical trials consortium, now in its fifth year, has been charged with developing and executing clinical trials to address the most important asthma management questions and identify new treatment approaches in pediatric and adult patients. This review will discuss the organization of AsthmaNet and the scientific context in which the network was developed and began its work, report the results of an internal priority-setting exercise designed to guide the network's scientific strategy, and highlight the portfolio of clinical trials, proof-of-concept studies, and mechanistic studies planned for the 7-year period of the network to update the global asthma community regarding the progress and processes of the network. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Frequência de sintomas de asma e de redução da função pulmonar entre crianças e adolescentes nadadores amadores Incidence of asthma symptoms and decreased pulmonary function in young amateur swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Nely Fiks

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar a frequência de sintomas de asma entre crianças e adolescentes nadadores amadores e descrever o tratamento clínico entre as crianças asmáticas em um clube esportivo privado na cidade de São Paulo. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos no estudo 171 nadadores amadores de 6 a 14 anos de idade. Todos os participantes ou seus responsáveis foram solicitados a responder o questionário International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC, e 119 realizaram prova de função pulmonar em repouso. RESULTADOS: A frequência geral de sintomas de asma (ISAAC > 6 pontos entre os nadadores foi de 16,8%. Entre os 119 nadadores que realizaram a espirometria, 39 (32,7% apresentaram alterações espirométricas (VEF1/CVF 6, 10 (31,2% alegaram não realizar nenhum tipo de tratamento para a doença. Daqueles que afirmaram realizar tratamento medicamentoso, 24% faziam uso de broncodilatadores mas não de corticosteroides. CONCLUSÕES: A frequência de sintomas de asma e de alterações da função pulmonar em nadadores amadores de 6 a 14 anos foi elevada. Além disso, uma proporção considerável destes atletas não recebia tratamento.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incidence of asthma symptoms in young amateur swimmers, and to describe the clinical treatment of the children with asthma in a private sports club in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: The study included 171 amateur swimmers, ranging from 6 to14 years of age. All of the participants or their legal guardians were asked to complete the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC questionnaire, and 119 were submitted to pulmonary function testing at rest. RESULTS: The overall incidence of asthma symptoms (ISAAC score > 6 among the swimmers was 16.8%. Of the 119 swimmers submitted to spirometry, 39 (32.7% presented spirometric alterations (FEV1/FVC 6, there were 10 (31.2% who stated that they were receiving no asthma treatment. Of those who reported

  7. Childhood Leukaemia Incidence in Hungary, 1973-2002. Interpolation Model for Analysing the Possible Effects of the Chernobyl Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toeroek, Szabolcs; Borgulya, Gabor; Lobmayer, Peter; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Schuler, Dezsoe; Fekete, Gyoergy

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of childhood leukaemia in Hungary has yet to be reported, although data are available since the early 70s. The Hungarian data therefore cover the time before and after the Chernobyl nuclear accident (1986). The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the Chernobyl accident on childhood leukaemia incidence in Hungary. A population-based study was carried out using data of the National Paediatric Cancer Registry of Hungary from 1973 to 2002. The total number of cases was 2204. To test the effect of the Chernobyl accident the authors applied a new approach called 'Hypothesized Impact Period Interpolation'-model, which takes into account the increasing trend of childhood leukaemia incidence and the hypothesized exposure and latency times. The incidence of leukaemia in the age group 0-14 varied between 33.2 and 39.4 per million person-years along the observed 30 year period, and the incidence of childhood leukaemia showed a moderate increase of 0.71% annually (p=0.0105). In the period of the hypothesized impact of the Chernobyl accident the incidence rate was elevated by 2.5% (95% CI: -8.1%; +14.3%), but this change was not statistically significant (p=0.663). The age standardised incidence, the age distribution, the gender ratio, and the magnitude of increasing trend of childhood leukaemia incidence in Hungary were similar to other European countries. Applying the presented interpolation method the authors did not find a statistically significant increase in the leukaemia incidence in the period of the hypothesized impact of the Chernobyl accident

  8. Spatial variation of natural radiation and childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Sylvia; Monfort, Christine; Green, Martyn; Muirhead, Colin; Draper, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of the geographical variation of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain over a 15 year period in relation to natural radiation (gamma and radon). Data at the level of the 459 district level local authorities in England, Wales and regional districts in Scotland are analysed in two complementary ways: first, by Poisson regressions with the inclusion of environmental covariates and a smooth spatial structure; secondly, by a hierarchical Bayesian model in which extra-Poisson variability is modelled explicitly in terms of spatial and non-spatial components. From this analysis, we deduce a strong indication that a main part of the variability is accounted for by a local neighbourhood 'clustering' structure. This structure is furthermore relatively stable over the 15 year period for the lymphocytic leukaemias which make up the majority of observed cases. We found no evidence of a positive association of childhood leukaemia incidence with outdoor or indoor gamma radiation levels. There is no consistent evidence of any association with radon levels. Indeed, in the Poisson regressions, a significant positive association was only observed for one 5-year period, a result which is not compatible with a stable environmental effect. Moreover, this positive association became clearly non-significant when over-dispersion relative to the Poisson distribution was taken into account. (author)

  9. Determinação de escore e nota de corte do módulo de asma do International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood para discriminação de adultos asmáticos em estudos epidemiológicos Determining the score and cut-off point that would identify asthmatic adults in epidemiological studies using the asthma module of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elayne de Fátima Maçãira

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Validar o questionário padronizado escrito do International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood, módulo sobre asma, para pesquisa de prevalência de asma, estabelecendo seu escore e a nota de corte para discriminação de adultos asmáticos. MÉTODOS: Entrevistamos pacientes ambulatoriais adultos, 40 asmáticos e 38 controles, pareados por sexo e idade, utilizando o módulo de asma do International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood, composto por oito aspectos dicotômicos de asma. Determinamos o escore e a nota de corte para discriminação de asmáticos, definindo sua sensibilidade, especificidade e índice de Youden. Validamos o método em contraposição ao diagnóstico clínico e funcional. A reprodutibilidade das questões individuais foi testada por meio de reentrevistas de metade dos pacientes após algumas semanas. RESULTADOS: O escore variou de 0 a 14 pontos. Um escore = 5 pontos permitiu discriminar pacientes asmáticos (sensibilidade = 93%, especificidade = 100% e índice de Youden = 0,93. A maioria das questões apresentou boa reprodutibilidade, observada em reentrevista após 48,2 ± 11,1 dias (Kappa e Kappa ponderado variando de 0,43 a 1,00 para as questões individuais. CONCLUSÃO: A validação de uma nota de corte permite uma interpretação alternativa às informações fornecidas pelo módulo de asma do International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood, levando em conta o conjunto das informações e não somente as respostas individuais de cada questão em estudos de prevalência de asma em adultos.OBJECTIVE: To validate, for use in asthma prevalence studies, the asthma module of the standardized written questionnaire developed for use in the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood, establishing the score and cut-off point that would identify asthmatic adults. METHODS: We interviewed 78 adult outpatients (40 adult asthmatics and 38 age-matched and gender-matched controls

  10. An unexpectedly high incidence of acute childhood diarrhea in Koot-Abdollah, Ahwaz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolahi, Ali-Asghar; Rastegarpour, Ali; Abadi, Alireza; Gachkar, Latif

    2010-07-01

    Koot-Abdollah is a neighborhood in Ahwaz, in the southeast of Iran, susceptible to public health hazards due to a number of factors, including a low level of personal hygiene, inappropriate community sanitation, and a high level of environmental and water pollution. This study was designed to measure the incidence of acute childhood diarrhea in this neighborhood. This was a descriptive population-based study. Via multistage sampling, data were collected by interviewing the mothers in their homes. Reported 95% confidence intervals included a finite population correction factor and accounted for the cluster sampling design. The study included 2016 children aged 6 to 60 months. Overall, 725 (36.0%) of the children studied had experienced an episode of acute diarrhea during the previous two weeks. In other words, the children demonstrated a rate of diarrhea per 100 person-years of 936 for the studied period, which was a time period expected to reveal the lowest possible incidence of diarrhea. The incidence of diarrhea per two weeks in Koot-Abdollah is exceptionally high. The limitation of available drinking water, warm weather, illiteracy, poverty, and low incomes, in addition to the low level of sanitation and personal hygiene and extreme environmental pollution contribute to this high incidence. Copyright 2010 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Childhood Asthma Hospital Discharge Medication Fills and Risk of Subsequent Readmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Chén C; Rubin, David M; Zorc, Joseph J; Mohamad, Zeinab; Faerber, Jennifer A; Feudtner, Chris

    2015-05-01

    To assess the relationship between posthospitalization prescription fills for recommended asthma discharge medication classes and subsequent hospital readmission. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of Medicaid Analytic Extract files from 12 geographically diverse states from 2005-2007. We linked inpatient hospitalization, outpatient, and prescription claims records for children ages 2-18 years with an index hospitalization for asthma to identify those who filled a short-acting beta agonist, oral corticosteroid, or inhaled corticosteroid within 3 days of discharge. We used a multivariable extended Cox model to investigate the association of recommended medication fills and hospital readmission within 90 days. Of 31,658 children hospitalized, 55% filled a beta agonist prescription, 57% an oral steroid, and 37% an inhaled steroid. Readmission occurred for 1.3% of patients by 14 days and 6.3% by 90 days. Adjusting for patient and billing provider factors, beta agonist (hazard ratio [HR] 0.67, 95% CI 0.51, 0.87) and inhaled steroid (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.42, 0.85) fill were associated with a reduction in readmission at 14 days. Between 15 and 90 days, inhaled steroid fill was associated with decreased readmission (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.77, 0.98). Patients who filled all 3 medications had the lowest readmission hazard within both intervals. Filling of beta agonists and inhaled steroids was associated with diminished hazard of early readmission. For inhaled steroids, this effect persisted up to 90 days. Efforts to improve discharge care for asthma should include enhancing recommended discharge medication fill rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Urbanization factors associated with childhood asthma and prematurity: a population-based analysis aged from 0 to 5 years in Taiwan by using Cox regression within a hospital cluster model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, Hui-Wen

    2015-04-01

    Childhood asthma and premature birth are both common; however, no studies have reported urbanization association between asthma and prematurity and the duration of prematurity affect asthma development. We use Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database (LHID) to explore association between asthma and prematurity among children by using a population-based analysis. This is a retrospective cohort study with registration data derived from Taiwan LHID. We evaluated prematurely born infants and children aged prematurely and 13 851 (40.27 per 1000 person-years) controls. The hazard ratio for asthma during 5-year follow-up period was 1.95 (95% confidence interval = 1.67-2.28) among children born prematurely. Boys born prematurely aged 0-2 years were associated with higher asthma rates compared with girls in non-premature and premature groups. Living in urban areas, those born prematurely were associated with higher rates of asthma compared with non-prematurity. Those born prematurely lived in northern region had higher asthma hazard ratio than other regions. Our analyses indicated that sex, age, urbanization level, and geographic region are significantly associated with prematurity and asthma. Based on cumulative asthma-free survival curve generated using the Kaplan-Meier method, infants born prematurely should be closely monitored to see if they would develop asthma until the age of 6 years.

  13. Exhaled breath condensate cysteinyl leukotrienes and airway remodeling in childhood asthma: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharitonov Sergei A

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs play an important role in airway remodeling. Previous reports have indicated that cysLTs augment human airway smooth muscle cell proliferation. Recently, cysLTs have been measured in exhaled breath condensate (EBC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between cysLTs in EBC and another marker of airway remodeling, reticular basement membrane (RBM thickening, in endobronchial biopsies in children. Methods 29 children, aged 4–15 years, with moderate to severe persistent asthma, who underwent bronchoscopy as part of their clinical assessment, were included. Subjects underwent spirometry and EBC collection for cysLTs analysis, followed by bronchoscopy and endobronchial biopsy within 24 hours. Results EBC cysLTs were significantly lower in asthmatic children who were treated with montelukast than in those who were not (median (interquartile range 36.62 (22.60–101.05 versus 249.1 (74.21–526.36 pg/ml, p = 0.004. There was a significant relationship between EBC cysLTs and RBM thickness in the subgroup of children who were not treated with montelukast (n = 13, r = 0.75, p = 0.003. Conclusion EBC cysLTs appear to be associated with RBM thickening in asthma.

  14. Perception of dyspnea in childhood asthma crisis by the patients and those in charge of them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Ana Alice Amaral Ibiapina; March, Maria Fátima Pombo; Evangelista, Lucia Araujo; Cunha, Antonio Ledo

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the correlation between perception of dyspnea during a mild to moderate asthma attack using the Modified Borg Scale (MBS) and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR). This was a cross-sectional study conducted with children and adolescents who sought a pediatric emergency service due to an asthma attack. Data were collected from July 2005 to June 2006. Demographic data were recorded. Patients and those in charge of them were requested to grade, individually, the patient's dyspnea using the MBS; afterwards, the peak expiratory flow rate was measured. 181 asthmatic patients were evaluated, with a mean age of 7.2 (± 2.4) years (range, 4-12). The mother sought medical aid in 83.4% of the cases (151/181). Patient symptoms included coughing in 68.5% (124/181), dyspnea in 47.0% (85/181), and wheezing in 12.7% (23/181). Thirty-six percent (65/181) had a mild attack, and 64.1% (116/181) a moderate one. A significant negative correlation was found between the patients' and accompanying adults' perceptions of patient's dyspnea and the PEFR (% predicted; rs = -0.240 and rs = -0.385, respectively). Both the patients and those looking after them had a poor perception of the severity of the patient's dyspnea. This emphasizes the need to monitor objective measures such as the PEFR and to develop better ways of evaluating dyspnea.

  15. Prenatal Exposure to Nicotine and Childhood Asthma: Role of Nicotine Acetylcholine Receptors, Neuropeptides and Fibronectin Expression in Lung

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roman, Jesse

    2006-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic lung disease characterized by airway dysfunction. Of the many factors implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma, a strong association exists between prenatal and postnatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS...

  16. The burden of severe asthma in childhood and adolescence: results from the paediatric U-BIOPRED cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleming, Louise; Murray, Clare; Bansal, Aruna T.; Hashimoto, Simone; Bisgaard, Hans; Bush, Andrew; Frey, Urs; Hedlin, Gunilla; Singer, Florian; van Aalderen, Wim M.; Vissing, Nadja H.; Zolkipli, Zaraquiza; Selby, Anna; Fowler, Stephen; Shaw, Dominick; Chung, Kian Fan; Sousa, Ana R.; Wagers, Scott; Corfield, Julie; Pandis, Ioannis; Rowe, Anthony; Formaggio, Elena; Sterk, Peter J.; Roberts, Graham; Tariq, Kamran; Dennison, Patrick; Behndig, Annelie F.; Lutter, Rene; Wagener, Ariane; van Drunen, Kees; Hekking, Pieter-Paul; Brinkman, Paul; Zwinderman, Koos; Mores, Nadia; Santini, Giuseppe; Valente, Salvatore; Rossios, Christos; Gibeon, David; Hoda, Uruj; Rocha, João Pedro Carvalho da Purificação; Sogbesan, Adesimbo; Gent, Julaiha; Menzies-Gow, Andrew; Campagna, Davide; Bigler, Jeannette; Boedigheimer, Michael J.; Yu, Wen; Hu, Xugang; Fichtner, Klaus; Nething, Katja; Erzen, Damijan; Sigmund, Ralf; Riemann, Kathrin; Berton, Alix; Klüglich, Matthias; Gahlemann, Martina; Hohlfeld, Jens; Badorrek, Philipp; Faulenbach, Cornelia; James, Anna; Henriksson, Elisabeth; Middelveld, Roelinde; Lantz, Ann-Sofie; Strandberg, Karin; Galffy, Gabriella; Szentkereszty, M.; Tamasi, Lilla; Smith, Katherine M.; de Meulder, Bertrand; Lefaudeux, Diane; Berglind, Ann; Konradsen, Jon R.; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Stokholm, Jakob; Kerry, Gina; Lowe, Lesley; Johnson, Katy; Stephan, Simon; Sunthar, Meera; Guillmant-Farry, Emily; Nsubuga, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    U-BIOPRED aims to characterise paediatric and adult severe asthma using conventional and innovative systems biology approaches. A total of 99 school-age children with severe asthma and 81 preschoolers with severe wheeze were compared with 49 school-age children with mild/moderate asthma and 53

  17. Oral terbutaline in chronic childhood asthma; effects related to plasma concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerholm, G; Foucard, T; Lindström, B

    1984-01-01

    Nine children, 10-15 years old with chronic asthma, were treated for weekly periods with gradually increasing doses of oral terbutaline sulphate: 45, 79, 118 and 166 micrograms/kg (mean values) 3 times daily. There was a linear relationship between dose and steady-state plasma concentration of terbutaline within patients, but the plasma levels varied 3-fold between patients taking similar doses. Symptom score, peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and volume of air expelled in the first second of forced expiration (FEV1) improved with increasing doses, and the need for inhalation therapy decreased. An increase in pulse rate and tremor was measurable at all dose levels, but reported side-effects were few and mild. Linear regression analysis showed a statistically significant relationship between the plasma concentration of terbutaline and the effect on FEV1 (p less than 0.01) and PEFR (p less than 0.05) within patients.

  18. Multimodal patient education program with stress management for childhood and adolescent asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Petra; Rudolph, Hiltrud; Stachow, Rainer; Petermann, Franz

    2003-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate a multimodal patient education program carried out during inpatient rehabilitation. The program included cognitive-behavioral stress management training as a main component. The efficacy was examined in comparison to an education program without stress management. In total N=68 patients aged between 8 and 16 years were included in the post-treatment and N=46 patients in the 6 months follow-up assessment. Short- and long-term intervention effects of the multimodal education program were observed in relation to patients' age. The experimental treatment elicited significant improvements in adaptive coping in adolescents aged from 14 to 16 years. In contrast, substantial effects were not yielded for the control treatment. The results suggest that the multimodal patient education training has beneficial effects on stress management in adolescents with asthma. Results are discussed with regard to predictive factors for rehabilitation outcome.

  19. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data has established increasing adiposity as a risk factor for incident asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and asthma are incompletely understood. In the present paper, we review current knowledge of possible mechanisms mediating the observed...... association between obesity and asthma....

  20. Asthma heterogeneity and severity

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Tara F.; Bleecker, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a common, chronic inflammatory airways disease characterized by a clinical syndrome of bronchial hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and reversible airflow obstruction. Individuals with asthma can vary widely in clinical presentation, severity, and pathobiology. The incident factors, pathogenesis, prognosis, and treatment of asthma remain incompletely understood. Utilizing measurable characteristics of asthmatic patients, including demographic, physiologic, and biologic markers, can ...

  1. Effect of childhood age in foster care on the incidence of divorce in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusby, James S M

    2010-02-01

    This retrospective study examines the long-term effect of the age at which British children were fostered in World War II on their divorce rate. A total of 859 respondents, aged 62 to 72 years, were recruited who had childhood homes in the county of Kent in southeast England during the war. Of these, 770 had been evacuated and fostered, and the remainder stayed at home. Reflecting the wartime concerns of Bowlby, Miller, and Winnicott (1939) regarding the wisdom of separating young children from their parents for a potentially long period, male and female respondents evacuated between the ages of 4 to 6 years had a significantly higher incidence of divorce compared with those in the 13- to 15-year age group. This association was found to be mediated by attachment style in which the fearful category was predominant. The relevance of these results in the broader developmental context, and to family counseling, are briefly discussed.

  2. IL13 gene polymorphisms modify the effect of exposure to tobacco smoke on persistent wheeze and asthma in childhood, a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurukulaaratchy Ramesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco smoke and genetic susceptibility are risk factors for asthma and wheezing. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a combined effect of interleukin-13 gene (IL13 polymorphisms and tobacco smoke on persistent childhood wheezing and asthma. Methods In the Isle of Wight birth cohort (UK, 1989–1999, five IL13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs: rs1800925 (-1112C/T, rs2066960, rs1295686, rs20541 (R130Q and rs1295685 were genotyped. Parents were asked whether their children had wheezed in the last 12 months at ages 1, 2, 4 and 10 years. Children who reported wheeze in the first 4 years of life and also had wheezing at age 10 were classified as early-onset persistent wheeze phenotype; non-wheezers never wheezed up to age 10. Persistent asthma was defined as having a diagnosis of asthma both during the first four years of life and at age 10. Logistic regression methods were used to analyze data on 791 children with complete information. Potential confounders were gender, birth weight, duration of breast feeding, and household cat or dog present during pregnancy. Results Maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with early-onset persistent wheeze (OR 2.93, p IL13 were not (OR 1.15, p = 0.60 for the common haplotype pair. However, the effect of maternal smoking during pregnancy was stronger in children with the common IL13 haplotype pair compared to those without it (OR 5.58 and OR 1.29, respectively; p for interaction = 0.014. Single SNP analysis revealed a similar statistical significance for rs20541 (p for interaction = 0.02. Comparable results were observed for persistent childhood asthma (p for interaction = 0.03. Conclusion This is the first report that shows a combined effect of in utero exposure to smoking and IL13 on asthma phenotypes in childhood. The results emphasize that genetic studies need to take environmental exposures into account, since they may explain contradictory findings.

  3. Evaluation of systematic assessment of asthma-like symptoms and tobacco smoke exposure in early childhood by well-child professionals: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafkamp-de Groen, Esther; van der Valk, Ralf J P; Mohangoo, Ashna D; van der Wouden, Johannes C; Duijts, Liesbeth; Jaddoe, Vincent W; Hofman, Albert; de Koning, Harry J; de Jongste, Johan C; Raat, Hein

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of systematic assessment of asthma-like symptoms and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure during regular preventive well-child visits between age 1 and 4 years by well-child professionals. Sixteen well-child centres in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, were randomised into 8 centres where the brief assessment form regarding asthma-like symptoms and ETS exposure was used and 8 centres that applied usual care. 3596 and 4179 children (born between April 2002 and January 2006) and their parents visited the intervention and control centres, respectively. At child's age 6 years, physician-diagnosed asthma ever, wheezing, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), airway resistance (Rint), health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and ETS exposure at home ever were measured. Linear mixed models were applied. No differences in asthma, wheezing, FeNO, Rint or HRQOL measurements between intervention and control group were found using multilevel regression in an intention-to-treat analysis (p>0.05). Children of whom the parents were interviewed by using the brief assessment form at the intervention well-child centres had a decreased risk on ETS exposure at home ever, compared to children who visited the control well-child centres, in an explorative per-protocol analysis (aOR = 0.71, 95% CI:0.59-0.87). Systematic assessment and counselling of asthma-like symptoms and ETS exposure in early childhood by well-child care professionals using a brief assessment form was not effective in reducing the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma ever and wheezing, and did not improve FeNO, Rint or HRQOL at age 6 years. Our results hold some promise for interviewing parents and using information leaflets at well-child centres to reduce ETS exposure at home in preschool children. Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN15790308.

  4. Evaluation of systematic assessment of asthma-like symptoms and tobacco smoke exposure in early childhood by well-child professionals: a randomised trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Hafkamp-de Groen

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of systematic assessment of asthma-like symptoms and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS exposure during regular preventive well-child visits between age 1 and 4 years by well-child professionals.Sixteen well-child centres in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, were randomised into 8 centres where the brief assessment form regarding asthma-like symptoms and ETS exposure was used and 8 centres that applied usual care. 3596 and 4179 children (born between April 2002 and January 2006 and their parents visited the intervention and control centres, respectively. At child's age 6 years, physician-diagnosed asthma ever, wheezing, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO, airway resistance (Rint, health-related quality of life (HRQOL and ETS exposure at home ever were measured. Linear mixed models were applied.No differences in asthma, wheezing, FeNO, Rint or HRQOL measurements between intervention and control group were found using multilevel regression in an intention-to-treat analysis (p>0.05. Children of whom the parents were interviewed by using the brief assessment form at the intervention well-child centres had a decreased risk on ETS exposure at home ever, compared to children who visited the control well-child centres, in an explorative per-protocol analysis (aOR = 0.71, 95% CI:0.59-0.87.Systematic assessment and counselling of asthma-like symptoms and ETS exposure in early childhood by well-child care professionals using a brief assessment form was not effective in reducing the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma ever and wheezing, and did not improve FeNO, Rint or HRQOL at age 6 years. Our results hold some promise for interviewing parents and using information leaflets at well-child centres to reduce ETS exposure at home in preschool children.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN15790308.

  5. A prospective cohort study on ambient air pollution and respiratory morbidities including childhood asthma in adolescents from the western Cape Province: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyib Olaniyan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence from existing literature that ambient air pollutant exposure in early childhood likely plays an important role in asthma exacerbation and other respiratory symptoms, with greater effect among asthmatic children. However, there is inconclusive evidence on the role of ambient air pollutant exposures in relation to increasing asthma prevalence as well as asthma induction in children. At the population level, little is known about the potential synergistic effects between pollen allergens and air pollutants since this type of association poses challenges in uncontrolled real life settings. In particular, data from sub-Sahara Africa is scarce and virtually absent among populations residing in informal residential settlements. Methods/design A prospective cohort study of 600 school children residing in four informal settlement areas with varying potential ambient air pollutant exposure levels in the Western Cape in South Africa is carried-out. The study has two follow-up periods of at least six-months apart including an embedded panel study in summer and winter. The exposure assessment component models temporal and spatial variability of air quality in the four study areas over the study duration using land-use regression modelling (LUR. Additionally, daily pollen levels (mould spores, tree, grass and weed pollen in the study areas are recorded. In the panel study asthma symptoms and serial peak flow measurements is recorded three times daily to determine short-term serial airway changes in relation to varying ambient air quality and pollen over 10-days during winter and summer. The health outcome component of the cohort study include; the presence of asthma using a standardised ISAAC questionnaire, spirometry, fractional exhaled nitric-oxide (FeNO and the presence of atopy (Phadiatop. Discussion This research applies state of the art exposure assessment approaches to characterize the effects of ambient air

  6. A prospective cohort study on ambient air pollution and respiratory morbidities including childhood asthma in adolescents from the western Cape Province: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaniyan, Toyib; Jeebhay, Mohamed; Röösli, Martin; Naidoo, Rajen; Baatjies, Roslynn; Künzil, Nino; Tsai, Ming; Davey, Mark; de Hoogh, Kees; Berman, Dilys; Parker, Bhawoodien; Leaner, Joy; Dalvie, Mohamed Aqiel

    2017-09-16

    There is evidence from existing literature that ambient air pollutant exposure in early childhood likely plays an important role in asthma exacerbation and other respiratory symptoms, with greater effect among asthmatic children. However, there is inconclusive evidence on the role of ambient air pollutant exposures in relation to increasing asthma prevalence as well as asthma induction in children. At the population level, little is known about the potential synergistic effects between pollen allergens and air pollutants since this type of association poses challenges in uncontrolled real life settings. In particular, data from sub-Sahara Africa is scarce and virtually absent among populations residing in informal residential settlements. A prospective cohort study of 600 school children residing in four informal settlement areas with varying potential ambient air pollutant exposure levels in the Western Cape in South Africa is carried-out. The study has two follow-up periods of at least six-months apart including an embedded panel study in summer and winter. The exposure assessment component models temporal and spatial variability of air quality in the four study areas over the study duration using land-use regression modelling (LUR). Additionally, daily pollen levels (mould spores, tree, grass and weed pollen) in the study areas are recorded. In the panel study asthma symptoms and serial peak flow measurements is recorded three times daily to determine short-term serial airway changes in relation to varying ambient air quality and pollen over 10-days during winter and summer. The health outcome component of the cohort study include; the presence of asthma using a standardised ISAAC questionnaire, spirometry, fractional exhaled nitric-oxide (FeNO) and the presence of atopy (Phadiatop). This research applies state of the art exposure assessment approaches to characterize the effects of ambient air pollutants on childhood respiratory health, with a specific focus on

  7. Reducing quality-of-care disparities in childhood asthma: La Red de Asma Infantil intervention in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Marielena; Ramos-Valencia, Gilberto; González-Gavillán, Jesús A; López-Malpica, Fernando; Morales-Reyes, Beatriz; Marín, Heriberto; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Mario H; Mitchell, Herman

    2013-03-01

    Although children living in Puerto Rico have the highest asthma prevalence of all US children, little is known regarding the quality-of-care disparities they experience nor the adaptability of existing asthma evidence-based interventions to reduce these disparities. The objective of this study was to describe our experience in reducing quality-of-care disparities among Puerto Rican children with asthma by adapting 2 existing evidence-based asthma interventions. We describe our experience in adapting and implementing 2 previously tested asthma evidence-based interventions: the Yes We Can program and the Inner-City Asthma Study intervention. We assessed the feasibility of combining key components of the 2 interventions to reduce asthma symptoms and estimated the potential cost savings associated with reductions in asthma-related hospitalizations and emergency department visits. A total of 117 children with moderate and severe asthma participated in the 12-month intervention in 2 housing projects in San Juan, Puerto Rico. A community-academic team with the necessary technical and cultural competences adapted and implemented the intervention. Our case study revealed the feasibility of implementing the combined intervention, henceforth referred to as La Red intervention, in the selected Puerto Rican communities experiencing a disproportionately high level of asthma burden. After 1-year follow-up, La Red intervention significantly reduced asthma symptoms and exceeded reductions of the original interventions. Asthma-related hospitalizations and emergency department use, and their associated high costs, were also significantly reduced. Asthma evidence-based interventions can be adapted to improve quality of care for children with asthma in a different cultural community setting.

  8. Incidence of childhood diabetes in The Netherlands: A decrease from north to south over North-Western Europe?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaandrager, G.J.; Bruining, G.J.; Veenhof, F.J.; Drayer, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    The incidence of childhood diabetes (0-19 years of age) in The Netherlands, where there is no nationalized health-care system, was investigated retrospectively in the years 1978 to 1980 inclusive. The method chosen was a questionnaire among all Dutch paediatricians and internal physicians acting as

  9. Allergy in severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giacco, S R; Bakirtas, A; Bel, E; Custovic, A; Diamant, Z; Hamelmann, E; Heffler, E; Kalayci, Ö; Saglani, S; Sergejeva, S; Seys, S; Simpson, A; Bjermer, L

    2017-02-01

    It is well recognized that atopic sensitization is an important risk factor for asthma, both in adults and in children. However, the role of allergy in severe asthma is still under debate. The term 'Severe Asthma' encompasses a highly heterogeneous group of patients who require treatment on steps 4-5 of GINA guidelines to prevent their asthma from becoming 'uncontrolled', or whose disease remains 'uncontrolled' despite this therapy. Epidemiological studies on emergency room visits and hospital admissions for asthma suggest the important role of allergy in asthma exacerbations. In addition, allergic asthma in childhood is often associated with severe asthma in adulthood. A strong association exists between asthma exacerbations and respiratory viral infections, and interaction between viruses and allergy further increases the risk of asthma exacerbations. Furthermore, fungal allergy has been shown to play an important role in severe asthma. Other contributing factors include smoking, pollution and work-related exposures. The 'Allergy and Asthma Severity' EAACI Task Force examined the current evidence and produced this position document on the role of allergy in severe asthma. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Use of digital media for the education of health professionals in the treatment of childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena F. Velasco

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Inhalation therapy is the main treatment for asthma and its adequate use has been a factor responsible for disease control; therefore, the aim of the study was to determine whether a digital media tool, which features portability on mobile phones, modifies the assimilation of the inhalation technique. METHODS: A total of 66 professionals working in the health care area with the pediatric population were selected. They were submitted to a pre-test on their knowledge of inhalation therapy. The professionals were randomized into two groups (A and B. Group A received a media application on their mobile phones showing the steps of inhalation therapy, while group B received the same information in written form only. A post-test was applied after 15 days. The results (pre- and post- were analyzed by two pediatric pulmonologists. RESULTS: Of the 66 professionals, 87.9% were females. Of a total possible score of ten, the mean score obtained in the pre-test was 5.3 ± 3, and in the second test, 7.5 ± 2 (p < 0.000. There were no significant differences when comparing the two groups (p = 0.726. The nurses had the lowest mean scores in the initial test (2.3 ± 2; however, they were the group that learned the most with the intervention, showing similar means to those of other groups in the second test (6.1 ± 3. CONCLUSION: There was significant improvement in knowledge about inhalation therapy in all professional categories using both methods, demonstrating that education, when available to professionals, positively modifies medical practice.

  11. Prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinitis and eczema in 13- to 14-year-old children in Africa: the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Khaled, N; Odhiambo, J; Pearce, N; Adjoh, K S; Maesano, I A; Benhabyles, B; Bouhayad, Z; Bahati, E; Camara, L; Catteau, C; El Sony, A; Esamai, F O; Hypolite, I E; Melaku, K; Musa, O A; Ng'ang'a, L; Onadeko, B O; Saad, O; Jerray, M; Kayembe, J M; Koffi, N B; Khaldi, F; Kuaban, C; Voyi, K; M'Boussa, J; Sow, O; Tidjani, O; Zar, H J

    2007-03-01

    Phase I of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood has provided valuable information regarding international prevalence patterns and potential risk factors in the development of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema. However, in Phase I, only six African countries were involved (Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco, Kenya, South Africa and Ethiopia). Phase III, conducted 5-6 years later, enrolled 22 centres in 16 countries including the majority of the centres involved in Phase I and new centres in Morocco, Tunisia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Togo, Sudan, Cameroon, Gabon, Reunion Island and South Africa. There were considerable variations between the various centres of Africa in the prevalence of the main symptoms of the three conditions: wheeze (4.0-21.5%), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (7.2-27.3%) and eczema (4.7-23.0%). There was a large variation both between countries and between centres in the same country. Several centres, including Cape Town (20.3%), Polokwane (18.0%), Reunion Island (21.5%), Brazzaville (19.9%), Nairobi (18.0%), Urban Ivory Coast (19.3%) and Conakry (18.6%) showed relatively high asthma symptom prevalences, similar to those in western Europe. There were also a number of centres showing high symptom prevalences for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (Cape Town, Reunion Island, Brazzaville, Eldoret, Urban Ivory Coast, Conakry, Casablanca, Wilays of Algiers, Sousse and Eldoret) and eczema (Brazzaville, Eldoret, Addis Ababa, Urban Ivory Coast, Conakry, Marrakech and Casablanca).

  12. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) P1, GSTM1, exercise, ozone and asthma incidence in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, T; Berhane, K; McConnell, R; Gauderman, W J; Avol, E; Peters, J M; Gilliland, F D

    2009-03-01

    Because asthma has been associated with exercise and ozone exposure, an association likely mediated by oxidative stress, we hypothesised that glutathione-S-transferase (GST)P1, GSTM1, exercise and ozone exposure have interrelated effects on the pathogenesis of asthma. Associations of the well characterised null variant of GSTM1 and four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that characterised common variation in the GSTP1 locus with new onset asthma in a cohort of 1610 school children were examined. Children's exercise and ozone exposure were classified using participation in team sports and community annual average ozone levels, respectively. A two SNP model involving putatively functional variants (rs6591255, rs1695 (Ile105Va)) best captured the association between GSTP1 and asthma. The risk of asthma was lower for those with the Val allele of Ile105Val (hazard ratio (HR) 0.60, 95% CI 0.4 to 0.8) and higher for the variant allele of rs6591255 (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.9). The risk of asthma increased with level of exercise among ile(105) homozygotes but not among those with at least one val(105) allele (interaction p value = 0.02). The risk was highest among ile(105) homozygotes who participated in >or=3 sports in the high ozone communities (HR 6.15, 95% CI 2.2 to 7.4). GSTM1 null was independently associated with an increased risk of asthma and showed little variation with air pollution or GSTP1 genotype. These results were consistent in two independent fourth grade cohorts recruited in 1993 and 1996. Children who inherit a val(105) variant allele may be protected from the increased risk of asthma associated with exercise, especially in high ozone communities. GSTM1 null genotype was associated with an increased risk of asthma.

  13. The increasing incidence of initial steroid resistance in childhood nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszak, Beata; Banaszak, Paweł

    2012-06-01

    Recently, a number of reports have highlighted changes in the histopathology and response to corticosteroid treatment in childhood nephrotic syndrome; however, these involved ethnically mixed populations. For comparison, the purpose of our research was to search for changes in the characteristics of nephrotic syndrome in a homogeneous population of Caucasian children over two consecutive decades. Chart analysis was performed to identify children with new-onset nephrotic syndrome. The children were admitted to the Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Zabrze, during two periods: 1986-1995 (76 patients) and 1996-2005 (102 patients). Specifically, a comparison of clinical characteristics and morphology of nephrotic syndrome between the two groups was performed. Steroid resistance was defined as no remission within 8 weeks of corticosteroid treatment. Histopathology was available in 36.8% and 43.1% of patients respectively. There was a significant increase in primary steroid resistance in the latter decade: 15.8% vs 31.4% (P = 0.017). Changes in the histopathology did not reach the level of statistical significance: minimal change nephrotic syndrome 25% vs 9% (P = 0.095), mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis 46.4% vs 61.3% (P = 0.21), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 17.9% vs 20.4% (P = 0.78), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis 7.1% vs 6.8% (P = 1.0), membranous glomerulonephritis 3.6% vs 0% (P = 0.39). Our results show the increasing incidence of primary steroid resistance in childhood nephrotic syndrome.

  14. Barriers to Asthma Management for School Nurses: An Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley Nadeau, Ellen; Toronto, Coleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood asthma is a growing health concern. Asthma is the most common chronic illness of childhood and a leading cause of emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and school absenteeism. School nurses play a valuable role in asthma management. The purpose of this integrative review is to examine barriers to asthma management for school nurses in…

  15. Childhood Cancer Incidence in India Betweem 2012 and 2014: Report of a Population-based Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suman; Paul, Dilip Kumar; Anshu, Kumar; Bhakta, Subhajit

    2017-12-15

    To provide an overview of childhood cancer incidence in India between 2012-2014. Secondary data analysis on age-adjusted rates of cancer incidence for children (0-14 years) were collected from the report of the National Cancer Registry Programme in the year 2016. Age-adjusted rates of childhood cancer incidence ranged from 18.5 per million in the state of Nagaland to 235.3 per million in Delhi for boys. The rates were 11.4 per million in East Khasi Hill district and 152.3 per million in Delhi for girls. Leukemia was the most predominant cancer for both boys and girls. Lymphoma was the second most common cancer in boys, and brain tumors in girls. Childhood cancer incidence is increasing in India compared to population-based cancer registry survey of 2009-2011. Cancers are mostly affecting 0-4 years age group, and there is a rising trend of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  16. Maternal vaginal microflora during pregnancy and the risk of asthma hospitalization and use of antiasthma medication in early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Thorsen, Poul; Jensen, Jørgen Skov

    2002-01-01

    . Maternal colonization with staphylococci (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4-3.4) and use of antibiotics in pregnancy (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1-2.6) were associated with asthma during the fifth year of life. CONCLUSION: The composition of the maternal vaginal micro-flora might be associated with wheezing and asthma...

  17. The need for precision medicine clinical trials in childhood asthma : rationale and design of the PUFFIN trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, Susanne J. H.; Pijnenburg, Marielle W.; Hovels, Anke M.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse

    A `one-size fits all'-approach does not fit all pediatric asthma patients. Current evidence suggests that in children with persistent asthma, ADRB2 genotype-guided treatment can improve treatment outcomes, yet this evidence is mainly derived from observational and genotype-stratified studies.

  18. Areas with high rates of police-reported violent crime have higher rates of childhood asthma morbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Andrew F.; Huang, Bin; Ryan, Patrick H.; Sandel, Megan T.; Chen, Chen; Kahn, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether population-level violent (and all) crime rates were associated with population-level child asthma utilization rates and predictive of patient-level risk of asthma reutilization after a hospitalization. Study design A retrospective cohort study of 4,638 pediatric asthma-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations between 2011 and 2013 was completed. For population-level analyses, census tract asthma utilization rates were calculated by dividing the number of utilization events within a tract by the child population. For patient-level analyses, hospitalized patients (n=981) were followed until time of first asthma-related reutilization. The primary predictor was the census tract rate of violent crime as recorded by the police; the all crime (violent plus non-violent) rate was also assessed. Results Census tract-level violent and all crime rates were significantly correlated with asthma utilization rates (both pcrime rate explained 35% of the population-level asthma utilization variance and remained associated with increased utilization after adjustment for census tract poverty, unemployment, substandard housing, and traffic exposure (p=.002). The all crime rate explained 28% of the variance and was similarly associated with increased utilization after adjustment (p=.02). Hospitalized children trended toward being more likely to reutilize if they lived in higher violent (p=.1) and all crime areas (p=.01). After adjustment, neither relationship was significant. Conclusions Crime data could help facilitate early identification of potentially toxic stressors relevant to the control of asthma for populations and patients. PMID:26960918

  19. Childhood asthma and spirometric indices are associated with polymorphic markers of two vitamin D 25-hydroxylase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ting Fan; Wang, Susan Shuxin; Tang, Man Fung; Kong, Alice Pik-Shan; Sy, Hing Yee; Hon, Kam Lun; Chan, Juliana Chung-ngor; Wong, Gary Wing-kin

    2015-06-01

    Polymorphic markers of vitamin D pathway genes have been associated with asthma traits in different White populations. This study investigated the relationship between asthma phenotypes and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of vitamin D receptor (VDR), vitamin D binding protein (GC), two 25-hydroxylases (CYP2R1 and CYP27A1), and 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) in Hong Kong Chinese children. 23 SNPs of the five vitamin D pathway genes were successfully genotyped in 914 asthmatic children and 1231 non-allergic controls. Genotypic and haplotypic associations with asthma phenotypes (diagnosis, spirometric indices, total IgE, and eosinophil percentage) were analyzed by multivariate regression. Generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction was used to detect epistatic interactions between SNPs for asthma phenotypes. Several SNPs of CYP27A1, CYP27B1, GC, and CYP2R1 were associated with asthma or spirometric indices, although only the association between FEV1 and CYP2R1 rs7935792 passed Bonferroni correction (p = 2.73 × 10(-4) ). Patients with CC genotype of rs7935792 had higher FEV1 than those with the other two genotypes. Asthma was also associated with TT haplotype of CYP27A1 and AGGATA haplotype of CYP2R1 (p = 0.021 and 0.024, respectively). Besides, strong association was found between FEV1 and GATAG of CYP2R1 (β = 13.37, p = 4.83 × 10(-4) ). GMDR failed to identify any 2-locus to 4-locus interaction that modulated asthma or spirometric indices. Several SNPs and haplotypes of CYP2R1 are associated with asthma diagnosis and FEV1 in children. Asthma is also modestly associated with a CYP27A1 haplotype. These two 25-hydroxylase genes may be genetic determinants for asthma phenotypes in children. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Spirometry in Asthma Care: A Review of the Trends and Challenges in Pediatric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuk, Adaeze C; Uwaezuoke, Samuel N; Ndukwu, Chizalu I; Ndu, Ikenna K; Iloh, Kenechukwu K; Okoli, Chinyere V

    2017-01-01

    Background: Given the rising incidence of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) globally, especially bronchial asthma, there is the need to reduce the associated morbidity and mortality by adopting an objective means of diagnosis and monitoring. Aim: This article aims to review the trends and challenges in the use of spirometry for managing childhood bronchial asthma especially in developing countries. Methods: We conducted a literature search of published data on the use of spirometry for the diagnosis of childhood bronchial asthma with special emphasis resource-poor countries. Results: Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of childhood asthma recommend the use of spirometry, but this is currently underused in both tertiary and primary care settings especially in developing countries. Lack of spirometers and proper training in their use and interpretation of findings as well as a dearth of asthma guidelines remains core to the underuse of spirometry in managing children with asthma. Targeting education of health care staff was, however, observed to improve its utility, and practical implementable strategies are highlighted. Conclusions: Spirometry is not frequently used for asthma diagnosis in pediatric practice especially in resource-poor countries where the NCD burden is higher. Strategies to overcome the obstacles are implementable and can make a difference in reducing the burden of NCD. PMID:28781518

  1. Asthma Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asthma diary is another way to help manage asthma. Tracking your child's symptoms and medicines will help you know when ... When to Go to the ER if Your Child Has Asthma Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Allergy Shots Asthma Center ...

  2. Risk factors of atopic dermatitis in Korean schoolchildren: 2010 international study of asthma and allergies in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Mean; Lee, So-Yeon; Kim, Woo Kyung; Han, Man Yong; Kim, Jihyun; Chae, Yoomi; Hahm, Myung-Il; Lee, Kee-Jae; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Park, Kang Seo; Park, Joon Soo; Ahn, Kangmo

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to analyse the risk factors of atopic dermatitis (AD) in Korean schoolchildren in 2010. A nationwide, cross-sectional study was conducted in children aged 6-7 years and adolescents aged 12-13 years who were randomly selected. Information was obtained through a Korean version of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire (ISAAC), and skin prick tests were performed. AD-diagnosed children were selected for risk factor analysis by using logistic regression. We enrolled 4,003 children (M/F = 2,021/ 1,982) in aged 6-7 years and 4,112 children (M/F = 2,029/2,083) in 12-13 years. In children aged 6-7 years, the lifetime prevalence of AD diagnosis was 35.6% (N = 1,424). On the other hand, in the 12 to 13 year age group, the lifetime prevalence of AD diagnosis was 24.2% (N = 981). In the univariate logistic regression analysis in 6-7 year-old children, possible risk factors were atopy, a parental history of allergic disease, the use of antibiotics during infancy, a history of having moved into a newly built house during infancy, the presence of visible mould in the house, and remodelling of house within 12 months. The statistical significance persisted after adjustment. However, antibiotic use during infancy and remodelling within 12 months showed no statistical significance as a risk factor for AD. In contrast, multivariate logistic regression analysis in adolescents demonstrated that female sex, atopy, a parental history of allergic diseases, the presence of visible mould in the house, and a history of having moved into a newly built house during infancy was associated with AD. There was no significant association between AD and other risk factors. In Korean schoolchildren, risk factors such as atopy, the presence of parental allergic diseases, moving into a newly built house during infancy and visible mould in the house were associated with AD.

  3. Prenatal Exposure to Nicotine and Childhood Asthma: Role of Nicotine Acetylcholine Receptors, Neuropeptides, and Fibronectin Expression in Lung

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roman, Jesse

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesize that prenatal exposure to nicotine, a major component of tobacco that transverses the placenta, is largely responsible for the development of asthma in children born of mothers who smoke...

  4. Areas with High Rates of Police-Reported Violent Crime Have Higher Rates of Childhood Asthma Morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Andrew F; Huang, Bin; Ryan, Patrick H; Sandel, Megan T; Chen, Chen; Kahn, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    To assess whether population-level violent (and all) crime rates were associated with population-level child asthma utilization rates and predictive of patient-level risk of asthma reutilization after a hospitalization. A retrospective cohort study of 4638 pediatric asthma-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations between 2011 and 2013 was completed. For population-level analyses, census tract asthma utilization rates were calculated by dividing the number of utilization events within a tract by the child population. For patient-level analyses, hospitalized patients (n = 981) were followed until time of first asthma-related reutilization. The primary predictor was the census tract rate of violent crime as recorded by the police; the all crime (violent plus nonviolent) rate was also assessed. Census tract-level violent and all crime rates were significantly correlated with asthma utilization rates (both P crime rate explained 35% of the population-level asthma utilization variance and remained associated with increased utilization after adjustment for census tract poverty, unemployment, substandard housing, and traffic exposure (P = .002). The all crime rate explained 28% of the variance and was similarly associated with increased utilization after adjustment (P = .02). Hospitalized children trended toward being more likely to reutilize if they lived in higher violent (P = .1) and all crime areas (P = .01). After adjustment, neither relationship was significant. Crime data could help facilitate early identification of potentially toxic stressors relevant to the control of asthma for populations and patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Association between Childhood Diarrhoeal Incidence and Climatic Factors in Urban and Rural Settings in the Health District of Mbour, Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokhna Thiam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the association between childhood diarrhoeal incidence and climatic factors in rural and urban settings in the health district of Mbour in western Senegal. We used monthly diarrhoeal case records among children under five years registered in 24 health facilities over a four-year period (2011–2014. Climatic data (i.e., daily temperature, night temperature and rainfall for the same four-year period were obtained. We performed a negative binomial regression model to establish the relationship between monthly diarrhoeal incidence and climatic factors of the same and the previous month. There were two annual peaks in diarrhoeal incidence: one during the cold dry season and one during the rainy season. We observed a positive association between diarrhoeal incidence and high average temperature of 36 °C and above and high cumulative monthly rainfall at 57 mm and above. The association between diarrhoeal incidence and temperature was stronger in rural compared to urban settings, while higher rainfall was associated with higher diarrhoeal incidence in the urban settings. Concluding, this study identified significant health–climate interactions and calls for effective preventive measures in the health district of Mbour. Particular attention should be paid to urban settings where diarrhoea was most common in order to reduce the high incidence in the context of climatic variability, which is expected to increase in urban areas in the face of global warming.

  6. Association between Childhood Diarrhoeal Incidence and Climatic Factors in Urban and Rural Settings in the Health District of Mbour, Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiam, Sokhna; Diène, Aminata N; Sy, Ibrahima; Winkler, Mirko S; Schindler, Christian; Ndione, Jacques A; Faye, Ousmane; Vounatsou, Penelope; Utzinger, Jürg; Cissé, Guéladio

    2017-09-12

    We assessed the association between childhood diarrhoeal incidence and climatic factors in rural and urban settings in the health district of Mbour in western Senegal. We used monthly diarrhoeal case records among children under five years registered in 24 health facilities over a four-year period (2011-2014). Climatic data (i.e., daily temperature, night temperature and rainfall) for the same four-year period were obtained. We performed a negative binomial regression model to establish the relationship between monthly diarrhoeal incidence and climatic factors of the same and the previous month. There were two annual peaks in diarrhoeal incidence: one during the cold dry season and one during the rainy season. We observed a positive association between diarrhoeal incidence and high average temperature of 36 °C and above and high cumulative monthly rainfall at 57 mm and above. The association between diarrhoeal incidence and temperature was stronger in rural compared to urban settings, while higher rainfall was associated with higher diarrhoeal incidence in the urban settings. Concluding, this study identified significant health-climate interactions and calls for effective preventive measures in the health district of Mbour. Particular attention should be paid to urban settings where diarrhoea was most common in order to reduce the high incidence in the context of climatic variability, which is expected to increase in urban areas in the face of global warming.

  7. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Diamant, Zuzana; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant impact on asthma incidence and manifestations. The purpose of the review is to discuss recent observations regarding the association between obesity and asthma focusing on underlying mechanisms, clinical presentation, response to therapy and effect...... of weight reduction. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical and epidemiological studies indicate that obese patients with asthma may represent a unique phenotype, which is more difficult to control, less responsive to asthma medications and by that may have higher healthcare utilization. A number of common comorbidities...... have been linked to both obesity and asthma, and may, therefore, contribute to the obese-asthma phenotype. Furthermore, recently published studies indicate that even a modest weight reduction can improve clinical manifestations and outcome of asthma. SUMMARY: Compared with normal-weight patients, obese...

  8. Outpatient Management of Asthma in Children

    OpenAIRE

    André Schultz; Andrew C. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The principal aims of asthma management in childhood are to obtain symptom control that allows individuals to engage in unrestricted physical activities and to normalize lung function. These aims should be achieved using the fewest possible medications. Ensuring a correct diagnosis is the first priority. The mainstay of asthma management remains pharmacotherapy. Various treatment options are discussed. Asthma monitoring includes the regular assessment of asthma severity and asthma control, wh...

  9. Childhood sarcoidosis in Denmark 1979-1994: incidence, clinical features and laboratory results at presentation in 48 children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, A L; Milman, N; Byg, K E

    2004-01-01

    .7-15). In 1979-1994 the incidence was 0.29 per 100000 person-years y of age. The incidence was 0.06 in children y of age and increased gradually with age to 1.02 in children aged 14-15 y. General malaise, fever, weight loss, abdominal discomfort, respiratory symptoms, lymphadenopathy......AIM: To describe the incidence, clinical presentation and paraclinical findings in childhood sarcoidosis in Denmark, 1979-1994. METHODS: Patients (n = 5536) with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis were drawn from the nationwide Patient Registry; 81 patients were y of age. The diagnosis...... of sarcoidosis was reconfirmed in 48/81 (59%) patients. In 35/48 (73%) patients, diagnosis was verified by histology, and in 13 it was substantiated by paraclinical/clinical findings. RESULTS: The series comprised 26 boys and 22 girls (male/female ratio 1.18). Median age at diagnosis was 13 y (range 0...

  10. Low Incidence of Osteonecrosis in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated With ALL-97 and ALL-02 Study of Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kenichi; Imamura, Toshihiko; Kihira, Kentaro; Suzuki, Koji; Ishida, Hisashi; Morita, Hiromi; Kanno, Miyako; Mori, Takeshi; Hiramatsu, Hidefumi; Matsubara, Kousaku; Terui, Kiminori; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Suenobu, So-Ichi; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Koji; Moriya-Saito, Akiko; Sato, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Hirohide; Yumura-Yagi, Keiko; Hara, Junichi; Hori, Hiroki; Horibe, Keizo

    2018-03-20

    Purpose Osteonecrosis (ON) is a serious complication of the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL); however, data relating to ON in Asian pediatric patients with ALL are scarce. Therefore, we performed a retrospective analysis of cohorts of Japanese patients with ALL to clarify the incidence, clinical characteristics, and risk factors of ON. Patients and Methods The incidence and characteristics of ON were determined in patients with ALL (n = 1,662) enrolled in two studies from the Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study (JACLS) group (n = 635 and n = 1,027 patients treated with the ALL-97 and ALL-02 protocols, respectively). Results In total, 24 of 1,662 patients suffered from ON, of which 12 of 635 and 12 of 1,027 patients were treated with the ALL-97 and the ALL-02 protocol, respectively. Of the 24 patients, 23 were older than 10 years. In multivariate analysis, age (≥ 10 years) was the sole significant risk factor for ON ( P 97 and the ALL-02 protocol, respectively, which was lower than reported previously, despite an administration of dexamethasone (DEX) similar to that in comparable studies; however, concomitant administration of DEX and l-asparaginase was reduced in the JACLS protocols. Conclusion We identified a low frequency of ON in the JACLS ALL-97 and ALL-02 studies. Although the sole risk factor for ON was age (≥ 10 years), even among high-risk patients, ON incidence was significantly lower than that reported in previous studies. These results suggest that, not only the total amount of DEX, but also how DEX and l-asparaginase are administered, which affects the clearance of DEX, may be associated with ON incidence in patients with ALL.

  11. A Significant Breakthrough in the Incidence of Childhood Cancers and Evaluation of its Risk Factors in Southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erjaee, Asma; Niknam, Maryam; Sadeghi, Ahmadreza; Dehghani, Maryam; Safaei, Zeinab; Teshnizi, Saeed Hosseini; Karimi, Mehran

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates epidemiologic and practical information about the incidence and risk factors of childhood cancer in a population of Southern Iranian children. A total number of 300 cancer patients along with 600 age- and gender-matched healthy control were interviewed by a trained physician regarding their demographic characteristics, and major family-associated risk factors, childhood malignancies. The average annual percentage change for cancers in the studied population is calculated as 45%. Our study indicated that possible risk factors which could contribute to the development of childhood cancer are maternal oral contraceptive pill use during pregnancy, exposure to radiation during pregnancy, parental smoking, residence near high voltage electricity lines, exposure to pesticides and fertilizers, patient allergy, contact with domestic animals and father's educational degree. Furthermore, new ecological risk factors such as air pollution due to nonstandard petroleum or toxic inhalant particles, nonhealthy food consumption, and satellite jamming are other predisposing factors. Our study reported a higher average annual percentage change of childhood cancers in our area, compared to the existing literature. In conclusion, detection and prevention of the consistent and possible new environmental risk factors such as nonstandard petroleum or satellite jamming from all around the country should be taking into consideration.

  12. Does pre-hospital telephone communication with a clinician result in more appropriate medication administration by parents during childhood asthma exacerbations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garro, A C; Fearon, D; Koinis-Mitchell, D; McQuaid, E L

    2009-11-01

    The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute asthma guidelines recommend that parents communicate with a clinician during childhood asthma exacerbations when symptoms worsen or do not improve with initial therapy. This study tested the hypothesis that communication by parents with a clinician before an Emergency Department visit was associated with more appropriate medication administration for children with asthma exacerbations. This was a retrospective cohort study using data gathered from parents of children presenting with an asthma exacerbation to the emergency department. The communicating cohort included parents who communicated by telephone with a clinician during the exacerbation and the non-communicating cohort included parents who did not. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to test three hypotheses; communication with a clinician is associated with (1) administration of short-acting beta-agonists (SABAs), (2) increased dosing frequency of SABAs, and (3) administration of an oral corticosteroid. A total of 199 subjects were enrolled, with 104 (52.3%) in the communicating and 95 (47.7%) in the non-communicating cohort. There was an association between communication and provider practice type, with children who received routine care from a private practice provider more likely to communicate with the clinician than children in hospital-based clinics or community health centers (Adjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.7). Impoverished children and children insured by Medicaid were less likely to communicate with a clinician (controlling for provider type). Parents who communicated with a clinician were more likely to administer a SABA (adjusted OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.3-9.4) and an oral corticosteroid (adjusted OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.3-8.4) but were not more likely to administer a SABA with increased dosing frequency (adjusted OR 0.9, 95% CI 0.5-1.6). Parents of children with asthma exacerbations who communicated with clinicians were more likely to administer SABAs

  13. Relation of DNA methylation of 5'-CpG island of ACSL3 to transplacental exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and childhood asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederica Perera

    Full Text Available In a longitudinal cohort of approximately 700 children in New York City, the prevalence of asthma (>25% is among the highest in the US. This high risk may in part be caused by transplacental exposure to traffic-related polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs but biomarkers informative of PAH-asthma relationships is lacking. We here hypothesized that epigenetic marks associated with transplacental PAH exposure and/or childhood asthma risk could be identified in fetal tissues. Mothers completed personal prenatal air monitoring for PAH exposure determination. Methylation sensitive restriction fingerprinting was used to analyze umbilical cord white blood cell (UCWBC DNA of 20 cohort children. Over 30 DNA sequences were identified whose methylation status was dependent on the level of maternal PAH exposure. Six sequences were found to be homologous to known genes having one or more 5'-CpG island(s (5'-CGI. Of these, acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 3 (ACSL3 exhibited the highest concordance between the extent of methylation of its 5'-CGI in UCWBCs and the level of gene expression in matched fetal placental tissues in the initial 20 cohort children. ACSL3 was therefore chosen for further investigation in a larger sample of 56 cohort children. Methylation of the ACSL3 5'-CGI was found to be significantly associated with maternal airborne PAH exposure exceeding 2.41 ng/m(3 (OR = 13.8; p<0.001; sensitivity = 75%; specificity = 82% and with a parental report of asthma symptoms in children prior to age 5 (OR = 3.9; p<0.05. Thus, if validated, methylated ACSL3 5'CGI in UCWBC DNA may be a surrogate endpoint for transplacental PAH exposure and/or a potential biomarker for environmentally-related asthma. This exploratory report provides a new blueprint for the discovery of epigenetic biomarkers relevant to other exposure assessments and/or investigations of exposure-disease relationships in birth cohorts. The results support the emerging theory of

  14. Spatial analysis of air pollution and childhood asthma in Hamilton, Canada: comparing exposure methods in sensitive subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arain Altaf

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in air pollution exposure within a community may be associated with asthma prevalence. However, studies conducted to date have produced inconsistent results, possibly due to errors in measurement of the exposures. Methods A standardized asthma survey was administered to children in grades one and eight in Hamilton, Canada, in 1994–95 (N ~1467. Exposure to air pollution was estimated in four ways: (1 distance from roadways; (2 interpolated surfaces for ozone, sulfur dioxide, particulate matter and nitrous oxides from seven to nine governmental monitoring stations; (3 a kriged nitrogen dioxide (NO2 surface based on a network of 100 passive NO2 monitors; and (4 a land use regression (LUR model derived from the same monitoring network. Logistic regressions were used to test associations between asthma and air pollution, controlling for variables including neighbourhood income, dwelling value, state of housing, a deprivation index and smoking. Results There were no significant associations between any of the exposure estimates and asthma in the whole population, but large effects were detected the subgroup of children without hayfever (predominately in girls. The most robust effects were observed for the association of asthma without hayfever and NO2LUR OR = 1.86 (95%CI, 1.59–2.16 in all girls and OR = 2.98 (95%CI, 0.98–9.06 for older girls, over an interquartile range increase and controlling for confounders. Conclusion Our findings indicate that traffic-related pollutants, such as NO2, are associated with asthma without overt evidence of other atopic disorders among female children living in a medium-sized Canadian city. The effects were sensitive to the method of exposure estimation. More refined exposure models produced the most robust associations.

  15. Preterm birth and low birth weight continue to increase the risk of asthma from age 7 to 43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Melanie C; D Olhaberriague, Ana López-Polín; Burgess, John A; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John L; Johns, David P; Abramson, Michael J; Walters, E Haydn; Dharmage, Shyamali C

    2017-08-01

    Perinatal events can influence the development of asthma in childhood but current evidence is contradictory concerning the effects on life-time asthma risk. To assess the relationship between birth characteristics and asthma from childhood to adulthood. All available birth records for the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study (TAHS) cohort, born in 1961 were obtained from the Tasmanian State Archives and Tasmanian hospitals. Low birth weight (LBW) was defined as less than 2500 grams. Preterm birth was defined as delivery before 37 weeks' gestation. Small for gestational age (SGA) was defined as a birth weight below the 10 th percentile for a given gestational age. Multivariate logistic and cox regression were used to examine associations between birth characteristics and lifetime risk of current and incident asthma, adjusting for confounders. The prevalence of LBW was 5.2%, SGA was 13.8% and preterm was 3.3%. LBW (OR = 1.65, 95%CI 1.12,2.44) and preterm birth (OR = 1.81, 95%CI 0.99, 3.31) were both associated with an increased risk of current asthma between the ages of 7 to 43 years. There was no association between SGA and current asthma risk. However, SGA was associated with incident asthma (HR = 1.32, 95%CI 1.00, 1.74), and there was an interaction with sex (p value = 0.08), with males having a greater risk of incident asthma (HR = 1.70, 95%CI 1.16-2.49) than females (HR = 1.04, 95%CI 0.70-1.54). Preterm birth and LBW were associated with an increased risk of current asthma into middle-age. These findings are the first to demonstrate the continuing impact of these characteristics on asthma risk into middle-age.

  16. Non-thyroid cancer incidence in Belarusian residents exposed to Chernobyl fallout in childhood and adolescence: Standardized Incidence Ratio analysis, 1997–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumova, Evgenia; Hatch, Maureen; Brenner, Alina; Nadyrov, Eldar; Veyalkin, Ilya; Polyanskaya, Olga; Yauseyenka, Vasilina; Polyakov, Semion; Levin, Leonid; Zablotska, Lydia; Rozhko, Alexander; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2016-01-01

    Background While an increased risk of thyroid cancer from post-Chernobyl exposure to Iodine-131 (I-131) in children and adolescents has been well-documented, risks of other cancers or leukemia as a result of residence in radioactively contaminated areas remain uncertain. Methods We studied non-thyroid cancer incidence in a cohort of about 12,000 individuals from Belarus exposed under age of 18 years to Chernobyl fallout (median age at the time of Chernobyl accident of 7.9 years). During 15 years of follow-up from1997 through 2011, 54 incident cancers excluding thyroid were identified in the study cohort with 142,968 person-years at risk. We performed Standardized Incidence Ratio (SIR) analysis of all solid cancers excluding thyroid (n=42), of leukemia (n=6) and of lymphoma (n=6). Results We found no significant increase in the incidence of non-thyroid solid cancer (SIR=0.83, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 0.61; 1.11), lymphoma (SIR=0.66, 95% CI: 0.26; 1.33) or leukemia (SIR=1.78, 95% CI: 0.71; 3.61) in the study cohort as compared with the sex-, age- and calendar-time-specific national rates. These findings may in part reflect the relatively young age of study subjects (median attained age of 33.4years), and long latency for some radiation-related solid cancers. Conclusions We found no evidence of statistically significant increases in solid cancer, lymphoma and leukemia incidence 25 years after childhood exposure in the study cohort; however, it is important to continue follow-up non-thyroid cancers in individuals exposed to low-level radiation at radiosensitive ages. PMID:26851723

  17. Benefits of mitigated ambient air quality due to transportation control on childhood asthma hospitalization during the 2002 summer Asian games in Busan, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Tae; Son, Ji-Young; Cho, Yong-Sung

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this study is to see whether there were any health benefits of mitigated air pollution concentration due to reduced traffic flow during a citywide intervention for the 2002 Summer Asian Games. Relative risks of hospitalization for childhood asthma during the post-Asian Game period compared with the baseline period were estimated using a time-series analysis of the generalized additive Poisson model. Fourteen consecutive days of traffic volume control in Busan during the Games reduced all regulated air pollutant levels by 1-25%. The estimated relative risk of hospitalization during the post-Games period over the baseline period was 0.73 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.49, 1.11). We observed that this reduced air pollution was unique in 2002 when the traffic volume reduction program was applied during the Games period. This empirical data provides epidemiologic evidence of the health benefits resulting from environmental interventions to reduce ambient air pollution.

  18. Long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonist in pediatric asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigemi Yoshihara

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonists (LABA, a class of agents for the long-term management of childhood bronchial asthma, are recommended for use in combination with steroid inhalation for the treatment of the morning dip in severe childhood asthma. In the present review, salmeterol (SM, a LABA inhalant with a long-acting bronchodilator effect, was compared with the recently introduced tulobuterol patch (TBP in terms of safety and efficacy, based on their respective clinical effects on childhood asthma. From a clinical perspective, both drugs had a preventive effect by suppressing the morning dip and exercise-induced asthma when used concomitantly with an inhaled corticosteroid, and both agents were associated with a lower incidence of adverse effects on the cardiovascular system than oral β2-adrenergic receptor agonists. Based on these findings, both SM and TBP are concluded to be highly efficacious and safe bronchodilator agents that are appropriate for the long-term management of childhood asthma.

  19. Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Asthma (Pediatric) Asthma (Pediatric) Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... meet the rising demand for asthma care. Our pediatric asthma team brings together physicians, nurses, dietitians, physical ...

  20. Coeliac disease and asthma association in children: the role of antibiotic consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canova, Cristina; Pitter, Gisella; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Romor, Pierantonio; Zanier, Loris; Zanotti, Renzo; Simonato, Lorenzo

    2015-07-01

    The relationship between coeliac disease and asthma has been scarcely investigated. Infant antibiotic exposure has been linked to both diseases. We evaluated the association between childhood coeliac disease and asthma and the role of antibiotics in the first year of life. We followed a cohort of children born in 1995-2011 in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region (Italy). Prescriptions for antibiotics in the first year of life and subsequent treated asthma were retrieved from drug prescription records; coeliac disease incident cases were identified from pathology reports, hospital discharges and exemption from prescription charges for clinical tests. We estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) using multivariate Poisson regression models. Among the 143,144 children, we identified 717 coeliac children and 34,969 asthmatics. Children with asthma were at increased risk of coeliac disease (IRR 1.46, 95% CI 1.25-1.67). Restricting the analysis to asthma that occurred before the diagnosis of coeliac disease, the excess risk disappeared, except for coeliac disease diagnosed after 5 years of age (IRR 1.37, 95% CI 1.09-1.71). Antibiotics were not a confounding factor in these associations. Childhood treated asthma and coeliac disease are significantly associated. This association is not confounded by antibiotic exposure in the first year of life and may be explained by other shared risk factors. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  1. Childhood and Adolescent Cancer in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil: Incidence, Geographical Distribution, and Association With Environmental Health Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Lídia N V; Silveira, José C; Luna, Carlos F; Lucena-Silva, Norma

    2018-01-01

    Cases of childhood and adolescent cancer diagnosed from 2009 to 2012 in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil, were analyzed considering the patients' sex and age, the type of cancer and the municipality of living to determine the incidence, geographical distribution, and association with environmental health indicators. The spatial distribution pattern of the cancer incidence was estimated using the Global Moran's index. The association between environmental health indicators and cancer incidence was evaluated by multiple regression. From 2009 to 2012, 1261 new cases of cancer were diagnosed in patients younger than 20 years old in the state of Pernambuco. Leukemia/lymphoma were the most common type of cancer contemplating 45.28% of the cases. The average age-adjusted incidence rate was 113 cases per million with no spatial distribution pattern. The municipalities were clustered according to their degree of inequality (P=0.017), human development index (P=0.001), population growth rate (P=0.008), urbanization level (P=0.001), number of agricultural crops per capita (P=0.001), and number of industries per capita (P=0.030). However, only urbanization level was positive correlated with incidence of pediatric cancer (P=0.009) likely because in more developed cities, people are more exposed to potential oncogenic factors, such as air and water pollution and processed and ultraprocessed food. The better access to specialized health services, which increases the chances of early diagnosis, may also contributes for a higher number of cases in more developed cities.

  2. In utero exposure to 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of childhood asthma, wheeze, and respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Haixia; Xun, Pengcheng; Pike, Katharine C

    2017-01-01

    venous blood and risk of offspring's asthma, wheeze, and respiratory tract infections. METHODS: Data were derived from PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar, references from relevant articles, and de novo results from published studies until December 2015. A random-effects meta-analysis was conducted among 16...

  3. Maternal waterpipe smoke exposure and the risk of asthma and allergic diseases in childhood: A post hoc analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Waked

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This analysis was conducted with the objective of evaluating association between waterpipe passive smoking exposure and asthma, and allergies among Lebanese children. Material and methods Data were taken from a crosssectional study on children from public and private schools. A sample of 22 schools participated in the study, where standardized written core questionnaires were distributed. From 5 to 12-year-old students filled in the questionnaires at home, while 13–14-year-old students filled it in in the class. In total, 5522 children were evaluated for the prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic eczema, and their associated factors, including waterpipe exposure due to parents’ smoking. Results The descriptive results of parental smoking were, as follows: among mothers: 1609 (29% mothers smoked cigarettes, 385 (7% smoked waterpipe and 98 (1.8% smoked both; among fathers: 2449 (44.2% smoked cigarettes, 573 (10.3% smoked waterpipe and 197 (3.5% smoked both. Maternal waterpipe smoking was significantly and moderately associated with allergic diseases (p < 0.001; ORa = 1.71, including probable asthma, rhinitis and dermatitis (p < 0.001 for all. Quite on the opposite, father’s waterpipe smoking was not associated with any of the diseases. Parental cigarette smoking demonstrated some positive effects: father’s cigarette smoking did not show association with dermatitis or asthma diagnosed by a physician, while mother’s cigarette smoking showed a positive association only with probable asthma. Moreover, no interactions between cigarette and waterpipe smoking were observed. Conclusions Maternal waterpipe smoking should be regarded as a high risk behavior; however, additional studies are necessary to confirm this finding.

  4. Application of a Time-Stratified Case-Crossover Design to Explore the Effects of Air Pollution and Season on Childhood Asthma Hospitalization in Cities of Differing Urban Patterns: Big Data Analytics of Government Open Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yen Kuo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have assessed the lagged effects of levels of different urban city air pollutants and seasons on asthma hospitalization in children. This study used big data analysis to explore the effects of daily changes in air pollution and season on childhood asthma hospitalization from 2001 to 2010 in Taipei and Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. A time-stratified case-crossover study and conditional logistic regression analysis were employed to identify associations between the risk of hospitalization due to asthma in children and the levels of air pollutants (PM2.5, PM10, O3, SO2, and NO2 in the days preceding hospitalization. During the study period, 2900 children in Taipei and 1337 in Kaohsiung aged ≤15 years were hospitalized due to asthma for the first time. The results indicated that the levels of air pollutants were significantly associated with the risk of asthma hospitalization in children, and seasonal effects were observed. High levels of air pollution in Kaohsiung had greater effects than in Taipei after adjusting for seasonal variation. The most important factor was O3 in spring in Taipei. In children aged 0–6 years, asthma was associated with O3 in Taipei and SO2 in Kaohsiung, after controlling for the daily mean temperature and relative humidity.

  5. Application of a Time-Stratified Case-Crossover Design to Explore the Effects of Air Pollution and Season on Childhood Asthma Hospitalization in Cities of Differing Urban Patterns: Big Data Analytics of Government Open Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ching-Yen; Pan, Ren-Hao; Chan, Chin-Kan; Wu, Chiung-Yi; Phan, Dinh-Van; Chan, Chien-Lung

    2018-03-31

    Few studies have assessed the lagged effects of levels of different urban city air pollutants and seasons on asthma hospitalization in children. This study used big data analysis to explore the effects of daily changes in air pollution and season on childhood asthma hospitalization from 2001 to 2010 in Taipei and Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. A time-stratified case-crossover study and conditional logistic regression analysis were employed to identify associations between the risk of hospitalization due to asthma in children and the levels of air pollutants (PM 2.5 , PM 10 , O₃, SO₂, and NO₂) in the days preceding hospitalization. During the study period, 2900 children in Taipei and 1337 in Kaohsiung aged ≤15 years were hospitalized due to asthma for the first time. The results indicated that the levels of air pollutants were significantly associated with the risk of asthma hospitalization in children, and seasonal effects were observed. High levels of air pollution in Kaohsiung had greater effects than in Taipei after adjusting for seasonal variation. The most important factor was O₃ in spring in Taipei. In children aged 0-6 years, asthma was associated with O₃ in Taipei and SO₂ in Kaohsiung, after controlling for the daily mean temperature and relative humidity.

  6. Three phenotypes of adult-onset asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amelink, M.; de Nijs, S. B.; de Groot, J. C.; van Tilburg, P. M. B.; van Spiegel, P. I.; Krouwels, F. H.; Lutter, R.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Weersink, E. J. M.; ten Brinke, A.; Sterk, P. J.; Bel, E. H.

    2013-01-01

    Adult-onset asthma differs from childhood-onset asthma in many respects. It is more heterogeneous, often severe and frequently associated with loss of lung function. To identify underlying mechanisms of adult-onset asthma and to capture predictors of disease progression, detailed characterization

  7. Understanding Children with Asthma: Trouble and Triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, JungHa; Wood, Beatrice L.; Cheah, PoAnn

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common illnesses of childhood; in the United States, nearly 9% of children have the condition (Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, 2006). Among children with chronic illnesses, asthma is the most common cause for school absence and hospitalization (Akinbami, 2006). Asthma is a chronic disorder of the…

  8. Epidemiological study of risk factors in pediatric asthma | Tageldin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Childhood asthma is a major public health problem in Egypt and worldwide. Epidemiologic, physiologic, and social factors appear to be associated with an increased risk of asthma. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the most frequent risk factors of childhood asthma exacerbation and severity in ...

  9. Incidence and 12-month outcome of non-transient childhood conversion disorder in the U.K. and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ani, Cornelius; Reading, Richard; Lynn, Richard; Forlee, Simone; Garralda, Elena

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about conversion disorder in childhood. To document clinical incidence, features, management and 12-month outcome of non-transient conversion disorder in under 16-year-olds in the U.K. and Ireland. Surveillance through the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Surveillance System. In total, 204 cases (age range 7-15 years) were reported, giving a 12-month incidence of 1.30/100 000 (95% CI 1.11-1.52). The most common symptoms were motor weakness and abnormal movements. Presentation with multiple symptoms was the norm. Antecedent stressors were reported for 80.8%, most commonly bullying in school. Most children required in-patient admission with frequent medical investigations. Follow-up at 12 months was available for 147 children, when all conversion disorder symptoms were reported as improved. Most families (91%) accepted a non-medical explanation of the symptoms either fully or partially. Childhood conversion disorder represents an infrequent but significant clinical burden in the UK and Ireland.

  10. Childhood brain tumours and use of mobile phones: comparison of a case–control study with incidence data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydin Denis

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The first case–control study on mobile phone use and brain tumour risk among children and adolescents (CEFALO study has recently been published. In a commentary published in Environmental Health, Söderqvist and colleagues argued that CEFALO suggests an increased brain tumour risk in relation to wireless phone use. In this article, we respond and show why consistency checks of case–control study results with observed time trends of incidence rates are essential, given the well described limitations of case–control studies and the steep increase of mobile phone use among children and adolescents during the last decade. There is no plausible explanation of how a notably increased risk from use of wireless phones would correspond to the relatively stable incidence time trends for brain tumours among children and adolescents observed in the Nordic countries. Nevertheless, an increased risk restricted to heavy mobile phone use, to very early life exposure, or to rare subtypes of brain tumours may be compatible with stable incidence trends at this time and thus further monitoring of childhood brain tumour incidence rate time trends is warranted.

  11. A nine-year prospective study on the incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X H; Li, T L; Yang, Z; Liu, Z Y; Wei, Y D; Jin, S X; Hong, C; Qin, R L; Li, Y Q; Dorman, J S; Laporte, R E; Wang, K A

    2000-12-01

    To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus in China, newly diagnosed cases of type 1 diabetes with an onset age under 15 years were retrospectively registered by 23 local centers in China following a standardized protocol on the basis of the nationwide registry established by the WHO DiaMond Project China Participating Center, Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine (CAPM). A population of about 24 million children were covered in the defined areas. A two-sample capture-recapture method was used to estimate case ascertainment. Between 1988 and 1996, 903 diabetic cases were registered in 9 ethnic groups. The overall ascertainment corrected incidence rate (IR) was 0.59 per 100,000 person-year. The IR was 0.52/100,000 (95% CI: 0.50-0.54) for males and 0.66/100,000 (95% CI: 0.64-0.68) for females. The standardized ascertainment corrected IR by the national age-specific population in 1990 was 0.57 per 100,000 person-year. The incidence among various ethnic groups ranged from 0.25/100,000 to 3. 06/100,000. The IRs increased with northern latitude, and the IR of Han population was significantly higher in North China compared with South China (0.67 versus 0.53 per 100,000 respectively, P < 0.01). A correlation model of incidence and calendar time showed that the IR increased significantly between 1988 and 1996 (r = 0.86, P = 0.0027). The relative risk (RR) of type 1 diabetes mellitus for different age-groups estimated by a Poisson regression model showed that taking RR as 1.00 for age-group from 0 to 4 years, the RR for age-group from 5 to 9 year and from 10 to 14 year was 2.30 and 3.60 respectively. The standardized ascertainment corrected IR of childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus in China in much lower than in other countries. The geographic and ethnic variability of the incidence suggests that both genetic and environmental factors play a role in the development of childhood diabetes in China.

  12. Efficacy of the I Can Control Asthma and Nutrition Now (ICAN) Pilot Program on Health Outcomes in High School Students with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouba, Joanne; Velsor-Friedrich, Barbarba; Militello, Lisa; Harrison, Patrick R.; Becklenberg, Amy; White, Barb; Surya, Shruti; Ahmed, Avais

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is the most prevalent chronic illness in childhood affecting 7 million youth. Many youth with asthma face another risk factor in obesity. Obesity, in turn, increases disorders such as asthma. Studies have recommended that asthma programs also address weight management in youth. Taking this into consideration, the I Can Control Asthma and…

  13. Children with Asthma and Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selda Yuzer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the chronic diseases which have are widely seen among the children. The disease has recently been in the increase all over the world and affects many children. In a study conducted with International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC method, it was found out that prevalence of childhood asthma was 17.1%. Participation in sportive activities by the children with asthma, which is today considered as a part of asthma treatment program, makes contributions to their physical, mental and psychological development and increases their quality of life. The most recommended sports for the children with asthma are swimming and water sports. Sports like tennis and volleyball are too advised. Choice of sports depends on severity of asthma, child and #8217;s choice and whether or not asthma is kept under control. Nursing approaches for the children with asthma include correction of symptoms, training of children and their families, assistance with disease adaptation, continuing asthma care at home and interventions to make children lead healthy activities of daily life of children. With protective measures to be taken by families and children; children should be encourage for sportive activities. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(3.000: 241-244

  14. Asthma - control drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asthma - children Wheezing Patient Instructions Asthma and school Asthma - child - discharge Asthma - quick-relief drugs Asthma - what to ask the doctor - adult Asthma - what to ask your doctor - child Bronchiolitis - discharge Exercise-induced asthma Exercising and asthma ...

  15. The association of childhood obesity with asthma and rhinitis symptoms in 6-8years old children living in the Coimbra district, Portugal: the role of environmental, family and socioeconomic factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Muc, Magdalena Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Antropologia, apresentada à Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra Introduction: The increase in the prevalence of obesity, asthma, and rhinitis in childhood suggests a link between them. Socio-demographic and early life risk factors, sedentary lifestyle, diet and tobacco exposure, among other factors, could be responsible for the increase in the number of obese asthmatics. There are two main phenotypes of obese asthmatics described so far and...

  16. Early-Life Exposure to the Great Smog of 1952 and the Development of Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Prashant; Zivin, Joshua Graff; Mullins, Jamie T; Neidell, Matthew

    2016-12-15

    Little is known about the long-term effects of air pollution exposure and the root causes of asthma. We use exposure to intense air pollution from the 1952 Great Smog of London as a natural experiment to examine both issues. To determine whether exposure to extreme air pollution in utero or soon after birth affects asthma development later in life. This was a natural experiment using the unanticipated pollution event by comparing the prevalence of asthma between those exposed to the Great Smog in utero or the first year of life with those conceived well before or after the incident and those residing outside the affected area at the time of the smog. Prevalence of asthma during childhood (ages 0-15) and adulthood (ages >15) is analyzed for 2,916 respondents to the Life History portion of the English Longitudinal Study on Aging born from 1945 to 1955. Exposure to the Great Smog in the first year of life increases the likelihood of childhood asthma by 19.87 percentage points (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.37-36.38). We also find suggestive evidence that early-life exposure led to a 9.53 percentage point increase (95% CI, -4.85 to 23.91) in the likelihood of adult asthma and exposure in utero led to a 7.91 percentage point increase (95% CI, -2.39 to 18.20) in the likelihood of childhood asthma. These results are the first to link early-life pollution exposure to later development of asthma using a natural experiment, suggesting the legacy of the Great Smog is ongoing.

  17. Breastfeeding and timing of first dietary introduction in relation to childhood asthma, allergies, and airway diseases: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen; Liu, Wei; Cai, Jiao; Weschler, Louise B; Wang, Xueying; Hu, Yu; Zou, Zhijun; Shen, Li; Sundell, Jan

    2017-06-01

    We investigated associations of breastfeeding (BF) durations and patterns and of timing of other dietary introductions with prevalence of asthma, wheeze, hay fever, rhinitis, pneumonia, and eczema among preschool children. During April 2011-April 2012, we conducted a cross-sectional study in 72 kindergartens from five districts of Shanghai, China and obtained 13,335 questionnaires of children 4-6-years-old. We used multiple logistic regression models to evaluate the target associations. Compared to children who were never BF, children who were exclusively breastfed 3-6 months had the lowest risk of asthma (adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval: 0.81, 0.72-0.91) and wheeze (0.93, 0.87-0.99); and exclusive BF >6 months was significantly associated with a reduced risk of hay fever (0.93, 0.89-0.97), rhinitis (0.97, 0.94-0.99), pneumonia (0.97, 0.94-0.99), and eczema (0.96, 0.93-0.99). No significant associations were found between time when fruits or vegetables were introduced and the studied diseases. Associations were independent of the child's sex and parent's ownership of the current residence. Longer duration BF was only significantly protective when there was no family history of atopy. This study suggests that heredity, but not sex and socioeconomic status, may negatively impact the effect of BF on childhood airway and allergic diseases. Our findings support China's national recommendation that mothers provide exclusive BF for the first four months, and continue partial BF for more than 6 months.

  18. Childhood immunization and atopic disease into middle-age--a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Melanie C; Haydn Walters, E; Burgess, John A; Jenkins, Mark A; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John L; Abramson, Michael J; Dharmage, Shyamali C

    2010-03-01

    The association between childhood immunizations and risk of atopic diseases is unclear. No study has examined possible associations between childhood immunizations and such diseases in middle age. The Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study (TAHS) is a population based cohort study of respiratory disease. The TAHS participants were followed from 7 to 44 yrs of age. Immunizations during childhood were examined for any association with asthma and atopic disease at age 44 yrs. Multivariable regression models were used to estimate relative risks while adjusting for confounders. Cox regression was used to estimate the association between childhood immunizations and asthma developing after the age of 7 yrs. We found no association between any childhood immunization (Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Polio, Smallpox) and asthma (ORs ranged from 0.87 to 1.17 p > 0.05), eczema (ORs ranged from 0.99 to 1.07 p > 0.05), food allergy (ORs ranged from 0.97 to 1.11 p > 0.05), or hay fever (ORs ranged from 1.02 to 1.05 p > 0.05) at age 44. Nor did we find any association between childhood immunizations and an increased risk of incident asthma after the age of 7 yrs (Diphtheria HR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.82, 1.36; Tetanus HR = 1.13, 95% CI 0.88, 1.44; Pertussis HR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.81, 1.30; Polio HR = 1.15, 95% CI 0.86, 1.54; Smallpox HR = 1.21, 95% CI 0.99, 1.48; DTP HR = 1.05, 95% CI 0.85, 1.30). Our analysis does not support any association between common childhood immunizations and risk of asthma and atopic disease in middle-age. Our findings should provide reassurance that in terms of life time risk of asthma and atopic disease, childhood immunization is safe.

  19. Allergic rhinitis is associated with poor asthma control in children with asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Eric P.; Nijkamp, Anke; Duiverman, Eric J.; Brand, Paul L. P.

    Background Asthma and allergic rhinitis are the two most common chronic disorders in childhood and adolescence. To date, no study has examined the impact of comorbid allergic rhinitis on asthma control in children. Objective To examine the prevalence of allergic rhinitis in children with asthma, and

  20. Roles of the State Asthma Program in Implementing Multicomponent, School-Based Asthma Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Laura L.; Wilce, Maureen A.; Gill, Sarah A.; Disler, Sheri L.; Collins, Pamela; Crawford, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Background: Asthma is a leading chronic childhood disease in the United States and a major contributor to school absenteeism. Evidence suggests that multicomponent, school-based asthma interventions are a strategic way to address asthma among school-aged children. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages the 36 health…

  1. A study of the association of childhood asthma with HLA alleles in the population of Siliguri, West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, M; Chatterjee, M; Chaudhuri, T K

    2014-09-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease for which a strong genetic basis is firmly established. It is a complex disorder influenced by gene-environment interaction. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes have been shown to be consistently associated with asthma and its related phenotypes in various populations. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of the selected HLA classes I and II allelic groups in asthmatic and control groups. HLA typing was performed using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific typing (PCR-SSP) method. The allele frequency was estimated by direct counting. Frequency of each HLA allelic group was compared between asthmatic group and control group using χ(2) test. P-value was corrected by multiplying with the number of the allelic groups studied. Odds ratio (OR) and its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) for each allelic group were calculated using graphpad instat 3.10. The results of this study showed a significantly higher frequency of HLA-DRB1*03 in asthmatics than in controls (11.43% vs 3.64%, OR = 3.78, 95% CI = 1.61-8.85, P = 0.0025, Pcorr  population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Asthma - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control drugs are taken every day to prevent asthma symptoms. Your child should take these medicines even if no symptoms ... you think your child has new symptoms of asthma. If your child has been diagnosed with asthma, call the provider: ...

  3. Asthma Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... plan, and environmental control measures to avoid your child's asthma triggers. By working together with your daughter's health ... which can diminish your allergies' effect on your asthma. Question 5 Once my child reaches puberty, he will outgrow his asthma. True ...

  4. Incidence and severity of childhood pneumonia in the first year of life in a South African birth cohort: the Drakenstein Child Health Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. David M le Roux, MBChB; Landon Myer, PhD; Mark P Nicol, PhD; Heather J Zar, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Background: Childhood pneumonia causes substantial mortality and morbidity. Accurate measurements of pneumonia incidence are scarce in low-income and middle-income countries, particularly after implementation of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. We aimed to assess the incidence, severity, and risk factors for pneumonia in the first year of life in children enrolled in a South African birth cohort. Methods: This birth cohort study is being done at two sites in Paarl, a periurban area of South...

  5. Childhood tuberculosis incidence in Southeast Brazil, 1996 Incidência da tuberculose na infância no Sudeste do Brasil, no ano de 1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando C. Nascimento

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to describe childhood tuberculosis incidence in Southeast Brazil in 1996. It is a descriptive study based on secondary records from the Tuberculosis Division of the São Paulo State Health Department. The study area includes 40 cities, has some 1,800,000 inhabitants, and is located between São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, the largest cities in Brazil. The study included cases up to 15 years of age. Independent variables were: sex, age, type of case, clinical presentation, radiology, AFB microscopy, HIV antibody tests, and method of discovery. The incidence rate in this age bracket was 10.4/100,000. Pulmonary manifestations were the most common, and control of contacts was the most common method of case discovery. AFB microscopy was performed in 18.6% of the cases and HIV testing was done in 14.9%. Incidence in this study was higher than for the State of São Paulo as a whole. Poor socioeconomic level, deterioration of public health services, treatment dropout by adults and their persistence as sputum-positive carriers, and flaws in case reporting and follow-up could explain these results.O objetivo deste estudo é descrever a incidência de tuberculose na infância, no Sudeste do Brasil. Trata-se de um estudo descritivo, com dados secundários obtidos junto à Divisão de Tuberculose da Secretaria Estadual de Saúde de São Paulo, relativos ao ano de 1996. A região estudada é composta por quarenta municípios, com população estimada em 1.800.000 habitantes e localizada entre São Paulo e Rio de Janeiro. As variáveis estudadas foram: sexo, idade, tipo de caso, forma clínica, tipo de descoberta e resultados dos exames radiológicos, de baciloscopia e do teste anti-HIV. Foram incluídos pacientes com até 15 anos de idade. A incidência de tuberculose encontrada nesta faixa etária foi de 10,4/100 mil habitantes. A forma pulmonar foi a mais freqüentemente encontrada e o tipo de descoberta de casos novos mais importante foi por

  6. A review of the incidence and survival of childhood and adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cancer incidence. The age range for adolescence for the purpose of scientific reporting has been set at 15 - 19 years.6 More recently the concept of 'young adult oncology' has referred to a larger group of young people ... Testicular cancer is the commonest ... In general the alkylating agents interact with DNA, preventing.

  7. Association between Frequency of Consumption of Fruit, Vegetables, Nuts and Pulses and BMI: Analyses of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Clare R; Stewart, Alistair W; Hancox, Robert J; Murphy, Rinki; Braithwaite, Irene; Beasley, Richard; Mitchell, Edwin A

    2018-03-07

    Diets which emphasize intakes of plant-based foods are recommended to reduce disease risk and for promoting healthy weight. The aim of this study was to examine the association between fruit, vegetables, pulses and nut intake and body mass index (BMI) across countries in adolescents (13-14 years) and children (6-7 years). Data from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood; 77,243 children's parents and 201,871 adolescents was used to examine the association between dietary intake (Food Frequency Questionnaire) and BMI using general linear models, adjusting for country gross national index. Adolescents who consumed fruit, vegetables, pulses and nuts three or more times a week had a lower BMI than the never or occasional group; eating nuts three or more times a week, was associated with a BMI value of 0.274 kg/m² lower than the never group ( p BMI of -0.079 kg/m². In this large global study, an inverse association was observed between BMI and the reported increasing intake of vegetables in 6-7 years old and fruit, vegetables, pulses and nuts in adolescents. This study supports current dietary recommendations which emphasize the consumption of vegetables, nut and pulses, although the effect sizes were small.

  8. The Virome and Its Major Component, Anellovirus, a Convoluted System Molding Human Immune Defenses and Possibly Affecting the Development of Asthma and Respiratory Diseases in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Freer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The microbiome, a thriving and complex microbial community colonizing the human body, has a broad impact on human health. Colonization is a continuous process that starts very early in life and occurs thanks to shrewd strategies microbes have evolved to tackle a convoluted array of anatomical, physiological, and functional barriers of the human body. Cumulative evidence shows that viruses are part of the microbiome. This part, called virome, has a dynamic composition that reflects what we eat, how and where we live, what we do, our genetic background, and other unpredictable variables. Thus, the virome plays a chief role in shaping innate and adaptive host immune defenses. Imbalance of normal microbial flora is thought to trigger or exacerbate many acute and chronic disorders. A compelling example can be found in the respiratory apparatus, where early-life viral infections are major determinants for the development of allergic diseases, like asthma, and other non-transmissible diseases. In this review, we focus on the virome and, particularly, on Anelloviridae, a recently discovered virus family. Anelloviruses are major components of the virome, present in most, if not all, human beings, where they are acquired early in life and replicate persistently without causing apparent disease. We will discuss how modulation of innate and adaptive immune systems by Anelloviruses can influence the development of respiratory diseases in childhood and provide evidence for the use of Anelloviruses as useful and practical molecular markers to monitor inflammatory processes and immune system competence.

  9. Association between Frequency of Consumption of Fruit, Vegetables, Nuts and Pulses and BMI: Analyses of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare R. Wall

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Diets which emphasize intakes of plant-based foods are recommended to reduce disease risk and for promoting healthy weight. The aim of this study was to examine the association between fruit, vegetables, pulses and nut intake and body mass index (BMI across countries in adolescents (13–14 years and children (6–7 years. Data from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood; 77,243 children’s parents and 201,871 adolescents was used to examine the association between dietary intake (Food Frequency Questionnaire and BMI using general linear models, adjusting for country gross national index. Adolescents who consumed fruit, vegetables, pulses and nuts three or more times a week had a lower BMI than the never or occasional group; eating nuts three or more times a week, was associated with a BMI value of 0.274 kg/m2 lower than the never group (p < 0.001. Compared to children who never or occasionally reported eating vegetables, those reporting that they ate vegetables three or more times per week had a lower BMI of −0.079 kg/m2. In this large global study, an inverse association was observed between BMI and the reported increasing intake of vegetables in 6–7 years old and fruit, vegetables, pulses and nuts in adolescents. This study supports current dietary recommendations which emphasize the consumption of vegetables, nut and pulses, although the effect sizes were small.

  10. Incidence and prognostic importance of glomerular crescents in renal diseases of childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M N; Baumal, R; Poucell, S; Steele, B T

    1984-01-01

    The renal biopsies of 372 children with various glomerular disorders were reviewed and crescent formation was seen in 56 cases (15%). Four disorders, i.e. systemic lupus erythematosus, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) types I and II and Henoch-Schönlein disease accounted for 74% of 10 diagnostic categories. Idiopathic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) was seen in only 2 cases. Crescents associated with MPGN types I or II or idiopathic RPGN had a bad renal prognosis, whereas the presence of crescents in other disorders did not necessarily affect the renal outcome. Immunofluorescent and electron microscopic findings are essential to distinguish many conditions which may be associated with crescent formation in childhood renal disease.

  11. Incidence of mutism, dysarthria and dysphagia associated with childhood posterior fossa tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Cristina; Morgan, Angela T

    2011-07-01

    Dysarthria and dysphagia are known complications following posterior fossa tumour (PFT) surgery. Outcome studies for these disorders, however, have focused on a select sub-group of children with mutism. Little is known regarding the incidence or features of these impairments in a consecutively admitted sample of children with PFT. This study describes the incidence and features of mutism, dysarthria and dysphagia during the acute post-surgical phase in a consecutive sample of children with PFT, unselected for the presence of mutism. A retrospective medical chart review of children aged 2 to 18 years consecutively admitted with PFT between January 2003 and January 2008 was conducted. Twenty-seven children with PFT were identified. Post-surgical mutism, dysarthria and dysphagia were recorded in 9/27 (33%), 8/27 (30%) and 9/27 (33%) cases, respectively. Dysarthria most commonly involved deficits in articulation; however, impairments in respiration, phonation and prosody were also reported. Dysphagia involved all stages of swallowing (i.e., pre-oral anticipatory, oral preparatory, oral and pharyngeal). Eighty-nine percent of children (8/9) presented with dysphagia at hospital discharge. The incidence of acute presentation of mutism, dysarthria and dysphagia post-surgery was relatively high, affecting around one in three cases. This incidence rate, considered together with the fact that over half of all cases had co-morbid communication or swallowing impairments, suggests that health professionals should be aware of the likelihood of dysarthria and dysphagia presentation in the acute period and consider speech pathology referral where necessary.

  12. The Shanghai Women's Asthma and Allergy Study: objectives, design, and recruitment results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartert, Tina V; Deng, Xinqing; Hartman, Terryl J; Wen, Wanqing; Yang, Gong; Gao, Yu-Tang; Jin, Meiling; Bai, Chunxue; Gross, Myron; Roberts, L Jackson; Sheller, James R; Christman, John; Dupont, William; Griffin, Marie; Shu, Xiao Ou

    2008-06-01

    The Shanghai Women's Asthma and Allergy Study is the first population-based incidence study designed to assess the associations of dietary antioxidant intake and measures of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activity with development of adult-onset asthma and allergic rhinitis. A total of 65,732 participants in the Shanghai Women's Health Study, an ongoing cohort study in seven districts of Shanghai, People's Republic of China, were recruited to the Shanghai Women's Asthma and Allergy Study from 2003 to 2007. Dietary intake was assessed in the parent study by using a validated and quantitative food frequency questionnaire at baseline recruitment and at the first biennial follow-up survey. Blood and urine samples were collected to measure baseline oxidative stress, antioxidant enzyme activity, and nutrient levels at the baseline survey. Incident asthma and allergic rhinitis were assessed by using a modification of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire during the biennial in-person survey of the Shanghai Women's Health Study. Diagnosis of asthma was confirmed by either methacholine challenge testing or test of reversibility to beta-agonists. Dietary antioxidant intake, plasma antioxidants, antioxidant enzymes, and urinary isoprostanes, a marker of oxidative stress, were measured prior to disease onset. This paper describes the study objectives, design, population demographics, and recruitment results.

  13. Overweight in childhood and adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toennesen, L L; Bjerregaard, A; Porsbjerg, C

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is increasing worldwide among children and adolescents, and has been associated with an increased incidence of asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying this association are incompletely understood. OBJECTIVE: In this cohort study we aimed to investigate whether being...... overweight in childhood and adolescence is associated with an increased risk of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), a hallmark of asthma, in early adulthood. METHODS: Of 527 subjects from a random population sample of children and adolescents (7-17 years) examined at baseline, a total of 184 subjects completed...... (ppb) versus 13.0 (10.6, 15.9) ppb, p = 0.23). CONCLUSION: In children and adolescents, being obese or overweight seems not to be associated with an increased risk of AHR or increased FeNO levels in early adulthood....

  14. Incidence trends for childhood type 1 diabetes in Europe during 1989-2003 and predicted new cases 2005-20: a multicentre prospective registration study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patterson, Christopher C; Dahlquist, Gisela G; Gyürüs, Eva

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of type 1 diabetes in children younger than 15 years is increasing. Prediction of future incidence of this disease will enable adequate fund allocation for delivery of care to be planned. We aimed to establish 15-year incidence trends for childhood type 1 diabetes...... in European centres, and thereby predict the future burden of childhood diabetes in Europe. METHODS: 20 population-based EURODIAB registers in 17 countries registered 29 311 new cases of type 1 diabetes, diagnosed in children before their 15th birthday during a 15-year period, 1989-2003. Age-specific log...... distribution across age-groups than at present (29%, 37%, and 34%, respectively). Prevalence under age 15 years is predicted to rise from 94 000 in 2005, to 160 000 in 2020. INTERPRETATION: If present trends continue, doubling of new cases of type 1 diabetes in European children younger than 5 years...

  15. High incidence and variable clinical outcome of cardiac hypertrophy due to ACAD9 mutations in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Marie; Assouline, Zahra; Bonnet, Damien; Rio, Marlène; Iserin, Franck; Sidi, Daniel; Goldenberg, Alice; Lardennois, Caroline; Metodiev, Metodi Dimitrov; Haberberger, Birgit; Haack, Tobias; Munnich, Arnold; Prokisch, Holger; Rötig, Agnès

    2016-08-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family, member 9 (ACAD9) mutation is a frequent, usually fatal cause of early-onset cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I deficiency in early childhood. We retrospectively studied a series of 20 unrelated children with cardiac hypertrophy and isolated complex I deficiency and identified compound heterozygosity for missense, splice site or frame shift ACAD9 variants in 8/20 patients (40%). Age at onset ranged from neonatal period to 9 years and 5/8 died in infancy. Heart transplantation was possible in 3/8. Two of them survived and one additional patient improved spontaneously. Importantly, the surviving patients later developed delayed-onset neurologic or muscular symptoms, namely cognitive impairment, seizures, muscle weakness and exercise intolerance. Other organ involvement included proximal tubulopathy, renal failure, secondary ovarian failure and optic atrophy. We conclude that ACAD9 mutation is the most frequent cause of cardiac hypertrophy and isolated complex I deficiency. Heart transplantation in children surviving neonatal period should be considered with caution, as delayed-onset muscle and brain involvement of various severity may occur, even if absent prior to transplantation.

  16. Intracerebral cavernous hemangioma after cranial irradiation in childhood. Incidence and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenger, V.; Sovinz, P.; Lackner, H.; Dornbusch, H.J.; Moser, A.; Urban, C.; Lingitz, H.; Eder, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Radiotherapy is an integral part of various therapeutic regimens in pediatric and adult oncology. Endocrine dysfunction, neurologic and psychiatric deficits, secondary malignancies and radiation-induced necrosis are well-known possible late effects of cranial irradiation. However, only sporadic cases of radiation-induced cavernous hemangiomas (RICH) have been reported so far. Patients and Methods: Pediatric patients who underwent cranial radiation therapy for malignant diseases between January 1980 and December 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. After the end of therapy they entered a detailed follow-up program. Results: Of 171 patients, eight (three patients with medulloblastoma, three patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and one patient each with ependymoma and craniopharyngioma) developed intracerebral cavernoma 2.9-18.4 years after irradiation representing a cumulative incidence (according to the Kaplan-Meier method) of 2.24%, 3.86%, 4.95%, and 6.74% within 5, 10, 15, and 20 years following radiation therapy, respectively. In patients treated in the first 10 years of life, RICH occurred with shorter latency and significantly more often (p = 0.044) resulting in an even higher cumulative incidence. Conclusion: These findings and previously published cases show that cavernous hemangiomas may occur after irradiation of the brain several years after the end of therapy irrespective of the radiation dose and type of malignancy. Particularly children < 10 years of age at the time of irradiation are at higher risk. Since patients with RICH frequently do not show symptoms but hemorrhage is a possible severe complication, imaging of the central nervous system should be performed routinely for longer follow- ups, particularly in patients who were treated as young children. (orig.)

  17. Intracerebral cavernous hemangioma after cranial irradiation in childhood. Incidence and risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strenger, V.; Sovinz, P.; Lackner, H.; Dornbusch, H.J.; Moser, A.; Urban, C. [Graz Medical Univ. (Austria). Div. of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology; Lingitz, H. [Graz Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology; Eder, H.G. [Graz Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2008-05-15

    Background and Purpose: Radiotherapy is an integral part of various therapeutic regimens in pediatric and adult oncology. Endocrine dysfunction, neurologic and psychiatric deficits, secondary malignancies and radiation-induced necrosis are well-known possible late effects of cranial irradiation. However, only sporadic cases of radiation-induced cavernous hemangiomas (RICH) have been reported so far. Patients and Methods: Pediatric patients who underwent cranial radiation therapy for malignant diseases between January 1980 and December 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. After the end of therapy they entered a detailed follow-up program. Results: Of 171 patients, eight (three patients with medulloblastoma, three patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and one patient each with ependymoma and craniopharyngioma) developed intracerebral cavernoma 2.9-18.4 years after irradiation representing a cumulative incidence (according to the Kaplan-Meier method) of 2.24%, 3.86%, 4.95%, and 6.74% within 5, 10, 15, and 20 years following radiation therapy, respectively. In patients treated in the first 10 years of life, RICH occurred with shorter latency and significantly more often (p = 0.044) resulting in an even higher cumulative incidence. Conclusion: These findings and previously published cases show that cavernous hemangiomas may occur after irradiation of the brain several years after the end of therapy irrespective of the radiation dose and type of malignancy. Particularly children < 10 years of age at the time of irradiation are at higher risk. Since patients with RICH frequently do not show symptoms but hemorrhage is a possible severe complication, imaging of the central nervous system should be performed routinely for longer follow- ups, particularly in patients who were treated as young children. (orig.)

  18. Childhood Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood Cancer Statistics Childhood Cancer Statistics – Graphs and Infographics Number of Diagnoses Incidence Rates Over Time Cancer Deaths Per Year 5-Year Survival Rate Infographics Childhood Cancer Statistics – Important Facts Each year, the ...

  19. Incidence of childhood diabetes in children aged less than 15 years and its clinical and metabolic characteristics at the time of diagnosis: data from the Childhood Diabetes Registry of Saxony, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galler, Angela; Stange, Thoralf; Müller, Gabriele; Näke, Andrea; Vogel, Christian; Kapellen, Thomas; Bartelt, Heike; Kunath, Hildebrand; Koch, Rainer; Kiess, Wieland; Rothe, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    The Childhood Diabetes Registry in Saxony, Germany, examined the incidence and metabolic characteristics of childhood diabetes. In the federal state of Saxony, newly diagnosed cases of diabetes in children and adolescents aged less than 15 years were registered continuously from 1999 until 2008. Family history, date of diagnosis, clinical and laboratory parameters were obtained. Reported cases were ascertained by public health departments as an independent data source and verified using the capture- recapture method. A total of 865 children and adolescents with newly diagnosed diabetes were registered in Saxony. About 96% of them were classified as having type 1 diabetes, 0.6% had type 2 diabetes, 2.4% had maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY), and 1.4% had other types of diabetes. The age-standardized incidence rate of type 1 diabetes was estimated at 17.5 per 100,000 children per year. Completeness of ascertainment as calculated by the capture-recapture method amounted to 93.6%. At the time of diagnosis, 27.1% of children with type 1 diabetes had ketoacidosis, 1.5% had a blood pH <7.0, and 1.1% were unconscious. The registry provided data about the incidence rates and clinical presentation of childhood diabetes in a defined German population. We observed higher incidence rates compared to previous surveys. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Association of PM2.5with diabetes, asthma, and high blood pressure incidence in Canada: A spatiotemporal analysis of the impacts of the energy generation and fuel sales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requia, Weeberb J; Adams, Matthew D; Koutrakis, Petros

    2017-04-15

    Numerous studies have reported an association between fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) and human health. Often these relationships are influenced by environmental factor that varies spatially and/or temporally. To our knowledge, there are no studies in Canada that have considered energy generation and fuel sales as PM 2.5 effects modifiers. Determining exposure and disease-specific risk factors over space and time is crucial for disease prevention and control. In this study, we evaluated the association of PM 2.5 with diabetes, asthma, and High Blood Pressure (HBP) incidence in Canada. Then we explored the impact of the energy generation and fuel sales on association changes. We fit an age-period-cohort as the study design, and we applied an over-dispersed Poisson regression model to estimate the risk. We conducted a sensitivity analysis to explore the impact of variation in clean energy rates and fuel sales on outcomes changes. The study included 117 health regions in Canada between 2007 and 2014. Our findings showed strong association of PM 2.5 with diabetes, asthma, and HBP incidence. A two-year increase of 10μg/m 3 in PM 2.5 was associated with an increased risk of 5.34% (95% CI: 2.28%; 12.53%) in diabetes incidence, 2.24% (95% CI: 0.93%; 5.38%) in asthma incidence, and 8.29% (95% CI: 3.44%; 19.98%) in HBP incidence. Our sensitivity analysis findings suggest higher risks of diabetes, asthma and HBP incidence when there is low clean energy generation. On the other hand, we found lower risk when we considered high rate of clean energy generation. For example, considering only diabetes incidence, we found that the risk in health regions with low rates of clean electricity is approximately 700% higher than the risk in health regions with high rates of clean electricity. Furthermore, our analysis suggested that the risk in regions with low fuel sales is 66% lower than the risk is health regions with low rates of clean electricity. Our study provides support for

  1. Trends and territorial inequalities of incidence and survival of childhood leukaemia and their relations to socioeconomic status in Hungary, 1971-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Juhasz, Attila; Nagy, Csilla; Schuler, Dezso; Garami, Miklos

    2017-09-01

    The Hungarian Childhood Cancer Registry, a population-based national registry of the Hungarian Paediatric Haemato-Oncology Network founded in 1971, monitors the incidence and mortality of childhood cancer. Our aims were to carry out a longitudinal study to investigate the trends and spatial inequalities of incidence and survival of leukaemia, and the association between survival and deprivation in Hungary. All cases of childhood leukaemia and myelodysplasia were analysed (3157 cases, 1971-2015, age: 0-14 years). Time trends and the annual percentage change in direct standardized incidence and mortality were assessed. Survival and association with deprivation were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression. Incidence rates of leukaemia (23.5-56.0/million) increased with an average annual percent change (AAPC) of 1%, determined by an increase in the incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (14.6-39.2/million, AAPC: 1.25%). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significant improvement in overall survival over the study period. Starting from 25% of cases surviving 5 years in the 70s; the overall 5-year survival reached 80% by 2010. Survival differences were observed with sex, leukaemia type and age at diagnosis. A reverse association was found in the survival probability of leukaemia by degree of deprivation. The Cox proportional hazards model verified a significant reverse association with deprivation [hazard ratio=1.08 (1.04-1.12)]. This is the first nationwide study to confirm the prognostic role of deprivation on the basis of a large cohort of patients with childhood leukaemia during a 45-year period. To maintain further improvement in treatment results, it is important to detect inequalities. Our results showed that deprivation may also be important in the survival of leukaemia.

  2. Incidence of thyroid carcinoma in patients who had diagnostic iodine-131 tests during childhood and adolescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, K.; Schnell-Inderst, P.; Haenseler, G.J.; Kandziora, C.; Meyer, G.

    1999-01-01

    To determine the carcinogenic effects of diagnostic amounts of radioactive iodine-131 on the infantile thyroid gland a multi-center retrospective cohort study was conducted which included data of 4973 subjects who had either been referred to diagnostic iodine-131 uptake tests (2262 subjects) or had had a diagnostic procedure of the thyroid without 131-iodine (2711 subjects) until the age of 18 years. Follow-up examinations of 35 percent of the subjects in the iodine-131 group and 41 percent of the subjects in the control group took place after a mean time period of 20 years after the first examination. Dosimetry of the thyroid burden of iodine-131 was carried out according to ICRP 53. The median of the thyroid organ dose was 1012 mGy. The report compares prevalences or incidences of thyroid disorders resp. occurring in both groups and gives a stratified analysis of primary diagnosis, age at exposure, and organ dose. A total number of five carcinomas of the thyroid was found. In the radioiodine group two carcinomas were assessed in a period of 16500 person-years. The control group yielded three carcinomas over 21000 person-years (Relative rate: 0,89, 95% confidence interval: 0,14-5,13). (orig.) [de

  3. A nested case-control study: personal, social and environmental correlates of vigorous physical activity in adolescents with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westergren, Thomas; Ommundsen, Yngvar; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Mowinckel, Petter; Fegran, Liv; Berntsen, Sveinung

    2015-03-01

    Physical activity (PA) is associated with health benefits. Children and adolescents with asthma may be limited in their PA, particularly at vigorous intensity due to asthma symptoms or poor psychological adjustment to asthma. We aimed to investigate if self-perceived competence, enjoyment, support from others and social-physical environment were associated with vigorous physical activity (VPA) and secondarily to assess if such associations were modified by asthma and asthma severity. Data from a nested case-control study at 13 years of age within the birth-cohort Environment and Childhood Asthma Study were compiled from 95 participants with and 79 without asthma. The participants completed a questionnaire designed to capture self-perceived competence, enjoyment, support from others and social-physical environment. VPA, defined as ≥ 6 Metabolic Equivalents, was recorded objectively by SenseWear™ Pro2 Armband. Asthma severity was assessed pragmatically by lung function and use of inhaled glucocorticosteroids and β2-agonists and incidence of exacerbations in the last 14 days. Data were analysed using linear regression analysis. No significant differences between adolescents with and without asthma were identified in terms of VPA, competence-enjoyment, support from others and social-physical environment. Peer support (b = 0.29 (0.05-0.52)) and competence-enjoyment (b = 0.23 (0.01-0.44)) were significantly and positively associated with VPA, and teacher support (b = -0.26 (-0.50 to -0.02)) were inversely associated. The model explained 25% of the variance in VPA. Peer support and competence-enjoyment were positively associated with increased VPN in adolescents irrespectively of asthma and asthma severity.

  4. Prevalence of symptoms of eczema in Latin America: results of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) Phase 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, D; Mallol, J; Wandalsen, G F; Aguirre, V

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) was to evaluate the prevalence of symptoms of eczema among children living in different parts of Latin America. Data were from centers that participated in ISAAC Phase 3. This was a cross-sectional questionnaire survey of 93,851 schoolchildren (6 to 7 years old) from 35 centers in 14 Latin American countries and 165,917 adolescents (13 to 14 years old) from 56 centers in 17 Latin American countries. The mean prevalence of current flexural eczema in schoolchildren was 11.3%, ranging from 3.2% in Ciudad Victoria (Mexico) to 25.0% in Barranquilla (Colombia). For adolescents, the prevalence varied from 3.4% in Santo André (Brazil) to 30.2% in Barranquilla (mean prevalence, 10.6%). The mean prevalence of current symptoms of severe eczema among schoolchildren was 1.5%, ranging from 0.3% in Ciudad Victoria, Toluca, and Cuernavaca (Mexico) to 4.9% in La Habana (Cuba). For adolescents, the mean prevalence was 1.4%, ranging from 0.1% in Mexicali Valley (Mexico) to 4.2% in Santa Cruz (Bolivia). These prevalence values are among the highest observed during ISAAC Phase 3. In general, the prevalence of current symptoms of eczema was higher among the Spanish-speaking centers for both schoolchildren and adolescents. Environmental risk factors must be evaluated in order to identify potential causes for the differences observed, even in centers from the same country.

  5. Overweight/obesity and respiratory and allergic disease in children: international study of asthma and allergies in childhood (ISAAC) phase two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinmayr, Gudrun; Forastiere, Francesco; Büchele, Gisela; Jaensch, Andrea; Strachan, David P; Nagel, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Childhood obesity and asthma are increasing worldwide. A possible link between the two conditions has been postulated. Cross-sectional studies of stratified random samples of 8-12-year-old children (n = 10 652) (16 centres in affluent and 8 centres in non-affluent countries) used the standardized methodology of ISAAC Phase Two. Respiratory and allergic symptoms were ascertained by parental questionnaires. Tests for allergic disease were performed. Height and weight were measured, and overweight and obesity were defined according to international definitions. Prevalence rates and prevalence odds ratios were calculated. Overweight (odds ratio = 1.14, 95%-confidence interval: 0.98; 1.33) and obesity (odds ratio = 1.67, 95%-confidence interval: 1.25; 2.21) were related to wheeze. The relationship was stronger in affluent than in non-affluent centres. Similar results were found for cough and phlegm, rhinitis and eczema but the associations were mostly driven by children with wheeze. There was a clear association of overweight and obesity with airways obstruction (change in FEV1/FVC, -0.90, 95%-confidence interval: -1.33%; -0.47%, for overweight and -2.46%, 95%-confidence interval: -3.84%; -1.07%, for obesity) whereas the results for the other objective markers, including atopy, were null. Our data from a large international child population confirm that there is a strong relation of body mass index with wheeze especially in affluent countries. Moreover, body mass index is associated with an objective marker of airways obstruction (FEV1/FVC) but no other objective markers of respiratory and allergic disorders.

  6. Lack of evidence for a protective effect of prolonged breastfeeding on childhood eczema: lessons from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) Phase Two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohr, C; Nagel, G; Weinmayr, G; Kleiner, A; Strachan, D P; Williams, H C

    2011-12-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding for at least 4 months is recommended by many governments and allergy organizations to prevent allergic disease. To investigate whether exclusive breastfeeding protects against childhood eczema. Study subjects comprised 51,119 randomly selected 8- to 12-year-old schoolchildren in 21 countries. Information on eczema and breastfeeding was gathered by parental questionnaire. Children were also examined for flexural eczema and underwent skin prick testing. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for each study centre and then pooled across populations. There was a small increase in the risk of reported 'eczema ever' in association with 'breastfeeding ever' and breastfeeding breastfeeding > 6 months (pooled adjusted OR 1·09, 95% CI 0·94-1·26). Risk estimates were very similar for exclusive breastfeeding 4 months and for eczema symptoms in the past 12 months and eczema on skin examination. As for more severe eczema, breastfeeding per se conveyed a risk reduction on sleep disturbed eczema (pooled adjusted OR 0·71, 95% CI 0·53-0·96), but this effect was lost where children had been exclusively breastfed for > 4 months (pooled adjusted OR 1·02, 95% CI 0·67-1·54). Allergic sensitization and a history of maternal allergic disease did not modify any of these findings. Although there was a protective effect of ever having been breastfed on more severe disease, we found no evidence that exclusive breastfeeding for 4 months or longer protects against eczema. Our results are consistent with findings from a recent systematic review of prospective studies. The U.K. breastfeeding guidelines with regard to eczema should be reviewed. Intervention studies are now required to explore how and when solids should be introduced alongside breastfeeding to aid protection against eczema and other allergic diseases. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists 2011.

  7. Outpatient Management of Asthma in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Schultz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The principal aims of asthma management in childhood are to obtain symptom control that allows individuals to engage in unrestricted physical activities and to normalize lung function. These aims should be achieved using the fewest possible medications. Ensuring a correct diagnosis is the first priority. The mainstay of asthma management remains pharmacotherapy. Various treatment options are discussed. Asthma monitoring includes the regular assessment of asthma severity and asthma control, which then informs decisions regarding the stepping up or stepping down of therapy. Delivery systems and devices for inhaled therapy are discussed, as are the factors influencing adherence to prescribed treatment. The role of the pediatric health care provider is to establish a functional partnership with the child and their family in order to minimize the impact of asthma symptoms and exacerbations during childhood.

  8. Characteristics of atopic children with pandemic H1N1 influenza viral infection: pandemic H1N1 influenza reveals 'occult' asthma of childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Shunji; Hirano, Reiji; Hashimoto, Kunio; Haneda, Yasuhiro; Shirabe, Komei; Ichiyama, Takashi

    2011-02-01

    The number of human cases of pandemic H1N1 influenza viral infection has increased in Japan since April 2009, as it has worldwide. This virus is widespread in the Yamaguchi prefecture in western Japan, where most infected children exhibited respiratory symptoms. Bronchial asthma is thought to be one of the risk factors that exacerbate respiratory symptoms of pandemic H1N1-infected patients, but the pathogenesis remains unclear. We retrospectively investigated the records of 33 children with pandemic H1N1 influenza viral infection who were admitted to our hospital between October and December 2009 and analyzed their clinical features. The percentage of children with asthma attack, with or without abnormal findings on chest radiographs (pneumonia, atelectasis, etc.), caused by pandemic H1N1 influenza infection was significantly higher than that of children with asthma attack and 2008-2009 seasonal influenza infection. Of the 33 children in our study, 22 (66.7%) experienced an asthma attack. Among these children, 20 (90.9%) did not receive long-term management for bronchial asthma, whereas 7 (31.8%) were not diagnosed with bronchial asthma and had experienced their first asthma attack. However, the severity of the attack did not correlate with the severity of the pulmonary complications of pandemic H1N1 influenza viral infection. The pandemic H1N1 influenza virus greatly increases the risk of lower respiratory tract complications such as asthma attack, pneumonia, and atelectasis, when compared to the seasonal influenza virus. Furthermore, our results suggest that pandemic H1N1 influenza viral infection can easily induce a severe asthma attack, pneumonia, and atelectasis in atopic children without any history of either an asthma attack or asthma treatment. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Food Consumption and Prevalence of Asthma & Allergies Symptoms in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Karimi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of asthma and allergy has increased significantly over the last 30 years. Genetic factors cannot explain this prevalence and a number of studies have been performed to determine the Environmental factors especially dietary factors which are effective in the incidence of these diseases. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between the food consumption and the subsequent development of asthma and other allergic disorder symptoms in 2003 of children in yazd. Methods: We performed a Descriptive cross-sectional study of selected children in primary and secondary schools in Yazd. Standardized questionnaire(ISAAC that was developed based on the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood were distributed to parents of 2768 children aged 6-7 years and 3201 children aged 13-14 years which randomly selected. The data was analyzed by Epi6.04 and SPSS softwares. Results: The prevalence of asthma, Allergic Rhinitis and Eczema symptoms in children 6-7 years old was 10.9%, 15.5% and 7.3% and in children 13-14 years old was 20.3 %, 42.7% and 14.8% respectively. High intake of butter-fat, chocolate, sweet and Sausage were associated with an increased risk of allergic rhinitis in children 6-7 years old. High intake of chocolate, Chips, egg were associated with an increased risk of wheeze and in children 13-14 years old. Conclusion: Dietary factors are associated with asthma and allergies symptoms. Fast foods, chocolates, junk foods & sausage may increase wheezing and allergic rhinitis & eczema symptoms in childhood

  10. The association between childhood sexual and physical abuse with incident adult severe obesity across 13 years of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A S; Dietz, W H; Gordon-Larsen, P

    2014-10-01

    Severe obesity has increased, yet childhood antecedents of adult severe obesity are not well understood. Estimate adult-onset severe obesity risk in individuals with history of childhood physical and/or sexual abuse compared with those who did not report abuse. Longitudinal analysis of participants from the US National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 10,774) wave II (1996; aged 12-22 years) followed through wave IV (2008-2009; aged 24-34 years). New cases of adult-onset severe obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 40 kg/m2 using measured height and weight) in individuals followed over 13 years who were not severely obese during adolescence (BMI childhood was associated with an increased risk of incident severe obesity in adulthood in non-minority females (hazard ratio [HR; 95% Confidence Interval] = 2.5; 1.3, 4.8) and males (HR = 3.6; 1.5, 8.5) compared with individuals with no history of abuse. In addition to other social and emotional risks, exposure to sexual and physical abuse during childhood may increase risk of severe obesity later in life. Consideration of the confluence of childhood abuse might be considered as part of preventive and therapeutic approaches to address severe obesity. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  11. The association between childhood sexual and physical abuse with incident adult severe obesity across 13 years of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Andrea S.; Dietz, William H.; Gordon-Larsen, Penny

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe obesity has increased yet childhood antecedents of adult severe obesity are not well understood. Objective Estimate adult-onset severe obesity risk in individuals with history of childhood physical and/or sexual abuse compared to those who did not report abuse. Methods Longitudinal analysis of participants from the U.S. National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N=10,774) Wave II (1996; aged 12–22 years) followed through Wave IV (2008–09; aged 24–34 years). New cases of adult-onset severe obesity (BMI≥40 kg/m2 using measured height and weight) in individuals followed over 13 years who were not severely obese during adolescence (BMI childhood was associated with an increased risk of incident severe obesity in adulthood in non-minority females (Hazard Ratio=2.5; 1.3, 4.8) and males (Hazard Ratio=3.6; 1.5, 8.5) compared to individuals with no history of abuse. Conclusion In addition to other social and emotional risks, exposure to sexual and physical abuse during childhood may increase risk of severe obesity later in life. Consideration of the confluence of childhood abuse might be considered as part of preventive and therapeutic approaches to address severe obesity. PMID:24115589

  12. Diagnosing Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... give your pediatrician will help determine if your child has asthma. Your pediatrician will need information about Your child’s ... function testing may be normal even if your child has asthma. Also keep in mind that not all children ...

  13. Occupational asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the airways of the lungs. When an asthma attack occurs, the lining of the air passages swells ... small amount of the substance can trigger an asthma attack. Using a respiratory device to protect or reduce ...

  14. Asthma Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is working to explore the role of common air pollutants in the development and exacerbation of asthma at different life stages as well as other environmental and genetic factors that might make a person more sensitive to developing asthma.

  15. Predicting asthma in preschool children with asthma symptoms: study rationale and design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.D. Hafkamp-De Groen (Esther); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); D. Caudri (Daan); A.H. Wijga (Alet); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); H. Raat (Hein)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In well-child care it is difficult to determine whether preschool children with asthma symptoms actually have or will develop asthma at school age. The PIAMA (Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy) Risk Score has been proposed as an instrument that predicts

  16. The Association Between Community Stressors and Asthma Prevalence of School Children in Winnipeg, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita L. Kozyrskyj

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It is generally surmised that community stressors have an incubating effect for a variety of diagnoses on maternal and child health. This is of public health significance, as children of mothers facing long-term distress were found to have a 60% higher risk for asthma diagnosis at age 7 in Manitoba, Canada. Our objective was to determine the association of community stressors with childhood asthma prevalence in Winnipeg, Canada from participants who completed the Study of Asthma, Genes and the Environment (SAGE survey administered in 2002–2003 to a birth cohort from 1995. Measures of community socioeconomic makeup and community disorder with rank ordinalized by quintile at the census tract level were obtained from the 1996 Canada Census. Crime data (annual incidence per 10,000 persons by neighbourhood profile for 2001 was provided by the Winnipeg Police Service. Dichotomous caregiver report of child asthma along with other indicators from the geocoded SAGE survey allowed linkage to 23 neighbourhood profiles. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the effect of community stressors on childhood asthma prevalence for birth and non-birth home children (N = 1472 and children resident of birth homes at age 7 or 8 (N = 698. After adjusting for individual risk factors, children resident of birth homes in a high thefts over $5,000 neighbourhood profile were twice as likely (Adjusted OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.11–3.81 to have report of asthma compared to children in a lower thefts over $5,000 profile, with community thefts over $5,000 explaining over half of the observed neighbourhood variation in asthma.

  17. School-based asthma disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkelman, David; Schwartz, Abby

    2004-06-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic childhood illness and the leading cause of missed school days. School is a potential location for establishing an asthma education program for children and their parents/caregivers designed to improve disease management. To determine whether a comprehensive, school-based asthma management program, in addition to a conventional disease management program, can reduce measures of asthma control, student absenteeism, and caregiver lost workdays. School nurses recruited parents/caregivers of students with asthma from three urban elementary and middle schools. Children were identified as having asthma by a previous diagnosis from their personal physician. Parents were invited to attend educational sessions about the program. Students received peak flow meters and training in their use and had access to an interactive asthma diary to record symptoms, peak flow, and medicine usage. They received monthly asthma education at school and had access to an online asthma education program and additional handouts. Parents received several educational calls regarding asthma and had a 24-hour, 7-days-a-week emergency number to call if problems arose. At 6 months, missed school days and unscheduled doctor visits were reduced by two thirds (n = 41; pschool-based asthma management program can successfully improve asthma control and reduce absenteeism in elementary and middle school students and caregiver lost workdays.

  18. Asthma - quick-relief drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asthma - children Wheezing Patient Instructions Asthma and school Asthma - child - discharge Asthma - control drugs Asthma - what to ask the doctor - adult Asthma - what to ask your doctor - child Bronchiolitis - discharge Exercise-induced asthma Exercising and asthma ...

  19. Prospective study of maternal alcohol intake during pregnancy or lactation and risk of childhood asthma: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Maria C; DeRoo, Lisa A; Håberg, Siri E; Magnus, Per; Nafstad, Per; Nystad, Wenche; London, Stephanie J

    2014-04-01

    Many women drink during pregnancy and lactation despite recommendations to abstain. In animals, alcohol exposure during pregnancy and lactation influences lung and immune development, plausibly increasing risk of asthma and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). Studies in humans are few. In the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, we examined maternal alcohol intake during pregnancy and lactation in relation to risk of current asthma at 36 months (49,138 children), recurrent LRTIs by 36 months (39,791 children), and current asthma at 7 years (13,253 children). Mothers reported frequency and amount of alcohol intake each trimester and the first 3 months following delivery. We calculated adjusted relative risk (aRR), comparing children of drinkers to nondrinkers, using Generalized Linear Models. A total of 31.8% of mothers consumed alcohol during first trimester, 9.7% during second trimester, and 15.6% during third trimester. Infrequent and low-dose prenatal alcohol exposure showed a modest statistically significant inverse association with current asthma at 36 months (aRRs ~ 0.85). No association was seen with the highest alcohol intakes during the first trimester when alcohol consumption was most common. RRs of maternal alcohol intake during pregnancy with recurrent LRTIs were ~1, with sporadic differences in risk for some metrics of intake, but without any consistent pattern. For current asthma at 7 years, similar inverse associations were seen as with current asthma at 36 months but were not statistically significant. Among children breastfed throughout the first 3 months of life, maternal alcohol intake during this time was not significantly associated with any of the 3 outcomes. The low levels of alcohol exposure during pregnancy or lactation observed in this cohort were not associated with increased risk of asthma or recurrent LRTIs. The slight inverse associations of infrequent or low-dose prenatal alcohol exposure with asthma may not be causal

  20. Updated estimates of the proportion of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain that may be caused by natural background ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, Mark P; Wakeford, Richard; Kendall, Gerald M

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of childhood leukaemia remains generally unknown, although exposure to moderate and high levels of ionising radiation, such as was experienced during the atomi