WorldWideScience

Sample records for child health services

  1. A profile of child health, child and adolescent mental health and maternity services in England 2007.

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Di; Parker, Ethna; Wistow, Richard; Dean, Richard; Thomson, Claire

    2007-01-01

    This is a report of the 2006/07 national child health, child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) and maternity services mapping exercise. This was the second year that child health and maternity service data was collected and the fifth year that the CAMHS exercise had been carried out. For the first time, data collection in these three areas was combined, underlining their joint aim to contribute to the monitoring of the implementation of the National Service Framework for Children, ...

  2. 45 CFR 1304.20 - Child health and developmental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... this section) from the child's entry into the program (for the purposes of 45 CFR 1304.20(a)(1), 45 CFR 1304.20(a)(2), and 45 CFR 1304.20(b)(1), “entry” means the first day that Early Head Start or Head... GRANTEE AND DELEGATE AGENCIES Early Childhood Development and Health Services § 1304.20 Child health...

  3. Child and adolescent mental health emergency services in Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Releva, M; Boskovska, M; Apceva, A; Polazarevska, M; Novotni, A; Bonevski, D; Sargent, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of child and adolescent mental health emergency services in Macedonia since 1993. The evolution of services through the Mental Crisis Centre for Children and Adolescents, funded by the Open Society Institute, and located in six cities is outlined. The paper also defines traditional services, the nature of child mental health emergencies, the evaluation process, follow-up care and training and supervision. It concludes with concern that the mental health emergency system is not sufficient to meet the needs of the child and adolescent population, particularly in the face of the Kosovar refugee crisis. Recommendations for the future are made. PMID:11508566

  4. Accessing maternal and child health services in Melbourne, Australia: Reflections from refugee families and service providers

    OpenAIRE

    Riggs Elisha; Davis Elise; Gibbs Lisa; Block Karen; Szwarc Jo; Casey Sue; Duell-Piening Philippa; Waters Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Often new arrivals from refugee backgrounds have experienced poor health and limited access to healthcare services. The maternal and child health (MCH) service in Victoria, Australia, is a joint local and state government operated, cost-free service available to all mothers of children aged 0–6 years. Although well-child healthcare visits are useful in identifying health issues early, there has been limited investigation in the use of these services for families from refug...

  5. Caregiver perceptions about mental health services after child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Hiu-fai; Bennett, Colleen E; Mondestin, Valerie; Scribano, Philip V; Mollen, Cynthia; Wood, Joanne N

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe caregiver perceptions about mental health services (MHS) after child sexual abuse (CSA) and to explore factors that affected whether their children linked to services. We conducted semi-structured, in-person interviews with 22 non-offending caregivers of suspected CSA victimschild advocacy center in Philadelphia. Purposive sampling was used to recruit caregivers who had (n=12) and had not (n=10) linked their children to MHS. Guided by the Health Belief Model framework, interviews assessed perceptions about: CSA severity, the child's susceptibility for adverse outcomes, the benefits of MHS, and the facilitators and barriers to MHS. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed using modified grounded theory. Recruitment ended when thematic saturation was reached. Caregivers expressed strong reactions to CSA and multiple concerns about adverse child outcomes. Most caregivers reported that MHS were generally necessary for children after CSA. Caregivers who had not linked to MHS, however, believed MHS were not necessary for their children, most commonly because they were not exhibiting behavioral symptoms. Caregivers described multiple access barriers to MHS, but caregivers who had not linked reported that they could have overcome these barriers if they believed MHS were necessary for their children. Caregivers who had not linked to services also expressed concerns about MHS being re-traumatizing and stigmatizing. Interventions to increase MHS linkage should focus on improving communication with caregivers about the specific benefits of MHS for their children and proactively addressing caregiver concerns about MHS. PMID:26602155

  6. Child psychoanalytic psychotherapy in the UK National Health Service: an historical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Rous, Elizabeth; Clark, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This review developed from a discussion with the late Professor Richard Harrington about interventions in Child and Adolescent Mental Health services (CAMHS) that lacked an evidence base. Our aim is to investigate the literature for signs that child psychoanalysis is a declining paradigm within the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) in the United Kingd...

  7. Vietnamese Immigrants in Brisbane, Australia: Perception of Parenting Roles, Child Development, Child Health, Illness, and Disability, and Health Service Utilisation

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Uyen N. T. L.

    2012-01-01

    The limited research into Vietnamese immigrants suggests that this group may have different perceptions relating to parenting roles, child development, child health, illness, and disability, and differing patterns of health service utilisation. The author conducted a pilot study exploring how Vietnamese immigrants differ from Anglo-Australian in relation to these issues. The pilot, utilising a mixed quantitative and qualitative method, was conducted in Brisbane, Australia, with subjects being...

  8. Latino Caregiver Psychosocial Factors and Health Care Services for Children Involved in the Child Welfare System

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Caitlin; Brinkmann, Andrea; Schneiderman, Janet U.

    2015-01-01

    Children in the child welfare system have a high prevalence of health problems, making pediatric health service use critical. Latino children represent a growing proportion of the child welfare system, and are at increased risk for health problems. Many have argued that Latino caregivers can provide Latino children with the least disruptive out-of-home placement, but little is known about how caregiver factors might relate to health services utilization or child health status within this popu...

  9. A profile of children’s health services, child and adolescent mental health services and maternity services in England 2007/8.

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Di; Devanney, Carol; Parker, Ethna; Wistow, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This report is the third in a series of profiles produced to report the results of the annual child health, child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) and maternity services mapping exercise in England. The 2007 exercise was carried out between 1st November 2007 and 28th February 2008 and it marked the third child health and maternity service mapping data collection and the sixth CAMHS mapping exercise. The report summarises the findings at a national level with some refe...

  10. Caregivers' Endorsement of Barriers to Mental Health Services for Children and Youth in Child Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagrana, Margarita; Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the three most common types of caregivers in the child welfare system (birth parents, relative caregivers, and foster parents), an active child welfare case, caregivers' endorsement of barriers to mental health services and mental health service use by caregivers for the children under their care. The…

  11. Transformation of the Title V Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grant

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Michael C.; Lauver, Cassie B.; Dykton, Christopher; Michael D. Kogan; Lawler, Michele H.; Raskin-Ramos, Lauren; Watters, Kathy; Wilson, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the transformation of the Title V Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Services Block Grant. The Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the Health Resources and Services Administration led a 21-month visioning process to engage input from MCH stakeholders and other national, state and local MCH leaders, families and other partners to improve, innovate, and transform the Title V MCH Services Block Grant. The process has helped inform the development of a new grant guidance for the...

  12. Factors influencing utilization of maternal and child health services among the postnatal mothers in hilly region

    OpenAIRE

    Priyanka Joshi; Gomathi Mahalingam; Dipti Y. Sorte

    2016-01-01

    Background: Maternal mortality is a global issue and WHO recommends the use of maternal health services to help improve the health of women and babies during pregnancy and childbirth. Use of maternal health services is an effective means for reducing the risk of maternal morbidity and mortality, especially in places where the maternal and child health (MCH services utilization was poor. The main objective of this study was to assess the factors affecting utilization of MCH services among post...

  13. Accessing maternal and child health services in Melbourne, Australia: Reflections from refugee families and service providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riggs Elisha

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Often new arrivals from refugee backgrounds have experienced poor health and limited access to healthcare services. The maternal and child health (MCH service in Victoria, Australia, is a joint local and state government operated, cost-free service available to all mothers of children aged 0–6 years. Although well-child healthcare visits are useful in identifying health issues early, there has been limited investigation in the use of these services for families from refugee backgrounds. This study aims to explore experiences of using MCH services, from the perspective of families from refugee backgrounds and service providers. Methods We used a qualitative study design informed by the socioecological model of health and a cultural competence approach. Two geographical areas of Melbourne were selected to invite participants. Seven focus groups were conducted with 87 mothers from Karen, Iraqi, Assyrian Chaldean, Lebanese, South Sudanese and Bhutanese backgrounds, who had lived an average of 4.7 years in Australia (range one month-18 years. Participants had a total of 249 children, of these 150 were born in Australia. Four focus groups and five interviews were conducted with MCH nurses, other healthcare providers and bicultural workers. Results Four themes were identified: facilitating access to MCH services; promoting continued engagement with the MCH service; language challenges; and what is working well and could be done better. Several processes were identified that facilitated initial access to the MCH service but there were implications for continued use of the service. The MCH service was not formally notified of new parents arriving with young children. Pre-arranged group appointments by MCH nurses for parents who attended playgroups worked well to increase ongoing service engagement. Barriers for parents in using MCH services included access to transportation, lack of confidence in speaking English and making

  14. Applying the Recovery Approach to the Interface between Mental Health and Child Protection Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Joe; Davidson, Gavin; Kavanagh, Damien

    2016-01-01

    There is a range of theoretical approaches which may inform the interface between child protection and adult mental health services. These theoretical perspectives tend to be focused on either child protection or mental health with no agreed integrating framework. The interface continues to be identified, in research, case management reviews and…

  15. Child & Adolescent Mental Health Services - first annual report 2008

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-10-01

    This Annual Report provides the first comprehensive survey carried out on community CAMHS teams and includes preliminary data collected by The Health Research Board on the admission of young people under the age of 18 years to inpatient mental health facilities. As many measures in this report do not have historic comparators it provides a baseline foundation that will be built upon in subsequent years providing an indication of trends that cannot yet be drawn on the basis of this report. The next report will include day hospital, liaison and inpatient services. Subsequent reports will further extend the mapping of mental health services for young people.

  16. Scaling Up Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services in South Africa: Human Resource Requirements and Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Crick; Boyce, Gerard; Flisher, Alan J.; Kafaar, Zuhayr; Dawes, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Background: Children and adolescents with mental health problems have poor service cover in low- and middle-income countries. Little is known about the resources that would be required to provide child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) in these countries. The purpose of this study was to calculate the human resources and associated…

  17. Perspectives on child diarrhoea management and health service use among ethnic minority caregivers in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rheinländer, Thilde; Samuelsen, Helle; Dalsgaard, Anders; Konradsen, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    investigates treatment seeking strategies for child diarrhoea among ethnic minority caregivers in Northern Vietnam in order to suggest improvements to health services for EMGs and other vulnerable groups. METHODS: The study obtained qualitative data from eight months of field work among four EMGs in lowland...... roles, long travelling distances for highland villagers, concerns about the indirect costs of treatment and a reluctance to use government health facilities due to feelings of being treated disrespectfully by health staff. However, ethnic minority caregivers all recognized the danger signs of child...... highland mothers from seeking health services and include family elders and fathers in future health promotion programs. Encouraging existing child health care practices, including continued breastfeeding during illness and the use of home-made rehydration solutions, also present important opportunities...

  18. Mental Health Need and Access to Mental Health Services by Youths Involved with Child Welfare: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Barbara J.; Phillips, Susan D.; Wagner, H. Ryan; Barth, Richard P.; Kolko, David J.; Campbell, Yvonne; Landsverk, John

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the relationship between the need for and use of mental health services among a nationally representative sample of children who were investigated by child welfare agencies after reported maltreatment. Method: Data were collected at study entry into the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being and were…

  19. Assessment of oral health promotion services offered as part of maternal and child health services in the Tshwane Health District, Pretoria, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Kolisa, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The study aimed to assess the oral health promotion services provided as part of the maternal and child health (MCH) services in the Tshwane Health District, Pretoria, South Africa. Methods The research design was a descriptive cross-sectional study using a modified standard questionnaire. The population was drawn from the parents/caregivers (PCGs) and the MCH nurses at seven clinics during June 2012 and June 2013 in Pretoria. Results The nurses’ response rate was 83%; average age ...

  20. Personal Reflections on the Development of an Integrated Service Delivery for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sam; Gilliland, David; Mayhew, Kathy; Wilson, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the issue of how to develop a greater level of integration across the continuum services to young people with mental health difficulties. Reference is made to the strategic guidance offered by key documents and a pilot project is described, which attempted to link services across providers including a specialist Child and…

  1. Constraints and Benefits of Child Welfare Contracts with Behavioral Health Providers: Conditions that Shape Service Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunger, Alicia C; Cao, Yiwen; Girth, Amanda M; Hoffman, Jill; Robertson, Hillary A

    2016-09-01

    This qualitative study examines worker perceptions of how public child welfare agencies' purchase of service contracts with private behavioral health organizations can both facilitate and constrain referral making and children's access to services. Five, 90-min focus groups were conducted with workers (n = 50) from an urban public child welfare agency in the Midwest. Using a modified grounded theory approach, findings suggest that contracts may expedite service linkages, but contract benefits are conditioned upon design and implementation. Results also suggest the critical role of front line workers in carrying out contractual relationships. Implications for research and interventions for enhancing contracting are discussed. PMID:26427998

  2. Bullying Experiences of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service-users: A Pilot Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Dyer, Kevin; Teggart, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Victims and perpetrators of bullying experience a variety of psychological problems. The aim of the current pilot study was to explore the bullying experiences of Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMHS) service-users. The investigation was conducted as a cross-sectional survey at a community-based specialist CAMH service. A modified version of the Revised Olweus Bully/Victim Questionnaire was used to assess bullying experiences. Participants comprised an opportunity sample of 26 adolescent...

  3. Quality assessment of child care services in primary health care settings of Central Karnataka (Davangere District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infectious disease and malnutrition are common in children. Primary health care came into being to decrease the morbidity. Quality assessment is neither clinical research nor technology assessment. It is primarily an administrative device used to monitor performance to determine whether it continues to remain within acceptable bounds. Aims and Objectives: To assess the quality of service in the delivery of child health care in a primary health care setting. To evaluate client satisfaction. To assess utilization of facilities by the community. Materials and Methods: Study Type: Cross-sectional community-based study. Quality assessment was done by taking 30-50%, of the service provider. Client satisfaction was determined with 1 Immunization and child examination-90 clients each. Utilization of services was assessed among 478 households. Statistical Analysis: Proportions, Likert′s scale to grade the services and Chi-square. Results: Immunization service: Identification of needed vaccine, preparation and care was average. Vaccination technique, documentation, EPI education, maintenance of cold chain and supplies were excellent. Client satisfaction was good. Growth monitoring: It was excellent except for mother′s education andoutreach educational session . Acute respiratory tract infection care: History, physical examination, ARI education were poor. Classification, treatment and referral were excellent. Client satisfaction was good. Diarrheal disease care: History taking was excellent. But examination, classification, treatment, ORT education were poor. Conclusion: Mothers education was not stressed by service providers. Service providers′ knowledge do not go with the quality of service rendered. Physical examination of the child was not good. Except for immunization other services were average.

  4. Influence of caregiver network support and caregiver psychopathology on child mental health need and service use in the LONGSCAN study

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsey, Michael A.; Gilreath, Tamika D.; Thompson, Richard; Graham, J. Christopher; Hawley, Kristin M.; Weisbart, Cindy; Browne, Dorothy; Kotch, Jonathan B.

    2012-01-01

    Using structural equation modeling, this study examined the relationship of caregiver network support on caregiver and child mental health need, as well as child mental health service use among 1075 8-year-old children participating in the LONGSCAN study. The final model showed acceptable fit (χ2 = 301.476, df = 136, p

  5. A social services-public health partnership in child protection: a rural model.

    OpenAIRE

    Saunders, E. J.; Goodall, K

    1985-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the amelioration of individual and family problems which contribute to child abuse and neglect requires a multidisciplinary effort. Unfortunately, however, these efforts are often sporadic or disjointed. This article is a description of a county social service-public health partnership in rural Minnesota which can serve as a model for other agencies interested in developing more interactive relationships with one another to the benefit of dysfunctional families an...

  6. Child Malnutrition, Social Development and Health Services in the Andean Region

    OpenAIRE

    LARREA CARLOS; MONTALVO PEDRO; RICAURTE ANA

    2005-01-01

    This study analyzes social, ethnic and regional determinants of child malnutrition, as well as the effects of access to health services in the Andean Region, through a comparison between Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. These three countries share a profile with high stunting prevalence and strong socio-economic, regional and ethnic disparities. The analysis is conducted using DHS (Peru 1992, 1996 and 2000, Bolivia 1997) and LSMS (Ecuador 1998) surveys and it focuses on an international comparative...

  7. Integrating Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Reproductive, Maternal and Child, and Tuberculosis Health Services Within National Health Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph Davey, Dvora; Myer, Landon; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Ramogola-Masire, Doreen; Kilembe, William; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-06-01

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) established 90-90-90 HIV treatment targets for 2020 including the following: 90 % of HIV-infected people know their HIV status, 90 % of HIV-infected people who know their status are on treatment, and 90 % of people on HIV treatment have a suppressed viral load. Integration of HIV and other programs into the national health system provides an important pathway to reach those targets. We examine the case for integrating HIV and other health services to ensure sustainability and improve health outcomes within national health systems. In this non-systematic review, we examined recent studies on integrating HIV, tuberculosis (TB), maternal-child health (MCH), and sexually transmitted infection (STI) programs. Existing evidence is limited about the effectiveness of integration of HIV and other services. Most studies found that service integration increased uptake of services, but evidence is mixed about the effect on health outcomes or quality of health services. More rigorous studies of different strategies to promote integration over a wider range of services and settings are needed. Research on how best to maximize benefits, including sustainability, of integrated services is necessary to help inform international and national policy. We recommend additional interventions to test how best to integrate HIV and MCH services, HIV and TB services, HIV testing and treatment, and STI testing and treatment. PMID:27221628

  8. Assessment of oral health promotion services offered as part of maternal and child health services in the Tshwane Health District, Pretoria, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Kolisa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study aimed to assess the oral health promotion services provided as part of the maternal and child health (MCH services in the Tshwane Health District, Pretoria, South Africa.Methods: The research design was a descriptive cross-sectional study using a modified standard questionnaire. The population was drawn from the parents/caregivers (PCGs and the MCH nurses at seven clinics during June 2012 and June 2013 in Pretoria.Results: The nurses’ response rate was 83%; average age of 37 years. The majority of the nurses (65% were females; 60% were professional nurses. Most (63% of the nurses reported that they provided oral health education (OHE services. A shortage of dental education materials (43%, staff time (48%, and staff training (52% were large constraints to nurses providing OHE. The majority of PCGs (n = 382; mean age 31.5 years had a low education level (76%. About 55% of PCGs received information on children’s oral health from the television and 35% at the MCH clinics. PCGs beliefs were worrying as about 38% believed primary dentition is not important and need not be saved.Conclusion: There is evidence of minimal integration of OHE at MCH sites. Parents’ beliefs are still worrying as a significant number do not regard the primary dentition as important. The MCH site remains an important easily accessible area for integration of oral health services with general health in complementing efforts in prevention of early childhood caries.Keywords: Oral health; Promotion integration

  9. Mother’s perceptions of child mental health problems and services: A cross sectional study from Lahore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Nazish; Ashraf, Sania; Shoukat, Rabia; Pervez, Muhammad Ijaz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the perceptions of mothers regarding child mental health problems, its causes, preferred treatment options, and to determine whom they would consult, if their child had a psychiatric illness. Methods: Following informed consent, a questionnaire covering perceptions regarding various aspects of child mental illness was used for data collection from mothers. They were asked to identify the symptoms and behaviours they considered psychopathological in children, which treatments they would prefer, where they would turn for help with a mentally ill child, and their understanding of the causes of child psychiatric disorders in addition to ways to increase awareness of child psychiatric issues in the society. Results: Ninety one mothers participated in the study. They equally perceived emotional, behavioural and cognitive symptoms as suggestive of mental ill health in childhood. Mothers perceived multiple causes of child mental health problems, including family problems, economic difficulties, social adversity and possession by evil spirits. A substantial proportion preferred medication, recitation of Holy Quran and psychotherapy as the preferred treatment options. Overall, mothers preferred consulting health professionals than religious scholars and faith healers. They were keen for steps to increase mental health awareness within their society. Conclusion: Despite different cultural perspective, mothers exhibit good understanding of symptoms of child mental health issues and appear open to various services and treatment options. Understanding parental perceptions and expectations from child psychiatric services are crucial in increasing families’ engagement in treatment. PMID:27375732

  10. Adolescents' and parents' views of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, I; McNamara, N; Healy, M; Gower, C; Sarkar, M; McNicholas, F

    2015-10-01

    Service user involvement is essential for quality care in the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). This study was conducted to explore adolescents' and parents' experiences of CAMHS in relation to accessibility, approachability and appropriateness. This study used a descriptive qualitative design, and focus groups and single interviews were conducted with adolescents (n = 15) and parents (n = 32) from three mental health clinics. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Accessing mental health services was a challenging experience for many parents and adolescents due to knowledge deficit, lack of information and limited availability of specialist services. Some parents and adolescents reported positive experiences while others reported negative experiences. They expressed a need for more information, involvement in decision making, flexible scheduling of appointments, school support and parent support groups. The nature and quality of the relationship with staff was critical to positive experience with the service; therefore, frequent changes of medical staff was disruptive. Mental health nurses can play a vital role in ensuring continuity, assessing adolescents' participation preferences and advocating for their information needs with other members of the interdisciplinary team. PMID:25977175

  11. Child Development: Day Care. 6. Health Services: A Guide for Project Directors and Health Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, A. Frederick, Jr.

    This manual is written to help day care directors, physicians, and others concerned with the health of children in day care to plan and carry out a group of services that will meet the health needs of children and their parents. It is divided into three parts. Part One is primarily concerned with Planners and Project Directors, and includes…

  12. Continuum of Care Services for Maternal and Child Health using mobile technology – a health system strengthening strategy in low and middle income countries

    OpenAIRE

    Balakrishnan, Ramkrishnan; Gopichandran, Vijayaprasad; Chaturvedi, Sharadprakash; Chatterjee, Rahul; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Chaudhuri, Indrajit

    2016-01-01

    Background Mobile phone technology is utilized for better delivery of health services worldwide. In low-and-middle income countries mobile phones are now ubiquitous. Thus leveraging mHealth applications in health sector is becoming popular rapidly in these countries. To assess the effectiveness of the Continuum of Care Services (CCS) mHealth platform in terms of strengthening the delivery of maternal and child health (MCH) services in a district in Bihar, a resource-poor state in India. Metho...

  13. What Can Education Teach Child Mental Health Services? Practitioners' Perceptions of Training and Joint Working

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vostanis, Panos; O'Reilly, Michelle; Taylor, Helen; Day, Crispin; Street, Cathy; Wolpert, Miranda; Edwards, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    The importance of joint working between educational and child mental health professionals is well documented but there are numerous challenges and only limited training models. While the evidence base and training programmes for educationalists regarding child mental health is growing, training mental health professionals about education is more…

  14. Parent information evenings: filling a gap in Irish child and adolescent mental health services?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, F

    2010-02-01

    It is estimated that 20% of children experience psychological problems at any one time. 1 Child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) in Ireland are under-resourced. Recent economic downturn has hindered the possibility of increased funding to alleviative these deficits. It is now imperative that mental health professionals create innovative and cost effective solutions to promote positive mental health. Recent literature has focused on the benefits of self delivered parenting programmes, with minimal costs incurred. 2,3 Based on the developing evidence supporting self directed approaches, the Lucena Foundation has initiated a series of parent information evenings. These evenings are offered on a monthly basis, and are free to attend. To date 1,538 parents have attended. Feedback from parents has been very positive with 80.5% of them finding them useful or very useful.

  15. [The role of community-based public health services in child and adolescent health in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, R E

    2005-10-01

    Children and adolescents increasingly show health-related problems which may not be considered as diseases to be treated but nevertheless severely affect academic performance and social behaviour. Regarding the consequences, e.g. from the PISA study, the significance of health problems and their negative impact on academic success are still not sufficiently taken into account. The tasks of paediatric public health services include: (1) health promotion in schools and kindergartens, (2) preventive and other medical checkups in kindergartens and schools to detect the individual needs of children and adolescents for support, (3) reducing the risk of long-term damage in handicapped or retarded children and adolescents by seeking out these children where necessary, and (4) advising the political decision makers by reporting on the population's health and social situation. The main aim is to provide children with special needs with what they need in order to prevent them, especially those whose parents cannot ensure this support themselves, developing a deeper disturbance, or to make sure that these young people are able to participate in social life and to integrate into society in spite of health problems or handicaps. To achieve these goals and to improve the health of children and adolescents, a community-based paediatric public health service has to cooperate with other institutions such as youth authorities, social welfare, education authorities, schools and other local institutions with an input into the health of children and adolescents. PMID:16179986

  16. Individual characteristics and use of maternal and child health services by adolescent mothers in Niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Rajesh Kumar; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Singh, Lucky; Kumar, Chandan

    2014-04-01

    Despite high rates of early childbearing, maternal mortality, and under-five mortality, little is known about factors that affect access of teenage mothers to maternal and child health (MCH) services in Niger. This paper explores potential factors associated with the utilization of MCH care services by adolescent mothers. Using the third wave of the Niger demographic and health survey (NDHS) 2006, we estimate three multivariate logistic regression models to assess individual characteristics associated with the utilization of antenatal care (ANC) and safe delivery care services among adolescent women, as well as full immunization received by children born to adolescent mothers. The analytical sample includes 934 adolescent mothers out of 1,835 respondents aged 15-19, and within this group, 493 mother-child dyads for children aged 12-59 months. Possessing any level of education was found associated with the increased use of all three selected MCH services, while urban residence and higher income were associated with the increased use of two of three MCH services studied. Higher birth order plus a birth interval more than 2 years for the most recent birth appeared associated with the lower probability of antenatal care visits and safe delivery care. This study finds that women who attended at least four ANC visits were more likely to experience safe delivery care, and the children whose mothers had safe delivery care were more likely to receive full immunization. Therefore, an effective program should be designed to promote a continuum of MCH care with special attention to adolescent women who are uneducated, poor and residing in rural areas. PMID:23737107

  17. Mental Health Services for Children and Youth in the Child Welfare System: A Focus on Caregivers as Gatekeepers

    OpenAIRE

    Villagrana, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Caregivers serve as gatekeepers for children while in the child welfare system, but few studies have focused on the caregiver and the factors that influence the use of mental health services for the children under their care. The purpose of this study was to examine the child’s mental health need, the caregiver’s level of stress, depression, and social support, and the utilization of mental health services by children using the three most common types of caregivers in the child welfare system...

  18. Cross-national reliability of clinician-rated outcome measures in child and adolescent mental health services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanssen-Bauer, Ketil; Gowers, Simon; Aalen, Odd O;

    2007-01-01

    Clinician-rated measures are in extensive use as routine outcome measures in child and adolescent mental health services. We investigated cross-national differences and inter-rater reliability of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA), the Children's Global...

  19. Relationship between parent held child records for immunisations, parental recall and health service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jessop, L

    2011-03-01

    Parent held child records (PHCR) were introduced in Ireland in 2008. This study investigated the relationship between the PHCR, parental recall and regional Health Service Executive (HSE) records for immunisation uptake. It used the Lifeways cohort study of 1070 singleton children to compare immunisation data from PHCR at one year, parental recall at five years and information from the HSE. When compared to HSE records, full recording of primary immunisations in the PHCR was reported for 695 of 749 (92.8%) children. Parental recall was correct for 520 of 538 (96.7%) children. Of the 307 completed PHCRs, 207 (75.9%) agreed with the HSE records. Agreement between the three sources for primary immunisations was 74-93% but was not statistically significant. Agreement was 91% (p < 0.001) for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccines between parental recall and HSE records. PHCRs underestimated and parental recall overestimated immunisation status when compared with HSE records.

  20. Somalia: supporting the child survival agenda when routine health service is broken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Imran Raza; Kamadjeu, Raoul; Assegid, Kebede; Mulugeta, Abraham

    2012-03-01

    Somalia, one of the most unstable countries in the world, has been without a permanent government for nearly 2 decades. With a health system in total disarray, coverage of basic health interventions remains low and, maternal and child mortality is among the highest in the world. Health partners jointly outlined an integrated package of critical child survival interventions to be delivered through a population-based delivery strategy known as Child Health Days (CHDs), to reduce child mortality. Using this strategy, key child survival interventions are delivered to the community with an objective of reaching children areas, and coverage disparity between the urban and rural areas was reduced from 17% (42% urban and 25% rural) to 10% (50% urban and 60% rural). In addition, infants were reached with a third dose of diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus vaccine, achieving 51% coverage during 2009 and 66% in 2010. This paper summarizes the challenges of scaling up child interventions in the troubled context of Somalia by reviewing the planning, implementation, and achievements of CHDs as well as reflecting on challenges for the future of child survival in Somalia. PMID:22315380

  1. 78 FR 6113 - Office of Clinical and Preventive Services Indigenous Child Health-Strong Communities, Healthy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... (AI/AN) to the highest level. The IHS, an agency within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), is responsible for providing Federal health services to AI/AN. The provision of health services... 1.9 million AI/AN who belong to 566 Federally recognized Tribes in 35 states. The IHS Maternal...

  2. Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice: Several Factors Influence the Placement of Children Solely To Obtain Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    Recent reports have documented how some parents choose to place their children in the child welfare or juvenile justice systems in order to obtain the mental health services that their children need. Senators Susan Collins and Joseph Lieberman of the Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs asked the General Accounting Office (GAO) to testify on:…

  3. Analysis of selected social determinants of health and their relationships with maternal health service coverage and child mortality in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang Van Minh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Achieving a fair and equitable distribution of health in the population while progressing toward universal health coverage (UHC is a key focus of health policy in Vietnam. This paper describes health barriers experienced by women (and children by inference in Vietnam, and measures how UHC, with reference to maternal health services and child mortality rates, is affected by selected social determinants of health (SDH, termed ‘barriers’. Methods: Our study uses a cross-sectional design with data from the 2011 Vietnam Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey. The study sample includes 11,663 women, aged 15–49 years. Weighted frequency statistics are cross-tabulated with socioeconomic characteristics of the population to describe the extent and distribution of health barriers experienced by disadvantaged women and children in Vietnam. A subset of women who had a live birth in the preceding two years (n=1,383 was studied to assess the impact of barriers to UHC and health. Six multiple logistic regressions were run using three dependent variables in the previous two years: 1 antenatal care, 2 skilled birth attendants, and 3 child death in the previous 15 years. Independent predictor variables were: 1 low education (incomplete secondary education, 2 lack of access to one of four basic amenities. In a second set of regressions, a constructed composite barrier index replaced these variables. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI were used to report regression results. Results: In Vietnam, about 54% of women aged 15–49 years in 2011, had low education or lacked access to one of four basic amenities. About 38% of poor rural women from ethnic minorities experienced both barriers, compared with less than 1% of rich urban women from the ethnic majority. Incomplete secondary education or lack of one of four basic amenities was a factor significantly associated with lower access to skilled birth attendants (OR=0.28, 95% CI: 0.14

  4. Utilization of Maternal and Child Health Care Services by Primigravida Females in Urban and Rural Areas of India

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan, Hemant; Sharma, Bhuwan

    2014-01-01

    Maternal complications and poor perinatal outcome are highly associated with nonutilisation of antenatal and delivery care services and poor socioeconomic conditions of the patient. It is essential that all pregnant women have access to high quality obstetric care throughout their pregnancies. Present longitudinal study was carried out to compare utilization of maternal and child health care services by urban and rural primigravida females. A total of 240 study participants were enrolled in t...

  5. Indicators of child health, service utilization and mortality in Zhejiang Province of China, 1998-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fang Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the levels of primary health care services for children and their changes in Zhejiang Province, China from 1998 to 2011. METHODS: The data were drawn from Zhejiang maternal and child health statistics collected under the supervision of the Health Bureau of Zhejiang Province. Primary health care coverage, hospital deliveries, low birth weight, postnatal visits, breastfeeding, underweight, early neonatal (<7 days mortality, neonatal mortality, infant mortality and under-5 mortality were investigated. RESULTS: The coverage rates for children under 3 years old and children under 7 years old increased in the last 14 years. The hospital delivery rate was high during the study period, and the overall difference narrowed. There was a significant difference (P<0.001 between the prevalence of low birth weight in 1998 (2.03% and the prevalence in 2011 (2.71%. The increase in low birth weight was more significant in urban areas than in rural areas. The postnatal visit rate increased from 95.00% to 98.45% with a significant difference (P<0.001. The breastfeeding rate was the highest in 2004 at 74.79% and lowest in 2008 at 53.86%. The prevalence of underweight in children under 5 years old decreased from 1.63% to 0.65%, and the prevalence was higher in rural areas. The early neonatal, neonatal, infant and under-5 mortality rates decreased from 6.66‰, 8.67‰, 11.99‰ and 15.28‰ to 1.69‰, 2.36‰, 3.89‰ and 5.42‰, respectively (P<0.001. The mortality rates in rural areas were slightly higher than those in urban areas each year, and the mortality rates were lower in Ningbo, Wenzhou, and Jiaxing regions and higher in Quzhou and Lishui regions. CONCLUSION: Primary health care services for children in Zhejiang Province improved from 1998 to 2011. Continued high rates of low birth weight in urban areas and mortality in rural areas may be addressed with improvements in health awareness and medical technology.

  6. The what, when, and why of implementation frameworks for evidence-based practices in child welfare and child mental health service systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Rochelle F; Self-Brown, Shannon; Rostad, Whitney L; Jackson, Matthew C

    2016-03-01

    It is widely recognized that children in the child welfare system are particularly vulnerable to the adverse health and mental effects associated with exposure to abuse and neglect, making it imperative to have broad-based availability of evidence-based practices (EBPs) that can prevent child maltreatment and reduce the negative mental health outcomes for youth who are victims. A variety of EBPs exist for reducing child maltreatment risk and addressing the associated negative mental health outcomes, but the reach of these practices is limited. An emerging literature documents factors that can enhance or inhibit the success of EBP implementation in community service agencies, including how the selection of a theory-driven conceptual framework, or model, might facilitate implementation planning by providing guidance for best practices during implementation phases. However, limited research is available to guide decision makers in the selection of implementation frameworks that can boost implementation success for EBPs that focus on preventing child welfare recidivism and serving the mental health needs of maltreated youth. The aims of this conceptual paper are to (1) provide an overview of existing implementation frameworks, beginning with a discussion of definitional issues and the selection criteria for frameworks included in the review; and (2) offer recommendations for practice and policy as applicable for professionals and systems serving victims of child maltreatment and their families. PMID:26547360

  7. Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice: Federal Agencies Could Play a Stronger Role in Helping States Reduce the Number of Children Placed Solely To Obtain Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    Child welfare directors in 19 states and juvenile justice officials in 30 counties estimated that in fiscal year 2001 parents placed over 12,700 children into the child welfare or juvenile justice systems so that these children could receive mental health services. Neither the child welfare nor the juvenile justice system was designed to serve…

  8. Child health in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niclasen, Birgit V L; Bjerregaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To review the knowledge on child health and child health problems in Greenland. METHOD: The review was based on theses, national statistics, national and international reports, and a search in Pub Med, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and WHOLIB databases from 1985 to 2005. The resulting articles...... importance to the health of children in Greenland. More accurate data on child health are necessary in the future to secure better prioritization. It is suggested to construct a set of reliable indicators of child health in Greenland to monitor the health of children on a national and regional basis....

  9. The Parent Participation Engagement Measure (PPEM): Reliability and Validity in Child and Adolescent Community Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haine-Schlagel, Rachel; Roesch, Scott C; Trask, Emily V; Fawley-King, Kya; Ganger, William C; Aarons, Gregory A

    2016-09-01

    Parent participation in community-based child mental health services is an important yet understudied process associated with treatment effectiveness. This paper describes the development and psychometrics of the Parent Participation Engagement Measure in a sample of 1374 parents and 563 youth receiving publicly-funded mental health services. Analyses indicated excellent internal consistency, and model fit indices/factor loadings supported a one-factor model. Convergent and discriminant validity were supported, although some coefficients were modest in magnitude. Psychometric results were consistent for Caucasian versus Hispanic, parent versus youth, and English versus Spanish-language respondents. The clinical and research utility of this measure are discussed. PMID:26520104

  10. Child Dental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy teeth are important to your child's overall health. From the time your child is born, there are things you can do to promote healthy teeth and prevent cavities. For babies, you should clean ...

  11. The Improvement of Prenatal, Postnatal, Newborn and Preschool ChildAND#8217;s Health Care Services in Istanbul: GEBLIZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savas Basar Kartal; Aziz Gurhan Birler; Demet Ozkul; Selma Unluer; Selime Gurleyuk; Aysun Yamak; Yeliz Ozturk; Asya Banu Topuzoglu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Keeping health records regularly is important for determining the health status of the population and planning health services. It is observed that the existing health record systems in Istanbul are insufficient in determining the number of pregnant women, puerperants, newborns and preschool children. METHODS: Therefore, an intervention study was planned by Istanbul Directorate of Health in order to provide systematic monitoring of pregnant women, puerperants, newborns and preschool children, and ensure that equity in the distribution of qualified prenatal and postnatal health care is maintained. This project called GEBLIZ has been started to be used since September 2008. RESULTS: According to this project all public and private health centers in which pregnant and child care are given have the responsibility to transfer necessary information about the patients to an electronic database. Through this computerized system, a connection between primary, secondary and tertiary health care settings has been maintained, and deficiencies of paper records have been completed. Health records have become more consistent. CONLUSION: Compared to one year before the start of the intervention, there have been important increases in the number of pregnant women, puerperants, newborns and infants detected by primary health care units. Besides, “home visits” which have been neglected were started actively by primary health care personnel, and preventive health service who stayed in the shadow of therapeutic health services came to life again. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(4.000: 289-296

  12. The discourse of professional identity in child and adolescent mental health services

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, Laurence James

    2008-01-01

    Background: Child and adolescent mental health teams have traditionally been constructed using multidisciplinary teams of different professions. Current workforce policy in mental health, however, stresses team function and the skills and competences required to fulfil that function which leads to a questioning of professional identity within those teams. Aims: This study aims therefore to define how professional identity is constructed in the policy discourse and amongst a sample of cur...

  13. Child life services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Child life programs are an important component of pediatric hospital-based care to address the psychosocial concerns that accompany hospitalization and other health care experiences. Child life specialists focus on the optimal development and well-being of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults while promoting coping skills and minimizing the adverse effects of hospitalization, health care, and/or other potentially stressful experiences. Using therapeutic play, expressive modalities, and psychological preparation as primary tools, in collaboration with the entire health care team and family, child life interventions facilitate coping and adjustment at times and under circumstances that might otherwise prove overwhelming for the child. Play and developmentally appropriate communication are used to: (1) promote optimal development; (2) educate children and families about health conditions; (3) prepare children and families for medical events or procedures; (4) plan and rehearse useful coping and pain management strategies; (5) help children work through feelings about past or impending experiences; and (6) establish therapeutic relationships with patients, siblings, and parents to support family involvement in each child's care. PMID:24777212

  14. Should child obesity be an issue for child protective services? A call for more research on this critical public health issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Deborah J; Gonzalez, Michelle; Ward, Dianne S; Vaughn, Amber; Emunah, Josie; Miller, Lindsey; Anton, Margaret

    2014-04-01

    Given the lasting effects on adolescent and adult health, childhood obesity is a major public health issue. The relatively slow progress toward the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity, however, has prompted leaders in both academic and practice sectors to advocate for what may be considered a radical intervention approach, to conceptualize extreme child obesity as an issue of child maltreatment. Advocates of this approach suggest that this conceptualization affords a new angle for intervention-the involvement of child protective services (CPS) in mandating family-focused lifestyle changes aimed at reducing child overweight and, in the most extreme cases, the removal of the obese child from the home. However, surprisingly little research has been conducted to inform policies or practices consistent with this recommendation, which is already being implemented in some states. This article aims to provide an overview of the challenges to the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity that have motivated the call for CPS involvement in extreme cases and to review the existing research related to this approach. Given that relatively little data are currently available to support or refute the merits of CPS involvement, recommendations for future research that would better inform public policy and decision making regarding this and other intervention strategies are also highlighted. PMID:24231942

  15. Child Social Exclusion Risk and Child Health Outcomes in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanty, Itismita; Edvardsson, Martin; Abello, Annie; Eldridge, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This paper studies the relationship between the risk of child social exclusion, as measured by the Child Social Exclusion (CSE) index and its individual domains, and child health outcomes at the small area level in Australia. The CSE index is Australia’s only national small-area index of the risk of child social exclusion. It includes five domains that capture different components of social exclusion: socio-economic background, education, connectedness, housing and health service...

  16. Utilization of maternal and child health care services by primigravida females in urban and rural areas of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Hemant; Sharma, Bhuwan

    2014-01-01

    Maternal complications and poor perinatal outcome are highly associated with nonutilisation of antenatal and delivery care services and poor socioeconomic conditions of the patient. It is essential that all pregnant women have access to high quality obstetric care throughout their pregnancies. Present longitudinal study was carried out to compare utilization of maternal and child health care services by urban and rural primigravida females. A total of 240 study participants were enrolled in this study. More illiteracy and less mean age at the time of marriage were observed in rural population. Poor knowledge about prelacteal feed, colostrums, tetanus injection and iron-follic acid tablet consumption was noted in both urban and rural areas. Very few study participants from both areas were counselled for HIV testing before pregnancy. More numbers of abortions (19.2%) were noted in urban study participants compared to rural area. Thus utilization of maternal and child health care (MCH) services was poor in both urban and rural areas. A sustained and focussed IEC campaign to improve the awareness amongst community on MCH will help in improving community participation. This may improve the quality, accessibility, and utilization of maternal health care services provided by the government agencies in both rural and urban areas. PMID:24977099

  17. International child health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Alexandra Y; Høgh, Birthe

    2007-01-01

    diseases and neonatal complications, over half associated with malnutrition. Conditions we could prevent and treat. One of UN's Millennium Development Goals is to reduce child mortality. However child health is more than mortality and morbidity indicators, it includes growth and development. Udgivelsesdato......International child health has improved. Better healthcare strategies, like IMCI, have contributed implementing basic interventions: vaccinations, nutrition supplement, oral rehydration and antibiotics. But 11 million children still die every year before they turn five, most from infectious...

  18. Knowledge and perception of Prevention of Mother to Child services amongst pregnant women accessing antenatal clinic in a Primary Health Care centre in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Owoaje, Eme T.; Adedoyin D. Omidokun; Ige, Olusimbo K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Few studies have assessed pregnant women’s perceptions regarding prevention of mother to child of HIV and the available services at the primary health care level in Nigeria.Objective: Assessment of knowledge and perception of antenatal clinic (ANC) attendees regarding Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) of HIV at primary health care facilities in south-west Nigeria.Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted amongst 400 antenatal attendees in a Primary Health Car...

  19. Development of maternal and child health services in the minority communities of Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Adams

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available TO get to the maternal and child health station in Mahamadia, a Moslem Arab village, you alight from the bus at the foot of Mount Tabor, slide down a hill, and find yourself in a courtyard with children and sheep. Bahija, the practical nurse, greets you and laughs as she tells of the Jewish paediatrician who, because of religious tenets forbidding touching a strange woman, refused to take her helping hand and proceeded to fall all the way. From the entrance shed you are led to two rooms with light coming from the open doors. The rooms are clean with stone floors that are easily washed and with the standard blue and white furniture seen in every Ministry of Health or Kupat Holim (General Sick Fund of the Federation of Labor station in Israel.

  20. Socio-demographic profile of child and adolescent users of oral health services in Victoria, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Rodrigo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the socio-demographic characteristics of the eligible population of users of public oral health care services in the Australian state of Victoria, aged 17 years or younger. The study was conducted as a secondary analysis of data collected from July 2008 to June 2009 for 45,728 young clients of public oral health care. The sample mean age was 8.9 (SD: 3.5 years. The majority (82.7% was between 6 and 17 years of age, and 50.3% were males. The majority (76.6% was Australian-born and spoke English at home (89.1%. The overall mean DMFT was 1.0 (SD: 2.1 teeth, with a mean dmft of 3.16 (SD: 5.79 teeth. Data indicate that, among six year olds in the Significant Caries Index (SiC category, the mean dmft was 6.82 teeth. Findings corroborate social inequalities in oral health outcome and provide suggestions for oral health services to develop strategies and priorities to reduce inequalities in health and well-being, and better coordinate and target services to local needs.

  1. Pilot of Te Tomokanga: A Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service Evaluation Tool for an Indigenous Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahu McClintock

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe acceptability of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS to Indigenous peoples is little studied. There has been a lack of evaluation tools able to take account of the more holistic approach to the attainment of mental health that characterises Māori, the Indigenous population of Aotearoa (New Zealand. This study aimed to develop such an instrument and establish some of its psychometric properties. Then, to use the measure to establish whānau (family or caregiver views on desirable CAMHS characteristics.MethodA self-administered survey, Te Tomokanga, was developed by modifying a North American questionnaire, the Youth Services Survey for Families (YSS-F. The intent of the tool was to record whānau experiences and views on service acceptability.The Te Tomokanga survey is unique in that it incorporates questions designed to examine CAMHS delivery in light of the Whare Tapa Whā[1], a Māori comprehensive model of health with a focus on whānau involvement and culturally responsive services. This mail or telephone survey was completed by a cohort of 168 Māori whānau. Their children had been referred to one of the three types of CAMHS, mainstream, bicultural, and kaupapa Māori[2], of the District Health Board (DHBs in the Midland health region, Aotearoa. The Midland health region is an area with a large Māori population with high levels of social deprivation.ResultsThe Te Tomokanga instrument was shown to have a similar factor structure to the North American questionnaire from which it had been derived. It identified issues relevant to Māori whānau satisfaction with CAMHS. The work supports the concept that Māori desire therapeutic methods consistent with the Whare Tapa Whā, such as whānau involvement and the importance of recognising culture and spirituality.The participants were generally positive about the services they received from the three different CAMHS types, which shows good acceptability of CAMHS for

  2. A comparative analysis of early child health and development services and outcomes in countries with different redistributive policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, Meta; Hopkins, Jessica; Biscaro, Anne; Srikanthan, Cinntha; Feller, Andrea; Bremberg, Sven; Verkuijl, Nienke; Flapper, Boudien; Ford-Jones, Elizabeth Lee; Williams, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Background: The social environment is a fundamental determinant of early child development and, in turn, early child development is a determinant of health, well-being, and learning skills across the life course. Redistributive policies aimed at reducing social inequalities, such as a welfare state

  3. A comparative analysis of early child health and development services and outcomes in countries with different redistributive policies

    OpenAIRE

    van den Heuvel, Meta; Hopkins, Jessica; Biscaro, Anne; Srikanthan, Cinntha; Feller, Andrea; Bremberg, Sven; Verkuijl, Nienke; Flapper, Boudien; Ford-Jones, Elizabeth Lee; Williams, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Background: The social environment is a fundamental determinant of early child development and, in turn, early child development is a determinant of health, well-being, and learning skills across the life course. Redistributive policies aimed at reducing social inequalities, such as a welfare state and labour market policies, have shown a positive association with selected health indicators. In this study, we investigated the influence of redistributive policies specifically on the social env...

  4. Mental Health of Immigrant Children: A New Challenge for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Services in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skokauskas, Norbert; Clarke, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    Ethnically, Ireland has diversified greatly over the past few years. According to the 2006 census, 419733 foreign nationals live in Ireland. Immigration is one of the one of the most stressful events a child can undergo; it involves profound changes, including a disruption of well-established relationships and acculturation. Since the…

  5. 75 FR 51083 - Office of Clinical and Preventive Services Maternal and Child Health Program: Project Choices...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... Implementation and Evaluation for American Indian and Alaska Native Women (CHOICES AI/AN) . This program is... Natives (AI/AN) tend to be higher than U.S. prevalence rates of FAS overall. CDC studies have reported... to support and educate AI/AN women of child bearing years in making healthy choices while...

  6. Factors influencing utilization of maternal and child health services among the postnatal mothers in hilly region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Joshi

    2016-06-01

    Results: The present study revealed that the main reasons given by the individual women for not attending antenatal and postnatal care services that they were apparently healthy in present pregnancy, distance from MCH centers, doctors are not available in MCH centers, better services in home and lack of time due to household work. Conclusions: The findings of this study will help the nurse-midwife who are working in community and hospital setup to understand the factors that hinder women from utilization of MCH services and provides evidence to address women's problem for ensure effective utilization of available MCH services. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2170-2176

  7. Accelerating reproductive and child health programme impact with community-based services: the Navrongo experiment in Ghana.

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the demographic and health impact of deploying health service nurses and volunteers to village locations with a view to scaling up results. METHODS: A four-celled plausibility trial was used for testing the impact of aligning community health services with the traditional social institutions that organize village life. Data from the Navrongo Demographic Surveillance System that tracks fertility and mortality events over time were used to estimate impact on fertility an...

  8. Child Social Exclusion Risk and Child Health Outcomes in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Itismita; Edvardsson, Martin; Abello, Annie; Eldridge, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This paper studies the relationship between the risk of child social exclusion, as measured by the Child Social Exclusion (CSE) index and its individual domains, and child health outcomes at the small area level in Australia. The CSE index is Australia’s only national small-area index of the risk of child social exclusion. It includes five domains that capture different components of social exclusion: socio-economic background, education, connectedness, housing and health services. Methods The paper used data from the National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM), University of Canberra for the CSE Index and its domains and two key Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) data sources for the health outcome measures: the National Hospital Morbidity Database and the National Mortality Database. Results The results show positive associations between rates of both of the negative health outcomes: potentially preventable hospitalisations (PPH) and avoidable deaths, and the overall risk of child social exclusion as well as with the index domains. This analysis at the small-area level can be used to identify and study areas with unexpectedly good or bad health outcomes relative to their estimated risk of child social exclusion. We show that children’s health outcomes are worse in remote parts of Australia than what would be expected solely based on the CSE index. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that developing composite indices of the risk of child social exclusion can provide valuable guidance for local interventions and programs aimed at improving children’s health outcomes. They also indicate the importance of taking a small-area approach when conducting geographic modelling of disadvantage. PMID:27152596

  9. Impact assessment and cost-effectiveness of m-health application used by community health workers for maternal, newborn and child health care services in rural Uttar Pradesh, India: a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Prinja, Shankar; Nimesh, Ruby; Gupta, Aditi; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Thakur, Jarnail Singh; Gupta, Madhu; Singh, Tarundeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: An m-health application has been developed and implemented with community health workers to improve their counseling in a rural area of India. The ultimate aim was to generate demand and improve utilization of key maternal, neonatal, and child health services. The present study aims to assess the impact and cost-effectiveness of this project.Methods/design: A pre–post quasi-experimental design with a control group will be used to undertake difference in differences analysis for as...

  10. Impact assessment and cost-effectiveness of m-health application used by community health workers for maternal, newborn and child health care services in rural Uttar Pradesh, India: a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Prinja, Shankar; Nimesh, Ruby; Gupta, Aditi; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Thakur, Jarnail Singh; Gupta, Madhu; Singh, Tarundeep

    2016-01-01

    Background An m-health application has been developed and implemented with community health workers to improve their counseling in a rural area of India. The ultimate aim was to generate demand and improve utilization of key maternal, neonatal, and child health services. The present study aims to assess the impact and cost-effectiveness of this project. Methods/design A pre–post quasi-experimental design with a control group will be used to undertake difference in differences analysis for ass...

  11. Impact assessment and cost-effectiveness of m-health application used by community health workers for maternal, newborn and child health care services in rural Uttar Pradesh, India: a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Shankar Prinja; Ruby Nimesh; Aditi Gupta; Pankaj Bahuguna; Jarnail Singh Thakur; Madhu Gupta; Tarundeep Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background: An m-health application has been developed and implemented with community health workers to improve their counseling in a rural area of India. The ultimate aim was to generate demand and improve utilization of key maternal, neonatal, and child health services. The present study aims to assess the impact and cost-effectiveness of this project. Methods/design: A pre–post quasi-experimental design with a control group will be used to undertake difference in differences analysis for a...

  12. Parental health and child schooling

    OpenAIRE

    Bratti, Massimiliano; Mendola, Mariapia

    2011-01-01

    Evidence on the role of parental health on child schooling is surprisingly thin. We explore this issue by estimating the short-run effects of parents\\' illness on child school enrollment. Our analysis is based on household panel data from Bosnia-Herzegovina, a country whose health and educational systems underwent extensive destruction during the 1992-1995 war. Using child fixed effects to correct for potential endogeneity bias, we find that — contrary to the common wisdom that shocks to the ...

  13. Child Neurology Services in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Wilmshurst, Jo M.; Badoe, Eben; Wammanda, Robinson D.; Mallewa, Macpherson; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Venter, Andre; Charles R. Newton

    2011-01-01

    The first African Child Neurology Association meeting identified key challenges that the continent faces to improve the health of children with neurology disorders. The capacity to diagnose common neurologic conditions and rare disorders is lacking. The burden of neurologic disease on the continent is not known, and this lack of knowledge limits the ability to lobby for better health care provision. Inability to practice in resource-limited settings has led to the migration of skilled profess...

  14. Child Labor, Gender, and Health

    OpenAIRE

    Leinberger-Jabari, Andrea; Parker, David L.; Oberg, Charles

    2005-01-01

    It is often forgotten that child labor is part of a multi-generational problem due in part to the failure to educate girls. Although the literacy rate for women has improved over the last two decades, in many countries it is less than half that of their male counterparts. This in turn leads to nutritional deficiencies, poverty, and poor health. While many researchers address the immediate health effects of child labor on the child laborers, this article addresses the issue of child labor from...

  15. Empowering districts to target priorities for improving child health service in Uganda using change management and rapid assessment methods

    OpenAIRE

    Odaga, John; Dorcus K. Henriksson; Nkolo, Charles; Tibeihaho, Hector; Musabe, Richard; Katusiime, Margaret; Sinabulya, Zaccheus; Mucunguzi, Stephen; Mbonye, Anthony K; Valadez, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Local health system managers in low- and middle-income countries have the responsibility to set health priorities and allocate resources accordingly. Although tools exist to aid this process, they are not widely applied for various reasons including non-availability, poor knowledge of the tools, and poor adaptability into the local context. In Uganda, delivery of basic services is devolved to the District Local Governments through the District Health Teams (DHTs). The Community an...

  16. A child health report card: 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C L; Wynder, E L

    1993-07-01

    It is because of statistics like the ones included above in the Report Card that the health of our children has become a topic of great concern. These statistics, however, reflect only a small piece of a much larger problem, which includes child poverty, child neglect, child abuse, family disintegration, educational failure, violence, and crime. Indeed the biggest threats to child health have roots in the past and present core of our social and environmental conditions. Improving the health of our children will require innovative and comprehensive approaches that include health education, health services, and family support. The cost of our failure to fund preventive programs in the area of child and family health is significant and mounting. Prenatal care for a pregnant women for 9 months cost about $600; however, medical care for a premature baby for only one day may cost more than four times as much ($2,500). Similar comparisons for the cost of prevention versus treatment are listed in Table 8. It is clear that unless we as a nation place more emphasis on funding preventive medicine, the health of our children will continue to suffer, with grave consequences for the future of our country. PMID:8415515

  17. 45 CFR 1304.22 - Child health and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AGENCIES Early Childhood Development and Health Services § 1304.22 Child health and safety. (a) Health... procedures for emergencies (e.g., fire or weather-related) which are practiced regularly (see 45 CFR 1304.53... allow for easy access to each child. (f) First aid kits. (1) Readily available, well-supplied first...

  18. 儿童卫生保健服务中的性别差异研究%Study of gender gaps in child health care services

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张绍强; 张玲; 陈文英; 冯文成; 夏洪波

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To understand the use of child health services between gender in Longgang district of Shenzhen, thereby providing a scientific basis for perfecting maternal and child health service system and improving the state of reproductive health services. [Methods] Stratified random sampling method was used to select 180 children under 2 years old from Longgang district,Shenzhen City as participants in this study, then to learn gender difference in child health care services among them by face-to-face questionnaire. [Results] 94. 08% of children were breastfeeding, the difference in the rate of breast feeding and the start time between sexes had no statistical significance. 86. 67% of children had a regular health check-up,and the check-up rate of boys was higher than that of girls (^2 =5. 588,P = 0. 018),93. 94% of children conducted a regularly vaccination. The difference in the rate of Planned Immunity between sexes had no statistical significance. [Conclusions] Gender issues affects the use of child health services, and the theory "women are equal to men" should be incorporated into maternal and child health care system,so as to improve the state of reproductive health services.%[目的]了解深圳市龙岗区不同性别儿童卫生保健服务利用情况,为完善社区妇幼保健服务体系和改善妇女儿童生殖健康状况提供科学依据. [方法]采用分层随机抽样方法,抽取深圳市龙岗区180名0~2岁儿童作为调查对象,利用自行设计的调查表进行调查,了解不同性别儿童接受保健服务情况. [结果]94.08%的儿童有过母乳喂养,不同性别儿童母乳喂养率和开奶时间差异无统计学意义.86.67%的儿童定期进行健康体检,男童定期健康体检率高于女童,差异有统计学意义(x2=5.588,P=0.018),93.94%的儿童定期进行预防接种,不同性别儿童实施计划免疫率差异无统计学意义. [结论]性别问题影响儿童保健服务,要将性别平等意识

  19. Child Labor: Labor Can Strengthen Its Efforts To Protect Children Who Work. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, Committee on Appropriations, U.S. Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    Occupational safety and health data and labor statistics were evaluated in order to update a 1991 report on child labor. Data were from the Bureau of Labor Statistics; Department of Health and Human Services; National Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH); the Department of Labor's (DOL's) investigations database and individual…

  20. Child Dental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a dentist or doctor suggests it. Provide healthy foods and limit sweet snacks and drinks Schedule regular dental check-ups Forming good habits at a young age can help your child have healthy teeth ...

  1. From placement to prison revisited: Do mental health services disrupt the delinquency pipeline among Latino, African American and Caucasian youth in the child welfare system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Antonio R; Greeson, Johanna K P; Kim, Minseop; Thompson, Allison; DeNard, Christina

    2015-12-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities in delinquency among child welfare-involved youth are well documented. However, less is known about the mechanisms through which these disparities occur. This study explores the extent to which sets of variables predict the occurrence of juvenile delinquency and whether race/ethnicity moderates the strength of the relationships between (1) social, emotional, and behavioral (SEB) problems and delinquency and (2) mental health service use and delinquency. We used a nationally representative sample of 727 African American, Caucasian, and Latino youth between the ages of 12-17 who were referred to the child welfare system. Controlling for age, gender, placement instability, maltreatment history, poverty, and urbanicity, linear regression analyses revealed that African American and Latino youth engaged in more delinquent acts than Caucasian youth did. However, service use decreased the likelihood of engaging in more delinquent acts for African Americans. Additional efforts are needed to illuminate and address the contextual and organizational barriers to delivering effective mental health services as a strategy to reduce racial disparities in delinquent behavior. PMID:26536399

  2. Child neurology services in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Badoe, Eben; Wammanda, Robinson D; Mallewa, Macpherson; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Venter, Andre; Newton, Charles R

    2011-12-01

    The first African Child Neurology Association meeting identified key challenges that the continent faces to improve the health of children with neurology disorders. The capacity to diagnose common neurologic conditions and rare disorders is lacking. The burden of neurologic disease on the continent is not known, and this lack of knowledge limits the ability to lobby for better health care provision. Inability to practice in resource-limited settings has led to the migration of skilled professionals away from Africa. Referral systems from primary to tertiary are often unpredictable and chaotic. There is a lack of access to reliable supplies of basic neurology treatments such as antiepileptic drugs. Few countries have nationally accepted guidelines either for the management of epilepsy or status epilepticus. There is a great need to develop better training capacity across Africa in the recognition and management of neurologic conditions in children, from primary health care to the subspecialist level. PMID:22019842

  3. Integration of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT postpartum services with other HIV care and treatment services within the maternal and child health setting in Zimbabwe, 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Wiegert

    Full Text Available We assessed the integration of PMTCT services during the postpartum period including early infant diagnosis of HIV (EID and adult and pediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART in maternal and child health (MCH facilities in Zimbabwe.From August to December 2012 we conducted a cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of 151 MCH facilities. A questionnaire was used to survey each site about staff training, dried blood spot sample (DBS collection, turnaround time (TAT for test results, PMTCT services, and HIV care and treatment linkages for HIV-infected mothers and children and HIV-exposed infants. Descriptive analyses were used. Of the facilities surveyed, all facilities were trained on DBS collection and 92% responded. Approximately, 99% of responding facilities reported providing DBS collection and a basic HIV-exposed infant service package including EID, extended nevirapine prophylaxis, and use of cotrimoxazole. DBS collection was integrated with immunisations at 83% of facilities, CD4 testing with point-of-care machines was available at 37% of facilities, and ART for both mothers and children was provided at 27% of facilities. More than 80% of facilities reported that DBS test results take >4 weeks to return; TAT did not have a direct association with any specific type of transport, distance to the lab, or intermediate stops for data to travel.Zimbabwe has successfully scaled up and integrated the national EID and PMTCT programs into the existing MCH setting. The long TAT of infant DBS test results and the lack of integrated ART programs in the MCH setting could reduce effectiveness of the national PMTCT and ART programs. Addressing these important gaps will support successful implementation of the 2014 Zimbabwe's PMTCT guidelines under which all HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding women will be offered life-long ART and decentralized ART care.

  4. [Maternal and infant health services and the public health clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urasaki, S

    1986-11-01

    The public health clinic under the jurisdiction of prefectural government should continue to play a major role in maternal-child health services. Ministry of Health's revision plan for Maternal-child Health Law, according to which maternal-child health services are to be transferred totally to municipal (city-town-village) government, is strongly opposed by public health nurses and others. The plan goes against the current movement and effort to revitalize public health clinics, where more 50% of services rendered are maternal-child health related. Secondly, municipal health centers would have much more difficulty providing quality services than prefectural public health clinics which receive annual federal aid for their operation. Federal funding for maternal-child health care, regardless of jurisdictions, is currently 1/3 of standard unit cost. Extreme financial strain on municipal governments would result in regional differences in the quality of services and/or eventual financial burden on the patients. While the national government is trying to emphasize administrative aspects of the public health clinic, it is ordinary citizens' day to day health problems that people expect the clinic to deal with, individually, via check-ups, health counseling, home visits, public health education and telephone health hot line. PMID:3642046

  5. Raising the bar for health and safety in child care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarelli, Patti

    2002-01-01

    During the past few decades, this country has experienced many socio-economic changes including a rise in the number of dual-income families and single parent homes. Combined with a fluctuating economy and drastic reforms in welfare, one of the results has been an ever-increasing number of children being cared for in out-of-home settings. With almost 75% of all children under age 5 years and 50% of infants in some form of child care on a regular basis, opportunities abound for nurses to promote optimal health and safety in child care. To ensure quality child care for these children, health care professionals are uniquely positioned to provide consultation services to centers and family child care settings. With expertise in child development, infection control, disease prevention, and health promotion, pediatric and public health nurses can provide many types of child care health consultation services to impact the care of these children positively. PMID:12087643

  6. Impact of a Child-Based Health Promotion Service-Learning Project on the Growth of Occupational Therapy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    This phenomenological study revealed the lived experiences of occupational therapy students as they embarked on a semester-long volunteer health promotion service-learning project during their entry-level master's program. Data analysis extrapolated themes from student journals, transcriptions of pre- and postinterviews, and field notes. Student roles were exemplified by what students wanted to learn, what they actually learned, and the unexpected benefits they experienced. In particular, issues with teaming, interprofessional development, and time management were discovered. The findings add to the growing literature about the benefits of service learning as a teaching strategy and how it facilitates mindfulness of community service, communication, and clinical reasoning of future therapists. Implications for learning and practice are discussed. PMID:27548859

  7. Health Consequences of Child Labour in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Salma Ahmed; Ranjan Ray

    2012-01-01

    Background: The paper examines the effect of child labour on child health outcomes in Bangladesh, advancing the methodologies and the results of papers published in different journals. Objective: We examine the effect of child labour on child health outcomes. Methods: We used Bangladesh National Child Labour Survey data for 2002-2003 for our analysis. Results: The main finding of the paper suggests that child labour is positively and significantly associated with the probability of b...

  8. 77 FR 9666 - National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; New Proposed Collection; Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Child Health and Human Development... Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will... purpose of this section to authorize the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development...

  9. Trade in health services.

    OpenAIRE

    Chanda, Rupa

    2002-01-01

    In light of the increasing globalization of the health sector, this article examines ways in which health services can be traded, using the mode-wise characterization of trade defined in the General Agreement on Trade in Services. The trade modes include cross- border delivery of health services via physical and electronic means, and cross-border movement of consumers, professionals, and capital. An examination of the positive and negative implications of trade in health services for equity, ...

  10. Does Interpersonal Psychotherapy improve clinical care for adolescents with depression attending a rural child and adolescent mental health service? Study protocol for a cluster randomised feasibility trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villanueva Elmer V

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression amongst adolescents is a costly societal problem. Little research documents the effectiveness of public mental health services in mapping this problem. Further, it is not clear whether usual care in such services can be improved via clinician training in a relevant evidence based intervention. One such intervention, found to be effective and easily learned amongst novice clinicians, is Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT. The study described in the current paper has two main objectives. First, it aims to investigate the impact on clinical care of implementing Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Adolescents for the treatment of adolescent depression within a rural mental health service compared with Treatment as Usual (TAU. The second objective is to record the process and challenges (i.e. feasibility, acceptability, sustainability associated with implementing and evaluating an evidence-based intervention within a community service. This paper outlines the study rationale and design for this community based research trial. Methods/design The study involves a cluster randomisation trial to be conducted within a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service in rural Australia. All clinicians in the service will be invited to participate. Participating clinicians will be randomised via block design at each of four sites to (a training and delivery of IPT, or (b TAU. The primary measure of impact on care will be a clinically significant change in depressive symptomatology, with secondary outcomes involving treatment satisfaction and changes in other symptomatology. Participating adolescents with significant depressive symptomatology, aged 12 to 18 years, will complete assessment measures at Weeks 0, 12 and 24 of treatment. They will also complete a depression inventory once a month during that period. This study aims to recruit 60 adolescent participants and their parent/guardian/s. A power analysis is not indicated as an intra

  11. 77 FR 10758 - National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Proposed Collection; Comment Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Child Health and Human Development... Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Building 6100... comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Institute of Child Health and ]...

  12. 77 FR 30294 - National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Submission for OMB Review; Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Child Health and Human Development... 1995, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institutes of....--It is the purpose of this section to authorize the National Institute of Child Health and...

  13. 77 FR 14530 - National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; New Proposed Collection; Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Child Health and Human Development... collection projects, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National... the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development* to conduct a national longitudinal...

  14. 77 FR 19022 - National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Submission for OMB Review; Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Child Health and Human Development... this section to authorize the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development* to conduct a... Child Health and Human Development* shall establish a consortium of representatives from...

  15. 45 CFR 1355.31 - Elements of the child and family services review system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FOSTER CARE MAINTENANCE PAYMENTS, ADOPTION ASSISTANCE, AND CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Elements of the child and family services...

  16. 45 CFR 1304.24 - Child mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... services. (1) Grantee and delegate agencies must work collaboratively with parents (see 45 CFR 1304.40(f... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Child mental health. 1304.24 Section 1304.24..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD...

  17. Birth placement and child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergusson, D M; Horwood, J; Shannon, F T

    1981-07-22

    The standards of health and health care for a sample of 1265 Christchurch children during the period birth to three years were examined. There was a systematic tendency for levels of health care and morbidity to vary with the child's birth placement: in general adopted children had the best standard of health care and the lowest rates of morbidity; children who entered single parent families at birth had the poorest standards of health care and the highest rates of morbidity. Statistical control for family social background including maternal age, education, ethnic status, family size and changes of residence tended to reduce the size of the observed differences. However, even when the results were controlled for these factors children in single parent families still has depressed levels of preventive health care and higher rates of hospital admission. Possible explanations of the differences are discussed. PMID:6944632

  18. Infant mental health screening in the general child health surveilliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll, Janni; Holstein, Bjørn Evald; Andersen, Anette;

    2016-01-01

    Title: Copenhagen Infant Mental Health Screening, CIMHS: Construct validity and predictivity of a general population measure. Introduction: The Copenhagen Infant Mental Health Screening (CIMHS) was developed as first part of an intervention program embedded in the existing services...... and Methods: At age 9-10 months a consecutive sample of 2,973 infants were assessed by community health nurses, using the CIMHS. Item-response analyses were used to explore construct validity and define cases. A case-cohort sample of 418 children was assessed at 1½ year in a two hour session comprising Bayley...... Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd edition (Bayley-III), parent interviews (including Child Behaviour Checklist 1½-5), video-recordings of play and eating. Diagnostic classification was completed by experienced child psychiatrists according to the Diagnostic Classification of Mental Health...

  19. The clinical effectiveness of a brief consultation and advisory approach compared to treatment as usual in child and adolescent mental health services.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGarry, Joan

    2008-07-01

    A brief consultation and advice (BCA) approach to dealing with routine referrals was introduced into a child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) over an 18-month period. This is a time-limited, client-centred and solution-focused approach to dealing with common non-complex referrals. The model proposes that all families are seen for an initial \\'consultation\\' appointment followed by a maximum of two further appointments. A randomized controlled study compared the clinical effectiveness of BCA treatment with treatment as usual (TAU) over a 6-month period. The parents of children referred to CAMHS were eligible to participate if their child was deemed \\'non-complex\\'. Ethical approval was granted by the relevant ethics committee. Families who consented to participate in the study were randomly allocated to either the BCA or TAU group. Sixty children enrolled in the study. Both groups showed improvements on a number of variables at 3 months post treatment, but only those receiving BCA showed continued improvement at 6 months. Participants in both groups showed high levels of satisfaction with the treatment received. Participants in the TAU group expressed dissatisfaction with long waiting times and had a higher drop out rate than the BCA treatment group. During the time frame studied, the introduction of the BCA approach did not lead to a decrease in overall mean waiting time. These results and the usefulness of a BCA model are discussed.

  20. Child-care Services for Working Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguret, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the attitudes of the public authorities in various countries concerning child-care services for working parents and the different systems of care in operation in industrial and developing nations. (Author/CT)

  1. Child Poverty and the Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    The persistence of child poverty in the United States and the pervasive health consequences it engenders present unique challenges to the health care system. Human capital theory and empirical observation suggest that the increased disease burden experienced by poor children originates from social conditions that provide suboptimal educational, nutritional, environmental, and parental inputs to good health. Faced with the resultant excess rates of pediatric morbidity, the US health care system has developed a variety of compensatory strategies. In the first instance, Medicaid, the federal-state governmental finance system designed to assure health insurance coverage for poor children, has increased its eligibility thresholds and expanded its benefits to allow greater access to health services for this vulnerable population. A second arm of response involves a gradual reengineering of health care delivery at the practice level, including the dissemination of patient-centered medical homes, the use of team-based approaches to care, and the expansion of care management beyond the practice to reach deep into the community. Third is a series of recent experiments involving the federal government and state Medicaid programs that includes payment reforms of various kinds, enhanced reporting, concentration on high-risk populations, and intensive case management. Fourth, pediatric practices have begun to make use of specific tools that permit the identification and referral of children facing social stresses arising from poverty. Finally, constituencies within the health care system participate in enhanced advocacy efforts to raise awareness of poverty as a distinct threat to child health and to press for public policy responses such as minimum wage increases, expansion of tax credits, paid family leave, universal preschool education, and other priorities focused on child poverty. PMID:27044708

  2. Improving Child Nutrition Outcomes in India : Can the Integrated Child Development Services Program Be More Effective?

    OpenAIRE

    Das Gupta, Monica; Lokshin, Michael; Gragnolati, Michele; Ivaschenko, Oleksiy

    2005-01-01

    Levels of child malnutrition in India fell only slowly during the 1990s, despite significant economic growth and large public spending on the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) program, of which the major component is supplementary feeding for malnourished children. To unravel this puzzle, the authors assess the program's placement and its outcomes using National Family Health Survey data from 1992 and 1998. They find that program placement is clearly regressive across states. The s...

  3. Improving child nutrition outcomes in India : can the integrated child development services be more effective?

    OpenAIRE

    Das Gupta, Monica; Lokshin, Michael; Gragnolati, Michele; Ivaschenko, Oleksiy

    2005-01-01

    Levels of child malnutrition in India fell only slowly during the 1990s, despite significant economic growth and large public spending on the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) program, of which the major component is supplementary feeding for malnourished children. To unravel this puzzle, the authors assess the program's placement and its outcomes using National Family Health Survey data from 1992 and 1998. They find that program placement is clearly regressive across states. The s...

  4. Child nutrition, child health, and school enrollment : a longitudinal analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Alderman, Harold; Behrman, Jere R.; Lavy, Victor; Menon, Rekha

    1997-01-01

    Better health and nutrition are thought to improve children's performance in school, and therefore their productivity after school. Most literature ignores the fact that child health and schooling reflect behavioral choices, so the estimated impact of health and nutrition on a child's schooling reflects biases in the studies. Using an explicit dynamic model for preferred estimates, the authors use longitudinal data to investigate how children's health and nutrition affect school enrollment in...

  5. 76 FR 50743 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... Development Special Emphasis Panel, Maintenance of Child Health and Development Studies Name and Address Files... Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  6. 75 FR 54897 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Review of T32 Applications from the... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  7. 75 FR 8974 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... Development Special Emphasis Panel; Maternal and Child Health in Poor Countries: Evidence from Randomized... Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  8. 76 FR 37133 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Development, Special Emphasis Panel. The Role of Human-Animal Interactions in Child Health and Development... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  9. 78 FR 37233 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute Of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Diet, Obesity, and Weight Change in Pregnancy... Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; 68-2 Diet, Obesity, and Weight Change in... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute Of Child...

  10. Access to Mainstream Health Services: A Case Study of the Difficulties Faced by a Child with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Freddy Jackson; Cooper, Kate; Diebel, Tara

    2013-01-01

    People with learning disabilities have higher levels of health needs compared with the general population (Nocon, 2006, Background evidence for the DRC's formal investigation into health inequalities experienced by people with learning disabilities or mental health problems. London and Manchester, Disability Rights Commission). Research has shown…

  11. College Health: Health Services and Common Health Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health College Health: Health Services and Common Health Problems Posted under Health Guides . ... March 2015. +Related Content What are student health services? The student health services (sometimes called the student ...

  12. Parental unemployment and child health

    OpenAIRE

    Mörk, Eva; Sjögren, Anna; Svaleryd, Helena

    2014-01-01

    We analyze to what extent health outcomes of Swedish children are worse among children whose parents become unemployed. To this end we combine Swedish hospitalization data for 1992-2007 for children 3-18 years of age with register data on parental unemployment. We find that children with unemployed parents are 17 percent more likely to be hospitalized than other children, but that most of the difference is driven by selection. A child fixed-effects approach suggests a small effect of parental...

  13. Health consequences of child labour in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The paper examines the effect of child labour on child health outcomes in Bangladesh, advancing the methodologies and the results of papers published in different journals. Objective: We examine the effect of child labour on child health outcomes. Methods: We used Bangladesh National Child Labour Survey data for 2002-2003 for our analysis. Results: The main finding of the paper suggests that child labour is positively and significantly associated with the probability of being injured or becoming ill. Intensity of injury or illness is significantly higher in construction and manufacturing sectors than in other sectors. Health disadvantages for different age groups are not essentially parallel. Conclusions: The results obtained in this paper strengthen the need for stronger enforcement of laws that regulate child labour, especially given its adverse consequences on health. Although the paper focuses on Bangladesh, much of the evidence presented has implications that are relevant to policymakers in other developing countries.

  14. The Effect of Humanized Service and Management in the Work of Maternal and Child Health%人性化服务与管理在妇幼保健工作中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓晓波

    2015-01-01

    目的 研究人性化服务与管理在妇幼保健工作中的作用和意义.方法 分析妇幼保健工作人性化服务的内涵及必要性,并在此基础上提出相应的人性化服务管理措施.结果 通过分析论证可得采用人性化服务,加强对护理人员的管理,能够提高妇幼保健机构护理的质量,提升医院的护理水平.结论 妇幼保健机构服务的人群特殊,医院的医护人员需要采用"以患者为中心"的工作理念,为患者提供更加全面、优质的护理服务,提高患者的满意度.%Objective To study the function and significance of human services and management in the work of maternal and child health.Methods To analyze the connotation and necessity of the human health service for the maternal and child health services,and to propose the corresponding management measures for human health services.Results Through the analysis and demonstration,we can know that the use of human services, strengthening the management of nursing staff,can improve the quality of maternal and child health care institutions,and improve the level of hospital care. Conclusion The health care organizations in the service of the people is more special,so the hospital's medical staff need to use the"the patient as the center"concept to provide patients with a more comprehensive,high quality care services,and improve patients' satisfaction..

  15. Child Maltreatment, Family Characteristics, and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Add Health Data

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Xiangming; TARUI, Nori

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Child maltreatment, which includes both child abuse and child neglect, is widely regarded as a serious social and public health problem that affects large numbers of children in the United States. In 2012, U.S. state and local child protective services received an estimated 3.4 million referrals of children being abused or neglected. There is increasing evidence that exposure to child maltreatment can lead to many emotional, behavioral, and physical health problems. However, little...

  16. Development of Child-Teen Obesity Treatment Service Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kahyun; Lee, Byung Mun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to develop an effective and efficient obesity treatment and management service platform for obese children/teenagers. Methods The integrated smart platform was planned and established through cooperation with service providers such as hospitals and public health centers, obese children/teenagers who constitute the service's user base, and IT development and policy institutions and companies focusing on child-teen obesity management and treatment. Results Based on guidelines on intervention strategies to manage child-teen obesity, we developed two patient/parent mobile applications, one web-monitoring service for medical staff, one mobile application for food-craving endurance, and one mobile application for medical examinations. Conclusions The establishment of the integrated service platform was successfully completed; however, this study was restrictively to the hospital where the pilot program took place. The effectiveness of the proposed platform will be verified in the future in tests involving other organizations. PMID:27525166

  17. 76 FR 69747 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Special Emphasis Panel; Infertility Treatment, Child Growth and Development to age Three Years... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  18. 77 FR 24964 - National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Submission for OMB Review; Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... at every study visit contact from the time that the enrolled child is 6 months of age to the time the child is 5 years of age. 30-Month Data Collection Module: We propose piloting an age- specific module... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Child Health and Human...

  19. Poverty experience, race, and child health.

    OpenAIRE

    Malat, Jennifer; Oh, Hyun Joo; Hamilton, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Studies that examine children's poverty and health at one point in time do not account for some children experiencing poverty briefly and others living in poverty for much of their lives. The objective of this study was to determine how duration of poverty and child race are related to child health. METHODS: To assess these relationships, we analyzed data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and its Child Development Supplement. Ordinary least squares regression was used to est...

  20. 78 FR 62309 - Child Health Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-16

    ...' health insurance until age 26, and no child can be denied coverage based on a pre-existing condition.... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-24500 Filed 10-15-13; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F4 ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9036 of October 4, 2013 Child Health Day, 2013 By the President of the...

  1. The Unmet Need for Mental Health Services among Probationers' Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Susan D.; Venema, Rachel; Roque, Lorena

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the unmet need for mental health services among children with parents on probation. A group of 77 probationers provided information on 170 children. Information about children's need for mental health services was based on the Child Behavior Checklist and information about children's receipt of mental health services was based…

  2. Perceived impact of Ghana's conditional cash transfer on child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Addo, Ebenezer

    2016-03-01

    A plethora of studies from sub-Saharan Africa indicate that orphaned and vulnerable children are exposed to adverse health, education and other social outcomes. Across diverse settings, conditional cash transfer (CCT) programmes have been successful in improving health outcomes amongst vulnerable children. This study explored the pathways of CCTs' impact on the health of orphans and vulnerable children in rural Ghana. Due to the multi-dimensional nature of CCTs, the programme impact theory was used to conceptualize CCTs' pathways of impact on child health. A qualitative descriptive exploratory approach was used for this study. This study drew on the perspectives of 18 caregivers, 4 community leaders and 3 programme implementers from two rural districts in Ghana. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with the participants. Thematic content analysis was conducted on the interview transcripts to pull together core themes running through the entire data set. Five organizing themes emerged from the interview transcripts: improved child nutrition, health service utilization, poverty reduction and social transformation, improved education and improved emotional health and well-being demonstrating the pathways through which CCTs work to improve child health. The results indicated that CCTs offer a valuable social protection instrument for improving the health of orphans and vulnerable children by addressing the social determinants of child health such as nutrition, access to health care, child poverty and education. PMID:25073762

  3. Commonalities and challenges: a review of Australian state and territory maternity and child health policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Virginia; Donovan, Jenny; Kruske, Sue; Kemp, Lynn; Homer, Caroline; Fowler, Cathrine

    2011-12-01

    Nurses and midwives play a key role in providing universal maternal, child and family health services in Australia. However, the Australian federation of states and territories has resulted in policy frameworks that differ across jurisdictions and services that are fragmented across disciplines and sectors. This paper reports the findings of a study that reviewed and synthesised current Australian service policy or frameworks for maternity and child health services in order to identify the degree of commonality across jurisdictions and the compatibility with international research on child development. Key maternity and child health service policy documents in each jurisdiction were sourced. The findings indicate that current policies were in line with international research and policy directions, emphasising prevention and early intervention, continuity of care, collaboration and integrated services. The congruence of policies suggests the time is right to consider the introduction of a national approach to universal maternal, child health services. PMID:22545909

  4. The Health Development Organization: An Organizational Approach to Achieving Child Health Development

    OpenAIRE

    Halfon, Neal; Inkelas, Moira; Hochstein, Miles

    2000-01-01

    The health development organization (HDO) is a new approach to the organization and delivery of children’s health and social services. The HDO would combine the best features of vertically integrated HMOs with horizontally integrated, child-focused social services and longitudinally integrated health promotion strategies. Its mandate would be to develop the health of children in a community. The impetus for creating HDOs is a growing body of evidence in chronic disease epidemiology, developme...

  5. Parental Health and Child Behavior: Evidence from Parental Health Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Westermaier, Franz; Mühlenweg, Andrea M.; Morefield, Brant

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the importance of parental health in the development of child behavior during early childhood. Our analysis is based on child psychometric measures from a longitudinal German dataset, which tracks mothers and their newborns up to age six. We identify major changes in parental health (shocks) and control for a variety of initial characteristics of the child including prenatal conditions. The results are robust to placebo regressions of health shocks that occur after the out...

  6. 75 FR 32488 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Child Health and Human Development ] Special Emphasis Panel, Maintenance of Child Health and... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory...

  7. Development and formative evaluation of an innovative mHealth intervention for improving coverage of community-based maternal, newborn and child health services in rural areas of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiren Modi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: A new cadre of village-based frontline health workers, called Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs, was created in India. However, coverage of selected community-based maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH services remains low. Objective: This article describes the process of development and formative evaluation of a complex mHealth intervention (ImTeCHO to increase the coverage of proven MNCH services in rural India by improving the performance of ASHAs. Design: The Medical Research Council (MRC framework for developing complex interventions was used. Gaps were identified in the usual care provided by ASHAs, based on a literature search, and SEWA Rural's1 three decades of grassroots experience. The components of the intervention (mHealth strategies were designed to overcome the gaps in care. The intervention, in the form of the ImTeCHO mobile phone and web application, along with the delivery model, was developed to incorporate these mHealth strategies. The intervention was piloted through 45 ASHAs among 45 villages in Gujarat (population: 45,000 over 7 months in 2013 to assess the acceptability, feasibility, and usefulness of the intervention and to identify barriers to its delivery. Results: Inadequate supervision and support to ASHAs were noted as a gap in usual care, resulting in low coverage of selected MNCH services and care received by complicated cases. Therefore, the ImTeCHO application was developed to integrate mHealth strategies in the form of job aid to ASHAs to assist with scheduling, behavior change communication, diagnosis, and patient management, along with supervision and support of ASHAs. During the pilot, the intervention and its delivery were found to be largely acceptable, feasible, and useful. A few changes were made to the intervention and its delivery, including 1 a new helpline for ASHAs, 2 further simplification of processes within the ImTeCHO incentive management system and 3 additional web

  8. Child prostitution: global health burden, research needs, and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Brian M; Levy, Barry S

    2002-04-20

    Child prostitution is a significant global problem that has yet to receive appropriate medical and public health attention. Worldwide, an estimated 1 million children are forced into prostitution every year and the total number of prostituted children could be as high as 10 million. Inadequate data exist on the health problems faced by prostituted children, who are at high risk of infectious disease, pregnancy, mental illness, substance abuse, and violence. Child prostitution, like other forms of child sexual abuse, is not only a cause of death and high morbidity in millions of children, but also a gross violation of their rights and dignity. In this article we estimate morbidity and mortality among prostituted children, and propose research strategies and interventions to mitigate such health consequences. Our estimates underscore the need for health professionals to collaborate with individuals and organisations that provide direct services to prostituted children. Health professionals can help efforts to prevent child prostitution through identifying contributing factors, recording the magnitude and health effects of the problem, and assisting children who have escaped prostitution. They can also help governments, UN agencies, and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to implement policies, laws, and programmes to prevent child prostitution and mitigate its effects on children's health. PMID:11978356

  9. 76 FR 13650 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  10. 78 FR 13359 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  11. 75 FR 61765 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; ``Reproductive Panel''. Date: November 3-5... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  12. 77 FR 12601 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  13. 78 FR 47328 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  14. 78 FR 6127 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... Children's Study, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act,...

  15. 78 FR 70311 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  16. 78 FR 37232 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... Officer, Division of Scientific Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act,...

  17. 76 FR 64092 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  18. 77 FR 58854 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... Officer, Division of Scientific Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  19. 78 FR 11658 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ..., Division of Scientific Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100 Executive... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act,...

  20. 77 FR 52338 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD); Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ...., Deputy Director, Eunice Kenney Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD); Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  1. 76 FR 72957 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  2. 77 FR 17080 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  3. 78 FR 21382 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... National Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  4. 75 FR 36662 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  5. 76 FR 18566 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  6. 76 FR 71986 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Rockville, MD 20852... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  7. 78 FR 23771 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... Institute, of Child Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  8. 78 FR 48880 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-451... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  9. 78 FR 23772 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... Scientific Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  10. 78 FR 11660 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute Of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Scientific Review, National Institute of Child Health, and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute Of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  11. 76 FR 71985 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... National Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01-G, Bethesda... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  12. 78 FR 4855 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... Officer, Division of Scientific Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  13. 77 FR 12599 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5b01, Bethesda, MD 20892... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  14. 76 FR 13649 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ..., Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  15. 78 FR 17419 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  16. 75 FR 36661 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  17. 76 FR 77544 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5C01... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act,...

  18. 77 FR 12604 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  19. 77 FR 52337 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ..., National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20892... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  20. 76 FR 13651 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01-G, Bethesda, MD 20892... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  1. 76 FR 11801 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  2. 75 FR 65496 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  3. 77 FR 58855 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  4. 78 FR 60294 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as..., Program Analyst, National Children's Study, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health...

  5. 76 FR 11800 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  6. 75 FR 66771 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  7. 76 FR 59708 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  8. 75 FR 5603 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  9. 76 FR 37132 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  10. 75 FR 54890 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  11. 76 FR 49780 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  12. 76 FR 20358 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  13. 76 FR 59415 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5C01, Bethesda, MD 20892... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act,...

  14. 75 FR 5602 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  15. 75 FR 18217 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  16. 76 FR 59707 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  17. 75 FR 8979 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  18. 76 FR 58283 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive ] Blvd... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  19. 76 FR 59709 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  20. 75 FR 8978 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  1. 75 FR 54891 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act,...

  2. 76 FR 43334 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  3. 76 FR 40738 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee..., Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive...

  4. 77 FR 19676 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room...

  5. 76 FR 65516 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Rockville, MD...

  6. 77 FR 61419 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  7. 77 FR 37421 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  8. 78 FR 12767 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  9. 75 FR 10491 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  10. 75 FR 51827 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd.,...

  11. 75 FR 12244 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

  12. 77 FR 37424 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5C01, Bethesda, MD 20892, (703)...

  13. 77 FR 26020 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD...

  14. 76 FR 40737 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd.,...

  15. 75 FR 4577 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and...

  16. 75 FR 55807 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01,...

  17. 75 FR 12243 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd. Room 5B01, Bethesda,...

  18. 76 FR 19999 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human...

  19. 75 FR 34457 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee..., National Institute of Child Health, And Human Development, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 5B01,...

  20. 77 FR 61418 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5b01, Bethesda, MD...

  1. 78 FR 18998 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health... contact person listed below in advance of the meeting. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Diet, Obesity, and Weight Change in...

  2. Conceptions of health service robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    2015-01-01

    Technology developments create rich opportunities for health service providers to introduce service robots in health care. While the potential benefits of applying robots in health care are extensive, the research into the conceptions of health service robot and its importance for the uptake...... of robotics technology in health care is limited. This article develops a model of the basic conceptions of health service robots that can be used to understand different assumptions and values attached to health care technology in general and health service robots in particular. The article takes...... a discursive approach in order to develop a conceptual framework for understanding the social values of health service robots. First a discursive approach is proposed to develop a typology of conceptions of health service robots. Second, a model identifying four basic conceptions of health service robots...

  3. The evolutionary biology of child health

    OpenAIRE

    Crespi, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    I apply evolutionary perspectives and conceptual tools to analyse central issues underlying child health, with emphases on the roles of human-specific adaptations and genomic conflicts in physical growth and development. Evidence from comparative primatology, anthropology, physiology and human disorders indicates that child health risks have evolved in the context of evolutionary changes, along the human lineage, affecting the timing, growth-differentiation phenotypes and adaptive significanc...

  4. MedlinePlus: Child Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Health Topics → Child Mental Health URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ...

  5. Pregnancy smoking, child health and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Koshy

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the research in this thesis was to assess, through cross-sectional school child health surveys, the health and nutrition of primary school children (5-11 years) in Merseyside, England, in relation to their mother’s history of pregnancy smoking. Childhood health outcomes assessed included

  6. Pediatric Health Assessments of Young Children in Child Welfare by Placement Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Janet U.; Leslie, Laurel K.; Arnold-Clark, Janet S.; McDaniel, Dawn; Xie, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To describe health-related problems across placement types (unrelated foster, kin foster, in-home with birth parent); to examine the association of placement and demographic/child welfare variables (child gender, age, race/ethnicity; caregiver language; type of maltreatment, and length of time receiving services from child welfare)…

  7. The importance of including both a child perspective and the child's perspective within health care settings to provide truly child-centred care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderbäck, Maja; Coyne, Imelda; Harder, Maria

    2011-06-01

    The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989) asserts the right of every child to self-determination, dignity, respect, non-interference, and the right to make informed decisions. The provision of quality care in health services tailored to children's preferences means that health professionals have a responsibility to ensure children's rights, and that the child is encouraged and enabled to make his or her view known on issues that affect them. This paper will help illuminate and differentiate between a child perspective and the child's perspective in health care settings. The issues are supported with research which illustrates the different perspectives. Both perspectives are required to perceive and encounter children as equal human beings in child-centred health care settings. PMID:21685225

  8. The Demand for Child Care Services in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Henriques, I; Vaillancourt, F.

    1986-01-01

    This Paper Examines the Determinants of the Demand for Child Care Services in Canada. Using Survey Data Collected for 1981 by Statistics Canada and Probit Analysis We Find That the Likelihood of Using Child Care Services Increases with Variables Such As the Education of the Mother and the Age of the Child and Decreases with the Number of Children in the Family.

  9. Marketing health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasa, R J

    1984-01-01

    Indisputably, marketing plays an important role in today's competitive health service industry. It is essential for every medical group manager to learn about the marketing process and his role in pursuing marketing in his medical group. Conducting internal and external assessments, developing promotional techniques and strategies, organizing and implementing a plan, and evaluating results are all critical areas in the marketing effort. When each critical area is carefully examined and steps are properly taken, a marketing approach will be totally consistent with delivery of high-quality patient care services. PMID:10299609

  10. Child health and parental relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Lisbeth Trille Gylling

    2011-01-01

    Using longitudinal national-level representative data from Denmark, this study considers the link between child disability or chronic illness and parental relationship termination as measured by the point in time at which one parent, following the breakup of the relationship, no longer resides in...... the household. By means of event-history techniques, I examine whether a Danish family's experience of having a child diagnosed with a disability or chronic illness affects the chances of parental relationship termination. My findings suggest that families with a child with disabilities or chronic...... illness do have a higher risk of parental relationship termination, when compared to families where no diagnosis of child disability or chronic illness is reported....

  11. Association between sociodemographic characteristics of female community health volunteers and their knowledge and performance on maternal and child health services in rural Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Acharya D; Singh JK; Adhikari S; Jain V

    2016-01-01

    Dilaram Acharya,1,2 Jitendra Kumar Singh,3,4 Samaj Adhikari,5 Varidmala Jain61Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu University, Devdaha Medical College and Research Institute, Devdaha-10, Rupandehi, Nepal; 2Department of Public Health, Purbanchal University, Sanjeevani College of Medical Sciences, Butwal, Rupandehi, Nepal; 3Department of Community Medicine and Public Health, Janaki Medical College, Tribhuvan University, Janakpur, Nepal; 4Department of Community Medicine, Institute of Me...

  12. FastStats: Child Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State and Territorial Data Reproductive Health Contraceptive Use Infertility Reproductive Health FastStats Mobile Application Get Email Updates ... Links National Health Interview Survey National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Mortality Data NCHS Survey Measures Catalog: ...

  13. Courses in reproductive and child health in India: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutapa Bandyopadhyay Neogi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Defining the human resource needs for providing quality maternal, newborn, and child health services across such a large and diverse population country like India is truly challenging. The effective response to significant challenges and increased requirements of evidence-based effectiveness of the public health projects on maternal and child health is putting pressure on existing program managers to acquire new advanced academic training and information. The data regarding the existing courses on reproductive and child health and related fields in the country were obtained by a predefined search made on the Internet through the Google search engine in December 2011. The collected data were the name and location of the institution offering the respective course, theme, course duration, course structure, eligibility criteria, and mode of learning. In India, around 15 institutes are offering certificate/postgraduate diploma courses on maternal and child health either as a regular program or through distance education program. The admission procedure for each institute is independent of others. The courses vary in terms of duration, eligibility criteria, and fee structure. Conceptualizing an educational initiative in response to national demands for increased workforce capacity to eliminate key medical and nonmedical educational barriers and financial and nonfinancial barriers to advanced academic preparation would enhance the quality of services available in the region.

  14. Child Welfare Workers’ Connectivity to Resources and Youth’s Receipt of Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia C. Bunger

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Youth involved in the child welfare system are at high risk for mental illness, substance abuse, and other behavioral health issues, which child welfare workers are expected to address through referrals. Child welfare workers (N=27 who participated in Project IMPROVE (Intervention for Multisector Provider Enhancement reported on services they provided to youth (N=307 in their caseloads. Using survey and administrative data, this paper examines workers’ service actions on behalf of youth. Results were consistent with the Gateway Provider Model and showed that youths received help from a greater variety of service sectors when their workers were able to identify behavioral health problems, and were familiar with and connected to other providers in the community. Improving service delivery to youth in child welfare may be accomplished by training workers in the signs and symptoms of behavioral health problems and familiarizing them with providers in the community.

  15. Child and adolescent service experience (ChASE): measuring service quality and therapeutic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Crispin; Michelson, Daniel; Hassan, Imren

    2011-11-01

    OBJECTIVES. Dissatisfaction with services has been associated with poorer child mental health outcomes, early treatment termination as well as disagreements over the nature of mental health difficulties, reasons for referral and therapy goals. The development of straightforward, reliable, and accurate methods of eliciting service users' views is essential within child and adolescent mental health care. This paper describes the development of the child and adolescent service experience (ChASE), a tool to measure children and young people's service experience DESIGN. The study comprises a non-experimental, cross-sectional design. METHODS. Participants were 132 mental health service users aged 8-18 years. Participants and their main carer completed the ChASE, Parent Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ) (Stallard, 1996) and Strengths and Difficulties (SDQ) Impact Supplement. Clinicians completed the SDQ Impact Supplement and provided clinical activity data. A sub-sample of participants completed the ChASE on a second occasion, 6 weeks after the completion of the first questionnaire. RESULTS. Scrutiny of ChASE data indicated high levels of completion. Principal axis factoring identified three factors within the ChASE: Relationship, Privacy, and Session Activity. The ChASE has good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Significant correlations were found between the ChASE and carer satisfaction, service use, and youth clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS. The ChASE is a short, psychometrically robust tool for routine measurement of children, and young people's experience of mental health services, which users can complete easily. The results underline the importance of alliance factors to children and young people and their association with clinical improvement as well as the potential for the ChASE to be used a measure of children's therapeutic progress and alliance. PMID:22003953

  16. Medical and Health Services Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SITE MAP | EN ESPAÑOL Management > Medical and Health Services Managers PRINTER-FRIENDLY EN ESPAÑOL Summary What They ... occupations. What They Do -> What Medical and Health Services Managers Do About this section In group medical ...

  17. 45 CFR 1306.30 - Provisions of comprehensive child development services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provisions of comprehensive child development services. 1306.30 Section 1306.30 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM...

  18. Exposure to child abuse and risk for mental health problems in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Renee; Baumrind, Nikki; Kimerling, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Risk for adult mental health problems associated with child sexual, physical, or emotional abuse and multiple types of child abuse was examined. Logistic regression analyses were used to test study hypotheses in a population-based sample of women (N = 3,936). As expected, child sexual, physical, and emotional abuse were independently associated with increased risk for mental health problems. History of multiple types of child abuse was also associated with elevated risk for mental health problems. In particular, exposure to all three types of child abuse was linked to a 23-fold increase in risk for probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Findings underscore relations between child emotional abuse and adult mental health problems and highlight the need for mental health services for survivors of multiple types of child abuse. PMID:18064973

  19. Mental Health Practice Guidelines for Child Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The guidelines and supporting rationale presented in this paper were developed from the October 2007 "Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare Consensus Conference" sponsored by Casey Family Programs, the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the REACH Institute (REsource for Advancing Children's Health). The purpose of the conference was to…

  20. Social Factors Influencing Child Health in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Quansah

    Full Text Available Social factors have profound effects on health. Children are especially vulnerable to social influences, particularly in their early years. Adverse social exposures in childhood can lead to chronic disorders later in life. Here, we sought to identify and evaluate the impact of social factors on child health in Ghana. As Ghana is unlikely to achieve the Millennium Development Goals' target of reducing child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015, we deemed it necessary to identify social determinants that might have contributed to the non-realisation of this goal.ScienceDirect, PubMed, MEDLINE via EBSCO and Google Scholar were searched for published articles reporting on the influence of social factors on child health in Ghana. After screening the 98 articles identified, 34 of them that met our inclusion criteria were selected for qualitative review.Major social factors influencing child health in the country include maternal education, rural-urban disparities (place of residence, family income (wealth/poverty and high dependency (multiparousity. These factors are associated with child mortality, nutritional status of children, completion of immunisation programmes, health-seeking behaviour and hygiene practices.Several social factors influence child health outcomes in Ghana. Developing more effective responses to these social determinants would require sustainable efforts from all stakeholders including the Government, healthcare providers and families. We recommend the development of interventions that would support families through direct social support initiatives aimed at alleviating poverty and inequality, and indirect approaches targeted at eliminating the dependence of poor health outcomes on social factors. Importantly, the expansion of quality free education interventions to improve would-be-mother's health knowledge is emphasised.

  1. Social Factors Influencing Child Health in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quansah, Emmanuel; Ohene, Lilian Akorfa; Norman, Linda; Mireku, Michael Osei; Karikari, Thomas K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Social factors have profound effects on health. Children are especially vulnerable to social influences, particularly in their early years. Adverse social exposures in childhood can lead to chronic disorders later in life. Here, we sought to identify and evaluate the impact of social factors on child health in Ghana. As Ghana is unlikely to achieve the Millennium Development Goals’ target of reducing child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015, we deemed it necessary to identify social determinants that might have contributed to the non-realisation of this goal. Methods ScienceDirect, PubMed, MEDLINE via EBSCO and Google Scholar were searched for published articles reporting on the influence of social factors on child health in Ghana. After screening the 98 articles identified, 34 of them that met our inclusion criteria were selected for qualitative review. Results Major social factors influencing child health in the country include maternal education, rural-urban disparities (place of residence), family income (wealth/poverty) and high dependency (multiparousity). These factors are associated with child mortality, nutritional status of children, completion of immunisation programmes, health-seeking behaviour and hygiene practices. Conclusions Several social factors influence child health outcomes in Ghana. Developing more effective responses to these social determinants would require sustainable efforts from all stakeholders including the Government, healthcare providers and families. We recommend the development of interventions that would support families through direct social support initiatives aimed at alleviating poverty and inequality, and indirect approaches targeted at eliminating the dependence of poor health outcomes on social factors. Importantly, the expansion of quality free education interventions to improve would-be-mother’s health knowledge is emphasised. PMID:26745277

  2. [Reflections on the development of maternal and child health in public health nursing in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Miao-Ching

    2014-06-01

    Continued global economic difficulties and Taiwan's health insurance scheme have focused the domestic healthcare system excessively on medical treatments and made this system overly market-oriented. The NHI (national health insurance) Reimbursement Policy lacks adequate flexibility to adjust to current health needs. The situation constrains the medical service budget and causes nursing shortages in hospitals, which in turn marginalizes the public health nurses working at health centers. It is important for the government and professional associations to establish a public healthcare model that adequately meets the needs of the community. In addition to strengthening the role and function of public health nurses, a service model must be developed and piloted. This paper analyzes the situation and problem of maternal and child healthcare in Taiwan, studies the successful experiences of maternal and child healthcare from other counties, and then provides recommendations for the future development of public health nursing in Taiwan. PMID:24899555

  3. 76 FR 71987 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... Institute of Child Health & Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory...

  4. 75 FR 17150 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child...

  5. 76 FR 64091 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child...

  6. 78 FR 17421 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child...

  7. 77 FR 8271 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child...

  8. Setting standards for primary health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, P; Thomason, J

    1993-10-01

    Clear performance guidelines, appropriate resources, supportive supervision, and appropriate training are needed to help primary health workers to uphold high-quality care. The Ministry of Health in Papua New Guinea and authorities of provincial health divisions have developed minimum standards for all levels of the primary health service, which supervisors use to monitor the performance of workers. These levels are aidposts with 1 community health worker, aidposts with 2 community health workers, health subcenters, health centers, and urban clinics. The standards are part of the National Health Plan. They form the basis for developing a national quality assurance plan. These standards allow health workers to understand what they need to do and supervisors to know on what to focus. They also allow the monitoring of quality care and rational planning. They guard against inappropriate health infrastructure development in areas where local politicians are active in sectoral investments. Some examples of standards for the first level of primary health services are: An orderly or a community health worker at an aidpost provides basic care for a population of 500-1000 people. The community health worker provides outpatient care each working day from 8 to 1300 hours. He/she needs to be available to provide care of acute minor illnesses evenings from 18 to 2000 hours and on call for serious illness at all times. The community health worker follows up on mothers and children seen at the maternal and child health clinic. He/she promotes family planning and provides oral contraceptives an injections. Each aidpost must have an outpatient treatment area suitable for conducting child clinics and patient examinations: sink; water supply; pharmacy; and sterilizer. The community health worker's house must have a tin roof, an external tank, and a latrine. PMID:8273154

  9. Maternal and child health in Brazil: progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victora, Cesar G; Aquino, Estela M L; do Carmo Leal, Maria; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto; Barros, Fernando C; Szwarcwald, Celia L

    2011-05-28

    In the past three decades, Brazil has undergone rapid changes in major social determinants of health and in the organisation of health services. In this report, we examine how these changes have affected indicators of maternal health, child health, and child nutrition. We use data from vital statistics, population censuses, demographic and health surveys, and published reports. In the past three decades, infant mortality rates have reduced substantially, decreasing by 5·5% a year in the 1980s and 1990s, and by 4·4% a year since 2000 to reach 20 deaths per 1000 livebirths in 2008. Neonatal deaths account for 68% of infant deaths. Stunting prevalence among children younger than 5 years decreased from 37% in 1974-75 to 7% in 2006-07. Regional differences in stunting and child mortality also decreased. Access to most maternal-health and child-health interventions increased sharply to almost universal coverage, and regional and socioeconomic inequalities in access to such interventions were notably reduced. The median duration of breastfeeding increased from 2·5 months in the 1970s to 14 months by 2006-07. Official statistics show stable maternal mortality ratios during the past 10 years, but modelled data indicate a yearly decrease of 4%, a trend which might not have been noticeable in official reports because of improvements in death registration and the increased number of investigations into deaths of women of reproductive age. The reasons behind Brazil's progress include: socioeconomic and demographic changes (economic growth, reduction in income disparities between the poorest and wealthiest populations, urbanisation, improved education of women, and decreased fertility rates), interventions outside the health sector (a conditional cash transfer programme and improvements in water and sanitation), vertical health programmes in the 1980s (promotion of breastfeeding, oral rehydration, and immunisations), creation of a tax-funded national health service in 1988

  10. Health insurance and child mortality in rural Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Schoeps

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Micro health insurance schemes have been implemented across developing countries as a means of facilitating access to modern medical care, with the ultimate aim of improving health. This effect, however, has not been explored sufficiently. Objective: We investigated the effect of enrolment into community-based health insurance on mortality in children under 5 years of age in a health and demographic surveillance system in Nouna, Burkina Faso. Design: We analysed the effect of health insurance enrolment on child mortality with a Cox regression model. We adjusted for variables that we found to be related to the enrolment in health insurance in a preceding analysis. Results: Based on the analysis of 33,500 children, the risk of mortality was 46% lower in children enrolled in health insurance as compared to the non-enrolled children (HR=0.54, 95% CI 0.43–0.68 after adjustment for possible confounders. We identified socioeconomic status, father's education, distance to the health facility, year of birth, and insurance status of the mother at time of birth as the major determinants of health insurance enrolment. Conclusions: The strong effect of health insurance enrolment on child mortality may be explained by increased utilisation of health services by enrolled children; however, other non-observed factors cannot be excluded. Because malaria is a main cause of death in the study area, early consultation of health services in case of infection could prevent many deaths. Concerning the magnitude of the effect, implementation of health insurance could be a major driving factor of reduction in child mortality in the developing world.

  11. Teenage childbearing and child health in Eritrea

    OpenAIRE

    Gebremariam Woldemicael

    2005-01-01

    Data from the 2002 Eritrea Demographic and Health Survey (EDHS) are used to examine teenage childbearing and its health consequences. Bivariate analysis is used to calculate trends and differentials in teenage childbearing. Logistic and Cox hazard models are employed to examine the health impact of teenage childbearing on mothers and their children. Teenage childbearing is high in Eritrea, where around half of all women aged 19 have already been pregnant with their first child. Nearly all fir...

  12. Individual health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnell-Inderst, Petra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The German statutory health insurance (GKV reimburses all health care services that are deemed sufficient, appropriate, and efficient. According to the German Medical Association (BÄK, individual health services (IGeL are services that are not under liability of the GKV, medically necessary or recommendable or at least justifiable. They have to be explicitly requested by the patient and have to be paid out of pocket. Research questions: The following questions regarding IGeL in the outpatient health care of GKV insurants are addressed in the present report: What is the empirical evidence regarding offers, utilization, practice, acceptance, and the relation between physician and patient, as well as the economic relevance of IGeL? What ethical, social, and legal aspects are related to IGeL? For two of the most common IGeL, the screening for glaucoma and the screening for ovarian and endometrial cancer by vaginal ultrasound (VUS, the following questions are addressed: What is the evidence for the clinical effectiveness? Are there sub-populations for whom screening might be beneficial? Methods: The evaluation is divided into two parts. For the first part a systematic literature review of primary studies and publications concerning ethical, social and legal aspects is performed. In the second part, rapid assessments of the clinical effectiveness for the two examples, glaucoma and VUS screening, are prepared. Therefore, in a first step, HTA-reports and systematic reviews are searched, followed by a search for original studies published after the end of the research period of the most recent HTA-report included. Results: 29 studies were included for the first question. Between 19 and 53% of GKV members receive IGeL offers, of which three-quarters are realised. 16 to 19% of the insurants ask actively for IGeL. Intraocular tension measurement is the most common single IGeL service, accounting for up to 40% of the offers. It is followed by

  13. Child Health Booklet: experiences of professionals in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Nepomuceno de Andrade

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Understanding the experiences of health professionals in primary care with the Child Health Booklet in child health care. Method: A qualitative study with a phenomenological approach, in which participated nurses and doctors from six teams of the Family Health Strategy (FHS in Belo Horizonte, MG. In total, were carried out 12 non-directive interviews, using two guiding questions. Results: A comprehensive analysis of the speeches enabled the construction of three categories that signal the experiences of the professionals with the booklet. The experiments revealed difficulties arising from the limitations of knowledge about the instrument; incomplete filling out of the booklet by many professionals that care for children; the daily confrontations of the process and the organization of work teams; disinterest of families with the instrument. Conclusion: The research points possible and necessary ways to improve the use of booklets as an instrument of full child health surveillance.

  14. Child abuse: concerns for oral health practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayman, Salim; Dincer, Elvir; Almas, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Child abuse and neglect are prevalent issues that permeate all ethnic, cultural and socioeconomic segments of society. Parents of abused children frequently change physicians in order to prevent detection, but they are more likely to continue to visit the child's dentist. Most states recognize four major types of maltreatment: neglect; physical abuse; psychological maltreatment; and sexual abuse. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry defines dental neglect as "the willful failure of parent or guardian to seek and follow through with treatment necessary to ensure a level of oral health essential for adequate function and freedom from pain and infection." The oral health practitioner must uphold his or her legal and ethical responsibility if there is suspicion, record and report the incidence. It may help save a child from further abuse. PMID:24027895

  15. Maternalmental health after a child's diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Karp, EA; Kuo, AA

    2014-01-01

    © 2015 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. Importance:The prevalence of psychological distress among mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) suggests a need for interventions that address parental mental health during the critical period after the child's autism diagnosis when parents are learning to navigate the complex system of autism services.Objective: To investigate whether a brief cognitive behavioral intervention, problem-solving education (PSE), decreas...

  16. International Family, Adult, and Child Enhancement Services (FACES): a community-based comprehensive services model for refugee children in resettlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birman, Dina; Beehler, Sarah; Harris, Emily Merrill; Everson, Mary Lynn; Batia, Karen; Liautaud, Joan; Frazier, Stacy; Atkins, Marc; Blanton, Shanika; Buwalda, Johanna; Fogg, Louis; Cappella, Elise

    2008-01-01

    The development of evidence-based mental health interventions for refugees is complicated by the cultural and linguistic diversity of the participants, and the need to balance treatment of past traumatic experiences with ongoing support during the process of acculturation. In an effort to gather "practice-based evidence" from existing mental health services for refugees, a collaborative study of International Family, Adult, and Child Enhancement Services (FACES), a comprehensive, community-based mental health program working with refugee children, was conducted to describe the program participants and service delivery model and to assess whether participants improved over time as a function of services. Results showed that participants improved, but that the improvement was not related to dosage of services. Implications of these findings for refugee mental health services are discussed and suggestions are made for future evaluation research of mental health services with refugees. PMID:18444734

  17. 20 CFR 638.542 - Child care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Child care services. 638.542 Section 638.542 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.542 Child care services. (a)...

  18. Accessibility of adolescent health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Richter

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents represent a large proportion of the population. As they mature and become sexually active, they face more serious health risks. Most face these risks with too little factual information, too little guidance about sexual responsibility and multiple barriers to accessing health care. A typical descriptive and explanatory design was used to determine what the characteristics of an accessible adolescent health service should be. Important results and conclusions that were reached indicate that the adolescent want a medical doctor and a registered nurse to be part of the health team treating them and they want to be served in the language of their choice. Family planning, treatment of sexually transmitted diseases and psychiatric services for the prevention of suicide are services that should be included in an adolescent accessible health service. The provision of health education concerning sexual transmitted diseases and AIDS is a necessity. The service should be available thought out the week (included Saturdays and within easy reach. It is recommended that minor changes in existing services be made, that will contribute towards making a health delivery service an adolescent accessible service. An adolescent accessible health service can in turn make a real contribution to the community’s efforts to improve the health of its adolescents and can prove to be a rewarding professional experience to the health worker.

  19. Neighborhood adversity, child health, and the role for community development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutte, Douglas P; Miller, Jennifer L; Erickson, David J

    2015-03-01

    Despite medical advances, childhood health and well-being have not been broadly achieved due to rising chronic diseases and conditions related to child poverty. Family and neighborhood living conditions can have lasting consequences for health, with community adversity affecting health outcomes in significant part through stress response and increased allostatic load. Exposure to this "toxic stress" influences gene expression and brain development with direct and indirect negative consequences for health. Ensuring healthy child development requires improving conditions in distressed, high-poverty neighborhoods by reducing children's exposure to neighborhood stressors and supporting good family and caregiver functioning. The community development industry invests more than $200 billion annually in low-income neighborhoods, with the goal of improving living conditions for residents. The most impactful investments have transformed neighborhoods by integrating across sectors to address both the built environment and the social and service environment. By addressing many facets of the social determinants of health at once, these efforts suggest substantial results for children, but health outcomes generally have not been considered or evaluated. Increased partnership between the health sector and community development can bring health outcomes explicitly into focus for community development investments, help optimize intervention strategies for health, and provide natural experiments to build the evidence base for holistic interventions for disadvantaged children. The problems and potential solutions are beyond the scope of practicing pediatricians, but the community development sector stands ready to engage in shared efforts to improve the health and development of our most at-risk children. PMID:25733725

  20. The Impact of Child, Family, and Child Protective Services Factors on Reports of Child Sexual Abuse Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinanan, Allison N.

    2011-01-01

    This study identified selected child factors (e.g., age, gender, race/ethnicity, disabilities, prior victimization, and relationship to perpetrator of abuse), family risk factors (e.g., substance abuse, domestic violence, inadequate housing, and financial problems), and services provided by child protective services that likely increased reports…

  1. 45 CFR 400.112 - Child welfare services for refugee children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Child welfare services for refugee children. 400.112 Section 400.112 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT, ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  2. Maternal and Child Health Bureau

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 345 million to support families through the voluntary home visiting program (04/01/2016) White House Rural IMPACT Initiative (08/04/2015) HRSA awards $5 million to support families of children with special health care needs (05/14/2015) ...

  3. Nutrition and maternal, neonatal, and child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Parul; Mullany, Luke C; Hurley, Kristen M; Katz, Joanne; Black, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    This article reviews the central role of nutrition in advancing the maternal, newborn, and child health agenda with a focus on evidence for effective interventions generated using randomized controlled trials in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). The 1000 days spanning from conception to 2 years of life are a critical period of time when nutritional needs must be ensured; failure to do so can lead to adverse impacts on short-term survival as well as long-term health and development [corrected]. The burden of maternal mortality continues to be high in many under-resourced settings; prenatal calcium supplementation in populations with low intakes can reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia morbidity and mortality and is recommended, and antenatal iron-folic acid use in many countries may reduce anemia, a condition that may be an underlying factor in postpartum hemorrhage. Sufficient evidence exists to promote multiple micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy to reduce fetal growth restriction and low birth weight. Early initiation of breastfeeding (within an hour), exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months of life, and vitamin A supplementation in the first few days of life in Asia (but not in Africa) reduce infant mortality. Biannual large-dose vitamin A supplements to children 6-59 months of age and zinc for treatment of diarrhea continue to be important strategies for improving child health and survival. Early nutrition and micronutrient status can influence child development but should be integrated with early responsive learning interventions. Future research is needed that goes beyond the 1000 days to ensure adequate preconceptional nutrition and health, with special emphasis on adolescents who contribute to a large proportion of first births in many LMIC. Thus, we make the case for integrating proven nutrition interventions with those for health in pregnant women, and with those for health and child development in neonates, infants, and

  4. Domestic Abuse and Child Health

    OpenAIRE

    Rawlings, Samantha; Siddique, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    We examine the effects of different kinds of domestic abuse (physical violence, emotional abuse, sexual abuse and physical violence while the victim is pregnant) on health outcomes of children born to victims. We use data on approximately 0.6 million children born between 1975 and 2013 across thirty different developing countries to investigate this relationship. Comparing children of abused mothers with otherwise similar children whose mothers were not victims of abuse, we find these childre...

  5. Health care's service fanatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlino, James I; Raman, Ananth

    2013-05-01

    The Cleveland Clinic has long had a reputation for medical excellence. But in 2009 the CEO acknowledged that patients did not think much of their experience there and decided to act. Since then the Clinic has leaped to the top tier of patient-satisfaction surveys, and it now draws hospital executives from around the world who want to study its practices. The Clinic's journey also holds Lessons for organizations outside health care that must suddenly compete by creating a superior customer experience. The authors, one of whom was critical to steering the hospital's transformation, detail the processes that allowed the Clinic to excel at patient satisfaction without jeopardizing its traditional strengths. Hospital leaders: Publicized the problem internally. Seeing the hospital's dismal service scores shocked employees into recognizing that serious flaws existed. Worked to understand patients' needs. Management commissioned studies to get at the root causes of dissatisfaction. Made everyone a caregiver. An enterprisewide program trained everyone, from physicians to janitors, to put the patient first. Increased employee engagement. The Clinic instituted a "caregiver celebration" program and redoubled other motivational efforts. Established new processes. For example, any patient, for any reason, can now make a same-day appointment with a single call. Set patients' expectations. Printed and online materials educate patients about their stays--before they're admitted. Operating a truly patient-centered organization, the authors conclude, isn't a program; it's a way of life. PMID:23898737

  6. Pre-service teachers’ awareness of child abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Nihal TUNCA; Özer, Özge

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the awareness of pre-service teachers from different departments related to the concept of child abuse. This study aims to determine pre-service teachers’ awareness of child abuse as a qualitative study, conducted in line with phenomenological design. In the study, one of the purposeful sampling methods, maximum diversity sampling method, was employed. The participants of the study are 15 pre-service teachers attending the departments of Psychological...

  7. Testing if Social Services Prevent Fatal Child Maltreatment Among a Sample of Children Previously Known to Child Protective Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Emily M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this article was to examine the potential impact of child welfare services on the risk for fatal child maltreatment. This was conducted using a subsample of children who were identified as "prior victims" in the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System from 2008 to 2012. At the multivariate level, the analyses show that case management services act to protect children from death as do family support services, family preservation services, and foster care, but that the results vary by type of maltreatment experienced. The author recommends that before strong conclusions are drawn, additional research in this area is warranted. PMID:27412527

  8. Poverty and child health in the UK: using evidence for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Sophie; Anwar, Elspeth; Barr, Ben; Law, Catherine; Taylor-Robinson, David

    2016-08-01

    There are currently high levels of child poverty in the UK, and for the first time in almost two decades child poverty has started to rise in absolute terms. Child poverty is associated with a wide range of health-damaging impacts, negative educational outcomes and adverse long-term social and psychological outcomes. The poor health associated with child poverty limits children's potential and development, leading to poor health and life chances in adulthood. This article outlines some key definitions with regard to child poverty, reviews the links between child poverty and a range of health, developmental, behavioural and social outcomes for children, describes gaps in the evidence base and provides an overview of current policies relevant to child poverty in the UK. Finally, the article outlines how child health professionals can take action by (1) supporting policies to reduce child poverty, (2) providing services that reduce the health consequences of child poverty and (3) measuring and understanding the problem and assessing the impact of action. PMID:26857824

  9. Does trade affect child health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, David I; Rothman, Dov

    2006-05-01

    Frankel and Romer [Frankel, J., Romer, D., 1999. Does trade cause growth? American Economic Review 89 (3), 379-399] documented positive effects of geographically determined trade openness on economic growth. At the same time, critics fear that openness can lead to a "race to the bottom" that increases pollution and reduces government resources for investments in health and education. We use Frankel and Romer's gravity model of trade to examine how openness to trade affects children. Overall, we find little harm from trade, and potential benefits largely through slightly faster GDP growth. PMID:16303196

  10. Radioprotection, Health and Security Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The missions of this service concern: assuring the radioprotection, health and security, performing expert examinations, training. The report presents the routine activities related to radioprotection as the source acquisition and management, dosimetric film management and control, disposal of radioactive wastes produced or stored in the institute. Also, aspects related to health and security services are mentioned

  11. Factors contributing to reduced caregiver strain in a publicly-funded child mental health system

    OpenAIRE

    Accurso, Erin C.; Garland, Ann F; Haine-Schlagel, Rachel; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Baker-Ericzén, Mary J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined caregiver strain in families who initiated mental health services for their child. Predictors of strain and the bidirectional relation between strain and child symptoms were examined. Participants included 218 children ages 4–13 with disruptive behavior problems and their caregivers, plus 96 psychotherapists, recruited from six publicly-funded clinics. Child disruptive behavior severity and caregiver strain were assessed at baseline, four, and eight months. Multilevel mode...

  12. Associations between birth health, maternal employment, and child care arrangement among a community sample of mothers with young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, Chi; Chyu, Laura; Ksobiech, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Although a large body of literature exists on how different types of child care arrangements affect a child's subsequent health and sociocognitive development, little is known about the relationship between birth health and subsequent decisions regarding type of nonparental child care as well as how this relationship might be influenced by maternal employment. This study used data from the Los Angeles Families and Neighborhoods Survey (L.A.FANS). Mothers of 864 children (ages 0-5) provided information regarding birth weight, maternal evaluation of a child's birth health, child's current health, maternal employment, type of child care arrangement chosen, and a variety of socioeconomic variables. Child care options included parental care, relative care, nonrelative care, and daycare center. Multivariate analyses found that birth weight and subjective rating of birth health had similar effects on child care arrangement. After controlling for a child's age and current health condition, multinomial logit analyses found that mothers with children with poorer birth health are more likely to use nonrelative and daycare centers than parental care when compared to mothers with children with better birth health. The magnitude of these relationships diminished when adjusting for maternal employment. Working mothers were significantly more likely to use nonparental child care than nonemployed mothers. Results suggest that a child's health early in life is significantly but indirectly related to subsequent decisions regarding child care arrangements, and this association is influenced by maternal employment. Development of social policy aimed at improving child care service should take maternal and family backgrounds into consideration. PMID:24188296

  13. Child Homicide: A Global Public Health Concern

    OpenAIRE

    Naeemah Abrahams; Shanaaz Mathews; Martin, Lorna J.; Carl Lombard; Nadine Nannan; Rachel Jewkes

    2016-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Child mortality (death) is a global public health concern. In 2015, 5.9 million children (43 out of every 1,000 children born alive) died before their fifth birthday. Nearly half of these deaths occurred among neonates (babies 28 days old or younger); three-quarters of them occurred among infants (children less than one year old). Most of these deaths happened in resource-limited countries following delivery complications, infections, and other natural causes. Some...

  14. Child health and mortality in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovsted, Jens Anders; Pörtner, Claus Christian; Tarp, Finn

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies factors that influence child health in Bissau, the capital of Guinea-Bissau. This environment is characterised by high infant mortality, but not by malnutrition. We show that although maternal education is important in determining child health and mortality this effect diminishes...... or disappears when health knowledge is introduced as an explanatory variable. It emerges that health knowledge has large and positive effects on both child mortality and health when instrumented for to capture endogeneity...

  15. 78 FR 22893 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ..., NCMRR, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, DHHS, 6100... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory...

  16. 78 FR 69857 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... National Institute, of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, DHHS, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 2A03... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory...

  17. 77 FR 32652 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... Review, National Institute Of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd. Room 5B01... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal...

  18. 78 FR 63995 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT, including consideration of personnel qualifications and... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal...

  19. 75 FR 78717 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal...

  20. 77 FR 12600 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 5b01... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal...

  1. 77 FR 32651 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal...

  2. 78 FR 13363 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... Shriver National Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal...

  3. 76 FR 71987 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal...

  4. 75 FR 39030 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child Health... Structural Birth Defects. Date: July 19, 2010. Time: 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate...

  5. 75 FR 32957 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal...

  6. 75 FR 32959 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 5B01... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal...

  7. 75 FR 35077 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal...

  8. Child Health USA 2013: Prenatal Care Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Services Utilization > Prenatal Care Utilization Prenatal Care Utilization Narrative Early and adequate prenatal care helps to ... 20.3 6.0 Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization Upon Initiation, * by Maternal Race/Ethnicity, 2011 Race/ ...

  9. The intake procedures of child sexual abuse cases at Mafikeng Service Point of the Department of Health and Social Development / Motshedi T.

    OpenAIRE

    Motshedi, Tshepiso Sinah

    2011-01-01

    Due to the legal obligation to report actual or suspected cases of child sexual abuse and neglect, parents, concerned community members and friends, as well as various professionals like teachers, doctors and psychologists, refer children on a daily basis to social workers in order to initiate an investigation of the allegations. The intake interview is therefore a critical step in the process of child protection and care. In the context of this study, intake interview refers t...

  10. The fiction of health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Echeverry

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 14.00 800x600 Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 What we know today as Health Services is a fiction, perhaps shaped involuntarily, but with deep health repercussions, more negative than positive. About 24 centuries ago, Asclepius god of medicine and Hygeia goddess of hygiene and health, generated a dichotomy between disease and health that remains until today. The confusing substitution of Health Services with Medical Services began by the end of the XIX century. But it was in 1948 when the so called English National Health Service became a landmark in the world and its model was adopted by many countries, having distorted the true meaning of Health Services. The consequences of this fiction have been ominous. It is necessary to call things by its name not to deceive society and to correct the serious imbalance between Medical Services and Health Services. Hygeia and Asclepius must become a brotherhood.

  11. School absence and treatment in school children with respiratory symptoms in the Netherlands: Data from the Child Health Monitoring System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee-van Der Wekke, J.; Meulmeester, J.F.; Radder, J.J.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    1998-01-01

    Study objective - To assess the prevalence of respiratory problems, and the relation of these problems with school attendance, medicine use, and medical treatment. Design - The Child Health Monitoring System. Setting - Nineteen public health services across the Netherlands. Participants - 5186 schoo

  12. 25 CFR 20.509 - What must the social services worker do when a child is placed in foster care or residential care...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... established case plan; (f) Immediately report any occurrences of suspected child abuse or neglect in a foster... resources; (c) Refer any child requiring medical, substance abuse, or behavioral (mental) health services to... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must the social services worker do when a child...

  13. School Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Charles C., Ed.

    A comprehensive guide for health procedures in small and large school systems, this volume emphasizes the need for coordination of school efforts with those of parents, departments of health, private practitioners of medicine and dentistry, and community health agencies. Particular attention is given to the role of the teacher in school health…

  14. Citizen Review Panels for Child Protective Services: A National Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Blake L.; Royse, David

    2008-01-01

    Citizen Review Panels (CRPs) for Child Protective Services are groups of citizen-volunteers throughout the United States who are federally mandated to evaluate local and state child protection systems. This study presents a profile of 332 CRP members in 20 states with regards to their demographic information, length of time on the panel, and …

  15. National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS) Child File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS) Child File data set consists of child-specific data of all reports of maltreatment to State child...

  16. 78 FR 19498 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  17. 77 FR 61420 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892-7510,...

  18. 77 FR 37422 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892-7510,...

  19. 77 FR 33474 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-435-...

  20. 77 FR 33473 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892-7510,...

  1. Child health and living at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niermeyer, S; Andrade Mollinedo, P; Huicho, L

    2009-10-01

    The health of children born and living at high altitude is shaped not only by the low-oxygen environment, but also by population ancestry and sociocultural determinants. High altitude and the corresponding reduction in oxygen delivery during pregnancy result in lower birth weight with higher elevation. Children living at high elevations are at special risk for hypoxaemia during infancy and during acute lower respiratory infection, symptomatic high-altitude pulmonary hypertension, persistence of fetal vascular connections, and re-entry high-altitude pulmonary oedema. However, child health varies from one population group to another due to genetic adaptation as well as factors such as nutrition, intercurrent infection, exposure to pollutants and toxins, socioeconomic status, and access to medical care. Awareness of the risks uniquely associated with living at high altitude and monitoring of key health indicators can help protect the health of children at high altitude. These considerations should be incorporated into the scaling-up of effective interventions for improving global child health and survival. PMID:19066173

  2. Impacts of Climate Change on Inequities in Child Health

    OpenAIRE

    Charmian M. Bennett; Sharon Friel

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses an often overlooked aspect of climate change impacts on child health: the amplification of existing child health inequities by climate change. Although the effects of climate change on child health will likely be negative, the distribution of these impacts across populations will be uneven. The burden of climate change-related ill-health will fall heavily on the world’s poorest and socially-disadvantaged children, who already have poor survival rates and low life expect...

  3. Lifetime Health Consequences of Child Labor in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chanyoung; Orazem, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The health consequences of child labor may take time to manifest themselves. This study examines whether children who began working at a young age experience increased incidence of illness or physical disability as adults.. When child labor and schooling are treated as chosen without consideration of unobserved abilities or health endowments, child labor appears to have small adverse effects on a wide variety of health measures. Some adverse health consequences such as heart disease or hypert...

  4. Promoting equity to achieve maternal and child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Sarah; Hoa, Dinh Thi Phuong; Målqvist, Mats; Sanneving, Linda; Saxena, Deepak; Tana, Susilowati; Yuan, Beibei; Byass, Peter

    2011-11-01

    Maternal and child mortality rates, the targets for two of the eight Millennium Development Goals, remain unacceptably high in many countries. Some countries have made significant advances in reducing deaths in pregnancy, childbirth, and childhood at the national level. However, on a sub-national basis most countries show wide disparities in health indices which are not necessarily reflected in national figures. This is a sign of inequitable access to and provision of health services. Yet there has been little attention to health equity in relation to the Millennium Development Goals. Instead, countries have focused on achieving national targets. This has led to an emphasis on utilitarian, as opposed to universalist, approaches to public health, which we discuss here. We recommend a policy of "proportionate universalism". In this approach, universal health care and a universal social policy are the ultimate goal, but in the interim actions are carried out with intensities proportionate to disadvantage. We also briefly describe an initiative that aims to promote evidence-based policy and interventions that will reduce inequity in access to maternal and child health care in China, India, Indonesia and Viet Nam. PMID:22118151

  5. HEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR FINANCING

    OpenAIRE

    Bitsioti, Zoi; Balaska, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : The socio-economic, technological and demographic changes taking place in recent decades in our country and more widely in the European Union are constantly transforming the environment in which experienced the health of a nation. So the demand of citizens for health services is increasing, while spending on health is not enough.  Aim: The purpose of this work was the report of organization and funding models of health systems, and the advantages and disadvantages, as appl...

  6. Male involvement in reproductive, maternal and child health: a qualitative study of policymaker and practitioner perspectives in the Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Jessica; Vyankandondera, Joseph; Luchters, Stanley; Simon, David; Holmes, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of involving men in reproductive, maternal and child health programs is increasingly recognised globally. In the Pacific region, most maternal and child health services do not actively engage expectant fathers and fathers of young children and few studies have been conducted on the challenges, benefits and opportunities for involving fathers. This study explores the attitudes and beliefs of maternal and child health policymakers and practitioners regarding the benefi...

  7. Health Services Procurement Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health

    2000-01-01

    The Healthcare Materials Management Board (HMMB) was established following the report to the Materials Management Advisory Group on procurement and materials management in the health sector Download the Report here

  8. Research inventory of child health: A report on roadmaps for the future of child health research in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Ottova, Veronika; Alexander, Denise; Rigby, Michael; Staines, Anthony; Hjern, Anders; Leonardi, Matilde; Blair, Mitch; Tamburlini, Giorgio; Gaspar de Matos, Margarida; Bourek, Ales; Köhler, Lennart; Gunnlaugsson, Geir; Tomé, Gina; Ramiro, Lucia; Santos, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    RICHE was the response to a call under HEALTH-2009-3.3-5, with the title of 'European child health research platform'. The call text asked us to “address the diversity and fragmentation in child health research in Europe in an inclusive multidisciplinary way, identifying existing research programmes in Member States, recent advances and identification of gaps to explore road maps for the future of child health research in Europe”. Project structure A consortium, with a final total of 23...

  9. Pre-service teachers’ awareness of child abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal TUNCA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the awareness of pre-service teachers from different departments related to the concept of child abuse. This study aims to determine pre-service teachers’ awareness of child abuse as a qualitative study, conducted in line with phenomenological design. In the study, one of the purposeful sampling methods, maximum diversity sampling method, was employed. The participants of the study are 15 pre-service teachers attending the departments of Psychological Counseling and Guidance, Teacher Education for the Intellectually Disabled, Pre-school Teacher Education, Social Studies, Art Teaching, Computer and Instructional Technologies, German Language Teaching, French Language Teaching, and Teacher Education for the Hearing Impaired, all within the Education Faculty of Anatolian University, Turkey. The data of the study was collected through the focus-group interview technique. The data collected from two different focus-group interviews were analyzed by content analysis technique using the NVivo 8 data analysis program. As a result of the analysis of the data, it was concluded that the pre-service teachers explained the concept of child abuse by most strongly emphasizing emotional abuse and least strongly by emphasizing economic abuse. In light of the pre-service teachers’ opinions, it was also concluded that the culture constructed by society through the meanings attached to genders, society’s view of sexuality, child marriage, proverbs and idioms specific to the local society and superstitions lead to incidences of child abuse. The current study revealed that child abuse can be prevented by providing training to raise the awareness of child abuse primarily for families then children, teachers and other concerned people. It was also found that the majority of pre-service teachers do not have enough information about how to act in the face of an incidence of child abuse.

  10. 高校附属医院城市社区妇幼保健服务模式探讨%Investigation on maternal and child health care service mode in urban communities adjacent to affiliated hospitals of colleges and universities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任菲菲; 刘沫

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore maternal and child health care service mode in urban communities adjacent to affiliated hospitals of colleges and universities, and provide new thoughts and methods for public hospital reform.Methods: Convenience sampling method was used to conduct questionnaire investigation on 395 pregnant women from a community managed by a tertiary hospital in urban area of Jinzhou city in Liaoning province, the requirements of pregnant women for health care knowledge and hospital community medical service mode were analyzed.Results: The requirements of pregnant women with different social and demographic characteristics for health education knowledge and patterns varied.Conclusion: As a new maternal and child health care management work service mode, community maternal and child health care adjacent to affiliated hospitals of colleges and universities in urban areas can strengthen the supports from hospitals for maternal and child health care service, quicken personnel training of maternal and child health care, enhance the active service cognition of nursers to maternal and child health care nursing, and provide new thoughts and methods for a promoting more effective maternal and child health care management mode and public hospital reform.%目的:探索高校附属医院城市社区妇幼保健服务模式,为公立医院改革提供新思路、新方法.方法:采用便利抽样方法,对辽宁省锦州市区由三级医院管理的某社区395名孕产妇进行问卷调查,分析孕产妇对保健知识和医院社区医疗服务模式的需求.结果:不同社会人口学特征的孕产妇对健康教育知识及健康教育方式的需求均不同.结论:高校附属医院城市社区妇幼保健作为一种新的妇幼保健管理工作服务模式,能增强医院对妇幼保健服务的支持,加快妇幼保健专业人才的培养,强化护理人员对妇幼保健护理的主动服务意识,为促进更加有效的妇幼保健管理模式和公

  11. Community Involvement - Health / Service

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Elizabeth Andress: Partnerships Produce a National Center for Home Food Preservation. Diana Friedman: National 4-H Healthy Lifestyles Grant. H. Wallace Goddard: Big Surprises on the Road to Happiness. Nancy Kershaw: Connecting the 4-H Clothing Project and Community. Jane A. Landis: NEAFCS Living Well Public Service Campaign. Rhea Lanting: The Healthy Diabetes Plate. Phyllis B. Lewis: Product Look-Alikes. Anna Martin: Raising Diabetes Awareness in Latino Communities. Earl Mcalexander: Youth Fi...

  12. Health Physics Measurements Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCK-CEN's programme on health physics measurements includes various activities in dosimetry, calibration , instrumentation , gamma-ray spectrometry, whole body counting , the preparation of standard sources, non-destructive assay and the maintenance of Euratom Fork detectors. Main achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  13. Environmental Health and Child Survival : Epidemiology, Economics, Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2008-01-01

    This report complements Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Development by looking at environmental health issues that affect child health broadly, while also exploring the links through malnutrition. This report argues that environmental health interventions are preventive measures that are imperative to improve child survival with sustainable results in the long term. Preventive measur...

  14. Involvement with child protective services: is this a useful question in population-based surveys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Hayley A; Boak, Angela; Mann, Robert E

    2013-09-01

    Direct questions on child maltreatment in population-based surveys are often limited by ethical and methodological issues. This restricts the ability of researchers to examine an important aspect of early adversity and its relationship to health and behavior. An alternative to excluding issues of maltreatment entirely in population-based surveys is to include questions on child and family involvement with child protective services (CPS). A school-based adolescent survey that included a question on child and family involvement with CPS yielded results that were generally consistent with other studies relating child maltreatment to health and behavioral outcomes such as psychological distress symptoms, delinquency, aspects of bullying, and health service utilization. Such findings suggest that questions on involvement with CPS may be a reasonable proxy for child maltreatment. Despite the lack of information on the reason for involvement or specific categories of maltreatment, CPS involvement questions highlight the shared familial experience that surrounds CPS involvement and serves as a general reflection of an adverse experience that can be utilized by researchers interested in early experiences. PMID:23838213

  15. Screening for Trauma Exposure, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression Symptoms among Mothers Receiving Child Welfare Preventive Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemtob, Claude M.; Griffing, Sascha; Tullberg, Erika; Roberts, Elizabeth; Ellis, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    The role of parental trauma exposure and related mental health symptoms as risk factors for child maltreatment for parents involved with the child welfare (CW) system has received limited attention. In particular, little is known about the extent to which mothers receiving CW services to prevent maltreatment have experienced trauma and suffered…

  16. Health literacy and child health promotion: implications for research, clinical care, and public policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lee M; Shaw, Judith S; Guez, Ghislaine; Baur, Cynthia; Rudd, Rima

    2009-11-01

    The nation's leading sources of morbidity and health disparities (eg, preterm birth, obesity, chronic lung disease, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, mental health disorders, and cancer) require an evidence-based approach to the delivery of effective preventive care across the life course (eg, prenatal care, primary preventive care, immunizations, physical activity, nutrition, smoking cessation, and early diagnostic screening). Health literacy may be a critical and modifiable factor for improving preventive care and reducing health disparities. Recent studies among adults have established an independent association between lower health literacy and poorer understanding of preventive care information and poor access to preventive care services. Children of parents with higher literacy skills are more likely to have better outcomes in child health promotion and disease prevention. Adult studies in disease prevention have suggested that addressing health literacy would be an efficacious strategy for reducing health disparities. Future initiatives to reduce child health inequities should include health-promotion strategies that meet the health literacy needs of children, adolescents, and their caregivers. PMID:19861485

  17. University of Washington Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The theme of the University of Washington based Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research (CHC) is understanding the biochemical, molecular and exposure...

  18. Aggregate Economic Shocks, Child Schooling, and Child Health

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco H.G. Ferreira; Schady, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    Do aggregate economic shocks, such as those caused by macroeconomic crises or droughts, reduce child human capital? The answer to this question has important implications for public policy. If shocks reduce investments in children, they may transmit poverty from one generation to the next. This paper uses a simple framework to analyze the effects of aggregate economic shocks on child schoo...

  19. 75 FR 29774 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health... Development Initial Review Group Function, Integration, and Rehabilitation Sciences Subcommittee; Function, Integration and Rehabilitation Sciences Subcommittee. Date: June 21, 2010. Time: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m....

  20. Who cares for former child soldiers? Mental health systems of care in Sierra Leone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Song; H. van den Brink; J. de Jong

    2013-01-01

    While numerous studies on former child soldiers (FCS) have shown mental health needs, adequate services are a challenge. This study aimed to identify priorities, barriers and facilitators of mental health care for Sierra Leonean FCS. Thematic analysis was done on 24 qualitative interviews with parti

  1. 77 FR 29675 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD); Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD); Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory...

  2. 76 FR 572 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... contact person listed below in advance of the meeting. Name of Committee: National Institute of...

  3. 75 FR 5601 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... Contact Person listed below in advance of the meeting. Name of Committee: National Institute of...

  4. 75 FR 2150 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... Human Development Council. The meeting will be open to the public, with attendance limited to...

  5. 76 FR 27651 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-435- 8382,...

  6. 77 FR 61421 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-496-1487,...

  7. 78 FR 12765 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-496-1487,...

  8. 76 FR 38401 - National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Revision to Proposed Collection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ... Disease Control and Prevention, the Environmental Protection Agency) to-- (1) plan, develop, and implement a prospective cohort study, from birth to adulthood, to evaluate the effects of both chronic and... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Child Health and Human...

  9. Posttraumatic Growth and Related Factors of Child Protective Service Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Young Sun; Ko, Young Bin; Han, In Young

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study is to measure the level of vicarious trauma, posttraumatic growth (PTG), and other factors affecting PTG among child protective service workers. Methods We include posttraumatic stress, social support, stress coping, and demographic data as independent variables. Data was collected from 255 full-time social workers from 43 child protective agencies as acomplete enumeration and 204 included in the final analysis. Results The major findings of the study were as f...

  10. Adults with a history of child sexual abuse: evaluation of a pilot therapy service.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, D.; Pearce, L.; Pringle, M.; Caplan, R.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate a pilot service offering therapy specifically to adults with a history of child sexual abuse. DESIGN--Questionnaire survey. SETTING--Specialised therapy unit, Breakfree, which offers care, therapy, and support. SUBJECTS--116 clients presenting to the service who were offered therapy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Scores from three psychological questionnaires--the social activities and distress scale, the general health questionnaire, and the delusions, symptoms, and states in...

  11. 45 CFR 1357.15 - Comprehensive child and family services plan requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) (42 U.S.C. 5101 et. seq.). (3) States must meet... services (including child abuse and neglect prevention, intervention, and treatment services; and foster... CFSP must describe the child welfare services (including child abuse and neglect...

  12. 25 CFR 20.504 - What short-term homemaker services can Child Assistance pay for?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (protective) supervision; (b) A severely handicapped or special needs child whose care places undue stress on... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What short-term homemaker services can Child Assistance... SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance How Child Assistance Funds...

  13. The Impact of Child Health and Family Inputs on Child Cognitive Develop-ment

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Kaestner; Hope Corman

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we extensively analyze the impact of child health and other family characteristics on the cognitive achievement of children between the ages of five and nine. We estimate both cross sectional and fixed effects models using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Several of our results challenge the conclusions found in the existing literature. First, we find only a weak relationship between several measures of child health and child cognitive development. Second, we...

  14. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45... Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health services... preventive health and health services block grant. (b) For the purposes of determining eligible...

  15. Health Professionals' Responses to Disclosure of Child Sexual Abuse History: Female Child Sexual Abuse Survivors' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Kim; Julich, Shirley; Glover, Marewa; Gautam, Jeny

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on a postal questionnaire, conducted in 2004, with female survivors of historic child sexual abuse. The questionnaire explored their experiences of health professionals' responsiveness to disclosure of child sexual abuse history. Of 61 participants, aged between 22 and 65, 69% had disclosed to health professionals. Those who had…

  16. A pilot study to evaluate incorporating eye care for children into reproductive and child health services in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania: a historical comparison study.

    OpenAIRE

    Mafwiri, MM; Kisenge, R; Gilbert, CE

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many blinding eye conditions of childhood are preventable or treatable, particularly in developing countries. However, primary eye care (PEC) for children is poorly developed, leading to unnecessary visual loss. Activities for control by health workers entail interventions for systemic conditions (measles, vitamin A deficiency), identification and referral of children with sight threatening conditions and health education for caregivers. This pilot study evaluated integrating a pac...

  17. Urban Health Service in China

    OpenAIRE

    Ling Li; Heng-fu Zou

    2006-01-01

    After 20 years of economic reform and development, China's healthcare system has not improved as well as the economy has. Instead, it has deteriorated in many aspects, both in rural and urban areas. The present situation can be briefly summarized as "Low accessibility and high prices in healthcare service". In terms of quality, efficiency, and fairness of health care, China's urban health care system is far behind the current economic status and people's demands. There are a lot of complaints...

  18. Caregiver Participation in Community-based Mental Health Services for Children Receiving Outpatient Care

    OpenAIRE

    Fawley-King, Kya; Haine-Schlagel, Rachel; Trask, Emily V.; Zhang, Jinjin; Garland, Ann F

    2013-01-01

    Caregiver participation in child mental health treatment has been associated with better youth outcomes, but little is known about the amount and type of caregiver participation in usual care services for children. This study examined 1255 caregivers’ reports of their participation in the outpatient services their children received through a large, public mental health system in the Southwest. The majority of the caregivers reported that they participated in their child's services. Extent of ...

  19. Harsh Parenting May Harm a Child's Physical Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158709.html Harsh Parenting May Harm a Child's Physical Health Problems might ... 2016 FRIDAY, May 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Harsh parenting may leave more than psychological scars, it might ...

  20. Mandates for Collaboration: Health Care and Child Welfare Policy and Practice Reforms Create the Platform for Improved Health for Children in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnik, Sarah; Wilson, Leigh; Scribano, Philip; Wood, Joanne N; Noonan, Kathleen

    2015-10-01

    Improving the health of children in foster care requires close collaboration between pediatrics and the child welfare system. Propelled by recent health care and child welfare policy reforms, there is a strong foundation for more accountable, collaborative models of care. Over the last 2 decades health care reforms have driven greater accountability in outcomes, access to care, and integrated services for children in foster care. Concurrently, changes in child welfare legislation have expanded the responsibility of child welfare agencies in ensuring child health. Bolstered by federal legislation, numerous jurisdictions are developing innovative cross-system workforce and payment strategies to improve health care delivery and health care outcomes for children in foster care, including: (1) hiring child welfare medical directors, (2) embedding nurses in child welfare agencies, (3) establishing specialized health care clinics, and (4) developing tailored child welfare managed care organizations. As pediatricians engage in cross-system efforts, they should keep in mind the following common elements to enhance their impact: embed staff with health expertise within child welfare settings, identify long-term sustainable funding mechanisms, and implement models for effective information sharing. Now is an opportune time for pediatricians to help strengthen health care provision for children involved with child welfare. PMID:26403650

  1. Diet quality, child health, and food policies in developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Bhargava, Alok

    2014-01-01

    Although the importance of diet quality for improving child health is widely recognized, the roles of environmental factors and the absorption of nutrients for children's physical growth and morbidity have not been adequately integrated into a policy framework. Moreover, nutrient intakes gradually affect child health, so it is helpful to use alternative tools to evaluate short-term interve...

  2. MedlinePlus Health Topic Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A search-based Web service that provides access to disease, condition and wellness information via MedlinePlus health topic data in XML format. The service accepts...

  3. Preventable infant mortality and quality of health care: maternal perception of the child's illness and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadad Salime

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used a qualitative methodology to analyze the discourse of mothers from Greater Metropolitan Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, whose infant children had died from what were considered avoidable causes (diarrhea, malnutrition, and pneumonia, seeking to elucidate the factors associated with utilization of health care services. Identification of the illness by the mother was related to perception of specific alterations in the child's state of health. Analysis of the alterations helped identify the principal characteristics ascribed to each alteration and their relationship to the search for treatment. The authors also studied the mother's assessment of treatment received at health care facilities; 43.0% of the cases involved problems related to the structure of health care services or the attending health care professionals. In 46.0% of the cases, mothers associated the child's death with flaws in the health care service. The study group showed a variety of interpretations of illness, often distinct from the corresponding biomedical concepts. The fact that attending health care personnel overlooked or underrated the mother's perception of the illness and the lack of communications between health care personnel and the child's family had an influence on the child's evolution and subsequent death.

  4. Preventable infant mortality and quality of health care: maternal perception of the child's illness and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salime Hadad

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This study used a qualitative methodology to analyze the discourse of mothers from Greater Metropolitan Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, whose infant children had died from what were considered avoidable causes (diarrhea, malnutrition, and pneumonia, seeking to elucidate the factors associated with utilization of health care services. Identification of the illness by the mother was related to perception of specific alterations in the child's state of health. Analysis of the alterations helped identify the principal characteristics ascribed to each alteration and their relationship to the search for treatment. The authors also studied the mother's assessment of treatment received at health care facilities; 43.0% of the cases involved problems related to the structure of health care services or the attending health care professionals. In 46.0% of the cases, mothers associated the child's death with flaws in the health care service. The study group showed a variety of interpretations of illness, often distinct from the corresponding biomedical concepts. The fact that attending health care personnel overlooked or underrated the mother's perception of the illness and the lack of communications between health care personnel and the child's family had an influence on the child's evolution and subsequent death.

  5. Nutrition Training Improves Health Workers' Nutrition Knowledge and Competence to Manage Child Undernutrition: A Systematic Review.

    OpenAIRE

    Sunguya, Bruno F.; Poudel, Krishna C.; Mlunde, Linda B.; Urassa, David P; Yasuoka, Junko; Jimba, Masamine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medical and nursing education lack adequate practical nutrition training to fit the clinical reality that health workers face in their practices. Such a deficit creates health workers with poor nutrition knowledge and child undernutrition management practices. In-service nutrition training can help to fill this gap. However, no systematic review has examined its collective effectiveness. We thus conducted this study to examine the effectiveness of in-service nutrition training on ...

  6. Nutrition training improves health workers’ nutrition knowledge and competence to manage child undernutrition: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Sunguya, Bruno F.; Poudel, Krishna C.; Mlunde, Linda B.; Urassa, David P; Junko eYasuoka; Masamine eJimba

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medical and nursing education lack adequate practical nutrition training to fit the clinical reality that health workers face in their practices. Such a deficit creates health workers with poor nutrition knowledge and child undernutrition management practices. In-service nutrition training can help to fill this gap. However, no systematic review has examined its collective effectiveness. We thus conducted this study to examine the effectiveness of in-service nutrition training on ...

  7. Birth of a health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G

    On April 18th, independent Zimbabwe celebrated its 3rd birthday. In 1980, within days after taking power, Robert Mugabe's government announced that health care was to be free to everyone earning less then Z150 (60 British pounds) a month--the vast majority of the population. Although the free services are a good public relations policy, more important was the decision to expand the health services at grassroots level and to shift emphasis from an urban based curative system to rural based preventive care. Zimbabwe desperately needs doctors. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the country has some 1400 registered doctors, roughly 1 for every 6000 people. Yet, of the 1400, under 300 work in the government health services and many of those are based in Harare, the capital. Of Zimbabwe's 28 district hospitals, only 14 have a full-time doctor. In some rural areas, there is 1 doctor/100,000 or more people. The nature of the country's health problems, coupled with the government's severe shortage of cash, shows why nursing is so crucial to Zimbabwe's development. If the rural communities, which make up 85% of the population, were to have easy access to a qualified nurse, or even a nursing assistant, the quality of life would double. The only thing that is more important is a clean water supply. Possibly the most important role for nurses in Zimbabwe is that of education. Nurses can spread awareness of basic hygiene, raise the skill of local people in dealing with minor health problems independently, carry out immunization programs, offer contraceptive advice, give guidance on breastfeeding and infant nutrition, and work with practitioners of traditional African medicines to make sure they possess basic scientific knowledge. Rebuilding after the war was not a major problem for the Mugabe health ministry, for in many areas there was simply nothing to rebuild. There were never any health services. A far greater problem has been the top heavy structure of the

  8. Effect of maternal and child health care program for urban migrant population on the state of health care service of migrant children in Beijing%城市流动人口妇幼保健服务项目对流动儿童保健状况的改善作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫淑娟; 陈欣欣

    2011-01-01

    [目的]分析城币流动人口妇幼保健服务项目对流动儿童保健状况的改善作用.[方法]采取分层整群抽样方法抽取朝阳区和大兴区共11个街乡,实施为期5年的流动人口妇幼保健项目.项目终期,在项目点随机抽取部分流动儿童进行入户问卷调查,与基线调查比较.[结果]共调查流动儿童1005名.结果显示:1)流动儿童看护人对儿童保健服务和知识的知晓率明显提高;2)流动儿童对保健服务的利用明显改善,建册率、儿童保健覆盖率和儿童系统管理率比基线时明显提高,升幅分别为71.7%、76.2%和87.5%;3)流动儿童健康状况明显改善,腹泻、咳嗽2周罹患率比基线明显降低.[结论]流动人口妇幼保健服务项目的实施对提高流动儿童看护人保健知识水平、改善流动儿童保健服务和健康状况具有明显的促进作用.%[Objective] To analyze the effect of maternal and child health care(MCH) program for urban migrant population on the state of health care service of migrant children in Beijing. [Methods] Eleven communities were chosen in Chaoyang and Daxing district by stratified cluster sampling to implement a five-year MCH program for urban migrant population. At the end of the program, caretakers of migrant children were randomly chosen in the communities to answer a questionnaire. Data were compared with the baseline. [Results] There were 1 005 migrant children involved in the terminal survey. The results showed that:1 )The awareness rate of child health service and knowledge of child health increased significantly among the caretakers of migrant children. 2)The utilization of health care service for migrant children improved significantly. The rates of having child health care record, health care coverage and system management significantly improved than the baseline. The increased rate was 71.7%, 76.2% and 87.5% respectively. 3)The health states of migrant children were significantly

  9. The Ghana essential health interventions program: a plausibility trial of the impact of health systems strengthening on maternal & child survival

    OpenAIRE

    Awoonor-williams, John Koku; Bawah, Ayaga A; Nyonator, Frank K; Asuru, Rofina; Oduro, Abraham; Ofosu, Anthony; Phillips, James F

    2013-01-01

    Background During the 1990s, researchers at the Navrongo Health Research Centre in northern Ghana developed a highly successful community health program. The keystone of the Navrongo approach was the deployment of nurses termed community health officers to village locations. A trial showed that, compared to areas relying on existing services alone, the approach reduced child mortality by half, maternal mortality by 40%, and fertility by nearly a birth — from a total fertility rate of 5.5 in o...

  10. Abortion health services in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Wendy V.; Guilbert, Edith R.; Okpaleke, Christopher; Hayden, Althea S.; Steven Lichtenberg, E.; Paul, Maureen; White, Katharine O’Connell; Jones, Heidi E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the location of Canadian abortion services relative to where reproductive-age women reside, and the characteristics of abortion facilities and providers. Design An international survey was adapted for Canadian relevance. Public sources and professional networks were used to identify facilities. The bilingual survey was distributed by mail and e-mail from July to November 2013. Setting Canada. Participants A total of 94 abortion facilities were identified. Main outcome measures The number and location of services were compared with the distribution of reproductive-age women by location of residence. Results We identified 94 Canadian facilities providing abortion in 2012, with 48.9% in Quebec. The response rate was 83.0% (78 of 94). Facilities in every jurisdiction with services responded. In Quebec and British Columbia abortion services are nearly equally present in large urban centres and rural locations throughout the provinces; in other Canadian provinces services are chiefly located in large urban areas. No abortion services were identified in Prince Edward Island. Respondents reported provision of 75 650 abortions in 2012 (including 4.0% by medical abortion). Canadian facilities reported minimal or no harassment, in stark contrast to American facilities that responded to the same survey. Conclusion Access to abortion services varies by region across Canada. Services are not equitably distributed in relation to the regions where reproductive-age women reside. British Columbia and Quebec have demonstrated effective strategies to address disparities. Health policy and service improvements have the potential to address current abortion access inequity in Canada. These measures include improved access to mifepristone for medical abortion; provincial policies to support abortion services; routine abortion training within family medicine residency programs; and increasing the scope of practice for nurses and midwives to include abortion

  11. Organizational Climate, Services, and Outcomes in Child Welfare Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glisson, Charles; Green, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the association of organizational climate, casework services, and youth outcomes in child welfare systems. Building on preliminary findings linking organizational climate to youth outcomes over a 3-year follow-up period, the current study extends the follow-up period to 7 years and tests main, moderating and…

  12. Group Services for Child Protective Clients. Final Report: Innovations in Protective Services, September 1, 1982 through August 31, 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Dept. of Human Resources, Austin. Office of Programs.

    The Group Services for Child Protective Clients Project was established to train child protective services staff members to provide effective group services. The project had four components: (1) group services training; (2) support groups for staff; (3) group services to clients; and (4) planning to continue the project after federal funding…

  13. Emergency Child Aid. Child Health and Safety Series (Module VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iscoe, Louise; And Others

    This manual for child care personnel in day care homes and centers provides a step by step review of what to do in common emergency situations. It is emphasized that the manual is not a substitute for the complete first aid course which every careperson should have. Initial sections of the manual focus on preparing for emergency conditions,…

  14. Privatized Child Welfare Services: Foster Parents' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Larry D.

    2001-01-01

    Foster parents were surveyed concerning their attitudes toward the privatization of family foster care services in Kansas. Respondents reported their current level of satisfaction, opinions about privatization, and their experiences with new community-based treatment teams. Responses indicated that satisfaction remained high, but also variances in…

  15. Child Labor and Environmental Health: Government Obligations and Human Rights

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph J Amon; Jane Buchanan; Jane Cohen; Juliane Kippenberg

    2012-01-01

    The Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour was adopted by the International Labour Organization in 1999. 174 countries around the world have signed or ratified the convention, which requires countries to adopt laws and implement programs to prohibit and eliminate child labor that poses harms to health or safety. Nonetheless, child labor continues to be common in the agriculture and mining sectors, where safety and envi...

  16. Cross-Validation of the Implementation Leadership Scale (ILS) in Child Welfare Service Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Natalie K; Torres, Elisa M; Ehrhart, Mark G; Roesch, Scott C; Aarons, Gregory A

    2016-08-01

    The Implementation Leadership Scale (ILS) is a brief, pragmatic, and efficient measure that can be used for research or organizational development to assess leader behaviors and actions that actively support effective implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs). The ILS was originally validated with mental health clinicians. This study validates the ILS factor structure with providers in community-based organizations (CBOs) providing child welfare services. Participants were 214 service providers working in 12 CBOs that provide child welfare services. All participants completed the ILS, reporting on their immediate supervisor. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to examine the factor structure of the ILS. Internal consistency reliability and measurement invariance were also examined. Confirmatory factor analyses showed acceptable fit to the hypothesized first- and second-order factor structure. Internal consistency reliability was strong and there was partial measurement invariance for the first-order factor structure when comparing child welfare and mental health samples. The results support the use of the ILS to assess leadership for implementation of EBPs in child welfare organizations. PMID:27002137

  17. Impacts of Climate Change on Inequities in Child Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charmian M; Friel, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses an often overlooked aspect of climate change impacts on child health: the amplification of existing child health inequities by climate change. Although the effects of climate change on child health will likely be negative, the distribution of these impacts across populations will be uneven. The burden of climate change-related ill-health will fall heavily on the world's poorest and socially-disadvantaged children, who already have poor survival rates and low life expectancies due to issues including poverty, endemic disease, undernutrition, inadequate living conditions and socio-economic disadvantage. Climate change will exacerbate these existing inequities to disproportionately affect disadvantaged children. We discuss heat stress, extreme weather events, vector-borne diseases and undernutrition as exemplars of the complex interactions between climate change and inequities in child health. PMID:27417491

  18. Impacts of Climate Change on Inequities in Child Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmian M. Bennett

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses an often overlooked aspect of climate change impacts on child health: the amplification of existing child health inequities by climate change. Although the effects of climate change on child health will likely be negative, the distribution of these impacts across populations will be uneven. The burden of climate change-related ill-health will fall heavily on the world’s poorest and socially-disadvantaged children, who already have poor survival rates and low life expectancies due to issues including poverty, endemic disease, undernutrition, inadequate living conditions and socio-economic disadvantage. Climate change will exacerbate these existing inequities to disproportionately affect disadvantaged children. We discuss heat stress, extreme weather events, vector-borne diseases and undernutrition as exemplars of the complex interactions between climate change and inequities in child health.

  19. The Tingathe programme: a pilot intervention using community health workers to create a continuum of care in the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT cascade of services in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon E Schutze

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Loss to follow-up is a major challenge in the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT programme in Malawi with reported loss to follow-up of greater than 70%. Tingathe-PMTCT is a pilot intervention that utilizes dedicated community health workers (CHWs to create a complete continuum of care within the PMTCT cascade, improving service utilization and retention of mothers and infants. We describe the impact of the intervention on longitudinal care starting with diagnosis of the mother at antenatal care (ANC through final diagnosis of the infant. Methods: PMTCT service utilization, programme retention and outcomes were evaluated for pregnant women living with HIV and their exposed infants enrolled in the Tingathe-PMTCT programme between March 2009 and March 2011. Multivariate logistic regression was done to evaluate maternal factors associated with failure to complete the cascade. Results: Over 24 months, 1688 pregnant women living with HIV were enrolled. Median maternal age was 27 years (IQR, 23.8 to 30.8; 333 (19.7% were already on ART. Among the remaining women, 1328/1355 (98% received a CD4 test, with 1243/1328 (93.6% receiving results. Of the 499 eligible for ART, 363 (72.8% were successfully initiated. Prior to, delivery there were 93 (5.7% maternal/foetal deaths, 137 (8.1% women transferred/moved, 51 (3.0% were lost and 58 (3.4% refused ongoing PMTCT services. Of the 1318 live births to date, 1264 (95.9% of the mothers and 1285 (97.5% of the infants received ARV prophylaxis; 1064 (80.7% infants were tested for HIV by PCR and started on cotrimoxazole. Median age at PCR was 1.7 months (IQR, 1.5 to 2.5. Overall transmission at first PCR was 43/1047 (4.1%. Of the 43 infants with positive PCR results, 36 (83.7% were enrolled in ART clinic and 33 (76.7% were initiated on ART. Conclusions: Case management and support by dedicated CHWs can create a continuum of longitudinal care in the PMTCT cascade and result in

  20. Globalization, democracy, and child health in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welander, Anna; Lyttkens, Carl Hampus; Nilsson, Therese

    2015-07-01

    Good health is crucial for human and economic development. In particular poor health in childhood is of utmost concern since it causes irreversible damage and has implications later in life. Recent research suggests globalization is a strong force affecting adult and child health outcomes. Yet, there is much unexplained variation with respect to the globalization effect on child health, in particular in low- and middle-income countries. One factor that could explain such variation across countries is the quality of democracy. Using panel data for 70 developing countries between 1970 and 2009 this paper disentangles the relationship between globalization, democracy, and child health. Specifically the paper examines how globalization and a country's democratic status and historical experience with democracy, respectively, affect infant mortality. In line with previous research, results suggest that globalization reduces infant mortality and that the level of democracy in a country generally improves child health outcomes. Additionally, democracy matters for the size of the globalization effect on child health. If for example Côte d'Ivoire had been a democracy in the 2000-2009 period, this effect would translate into 1200 fewer infant deaths in an average year compared to the situation without democracy. We also find that nutrition is the most important mediator in the relationship. To conclude, globalization and democracy together associate with better child health in developing countries. PMID:25982869

  1. Health-e-Child a grid platform for european paediatrics

    CERN Document Server

    Skaburskas, K; Shade, J; Manset, D; Revillard, J; Rios, A; Anjum, A; Branson, A; Bloodsworth, P; Hauer, T; McClatchey, R; Rogulin, D

    2008-01-01

    The Health-e-Child (HeC) project [1], [2] is an EC Framework Programme 6 Integrated Project that aims to develop a grid-based integrated healthcare platform for paediatrics. Using this platform biomedical informaticians will integrate heterogeneous data and perform epidemiological studies across Europe. The resulting Grid enabled biomedical information platform will be supported by robust search, optimization and matching techniques for information collected in hospitals across Europe. In particular, paediatricians will be provided with decision support, knowledge discovery and disease modelling applications that will access data in hospitals in the UK, Italy and France, integrated via the Grid. For economy of scale, reusability, extensibility, and maintainability, HeC is being developed on top of an EGEE/gLite [3] based infrastructure that provides all the common data and computation management services required by the applications. This paper discusses some of the major challenges in bio-medical data integr...

  2. A Comparison of Medical Birth Register Outcomes between Maternity Health Clinics and Integrated Maternity and Child Health Clinics in Southwest Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miia Tuominen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Primary maternity care services are globally provided according to various organisational models. Two models are common in Finland: a maternity health clinic and an integrated maternity and child health clinic. The aim of this study was to clarify whether there is a relation between the organisational model of the maternity health clinics and the utilisation of maternity care services, and certain maternal and perinatal health outcomes. Methods: A comparative, register-based cross-sectional design was used. The data of women (N = 2741 who had given birth in the Turku University Hospital area between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2009 were collected from the Finnish Medical Birth Register. Comparisons were made between the women who were clients of the maternity health clinics and integrated maternity and child health clinics. Results: There were no clinically significant differences between the clients of maternity health clinics and integrated maternity and child health clinics regarding the utilisation of maternity care services or the explored health outcomes. Conclusions: The organisational model of the maternity health clinic does not impact the utilisation of maternity care services or maternal and perinatal health outcomes. Primary maternity care could be provided effectively when integrated with child health services.

  3. Health reform, population policy and child nutritional status in China

    OpenAIRE

    Bredenkamp, Caryn

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the determinants of child nutritional status in seven provinces of China during the 1990s, focusing specifically on the role of two areas of public policy, namely health system reforms and the one child policy. The empirical relationship between income and nutritional status, and the extent to which that relationship is mediated by access to quality healthcare and being...

  4. Financial Health of Child Care Facilities Affects Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, Mary R.; Sull, Theresa M.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that child care facility owners, boards of directors, staff, and parents need to focus on financial management, as poor financial health compromises the quality of care for children. Specifically addresses the issues of: (1) concern for providing high quality child care; (2) the connection between quality and money; and (3) strengthening…

  5. [Vulnerability and National Health Service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Safegarding health has been an objective of every learned civilization, ancient and modern. In modern times, at least in the western world, the increase in longevity associated with social isolation has created further vu1nerability for the older individua1. Today, healthcare is a social burden of extremely high cost. Among us this service is provided by the National Health Service in accordance to the Constituição da República Portuguesa (Constitution of the Portuguese Republic). Despite the constitutional guarantees of equa1ity in health there are obvious discrepancies in access to health care and the conditions that promote health such as education and wealth. In a poor country, even with limited resources, inequa1ity can be minimized via policies and practical measures founded in equa1ity and social responsibility, not only the principles of economic efficiency. Only in this way can we guarantee equa1 access to health and the distribution of available resources in accordance to health care necessities. Yet, the investment in high technology among us seems out of fase with the investment in the area concerning functional recovery from high morta1ity illness, such as stroke. In Portugal the problem is extremely bad. Life expectancy has been extended but qua1ity of life is still very low. Victims of the social order, the elderly live alone without family who can care for them; on the other hand, the lack of investment in recovery and social integration of individua1s with disabling scars, Turns the ends of their life's into a nightmare for themselves and their kin. It follows stating the necessity to analyse and define the criteria to be used when allocating resources in order to guarantee equality in health and relief from suffering and also to stop discrimination of vu1nerable populations in access to healthcare. Whatever the criteria, it must be pre-defined and its principles widely discussed, reiterating, only that longevity cannot be an acceptable criteria

  6. La salud en la infancia Child health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concha Colomer-Revuelta

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available En España, la infancia aparece como un grupo de población con escasas necesidades y problemas de salud, lo que lo hace casi invisible en la investigación y en la planificación de servicios. En general, no se tiene en cuenta que se trata de un período de desarrollo y de alta vulnerabilidad a los riesgos físicos y psicosociales, y de respuesta positiva a los factores protectores. En este artículo se recogen datos y reflexiones sobre algunos problemas que mejoran (mortalidad, cáncer y otros que persisten o empeoran (calidad del ambiente, maltrato, salud mental, obesidad, discapacidades y estilos de vida, y se plantean nuevos desafíos relacionados con la calidad de vida y la equidad de género y clase social. Además se revisan las respuestas que se dan desde los servicios de salud, las políticas medioambientales y de promoción de la salud, y se propone una atención específica a la salud de niños y niñas desde un enfoque de los derechos humanos.Children in Spain are considered as being a population group with few health problems and needs therefore making it almost invisible in research and services' planning. Generally, it is not taken into account that this is a development period with very high vulnerability to physical and psychosocial risks whereas there is a positive response to protective factors. This article covers some data and thoughts on their health problems that are improving (mortality, cancer, those that persist or worsen (environmental quality, abuse, mental health, obesity, disabilities and lifestyles and new challenges relating to quality of life and gender and social class equity. Responses provided by the health services are reviewed, as are environmental policies and health promotion and specific care is proposed for boys' and girls' health from a children's human rights-focused perspective.

  7. The influence of child care on maternal health and mother-child interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kröll, Alexandra; Borck, Rainald

    2013-01-01

    In Germany, formal child care coverage rates have increased markedly over the past few decades. The expansion in coverage is particularly pronounced for under 3 year-olds. The present paper is concerned with how mothers' mental and physical health is affected by whether they place their child in formal day care or not. Furthermore, the effects of formal child care usage on mother-child interaction are examined. The analysis is based on data from the German Socio-Economic Panel for the years 2...

  8. 25 CFR 20.505 - What services are provided jointly with the Child Assistance Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... abuse, neglect or exploitation in coordination with law enforcement and courts. (c) A written case plan... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What services are provided jointly with the Child... SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance How Child Assistance Funds...

  9. Antiretroviral interventions to reduce mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus: challenges for health systems, communities and society.

    OpenAIRE

    Baggaley, R; Van Praag, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the ethical, economic and social issues that should be considered when antiretroviral interventions are being planned to reduce mother-to-child transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus. Interventions aiming to reduce mother-to-child transmission should be concerned with the rights of both the child and the mother. Women should not be seen as vectors of transmission but as people entitled to adequate health care and social services in their own right. For women acce...

  10. Mental Health Problems in Young Children Investigated by U.S. Child Welfare Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Sarah McCue; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Heneghan, Amy; Zhang, Jinjin; Rolls-Reutz, Jennifer; Fisher, Emily; Landsverk, John; Stein, Ruth E. K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the prevalence/predictors of mental health (MH) problems and services use in 12- to 36-month-old children who had been investigated for maltreatment. Method: Data came from the second National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW II), a longitudinal study of youth ages 0 to 17.5 years referred to U.S. child…

  11. World Trade Organization activity for health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Clémence

    2012-01-01

    Since the establishment of a multilateral trading system and the increasing mobility of professionals and consumers of health services, it seems strongly necessary that the World Trade Organization (WTO) undertakes negotiations within the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), and that WTO's members attempt to reach commitments for health-related trade in services. How important is the GATS for health policy and how does the GATS refer to health services? What are the current negotiations and member's commitments? PMID:23016196

  12. Parenting and child mental health: a cross-cultural perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Bornstein, Marc H.

    2013-01-01

    In its most general instrumental sense, parenting consists of care of the young in preparing them to manage the tasks of life. Parents provide childhood experiences and populate the environments that guide children's development and so contribute to child mental health. Parenting is expressed in cognitions and practices. However, parents do not parent, and children do not grow up, in isolation, but in multiple contexts, and one notable context of parenting and child mental health is culture. ...

  13. School Health Services and Millennium Development Goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mininim Oseji

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: School health services are geared at preventing, protecting and improving the health status of the school population to enable them benefit fully from the school system. The year 2015 is the target date for the attainment of the eight Millennium Development Goals adopted by world leaders at the Millennium Summit in September 2000. Coverage of immunisation against measles and prevalence of underweight children under five years are both indicators for tracking attainment of Millennium Development Goals (MDGs 1 and 4 – eradicate extreme hunger and poverty and reduce child mortality.Aims and Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the immunization and nutrition status as well as general well-being of primary school children through pre-enrolment medical examination.Methods/Study Design: A rural community in southern Nigeria was chosen for this pilot study, which was cross-sectional in design and conducted in 2010. The study instrument was a pre-enrolment medical examination form adopted from that provided by the State Ministry of Health. All newly enrolled school children in all three primary schools in the community were examined by medical doctors who completed the section on physical examination of the form. Nurses and volunteer assistants took the heights and weights of the children. Personal details and medical history of the examined children were thereafter obtained from the parents/guardians who were requested to give the dates their children received routine immunization, with photocopies of the immunization record where available. The heights and weights of the children were used to assess nutritional status by comparing with growth standards from the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study. Data were analysed using Epi Info version 3.5.1.Results/Findings: A total of 95 children were examined males being 54.7% while females were 45.3%. Medical history was provided for 46 children, 54.3% of which had evidence

  14. 77 FR 43344 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892-7510,...

  15. A Comparison of Medical Birth Register Outcomes between Maternity Health Clinics and Integrated Maternity and Child Health Clinics in Southwest Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Tuominen, Miia; Kaljonen, Anne; Ahonen, Pia; Mäkinen, Juha; Rautava, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Primary maternity care services are globally provided according to various organisational models. Two models are common in Finland: a maternity health clinic and an integrated maternity and child health clinic. The aim of this study was to clarify whether there is a relation between the organisational model of the maternity health clinics and the utilisation of maternity care services, and certain maternal and perinatal health outcomes.Methods: A comparative, register-based cros...

  16. Fragmented implementation of maternal and child health home-based records in Vietnam: need for integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotsugu Aiga

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Home-based records (HBRs are globally implemented as the effective tools that encourage pregnant women and mothers to timely and adequately utilise maternal and child health (MCH services. While availability and utilisation of nationally representative HBRs have been assessed in several earlier studies, the reality of a number of HBRs subnationally implemented in a less coordinated manner has been neither reported nor analysed. Objectives: This study is aimed at estimating the prevalence of HBRs for MCH and the level of fragmentation of and overlapping between different HBRs for MCH in Vietnam. The study further attempts to identify health workers’ and mothers’ perceptions towards HBR operations and utilisations. Design: A self-administered questionnaire was sent to the provincial health departments of 28 selected provinces. A copy of each HBR available was collected from them. A total of 20 semi-structured interviews with health workers and mothers were conducted at rural communities in four of 28 selected provinces. Results: Whereas HBRs developed exclusively for maternal health and exclusively for child health were available in four provinces (14% and in 28 provinces (100%, respectively, those for both maternal health and child health were available in nine provinces (32%. The mean number of HBRs in 28 provinces (=5.75 indicates over-availability of HBRs. All 119 minimum required items for recording found in three different HBRs under nationwide scale-up were also included in the Maternal and Child Health Handbook being piloted for nationwide scaling-up. Implementation of multiple HBRs is likely to confuse not only health workers by requiring them to record the same data on several HBRs but also mothers about which HBR they should refer to and rely on at home. Conclusions: To enable both health workers and pregnant women to focus on only one type of HBR, province-specific HBRs for maternal and/or child health need to be

  17. Parenting and proximity to social services: Lessons from Los Angeles County in the community context of child neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire-Jack, Kathryn; Klein, Sacha

    2015-07-01

    Using a sample of 438 parents in Los Angeles County, CA, this study examines the role of proximity to social services in child neglect. In an extension of social disorganization theory, it seeks to understand the potential sources of support in neighborhoods for families. It uses ordinary least squares regression to examine driving distance from parents' residences to four types of services (child care, domestic violence, mental health/substance abuse, and poverty). The results show an association between proximity to mental health and substance abuse services and parents' self-reported neglectful behaviors. Additionally, higher levels of socioeconomic disadvantage (poverty, unemployment, and low education), having older children, respondents being male, and respondents being older parents are associated with higher levels of child neglect, while being white is associated with lower levels. Overall, the findings suggest a potentially protective role of geographic access to mental health and substance abuse services in child maltreatment. Additional research on the pathways through which proximity to services influences child neglect is needed. PMID:26026359

  18. 76 FR 62295 - Child Health Day, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... hosted the White House Conference on Bullying Prevention because no child should feel unsafe or be afraid... the two hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-26149 Filed 10-6-11; 8:45...

  19. Child care subsidies, maternal health, and child-parent interactions: evidence from three nationally representative datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Chris M; Tekin, Erdal

    2014-08-01

    A complete account of the US child care subsidy system requires an understanding of its implications for both parental and child well-being. Although the effects of child care subsidies on maternal employment and child development have been recently studied, many other dimensions of family well-being have received little attention. This paper attempts to fill this gap by examining the impact of child care subsidy receipt on maternal health and the quality of child-parent interactions. The empirical analyses use data from three nationally representative surveys, providing access to numerous measures of family well-being. In addition, we attempt to handle the possibility of non-random selection into subsidy receipt by using several identification strategies both within and across the surveys. Our results consistently indicate that child care subsidies are associated with worse maternal health and poorer interactions between parents and their children. In particular, subsidized mothers report lower levels of overall health and are more likely to show symptoms consistent with anxiety, depression, and parenting stress. Such mothers also reveal more psychological and physical aggression toward their children and are more likely to utilize spanking as a disciplinary tool. Together, these findings suggest that work-based public policies aimed at economically disadvantaged mothers may ultimately undermine family well-being. PMID:23832797

  20. Health visitors' assessments of parent–child relationships: a focus group study

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, P; Barbour, R.S.; Graham, C; Currie, M.; Puckering, C.; Minnis, H.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Health visitors (HVs), also known as public health nurses, in the UK provide a universal community-based service to preschool children and their parents. Since they have ongoing supportive contact with almost all mothers and young children they have opportunities to identify problems in the parent–infant relationship: for example during developmental screening, home visits and immunisation clinics. Research into the role of screening for problems in the parent–child relationship i...

  1. Integrated Health Service Delivery: Why and How?

    OpenAIRE

    Satya Ranjan Lenka; Bitra George

    2013-01-01

    Integrated service delivery is an approach of combining services of multiple interrelated diseases to increase overall efficiency of the health system and patient convenience. Experiences across the globe have demonstrated benefits from integration of health services. Capacity building, sensitization, ownership, and commitment among stakeholders and up-gradation of health system are keys to success in delivering integrated services. However, integration is challenging and has no one-size-fits...

  2. Evolutions in health services quality approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lelia Chiru

    2006-01-01

    Health services are representing a very important area at the services sector. Grouped under the generic denomination “health”, these services are implicated in the creation of material conditions for human life and in quality life growth. Taking into account the importance of health services in social life and its contribution to quality life growth, we are considering necessarily to enhance the interest in continuous improve of quality in activities deployed in health field. This imposes pr...

  3. Mental Health Service Delivery Systems and Perceived Qualifications of Mental Health Service Providers in School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Decia Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Latest research on the mental health status of children indicates that schools are key providers of mental health services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003). The push for school mental health services has only increased as stakeholders have begun to recognize the significance of sound mental health as an essential part of…

  4. Characteristics of Sexually Abused Children and Their Nonoffending Mothers Followed by Child Welfare Services: The Role of a Maternal History of Child Sexual Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Karine; Tourigny, Marc; Paillé, Pierre; Pauzé, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Considering the importance of mother's support in the adaptation of a sexually abused child, it is relevant to determine if the mothers and children involved in an intergenerational cycle of child sexual victimization differ from dyads in which only the child has been abused. The purpose of this study was to compare mother-child dyads with sexually abused children according to whether the mother had herself been victim of child sexual abuse. The sample included 87 dyads with sexually abused children aged 3-18 years old and their mothers (44 reporting maternal and child abuse), followed by social welfare services of the province of Quebec (Canada). The two groups of mothers were compared on their past family abuse experiences and past family relations, their mental health history, their current psychological distress, their parenting behaviors, and their current levels of family functioning. Children were compared on their adaptation. Multivariate analyses indicated that mothers reporting child sexual abuse were more likely to report more other maltreatments in their childhood and greater prevalence of lifetime history of alcohol abuse disorders, dysthymia, and panic disorder compared with mothers who had not experienced CSA. Compared to children whose mothers had not experienced CSA, those whose mothers had experienced CSA showed higher rates of problems behaviors and were more likely to report having been sexually abused by a trusted person. These results highlight the specific clinical needs for the assessment and treatment for sexually abused children whose mothers experienced child sexual abuse. PMID:27472507

  5. Maternal Health and Child Mortality in Rural India

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Manoj K.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of maternal health on the under-five mortality has been examined. Third wave of micro-level National Family Health Survey 2005-06 data for rural India is used. Using various alternative measures of maternal health, the paper finds strong association between maternal health and child mortality. In particular, the effects of maternal height, weight, presence of any disease and anemia are found significant. Based on our findings, we argue that if the possible generation...

  6. The Impact of Child and Family Service Reviews on Knowledge Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischen, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    This article uses knowledge management as a framework to analyze the impact of the child and family review process on child protective service agencies. Results of a qualitative analysis of child and family service reviews and program improvement plans indicated that the process has led to an increase in the use of family team meetings and risk…

  7. 33 CFR 55.5 - Who is eligible for child development services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who is eligible for child development services? 55.5 Section 55.5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.5 Who is eligible for child development...

  8. Child labor and environmental health: government obligations and human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amon, Joseph J; Buchanan, Jane; Cohen, Jane; Kippenberg, Juliane

    2012-01-01

    The Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour was adopted by the International Labour Organization in 1999. 174 countries around the world have signed or ratified the convention, which requires countries to adopt laws and implement programs to prohibit and eliminate child labor that poses harms to health or safety. Nonetheless, child labor continues to be common in the agriculture and mining sectors, where safety and environmental hazards pose significant risks. Drawing upon recent human rights investigations of child labor in tobacco farming in Kazakhstan and gold mining in Mali, the role of international human rights mechanisms, advocacy with government and private sector officials, and media attention in reducing harmful environmental exposures of child workers is discussed. Human rights-based advocacy in both cases was important to raise attention and help ensure that children are protected from harm. PMID:23316246

  9. Improving Coordination of Addiction Health Services Organizations with Mental Health and Public Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erick G; Andrews, Christina; Harris, Lesley; Padwa, Howard; Kong, Yinfei; M S W, Karissa Fenwick

    2016-01-01

    In this mixed-method study, we examined coordination of mental health and public health services in addiction health services (AHS) in low-income racial and ethnic minority communities in 2011 and 2013. Data from surveys and semistructured interviews were used to evaluate the extent to which environmental and organizational characteristics influenced the likelihood of high coordination with mental health and public health providers among outpatient AHS programs. Coordination was defined and measured as the frequency of interorganizational contact among AHS programs and mental health and public health providers. The analytic sample consisted of 112 programs at time 1 (T1) and 122 programs at time 2 (T2), with 61 programs included in both periods of data collection. Forty-three percent of AHS programs reported high frequency of coordination with mental health providers at T1 compared to 66% at T2. Thirty-one percent of programs reported high frequency of coordination with public health services at T1 compared with 54% at T2. Programs with culturally responsive resources and community linkages were more likely to report high coordination with both services. Qualitative analysis highlighted the role of leadership in leveraging funding and developing creative solutions to deliver coordinated care. Overall, our findings suggest that AHS program funding, leadership, and cultural competence may be important drivers of program capacity to improve coordination with health service providers to serve minorities in an era of health care reform. PMID:26350114

  10. Disparities in academic achievement and health: the intersection of child education and health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscella, Kevin; Kitzman, Harriet

    2009-03-01

    Recent data suggest that that the United States is failing to make significant progress toward the Healthy People 2010 goal of eliminating health disparities. One missing element from the US strategy for achieving this goal is a focus on gaps in child development and achievement. Academic achievement and education seem to be critical determinants of health across the life span and disparities in one contribute to disparities in the other. Despite these linkages, national policy treats child education and health as separate. Landmark education legislation, the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, is due for Congressional reauthorization. It seeks to eliminate gaps in academic child achievement by 2014. It does so by introducing accountability for states, school districts, and schools. In this special article, we review health disparities and contributors to child achievement gaps. We review changes in achievement gaps over time and potential contributors to the limited success of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, including its unfunded mandates and unfounded assumptions. We conclude with key reforms, which include addressing gaps in child school readiness through adequate investment in child health and early education and reductions in child poverty; closing the gap in child achievement by ensuring equity in school accountability standards; and, importantly, ensuring equity in school funding so that resources are allocated on the basis of the needs of the students. This will ensure that schools, particularly those serving large numbers of poor and minority children, have the resources necessary to promote optimal learning. PMID:19255042

  11. Regional health library service in northern Ireland.

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, D S

    1990-01-01

    The regional medical library service provided to physicians, hospitals, nurses, social workers, and health care administrators throughout Northern Ireland by the Queen's University of Belfast is described. A brief outline of the National Health Service in the United Kingdom is given, and the library service is described in terms of collections, cataloging, interlibrary loan, and reference.

  12. Decision making in child protective services: a risky business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camasso, Michael J; Jagannathan, Radha

    2013-09-01

    Child Protective Services (CPS) in the United States has received a torrent of criticism from politicians, the media, child advocate groups, and the general public for a perceived propensity to make decisions that are detrimental to children and families. This perception has resulted in numerous lawsuits and court takeovers of CPS in 35 states, and calls for profound restructuring in other states. A widely prescribed remedy for decision errors and faulty judgments is an improvement of risk assessment strategies that enhance hazard evaluation through an improved understanding of threat potentials and exposure likelihoods. We examine the reliability and validity problems that continue to plague current CPS risk assessment and discuss actions that can be taken in the field, including the use of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve technology to improve the predictive validity of risk assessment strategies. PMID:23231374

  13. Role of Child Nutrition Programs in Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M. Josephine

    The role of health educators in integrating child nutrition programs into school health education is discussed and issues attending such programs are considered. The importance of breakfast and lunch programs in the school is stressed with particular emphasis on using these programs to instruct children in sound nutritional practices. It is…

  14. Teacher-reported prevalence and management of child health problems at primary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyland, Anna F; Pickett, Kate E; Barber, Sally; McEachan, Rosemary; Wright, John

    2016-06-01

    We explored primary school teacher-reported experiences, prevalence and management of child health and developmental problems and medication administration from one multi-ethnic urban community in England. A survey was delivered to 90 reception class teachers in 45 primary schools, and semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of eight respondents. Fifty-six percent of teachers completed the questionnaire. Findings suggest that teachers and school staff may represent an underused resource for identifying children with developmental and health conditions and that the connections formed between schools and families could be utilized by other services by delivering interventions in schools where possible. Whilst most schools use a policy to inform the management of child health in school, some key areas such as training and documentation of medication administration may not be followed in practice. Interview findings supported and expanded on survey data by identifying barriers to collaboration between services and families. PMID:25713008

  15. 77 FR 4569 - Revision to Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National Institute of Child Health and Human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... time that the enrolled child is 6 months of age to the time the child is 5 years of age. 30-Month Data... Institute of Child Health and Human Development; the National Children's Study, Vanguard (Pilot) Study... of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will...

  16. Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health in the Community: Task-sharing Between Male and Female Health Workers in an Indian Rural Context

    OpenAIRE

    Elazan, Sara J; Higgins-Steele, Ariel E; Jean Christophe Fotso; Rosenthal, Mila H; Dharitri Rout

    2016-01-01

    Background: Male community health workers (CHWs) have rarely been studied as an addition to the female community health workforce to improve access and care for reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health (RMNCH). Objective: To examine how male health activists (MHAs) coordinated RMNCH responsibilities with existing female health workers in an Indian context. Materials and Methods: Interviews from male and female CHWs were coded around community-based engagement, outreach services, and ...

  17. The impact of childhood obesity on health and health service use: an instrumental variable approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kinge, Jonas Minet; Morris, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    In the following paper we estimate the impact of obesity in childhood on health and health service use in England using instrumental variables. We use data on children and adolescents aged 3-18 years old from fifteen rounds of the Health Survey for England (1998-2012), which has measures of self-assessed health, primary care use, prescribed medication use, and nurse-measured height and weight. We use instruments for child obesity using genetic variation in weight. We detect a few potential is...

  18. Preventive Health Services Utilization Among Korean Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeongmo; Casado, Banghwa Lee

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the use of preventive health services among Korean American adults. Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey of 212 Korean Americans in the Chicago, Illinois, metropolitan area. Guided by the Andersen's behavioral model, the authors examined whether predisposing (age, gender, marital status, household size, education), enabling (income, health insurance, English proficiency, citizenship, social network), and need (health status) factors are predictive of Korean Americans' preventive health services utilization. A binomial logistic regression showed that younger age, male, noncitizen, low income, no insurance, a larger family network, and better perceived health were associated with decreased odds of using preventive health services. PMID:27171558

  19. Associations in the continuum of care for maternal, newborn and child health: a population-based study of 12 sub-Saharan Africa countries

    OpenAIRE

    Owili, Patrick Opiyo; Muga, Miriam Adoyo; Chou, Yiing-Jenq; Hsu, Yi-Hsin Elsa; Huang, Nicole; Chien, Li-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the progress in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4 and 5, inequity in the utilization of maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH) care services still remain high in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The continuum of care for MNCH that recognizes a tight inter-relationship between maternal, newborn and child health at different time periods and location is key towards reducing inequity in health. In this study, we explored the distributions in the utilization MNCH services i...

  20. Feasibility and impact of doctor-nurse task delegation in preventive child health care in the netherlands, a controlled before-after study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjamins, S. Janine; Damen, Maurice L W; Van Stel, Henk F.

    2015-01-01

    Background  In the Netherlands a need is felt for more flexible Child Health Care services, both efficient and tailored to needs.We set up a study on impact and feasibility of task delegation to child health care nurses performing all regular checkups on children aged 2 months to 4 years. Abnormal f

  1. Mother and child health project in Bragin district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    constituted 4.5 % (668 cases) in 2001 already 5.5 % (806 cases) from the total number of the children born. Further problems are:predominance of stationary assistance in primary health care; absence of interdisciplinary approach and of decentralization of medical treatment; lack of the main kinds of equipment, spare materials and medications, which are necessary for providing medical treatment; difficulty for rural population in accessing the available medical services: long distances, absence of information, low interaction with medical personnel; low sanitary culture among women (contraceptives are not used, the cases of unwanted pregnancies occur very often, STD problems, late notification of the doctor when the child is getting ill); giving birth to children as a means of getting state subsidy. In the framework of technical cooperation SDC supported Gomel' regional hospital some years ago with equipment for mother and child health care. The equipment (incubators, CO2 monitors) donated in 1996 to the delivery department and department for rehabilitation and intensive therapy are still in use and in good condition. This maternity hospital provides help to women from the Gomel' area with the most serious and difficult complications during the period of pregnancy. Sixty or seventy women come to this regional hospital from Bragin district every year, and it makes 40-50% of the whole number of deliveries in the district Bragin district in the very south of the Gomel area is one of the most contaminated areas in Belarus, where people still settle, hi order to help in solving the existing problems SDC in cooperation with local authorities is developing a mother and child health project for Bragin district. The aim of the project is to support and build up primary health care structures in the field of mother and child health. The duration of the project will be three years. The project consists of the following parts: community approach strategy to disseminate health messages on

  2. Acceptance of Swedish e-health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Louise Jung

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Mary-Louise Jung1, Karla Loria11Division of Industrial Marketing, e-Commerce and Logistics, Lulea University of Technology, SwedenObjective: To investigate older people’s acceptance of e-health services, in order to identify determinants of, and barriers to, their intention to use e-health.Method: Based on one of the best-established models of technology acceptance, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM, in-depth exploratory interviews with twelve individuals over 45 years of age and of varying backgrounds are conducted.Results: This investigation could find support for the importance of usefulness and perceived ease of use of the e-health service offered as the main determinants of people’s intention to use the service. Additional factors critical to the acceptance of e-health are identified, such as the importance of the compatibility of the services with citizens’ needs and trust in the service provider. Most interviewees expressed positive attitudes towards using e-health and find these services useful, convenient, and easy to use.Conclusion: E-health services are perceived as a good complement to traditional health care service delivery, even among older people. These people, however, need to become aware of the e-health alternatives that are offered to them and the benefits they provide.Keywords: health services, elderly, technology, Internet, TAM, patient acceptance, health-seeking behavior

  3. Gender bias in child care and child health: global patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Rohan; Jain, Snigdha; Lodha, Rakesh; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian

    2014-04-01

    Gender-based discrimination is reported across the spectrum of paediatric healthcare including emergency, inpatient, outpatient and preventive care and is mostly reported from South Asia and China with sporadic reports from Africa and South America. Biases against young girls have been documented even in immunisation percentage, home food allocation, seeking medical care for childhood ailments and percentage of household healthcare expenditures allocated to them. Such gender discrimination in access to medical care is likely to have an influence on the overall health of female children. Over the last five decades, the under-5 sex ratios are worsening in India with declining number of girls. Deliberate parental neglect of girls' essential and life-saving medical care is also an important contributing factor apart from sex-selective abortions to the declining gender ratios. Corrective measures and focused action are needed. PMID:24344176

  4. Caseworker-Perceived Caregiver Substance Abuse and Child Protective Services Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Lawrence M.; Slack, Kristen S.; Waldfogel, Jane; Bruch, Sarah K.

    2010-01-01

    We used data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being to examine associations of child protective services (CPS) caseworkers’ perceptions of caregiver substance abuse with their perceptions of the severity of risk and harm a child experienced as a result of alleged maltreatment, as well as with whether a family experienced a range of CPS outcomes. The outcomes included whether the family received services from CPS, was substantiated for maltreatment, experienced child remov...

  5. Child Labor and Health: Quantifying the Global Health Impacts of Child Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graitcer, Philip L.; Lerer, Leonard B.

    Child labor remains one of the most controversial challenges at the end of the 20th century. Approximately 250 million children in developing countries work either full- or part-time. Child labor is not confined to less-developed countries, as economic transitions bring shifts in the prevalence and nature of child labor. Throughout the world,…

  6. Psychotherapy services outside the National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, U

    1976-02-01

    With the help of an Upjohn Travelling Fellowship, I visited 15 units providing services for people under stress. There were nine residential units and six non-residential units, all were Christian charitable organisations and in all there was close co-operation with the medical profession.All these organisations accept referrals from general practitioners and deserve to be more widely known. PMID:1255548

  7. Pathways to Service Receipt: Modeling Parent Help-Seeking for Childhood Mental Health Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Godoy, Leandra; Mian, Nicholas D.; Eisenhower, Abbey S.; Carter, Alice S.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding parent appraisals of child behavior problems and parental help-seeking can reduce unmet mental health needs. Research has examined individual contributors to help-seeking and service receipt, but use of structural equation modeling (SEM) is rare. SEM was used to examine parents’ appraisal of child behavior, thoughts about seeking help, and receipt of professional services in a diverse, urban sample (N = 189) recruited from women infant and children offices. Parents of children 1...

  8. Health services under the General Agreement on Trade in Services

    OpenAIRE

    Adlung Rudolf; Carzaniga Antonia

    2001-01-01

    The potential for trade in health services has expanded rapidly in recent decades. More efficient communication systems have helped to reduce distance-related barriers to trade; rising incomes and enhanced information have increased the mobility of patients; and internal cost pressures have led various governments to consider possibilities for increased private participation. As yet, however, health services have played only a modest role in the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). ...

  9. Multiple trauma and mental health in former Ugandan child soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Fionna; Oettingen, Gabriele; Daniels, Judith; Adam, Hubertus

    2010-10-01

    The present study examines the effect of war and domestic violence on the mental health of child soldiers in a sample consisting of 330 former Ugandan child soldiers (age: 11-17 years, female: 49%). All children had experienced at least 1 war-related event and 78% were additionally exposed to at least 1 incident of domestic violence. Prevalences of posttraumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder were 33%, and 36%, respectively. Behavioral and emotional problems above clinical cutoff were measured in 61%. No gender differences were found regarding mental health outcomes. War experience and domestic violence were significantly associated with all mental health outcomes. The authors' findings point to the detrimental effects of domestic violence in addition to traumatizing war experiences in child soldiers. PMID:21053376

  10. Health services research: why and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjort, P F

    1976-01-01

    It is useful to divide medical research into three areas: biomedical, clinical, and health services research. The areas partly overlap, and health services research is also related to social services research. Research is carried out to solve problems and is an instrument for change. Health services research has developed over the last ten years in response to increasing problems in many health services. Superficially, these problems are caused by insufficient resources, but no service can hope to pay its way out of them. Some may be fairly accurately investigated, like need, demand, and utilization of care. Others are more complicated, e.g. evaluation of care, defining standards, and cost--benefit analyses. A few deal with fundamental values, like quality of life and responsibility of individuals and societies. So far, health services research has led to greater emphasis on primary care, but it is fair to say that it has not managed to infiltrate the service and influence people's attitudes and ambitions. In the future, one must bring health services research inside the service and involve the professionals more deeply. One must support prevention studies, attack the ethical and clinical problems related to quality of life, study the potential of non-professional support in the community, and promote rational attitudes among professions, patients, people and politicians. The task is never-ending and health services research, therefore, must be part of the programme of all medical schools. PMID:829768

  11. 75 FR 68612 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Prospective Analysis of Autobiographical Memory...

  12. The effect of material hardship on child protective service involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mi-Youn

    2015-03-01

    This study employs four waves of survey data on 1,135 families from the Illinois Families Study, a longitudinal panel study of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families in Illinois. This study explores the following issues within this low-income population: (1) whether material hardships are associated with child protective services (CPS) investigations, (2) whether the effect of material hardship on CPS differs by the type of child maltreatment investigated, and (3) whether psychological distress mediates the association between material hardship and CPS involvement. Results from pooled and fixed effects logistic regressions suggest that caregivers who experience material hardship are more likely to become involved in CPS. In general, investigated neglect reports are responsive to particular types of hardship such as housing and food, while investigated physical abuse reports are responsive to levels of hardship regardless of specific types. The association between material hardship and CPS involvement is not fully explained by depressive symptoms or parenting stress. The study results suggest that in order to prevent child maltreatment, it may be necessary to address a family's unmet material needs through economic support interventions. PMID:24908518

  13. Qualitative survey on current situation and demand of child health care service in Xuhui District of Shanghai city%上海市徐汇区儿童保健服务现状和需求的定性调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚; 朱国伟; 王克利

    2013-01-01

    目的:了解徐汇区社区儿童保健现状与需求的差别,为明确今后的工作重点提供依据.方法:结合现有资料,采用定性研究方法中个人访谈和小组访谈的方式,对儿童保健服务的管理者和提供者进行深入访谈.结果:儿童心理行为问题比较突出;儿童家长对于育儿指导、早期教育的需求较大且尚未满足,微量元素的测定的需求尚能满足;对智力开发的需求过度;现有儿童保健服务项目可以适当调整.结论:儿童家长对保健服务的需求不断增加,服务提供者不仅要了解、满足儿童家长需求,也要引导正确的需求方向,提高儿童保健工作水平.%Objective: To understand the difference of current situation and demand of child health care service in Xuhui District, and provide a basis for defining further key emphasis in work. Methods: The managers and providers of child health care services were interviewed deeply by means of personal interview and group interview in qualitative research method combined with current data. Results: Behavior problems in children were more outstanding; the demands of parents for parenting guidance, early education were large and unsatisfied , the demand for trace elements detection was satisfied; the demand for intellectual development was excessive; the current child health care service items could be adjusted appropriately.

  14. Health services utilisation disparities between English speaking and non-English speaking background Australian infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jack

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the differences in health services utilisation and the associated risk factors between infants from non-English speaking background (NESB and English speaking background (ESB within Australia. Methods We analysed data from a national representative longitudinal study, the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC which started in 2004. We used survey logistic regression coupled with survey multiple linear regression to examine the factors associated with health services utilisation. Results Similar health status was observed between the two groups. In comparison to ESB infants, NESB infants were significantly less likely to use the following health services: maternal and child health centres or help lines (odds ratio [OR] 0.56; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 0.40-0.79; maternal and child health nurse visits (OR 0.68; 95% CI, 0.49-0.95; general practitioners (GPs (OR 0.58; 95% CI, 0.40-0.83; and hospital outpatient clinics (OR 0.54; 95% CI, 0.31-0.93. Multivariate analysis results showed that the disparities could not be fully explained by the socioeconomic status and language barriers. The association between English proficiency and the service utilised was absent once the NESB was taken into account. Maternal characteristics, family size and income, private health insurance and region of residence were the key factors associated with health services utilisation. Conclusions NESB infants accessed significantly less of the four most frequently used health services compared with ESB infants. Maternal characteristics and family socioeconomic status were linked to health services utilisation. The gaps in health services utilisation between NESB and ESB infants with regard to the use of maternal and child health centres or phone help, maternal and child health nurse visits, GPs and paediatricians require appropriate policy attentions and interventions.

  15. Repository on maternal child health: Health portal to improve access to information on maternal child health in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality and essential health information is considered one of the most cost-effective interventions to improve health for a developing country. Healthcare portals have revolutionalized access to health information and knowledge using the Internet and related technologies, but their usage is far from satisfactory in India. This article describes a health portal developed in India aimed at providing one-stop access to efficiently search, organize and share maternal child health information relevant from public health perspective in the country. Methods The portal ‘Repository on Maternal Child Health’ was developed using an open source content management system and standardized processes were followed for collection, selection, categorization and presentation of resource materials. Its usage is evaluated using key performance indicators obtained from Google Analytics, and quality assessed using a standardized checklist of knowledge management. The results are discussed in relation to improving quality and access to health information. Results The portal was launched in July 2010 and provides free access to full-text of 900 resource materials categorized under specific topics and themes. During the subsequent 18 months, 52,798 visits were registered from 174 countries across the world, and more than three-fourth visits were from India alone. Nearly 44,000 unique visitors visited the website and spent an average time of 4 minutes 26 seconds. The overall bounce rate was 27.6%. An increase in the number of unique visitors was found to be significantly associated with an increase in the average time on site (p-value 0.01, increase in the web traffic through search engines (p-value 0.00, and decrease in the bounce rate (p-value 0.03. There was a high degree of agreement between the two experts regarding quality assessment carried out under the three domains of knowledge access, knowledge creation and knowledge transfer (Kappa

  16. Child health nurses in the Solomon Islands: lessons for the Pacific and other developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colquhoun Samantha

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To understand the roles of nurses with advanced training in paediatrics in the Solomon Islands, and the importance of these roles to child health. To understand how adequately equipped child health nurses feel for these roles, to identify the training needs, difficulties and future opportunities. Design Semi-structured interviews. Settings Tertiary hospital, district hospitals and health clinics in the Solomon Islands. Participants Twenty-one paediatric nurses were interviewed out of a total of 27 in the country. Results All nurses were currently employed in teaching, clinical or management areas. At least one or two nurses were working in each of 7 of the 9 provinces; in the two smaller provinces there were none. Many nurses were sole practitioners in remote locations without back-up from doctors or other experienced nurses; all had additional administrative or public health duties. Different types of courses were identified: a residential diploma through the University of Papua New Guinea or New Zealand and a diploma by correspondence through the University of Sydney. Conclusions Child health nurses in the Solomon Islands fulfill vital clinical, public health, teaching and administrative roles. Currently they are too few in number, and this is a limiting factor for improving the quality of child health services in that country. Current methods of training require overseas travel, or are expensive, or lack relevance, or remove nurses from their work-places and families for prolonged periods of time. A local post-basic child health nursing course is urgently needed, and models exist to achieve this.

  17. Child health nurses in the Solomon Islands: lessons for the Pacific and other developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To understand the roles of nurses with advanced training in paediatrics in the Solomon Islands, and the importance of these roles to child health. To understand how adequately equipped child health nurses feel for these roles, to identify the training needs, difficulties and future opportunities. Design Semi-structured interviews. Settings Tertiary hospital, district hospitals and health clinics in the Solomon Islands. Participants Twenty-one paediatric nurses were interviewed out of a total of 27 in the country. Results All nurses were currently employed in teaching, clinical or management areas. At least one or two nurses were working in each of 7 of the 9 provinces; in the two smaller provinces there were none. Many nurses were sole practitioners in remote locations without back-up from doctors or other experienced nurses; all had additional administrative or public health duties. Different types of courses were identified: a residential diploma through the University of Papua New Guinea or New Zealand and a diploma by correspondence through the University of Sydney. Conclusions Child health nurses in the Solomon Islands fulfill vital clinical, public health, teaching and administrative roles. Currently they are too few in number, and this is a limiting factor for improving the quality of child health services in that country. Current methods of training require overseas travel, or are expensive, or lack relevance, or remove nurses from their work-places and families for prolonged periods of time. A local post-basic child health nursing course is urgently needed, and models exist to achieve this. PMID:23171144

  18. A study to assess the effectiveness of planned health teaching programme using child-to –child approach on knowledge of selected first aid measures among school children in selected schools at Dharapuram in Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Muneeswari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available “All citizens – All health workers” Everyone, even the children also have responsible to involve in health services & act as change agents for health promotion. The study was to assess the effectiveness of teaching programme using child-to-child approach on knowledge of selected first aid measures in children. The aim of the study to assess effectiveness of planned health teaching programme on selected first aid measures among school children using child-to-child approach. Quasi experimental design was adopted. The present study was conducted at Dharapuram in Erode district, Tamil Nadu India. The samples were 200 selected by simple random sampling method. The results showed that (‘Z’ value =1.96 mean pre and post-tests value were 10.26 and 21.55. The study concluded that about 68.5percent of students gained adequate knowledge after teaching programme using child-to-child approach.

  19. Primary prevention of childhood obesity through counselling sessions at Swedish child health centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Döring, Nora; Hansson, Lena M; Andersson, Elina Scheers;

    2014-01-01

    on-going population-based PRIMROSE trial, which targets childhood obesity, is embedded in the regular national (routine) preventive child health services that are available free-of-charge to all young families in Sweden. Of the participants (n = 1369), 489 intervention and 550 control mothers (75......-day food diary. We are not aware of any previous RCT, concerned with the primary prevention of childhood obesity through sessions at CHC that addresses healthy eating habits and physical activity in the context of a routine child health services programme. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN16991919.......BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity is a growing concern in Sweden. Children with overweight and obesity run a high risk of becoming obese as adults, and are likely to develop comorbidities. Despite the immense demand, there is still a lack of evidence-based comprehensive prevention programmes targeting...

  20. Equity in maternal, newborn, and child health care coverage in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Singh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Addressing inequitable coverage of maternal and child health care services among different socioeconomic strata of population and across states is an important part of India's contemporary health program. This has wide implications for the achievement of the Millennium Development Goal targets. Objective: This paper assesses the inequity in coverage of maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH care services across household wealth quintiles in India and its states. Design: Utilizing the District Level Household and Facility Survey conducted during 2007–08, this paper has constructed a Composite Coverage Index (CCI in MNCH care. Results: The mean overall coverage of 45% was estimated at the national level, ranging from 31% for the poorest to 60% for the wealthiest quintile. Moreover, a massive state-wise difference across wealth quintiles was observed in the mean overall CCI. Almost half of the Indian states and union territories recorded a =50% coverage in MNCH care services, which demands special attention. Conclusion: India needs focused efforts to address the inequity in coverage of health care services by recognising or defining underserved people and pursuing well-planned time-oriented health programs committed to ameliorate the present state of MNCH care.

  1. Child health care utilisation in families with young or single mothers in a Swedish county.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallby, Thomas; Modin, Bitte; Hjern, Anders

    2013-03-01

    Young age and lone parenthood are risk factors for impaired health among mothers and their children. Due to the higher risks of negative influences on physical and mental health, young and single mothers should be of special concern to the Child Health Services (CHS). In the present study, we investigated consumption patterns of child health care services among young and single mothers in Uppsala County, Sweden to study whether they are reached by the universal CHS program and if selective or indicative measures were administered in daily CHS practice. Register data on CHS contacts and socio-demographic indicators were collected for 10692 infants, born in 1998-2006. Results show small differences in contact pattern and immunization status, between children of young versus older, and single versus cohabiting mothers. However, both young (RR 0.64) and single (RR 0.80) mothers had significantly lower rates of participation in parental group. The CHS were consequently successful in implementing the universal preventive child health programme for all families, including families with young or single mothers. There was no indication, however, of an established selective preventive strategy aimed at these high risk families. Programs for strengthening the support provided to vulnerable families by the CHS are needed. PMID:23197384

  2. Health-e-Child: a grid platform for european paediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Health-e-Child (HeC) project [1], [2] is an EC Framework Programme 6 Integrated Project that aims to develop a grid-based integrated healthcare platform for paediatrics. Using this platform biomedical informaticians will integrate heterogeneous data and perform epidemiological studies across Europe. The resulting Grid enabled biomedical information platform will be supported by robust search, optimization and matching techniques for information collected in hospitals across Europe. In particular, paediatricians will be provided with decision support, knowledge discovery and disease modelling applications that will access data in hospitals in the UK, Italy and France, integrated via the Grid. For economy of scale, reusability, extensibility, and maintainability, HeC is being developed on top of an EGEE/gLite [3] based infrastructure that provides all the common data and computation management services required by the applications. This paper discusses some of the major challenges in bio-medical data integration and indicates how these will be resolved in the HeC system. HeC is presented as an example of how computer science (and, in particular Grid infrastructures) originating from high energy physics can be adapted for use by biomedical informaticians to deliver tangible real-world benefits

  3. Comparison of Family Clinic Community Health Service Model with State-owned Community Health Service Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万方荣; 卢祖洵; 张金隆

    2002-01-01

    Summary: Based on a survey of community health service organization in several cities, communi-ty health service model based on the family clinic was compared with state-owned communityhealth service model, and status quo, advantages and problems of family community health serviceorganization were analyzed. Furthermore, policies for the management of community health ser-vice organization based on the family clinic were put forward.

  4. Why Should We Care about Child Labor? The Education, Labor Market, and Health Consequences of Child Labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, Kathleen; Dehejia, Rajeev; Gatti, Roberta

    2009-01-01

    Despite the extensive literature on the determinants of child labor, the evidence on the consequences of child labor on outcomes such as education, labor, and health is limited. We evaluate the causal effect of child labor participation among children in school on these outcomes using panel data from Vietnam and an instrumental variables strategy.…

  5. Towards universal health coverage for reproductive health services in Ethiopia: two policy recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onarheim, Kristine Husøy; Taddesse, Mieraf; Norheim, Ole Frithjof; Abdullah, Muna; Miljeteig, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive health services are crucial for maternal and child health, but universal health coverage is still not within reach in most societies. Ethiopia's goal of universal health coverage promises access to all necessary services for everyone while providing protection against financial risk. When moving towards universal health coverage, health plans and policies require contextualized knowledge about baseline indicators and their distributions. To understand more about the factors that explain coverage, we study the relationship between socioeconomic and geographic factors and the use of reproductive health services in Ethiopia, and further explore inequalities in reproductive health coverage. Based on these findings, we discuss the normative implications of these findings for health policy. Using population-level data from the Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey (2011) in a multivariate logistic model, we find that family planning and use of antenatal care are associated with higher wealth, higher education and being employed. Skilled attendance at birth is associated with higher wealth, higher education, and urban location. There is large variation between Addis Ababa (the capital) and other administrative regions. Concentration indices show substantial inequalities in the use of reproductive health services. Decomposition of the concentration indices indicates that difference in wealth is the most important explanatory factor for inequality in reproductive health coverage, but other factors, such as urban setting and previous health care use, are also associated with inequalities. When aiming for universal health coverage, this study shows that different socioeconomic factors as well as health-sector factors should be addressed. Our study re-confirms the importance of a broader approach to reproductive health, and in particular the importance of inequality in wealth and geography. Poor, non-educated, non-employed women in rural areas are

  6. Acceptance of Swedish e-health services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mary-Louise; Loria, Karla

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate older people’s acceptance of e-health services, in order to identify determinants of, and barriers to, their intention to use e-health. Method: Based on one of the best-established models of technology acceptance, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), in-depth exploratory interviews with twelve individuals over 45 years of age and of varying backgrounds are conducted. Results: This investigation could find support for the importance of usefulness and perceived ease of use of the e-health service offered as the main determinants of people’s intention to use the service. Additional factors critical to the acceptance of e-health are identified, such as the importance of the compatibility of the services with citizens’ needs and trust in the service provider. Most interviewees expressed positive attitudes towards using e-health and find these services useful, convenient, and easy to use. Conclusion: E-health services are perceived as a good complement to traditional health care service delivery, even among older people. These people, however, need to become aware of the e-health alternatives that are offered to them and the benefits they provide. PMID:21289860

  7. Does Health Insurance Impede Trade in Health Care Services?

    OpenAIRE

    MATTOO, Aaditya; Rathindran, Randeep

    2005-01-01

    There is limited trade in health services despite big differences in the price of health care across countries. Whether patients travel abroad for health care depends on the coverage of treatments by their health insurance plan. Under existing health insurance contracts, the gains from trade are not fully internalized by the consumer. The result is a strong "local-market bias" in the consumption of health care. A simple modification of existing insurance products can create sufficient incenti...

  8. Inequalities in child and maternal health outcomes in CEE and the CIS

    OpenAIRE

    Falkingham, Jane; Evandrou, Maria; Lyons-Amos, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Following the collapse of the Soviet Union and socialism in Europe, there was a universal drop in economic wellbeing in former socialist countries. This in turn influenced demographic behaviours, with a slump in fertility and fall in life expectancy. Maternal and child health also suffered setbacks, due to rising poverty rates and the erosion of service provision. This paper evaluates progress in former socialist countries in Central and Eastern Europe since the fall of socialism, with a part...

  9. The Child Health Disadvantage of Parental Cohabitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeer, Kammi K.

    2011-01-01

    This study uses Fragile Families data (N = 2,160) to assess health differences at age 5 for children born to cohabiting versus married parents. Regression analyses indicate worse health for children born to cohabiting parents, including those whose parents stably cohabited, dissolved their cohabitation, and married, than for children with stably…

  10. Designing online health services for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty, Bradley H; Slack, Warner V

    2016-01-01

    Patients are increasingly interacting with their healthcare system through online health services, such as patient portals and telehealth programs. Recently, Shabrabani and Mizrachi provided data outlining factors that are most important for users or potential users of these online services. The authors conclude convincingly that while online health services have great potential to be helpful to their users, they could be better designed. As patients and their families play an increasingly active role in their health care, online health services should be made easier for them to use and better suited to their health-related needs. Further, the online services should be more welcoming to people of all literacy levels and from all socioeconomic backgrounds. PMID:27307985

  11. Parental Views of In-Home Services: What Predicts Satisfaction with Child Welfare Workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Mimi V.; Gibbons, Claire B.; Barth, Richard P.; McCrae, Julie S.

    2003-01-01

    Analyzed data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being regarding predictors of client satisfaction with child welfare workers. Found that caregiver reports of having fewer than two child welfare workers, having more recent contact, and receiving timely, responsive services were associated with higher perceived quality of…

  12. Mothers in Substance Abuse Treatment: Differences in Characteristics Based on Involvement with Child Welfare Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grella, Christine E.; Hser, Yih-Ing; Huang; Yu-Chuang

    2006-01-01

    Problem: Greater awareness of the role of parental substance abuse in child maltreatment makes it imperative that the substance abuse treatment and child welfare systems coordinate services for these parents. Yet little is known about the characteristics of child-welfare involved parents (primarily mothers) who enter into substance abuse…

  13. Factors Associated with Service Use among Immigrants in the Child Welfare System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Khushmand; Chemtob, Claude M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated child, caregiver, and caseworker factors associated with greater use of family support services by immigrant families in the U.S. child welfare system. Among child factors, higher levels of internalizing behavior problems (Odds Ratio (O.R.) = 3.60), externalizing behavior problems (O.R. = 2.62) and a history of neglect…

  14. Designing online health services for patients

    OpenAIRE

    Crotty, Bradley H; Slack, Warner V

    2016-01-01

    Patients are increasingly interacting with their healthcare system through online health services, such as patient portals and telehealth programs. Recently, Shabrabani and Mizrachi provided data outlining factors that are most important for users or potential users of these online services. The authors conclude convincingly that while online health services have great potential to be helpful to their users, they could be better designed. As patients and their families play an increasingly ac...

  15. Service network analysis for agricultural mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Fuller Jeffrey D; Kelly Brian; Law Susan; Pollard Georgia; Fragar Lyn

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Farmers represent a subgroup of rural and remote communities at higher risk of suicide attributed to insecure economic futures, self-reliant cultures and poor access to health services. Early intervention models are required that tap into existing farming networks. This study describes service networks in rural shires that relate to the mental health needs of farming families. This serves as a baseline to inform service network improvements. Methods A network survey of men...

  16. What Every Child Needs for Good Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teen Eating Disorders Teen Depression and Suicide Teen Self-esteem Feeling Good About Yourself Teen Stress: A Guide to Surviving Stress SOURCES “Facts for Families," America Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry “Children’s and Adolescent’s Mental Health," US Dept. ...

  17. Integrating mental health services: the Finnish experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Lehtinen

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to give a short description of the most important developments of mental health services in Finland during the 1990s, examine their influences on the organisation and provision of services, and describe shortly some national efforts to handle the new situation. The Finnish mental health service system experienced profound changes in the beginning of the 1990s. These included the integration of mental health services, being earlier under own separate administration, with other specialised health services, decentralisation of the financing of health services, and de-institutionalisation of the services. The same time Finland underwent the deepest economic recession in Western Europe, which resulted in cut-offs especially in the mental health budgets. Conducting extensive national research and development programmes in the field of mental health has been one typically Finnish way of supporting the mental health service development. The first of these national programmes was the Schizophrenia Project 1981–97, whose main aims were to decrease the incidence of new long-term patients and the prevalence of old long-stay patients by developing an integrated treatment model. The Suicide Prevention Project 1986–96 aimed at raising awareness of this special problem and decreasing by 20% the proportionally high suicide rate in Finland. The National Depression Programme 1994–98 focused at this clearly increasing public health concern by several research and development project targeted both to the general population and specifically to children, primary care and specialised services. The latest, still on-going Meaningful Life Programme 1998–2003 which main aim is, by multi-sectoral co-operation, to improve the quality of life for people suffering from or living with the threat of mental disorders. Furthermore, the government launched in 1999 a new Goal and Action Programme for Social Welfare and Health Care 2000–2003, in

  18. Why Should We Care about Child Labor? The Education, Labor Market, and Health Consequences of Child Labor

    OpenAIRE

    Beegle, Kathleen; Dehejia, Rajeev; Gatti, Roberta

    2009-01-01

    Despite the extensive literature on the determinants of child labor, the evidence on the consequences of child labor on outcomes such as education, labor, and health is limited. We evaluate the causal effect of child labor participation among children in school on these outcomes using panel data from Vietnam and an instrumental variables strategy. Five years subsequent to the child labor experience we find significant negative impacts on education, and also find a higher probability of wage w...

  19. Why Should We Care About Child Labor? The Education, Labor Market, and Health Consequences of Child Labor

    OpenAIRE

    Beegle, Kathleen; Dehejia, Rajeev; Gatti, Roberta

    2005-01-01

    Although there is extensive literature on the determinants of child labor and many initiatives aimed at combating it, there is limited evidence on the consequences of child labor on socioeconomic outcomes such as education, wages, and health. The authors evaluate the causal effect of child labor participation on these outcomes using panel data from Vietnam and an instrumental variables strategy. Five years subsequent to the child labor experience, they find significant negative effects on sch...

  20. Evaluating web sites: reliable child health resources for parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golterman, Linda; Banasiak, Nancy C

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a framework for evaluating the quality of health care information on the Internet and identifies strategies for accessing reliable child health resources. A number of methods are reviewed, including how to evaluate Web sites for quality using the Health Information Technology Institute evaluation criteria, how to identify trustworthy Web sites accredited by Health On the Net Foundation Code of Conduct, and the use of portals to access prescreened Web sites by organizations, such as the Medical Library Association. Pediatric nurses can use one or all of these strategies to develop a list of reliable Web sites as a supplement to patient and family teaching. PMID:21661608

  1. Global child health: challenges and goals in the 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, R S

    1994-01-01

    The UNICEF message to the pediatricians and child health experts attending the Regional Pediatric Congress of the Union of National Pediatric Societies of Turkish Republics is that the way children are conceptualized in the development process has a major impact on poverty. UNICEF argues that human resource development is the safest way out of population pressure, vanishing forests, and despoiled rivers. Thailand, South Korea, Taiwan, and Singapore are examples of countries that "sacrificed, deferred consumer gratification of the elites, and disciplined themselves" in order to provide better care for their children in terms of good nutrition, good health care, and rigorous primary and secondary education for all children. Family planning was available to all parents. The emphasis was on hygiene, immunization, clean water supplies, and sanitation. Lower infant and child mortality created confidence in child survival and parental willingness to have fewer children. The working population is healthier due to the state nutrition programs and a better skilled labor force due to education and training. These countries are no longer underdeveloped because of the priority on children for over a generation and a half. Robert Heilbroner has described this strategy for development as based on social development, human development, and protection of children aged under 5 years. The Alma Ata conference in 1976 was instrumental in focusing on the health of the child by setting a standard of health for all by the year 2000. Many countries are moving in the direction proposed in these agendas. The result has been a 33% reduction in child mortality within 10 years and greater immunization in some developing countries than in Europe and North America. Immunization rates in Ankara, Turkey; Calcutta, India; Lagos, Nigeria; and Mexico City are higher than in Washington, D.C. or New York City. The 1990 World Summit for Children found that the following rules are applicable to

  2. 42 CFR 93.220 - Public Health Service or PHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and Science and the following Operating Divisions: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Agency... Administration, Health Resources and Services Administration, Indian Health Service, National Institutes of Health, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the offices of...

  3. Mental health services in the Solomon Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orotaloa, Paul; Blignault, Ilse

    2012-06-01

    The Solomon Islands comprise an archipelago of nearly 1,000 islands and coral atolls and have an estimated population of 549,574 people. Formal mental health services date back to 1950 when an asylum was established. Since then the process of mental health service development has been largely one of incremental change, with a major boost to community services in the last two decades. During the 1990s a mental health outpatient clinic was established in Honiara, together with attempts to recruit nursing staff as psychiatric coordinators in the provinces. In 1996, the Ministry commenced sending registered nurses for psychiatric training in Papua New Guinea. By 2010, there were 13 psychiatric nurses and one psychiatrist, with a second psychiatrist in training. A National Mental Health Policy was drafted in 2009 but is yet to be endorsed by Cabinet. A significant portion of the population still turns to traditional healers or church leaders for purposes of healing, seeking help from Western medicine only after all other alternatives in the community have been exhausted. There is still a long way to go before mental health services are available, affordable and accessible to the whole population, including people living in geographically remote areas. Realization of this vision requires increased resourcing for mental health services; improved communication and collaboration between the centrally-based, national mental health services and the provincial health services; and closer, ongoing relationships between all stakeholders and partners, both locally and internationally. PMID:26767360

  4. Traditional perspectives on child and family health

    OpenAIRE

    Warne, Donald

    2005-01-01

    First Nations and American Indian communities experience significant health disparities compared with the general populations of Canada and the United States. Children from these communities experience higher rates of infant mortality, suicide and unintentional injury. From a traditional Lakota perspective, many of the health disparities faced in Aboriginal communities are linked to imbalances in the family and community. These imbalances can lead to detrimental behaviours, including substanc...

  5. International Child Health Elective for Pediatric Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Da Dalt, Liviana; Putoto, Giovanni; Carraro, Dante; Gatta, Alessandra; Baraldi, Eugenio; Perilongo, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Background There are increasing evidence highlighting the importance of incorporating issues of global health into pre- and post-graduate medical curricula. Medical international cooperation is a fundamental component of strategies to include global health issues in post-graduate medical curricula. Methods Here we describe a seven-year cooperation between the Non Governmental Organization (NGO) “Doctors for Africa CUAMM” and the Pediatric Residency Program (PRP) of the University of Padua (It...

  6. Homework for Parents -- Your Child's Back-To-School Health Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips Share this! Home » Health Tips » Child Emergencies Homework for Parents — Your Child's Back-To-School Health ... advise parents and guardians to do a little homework of their own and go through a back- ...

  7. Mental Health Care in a High School Based Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, Lisa; Juszczak, Linda; Fisher, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Describes the mental-health and medical services provided at a high-school-based service center. Five years after the center's inception mental health visits had quadrupled. One third of students utilizing the center reported substance abuse within their family. Other reasons for center use included pregnancy, suicidal ideation, obesity,…

  8. Social context, social position and child survival : Social determinants of child health inequities in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Antai, Diddy

    2010-01-01

    Under-five mortality rate is a key indicator of the level of child health and overall well-being of a given population and is an indicator of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals 4. Of the estimated more than 10 million children that die worldwide each year, 41% of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. With over one million children dying yearly from preventable diseases in Nigeria, the country may not meet the other Millennium Development Goals by 2015. Child...

  9. Parenting and child mental health: a cross-cultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Marc H

    2013-10-01

    In its most general instrumental sense, parenting consists of care of the young in preparing them to manage the tasks of life. Parents provide childhood experiences and populate the environments that guide children's development and so contribute to child mental health. Parenting is expressed in cognitions and practices. However, parents do not parent, and children do not grow up, in isolation, but in multiple contexts, and one notable context of parenting and child mental health is culture. Every culture is characterized, and distinguished from other cultures, by deep-rooted and widely acknowledged ideas about how one needs to feel, think, and act as an adequately functioning member of the culture. Insofar as parents subscribe to particular conventions of a culture, they likely follow prevailing "cultural scripts" in childrearing. Broadening our definition, it is therefore the continuing task of parents also to enculturate children by preparing them for the physical, psychosocial, and educational situations that are characteristic of their specific culture. Cross-cultural comparisons show that virtually all aspects of parenting children are informed by culture: culture influences when and how parents care for children, what parents expect of children, and which behaviors parents appreciate, emphasize and reward or discourage and punish. Thus, cultural norms become manifest in the mental health of children through parenting. Furthermore, variations in what is normative in different cultures challenge our assumptions about what is universal and inform our understanding of how parent-child relationships unfold in ways both culturally universal and specific. This essay concerns the contributions of culture to parenting and child mental health. No study of a single society can address this broad issue. It is possible, however, to learn lessons about parenting and child mental health from the study of different societies. PMID:24096792

  10. The Influence of Family Environment on Mental Health Need and Service Use among Vulnerable Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Richard; Lindsey, Michael A.; English, Diana J.; Hawley, Kristin M.; Lambert, Sharon; Browne, Dorothy C.

    2007-01-01

    Children in child welfare are especially likely to have unmet mental health needs. The role of family factors in children's use of mental health services was examined in a longitudinal sample of 1,075 maltreated or at-risk children. Vulnerable family environment (poor family functioning, low social support, and caregiver psychological distress) is…

  11. Child mental health differences amongst ethnic groups in Britain: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon David A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inter-ethnic differences have been reported for many mental health outcomes in the UK, but no systematic review on child mental health has been published. The aim of this review is to compare the population-based prevalence of child mental disorders between ethnic groups in Britain, and relate these findings to ethnic differences in mental health service use. Methods A systematic search of bibliographic databases for population-based and clinic-based studies of children aged 0–19, including all ethnic groups and the main child mental disorders. We synthesised findings by comparing each minority group to the White British study sample. Results 31 population-based and 18 clinic-based studies met the inclusion criteria. Children in the main minority groups have similar or better mental health than White British children for common disorders, but may have higher rates for some less common conditions. The causes of these differences are unclear. There may be unmet need for services among Pakistani and Bangladeshi children. Conclusion Inter-ethnic differences exist but are largely unexplained. Future studies should address the challenges of cross-cultural psychiatry and investigate reasons for inter-ethnic differences.

  12. Ethnicity and child health in northern Tanzania: Maasai pastoralists are disadvantaged compared to neighbouring ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, David W; Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique; Ghiselli, Margherita E; Ngadaya, Esther; Ngowi, Bernard; Mfinanga, Sayoki G M; Hartwig, Kari; James, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The Maasai of northern Tanzania, a semi-nomadic ethnic group predominantly reliant on pastoralism, face a number of challenges anticipated to have negative impacts on child health, including marginalisation, vulnerabilities to drought, substandard service provision and on-going land grabbing conflicts. Yet, stemming from a lack of appropriate national survey data, no large-scale comparative study of Maasai child health has been conducted. Savannas Forever Tanzania surveyed the health of over 3500 children from 56 villages in northern Tanzania between 2009 and 2011. The major ethnic groups sampled were the Maasai, Sukuma, Rangi, and the Meru. Using multilevel regression we compare each ethnic group on the basis of (i) measurements of child health, including anthropometric indicators of nutritional status and self-reported incidence of disease; and (ii) important proximate determinants of child health, including food insecurity, diet, breastfeeding behaviour and vaccination coverage. We then (iii) contrast households among the Maasai by the extent to which subsistence is reliant on livestock herding. Measures of both child nutritional status and disease confirm that the Maasai are substantially disadvantaged compared to neighbouring ethnic groups, Meru are relatively advantaged, and Rangi and Sukuma intermediate in most comparisons. However, Maasai children were less likely to report malaria and worm infections. Food insecurity was high throughout the study site, but particularly severe for the Maasai, and reflected in lower dietary intake of carbohydrate-rich staple foods, and fruits and vegetables. Breastfeeding was extended in the Maasai, despite higher reported consumption of cow's milk, a potential weaning food. Vaccination coverage was lowest in Maasai and Sukuma. Maasai who rely primarily on livestock herding showed signs of further disadvantage compared to Maasai relying primarily on agriculture. We discuss the potential ecological, socioeconomic, demographic

  13. Ethnicity and child health in northern Tanzania: Maasai pastoralists are disadvantaged compared to neighbouring ethnic groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Lawson

    Full Text Available The Maasai of northern Tanzania, a semi-nomadic ethnic group predominantly reliant on pastoralism, face a number of challenges anticipated to have negative impacts on child health, including marginalisation, vulnerabilities to drought, substandard service provision and on-going land grabbing conflicts. Yet, stemming from a lack of appropriate national survey data, no large-scale comparative study of Maasai child health has been conducted. Savannas Forever Tanzania surveyed the health of over 3500 children from 56 villages in northern Tanzania between 2009 and 2011. The major ethnic groups sampled were the Maasai, Sukuma, Rangi, and the Meru. Using multilevel regression we compare each ethnic group on the basis of (i measurements of child health, including anthropometric indicators of nutritional status and self-reported incidence of disease; and (ii important proximate determinants of child health, including food insecurity, diet, breastfeeding behaviour and vaccination coverage. We then (iii contrast households among the Maasai by the extent to which subsistence is reliant on livestock herding. Measures of both child nutritional status and disease confirm that the Maasai are substantially disadvantaged compared to neighbouring ethnic groups, Meru are relatively advantaged, and Rangi and Sukuma intermediate in most comparisons. However, Maasai children were less likely to report malaria and worm infections. Food insecurity was high throughout the study site, but particularly severe for the Maasai, and reflected in lower dietary intake of carbohydrate-rich staple foods, and fruits and vegetables. Breastfeeding was extended in the Maasai, despite higher reported consumption of cow's milk, a potential weaning food. Vaccination coverage was lowest in Maasai and Sukuma. Maasai who rely primarily on livestock herding showed signs of further disadvantage compared to Maasai relying primarily on agriculture. We discuss the potential ecological

  14. Scope of health systems research in Child Survival and Safe Motherhood programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, P K

    1993-01-01

    Editorial commentary focused on several Health System Research (HSR) approaches which exemplified some of the key issues for application of HSR for further improvement in Maternal and Child Health (MCH) services in India. The goals of HSR are to delineate health policy which improves the operations of the health care delivery system for sustainability at the district level. HSR is part of a global effort of Health For All by 2000 AD and India's Child Survival and Safe Motherhood (CSSM) program, sponsored by IDA/UNICEF. CSSM aims also to end polio by 2000 AD, eliminate neonatal tetanus by 1995, and prevent deaths and morbidity from measles, diarrheal diseases, and acute respiratory infection. MCH services will be expanded at the village, subcenter, primary health center, and community health center levels in order to reduce maternal mortality to below 2/1000 from the 1990 5/1000 and to reduce mortality of children aged 1-4 years to less than 10/1000 live births from 80/1000 by 2000 AD. States with particularly high levels of child and maternal mortality are Bihar, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Madhya Pradesh, which have about 40% of India's population. These states have low marriage ages, low female literacy, and few women in nonagricultural employment. There are about 90 districts in these states with particularly low demographic indicators. India policy directs all CSSM work to be carried out by existing staff; the program emphasis will be training, supervision, and logistics. IEC will need to be directed to attitudinal change in rural areas and urban slums. Research has found that coverage is uneven and quality of MCH services, poor. One study will evaluate the performance over 5 years in Gwalior district in a nutrition and school health program. Another research effort will perform quality assessment of MCH care at the primary health care level and promote community awareness and increased utilization. An ongoing study is evaluating nationally the family welfare

  15. Health Expenditures, Services and Outcomes in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    David H. Peters; Kandola, Kami; Elemendorf, A. Edward; Chellaraj, Gnanaraj

    2010-01-01

    In the past thirty years, Sub-Saharan African countries have made remarkable improvements in health conditions and status. However, they still suffer from some of the worst health problems in the world, and AIDS is making conditions much worse than they will be otherwise. This study, health expenditures, services, and outcomes in Africa considers 48 countries of Sub-Saharan Africa and outl...

  16. 42 CFR 457.402 - Definition of child health assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Prescription drugs and biologicals and the administration of these drugs and biologicals, only if these drugs... related supportive services (such as home health nursing services, personal care, assistance with... members and minor modification to the home.) (o) Nursing care services (such as nurse...

  17. The dynamic relationship between cash transfers and child health: can the child support grant in South Africa make a difference to child nutrition?

    OpenAIRE

    Zembe-Mkabile, Wanga; Ramokolo, Vundli; Sanders, David; Jackson, Debra; Doherty, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cash transfer programmes targeting children are considered an effective strategy for addressing child poverty and for improving child health outcomes in developing countries. In South Africa, the Child Support Grant (CSG) is the largest cash transfer programme targeting children from poor households. The present paper investigates the association of the duration of CSG receipt with child growth at 2 years in three diverse areas of South Africa. Design The study analysed data on CSG ...

  18. Health services accessibility among Spanish elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Mayoralas, G; Rodríguez, V; Rojo, F

    2000-01-01

    The paper aims to identify the variables that best explain the use of health services by people aged 65 and over in Spain. The data comes from the 1993 Spanish National Health Survey (ENSE 93). The conceptual framework is the model proposed by Andersen, who suggests that utilisation is a function of predisposition to use the services, the ability to use them and of need. A bivariate and multivariate analysis (SPSS-X Discriminant Procedure) is conducted to define the predictors that best discriminate users and non-users. The use of each health service is explained by a different set of variables. The need variables play a more important role in predicting the use of non-discretionary services that are more closely related to healing processes (medical consultations, emergencies and hospitalisation). The predisposing and enabling variables are more relevant in explaining the use of dental services, indicating a certain degree of inequity of these discretionary services. PMID:10622691

  19. Intelligent Healthcare Service Using Health Lifelog Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junho; Choi, Chang; Ko, Hoon; Kim, Pankoo

    2016-08-01

    Recently, there have been many studies of health services combined with smart devices, gathering a user' health lifelog and managing his or her health for the improvement of the quality of his or her life, using various sensors. However, previous works have problems in the extraction of patterns in person's complex health lifelog, the analysis of complex relations among those patterns, the extension of them to related services, and reuse of lifelog patterns. The healthcare lifelogs should search efficiently data necessary for users from big data because those gather real-time data of various types of data. The healthcare lifelogs should search efficiently data necessary for users from big data because those gather real-time data of various types of data. In this paper, we propose the intelligent healthcare service for reasoning personal health state with data extraction, pattern analysis, health life ontology modeling using health lifelog analysis based on smart devices. The proposed health information service provided more and more appropriate service with users if more reasoning rules related to more and various healthcare lifelog information gathering are included in the service. PMID:27352004

  20. 78 FR 70309 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 5B01... of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel... Branch, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH,...

  1. Child health developmental plasticity, and epigenetic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasticity in developmental programming has evolved in order to provide the best chances of survival and reproductive success to the organism under changing environments. Environmental conditions that are experienced in early life can profoundly influence human biology and long-term health. Developm...

  2. AN EMPIRICAL RESEARCH IN COMMUNICATION MANAGEMENT: THE CASE OF CHILD ADOPTION SERVICES

    OpenAIRE

    Sefora Marcela SANA

    2014-01-01

    The empirical study’s purpose was the analysis of marketing communication tools used by nonprofit and public organizations in sustaining the social cause of child adoption, as part of child protection services. The conceptual framework of the study is based on marketing theory of promotional mix and communication techniques applicable to nonprofit and public institutions. Empirical analyses underlines the correspondence between the level of awareness regarding child adoption services, and com...

  3. Housing Services for Child Welfare-Involved Families: An Initial Evaluation Using Observational Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Patrick J.; Taylor, Jeremy J.; Rufa, Anne K.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of housing services among child welfare-involved families using observational data. Propensity score matching with data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being compared intact families (n = 183) who received housing services 12 months after initial investigation to nontreated families balanced on…

  4. Children's Experiences of Domestic Violence: Developing an Integrated Response from Police and Child Protection Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Nicky; Miller, Pam; Richardson Foster, Helen; Thomson, Gill

    2011-01-01

    Police notifications of incidents of domestic violence to child protection services constitute an acknowledgement of the harm that domestic violence inflicts on children. However, these notifications represent a substantial demand on child welfare services and the outcomes for children and victims of domestic violence have been questioned. This…

  5. Legal and Social Service Responses to Child Sexual Abuse: A Primer and Discussion of Relevant Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Tisha R. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a broad overview of legal and social service responses to child sexual abuse, the overarching legal framework provided by federal legislation, and funding mandates and the unique and shared investigative concerns of law enforcement and child protective service entities. Relevant psychological research is highlighted throughout,…

  6. Child Physical Abuse and Concurrence of Other Types of Child Abuse in Sweden--Associations with Health and Risk Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annerback, E. M.; Sahlqvist, L.; Svedin, C. G.; Wingren, G.; Gustafsson, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the associations between child physical abuse executed by a parent or caretaker and self-rated health problems/risk-taking behaviors among teenagers. Further to evaluate concurrence of other types of abuse and how these alone and in addition to child physical abuse were associated with bad health status and risk-taking…

  7. Early childbirth, health inputs and child mortality: recent evidence from Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Maitra, Pushkar; Pal, Sarmistha

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between early childbearing, parental use of health inputs and child mortality in Bangladesh. In order to account for the potential endogeneity of the age at birth and use of health inputs, (hospital delivery and child vaccination) in the child mortality regression, we jointly estimate mother’s age at childbirth, hospital delivery, child vaccination and child mortality taking into account of unobserved mother level heterogeneity. There is evidence of signif...

  8. Service network analysis for agricultural mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Jeffrey D

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Farmers represent a subgroup of rural and remote communities at higher risk of suicide attributed to insecure economic futures, self-reliant cultures and poor access to health services. Early intervention models are required that tap into existing farming networks. This study describes service networks in rural shires that relate to the mental health needs of farming families. This serves as a baseline to inform service network improvements. Methods A network survey of mental health related links between agricultural support, health and other human services in four drought declared shires in comparable districts in rural New South Wales, Australia. Mental health links covered information exchange, referral recommendations and program development. Results 87 agencies from 111 (78% completed a survey. 79% indicated that two thirds of their clients needed assistance for mental health related problems. The highest mean number of interagency links concerned information exchange and the frequency of these links between sectors was monthly to three monthly. The effectiveness of agricultural support and health sector links were rated as less effective by the agricultural support sector than by the health sector (p Conclusion Aligning with agricultural agencies is important to build effective mental health service pathways to address the needs of farming populations. Work is required to ensure that these agricultural support agencies have operational and effective links to primary mental health care services. Network analysis provides a baseline to inform this work. With interventions such as local mental health training and joint service planning to promote network development we would expect to see over time an increase in the mean number of links, the frequency in which these links are used and the rated effectiveness of these links.

  9. Office for prevention and health services assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, James A.

    1994-12-01

    The Air Force Surgeon General has established the Office for Prevention and Health Care ASsessment (OPHSA) to become the center of excellence for preventive services and health care assessment in the U.S. Air Force and the Department of Defense. OPHSA using the principles of total quality management and integrated teams will evaluate, compare, and modify preventive services delivery guidelines to preserve the fighting force by preventing illness and injuries in military populations. OPHSA will evaluate and formulate health care delivery guidelines to improve health care access and delivery to military patient populations. OPHSA will develop data to determine the health status and health needs to beneficiary populations so medical managers can deliver medical care in the most cost effective manner. OPHSA is located at Brooks Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. OPHSA will have thirty seven active duty military, civil service, and contract employees and should be fully functional by the end of 1995.

  10. Parental Compensatory Behaviors and Early Child Health Outcomes in Cebu, Philippines*

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Haiyong; Mroz, Thomas; Adair, Linda

    2009-01-01

    A dynamic optimization model of parents choosing investments in their children’s health motivates an empirical model of parents’ choices of health inputs for their children and the impacts of these decisions on their children’s subsequent health. Estimates of the child health input demand functions and the child health production functions from the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey accord with the prediction that optimizing behavior results in higher levels of aggregate child heal...

  11. School absence and treatment in school children with respiratory symptoms in the Netherlands: Data from the Child Health Monitoring System

    OpenAIRE

    Spee-van der Wekke, J.; Meulmeester, J.F.; Radder, J.J.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S P

    1998-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of respiratory problems, and the relation of these problems with school attendance, medicine use, and medical treatment. DESIGN: The Child Health Monitoring System. SETTING: Nineteen public health services across the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: 5186 school children aged 4-15 years, who were eligible for a routine health assessment in the 1991/1992 school year. MAIN RESULTS: Respiratory symptoms were present in 12% of the children. Recent symptoms...

  12. Development and Pilot Evaluation of a Tablet-Based Application to Improve Quality of Care in Child Mental Health Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Bunnell, Brian E.; Andrews III, Arthur R; Tatiana M. Davidson; Hanson, Rochelle F.; Danielson, Carla Kmett; Saunders, Benjamin E.; Soltis, Kathryn; Yarian, Caleb; Chu, Brian; Adams, Zachary W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Children need access to high quality mental health care. Effective treatments now exist for a wide range of mental health conditions. However, these interventions are delivered with variable effectiveness in traditional mental health service settings. Innovative solutions are needed to improve treatment delivery quality and effectiveness. Objective The aim of this study was to develop a scalable, sustainable technology-based approach to improve the quality of care in child mental h...

  13. Indicators of mental health services evaluation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Caroline Gonçalves Cavalcante

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study was performed with the objective to evaluate the structure of the Mental Health Service Network of the Municipal Health Department of Goiania, the capital city of Goias state, Brazil. Data were collected using a semi-structured instrument and photographic records, and analyzed using Atlas.ti 6.2, and based on Donabedian’s theoretical framework. Various conditions were observed for service facilities; from structures that were precarious and unsuitable for therapy, to facilities that were welcoming and had good accessibility. The main positive aspect was the diversity of multidisciplinary teams. Making service facilities appropriate is imperative, although it is recognized that the municipality is currently undergoing reformulation, aiming at meeting the needs of the National Policy for Mental Health. Furthermore, intersectoral partnerships should be established for evaluation processes, particularly in the academia and service domains, which could generate the desired impact on health care to clients of specialized services. Descriptors: Health Services Evaluation; Mental Health; Structure of Services.

  14. Quality of Health Management Information System for Maternal & Child Health Care in Haryana State, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Atul; Rana, Saroj Kumar; Prinja, Shankar; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite increasing importance being laid on use of routine data for decision making in India, it has frequently been reported to be riddled with problems. Evidence suggests lack of quality in the health management information system (HMIS), however there is no robust analysis to assess the extent of its inaccuracy. We aim to bridge this gap in evidence by assessing the extent of completeness and quality of HMIS in Haryana state of India. Methods Data on utilization of key maternal and child health (MCH) services were collected using a cross-sectional household survey from 4807 women in 209 Sub-Centre (SC) areas across all 21 districts of Haryana state. Information for same services was also recorded from HMIS records maintained by auxiliary nurse midwives (ANMs) at SCs to check under- or over-recording (Level 1 discordance). Data on utilisation of MCH services from SC ANM records, for a subset of the total women covered in the household survey, were also collected and compared with monthly reports submitted by ANMs to assess over-reporting while report preparation (Level 2 discordance) to paint the complete picture for quality and completeness of routine HMIS. Results Completeness of ANM records for various MCH services ranged from 73% for DPT1 vaccination dates to 94.6% for dates of delivery. Average completeness level for information recorded in HMIS was 88.5%. Extent of Level 1 discordance for iron-folic acid (IFA) supplementation, 3 or more ante-natal care (ANC) visits and 2 Tetanus toxoid (TT) injections was 41%, 16% and 2% respectively. In 48.2% cases, respondents from community as well as HMIS records reported at least one post-natal care (PNC) home visit by ANM. Extent of Level 2 discordance ranged from 1.6% to 6%. These figures were highest for number of women who completed IFA supplementation, contraceptive intra-uterine device insertion and provision of 2nd TT injection during ANC. Conclusions HMIS records for MCH services at sub-centre level

  15. The social determinants of child health: variations across health outcomes – a population-based cross-sectional analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Victorino Charlemaigne C; Gauthier Anne H

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Disparities in child health outcomes persist despite advances in medical technology and increased global wealth. The social determinants of health approach is useful in explaining the disparities in health. Our objective in this paper is four-fold: (1) to test whether the income relationship (and the related income gradient) is the same across different child health outcomes; (2) to test whether the association between income and child health outcomes persists after contro...

  16. Study protocol: realist evaluation of effectiveness and sustainability of a community health workers programme in improving maternal and child health in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Mirzoev, T; Etiaba, E; Ebenso, B; Uzochukwu, B; Manzano, A.; Onwujekwe, O; Huss, R; Ezumah, N; Hicks, JC; Newell, J; Ensor, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Achievement of improved maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes continues to be an issue of international priority, particularly for sub-Saharan African countries such as Nigeria. Evidence suggests that the use of Community Health Workers (CHWs) can be effective in broadening access to, and coverage of, health services and improving MCH outcomes in such countries. Methods/design In this paper, we report the methodology for a 5-year study which aims to evaluate the context, process...

  17. Child, Caregiver, and Family Characteristics Associated with Emergency Department Use by Children Who Remain at Home after a Child Protective Services Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Janet U.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Leslie, Laurel K.; Zhang, Jinjin; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To examine emergency department (ED) use among children involved with child protective services (CPS) in the US but who remain at home, and to determine if ED use is related to child, caregiver and family characteristics as well as receipt of CPS services. Method: We analyzed data on 4,001 children in the National Survey of Child and…

  18. Poverty and Child Health in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Almost half of young children in the United States live in poverty or near poverty. The American Academy of Pediatrics is committed to reducing and ultimately eliminating child poverty in the United States. Poverty and related social determinants of health can lead to adverse health outcomes in childhood and across the life course, negatively affecting physical health, socioemotional development, and educational achievement. The American Academy of Pediatrics advocates for programs and policies that have been shown to improve the quality of life and health outcomes for children and families living in poverty. With an awareness and understanding of the effects of poverty on children, pediatricians and other pediatric health practitioners in a family-centered medical home can assess the financial stability of families, link families to resources, and coordinate care with community partners. Further research, advocacy, and continuing education will improve the ability of pediatricians to address the social determinants of health when caring for children who live in poverty. Accompanying this policy statement is a technical report that describes current knowledge on child poverty and the mechanisms by which poverty influences the health and well-being of children. PMID:26962238

  19. Child maltreatment and educational attainment in young adulthood: results from the Ontario Child Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masako; Georgiades, Katholiki; Boyle, Michael H; MacMillan, Harriet L

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the adverse effects of child maltreatment on academic performance; however, most of these studies used selective samples and did not account for potential confounding or mediating factors. We examined the relationship between child physical abuse (PA; severe and non-severe) and sexual abuse (SA) and educational attainment (years of education, failure to graduate from high school) with a Canadian community sample. We used data from the Ontario Child Health Study (N = 1,893), a province-wide longitudinal survey. Potential confounding variables (family socio-demographic and parental capacity) and child-level characteristics were assessed in 1983, and child abuse was determined in 2000-2001 based on retrospective self-report. Results showed that PA and SA were associated with several factors indicative of social disadvantage in childhood. Multilevel regression analyses for years of education revealed a significant estimate for severe PA based on the unadjusted model (-0.60 years, 95% CI = [-0.45, -0.76]); estimates for non-severe PA (0.05 years, CI = [-0.15, 0.26]) and SA (-0.25 years, CI = [-0.09, -0.42]) were not significant. In the adjusted full model, the only association to reach significance was between severe PA and reduced years of education (-0.31 years, CI = [-0.18, -0.44]). Multilevel regression analyses for failure to graduate from high school showed significant unadjusted estimates for severe PA (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = [1.21, 2.58]) and non-severe PA (OR = 1.61, CI = [1.01, 2.57]); SA was not associated with this outcome (OR = 1.40, CI = [0.94, 2.07]). In the adjusted full models, there were no significant associations between child abuse variables and failure to graduate. The magnitude of effect of PA on both outcomes was reduced largely by child individual characteristics. These findings generally support earlier research, indicating the adverse effects of child maltreatment on educational attainment. Of particular note

  20. Evaluation of Maternal Health Component of Reproductive and Child Health (RCH II Programme in Beed District, Maharashtra, India 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dnyaneshwar Nipte,

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Situation analysis of Reproductive and Child Health programme of Government of India in Beed district of Maharashtra state in India indicated lack of achievement of targeted maternal health indicators. Evaluation of the utilization of maternal health services component of Reproductive and Child Health (RCH II programme in Beed district of Maharashtra state in India was undertaken. Material and Methods: A cross sectional survey in the rural area of Beed district using cluster sampling method was conducted. The information about the utilization of maternal health services was collected from mothers who delivered between 1st April and 30th June 2013. A facility survey using pre tested check list was undertaken. Analysis of the data using Epi Info Version 3.5.3 and proportion for selected maternal health care indicators were calculated. Results: Out of the 374 mothers included in the study, 122 (33.0% had registered within first trimester of pregnancy; nearly 50% had received more than three antenatal care (ANC visits and 90% had institutional delivery. Of the 70 mothers, who made phone call for ambulance service, 56 (80% utilized ambulance from their residence to the hospitals. Of the 183 mothers who delivered in Government hospitals, 103 (56.3% utilized it to reach home from hospitals after delivery. Of the eligible women, 96 (76.2% were registered for Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY scheme of the Government and 67 (69.8% received the benefit. In all 46 (16.4% Auxiliary Nurse Midwives (ANMs were trained as Skilled Birth Attendant (SBA. Of the 22 facilities, 14 (63.6% had delivery kits and in 6 (27.3% facilities maternal health services were monitored by medical officers. Conclusion: The utilization of maternal health care services and knowledge and implementation regarding JSY Scheme and ambulance service utilization among mothers was less than desirable. The coverage of training of ANMs as SBA was low. Provision of antenatal services in

  1. Health Service use of ionising radiations: Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet gives outline guidance on the use of ionising radiations in the Health Service in the United Kingdom. Extensive reference is made to documents where more detailed information may be found. The guidance covers general advice on the medical use of ionising radiations, statutory requirements, and guidance on selected Health Service issues such as patient identification procedures, information management systems, deviations from prescribed radiation dose, imaging and radiotherapy. (57 references) (U.K.)

  2. Privacy as a Service in Digital Health

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Xiang; Hyysalo, Jarkko; Rautiainen, Mika; Riekki, Jukka,; Sauvola, Jaakko; Maarala, Altti Ilari; Honko, Harri

    2016-01-01

    Privacy is a key challenge for continued digitalization of health. The forthcoming European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is transforming this challenge into regulatory directives. User consent provisioning and coordinating across data services will be the keys in addressing this challenge. We suggest a privacy-driven architecture that provides tools for providing user consent as a service. This enables managing and reusing private health information between a large amount of data...

  3. Qualitative Methods in Mental Health Services Research

    OpenAIRE

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative and mixed methods play a prominent role in mental health services research. However, the standards for their use are not always evident, especially for those not trained in such methods. This paper reviews the rationale and common approaches to using qualitative and mixed methods in mental health services and implementation research based on a review of the papers included in this special series along with representative examples from the literature. Qualitative methods are used t...

  4. Web services synchronization health care application

    CERN Document Server

    Limam, Hela

    2011-01-01

    With the advance of Web Services technologies and the emergence of Web Services into the information space, tremendous opportunities for empowering users and organizations appear in various application domains including electronic commerce, travel, intelligence information gathering and analysis, health care, digital government, etc. In fact, Web services appear to be s solution for integrating distributed, autonomous and heterogeneous information sources. However, as Web services evolve in a dynamic environment which is the Internet many changes can occur and affect them. A Web service is affected when one or more of its associated information sources is affected by schema changes. Changes can alter the information sources contents but also their schemas which may render Web services partially or totally undefined. In this paper, we propose a solution for integrating information sources into Web services. Then we tackle the Web service synchronization problem by substituting the affected information sources....

  5. Infant and Young Child Feeding: a Key area to Improve Child Health

    OpenAIRE

    Habibolah Taghizade Moghaddam; Gholam Hasan Khodaee; Maryam Ajilian Abbasi; Masumeh Saeidi

    2015-01-01

    Good nutrition is essential for survival, physical growth, mental development, performance, productivity, health and well-being across the entire life-span: from the earliest stages of fetal development, at birth, and through infancy, childhood, adolescence and on into adulthood. Poor nutrition in the first 1,000 days of children’s lives can have irreversible consequences. For millions of children, it means they are, forever, stunted. Every infant and child has the right to good nutrition acc...

  6. Health psychology in brain injury rehabilitation services

    OpenAIRE

    Eldred, C.E.

    2006-01-01

    The work carried out in this portfolio was completed while working as a Health Psychologist in Training within a vocational rehabilitation service for adults with acquired brain injury All pieces of work were carried out within this setting expect for the consultancy unit which was carried out within a pilot service delivered by an Adult Disability Team ofa local Social Services. Individuals with acquired brain injury often do not have full understanding of the nature. degree or impact of the...

  7. Filipino Child Health in the United States: Do Health and Health Care Disparities Exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce R. Javier, MD, MPH

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionFilipinos are the second largest Asian subgroup in the United States, but few studies have examined health and health care disparities in Filipino children. The objectives of this review are 1 to appraise current knowledge of Filipino children’s health and health care and 2 to present the implications of these findings for research, clinical care, and policy.MethodsWe identified articles for review primarily via a Medline search emphasizing the terms Filipino and United States crossed with specific topics in child and adolescent health that fall under one of Healthy People 2010’s 28 focus areas. ResultsFilipino children are underrepresented in medical research. Studies that compare Filipino children and adolescents with white children or children of other Asian Pacific Islander subgroups suggest disparities with regard to gestational diabetes, rates of neonatal mortality and low birth weight, malnutrition in young children, overweight, physical inactivity and fitness, tuberculosis, dental caries, and substance abuse. Studies that compare Filipino adults with white adults describe adult Filipino health problems similar to those of Filipino children, including higher rates of diabetes, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome. Health care disparities remain to be determined.ConclusionHealth and health care disparities appear to exist for Filipino children, but more research is needed to confirm these findings. Practitioners serving this population need to consider social and cultural factors that can increase or diminish risk for health problems. There are priorities in research and policy that, if pursued, may improve the health care and health outcomes of Filipino children.

  8. 77 FR 76052 - Health Resources and Services Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities... and Services Administration (HRSA) publishes periodic summaries of proposed projects being developed...: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) plans to conduct a survey of the...

  9. Child Health and Nutrition: Getting better and facing new challenges in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shougang Wei

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundChild healthcare practices in China over the last 60 yearshave extensively improved children’s health and growth, yetnew challenges lie ahead. This review aims to summarisethe successful experiences and the newly identifiedproblems in child healthcare in China.MethodInformation, available to the public, was obtained fromChinese databases and Chinese Government websites,chiefly the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructuredatabase, the Chinese Biomedical Literature database, theMinistry of Health website and the National WorkingCommittee on Children and Women website.ResultsDuring its poverty-stricken 1950s–1970s, China protectedchildren’s health mainly through prevention and control ofcommon infectious diseases and severe malnutrition withina comprehensive healthcare system. After the subsequent30 years of rapid socio-economic development, China hasachieved great success in reducing childhood mortality ratesand promoting child growth, meeting the MillenniumDevelopment Goal 4 targets and the WHO child growthstandards. Meanwhile, new challenges for children’shealthcare emerged, including: large disparities in thehealth, growth and nutritional status of children, and in theaccessibility and quality of child healthcare, between urbanand rural areas and across different regions of China; thenutritional and healthcare concerns of the fast-expandingpopulation of migrant children and rural left-behindchildren; the burgeoning epidemic of childhood obesity inurban and economically developed areas; micronutrientdeficiencies such as calcium, iron, zinc and vitamin A; andincreasing prevalence of mental and behavioural disorders.ConclusionUnder poor economic conditions, healthcare plays a keyrole in protecting children against diseases. With thedevelopment of social economy, new challenges present tohealthcare services, specifically, to comprehensivelypromote and optimise childrens’ health and nutrition.

  10. Saúde infantil: condições de vida e utilização de serviços de saúde em área da Região Metropolitana de São Paulo, 1996 Child health: social conditions and health services utilization in São Paulo Metropolitan Region, 1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Fiorini Puccini

    2002-08-01

    were stratified into four bands; the sampling process considered two independent populations: children under one year old and children between one and four years old. Indicators of prenatal and perinatal care and child's health attention were investigated. Statistical analysis: estimates of proportions, standard errors and confidence intervals (95% were calculated, utilizing the Csample: Epi-info 6.04 program. RESULTS: in all the bands, over 90% of the mothers had prenatal assistance, although with a tendency towards later access in band four (shantytowns. Around 80% of the children under one year old were followed up by healthcare clinics; the basic health units were principally utilized for vaccinations (97,4% and checkups (79,0%, especially for band four, and the other healthcare facilities were utilized for medical visits without appointments. For band one (best conditions, there was a greater demand for private and health insurance services. For acute affections healthcare facilities services were the option for almost 100% of the cases. CONCLUSIONS: no segments of the population were identified as being excluded from the health system; some indicators pointed towards deficiencies for all bands, some of which were more accentuated for band four.

  11. Conflict, Child Health, and Household Adjustments in Eritrea

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Child stunting in growth currently affects 164 million children globally, and has dire consequences for the future well-being of the affected children. Wars disproportionately affect children and is believed to raise levels of stunting due to malnutrition and diseases. Using the 2002 Eritrean Demographic and Health Survey, this thesis adopts a differences-in-differences methodology and finds that the 1998-2000 border war between Eritrea and Ethiopia raised levels of stunting in affected regio...

  12. Epidemiology of child injuries in Uganda: challenges for health policy

    OpenAIRE

    Renee Yuen-Jan Hsia; Doruk Ozgediz; Sudha Jayaraman; Patrick Kyamanywa; Milton Mutto; Kobusingye, Olive C.

    2011-01-01

    Globally, 90% of road crash deaths occur in the developing world. Children in Africa bear the major part of this burden, with the highest unintentional injury rates in the world. Our study aims to better understand injury patterns among children living in Kampala, Uganda and provide evidence that injuries are significant in child health. Trauma registry records of injured children seen at Mulago Hospital in Kampala were analysed. This data was collected when patients were seen initially and i...

  13. General practitioner training needs for child health surveillance.

    OpenAIRE

    Goodhart, L C

    1991-01-01

    A postal questionnaire was sent to 136 Hackney general practitioners inquiring about their plans for child health surveillance. A total of 112 responded and detailed their training needs, both practical and theoretical. Ninety one responders were providing or planning to provide surveillance. Responders were eager for further training particularly in premature baby follow up, mental handicap, speech and hearing assessment, and social and behavioural problems.

  14. Differentials in reproductive and child health status in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhilesh Parchure

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Inequalities in reproductive and child health (RCH exist, in general, in different regions of India. The present study aims to investigate the current status of RCH and examine the factors responsible for it in different parts of India.

    Methods: This study utilized data obtained from two Indian studies – (i National Family Health Survey – 3 (NFHS- 2005-06 and (ii District Level Household Survey (DLHS – 2002-04. Reproductive Health Index was computed on the basis of five variables such as total fertility rate, infant mortality rate, birth order, delivery care and female educational attainment.

    Results: In terms of reproductive and child health, a wide range of variation exists in India in its different regions. The study reveals that among Indian states, 13 states have an index value less than the national average. On the basis of the reproductive health index, the Indian states can be divided into three categories, namely; progressive states, semi progressive states and backward states.

    Conclusions: The interstate differences in healthcare utilization are partly due to variations in the implementation of maternal health care programs as well as differences in availability of and accessibility to healthcare between Indian states.

  15. [Effectiveness of health examinations by occupational health services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauni, Riitta; Leino, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Health examinations are part of the activities of occupational health services in preventing diseases and promoting occupational health. Their aim is to protect workers from health risks on one hand but also to promote the worker's own resources and health in order to maintain their capacity for work. Initiation of preventive, corrective and rehabilitative measures and those directed toward the workplace is attempted at the earliest possible stage. When interpreting the examination data it is in fact important to recognize whether it is the effectiveness of the health examination visit or the subsequent procedures that is being evaluated. PMID:26939488

  16. HIV infection and maternal and child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, P

    1988-01-01

    Collaborative studies to determine the consequences of pregnancy in HIV infected women have been begun in the last 2 years. Both HIV and HIV antibodies pass through the placenta, and 30-50% of infants born to HIV infected mothers are infected in utero. In developed countries it is feasible to screen pregnant women in high risk groups for HIV positivity. In developing countries, where heterosexual transmission is the main route of infection, there are no high risk groups, and it is not feasible to screen all pregnant women. Some data have shown that HIV infection in pregnancy is associated with intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, and high infant mortality. There is no evidence that cesarean section reduces infection in neonates, and it should not be performed on HIV infected women. By 1987 almost 1.5% of AIDS cases in the US were in vertically infected infants. In Africa also the main factor in HIV in infancy is vertical transmission. AIDS in infancy follows 1 of 2 distinct patterns: failure to thrive and death from Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia within the 1st year or else apparent health during infancy but death from opportunistic infections by age 3. HIV infection in childhood is uncommon and can usually be traced to blood transfusions or unsterilized needles used for vaccinations. Neurological symptoms often develop early in children. Breast feeding probably does not infect any infants who have not already been infected in utero, and in developing counties breast feeding is still the best assurance of total nutrition. Pooled, unpasteurized milk banks, on the other hand, represent an unnecessary danger, and milk donors should be screened. Since there is no evidence that routine immunization accelerates the course of HIV infection, and since mass screening is not feasible in developing countries, the World Health Organization recommends that routine immunizations be continued. Since the best protection from in utero HIV infection is the use of

  17. The Role of Quality Service Systems in Involving Families in Mental Health Treatment for Children with Severe Emotional Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, Lindsay Satterwhite; Heflinger, Craig Anne

    2012-01-01

    Family involvement in the planning and execution of mental health treatment has been shown to positively influence child outcomes; however, there is wide variability in the levels of involvement by families. The current study investigated the influence of child, family caregiver, service system, and community factors on the level of family…

  18. HOUSEHOLD NUCLEATION, DEPENDENCY AND CHILD HEALTH OUTCOMES IN GHANA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annim, Samuel Kobina; Awusabo-Asare, Kofi; Amo-Adjei, Joshua

    2015-09-01

    This study uses three key anthropometric measures of nutritional status among children (stunting, wasting and underweight) to explore the dual effects of household composition and dependency on nutritional outcomes of under-five children in Ghana. The objective is to examine changes in household living arrangements of under-five children to explore the interaction of dependency and nucleation on child health outcomes. The concept of nucleation refers to the changing structure and composition of household living arrangements, from highly extended with its associated socioeconomic system of production and reproduction, social behaviour and values, towards single-family households - especially the nuclear family, containing a husband and wife and their children alone. A negative relationship between levels of dependency, as measured by the number of children in the household, and child health outcomes is premised on the grounds that high dependency depletes resources, both tangible and intangible, to the disadvantage of young children. Data were drawn from the last four rounds of the Ghana Demographic and Health Surveys (GDHSs), from 1993 to 2008, for the first objective - to explore changes in household composition. For the second objective, the study used data from the 2008 GDHS. The results show that, over time, households in Ghana have been changing towards nucleation. The main finding is that in households with the same number of dependent children, in nucleated households children under age 5 have better health outcomes compared with children under age 5 in non-nucleated households. The results also indicate that the effect of dependency on child health outcomes is mediated by household nucleation and wealth status and that, as such, high levels of dependency do not necessarily translate into negative health outcomes for children under age 5, based on anthropometric measures. PMID:25167165

  19. Role of the Public Health Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Public Health Service must assume the role of the overall Public Health Coordinator, seeking to afford the highest level of health protection both to the nearby population as well as to the more distant groups. Data will be given relative to the limited experience the PHS has had in the removal of populations from areas of suspected hazards. Problems inherent in the evacuation of civilians of all ages will be discussed. (author)

  20. Essential Concepts in Modern Health Services

    OpenAIRE

    A, El Taguri

    2008-01-01

    Health services have the functions to define community health problems, to identify unmet needs and survey the resources to meet them, to establish SMART objectives, and to project administrative actions to accomplish the purpose of proposed action programs. For maximum efficacy, health systems should rely on newer approaches of management as management-by-objectives, risk-management, and performance management with full and equal participation from professionals and consumers. The public sho...

  1. General practitioners and occupational health services.

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, G.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational physicians and general practitioners often appear to differ in their attitudes to the provision of health screening, health promotion and vaccination in the workplace. AIM: This study aimed to explore the attitudes of occupational physicians and general practitioners to particular aspects of workplace health services. METHOD: Anonymous piloted postal questionnaires were sent to 400 UK general practitioners and 300 occupational physicians. RESULTS: Questionnaires were ...

  2. Communal child-rearing: The role of nurses in school health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fhumulani M. Mulaudzi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Child-rearing remains a concern within our communities, especially because families of today lack primary parents due to multifaceted challenges such as working mothers, diseases and violence. Health-promoting school initiatives are necessary because they allow a multifaceted approach to child-rearing. They further provide a conducive environment for continued schoolchild-rearing moving from home to school. Objectives: This study promotes an integrated approach to school care using the African concept of Ubuntu – solidarity and sense of community – as a point of departure. The socio-ecological model was used, which includes the work of the school healthcare nurse in contributing to holistic health services. Method: An integrative review was conducted in January 2013, which included methodology studies, a theory review and a variety of studies related to school health. The studies were categorised according to school health, Ubuntu and the socio-ecological model. Findings: The role of school healthcare nurses entails acting as a liaison officer between a variety of stakeholders who work together to shape the future of children. Conclusion: Ubuntu, together with the socio-ecological model, can assist us to involve an entire community to raise children. This knowledge serves as a background to the planning of a school health programme. The role of the nurse in school health can also assist in collaborative efforts to formulate the programme and develop the competencies that will inform school health nurse training curricula.

  3. [Quality assurance in occupational health services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, J

    1996-01-01

    The general conditions influencing the quality assurance and audit in Polish occupational health services are presented. The factors promoting or hampering the implementation of quality assurance and audits are also discussed. The major influence on the transformation of Polish occupational health services in exorted by employers who are committed to cover the costs of the obligatory prophylactic examination of their employees. This is the factor which also contributes to the improvement of quality if services. The definitions of the most important terms are reviewed to highlight their accordance with the needs of occupational health services in Poland. The examples of audit are presented and the elements of selected methods of auditing are suggested to be adopted in Poland. PMID:8760511

  4. Innovations in plant health services in Nicaragua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Solveig; Centeno, Julio; López, Julio;

    2013-01-01

    creation of a ‘National Plant Health System’ offering regular advice to farmers. The innovations were driven by a momentum for change, committed individuals, joint learning and flexibility in programme management. External facilitation encouraged experimentation and bolstered growth of new alliances. The......Establishing a few community-based plant clinics in Nicaragua led to a series of innovations in plant health service delivery. A grassroots experiment became a nationwide initiative involving local service providers, universities, research institutions and diagnostic laboratories. This led to the...... development of the national plant health system was constrained by existing work cultures that limit the scope of individual and institutional innovations....

  5. Impact of information and communication technology on child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Eugenia Hc; White, Peter; Lai, Christopher Wk

    2016-06-01

    This article provides a general framework for understanding the use of information and communication technology in education and discusses the impact of computer usage on students' health and development. Potential beneficial and harmful effects of computer use by children are discussed. Early epidemiological and laboratory studies have indicated that children are at least of similar risk of developing musculoskeletal and vision problems as adults, and musculoskeletal and visual health problems developed in childhood are likely to persist into adulthood. This article, therefore, aims to provide a reflection on the deficits of existing policy and recommendations for child-specific guidelines in computer use. PMID:27333844

  6. Sustaining an Aboriginal mental health service partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jeffrey D; Martinez, Lee; Muyambi, Kuda; Verran, Kathy; Ryan, Bronwyn; Klee, Ruth

    2005-11-21

    The Regional Aboriginal Integrated Social and Emotional (RAISE) Wellbeing program commenced in February 2003 as an Aboriginal mental health service partnership between one Aboriginal Health Service and three mainstream services: a community mental health team, a hospital mental health liaison, and an "outback" community counselling service. A case study method was used to describe the drivers (incentives for program development), linkage processes (structures and activities through which the partnership operated), and sustainability of the program. Program drivers were longstanding problems with Aboriginal peoples' access to mental health care, policy direction favouring shared service responsibility, and a relatively small amount of new funding for mental health that allowed the program to commence. Linkage processes were the important personal relationships between key individuals. Developing the program as a part of routine practice within and across the partner organisations is now needed through formal agreements, common care-management tools, and training. The program's sustainability will depend on this development occurring, as well as better collection and use of data to communicate the value of the program and support calls for adequate recurrent funds. The development of care-management tools, training and data systems will require a longer period of start-up funding as well as some external expertise. PMID:16296956

  7. Legal Issues in Implementing the Community Service Orders for Child Offenders in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norazla Abdul Wahab

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Community service orders are a proposed alternative form of punishment for children who have been or are in conflict with the law. Despite an absence of clear laws in Malaysia pertaining to this order regarding its application to child offenders, it is nonetheless viewed as a more suitable form of punishment in protecting a child offender’s best interest compared to a fine or a sentence of imprisonment. In light of the above, the objective of this article is to analyse two main legal issues relating to the future implementation of community service orders as an alternative form of sentence, such as the number of credit hours per sentence and the types of community service activities to be implemented. The research has shown that there is no uniformity in determining the minimum and maximum amount of credit hours in implementing community service orders against child offenders where some countries may have the maximum of 80 to 150 hours and 8 to 10 hours for the minimum. The research also found that community service orders have greatly benefited both the society and child offenders; the child offenders will be integrated back to the society and might as well undergo their rehabilitation process. This research may be significant in preparing guidelines or a complete implementation model for community service orders applicable to child offenders in Malaysia, as well as a reference for the Officers in the Community Service Department and Magistrates in the Child Courts in Malaysia.

  8. Recording actions to prevent child morbidity in children's health cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Daniele de Souza; Santos, Nathanielly Cristina Carvalho de Brito; Costa, Dayse Kalyne Gomes da; Pereira, Mayara de Melo; Vaz, Elenice Maria Cecchetti; Reichert, Altamira Pereira da Silva

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the registering of preventative actions in relation to child morbidity using information regarding vaccinations, as well as iron and vitamin A supplements, which are recorded in children's health cards. This transversal study used a quantitative approach and was performed in Family Health Units in the city of João Pessoa, Paraíba; the sampling was by convenience and totaled 116 children's health cards. The data was collected by observing the cards and the analysis was simple, statistical. The highest percentage of children had their vaccination cards up to date (92.2%) and those that did not were aged between 6 and 12 months: 78.9% of the cards did not have records relating to iron and vitamin A supplements and others only had records of one of the supplements being administered. The vaccination status of children in the first year of life was found to be satisfactory; however, discrepancies were observed in the recordings of the administration of iron and vitamin A supplements, which complicates monitoring performed by child health care professionals. It is hoped that this study will contribute to discussions and strategies aimed at improving the monitoring and recording of micronutrients in children's health cards. PMID:27383363

  9. [Marketing mix in health service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The marketing mix is the combination of the marketing variables that a firm employs with the purpose to achieve the expected volume of business within its market. In the sale of goods, four variables compose the marketing mix (4 Ps): Product, Price, Point of sale and Promotion. In the case of providing services, three further elements play a role: Personnel, Physical Evidence and Processes (7 Ps). The marketing mix must be addressed to the consumers as well as to the employees of the providing firm. Furthermore, it must be interpreted as employees ability to satisfy customers (interactive marketing). PMID:26093140

  10. Socioeconomic factors differentiating maternal and child health-seeking behavior in rural Bangladesh: A cross-sectional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Stan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been an increasing availability and accessibility of modern health services in rural Bangladesh over the past decades. However, previous studies on the socioeconomic differentials in the utilization of these services were based on a limited number of factors, focusing either on preventive or on curative modern health services. These studies failed to collect data from remote rural areas of the different regions to examine the socioeconomic differentials in health-seeking behavior. Methods Data from 3,498 randomly selected currently married women from three strata of households within 128 purposively chosen remote villages in three divisions of Bangladesh were collected in 2006. This study used bivariate and multivariate logistic analyses to examine both curative and preventive health-seeking behaviors in seven areas of maternal and child health care: antenatal care, postnatal care, child delivery care, mother's receipt of Vitamin A postpartum, newborn baby care, care during recent child fever/cough episodes, and maternal coverageby tetanus toxoid (TT. Results A principal finding was that a household's relative poverty status, as reflected by wealth quintiles, was a major determinant in health-seeking behavior. Mothers in the highest wealth quintile were significantly more likely to use modern trained providers for antenatal care, birth attendance, post natal care and child health care than those in the poorest quintile (χ2, p Conclusion Within rural areas of Bangladesh, where overall poverty is greater and access to health care more difficult, wealth differentials in utilization remain pronounced. Those programs with high international visibility and dedicated funding (e.g., Immunization and Vitamin A delivery have higher overall prevalence and a more equitable distribution of beneficiaries than the use of modern trained providers for basic essential health care services. Implications of these findings and

  11. When do parents and child health professionals agree on child’s psychosocial problems? Cross-sectional study on parent–child health professional dyads

    OpenAIRE

    Crone, Mathilde R; Zeijl, Elke; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background About one third of all parents have concerns about their child’s psychosocial development. Agreement between child health professionals (CHPs) and parents about such concerns may improve treatment adherence and outcomes. This study investigates which child, parenting and/or environmental stressors are associated with (dis)agreement in concerns regarding psychosocial problems in children, in parent-CHP dyads. Methods During routine child health assessments, data were collected from ...

  12. Child Health Issues in New Zealand: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Darlene R.

    2007-01-01

    International travel can provide the unique opportunity to experience other cultures. For nurses, it can also provide a window through which different health care structures and services can be viewed. Many similarities and differences can be found between the country visited and the United States in terms of health issues, nursing education,…

  13. Effects of nuclear war on health and health services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the findings since 1987 in the field of research related to the possible impact of nuclear war and nuclear explosions on health and health services. An annex contains the finding and conclusions of a 1989 United Nations study on the climatic and other effects of nuclear war. 1 tab

  14. School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

  15. Health care governance in the UK National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jo H

    2004-01-01

    The NHS Plan sets out a challenging agenda for modernising the UK National Health Service (NHS), governing the organisation's performance and improving and extending service provision. Good health care governance is an essential prerequisite for all modernisation effort. This article will explore the responsibilities and implications for health care boards, managers and clinical staff in providing assurances for health care governance. Health care organisation directors, executive and non-executive, all share responsibility for the direction and control of the organisation. They are required to act in the best interest of the patients, staff and the general public and have statutory obligations to provide safe systems of work under the Health and Safety Regulations. Each director has a role in ensuring openness, being honest and acting with integrity, taking responsibility for their own personal learning and development, constructively challenge and develop strategy and ensuring the probity of the organisation's activities. PMID:15566273

  16. Public Health Service Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Off-Site Radiological Safety Programs conducted on past Plowshare experimental projects by the Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory for the AEC will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the evaluation of the potential radiation hazard to off-site residents, the development of an appropriate safety plan, pre- and post-shot surveillance activities, and the necessity for a comprehensive and continuing community relations program. In consideration of the possible wide use of nuclear explosives in industrial applications, a new approach to off-site radiological safety will be discussed. (author)

  17. Child Health and Young Adult Outcomes. NBER Working Paper No. 14482

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Janet; Stabile, Mark; Manivong, Phongsack; Roos, Leslie L.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has shown a strong connection between birth weight and future child outcomes. But this research has not asked how insults to child health after birth affect long-term outcomes, whether health at birth matters primarily because it predicts future health or through some other mechanism, or whether health insults matter more at some…

  18. Climate Services to Improve Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Jancloes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A high level expert panel discussed how climate and health services could best collaborate to improve public health. This was on the agenda of the recent Third International Climate Services Conference, held in Montego Bay, Jamaica, 4–6 December 2013. Issues and challenges concerning a demand led approach to serve the health sector needs, were identified and analysed. Important recommendations emerged to ensure that innovative collaboration between climate and health services assist decision-making processes and the management of climate-sensitive health risk. Key recommendations included: a move from risk assessment towards risk management; the engagement of the public health community with both the climate sector and development sectors, whose decisions impact on health, particularly the most vulnerable; to increase operational research on the use of policy-relevant climate information to manage climate- sensitive health risks; and to develop in-country capacities to improve local knowledge (including collection of epidemiological, climate and socio-economic data, along with institutional interaction with policy makers.

  19. Leadership and the UK health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, N

    2000-02-01

    This paper explores future leadership requirements for health services in the context of relevant leadership theory and the changing environment for health services in the UK. The output of leadership research is both prolific and confusing and its applicability to health services management uncertain especially in the context of constraints on the strategic managerial behaviour and choices of public service managers. The introduction of general management to the UK NHS in the 1980s, followed by an internal market for health care in 1990 should have provided the opportunity for managers to work differently and to create personal space for leadership. However, it is not known whether sustainable , new ways of leadership working have emerged although it is reasonable to hypothesis from studies elsewhere that a number of contextual and behavioural leadership models are likely to be found in the NHS. Although management researchers have explored networking and referred to the impact of the external environment of leadership, insufficient importance has been attached to-date to the impact of future trends in health services on the leadership of change in the health sector. The paper argues that in future health services leadership will require much more than traditional networking with other organizations and groups and will need to focus on developing and securing external agreement to an agenda for positive change turning the apparent constraints of the external environment, determined primarily by government policies,into opportunities. In other words, the demands of external or contextual leadership will increase forcing a stronger focus on having to achieve change through others. PMID:11010225

  20. Public health capacity in the provision of health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdmanis, Vivian; DeNicola, Arianna; Bernet, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we assess the capacity of Florida's public health departments. We achieve this by using bootstrapped data envelopment analysis (DEA) applied to Johansen's definition of capacity utilization. Our purpose in this paper is to measure if there is, theoretically, enough excess capacity available to handle a possible surge in the demand for primary care services especially after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act that includes provisions for expanded public health services. We measure subunit service availability using a comprehensive data source available for all 67 county health departments in the provision of diagnostic care and primary health care. In this research we aim to address two related research questions. First, we structure our analysis so as to fix budgets. This is based on the assumption that State spending on social and health services could be limited, but patient needs are not. Our second research question is that, given the dearth of primary care providers in Florida if budgets are allowed to vary is there enough medical labor to provide care to clients. Using a non-parametric approach, we also apply bootstrapping to the concept of plant capacity which adds to the productivity research. To preview our findings, we report that there exists excess plant capacity for patient treatment and care, but question whether resources may be better suited for more traditional types of public health services. PMID:24687803