WorldWideScience

Sample records for child cerebral palsy

  1. Handling the Young Cerebral Palsied Child at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnie, Nancie R.

    Written primarily for parents of cerebral palsied children, the text discusses and illustrates methods for handling the child in daily activities. Introduced with a questionnaire concerning developmental stages and activity levels, the manual describes the most common difficulties of the spastic, athetoid, ataxic, or flaccid child. Drawings and…

  2. The Child with Cerebral Palsy and Anaesthesia

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    A Rudra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is the result of an injury to the developing brain during the antenatal, perinatal or postnatal period. Clinical manifestation relate to the areas affected. Patients with CP often present for elective surgical proce-dures to correct various deformities. Anaesthetic concerns of anaesthesia are intraoperative hypothermia , and slow emergence. Suxamethonium does not cause hyperkalaemia in these patients, and a rapid sequence induction may be indicated. Temperature should be monitored and an effort made to keep the patient warm. Cerebral abnormalities may lead to slow awakening; the patient should remain intubated until fully awake and airway reflexes have returned. Pulmonary infection can complicate the postoperative course. Postoperative pain management and the prevention of muscle spasms are important and drugs as baclofen and botulinum toxin are discussed. Epidural analgesia is particu-larly valuable when major orthopaedic procedures are performed.

  3. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  4. Congenital cerebral palsy, child sex and parent cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Streja, Elani; Wu, Chunsen; Uldall, Peter Vilhelm

    2013-01-01

    up was 50 ± 8 years. After adjustment for maternal age, parental education, child's sex, child's residence, child being small for gestational age and maternal hypertensive disorder during pregnancy, mothers of CP male children had an excess risk of cardiovascular disease (HR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1......OBJECTIVE: Genes associated with cardiovascular disease may also be risk factors for congenital cerebral palsy (CP) and these associations may be modified by sex, since there is an increased risk of CP in male children. We investigated the association between CP of the child with cardiovascular...... disease in parents, taking sex of the child into consideration. METHODS: All parents of non-adopted singletons born in Denmark between 1973 and 2003 were included. Parents of a child with CP, confirmed by the Danish National CP registry, were considered exposed. Cox proportional hazards regressions were...

  5. The Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life for Children (CP QOL-Child): Evidence of Construct Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Lin; Wang, Hui-Yi; Tseng, Mei-Hui; Shieh, Jeng-Yi; Lu, Lu; Yao, Kai-Ping Grace; Huang, Chien-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life for Children (CP QOL-Child) is the first health condition-specific questionnaire designed for measuring QOL in children with cerebral palsy (CP). However, its construct validity has not yet been confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Hence, this study assessed the construct validity of the caregiver…

  6. Congenital cerebral palsy, child sex and parent cardiovascular risk.

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    Elani Streja

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Genes associated with cardiovascular disease may also be risk factors for congenital cerebral palsy (CP and these associations may be modified by sex, since there is an increased risk of CP in male children. We investigated the association between CP of the child with cardiovascular disease in parents, taking sex of the child into consideration. METHODS: All parents of non-adopted singletons born in Denmark between 1973 and 2003 were included. Parents of a child with CP, confirmed by the Danish National CP registry, were considered exposed. Cox proportional hazards regressions were used to model risk of cardiovascular outcomes for exposed parents compared to all other parents beginning at the child's 10(th birthday. RESULTS: We identified 733,730 mothers and 666,652 fathers among whom 1,592 and 1,484, respectively, had a child with CP. The mean age for mothers at end of follow up was 50 ± 8 years. After adjustment for maternal age, parental education, child's sex, child's residence, child being small for gestational age and maternal hypertensive disorder during pregnancy, mothers of CP male children had an excess risk of cardiovascular disease (HR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.16-2.00, attributable mostly to an increased incidence of hypertension and cerebrovascular disease. After additional adjustment for preterm birth, the association was markedly attenuated for cardiovascular disease (1.34, 95%CI: 1.02 - 1.76, became nonsignificant for hypertension, but remained significant for cerebrovascular disease (HR: 2.73, 95% CI: 1.45- 5.12. There was no increased risk of cardiovascular events in mothers of female CP children, or fathers of CP children of any sex. CONCLUSIONS: Women that have a male child with CP are at increased risk for premature cardiovascular disease. Part of this association may be related to risk factors for preterm births.

  7. POSTOPERATIVE MUSCLE SPASM IN A CHILD WITH CEREBRAL PALSY: A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Sanmuga Piriya; Suresh Kumar; Mohamud Iqbal; Prasanna Kumar; Sivashanmugham

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a non-progressive motor disorder which occurs due to hypoxic insult to fetus during perinatal period. These children often present for elective surgical procedures to correct various deformities. Peri-operative care of a child with cerebral palsy is a real challenge to the anaesthetics because of associated comorbidities. Yet another problem in these patients is behavior abnormality and difficulty in communication. Therefore regional anaesthesia is usually co...

  8. Nutritional Assessment of the Young Child with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, Maureen A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy sometimes display nutritional inadequacy, as evaluated through anthropometric measurements and laboratory values. Causes of poor nutritional status include inadequate calories offered or adequate calories offered but not consumed. Inadequate caloric retention may be due to vomiting, rumination, or gastroesophageal…

  9. Bruxism Control in a Child with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cristiana Aroeira G. R.; de Paula, Viviane Andrade Cancio; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Primo, Laura Salignac Guimarães; Castro, Gloria Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most severe childhood disabilities due to a lesion in the developing brain. Oral conditions often observed in this pathogenic are a tendency for the delayed eruption of permanent molars, higher percentages of malocclusion and parafunctional habits, including bruxism. The significance of oral conditions observed in CP patients demonstrates the need for intensive home and professional care for these individuals. This paper presents a 7-year-old boy, with cerebral palsy, severe mental retardation, who had high abrasion wear of the primary teeth related to bruxism. Dental care was carried out under oxide-induced sedation, and management of the bruxism was achieved after the use of a resin acrylic protective appliance fixed on both sides of the mandibula. The treatment performed offered efficiency advantages, was clinically viable, and should be a valuable option to practitioners considering appliance therapy to control parafunctional behavior. PMID:21991456

  10. POSTOPERATIVE MUSCLE SPASM IN A CHILD WITH CEREBRAL PALSY: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanmuga Piriya

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy is a non-progressive motor disorder which occurs due to hypoxic insult to fetus during perinatal period. These children often present for elective surgical procedures to correct various deformities. Peri-operative care of a child with cerebral palsy is a real challenge to the anaesthetics because of associated comorbidities. Yet another problem in these patients is behavior abnormality and difficulty in communication. Therefore regional anaesthesia is usually combined with general anaesthesia and not used alone. The two most important anaesthetics concerns in these patients are hypothermia and post-operative muscle spasm. Epidural analgesia is the most effective method of post-operative pain relief. Even though opioids can be used for post-operative analgesia, clonidine is more effective in relieving post-operative muscle spasm. In this case report we have discussed about the anesthetic management and postoperative muscle spasm in a child with cerebral palsy.

  11. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  12. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be sure to follow us on Twitter . United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  13. Parental social consequences of having a child with cerebral palsy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan I; Flachs, Esben M; Madsen, Mette

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyse the social situation of parents who have a child with cerebral palsy (CP). METHOD: This was a population-based longitudinal study with linkage to public registries. Parents of children with CP (n=3671) identified in the Danish CP Registry were compared with 17 983 parents of child...... parents in the labour market and living together with their child. Special attention needs to be paid to the financial situation of families with children with CP under 10 years of age.......AIM: To analyse the social situation of parents who have a child with cerebral palsy (CP). METHOD: This was a population-based longitudinal study with linkage to public registries. Parents of children with CP (n=3671) identified in the Danish CP Registry were compared with 17 983 parents...... of children without CP. Employment, income, cohabitation status, and presence of additional children were factors analysed during a follow-up period of 28 years. We followed parents from before their child was born and up to the age of 43 years of the child. RESULTS: Mothers of children with CP under the age...

  14. CEREBRAL PALSY AND MUSIC ACHIEVEMENT

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    Miodrag L. STOSHLJEVIKJ

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Pupils with cerebral palsy attend elementary education accordind to a regular and special teaching plan and program. Regular school curriculum was reformed in 1992, while special plan and program has not been changed and adapted according to pupil’s needs and capacities. Music is one of the best means of expressing oneself and plays a very important role in the development of every child, the child with cerebral palsy in particular.In order to test the possibility of pupils with cerebral palsy, with and without mental retardation, to apprehend the actual program content, we have conducted research on musical achievement of children with cerebral palsy. During 2007 a research was carried out, on the sample of 27 pupils with cerebral palsy and mild mental retardation who attended classes in the school “Miodrag Matikj”, and a sample of16 students with cerebral palsy without mental retardation who attended the school “Dr. Dragan Hercog” in Belgrade.Results of the research, as well as analysis of music curriculum content, indicated that the capacities of students with cerebral palsy to carry out the curriculum tasks require special approach and methodology. Therefore, we introduced some proposals to overcome the difficulties in fulfilling music curriculum demands of those pupils. We made special emphasis on the use of computer based Assistive technology which facilitates the whole process to a large extent.

  15. Result of bilateral total hip replacement in the treatment of a child with cerebral palsy

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    Владимир Евгеньевич Басков

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Total hip replacement in children is performed according to very limited and compelling indications. The principal of such a treatment is the complete and irreversible destruction of the hip joint accompanied by a permanent loss of function of the lower limb. Hip replacement in children with cerebral palsy is a very rare method of treatment. According to observations from the Turner Institute, it was performed in only 2% of all replacement cases. After the placement of an artificial joint, the atherogenic component of the contractures disappears and improves the motor activity of patients. In this paper, a 3-year follow-up of the bilateral total hip replacement in a child with cerebral palsy and bilateral secondary stage III coxarthrosis is presented.

  16. Effectiveness of low cost adapted school furniture on the functional performance of a child with cerebral palsy

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    Marco Aurélio Teixeira Piovezanni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with cerebral palsy present an atypical motor function, characteristic altered postures in movement coordination and muscle tone. This causes limitations in their ability to perform functional activities. In this context, the introduction of assistive technology is vital to the objective of augmenting their ability to function productively and be included in society. It is common for individuals with cerebral palsy to have difficulty maintaining body dynamics, especially with seated posture. The objective of this study is to produce an adapted school desk and adapted school chair with low cost materials and to study their efficacy in adjusting the writing motor skills of a child with cerebral palsy. This stydi’s case is a boy who has been diagnosed with diplegic cerebral palsy. The collection and registration of data was done in three stages, with the child positioned in adapted furniture, regular school furniture and again in the furniture adapted to establish a comparison. Data analysis was through nonparametrical statistical tests. There was no statistical significance and was verified inconsistency in the data presented, because cannot be said for sure wich furniture was more effective in carrying while performing a proposed task and even if there was learning motor with its repetition. This fact does not invalidate the adequacy of school furniture to the student with cerebral palsy, because is an important factor facilitate control and postural stability to the individual, which interferes with fine motor skills of these individuals, influencing their performance in school activities.

  17. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems in the muscles or nerves. Instead, faulty development or damage to motor areas in the brain disrupt the brain's ability to adequately control movement and posture (United Cerebral Palsy, 2010). "Cerebral" refers to the ...

  18. Validity of the Child Facial Coding System for the Assessment of Acute Pain in Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Kellie L; LeFort, Sandra; O'Brien, Michelle; Coyte, Peter C; Guerriere, Denise N

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the concurrent and discriminant validity of the Child Facial Coding System for children with cerebral palsy. Eighty-five children (mean = 8.35 years, SD = 4.72 years) were videotaped during a passive joint stretch with their physiotherapist and during 3 time segments: baseline, passive joint stretch, and recovery. Children's pain responses were rated from videotape using the Numerical Rating Scale and Child Facial Coding System. Results indicated that Child Facial Coding System scores during the passive joint stretch significantly correlated with Numerical Rating Scale scores (r = .72, P Child Facial Coding System scores were also significantly higher during the passive joint stretch than the baseline and recovery segments (P Child Facial Coding System is a valid method of identifying pain in children with cerebral palsy.

  19. Effect of hippotherapy on perceived self-competence and participation in a child with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Alana; McCloskey, Sandra; Dole, Robin L

    2011-01-01

    This case report highlights changes in self-competence and social acceptance, along with changes in functional skills, after an 8-week program of hippotherapy. A 6-year-old girl with mild ataxic cerebral palsy, level I Gross Motor Functional Classification System, exhibited typical impairments in body systems and functions that affected her participation in age-appropriate functional and leisure activities. The child's performance on the Gross Motor Function Measure-66, the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument, and the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance for Young Children were examined at baseline, after the 8-week intervention, and at a 2-month follow-up session. Data at 8 weeks demonstrated positive changes in all areas, with improvements continuing for 2 months after the program's completion. Hippotherapy not only may be an effective intervention to improve functional gross motor development but also may affect perceived self-competence and social acceptance, which may lead to increases in participation for children with mild cerebral palsy.

  20. Validating the Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life for Children (CP QOL-Child) questionnaire for use in Chinese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H-Y; Cheng, C-C; Hung, J-W; Ju, Y-H; Lin, J-H; Lo, S-K

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life for Children (CP QOL-Child) questionnaire. We performed forward (into Chinese) and backward translation of the CP QOL-Child for: (1) the primary caregiver form (for parents of children with CP aged 4-12 years); and (2) the child self-report form (for children with cerebral palsy aged 9-12 years). Psychometric properties assessed included test-retest reliability, internal consistency, item discrimination, construct validity, and concordance between the forms of questionnaire. The Chinese CP QOL-Child was completed by 145 caregivers and 44 children. Excellent test-retest reliability and internal consistency were obtained. Item discrimination analysis revealed a majority of the items have moderate to good discriminating power. Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated distinguishable domain structure as on the original English version. Significant associations were found between lower QOL and more severe motor disability. Consistent with the English version, the highest correlation between the primary caregiver and child forms on QOL was in the domain of functioning. Results of this study indicate that the Chinese CP QOL-Child appears to be valid for use in Mandarin-Chinese speaking children with cerebral palsy.

  1. Maternal Stress and Mother-Child Interaction Style Amon the Mothers of Cerebral Palsy Children – A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Rani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the relationship between parenting stress and mother-child interaction style among the mothers of cerebral palsy children. Methods: The study was conducted in Samvedna Trust for handicapped in the Allahabad city. A purposive sample of 38 children with cerebral palsy within the age group of 5- 12 years was selected. Parenting stress was measured by using Parenting Stress Index Short-Forem (Abidin, 1995 Mother-child interactions were videotaped for 7 minutes during an unstructured play and was rated on three dimensions of responsiveness, affect and directive-ness, which are the subscales of the Maternal Behavior Rating Scale (MBRS, Mahoney 1992. Qualitative analysis was used to study the relationship. Each mother-child dyad was observed separately for the quality of interactions demonstrated in relation to mothers’ stress level in each dyad. Results: The findings from this qualitative analysis suggested that the mothers who were experiencing a high stress level were found to be less effective during interaction. This means that mothers were less responsive to their child‘s behavior and actions; exhibited less warmth, enjoyment and approval of the child during interaction; and more controlling than the mothers who were not under much stress. Conclusion: Strong association between parenting stress and interaction style suggests the need for the therapists to develop and implement interventions to enhance the quality of mother-child interaction along with other rehabilitation services provided to these children with cerebral palsy.

  2. Kinematic gait parameters of a child with cerebral palsy: Comparison between different forms of support

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    Micheli Martinello

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinematic haracteristics of gait in children with spastic diplegia aided by different forms of support (one crutch, two crutches, and scapular girdle, and thus determine the most appropriate way to train gait in children with spastic diplegia based on biomechanical characteristics. The study subject was a female, nine-year-old child, diagnosed with cerebral palsy of spastic diplegia type. The following instruments were used for clinical evaluation of gross motor function: Gross Motor Function Classification System - GMFCS, Gross Motor Function Measure - GMFM 88, and Modified Ashworth Scale. The child performed five repetitions of gait with each type of support. By kinematic analysis, spatiotemporal and angular variables of hip and knee in the sagittal plane were obtained. The values closest to typical gait were obtained with 2 crutches, followed by support with scapular girdle and one crutch. It was possible to observe that gait with two crutches was the most appropriate form of support, considering the functionality and independence of the child assessed; however, gait supported by scapular girdle may be appropriate for gait training in clinical practice, because it stimulates different spatiotemporal and angular parameters.

  3. Astym Therapy Improves Bilateral Hamstring Flexibility and Achilles Tendinopathy in a Child with Cerebral Palsy: A Retrospective Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Nicole A.; Alstat, Lucas R.; Van Zant, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this case report was to describe the use of Astym therapy to improve hamstring flexibility and Achilles tendinopathy in a child with cerebral palsy. CASE DESCRIPTION An eight-year-old female with cerebral palsy was referred to physical therapy for the treatment of bilateral hamstring inflexibility and Achilles tendinopathy. Treatment focused on an Astym therapy protocol of eccentric exercise, stretching, active and passive range of motion, gait training, and a home exercise program. The patient underwent a total of 11 physical therapy treatment sessions. OUTCOMES At the conclusion of treatment, the patient demonstrated improved resting muscle tone in bilateral lower extremities with active 90/90 hamstring flexibility measured at 165° and ankle dorsiflexion active range of motion of 5° without pain at 0° and 90° knee flexion. The patient exhibited an improved gait pattern with even stride length and diminished genu recurvatum, decreased pain with standing and walking, discontinued use of ankle–foot orthoses, and improved activity tolerance and overall function for daily activities. DISCUSSION The results of this case report indicate that physical therapy rehabilitation utilizing an Astym therapy protocol can successfully achieve gains in flexibility and strength and allow for improved function of bilateral lower extremities in a patient with cerebral palsy. CONCLUSION Based on the findings of this case report, clinicians should consider the use of Astym therapy in treating musculoskeletal soft tissue dysfunction in pediatric patients with cerebral palsy.

  4. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

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    Balakrishnan B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bindu Balakrishnan,1 Elizabeth Nance,1 Michael V Johnston,2 Rangaramanujam Kannan,3 Sujatha Kannan1 1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Department of Neurology and Pediatrics, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. Keywords: dendrimer, cerebral palsy, neuroinflammation, nanoparticle, neonatal brain injury, G4OH-PAMAM

  5. Electromyographic analysis of erector spinae muscle for a child with cerebral palsy

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    Wilczyński Jacek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the electromyographic analysis of the erector spinae muscle, using the Noraxon Tele Myo DTS equipment. It’s used to test the neuromuscular function, during physical activity. It allows for detailed localization of the pathological changes in the muscle tissue. It can be also helpful to define the functional disorders of the muscular system in children with cerebral palsy. For the purpose of the study, a six-year-old girl with this disease was examined, one of the types of EMG - surface electromyography being used. The problem which is of primary importance in children with cerebral palsy is a widely understood damage of the musculoskeletal system. The test was performed in five starting positions, with the electrodes placed on the lumbar spine. As a result of the analysis, a motor skills disorder, asymmetry of muscle tension and dystonia was diagnosed. Dystonia may be the result of other disease, characteristic to children with cerebral palsy – scoliosis.

  6. AUDITORY REHABILITATION AND BILATERAL COCHLEAR IMPLANT ON CHILD WHITH CEREBRAL PALSY

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    Anacléia Melo da Silva Hilgenberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the hearing and language improvement in children with cerebral palsy submitted to cochlear implantation bilaterally. METHODS: Prospective, analytical descriptive. Study case and a broad bibliographical analysis in MEDLINE/PUBMED and EMBASE including detailed analysis of the rehabilitation techniques as serial phonoaudiological appointments; Sessions of phonoterapy recorded and criterious analysis of the tests such as IT-MAIS and MacArthur analysis. The teste were applied after Bilateral Cochlear Implantation: 15, 20, 22, 31 e 38 months.RESULTS: The results obtained and bibliographical analysis showed that cochlear implantation in children with cerebral palsy and profound hearing loss is the best option at the moment to perform hearing rehabilitation. The IT-MAIS and MacArthur tests showed a big improvement at 15 and 38 months after use of the cochlear implants. The IT-MAIS test showed 40% score in the beggining and 75% at the end. Mac Arthur test revealed a big evolution at vocabulary comprehension (58 to 342 and linguistic repertory (54 to 289.

  7. CEREBRAL PALSY : ANTENATAL RISK FACTORS

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    Srinivasa Rao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cerebral palsy (CP is a group of permanent movement disorders that appear in early childhood. Cerebral palsy is caused by abnormal development or damage to the parts of the brain that control movement, balance, and posture. Most often the problems occur during pregnancy; however, they may also occur during childbirth, or shortly after birth. Often the cause is unknown. AIM: To study the different antenatal maternal risk factors associated with cerebral palsy in the study group. MATERIA LS AND METHODS: Retrospective study was done to assess possible associated antenatal risk factors for cerebral palsy. Mothers of 100 cerebral palsy children were selected who are treated in Rani Chandramani Devi Hospital, a Government hospital in Visakhapa tn am, Andhra Pradesh State, India , from 2012 to 2014 and 100 controls, mothers of normal children were studied. Detailed antenatal history was obtained from the mothers of the children in both affected and control group. RESULTS: From the data, we conclude that the association of maternal anaemia with cerebral palsy is 7.3 times higher; association of maternal hypertension with cerebral palsy is 6.6 time higher, association with Pre - eclampsia is 6 times higher; association with Eclampsia is 8.6 times higher ; with antepartum haemorrhage, the association is 8.6 times higher and association of multiple pregnancy with cerebral palsy is 4.8 times higher than with controls. CONCLUSION: From this study of the role of antenatal risk factors, in the occurrence of cer ebral palsy in children it is concluded that the most common risk factor associated with cerebral palsy is the maternal anaemia and the other important risk factors associated being hypertension, pre eclampsia, eclampsia, antepartum haemorrhage and multipl e births.

  8. Pretend Play of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Luzia Iara; Pacciulio, Amanda Mota; dos Santos, Camila Abrao; dos Santos, Jair Licio; Stagnitti, Karen Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Evaluate self-initiated pretend play of children with cerebral palsy. Method: Twenty preschool children participated in the study. Pretend play ability was measured by using the child-initiated pretend play assessment culturally adapted to Brazil. Results: There were significant negative correlations between the children's…

  9. Description of a multifaceted rehabilitation program including overground gait training for a child with cerebral palsy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Elizabeth; Naber, Erin; Geigle, Paula

    2010-01-01

    This case describes the outcomes of a multifaceted rehabilitation program including body weight-supported overground gait training (BWSOGT) in a nonambulatory child with cerebral palsy (CP) and the impact of this treatment on the child's functional mobility. The patient is a nonambulatory 10-year-old female with CP who during an inpatient rehabilitation stay participated in direct, physical therapy 6 days per week for 5 weeks. Physical therapy interventions included stretching of her bilateral lower extremities, transfer training, bed mobility training, balance training, kinesiotaping, supported standing in a prone stander, two trials of partial weight-supported treadmill training, and for 4 weeks, three to five times per week, engaged in 30 minutes of BWSOGT using the Up n' go gait trainer, Lite Gait Walkable, and Rifton Pacer gait trainer. Following the multifaceted rehabilitation program, the patient demonstrated increased step initiation, increased weight bearing through bilateral lower extremities, improved bed mobility, and increased participation in transfers. The child's Gross Motor Functional Measure (GMFM) scores increased across four dimensions and her Physical Abilities and Mobility Scale (PAMS) increased significantly. This case report illustrates that a multifaceted rehabilitation program including BWSOGT was an effective intervention strategy to improve functional mobility in this nonambulatory child with CP.

  10. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge;

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  11. Learn More About Cerebral Palsy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-03-30

    This podcast describes the causes, preventions, types, and signs and symptoms of cerebral palsy.  Created: 3/30/2008 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities.   Date Released: 3/21/2008.

  12. MR imaging of cerebral palsy

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    Saginoya, Toshiyuki [Urasoe General Hospital, Okinawa (Japan); Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Kuniyoshi, Kazuhide [and others

    1996-06-01

    We evaluated 35 patients with cerebral palsy on the basis of MR imaging findings in the brain. The types of palsy were spastic quadriplegia (n=11), spastic diplegia (n=9), spastic hemiplegia (n=2), double hemiplegia (n=1), athetosis (n=10) and mixed (n=2). Of all patients, 28 (80%) generated abnormal findings. In spastic quadriplegia, although eight cases revealed severe brain damage, two cases showed no abnormal findings in the brain. One of the three had cervical cord compression caused by atlanto-axial subluxation. In spastic diplegia, the findings were divided according to whether the patient was born at term or preterm. If the patient had been born prematurely, the findings showed periventricular leukomalacia and abnormally high intensity in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule on T2-weighted images. MR imaging in spastic hemiplegia revealed cerebral infarction. In the athetoid type, half of all cases showed either no abnormal findings or slight widening of the lateral ventricle. Three cases showed abnormal signals of the basal ganglia. The reason why athetoid-type palsy did not show severe abnormality is unknown. We believe that MR imaging is a useful diagnostic modality to detect damage in the brain in cerebral palsy and plays an important role in the differentiation of cerebral palsy from the spastic palsy disease. (author)

  13. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht;

    2009-01-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs....... The population analyzed was retrieved from the Danish Cerebral Palsy Register, which covers the eastern part of the country and has registered about half of the Danish population of individuals with CP since 1950. For this study we analyzed 2367 individuals with CP, who were born in 1930 to 2000 and were alive...

  14. Quantitative Effects of Repeated Muscle Vibrations on Gait Pattern in a 5-Year-Old Child with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Camerota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate quantitatively and objectively the effects of repeated muscle vibration (rMV of triceps surae on the gait pattern in a 5-year-old patient with Cerebral Palsy with equinus foot deformity due to calf spasticity. Methods. The patient was assessed before and one month after the rMV treatment using Gait Analysis. Results. rMV had positive effects on the patient's gait pattern, as for spatio-temporal parameters (the stance duration and the step length increased their values after the treatment and kinematics. The pelvic tilt reduced its anteversion and the hip reduced the high flexion evidenced at baseline; the knee and the ankle gained a more physiological pattern bilaterally. The Gillette Gait Index showed a significant reduction of its value bilaterally, representing a global improvement of the child's gait pattern. Conclusions. The rMV technique seems to be an effective option for the gait pattern improvement in CP, which can be used also in very young patient. Significant improvements were displayed in terms of kinematics at all lower limb joints, not only at the joint directly involved by the treatment (i.e., ankle and knee joints but also at proximal joints (i.e., pelvis and hip joint.

  15. Impact of a virtual reality-based intervention on motor performance and balance of a child with cerebral palsy: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Leticia Pavão

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify the effect of an intervention protocol using virtual reality (VR on the motor performance and balance of a child with cerebral palsy (CP.CASE DESCRIPTION: To comply with the proposed objectives, a 7-year old child with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP, GMFCS level I, was submitted to a physiotherapy intervention protocol of 12 45-minute sessions, twice a week, using virtual reality-based therapy. The protocol used a commercially-available console (XBOX(r360Kinect(r able to track and reproduce body movements on a screen. Prior to the intervention protocol, the child was evaluated using the Motor Development Scale (MDS and the Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS in order to assess motor development and balance, respectively. Two baseline assessments with a 2-week interval between each other were carried out for each tool. Then, the child was re-evaluated after the twelfth session. The results showed no changes in the two baseline scores. After the intervention protocol, the child improved his scores in both tools used: the PBS score increased by 3 points, reaching the maximal score, and the MDS increased from a much inferior motor performance to just an inferior motor performance.COMMENTS: The evidence presented in this case supports the use of virtual reality as a promising tool to be incorporated into the rehabilitation process of patients with neuromotor dysfunction.

  16. Embodying Investigations of Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Kristian Møller Moltke

    The main question of Kristian Martiny’s dissertation is: how do we help persons living with the brain damage, cerebral palsy (CP)? This question is as complex and difficult to answer as any healthcare question. Martiny argues that we need to ‘open up’ how we do ( cognitive ) science in order...

  17. Ocular defects in cerebral palsy

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    Katoch Sabita

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a high prevalence of ocular defects in children with developmental disabilities. This study evaluated visual disability in a group of 200 cerebral palsy (CP patients and found that 68% of the children had significant visual morbidity. These findings emphasize the need for an early ocular examination in patients with CP.

  18. Clinical practice: swallowing problems in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Corrie E; van Hulst, Karen; Rotteveel, Jan J; Willemsen, Michel A A P; Jongerius, Peter H

    2012-03-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common physical disability in early childhood. The worldwide prevalence of CP is approximately 2-2.5 per 1,000 live births. It has been clinically defined as a group of motor, cognitive, and perceptive impairments secondary to a non-progressive defect or lesion of the developing brain. Children with CP can have swallowing problems with severe drooling as one of the consequences. Malnutrition and recurrent aspiration pneumonia can increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Early attention should be given to dysphagia and excessive drooling and their substantial contribution to the burden of a child with CP and his/her family. This review displays the important functional and anatomical issues related to swallowing problems in children with CP based on relevant literature and expert opinion. Furthermore, based on our experience, we describe a plan for approach of investigation and treatment of swallowing problems in cerebral palsy.

  19. Neuroimaging in Cerebral Palsy – Report from North India

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    Anju AGGARWAL

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Aggarwal A, Mittal H, Debnath SKR, Rai A. Neuroimaging in Cerebral Palsy–Report from North India. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Autumn; 7(3:41- 46. ObjectiveOnly few Indian reports exist on neuroimaging abnormalities in children with cerebral palsy (CP from India. Materials & MethodsWe studied the clinico-radiological profile of 98 children diagnosed as CP at a tertiary centre in North India. Relevant investigations were carried out to determine the etiology. ResultsAmong the 98 children studied, 80.5% were males and 22.2% were premature. History of birth asphyxia was present in 41.9%. Quadriplegic CP was seen in 77.5%, hemiplegic in 11.5%, and diplegic in 10.5%. Other abnormalities were microcephaly (60.5%, epilepsy (42%, visual abnormality (37%, and hearing abnormality (20%. Neuroimaging was abnormal in 94/98 (95.91%.Abnormalities were periventricular white matter abnormalities (34%, deep grey matter abnormalities (47.8%, malformations (11.7%, and miscellaneous lesions (6.4%. Neuroimaging findings did not relate to the presence of birth asphyxia, sex, epilepsy, gestation, type of CP, or microcephaly. ConclusionsNeuroimaging is helpful for etiological diagnosis, especially malformations.  ReferencesSinghi PD, Ray M, Suri G. Clinical spectrum of cerebral palsy in north India-an analysis of 1000 cases. J Trop Pediatr 2002 48(3; 162-6.Sharma P, Sharma U, Kabra A. Cerebral Palsy-Clinical Profile and Predisposing Factors. Indian Pediatr 1999;36(10:1038-42.Nelson KB, Ellenberg JH. Antecedents of cerebral palsy. Multivariate analysis of risk. N Engl J Med 1986 315(2:81-6.Krägeloh-Mann I, Horber V. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in elucidating the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy: a systematic review. Dev Med Child Neurol 2007; 49(2:144-51.Rosenbaum P, Paneth N, Leviton A, Goldstein M, Bax M, Damiano D, et al. A report: the definition and classification of cerebral palsy April 2006. Dev Med Child Neurol Suppl 2007

  20. Parents of children with cerebral palsy : a review of factors related to the process of adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rentinck, I. C. M.; Ketelaar, M.; Jongmans, M. J.; Gorter, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    Background Little is known about the way parents adapt to the situation when their child is diagnosed with cerebral palsy. Methods A literature search was performed to gain a deeper insight in the process of adaptation of parents with a child with cerebral palsy and on factors related to this proces

  1. Position as a Cause of Deformity in Children with Cerebral Palsy (1976)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrutton, David

    2008-01-01

    Deformities in the child with cerebral palsy have been ascribed to muscle imbalance (Sharrard 1961) and increased tone (Pollock 1959) or to the type of cerebral palsy (Bobath and Bobath 1975). As far as we know, the position in which the child is nursed, especially during the first year of life, has not been considered as a cause of deformity. It…

  2. Psychometric properties of the Child Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ applied to children and adolescents with cerebral palsy

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    Araújo Renata RH

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral palsy (CP patients have motor limitations that can affect functionality and abilities for activities of daily living (ADL. Health related quality of life and health status instruments validated to be applied to these patients do not directly approach the concepts of functionality or ADL. The Child Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ seems to be a good instrument to approach this dimension, but it was never used for CP patients. The purpose of the study was to verify the psychometric properties of CHAQ applied to children and adolescents with CP. Methods Parents or guardians of children and adolescents with CP, aged 5 to 18 years, answered the CHAQ. A healthy group of 314 children and adolescents was recruited during the validation of the CHAQ Brazilian-version. Data quality, reliability and validity were studied. The motor function was evaluated by the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM. Results Ninety-six parents/guardians answered the questionnaire. The age of the patients ranged from 5 to 17.9 years (average: 9.3. The rate of missing data was low (disability index with the visual analogue scales was not significant; for the convergent validity CHAQ disability index had a strong correlation with the GMFM (0.77; for the divergent validity there was no correlation between GMFM and the pain and overall evaluation scales; for the criterion validity GMFM as well as CHAQ detected differences in the scores among the clinical type of CP (p disability index score (mean:2.16; SD:0.72 was higher than the healthy group (mean:0.12; SD:0.23(p Conclusion CHAQ reliability and validity were adequate to this population. However, further studies are necessary to verify the influence of the ceiling effect on the responsiveness of the instrument.

  3. Everyday life and social consequences of cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The disclosure of diagnosis for a child with cerebral palsy (CP) is a highly stressful experience to the parents. The experience can be alleviated by clarity, empathy, and an emphasis on the child's resources and abilities. Despite chronic stress many families function well and manage to strengthen...

  4. Energy requirements of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, S Eileen

    2004-01-01

    Energy requirements of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy appear to be disease-specific and different from the current recommendations for healthy children, varying depending upon functional capacity, degree of mobility, severity of disease, and level of altered metabolism. Feeding problems are prevalent in many of these children, and can result in inadequate energy intake. Wasting of voluntary muscles, a common symptom of cerebral palsy, contributes to reduced resting energy needs; nevertheless, the location of the central nervous system lesion may also influence energy requirements. To guarantee individualized, accurate, and optimal energy recommendations for this population, resting energy expenditure should preferentially be measured by indirect calorimetry. Equations and formulae to predict healthy people's resting energy expenditure are available, but tend to overestimate these children's energy needs. Future studies should address the role of the central nervous system in regulating energy metabolism in this population. When adequately nourished, children and adolescents with cerebral palsy appear more tranquil and require decreased feeding time, which gives caregivers time to develop the child's functional independence and character. Understanding energy requirements of this population will provide caregivers and health professionals with guidelines for providing optimal nutritional status.

  5. Use of computer access technology as an alternative to writing for a pre-school child with athetoid cerebral palsy--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhas, Brightlin Nithis; Samuel, Preethy Sarah; Manigandan, C

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the use of an outcome-driven model of decision-making in the implementation of computer access technology (CAT) for a pre-school child with athetoid cerebral palsy. The child did not have the fine motor skills required to hold a pencil but had the cognitive abilities to learn to write; therefore, we explored the use of a CAT device to enable written communication. Case study methodology was used to describe the selection process, child-level outcomes, and clinical challenges faced by the therapist in the use of a consortium model that was designed for an outcome-driven model of decision-making. The critical role of an occupational therapist in this process using a family-centered approach is discussed.

  6. Birth Defects: Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to help relax muscle spasms, including: Diazepam (Valium®), baclofen (Lioresal®), dantrolene (Dantrium®) and tizanidine (Zanaflex®). Your child takes these by mouth. Baclofen, a medicine that your child gets through a ...

  7. Reading with Love: Reading of Life Narrative of a Mother of a Child with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercieca, Daniela; Mercieca, Duncan P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws upon Deleuze and Guattari's ideas to suggest a different kind of reading of a narrative of a mother of a child with severe disability, and thus a different kind of ethical response to them. This reading gives readers the possibility of opening up experiences of parents and children with disability, rather than…

  8. Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

  9. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as CP is diagnosed, a child can begin therapy for movement, and other areas that need help, such as learning, speech, hearing, and social and emotional development. In addition, medicine, surgery, or braces ... Therapy Bones, Muscles, and Joints Dietary ...

  10. MR findings of cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Hum; Chang, Seung Kuk; Cho, Mee Young; Park, Dong Woo; Kim, Jong Deok; Eun, Choong Ki [Pusan Paik Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-15

    To evaluate the MR findings of brain damage in cerebral palised patients and to correlate it with gestational age and the time of damage. A retrospective analysis was performed in 40 patients who underwent MR scanning for evaluation of brain lesion in clinically diagnosed cerebral palsy. Authors classified the patients into two groups as premature and full-term and compared MR findings of the two groups. Abnormal MR findings were noted in 28 cases (70%). Five out of 6 patients who had been born prematurely showed isolate periventricular white matter lesions. Twenty-three out of 34 patients who had been born at full-term showed abnormal MR findings. Of these 23 patients, migration anomalies in 7 patients, isolate periventricular white matter lesions in 3 patients, and other combined periventricular subcortical white matter and deep gray matter lesions in 14 patients were seen. At least, 10 patients(43%) of full term group showed abnormal MRI findings reflecting intrauterine brain damage and all 5 patients of premature group showed isolate periventricular white matter lesions suggesting immaturity of brain. MRI is thought to be very useful in the assessment of brain damage for the patients with cerebral palsy by recognizing the location of the lesion and estimating the time of damage.

  11. Quality of life in children with cerebral palsy: implications for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Kim-Michelle; Davis, Elise; Reddihough, Dinah; Graham, Kerr; Waters, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    The ability to assess the quality of life of children with cerebral palsy to inform and evaluate individual care plans, service planning, interventions, and policies is crucial. In this article, the recent evidence on quality of life in children with cerebral palsy is reviewed, with attention to the determinants of quality of life and role of this construct as a practical outcome indicator in clinical trials. Quality of life measurement advances for children with cerebral palsy are discussed with a focus on condition-specific quality of life measures, particularly, the Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life-Child, which is the first condition-specific quality of life measure for children with cerebral palsy. The article presents an overview for clinicians and researchers intending to use quality of life measures on children with cerebral palsy and provides recommendations for future research that will better inform practice in the field.

  12. Psychological Problems in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Cross-Sectional European Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Jackie; White-Koning, Melanie; Dickinson, Heather O.; Thyen, Ute; Arnaud, Catherine; Beckung, Eva; Fauconnier, Jerome; Marcelli, Marco; McManus, Vicki; Michelsen, Susan I.; Parkinson, Kathryn; Colver, Allan

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To describe psychological symptoms in 8-12-year-old children with cerebral palsy; to investigate predictors of these symptoms and their impact on the child and family. Design: A cross-sectional multi-centre survey. Participants: Eight hundred and eighteen children with cerebral palsy, aged 8-12 years, identified from population-based…

  13. Behaviour in Children with Cerebral Palsy with and without Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Malin; Olsson, Ingrid; Hagberg, Gudrun; Beckung, Eva

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe behavioural problems in children with cerebral palsy (CP) with and without epilepsy. The children were sampled from the Western Sweden CP register and were part of a European Union project. The Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire and questions on epilepsy were answered by one parent of each child. Medical…

  14. Aerobic training in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsenga, A L; Shephard, R J; Ahmaidi, S; Ahmadi, S

    2013-06-01

    Rehabilitation is a major goal for children with cerebral palsy, although the potential to enhance cardio-respiratory fitness in such individuals remains unclear. This study thus compared current cardio-respiratory status between children with cerebral palsy and able-bodied children, and examined the ability to enhance the cardio-respiratory fitness of children with cerebral palsy by cycle ergometer training. 10 children with cerebral palsy (Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I and II) participated in thrice-weekly 30 min cycle ergometer training sessions for 8 weeks (mean age: 14.2±1.9 yrs). 10 additional subjects with cerebral palsy (mean age: 14.2±1.8 yrs) and 10 able-bodied subjects (mean age: 14.1±2.1 yrs) served as controls, undertaking no training. All subjects undertook a progressive cycle ergometer test of cardio-respiratory fitness at the beginning and end of the 8-week period. Cardio-respiratory parameters [oxygen intake V˙O2), ventilation V ˙ E) and heart rate (HR)] during testing were measured by Cosmed K4 b gas analyzer. The children with cerebral palsy who engaged in aerobic training improved their peak oxygen consumption, heart rate and ventilation significantly (pchildren with cerebral palsy can benefit significantly from cardio-respiratory training, and such training should be included in rehabilitation programs.

  15. Feeding method and health outcomes of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Brian

    2004-08-01

    Disorders of feeding and swallowing are common in children with cerebral palsy. Feeding and swallowing disorders have significant implications for development, growth and nutrition, respiratory health, gastrointestinal function, parent-child interaction, and overall family life. Assessments need to be comprehensive in scope and centered around the medical home. Oral feeding interventions for children with cerebral palsy may be effective in promoting oral motor function, but have not been shown to be effective in promoting feeding efficiency or weight gain. Feeding gastrostomy tubes are a reasonable alternative for children with severe feeding and swallowing problems who have had poor weight gain.

  16. The effects of virtual reality game training on trunk to pelvis coupling in a child with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barton Gabor J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good control of trunk and pelvic movements is necessary for well controlled leg movements required to perform activities of daily living. The nature of movement coupling between the trunk and pelvis varies and depends on the type of activity. Children with cerebral palsy often have reduced ability to modulate coupling between the trunk and pelvis but movement patterns of the pelvis can be improved by training. The aim of this study was to examine how pelvis to trunk coupling changed while playing a computer game driven by pelvic rotations. Methods One boy with cerebral palsy diplegia played the Goblin Post Office game on the CAREN virtual rehabilitation system for six weeks. He navigated a flying dragon in a virtual cave towards randomly appearing targets by rotating the pelvis around a vertical axis. Motion of the pelvis and trunk was captured in real-time by a Vicon 612 optoelectronic system tracking two clusters of three markers attached to the sacrum and thoracic spine. Results Convex hull areas calculated from angle-angle plots of pelvic and trunk rotations showed that coupling increased over game training (F1,11 = 7.482, p = 0.019. Reaching to targets far from the midline required tighter coupling than reaching near targets (F1,12 = 10.619, p = 0.007. Conclusions Increasing coupling appears to be an initial compensation mechanism using the better controlled trunk to drive rotation of the pelvis. Co-contractions causing increased coupling are expected to reduce over longer exposure to training. The control scheme of the training game can be set to facilitate de-coupling of pelvic movements from the trunk. Using large ranges of pelvic rotation required more coupling suggesting that training of selective pelvic movements is likely to be more effective close to a neutral pelvic posture.

  17. Validation of a cerebral palsy register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Monica Wedell; Langhoff-Roos, J; Uldall, P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse completeness and validity of data in the Cerebral Palsy Register in Denmark, 1979-1982. METHODS: Completeness has been assessed by comparing data from The Danish National Patient Register (DNPR) with the cases included in the Cerebral Palsy Register (CPR). Agreement between......, but gestational age was subject to a systematic error, and urinary infections in pregnancy (kappa = 0.43) and placental abruption (kappa = 0.52) were seriously under-reported in the CPR. CONCLUSIONS: Completeness of the Cerebral Palsy Register in Denmark, 1979-1982, has been assessed to maximal 85%, emphasizing...

  18. Sleep disorders in children with cerebral palsy: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lélis, Ana Luíza P A; Cardoso, Maria Vera L M; Hall, Wendy A

    2016-12-01

    Sleep disorders are more prevalent in children with cerebral palsy. The review aimed to identify and synthesize information about the nature of sleep disorders and their related factors in children with cerebral palsy. We performed an electronic search by using the search terms sleep/child*, and sleep/cerebral palsy in the following databases: Latin American literature on health sciences, SCOPUS, medical publications, cumulative index to nursing and allied health literature, psycinfo, worldcat, web of science, and the Cochrane library. The selection criteria were studies: available in Portuguese, English or Spanish and published between 2004 and 2014, with results addressing sleep disorders in children (ages 0-18 y) with a diagnosis of cerebral palsy. 36,361 abstracts were identified. Of those, 37 papers were selected, and 25 excluded. Twelve papers were incorporated in the study sample: eight quantitative studies, three reviews, and one case study. Eleven types of sleep disorders were identified, such as difficult morning awakening, insomnia, nightmares, difficulties in initiating and maintaining nighttime sleep (night waking), and sleep anxiety. Twenty-one factors were linked to sleep disorders, which we classified as intrinsic factors associated with common comorbidities accompanying cerebral palsy, and extrinsic aspects, specifically environmental and socio-familial variables, and clinical-surgical and pharmacological interventions.

  19. Cerebral palsy in preterm infants

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    Demeši-Drljan Čila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Cerebral palsy (CP is one of the leading causes of neurological impairment in childhood. Preterm birth is a significant risk factor in the occurrence of CP. Clinical outcomes may include impairment of gross motor function and intellectual abilities, visual impairment and epilepsy. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among gestational age, type of CP, functional ability and associated conditions. Methods. The sample size was 206 children with CP. The data were obtained from medical records and included gestational age at birth, clinical characteristics of CP and associated conditions. Clinical CP type was determined according to Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe (SCPE and topographically. Gross motor function abilities were evaluated according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS. Results. More than half of the children with CP were born prematurely (54.4%. Statistically significant difference was noted with respect to the distribution of various clinical types of CP in relation to gestational age (p < 0.001. In the group with spastic bilateral CP type, there is a greater proportion of children born preterm. Statistically significant difference was noted in the functional classification based on GMFCS in terms of gestational age (p = 0.049, children born at earlier gestational age are classified at a higher GMFCS level of functional limitation. The greatest percentage of children (70.0% affected by two or more associated conditions was found in the group that had extremely preterm birth, and that number declined with increasing maturity at birth. Epilepsy was more prevalent in children born at greater gestational age, and this difference in distribution was statistically significant (p = 0.032. Conclusion. The application of antenatal and postnatal protection of preterm children should be a significant component of the CP prevention strategy. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike

  20. Ocular problems in children with cerebral palsy

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    Esra Ayhan Tuzcu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate eye problemsin children with cerebral palsy in our region.Materials and Methods: 90 patients which was diagnosedas cerebral palsy, treated and followed up in PediatricNeurology Department of Mustafa Kemal University,were included to this study. The history was taken, anda physical examination was performed to determine theetiology of the disease and type of SP. All of the patientswere underwent a detailed ophthalmological examinationincluding visual acuity, refractive error, amblyopia, strabismus,nystagmus and fundus examination.Results: Totally 90 patients, 51 male and 39 female,were included to the study. When the etiologic factorswere evaluated, the asphyxia was seen in 33.3% of thepatients. The most common type of cerebral palsy wasspastic quadriplegia at the rate of 43.3%. Eye problemswere detected in 60% of our cases. Of this, 54.4% wererefractive errors, 35.6% were strabismus, and 22.2%were optic nerve pathologies. Amblyopia was found in11.1% of cases. Although strabismus is more common inspastic diplegia type of cerebral palsy, there was no statisticallysignificant differenceConclusions: In conclusion, eye problems are commonin children with cerebral palsy. Therefore, we recommendroutine eye examination in these patients due to be beneficialin reducing the detection and communication difficulties.Key words: Cerebral palsy, refractive error, strabismus,optic atrophy

  1. Family adaptation to cerebral palsy in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guyard, Audrey; Michelsen, Susan I; Arnaud, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    not only on physical condition but also on adolescent psychological problems to improve family adaptation. Families at risk of experiencing severe distress should be targeted early and proactive caregiver interventions on the whole family should be performed. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS: Family is a dynamic......BACKGROUND AND AIM: Factors promoting family adaptation to child's disability are poorly studied together. The aim of the study was to describe the family adaptation to disability and to identify determinants associated with using a global theoretical model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 286 families...... of teenagers [13-17 years] with cerebral palsy (CP) from 4 European disability registers were included and visited at home. Face to face interviews were performed in order to measure parental distress, perceived impact in various dimensions of family life, family resources and stressors. Relationships were...

  2. The early markers for later dyskinetic cerebral palsy are different from those for spastic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einspieler, C; Cioni, G; Paolicelli, PB; Bos, AF; Dressler, A; Ferrari, F; Roversi, MF; Prechtl, HFR

    2002-01-01

    Qualitative abnormalities of spontaneous motor activity in new-borns and young infants are early predictive markers for later spastic cerebral palsy. Aim of this research was to identify which motor patterns may be specific for later dyskinetic cerebral palsy. In a large, prospectively performed lon

  3. Gastrostomy tube feeding of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlseng, Magnus O; Andersen, Guro L; DA Graca Andrada, Maria

    2012-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries.......To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries....

  4. Diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Thomas Michael

    2008-12-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most prevalent cause of persisting motor function impairment with a frequency of about 1/500 births. In developed countries, the prevalence rose after introduction of neonatal intensive care, but in the past decade, this trend has reversed. A recent international workshop defined cerebral palsy as "a group of permanent disorders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation, that are attributed to non-progressive disturbances that occurred in the developing fetal or infant brain." In a majority of cases, the predominant motor abnormality is spasticity; other forms of cerebral palsy include dyskinetic (dystonia or choreo-athetosis) and ataxic cerebral palsy. In preterm infants, about one-half of the cases have neuroimaging abnormalities, such as echolucency in the periventricular white matter or ventricular enlargement on cranial ultrasound. Among children born at or near term, about two-thirds have neuroimaging abnormalities, including focal infarction, brain malformations, and periventricular leukomalacia. In addition to the motor impairment, individuals with cerebral palsy may have sensory impairments, cognitive impairment, and epilepsy. Ambulation status, intelligence quotient, quality of speech, and hand function together are predictive of employment status. Mortality risk increases incrementally with increasing number of impairments, including intellectual, limb function, hearing, and vision. The care of individuals with cerebral palsy should include the provision of a primary care medical home for care coordination and support; diagnostic evaluations to identify brain abnormalities, severity of neurologic and functional abnormalities, and associated impairments; management of spasticity; and care for associated problems such as nutritional deficiencies, pain, dental care, bowel and bladder continence, and orthopedic complications. Current strategies to decrease the risk of cerebral palsy include interventions to

  5. Parálisis cerebral Cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Malagon Valdez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El término parálisis cerebral (PC engloba a un gran número de síndromes neurológicos clínicos, de etiología diversa. Estos síndromes se caracterizan por tener una sintomatología común: los trastornos motores. Algunos autores prefieren manejar términos como "encefalopatía fija", "encefalopatías no evolutivas". Se mencionan la utilidad de programas de intervención temprana y métodos especiales de rehabilitación, así como el manejo de las deficiencias asociadas como la epilepsia, deficiencia mental, trastornos del lenguaje, audición, visión, déficit de la atención que mejoran el pronóstico de manera significativa. El pronóstico también depende de la gravedad del padecimiento y de las manifestaciones asociadas.The term cerebral palsy (CP, is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the nonevolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations.

  6. Stigma Against Mental Illness and Cerebral Palsy in China

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Liying

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation examines the stigmatization of two health conditions: mental disability and physical disability in the context of China. In particular, it addresses two main themes: the processes and impacts of stigma, and the variables that moderate the association of stigma with social attributes. The first paper applied a qualitative approach to identify the sources of burdens of raising a child with cerebral palsy in China and how stigma and “face” as a cultural factor affect childr...

  7. Aquatic exercise in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrijević Lidija; Bjelaković Bojko; Lazović Milica; Stanković Ivona; Čolović Hristina; Kocić Mirjana; Zlatanović Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Aquatic exercise is one of the most popular supplementary treatments for children with neuro-motor impairment, especially for cerebral palsy (CP). As water reduces gravity force which increases postural stability, a child with CP exercises more easily in water than on land. Objective. The aim of the study was to examine aquatic exercise effects on gross motor functioning, muscle tone and cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP. Methods. The study included 1...

  8. CT findings in patients with cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konno, K. (Akita Univ. (Japan))

    1982-01-01

    Clinical findings and CT findings in 73 cases of cerebral palsy were studied. The causes of cerebral palsy were presumed to be as follows: abnormal cerebral development (36%), asphyxial delivery (34%), and immature delivery (19%), etc. CT findings were abnormal in 58% of the 73 cases, 83% of the spastic tetraplegia patients and all of the spastic hemiplegia patients showed abnormal CT findings. All the patients with spastic monoplegia presented normal CT findings. In 75% of the spastic hemiplegia cases, the CT abnormalities were due to cerebral parenchymal abnormality such as porencephaly and regional low absorption. In cases of spastic tetraplegia, cerebral parenchymal abnormality was found only in 10%. Cortical atrophy was found only in 15 of the 73 cases, whereas central atrophy was found in 36 cases.

  9. Epidemiology of cerebral palsy in Southern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev-Friis, Christina; Dunkhase-Heinl, Ulrike; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence, subtypes, severity and neuroimaging findings of cerebral palsy (CP) in a cohort of children born in Southern Denmark. Risk factors were analysed and aetiology considered. METHODS: A population-based cohort study covering 17...... prevention of CP is possible if the numbers of preterm births and multiple pregnancies can be reduced. FUNDING: The Danish Cerebral Palsy Follow-up Programme is supported by the foundation "Ludvig og Sara Elsass Fond". TRIAL REGISTRATION: 2008-58-0034....

  10. Feeding difficulties in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Morag J; Parr, Jeremy R; Sullivan, Peter B

    2012-12-01

    Feeding difficulties are common in children with cerebral palsy and have an effect on growth, nutritional state, general health, social interaction and behaviour and developmental outcomes. Many factors have an effect on feeding ability. Identification of these factors and amelioration of their impact on feeding difficulties is essential to promote adequate growth and nutrition. Appropriate assessment and management is best achieved by a multiprofessional team skilled in the care of children with cerebral palsy and feeding impairments. Feeding difficulties must be considered within the wider context of family and social circumstance.

  11. Pathophysiology of muscle contractures in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathewson, Margie A; Lieber, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy present with a variety of adaptations to muscle structure and function. These pathophysiologic symptoms include functional deficits such as decreased force production and range of motion, in addition to changes in muscle structure such as decreased muscle belly size, increased sarcomere length, and altered extracellular matrix structure and composition. On a cellular level, patients with cerebral palsy have fewer muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, and altered gene expression. Understanding the nature of these changes may present opportunities for the development of new muscle treatment therapies.

  12. Patterns of interaction between caregiver and child (two to seven-years-old with complex communication needs and cerebral palsy, using Augmentative and Alternative Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Chaves Cruz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the communicative interaction patterns of 40 children (from two to seven years of age with complex communication needs with cerebral palsy using Augmentative and Alternative Communication Systems (AACS with their primary caregivers. The dyads were videotaped in a free-play situation for 15 minutes considering five categories of variables: mother-child communication patterns; conversational management; implicit educational strategies; turn-taking, and communication functions. The findings indicated a pattern of mother-directed initiation of interaction, 85% of them doing so many times and only 15% doing so only occasionally. Similar results were obtained with different formulations of questions: the results revealed that 85% of the mothers directed their children with questions that favoured Yes/No replies. In the turn-taking analysis, 70% of caregivers that received training in AACS managed the communication interaction with their children in a compensated way as compared with 40.6% of those who did not receive such a training. Regarding duration of training in AACS, 72% of mothers with less than 12 months of training failed to respond to children’s communication attempts through sounds as compared with 45.0% of those with more than 12 month’s training in AACS. Communicative functions were seen to be independent of the type of AACS employed. Future research is discussed in the light of the present finding.

  13. Epidemiology of cerebral palsy in Southern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev-Friis, Christina; Dunkhase-Heinl, Ulrike; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence, subtypes, severity and neuroimaging findings of cerebral palsy (CP) in a cohort of children born in Southern Denmark. Risk factors were analysed and aetiology considered. METHODS: A population-based cohort study covering 17,580 l...

  14. Thyroxine Level of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jie

    2000-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the thyroxine level of Children with cerebral palsy so as to understand thd changes of their nevous endocrine. Methods:Radioimmunoassay was applied to 57 Children with cerebral palsy and 108 normal children.The serum level of tridothyronine(T3), thyroxine(T4)free tridothyronine(FT3),free thyroxin(FT4),and thyroid stimulating hormone(TSH) were measured for those children in the moming and and in condition without any food Rsults: (1)Chiidren with cerebral palsy all showed low T3 values.The difference of T3 value between CP children and norrmal children was significant (P<0.001). (2)Results from groups with difference ages:the CP toddler′s age group also showed low T4 and FT4 values The difference of T4 and FT4 values between the toddler′s age CP childrengroup and the toddler′s age normal children group tegted was significant (CP<0.01 for T4, P <0. 05 for FT4): Conclusion:The tlyroxine level of children with cerebral palsy showed lower values compared to normal children, especisly, the low T3 values were significant.

  15. Cerebral Palsy: Still A Social Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angom Bisharda

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Research Problem: What arc the social aspects of cerebral palsy?Objective: To determine the extent and severity of neuromuscular involvement in cases of cerebral palsy and to find out the associated defects among these children.Study Design: Cross sectional study.Setting: Tertiary care hospital, outdoor patients.Participants: Children in the age group of 0 - 12 years.Sample Size: 120 children suffering from cerebral palsy.Study Variables: Social factors, neuromuscular involvement.Statistical Analysis: By proportionsResult: Out of 120 cases, maximum number of cases (66.6% were in the age group of 1- 4 years. 83 cases ( 69.16% were males. Among the various types, spastic type was the commonest (87.5%. Of these spastic cases, 52 (49.52% had quadriplegia. No case of tremor and rigidity was seen. Delayed milestones was the commonest associated disorder, seen in 107 (89.16% cases, followed by speech defect in 58(48.3% cases, visual defect in 34(28.3% cases and convulsions in 24 (20.0% cases. Hearing defect was seen in 5 cases (4.16% only.Conclusion: More concerted efforts arc required to identify children with cerebral palsy and rehabilitate them for the betterment of society.

  16. Parental infertility and cerebral palsy in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Basso, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Children born after in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) have been reported to have a higher risk of cerebral palsy (CP), perhaps due to the higher frequency of preterm birth, multiple births or vanishing embryo in the pregnancies. However, it has been suggested...

  17. Early identification and intervention in cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Anna; Greisen, Gorm; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-01-01

    Infants with possible cerebral palsy (CP) are commonly assumed to benefit from early diagnosis and early intervention, but substantial evidence for this is lacking. There is no consensus in the literature on a definition of 'early', but this review focuses on interventions initiated within the fi...

  18. Gait Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as…

  19. Clinical practice: swallowing problems in cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, C.E.; Hulst, K. van; Rotteveel, J.J.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Jongerius, P.H.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common physical disability in early childhood. The worldwide prevalence of CP is approximately 2-2.5 per 1,000 live births. It has been clinically defined as a group of motor, cognitive, and perceptive impairments secondary to a non-progressive defect or lesion of the

  20. Cerebral palsy: the first three years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, M M; Koffman, M

    1980-09-01

    The orthopedic surgeion should be an integral part of a medical team for evaluation and treatment of young children with cerebral palsy. Surgical procedures in this first three years of life are usually limited to the adductor releases about the hip. Stretching and plastic splints about the ankle and knee followed by ankle-foot orthoses are frequently effective in correction of deformity.

  1. Assessment of the hand in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Bhardwaj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy is the musculoskeletal manifestation of a nonprogressive central nervous system lesion that usually occurs due to a perinatal insult to the brain. Though the cerebral insult is static the musculoskeletal pathology is progressive. Some patients with cerebral palsy whose hands are affected can be made better by surgery. The surgical procedures as such are not very technically demanding but the assessment, decision-making, and selecting the procedures for the given patient make this field challenging. When done well, the results are rewarding not only in terms of improvement in hand function but also in appearance and personal hygiene, which leads to better self-image and permits better acceptance in the society. This article focuses on the clinical examination, patient selection, and decision-making while managing these patients.

  2. Predictors of participation of adolescents with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang, Van Mô; Colver, Allan; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether childhood factors that are amenable to intervention (parenting stress, child psychological problems and pain) predicted participation in daily activities and social roles of adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). We randomly selected 1174 children aged 8-12 years from eight...... measures: parent reported stress (Parenting Stress Index Short Form), their child's psychological difficulties (Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire) and frequency and severity of pain; either child or parent reported the child's participation (LIFE Habits questionnaire). We fitted a structural equation...... model to each of the participation domains, regressing participation in childhood and adolescence on parenting stress, child psychological problems and pain, and regressing adolescent factors on the corresponding childhood factors; models were adjusted for impairment, region, age and gender. Pain...

  3. Cerebral Palsy. Fact Sheet = La Paralisis Cerebral. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is written in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition of cerebral palsy and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy:…

  4. Stationary Cycling and Children with Cerebral Palsy: Case Reports for Two Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Kara L.; DeMuth, Sharon K.; Knutson, Loretta M.; Fowler, Eileen G.

    2010-01-01

    These case reports describe a stationary cycling intervention and outcomes for two child participants (P1 and P2) with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. Each child completed a 12-week, 30-session cycling intervention consisting of strengthening and cardiorespiratory fitness phases. P1 exhibited higher training intensities, particularly during the…

  5. Determinants of Developmental Gain in Daily Activities in Young Children with Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijsen-Terpstra, Anne J A; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Verschuren, Olaf; Smits, Dirk-Wouter; Jongmans, Marian J; Gorter, Jan Willem

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine which child and family characteristics at the child's age of 2 years are determinants of development of self-care and mobility activities over a period of 2 years in young children with cerebral palsy (CP). Longitudinal data of 92 children, representing all level

  6. Determinants of developmental gain in daily activities in young children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijsen-Terpstra, Anne JA; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Verschuren, Olaf; Smits, Dirk-Wouter; Jongmans, Marian J; Gorter, Jan Willem

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine which child and family characteristics at the child's age of 2 years are determinants of development of self-care and mobility activities over a period of 2 years in young children with cerebral palsy (CP). Longitudinal data of 92 children, representing all level

  7. Food pattern and nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Patrícia Ayrosa C; Amancio, Olga Maria S; Araújo, Roberta Faria C; Vitalle, Maria Sylvia de S; Braga, Josefina Aparecida P

    2013-09-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess the food intake pattern and the nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 90 children from two to 12.8 years with cerebral palsy in the following forms: hemiplegia, diplegia, and tetraplegia. Nutritional status was assessed by weight, height, and age data. Food intake was verified by the 24-hour recall and food frequency questionnaire. The ability to chew and/or swallowing, intestinal habits, and physical activity were also evaluated. RESULTS For 2-3 year-old age group, the mean energy intake followed the recommended range; in 4-6 year-old age group with hemiplegia and tetraplegia, energy intake was below the recommended limits. All children presented low intake of carbohydrates, adequate intake of proteins and high intake of lipids. The tetraplegia group had a higher prevalence of chewing (41%) and swallowing (12.8%) difficulties compared to 14.5 and 6.6% of children with hemiplegia, respectively. Most children of all groups had a daily intestinal habit. All children presented mild physical activity, while moderate activity was not practiced by any child of the tetraplegia group, which had a significantly lower height/age Z score than those with hemiplegia (-2.14 versus -1.05; p=0.003). CONCLUSIONS The children with cerebral palsy presented inadequate dietary pattern and impaired nutritional status, with special compromise of height. Tetraplegia imposes difficulties regarding chewing/swallowing and moderate physical activity practice.

  8. Food pattern and nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Ayrosa C. Lopes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES To assess the food intake pattern and the nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 90 children from two to 12.8 years with cerebral palsy in the following forms: hemiplegia, diplegia, and tetraplegia. Nutritional status was assessed by weight, height, and age data. Food intake was verified by the 24-hour recall and food frequency questionnaire. The ability to chew and/or swallowing, intestinal habits, and physical activity were also evaluated. RESULTS For 2-3 year-old age group, the mean energy intake followed the recommended range; in 4-6 year-old age group with hemiplegia and tetraplegia, energy intake was below the recommended limits. All children presented low intake of carbohydrates, adequate intake of proteins and high intake of lipids. The tetraplegia group had a higher prevalence of chewing (41% and swallowing (12.8% difficulties compared to 14.5 and 6.6% of children with hemiplegia, respectively. Most children of all groups had a daily intestinal habit. All children presented mild physical activity, while moderate activity was not practiced by any child of the tetraplegia group, which had a significantly lower height/age Z score than those with hemiplegia (-2.14 versus -1.05; p=0.003. CONCLUSIONS The children with cerebral palsy presented inadequate dietary pattern and impaired nutritional status, with special compromise of height. Tetraplegia imposes difficulties regarding chewing/swallowing and moderate physical activity practice.

  9. Health Care Transition Experiences of Young Adults With Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Ellen McLaughlin

    2015-01-01

    Health care transition (HCT) describes the purposeful, planned movement of adolescents from child to adult-orientated care. The purpose of this qualitative study is to uncover the meaning of transition to adult-centered care as experienced by young adults with cerebral palsy (YA-CP) through the research question: What are the lived experiences of young adults with cerebral palsy transitioning from pediatric to adult healthcare? Six females and 3 males, aged 19-25 years of age, who identified as carrying the diagnosis of cerebral palsy without cognitive impairment, were interviewed. Giorgi's (1985) method for analysis of phenomenology was the framework for the study and guided the phenomenological reduction. The meaning of the lived experiences of YA-CPs transition to adult health care is expert novices with evidence and experience-based expectations, negotiating new systems interdependently and accepting less than was expected. More information and support is needed for the YA-CP during transition to ensure a well-organized move to appropriate adult-oriented health care that is considerate of the lifelong impact of the disorder. The nurses' role as advocate, mentor and guide can optimize the individual's response to the transition process.

  10. Hip and Spine in Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Persson-Bunke, Måns

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) have an increased risk of scoliosis, contractures including windswept hip deformity (WS), and hip dislocation. In 1994, a follow-up program and registry for children and adolescents with CP (CPUP) was initiated in Sweden to allow the early detection and prevention of hip dislocations and other musculoskeletal deformities. Purpose: To analyze the prevalence of scoliosis and WS in children with CP and to study the effect of CPUP. To e...

  11. Dietary Practices in Saudi Cerebral Palsy Children

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Hammad, Nouf S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the dietary practices of Saudi cerebral palsy (CP) children. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the following information from parents of CP children: demographics, main source of dietary information, frequency of main meals, foods/drinks used for main meals and in-between-meals. Results: Parents of 157 CP children participated. Parents were divided into three, while children were divided into two age groups. The main sources of dietary inf...

  12. Regional Cerebral Perfusion in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Yong; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Yoon, Byung Woo; Lee, Sang Bok; Jeon, Beom S. [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Han; Lee, Myung Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-15

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a Parkinson-plus syndrome characterized clinically by supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, pseudobulbar palsy, axial rigidity, bradykinesia, postural instability and dementia. Presence of dementia and lack of cortical histopathology suggest the derangement of cortical function by pathological changes in subcortical structures in PSP, which is supported by the pattern of behavioral changes and measurement of brain metabolism using positron emission tomography. This study was done to examine whether there are specific changes of regional cerebral perfusion in PSP and whether there is a correlation between severity of motor abnormaility and degree of changes in cerebral perfusion. We measured regional cerebral perfusion indices in 5 cortical and 2 subcortical areas in 6 patients with a clinical diagnosis of PSP and 6 healthy age and sex matched controls using Tc-99m-HMPAO SPECT. Compared with age and sex matched controls, only superior frontal regional perfusion index was significantly decreased in PSP (p<0.05). There was no correlation between the severity of the motor abnormality and any of the regional cerebral perfusion indices (p>0.05). We affirm the previous reports that perfusion in superior frontal cortex is decreased in PSP. Based on our results that there was no correlation between severity of motor abnormality and cerebral perfusion in the superior frontal cortex, nonmotoric symptoms including dementia needs to be looked at whether there is a correlation with the perfusion abnormality in superior frontal cortex

  13. Cerebral palsy in eastern Denmark: declining birth prevalence but increasing numbers of unilateral cerebral palsy in birth year period 1986-1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Susanne Holst; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Uldall, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Cerebral Palsy Registry in eastern Denmark has been collecting cases using a uniform data sampling procedure since birth year 1979. Children are included by two child neurologists and an obstetrician. Information on pregnancy, birth, neonatal period, impairments and demographic data...... are registered. The total cerebral palsy birth prevalence has been significantly decreasing since the birth period 1983-1986 with 3.0 per 1000 live births until the period 1995-1998 with 2.1 per 1000 live births. The overall decrease was seen in preterm infants (...

  14. Malnutrition is common in Ugandan children with cerebral palsy, particularly those over the age of five and those who had neonatal complications

    OpenAIRE

    Kakooza‐Mwesige, Angelina; Tumwine, James K; Eliasson, Ann‐Christin; Namusoke, Hanifa K.; Forssberg, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim Poor growth and malnutrition are frequently reported in children with cerebral palsy in developed countries, but there is limited information from developing countries. We investigated the nutritional status of Ugandan children with cerebral palsy and described the factors associated with poor nutrition. Methods We examined 135 children from two to 12 years with cerebral palsy, who attended Uganda's national referral hospital. A child was considered underweight, wasted, stunted o...

  15. Associations between Manual Abilities, Gross Motor Function, Epilepsy, and Mental Capacity in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa GAJEWSKA*

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Gajewska E, Sobieska M, Samborski W. Associations between Manual Abilities, Gross Motor Function, Epilepsy, and Mental Capacity in Children with Cerebral Palsy. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Spring 8(2:45-52.ObjectiveThis study aimed to evaluate gross motor function and hand function in children with cerebral palsy to explore their association with epilepsy and mental capacity. Material & MethodsThe research investigating the association between gross and fine motor function and the presence of epilepsy and/or mental impairment was conducted on a group of 83 children (45 girls, 38 boys. Among them, 41 were diagnosedwith quadriplegia, 14 hemiplegia, 18 diplegia, 7 mixed form, and 3 athetosis.A neurologist assessed each child in terms of possible epilepsy and confirmed diagnosis in 35 children. A psychologist assessed the mental level (according toWechsler and found 13 children within intellectual norm, 3 children with mild mental impairment, 18 with moderate, 27 with severe, and 22 with profound.Children were then classified based on Gross Motor Function Classification System and Manual Ability Classification Scale.ResultsThe gross motor function and manual performance were analysed in relation to mental impairment and the presence of epilepsy. Epilepsy was found to disturb conscious motor functions, but also higher degree of mental impairment wasobserved in children with epilepsy.ConclusionThe occurrence of epilepsy in children with cerebral palsy is associated with worse manual function. The occurrence of epilepsy is associated with limitations in conscious motor functions. There is an association between epilepsy in children with cerebral palsy and the degree of mental impairment.The occurrence of epilepsy, mainly in children with hemiplegia and diplegia is associated with worse mental capacities.ReferencesRichards CL, Malouin F. Cerebral palsy: definition, assessment and rehabilitation. Handb Clin Neurol

  16. Probability of walking in children with cerebral palsy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckung, E.; Hagberg, G.; Uldall, P.;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this work was to describe walking ability in children with cerebral palsy from the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe common database through 21 years and to examine the association between walking ability and predicting factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Anonymous data...

  17. Quality of Arithmetic Education for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Kathleen M.; de Moor, Jan; van Lieshout, Ernest C. D. M.; Withagen, Floortje

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the quality of arithmetic education for children with cerebral palsy. The use of individual educational plans, amount of arithmetic instruction time, arithmetic instructional grouping, and type of arithmetic teaching method were explored in three groups: children with cerebral palsy (CP) in…

  18. Processo de indicação do implante coclear em uma criança com paralisia cerebral: estudo de caso Indication process of cochlear implant for a child with cerebral palsy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jaquelini Dias dos Santos

    2011-12-01

    . Studies regarding the indication of cochlear implant (CI for children with cerebral palsy and hearing impairment are restricted internationally, and, in Brazil, non-existent. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe the process of pre-surgical assessment of a child with CP who was a candidate for cochlear implantation. The study was conducted with a boy, 2 years and 6 months old, with CP and bilateral hearing impairment. The pre-surgical protocol followed the procedures already used at the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies, including: speech-language pathology and audiological, neurological, otorhinolaryngological, and psychological evaluations through clinical observations, questionnaires, and imaging findings. The patient was diagnosed with profound and bilateral auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder, moderate quadriparesis athetoid, global developmental delay (except in visual function, presence of intentional communicative behavior, good social contact, absence of intellectual impairments or other additional disabilities within the clinical framework of CP, and a family integrated to the treatment. Based on the results obtained, the CI was recommended to this patient, who is currently enrolled in a systematic monitoring program. This study highlights the importance of the pre-surgical protocol for children with CP who are candidates for CI. Through assessment tools directed to the global aspects of development, one can obtain specific information that improve parent counseling regarding the child's prognosis and make it possible to trace actual hearing rehabilitation goals.

  19. Two Child Patients Misdiagnosed as Cerebral Palsy%误诊为脑性瘫痪康复治疗患儿二例分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚献花

    2014-01-01

    Diseasescausingdevelopmentretardationandmotionabnormalitiesinchildrenaremany,suchas,besides cerebral palsy( CP),thyroid hypofunction,chromosomal abnormalities,genetic metabolic diseases,leucodystrophy,dystonia, etc. Glutaric aciduria is a branched chain amino acid metabolism disorder,presenting with development retardation and dystonia accompanied mainly by a serious injuries to nervous system such as epilepsy and with the clinical manifestations of intermittent vomiting,hypoglycemia,metabolic acidosis and so on. Dysmyotonia has a feature of mildness in the morning and severity in the evening besides the performances of development retardation and motion abnormalities. This paper reviews 2 child patients with the above-mentioned diseases misdiagnosed as CP and their rehabilitation therapies,to deepen rehabilitation doctors′awareness about CP to make correct diagnoses and treatments timely.%引起患儿发育落后、运动异常的疾病很多,除脑性瘫痪外还可见于甲状腺功能低下、染色体异常、遗传代谢性疾病、脑白质病、肌张力障碍等。戊二酸尿症属支链氨基酸代谢障碍性疾病,除表现为发育落后及肌张力异常外,主要伴随有神经系统严重损伤(如癫痫),同时多表现有间断性呕吐、低血糖、代谢性酸中毒等临床表现。肌张力障碍性疾病表现为发育落后及运动障碍,且运动障碍具有晨轻暮重的特点。本文对将以上疾病误诊为脑性瘫痪康复治疗的2例患儿进行分析,以加深康复医生对脑性瘫痪的认识,及时做出正确诊断与治疗,避免发生误诊。

  20. REHABILITATION OF PERSONS WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasa CICEVSKA-JOVANOVA

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The persons with cerebral palsy with motoric impairments as a primary demmages, they have other following disables: visual impairments, hearing impairments, speech disables and very often they have intellectual difficulties.This persons in school have problems with writing, they couldn’t oriented in the books, they have difficulties with manipulation with school’s supplies and didactic materials, they couldn’t follow the order of the words in the line during the reading and the writing and etc.Using the exercises of psycho-motor reeducation, all before mentioned difficulties and problems can be mitigate or disappear.

  1. Education and employment prospects in cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Uldall, Peter; Kejs, Anne Mette T

    2005-01-01

    Parents and paediatric neurologists need information on the long-term social prognosis of children with cerebral palsy (CP). No large population-based study has been performed on this topic. On 31 December 1999, to find predictors in childhood of subsequent education and employment, 819...... information was obtained from Denmark's unique registries. Of the participants with CP, 33% vs 77% of controls, had education beyond lower secondary school (i.e. after age 15-16y), 29% were competitively employed (vs 82% of controls), 5% were studying, and 5% had specially created jobs. Excluding participants...

  2. Education and employment prospects in cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Uldall, Peter; Kejs, Anne Mette T;

    2005-01-01

    information was obtained from Denmark's unique registries. Of the participants with CP, 33% vs 77% of controls, had education beyond lower secondary school (i.e. after age 15-16y), 29% were competitively employed (vs 82% of controls), 5% were studying, and 5% had specially created jobs. Excluding participants......Parents and paediatric neurologists need information on the long-term social prognosis of children with cerebral palsy (CP). No large population-based study has been performed on this topic. On 31 December 1999, to find predictors in childhood of subsequent education and employment, 819...

  3. Parálisis cerebral Cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Malagon Valdez

    2007-01-01

    El término parálisis cerebral (PC) engloba a un gran número de síndromes neurológicos clínicos, de etiología diversa. Estos síndromes se caracterizan por tener una sintomatología común: los trastornos motores. Algunos autores prefieren manejar términos como "encefalopatía fija", "encefalopatías no evolutivas". Se mencionan la utilidad de programas de intervención temprana y métodos especiales de rehabilitación, así como el manejo de las deficiencias asociadas como la epilepsia, deficiencia me...

  4. Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaire for Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farin SOLEIMANI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Soleimani F, Vameghi R, Kazemnejad A, Akbar Fahimi N, Nobakht Z, Rassafiani M. Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaire for Children. Iran J Child Neurol. 2015 Winter;9(1:76-86. AbstractObjectiveCerebral palsy (CP is the most common cause of chronic disability that restricts participation in daily life for children. Thereby, it is comprised of quality of life. Quality of life (QOL measures have been a vital part of health outcome appraisals for individuals with CP and to obtain empirical evidence for the effectiveness of a range of interventions. The CP QOL-Child is a condition-specific QOL questionnaire designed for children with CP to assess well-being rather than ill-being.Materials & MethodsForward and backward translations of the CP QOL-Child were performed for: (1 the primary caregiver form (for parents of children with CP aged 4–12 years; and (2 the child self-report form (for children with cerebral palsy aged 9–12 years. Psychometric properties assessment included reliability, internal consistency, and item discrimination, construct validity with Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS and Manual Ability Classification System (MACS was done. SPSS was used to analyze the results of this study.ResultsA sample of 200 primary caregivers forchildren with CP (mean = 7.7 years and 40 children (mean = 10.2 years completed. Internal consistency ranged from 0.61–0.87 for the primary caregivers form, and 0.64–0.86 for the child self-report form. Reliability ranged from 0.47–0.84. Item discrimination analysis revealed that a majority of the items (80% have high discriminating power. Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated a distinguishable domain structure as in the original English version. Moderate associations were found between lower QOL and more severe motor disability(GMFCS; r = .18–.32; p < .05 and MACS; r= .13 - .40; p < .05. The highest

  5. Dynamic touch is affected in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocarino, Juliana M; Fonseca, Sergio T; Silva, Paula L P; Gonçalves, Gabriela G P; Souza, Thales R; Mancini, Marisa C

    2014-02-01

    Children with developmental disorders such as cerebral palsy have limited opportunities for effortful interactions with objects and tools. The goal of the study was to investigate whether children with cerebral palsy have deficits in their ability to perceive object length by dynamic touch when compared to typically developing children. Fourteen children with typical development and 12 children with cerebral palsy were asked to report the length of hand-held rods after wielding them out of sight. Multilevel regression models indicated that I1 (maximum principal moment of inertia) was a significant predictor of perceived length - LP (pcerebral palsy (group factor) partially explained such variance (p=.002). In addition, accuracy and reliability of the length judgments made by children with cerebral palsy were significantly lower than the typically developing children (p<.05). Theoretical and clinical implications of these results were identified and discussed.

  6. Parents' reactions to the diagnosis of cerebral palsy : associations between resolution, age and severity of disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuengel, C.; Rentinck, I. C. M.; Stolk, J.; Voorman, J. M.; Loots, G. M. P.; Ketelaar, M.; Gorter, J. W.; Becher, J. G.

    2009-01-01

    Background For parents, receiving a diagnosis, typically in early childhood, that their child has cerebral palsy may conjure up high distress and anxiety. Resolution of these initial reactions may help parents to focus on the challenges and needs of their children. Aims of the study were to test whe

  7. An eye for possibilities in the development of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttcher, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Taking children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) as an example, the article seeks an understanding of children with disabilities that connects neuropsychological theories of neural development with the situated cognition perspective and the child as an active participant in its social practices. The early...

  8. Autism Spectrum Disorder Phenotype in Children with Ambulatory Cerebral Palsy: A Descriptive Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smile, S.; Dupuis, A.; MacArthur, C.; Roberts, W.; Fehlings, D.

    2013-01-01

    The current study aims to describe the cognitive profile, autism profile, medical and behavioral presentation of children with a dual diagnosis of cerebral palsy (CP) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Little is known about the dual presentation of CP and ASD. Timely diagnosis is imperative as early intervention may impact a child's developmental…

  9. Computed tomography in spastic cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, H.; Taudorf, K.; Melchior, J.C.

    1982-09-01

    Eighty-three children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) were examined with cranial CT. In 56 cases the CT findings were abnormal. The most frequent abnormality was atrophy, present in 44 patients. The frequency of pathologic CT increased with severity of the CP. Patients with CP of postnatal aetiology more often had abnormal CT than patients with other known causes. Pathologic CT findings were seen more often in patients with seizures than in patients without. Infarctions and hemiatrophy were much more frequent in patients with hemiplegia than in patients with other types of spastic CP. A special kind of central atrophy, called isolated atrophy around the cella media, is described. This condition was seen in 20% of cases, most often in hemi- and paraplegic patients. Early infarctions in the border areas between the vascular territories of the internal carotid and the posterior cerebral artery may be the reason for this kind of atrophy.

  10. Parental stress in mothers of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysa Ferreira Martins Ribeiro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to evaluate parental stress of mothers of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy; to verify whether parental stress undergoes variations according to the level of motor compromise, the child's phase of life, and sociodemographic variables.METHOD: a cross-sectional, descriptive study, with 223 mothers of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy.RESULTS: 45.3% of the mothers presented high levels of stress; there were differences in stress between mothers of children with mild and severe motor impairment; mothers of older children were more stressed than mothers of younger children and of adolescents; paid work and leisure activities reduced the stress.CONCLUSION: mothers of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy, whose children present mild to severe motor impairment are vulnerable to parental stress. Paid work and leisure activities were the factors that contributed most to reducing the stress.

  11. Physical activity as a prescription for the children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghavan Shariat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available After so many years devoted to practicing medicine as children physiotherapists, the therapists finally found the importance of balance training exercises in children who suffer from cerebral palsy. It is only through controlling balance that we can achieve improvement in body movement and position that will culminate into performance independence in a child. Formerly, working over controlling balance in cerebral palsy children has been very difficult, because contracture and spasticity did not let us to have an effective balance training exercise. In this respect, we have summarized the results of previous authors that specify the level of effectiveness of exercise therapy. The results of different studies showed that level of effectiveness of exercise therapy on alleviating the symptoms of spastic cerebral palsy is average in accordance with Cohen's effect size Interpretation table.

  12. Development of The Viking Speech Scale to classify the speech of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Lindsay; Virella, Daniel; Mjøen, Tone; da Graça Andrada, Maria; Murray, Janice; Colver, Allan; Himmelmann, Kate; Rackauskaite, Gija; Greitane, Andra; Prasauskiene, Audrone; Andersen, Guro; de la Cruz, Javier

    2013-10-01

    Surveillance registers monitor the prevalence of cerebral palsy and the severity of resulting impairments across time and place. The motor disorders of cerebral palsy can affect children's speech production and limit their intelligibility. We describe the development of a scale to classify children's speech performance for use in cerebral palsy surveillance registers, and its reliability across raters and across time. Speech and language therapists, other healthcare professionals and parents classified the speech of 139 children with cerebral palsy (85 boys, 54 girls; mean age 6.03 years, SD 1.09) from observation and previous knowledge of the children. Another group of health professionals rated children's speech from information in their medical notes. With the exception of parents, raters reclassified children's speech at least four weeks after their initial classification. Raters were asked to rate how easy the scale was to use and how well the scale described the child's speech production using Likert scales. Inter-rater reliability was moderate to substantial (k>.58 for all comparisons). Test-retest reliability was substantial to almost perfect for all groups (k>.68). Over 74% of raters found the scale easy or very easy to use; 66% of parents and over 70% of health care professionals judged the scale to describe children's speech well or very well. We conclude that the Viking Speech Scale is a reliable tool to describe the speech performance of children with cerebral palsy, which can be applied through direct observation of children or through case note review.

  13. Percepção de conflito em uma família recasada constituída por um filho com paralisia cerebral Perception of conflict in a stepfamily with a child with cerebral palsy

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    Hilda Rosa Moraes de Freitas

    2012-03-01

    authority. The objective of this article was to describe the structure and dynamics of a stepfamily having a child with cerebral palsy, based on the members' representations of conflict situations. In this case study focused on a family, made up of three members: mother, son and stepfather. A semi-structured interview and the Family System Test (FAST were applied. The FAST scores showed closeness in the mother-child dyad and distance in the stepfather-stepson dyad, with the hierarchy focused on the mother figure. As to the flexibility of boundaries, the couple's perception indicated rigid boundaries, both for the family and for parental systems, while the child's perception of the family system revealed diffused boundaries. Therefore, some factors highlighted in the literature and evident in this family such as differences in the couple's life cycle, short period of marriage, emotional baggage between mother and son, added to demands of child care, resources and biopsychological provisions, constituted a rigid standard with low flexibility, which made it difficult to include the stepfather in the group, resulting in less commitment to co-parenting in the care and education of the stepchild.

  14. Lame from birth: early concepts of cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Deformations have been attributed to supernatural causes since antiquity. Cerebral palsy was associated with God's wrath, witchcraft, the evil eye, or maternal imagination. Greek scholars recommended prevention by tight swaddling, a custom that persisted into modern times. In the Middle Ages, the midwife's negligence was held responsible as was difficult teething. Morgagni described in 1769 that the neonatal brain can liquefy, and Bednar described leukomalacia in 1850 as a distinct disorder of the newborn. In 1861, Little associated cerebral palsies with difficult or protracted labor and neonatal asphyxia, but he was challenged by Freud, who in 1897 declared that most cases are prenatal in origin. In 1868, Virchow demonstrated inflammatory changes, a view recently confirmed by Leviton and Nelson. Although a causal relationship of cerebral palsy to the birth never has been established, the habit to put the blame for cerebral palsy on someone remained a frequent attitude.

  15. Postural control in sitting children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brogren, E; Hadders-Algra, M; Forssberg, H

    1998-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) display postural problems, largely interfering with daily life activities. Clarification of neural mechanisms controlling posture in these children could serve as a base for more successful intervention. Studies on postural adjustments following horizontal forward a

  16. Health-related physical fitness for children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltais, Désirée B; Wiart, Lesley; Fowler, Eileen; Verschuren, Olaf; Damiano, Diane L

    2014-08-01

    Low levels of physical activity are a global health concern for all children. Children with cerebral palsy have even lower physical activity levels than their typically developing peers. Low levels of physical activity, and thus an increased risk for related chronic diseases, are associated with deficits in health-related physical fitness. Recent research has provided therapists with the resources to effectively perform physical fitness testing and physical activity training in clinical settings with children who have cerebral palsy, although most testing and training data to date pertains to those who walk. Nevertheless, on the basis of the present evidence, all children with cerebral palsy should engage, to the extent they are able, in aerobic, anaerobic, and muscle-strengthening activities. Future research is required to determine the best ways to evaluate health-related physical fitness in nonambulatory children with cerebral palsy and foster long-term changes in physical activity behavior in all children with this condition.

  17. Combination of Citicoline and Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Nasiri

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Results demonstrated that citicoline in combination to physiotherapy appears to be a promising agent to improve gross motor function in patients with cerebral palsy versus physiotherapy alone. Although, further studies are need to be done.

  18. Attentional and executive impairments in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottcher, Louise; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Uldall, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are reported to have learning and social problems. The aim of the present study was to examine whether children with CP have impairments in attention or executive function.......Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are reported to have learning and social problems. The aim of the present study was to examine whether children with CP have impairments in attention or executive function....

  19. Stability and Harmony of Gait in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosa, Marco; Marro, Tiziana; Paolucci, Stefano; Morelli, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the stability and harmony of gait in children with cerebral palsy. Seventeen children with spastic hemiplegia due to cerebral palsy (5.0 [plus or minus] 2.3 years old) who were able to walk autonomously and seventeen age-matched children with typical development (5.7 [plus or minus] 2.5 years old,…

  20. Social integration of adults with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Uldall, Peter; Hansen, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    , estimated in childhood, with regard to walking ability was 65% able to walk without assistance, 22% with assistance, and 12% not able to walk (for 1% of the participants their walking ability was not known). We found no sign of increased social integration over the past two or three decades in Denmark......Social integration and independence is the ultimate goal of habilitation and social support for patients with cerebral palsy (CP). Having a partner and having children provide support for social integration of adults with or without a disability. We studied 416 participants with CP born between......, cohabiting partner, or biological children. The remaining participants had at least one of these types of social contact, but this more optimally socially integrated half of the participants only combined all three types of social contact half as often as the comparison group. This could be due to cognitive...

  1. Nutritional management of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, K L; Samson-Fang, L

    2013-12-01

    Children with severe cerebral palsy and particularly those with oropharyngeal dysfunction are at risk of poor nutritional status. Determining the need and the mode of nutritional intervention is multifactorial and requires multiple methodologies. First-line treatment typically involves oral nutritional support for those children who are safe to consume an oral diet. Enteral tube feeding may need to be considered in children with undernutrition where poor weight gain continues despite oral nutritional support, or in those with oropharyngeal dysphagia and an unsafe swallow. Estimates for energy and protein requirements provide a starting point only, and ongoing assessment and monitoring is essential to ensure nutritional needs are being met, that complications are adequately managed and to avoid over or under feeding.

  2. Reduced accommodation in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leat, S J

    1996-09-01

    Accommodation in 43 subjects with cerebral palsy was measured objectively using a dynamic retinoscopy technique, which has already been shown to be reliable and repeatable. The subject's ages ranged from 3 to 35 years. Of these, 42% were found to have an accommodative response pattern which was different from the normal control group for his/her age. Nearly 29% had an estimated amplitude of accommodation of 4 D or less. The presence of reduced accommodation was found to be associated with reduced visual acuity, but was not associated with cognitive or communication ability, refractive error or age. The prevalence of other ocular disorders in this group is also high. These findings have developmental and educational implications.

  3. Evaluation of postural stability in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenis-Coskun, Ozge; Giray, Esra; Eren, Beyhan; Ozkok, Ozlem; Karadag-Saygi, Evrim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Postural stability is the ability of to maintain the position of the body within the support area. This function is affected in cerebral palsy. The aim of the present study was to compare static and dynamic postural stability between children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy and healthy controls. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven children between the ages of 5 and 14 diagnosed with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (19 right, 18 left) and 23 healthy gender- and age-matched controls were included in the study. Postural stability was evaluated in both of the groups using a Neurocom Balance. Sway velocity was measured both with the eyes open and closed. Sit to stand and turning abilities were also assessed. [Results] The sway velocities with the eyes open and closed were significantly different between the groups. The weight transfer time in the Sit to Stand test was also significantly slower in children with cerebral palsy. Children with cerebral palsy also showed slower turning times and greater sway velocities during the Step and Quick Turn test on a force plate compared with their healthy counterparts. [Conclusion] Both static and dynamic postural stability parameters are affected in hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Further research is needed to define rehabilitation interventions to improve these parameters in patients. PMID:27313338

  4. Gait analysis of children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Wang; Yuexi Wang

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was carried out in the key laboratory for Technique Diagnosis and Function Assessment of Winter Sports of China to investigate the differences in gait characteristics between healthy children and children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy. With permission of their parents, 200 healthy children aged 3 to 6 years in the kindergarten of Northeastern University were enrolled in this experiment. Twenty children aged 3 to 6 years with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy from Shengjing Hospital, China were also enrolled in this experiment. Standard data were collected by simultaneously recording gait information from two digital cameras.DVracker was used to analyze the standard data. The children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy had a longer gait cycle, slower walking speed, and longer support phase than did the healthy children.The support phase was longer than the swing phase in the children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. There were significant differences in the angles of the hip, knee, and ankle joint between children with cerebral palsy and healthy children at the moment of touching the ground and buff -ering, and during pedal extension. Children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy had poor motor coordination during walking, which basically resulted in a short stride, high stride frequency to maintain speed, more obvious swing, and poor stability.

  5. Can global positioning systems quantify participation in cerebral palsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Pazi, Hilla; Barzilay, Yair; Shoval, Noam

    2014-06-01

    This study examined whether motor-related participation could be assessed by global positioning systems in individuals with cerebral palsy. Global positioning systems monitoring devices were given to 2 adolescent girls (14-year-old with diplegic cerebral palsy and her 15-year-old healthy sister). Outcome measures were traveling distances, time spent outdoors, and Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment questionnaires. Global positioning systems documented that the girl with cerebral palsy did not visit nearby friends, spent less time outdoors and traveled shorter distances than her sister (P = .02). Participation questionnaire corroborated that the girl with cerebral palsy performed most activities at home alone. Lower outdoor activity of the girl with cerebral palsy measured by a global positioning system was 29% to 53% of that of her sibling similar to participation questionnaires (44%). Global positioning devices objectively documented low outdoor activity in an adolescent with cerebral palsy compared to her sibling reflecting participation reported by validated questionnaires. Global positioning systems can potentially quantify certain aspects of participation.

  6. EVALUATION OF NEUROIMAGING IN CEREBRAL PALSY

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    S.H. Hasanpour avanji

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveCerebral palsy (CP, a common static motor neurological disorder of childhood with wide spectrum of underlying etiologies, can be demonstrated with different neuro imaging techniques. We undertook this study to investigate the diagnosis of intracranial lesions in children with CP and its correlation between clinical deficits and neuroradiological findings.Materials and methodsIn this prospective hospital-based study, the data of 120 patients with CP, aged below 18 years, referring to the neurology clinic of the Ali Asghar Pediatric hospital in Tehran was studied; data on their cranial neuroimaging findings was analyzed any possible association(s between the gestational ages, prenatal history and neurological deficits were investigated.ResultsOf the 120 patients, 72 (60% were male; 75% were aged below 7 years.Common predisposing factors were prenatal asphyxia, LBW, prematurity and toxemia of pregnancy. Of the 120 cases, 90%(107 had spastic CP, with the quadriplegic type being the most common (54%, followed by spastic paraplegia (21%; twenty-four patients (20% had significant Preventricular Leucomalacia (PVL, a finding more common among those born pre-term.Sixteen patients had hemiplegic CP, 14 of whom showed unilateral lesions on brain MRI imaging. Ten (8% had extra pyramidal CP, a condition more common among term born infants, while six of the 10(72% showed significant abnormalities on the basal ganglia. Cerebral atrophy was seen in 60 (50% of patients and PVL in 20%; encephalomalacia, gliosis, middle cerebral artery infarcts, PVL and gliosis indicated hypoxia as a risk factor for CP. Extent of MRI lesions correlated with the severity of neurological deficits in CP lesions, which were more extensive in Quadriplegics and double hemiplegics rather than paraplegics, and among those delivered preterm as compared to those born at term.ConclusionRadiological findings were found to be closely related to the type of CP and the neurological

  7. Health-Related Quality of Life of Nigerian Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A E Ogunrinu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the impact of cerebral palsy on health-related quality of life (HRQoL of Nigerian children.Method: This is a cross-sectional survey. The study involved 54 children (33 males and 21 females, between 1 and 12 years of age, with cerebral palsy. They were consecutively recruited from two tertiary health institutions in Lagos, Nigeria. The socio-demographic details of the participants were obtained through interviews. Their HRQoL was assessed using the Child Health Questionnaire-Parent Form-28 (CHQ-PF 28. The questionnaire was completed by their parents, guardians or primary care-givers. Severity of motor disability was assessed and classified using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS. Data were summarised using descriptive statistics. Chi-square was used to find the association between each of the selected socio-demographic variables and motor disability, and HRQoL.Results: Thirty-eight children (70.3% were between 1 and 6 years of age, and 16 (29.7% were between 7 and 12 years. The participants’ overall scores and scores on each domain of CHQ-PF 28 were very low. Majority (69.5% were in GMFCS classification-level 1, 7 (13.0% were in level 2, 12 (22.2% were in level 3, 14 (25.9% were in level 4, and 16 (29.6% were in level 5. Age had significant effect (CI = 95% on HRQoL of children with cerebral palsy. Severity of disability had negative impact (CI = 95% on HRQoL of children with cerebral palsy. Conclusions: The health-related quality of life of Nigerian children with cerebral palsy is low, and is negatively affected by age and severity of disability. Key words: Quality of life, cerebral palsy, children, Nigeriadoi 10.5463/DCID.v22i2.24

  8. Persistence of Cerebral Palsy Diagnosis: Assessment of a Low-Birth-Weight Cohort at Ages 2, 6, and 9 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Steven J; Feldman, Judith F; Lorenz, John M; Pinto-Martin, Jennifer A; Whitaker, Agnes H; Paneth, Nigel

    2016-03-01

    We examined the stability of nondisabling and disabling cerebral palsy at age 2 in a longitudinally followed tri-county low-birth-weight (cerebral palsy diagnoses at age 2, 61 (9% of the cohort, n = 61/777) had disabling cerebral palsy and 52 (7%, n = 52/777) had nondisabling cerebral palsy. Of 48 followed children diagnosed with disabling cerebral palsy at age 2, 98% were again classified as having cerebral palsy at school age, and 1 had an uncertain cerebral palsy status. By contrast, 41% (n = 17) of the 43 children diagnosed with nondisabling cerebral palsy at age 2 were classified as not having cerebral palsy. Of the 517 followed children who were not diagnosed with cerebral palsy at age 2, 7% (n = 35) were classified as having late emerging nondisabling cerebral palsy at school age.

  9. Excess Pre-Pregnancy Weight May Slightly Raise Baby's Cerebral Palsy Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Excess Pre-Pregnancy Weight May Slightly Raise Baby's Cerebral Palsy Risk But, study found overall odds remain quite ... slight increased risk of having a baby with cerebral palsy, a new study suggests. After reviewing data from ...

  10. What consistency of food is best for children with cerebral palsy who cannot chew?

    OpenAIRE

    Croft, R D

    1992-01-01

    Video recordings were made of 67 children with cerebral palsy and 64 able bodied children eating soft boiled ('non-mashed') and mashed potato. Those children with cerebral palsy who had no speech, presumed to have poor oral motor function, took significantly longer to eat non-mashed than mashed potato. Children with cerebral palsy, especially those with no speech, were more likely to cough or choke while eating non-mashed than mashed potato. It is recommended that children with cerebral palsy...

  11. Clinical significance of the corpus callosum in cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ja; Kim, Ji Chang [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Chul [School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); And Others

    2000-10-01

    To evaluate, using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, the clinal significance of the corpus callosum by measuring the size of various portions of the corpus callosum in children with cerebral palsy, and in paired controls. Fifty-two children (30 boys and 22 girls aged between six and 96 (median, 19) months) in whom cerebral palsy was clinically diagnosed underwent MR imaging. There were 23 term patients and 29 preterm, and the control group was selected by age and sex matching. Clinal subtypes of cerebral palsy were classified as hemiplegia (n=14), spastic diplegia (n=22), or spastic quadriplegia (n=16), and according to the severity of motor palsy, the condition was also classified as mild (n=26), moderate (n=13), or severe (n=13). In addition to the length and height of the corpus callosum, the thickness of its genu, body, transitional zone and splenium, as seen on midsagittal T1-weighted MR images, were also measured. Differences in the measured values of the two groups were statistically analysed and differences in the size of the corpus callosum according to the clinical severity and subtypes of cerebral palsy, and gestational age, were also assessed. Except for height, the measured values of the corpus callosum in patients with cerebral palsy were significantly less than those of the control group (p less than 0.05). Its size decreased according to the severity of motor palsy. Compared with term patients, the corpus callosum in preterm patients was considerably smaller (p less than 0.05). There was statistically significant correlation between the severity of motor palsy and the size of the corpus callosum. Quantitative evaluation of the corpus callosum might be a good indicator of neurologic prognosis, and a sensitive marker for assessing the extent of brain injury.

  12. FEEDING, GROWTH AND NUTRITION DISORDERS IN CEREBRAL PALSY

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    Rosulescu Eugenia

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the growth, physical development and nutrition status for a sample of cerebral palsied children with spastic, dyskinetic and ataxic type.Material and methods: A total of 81 children with CP, who were rehabilitated in the pediatrics rehabilitation clinic between 2005 - 2008 years, were included. Children’s assessments included: anthropometric measures (height H, recumbent length L, weight W, anthropometric indicators (weight fot length WL, body mass indexBMI and was calculated the Z score, ZWL (Z score of weight for length and ZBMI (the Z score for BMI related to the age. The oral-motor dysfunction were quantified on a scale developed for the evaluation of feeding disorders in this population. SCPE classification was used in CP typing.Results: 30% subjects presented mild alimentary disorder, 12% moderate and 5% severe alimentary disorders. 2/9 cases (for the child younger than 2 years showed a ZWL under -2SD. 4/72 (5.5% subjects from the group of children older than 2 years were overweight and 7 (10% have presented an altered nutritional status (ZBMI under-2SD.Discussion and Conclusion: Nutrition evaluation is important and should be done early and periodically to ensure proper growth for the child, it is important also in rehabilitation and child development, societal participation and motor abilities.

  13. Using multivariate diagnostics to assess the functional status of children with cerebral palsy.

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    Vindiuk Pavel Andreevich

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The considered assessment of energy supply from children with cerebral palsy. The study involved 16 children with spastic forms of cerebral palsy secondary school age. The use of testimony bagatofaktonoї rapid diagnosis in this population. It is established that the rate of functional status of children with cerebral palsy grow under the influence of physical rehabilitation.

  14. The Role of Information Systems to Manage Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    AJAMI, Sima; MAGHSOUDLORAD, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Objective In healthcare system, it is necessary to have exact and accurate information in order to address health care needs and requirements of society members as well as expectations of policy makers, planners and decision makers. The aim of this narrative review article was to explain the role of information systems in cerebral palsy management and identify the advantages and barriers to the development of cerebral palsy registry system. Data were collected using databases such as of Science Direct, PubMed, Proquest, Springer, and SID (Scientific Information Database). Overall, 65 sources were selected. One of the biggest challenges for children with physical and motor disabilities in rehabilitation center is access to a system, which provides a comprehensive data set reflecting all information on a patient’s care. Thus, data and information management in children with physical and motor disability such as cerebral palsy facilitates access to data and cerebral palsy data comparison as well as the monitoring incidence rate of cerebral palsy, enhancing health care quality; however, there are always numerous barriers to establish the system. One of the ways to overcome these problems is the establishment of a standard framework of minimum data sets and exact definition of its data components. Reliable standards in the use of applications as well as user-friendly software will ensure patients’ data extraction and registration. PMID:27247578

  15. Cross-Cultural adaptation of an instrument to computer accessibility evaluation for students with cerebral palsy

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    Gerusa Ferreira Lourenço

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The specific literature indicates that the successful education of children with cerebral palsy may require the implementation of appropriate assistive technology resources, allowing students to improve their performance and complete everyday tasks more efficiently and independently. To this end, these resources must be selected properly, emphasizing the importance of an appropriate initial assessment of the child and the possibilities of the resources available. The present study aimed to translate and adapt theoretically an American instrument that evaluates computer accessibility for people with cerebral palsy, in order to contextualize it for applicability to Brazilian students with cerebral palsy. The methodology involved the steps of translation and cross-cultural adaptation of this instrument, as well as the construction of a supplementary script for additional use of that instrument in the educational context. Translation procedures, theoretical and technical adaptation of the American instrument and theoretical analysis (content and semantics were carried out with the participation of professional experts of the special education area as adjudicators. The results pointed to the relevance of the proposal of the translated instrument in conjunction with the script built to the reality of professionals involved with the education of children with cerebral palsy, such as occupational therapists and special educators.

  16. Predictors for early diagnosis of cerebral palsy from national registry data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granild-Jensen, Jakob Bie; Rackauskaite, Gija; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: As early intervention is important in cerebral palsy (CP), an early diagnosis is desirable. The aim of this study was to establish the median diagnostic age of CP and to identify predictors of an early diagnosis in a population-based cohort. METHOD: Using the Danish National Cerebral Palsy...... disability, and abnormalities in the cerebral ultrasonography. The gestational age was not associated with the diagnostic age. INTERPRETATION: The median diagnostic age implies that half of the Danish children with CP will be able to enter an early intervention program before 1 year of age. A late diagnosis...... Registry (NCPR), we identified 1291 children with CP (764 males, 527 females) born between 1995 and 2003. The date of diagnosis was defined as the day the parents were told that their child was spastic or had CP. We calculated the age of diagnosis and analysed the following predictors: type of CP, degree...

  17. Rehabilitation outcomes of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcinkaya, Ebru Yilmaz; Caglar, Nil Sayıner; Tugcu, Betul; Tonbaklar, Aysegul

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the results of Bobath-based rehabilitation performed at a pediatric cerebral palsy (CP) inpatient clinic. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 28 children with CP who were inpatients at a pediatric service. Inclusion criteria were: being an inpatient of our hospital aged 2-12 with a diagnosis of CP; having one permanent primary caregiver; and the caregiver having no medical or psychotic problems. All of the patients received Bobath treatment for 1 hour per day, 5 days a week. The locomotor system, neurologic and orthopedic examination, Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) of the patients, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) of permanent caregivers were evaluated at the time of admission to hospital, discharge from hospital, and at 1 and 3 months after discharge. [Results] Post-admission scores of GMFM at discharge, and 1 and 3 months later showed significant increase. Social function and emotional role subscores of SF-36 had increased significantly at discharge. [Conclusion] Bobath treatment is promising and randomized controlled further studies are needed for rehabilitation technics.

  18. Cerebral palsy: definition, assessment and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Carol L; Malouin, Francine

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 25 years the definition and classification of cerebral palsy (CP) have evolved, as well as the approach to rehabilitation. CP is a disorder of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitations attributed to nonprogressive disturbances of the fetal or infant brain that may also affect sensation, perception, cognition, communication, and behavior. Motor control during reaching, grasping, and walking are disturbed by spasticity, dyskinesia, hyperreflexia, excessive coactivation of antagonist muscles, retained developmental reactions, and secondary musculoskeletal malformations, together with paresis and defective programing. Weakness and hypoextensibility of the muscles are due not only to inadequate recruitment of motor units, but also to changes in mechanical stresses and hormonal factors. Two methods, the General Movements Assessment and the Test of Infant Motor Performance, now permit the early detection of CP, while the development of valid and reliable outcome measures, particularly the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), have made it possible to evaluate change over time and the effects of clinical interventions. The GMFM has further led to the development of predictive curves of motor function while the Gross Motor Classification System and the Manual Ability Classification System provide standardized means to classify the severity of the movement disability. With the emergence of the task-oriented approach, the focus of therapy in rehabilitation has shifted from eliminating deficits to enhancing function across all performance domains by emphasizing fitness, function, participation, and quality of life. There is growing evidence supporting selected interventions and interest for the therapy and social integration of adults with CP.

  19. Computed tomographic (CT) scans in cerebral palsy (CP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolawole, T.M.; Patel, P.J. (King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Radiology); Mahdi, A.H. (King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Paediatrics)

    1989-11-01

    The CT findings in 120 cerebral palsied children are analysed. The 72.5% positive findings are correlated with the clinical types, as well as the aetiological basis for the cerebral palsy. The spastic type, 83.3% of the total number of children, had the highest positive findings. The yield was increased in children with seizures (91.3%) and those in the postnatal group (90%), as well as those with birth trauma and neonatal asphyxia (94%). The findings were those of atrophy in 30.8%, hydrocephalus, in 10%, infarct in 11.6%, porencephaly in 8.3% and others. The atropic changes and their patterns are explained. Treatable lesions, such as tumour, hydrocephalus, subdural haematoma, porencephaly and hygroma were identified in 22.5% of cases. It is concluded that CT scan is definitely efficacious in the management of cerebral palsied children. (orig.).

  20. Being a woman, mother to a child with cerebral palsy Ser mujer madre de un niño portador de parálisis cerebral Ser mulher mãe de uma criança portadora de paralisia cerebral

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    Viviane Marten Milbrath

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To get to know the adaptation process experienced by a woman, motivated by the birth of a child with cerebral palsy. METHODS: The investigation was performed with a descriptive, exploratory methodology, focusing on the qualitative approach. Six women, mothers of children with brain palsy, participated in the study. Data collection happened in an institution that delivers care to children with special needs, located in a town of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. RESULTS: data analysis revealed that the woman abdicates from her social, professional and even personal life to take better care of her child. Besides, these mothers were shown to need psychosocioeconomic support from their families and the people who surround them, in both the process of initial adaptation and overcoming and the whole period of care for the child. CONCLUSION: The woman assumes and experiences the responsibility of taking care of the child with special needs.OBJETIVO: Conocer el proceso de adaptación vivenciado por la mujer, motivado por el nacimiento de un hijo portador de parálisis cerebral. MÉTODOS: La investigación contempló una metodología descriptiva, exploratoria a la luz de un abordaje cualitativo. Participaron en el estudio seis mujeres, madres de niños portadores de parálisis cerebral. La recolección de los datos se llevó a cabo en una institución que atiende a niños portadores de necesidades especiales, localizada en un municipio de Río Grande del Sur. RESULTADOS: El análisis de los datos reveló abdicación, de la mujer, de su vida social, profesional y, hasta personal, en pro del cuidado de su hijo. Aparte de ello, las madres demostraron que necesitan de apoyo psico-socio-económico familiar y de las personas que las rodean, tanto durante el proceso de adaptación y superación de las vivencias iniciales, como durante todo el período del cuidado al niño. CONCLUSIÓN: La mujer asume y vivencia la responsabilidad del cuidado

  1. A prospective, longitudinal study of growth, nutrition and sedentary behaviour in young children with cerebral palsy

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    Weir Kelly A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in childhood, occurring in one in 500 children. It is caused by a static brain lesion in the neonatal period leading to a range of activity limitations. Oral motor and swallowing dysfunction, poor nutritional status and poor growth are reported frequently in young children with cerebral palsy and may impact detrimentally on physical and cognitive development, health care utilisation, participation and quality of life in later childhood. The impact of modifiable factors (dietary intake and physical activity on growth, nutritional status, and body composition (taking into account motor severity in this population is poorly understood. This study aims to investigate the relationship between a range of factors - linear growth, body composition, oral motor and feeding dysfunction, dietary intake, and time spent sedentary (adjusting for motor severity - and health outcomes, health care utilisation, participation and quality of life in young children with cerebral palsy (from corrected age of 18 months to 5 years. Design/Methods This prospective, longitudinal, population-based study aims to recruit a total of 240 young children with cerebral palsy born in Queensland, Australia between 1st September 2006 and 31st December 2009 (80 from each birth year. Data collection will occur at three time points for each child: 17 - 25 months corrected age, 36 ± 1 months and 60 ± 1 months. Outcomes to be assessed include linear growth, body weight, body composition, dietary intake, oral motor function and feeding ability, time spent sedentary, participation, medical resource use and quality of life. Discussion This protocol describes a study that will provide the first longitudinal description of the relationship between functional attainment and modifiable lifestyle factors (dietary intake and habitual time spent sedentary and their impact on the growth, body composition and

  2. Narrative ability in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holck, Pernille; Dahlgren Sandberg, Annika; Nettelbladt, Ulrika

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study a group of children with cerebral palsy (CP) were found to have considerable difficulties with narratives, performing several standard deviations below the criteria for the Information score of the Bus Story Test (BST). To examine in depth the performance of children with CP and a control group with typically developing (TD) children on a narrative task, in order to search for possible underlying causes to the problems in the CP group. The results of the BST for 10 children with CP, mean age 7;11 years, were investigated. The analysis of the BST was supplemented with the use of the Narrative Assessment Profile (NAP) and quantitative analyses of number of words, mazes, propositions, types of conjunctions and story elements. A significant relationship between the explicitness dimension on the Narrative Assessment Profile and the BST Information score in the CP group suggested that the problems could be derived to a limited use of cohesion and a scarcity of essential information. Compared to the CP group, the TD group used significantly more causal conjunctions. The results indicate a general problem with cohesion at the textual level in the CP group. A further finding was the occurrence of a positive correlation between the use of mazes and the BST Information score in the CP group. These results have implications for the design of a more specific intervention for children, where the NAP was found to be a valuable tool in combination with the BST or other assessment materials. Further, it is shown that mazes, mostly regarded as a behaviour that not enhances speech production, for some children can be used as a means to find necessary words and pieces of information.

  3. Hand Functioning in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, Carlyne; Bleyenheuft, Yannick; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Brain lesions may disturb hand functioning in children with cerebral palsy (CP), making it difficult or even impossible for them to perform several manual activities. Most conventional treatments for hand dysfunction in CP assume that reducing the hand dysfunctions will improve the capacity to manage activities (i.e., manual ability, MA). The aim of this study was to investigate the directional relationships (direct and indirect pathways) through which hand skills influence MA in children with CP. A total of 136 children with CP (mean age: 10 years; range: 6–16 years; 35 quadriplegics, 24 diplegics, 77 hemiplegics) were assessed. Six hand skills were measured on both hands: touch-pressure detection (Semmes–Weinstein esthesiometer), stereognosis (Manual Form Perception Test), proprioception (passive mobilization of the metacarpophalangeal joints), grip strength (GS) (Jamar dynamometer), gross manual dexterity (GMD) (Box and Block Test), and fine finger dexterity (Purdue Pegboard Test). MA was measured with the ABILHAND-Kids questionnaire. Correlation coefficients were used to determine the linear associations between observed variables. A path analysis of structural equation modeling was applied to test different models of causal relationships among the observed variables. Purely sensory impairments did seem not to play a significant role in the capacity to perform manual activities. According to path analysis, GMD in both hands and stereognosis in the dominant hand were directly related to MA, whereas GS was indirectly related to MA through its relationship with GMD. However, one-third of the variance in MA measures could not be explained by hand skills. It can be concluded that MA is not simply the integration of hand skills in daily activities and should be treated per se, supporting activity-based interventions. PMID:24782821

  4. Hand functioning in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlyne eArnould

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain lesions may disturb hand functioning in children with cerebral palsy (CP, making it difficult or even impossible for them to perform several manual activities. Most conventional treatments for hand dysfunction in CP assume that reducing the hand dysfunctions will improve the capacity to manage activities (i.e., manual ability, MA. The aim of this study was to investigate the directional relationships (direct and indirect pathways through which hand skills influence MA in children with CP. A total of 136 children with CP (mean age: 10 years; range: 6–16 years; 35 quadriplegics, 24 diplegics, 77 hemiplegics were assessed. Six hand skills were measured on both hands: touch-pressure detection (Semmes-Weinstein aesthesiometer, stereognosis (Manual Form Perception Test, proprioception (passive mobilization of the metacarpophalangeal joints, grip strength (Jamar dynamometer, gross manual dexterity (Box and Block Test, and fine finger dexterity (Purdue Pegboard Test. MA was measured with the ABILHAND-Kids questionnaire. Correlation coefficients were used to determine the linear associations between observed variables. A path analysis of structural equation modeling was applied to test different models of causal relationships among the observed variables. Purely sensory impairments did seem not to play a significant role in the capacity to perform manual activities. According to path analysis, gross manual dexterity in both hands and stereognosis in the dominant hand were directly related to MA, whereas grip strength was indirectly related to MA through its relationship with gross manual dexterity. However, one-third of the variance in MA measures could not be explained by hand skills. It can be concluded that MA is not simply the integration of hand skills in daily activities and should be treated per se, supporting activity-based interventions.

  5. Treating cerebral palsy with aculaser therapy

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    Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik M.; Nadeem Khan, Malik M.; Qazi, Faiza M.; Awan, Abid H.; Dar, Irfan

    2008-03-01

    A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah Trust for C.P. & Paralysis in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (C.P.) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia, monoplegia, sensory-neural deafness and speech disorders. In all 250 childern were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 3 years from December 2003 till December 2006. These children were further classified according to the type of C.P. (spastic, athetoid, mixed) they suffered from and associated Neurological Disorders. This article shows results in C.P. childern who were treated with ACULASER THERAPY for minimum 6 weeks and more or had minimum of 15 treatment sessions and more. This article also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 1 month to 1 year did not show any reversal of the signs and symptoms. Analysis of the data showed that out of 171 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 147 showed marked improvement showing 87% success rate, out of 126 children with Epileptic fits, there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 91 children showing 72% success rate, out of 48 children with Cortical Blindness 30 children showed improvement accounting for 63% efficacy rate, out of 105 children with Hearing Difficulties, 63 showed marked improvement accounting for 60% improvement rate, out of 190 children with Speech Disorders 122 showed improvement reflecting 64% improvement rate, out of 96 children with Hemiplegia 71 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 74% improvement rate, out of 76 children with Quadriplegia 52 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 58 children with Paraplegia of

  6. Does the risk of cerebral palsy increase or decrease with increasing gestational age?

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    Murphy-Kaulbeck Lynn

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is generally accepted that the risk of cerebral palsy decreases with increasing gestational age of live born infants. However, recent studies have shown that cerebral palsy often has prenatal antecedents including congenital malformations, vascular insults and maternal infection. Cerebral palsy is therefore better viewed as occurring among fetuses, rather than among infants. We explored the epidemiologic implications of this change in perspective. Methods We used recently published data from Shiga Prefecture, Japan and from North-East England to examine the pattern of gestational age-specific rates of cerebral palsy under these alternative perspectives. We first calculated gestational age-specific rates of cerebral palsy as per convention, by dividing the number of cases of cerebral palsy identified among live births within any gestational age category by the number of live births in that gestational age category. Under the alternative formulation, we calculated gestational age-specific rates of cerebral palsy by dividing the number of cases of cerebral palsy identified among live births within any gestational age category by the number of fetuses who were at risk of being born at that gestation and being afflicted with cerebral palsy. Results Under the conventional formulation, cerebral palsy rates decreased with increasing gestational age from 63.9 per 1,000 live births at Conclusions The fetuses-at-risk approach is the appropriate epidemiologic formulation for calculating the gestational age-specific rate of cerebral palsy from a causal perspective. It shows that the risk of cerebral palsy increases as gestational duration increases. This compelling view of cerebral palsy risk may help refocus research aimed at understanding and preventing cerebral palsy.

  7. German translation of the caregiver priorities and child health index of life with disabilities questionnaire: test-retest reliability and correlation with gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Brix, Olga; Bernius, Peter; Schroeder, A Sebastian; Kluger, Gerhard J; Beyerlein, Andreas; Weir, Shannon; von Kries, Rudiger; Narayanan, Unni G; Mall, Volker; Berweck, Steffen

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to translate the Caregiver Priorities and Child Health Index of Life with Disabilities (CPCHILD) questionnaire into German and to evaluate its reliability and validity by studying the association between CPCHILD scores and gross motor function as measured by the gross motor function classification system (GMFCS) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The original CPCHILD questionnaire and manual were translated and back translated. It was administered to primary caregivers of persons with CP (GMFCS levels III-V) and was completed a second time 2 weeks after the first to measure test-retest reliability (n = 17). Primary caregivers of 68 children with CP; GMFCS level III (n = 14), level IV (n = 28), and level V (n = 26) completed the questionnaire. Mean total CPCHILD scores across GMFCS levels were 67.1 ± 14.9 for GMFCS level III, 56.6 ± 11.8 for level IV, and 44.3 ± 12.9 for level V. Good correlation (r =  - 0.56) was observed between GMFCS and total scores test-retest reliability showed intraclass correlation coefficients between 0.4 and 0.9. The German CPCHILD yielded similar test-retest reliability and score distributions across the GMFCS level as the original version. The best correlations were observed for domains that are close to the functional deficits.

  8. CT findings of cerebral palsy and behaviour development

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    Sakamoto, Zenji

    1987-06-01

    It is well recognized that CT scan is very useful in the early diagnosis of cerebral palsy. The author has studied this time the CT scan findings of cerebral palsy children in their relations to the type of palsy, cause of palsy, complications in the central nervous system, and prognosis of behaviour development, in order to predict the prognosis of behaviour development. Dilatation of the contralateral cerebral ventricle was found in 82 % of hemiplegic type. Abnormal EEG was found in 73 %, but their behaviour development was satisfactory, with good development of speech regardless to the side of palsy. This might be helped by compensational function of the brain due to plasticity. Diplegia presented bilateral moderate dilatation of ventricles with favorable prognosis. Tetraplegia was caused mostly by asphyxia or congenital anomaly and revealed marked dilatation of ventricles or severe cortical atrophy. Some cases presented diffuse cortical low-density, often associated with abnormal EEG, and their prognosis was worst. Athetosis had normal CT finding or mild ventricular dilatation, but all cases of ataxia presented normal CT findings. Hypotonia had mild ventricular dilatation. Two of three mixed type cases had normal CT findings and another had mild ventricular dilatation. No correlation was found between ventricular dilatation and behaviour development, but statistically significant difference was found in the cases with 30 % or more Evans' ratio (P < 0.05). Prognosis of severe ventricular dilatation cases was poor.

  9. Therapies for children with cerebral palsy A Web of Science-based literature analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaping Mu; Na Li; Lijun Guan; Chunnan Wang; Shuyun Shang; Yan Wang

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To identify global research trends in three therapies for children with cerebral palsy.DATA RETRIEVAL:We performed a bibliometric analysis of studies on therapies for children with cerebral palsy from 2002 to 2011 retrieved from Web of Science.SELECTION CRITERIA:Inclusion criteria:(a)peer-reviewed published articles on botulinum toxin,constraint-induced movement therapy,or acupuncture for children with cerebral palsy indexed in Web of Science;(b)original research articles,reviews,meeting abstracts,proceedings papers,book chapters,editorial material,and news items;and(c)publication between 2002 and 2011.Exclusion criteria:(a)articles that required manual searching or telephone access;(b)documents that were not published in the public domain;and(c)a number of corrected papers from the total number of articles.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:(1)Number of publications on the three therapies;(2)annual publication output,distribution by journals,distribution by institution,and top-cited articles on botulinum toxin;(3)annual publication output,distribution by journal,distribution by institution,and top-cited articles on constraint-induced movement therapy;(4)annual publication,distribution by journal,distribution by institution,and top-cited articles on acupuncture.RESULTS:This analysis,based on Web of Science articles,identified several research trends in studies published over the past 10 years of three therapies for children with cerebral palsy.More articles on botulinum toxin for treating children with cerebral palsy were published than the articles regarding constraint-induced movement therapy or acupuncture.The numbers of publications increased over the 10-year study period.Most papers appeared in journals with a focus on neurology,such as Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology and Journal of Child Neurology.Research institutes publishing on botulinum toxin treatments for this population are mostly in the Netherlands,the United States of America,and Australia

  10. Retrospective Descriptive Study of Cerebral Palsy in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    There is very little data pertaining to cerebral palsy (CP) from Nepal. In this retrospective study it was observed that dyskinetic CP was seen in 29% and the sex ratio of males to females was two in the study population of children with CP. Both of these are much higher than data from developed countries. Hence, further randomized cross-sectional…

  11. Language and Motor Speech Skills in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirila, Silja; van der Meere, Jaap; Pentikainen, Taina; Ruusu-Niemi, Pirjo; Korpela, Raija; Kilpinen, Jenni; Nieminen, Pirkko

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate associations between the severity of motor limitations, cognitive difficulties, language and motor speech problems in children with cerebral palsy. Also, the predictive power of neonatal cranial ultrasound findings on later outcome was investigated. For this purpose, 36 children (age range 1 year 10 months…

  12. Aerobic capacity in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, Olaf; Takken, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This study described the aerobic capacity [VO(2peak) (ml/kg/min)] in contemporary children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) using a maximal exercise test protocol. Twenty-four children and adolescents with CP classified at Gross Motor Functional Classification Scale (GMFCS) level I or level

  13. Reproducibility of Tactile Assessments for Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Megan Louise; Ware, Robert S.; Boyd, Roslyn Nancy; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Johnston, Leanne Marie

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review identified tactile assessments used in children with cerebral palsy (CP), but their reproducibility is unknown. Sixteen children with unilateral CP and 31 typically developing children (TDC) were assessed 2-4 weeks apart. Test-retest percent agreements within one point for children with unilateral CP (and TDC) were…

  14. Aerobic Capacity in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, Olaf; Takken, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This study described the aerobic capacity [VO[subscript 2peak] (ml/kg/min)] in contemporary children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) using a maximal exercise test protocol. Twenty-four children and adolescents with CP classified at Gross Motor Functional Classification Scale (GMFCS) level I or level II and 336 typically developing…

  15. Intermittent versus Continuous Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Annette Sandahl; Lange, Christa

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the delivery of the same amount of intermittent versus continuous physiotherapy given to children with cerebral palsy (CP). This was organized either in an intermittent regime four times a week for 4 weeks alternating with a 6-week treatment pause, or a continuous once or twice a week regime, both…

  16. Tactile Assessment in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Clinimetric Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Megan Louise; Boyd, Roslyn Nancy; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Johnston, Leanne Marie

    2011-01-01

    This review evaluates the clinimetric properties of tactile assessments for children with cerebral palsy. Assessment of registration was reported using Semmes Weinstein Monofilaments (SWMs) or exteroception. Assessment of two-point discrimination was reported using the Disk-Criminator[R] or paperclip methods; Single point localization and double…

  17. Home literacy environment: characteristics of children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.H.J.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Balkom, L.J.M. van; Moor, J.M.H. de

    2009-01-01

    Background: Various aspects of the home literacy environment are considered to stimulate the emergent literacy development in children without disabilities. It is important to gain insight into the home literacy environment of children with cerebral palsy given that they have been shown to have diff

  18. Evaluating rehabilitation interventions in preschool children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijsen-Terpstra, A.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) face limitations in their daily activities, in particular regarding mobility and self-care. Although many treatment ideas and approaches are available, evidence to show which intervention is the most effective for preschool children with CP is lacking. Furthermore,

  19. Postural control during reaching in preterm children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, JC; Begeer, C; Fock, JM; Otten, B; Stremmelaar, E; van Eykern, LA; Hadders-Algra, M

    2004-01-01

    Postural control during reaching with the dominant arm was assessed in 58 preterm children with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 2 to 11 years, comprising 34 with spastic hemiplegia (17 males, 17 females) and 24 with bilateral spastic CP (bilateral CP; 15 male, 9 females). Assessments were made by multiple

  20. What constitutes cerebral palsy in the twenty-first century?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smithers-Sheedy, Hayley; Badawi, Nadia; Blair, Eve

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Determining inclusion/exclusion criteria for cerebral palsy (CP) surveillance is challenging. The aims of this paper were to (1) define inclusion/exclusion criteria that have been adopted uniformly by surveillance programmes and identify where consensus is still elusive, and (2) provide an u...

  1. Gait Training and Ankle Dorsiflexors in Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at University of Copenhagen, Denmark, evaluated whether 4 weeks of 30 min daily treadmill training with an incline may facilitate corticospinal transmission and improve control of the ankle joint in 16 children, aged 5-14 years, with cerebral palsy.

  2. Altered sense of agency in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Christensen, Mark S; Kliim-Due, Mette;

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Background Children diagnosed with spastic Cerebral Palsy (CP) often show perceptual and cognitive problems, which may contribute to their functional deficit. Here we investigated if altered ability to determine whether an observed movement is performed by themselves (sense of agency...

  3. Growth and Nutrition Disorders in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperminc, Michelle N.; Stevenson, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    Growth and nutrition disorders are common secondary health conditions in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Poor growth and malnutrition in CP merit study because of their impact on health, including psychological and physiological function, healthcare utilization, societal participation, motor function, and survival. Understanding the etiology of…

  4. Language Abilities Following Prematurity, Periventricular Brain Injury, and Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Heidi M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study compared language abilities in three groups of preschool children (total n=18) who were born prematurely: children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy associated with perinatal brain injury, with similar brain injury but no motor impairment, and with no brain injuries. No significant differences were observed among the groups on any…

  5. Executive Functions in Youth With Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pirila, Silja; van der Meere, Jaap J.; Rantanen, Kati; Jokiluoma, Maria; Eriksson, Kai

    2011-01-01

    Dependent on criteria used, between 35% and 53% of the participants with cerebral palsy fulfilled the criteria of clinically relevant executive function problems as defined by Conners' (1994) Continuous Performance Test. Executive function problems were noticed mainly in participants with bilateral

  6. Understanding Participation of Preschool-Age Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, Lisa Ann; Palisano, Robert J.; Orlin, Margo N.; Chang, Hui-Ju; Begnoche, Denise; An, Mihee

    2012-01-01

    Participation in home, school, and community activities is a primary outcome of early intervention services for children with disabilities and their families. The objectives of this study were to (a) describe participation of preschool-age children with cerebral palsy (CP); (b) determine effects of sex, age, and gross motor function on intensity…

  7. Orthodontic Treatment for a Patient with Cerebral Palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Kai-hong; DUAN Chang-hua; WANG Zeng-quan

    2009-01-01

    @@ Cerebral palsy(CP) is a group of permanent disorders asso-ciated with the developmental brain injuries that occur during fe-tal development, at birth, or shortly after birth[1,2]. Very few of such patients had the chance to be treated their maloccluded teeth. So, many orthodontists have no experience on such cases.

  8. Robot-Assisted Task-Specific Training in Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Hermano I.; Ladenheim, Barbara; Hippolyte, Christopher; Monterroso, Linda; Mast, Joelle

    2009-01-01

    Our goal was to examine the feasibility of applying therapeutic robotics to children and adults with severe to moderate impairment due to cerebral palsy (CP). Pilot results demonstrated significant gains for both groups. These results suggest that robot-mediated therapy may be an effective tool to ameliorate the debilitating effects of CP and…

  9. Cerebral palsy litigation: change course or abandon ship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartwelle, Thomas P; Johnston, James C

    2015-06-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds' labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule-the Daubert doctrine that excludes "junk science" from the courtroom-as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring's 40-year masquerade as science.

  10. Predictors of Verbal Working Memory in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Marieke; Verhoeven, Ludo; de Moor, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine the precursors of verbal working memory in 52 children with cerebral palsy with varying degrees of speech impairments in the first grade of special education. Following Baddeley's model of working memory, children's verbal working memory was measured by means of a forced-recognition task. As precursors…

  11. Home Literacy Environment: Characteristics of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Marieke; Verhoeven, Ludo; van Balkom, Hans; de Moor, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Various aspects of the home literacy environment are considered to stimulate the emergent literacy development in children without disabilities. It is important to gain insight into the home literacy environment of children with cerebral palsy given that they have been shown to have difficulty acquiring literacy skills. Aims: The aims…

  12. Systemic inflammation and cerebral palsy risk in extremely preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuban, Karl C K; O'Shea, T Michael; Allred, Elizabeth N; Paneth, Nigel; Hirtz, Deborah; Fichorova, Raina N; Leviton, Alan

    2014-12-01

    The authors hypothesized that among extremely preterm infants, elevated concentrations of inflammation-related proteins in neonatal blood are associated with cerebral palsy at 24 months. In 939 infants born before 28 weeks gestation, the authors measured blood concentrations of 25 proteins on postnatal days 1, 7, and 14 and evaluated associations between elevated protein concentrations and cerebral palsy diagnosis. Protein elevations within 3 days of birth were not associated with cerebral palsy. Elevations of tumor necrosis factor-α, tumor necrosis factor-α-receptor-1, interleukin-8, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on at least 2 days were associated with diparesis. Recurrent-persistent elevations of interleukin-6, E-selectin, or insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 were associated with hemiparesis. Diparesis and hemiparesis were more likely among infants who had at least 4 of 9 protein elevations that previously have been associated with cognitive impairment and microcephaly. Repeated elevations of inflammation-related proteins during the first 2 postnatal weeks are associated with increased risk of cerebral palsy.

  13. Functional Electrical Stimulation in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Marietta

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about functional electrical stimulation in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is defined as the electrical stimulation of muscles that have impaired motor control, in order to produce a contraction to obtain functionally useful movement. It was first proposed in…

  14. Operant Control of Pathological Tongue Thrust in Spastic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, George A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior modification procedure, carried out at mealtime with a ten-year-old retarded boy who had spastic cerebral palsy, consisted of differential reinforcement and punishment, and resulted in substantial decreases in tongue thrust (reverse swallowing) and food expulsion, and a large increase in observed chewing. (Author/DLS)

  15. Cerebral Palsy Symptoms in Children Decreased Following Massage Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Field, Tiffany; Largie, Shay; Diego, Miguel; Manigat, Natasha; Seoanes, Jacqueline; Bornstein, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Twenty young children (mean age = 32 months) with cerebral palsy (CP) recruited from early intervention programs received 30 minutes of massage or reading twice weekly for 12 weeks. The children receiving massage therapy showed fewer physical symptoms including reduced spasticity, less rigid muscle tone overall and in the arms, and improved fine…

  16. Physical activity in young children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, J. Nathalie; van Schie, Petra E. M.; Becher, Jules G.; Smits, Dirk-Wouter; Gorter, Jan Willem; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to describe the physical activity levels of 5- and 7-year-old children with cerebral palsy (CP, n = 97), to compare their physical activity levels with those of typically developing peers (TD, n = 57) and the Dutch recommendation for physical activity, and to inves

  17. Improving Cognitive Abilities and e-Inclusion in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinengo, Chiara; Curatelli, Francesco

    Besides overcoming the motor barriers for accessing to computers and Internet, ICT tools can provide a very useful, and often necessary, support for the cognitive development of motor-impaired children with cerebral palsy. In fact, software tools for computation and communication allow teachers to put into effect, in a more complete and efficient way, the learning methods and the educational plans studied for the child. In the present article, after a brief analysis of the general objectives to be pursued for favouring the learning for children with cerebral palsy, we take account of some specific difficulties in the logical-linguistic and logical-mathematical fields, and we show how they can be overcome using general ICT tools and specifically implemented software programs.

  18. LEARN 2 MOVE 2-3: a randomized controlled trial on the efficacy of child-focused intervention and context-focused intervention in preschool children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verschuren Olaf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the efficacy and the working mechanisms of physical and occupational therapy interventions for children with cerebral palsy (CP. In recent years a shift from a child-focused intervention approach to a more context-focused intervention approach can be recognized. Until now the evidence on the efficacy and the working mechanisms of these interventions for children with CP is inconclusive. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and working mechanisms of two intervention approaches compared to regular care intervention in improving mobility and self-care skills of children (2-3 years with CP and their families: a child-focused intervention approach and a context-focused intervention approach. Methods/Design A multi-centre, randomized controlled trial research design will be used. Ninety-four children with CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS level I-IV; age 2 to 3 years, their parents, and service providers (physical and occupational therapists will be included. During a period of six months children will receive child-focused, context-focused or regular care intervention. Therapists will be randomly assigned to deliver either a child-focused intervention approach, a context-focused intervention approach or regular care intervention. Children follow their therapist into the allocated intervention arm. After the six months study-intervention period, all participants return to regular care intervention. Outcomes will be evaluated at baseline, after six months and at a three months follow-up period. Primary outcome is the capability of functional skills in self-care and mobility, using the Functional Skills Scale of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI. Other outcomes will be quality of life and the domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - for Children and Youth (ICF-CY, including body function and structure, activities (gross motor

  19. Disappearance of spasticity after selective dorsal rhizotomy does not prevent muscle shortening in children with cerebral palsy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spijker, Margje; Strijers, Rob L M; van Ouwerkerk, Willem J R; Becher, Jules G

    2009-05-01

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy is an effective treatment for spasticity in children with cerebral palsy who have a spastic motor disorder. It is hypothesized that muscle shortening is related to spasticity; the lack of stretch of a muscle is thought to be the cause of muscle shortening. If this is true, the treatment for spasticity should prevent the occurrence of muscle shortening during growth. We present the case of 1 child with cerebral palsy and spastic diplegia, for whom the treatment with selective dorsal rhizotomy was successful in improving the walking abilities. She did, however, develop muscle shortening during growth. In conclusion, the development of muscle shortening during growth in children with cerebral palsy and spastic paresis cannot be prevented by treatment for the spasticity alone.

  20. Neurophysiologic findings in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Kothari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Cerebral palsy (CP is a heterogeneous group of permanent, non-progressive motor disorders of movement and posture caused by chronic brain injuries. It is the most common cause of physical disability in childhood; spastic cerebral palsy being the most prevalent of its various forms. There is scanty information about the neurophysiologic investigations in children diagnosed as having spastic CP. Aims : The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between abnormal VEP and BAEP findings with different clinical parameters in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Materials and Methods : Fifteen children with spastic CP in the age range 4 months to 10 years participated in this study. Evaluation of VEPs, brainstem evoked potentials (BAEPs were performed in all study patients as well as 35 healthy children as controls. The study was conducted after obtaining ethics committee approval and informed consent of parents. Statistical Analysis Used : Significance of difference in the mean values of different parameters in different groups was assessed by Student′s "t" test and the P value <0.05 was considered to be significant. All the values were expressed as mean ± 1 Std. Deviation. Results : A significant difference was found in the VEP latencies and amplitude between the subjects with CP and controls. Striking BAEP abnormalities in CP patients include prolongation of absolute latency of wave V, interpeak latencies of III-V and lowered I-V ratio. Abnormal VEPs and BAEPs in children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy demonstrated a correlation with the presence of moderate to severe developmental delay. Conclusions : The differences in VEPs and BAEPs were determined between CP children and healthy children. The abnormalities found are probably linked to the neurological deficits present in cases of cerebral palsy.

  1. Use of Sensorimotor Functions for Early Identification and Neurohabilitation of Infants with Cerebral Palsy and/or Cerebral Palsy Precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    Presents the use of six sensorimotor functions (SMF) as a screening test for cerebral palsy in neonates. Functions include sitting in air, self-pulling to sit, self-propelling Katona slide crawl, assisted crawling, and elementary walking. Nine case examples are provided in an appendix. (Author/CR)

  2. Motion Tracking of Infants in Risk of Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mikkel Damgaard

    Every year 2-3 out of 1000 infants are born with cerebral cerebral palsy. Among others, the disorder often affects motor, cognitive and perceptual skills. The disorder is usually detected when the infants are old enough the crawl and walk, i.e. when the infant is 1-2 years old. However, studies...... show that the infant’s movements are affected already in the first year of life and methods exist for assessing the movements. The methods often require observation of the movements and qualitative evaluation of these. A more objective measure is desired in order to be able to diagnose cerebral palsy...... much earlier. The goal with this thesis is to describe the development of a markerless motion tracking system for infants. Based on data recorded with a low-cost depth sensor, image analysis and mathematical modeling is used to model the infant’s body and its movements. Two methods are considered...

  3. Análise clínico-qualitativa do discurso de uma criança com paralisia cerebral Análisis clinico-cualitativo del discurso de un niño con parálisis cerebral Cinical-qualitative analysis of the discourse of a child with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Massi

    2009-12-01

    de significado.This article proposes a reflection on the establishment of procedural linguistic-discursive production of a child with cerebral palsy in the light of interactive situations. It presents clinic qualitative method as a way of linguistic-discursive investigation and intervention, emphasizing a social verbal interaction and a subjective relationship. The data was longitudinal collected during one year and four months and the linguistic productions of a four-year-old child were analysed in a discursive perspective. Therefore, faraway from measurable evaluations and treatments, which are based in mechanic tasks of words codification and de-codification, our research was based in a group process significant construction analysis. Such analysis allow us to affirm that this child amplify her role in the dialogue. Thus, we observe that in the beginning of the process the child presented a fragmented discourse, and after all she presented complete structured narratives.

  4. Effects of Neurodevelopmental Therapy on Gross Motor Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina LABAF

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA How to Cite This Article: labaf S, Shamsoddini A, Hollisaz MT, Sobhani V, Shakibaee A . Effects of Neurodevelopmental Therapy on Gross Motor Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy. Iran J Child Neurol. Spring 2015;9(1:37-42.AbstractObjectiveNeurodevelopmental treatments are an advanced therapeutic approach practiced by experienced occupational therapists for the rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy. The primary challenge in children with cerebral palsy is gross motor dysfunction. We studied the effects of neurodevelopmental therapy on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy.Materials & MethodsIn a quasi-experimental design, 28 children with cerebral palsy were randomly divided into two groups. Neurodevelopmental therapy was given to a first group (n=15 with a mean age of 4.9 years; and a second group with a mean age 4.4 years (n=13 who were the control group. All children were evaluated with the Gross Motor Function Measure. Treatments were scheduled for three - one-hour sessions per week for 3 months.ResultsWe obtained statistically significant differences in the values between the baseline and post treatment in two groups. The groups were significantly different in laying and rolling (P=0.000, sitting (0.002, crawling and kneeling (0.004, and standing abilities (P=0.005. However, there were no significantdifferences in walking, running, and jumping abilities between the two groups (0.090.ConclusionWe concluded that the neurodevelopmental treatment improved gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy in four dimensions (laying and rolling, sitting, crawling and kneeling, and standing. However, walking, running, and jumping did not improve significantly. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso

  5. Risk of cerebral palsy among the offspring of immigrants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel G Ray

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP has a multifactorial etiology, and placental vascular disease may be one major risk factor. The risk of placental vascular disease may be lower among some immigrant groups. We studied the association between immigrant status and the risk of CP.We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of all singleton and twin livebirths in Ontario between 2002-2008, and who survived ≥28 days after birth. Each child was assessed for CP up to age 4 years, based on either a single inpatient or ≥2 outpatient pediatric diagnoses of CP. Relative to non-immigrants (n = 566,668, the risk of CP was assessed for all immigrants (n = 177,390, and further evaluated by World region of origin. Cox proportional hazard ratios (aHR were adjusted for maternal age, income, diabetes mellitus, obesity, tobacco use, Caesarean delivery, year of delivery, physician visits, twin pregnancy, preterm delivery, as well as small- and large-for-gestational age birthweight.There were 1346 cases of CP, with a lower rate among immigrants (1.45 per 1000 than non-immigrants (1.92 per 1000 (aHR 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67 to 0.88. Mothers from East Asia and the Pacific (aHR 0.54, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.77 and the Caribbean (aHR 0.58, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.93 were at a significantly lower risk of having a child with CP. Whether further adjusting for preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, placental abruption or placental infraction, or upon using a competing risk analysis that further accounted for stillbirth and neonatal death, these results did not change.Immigration and ethnicity appear to attenuate the risk of CP, and this effect is not fully explained by known risk factors.

  6. Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Big Kids (6 to 12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... palsy as they are for all kids. Many sports programs, such as Special Olympics , Little League Challenger Division , and TOPSoccer , can help your child to be physically active while also meeting new friends who have similar challenges. Therapeutic horseback riding programs and aquatic therapy are also ...

  7. Neonatal risk factors for cerebral palsy in very preterm babies: case-control study.

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, D. J.; Hope, P. L.; Johnson, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify neonatal risk factors for cerebral palsy among very preterm babies and in particular the associations independent of the coexistence of antenatal and intrapartum factors. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Oxford health region. SUBJECTS: Singleton babies born between 1984 and 1990 at less than 32 weeks' gestation who survived to discharge from hospital: 59 with cerebral palsy and 234 randomly selected controls without cerebral palsy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adverse neo...

  8. Depression in Mothers of Children with Cerebral Palsy and Its Relation to Severity and Type of Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Sajedi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "nChildren with cerebral palsy (CP suffer from several problems, so the family especially the mothers undertake a lot of social and emotional difficulties. The purpose of this study was to determine the severity of depression in mothers of children with CP in comparison with mothers who have normal children and its relation to the type of CP and severity of the disability. During this descriptive-analytic study, 43 mothers who had younger than 8 year-old children with CP under rehabilitation services in SABA clinic, related to the University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences (USWR, Tehran, Iran, were selected as the case group by simple sampling. A data registration form and the Beck Depression Inventory II were completed by them. The type of CP and the severity of disability were determined by a pediatrician and an occupational therapist respectively, using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS. Seventy-seven mothers of normal children, serving as the control group for comparing with case group, filled in the same questionnaires. There were significant differences in the mean depression scores (P=0.003 between the two groups. Having a child with CP also increases the risk of developing depression in mothers as much as 2.26 times (OR=2.26. There were no statistically significant differences in depression scores and the severity of disability and also among the five types of CP. It seems that having a child with CP is probably associated with higher prevalence and severity of depression in mothers. So treatment or prevention of depression in mothers of children with CP is highly recommended for improving the rehabilitation process and achieve better results in these children.

  9. Depression in Mothers of Children with Cerebral Palsy and Its Relation to Severity and Type of Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Sajedi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Children with cerebral palsy (CP suffer from several problems, so the family especially the mothers undertake a lot of social and emotional difficulties. The purpose of this study was to determine the severity of depression in mothers of children with CP in comparison with mothers who have normal children and its relation to the type of CP and severity of the disability. During this descriptive-analytic study, 43 mothers who had younger than 8 year-old children with CP under rehabilitation services in SABA clinic, related to the University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences (USWR, Tehran, Iran, were selected as the case group by simple sampling. A data registration form and the Beck Depression Inventory II were completed by them. The type of CP and the severity of disability were determined by a pediatrician and an occupational therapist respectively, using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS. Seventy-seven mothers of normal children, serving as the control group for comparing with case group, filled in the same questionnaires. There were significant differences in the mean depression scores (P=0.003 between the two groups. Having a child with CP also increases the risk of developing depression in mothers as much as 2.26 times (OR=2.26. There were no statistically significant differences in depression scores and the severity of disability and also among the five types of CP. It seems that having a child with CP is probably associated with higher prevalence and severity of depression in mothers. So treatment or prevention of depression in mothers of children with CP is highly recommended for improving the rehabilitation process and achieve better results in these children.

  10. The effect of hippotherapy on gait in patients with spastic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Fízková

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disorders of motor skills, especially regarding gait, are prevalent in nearly all forms of cerebral palsy. Through a horse’s back movement, the patient is exposed to proprioceptive stimulation, thus improvement in gait performance could be expected. OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to determine the effect of hippotherapy on gait in patients with spastic cerebral palsy. METHODS: Eleven subjects (age 14.3 ± 4.8 years, height 148.2 ± 17.6 cm, weight 43.3 ± 20.2 kg with spastic cerebral palsy participated in the study. Gait assessment was performed before and after a weeklong stay. The hippotherapy was conducted daily. Kinematic data from three trials for each child was obtained using the Vicon MX system (seven infrared cameras, frequency 200 Hz. Comparison of ankle, knee, hip and pelvis movement before and after hippotherapy intervention was performed in Statistica (version 10.0 using the Wilcoxon test. To determine the effect size, Cohen’s d was used. RESULTS: After completing the short-term hippotherapy intervention, we observed a decrease in the second plantar flexion during initial swing (p < .05, decrease in knee flexion during the stance phase (p < .05, decrease in the hip range of motion in sagittal plane (p < .05 and decrease in the pelvic obliquity (p < .05. The effect size for all statistically significant differences was low. CONCLUSIONS: Hippotherapy combined with individually defined physiotherapy can lead to some changes in bipedal locomotion in terms of improvement and thus contribute to greater self-sufficiency, self-reliance and independence of patients with cerebral palsy.

  11. TORCH infection and cerebral palsy%TORCH感染与小儿脑性瘫痪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蔚; 覃蓉

    2001-01-01

    @@Background: Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that are related but probably have different causes. Children who have cerebral palsy acquire the disorder before or during or after birth. Objective: To discuss the relationship between the TORCH infection and cerebral palsy onset . Design : A TORCH screen is given to the children who have cerebral palsy in our hospital(1996.1~ 1998.6). A TORCH screen checks to see if the baby has been infected by any of the common causes.

  12. Feeding and Gastrointestinal Problems in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkin, Gulten; Culha, Canan; Ozel, Sumru; Kirbiyik, Eylem Gulsen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of our study was to identify feeding and gastrointestinal system (GIS) problems in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and to evaluate the relationship between these problems and the severity of CP. A total of 120 children with CP were enrolled consecutively into the study (67 males, 53 females; mean age: 6.0[plus or minus]2.4 years; range:…

  13. Temporomandibular Joint Assesment in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Özden Canbay; Esra Doğru Hüzmeli; Nihan Katayıfçı; Mesut Çelik

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Aim of this study was to functionally evaluate temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in children with Cerebral palsy (CP). Materials and Methods: After recording the individual’s demographic information, questions about TMJ stiffness, presence of saliva, nutrition, oral splint, pain, respiratory system, history of epilepsy, chewing problems and disease were asked to the individuals and/or parents. Mandibular mobility was evaluated with length measurement and neck muscle strength was ...

  14. Assessment of growth and nutrition in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson-Fang, L; Bell, K L

    2013-12-01

    This manuscript provides an update on the assessment of growth and nutrition in children with cerebral palsy and children with similar neurodevelopmental disabilities. Topics include the assessment of linear growth using segmental measures, avoidance of commonly used tools to assess nutritional status in typically developing children that are not valid in this population of children and how to use other nutritional assessment tools that have been developed specific to this population of children.

  15. Growth and Nutrition Disorders in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    KUPERMINC, MICHELLE N; Stevenson, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    Growth and nutrition disorders are common secondary health conditions in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Poor growth and malnutrition in CP merit study because of their impact on health, including psychological and physiological function, healthcare utilization, societal participation, motor function, and survival. Understanding the etiology of poor growth has led to a variety of interventions to improve growth. One of the major causes of poor growth, malnutrition, is the best-studied cont...

  16. FEEDING, GROWTH AND NUTRITION DISORDERS IN CEREBRAL PALSY

    OpenAIRE

    Rosulescu Eugenia; Ilona Ilinca; Mihaela Zăvăleanu; Costin Nanu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the growth, physical development and nutrition status for a sample of cerebral palsied children with spastic, dyskinetic and ataxic type.Material and methods: A total of 81 children with CP, who were rehabilitated in the pediatrics rehabilitation clinic between 2005 - 2008 years, were included. Children’s assessments included: anthropometric measures (height H, recumbent length L, weight W), anthropometric indicators (weight fot length WL, body mass indexBMI) and was ca...

  17. Prevalance of Obesity in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, Ankita; Diwan, Shraddha; Diwan, Jasmin; Vyas, Neeta

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Obesity are epidemic among children and adolescents. There is worldwide tendency of increasing prevalence of obesity in children. Cerebral palsy (CP) is leading cause of childhood disability.studies have proposed mechanism of children with disability leading towards obesity and related health risks. So this study is aimed at determining whether such trend of obesity exists in children with CP in terms of BMI and WHR.

  18. MRI of patients with cerebral palsy and normal CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogaert, P. van; Szliwowski, H.B. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Neurology); Baleriaux, D.; Christophe, C. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology))

    1992-02-01

    Three children with clinical evidence of cerebral palsy (CP) and normal cerebral computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify CT-undetectable white matter lesions in the watershed zones of arterial territories. The two patients with spastic diplegia showed bilateral lesions either in the subcortical regions or in the occipital periventricular regions. The patient with congenital hemiplegia exhibited unilateral lesions in the periventricular region. We conclude that MRI is more informative than CT for the evaluation of patients with CP. (orig.).

  19. Analysis of cranial CT-scan findings in cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, F.; Andoh, T.; Une, K.; Takamatsu, T. (Kitakyushu Municipal Sogo-Ryoiku Center (Japan))

    1981-06-01

    CT-scan findings of 87 cerebral palsied children were studied. They consist of 23 cases of spastic quadriplegia, 9 cases of diplegia, 12 cases of paraplegia, 24 cases of athetosis and mixed type, and 19 cases of hemiplegia. In the former four types, ventricular dilatation and cortical atrophy were measured and abnormal changes in cerebral substance and cerebellar atrophy were observed. Spastic quadriplegia showed most intense changes in every aspect of the abnormalities, while paraplegia had almost normal appearance. Athetosis and mixed type had moderate changes. Hemiplegia always showed asymmetrical view on CT-scan, dilatation of lateral ventricle or atrophy of hemisphere in contralateral side being observed.

  20. Anestesia e paralisia cerebral Anestesia y parálisis cerebral Anesthesia and cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Március Vinícius M Maranhão

    2005-12-01

    riesgo, fisiopatología, cuadro clínico, diagnóstico, terapéuticas utilizadas bien como evaluación pre-operatoria, medicación pre-anestésica, manoseo intra y posoperatorio, analgesia posoperatoria y dolor crónico. CONCLUSIONES: El anestesista desempeña un papel importante en la disminución de la morbidez y mortalidad anestésico-quirúrgica en pacientes portadores de parálisis cerebral. El conocimiento de la fisiopatología de los diferentes tipos de parálisis cerebral bien como de las enfermedades asociadas y sus terapéuticas es imprescindible, pues permite al anestesista anticipar y precaver complicaciones intra y posoperatorias en este tipo de paciente.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cerebral palsy (CP is a non-progressive disease induced by CNS injury, which leads to patients' motor impairment. CP patients are often submitted to surgical procedures due to usual diseases and some surgical situations related with CP. The aim of this article was to review cerebral palsy aspects of interest to anesthesiologists to allow an adequate pre, intra and postoperative management of these patients. CONTENTS: This article addresses cerebral palsy aspects such as etiology, classification, risk factors, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and therapies and, in addition to preoperative evaluation, preanesthetic medication, intra and postoperative management, postoperative analgesia and chronic pain. CONCLUSIONS: Anesthesiologists play an important role in decreasing anesthetic-surgical morbidity and mortality of cerebral palsy patients. The understanding of different aspects of cerebral palsy pathophysiologies, in addition to those of associated diseases and their therapies is paramount, because it allows anesthesiologists to anticipate and prevent intra and postoperative complications in this type of patient.

  1. Cerebral Palsy: General Information. Fact Sheet Number 2 = La Paralisis Cerebral: Informacion General. Fact Sheet Number 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interstate Research Associates, McLean, VA.

    This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is offered in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy: spastic, athetoid,…

  2. Hip salvage surgery in cerebral palsy cases: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Rafael Carboni; Mansano, Marcelo Valentim; Bovo, Miguel; Yamada, Helder Henzo; Rancan, Daniela Regina; Fucs, Patricia Maria de Moraes Barros; Svartman, Celso; de Assumpção, Rodrigo Montezuma César

    2015-01-01

    Imbalance and muscle spasticity, in association with coxa valga and persistent femoral anteversion, compromises hip development in cases of cerebral palsy and may result in chronic pain and even dislocation. Some of these hips undergo salvage surgery because of the severe impact of their abnormalities in these patients' quality of life. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to compare the results from the main hip salvage techniques applied to these individuals. The literature search focused on studies that evaluated results from hip salvage surgery in cases of cerebral palsy, published from 1970 to 2011, which are present in the Embase, Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library and SciELO databases. Although the results were not statistically comparable, this systematic review demonstrates that hip salvage surgery should be indicated after individual evaluation on each patient, due to the wide spectrum of presentations of cerebral palsy. Therefore, it seems that no surgical technique is superior to any other. Rather, there are different indications.

  3. Hip salvage surgery in cerebral palsy cases: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Carboni de Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Imbalance and muscle spasticity, in association with coxa valga and persistent femoral anteversion, compromises hip development in cases of cerebral palsy and may result in chronic pain and even dislocation. Some of these hips undergo salvage surgery because of the severe impact of their abnormalities in these patients' quality of life. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to compare the results from the main hip salvage techniques applied to these individuals. The literature search focused on studies that evaluated results from hip salvage surgery in cases of cerebral palsy, published from 1970 to 2011, which are present in the Embase, Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library and SciELO databases. Although the results were not statistically comparable, this systematic review demonstrates that hip salvage surgery should be indicated after individual evaluation on each patient, due to the wide spectrum of presentations of cerebral palsy. Therefore, it seems that no surgical technique is superior to any other. Rather, there are different indications.

  4. Impaired Voluntary Movement Control and Its Rehabilitation in Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is caused by early damage to the developing brain, as the most common pediatric neurological disorder. Hemiplegia (unilateral spastic cerebral palsy) is the most common subtype, and the resulting impairments, lateralized to one body side, especially affect the upper extremity, limiting daily function. This chapter first describes the pathophysiology and mechanisms underlying impaired upper extremity control of cerebral palsy. It will be shown that the severity of impaired hand function closely relates to the integrity of the corticospinal tract innervating the affected hand. It will also shown that the developing corticospinal tract can reorganize its connectivity depending on the timing and location of CNS injury, which also has implications for the severity of hand impairments and rehabilitation. The mechanisms underlying impaired motor function will be highlighted, including deficits in movement execution and planning and sensorimotor integration. It will be shown that despite having unimanual hand impairments, bimanual movement control deficits and mirror movements also impact function. Evidence for motor learning-based therapies including Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy and Bimanual Training, and the possible pathophysiological predictors of treatment outcome and plasticity will be described. Finally, future directions for rehabilitations will be presented.

  5. Aquatic exercise in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Lidija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Aquatic exercise is one of the most popular supplementary treatments for children with neuro-motor impairment, especially for cerebral palsy (CP. As water reduces gravity force which increases postural stability, a child with CP exercises more easily in water than on land. Objective. The aim of the study was to examine aquatic exercise effects on gross motor functioning, muscle tone and cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP. Methods. The study included 19 children of both sexes, aged 6 to 12 years, with spastic CP. They were included in a 12-week aquatic exercise program, twice a week. Measurements of GMFM (Gross Motor Function Measurement, spasticity (MAS – Modified Ashworth Scale, heart rate (HR and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max were carried out before and after treatment. The measurement results were compared before and after treatment. Results. GMFM mean value before therapy was 80.2% and statistically it was significantly lower in comparison to the same value after therapy, which was 86.2% (p<0.05. The level of spasticity was considerably decreased after therapy; the mean value before treatment was 3.21 according to MAS, and after treatment it was 1.95 (p<0.001. After treatment there was a statistically significant improvement of cardiorespiratory indurance, i.e., there was a significant decrease in the mean value of HR and a significant increase of VO2max (p<0.001. Conclusion. Aquatic exercise program can be useful in improving gross motor functioning, reducing spasticity and increasing cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175092

  6. Cerebral palsy in eastern Denmark: declining birth prevalence but increasing numbers of unilateral cerebral palsy in birth year period 1986-1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravn, Susanne Holst; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Uldall, Peter

    2010-05-01

    The Cerebral Palsy Registry in eastern Denmark has been collecting cases using a uniform data sampling procedure since birth year 1979. Children are included by two child neurologists and an obstetrician. Information on pregnancy, birth, neonatal period, impairments and demographic data are registered. The total cerebral palsy birth prevalence has been significantly decreasing since the birth period 1983-1986 with 3.0 per 1000 live births until the period 1995-1998 with 2.1 per 1000 live births. The overall decrease was seen in preterm infants (term infants and despite a simultaneous fall in perinatal and early neonatal mortality in the preterm group. Analysing the subtypes of CP we found a significant increase in the numbers as well as the rate of unilateral CP with a simultaneous fall in the numbers as well as the rate of bilateral CP. The explanation of this rise is not obvious. A change from bilateral periventricular lesions to unilateral is a possibility, but no major change in the neonatal handling could be documented. Regarding associated impairments, developmental delay/learning disabilities as well as motor function assessed by ability to walk (unassisted/assisted), both have changed toward higher percentage of children with unassisted walking and in need of special education.

  7. The Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry. A registry on a specific impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, P; Michelsen, S I; Topp, M;

    2001-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the commonest disabling impairment in childhood, with a prevalence of 2-3 per 1000 live births. The Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry is a research registry that contains cases of CP from birth year 1925 and has estimated the birth prevalence since 1950. Data on children with CP...

  8. Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Brain and Cerebellum in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciorkowska, Elżbieta; Gościk, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies are rarely used in the diagnosis of patients with cerebral palsy. The aim of present study was to assess the relationships between the volumetric MRI and clinical findings in children with cerebral palsy compared to control subjects. Materials and Methods. Eighty-two children with cerebral palsy and 90 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were collected. Results. The dominant changes identified on MRI scans in children with cerebral palsy were periventricular leukomalacia (42%) and posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (21%). The total brain and cerebellum volumes in children with cerebral palsy were significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Significant grey matter volume reduction was found in the total brain in children with cerebral palsy compared with the control subjects. Positive correlations between the age of the children of both groups and the grey matter volumes in the total brain were found. Negative relationship between width of third ventricle and speech development was found in the patients. Positive correlations were noted between the ventricles enlargement and motor dysfunction and mental retardation in children with cerebral palsy. Conclusions. By using the voxel-based morphometry, the total brain, cerebellum, and grey matter volumes were significantly reduced in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:27579318

  9. TORSIONAL DEFORMITIES OF LOWER LIMBS IN PATIENTS WITH INFANTILE CEREBRAL PALSY (LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Никита Олегович Хусаинов

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the literature devoted to the problem of torsional deformities of the lower limbs in patients with infantile cerebral palsy. It also describes biomechanical features peculiar to the patients with infantile cerebral palsy, as well as long-term results of performed surgical interventions.

  10. Quantifying the physical, social and attitudinal environment of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickinson, Heather O; Colver, Allan; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy

    2011-01-01

    To develop an instrument to represent the availability of needed environmental features (EFs) in the physical, social and attitudinal environment of home, school and community for children with cerebral palsy.......To develop an instrument to represent the availability of needed environmental features (EFs) in the physical, social and attitudinal environment of home, school and community for children with cerebral palsy....

  11. Pain in young people aged 13 to 17 years with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parkinson, Kathryn N; Dickinson, Heather O; Arnaud, Catherine;

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and associations of self- and parent-reported pain in young people with cerebral palsy (CP).......To determine the prevalence and associations of self- and parent-reported pain in young people with cerebral palsy (CP)....

  12. Epilepsy and cerebral palsy: characteristics and trends in children born in 1976-1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellier, Elodie; Uldall, Peter; Calado, Eulalia;

    2012-01-01

    Although epilepsy is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP), no data exists on prevalence rates of CP and epilepsy.......Although epilepsy is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP), no data exists on prevalence rates of CP and epilepsy....

  13. Arithmetic Difficulties in Children with Cerebral Palsy Are Related to Executive Function and Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Kathleen M.; de Moor, Jan; van Lieshout, Ernest C. D. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although it is believed that children with cerebral palsy are at high risk for learning difficulties and arithmetic difficulties in particular, few studies have investigated this issue. Methods: Arithmetic ability was longitudinally assessed in children with cerebral palsy in special (n = 41) and mainstream education (n = 16) and…

  14. "I Do Lots of Things": Children with Cerebral Palsy's Competence for Everyday Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Jessica M.; Hammel, Joy

    2011-01-01

    This study explored how children with cerebral palsy describe competent performance in everyday activities and sought to better understand the processes by which the children developed competence. Five children with cerebral palsy aged six to 17 years participated in a three-step procedure that included two observations, one semi-structured…

  15. Preterm birth and cerebral palsy. Predictive value of pregnancy complications, mode of delivery, and Apgar scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Monica Wedell; Langhoff-Roos, J; Uldall, P

    1997-01-01

    .01), and low Apgar scores at 1 minute (45% vs. 36%, p or = 3 (adjusted OR = 1.53 (95% CI 1.00-2.34), p ... complications preceding preterm birth did not imply a higher risk of cerebral palsy. Delivery by Cesarean section was a prognostic factor for developing cerebral palsy, and the predictive value of Apgar scores was highly limited....

  16. Arithmetic difficulties in children with cerebral palsy are related to executive function and working memory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenks, K.M.; Moor, J.M.H. de; Lieshout, E.C. van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although it is believed that children with cerebral palsy are at high risk for learning difficulties and arithmetic difficulties in particular, few studies have investigated this issue. METHODS: Arithmetic ability was longitudinally assessed in children with cerebral palsy in special (n

  17. Arithmetic difficulties in children with cerebral palsy are related to executive function and working memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenks, K.M.; Moor, J.M.H. de; Lieshout, E.C.D.M. van

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although it is believed that children with cerebral palsy are at high risk for learning difficulties and arithmetic difficulties in particular, few studies have investigated this issue. Methods: Arithmetic ability was longitudinally assessed in children with cerebral palsy in special (n

  18. Intensive Dysarthria Therapy for Older Children with Cerebral Palsy: Findings from Six Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Lindsay; Smallman, Claire; Farrier, Faith

    2006-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy often have speech, language and communication difficulties that affect their access to social and educational activities. Speech and language therapy to improve the intelligibility of the speech of children with cerebral palsy has long been advocated, but there is a dearth of research investigating therapy…

  19. Self-reported quality of life of adolescents with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colver, Allan; Rapp, Marion; Eisemann, Nora

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with cerebral palsy who can self-report have similar quality of life (QoL) to their able-bodied peers. Is this similarity also found in adolescence? We examined how self-reported QoL of adolescents with cerebral palsy varies with impairment and compares with the general popul...

  20. COMPARISON OF MUSCLE STRENGTH, SPRINT POWER AND AEROBIC CAPACITY IN ADULTS WITH AND WITHOUT CEREBRAL PALSY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Sonja; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Bessems, Paul J. C.; Lamberts, Marcel L.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare: (i) muscle strength, sprint power and maximal aerobic capacity; and (ii) the correlations between these variables in adults with and without cerebral palsy. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: Twenty adults with and 24 without cerebral palsy. Methods: Isometric and isokin

  1. Psychological problems in children with cerebral palsy: a cross-sectional European study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parkes, Jackie; White-Koning, Melanie; Dickinson, Heather O

    2008-01-01

    '. CONCLUSIONS: A significant proportion of children with cerebral palsy have psychological symptoms or social impairment sufficiently severe to warrant referral to specialist services. Care must be taken in the assessment and management of children with cerebral palsy to ensure psychological problems...

  2. Effect of Translucency on Transparency and Symbol Learning for Children with and without Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Hsiung; Chen, Ming-Chung

    2011-01-01

    Based on the concept of iconicity, the iconicity hypothesis was emphasized for decades. The aims of this study were to explore the effect of translucency on transparency and symbol learning for children with and without cerebral palsy. Twenty children with cerebral palsy and forty typical peers participated in the study. Ten symbols with high…

  3. European study of frequency of participation of adolescents with and without cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, Susan I; Flachs, Esben M; Damsgaard, Mogens T; Parkes, Jacqueline; Parkinson, Kathryn; Rapp, Marion; Arnaud, Catherine; Nystrand, Malin; Colver, Allan; Fauconnier, Jerome; Dickinson, Heather O; Marcelli, Marco; Uldall, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Children with cerebral palsy participate less in everyday activities than children in the general populations. During adolescence, rapid physical and psychological changes occur which may be more difficult for adolescents with impairments. Within the European SPARCLE project we measured frequency of participation of adolescents with cerebral palsy by administering the Questionnaire of Young People's Participation to 667 adolescents with cerebral palsy or their parents from nine European regions and to 4666 adolescents from the corresponding general populations. Domains and single items were analysed using respectively linear and logistic regression. Adolescents with cerebral palsy spent less time with friends and had less autonomy in their daily life than adolescents in the general populations. Adolescents with cerebral palsy participated much less in sport but played electronic games at least as often as adolescents in the general populations. Severity of motor and intellectual impairment had a significant impact on frequency of participation, the more severely impaired being more disadvantaged. Adolescents with an only slight impairment participated in some domains as often as adolescents in the general populations. Regional variation existed. For example adolescents with cerebral palsy in central Italy were most disadvantaged according to decisional autonomy, while adolescents with cerebral palsy in east Denmark and northern England played sports as often as their general populations. Participation is an important health outcome. Personal and environmental predictors of participation of adolescents with cerebral palsy need to be identified in order to design interventions directed to such predictors; and in order to inform the content of services.

  4. Theory of Mind and Irony Comprehension in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillies, Stephanie; Hody, Anais; Calmus, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of the present study was to characterise the pragmatic abilities of French children with cerebral palsy through their understanding of irony and other people's mental states. We predicted that children with cerebral palsy would have difficulty understanding false-belief and ironic remarks, due to the executive dysfunction that…

  5. Electropalatography in the Description and Treatment of Speech Disorders in Five Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordberg, Ann; Carlsson, Goran; Lohmander, Anette

    2011-01-01

    Some children with cerebral palsy have articulation disorders that are resistant to conventional speech therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the visual feedback method of electropalatography (EPG) could be an effective tool for treating five children (mean age of 9.4 years) with dysarthria and cerebral palsy and to explore…

  6. Effects of Frequency of Feedback on the Learning of Motor Skill in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemayattalab, Rasool; Rostami, Leila Rashidi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of frequency of knowledge of results (KR) on the learning of dart in individuals with cerebral palsy type I. Twenty-four individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) between the ages of 5 and 17 were chosen for this study. They were put into 3 homogenous groups according to their records after 20…

  7. Measuring intellectual ability in children with cerebral palsy: can we do better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwell, Sarah; Reid, Susan M; Reddihough, Dinah S; Wrennall, Jacquie; Ong, Ben; Stargatt, Robyn

    2014-10-01

    Standard intelligence tests such as the WPPSI-III have limitations when testing children with motor impairment. This study aimed to determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy with sufficient verbal and motor skills to complete the WPPSI-III, to determine their comparative ability to complete tasks with and without a significant motor component, and to investigate short forms of the WPPSI-III as alternatives. Participants were 78 of 235 eligible 4-5 year old children with cerebral palsy resident in the Australian state of Victoria. Verbal IQ (VIQ), Performance IQ (PIQ), and Full-scale IQ (FSIQ) were determined using the WPPSI-III. Initial screening for pointing and verbal abilities determined which tests were attempted. The impact of speed was investigated by comparing scores on the Block Design subtest with and without an imposed time limit. FSIQ scores were calculated from two short forms of the WPPSI-III and compared to the full form. On screening, 16 children had inadequate pointing (14) and verbal abilities (2). FSIQ was obtained in 62 (82%) children. Strong associations were seen between completion of the entire test battery and topographical pattern, level of manual ability and level of gross motor function. Scores on subtests requiring manual ability were depressed relative to other scores. Children performed better using short forms of the WPPSI-III and, for a minority, when time limits were disregarded. In summary, children with cerebral palsy often lack the fine and gross motor skills necessary to complete the WPPSI-III, scoring relatively poorly on tasks requiring a fine motor response. Using short-form estimations of FSIQ comprised of subtests without a significant fine motor component has the potential to increase a child's FSIQ by approximately 5 points. These findings have important clinical implications when assessing a child with both motor and cognitive limitations.

  8. [Cognitive stimulation in children with cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriel, V; Garcia-Molina, A; Aparicio-Lopez, C; Ensenat, A; Roig-Rovira, T

    2014-11-16

    Introduccion. La paralisis cerebral a menudo cursa con deficits cognitivos de atencion, visuopercepcion, funciones ejecutivas y memoria de trabajo. Objetivo. Analizar el efecto de un tratamiento de estimulacion cognitiva sobre las capacidades cognitivas en niños con pa­ralisis cerebral. Pacientes y metodos. Muestra de 15 niños con paralisis cerebral, con una edad media de 8,80 ± 2,51 años, clasificados mediante el Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) en nivel I (n = 6), nivel II (n = 4), nivel III (n = 2) y nivel V (n = 3). Los deficits cognitivos se evaluaron mediante la escala de inteligencia de Wechsler para niños (WISC-IV) y el Continuous Performance Test (CPT-II). Se administraron los cuestionarios para padres y profesores del Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) y las escalas de evaluacion de Conners (CPRS-48 y CTRS-28). Se realizo un programa de estimulacion cognitiva dos horas semanales durante ocho semanas. Resultados. Se observaron diferencias estadisticamente significativas tras aplicar el tratamiento de estimulacion cognitivo en el indice de razonamiento perceptivo de la WISC-IV. No se obtuvieron diferencias antes y despues del tratamiento en las puntuaciones del Conners y del BRIEF. Tampoco se hallaron diferencias en los resultados de la WISC-IV en funcion del sexo ni en el GMFCS. Conclusion. El rendimiento cognitivo de los niños con paralisis cerebral mejora tras la aplicacion de un programa de rehabilitacion cognitiva.

  9. Theory of mind and irony comprehension in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillies, Stéphanie; Hody, Anaïs; Calmus, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of the present study was to characterise the pragmatic abilities of French children with cerebral palsy through their understanding of irony and other people's mental states. We predicted that children with cerebral palsy would have difficulty understanding false-belief and ironic remarks, due to the executive dysfunction that accompanies the motor disorders of cerebral palsy. We conducted an experiment in which children with cerebral palsy and typically developing matched controls performed theory-of-mind and executive function tasks. They then listened to ironic stories and answered questions about the speakers' beliefs and attitudes. The groups differed significantly on second-order theory of mind, irony comprehension and working memory, indicating pragmatic difficulties in children with cerebral palsy.

  10. Public health issues related to infection in pregnancy and cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schendel, Diana E.; Schuchat, Anne; Thorsen, Poul

    2002-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common neuromotor developmental disability of childhood, affecting as many as 8,000 to 12,000 children born in the U.S. each year (corresponding to a prevalence rate of between 2 and 3 per 1000 children). Recent improvements in neonatal care have not resulted in a decline...... in the overall prevalence of cerebral palsy and, in fact, greater numbers of very preterm/very low birth weight infants are surviving with cerebral palsy and other developmental problems. Infection in pregnancy may be an important cause of the disorder. In preterm infants, there appears to be about a 2-fold...... inflammation typically associated with infection also suggest that an inflammatory response may be an important independent etiologic factor. If a substantial proportion of cerebral palsy is attributable to acute amnionitis infection and/or neonatal sepsis, cerebral palsy should have decreased in the United...

  11. Effectiveness of Neurogenesis in treating Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan AMIRSALARI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Amirsalary S, Dehghan L, Dalvand H, Haghgoo H. Effectiveness of Neurogenesis in treating children with Cerebral Palsy. Iran J Child Neurol 2012;6(2:1-8. objectiveTissue-specific stem cells divide to generate different cell types for the purpose oftissue repair in the adult. The aim of this study was to detect the significance ofneurogenesis in the central nervous system in patients with cerebral palsy (CP.Materials & MethodsA search was made in Medline, CINAHL, PubMed, ISI Web of Science andGoogle Scholar from 1995 to February 2011. The outcomes measured in thereview were classified to origins, proliferation, and migration of new neurons,and neurogenesis in CP.ResultsAccording to the review of articles, neurogenesis persists in specific brainregions throughout lifetime and can be enhanced from endogenous progenitorcells residing in the subventricular zone by growth factors or neurotrophicfactors and rehabilitation program.ConclusionMost of the studies have been conducted in the laboratory and on animals,more work is required at the basic level of stem cell biology, in the developmentof human models, and finally in well-conceived clinical trials. References1. Buonomano DV, Merzenich MM. Cortical plasticity: from synapses to maps. Annu Rev Neurosci 1998; 21:149-86.2. Haghgoo H. Fundemental of neurosciences. 1st ed. Tehran; USWR Press; 2011.3. Payne BR, Lomber SG. Reconstructing functional systems after lesions of cerebral cortex. Nat Rev Neurosci 2001 Dec;2(12:911-9.4. Bax M, Goldstein M, Rosenbaum P, Leviton A, Paneth N, Dan B, et al. Proposed definition and classification of cerebral palsy. Dev Med Child Neurol 2005 Apr;47(8:571-6.5. Joghataei M, Kazem M. Barresi sathe niazhaie jamee be khadamate behzisti colle keshvar [persian].Tehran: University of. Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences; 1990.6. Johnson A. Prevalence and characteristics of children with cerebral palsy in Europe. Dev Med Child Neurol

  12. Dietary Needs for Kids With Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which may include the doctor and a dietitian, speech-language therapist , and occupational therapist — can make sure that your ... and beverages to help them swallow safely. A speech-language therapist can help determine if your child needs a ...

  13. Focus on Function – a randomized controlled trial comparing two rehabilitation interventions for young children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Dianne

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with cerebral palsy receive a variety of long-term physical and occupational therapy interventions to facilitate development and to enhance functional independence in movement, self-care, play, school activities and leisure. Considerable human and financial resources are directed at the "intervention" of the problems of cerebral palsy, although the available evidence supporting current interventions is inconclusive. A considerable degree of uncertainty remains about the appropriate therapeutic approaches to manage the habilitation of children with cerebral palsy. The primary objective of this project is to conduct a multi-site randomized clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of a task/context-focused approach compared to a child-focused remediation approach in improving performance of functional tasks and mobility, increasing participation in everyday activities, and improving quality of life in children 12 months to 5 years of age who have cerebral palsy. Method/Design A multi-centred randomized controlled trial research design will be used. Children will be recruited from a representative sample of children attending publicly-funded regional children's rehabilitation centers serving children with disabilities in Ontario and Alberta in Canada. Target sample size is 220 children with cerebral palsy aged 12 months to 5 years at recruitment date. Therapists are randomly assigned to deliver either a context-focused approach or a child-focused approach. Children follow their therapist into their treatment arm. Outcomes will be evaluated at baseline, after 6 months of treatment and at a 3-month follow-up period. Outcomes represent the components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, including body function and structure (range of motion, activities (performance of functional tasks, motor function, participation (involvement in formal and informal activities, and environment (parent

  14. Single-level selective dorsal rhizotomy for spastic cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David; Cawker, Stephanie; Paget, Simon; Wimalasundera, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The management of cerebral palsy (CP) is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is a neurosurgical technique that aims to reduce spasticity in the lower limbs. A minimally invasive approach to SDR involves a single level laminectomy at the conus and utilises intraoperative electromyography (EMG). When combined with physiotherapy, SDR is effective in selected children and has minimal complications. This review discusses the epidemiology of CP and the management using SDR within an integrated multidisciplinary centre. Particular attention is given to the single-level laminectomy technique of SDR and its rationale, and the patient workup, recovery and outcomes of SDR. PMID:27757432

  15. Asymmetry in children with cerebral palsy and oral structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberfellner, H; Richter, M

    1980-12-01

    Twenty-six children with cerebral palsy were examined with respect to structural asymmetry of the mouth. In 19 children there were clear cut correlations between symmetry/asymmetry of voluntary function and the oral findings. Patients with symmetrical patterns of movements had symmetrical dentition, while in those with asymmetrical function the favoured side corresponded to the side with structural changes. Apparent exceptions to this rule in 7 children could be resolved in 6 by analysis of their complex case histories. Fifty normal controls showed oral asymmetries of nearly identical frequency and magnitude. In this respect there is no difference between the normal and handicapped group.

  16. Altered sense of agency in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Christensen, Mark S; Kliim-Due, Mette;

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Background Children diagnosed with spastic Cerebral Palsy (CP) often show perceptual and cognitive problems, which may contribute to their functional deficit. Here we investigated if altered ability to determine whether an observed movement is performed by themselves (sense of agency......) contributes to the motor deficit in children with CP. Methods Three groups; 1) CP children, 2) healthy peers, and 3) healthy adults produced straight drawing movements on a pen-tablet which was not visible for the subjects. The produced movement was presented as a virtual moving object on a computer screen...... the movements in 310 seconds, whereas healthy children and especially CP children were significantly slower (p...

  17. The importance of good nutrition in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, Gina

    2015-02-01

    Poor nutritional status, which is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP), has generated considerable interest because of its wide-ranging impact on the children's health and well-being. Understanding the causes of poor nutrition, and the appropriate measurements required to interpret the nutritional status in children with CP, are integral to developing appropriate nutritional intervention strategies. Focusing attention on improving nutrition early in the lives of children with CP affords families and care providers with a unique opportunity for intervention, which may result in better outcomes for the children.

  18. Management of spinal infections in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebaaly, A; El Rachkidi, R; Yaacoub, J J; Saliba, E; Ghanem, I

    2016-10-01

    Cerebral palsy patients who undergo posterior spinal instrumentation for scoliosis are at a greater risk of surgical site infection compared to adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. Many infecting organisms are reported. Risk factors include patients' specific factors, nutritional status as well as surgery related factors. Although surgical management is still controversial, it is always based on irrigation and debridement followed or not by implant removal. The purpose of this paper is to review the pathophysiology of surgical site infection in this patient population and to propose a treatment algorithm, based on a thorough review of the current literature and personal experience.

  19. Modifying the effects of cerebral palsy: the Gregg Mozgala story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitow, Leon; Rogoff, Tamar; Mozgala, Gregg; Chmelik, Stefan; Comeaux, Zachary; Hannon, John; Lederman, Eyal; Myers, Tom

    2010-04-01

    In response to a news report of the rehabilitation of a New York-based dancer/actor with cerebral palsy, to the point where a ballet performance was scheduled, it was determined that a report based on the individuals involved would be commissioned. The resulting reports from the choreographer responsible for the rehabilitation exercises, and the dancer, were circulated to an interdisciplinary selection of physical medicine experts, for commentary as to what clinicians might learn from the case, and what mechanisms might be involved.

  20. Recent advances in the neuroimaging and neuropsychology of cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, A Sophia

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the recent advances in understanding of cerebral palsy (CP) and outlines how these advances could inform pediatric neuropsychological rehabilitation. Three main areas are discussed: the improved delineation of differing presentations resulting from more advanced imaging techniques with emerging links to function; a brief review of research examining neuropsychological functioning of children with CP and their quality of life and participation; and lastly, some of the evidence for efficacious interventions and the extent to which these interventions are derived from neuropsychological theory and practice. Advances and gaps in knowledge in addition to suggestions of areas for future focus in research and practice are discussed throughout the article.

  1. TANG's Scalp Acupuncture and Infantile Cerebral Palsy:Case Reports of 34 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦秀娣; 韩丑萍

    2008-01-01

    @@ Cerebral palsy (CP) refers to non-progressive motor disorder resulting from a group of cerebral lesions. It can occur as a result of motor center injuries before, during or after birth and subsequently non-progressive central motor dysfunction, followed by mental retardation and motor impairment of the four limbs. The author treated 34 cases of cerebral palsy with the scalp acupuncture of Doctor TANG Song-yan. The report is now as follows.

  2. Characteristics of children with hip displacement in cerebral palsy

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    Wagner Philippe

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hip dislocation in children with cerebral palsy (CP is a common and severe problem. The dislocation can be avoided, by screening and preventive treatment of children with hips at risk. The aim of this study was to analyse the characteristics of children with CP who develop hip displacement, in order to optimise a hip surveillance programme. Methods In a total population of children with CP a standardised clinical and radiological follow-up of the hips was carried out as a part of a hip prevention programme. The present study is based on 212 children followed until 9–16 years of age. Results Of the 212 children, 38 (18% developed displacement with Migration Percentage (MP >40% and further 19 (9% MP between 33 and 39%. Mean age at first registration of hip displacement was 4 years, but some hips showed MP > 40% already at two years of age. The passive range of hip motion at the time of first registration of hip displacement did not differ significantly from the findings in hips without displacement. The risk of hip displacement varied according to CP-subtype, from 0% in children with pure ataxia to 79% in children with spastic tetraplegia. The risk of displacement (MP > 40% was directly related to the level of gross motor function, classified according to the gross motor function classification system, GMFCS, from 0% in children in GMFCS level I to 64% in GMFCS level V. Conclusion Hip displacement in CP often occurs already at 2–3 years of age. Range of motion is a poor indicator of hips at risk. Thus early identification and early radiographic examination of children at risk is of great importance. The risk of hip displacement varies according to both CP-subtype and GMFCS. It is sometimes not possible to determine subtype before 4 years of age, and at present several definitions and classification systems are used. GMFCS is valid and reliable from 2 years of age, and it is internationally accepted. We recommend a hip

  3. A Multivariate Model of Determinants of Change in Gross-Motor Abilities and Engagement in Self-Care and Play of Young Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, Lisa A.; Palisano, Robert J.; Bartlett, Doreen J.; McCoy, Sarah Westcott

    2011-01-01

    A multivariate model of determinants of change in gross-motor ability and engagement in self-care and play provides physical and occupational therapists a framework for decisions on interventions and supports for young children with cerebral palsy and their families. Aspects of the child, family ecology, and rehabilitation and community services…

  4. Parent-reported quality of life of children with cerebral palsy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnaud, Catherine; White-Koning, Melanie; I. Michelsen, Susan

    2008-01-01

    : The parental response rates were >93% for all domains except one. Gross motor function and IQ level were found to be associated independently with quality of life in most domains. However, greater severity of impairment was not always associated with poorer quality of life; in the moods and emotions, self-perception......, social acceptance, and school environment domains, less severely impaired children were more likely to have poor quality of life. Pain was associated with poor quality of life in the physical and psychological well-being and self-perception domains. Parents with higher levels of stress were more likely......OBJECTIVE: The goal was to determine whether the type and severity of the child's impairments and the family's psychosocial, social, and economic characteristics influence parent-reported child quality of life across the spectrum of severity of cerebral palsy. METHODS: Our population-based, cross...

  5. Mutation in the AP4M1 Gene Provides a Model for Neuroaxonal Injury in Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.M. Verkerk (Annemieke); R. Schot (Rachel); B. Dumee (Belinda); K. Schellekens (Karlijn); S.M.A. Swagemakers (Sigrid); A.M. Bertoli Avella (Aida); M. Leguin (Maarten); J. Dudink (Jeroen); P. Govaert (Paul); A.L. van Zwol (Arjen); J. Hirst (Jennifer); M.W. Wessels (Marja); C.E. Catsman-Berrevoets (Coriene); F.W. Verheijen (Frans); E. de Graaff (Esther); I.F.M. de Coo (René); J.M. Kros (Johan); R. Willemsen (Rob); P.J. Willems (Patrick); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); G.M.S. Mancini (Grazia)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCerebral palsy due to perinatal injury to cerebral white matter is usually not caused by genetic mutations, but by ischemia and/or inflammation. Here, we describe an autosomal-recessive type of tetraplegic cerebral palsy with mental retardation, reduction of cerebral white matter, and at

  6. Animal Models of Cerebral Palsy: Hypoxic Brain Injury in the Newborn

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    Mark Daniel WILSON

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Wilson MD. Animal Models of Cerebral Palsy: Hypoxic Brain Injury in the Newborn. Iran J Child Neurol. Spring2015; 9(2:9-16.AbstractObjectiveHypoxic insults are implicated in the spectrum of fetal disorders, including cerebral palsy (CP. In view of the major contribution of intrapartum risk factors and prematurity to subsequent neurological morbidity and mortality in humans, this study aimed to clarify the pathophysiology of brain injury, especially periventricular white matter damage (WMD, that occur in utero to the immature and near-term fetal CNS.Materials & MethodsAn evaluation of the resulting neurological and behavioural phenotype in the newborn was performed by utilising a battery of neurobehavioural tests, including the Morris water-maze and the open-field test, followed by cerebral MRI and histopathology.ResultsThis study used a murine model to examine the deleterious effects of WMD brought about by cerebral hypoxia-ischemia (HI and the characteristic features of CP in mice. Murine models have proven themselves valuable in the area of experimental neuroscience.Conclusion Hypoxia-treated mice were observed to demonstrate a significant neurofunctional deficit compared with sham mice on two behavioral measures. Indeed, different brain regions, including the sensorimotor cortex, the striatum, and the hippocampus were noticeably damaged after HI insult, as determined by both MRI and histopathology. These results, albeit qualitative in nature, appear to support the pre-existing finding that the long-term neurofunctional outcome in animal subjects with CP is strongly associated with the anatomical extent and pattern of cerebral damage as determined by both delayed neuroimaging and histopathology.

  7. Use of Botulinum toxin in 55 children with cerebral palsy

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    Mohammadi M

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A (BTA inhibits presynaptic release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction and has reportedly been successful in the treatment of spastic disorders.To evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin on cerebral palsied children with spastic or mixed type of the disease, especially those patiens having spasticity as a cardinal symptom without joint contracture, we designed the following study. Ninety-one cases (55 of referred patients to pediatic Neurology outpatient clinics of children’s Medical Center were given BTA injections in affected muscles of the lower limb. They were reevaluating 3 to 5 weeks and 3 months later for type of walking and range of affected joints’ movement. The study showed a clinically significant gait improvement in 71.2% of patients (P<0.0005 and also an overall increased range of motion in affected limbs after BTA injection (P<0.04. Side effects occurred only in two cases as transient generalized weakness, gent recurvatum and ptosis. Drug effectiveness was time-limited, lasting abot 3 months in all patients ( a golden time for rehabilitation therapists to improve the patients’ condition. Overall, BTA has improved both the type of walking as well as the range of joints motion in our patients. So its’ administration is suggested in cerebral palsied children if the spasticity is a major and disabling sign

  8. Developmental Coordination Disorder and cerebral palsy: categories or a continuum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearsall-Jones, Jillian G; Piek, Jan P; Levy, Florence

    2010-10-01

    Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is a movement disorder affecting between 1.7% and 6% of children aged 5-11 years. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Text Revision codes DCD as an Axis I Clinical Disorder. If there is neurological involvement, as is the case for cerebral palsy, the movement disorder would be coded as an Axis III General Medical Condition. What little is known of the aetiology of DCD implicates neurological involvement. In a previous co-twin control study of monozygotic twins concordant and discordant for DCD, seven of the nine twins who met criteria for DCD on the McCarron Assessment of Neuromuscular Development experienced perinatal oxygen perfusion problems, while another experienced prenatal complications. This supported findings in an earlier study of a relationship between environmental factors and DCD, and strengthened the hypothesis that DCD and cerebral palsy have similar causal pathways and may fall on a continuum of movement disorder rather than being discrete categories. In the present paper, this hypothesis is tested by application of the nine principles identified by Sir Austin Bradford Hill as important when considering observed associations between two variables. Implications for prevention, clinical intervention, policy, and classification systems are discussed.

  9. Computerized tomographic studies in cerebral palsy. Analysis of 200 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugie, Y. (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1981-09-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings in 200 children with cerebral palsy (CP) were analysed from the viewpoint of clinical manifestations, disease complications and etiological factors. CT scans of 135 cases (67.5%) were found to be abnormal and there were 14 (7%) borderline cases. The major abnormality found on CT scans was cerebral atrophy. Other important changes included focal or diffuse low density area in the brain tissue, congenital malformation, and cerebellar atrophy. From the clinical point of view, a large number of patients with spastic tetraplegia and spastic diplegia showed highly abnormal CT scans. On the other hand, in patients with spastic monoplegia, spastic paraplegia, and athetotic type, CT findings were normal or revealed only minor cerebral atrophy. Most children showing asymmetric clinical symptoms had corresponding asymmetric CT abnormalities which included ventricular enlargement, low density area in the brain tissue, and hemispherical volume. There was a significant correlation between the severity of physical impairment and the extent of CT abnormalities. Severely affected children had grossly abnormal CT scans such as hydranencephaly, polycystic change, and extensive cerebral atrophy. In the patients complicated with epilepsy, the incidence and severity of abnormal CT were higher than those of non-epileptic patients. Mentally retarded patients had variable enlargement of the subarachnoidal space depending on the severity of their mental retardation. Patients with suspected postnatal etiology also had high incidence of severe CT abnormality. CT scan is a valuable tool for evaluating patients with CP and in some cases, possible etiology of the disease may be discovered.

  10. Surgical treatment of equinus foot deformity in children with cerebral palsy (review

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    Krasnov A.S.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The review presents data about etiology and pathogenesis of cerebral palsy in children and its clinical manifestations. The effectiveness analysis of main surgical methods to correct equinus foot deformity in children with cerebral palsy has been conducted. The article comes to conclusion that at present surgical methods eliminating all pathologic deformity units are incompletely presented. In this connection high recurrence frequency after using traditional treatment methods is registered. Development of surgical intervention adequate to pathologic foot state in children with cerebral palsy is a perspective direction in treatment of given category of patients

  11. Reliability and validity of the C-BiLLT: a new instrument to assess comprehension of spoken language in young children with cerebral palsy and complex communication needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geytenbeek, Joke J; Mokkink, Lidwine B; Knol, Dirk L; Vermeulen, R Jeroen; Oostrom, Kim J

    2014-09-01

    In clinical practice, a variety of diagnostic tests are available to assess a child's comprehension of spoken language. However, none of these tests have been designed specifically for use with children who have severe motor impairments and who experience severe difficulty when using speech to communicate. This article describes the process of investigating the reliability and validity of the Computer-Based Instrument for Low Motor Language Testing (C-BiLLT), which was specifically developed to assess spoken Dutch language comprehension in children with cerebral palsy and complex communication needs. The study included 806 children with typical development, and 87 nonspeaking children with cerebral palsy and complex communication needs, and was designed to provide information on the psychometric qualities of the C-BiLLT. The potential utility of the C-BiLLT as a measure of spoken Dutch language comprehension abilities for children with cerebral palsy and complex communication needs is discussed.

  12. Family life of caregivers: A descriptive study of disruption of family activities, leisures and interaction of caregivers of children with cerebral palsy

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    Ramita Sardana

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: The purpose of this research was to study family life of caregivers who provide primary care to children with Cerebral Palsy. Aim: To study the family activities, leisure and interaction of caregivers of children with Cerebral Palsy. Settings and Design: Study was conducted in Dept. of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, AIIMS, New Delhi. Methods and Material: Study sample consisted of 65 primary caregivers of children with Cerebral Palsy. Questionnaires about family activities, leisure and interaction from Family burden interview schedule were used. Descriptive statistics and multiple regressions were used for data analysis. Results: All three domains i.e. disruption of routine family activities, family leisure and family interaction were found to be disrupted in caregivers of children with Cerebral Palsy. Various factors like education of caregiver, total children, family income, duration of caregiving, speech disturbance in child, seizures and mental retardation were found to effect scores of disruption of family activities, leisure and interaction. Conclusions: Caregivers of children with Cerebral palsy experience disruption of family activities, leisure and interaction. For proper care of children caregiver’s family life should be taken care of. Healthcare providers should enhance support networks to encourage and promote normal family activities, leisure and interactions of caregivers.

  13. The impact of Kinesio taping technique on children with cerebral palsy

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    Alireza Shamsoddini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is the most common movement disorder in children that is associated with life-long disability and multiple impairments. The clinical manifestations of CP vary among children. CP is accompanied by a wide range of problems and has a broad spectrum. Children with CP demonstrate poor fine and dross motor function due to psychomotor disturbances. Early rehabilitation programs are essential for children with CP and should be appropriate for the age and functional condition of the patients. Kinesio taping (KT technique is a relatively new technique applied in rehabilitation programs of CP. This article reviews the effects of KT techniques on improving motor skills in children with CP. In this study, we used keywords "cerebral palsy, Kinesio Tape, KT and Taping" in the national and international electronic databases between 1999 and 2016. Out of the 43 articles obtained, 21 studies met the inclusion criteria. There are several different applications about KT technique in children with CP. Review of the literature demonstrated that the impact of this technique on gross and fine motor function and dynamic activities is more effective than postural and static activities. Also this technique has more effectiveness in the child at higher developmental and motor stages. The majority of consistent findings showed that KT technique as part of a multimodal therapy program can be effective in the rehabilitation of children with CP to improve motor function and dynamic activities especially in higher developmental and motor stages.

  14. Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis in a Child with Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome

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    L. Ghedira Besbes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotic syndrome (NS is a renal disorder characterized by heavy proteinuria, hypoalbuninemia, edema and hypercholesterolemia. Nephrotic syndrome in children is known to be associated with an hypercoagulable state and thromboembolic complications. However cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT is very rare. Here we report a seven-year-old child with steroid-dependent idopathic nephrotic syndrome resulting from a minimal change disease, developed multiple cerebral sinovenous thrombosis, presenting with headache, left sixth nerve palsy, and papilledema. The diagnosis of CSVT was established by cranial computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance angiography. He gradually recovered after anticoagulant therapy. CSVT is very rare in nephrotic children. The diagnosis of CSVT should be considered in any patient with nephrotic syndrome who develops neurologic symptoms. This report highlights the importance of suspecting and recognizing this potentially life threatening complication and initiating early treatment.

  15. Uso de órtese para abdução do polegar no desempenho funcional de criança portadora de paralisia cerebral: estudo de caso único Use of abduction thumb orthosis in functional performance of a child with cerebral palsy: a single-subject study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana M. Valladão N. Rodrigues

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: documentar o impacto do uso da órtese de abdução do polegar no desempenho funcional de uma criança hemiparética com leve espasticidade. MÉTODOS: foi utilizado um desenho experimental de caso-único do tipo AB. A fase A consistiu na coleta de dados durante um período sem intervenção (condição controle. A fase B incluiu o uso de órtese de abdução do polegar como procedimento terapêutico associado ao atendimento de terapia ocupacional tradicional. A fase A teve a duração de seis semanas e a fase subseqüente de oito semanas. A criança foi avaliada semanalmente quanto à amplitude ativa de movimento de extensão e flexão de punho, abdução e oponência do polegar e quanto à função manual. A análise dos dados foi realizada através dos métodos estatísticos Celeration Line e Banda de Dois Desvios-Padrão, assim como da Análise Visual. RESULTADOS: a criança apresentou melhora significativa na amplitude de movimento do punho e polegar (ADM ativa. Com relação à função manual observou-se redução do tempo para realização das tarefas, porém não significativa, exceto para a tarefa de empilhar blocos. CONCLUSÕES: os resultados sugerem que o uso da órtese de abdução do polegar pode ser útil no tratamento de crianças com paralisia cerebral espástica para a melhoria da ADM ativa da mão, podendo ser utilizada como adjuvante a outras terapêuticas.OBJECTIVE: to investigate the impact of a thumb abduction orthosis on functional skills of a child with hemiparetic cerebral palsy and mild spasticity. METHODS: an AB single-subject design was used in this study. Baseline A consisted of data collected during a period without intervention (control conditions. The intervention phase B included the use of a thumb abduction orthosis in association with traditional occupational therapy. The baseline lasted six weeks and the intervention period eight weeks. Assessments were performed once a week throughout the study and

  16. Paralisia cerebral, novas perspectivas terapêuticas Cerebral palsy, new therapeutic possibilities

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    Newra Tellechea Rotta

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: a revisão da paralisia cerebral tem como objetivo oferecer ao pediatra informações atualizadas sobre o diagnóstico e tratamento. Fontes dos dados: foram utilizados dados de revisão bibliográfica não sistematizada e da experiência no atendimento dos pacientes da Unidade de Neurologia do Serviço de Pediatria do HCPA-UFRGS. Síntese dos dados: o diagnóstico e tratamento da paralisia cerebral é multidisciplinar. Ao lado do sintoma principal motor, estão os sintomas associados que requerem igual atenção. Os exames de neuroimagem são importantes para melhor localizar a lesão, e mostrar sua extensão e características. O EEG auxilia no diagnóstico das epilepsias associadas. O tratamento principal é fisioterápico, auxiliado pelo tratamento da espasticidade, com antiespásticos orais, ou com toxina botulínica injetável. O tratamento de epilepsia secundária varia de acordo com o tipo de crise. Conclusões: o pediatra é o primeiro médico a entrar em contato com a criança com paralisia cerebral, e deve estar apto para reconhecer precocemente os desvios do desenvolvimento, orientar o manejo e, dentro das possibilidades e necessidades, encaminhar ao especialista.Objective: to provide pediatrician with updated information about diagnoses and treatment of cerebral palsy. This articles aims at supplying pediatricians with tools that will help them diagnose and treat cerebral palsy. Sources: non-systematic review of literature combined with personal experience at the Neurology Unit of Pediatrics Service of Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre - Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Summary of the findings: the cerebral palsy diagnosis and treatment are based on multidisciplinary clinical exam, EEG, CT and MR. Conclusions: pediatricians are the first physician that see the patient with cerebral palsy. Thus, they should be able to diagnose an treat it.

  17. 脑瘫儿童生存质量评价量表的修订与试用%Primary Application and Revision of Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaire for Children (CP QOL-Child) for Children with CP in Shanxi Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳平; 张洪才; 郭新志; 曲成毅

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To import in and revise the cerebral palsy quality of life questionnaire for children (CP-QOL-child), and to provide the basic evidence for the evaluation of quality of life of children with cerebral palsy and for the evaluation of the rehabilitation effect. Methods: The questionnaire was translated exactly and revised on the basis of the Chinese basic condition. Twenty-seven children with cerebral palsy (4-9 years old) in Shanxi rehabilitation hospital for cerebral palsy were analyzed. The reliability of the questionnaire was tested by Cronbach's alpha coefficient and half-split coefficient. The validity of the questionnaire was tested by the relation coefficient of areas with the items and of areas each other. The data were inputted and analyze by SPSS. 13.0. Results: The cronbach's alpha coefficient of the questionnaire revised was 0. 916. The cronbach's alpha coefficient of every area was 0. 759-0. 889. The half-split coefficient of the questionnaire revised was 0. 690. The half-split coefficient of every area was 0. 667-0. 899. The relation coefficient of areas with the items was 0. 452-0. 888. The relation coefficient of areas with each other was 0.18-0. 62. The score of social wellbeing and acceptance was 71.06± 12.59. The score of functioning was 59.76±14.28. The score of participation and physical health was 62.64±13.34. The score of emotion wellbeing and self esteem was 65. 12±17.30. The score of participation and physical health with access for services was 49. 70± 15. 18. The score of pain and impact of disability was 63. 60 ±21.24. The score of family health was 46. 64±19.30. Conclusion: The revised native CP QOL-child has better satisfactory validities and reliabilities. The score of areas of social wellbeing and acceptance, functioning and family health of children with cerebral palsy in Shanxi rehabilitation hospital for cerebral palsy is lower.%目的:引进并修订脑瘫儿童生存质量评价量表(CP QOL-Child),为分析和

  18. Bedtime diazepam enhances well-being in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Anna; Mathew, M C

    2005-01-01

    In work with children with cerebral palsy at Ashirvad, Child Development and Research Centre, Chennai, India, the authors were confronted with fretful children who resisted any attempt to mobilize their limbs due to hypertonia and muscle spasm. It was found that administering a bedtime dose of diazepam to reduce hypertonia and muscle spasm alongside passive stretching exercises significantly improved the behaviour of the child. There was significant improvement in the well-being of the child during the activities of daily living and this reduced the family's burden of caring for the child. In this double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, each child received a bedtime dose of diazepam or placebo. The bedtime diazepam relaxed the muscles and this made the passive stretching easy and the movements sustained the muscle relaxation during the day. There were fewer unwarranted crying spells during the day and less wakefulness during the night. The adverse effect of day time sedation was not observed with the use of a single dose of diazepam at bedtime.

  19. Rehabilitation of adolescent patients with cerebral palsy by means of physical culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vindiuk P.A.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It is researched the effect of exercise in the promptness with mobile games on the power supply of the body of adolescents with cerebral palsy. The study involved 16 adolescent schoolchildren with spastic forms of cerebral palsy of varying severity. In order to determine their level of functional training has been used S.A. Dushanina's multifactor express-diagnostics. It is shown indications of the possibility of multi-factor for the rapid diagnosis of this group. It is established that the lessons of physical culture, which includes a specially organized outdoor games, elements of switch room training and training on cycling performance of functional contribute to the growth of training and have a positive effect on the body of adolescents with cerebral palsy as a whole. Aim of work - to estimate influence of employments a physical culture on energy-supply of organism of teenagers with cerebral palsy.

  20. Differences in standing balance between patients with diplegic and hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Valeska Gatica; Rebolledo, Guillermo Méndez; Muñoz, Eduardo Guzman; Cortés, Natalia Ibarra; Gaete, Caterine Berrios; Delgado, Carlos Manterola

    2013-09-15

    Maintaining standing postural balance is important for walking and handling abilities in patients with cerebral palsy. This study included 23 patients with cerebral palsy (seven with spastic diplegia and 16 with spastic hemiplegia), aged from 7 to 16 years of age. Standing posture balance measurements were performed using an AMTI model OR6-7 force platform with the eyes open and closed. Patients with diplegic cerebral palsy exhibited greater center of pressure displacement areas with the eyes open and greater center of pressure sway in the medial-lateral direction with the eyes open and closed compared with hemiplegic patients. Thus, diplegic patients exhibited weaker postural balance control ability and less standing stability compared with hemiplegic cerebral palsy patients.

  1. Therapeutic Potential of Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Transplantation for Cerebral Palsy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy is the most common motor disability in childhood. In current paper, we first report our clinical data regarding administration of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs transplantation in treatment of cerebral palsy. A 5-year-old girl with cerebral palsy was treated with multiple times of intravenous and intrathecal administration of MSCs derived from her young sister and was followed up for 28 months. The gross motor dysfunction was improved. Other benefits included enhanced immunity, increased physical strength, and adjusted speech and comprehension. Temporary low-grade fever was the only side effect during the treatment. MSCs may be a safe and effective therapy to improve symptoms in children with cerebral palsy.

  2. Cramped synchronized general movements in preterm infants as an early marker for cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, F; Cioni, G; Einspieler, C; Roversi, MF; Bos, AF; Paolicelli, PB; Ranzi, A; Prechtl, HFR

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain whether specific abnormalities (ie, cramped synchronized general movements [GMs]) can predict cerebral palsy and the severity of later motor impairment in preterm infants affected by brain lesions. Design: Traditional neurological examination was performed, and GMs were seria

  3. Predictors of reading comprehension in children with cerebral palsy and typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbell, Shana; Donders, Jacobus; Van Tubbergen, Marie; Warschausky, Seth

    2010-01-01

    Predictors of reading comprehension were evaluated in 41 children with cerebral palsy and 74 typically developing children between the ages of 6 and 12 years. Regression analyses were conducted to determine the relative contributions of measures of phonemic awareness, receptive vocabulary, and general reasoning to variance in reading comprehension. All three independent variables were statistically significant predictors of reading comprehension in both groups of participants. The impact of phonemic awareness on reading comprehension was moderated by age, but only in the typically developing group. Within the group with cerebral palsy, there was an indirect effect of functional expressive ability on reading comprehension, mediated by phonemic awareness. It is concluded that largely the same variables predict reading comprehension in children with cerebral palsy as in typically developing children, but that children with cerebral palsy continue to rely on phonological processing for a more protracted period of time.

  4. Longitudinal Association Between Gross Motor Capacity and Neuromusculoskeletal Function in Children and Youth With Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Rimke C.; Becher, Jules G.; Voorman, Jeanine M.; Gorter, Jan Willem; van Eck, Mirjam; van Meeteren, Jetty; Smits, Dirk Wouter; Twisk, Jos W.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine associations over longitudinal measurements between neuromusculoskeletal function and gross motor capacity in children and youth with cerebral palsy (CP). Design: A prospective cohort study. Setting: Rehabilitation departments of university medical centers and rehabilitations c

  5. Longitudinal Association Between Gross Motor Capacity and Neuromusculoskeletal Function in Children and Youth With Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Rimke C.; Becher, Jules G.; Voorman, Jeanine M.; Gorter, Jan Willem; van Eck, Mirjam; van Meeteren, Jetty; Smits, Dirk Wouter; Twisk, Jos W.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; van Schie, P. E M; Schuengel, C.; Ketelaar, M.; Lindeman, E.; Jongmans, M.; Roebroeck, M. E.; Tan, S. S.; Wiegerink, D. J H G; Reinders-Messelink, H. A.; Verheijden, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine associations over longitudinal measurements between neuromusculoskeletal function and gross motor capacity in children and youth with cerebral palsy (CP). Design A prospective cohort study. Setting Rehabilitation departments of university medical centers and rehabilitations cent

  6. Differences in standing balance between patients with diplegic and hemiplegic cerebral palsy*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valeska Gatica Rojas; Guillermo Mndez Rebolledo; Eduardo Guzman Muoz; Natalia Ibarra Corts; Caterine Berrios Gaete; Carlos Manterola Delgado

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining standing postural balance is important for walking and handling abilities in patients with cerebral palsy. This study included 23 patients with cerebral palsy (seven with spastic diplegia and 16 with spastic hemiplegia), aged from 7 to 16 years of age. Standing posture balance measure-ments were performed using an AMTI model OR6-7 force platform with the eyes open and closed. Patients with diplegic cerebral palsy exhibited greater center of pressure displacement areas with the eyes open and greater center of pressure sway in the medial-lateral direction with the eyes open and closed compared with hemiplegic patients. Thus, diplegic patients exhibited weaker postural balance control ability and less standing stability compared with hemiplegic cerebral palsy patients.

  7. Gait changes following myofascial structural integration (Rolfing) observed in 2 children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Alexis B; Price, Karen S; Loi, Elizabeth C; Buysse, Christina A; Jaramillo, Theresa M; Pico, Elaine L; Feldman, Heidi M

    2014-10-01

    Children with spastic cerebral palsy experience difficulty with ambulation. Structural changes in muscle and fascia may play a role in abnormal gait. Myofascial structural integration (Rolfing) is a manual therapy that manipulates muscle and soft tissues to loosen fascia layers, reposition muscles, and facilitate alignment. This study aimed to document (1) gait characteristics of 2 children with cerebral palsy and (2) effects of myofascial structural integration on their gait. Children received 3 months of weekly therapy sessions by an experienced practitioner. Gait parameters were recorded at baseline and after treatment using an electronic walkway. Children with cerebral palsy demonstrated abnormal velocity and cadence, decreased step length and single support times, and increased double support time. After treatment, both children demonstrated improvement for 3 months in cadence and double support time. The objective gait analyses demonstrated temporary improvements after myofascial structural integration in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

  8. Pilot study of a targeted dance class for physical rehabilitation in children with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Citlali López-Ortiz; Tara Egan; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This pilot study evaluates the effects of a targeted dance class utilizing classical ballet principles for rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy on balance and upper extremity control. Methods: Twelve children with cerebral palsy (ages 7–15 years) with Gross Motor Function Classification scores II–IV participated in this study and were assigned to either a control group or targeted dance class group. Targeted dance class group participated in 1-h classes three times per...

  9. Correction of vegetative-vascular regulation in cerebral palsy by means of sports games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucherov D.S.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The peculiarities of the physical rehabilitation of sports facilities aimed at correcting the condition of vegetative-vascular regulation of children with cerebral palsy at the age of 11-13 years. The results of heart rate variability. The positive effects of the application of physical rehabilitation with elements of sports in children with cerebral palsy, effective changes in the state of vegetative-vascular regulation and improvement of cardiac regulation.

  10. Reduction of pain sensitivity after somatosensory therapy in adults with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Inmaculada eRiquelme; Anna eZamorano; Pedro eMontoya

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Pain and deficits in somatosensory processing seem to play a relevant role in cerebral palsy (CP). Rehabilitation techniques based on neuroplasticity mechanisms may induce powerful changes in the organization of the primary somatosensory cortex and have been proved to reduce levels of pain and discomfort in neurological pathologies. However, little is known about the efficacy of such interventions for pain sensitivity in CP individuals. Methods. Adults with cerebral palsy participa...

  11. Children with cerebral palsy do not achieve healthy physical activity levels

    OpenAIRE

    Bratteby Tollerz, L. U.; Forslund, A. H.; Olsson, R. M.; Lidström, Helene; Holmback, U.

    2015-01-01

    AimThis study compared daily activity energy expenditure (AEE) in children with cerebral palsy with a control group and investigated whether the children achieved healthy levels of physical activity. MethodsWe enrolled eight children with bilateral cerebral palsy, from eight to 10years of age, and a group of controls matched for age and gender. For three days, physical activity was simultaneously measured by accelerometers and self-reports using a diary. The daily AEE results were compared be...

  12. Effects of interactive games on motor performance in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    AlSaif,Amer A.; Alsenany, Samira

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Motor control and muscle strength impairments are the prime reasons for motor behavior disorders in children with spastic cerebral palsy. These impairments lead to histological changes in muscle growth and the learning of motor skills. Therefore, such children experience reduced muscle force generation and decreased muscle flexibility. We investigated the effect of training with Nintendo Wii Fit games on motor performance in children with spastic cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Method...

  13. Effect of physical therapy frequency on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Eun-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study attempted to investigate the effect of physical therapy frequency based on neurodevelopmental therapy on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] The study sample included 161 children with cerebral palsy who attended a convalescent or rehabilitation center for disabled individuals or a special school for children with physical disabilities in South Korea. Gross Motor Function Measure data were collected according to physical therapy fr...

  14. A prospective, longitudinal study of growth, nutrition and sedentary behaviour in young children with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Weir Kelly A; Tweedy Sean M; Boyd Roslyn N; Bell Kristie L; Stevenson Richard D; Davies Peter SW

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in childhood, occurring in one in 500 children. It is caused by a static brain lesion in the neonatal period leading to a range of activity limitations. Oral motor and swallowing dysfunction, poor nutritional status and poor growth are reported frequently in young children with cerebral palsy and may impact detrimentally on physical and cognitive development, health care utilisation, participation and quality o...

  15. Growth, Nutritional Status, and Feeding Difficulties in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlseng, Magnus Odin

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause of chronic motor disability in childhood, and is caused by an early injury affecting the parts of the brain responsible for body movement and control. In addition to motor problems, children with CP often struggle with conditions such as epilepsy, chronic pain, feeding difficulties, and poor growth. Despite extensive research, the cause of a child’s cerebral palsy is often unknown, but for most children the brain injury has occurred ...

  16. Effects of Prolonged Standing on Gait in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Yasser; Lovelace-Chandler, Venita; Zabel, Reta J.; McMillan, Amy Gross

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of prolonged standing on gait characteristics in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Six children with spastic cerebral palsy participated in this study with an average age of 6.5 years (SD = 2.5, range = 4.0-9.8 years). A reverse baseline design (A-B-A) was used over a 9-week period. During…

  17. Exercise and Physical Activity Recommendations for People with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark D.; Balemans, Astrid C.J.; Hurvitz, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) and its promotion, as well as the avoidance of sedentary behaviour play important roles in health promotion and prevention of lifestyle-related diseases. Guidelines for typically developing youth and adults published by the World Health Organization and American College of Sports Medicine are available. However, detailed recommendations for PA and sedentary behaviour have not been established for children, adolescents and adults with cerebral palsy (CP). This paper presents the first CP-specific PA and exercise recommendations. The recommendations are based on (1) a comprehensive review and analysis of the literature, (2) expert opinion and (3) extensive clinical experience. The evidence supporting these recommendations are based on randomized controlled trials and observational studies involving children, adolescents and adults with CP, and buttressed by the previous guidelines for the general population. These recommendations may be used to guide healthcare providers on exercise and daily PA prescription for individuals with CP. PMID:26853808

  18. Botulinum Toxin Treatment for Limb Spasticity in Childhood Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Vito; Testa, Gianluca; Restivo, Domenico A.; Cannavò, Luca; Condorelli, Giuseppe; Portinaro, Nicola M.; Sessa, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    CP is the most common cause of chronic disability in childhood occurring in 2–2.5/1000 births. It is a severe disorder and a significant number of patients present cognitive delay and difficulty in walking. The use of botulinum toxin (BTX) has become a popular treatment for CP especially for spastic and dystonic muscles while avoiding deformity and pain. Moreover, the combination of physiotherapy, casting, orthotics and injection of BTX may delay or decrease the need for surgical intervention while reserving single-event, multi-level surgery for fixed musculotendinous contractures and bony deformities in older children. This report highlights the utility of BTX in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. We include techniques for administration, side effects, and possible resistance as well as specific use in the upper and lower limbs muscles. PMID:26924985

  19. Incidence of inguinal hernia in children with congenital cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, J I; Latocha, J E

    1990-01-01

    The incidence of inguinal hernia among 247 children with cerebral palsy was ascertained. During the first year of life, 20 of the 153 boys developed hernia, as did one of the 94 girls. Among boys with birthweights of 1000 to 2000g the incidence was 31 per cent, which is twice the rate for normal...... children. The incidence among boys with birthweights greater than 2000g was 8 per cent. A comparison group could not be found, but this incidence appears to be excessive, considering the reported normal incidence of 1 to 4 per cent in boys. The authors recommend routine examination for inguinal hernia......, particularly for boys with birthweights less than 2000g and with spastic tetraplegia. Conversely, one should be alert to the possibility of concurrent spasticity in preterm males with inguinal hernia....

  20. Principles of Bobath neuro-developmental therapy in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimont, L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the basics of Bobath Neurodevelopment Therapy (NDT) for the rehabilitation of patients with cerebral palsy, based on the fundamentals of neurophysiology. Two factors are continually stressed in therapy: first, postural tension, whose quality provides the foundation for the development of motor coordination, both normal and pathological, and plays a role in shaping the mechanism of the normal postural reflex; and secondly, the impact of damage to the central nervous system on the process of its growth and development. The practical application of the theoretical assumptions includes the use of inhibition, facilitation, and stimulation by key points of control, preparatory to evoking more nearly normal motor responses.

  1. Botulinum toxin treatment for limb spasticity in childhood cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito ePavone

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CP is the most common cause of chronic disability in childhood occurring in 2 to 2.5/1000 births. It is a severe disorder and a significant number of patients present cognitive delay and difficulty in walking. The use of botulinum toxin (BTX has become a popular treatment for CP especially for spastic and dystonic muscles while avoiding deformity and pain. Moreover, the combination of physiotherapy, casting, orthotics and injection of BTX may delay or decrease the need for surgical intervention while reserving single-event, multi-level surgery for fixed musculotendinous contractures and bony deformities in older children. This report highlights the utility of BTX in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. We include techniques for administration, side effects and possible resistance as well as specific use in the upper and lower limbs muscles

  2. Temporomandibular Joint Assesment in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özden Canbay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aim of this study was to functionally evaluate temporomandibular joint (TMJ in children with Cerebral palsy (CP. Materials and Methods: After recording the individual’s demographic information, questions about TMJ stiffness, presence of saliva, nutrition, oral splint, pain, respiratory system, history of epilepsy, chewing problems and disease were asked to the individuals and/or parents. Mandibular mobility was evaluated with length measurement and neck muscle strength was evaluated with manual muscle test. Results: It was found that 15% individuals with CP who participated in the study, had jaw sensitivity, stiffness and locked up, 30% had headache, 25 % had bruxism, 15 %had nail biting and 25 % had otalgia. Swallowing problems were seen majorly in boys than girls (p<0.05. Conclusions: It was seen that children with CP have TMJ problems. Literature on this area is limited so it was thought that research is needed about prevention and treatment of TMJ disorders.

  3. Therapeutic Potential of Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya Purandare

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cerebral palsy (CP is a severe disabling disease with worldwide incidence being 2 to 3 per 1000 live births. CP was considered as a noncurable, nonreparative disorder, but stem cell therapy offers a potential treatment for CP. Objective. The present study evaluates the safety and efficacy of autologous bone-marrow-derived mononuclear cell (BMMNCs transplantation in CP patient. Material and Methods. In the present study, five infusions of autologous stem cells were injected intrathecally. Changes in neurological deficits and improvements in function were assessed using Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS-E&R scale. Results. Significant motor, sensory, cognitive, and speech improvements were observed. Bowel and bladder control has been achieved. On the GMFCS-E&R level, the patient was promoted from grade III to I. Conclusion. In this study, we report that intrathecal infusion of autologous BMMNCs seems to be feasible, effective, and safe with encouraging functional outcome improvements in CP patient.

  4. Extensibility of hip adductors in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lespargot, A; Renaudin, E; Khouri, N; Robert, M

    1994-11-01

    The passive extension of relaxed hip adductor muscles was measured in 20 normal children and 10 children (aged nine to 13 years) with cerebral palsy (CP) by a method that could distinguish between shortening of the muscle body and tendon. No muscle-body contracture occurred in the children with CP during treatment (physiotherapy plus moderate stretching on an apparatus for six hours a day); only the tendons were short. However, four children showed signs of muscle-body contracture after interrupting treatment for six to eight weeks. It is possible that muscle-body contracture can be prevented by non-surgical methods, although tendon shortening can, at present, only be treated surgically.

  5. MR findings of cerebral palsy and clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Ho; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01

    To demonstrate MR findings of cerebral palsy (CP), correlation with clinical findings, and differences between the full-term and pre-term group. Brain MRI of 94 patients with cerebral palsy (CP) were reviewed. The frequency of each MR finding, statistical correlation with clinical findings including type, severity and extent of CP, and differences between the full-term and pre-term group were analyzed. Abnormal MR findings were found in 83 patients(88%), and were as follows : diffuse brain atrophy(30%); periventricular leukomalacia(PVL)(28%); infarction(11%), basal ganglia abnormality(11%); delayed myelination(10%); nonspecific tissue loss or encephalomalacia(9%); and cortical dysplasia(7%). Hemiplegia was the most common condition among patients with infarction, and was found in 80% of this group; diplegia was found in 50% of cases with diffuse brain atrophy, while paraplegia was found in 36% of those with normal MR findings (p < .05). Mild symptoms were dominant in patients with normal MR findings(82%) and in those with infarctions(90%)(p < .05). PVL was the dominant finding in the pre-term group (65%) whereas findings in the full-term group varied; in this group, 38% of MR findings suggested prenatal insults. Possible causative factors were found in 66% of the full-term and 80% of the pre-term group. Perinatal factors were dominant in the pre-term group(81%), whereas prenatal and postnatal factors showed relatively higher frequencies in the full-term group(30% and 24%, respectively). Diffuse brain atrophy and PVL were the most common MR findings. The extent of CP the pre-term correlated well with MR findings. PVL and perinatal factors were dominant in the pre-term group, whereas variable MR findings and relatively higher frequencies of pre- and postnatal factors were found in the full-term group.

  6. Sudden onset odontoid fracture caused by cervical instability in hypotonic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiohama, Tadashi; Fujii, Katsunori; Kitazawa, Katsuhiko; Takahashi, Akiko; Maemoto, Tatsuo; Honda, Akihito

    2013-11-01

    Fractures of the upper cervical spine rarely occur but carry a high rate of mortality and neurological disabilities in children. Although odontoid fractures are commonly caused by high-impact injuries, cerebral palsy children with cervical instability have a risk of developing spinal fractures even from mild trauma. We herein present the first case of an odontoid fracture in a 4-year-old boy with cerebral palsy. He exhibited prominent cervical instability due to hypotonic cerebral palsy from infancy. He suddenly developed acute respiratory failure, which subsequently required mechanical ventilation. Neuroimaging clearly revealed a type-III odontoid fracture accompanied by anterior displacement with compression of the cervical spinal cord. Bone mineral density was prominently decreased probably due to his long-term bedridden status and poor nutritional condition. We subsequently performed posterior internal fixation surgically using an onlay bone graft, resulting in a dramatic improvement in his respiratory failure. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an odontoid fracture caused by cervical instability in hypotonic cerebral palsy. Since cervical instability and decreased bone mineral density are frequently associated with cerebral palsy, odontoid fractures should be cautiously examined in cases of sudden onset respiratory failure and aggravated weakness, especially in hypotonic cerebral palsy patients.

  7. On the Use of Dance as a Rehabilitation Approach for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Single Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán Pascual, Patricia; Mortes Roselló, Esther; Domingo Jacinto, Amparo; Belda Lois, Juan Manuel; Bermejo, Ignacio; Medina, Enric; Barberà Guillem, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) is the most common motor disability in childhood. It is a group of permanent disorders that affect child development causing disorders of movement and posture and activity limitations. The impairment of psychomotor skills of children with Cerebral Palsy is attributed to a permanent alteration occurred in non-progressive brain development of the fetus or nursing infant. Some motor related symptoms can be treated using proper physical therapy. However, one of the biggest problems of the usual physical therapy is adherence to therapy. Ballet can be an alternative or a complement to physiotherapy, with the added attraction of not being part of a to therapy, but a fun activity with the extra reward associated with the realization of an artistic activity. For some years the ballet is used as therapeutically valuable for both children with cerebral palsy: Intensive ballet training can generate changes in the sensorimotor cortex. Ballet is characterized by a complex process of movements that have to be in a musical rhythm (hence have to be precise), in which there is an overall coordination of the muscles. It is also a highly motivating and rewarding activity that allows many children with CP sharing the activities of their peers without special needs. Objective measurements of the Full Port de Bras movement has been chosen as an index of improvement. The results shows progressive improvements of the execution in a single case.

  8. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  9. Genu recurvatum in cerebral palsy--part B: hamstrings are abnormally long in children with cerebral palsy showing knee recurvatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Ernst B; Svehlík, Martin; Steinwender, Gerhard; Saraph, Vinay; Linhart, Wolfgang E

    2010-07-01

    Hyperextension of the knee in stance (knee recurvatum) is a common disorder in patients with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). A group 35 children with CP (47 lower limbs) was divided into two subgroups according to the timing of maximum knee extension during the stance phase of gait. Gait analysis and musculoskeletal modelling data were compared with a control group of 12 normally developing children. We observed no difference in kinematics between the CP groups who showed an equinus position of the foot at initial contact. Both groups showed increased external extensor moments across the knee. The muscle-tendon lengths of the hamstrings were abnormally long at initial contact, and in both recurvatum groups, contracted faster compared with the control group. Surface electromyography revealed prolonged activity of the hamstrings in stance and early activation in swing. Abnormally long hamstrings at initial contact together with equinus position of the foot are the main causes of genu recurvatum in children with CP.

  10. Neuro-Ophthalmological Disorders in Cerebral Palsy: Ophthalmological, Oculomotor, and Visual Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzi, Elisa; Signorini, Sabrina G.; La Piana, Roberta; Bertone, Chiara; Misefari, Walter; Galli, Jessica; Balottin, Umberto; Bianchi, Paolo Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Cerebral visual impairment (CVI) is a disorder caused by damage to the retrogeniculate visual pathways. Cerebral palsy (CP) and CVI share a common origin: 60 to 70% of children with CP also have CVI. We set out to describe visual dysfunction in children with CP. A further aim was to establish whether different types of CP are associated with…

  11. Motor vehicle crashes during pregnancy and cerebral palsy during infancy: a longitudinal cohort analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelmeier, Donald A; Naqib, Faisal; Thiruchelvam, Deva; R Barrett, Jon F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the incidence of cerebral palsy among children born to mothers who had their pregnancy complicated by a motor vehicle crash. Design Retrospective longitudinal cohort analysis of children born from 1 April 2002 to 31 March 2012 in Ontario, Canada. Participants Cases defined as pregnancies complicated by a motor vehicle crash and controls as remaining pregnancies with no crash. Main outcome Subsequent diagnosis of cerebral palsy by age 3 years. Results A total of 1 325 660 newborns were analysed, of whom 7933 were involved in a motor vehicle crash during pregnancy. A total of 2328 were subsequently diagnosed with cerebral palsy, equal to an absolute risk of 1.8 per 1000 newborns. For the entire cohort, motor vehicle crashes correlated with a 29% increased risk of subsequent cerebral palsy that was not statistically significant (95% CI −16 to +110, p=0.274). The increased risk was only significant for those with preterm birth who showed an 89% increased risk of subsequent cerebral palsy associated with a motor vehicle crash (95% CI +7 to +266, p=0.037). No significant increase was apparent for those with a term delivery (95% CI −62 to +79, p=0.510). A propensity score-matched analysis of preterm births (n=4384) yielded a 138% increased relative risk of cerebral palsy associated with a motor vehicle crash (95% CI +27 to +349, p=0.007), equal to an absolute increase of about 10.9 additional cases per 1000 newborns (18.2 vs 7.3, p=0.010). Conclusions Motor vehicle crashes during pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of cerebral palsy among the subgroup of cases with preterm birth. The increase highlights a specific role for traffic safety advice in prenatal care. PMID:27650764

  12. Development of spasticity with age in a total population of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Philippe

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of spasticity with age in children with cerebral palsy (CP has, to our knowledge, not been studied before. In 1994, a register and a health care program for children with CP in southern Sweden were initiated. In the programme the child's muscle tone according to the modified Ashworth scale is measured twice a year until six years of age, then once a year. We have used this data to analyse the development of spasticity with age in a total population of children with cerebral palsy. Methods All measurements of muscle tone in the gastrocnemius-soleus muscle in all children with CP from 0 to 15 years during the period 1995–2006 were analysed. The CP subtypes were classified according to the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe network system. Using these criteria, the study was based on 6218 examinations in 547 children. For the statistical analysis the Ashworth scale was dichotomized. The levels 0–1 were gathered in one category and levels 2–4 in the other. The pattern of development with age was evaluated using piecewise logistic regression in combination with Akaike's An Information Criterion. Results In the total sample the degree of muscle tone increased up to 4 years of age. After 4 years of age the muscle tone decreased each year up to 12 years of age. A similar development was seen when excluding the children operated with selective dorsal rhizotomy, intrathecal baclofen pump or tendo Achilles lengthening. At 4 years of age about 47% of the children had spasticity in their gastro-soleus muscle graded as Ashworth 2–4. After 12 years of age 23% of the children had that level of spasticity. The CP subtypes spastic bilateral and spastic unilateral CP showed the same pattern as the total sample. Children with dyskinetic type of CP showed an increasing muscle tone up to age 6, followed by a decreasing pattern up to age 15. Conclusion In children with CP, the muscle tone as measured with the Ashworth

  13. Novel transcriptional profile in wrist muscles from cerebral palsy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniam Shankar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral palsy (CP is an upper motor neuron disease that results in a progressive movement disorder. Secondary to the neurological insult, muscles from CP patients often become spastic. Spastic muscle is characterized by an increased resistance to stretch, but often develops the further complication of contracture which represents a prominent disability in children with CP. This study's purpose is to characterize alterations of spastic muscle on the transcriptional level. Increased knowledge of spastic muscle may lead to novel therapies to improve the quality of life for children with CP. Method The transcriptional profile of spastic muscles were defined in children with cerebral palsy and compared to control patients using Affymetrix U133A chips. Expression data were verified using quantitative-PCR (QPCR and validated with SDS-PAGE for select genes. Significant genes were determined using a 2 × 2 ANOVA and results required congruence between 3 preprocessing algorithms. Results CP patients clustered independently and 205 genes were significantly altered, covering a range of cellular processes. Placing gene expression in the context of physiological pathways, the results demonstrated that spastic muscle in CP adapts transcriptionally by altering extracellular matrix, fiber type, and myogenic potential. Extracellular matrix adaptations occur primarily in the basal lamina although there is increase in fibrillar collagen components. Fiber type is predominately fast compared to normal muscle as evidenced by contractile gene isoforms and decrease in oxidative metabolic gene transcription, despite a paradoxical increased transcription of slow fiber pathway genes. We also found competing pathways of fiber hypertrophy with an increase in the anabolic IGF1 gene in parallel with a paradoxical increase in myostatin, a gene responsible for stopping muscle growth. We found evidence that excitation-contraction coupling genes are altered in

  14. Determinants of Developmental Gain in Daily Activities in Young Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijsen-Terpstra, Anne J A; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Verschuren, Olaf; Smits, Dirk-Wouter; Jongmans, Marian J; Gorter, Jan Willem

    2014-09-18

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to examine which child and family characteristics at the child's age of 2 years are determinants of development of self-care and mobility activities over a period of 2 years in young children with cerebral palsy (CP). Longitudinal data of 92 children, representing all levels of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), were analyzed. Children's self-care and mobility activities were assessed with the Functional Skills Scale of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory. Development of self-care and mobility activities was related to several child determinants but no family determinants. GMFCS, type of CP, intellectual capacity, and epilepsy were related to the development of self-care and mobility activities, while manual ability and spasticity were related to development of mobility activities. Multivariate analysis indicated that GMFCS and intellectual capacity were the strongest determinants of development of self-care activities, and GMFCS was the strongest determinant of development of mobility activities. The change in self-care and mobility activities was less favorable in severely affected children with severe disability. Knowledge of GMFCS level and intellectual capacity is important in anticipating change over time and goal setting in young children with CP.

  15. 脑性瘫痪的定义、诊断标准及临床分型%Definition, diagnostic criteria and clinic classification of cerebral palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓捷; 唐久来; 马丙祥; 秦炯; 邹丽萍; 王家勤

    2014-01-01

    Base on the definition,classification and diagnostic condition of cerebral palsy published by Pediatrics Neurology Group of Chinese Medical Association in 2005 and Child Rehabilitation Committee of Chinese Rehabilitation Medical Association in 2007.Referencing foreign diagnosis and treatment guidelines for child with cerebral palsy and the current paper report,going through more than once discussion,compiled by Chinese Compiling Committee of Rehabilitation and Treatment Guidelines for Cerebral Palsy so as to guide comprehension of the definition of cerebral palsy,enhance the level of diagnosis and classification of cerebral palsy for clinic doctor and all so acting on international convention.%在2005年中华医学会儿科学分会神经学组和2007年中国康复医学会儿童康复专业委员会制定发表的《小儿脑性瘫痪的定义、分型和诊断条件》的基础上,《中国脑性瘫痪康复治疗指南》编写委员会参考国外有关小儿脑性瘫痪诊疗指南和最新文献报道,多次组织讨论编写.以便更好地指导临床医师对小儿脑性瘫痪定义的理解,提高脑性瘫痪的诊断和分型水平,与国际接轨.

  16. Sociometric status and the attribution of intentions in a sample of adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyer, Anne-Pier; Tessier, Réjean; Nadeau, Line

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To examine how cerebral palsy (CP) and sociometric status at age 10 explain the development of a cognitive bias across two groups of adolescents aged 15. Method Children with CP (N = 60) and without CP (N = 57) are part of a follow-up study. Three categories of sociometric status (popular, average, rejected) were obtained by conducting a class-wide interview in the class of the target children at age 10. At 15 years old, the same children (CP and non-CP) were asked to complete the Home Interview With Child questionnaire measuring a cognitive bias (hostile attribution of intentions (AI)). Results Children with CP, especially girls, were significantly more rejected and less popular than controls at age 10. At age 15, among all participants, sociometric rejected and popular children tended to have a higher percentage of hostile AI than sociometric average children. Conclusions There were no significant results for the combined effect of CP and sociometric status on the development of hostile AI at age 15. However, knowing the risk incurred by children with CP of being socially rejected, attention should be paid in the rehabilitation process to opportunities for social participation to facilitate the development of social competence. Implications for Rehabilitation Level I or II cerebral palsy (CP) is a condition that affects not only motor abilities but also social competence in children. Sociometric status in a group tends to affect the development of the ability to interprete intentions of others during adolescence. Sociometric measures in the class of children with CP could be a useful tool in the rehabilitation process in order to better define social participation opportunities. To improve social participation attempts, rehabilitation interventions should target social initiating skills, flexibility in interpreting peers' behaviours, and ability to react effectively to negative peer treatment.

  17. Stress and social support in caregivers of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyne Kalyane Câmara de Oliveira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to describe the levels of stress and perceived social support for caregivers of children with cerebral palsy (CP, as well as investigate the relationship between stress, social support, and variables related to caregivers, the environment and children, namely: the number of children, education level of caregivers, family income, behavior, and the child’s motor level. This study comprised 50 children with CP between 3 and 7.5 years old, their 50 caregivers, and 25 rehabilitation professionals who care for children in health institutions from the countryside of São Paulo state, Brazil. The following measuring instruments were used: the Gross Motor Function Classification System for Cerebral Palsy, the Lipp’s Inventory of Stress Symptoms in Adults, the Social Support Questionnaire, and a form identifying the participants. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics by the following tests: Chi-square, Fisher exact, Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, and Odds Ratio. The results showed stress among the participating caregivers (66%, with predominance of the resistance phase (93.9% and psychological symptoms (69.7%, low perceived social support for caregivers, concomitant with an adequate satisfaction with the support received, as well as significant relationships of stress versus social support (p = 0.017 and education level versus social support (p = 0.037. The data allow analysis of the relationship between the variables investigated and about the impact of having a child with CP in the family regarding the physical, emotional and psychological well-being of caregivers, besides providing subsidies to think of strategies at different levels of care for families of children with disabilities.

  18. Stem cells for cerebral palsy%干细胞在脑性瘫痪治疗中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金刚; 尹忠民; 闻华

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stem cells under appropriate conditions can differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, which may radically improve neurons loss and glial cell degeneration in cerebral palsy children, thus to improve brain function in children.OBJECTIVE: To retrospectively analyze the effects of stem cells from different sources on cerebral palsy children. METHODS: The first author searched PubMed and Wanfang databases (1992/2011) for articles concerning therapies for cerebral palsy and stem cells from different sources for cerebral palsy. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Neural stem cells for animal nerve injury repair have been a reported, but the clinical application of neural stem cells is still in clinical trials. Although embryonic, bone marrow blood, fetal cord blood, umbilical cord-derived stem cells have been applied to child cerebral palsy in some hospitals and a preliminary efficacy has been obtained, the specific evaluation criteria and long-term effects remain to be further studied.%背景:干细胞在适当条件下可以分化为神经元细胞、星形胶质细胞与少突胶质细胞,可能从根本上改善脑性瘫痪患儿神经元缺失及神经胶质细胞变性,进而改善患儿脑功能障碍,从理论上达到根治目的.目的:回顾性分析不同来源干细胞经不同途径治疗脑性瘫痪患儿的疗效.方法:由第一作者检索1992/2011 PubMed数据及万方数据库有关脑性瘫痪的治疗及不同来源干细胞在治疗脑性瘫痪等方面的文献.结果与结论:神经干细胞在动物神经功能损伤中的修复作用已有很多国内外报道,但目前其在人体的临床应用仍处于临床试验阶段.虽然胚胎、骨髓血、胎儿脐带血、脐带来源的干细胞已在部分医院应用到脑性瘫痪患儿中,并取得了初步的疗效,其具体评定标准及长期疗效仍有待进一步随访、观察.

  19. Rare Presentation of Rhino-Orbital-Cerebral Zygomycosis: Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mohebbi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis afflicts primarily diabetics and immunocompromised individual, but can also occur in normal hosts rarely. We here presented an interesting case of facial nerve palsy and multiple cold abscesses of neck due to rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis in an otherwise healthy man. Although some reports of facial nerve paralysis in conjunction with rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis exist, no case of bilateral complete facial paralysis has been reported in the literature to date.

  20. Screening for psychopathology in a national cohort of 8- to 15-year-old children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rackauskaite, Gija; Bilenberg, Niels; Bech, Bodil Hammer

    2015-01-01

    was associated with an increased prevalence of psychopathology (odds ratio (OR) 2.6, CI 1.4-4.6, for Developmental Quotient of cognitive function (DQ) 50-85 and OR 3.0, CI 1.3-7.0, for DQsingle parent showed increased odds for a positive CBCL screening compared to children living......Cerebral palsy (CP) is often accompanied by psychopathology and learning disability. AIMS: (1) to evaluate the prevalence of psychopathology as estimated by the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) parental questionnaire in 8- to 15-year-old Danish children with CP and to analyze its association...... with cognitive ability and families' social characteristics; (2) to examine to what extent children with CP had been evaluated by a child psychiatrist and/or psychologist. METHOD: The parents of 462 children with CP answered a questionnaire about their child's treatment and the family's characteristics and 446...

  1. Capacity of adolescents with cerebral palsy on paediatric balance scale and Berg balance scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantakat, Chanada; Ramrit, Sirinun; Emasithi, Alongkot; Siritaratiwat, Wantana

    2014-10-15

    The Berg balance scale (BBS) and the paediatric balance scale (PBS) are reliable tools for measuring balance ability. However, reports of BBS and PBS scores in adolescent cerebral palsy have been limited. The objectives of this study were to investigate functional balance capacities, as tested with the BBS and PBS in adolescents with cerebral palsy, to compare the total PBS and BBS scores between Gross Motor Function Classification System-Expanded and Revised (GMFCS-E&R) levels and to compare the static balance PBS and BBS scores within each GMFCS-E&R level. Fifty-eight school-aged adolescents with cerebral palsy between the ages of 12 and 18 years with GMFCS-E&R levels of I to IV were recruited. The Kruskal-Wallis test was utilized to compare the median scores for the PBS and BBS between the different GMFCS-E&R levels. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were performed to examine the differences in the static balance scores between the PBS and the BBS within the same GMFCS-E&R levels. The results reveal that there were differences in the BBS and PBS scores among the four GMFCS-E&R levels. A significant difference was found between the BBS and PBS scores only among the patients with cerebral palsy and level III GMFCS-E&R. The BBS and PBS are valid and reliable tools for clinical examination and for distinguishing between levels of functional balance in adolescents with cerebral palsy.

  2. Self-esteem of persons with cerebral palsy: from adolescence to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill-Evans, J E; Restall, G

    1991-09-01

    A longitudinal study of self-esteem in 22 adolescents with cerebral palsy is reported. The subjects were matched with nondisabled adolescents by age, sex, IQ, and school. Seven years later, 39 of the 44 subjects (mean age = 22.8 years) completed the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale (Roid & Fitts, 1988), the Social Support Inventory (McCubbin, Patterson, Rossman, & Cooke, 1982), and a demographic questionnaire with some open-ended questions. As adolescents, the girls with cerebral palsy scored significantly lower than the other groups on physical, social, and personal self-esteem; however, as adults, these subjects were no longer significantly different from the other groups. Male subjects with cerebral palsy had self-esteem scores similar to those of the nondisabled groups in both adolescence and adulthood. Demographic information is summarized. The factors that the subjects identified as leading to changes in self-esteem were relationships and experiences. The low self-esteem scores indicate that psychosocial occupational therapy intervention with adolescent girls with cerebral palsy and with some adults with cerebral palsy would be appropriate.

  3. Evaluation of relationship between feeding reflexes and articulation in spastic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Hadian

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy is the term used to describe a movement disorder though to be the result of nonprogressive brain damage. Due to damage to CNS, it is associated with articulation disorder and abnormal feeding reflex. Lack of oral function control and coordination following feeding reflex disorders. Articulation disorders are seen in most of the cerebral palsied patients.This research aimed to determine the relationship between feeding reflexes and articulation in cerebral palsy (spasticchildren. Methods: This study was cross sectionally carried out on 52 children with cerebral palsy, 5 to 10 yrs old, in rehabilitation centers and private clinics. The information related to feeding reflexes was collected through direct observation of patient and evaluation of sound articulation through phonetic information test. Results: Statistical analysis carried out by SPSS and chi-square and fisher exact tests. Abnomal chewing and tongue reflex are more prevalent than other feeding reflexes.The relationship between lip reflex and articulation of p/m/r/y/f/č and chewing reflex with articulation of/z/š/ is meaningful. The relationship between biting reflex with articulation of /z/j/l/š/ is meaningful. The relationship between tongue reflex and rooting reflex with articulation of sound is not meaningful. Conclusion: With regard to the result of this research, it can be suggested that in children with cerebral palsy following feeding reflex disorders, abnormal posture during speech occurs that could have effect on articulation.

  4. Resting position of the head and malocclusion in a group of patients with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Mihi, Victoria; Orellana, Lorena M.; Silvestre-Rangil, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy are found as a result of these disorders, along with associated neuromuscular functional alterations that affect the resting position of the head. In this context, the resting position of the head could be responsible for several skeletal and dental occlusal disorders among patients with cerebral palsy. Objective: To assess the presence of malocclusions in patients with cerebral palsy, define the most frequent types of malocclusions, and evaluate how the resting position of the head may be implicated in the development of such malocclusions. Study design: Forty-four patients aged between 12-55 years (18 males and 26 females) were studied. Occlusal conditions, the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI), changes in the resting position of the head, and breathing and swallowing functions were assessed. Results: Orthodontic treatment was required by 70.8% of the patients, the most frequent malocclusions being molar class II, open bite and high overjet. These individuals showed altered breathing and swallowing functions, as well as habit and postural disorders. The resting position of the head, especially the hyperextended presentation, was significantly correlated to high DAI scores. Conclusions: The results obtained suggest that patients with cerebral palsy are more susceptible to present malocclusions, particularly molar class II malocclusion, increased open bite, and high overjet. Such alterations in turn are more common in patients with a hyperextended position of the head. Key words:Cerebral palsy, malocclusion, head position, disabled patients. PMID:24596627

  5. Isometric joystick: a study of control by adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, H; Noble, G; Seeger, B R

    1992-03-01

    This research was undertaken to determine the best wheelchair driving method for clients with cerebral palsy who were experiencing difficulties using displacement joysticks. The hypothesis was that adolescents with cerebral palsy would perform better in a tracking task using an isometric joystick (which has no moving parts) than a displacement joystick of the type used in commercial wheelchair controllers. A series of single subject case studies was performed in which the activating force of the isometric joystick was individualised for each subject. Comparative evaluation of the isometric joystick and a displacement joystick was then carried out. Results indicate that performance using the displacement joystick was superior to performance with the isometric joystick for the able-bodied subject and four of the five subjects with cerebral palsy. One of the subjects showed significantly better performance on the displacement joystick using his hand, and no significant difference between joysticks using his foot. The remaining subject, who used his foot, showed no significant difference between joysticks. These findings suggest that subjects with cerebral palsy with prior experience using a displacement joystick do not appear to benefit by the use of an isometric joystick compared to a displacement joystick. No difference in the use of the two joysticks was found for subjects with cerebral palsy who had no prior experience using a joystick. This suggests that an isometric joystick is an option for people beginning to learn to drive an electric wheelchair.

  6. Categorization of gait patterns in adults with cerebral palsy: a clustering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Nicolas; Pradon, Didier; Cosson, Julie; Robertson, Johanna; Marchiori, Claire; Zory, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Gait patterns in adults with cerebral palsy have, to our knowledge, never been assessed. This contrasts with the large number of studies which have attempted to categorize gait patterns in children with cerebral palsy. Several methodological approaches have been developed to objectively classify gait patterns in patients with central nervous system lesions. These methods enable the identification of groups of patients with common underlying clinical problems. One method is cluster analysis, a multivariate statistical method which is used to classify an entire data set into homogeneous groups or "clusters". The aim of this study was to determine, using cluster analysis, the principal gait patterns which can be found in adults with cerebral palsy. Data from 3D motion analyses of 44 adults with cerebral palsy were included. A hierarchical cluster analysis was used to subgroup the different gait patterns based on spatiotemporal and kinematic parameters in the sagittal and frontal planes. Five clusters were identified (C1-C5) among which, 3 subgroups were determined, based on spontaneous gait speed (C1/C2: slow, C3/C4: moderate and C5: almost normal). The different clusters were related to specific kinematic parameters that can be assessed in routine clinical practice. These 5 classifications can be used to follow changes in gait patterns throughout growth and aging as well to assess the effects of different treatments (physiotherapy, surgery, botulinum toxin, etc.) on gait patterns in adults with cerebral palsy.

  7. Delivering healthcare services to children with cerebral palsy and their families: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayles, Emily; Jones, Anne; Harvey, Desley; Plummer, David; Ruston, Sally

    2015-05-01

    Children with cerebral palsy have complex healthcare needs and often require complex multidisciplinary care. It is important for clinicians to understand which approaches to healthcare service delivery for this population are supported in the literature and how these should be applied in clinical practice. This narrative review aims to identify and review the evidence for current approaches to healthcare service delivery for children with cerebral palsy. Databases were searched using key terms to identify relevant research articles and grey literature from December 2011 to September 2013. Search results were screened and sorted according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Thirty-two documents were included for evaluation and their content was analysed thematically. Three current approaches to healthcare service delivery for children with cerebral palsy identified in this narrative review were family-centred care, the World Health Organisation's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and collaborative community-based primary care. However, healthcare services for children with cerebral palsy and their families are inconsistently delivered according to these approaches and the identified guidelines or standards of care for children with cerebral palsy have limited incorporation of these approaches. Future research is required to investigate how these approaches to healthcare service delivery can be integrated into clinical practices to enable clinicians to improve services for this population.

  8. Depression in Parents of Children with Cerebral Palsy in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Sinanović

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to examine depression in parents of children with cerebral palsy, with hypothesis to have more depressive symptom among mothers of children with cerebral palsy. The sample of examinees (between 23 and 62 age was used in this research. The first subsample of examinees (N=23 was made of mothers (average 33±5.83 of children with cerebral palsy. The second subsample of examinees (N=12 was made of fathers of children with cerebral palsy (average 38±9.8. The third subsample of examinees (N=16 represented the control group, and it was made of mothers of children without disorders (average 38±6.57. For the purpose of quantitative measurement of depression, the Zung self-evaluated method for depression was applied. All data research were processed by parametric and nonparametric statistics. The frequencies and percents were also calculated, and Kruskal-Valis single-factor analysis of variants was applied for checking the hypothesis. According to the results of this research, it was concluded that there was no statistically significant difference in the evaluation of depression between mothers and fathers of children with cerebral palsy, as well as there is no statistically significant difference in relation to mothers of children without disorders

  9. Infants at high risk of cerebral palsy : Neuromotor characteristics and the effect of the early intervention programme COPCA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, Elisa Gerdina

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, over 140 million babies are born each year. Most of them are healthy and will develop typically, but some infants are at risk of neurodevelopmental disorders like cerebral palsy. The primary aim of this thesis was to enhance the identification of infants at risk of cerebral palsy (CP) and

  10. Physical Activity in the Life of a Woman with Cerebral Palsy: Physiotherapy, Social Exclusion, Competence, and Intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Cadeyrn J.; Andersen, Mark B.; Morris, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Although physical activity can have substantial mental and physical health benefits, people with cerebral palsy usually lead sedentary lives. To understand, at an individual level, this inactivity, we interviewed a 29-year-old minimally active woman with cerebral palsy (Alana) about the meanings and experiences of physical activity throughout her…

  11. Classification of Speech and Language Profiles in 4-Year-Old Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Prospective Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hustad, Katherine C.; Gorton, Kristin; Lee, Jimin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors proposed and tested a preliminary speech and language classification system for children with cerebral palsy. Method: Speech and language assessment data were collected in a laboratory setting from 34 children with cerebral palsy (CP; 18 male, 16 female) with a mean age of 54 months (SD = 1.8). Measures of…

  12. Trends in Prevalence and Characteristics of Post-Neonatal Cerebral Palsy Cases: A European Registry-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germany, Laurence; Ehlinger, Virginie; Klapouszczak, Dana; Delobel, Malika; Hollody, Katalin; Sellier, Elodie; De La Cruz, Javier; Alberge, Corine; Genolini, Christophe; Arnaud, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The present paper aims to analyze trends over time in prevalence of cerebral palsy of post-neonatal origin, to investigate whether changes are similar according to severity and to describe the disability profile by etiology. Post-neonatal cases, birth years 1976 to 1998, were identified from the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe…

  13. Effect of Cardiorespiratory Training on Aerobic Fitness and Carryover to Activity In Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jane M.; Scianni, Aline; Ada, Louise

    2010-01-01

    The question under consideration was does cardiorespiratory training improve aerobic fitness in children with cerebral palsy and is there any carryover into activity? The study design consisted of a systematic review of randomized trials using the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Participants were children of school age with cerebral palsy.…

  14. The Use of Computers and Augmentative and Alternative Communication Devices by Children and Young with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Thais Pousada; Loureiro, Javier Pereira; Gonzalez, Betania Groba; Riveiro, Laura Nieto; Sierra, Alejandro Pazos

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the use of computers and assistive devices amongst children with cerebral palsy (CP) and establish the satisfaction level of both users and educational staff. The study was carried out with 30 children with cerebral palsy. A questionnaire was designed to characterize the use of new technologies and…

  15. The Effect of Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Quality of Life in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Kai Hsun; Nixon, Gillian M.

    2008-01-01

    Benefits of treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children with cerebral palsy could differ from those in otherwise healthy children. We examined the effects of OSA treatment by comparing a group of children with cerebral palsy treated with adenotonsillectomy or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) by nasal mask with controls who…

  16. Description and Psychometric Properties of the CP QOL-Teen: A Quality of Life Questionnaire for Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elise; Mackinnon, Andrew; Davern, Melanie; Boyd, Roslyn; Bohanna, India; Waters, Elizabeth; Graham, H. Kerr; Reid, Susan; Reddihough, Dinah

    2013-01-01

    To assess the measurement properties of a new QOL instrument, the Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaire-Teen (CP QOL-Teen), in adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 13-18 years, examining domain structure, reliability, validity and adolescent-caregiver concordance. Based on age, 695 eligible families were invited to participate by mail.…

  17. Postural Muscle Dyscoordination in Children With Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanda C. van der Heide

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper gives an overview of the knowledge currently available on muscular dyscoordination underlying postural problems in children with cerebral palsy (CP. Such information is a prerequisite for developing successful therapeutic interventions in children with CP. Until now, three children with CP functioning at GMFCS (Gross Motor Function Classification System level V have been documented. The children totally or partially lacked direction specificity in their postural adjustments and could not sit independently for more than 3 seconds. Some children functioning at GMFCS level IV have intact direction-specific adjustments, whereas others have problems in generating consistently direction-specific adjustments. Children at GMFCS levels I to III have an intact basic level of control but have difficulties in fine-tuning the degree of postural muscle contraction to the task-specific conditions, a dysfunction more prominently present in children with bilateral spastic CP than in children with spastic hemiplegia. The problems in the adaptation of the degree of muscle contraction might be the reason that children with CP, more often than typically developing children, show an excess of antagonistic coactivation during difficult balancing tasks and a preference for cranial-caudal recruitment during reaching. This might imply that both stereotypies might be regarded as functional strategies to compensate for the dysfunctional capacity to modulate subtly postural activity.

  18. Frequency of parafunctional oral habits in patients with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, A O L; Guimarães, A S; Ciamponi, A L; Marie, S K N

    2007-05-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most frequent conditions encountered in the daily practice of dentists who treat special-needs patients and it seems that parafunctional oral habits are often present in such individuals. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of occurrence of parafunctional habits in individuals with CP. Sixty-five patients with CP were evaluated through a questionnaire and clinical observation, regarding the following habits: pacifier-sucking, finger-sucking, biting objects, tongue interposition, and bruxism. The results showed that nine (13.8%) patients presented with pacifier-sucking, four (6.1%) showed finger-sucking, 12 (18.4%) had the habit of biting objects, 27 (41.5%) presented with tongue interposition, and 24 (36.9%) had eccentric bruxism. The significance of the presence of oral parafunctional habits in individuals with CP, revealed in this study, justifies the need to establish protocols for adequate prevention and clinical intervention in order to minimize the deleterious consequences that may result from such habits.

  19. Postural pattern recognition in children with unilateral cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domagalska-Szopa M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Małgorzata Domagalska-Szopa, Andrzej Szopa School of Health Sciences, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland Background: Several different strategies for maintaining upright standing posture in children with cerebral palsy (CP were observed. Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to define two different postural patterns in children with unilateral CP, using moiré topography (MT parameters. Additionally, another focus of this article was to outline some implications for managing physiotherapy in children with hemiplegia. Patients and methods: The study included 45 outpatients with unilateral CP. MT examinations were performed using a CQ Elektronik System device. In addition, a weight distribution analysis on the base of support between unaffected and affected body sides was performed simultaneously. A force plate pressure distribution measurement system (PDM-S with Foot Print software was used for these measurements. Results: The cluster analysis revealed four groups: cluster 1 (n=19; 42.22%; cluster 2 (n=7; 15.56%; cluster 3 (n=9; 20.00%; and cluster 4 (n=10; 22.22%. Conclusion: Based on the MT parameters (extracted using a data reduction technique, two postural patterns were described: 1 the pro-gravitational postural pattern; and 2 the anti-gravitational pattern. Keywords: deviation of body posture, strategy of compensation, moiré topography examinations, cluster analysis

  20. Pain in adults with cerebral palsy: impact and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogtle, Laura K

    2009-10-01

    Studies of health in adults with cerebral palsy (CP) have identified pain as a significant concern. Investigations regarding incidence, intensity, and location in adults with CP found that increasing age and inactivity appeared to be related to pain. Activity and participation in adults with CP seem to be only moderately affected by presence of pain. Various sources of pain have been identified in adults with CP but have not been well studied. These include orthopedic issues, poor bone mineral density and related fractures, dental and jaw problems, and nutrition-related pain. Limited healthcare utilization studies suggest that adults with CP use healthcare services, especially preventative and rehabilitative services less, and do not consult physicians regarding pain. Medication solutions for chronic pain are not well studied. Botulinum toxin and intrathecal baclofen have been demonstrated to minimize pain; however, the impact of other medications needs further investigation. Other interventions for pain include small studies examining the use of biofeedback and exercise. Larger studies are needed to establish effectiveness. In order to prevent future generations of adults with CP from experiencing high levels of pain, environmental sources of pain need more specific study, as do interventions that are affordable and easily accessed.

  1. SPASTIC FORM OF CEREBRAL PALSY, EPILEPSY WITH BENIGN EPILEPTIFORM DISCHARGE OF CHILDHOOD ON ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM, AND IATROGENIC STEVENS–JOHNSON SYNDROME (CASE DESCRIPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kotov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the phenomenon of dual pathology – a combination of structural changes in the brain and benign epileptiform discharge of childhood on electroencephalogram. The uniqueness lies in the observation that the child, since birth suffering from spastic form of cerebral palsy and severe epilepsy, demonstrated the development of Stevens–Johnson syndrome due to intolerance of one of the antiepileptic drugs. Therapeutic approaches to overcome a whole range of violations are discussed in the article.

  2. Computed tomographic findings in cerebral palsy: Analysis of hemisphere and lateral ventricular volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seoung Hwan; Kim, Hak Jin; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-04-15

    Authors analysed the CT findings of 28 cerebral palsy patients at Pusan National University Hospital from January, 1984 to December, 1987. Volumes of hemispheres, lateral ventricles and paranchymes were measured in patients who showed no remarkable abnormality on CT film, and compared with those of normal control group. 1. Among the 28 cerebral palsy patients, there were 6 cases of diffuse atrophy in CT findings, and unilateral atrophy in 2 cases and encephalomalacia and diffuse white matter low density in 1 case and generalized symmetrical white matter low density in 1 case, but remaining 18 cases had no specific abnormal finding on CT. 2. Difference in volumes of brain parenchyma and lateral ventricles of each hemisphere was greater than that of control group. 3. There were more enlarged lateral ventricles and prominent unilateral brain atrophy in 18 cases of cerebral palsy who showed no specific abnormality on CT as compared with normal control group.

  3. Upper limb functional assessment of children with cerebral palsy using a sorting box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano-Gonzalez, Y; Melendez-Calderon, A; Burdet, E; Chong-Quero, J E; Villanueva-Ayala, D; Perez-Moreno, J C

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the use of a sorting box to obtain a quantitative assessment of upper limb motor function in children with cerebral palsy. In our study, children with and without cerebral palsy placed and removed geometrical objects of a sorting-box while their wrist position was monitored by a camera-based, motion-tracking system. We analyzed three different smoothness metrics (logarithmic dimensionless jerk, spectral arc-length and number of peaks) together with time to task completion. Our results suggest that smoothness metrics are an effective tool to distinguish between impaired and non-impaired subjects, as well as to quantify differences between the affected and less-affected sides in children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy.

  4. Prognostic Predictors for Ambulation in Thai Children With Cerebral Palsy Aged 2 to 18 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeratisiroj, Orawan; Thawinchai, Nuanlaor; Siritaratiwat, Wantana; Buntragulpoontawee, Montana

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine prognostic predictors for ambulation among Thai children with cerebral palsy and identify their ambulatory status. A retrospective cohort study was performed at 6 special schools or hospitals for children with physical disabilities. The prognostic predictors for ambulation were analyzed by multivariable ordinal continuation ratio logistic regression. The 533 participants aged 2 to 18 years were divided into 3 groups: 186 with independent ambulation (Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS I-II]), 71 with assisted ambulation (Gross Motor Function Classification System III), and 276 with nonambulation (Gross Motor Function Classification System IV-V). The significant positive predictors for ambulation were type of cerebral palsy (spastic diplegia, spastic hemiplegia, dyskinesia, ataxia, hypotonia, and mixed type), sitting independently at age 2 years, and eating independently. These predictors were used to develop clinical scoring for predicting the future ability to walk among Thai children with cerebral palsy.

  5. Dorsiflexor muscle-group thickness in children with cerebral palsy: Relation to cross-sectional area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Magnusson, Peter; Jensen, Bente R;

    2009-01-01

    If the thickness and cross-sectional area of the dorsiflexor muscle group are related in children with cerebral palsy, measurements of muscle thickness may be used to monitor changes in muscle size due to training or immobilisation in these patients. We assessed the validity and reliability...... of measurements of dorsiflexor muscle-thickness using the cross-sectional area of the muscle group as the criterion-related muscle-size variable. Muscle thickness was measured using ultrasound, and cross-sectional area using MRI in nine children with spastic cerebral palsy (eight with hemiplegia). Test......-retest reliability of the muscle-thickness measurements was assessed in six healthy subjects. All measurements were made on both legs at 35% lower leg length. In the children with cerebral palsy, dorsiflexor muscle-thickness and cross-sectional area were well correlated (r;{2} = 0.778, P

  6. European study of frequency of participation of adolescents with and without cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan I; Flachs, Esben M; Damsgaard, Mogens T

    2014-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy participate less in everyday activities than children in the general populations. During adolescence, rapid physical and psychological changes occur which may be more difficult for adolescents with impairments. Within the European SPARCLE project we measured frequency...... respectively linear and logistic regression. Adolescents with cerebral palsy spent less time with friends and had less autonomy in their daily life than adolescents in the general populations. Adolescents with cerebral palsy participated much less in sport but played electronic games at least as often...... as adolescents in the general populations. Severity of motor and intellectual impairment had a significant impact on frequency of participation, the more severely impaired being more disadvantaged. Adolescents with an only slight impairment participated in some domains as often as adolescents in the general...

  7. Assessment of bone density in patients with scoliosis neuromuscular secondary to cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charbel Jacob Júnior

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate bone mineral density in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis secondary to spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy. METHODS: A prospective descriptive study in which, in addition to bone densitometry, the anthropometric data of the patients were assessed. As inclusion criterion we adopted patients with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy, wheelchair users, aged between 10 and 20 years and with neuromuscular scoliosis. RESULTS: We evaluated 31 patients, 20 female, whose average age was 14.2 years. The mean bone density was -3.2 standard deviation (Z-score, with mean biceps circumference of 19.4 cm, calf circumference 18.6 cm and BMI of 13.6 kg/m². CONCLUSION: There is a high incidence of osteoporosis in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis secondary to spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy.

  8. Individualized, home-based interactive training of cerebral palsy children delivered through the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, Peder E; Kliim-Due, Mette; Rasmussen, Betina;

    2011-01-01

    The available health resources limit the amount of therapy that may be offered to children with cerebral palsy and the amount of training in each session may be insufficient to drive the neuroplastic changes, which are necessary for functional improvements to take place. The aim of this pilot stu...... was to provide proof of concept that individualized and supervised interactive home-based training delivered through the internet may provide an efficient way of maintaining intensive training of children with cerebral palsy over prolonged periods.......The available health resources limit the amount of therapy that may be offered to children with cerebral palsy and the amount of training in each session may be insufficient to drive the neuroplastic changes, which are necessary for functional improvements to take place. The aim of this pilot study...

  9. Stiff-knee gait in cerebral palsy: how do patients adapt to uneven ground?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Harald; Hösl, Matthias; Schwameder, Hermann; Döderlein, Leonhard

    2014-04-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to reduced toe clearance mostly caused by a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). The aim of this study was to investigate adaptive mechanism to an uneven surface in stiff-knee walkers with cerebral palsy. Sixteen patients with bilateral cerebral palsy, GMFCS I-II and stiff-knee gait, mean age 14.1 (SD=6.2) years, were compared to 13 healthy controls with mean age 13.5 (SD=4.8) years. Gait analysis including EMG was performed under even and uneven surface conditions. Similar strategies to improve leg clearance were found in patients as well as in controls. Both adapted with significantly reduced speed and cadence, increased outward foot rotation, knee and hip flexion as well as anterior pelvic tilt. Therefore cerebral palsy and stiff-knee gait did not affect the adaptation capacity on the uneven surface. On the uneven surface an average increase in knee flexion of 7° (SD=3°) and 12° (SD=5°) was observed in controls and patients with cerebral palsy, respectively. Although rectus femoris activity was increased in patients with cerebral palsy, they were able to increase their knee flexion during swing. The results of this study suggest that walking on uneven surface has the potential to improve knee flexion in stiff-knee walkers. Therefore training on uneven surface could be used as a conservative treatment regime alone, in combination with Botulinum neurotoxin or in the rehabilitation of surgery.

  10. Preliminary study of novel, timed walking tests for children with spina bifida or cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Kyra J; Lanovaz, Joel; Bisaro, Derek; Oates, Alison; Musselman, Kristin E

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Walking assessment is an important aspect of rehabilitation practice; yet, clinicians have few psychometrically sound options for evaluating walking in highly ambulatory children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of two new measures of walking function—the Obstacles and Curb tests—relative to the 10-Meter Walk test and Timed Up and Go test in children with spina bifida or cerebral palsy. Methods: A total of 16 ambulatory children with spina bifida (n=9) or cerebral palsy (n=7) (9 boys; mean age 7years, 7months; standard deviation 3years, 4months) and 16 age- and gender-matched typically developing children participated. Children completed the walking tests, at both self-selected and fast speeds, twice. To evaluate discriminative validity, scores were compared between typically developing and spina bifida/cerebral palsy groups. Within the spina bifida/cerebral palsy group, inter-test correlations evaluated convergent validity and intraclass correlation coefficients evaluated within-session test–retest reliability. Results: At fast speeds, all tests showed discriminative validity (p<0.006 for typically developing and spina bifida/cerebral palsy comparisons) and convergent validity (rho=0.81–0.90, p⩽0.001, for inter-test correlations). At self-selected speeds, only the Obstacles test discriminated between groups (p=0.001). Moderately strong correlations (rho=0.73–0.78, p⩽0.001) were seen between the 10-Meter Walk test, Curb test, and Timed Up and Go test. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.81 to 0.97, with higher test–retest reliability for tests performed at fast speeds rather than self-selected speeds. Conclusion: The Obstacles and Curb tests are promising measures for assessing walking in this population. Performing tests at fast walking speeds may improve their validity and test–retest reliability for children with spina bifida/cerebral palsy. PMID:27493754

  11. Current Situation and Characteristics Analysis on Cerebral Palsy Rehabilitation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琴玉

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic characteristics and patterns of cerebral palsy rehabilitation in China. Method: To elaborate the specific acupuncture methods and action mechanism of cerebral palsy in China by combining analysis on the therapeutic situation of cerebral palsy from both home and abroad with research literatures. Conclusion: Acupuncture has great potential in social and economic benefits in the treatment of cerebral palsy. It is necessary to develop prospective, multi-center and randomly controlled trials on acupuncture treatment of cerebral palsy with exact and feasible therapeutic plans and establish acupuncture-centered cerebral palsy rehabilitation system with Chinese characteristics.%目的:探讨中国脑性瘫痪的康复治疗特点及模式.方法:分析国内外脑性瘫痪治疗现状,结合文献详细阐述国内采用针灸治疗脑瘫的具体方法及其机理研究.结论:针灸治疗脑瘫有着极大的潜在社会效益和经济效益.宜开展针灸治疗小儿脑瘫的前瞻性、多中心、随机对照试验,探索出疗效确切、可行性强的针灸治疗方案,建立以针灸为中心的有中国特色的脑性瘫痪康复体系.

  12. Factors Related to Psychosocial Quality of Life for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. Tessier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Current health services interventions focus on the treatment of the musculoskeletal impairments of cerebral palsy (CP. The goal of this study was to explore whether the severity of physical symptoms correlates with psychosocial quality of life (QOL among pediatric patients with CP. Methods. A sample of 53 caregivers of children with CP was surveyed and health status information was extracted from patient medical records. Descriptive analysis explored the association between the main outcome variable, psychosocial QOL (CP QOL-child, and patient demographics, comorbidity (e.g., visual, hearing and feeding impairments, language delays, and epilepsy, CP severity (GMFCS, and the receipt of family centered care (MPOC-20. Results. Child psychosocial QOL decreased with increasing comorbidity but was not associated with CP symptom severity or any measured demographic factors. Reporting high levels of family centered care (FCC was associated with higher psychosocial QOL in univariate analysis but was not significant when controlling for comorbidities. Conclusion. There is no clear connection between symptom severity and psychosocial QOL in children with CP. Comorbidity however is strongly associated with psychosocial QOL. Focusing on reducing CP comorbidities could have a positive impact on psychosocial QOL.

  13. Dynamics of activity free radical oxidation reactions in students with cerebral palsy results over the course of the educational process

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    Makarova E.V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of changes activity of reactions is studied freely radical oxidize for students with the consequences of child's cerebral paralysis. 20 students took part in an experiment. Found that the course of study they have more active free radical oxidation reactions and decreases the activity of antiradical protection. Given the use of additional physical activity in aerobic training indicators intracellular antioxidant defense system increased, decreased content of reaction products of lipid peroxidation. However, increased rates of maximum oxygen consumption and increased tolerance of students with cerebral palsy to the consequences of physical activity. It is set that the pathological changes of metabolism for students ground the necessity of application of the differentiated physical loadings. The optimum forms of physical rehabilitation of the aerobic training is the dosed walking, medical swimming, dosed after distance, sometimes and by the corner of getting up pedestrian ascents. Loading is increased due to a volume, but not intensity of exercises.

  14. CT findings in cerebral palsy - An attempt at clinico-radiological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyo Keun; Lee, Kil Woo; Choo, In Wook; Kim, Mee Kang; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mun Gyu [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    CT scans of one hundred-three children with cerebral palsy were analyzed retrospectively and correlated with various clinical assessment. Incidence of pathologic CT scans was 71% and most common pathology was brain atrophy (45%). Other pathology consisted of brain anomaly (13%), infarction (11%), hydrocephalus (6%), porencephalic cyst (6%), diffuse periventricular low density (5%) and pathologic calcification (4%). No statistically significant correlation could be found between the types of cerebral palsy and incidence of pathologic CT findings. Higher incidence of pathologic CT scans could be shown in the group that physical handicap was severe and etiological factor was prenatal or postnatal and in the patients with seizure.

  15. Asphyxia-related risk factors and their timing in spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene F.; Schendel, Diana; Grove, Jakob;

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of asphyxia-related conditions (reducing blood flow or blood oxygen levels in the fetus) with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) considering different gestational age groups and the timing of risk. Design Population-based case-control study. Setting Danish Cerebral...... Palsy Register in eastern Denmark and Danish Medical Birth Register. Population or Sample 271 singletons with spastic CP and 217 singleton controls, frequency matched by gestational age group, born 1982-1990 in eastern Denmark. Methods Data were abstracted from medical records, and a priori asphyxia...

  16. Prenatal Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl Substances and the Risk of Congenital Cerebral Palsy in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liew, Zeyan; Ritz, Beate; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie;

    2014-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are persistent pollutants and endocrine disruptors that may affect fetal brain development. We investigated whether prenatal exposure to PFASs increases the risk of congenital cerebral palsy (CP). The source population for this study includes 83,389 liveborn...... singletons and mothers enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort during 1996-2002. We identified 156 CP cases by linking the cohort to the Danish National Cerebral Palsy Register, and we randomly selected 550 controls using a case-cohort design. We measured 16 PFASs in maternal plasma collected in early...

  17. Gait training facilitates central drive to ankle dorsiflexors in children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Petersen, Tue Hvass; Farmer, Simon Francis;

    2015-01-01

    facilitate corticospinal transmission and improve the control of the ankle joint in children with cerebral palsy. Sixteen children with cerebral palsy (Gross Motor Classification System I:6, II:6, III:4) aged 5-14 years old, were recruited for the study. Evaluation of gait ability and intramuscular coherence...... in the strength of coherence in the beta and gamma band were positively correlated with improvements in the subjects' ability to lift the toes in the swing phase. These data show that daily intensive gait training increases beta and gamma oscillatory drive to ankle dorsiflexor motor neurons and that it improves...

  18. Clinical Observation of Infantile Cerebral Palsy Mainly Treated by Scalp Acupuncture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Yi-zhong; CHEN Rui-hua; LIAO Rong-gui; XIAO Yuan-chun

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical effects of scalp acupuncture in treating infantile cerebral palsy were observed. Methods: Forty-five patients were treated by scalp acupuncture, functional exercise, intravenous drip,and parents' instructive training. Results: Basic recovery occurred in 4 cases, marked effectiveness in 21 cases and effectiveness in 15 cases. The total effective rate was 88.9%. The shorter duration and the longer course were,the better curative effects got. Conclusion: A combined treatment of scalp acupuncture, physiotherapy and intravenous drip can markedly improve clinical symptoms, signs, and intelligence in children with cerebral palsy.

  19. Individualized, home-based interactive training of cerebral palsy children delivered through the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, Peder E; Kliim-Due, Mette; Rasmussen, Betina;

    2011-01-01

    The available health resources limit the amount of therapy that may be offered to children with cerebral palsy and the amount of training in each session may be insufficient to drive the neuroplastic changes, which are necessary for functional improvements to take place. The aim of this pilot study...... was to provide proof of concept that individualized and supervised interactive home-based training delivered through the internet may provide an efficient way of maintaining intensive training of children with cerebral palsy over prolonged periods....

  20. Cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and severe intellectual disability in a patient with 3q29 microduplication syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Jaén, Alberto; Castellanos, María del Carmen; Fernández-Perrone, Ana Laura; Fernández-Mayoralas, Daniel Martín; de la Vega, Alberto González; Calleja-Pérez, Beatriz; Fernández, Ester Corbacho; Albert, Jacobo; Hombre, María Carmen Sánchez

    2014-08-01

    Interstitial microduplication of 3q29 has been recently described. Individuals with this syndrome have widely variable phenotypes. We describe the first clinical case with a 1.607 Mb duplication at 3q29 (chr3: 195,731,956-197,339,329), accompanied by severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, and cerebral palsy. This duplication involves 22 genes; PAK2, DLG1, BDH1, and FBXO45 are implicated in neuronal development and synaptic function and could play an important role in this syndrome. We propose considering genetic studies, particularly array comparative genomic hybridization, in patients with epilepsy and/or cerebral palsy of unknown etiology when dysmorphic features are present.

  1. Early intervention to improve hand function in hemiplegic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Purna Basu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy often have marked hand involvement with excessive thumb adduction and flexion and limited active wrist extension from infancy. Post-lesional aberrant plasticity can lead to progressive abnormalities of the developing motor system. Disturbances of somatosensory and visual function and developmental disregard contribute to difficulties with hand use. Progressive soft tissue and bony changes may occur, leading to contractures which further limit function in a vicious cycle. Early intervention might help to break this cycle: however, the precise nature and appropriateness of the intervention must be carefully considered. Traditional approaches to the hemiplegic upper limb include medications and botulinum toxin injections to manage abnormalities of tone, and surgical interventions. Therapist input, including provision of orthoses, remains a mainstay although many therapies have not been well evaluated. There has been a recent increase in interventions for the hemiplegic upper limb, mostly aimed outside the period of infancy. These include trials of constraint-induced movement therapy and bimanual therapy as well as the use of virtual reality and robot-assisted therapy. In future, non-invasive brain stimulation may be combined with therapy. Interventions under investigation in the infant age group include modified constraint-induced movement therapy and action observation therapy. A further approach which may be suited to the infant with thumb-in-palm deformity, but which requires evaluation, is the use of elastic taping. Enhanced cutaneous feedback through mechanical stimulation to the skin provided by the tape during movement has been postulated to modulate ongoing muscle activity. If effective, this would represent a low-cost, safe, widely applicable early intervention.

  2. Psychological impact of cerebral palsy on families: The African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olajide A Olawale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychological stress associated with cerebral palsy (CP is known to be one of the most depressing conditions of families. In the traditional African society, some peculiar factors may contribute to the stress. Aims: The aims of this study were to identify and describe, from the African perspective, the psychological impact of CP on families and determine the strategies adopted by families in coping with it. Settings and Design: The study was a cross-sectional descriptive survey conducted in the Physiotherapy Department of a tertiary hospital. Materials and Methods: Participants were 52 parents of children with CP. They completed a questionnaire designed to determine the degree of psychological stress on the families and strategies adopted to cope with the stress. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics were used to show responses in graphical formats. Results: Respondents agreed that having adequate knowledge of CP would help them cope well with the demands of taking care of children with CP. 38.5% of respondents said that people in the society accused them of some wrongdoing that has made their children to have CP. Personal problems experienced include loss of job, lack of concentration at work, loss of family joy, and derangement of financial affairs of the family. 26 (50% of them resort to religious/spiritual intervention as an alternative or complementary mode of treatment for their children while 28% resort to dependence on the extended family system for support. Conclusion: Families caring for children with CP generally have a positive attitude towards their children. However, there is need to educate the public on the causes of CP and treatment options available to families.

  3. Cerebellar stimulation for cerebral palsy--double blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R; Schulman, J; Delehanty, A

    1987-01-01

    Twenty spastic cerebral palsy (CP) patients undergoing chronic cerebellar stimulation (CCS) for reduction of spasticity and improvement in function have participated in a double-blind study. Seven US centers involving 9 neurosurgeons (1984-6) have replaced the depleted Neurolith 601 fully implantable pulse generator (Pacesetter Systems Incorp.-Neurodyne Corp., Sylmar, CA) with new units in 19 CP patients, 1 patient entered the study following his initial implant. A magnetically controllable switch was placed in line between the Neurolith stimulator and the cerebellar lead, so allowing switching sequences for the study. Physical therapists, living in the vicinity of the patient's home, carried out two quantitative evaluations: 1. Joint angle motion measurements (passive and active). 2. Motor performance testing was done when possible and included: reaction time, hand dynamonetry, grooved peg board placement, hand/foot tapping, and rotary pursuit testing. Testing was done presurgery, at 2 weeks postimplant, then the switch was activated either "on" or "off" to a schedule, with testing and reswitching at 1, 2 and 4 months, then the switch was left turned "on". Of the 20 patients, 16 finished the tests, 2 patients failed to finish and 2 had switch problems and were deleted from the study. Two of the 16 patients were "off" through the entire testing. Of the 14 that had periods of the stimulator being "on", 10 patients (72%) had quantitative improvements of over 20%, (1 pt: 50+% improvements; 4 pts: 30-50%, 5 pts: 20-30%); while 1 patient (7%) had improvements in the 10-20% level, whereas 3 patients (21%) showed no improvement.

  4. Effects of oral motor therapy in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seray Nural Sigan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Oral motor dysfunction is a common issue in children with cerebral palsy (CP. Drooling, difficulties with sucking, swallowing, and chewing are some of the problems often seen. In this study, we aimed to research the effect of oral motor therapy on pediatric CP patients with feeding problems. Materials and Methods: Included in this single centered, randomized, prospective study were 81 children aged 12-42 months who had been diagnosed with CP, had oral motor dysfunction and were observed at the Pediatric Neurology outpatient clinic of the Children′s Health and Diseases Department, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul University. Patients were randomized into two groups: The training group and the control group. One patient from the training group dropped out of the study because of not participating regularly. Following initial evaluation of all patients by a blinded physiotherapist and pedagogue, patients in the training group participated in 1 h oral motor training sessions with a different physiotherapist once a week for 6 months. All patients kept on routine physiotherapy by their own physiotherapists. Oral motor assessment form, functional feeding assessment (FFA subscale of the multidisciplinary feeding profile (MFP and the Bayley scales of infant development (BSID-II were used to evaluate oral motor function, swallowing, chewing, the gag reflex, the asymmetrical tonic neck reflex, tongue, jaw, and mouth function, severity of drooling, aspiration, choking, independent feeding and tolerated food texture during the initial examination and 6 months later. Results: When the initial and post-therapy FFA and BSID-II scores received by patients in the training and the study group were compared, the training group showed a statistically significant improvement (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Oral motor therapy has a beneficial effect on feeding problems in children with CP.

  5. Early diagnosis and early intervention in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijna eHadders-Algra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the opportunities and challenges for early diagnosis and early intervention in cerebral palsy (CP. CP describes a group of disorders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation, that are attributed to disturbances that occurred in the fetal or infant brain. Therefore the paper starts with a summary of relevant information from developmental neuroscience. Most lesions underlying CP occur in the second half of gestation, when developmental activity in the brain reaches its summit. Variations in timing of the damage not only result in different lesions, but also in different neuroplastic reactions and different associated neuropathologies. This turns CP into a heterogeneous entity. This may mean that the best early diagnostics and the best intervention methods may differ for various subgroups of children with CP. Next, the paper addresses possibilities for early diagnosis. It discusses the predictive value of neuromotor and neurological exams, neuro-imaging techniques and neurophysiological assessments. Prediction is best when complementary techniques are used in longitudinal series. Possibilities for early prediction of CP differ for infants admitted to neonatal intensive care and other infants. In the former group best prediction is achieved with the combination of neuro-imaging and the assessment of general movements, in the latter group best prediction is based on carefully documented milestones and neurological assessment. The last part reviews early intervention in infants developing CP. Most knowledge on early intervention is based on studies in high risk infants without CP. In these infants early intervention programs promote cognitive development until preschool age; motor development profits less. The few studies on early intervention in infants developing CP suggest that programs that stimulate all aspects of infant development by means of family coaching are most promising. More research is

  6. Aculaser therapy for the treatment of cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik M.; Nadeem Khan, Malik M.; Qazi, Faiza M.; Awan, Abid H.; Ammad, Haseeb U.

    2012-03-01

    A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah Trust for C.P. & Paralysis in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (C.P.) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia, monoplegia, sensoryneural deafness and speech disorders. In all 500 children were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 4 years from December 2006 till December 2010. These children were further classified according to the type of C.P. (spastic, athetoid, mixed) they suffered from and associated Neurological Disorders. This article shows results in C.P. childern who were treated with ACULASER THERAPY for a minimum of 08 weeks and more or had minimum of 15 treatment sessions and more. This article also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 1 month to 1 year did not show any reversal of the signs and symptoms. Analysis of the data showed that out of 342 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 294 showed marked improvement showing 87% success rate, out of 252 children with Epileptic fits, there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 182 children showing 72% success rate, out of 96 children with Cortical Blindness 60 children showed improvement accounting for 63% efficacy rate, out of 210 children with Hearing Difficulties, 126 showed marked improvement accounting for 60% improvement rate, out of 380 children with Speech Disorders 244 showed improvement reflecting 64 % improvement rate, out of 192 children with Hemiplegia 142 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 74% improvement rate, out of 152 children with Quadriplegia 104 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 116 children with

  7. Immature spinal locomotor output in children with Cerebral Palsy

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    Germana Cappellini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Detailed descriptions of gait impairments have been reported in cerebral palsy (CP, but it is still unclear how maturation of the spinal motoneuron output is affected. Spatiotemporal alpha-motoneuron activation during walking can be assessed by mapping the electromyographic activity profiles from several, simultaneously recorded muscles onto the anatomical rostrocaudal location of the motoneuron pools in the spinal cord, and by means of factor analysis of the muscle activity profiles. Here, we analysed gait kinematics and EMG activity of 11 pairs of bilateral muscles with lumbosacral innervation in 35 children with CP (19 diplegic, 16 hemiplegic, 2-12 years and 33 typically developing (TD children (1-12 years. TD children showed a progressive reduction of EMG burst durations and a gradual reorganization of the spatiotemporal motoneuron output with increasing age. By contrast, children with CP showed very limited age-related changes of EMG durations and motoneuron output, as well as of limb intersegmental coordination and foot trajectory control (on both sides for diplegic children and the affected side for hemiplegic children. Factorization of the EMG signals revealed a comparable structure of the motor output in children with CP and TD children, but significantly wider temporal activation patterns in children with CP, resembling the patterns of much younger TD infants. A similar picture emerged when considering the spatiotemporal maps of alpha-motoneuron activation. Overall, the results are consistent with the idea that early injuries to developing motor regions of the brain substantially affect the maturation of the spinal locomotor output and consequently the future locomotor behaviour.

  8. What are the best animal models for testing early intervention in cerebral palsy?

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    Gavin John Clowry

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interventions to treat cerebral palsy should be initiated as soon as possible in order to restore the nervous system to the correct developmental trajectory. One drawback to this approach is that interventions have to undergo exceptionally rigorous assessment for both safety and efficacy prior to use in infants. Part of this process should involve research using animals but how good are our animal models? Part of the problem is that cerebral palsy is an umbrella term that covers a number of conditions. There are also many causal pathways to cerebral palsy, such as periventricular white matter injury in premature babies, perinatal infarcts of the middle cerebral artery or generalised anoxia at the time of birth, indeed multiple causes, including intra-uterine infection or a genetic predisposition to infarction, may need to interact to produce a clinically significant injury. In this review we consider which animal models best reproduce certain aspects of the condition, and the extent to which the multifactorial nature of cerebral palsy has been modelled. The degree to which the corticospinal system of various animals models human corticospinal system function and development is also explored. Where attempts have already been made to test early intervention in animal models, the outcomes are evaluated in light of the suitability of the model.

  9. Avaliação da sobrecarga do cuidador de crianças com paralisia cerebral através da escala Burden Interview Assessment of the caregiver burden of children with cerebral palsy using the Burden Interview scale

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    Ana Cristina Resende Camargos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: avaliar fatores que influenciam na sobrecarga dos cuidadores de crianças com paralisia cerebral. MÉTODOS: foram entrevistados 56 cuidadores de crianças com paralisia cerebral com idade entre um e 15 anos. Para avaliar a sobrecarga dos cuidadores foi utilizada a escala Burden Interview e foram coletados dados sobre nível socioeconômico da família, gravidade do comprometimento motor, diagnóstico topográfico e idade das crianças com paralisia cerebral. Para análise dos dados foram utilizados os testes Mann-Whitney e Kruskal-Wallis. RESULTADOS: um menor nível socioeconômico da família (p=0,03 e uma menor gravidade do comprometimento motor (p=0,05 das crianças com paralisia cerebral foram associados com maior sobrecarga do cuidador. Não houve diferença significativa em relação ao diagnóstico topográfico (p=0,71 e à idade das crianças com paralisia cerebral (p=0,35. CONCLUSÕES: o conhecimento de fatores que influenciam a sobrecarga dos cuidadores de crianças com paralisia cerebral é mais um dado a ser agregado no planejamento de atenção e intervenção a esse público específico.OBJECTIVES: to evaluate factors that influence the caregiver burden of children with cerebral palsy. METHODS: 56 caregivers who worked with children with cerebral palsy aged between one and fifteen years old were evaluated. To evaluate the caregiver burden the Burden Interview scale was used, along with data on the social and economic circumstances of the children's families, the severity of motor impairment, topographic diagnosis and age of child. The Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis test were used for data analysis. RESULTS: poorer social and economic circumstances of the children's families (p=0.03 and a lower severity of motor impairment (p=0.05 in the child with cerebral palsy were associated to a heavier caregiver burden. There was no significant difference in the case of topographic diagnosis (p=0.71 and age of child with cerebral

  10. Digital Games and Assistive Technology: Improvement of Communication of Children with Cerebral Palsy

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    Ferreira, Maria Inês Jesus; Travassos, Xisto Lucas; Sampaio, Renelson; Pereira-Guizzo, Camila de Sousa

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to analyze the frequency of occurrence of different forms of communication in nonspeaking children during activities with digital games. The participants in this study were three children with multiple disabilities, whose limitations were due to cerebral palsy. All the children had severe oral communication disabilities. Three…

  11. Mirror Visual Feedback Induces Lower Neuromuscular Activity in Children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy

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    Feltham, Max G.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effects of mirror feedback information on neuromuscular activation during bimanual coordination in eight children with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy (SHCP) and a matched control group. The "mirror box" creates a visual illusion, which gives rise to a visual perception of a zero lag, symmetric movement between the two…

  12. Novel Virtual Environment for Alternative Treatment of Children with Cerebral Palsy

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    de Oliveira, Juliana M.; Fernandes, Rafael Carneiro G.; Pinto, Cristtiano S.; Pinheiro, Plácido R.; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a severe condition usually caused by decreased brain oxygenation during pregnancy, at birth or soon after birth. Conventional treatments for cerebral palsy are often tiresome and expensive, leading patients to quit treatment. In this paper, we describe a virtual environment for patients to engage in a playful therapeutic game for neuropsychomotor rehabilitation, based on the experience of the occupational therapy program of the Nucleus for Integrated Medical Assistance (NAMI) at the University of Fortaleza, Brazil. Integration between patient and virtual environment occurs through the hand motion sensor “Leap Motion,” plus the electroencephalographic sensor “MindWave,” responsible for measuring attention levels during task execution. To evaluate the virtual environment, eight clinical experts on cerebral palsy were subjected to a questionnaire regarding the potential of the experimental virtual environment to promote cognitive and motor rehabilitation, as well as the potential of the treatment to enhance risks and/or negatively influence the patient's development. Based on the very positive appraisal of the experts, we propose that the experimental virtual environment is a promising alternative tool for the rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy. PMID:27403154

  13. Effects of Abnormal Oral Reflexes on Speech Articulation in Persian Speaking Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

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    DADGAR, Hooshang; HADIAN, Mohammad Reza; LIRA, Ortega Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of abnormal oral reflexes and speech sound production in children with severe cerebral palsy. Materials & Methods Seven oral reflexes such as, rooting, mouth-opening, biting, chewing, lip, tongue, and suckling were examined in 52Persian-speaking monolingual children with spastic cerebral palsy (ages 5-10 yr).Phonetic information tests were administered to investigate their ability for articulation of the speech sounds. Results A significant relationship between three (i.e. the chewing, lip, and biting reflexes) out of the seven abnormal oral reflexes and the speech articulation was noticed. The presence of the chewing reflex was associated with deficits in production of /s, z, š,č/ sounds. The lip reflex was associated with deficits in the production of /p, m, r, j, f, č/ sounds. The biting reflex was associated with deficits in the production of /z, l, y and š/ sounds. No significant relationship was found between the rooting, mouth-opening, tongue, and suckling reflexes and sound articulation. Conclusion The presence of abnormal reflexes in the children with spastic cerebral palsy would suggest a correlation between these reflexes and sound articulation in Iranian children with spastic cerebral palsy. Hence, these observations might suggest some disturbances in normal speech development. PMID:27375753

  14. Energy Efficiency in Gait, Activity, Participation, and Health Status in Children with Cerebral Palsy

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    Kerr, Claire; Parkes, Jackie; Stevenson, Mike; Cosgrove, Aidan P.; McDowell, Brona C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish if a relationship exists between the energy efficiency of gait, and measures of activity limitation, participation restriction, and health status in a representative sample of children with cerebral palsy (CP). Secondary aims were to investigate potential differences between clinical subtypes and gross motor…

  15. Sensory Feedback Training for Improvement of Finger Perception in Cerebral Palsy

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    Tobias Blumenstein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To develop and to test a feedback training system for improvement of tactile perception and coordination of fingers in children and youth with cerebral palsy. Methods. The fingers of 7 probands with cerebral palsy of different types and severity were stimulated using small vibration motors integrated in the fingers of a hand glove. The vibration motors were connected through a microcontroller to a computer and to a response 5-button keyboard. By pressing an appropriate keyboard button, the proband must indicate in which finger the vibration was felt. The number of incorrect responses and the reaction time were measured for every finger. The perception and coordination of fingers were estimated before and after two-week training using both clinical tests and the measurements. Results. Proper functioning of the developed system in persons with cerebral palsy was confirmed. The tactile sensation of fingers was improved in five of seven subjects after two weeks of training. There was no clear tendency towards improvement of selective use of fingers. Conclusion. The designed feedback system could be used to train tactile perception of fingers in children and youth with cerebral palsy. An extensive study is required to confirm these findings.

  16. Level of Motivation in Mastering Challenging Tasks in Children with Cerebral Palsy

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    Majnemer, Annette; Shevell, Michael; Law, Mary; Poulin, Chantal; Rosenbaum, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe and identify factors associated with motivation in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Children with CP were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Children were assessed using the Leiter Intelligence Test, the Gross Motor Function Measure, and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale. Parents…

  17. Feeding Interventions for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Review of the Evidence

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    Snider, Laurie; Majnemer, Annette; Darsaklis, Vasiliki

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To examine the evidence of the effectiveness of different feeding interventions for children with cerebral palsy. Methods: A search of 12 electronic databases identified all relevant studies. For each study, the quality of the methods was assessed according to the study design. A total of 33 articles were retrieved, and 21 studies were…

  18. Action planning in typically and atypically developing children (unilateral cerebral palsy).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craje, C.; Aarts, P.B.M.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.; Steenbergen, B.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the development of action planning in children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP, aged 3-6 years, n=24) and an age matched control group. To investigate action planning, participants performed a sequential movement task. They had to grasp an object (a wooden pl

  19. Development of non-verbal intellectual capacity in school-age children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, D. W.; Ketelaar, M.; Gorter, J. W.; van Schie, P. E.; Becher, J. G.; Lindeman, E.; Jongmans, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are at greater risk for a limited intellectual development than typically developing children. Little information is available which children with CP are most at risk. This study aimed to describe the development of non-verbal intellectual capacity of sch

  20. Measuring intellectual ability in cerebral palsy: The comparison of three tests and their neuroimaging correlates.

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    Ballester-Plané, Júlia; Laporta-Hoyos, Olga; Macaya, Alfons; Póo, Pilar; Meléndez-Plumed, Mar; Vázquez, Élida; Delgado, Ignacio; Zubiaurre-Elorza, Leire; Narberhaus, Ana; Toro-Tamargo, Esther; Russi, Maria Eugenia; Tenorio, Violeta; Segarra, Dolors; Pueyo, Roser

    2016-09-01

    Standard intelligence scales require both verbal and manipulative responses, making it difficult to use in cerebral palsy and leading to underestimate their actual performance. This study aims to compare three intelligence tests suitable for the heterogeneity of cerebral palsy in order to identify which one(s) could be more appropriate to use. Forty-four subjects with bilateral dyskinetic cerebral palsy (26 male, mean age 23 years) conducted the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM), the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-3rd (PPVT-III) and the Wechsler Nonverbal Scale of Ability (WNV). Furthermore, a comprehensive neuropsychological battery and magnetic resonance imaging were assessed. The results show that PPVT-III gives limited information on cognitive performance and brain correlates, getting lower intelligence quotient scores. The WNV provides similar outcomes as RCPM, but cases with severe motor impairment were unable to perform it. Finally, the RCPM gives more comprehensive information on cognitive performance, comprising not only visual but also verbal functions. It is also sensitive to the structural state of the brain, being related to basal ganglia, thalamus and white matter areas such as superior longitudinal fasciculus. So, the RCPM may be considered a standardized easy-to-administer tool with great potential in both clinical and research fields of bilateral cerebral palsy.

  1. An Exploration of Loneliness: Communication and the Social Networks of Older People with Cerebral Palsy

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    Ballin, Liora; Balandin, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Background: There is a large body of research focusing on the experiences of loneliness of older adults, yet little is known about the loneliness experiences of older adults with lifelong disability. In this paper, the authors present some findings from a larger qualitative study on the loneliness experiences of older people with cerebral palsy.…

  2. Meta-analysis of the effect of strengthening interventions in individuals with cerebral palsy.

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    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the evidence that strengthening interventions can improve muscle strength and activity in individuals with cerebral palsy. The search focused on studies that employed strength training for children with cerebral palsy for which six electronic databases were used to extract literature published from 2001 to 2012. The key terms used in these searches were combined strength training, strengthening, weight training, weight lifting, resistance, and cerebral palsy. The quality of each study was assessed using the PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database) scale. Thirteen randomized controlled trial studies were selected and divided into categories according to program type, mode, and outcome measures. The overall effect sizes of each study and types of strengthening were large. Strengthening exercise improved muscle strength to a greater degree, when practiced 3 times per week in 40-50 min sessions than in other categories of session length, and greater improvement was observed in younger children than in older. The effect size of the activities and variables related to gait, except for gait endurance, were medium to large. The effect size of individual muscles was large, but the effect sizes for ankle plantar flexor, hip abductor/adductor, and extensor were insignificant. Strengthening interventions are useful for increasing muscle strength in individuals with cerebral palsy, specifically in youth and children, and optimal exercise consisted of 40- to 50-min sessions performed 3 times per week. Although strengthening interventions may improve activities, including gait, more studies that are rigorous are needed to determine the contributions to gross motor function.

  3. A Neurocognitive Perspective on Developmental Disregard in Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy

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    Houwink, Annemieke; Aarts, Pauline B. M.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Steenbergen, Bert

    2011-01-01

    A common problem in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) is the asymmetrical development of arm and hand capacity caused by the lack of use of the affected upper limb, or developmental disregard. In this paper, we provide a neuropsychological model that relates developmental disregard to attentional processes and motor learning. From this…

  4. Cognitive correlates of mathematical achievement in children with cerebral palsy and typically developing children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenks, K.M.; Lieshout, E.C. van; Moor, J.M.H. de

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Remarkably few studies have investigated the nature and origin of learning difficulties in children with cerebral palsy (CP). AIMS: To investigate math achievement in terms of word-problem solving ability in children with CP and controls. Because of the potential importance of reading fo

  5. Changes in Trunk and Head Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy after Hippotherapy: A Pilot Study

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    Shurtleff, Tim L.; Engsberg, Jack R.

    2010-01-01

    Hippotherapy (HPOT) is a therapy that uses horse movement. This pilot investigation objectively evaluated the efficacy of HPOT in improving head/trunk stability in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The participants were six children with spastic diplegia and six children without disability. Head and trunk stability was challenged by using a…

  6. Therapist-Designed Adaptive Riding in Children With Cerebral Palsy : Results of a Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angsupaisal, Mattana; Visser, Baudina; Alkema, Anne; Meinsma-van der Tuin, Marja; Maathuis, Carel G. B.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2015-01-01

    Background. It is debatable whether adaptive riding (AR) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) improves postural control and gross motor development. Objective. The study aim was to explore the feasibility of an extensive assessment protocol for a randomized controlled trial of therapist-designed ada

  7. Arm Swing during Walking at Different Speeds in Children with Cerebral Palsy and Typically Developing Children

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    Meyns, Pieter; Van Gestel, Leen; Massaad, Firas; Desloovere, Kaat; Molenaers, Guy; Duysens, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) have difficulties walking at a normal or high speed. It is known that arm movements play an important role to achieve higher walking speeds in healthy subjects. However, the role played by arm movements while walking at different speeds has received no attention in children with CP. Therefore we investigated the…

  8. Differentiation between non-neural and neural contributors to ankle joint stiffness in cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Gooijer-van de Groep, K.L.; De Vlugt, E.; De Groot, J.H.; Van der Heijden-Maessen, H.C.M.; Wielheesen, D.H.M.; Van Wijlen-Hempel, R.M.S.; Arendzen, J.H.; Meskers, C.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Spastic paresis in cerebral palsy (CP) is characterized by increased joint stiffness that may be of neural origin, i.e. improper muscle activation caused by e.g. hyperreflexia or non-neural origin, i.e. altered tissue viscoelastic properties (clinically: “spasticity” vs. “contracture”). D

  9. Reference values for anaerobic performance and agility in ambulatory children and adolescents with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, Olaf; Bloemen, Manon; Kruitwagen, Cas; Takken, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to provide reference values of anaerobic performance and agility in a group of children and adolescents with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Method A total of 300 children (184 males, 116 females) with spastic CP were recruited from 26 rehabilitation centres in six differe

  10. Modified Constraint-Induced Therapy for Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Margaret; Ziviani, Jenny; Naylor, Olivia; Evans, Ruth; Novak, Iona; Herbert, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Conventional constraint-based therapies are intensive and demanding to implement, particularly for children. Modified forms of constraint-based therapies that are family-centred may be more acceptable and feasible for families of children with cerebral palsy (CP)-but require rigorous evaluation using randomized trials. The aim of this study…

  11. Effectiveness of Adaptive Pretend Play on Affective Expression and Imagination of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hsieh-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) have difficulty participating in role-pretending activities. The concept of adaptive play makes play accessible by modifying play materials for different needs or treatment goals for children with CP. This study examines the affective expressions and imagination in children with CP as a function of…

  12. Treadmill Training with Partial Body-Weight Support in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Akmer; Krosschell, Kristin; Spira, Deborah Gaebler

    2009-01-01

    OKAim: The aim of this systematic review was to examine the literature on the effects of partial body-weight support treadmill training (PBWSTT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) on functional outcomes and attainment of ambulation. Method: We searched the relevant literature from 1950 to July 2007. We found eight studies on the use of PWSBTT on…

  13. Gaze Behaviour during Interception in Children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kampen, P. M.; Ledebt, A.; Smorenburg, A. R. P.; Vermeulen, R. J.; Kelder, M. E.; van der Kamp, J.; Savelsbergh, G. J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Anticipatory gaze behaviour during interceptive movements was investigated in children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy (SUCP), and related to the side of the intracerebral lesion. Five children with lesions of the right hemisphere (RHL) and five children with lesions of the left hemisphere (LHL) had to walk towards and intercept a ball that…

  14. Psychiatric Disorders among Children with Cerebral Palsy at School Starting Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorgaas, H. M.; Hysing, M.; Elgen, I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present population study was to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in children with cerebral palsy (CP), as well as the impact of comorbid conditions. A cohort of children with CP born 2001-2003, and living in the Western Health Region of Norway were evaluated at school starting age. Parents were interviewed with the…

  15. Twenty Weeks of Computer-Training Improves Sense of Agency in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, A.; Christensen, M. S.; Nielsen, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) show alteration of perceptual and cognitive abilities in addition to motor and sensory deficits, which may include altered sense of agency. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether 20 weeks of internet-based motor, perceptual and cognitive training enhances the ability of CP children to determine whether they…

  16. Fundamental Movement Skills and Physical Activity among Children with and without Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capio, Catherine M.; Sit, Cindy H. P.; Abernethy, Bruce; Masters, Rich S. W.

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental movement skills (FMS) proficiency is believed to influence children's physical activity (PA), with those more proficient tending to be more active. Children with cerebral palsy (CP), who represent the largest diagnostic group treated in pediatric rehabilitation, have been found to be less active than typically developing children. This…

  17. Intelligibility of 4-Year-Old Children with and without Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hustad, Katherine C.; Schueler, Brynn; Schultz, Laurel; DuHadway, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors examined speech intelligibility in typically developing (TD) children and 3 groups of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who were classified into speech/language profile groups following Hustad, Gorton, and Lee (2010). Questions addressed differences in transcription intelligibility scores among groups, the effects of utterance…

  18. Action planning in typically and atypically developing children (unilateral cerebral palsy)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crajé, M.C.; Aarts, P.B.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.; Steenbergen, B.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the development of action planning in children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP, aged 3-6 years, n = 24) and an age matched control group. To investigate action planning, participants performed a sequential movement task. They had to grasp an object (a wooden

  19. Effect of Task Constraint on Reaching Performance in Children with Spastic Diplegic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yun-Huei; You, Jia-Yuan; Cherng, Rong-Ju

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to examine the effect of task constraint on the reaching performance in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and to examine the correlations between the reaching performance and postural control. Eight children with CP and 16 typically developing (TD) children participated in the study. They performed a…

  20. Effect of seat surface inclination on postural control during reaching in preterm children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadders-Algra, Mijna; van der Heide, Jolanda C.; Fock, Johanna M.; Stremmelaar, Elisabeth; van Eykern, Leo A.; Otten, Bert

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose Because it is debatable whether seat surface inclination improves motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP), the effect of seat surface tilting on postural control and quality of reaching was studied. Subjects The subjects were 58 children with CP aged 2 to 11 years

  1. Whole-exome sequencing points to considerable genetic heterogeneity of cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McMichael, G.; Bainbridge, M.N.; Haan, E.; Corbett, M.; Gardner, A.; Thompson, S.; Bon, B.W.M. van; Eyk, C.L. van; Broadbent, J.; Reynolds, C.; O'Callaghan, M.E.; Nguyen, L.S.; Adelson, D.L.; Russo, R.; Jhangiani, S.; Doddapaneni, H.; Muzny, D.M.; Gibbs, R.A.; Gecz, J.; MacLennan, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common, clinically heterogeneous group of disorders affecting movement and posture. Its prevalence has changed little in 50 years and the causes remain largely unknown. The genetic contribution to CP causation has been predicted to be ~2%. We performed whole-exome sequencing

  2. A Systematic Review of Common Physiotherapy Interventions in School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Liz; Baker, Richard; Harvey, Adrienne

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review focused on the common conventional physiotherapy interventions used with children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 4 to 18 years, and critically appraised the recent evidence of each of these interventions using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. The search strategy yielded 34 articles after…

  3. Efficacy of Intensive Versus Nonintensive Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Metaanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpino, Carla

    2010-01-01

    A commonly used treatment for cerebral palsy in children is so-called "conventional therapy", which includes physiotherapy or the neurodevelopmental approach. Although more intensive rehabilitative treatment is thought to be more effective than less intensive interventions, this assumption has not been proven. In this study we compared the…

  4. Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices as a Measure of Cognitive Functioning in Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, R.; Junque, C.; Vendrell, P.; Narberhaus, A.; Segarra, D.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cognitive dysfunction is frequent in Cerebral Palsy (CP). CP motor impairment and associated speech deficits often hinder cognitive assessment, with the result being that not all CP studies consider cognitive dysfunction. Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices is a simple, rapid test which can be used in persons with severe motor…

  5. Measurement of the functional impact of adaptive seating technology in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryan, S.E.

    2009-01-01

    Many young children with cerebral palsy have motor impairments that affect their ability to sit and do activities unsupported. They often rely on special adaptive seating devices for postural control and stability. Healthcare practitioners generally accept that these products improve functioning in

  6. ТREATMENT STRATEGY OF FLEXION CONTRACTURE OF THE WRIST JOINT IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Владимир Александрович Новиков

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objective of study was to assess the effectiveness of transplantation of m. flexor carpi ulnaris tendon on the place of m. extensor carpi radialis brevis / longus (Green operation to eliminate the deficit of active wrist joint extension in children with cerebral palsy. Materials and methods. The present study is based on a survey of children with cerebral palsy with affected upper limb. The main criterion for selection of patients was the presence of active extension deficit in the wrist joint, both isolated and in combination with other contractures of the upper limb joints. Total 22 patients with spastic forms of cerebral palsy were examined. Results and conclusions. Green operation is a good method of surgical treatment of active extension deficit in the wrist joint in patients with cerebral palsy. In the presence of moderately severe contractures in the wrist joint, serial casting can eliminate them completely. Presence of a fixed pronation contracture of the forearm is a factor that reduces the effectiveness of FCU transplantation. Pronation contracture should be corrected before or during Green surgery. FCU transplantation is effective for children of any age, but its effectiveness is reduced from 12 years old.

  7. Neurorehabilitation with versus without resistance training after botulinum toxin treatment in children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Jensen, Bente Rona; Nielsen, Lone M

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of physical rehabilitation with (PRT) and without (CON) progressive resistance training following treatment of spastic plantarflexors with botulinum toxin type A (BoNT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: Fourteen children with CP performed supervised...... in the two groups, and the improvement was related to the reduction in antagonist (soleus) co-activity (Ptypes of physical rehabilitation...

  8. Motor imagery training in hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a potentially useful therapeutic tool for rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, B.; Craje, Céline; Nilsen, D.M.; Gordon, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Converging evidence indicates that motor deficits in cerebral palsy (CP) are related not only to problems with execution, but also to impaired motor planning. Current rehabilitation mainly focuses on alleviating compromised motor execution. Motor imagery is a promising method of training the more 'c

  9. Association between motor and mental functioning in toddlers with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enkelaar, Lotte; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Gorter, Jan Willem

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to examine the association between motor and mental functioning in toddlers with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: The Mental and Motor Scales of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-Second Edition (BSID-II) were administered. Subjects: Seventy-eight toddlers with CP (mean a

  10. Comprehensive Quantification of the Spastic Catch in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Bar-On; Erwin, Aertbelien; Guy, Molenaers; Herman, Bruyninckx; Davide, Monari; Ellen, Jaspers; Anne, Cazaerck; Kaat, Desloovere

    2013-01-01

    In clinical settings, the spastic catch is judged subjectively. This study assessed the psychometric properties of objective parameters that define and quantify the severity of the spastic catch in children with cerebral palsy (CP). A convenience sample of children with spastic CP (N = 46; age range: 4-16 years) underwent objective spasticity…

  11. Gait Patterns in Hemiplegic Children with Cerebral Palsy: Comparison of Right and Left Hemiplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study are to compare quantitatively the gait strategy of the right and left hemiplegic children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) using gait analysis. The gait strategy of 28 right hemiparetic CP (RHG) and 23 left hemiparetic CP (LHG) was compared using gait analysis (spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters) and considering the hemiplegic…

  12. Motor imagery for walking: A comparison between cerebral palsy adolescents with hemiplegia and diplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molina, M.; Kudlinski, C.; Guilbert, J.; Spruijt, S.; Steenbergen, B.; Jouen, F.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate whether motor imagery (MI) could be observed in cerebral palsy (CP) participants presenting a bilateral affected body side (diplegia) as it has been previously revealed in participants presenting a unilateral body affected sided (hemiplegia). MI capacity for

  13. Motor imagery for walking: A comparison between cerebral palsy adolescents with hemiplegia and diplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molina, M.; Kudlinski, C.; Guilbert, J.; Spruijt, S.; Steenbergen, B.; Jouen, F.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate whether motor imagery (MI) could be observed in cerebral palsy (CP) participants presenting a bilateral affected body side (diplegia) as it has been previously revealed in participants presenting a unilateral body affected sided (hemiplegia). MI capacity for

  14. Neuromuscular Adaptations to Eccentric Strength Training in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Siobhan; Hamer, Peter; Alderson, Jacqueline; Lloyd, David

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To determine the neuromuscular outcomes of an eccentric strength-training programme for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: In this randomised, parallel-group trial with waiting control, 14 participants with CP (six males, eight females; mean age 11y, SD 2y range 9-15y), diagnosed with upper-limb spasticity were…

  15. Romantic Relationships and and Sexual Experiences of Adolescents and Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.H.G. Wiegerink (Diana)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To describe the development of romantic relationships and sexual experiences of young adults with cerebral palsy (CP) and the physical and emotional obstacles they experience with sexuality. Regarding the ICF domains we investigated whether this development is associated with

  16. Gait Patterns in Twins with Cerebral Palsy: Similarities and Development over Time after Multilevel Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drongelen, Stefan; Dreher, Thomas; Heitzmann, Daniel W. W.; Wolf, Sebastian I.

    2013-01-01

    To examine gait patterns and gait quality, 7 twins with cerebral palsy were measured preoperatively and after surgical intervention. The aim was to study differences and/or similarities in gait between twins, the influence of personal characteristics and birth conditions, and to describe the development of gait over time after single event…

  17. A Predictive Mathematical Model of Muscle Forces for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Samuel C. K.; Ding, Jun; Prosser, Laura A.; Wexler, Anthony S.; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine if our previously developed muscle model could be used to predict forces of the quadriceps femoris and triceps surae muscles of children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Twenty-two children with CP (12 males, 10 females; mean age 10y, SD 2y, range 7-13y; Gross Motor Function…

  18. Ankle torque steadiness is related to muscle activation variability and coactivation in children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Rose, Martin Høyer; Sløk, Rikke;

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) investigate the significance of muscle activation variability and coactivation for the ability to perform steady submaximal ankle torque (torque steadiness) in healthy children and those with cerebral palsy (CP), and (2) assess ankle function during isometric...

  19. Feasibility of bioelectrical impedance analysis in children with a severe generalized cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veugelers (Rebekka); C. Penning (Corine); L. van Gulik (Laura); D. Tibboel (Dick); H.M. Evenhuis (Heleen)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The need is strong for an accurate and easy-to-perform test to evaluate the nutritional state of children who have a severe generalized cerebral palsy, defined as a severe motor handicap and an intellectual disability. For that purpose, we determined the feasibility of bioelec

  20. Twenty weeks of home-based interactive training of children with cerebral palsy improves functional abilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jakob; Greve, Line Z; Kliim-Due, Mette;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Home-based training is becoming ever more important with increasing demands on the public health systems. We investigated whether individualized and supervised interactive home-based training delivered through the internet improves functional abilities in children with cerebral palsy...

  1. The Preschool Attainment Record: A Concurrent Validity Study with Cerebral Palsied Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasner, Paul R.; Silverstein, Leonard

    1976-01-01

    Twenty-seven multiply handicapped cerebral palsied preschool children were administered the Preschool Attainment Record, The Vineland Maturity Scale, and the Gesell Developmental Schedules in order to assess concurrent validity on the first measure. Significant correlations were obtained among the three measures. (Author/JKS)

  2. Interlimb coordination during forward walking is largely preserved in backward walking in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyns, P.; Molenaers, G.; Desloovere, K.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Limb kinematics in backward walking (BW) are essentially those of forward walking (FW) in reverse. It has been argued that subcortical mechanisms could underlie both walking modes. METHODS: Therefore, we tested whether participants with supraspinal/cortical deficits (i.e. cerebral palsy)

  3. The digital memory game: an assistive technology resource evaluated by children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Neide Silva da Cunha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The activities of daily living are routine self-maintenance tasks. Children with cerebral palsy can have difficulties, which can vary according to their level of motor impairment, in the performance of functional activities such as feeding and dressing themselves. The use of digital memory gaming can be a play activity and a technological resource that stimulates cognitive skills and contributes to the development of persons with disabilities. The objective of this article is to analyze the usability and effectiveness of a digital memory game for activities of daily living with children with cerebral palsy. Two children with cerebral palsy, one aged 5 and the other aged 7, participated in the investigation. The results obtained in the usability analysis are satisfactory because there were no major problems with the interface and the time available for the game and the rules presented were observed. The results also reveal the effectiveness of digital memory gaming for the recognition of objects and the activities of daily life. The importance of digital memory gaming for children with cerebral palsy is discussed.

  4. Production and Perception of Mandarin Tone in Adults with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Jing-Yi; Weismer, Gary; Kent, Ray D.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to document tone production and intelligibility deficits in Mandarin-speaking persons with cerebral palsy (CP). Spastic, athetoid, and mixed types of CP were studied, along with a control group, to investigate the possibility of tone production and intelligibility deficits that were differentially…

  5. Daily activities of school-age children with cerebral palsy : development and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    In care and research, there is increasing interest in the daily lives of children with cerebral palsy (CP). So far, we know that CP can have a limiting impact on daily activities such as locomotion and self-care. What we, however, don’t know is how children with CP develop over time in terms of thei

  6. Effect of multilevel botulinum toxin A and comprehensive rehabilitation on gait in cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Knol, Dirk L.; Speth, Lucianne A.; Maathuis, Carel G.; Jongerius, Peter H.; Becher, Jules G.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of multilevel botulinum toxin A and comprehensive rehabilitation on gait pattern, muscle length, and spasticity, a multicenter randomized trial was performed in 46 children with spastic cerebral palsy who walk with flexed knees. Their mean age was 8.0 years (range 4 to 11 year

  7. Hearing rehabilitation in cerebral palsy: development of language and hearing after cochlear implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anacléia Melo da Silva Hilgenberg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Auditory rehabilitation in children with bilateral severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss with cochlear implant has been developed in recent decades; however, the rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy still remains a challenge to otolaryngology and speech therapy professionals. OBJECTIVE: To verify the effectiveness of cochlear implants in the development of auditory and language skills in children with cerebral palsy. METHODS: A prospective analytical study. The evaluation of auditory responses to speech test was applied to the children in this study at regular intervals following implantation. Standardized tests that assess and quantify the development of auditory and language skills were administered and speech therapy video records and speech therapy files were analyzed. All children went through individually tailored intensive audiological rehabilitation programs following cochlear implantation. RESULTS: Two participants had gradual auditory and language development when compared to other participants who reached advanced levels in hearing and oral language classifications. CONCLUSION: The use of the Cochlear implant enabled participants to reach advanced stages of hearing and language skills in three of the five participants with cerebral palsy in this study. This electronic device is a viable therapeutic option for children with cerebral palsy to help them achieve complex levels of auditory and language skills.

  8. Assessment of specific characteristics of abnormal general movements : does it enhance the prediction of cerebral palsy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, Elisa G.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2011-01-01

    AIM Abnormal general movements at around 3 months corrected age indicate a high risk of cerebral palsy (CP). We aimed to determine whether specific movement characteristics can improve the predictive power of definitely abnormal general movements. METHOD Video recordings of 46 infants with definitel

  9. Dysarthria in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Clinical Presentation and Impacts on Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schölderle, Theresa; Staiger, Anja; Lampe, Renée; Strecker, Katrin; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although dysarthria affects the large majority of individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) and can substantially complicate everyday communication, previous research has provided an incomplete picture of its clinical features. We aimed to comprehensively describe characteristics of dysarthria in adults with CP and to elucidate the impact of…

  10. Relationship between Kinematics, F2 Slope and Speech Intelligibility in Dysarthria Due to Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Panying; Loucks, Torrey; Kim, Heejin; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A multimodal approach combining acoustics, intelligibility ratings, articulography and surface electromyography was used to examine the characteristics of dysarthria due to cerebral palsy (CP). CV syllables were studied by obtaining the slope of F2 transition during the diphthong, tongue-jaw kinematics during the release of the onset consonant,…

  11. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy and Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Cynthia Marie; Boliek, Carol Ann

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an intensive voice treatment (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, commonly known as LSVT LOUD) for children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and dysarthria. Method: A nonconcurrent multiple baseline single-subject design with replication across 5 children with spastic CP was used.…

  12. Intensive Speech and Language Therapy for Older Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Lindsay; Miller, Nick; Robson, Sheila; Steen, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether speech therapy using a speech systems approach to controlling breath support, phonation, and speech rate can increase the speech intelligibility of children with dysarthria and cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Sixteen children with dysarthria and CP participated in a modified time series design. Group characteristics were…

  13. Pathophysiology of impaired hand function in children with unilateral cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, A.M.; Bleyenheuft, Y.; Steenbergen, B.

    2013-01-01

    Unilateral spastic cerebral palsy, caused by damage to the developing central nervous system, is characterized by motor impairments mainly lateralized to one side of the body, with hand impairments greatly contributing to functional limitations. The integrity of the motor areas and the corticospinal

  14. Pathophysiology of impaired hand function in children with unilateral cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, A.M.; Bleyenheuft, Y.; Steenbergen, B.

    2013-01-01

    Unilateral spastic cerebral palsy, caused by damage to the developing central nervous system, is characterized by motor impairments mainly lateralized to one side of the body, with hand impairments greatly contributing to functional limitations. The integrity of the motor areas and the corticospinal

  15. Does Intellectual Disability Affect the Development of Dental Caries in Patients with Cerebral Palsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Rafaela Nogueira; Alcantara, Carlos Eduardo Pinto; Mota-Veloso, Isabella; Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L.; Oliveira-Ferreira, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the severity of intellectual disability is a factor that affects the development of dental cavities in patients with cerebral palsy. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 165 individuals who were selected from a physical rehabilitation center, a special public school and a regular public school. Of…

  16. Deficits in the Ability to Use Proprioceptive Feedback in Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Daniel J.; Hurvitz, Edward A.; Brown, Susan H.

    2009-01-01

    Compared with motor impairment in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP), less attention has been paid to sensory feedback processing deficits. This includes, especially, proprioceptive information regarding arm position. This study examined the ability of children with hemiplegic CP to use proprioceptive feedback during a goal-directed…

  17. Physical Activity Measurement Instruments for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capio, Catherine M.; Sit, Cindy H. P.; Abernethy, Bruce; Rotor, Esmerita R.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This paper is a systematic review of physical activity measurement instruments for field-based studies involving children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Database searches using PubMed Central, MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and PEDro located 12 research papers, identifying seven instruments that met the inclusion…

  18. Novel Virtual Environment for Alternative Treatment of Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Juliana M; Fernandes, Rafael Carneiro G; Pinto, Cristtiano S; Pinheiro, Plácido R; Ribeiro, Sidarta; de Albuquerque, Victor Hugo C

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a severe condition usually caused by decreased brain oxygenation during pregnancy, at birth or soon after birth. Conventional treatments for cerebral palsy are often tiresome and expensive, leading patients to quit treatment. In this paper, we describe a virtual environment for patients to engage in a playful therapeutic game for neuropsychomotor rehabilitation, based on the experience of the occupational therapy program of the Nucleus for Integrated Medical Assistance (NAMI) at the University of Fortaleza, Brazil. Integration between patient and virtual environment occurs through the hand motion sensor "Leap Motion," plus the electroencephalographic sensor "MindWave," responsible for measuring attention levels during task execution. To evaluate the virtual environment, eight clinical experts on cerebral palsy were subjected to a questionnaire regarding the potential of the experimental virtual environment to promote cognitive and motor rehabilitation, as well as the potential of the treatment to enhance risks and/or negatively influence the patient's development. Based on the very positive appraisal of the experts, we propose that the experimental virtual environment is a promising alternative tool for the rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy.

  19. Sit-to-Stand Movement in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Adriana Neves; Pavao, Silvia Leticia; Rocha, Nelci Adriana Cicuto Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) movement is widely performed in daily life and an important pre requisite for acquisition of functional abilities. However, STS is a biomechanical demanding task which requires high levels of neuromuscular coordination, muscle strength and postural control. As children with cerebral palsy (CP) exhibit a series of impairments in…

  20. Control of angular momentum during walking in children with cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, S.M.; Meyns, P.; Jonkers, I.; Kaat, D.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Children with hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (CP) walk with marked asymmetries. For instance, we have recently shown that they have less arm swing on the affected side, and more arm swing at the unaffected side. Such an increase in arm swing at the unaffected side may be aimed at controlling total body

  1. Control of Angular Momentum during Walking in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Kaat, Desloovere; Duysens, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Children with hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (CP) walk with marked asymmetries. For instance, we have recently shown that they have less arm swing on the affected side, and more arm swing at the unaffected side. Such an increase in arm swing at the unaffected side may be aimed at controlling total body angular momentum about the vertical axis,…

  2. Effects of interactive games on motor performance in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSaif, Amer A; Alsenany, Samira

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] Motor control and muscle strength impairments are the prime reasons for motor behavior disorders in children with spastic cerebral palsy. These impairments lead to histological changes in muscle growth and the learning of motor skills. Therefore, such children experience reduced muscle force generation and decreased muscle flexibility. We investigated the effect of training with Nintendo Wii Fit games on motor performance in children with spastic cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Forty children with cerebral palsy spastic diplegia aged 6-10 years diagnosed with level-3 functional capabilities according to the Gross Motor Classification System (GMFCS) were enrolled. Participants were divided randomly into equal groups: group (A) that practiced with the Nintendo Wii Fit game for at least 20 minutes/day for 12 weeks and group (B) that underwent no training (control group). The Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 (mABC-2) was used to assess motor performance, because it mainly involves motor tasks very similar to those involved in playing Nintendo Wii Fit games, e.g., goal-directed arm movements, balancing, and jumping. [Results] There were significant improvements in the subscales of the motor performance test of those who practiced with the Nintendo Wii, while the control group showed no significant changes. [Conclusion] Using motion interactive games in home rehabilitation is feasible for children with cerebral palsy.

  3. Treatment of cerebral palsy children by integrative medical sequential method:a clinical efficacy observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽芳

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the efficacy of integrative medical sequential method in treating cerebral palsy(CP)children’s intelligence development,muscular tension,serum interleukin 6(IL-6),and tumor necrosisfactorα(TNF-α).Methods Totally 111 CP children were randomly assigned to the control group(50 cases)and the treatment group(61 cases).All patients received

  4. Cerebral Palsy and Related Disorders, Prevention and Early Care: An Annotated Bibliography. Volume I, Part One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembolt, Raymond R., Comp.; Roth, Beth, Comp.

    Presented alphabetically by author's name in the first of a two volume annotated bibliography are 602 abstracts of scientific and public education literature on cerebral palsy published through 1971. The entries are said to focus on children under 2 years of age whose development has been delayed by the condition. The bibliography is explained to…

  5. Cerebral Palsy and Related Disorders Prevention and Early Care: An Annotated Bibliography. Volume II, Part Two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembolt, Raymond R., Comp.; Roth, Beth, Comp.

    Presented alphabetically by author's name in the second of the two volume annotated bibliography are 483 abstracts of scientific and public education literature on cerebral palsy published through 1971. The entries are said to focus on children under 2 years of age whose development has been delayed by the condition. The bibliography is explained…

  6. Motor Control of the Lower Extremity Musculature in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpin, David J.; Stuberg, Wayne; Stergiou, Nicholas; Kurz, Max J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to quantify the differences in torque steadiness and variability of the muscular control in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and typically developing (TD) children. Fifteen children with CP (age = 14.2 [plus or minus] 0.7 years) that had a Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) score of I-III and 15…

  7. Clinimetric Properties of the Assessment of Preschool Children's Participation in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-ling; Chen, Chung-yao; Shen, I-hsuan; Liu, I-Shu; Kang, Lin-ju; Wu, Ching-yi

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the criterion-related validity and clinimetric properties of the Assessment of Preschool Children's Participation (APCP) for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Eighty-two children with CP (age range, two to five years and 11 months) and their caregivers participated in this study. The APCP consists of diversity and intensity…

  8. Twenty weeks of computer-training improves sense of agency in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Christensen, Mark Schram; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2012-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) show alteration of perceptual and cognitive abilities in addition to motor and sensory deficits, which may include altered sense of agency. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether 20 weeks of internet-based motor, perceptual and cognitive training enhances ...

  9. Motor Learning of a Bimanual Task in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ya-Ching; Gordon, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) have been shown to improve their motor performance with sufficient practice. However, little is known about how they learn goal-oriented tasks. In the current study, 21 children with unilateral CP (age 4-10 years old) and 21 age-matched typically developed children (TDC) practiced a simple bimanual…

  10. Predictors of parent-reported quality of life of adolescents with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Marion; Eisemann, Nora; Arnaud, Catherine;

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Parent-reporting is needed to examine Quality of Life (QoL) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) across all severities. This study examines whether QoL changes between childhood and adolescence, and what predicts adolescent QoL. METHOD: SPARCLE is a European cohort study of children with CP,...

  11. Brain Structure and Executive Functions in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weierink, Lonneke; Vermeulen, R. Jeroen; Boyd, Roslyn N.

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to establish the current knowledge about brain structure and executive function (EF) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Five databases were searched (up till July 2012). Six articles met the inclusion criteria, all included structural brain imaging though no functional brain imaging. Study quality was assessed using…

  12. Interrater Reliability of Goal Attainment Scaling in Rehabilitation of Children With Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, Duco; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Lindeman, Eline; Galama, Krys; Gorter, Jan Willem

    2010-01-01

    Steenbeek D, Ketelaar M, Lindeman E, Galtuna K, Gorter JW. Interrater reliability of goal attainment scaling in rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2010; 91:429-35. Objectives: To determine the interrater reliability of Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) in the routine p

  13. Early vibration assisted physiotherapy in toddlers with cerebral palsy - a randomized controlled pilot trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stark, C.; Herkenrath, P.; Hollmann, H.; Waltz, S.; Becker, I.; Hoebing, L.; Semler, O.; Hoyer-Kuhn, H.; Duran, I.; Hero, B.; Hadders-Algra, M.; Schoenau, E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to investigate feasibility, safety and efficacy of home-based side-alternating whole body vibration (sWBV) to improve motor function in toddlers with cerebral palsy (CP). METHODS: Randomized controlled trial including 24 toddlers with CP (mean age 19 months (SD±3.1); 13 boys). INTERVENTI

  14. Development of the Gross Motor Function Classification System for Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Palisano, Robert J.; Bartlett, Doreen J.; Galuppi, Barbara E.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2008-01-01

    The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) for cerebral palsy has been widely used internationally for clinical, research, and administrative purposes. This paper recounts the ideas and work behind the creation of the GMFCS, reports on the lessons learned, and identifies some philosophical challenges inherent in trying to develop an…

  15. The Relationship between Manual Ability and Ambulation in Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majnemer, Annette; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Shevell, Michael; Poulin, Chantal; Lach, Lucyna; Law, Mary; Schmitz, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between gross motor function and manual ability in 120 adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) (15.2, SD 2.1 years, 59.8% male). Adolescents were evaluated using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS). A neurologist classified CP subtype. Most…

  16. Developmental Trajectories of Daily Activities in Children and Adolescents With Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Rimke C.; Becher, Jules G.; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Smits, Dirk-Wouter; Voorman, Jeanine M.; Tan, Siok Swan; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the developmental trajectories of mobility performance and daily activities in children and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP). To explore the influence of gross motor function and intellectual disability on these trajectories. METHODS: Four hundred and twenty-four Dutch p

  17. Measurement of Habitual Physical Activity Performance in Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanchy, Kelly M.; Tweedy, Sean M.; Boyd, Roslyn

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This systematic review compares the validity, reliability, and clinical use of habitual physical activity (HPA) performance measures in adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Measures of HPA across Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I-V for adolescents (10-18y) with CP were included if at least 60% of items…

  18. Ambulatory Activity of Children with Cerebral Palsy: Which Characteristics Are Important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wely, Leontien; Becher, Jules G.; Balemans, Astrid C. J.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess ambulatory activity of children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 7 to 13 years, and identify associated characteristics. Method: Sixty-two children with spastic CP (39 males, 23 females; mean age 10y 1mo, SD 1y 8mo; age range 7-13y), classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I to III, participated.…

  19. Early vibration assisted physiotherapy in toddlers with cerebral palsy - a randomized controlled pilot trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stark, C.; Herkenrath, P.; Hollmann, H.; Waltz, S.; Becker, I.; Hoebing, L.; Semler, O.; Hoyer-Kuhn, H.; Duran, I.; Hero, B.; Hadders-Algra, M.; Schoenau, E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to investigate feasibility, safety and efficacy of home-based side-alternating whole body vibration (sWBV) to improve motor function in toddlers with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: Randomized controlled trial including 24 toddlers with CP (mean age 19 months (SD+3.1); 13 boys). Interventi

  20. Participation in Home, Extracurricular, and Community Activities among Children and Young People with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlin, Margo N.; Palisano, Robert J.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Kang, Lin-Ju; Polansky, Marcia; Almasri, Nihad; Maggs, Jill

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Participation in home, extracurricular, and community activities is a desired outcome of rehabilitation services for children and young people with cerebral palsy (CP). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of age and gross motor function on participation among children and young people with CP. Method: Five hundred…

  1. Stability of Caregiver-Reported Manual Ability and Gross Motor Function Classifications of Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imms, Christine; Carlin, John; Eliasson, Ann-Christin

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To examine the stability of caregiver-reported classifications of function of children with cerebral palsy (CP) measured 12 months apart. Method: Participants were 86 children (50 males, 36 females) with CP of all motor types and severities who were recruited into a population-based longitudinal study. Children were aged 11 years 8 months (SD…

  2. The relationship between gross motor function and manual ability in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoui, Maryam; Majnemer, Annette; Dagenais, Lynn; Shevell, Michael I

    2013-12-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted to describe the relationship between gross motor function and manual ability in children with cerebral palsy and explore differences between cerebral palsy subtypes and associated comorbidities. Children with cerebral palsy born between 1999 and 2008 were included from the Registre de la Paralyse Cérébrale de Québec identifying 332 children. The overall agreement between Gross Motor Function Classification System and Manual Ability Classification Scale Levels was moderate (kappa 0.457, standard error 0.034) with a strong positive correlation (Spearman rho of 0.820, standard error 0.023). This agreement was moderate among children with spastic quadriparesis and dysketic cerebral palsy, fair in children with spastic diplegia, and poor in children with spastic hemiplegia. Children with cognitive impairment showed a higher correlation than those without cognitive impairment. The correlation between gross motor function and manual ability in children with CP varies based on neurologic subtype and cognitive level.

  3. Developing and Validating the Communication Function Classification System for Individuals with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Paneth, Nigel; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Kent, Raymond D.; Lillie, Janet; Eulenberg, John B.; Chester, Ken, Jr.; Johnson, Brenda; Michalsen, Lauren; Evatt, Morgan; Taylor, Kara

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to create and validate the Communication Function Classification System (CFCS) for children with cerebral palsy (CP), for use by a wide variety of individuals who are interested in CP. This paper reports the content validity, interrater reliability, and test-retest reliability of the CFCS for children with CP.…

  4. Perawatan Gigi dengan Anestesi Umum pada Anak Cerebral Palsy (Laporan Kasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Putriany A. M. Putriany

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This report describes an 11 years old boy with Cerebral Palsy who treated under general anesthesia, because patient extremely uncooperative. Treatment involved 2 GIC restorations and 7 extractions. Under general anesthesia, total oral rehabilitation can be finished at a single operative visit with minimal psychological trauma. At follow-ip visit patient exhibited positive behavior and better coping with dental situation.

  5. Perawatan Gigi dengan Anestesi Umum pada Anak Cerebral Palsy (Laporan Kasus)

    OpenAIRE

    Tri Putriany A. M. Putriany; Sarworini Bagio Budiardjo; Ismu Suharsono Suwelo

    2015-01-01

    This report describes an 11 years old boy with Cerebral Palsy who treated under general anesthesia, because patient extremely uncooperative. Treatment involved 2 GIC restorations and 7 extractions. Under general anesthesia, total oral rehabilitation can be finished at a single operative visit with minimal psychological trauma. At follow-ip visit patient exhibited positive behavior and better coping with dental situation.

  6. Effectiveness of physical therapy interventions for children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttila, Heidi; Autti-Rämö, Ilona; Suoranta, Jutta;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the effectiveness of physical therapy (PT) interventions on functioning in children with cerebral palsy (CP). METHODS: A search was made in Medline, Cinahl, PEDro and the Cochrane library for the period 1990 to February 2007. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on PT...

  7. Amount and Focus of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy for Young Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisano, Robert J.; Begnoche, Denise M.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Bartlett, Doreen J.; McCoy, Sarah Westcott; Chang, Hui-Ju

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) services for a cohort of 399 children with cerebral palsy (CP), 2-6 years old, residing in the United States and Canada. Parents completed a services questionnaire by telephone interview. Therapists classified children's Gross Motor Function Classification…

  8. Assessment of Postural Control in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavao, Silvia Leticia; dos Santos, Adriana Neves; Woollacott, Marjorie Hines; Rocha, Nelci Adriana Cicuto Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    This paper aimed to review studies that assessed postural control (PC) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and describe the methods used to investigate postural control in this population. It also intended to describe the performance of children with CP in postural control. An extensive database search was performed using the keywords: postural…

  9. Perception-Action and Adaptation in Postural Control of Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barela, Jose A.; Focks, Grietje M. Jaspers; Hilgeholt, Toke; Barela, Ana M. F.; Carvalho, Raquel de P.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the coupling between visual information and body sway and the adaptation in this coupling of individuals with cerebral palsy (CP). Fifteen children with and 15 without CP, 6-15 years old, were required to stand upright inside of a moving room. All children first performed two trials with no movement of the room…

  10. The influence of estimated body segment parameters on predicted joint kinetics during diplegic cerebral palsy gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, D; Walsh, M; O'Sullivan, R; O'Brien, T; Simms, C K

    2014-01-01

    Inverse Dynamic calculations are routinely used in joint moment and power estimates during gait with anthropometric data often taken from published sources. Many biomechanical analyses have highlighted the need to obtain subject-specific anthropometric data (e.g. Mass, Centre of Mass, Moments of Inertia) yet the types of imaging techniques required to achieve this are not always available in the clinical setting. Differences in anthropometric sets have been shown to affect the reactive force and moment calculations in normal subjects but the effect on a paediatric diplegic cerebral palsy group has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of using different anthropometric sets on predicted sagittal plane moments during normal and diplegic cerebral palsy gait. Three published anthropometric sets were applied to the reactive force and moment calculations of 14 Cerebral Palsy and 14 Control subjects. Statistically significant differences were found when comparing the different anthropometric sets but variability in the resulting sagittal plane moment calculations between sets was low (0.01-0.07 Nm/kg). In addition, the GDI-Kinetic, used as an outcome variable to assess whether differences were clinically meaningful, indicated no clinically meaningful difference between sets. The results suggest that the effects of using different anthropometric sets on the kinetic profiles of normal and diplegic cerebral palsy subjects are clinically insignificant.

  11. Inferential Ability in Children with Cerebral Palsy, Spina Bifida and Pragmatic Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holck, Pernille; Sandberg, Annika Dahlgren; Nettelbladt, Ulrika

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate and compare the ability to make inferences in three groups of children ranging from 5;2 to 10;9 years: 10 children with cerebral palsy (CP), 10 children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus (SBH) and 10 children with pragmatic language impairment (PLI). The relationship between inferential and literal…

  12. Children with Cerebral Palsy, Spina Bifida and Pragmatic Language Impairment: Differences and Similarities in Pragmatic Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holck, Pernille; Nettelbladt, Ulrika; Sandberg, Annika Dahlgren

    2009-01-01

    Pragmatically related abilities were studied in three clinical groups of children from 5 to 11 years of age; children with cerebral palsy (CP; n = 10), children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus (SBH; n = 10) and children with pragmatic language impairment (PLI; n = 10), in order to explore pragmatic abilities within each group. A range of…

  13. Context Therapy: A New Intervention Approach for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Johanna; Law, Mary C.; Pollock, Nancy; Wilson, Brenda; Russell, Dianne J.; Walter, Stephen D.; Rosenbaum, Peter; Galuppi, Barb

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To describe the development of context therapy, a new intervention approach designed for a randomized controlled trial. Method: Therapists were trained to change task and environmental factors to achieve parent-identified functional goals for children with cerebral palsy. Therapists did not provide any remediation strategies to change the…

  14. Exploring Communication Technology Behaviour of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    rasid, Nadia natasha binte mohamed; Nonis, Karen P.

    2015-01-01

    Communication among adolescents with cerebral palsy can be restricted with traditional Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) device coupled with environmental and social barriers. The advance of communication technology offer solutions to reduce such barriers. Given that there is limited research in communication behaviours of…

  15. The Influence of Motor Impairment on Autonomic Heart Rate Modulation among Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamuner, Antonio Roberto; Cunha, Andrea Baraldi; da Silva, Ester; Negri, Ana Paola; Tudella, Eloisa; Moreno, Marlene Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    The study of heart rate variability is an important tool for a noninvasive evaluation of the neurocardiac integrity. The present study aims to evaluate the autonomic heart rate modulation in supine and standing positions in 12 children diagnosed with cerebral palsy and 16 children with typical motor development (control group), as well as to…

  16. Treatment of Infantile Cerebral Palsy by Scalp Acupuncture Combined with Point Injection in 48 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Li-min; XIANG Li-min

    2003-01-01

    The author treated forty-eight cases of infantile cerebral palsy with scalp acupuncture and point injection. After two courses of treatment the infants made progress in different degrees. Eight cases were cured,sixteen cases were obviously improved, twenty-two cases were improved and two cases were unchanged. The total effective rate was 95.8%.

  17. Predicting Speech Intelligibility with a Multiple Speech Subsystems Approach in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jimin; Hustad, Katherine C.; Weismer, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Speech acoustic characteristics of children with cerebral palsy (CP) were examined with a multiple speech subsystems approach; speech intelligibility was evaluated using a prediction model in which acoustic measures were selected to represent three speech subsystems. Method: Nine acoustic variables reflecting different subsystems, and…

  18. Developmental trajectories of social participation in individuals with cerebral palsy : A multicentre longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Siok Swan; Wiegerink, Diana J H G; Vos, Rimke C.; Smits, Dirk Wouter; Voorman, Jeanine M.; Twisk, Jos W R; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Roebroeck, Marij E.; Dallmeijer, A. J.; Vos, R. C.; Van Eck, M.; Van Schie, P.; Voorman, J. M.; Becher, J. G.; Schuengel, C.; Ketelaar, M.; Smits, D. W.; Lindeman, E.; Jongmans, M.; Roebroeck, M. E.; Tan, S. S.; Wiegerink, D. J H G; Van Meeteren, J.; Reinders-Messelink, H. A.; Gorter, J. W.; Verheijden, J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to determine the developmental trajectories of social participation, by level of gross motor function and intellectual disability, in a Dutch population of individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 1 to 24 years. Method: As part of the Pediatric Rehabilitation Research in the N

  19. Outcome Assessments in Children with Cerebral Palsy, Part II: Discriminatory Ability of Outcome Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Anita M; Gorton, George; Oeffinger, Donna; Barnes, Douglas; Calmes, Janine; Nicholson, Diane; Damiano, Diane; Abel, Mark; Kryscio, Richard; Rogers, Sarah; Tylkowski, Chester

    2007-01-01

    Discriminatory ability of several pediatric outcome tools was assessed relative to Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level in patients with cerebral palsy. Five hundred and sixty-two patients (400 with diplegia, 162 with hemiplegia; 339 males, 223 females; age range 4-18y, mean 11y 1mo [SD 3y 7mo]), classified as GMFCS Levels I to…

  20. Health-related physical fitness of ambulatory adolescents and young adults with spastic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.F.J. Nooijen (Carla); J. Slaman (Jorrit); W.M.A. van der Slot (Wilma); H.J. Stam (Henk); M.E. Roebroeck (Marij); R.J.G. van den Berg-Emons (Rita)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractOBJECTIVE: To describe in detail the health-related physical fitness of adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy, compared with able-bodied references, and to assess differences related to Gross Motor Functioning Classification System (GMFCS) level and distribution of cerebra

  1. Drooling in children with cerebral palsy: effect of salivary flow reduction on daily life and care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burg, J.J. van der; Jongerius, P.H.; Hulst, K. van; Limbeek, J. van; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of salivary flow reduction on daily life and provision of care in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Parents of children with CP were asked to fill in a questionnaire on the impact of drooling on the daily life of their children and their famil

  2. Botulinum toxin effect on salivary flow rate in children with cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerius, P.H.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Limbeek, J. van; Gabreëls, F.J.M.; Hulst, K. van; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type A in reducing salivary flow rate in children with cerebral palsy (CP) with severe drooling. METHODS: During a controlled clinical trial, single-dose BoNT injections into the submandibular salivary glands were compared wi

  3. Emergent Literacy Activities, Instructional Adaptations and School Absence of Children with Cerebral Palsy in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Marieke; de Moor, Jan; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to get an overview of the emergent literacy activities, instructional adaptations and school absence of children with cerebral palsy (CP) compared to normally developing peers. The results showed that there were differences between the groups regarding the amount of emergent literacy instruction. While time…

  4. Epilepsy in Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy Due to Perinatal Arterial Ischaemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanigasinghe, Jithangi; Reid, Susan M.; Mackay, Mark T.; Reddihough, Dinah S.; Harvey, A. Simon; Freeman, Jeremy L.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the frequency, risk factors, manifestations, and outcome of epilepsy in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) due to perinatal arterial ischaemic stroke (AIS). Method: The study group comprised 63 participants (41 males, 22 females) from a population-based CP register whose brain imaging showed…

  5. Improvements in children with cerebral palsy following intrathecal baclofen: use of the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago Care and Comfort Caregiver Questionnaire (RIC CareQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Karin W; Tann, Beverley; Mutlu, Akmer; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah

    2014-03-01

    Implantation of an intrathecal baclofen pump is recommended for children with cerebral palsy as a means to improve care and comfort when other options fail to control severe hypertonia. Making an assessment of a child's spasticity-related limitations in both routine care and activity is a necessary component of selection of intrathecal baclofen candidates. The Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago Care and Comfort Caregiver Questionnaire (RIC CareQ) is a validated, easy-to-use questionnaire that elicits information about the ease of daily activity and caregiving in patients with severe spasticity. Questionnaires completed by caregivers and patients at a pediatric physiatry spasticity clinic over an 11-year period were reviewed to evaluate whether the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago Care and Comfort Caregiver Questionnaire captured improved caregiving and comfort of children with cerebral palsy and severe spasticity following intrathecal baclofen pump implantation. The Questionnaire scores showed improvement after intrathecal baclofen pump implantation, consistent with subjective reports of patient and caregiver satisfaction.

  6. Parent and professional reports of the quality of life of children with cerebral palsy and associated intellectual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White-Koning, Melanie; Grandjean, Hélène; Colver, Allan; Arnaud, Catherine

    2008-08-01

    To examine parent-professional agreement in proxy-reports of child quality of life (QoL) and the factors associated with low child QoL in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and associated intellectual impairment. Professional (teacher, therapist, or residential carer) and parent reports of QoL for 204 children (127 males, 77 females, mean age 10 y 4 mo [SD 1y 6mo]; range 8-12 y) with CP and IQprofessional agreement was studied using correlation and mean differences; multilevel logistic regression was used to determine factors influencing QoL reports and agreement. The mean parent-reported scores of child QoL were significantly higher than the professional reports in the Psychological well-being domain and significantly lower for Social support. The average frequency of disagreement (parent-professional difference >0.5SD of scores) over all domains was 62%. High levels of stress in parenting negatively influenced parent reports of child QoL compared with professional reports, while child pain was associated with professionals rating lower than parents. Proxies do not always agree when reporting the QoL of children with severe disabilities. Parental well-being and child pain should be taken into account in the interpretation of QoL reports in such children.

  7. Inhibitory and excitatory amino acids in the cerebrospinal fluid of children with two types of cerebral palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haibin Yuan; Li Wang; Fei Yin; Li Li; Jing Peng

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Under normal conditions, excitatory amino acids are dynamically balanced with inhibitory amino acids. Excitatory amino acids have been implicated in perinatal brain injury. OBJECTIVE: To investigate differences in the levels of the excitatory amino acids glutamic acid and aspartic acid, and the inhibitory amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of children with spastic cerebral palsy or athetotic cerebral palsy. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Case-control exploratory observation of neurotransmitter in patients. The experiment was performed in the Pediatrics Department of the Second Affiliated Hospital of Changsba Medical College, the Cerebral Palsy Center of Xiangtan Affiliated Hospital of South China University and the Pediatrics Department of Xiangya Hospital, between February 2006 and May 2007. PARTICIPANTS: We selected 27 children with cerebral palsy, including 13 with spastic cerebral palsy and 14 with athetotic cerebral palsy. We selected 10 patients who were not affected by any neurological disease as controls. METHODS: Two mL blood-free CSF was harvested between the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae of each patient after anesthesia, and stored at 70℃. One mL CSF was mixed with 10 mg sulfosalicylic acid and placed in ice-bath for 10 minutes, then centrifuged 2 000 g for 10 minutes. The supernatant was collected for amino acid quantitation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The concentrations of glutamic acid, aspartic acid and GABA in the CSF were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorometric method. The correlation of glutamie acid, aspartic acid and GABA levels with muscular tension in children with cerebral palsy was analyzed using linear dependence. RESULTS: The concentration of GABA was significantly lower in both spastic cerebral palsy and athetotic cerebral palsy patients than in the control group (P 0.05). CONCLUSION: Spastic cerebral palsy and athetotic cerebral palsy patients exhibit an

  8. Physical activity stimulation program for children with cerebral palsy did not improve physical activity: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leontien Van Wely

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Question: In children with cerebral palsy, does a 6-month physical activity stimulation program improve physical activity, mobility capacity, fitness, fatigue and attitude towards sports more than usual paediatric physiotherapy? Design: Multicentre randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation, blinded assessments and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Forty-nine walking children (28 males aged 7–13 years with spastic cerebral palsy and severity of the disability classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System level I–III. Intervention: The intervention group followed a 6-month physical activity stimulation program involving counselling through motivational interviewing, home-based physiotherapy, and 4 months of fitness training. The control group continued their usual paediatric physiotherapy. Outcome measures: Primary outcomes were walking activity (assessed objectively with an activity monitor and parent-reported physical activity (Activity Questionnaire for Adults and Adolescents. Secondary outcomes were: mobility capacity, consisting of Gross Motor Function Measure-66 (GMFM-66, walking capacity and functional strength, fitness (aerobic and anaerobic capacity, muscle strength, self-reported fatigue, and attitude towards sport (child and parent. Assessments were performed at baseline, 4 months, 6 months and 12 months. Results: There were no significant intervention effects for physical activity or secondary outcomes at any assessment time. Positive trends were found for parent-reported time at moderate-to-vigorous intensity (between-group change ratio = 2.2, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.4 and GMFM-66 (mean between-group difference = 2.8 points, 95% CI 0.2 to 5.4 at 6 months, but not at 12 months. There was a trend for a small, but clinically irrelevant, improvement in the children's attitudes towards the disadvantages of sports at 6 months, and towards the advantages of sports at 12 months. Conclusions: This physical

  9. Anestesia e paralisia cerebral Anestesia y parálisis cerebral Anesthesia and cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Március Vinícius M Maranhão

    2005-01-01

    JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A paralisia cerebral (PC) é uma doença não progressiva decorrente de lesão no sistema nervoso central, levando a um comprometimento motor do paciente. O portador de PC freqüentemente é submetido a procedimentos cirúrgicos devido a doenças usuais e situações particulares decorrentes da paralisia cerebral. Foi objetivo deste artigo revisar aspectos da paralisia cerebral de interesse para o anestesiologista, permitindo um adequado manuseio pré, intra e pós-operatório n...

  10. Acupuncture for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Yejiao; He, Qi; Zhang, Xinghe

    2017-01-01

    Background Cerebral palsy (CP), a childhood disease of high morbidity and serious harmfulness, has no effective therapies to completely relieve the associated pain. Acupuncture has been used widely in China to alleviate several CP symptoms, such as pain and motion disorders, despite the deficiency of high-quality evidence related to this practice. Objective The aim of this systematic review protocol is to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of children with CP. Methods The following electronic databases will be searched: Cochrane Library, Web of Science, EBASE, Springer, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wan-fang database, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, and other sources. All published randomized controlled trials from inception to December 2016 will be included. RevMan V.5.3 software will be implemented for the assessment of bias risk, data synthesis, subgroup analysis, and meta-analyses if inclusion conditions are met. Individuals recruited into the trials will include children with all types of CP, and these individuals will be involved as coresearchers to develop and evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of children with CP. Due to language barriers, only English and Chinese articles will be retrieved. Results The systematic review will synthesize the available knowledge surrounding acupuncture for children with CP. The findings will be synthesized to determine the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for children with CP. Conclusions The review has not been completed. This protocol presents a proper method to implement the systematic review, and ensures transparency for the completed review. Findings from the systematic review will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and results will be presented at relevant conferences. The data of individual patients will not be included

  11. Operative treatment for spinal deformities in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Carol C

    2013-11-01

    The higher the functional impairment, the more likely patients with cerebral palsy (cP) are to develop a scoliotic deformity. This is usually long-sweeping, C-shaped, and progressive in nature, since the causes of the deformity, such as muscular weakness, imbalance, and osteoporosis, persist through adulthood. In contrast to idiopathic scoliosis, not only is the spine deformed, the patient is also sick. This multimorbidity warrants a multidisciplinary approach with close involvement of the caregivers from the beginning. Brace treatment is usually ineffective or intolerable in light of the mostly stiff and severe deformities and the poor nutritional status. The pros and cons of surgical correction need to weighed up when pelvic obliquity, subsequent loss of sitting balance, pressure sores, and pain due to impingement of the rib cage on the ileum become issues. General risks of, for example, pulmonary or urogenital infections, pulmonary failure, the need for a tracheostoma, permanent home ventilation, and death add to the particular surgery-related hazards, such as excessive bleeding, surgical site infections, pseudarthrosis, implant failure, and dural tears with leakage of cerebrospinal fluid. The overall complication rate averages around 25 %. From an orthopedic perspective, stiffness, marked deformities including sagittal profile disturbances and pelvic obliquity, as well as osteoporosis are the main challenges. In nonambulatory patients, long fusions from T2/T3 with forces distributed over all segments, low-profile anchors in areas of poor soft tissue coverage (sublaminar bands, wires), and strong lumbosacropelvic modern screw fixation in combination with meticulous fusion techniques (facetectomies, laminar decortication, use of local autologous bone) and hemostasis can be employed to keep the rate of surgical and implant-related complications at an acceptably low level. Excessive posterior release techniques, osteotomies, or even vertebrectomies in cases of

  12. Reliability of "Modified timed up and go" test in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjivani N Dhote

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Timed up and go (TUG is a quick test used in clinical practice as an outcome measure to assess functional ambulatory mobility or dynamic balance in adults. However, little information is available on TUG test used in cerebral palsy. Hence, the purpose of our study was to assess the intra-rater reliability of TUG test in cerebral palsy children. Aim and Objective: To assess within-session and test-retest reliability after 1 week of TUG test in cerebral palsy children. Setting and Design: It was an a cross-sectional observational study conducted in a neurorehabilitation unit, with 30 cerebral palsy children of 4-12 years, within Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS level I, II, III, and with an IQ ≥50.The sampling technique used was purposive sampling excluding children with cognitive deficit. Materials and Methods: Subjects performed TUG on three occasions - Initial assessment (time 1, 30 min after initial assessment (time 2, and 1 week after initial assessment (time 3. Three trails were conducted for each of the three occasions. The mean score of three trials was documented as the final score. Within-session and test-retest reliability were analyzed using scores of time 1 and 2, and time 1 and 3, respectively. Statistical Analysis: The documented data were analyzed for within-session and test-retest reliability after 1 week of TUG test by using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Results: Reliability of TUG test was high, with ICC of 0.99 for within-session reliability and 0.99 for test-retest reliability. Conclusion: Intra-rater reliability of TUG test in cerebral palsy children was found to be high.

  13. Predictors of participation of adolescents with cerebral palsy: A European multi-centre longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Van Mô; Colver, Allan; Dickinson, Heather O; Marcelli, Marco; Michelsen, Susan I; Parkes, Jackie; Parkinson, Kathryn; Rapp, Marion; Arnaud, Catherine; Nystrand, Malin; Fauconnier, Jérôme

    2014-11-14

    We investigated whether childhood factors that are amenable to intervention (parenting stress, child psychological problems and pain) predicted participation in daily activities and social roles of adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). We randomly selected 1174 children aged 8-12 years from eight population-based registers of children with CP in six European countries; 743 (63%) agreed to participate. One further region recruited 75 children from multiple sources. These 818 children were visited at home at age 8-12 years, 594 (73%) agreed to follow-up at age 13-17 years. We used the following measures: parent reported stress (Parenting Stress Index Short Form), their child's psychological difficulties (Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire) and frequency and severity of pain; either child or parent reported the child's participation (LIFE Habits questionnaire). We fitted a structural equation model to each of the participation domains, regressing participation in childhood and adolescence on parenting stress, child psychological problems and pain, and regressing adolescent factors on the corresponding childhood factors; models were adjusted for impairment, region, age and gender. Pain in childhood predicted restricted adolescent participation in all domains except Mealtimes and Communication (standardized total indirect effects β -0.05 to -0.18, 0.01

  14. Predicting low bone density in children and young adults with quadriplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Richard C; Kairalla, John; Abbas, Almas; Stevenson, Richard D

    2004-06-01

    Many children and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP) have diminished bone mineral density (BMD) and a propensity to fracture with minimal trauma. The aim of this study was to identify variables which are routinely assessed as part of standard clinical care and that might be used to identify those individuals with CP who are most likely to have low BMD. One hundred and seven participants (ages 2 years 1 month to 21 years 1 month; mean age 10 years 11 months, SD 4 years 2 months) with moderate to severe spastic CP were assessed in detail. This included gathering clinical data, taking anthropometric measures of growth and nutrition, as well as dual energy X-ray absorptiometry measures of BMD. Seventeen participants were ambulatory with assistance (Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS] level III), and 90 were capable of little or no ambulation even with assistance (26 GMFCS level IV and 64 GMFCS level V). Weight z score proved to be the best predictor of BMD z score. Declining BMD z scores also correlated with increasing age and greater severity of involvement. It can be predicted, with reasonable reliability, that a 10-year-old non-ambulatory child with quadriplegic CP and a 'typical' weight z score of -2 will have a BMD z score that is at best -2. Prior fractures, use of anticonvulsants, and feeding difficulties further reduce predicted BMD.

  15. Oral health in children with physical (Cerebral Palsy) and intellectual (Down Syndrome) disabilities: Systematic review I

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nova-García, Manuel-Joaquín; Mourelle-Martínez, Mª Rosa; Bartolomé-Villar, Begona

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traditionally, patients with physical and/or intellectual disabilities presented greater oral pathology, owing to their condition and to other external factors. Improved social and health conditions make it necessary to update knowledge on their oral and dental health. Material and Methods For this purpose, a bibliographic review was done regarding the state of oral health of children with these two types of disability, in comparison with a control group. Some of the guidelines of the PRISMA statement were taken into account. The ranking of the articles found is based on the modified Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. The final number of articles evaluated was 14. Parameters such as dental caries, oral hygiene, gingival health, dental traumas, malocclusion and habits were considered. Results There is no consensus among authors regarding dental caries, oral hygiene and gingival health. The different results obtained are due in part to the fact that the methodologies used were not the same. However, it has been noted that, when studying other parameters and regardless of the methodology employed, the results obtained are similar. Conclusions Children with physical and intellectual disabilities constitute a group that needs early and regular dental care in order to prevent and limit the severity of the pathologies observed. Key words:Oral health, dental caries, malocclusion, oral habits, dental trauma, oral hygiene, disabled child, cerebral palsy and Down syndrome. PMID:27398187

  16. Teacher literacy expectations for kindergarten children with cerebral palsy in special education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Marieke; Verhoeven, Ludo; de Moor, Jan

    2009-09-01

    Teacher expectations are important for the literacy development of children. The goal of this study was to investigate to what extent teacher expectations for future literacy success at the end of elementary school differed for children with cerebral palsy (CP) as compared with peers without disabilities in kindergarten. In addition, we investigated to what extent teacher literacy expectations of children with CP were related to additional impairments such as speech, intellectual and physical impairments, and to the current level of emergent literacy skills. Forty-nine teachers of children with CP and 71 teachers of non-disabled children responded to the questionnaire. The results showed that teacher expectations for future reading and writing success of children with CP were lower (all P values are teachers had no idea what to expect for the future reading development, and 12 teachers did not know what to expect for the future writing development of the child with CP. Multiple regression analysis showed that teacher reading expectations could best be predicted by both intelligence and emergent literacy skills (Pteacher writing skills could best be predicted by intelligence (P<0.001).

  17. Wheeled mobility: the perception of parents of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Volpini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Children with cerebral palsy (CP often use mobility devices as facilitators of their functionality and independence, and these devices may have a positive impact on their caregivers’ quality of life. Considering a family-centered approach, parents assume a decisive role in different stages of the therapeutic process, guiding several actions of the rehabilitation professionals during the search, development and/or adaptation of equipment that meet the specific needs of customers. The aim of this research was to understand the perceptions of parents of children with CP on the use of the wheelchair in the daily routines of their children. This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews with 16 parents of CP children who were wheelchair users assisted at ‘Associação Mineira de Reabilitação’. Content analysis grounded the categorization of themes that emerged from the interviews. The results expressed in themes such as “The look on the daily routine” and “The look on the equipment” pointed out characteristics related to the benefits of the use of the wheelchair in promoting child participation at home, at school, and in community environments, as well as different features of wheelchairs that facilitate or hamper their use in children’s daily routine.

  18. Gastrostomy tube feeding in children with cerebral palsy: a prospective, longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Peter B; Juszczak, Edmund; Bachlet, Allison M E; Lambert, Bridget; Vernon-Roberts, Angharad; Grant, Hugh W; Eltumi, Muftah; McLean, Liz; Alder, Nicola; Thomas, Adrian G

    2005-02-01

    We report a longitudinal, prospective, multicentre cohort study designed to measure the outcomes of gastrostomy tube feeding in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Fifty-seven children with CP (28 females, 29 males; median age 4y 4mo, range 5mo to 17y 3mo) were assessed before gastrostomy placement, and at 6 and 12 months afterwards. Three-quarters of the children enrolled (43 of 57) had spastic quadriplegia; other diagnoses included mixed CP (6 of 57), hemiplegia (3 of 57), undiagnosed severe neurological impairment (3 of 57), ataxia (1 of 57), and extrapyramidal disorder (1 of 57). Only 7 of 57 (12%) could sit independently, and only 3 of 57 (5%) could walk unaided. Outcome measures included growth/anthropometry, nutritional intake, general health, and complications of gastrostomy feeding. At baseline, half of the children were more than 38D below the average weight for their age and sex when compared with the standards for typically-developing children. Weight increased substantially over the study period; the median weight z score increased from -3 before gastrostomy placement to -2.2 at 6 months and -1.6 at 12 months. Almost all parents reported a significant improvement in their child's health after this intervention and a significant reduction in time spent feeding. Statistically significant and clinically important increases in weight gain and subcutaneous fat deposition were noted. Serious complications were rare, with no evidence of an increase in respiratory complications.

  19. Household task participation of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and typical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Maíra Ferreira do; Drummond, Adriana de França; Coster, Wendy J; Mancini, Marisa Cotta

    2014-02-01

    This cross-sectional study compared patterns of household task participation (e.g., performance, assistance and independence) of youth with cerebral palsy (CP), Down syndrome (DS) and typical development (TD). Parents of 75 children and adolescents were interviewed to report on their youths' active engagement in daily self-care and family-care tasks, using the children helping out: responsibilities, expectations and supports (CHORES) questionnaire. Groups were equivalent in age (mean=9.3 years; SD=2.2 years), sex (male=39; female=36), respondent education, presence of maid, and number of siblings at home, but differed on child cognitive function and family socioeconomic status, with the DS and the CP groups scoring lower than the TD group but not different from each other. ANOVA revealed group differences on CHORES performance of self-care tasks (p=0.004), on total participation score (p=0.04) and on assistance scores (phome is not prevented by the presence of their disabilities.

  20. Influence of the environment on performance of gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatudimu, Margaret Bukola

    2012-01-01

    Assessment and physiotherapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) are conventionally carried out in the hospital or clinic setting. However, the daily lives of these children include a variety of environmental settings in addition to the clinical setting. The objective of this study was therefore to explore the possible influence of the environment on motor function in children with CP. Purposively selected children with CP (n=107), ages 1 and 6 years with mean age of 2.1 years (SD 1.10 yrs), were involved in this study. The motor function of each child was assessed in the hospital and at their homes within a one-week interval, using the gross motor function measure (GMFM); this was done at the baseline and on a monthly basis for eight consecutive months. The paired t-test rank was computed to compare the overall GMFM score and each of the sub-domain scores measured in the clinic and at home. GMFM scores measured at home were significantly higher than those measured in the clinic and this pattern was also obtained for the sub-domains throughout the study period, suggesting that children performed gross motor functions better at their homes than in the clinic.

  1. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation for patients with cerebral palsy: improving long-term care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trabacca A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Trabacca, Teresa Vespino, Antonella Di Liddo, Luigi Russo Scientific Institute I.R.C.C.S. “Eugenio Medea” – “La Nostra Famiglia” – Unit for Severe Disabilities in Developmental Age and Young Adults (Developmental Neurology and Neurorehabilitation, Brindisi Research Centre, Brindisi, Italy Abstract: Cerebral palsy (CP is one of the most frequent causes of child disability in developed countries. Children with CP need lifelong assistance and care. The current prevalence of CP in industrialized countries ranges from 1.5 to 2.5 per 1,000 live births, with one new case every 500 live births. Children with CP have an almost normal life expectancy and mortality is very low. Despite the low mortality rate, 5%–10% of them die during childhood, especially when the severe motor disability is comorbid with epilepsy and severe intellectual disability. Given this life expectancy, children with CP present with a lifelong disability of varying severity and complexity, which requires individualized pathways of care. There are no specific treatments that can remediate the brain damage responsible for the complex clinical–functional dysfunctions typical of CP. There are, however, a number of interventions (eg, neurorehabilitation, functional orthopedic surgery, medication, etc aimed at limiting the damage secondary to the brain insult and improving these patients’ activity level and participation and, therefore, their quality of life. The extreme variability of clinical aspects and the complexity of affected functions determine a multifaceted skill development in children with CP. There is a need to provide them with long-term care, taking into account medical and social aspects as well as rehabilitation, education, and assistance. This long-term care must be suited according to children’s developmental stage and their physical, psychological, and social development within their life contexts. This impacts heavily on the national

  2. 阳光鹿童让cerebral palsy baby站起来

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹培红

    2014-01-01

    什么是cerebral palsy baby?其实就是俗称的脑瘫儿童。但是,李光玉大夫一再强调,最好不要用脑瘫这个词,其实,这个病只是脑神经的损伤而不是不可以恢复的。本次采访用了cerebral palsy baby而不是中文脑瘫。这个用英文也是源于前一段时间的渐冻人ALS,用英文称呼这个病,对中国人来说,显得没那么可怕。我们也期望cerebral palsy能够有一个更好的中文译名,因为,这些孩子本来就可以站起来!

  3. Impaired motor planning and motor imagery in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy: challenges for the future of pediatric rehabilitation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, B.; Jongbloed-Pereboom, M.; Spruijt, S.; Gordon, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Compromised action performance is one of the most characteristic features of children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (USCP). Current rehabilitation efforts predominantly aim to improve the capacity and performance of the affected arm. Recent evidence, however, suggests that compromised motor

  4. Clinical usefulness of Adeli suit therapy for improving gait function in children with spastic cerebral palsy: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Adeli suit therapy (AST) on gross motor function and gait function in children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Two participants with spastic cerebral palsy were recruited to undergo AST. AST was applied in 60-minute sessions, five times per week, with 20 sessions total over 4 weeks. Assessments of gross motor function, spatiotemporal parameters, and functional ambulation performance for gait were conducted. [Results] Gross motor function, cadence, and functional ambulation performance improved after the intervention in both cases. [Conclusion] Although additional follow-up studies are required, the results demonstrated improved gross motor function and functional ambulation performance in the children with cerebral palsy. These findings suggest a variety of applications for conservative therapeutic methods that require future clinical trials in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:27390453

  5. Comparative study between subjective assessment and quantitative evaluation of CT findings with cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugie, Y.; Sugie, H.; Kitai, A.; Maruyama, H.; Fukuyama, Y. (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1982-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed on 200 children with cerebral palsy with Hitachi CT-H250. The CT scans of 136 cases revealed cerebral atrophy with ventricular and/or subarachnoid space enlargement. The lateral ventricles, the third ventricle and the two parts of subarachnoid space on the CT picture were subjectively evaluated and divided into five grades ranging from no enlargement to marked enlargement. In addition, the size of the ventricles and the subarachnoid spaces were quantitatively determined; the transverse diameter of brain (b), the largest width of the anterior horns of the lateral ventricles (c), the bicaudate nuclear distance (d), the greatest width of the third ventricle, the longitudinal cerebral fissure and sylvian fissures as described by Miyao et al. (1978). Comparison of these quantitative techniques confirmed the initial subjective evaluation. However, in some cases, amendment of the subjective evaluation was needed. As mentioned before (Miyao et al.), the cerebral longitudinal fissure was relatively wide in normal infants. Accordingly, it was often difficult to find out abnormal widening only by subjective evaluation. The purpose of this paper was to establish the criteria of quantitative measuring and assessing of the lateral and third ventricles, the cerebral longitudinal fissures, and the sylvian fissures enlargement. Interpretation of some problem cases associated with measuring was also discussed. The quantitative CT evaluation may be a good reference in assessing cerebral atrophy in cerebral palsy and other neurological diseases.

  6. Cerebral hypometabolism in progressive supranuclear palsy studied with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, N.L.; Gilman, S.; Berent, S.; Morin, E.M.; Brown, M.B.; Koeppe, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is characterized by supranuclear palsy of gaze, axial dystonia, bradykinesia, rigidity, and a progressive dementia. Pathological changes in this disorder are generally restricted to subcortical structures, yet the type and range of cognitive deficits suggest the involvement of many cerebral regions. We examined the extent of functional impairment to cerebral cortical and subcortical structures as measured by the level of glucose metabolic activity at rest. Fourteen patients with PSP were compared to 21 normal volunteers of similar age using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography. Glucose metabolism was reduced in the caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, pons, and cerebral cortex, but not in the cerebellum in the patients with PSP as compared to the normal subjects. Analysis of individual brain regions revealed significant declines in cerebral glucose utilization in most regions throughout the cerebral cortex, particularly those in the superior half of the frontal lobe. Declines in the most affected regions of cerebral cortex were greater than those in any single subcortical structure. Although using conventional neuropathological techniques the cerebral cortex appears to be unaffected in PSP, significant and pervasive functional impairments in both cortical and subcortical structures are present. These observations help to account for the constellation of cognitive symptoms in individual patients with PSP and the difficulty encountered in identifying a characteristic psychometric profile for this group of patients.

  7. Elementary school enrolment and its determinants among children with cerebral palsy in Thiruvananthapuram district, Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thekkumkara Surendran Nair Anish

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There is enough documented evidence to prove the benefits of early and appropriate initiation of education among children with cerebral palsy (CP. Aim: To find out the proportion of children with CP who are enrolled for some kind of formal education and to study the determinants of the same. Setting and Design: This cross sectional study was done among children, attending the special clinics at government medical college, Thiruvananthapuram. Materials and Methods: Children between 3 and 12 years of age diagnosed with CP were subjects for the study. Statistical Analysis Used: Enrollment for any form of formal education was the major outcome variable. The factors associated with initiation of formal education were tested using Chi-square test or Fischer′s exact test. Independent association of each factor was evaluated through binary logistic Regression analysis. Results and Conclusions: The mean (SD age of the children (n = 86 was 5.7 (2.3 years with forty-six (53.5% of them being girls. Diplegia was the commonest limb abnormality found. Fifty-two (60.5% children were undergoing some kind of schooling. Those children who were less dependent physically and those who had achieved better language development were regular school goers. After binary logistic regression the ability of a child to speak in sentences (P = 0.008 and ambulatory level of the child (P = 0.019 were factors which favored, whereas delay in attaining the adaptive developmental milestone of transferring objects from one hand to another (P = 0.014 was found to be detrimental for school enrollment.

  8. Changing the main indicators to assess motor function in children with cerebral palsy spastic form by hydrokinesitherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Taran I.V.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to identify the efficiency of the developed technique hydrokinetic system of physical rehabilitation for children 3-5 years old with cerebral palsy spastic form. Examined the impact of comparing the effectiveness of exercise in the water by two techniques: the author and accepted. In experiment involved 24 people aged 3-5 years old with cerebral palsy spastic form. The experiment lasted one year, classes were held hydrokinesitherapy 2 times a week. In the study recorde...

  9. An investigation of the relationship of drooling with nutrition and head control in individuals with quadriparetic cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Taş, Seda Ayaz; Çankaya, Tamer

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship of drooling, nutrition, and head control in individuals with quadriparetic cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-six individuals between the ages 2 and 15 diagnosed with spastic quadriparetic cerebral palsy and their families/caretakers were included in the study. Drooling severity and frequency of individuals was evaluated by using the scale developed by Thomas-Stonell and Greenberg (Drooling Severity and Frequ...

  10. Hip joint pain in children with cerebral palsy and developmental dysplasia of the hip: why are the differences so huge?

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds Non-traumatic hip dislocation in children is most often observed in the course of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and infantile cerebral palsy. The risk of pain sensations from dislocated hip joint differentiates the discussed groups of patients. Will every painless hip joint in children with cerebral palsy painful in the future? Methods Material included 34 samples of joint capsule and 34 femoral head ligaments, collected during open hip joint reduction from 19 children ...

  11. Social Attitudes toward Cerebral Palsy and Potential Uses in Medical Education Based on the Analysis of Motion Pictures

    OpenAIRE

    Marek Jóźwiak; Brian Po-Jung Chen; Bartosz Musielak; Jacek Fabiszak; Andrzej Grzegorzewski

    2015-01-01

    This study presents how motion pictures illustrate a person with cerebral palsy (CP), the social impact from the media, and the possibility of cerebral palsy education by using motion pictures. 937 motion pictures were reviewed in this study. With the criteria of nondocumentary movies, possibility of disability classification, and availability, the total number of motion pictures about CP was reduced to 34. The geographical distribution of movie number ever produced is as follows: North Ameri...

  12. Rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review of the speech therapy approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirata, Gisela Carmona

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are an estimated 30,000-40,000 new cases of cerebral palsy per year in Brazil. Motor disorders caused by cerebral palsy can lead to dysphagia as they may alter the preparatory, oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal phases. Aim: To identify existing rehabilitation methods of swallowing disorders in cerebral palsy, with emphasis on the pursuit of research using the Bobath concept, the Castillo Morales concept, oral sensorimotor therapy, and continuing education. Summary of the findings: We performed a systematic review of the medical and speech therapy literature on the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy spanning 1977-2010 and from all languages and nations. Among the 310 articles retrieved, only 22 (7.09% addressed therapeutic rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy. Of the 22 reports, 12 (54.5% were from Canada, 3 (13.6% were from Japan, 2 (9% were from Brazil, 2 (9% were from Germany, 1 (4.5% was from the USA, 1 (4.5% was from the United Kingdom, and 1 (4.5% was from Poland. Of these reports, 63.6% used oral sensorimotor therapy as a therapeutic method, 36.3% reported continuing education as a therapeutic approach, and only 18.1% and 9% used the Bobath concept and Castillo Morales concept, respectively. Conclusion: Even with a constantly increasing cerebral palsy population, few studies include (rehabilitation in the treatment of oropharyngeal dysphagia in these children.

  13. Effects of recombinant growth hormone replacement and physical rehabilitation in recovery of gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimunde, Pedro; Rodicio, Cristina; López, Natalia; Alonso, Alba; Devesa, Pablo; Devesa, Jesús

    2010-11-30

    Cerebral palsy is an important health issue that has a strong socioeconomic impact. There is no cure for cerebral palsy, and therapeutic approaches only report small benefits for affected people. In this study we assessed the effects of growth hormone treatment (0.3 μg/kg/day) combined with physical rehabilitation in the recovery of gross motor function in children with growth hormone deficiency and cerebral palsy (four males and six females, mean age 5.63 ± 2.32 years) as compared with that observed in a similar population of cerebral palsy children (five males, five females, mean age 5.9 ± 2.18 years) without growth hormone deficiency treated only with physical rehabilitation for two months. The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-88) and Modified Ashworth Scale were performed before commencing the treatment and after completion thereof. In children with cerebral palsy and growth hormone deficiency, Dimension A (P gross motor function in children with growth hormone deficiency and cerebral palsy.

  14. [How to deal with cerebral palsy in 21st century--a new epoch in clinic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chun-Yu; Leng, Li-Ge; Tian, Zeng-Min

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this paper were to define (1) criteria of cerebral palsy; (2) classification of cerebral palsy; (3) etiology, neuroimaging, and epidemiology of cerebral palsy; (4) different kinds of treatments of cerebral palsy. Data were drawn from an international survey of PUBMED (1994-2014) and CNKI (1994-2014). An expert panel used a consensus building technique. The10-point Jadad scale was used to assess the quality of the trials based on the following items, including allocation sequence generation, randomization concealment, methods of blinding, and descriptions of withdrawals and dropouts. Our clinical experience was also summarized. Below is a summary. (1) Further work is warranted to reach agreement for the classification of cerebral palsy. (2) A worldwide prevalence of 1.5-4.0 per 1 000 live births, with an average lifetime cost of 1 million dollars per person in the United States, while it is 1.8-6.0 per 1000 live births in China. (3) Comparison of clinical efficacy of different treatments. In this review, the current advances in different kind of treatments of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy.

  15. Establishing a rat model of spastic cerebral palsy by targeted ethanol injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yadong Yu; Liang Li; Xinzhong Shao; Fangtao Tian; Qinglu Sun

    2013-01-01

    Spastic cerebral palsy is general y considered to result from cerebral cortical or pyramidal tract damage. Here, we precisely targeted the left pyramidal tract of 2-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats placed on a stereotaxic instrument under intraperitoneal anesthesia. Based on the rat brain ste-reotaxic map, a 1-mm hole was made 10 mm posterior to bregma and 0.8 mm left of sagittal suture. A microsyringe was inserted perpendicularly to the surface of the brain to a depth of 9.7 mm, and 15μL of ethanol was slowly injected to establish a rat model of spastic cerebral palsy. After modeling, the rats appeared to have necrotic voids in the pyramidal tract and exhibited typical signs and symptoms of flexion spasms that lasted for a long period of time. These findings indicate that this is an effective and easy method of establishing a rat model of spastic cerebral palsy with good re-producibility. Ethanol as a chemical ablation agent specifical y and thoroughly damages the pyra-midal tract, and therefore, the animals display flexion spasms, which are a typical symptom of the disease.

  16. Having another look at cerebral palsy: Current definitions and classification systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Rainey Perry

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although many music therapists work with clients with cerebral palsy, this diagnostic term has a low profile in current music therapy literature. This is especially the case when the focus of intervention is not in the realm of physical functioning. The frequently co-occurring disorders in sensation, cognition, communication, perception, and behaviour are often the focus of music therapy intervention, particularly with children and adults with severe and multiple disability. Current perspectives on the care and participation of children and adults with cerebral palsy, including motor classification scales, can be useful for research and clinical reporting. These scales are explained and examined, as is the effect of the motor impairments of cerebral palsy on active music therapy methods. Clinical vignettes illustrate the effect of different levels of functional fine motor skills as assessed by the Manual Ability Classification System (Eliasson, A.C., et al, 2006 on musical interaction. Including the term “cerebral palsy” in clinical reports and research also has implications for awareness of music therapy in the wider community.

  17. Quantitative analysis of the corpus callosum in children with cerebral palsy and developmental delay: correlation with cerebral white matter volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panigrahy, Ashok [Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Barnes, Patrick D. [Stanford University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Lucile Salter Packard Children' s Hospital, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Robertson, Robert L. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Sleeper, Lynn A. [New England Research Institute, Watertown, MA (United States); Sayre, James W. [UCLA Medical Center, Departments of Radiology and Biostatistics, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-12-01

    This study was conducted to quantitatively correlate the thickness of the corpus callosum with the volume of cerebral white matter in children with cerebral palsy and developmental delay. Material and methods: A clinical database of 70 children with cerebral palsy and developmental delay was established with children between the ages of 1 and 5 years. These children also demonstrated abnormal periventricular T2 hyperintensities associated with and without ventriculomegaly. Mid-sagittal T1-weighted images were used to measure the thickness (genu, mid-body, and splenium) and length of the corpus callosum. Volumes of interest were digitized based on gray-scale densities to define the hemispheric cerebral white matter on axial T2-weighted and FLAIR images. The thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum was correlated with cerebral white matter volume. Subgroup analysis was also performed to examine the relationship of this correlation with both gestational age and neuromotor outcome. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance and Pearson correlation coefficients. There was a positive correlation between the thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum and the volume of cerebral white matter across all children studied (R=0.665, P=0.0001). This correlation was not dependent on gestational age. The thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum was decreased in the spastic diplegia group compared to the two other groups (hypotonia and developmental delay only; P<0.0001). Within each neuromotor subgroup, there was a positive correlation between thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum and volume of the cerebral white matter. (orig.)

  18. Intrathecal baclofen withdrawal resembling serotonin syndrome in an adolescent boy with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Maria L; Eiland, Lea S

    2008-10-01

    Intrathecal baclofen (ITB) is increasingly being used to reduce spasticity among children with cerebral palsy, dystonia, and spinal cord injuries. However, complications such as withdrawal, which is a potentially life-threatening condition, can occur. Intrathecal baclofen withdrawal should be differentiated with autonomic dysreflexia, malignant hyperthermia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and serotonin syndrome. We report a case of ITB withdrawal secondary to low residual volume in the pump reservoir and resembling serotonin syndrome in an adolescent with cerebral palsy. He presented with agitation, diaphoresis, increasing spasticity, rigidity, jitteriness, hyperreflexia, clonus, tachycardia, hypertension, and rhabdomyolysis. Treatment consisted of emergent refilling of the pump, intravenous diazepam, and oral cyproheptadine. We also emphasize the importance of prompt recognition of ITB withdrawal among high-risk patients.

  19. The efficacy of diazepam in enhancing motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Anna; Mathew, M C; Thomas, Molly; Antonisamy, B

    2005-04-01

    Muscle spasm and hypertonia limit mobility in children with spastic cerebral palsy. This double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized controlled clinical trial studies the clinical efficacy of a low dose of diazepam in enhancing movement in children with spastic cerebral palsy. One hundred and eighty children fulfilled the criteria and were randomly allocated to receive one of two doses of diazepam or placebo at bedtime; 173 completed the study. There was a significant reduction of hypertonia, improvement in the range of passive movement, and an increase in spontaneous movement in the children who received diazepam. There was no report of daytime drowsiness. In developing countries, where cost factors often determine choice of drug, diazepam is a cheap and effective way of relieving spasm and stiffness, optimizing physical therapy and facilitating movement in children with spasticity.

  20. Finger exercise with keyboard playing in adults with cerebral palsy: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Hyun Ju; Cho, Sung-Rae; Jeong, Eunju; Kim, Soo Ji

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of Therapeutic Instrument Music Performance (TIMP) for fine motor exercises in adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Individuals with CP (n = 5) received a total of twelve, 30-min TIMP sessions, two days per week for six to nine weeks. Pre- and post-Music Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) data were used as a measure of hand function. Pre-velocity was significantly different from the normative data obtained from typical adults (n = 20); however, post-velocity did not yield significance, specifically in the second and fifth fingers, indicating improvement in hand function for the adults with cerebral palsy. The finding implies that TIMP using keyboard playing may effectively improve manual dexterity and velocity of finger movement. Based on these results, future program development of instrumental playing for adults with CP is called for to enhance both their independent living skills and quality of life.