WorldWideScience

Sample records for chiiki consortium energy

  1. Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium energy field/R and D high performance flat panel display technology (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium energy bun`ya / koseino flat panel display gijutsu no sogo kaihatsu kenkyu (daiichi nendo ) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    One of the subjects in technology supporting the highly information-oriented society which will develop and diversify toward the 21st century is the construction of high grade man/machine interface. For it, high precision/high luminance/energy saving/thin plane displays are strongly requested. This R and D is to indicate models of systematical development in the region of element technology individually existing in the Shikoku area by forming a regional consortium in the industry/universities/government. Creation of new industries by gathering display related enterprises is a first step in a plan to realize `Display Island Shikoku.` As a concrete target, with the use of high-tech diamond semiconducting technology, a development is conducted of the high performance flat panel display using the negative electron affinity (NEA) electron emitter which drastically solves the problems such as luminance, visibility angle and response speed, the subjects on the commercialized liquid crystal flat panel display. 16 refs., 45 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. FY 2000 report on the results of the regional consortium R and D project - Regional consortium energy field. Third year report. Development of precision farming system combined with the autonomous vehicle for large scale agriculture; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo - chiiki consortium energy bun'ya. Daikibo nogyo muke seimitsu jiritsu soko sagyo shien system no kenkyu kaihatsu (dai 3 nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    A farming supporting system that enables autonomous driving was developed from a viewpoint that the development of super manpower saving technology including automation helps sustainable development of the Japanese agriculture. The following were conducted: development of autonomous driving vehicle, development of automated operation unit, field space mapping for precision agriculture and development of groups of PF (precision farming) work machine (weeder, controller, fertilizer applicator, harvesting machine), development of groups of field work sensor (simple soil analytical system, crop growing sensor, glass yield sensor), development of field information managing database, development of work optimized application software. The operation test on the integration system was made at the model production field. The operation experiment using fertilizer applicator, controller and autonomous driving tractor was carried out at a beet field of 2ha in the farming zone in Tokachi, Hokkaido, and the results were obtained as expected. Further, as to the precision agriculture introduced with developmental equipment, etc., 20% of the energy consumption is expected to be reduced. (NEDO)

  3. Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium energy field / Development of an environmentally friendly industrial cleaning system using near-critical and supercritical carbon dioxide (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium energy bun`ya / chorinkai ryutai wo mochiita kankyo chowagata kogyo senjo sochi no kaihatsu (daiichi nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    In the manufacturing process of semiconductors and in the high tech industry, cleaning is indispensable. At present, when regulation of the use of CFC which used to be much used has been decided on, the conversion to the use of substitutes for CFC cleaning is urgently needed. Transfer to cleaning by water/alcohol/hydrocarbon has been proceeded with, but there are a lot of problems. Out of the development of the cleaning method using supercritical fluid, the paper described the fiscal 1997 result. As to enhancement of efficiency and decrease in size of equipment, a cleaning experiment by high pressure CO2 around the critical point was conducted by integrating nozzle, ultrasonic generator and cavitation generator and adding solvent circulating system. Multi-purpose and energy saving of the equipment were also studied. To establish an analysis method for the cleaning degree, the contaminated component film of trace organic matter with a specified thickness was formed on the silicon wafer, and using the Fourier transform ultrared spectroscopy, a method to determine the film thickness was studied. For the function evaluation for precision machine parts and determination of optimum cleaning conditions, the cleaning/degreasing process of valves were compared with the conventional method. For the product manufacturing, the paper investigated and prepared the data in Japan and from abroad. 55 refs., 79 figs., 18 tabs.

  4. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenbacher, Don [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  5. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on area consortium research and development business, 1st year. Area consortium energy research and development (molding material processing eco-system using powder lubricant); 1998 nendo chiiki consortium energy kenkyu kaihatsu bun'ya. Funtai rikei junkatsuzai wo mochiita sokeizai kako eko system no kenkyu kaihatsu (dai 1 nendo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    A material processing technology demanding but low energy and cost and causing low environmental impact was developed using a powder lubricant in a closed metal die system. An inorganic powder excellent in adhesiveness as lubricant was discovered. Powder lubricants for die casting and new carbon lubricants for metal die forging were also developed. In a test in an eco-die casting system, it was found that power was better than water solution in terms of finish and energy efficiency. In the development of a metal forging system using a powder lubricant, existing graphite lubricants and new powder lubricants containing fullerene were subjected to evaluation (ring tests). Two types of graphite solutions now in use and two powder lubricants were evaluated by the ring tests, and this enabled the comprehension of powder lubricant characteristics. For the development of a die casting system requiring no lubricant, a metal die surface treatment method was found that produces a surface excellent in resisting erosion by the application of the aluminizing ion nitriding composite treatment method. In addition, wettability was compared between a PVD (physical vapor deposition)-formed nitride film and the powder lubricant constituents. The report also refers to surveys conducted for commercialization. (NEDO)

  6. Research and development project of regional consortiums in fiscal 1998. Research and development of regional consortium energy (development of measuring technology to aid energy conservation in electronic device manufacturing processes (design and trial production of IMI) (Report on the result in the first year)); 1998 nendo chiiki consortium energy kenkyu kaihatsu. Denshi kikirui seizo process no sho energy shien keisoku seigyo gijutsu no kaihatsu (IMI no sekkei to shisaku) (dai 1 nendo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This paper summarizes the development of intelligent micro instruments (IMI) inaugurated in fiscal 1998 as the wide-area consortium project for the Tama area. Research and development will be carried out on the following items: IMI substrate elements utilizing micro machining technology, applicable to micro sensors and micro probes, semiconductor process sensors, electronic device measuring probes, signal processing and communication circuits for wireless sensing. This paper describes the achievements during fiscal 1998. Technologies were transferred from the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory of the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology on silicon micro machining and PZT piezoelectric thin film formation. An IMI research laboratory was installed at the Tokyo Metropolitan University. In developing the IMI substrate elements, different beams applicable to sensors and probes were fabricated on a trial basis, and their mechanical properties were measured. For the semiconductor process sensors, discussions were given on micronization on a chlorine ion analyzer. In developing the electronic device measuring probes, the target was placed on measurement of in-situ characteristics of IC chips on a wafer. A prototype transmitting and receiving circuit board was fabricated for developing the wireless sensing. (NEDO)

  7. The Statewide Energy Consortium: A California Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, G. Cleve; Giacosie, Robert V.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the formation and organization of a statewide energy consortium consisting of faculty from 19 campuses of the California State University and Colleges system. Also describes three major consortium activities and reasons for its success. (SK)

  8. Regional new energy vision for Izumi City; 2001 nendo Izumi shi chiiki shin energy vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    For promoting the introduction of new energy and for elevating people's consciousness of such in Izumi City, Kagoshima Prefecture, surveys and studies were conducted concerning the energy demand of the city, the amount of new energy resources in existence, and new energy introduction plans, and then a vision was formulated. The city's yearly energy demand is estimated at approximately 4,011,009 GJ, with approximately 61% to be met by oil-based fuels and approximately 31% by electric power. The amount of new energy resources in existence is estimated at 1,633,806 GJ, equivalent to approximately 41% of the amount of demanded energy. Projects for new energy introduction were discussed, which included the introduction of photovoltaic power into Crane Park, Izumi Municipal Lyceum, and city-operated primary and junior high schools; introduction of a wind power system (600 kW) into the Uwaba highland district; installation of hybrid power-lighted outdoor light in the vicinity of Izumi railway station, in parks, and along a jogging road; introduction of a cogeneration system utilizing biomass energy from a sewage treatment plant; use of hybrid cars for official service; promotion of the introduction of photovoltaic power systems into residences; and electric appliance improvement for power conservation. (NEDO)

  9. Regional new energy vision for Tadami Town; 2001 nendo Tadami machi chiiki shin energy vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    For promoting the introduction of new energy and for enhancing people's consciousness of such at Tadami Town, Fukushima Prefecture, surveys and studies were conducted involving the energy demand characteristics of the town, the amount of new energy resources in existence, and new energy introduction projects, and a vision was formulated. Though there is not a great change through the year in town's demand for power, more power is necessary in winter for heating and lighting. As for demand for gas and oil, demand for heating oil reaches its peak in winter. New energy introduction projects were discussed, which would utilize snow for the dynamization of industries, and studies were conducted about the selection of items to be stored in snow rooms, selection of proper cold heat utilization systems, care to be taken in the designing of facilities, installation of snow rooms, development of specialty goods proper to the town, and so forth. Eco-school development was also studied as an environmental education project harmonizing with the local circumstances. Discussed for the fostering of welfare were an energy business for a Welfare House, snow handling measures linked to new energy utilization systems, and the like. (NEDO)

  10. New energy visions for the Town of Ichinohe district; Ichinohecho chiiki shin energy vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-02-01

    The new energy visions are drawn for Town of Ichinohe, Iwate Pref. The town's population has been generally decreasing since 1975, from 21,433 to 17,906 in 1995. The town consumed energy totaling 288,691Gcal in 1998, of which the transportation sector accounts for 55%, followed by the domestic, commercial and industrial sectors, in this order, the industrial sector accounting for only 7%. The estimated new energy sources available to the town are wind power, power generated by temperature difference at rivers or using snow, solar energy, biomass energy and energy from wastes, in the order of quantity, totaling 137GWh/y as electrical power and 45.6Tcal/y as heat. The priority projects include making Ichinohe Primary School an eco-school, construction of a biomass demonstration plant in the Okunakayama district, introduction of a boiler firing wood chips at Okunakayama Heights, construction of a wind power mill at Takamori Heights, and introduction of new energies by the citizens. (NEDO)

  11. New energy vision drawn up for Fukushima Prefecture; Fukushimaken chiiki shin energy vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    In Fukushima Prefecture, photovoltaic power generation and solar heat utilization will be introduced into public facilities, old official cars will be replaced by clean energy types upon renewal, and cogeneration will be adopted. In every city and town, photovoltaic power generation and solar heat utilization will be introduced into public facilities, clean energy vehicles will be adopted as official cars and garbage collecting vehicles, wind power generation will be introduced, waste treatment facilities will be newly constructed, and they will be provided upon re-construction with systems of refuse fueled power generation and waste heat utilization. The inhabitants of the prefecture will be requested to be positive in adopting the photovoltaic power generation system, water heating system driven by solar heat, and other solar systems, and in purchasing hybrid vehicles or replacing old vehicles with hybrid vehicles. Business people are requested to make use of photovoltaic power generation and solar heat utilization, wind power generation, biomass energy, cogeneration and fuel cells, and clean energy vehicles for their offices and factories. (NEDO)

  12. Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium field/ R and D on the technology to create new organic electroluminescence devices (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium bun`ya / shin`yuki electroluminescence device no sosei gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu (daiichi nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The paper develops the R and D having as core creative technical seeds on the design principle of organic electroluminescence (EL) devices, aims at producing as products a polychrome display and a new energy saving type light source, develops new high efficient luminescent materials which support the production of products with high liability, and develops protective coats universally applicable to optical and electronic devices and sealing technology. In fiscal 1997, the following are commenced: 1) development of luminescent devices, 2) development of new luminescent agents, and 3) development of the mounting technology. In 1), the following are conducted: R and D for improvement of durability of EL devices, development of the process technology for polychroism, multi-coloring, and development of the large picture thin film formation technology. For the development of energy saving type high efficiency light source devices, a method is established for producing organic layers by a new wet coating method. In 3), the R and D are carried out of a method to form inorganic protective coats at low temperature and a method to highly evaluate structural defects in the protective coat. For the sealing of devices, low melting point glass and the forming technology are developed. 41 refs., 112 figs., 19 tabs.

  13. Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium field / R and D on the formation of UHQ transparent conductive films (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium bun`ya / UHQ tomei dodenmaku keisei ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu (daiichi nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    For the formation of low temperature process UHQ transparent conductive films, the development is made of new production process technology exceeding the limit of the conventional technology. The transparent conductive film to be used is ITO. To achieve this purpose, the following were conducted: 1) development of multi-beam UHQ thin film forming equipment, 2) fabrication of low resistance rate transparent conductive film of 10{sup -5}ohm{center_dot}cm order, 3) formation of transparent conductive film around 100degC, 4) evaluation of UHQ transparent conductive film, 5) comprehensive research/survey, etc. In 1), thin film forming equipment is developed which uses characteristics of each excitation beam such as cluster ion beam, radiation and laser. In 2), low resistance rate of 10{sup -5}ohm{center_dot}cm order is realized by ultraprecisely controlling structures of elements composing the film, using the practical equipment developed by Osaka National Research Institute. In 3), low temperature film formation around 100degC is realized by precisely controlling atomic/molecular energy in the reaction. In 4), film evaluation is conducted from a practical aspect by measuring resistance rate, transparency, hole constant, etc. of the film developed. 13 refs., 47 figs., 29 tabs.

  14. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-04-01

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  15. Report on new energy vision at Hinase Town area; 2001 nendo Hinase cho chiiki shin energy vision hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-01

    With an objective of accelerating introduction of and uplifting consciousness on new energies at Hinase Town in Hyogo Prefecture, investigations and discussions were given on the energy demand, quantity of new energies available, and the new energy introduction projects for the town, thus a new energy vision was established. The estimated amount of energy consumption in Hinase Town is 242,814,320,000 kcal in fiscal 2000. The amount of carbon dioxide discharge associated therewith is 76.57 t-CO2/year. Regarding the energy consumption by departments, the industrial department consumes the most, followed by the transportation department, civil household department, and civil business department. The new energy introduction projects have discussed servicing of the bio-gas plant utilizing organic wastes and cogeneration, the new energy introduction projects for the Natural Energy Island at Kakui Island and the ocean ranch consisted of the use of solar heat water warmer, solar cell powered street lights, photovoltaic power generation, and electric cars for sightseeing visitors, the Eco-school promotion project for primary schools, introduction of energy saving devices into the town office, and the new energy proliferation and enlightenment project. (NEDO)

  16. Report on a survey for new energy vision establishment in Yoshimatsu Township; Yoshimatsumachi chiiki shin energy vision sakutei chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This paper reports on a survey for new energy vision establishment in Yoshimatsu Township located in the northern tip of Kagoshima Prefecture. The estimated values for expected usable amounts of the new energies under the vision are solar energy at 3.9 x 10{sup 6} kWh/year, wastes energy at 3349 Gcal/year, small hydraulic power at 0.1 x 10{sup 6} kWh/year, wind power at 14.3 x 10{sup 6} kWh/year, and geothermal energy at 62.25 Gcal/year. The new energies having high possibility for introducing them into the area are solar energy, wind power and small hydraulic power, all being utilized mainly for electric power generation. The specific introduction plan calls for installing wind power plants in the Mizuhara area to expand population exchange and enlighten people on the plan. The same purpose applies to solar energy power plus wind power generation in Ikedaira Park, and the solar energy power generation plan for the highway front. For enhancement, education and enlightenment of the people on welfare, solar energy power plants are intended to be built for the township office building, multi-purpose gymnasium, primary and secondary schools, lunch supply center, and the home of welfare. A micro-hydroelectric power plant is intended to be installed in the Takenaka water purification plant to expand population exchange and enlighten the people on the plan. A solar energy power plant is also planned to be built in front of Yoshimatsu Station (NEDO)

  17. Regional new energy vision drawn up for Kameda Town for fiscal 1998; 1998 nendo Kamedamachi chiiki shin energy vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Approach of Kameda Town, Niigata Prefecture, to the adoption of new energy is described. Concerning the new energy hardware for domestic use, the introduction into residential houses of photovoltaic power generation and/or wind power generation is taken up. Concerning the new energy software, its incorporation into the actual life is considered. As for the approach of industrial circles to the introduction of new energy into themselves, it is thought that they, as in the case of residential houses, will have photovoltaic power generation, wind power generation, hybrid power generation and will accept, in addition, heat pumps to collect heat out of river water or sewage. It is desired that every business will earnestly endeavor to introduce new energy into itself. A biomass energy plant and a greenhouse are studied as model projects. The town authorities will consider the use of new energy in a public installation, the town gymnasium in this case, and a comparison is made between the current energy system, a cogeneration system, and a heat pump system which is a heat source of the future. (NEDO)

  18. Report on a regional new energy vision establishment in Yatsuka Township; Yatsukamachi chiiki shin energy vision sakutei jigyo hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Surveys and discussions were given on establishing a new energy vision in Yatsuka Township in Shimane Prefecture. For the survey on available amount of natural energies (sunlight and wind), all-weather insolation required for solar energy power generation was analyzed by using the NEDO information, and wind was analyzed based on observations at Matsue Meteorological Observatory, Sakai-minato Observatory, and Nakaura Water Gate. In discussing the system, power generation amount in the Matsue area was estimated for the case when solar cells of single crystal silicon plus amorphous hybrid type HIP-H48B1 are used. For wind power generation, power generation amount was calculated from observation values derived at the Nakaura water gate when wind mills with diameters from 2 to 10 m are used. Furthermore, calculations were performed on power amount generated uniformly by using a hybrid system using solar energy power generation and wind power generation. As a result of the discussions, a plan was established to introduce the new energies by means of a solar and wind energy hybrid power generation system to the greenhouse 'Green Stellar' symbolizing the Japan's largest peony production, being capable of year-round peony cultivation. The system is planned to be introduced to the town office building and other public organizations sequentially according to annual programs. (NEDO)

  19. Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium energy field / research and development of a reverse engineering system for local industrial articles (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium bun`ya / chiiki kogeihin muke reverse engineering system no kenkyu kaihatsu (daiichi nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The paper described the fiscal 1997 result of the research on the application of local industrial article use reverse engineering (RE, it had been regarded as imitation and reproduction technology, but has recently been as a part of the production information integration). With the actual local industrial article as standard, which has features in design and was added with local traditionality, such as glass having 3D free-form surface, 3D shape information modeling technology RE is developed, and a system for direct automatic metal mold processing is established, aiming at shortening of delivery date, cost reduction and higher grade. The target of the research is Okinawa prefecture. In fiscal 1997, study was made of the speeding-up of the non-contact 3D shape information inputting (multi-point simultaneous inputting by CCD of the laser reflected light of the actual model) and the data storage technology. Cast iron was selected as molding materials, judging from reactivity/machinability with heat resistant glass. Also studied was the blend of glass materials suitable for press forming. Further, studies were proceeded with of development of intellectual cutting tools into which sensor function is integrated and of virtual reality for facilitating/accelerating the design up to metal mold manufacturing. 39 refs., 88 figs., 21 tabs.

  20. The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy Technology (CARET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, E. M.; Henderson, D. O.; Buffinger, D. R.; Fuller, C. W.; Uribe, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy (CARET) is a research and education program which uses the theme of renewable energy to build a minority scientist pipeline. CARET is also a consortium of four universities and NASA Lewis Research Center working together to promote science education and research to minority students using the theme of renewable energy. The consortium membership includes the HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), Fisk, Wilberforce and Central State Universities as well as Kent State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. The various stages of this pipeline provide participating students experiences with a different emphasis. Some emphasize building enthusiasm for the classroom study of science and technology while others emphasize the nature of research in these disciplines. Still others focus on relating a practical application to science and technology. And, of great importance to the success of the program are the interfaces between the various stages. Successfully managing these transitions is a requirement for producing trained scientists, engineers and technologists. Presentations describing the CARET program have been given at this year's HBCU Research Conference at the Ohio Aerospace Institute and as a seminar in the Solar Circle Seminar series of the Photovoltaic and Space Environments Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. In this report, we will describe the many positive achievements toward the fulfillment of the goals and outcomes of our program. We will begin with a description of the interactions among the consortium members and end with a description of the activities of each of the member institutions .

  1. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and Ca

    2014-11-06

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  2. Advanced Offshore Wind Energy - Atlantic Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempton, Willett

    2015-11-04

    This project developed relationships among the lead institution, U of Delaware, wind industry participants from 11 companies, and two other universities in the region. The participating regional universities were University of Maryland and Old Dominion University. Research was carried out in six major areas: Analysis and documentation of extreme oceanic wind events & their impact on design parameters, calibration of corrosivity estimates measured on a coastal turbine, measurment and modeling of tower structures, measurement and modeling of the tribology of major drive components, and gearbox conditioning monitoring using acoustic sensors. The project also had several educational goals, including establishing a course in wind energy and training graduate students. Going beyond these goals, three new courses were developed, a graduate certificate program in wind power was developed and approved, and an exchange program in wind energy was established with Danish Technical University. Related to the installation of a Gamesa G90 turbine on campus and a Gamesa-UD research program established in part due to this award, several additional research projects have been carried out based on mutual industry-university interests, and funded by turbine revenues. This award and the Gamesa partnership have jointly led to seven graduate students receiving full safety and climb training, to become “research climbers” as part of their wind power training, and contributing to on-turbine research. As a result of the educational program, already six graduate students have taken jobs in the US wind industry.

  3. Let People Bathe in Clean Energy. Regional new energy vision for Matsuyama Town; 2001 nendo Matsuyama machi chiiki shin energy vision. Toumeinal energy wo sosoide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    For promoting the introduction of new energy and for enhancing people's consciousness of such at Matsuyama Town, Yamagata Prefecture, surveys and studies were conducted involving the amount of energy needed by the town, the amount of new energy resources in existence, and new energy introduction projects, and then a vision was formulated. The town demands 120,407-million kcal/year in energy comprising 56.8% from oil based fuels, 39.2% from electric power, and 4.1% from LP gas. As for consumption, 35.6% is consumed by households, 28.9% by industries, 21.3% by transportation, and 14.2% by commerce. The amount of carbon dioxide due to the consumption is estimated at 28,000 t-CO2/year. Key projects for new energy introduction were discussed, which included an eco-town project for introducing photovoltaic power generation systems, passive solar heat utilization systems, clean energy vehicles, and so forth, into public facilities; an eco-agriculture project for utilizing wind power generation and livestock excreta energy; an eco-park project for exhibiting new energies to the public; and an eco-school pilot model project. (NEDO)

  4. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-11

    The numbers of individuals with adequate education and training to participate effectively in the highly technical aspects of environmental site cleanup are insufficient to meet the increasing demands of industry and government. Young people are particularly sensitive to these issues and want to become better equipped to solve the problems which will confront them during their lives. Educational institutions, on the other hand, have been slow in offering courses and curricula which will allow students to fulfill these interests. This has been in part due to the lack of federal funding to support new academic programs. This Consortium has been organized to initiate focused educational effort to reach inner-city youth with interesting and useful energy and environmental programs which can lead to well-paying and satisfying careers. Successful Consortium programs can be replicated in other parts of the nation. This report describes a pilot program in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and Baltimore with the goal to attract and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas, environmental restoration, and waste management.

  5. Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium energy field / R and D of a task adaptation type group architecture transfer robot system, TRIPTERS (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium energy bun`ya / task tekigogata gun kosei hanso robot system TRIPTERS no kaihatsu kenkyu (daiichi nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The paper stated the fiscal 1997 result of the development of a task adaptation type group architecture transfer robot system (TRIPTERS) which can cope with changes in carrying task rapidly and flexibly. R and D were conducted mainly of various functional modules, the operation management technology which enables group architecture, and the basic design of a standardized transfer robot. As to the positioning, studied were the construction of the basic hardware of laser position measuring device, and the application method. Concerning the cooperative carrying, conducted were securing of positioning accuracy of matters to be carried, high speed heavy transfer control, and design of dead reckoning system. Relating to the operation management, passable areas were divided into more than one zones, and the effective path reservation method was constructed so that one and the same zone is not occupied. As to the environmental recognition/obstacle avoidance, developed were actual hour/distance acquisition equipment, and autonomous cars running according to the directions of the color sign recognition system by stereo CCD camera. Also conducted were the development of methods to recognize the distance to obstacles and to discriminate areas, the development of mobile sensor, and the basic experiment on running of the demonstration machine. 44 refs., 153 figs., 15 tabs.

  6. Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium energy field / Development of the plasma use surface treatment process by in-situ control (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium energy bun`ya / in-situ seigyo ni yoru plasma riyo hyohi shori process no kaihatsu (daiichi nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The paper described the fiscal 1997 result of the development. To know of in-plasma phenomena such as carburization and nitriding, a basic plasma experimental device was fabricated for quantitative measurement of reaction activity species. For the study of reaction control between plasma and substrate, a rotary analyzer type ellipsometer was fabricated as a method to detect composition and thickness of the deposit on the substrate surface. For He gas cooling after carburization and hardening, basic specifications for He gas refining/circulating system were confirmed. For perfect non-hazardous processing of exhaust gas from plasma carburization furnace, conducted was the thermodynamic computation of the process. Priority in order of the functions to be possessed as specifications for basic design of mini plant is plasma carburization, He gas cooling, and in-situ measurement. To make the most of the plasma use surface treatment as substitutes for expensive alloy elements, sliding parts/die-cast mold raw materials were carburized to measure the hardness. The Cr carbide coating technology by plasma CVD is also under study as an application example except carburization. 47 refs., 59 figs., 31 tabs.

  7. Survey report on the development/utilization of petroleum substitution energy in the Pacific region; Taiheiyo chiiki sekiyu daitai energy kaihatsu riyo chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The paper collected/analyzed data on petroleum substitution energy in the Pacific region. In fiscal 1996, in addition to collection of the existing energy data, conducted were collection of energy data made retroactive from 1971, and time-series collection of the energy related expanded data including energy related production statistics/social statistics, energy consumption amount by industry, power generation facilities, oil production facilities, and environmental data. As to petroleum substitution energy, the paper took up new energy such as hydroelectric, nuclear, geothermal, photovoltaic, and wind power generation, and commercial-base renewable energy. As a result of the analysis, the supply of petroleum substitution energy in the whole Pacific region has been stable, 6.6% during 1980-1990, 7.4% in the first half of the 1990s, largely over the primary energy supply. The supply of nuclear power was overwhelmingly large, followed by hydroelectric energy and geothermal/new energy. 15 figs., 23 tabs.

  8. Report on results of the survey for drawing new energy visions for the Town of Shiranuka district; Shiranukamachi chiiki shin energy vision sakutei chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The new energy visions are drawn for Town of Shiranuka. Utilization of solar energy is at the top of the prospective new energy reserves for the town, followed by utilization of heat of wastes, biomass energy (in the stock raising industry), and photovoltaic power generation. The expected recoverable new energies account for approximately 35% of the total annual energy consumption of the town. The basic guidelines for introduction of new energies are drawing the priority projects which place importance on environmental education and bringing up talented persons, development of the soft policies for supporting the citizens and related entrepreneurs, and introduction of new energies for promoting new industries. The priority projects include hard ones, e.g., foundation of Eco-school Shiranuka, Eco-park Kushiro/Shiranuka (biomass energy supply center) and Koima new energy park, and soft ones, e.g., establishment of the new energy grand prize awarded by PR brochure ''Shiranuka'', foundation of the Shiranuka fund for introduction of new energies, construction of a Shiranuka Citizens' power station, and rent-a-car project for eco-car test runs. (NEDO)

  9. Survey report on a regional new energy vision establishment project in Shirane Town; Shiranemachi chiiki shin energy vision sakutei nado jigyo chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Surveys and discussions were given on regional new energy vision establishment in Shirane Town, Yamanashi Prefecture. Shirane Township has taken up environment as one of the important policies in the 'Shirane Heartful Plan', and discussed different projects to introduce new energies along the said vision. The basic policy in the discussions positioned in the new energies to be introduced the solar energy having large available amount as the center, cogeneration for emergency, clean energy fueled automobiles as a means to reduce environmental load, and wind power generation as part of the environmental education courses. The planned introduction projects will include the following applications: traffic road signs powered by solar energy, clean energy fueled automobiles, a solar energy powered hot water supply system at lunch supply centers, solar energy power generation facilities for culture halls and schools, street lights powered by a solar energy and wind power hybrid generation system, solar energy power generation and cogeneration for wide-area disaster prevention facilities, and a solar heat utilization system for flower and fruit farms. (NEDO)

  10. Basic research report for drawing up regional new energy vision for Aomori Prefecture; Aomoriken chiiki shin energy vision sakutei kiso chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Based on the amount of new energy expectedly collectable in the region, feasibility of its use is examined, with various circumstances including the magnitude of demand for it taken into consideration. The types of new energy whose introduction into the Aomori Prefecture region is very likely are the energy of the sun (light and heat) and that of the wind. As for geothermal energy, hydraulic energy of small and medium dimensions, energy from the snow, and energy from wastes, the probabilities of their introduction will grow fairly high dependent on the outcome of negotiations or alignment with energy demanding parties. As for wave power energy and temperature difference energy, though they exist in abundance, there remain difficult problems to solve relating to exploiting technologies and consuming parties, and at the current stage it is deemed that probabilities are low that they will be introduced into the prefecture. As for utilization by incineration of biomass such as excrements of animals and thinnings from forests, probability of realization is low now that there are other uses for them, return to the farmland or processing at timber mills. As for methane fermentation in the treatment of sewage and sludge, the energy from this process is being consumed at many locations across the prefecture, and it is deemed that probabilities are high that their utilization will expand. (NEDO)

  11. Report on a new energy vision establishment project for the Kaimon Township area in fiscal 1998; 1998 nendo Kaimonmachi chiiki shin energy vision sakutei gyomu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This paper reports on new energy vision establishment for the Kaimon Township area located in the skirts of Mt. Kaimon standing at the southernmost tip of the Japanese main island. The available new energy amount may be estimated for solar energy at 10.08 x 10{sup 6} kWh/year, solar heat at 5389 x 10{sup 6} kcal/year, wind power at 20.3 x 10{sup 6} kWh/year, wastes energy at 3111 x 10{sup 6} kcall/year, biomass forestry resources at 77 x 10{sup 6} kcal/year, and biomass stockbreeding resources at 27765 x 10{sup 6} kcal/year. Total energy available will be 30.38 x 10{sup 6} kWh/year for electric power generation, and 36342 x 10{sup 6} kcal/year for heat source. The area has more insolation than the national average, making potential high for solar energy power generation. Areas with annual average wind velocity of 5.5 m/s or higher are distributed widely, whereas wind power can correspond to 90% of the annual electric power consumed in the town. Geothermal temperatures are too low, making it difficult to be utilized for power generation, but could be used for heating hot spring water. Other energies, wastes and biomasses available in the town are not so great in quantity. The township will take the leadership in planning introduction of model type new energy facilities, and develop positively the enlightenment and proliferation activities for the time being. (NEDO)

  12. FY 1997 report on the field survey on country situations including efficient energy consumption. Vietnam; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (energy shohi koritsuka nado chiiki josei genchi chosa). Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Field survey was made on the current state of and issues on energy in Vietnam. In Vietnam, firewood is in wide use as non-commercial energy, and sums to a half of total energy consumption. Other energies such as hydroelectric power, petroleum, natural gas and coal are self-sustainable. Commercial energy consumption in 1995 is estimated at 10,070,000t in oil equivalent, which is broken down into 23% for coal, 42% in oil, 5% for natural gas and 30% for electricity. Abundant water resources will form the mainstay of future electric power supply. Commercial production of oil started in 1986 becoming an oil exporting country. Several promising natural gas fields were discovered as the result of the exploration by foreign capital. Coal deposits are estimated to be nearly 3.5 billion tons, and most of them are anthracite. Electric power demand is growing at a higher rate than the economic growth of Vietnam. The growth rate of electric power demand is set to be 1.3 times that of GDP. Since construction funds for new plants cannot be satisfied with the national budget and domestic investment alone, the country is expecting foreign capitals. 21 figs., 36 tabs.

  13. Research report on regional new energy vision drawn up for Okoppe Town; Okoppe machi chiiki shin energy vision sakutei chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Investigations are made about the amount of new energy in existence at Okoppe Town, Hokkaido, and about technologies for its exploitation. Kinds of new energy sources that may be utilized are chosen and listed in a preliminary study, which are mentioned below. Central to the new energy endeavors are renewable energy such as of the sun and wind, methane fermentation making use of livestock excrements and organic wastes out of scallop processing, solidified fuel prepared out of urban refuse, recovery of exhaust heat latent in the drainage by heat pumps, and cogeneration systems for hospitals and like facilities. It is believed that photovoltaic power generation systems and heat collectors should be used positively. As for wind power generation, it is suggested that it should be introduced jointly with other new energy technologies to supply power mainly to various facilities on Okoppe Dairy Hill. For the production of methane by livestock excrement fermentation, centralized treatment will be required for which the problems of collecting and transporting exerements have to be solved first of all. It is possible to recover heat from the drainage and, after temperature augmentation by heat pumps, use the heat for room heating and hot water supply. It is supposed that cogeneration, since it is relatively low in cost, will be adopted by hospitals accepting the national health insurance system. (NEDO)

  14. Institutional support for the Utah Consortium for Energy Research and Education. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    The Utah Consortium for Energy Research and Education is made up of three colleges and universities in Utah. The scope of the Consortium plan is the marshalling of the academic research resources, as well as the appropriate non-academic resources within Utah to pursue, as appropriate, energy-related research activities. The heart of this effort has been the institutional contract between DOE and the University of Utah, acting as fiscal agent for the Consortium. Sixteen programs are currently being funded, but only ten of the projects are described in this report. Three projects are on fission/fusion; three on environment and safety; four on fossil energy; three on basic energy sciences; one each on conservation, geothermal, and solar.

  15. Report on a feasibility study of making an international joint research on energy in the Asia region; Asia chiiki kokusai kyodo kenkyu kanosei chosa hokokusho. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    A survey was conducted on the energy situation in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and India, and a possibility of making an international joint research. Thailand has sharply increased investments from Europe and the U.S. since 1985, and has been making a rapid industrialization. As to the energy policy, it is important to secure the stable supply and stabilize the price. Indonesia has been rapidly increasing energy consumption in accordance with the recent economic growth, and is fear of becoming a net oil importing country in the near future. They are taking a policy for securing as much domestic oil and gas as possible. Malaysia has been keeping a high growth of over 8% per year for the past 8 years and rapidly increased energy demand. It is expected that they will maintain a high level of the development of energy resources. In the Philippines, the industrial energy is mostly coal, but electricity expected in future is from the oil-fueled power generation. The stable import of oil is a problem. 45 figs., 51 tabs.

  16. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium: Inventory of existing programs. Appendix 13.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-21

    This is the ``first effort`` to prepare an inventory of existing educational programs, focused primarily on inner-city youth, in operation in Washington, DC, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. The purpose of the inventory is to identify existing programs which could be augmented, adapted, or otherwise strengthened to help fulfil the mission of the Department of Energy-sponsored Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium, the mission of which is to recruit and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas and in environmental restoration and waste management. The Consortium does not want to ``reinvent the wheel`` and all of its members need to learn what others are doing. Each of the 30 participating academic institutions was invited to submit as many program descriptions as they wished. Due to the summer holidays, or because they did not believe than they were carrying out programs relevant to the mission of the Consortium, some institutions did not submit any program descriptions. In addition, several industries, governmental agencies, and not-for-profit institutions were invited to submit program descriptions.

  17. New energy visions for the Town of Naie district. Human-friendly Town of Naie City by environment-friendly energies; Naiemachi chiiki shin energy vision. Kankyo ni yasashii energy ga tsukuru hito ni yasashii machi Naie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The new energy visions are drawn for Town of Naie, Sorachi-gun in Hokkaido, where the industrial sector (manufacturing industries) consumes more than 60% of the total energy consumption. By energy type, oil and others account for 80%. When arranged in the order of expected recoverable quantity, the new energies for the town include utilization of solar energy, photovoltaic power generation, wind power generation, and utilization of wastes, biomass energy (agricultural products) and snow energy. The basic guidelines for introduction of new energies are for health and welfare, clearing and utilization of snow, environmental education and bringing up talented persons, supporting the related entrepreneurs, and integration of new energy with promotion of energy-saving movement. The priority projects the town plans to promote include utilization of biogas and temperature-differential energy for the town's water purification center; foundation of the Naie eco-school; and drawing conceptions for utilization of underground heat, utilization of low-temperature and snow/ice energy, co-energy around the spa of Naie, and mega-solar and eco-park at the Sorachi housing complex. (NEDO)

  18. The Solar Energy Consortium of New York Photovoltaic Research and Development Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Petra M.

    2012-10-15

    Project Objective: To lead New York State to increase its usage of solar electric systems. The expected outcome is that appropriate technologies will be made available which in turn will help to eliminate barriers to solar energy usage in New York State. Background: The Solar Energy Consortium has been created to lead New York State research on solar systems specifically directed at doubling the efficiency, halving the cost and reducing the cost of installation as well as developing unique form factors for the New York City urban environment.

  19. FY 2000 report on the results of the regional consortium R and D project - Regional consortium energy R and D field. Third year report. R and D of a working material processing eco system using powder mold-releasing lubricant; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo - chiiki consortium energy kenkyu kaihatsu bun'ya. Funtai rigata junkatsuzai wo mochiita sokeizai kako eco system no kenkyu kaihatsu (dai 3 nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    For the purpose of constructing the industry of processing low cost/low environmental load working materials, the development was proceeded with of a block die type powder mold-releasing system. Studies were made in the following 6 fields: 1) optimization/commercialization of new adhesion/flow methods; 2) optimization/commercialization of new powder mold-releasing lubricant; 3) demonstrative experiment and optimization of an eco die cast system; 4) optimization of a powder mold-releasing forging system; 5) application test on the actual mold-releasing lubricant reduction type system; 6) comprehensive investigational study. In 1), studied were a method to integrate the profile of supply pressure of powder conveying air flow and the basic information on adhesion behavior into the practical process, and optimization of powder supply method and supply device control sequence. In 2), the development was made of a sleeve use high thermal insulation type powder mold-releasing lubricant (composed mostly of Al(OH){sub 3}, graphite and wax). This powder mold-releasing lubricant remarkably improved forging ability of the ultra-thin material with 0.4mm thickness and materials with complex shapes and markedly decreased fracture chills. (NEDO)

  20. Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium energy field / R and D mesoscopic organ control heat-resistant / wear-resistant metal group composite materials (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium energy bun`ya / mesoscopic fukuso soshiki seigyo tainetsu taimamosei kinzokuki fukugo zairyo no kenkyu kaihatsu (daiichi nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Out of the R and D of mesoscopic metal group composite materials, the paper described the fiscal 1997 results. In the in-situ method as a composite material making method, elucidated to some degree were chemical composition of Fe-C-Cr-V-Nb-Mo-W-Ni base multi-dimensional alloys, and wear resistance and oxidation resistance of MC type carbide dispersion multi-phase texture crystallizing as primary crystal and eutectic. In the composite material making with ceramic fiber and alloy by the pressure infiltration method, the paper clarified the texture formation mechanism in solidification/heat treatment by a combination of Al alloys and alumina long fiber, and the relation between fiber configuration and wear resistance. By MA and MG methods as the powder metallurgy composite material making method, a composed body of {alpha}-stainless steel of Fe-12%Cr composition and M23C6 of 40-90vol% are designed for alloy composition, and powder of amorphous or hyperfine texture was fabricated. By hot pressing this, fine texture mixed with M23C6 of 1{mu}m and ferrite was obtained. Further, by mechanically alloying the powder composed of high speed steel, TiN powder and TiC powder, hyperfine texture mixed powder was fabricated. Conditions of HIP treatment of large members were also discussed. 58 refs., 124 figs., 35 tabs.

  1. FY 2000 report on the results of the regional consortium R and D project - Regional consortium energy field. First year report. Development of the process for creation of new functional materials using electron beam excited plasma; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo - chiiki consortium energy bun'ya. Denshi beam reiki plasma wo mochiita shinkino zairyo sosei process no kaihatsu (dai 1 nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The development of manufacturing technology was proceeded with for a high speed nitriding system using electron beam excited plasma device which realizes high dissociation for nitrogen molecules and controls the plasma state. By the device, the following are aimed at: high quality/high speed nitriding, formation of super-hard cubic system boron nitride (c-BN) and carbon nitride (CN) films on the surface of tools, and formation of TiO{sub 2} thin films with high infrared reflectance and environmental purification photocatalyst function. TiO{sub 2} thin films are assumed to be applied to window glass by making use of the high performance heat mirror function as well as the environmental purification function. Studies were made in the following 6 fields: 1)development of small electron beam excitation plasma source; 2) development of high speed nitrided container; 3) establishment of technology for real-time monitoring of radicals and ions; 4) design/trial manufacture of a device to form super-hard nitrided thin films; 5) development of heat mirror film formation device; 6) establishment of a method to evaluate effects of photocatalyst. (NEDO)

  2. FY 2000 report on the results of the regional consortium R and D project - Regional consortium energy field. Final year report. R and D on the bio-fuel production by high functional bio-reactor; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo - chiiki consortium energy bun'ya. Kokino bio reactor ni yoru bio nenryo seisan ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu (saishu nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    A system was developed for producing automobile fuel from the recycled paper and waste cooking oil using high functional intelligent yeast. Element technology is the functional yeast creation technology and the online intelligent control technology of the process into which the fixed bio-reactor was inserted. Studies were made on the following: 1) creation of high activity lipase production/ethanol production yeasts; 2) bio-fuel production by intelligent bio-reactor; 3) process optimization control technology by fuzzy control; 4) stabilization of bio-fuel production yeast; 5) comprehensive investigational study. In FY 2000, the results were obtained as written below: development of the stable lipase coming from rhizopus japonicus, fixed bacterium using rhizopus oryzae fungus body which can be used more than ten times, direct ethanol fermentation from starch by developing the multi-copy glucoamylase manifestation yeast, operation of a 20L capacity bench plant, etc. (NEDO)

  3. FY 2000 report on the results of the regional consortium R and D project - Regional consortium energy field. Second year report. Development of the energy saving manufacturing process of smart materials having electromagnetic wave absorbing function using the microwave-hydrothermal method; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo - chiiki contortium energy bun'ya. Micro ha - suinetsuho wo riyoshita denjiha kyushu kino wo yusuru smart zairyo no sho energy gata seizo process no kaihatsu (dai 2 nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The development was proceeded with of electromagnetic wave absorbing materials (board) which dispersed carbon fiber as conducting material and ferrite as magnetic material to matrices such as resin and cement. With the multi-layer structure as a basis, the material has wave absorbing ability in the area of 300MHz-60GHz band. The material is presumed to be applied to wall construction use materials and bodies of electronic equipment since it prevents the radio wave reflection caused by structures such as bridges. Ferrite was synthesized by microwave-hydrothermal method (500kPa, 2.54GHz). Further, carbon fiber was covered with ferrite for improvement of absorption characteristics. Studies were made in the following 5 fields: 1) design of smart materials and development of hybrid process technology; 2) study on the evaluation of wave absorbing function; 3) R and D of the manufacturing process of smart forming materials; 4) development of the fiber surface processing process using ocean resource; 5) comprehensive investigational study. In 1), study was conducted on relations among electromagnetic shielding characteristics of the ferrite-covering carbon fiber, fiber length and fiber content. (NEDO)

  4. Museum of water, green and the sun - Marumori. New energy vision of the Marumori Town area; 2001 nendo Marumori machi shin energy vision hokokusho. Chiiki shin energy vision sakutei tou jigyo (Mizu to midori nto taiyo no hakubutsukan Marumori)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-01

    In Marumori Town, Miyagi Prefecture, a 'new energy vision of the area' was worked out which indicated the assessment of the energy reserved in the town and the course of new energy to be determined in the future. The energy consumption amount of Marumori Town in FY 1999 was estimated at 47,535 kL in crude oil conversion. By sector, the energy consumption amount was the largest in the order of the industrial sector, the transportation sector and the commercial/residential sector. The availability of new energy in Maruyama Town was estimated at approximately 480,585 GJ, of which the solar energy utilization was the largest, 53.1%. The photovoltaic power generation was the next largest, 25.4%, followed by the temperature difference energy (underground water), 8.9%, clean energy car, 7.8%, etc. As a plan for the first introduction of new energy, the following were studied: introduction of photovoltaic power generation facilities to the Marumori Town Office, introduction of new energy to public facilities around the Fudoson Park, introduction of wind power generation facilities to the town-run pasture, construction of the Marumori-type biogas plant, construction of a mini hydroelectric power plant, introduction of clean energy car to public vehicles, introduction of new energy facilities to the area of Kawa-no-Eki (station of the river), etc. (NEDO)

  5. Final Technical Report for the Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazeli, Sandy [National Association of State Energy Officials, Arlington, VA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The Commercial Buildings Consortium (CBC) was established in 2009, under the chairmanship of the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), as a supporting organization to the Commercial Buildings Initiative (CBI). The CBI was created by Congress through the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) and launched by the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2008 with the goal to “develop and disseminate technologies, practices, and policies for establishment of zero net energy commercial buildings.”. The impact of the CBC since 2009 has been multifold, resulting in increased collaboration, increased innovation, and increased demonstration and deployment. During the project performance period of 2009-2014, the CBC provided an organizational framework for sustained public-private collaboration among more than 600 commercial building professionals, researchers and educators, utilities, and government agencies at federal, state, and local level. The CBC’s research has identified emerging technologies, market strategies, and innovative public and corporate policies to help advance CBI’s zero-net-energy. Finally, the CBC worked in close partnership with DOE’s commercial building teams and the Better Buildings Alliances to identify opportunities for proving out and deploying energy-saving technologies and practices.

  6. The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) - A Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb Aldrich; Lois Arena; Dianne Griffiths; Srikanth Puttagunta; David Springer

    2010-12-31

    This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) (http://www.carb-swa.com/), one of the 'Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership' Industry Teams, for the period January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. The Building America Program (BAP) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program (BTP). The long term goal of the BAP is to develop cost effective, production ready systems in five major climate zones that will result in zero energy homes (ZEH) that produce as much energy as they use on an annual basis by 2020. CARB is led by Steven Winter Associates, Inc. with Davis Energy Group, Inc. (DEG), MaGrann Associates, and Johnson Research, LLC as team members. In partnership with our numerous builders and industry partners, work was performed in three primary areas - advanced systems research, prototype home development, and technical support for communities of high performance homes. Our advanced systems research work focuses on developing a better understanding of the installed performance of advanced technology systems when integrated in a whole-house scenario. Technology systems researched included: - High-R Wall Assemblies - Non-Ducted Air-Source Heat Pumps - Low-Load HVAC Systems - Solar Thermal Water Heating - Ventilation Systems - Cold-Climate Ground and Air Source Heat Pumps - Hot/Dry Climate Air-to-Water Heat Pump - Condensing Boilers - Evaporative condensers - Water Heating CARB continued to support several prototype home projects in the design and specification phase. These projects are located in all five program climate regions and most are targeting greater than 50% source energy savings over the Building America Benchmark home. CARB provided technical support and developed builder project case studies to be included in near-term Joule Milestone reports for the following community scale projects: - SBER Overlook at

  7. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on area consortium research and development business. Area consortium for venture business development by building base for small business (computer-controlled PCM-aided constant-temperature cracking and multimetal-smelting Technology); 1998 nendo venture kigyo ikuseigata chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu (chusho kigyo sozo kibangata). Computer seigyo ni yoru PCM koon seigyo bunkai obyobi multi smelting giho no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Treatment of domestically produced waste of electrical appliances is studied, for which an energy-efficient constant-temperature cracking unit (medium/low-temperature cracking furnace) working on the PCM (phase change material) technology and a multimetal smelter (high-temperature cracking furnace) are combined. The system is to recover, regenerate, and reuse the valuables efficiently at low cost without allowing any waste out, and a resources cycle is established beyond the thermal cycle, which will to promote the recycling of used resources. As one of promising PCM materials, Al-Si excellent in thermal response is selected, and kept at 578-579 degrees C for one hour. The result obtained indicates that, once the PCM is molten, homogenous conditions may be restored semipermanently by heating but supplementarily to cover the lost heat, and that therefore it is a promising candidate for a heat source. Data are also collected about temperature control and auxiliary materials to be injected, necessary for collection from the smelter, and some metal was recovered. With a PCM layer enclosing the heated material, a computer-aided automatic control system is realized capable of adjusting the temperature to stay at a constant level. (NEDO)

  8. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on area consortium research and development business. Area consortium for venture business development by building base for small business (high-efficiency superhigh-accuracy grinding technology by nano-scale in-process measurement and control using novel grinding wheel); 1998 nendo venture kigyo ikuseigata chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu (chusho kigyo sozo kibangata). Shingata kensaku toishi wo mochiita nano in-process keisoku seigyo ni yoru konoritsu choseimitsu kensaku kako gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The aim is to develop a superflat grinding system for functional devices such as hard disks and magnetic heads. Cast iron powder is used as bonding material high in reacting with diamond for an increase in the anchoring power. A chemical reaction occurs to realize a strong bond between the two, producing a precision grinding wheel long in life and high in efficiency. A wheel with some hollows is also developed in which the grits have to bear more load because of the hollows, this achieving grinding efficiency five times higher than that of other types of the same grit size. A system is developed, provided with a constant pressure mechanism for the grinding direction and constant travel mechanism normal to the work surface. Using the constant pressure system, the grinding speed depends on the wheel grinding capability, and then the wheel is allowed to exhibits its best. The system suffers less clogging than the conventional ones. The specific grinding energy which is the index of the match between the wheel and the work may be determined, and this enables prompt condition optimization. It is proved that the wheel with hollows is remarkably higher in grinding capability than wheels of the same grit size on the market. The two are found to be alike in achieving top-class finish in terms of surface coarseness and flatness. (NEDO)

  9. Urban energy management today: Ten year compendium of UCETF programs. Products and expertise of the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force, 1979--1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The reports listed in this Overview summarize projects conducted through the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force by local government staff who have defined and implemented many of the energy strategies described above. Reports from their projects illustrate effective approaches to plan and implement these strategies, as well as software tools, surveys, and technical instruments valuable to other local government officials conducting similar projects.

  10. Synergistic Microbial Consortium for Bioenergy Generation from Complex Natural Energy Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Bochuan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial species have evolved diverse mechanisms for utilization of complex carbon sources. Proper combination of targeted species can affect bioenergy production from natural waste products. Here, we established a stable microbial consortium with Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis in microbial fuel cells (MFCs to produce bioenergy from an abundant natural energy source, in the form of the sarcocarp harvested from coconuts. This component is mostly discarded as waste. However, through its usage as a feedstock for MFCs to produce useful energy in this study, the sarcocarp can be utilized meaningfully. The monospecies S. oneidensis system was able to generate bioenergy in a short experimental time frame while the monospecies E. coli system generated significantly less bioenergy. A combination of E. coli and S. oneidensis in the ratio of 1 : 9 (v : v significantly enhanced the experimental time frame and magnitude of bioenergy generation. The synergistic effect is suggested to arise from E. coli and S. oneidensis utilizing different nutrients as electron donors and effect of flavins secreted by S. oneidensis. Confocal images confirmed the presence of biofilms and point towards their importance in generating bioenergy in MFCs.

  11. Synergistic microbial consortium for bioenergy generation from complex natural energy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Victor Bochuan; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Chua, Song-Lin; Zhang, Qichun; Cao, Bin; Chye, Joachim Loo Say; Yang, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Microbial species have evolved diverse mechanisms for utilization of complex carbon sources. Proper combination of targeted species can affect bioenergy production from natural waste products. Here, we established a stable microbial consortium with Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to produce bioenergy from an abundant natural energy source, in the form of the sarcocarp harvested from coconuts. This component is mostly discarded as waste. However, through its usage as a feedstock for MFCs to produce useful energy in this study, the sarcocarp can be utilized meaningfully. The monospecies S. oneidensis system was able to generate bioenergy in a short experimental time frame while the monospecies E. coli system generated significantly less bioenergy. A combination of E. coli and S. oneidensis in the ratio of 1:9 (v:v) significantly enhanced the experimental time frame and magnitude of bioenergy generation. The synergistic effect is suggested to arise from E. coli and S. oneidensis utilizing different nutrients as electron donors and effect of flavins secreted by S. oneidensis. Confocal images confirmed the presence of biofilms and point towards their importance in generating bioenergy in MFCs.

  12. Report on a survey in fiscal 1998 for petroleum substituting energy development and utilization in the Pacific Ocean region; 1998 nendo Taiheiyo chiiki sekiyu daitai energy kaihatsu riyo chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    A survey was carried out to make available the information base that can collect, put into order and provide quickly and accurately the energy related information based on global environment problems in the Pacific Ocean region. Fiscal 1998 has performed a substituting energy demand and supply analysis in the Pacific Ocean region by adding the 1996 data, in addition to collection of the normal energy data. For the purpose of analyzing the petroleum substituting energy demand and supply in the Pacific Ocean region, data were collected from 17 countries for fiscal 1997 and the quarterly data for 1998. Retroactive data collection was also continued. The growth rate of primary energy supply in the Pacific Ocean region is 1.8% in average in the 1980's, and 3.8% in the 1990's. In contrast, the growth rate of petroleum substituting energies is 6.4% in the 80's and 6.2% in the former half of the 90's, being far higher than the growth rate of the primary energy supply. The share of the petroleum substituting energies accounting for in the primary energy supply has increased from 6.7% in 1980 to 12.1% in 1996. As the breakdown, nuclear power accounts for overwhelmingly large, followed by geothermal energy and new energies. (NEDO)

  13. New energy vision in the Hanamaki City area. Hanamaki, a country of dream where human and nature are glittering; Hanamakishi chiiki shin energy vision. Hito to shizen ga kirameku ihatobu hanamaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    With objectives to promote introduction of new energies into the city of Hanamaki and elevate consciousness of energy conservation, surveys and discussions were carried out on energy consumption in the city, available amount of new energies, and specific introduction projects. The energy consumption amount in Hanamaki City as a whole is estimated to be 211066 kl converted to crude oil in fiscal 1995, in which consumption by the transportation department, particularly consumption of automotive fuel accounts for high percentage. The available amount of new energies amounts to 324444 kl converted to crude oil, and 52665 kl for electric power generation as the sum of solar energy, wind power for electric power generation, biomass and geothermal energies. This is an amount that can sufficiently take care of demand of the city. The new energy introduction projects that have been proposed include: introduction of clean energy fueled automobiles, building of a fairy tale village and museum, introduction of primary, secondary and eco-school systems, introduction thereof to welfare facilities, an athletic park improvement project, a traffic safety facility improvement project, a tourist inducing and guiding project, a greenhouse energy improvement project, and snow melting. (NEDO)

  14. Fiscal 2000 survey report. Survey report on development and utilization of alternative energies for oil in Pacific region; 2000 nendo Taiheiyo chiiki sekiyu daitai energy kaihatsu riyo chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    A survey was conducted, with environmental matters taken into consideration, for building an information gathering infrastructure for the countries in the Pacific region, capable of promptly and accurately collecting and offering energy related information. Conducted in this fiscal year were regular data gathering, review of oil supply and demand and alternative energy supply and demand in the Pacific region, on-site survey of alternative energy development and utilization in Vietnam, quarterly analyses of trend of energy demand, and the like. The supply of primary energy in the Pacific region increased by 2.3% per year in the period 1980 through 1998. The rate of increase was the lowest with oil, and the highest with hydroelectricity, atomic power, and recoverable energies such as geothermal energy. The Vietnamese Government is promoting its efforts to develop power sources by use of recoverable energies for farm village electrification. Efforts are being earnestly exerted to develop its rich natural gas resources and it is expected that there will be a remarkable achievement in the use of alternative energies due to an increase in natural gas consumption. In the field of data collection, various data were registered with the database. (NEDO)

  15. Report on the project for working out the new energy vision of the Chinen Village area in FY 2001; 2001 nendo Chinen son chiiki shin energy vision sakutei tou jigyo hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    For the purpose of promoting the introduction of new energy and enhancing the awareness of it in Chinen Village, Okinawa Prefecture, an investigational study was conducted of the trend of energy consumption of the village, existence amount of new energy, case study for new energy introduction, etc., and a vision was worked out. The energy consumption amount of Chinen Village in FY 1999 was estimated at 591,935 x 10{sup 3} MJ/y. By sector, the consumption amount in the transportation sector was the highest, approximately 40%, followed in order by the household sector, business sector and industrial sector. The rate of energy source was 49.2% of petroleum, 42.3% of electric power and 8.5% of gas. As the case study for new energy introduction, the following were studied: introduction of photovoltaic power generation to the village office/Azama Sun Beach/hydroponics/JA branch office/prawn farm, introduction of photovoltaic power generation/wind power generation to the village gymnasium/village drainage pump/refrigerating facilities of the fisheries cooperative association, etc. Further, as the new project, the following were studied: introduction of photovoltaic power generation/wind power generation to the agricultural irrigation project/comprehensive sports park, introduction of photovoltaic power generation to the new building of Chinen Elementary School/maker of processed medicinal herbs. (NEDO)

  16. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on area consortium research and development business, 1st year. Area consortium energy research and development (biofuel production by advanced function bioreactor); 1998 nendo chiiki consortium energy bun'ya. Kokino bio reactor ni yoru bio nenryo seisan ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Studies were made to produce ethanol directly from starch and cellulose and to collect biodiesel fuels from waste oil by an enzymatic method. For an increase in the yield of biodiesel fuel production, lipase enzymes were explored and optimum reaction conditions were sought for. Starch decomposition was quick for conversion into the target material in a system with the co-expression of amylase and glucoamylase present on the yeast cell surface layer. There was dramatically rapid progress in the increase of enzymatic activity in the cell, although dependent on cell membrane surface treatment conditions. In the generation of acetaminophen by recombinant cohesive yeasts, highly active and expressive yeasts were automatically fixed in the porous support (intelligent bioreactor) while those deactivated or dead were automatically removed. For the construction of a fuzzy control system for this reaction, basic models were investigated, built on the basis of the enzymatic model of reaction and substance balance. A high-precision structural analysis was conducted for the exploration of secondary structure stabilizing factors in protein and peptide and for the elucidation of correlations between structure and function. (NEDO)

  17. Survey report of FY 1996 on the questionnaires related to new energies for local governments in Kinki district; 1996 nendo chosa hokokusho (shin energy ni kansuru Kinki chiiki jichitai anketo chosa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The photovoltaic (PV) power generation system having a lot of merits for environment and energy has been put into a diffusion stage from the viewpoint of its technology due to its progressive technology innovation. However, it is not widely diffused in the whole society due to its high cost. Systematic investigation for the future PV power generation was conducted through the verification of factors obstructing the diffusion promotion and the investigation of the problems. Then, questionnaires were conducted for local governments in the Kinki district. Proportion of the local governments positively promoting the introduction of PV power generation was 3.4%. Among new energies, 45.7% of the governments were interested in solar heat utilization, and 43.1% were interested in PV power generation. Proportion of the local governments understanding the subsidy system of MITI was 57.7%. For the explanation meeting of new energy introduction promotion, 55.4% of the local governments wanted to participate. Among the interesting themes, 61.0% were interested in the introduction examples, 52.4% were in the introduction support, 52.1% were in the introduction of fundamental knowledge, and 30.0% were in the latest technology trends and in the guide for introduction

  18. Survey report on a regional new energy vision establishment in Ueki Township. Town of solar energy and energy conservation (vision to build the town by actively living and creating with environment); Uekimachi chiiki shin energy vision sakutei chosa hokokusho. Taiyo energy to sho energy no machi (kankyo to sekkyokuteki ni kyosei kyososuru machizukuri vision)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Discussions were given on the new energy vision at Ueki Township in Kumamoto Prefecture. The total energy demand in Ueki Township is 898 x 10{sup 7} Kcal. of which about 44% is accounted for by the transportation department, 34.7% by the industrial department, and 21% by the consumer department. The total available regional new energy amount is estimated to be 52.1 x 10{sup 6} kWh/year, which is consisted of stockbreeding wastes energy at 44.1%, solar energy power generation at 33.2% and solar heat utilization at 22.6%. Introduction of wind energy was judged impracticable. The new energy introduction plan calls for introduction of solar energy power generation for lighting and air conditioning of the diamond shaped nursery school, the Yamamoto nursery school, the Ueki Township office building, the multi-purpose sports center, the Ueki Hospital operated by the national health insurance, the multi-purpose health and welfare center, Yoshimatsu Sports Park, and Tahara Sports Park. A subsidy institution by the local government was discussed as the proliferation plan of solar energy power generation systems to be installed in individuals' houses and enterprises, with which introduction to residential houses of about 30% was targeted by 2010. (NEDO)

  19. Feasibility study for international collaboration on photovoltaic power generation and long-distance energy transmission technologies utilizing desert areas environment; Sabaku chiiki wo riyoshita taiyoko hatsuden chokyori yuso gijutsu ni kakawaru kokusai kyoryoku kanosei chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    A workshop was held at Tokyo in March, 1997 on the research and development and feasibility study for international collaboration on photovoltaic (PV) power generation and long-distance energy transmission technologies utilizing desert areas environment. Two speakers from the USA, one from Italy, and two from China were invited, and four speakers in Japan presented papers. A total of 48 persons participated. In the technical sessions, `World energy demand and PV system potential` by Prof. Kurokawa, `Long distance transmission of PV power` by Mr. A. Invenizzi, `Case studies of large scale PV systems distributed throughout desert areas of the world` by Mr. Hirasawa, `Linking renewable energy resources around the world` by Mr. P. Meisen, `Properties of large scale PV plant in the USA` by Mr. J. Benner, `Future prospect of PV electrification in China` by Mr. Kong Li, `Application of large-scale PV systems in deserts in China` by Mr. Isomura, and `Effects of large-scale PV power plant in a climatic desert areas` by Prof. Ihara were presented. 38 refs., 62 figs., 29 tabs.

  20. Fiscal 1998 survey for geothermal energy development promotion. Environmental impact survey report (No. B-7 Kuwanosawa region); 1998 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa. Kankyo eikyo chosa hokokusho (No.B-7 Kuwanosawa chiiki)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    This survey aims to learn the current states of environmental factors required for the comprehension of the impacts on surroundings of a structural boring for geothermal energy exploration. The target site is an approximately 10km{sup 2}-large area located among the mountains 20km south-south-east of Yuzawa City, Akita Prefecture. It is found that numerous animals and vegetables inhabit the Kuwanosawa region and its vicinity. They are 19 species of mammals in 10 families under 5 orders; 73 species of birds in 25 families under 10 orders; 6 species of reptiles in 13 families; 9 species of amphibians in 6 families under 2 orders; and 719 species of insects in 179 families under 17 orders. Valuable animals include flying squirrels, mandarin ducks, black salamanders, and small Gifu butterflies. There are 670 species of vegetables in 132 families. Valuable vegetables are Iinuma bulblets, wild rhubarb roots, and Amur adonises. Floras found in existence are a natural flora in the beech class area, compensatory flora in the beech class area, afforested area, and a flora in the crop land. No remarkable fluctuation was observed in the Takamatsu spa throughout the survey period. Fluctuations were observed in all the survey items at the Doroyu-Okuyama inn. (NEDO)

  1. Illinois Cleantech Ecosystem Consortium (ICE) for the Department of Energy Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielke, Jason [Clean Energy Trust, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-01-31

    The DoE Innovation Ecosystem Initiative was a gamechanger for Clean Energy Trust. The grant accelerated our development from a concept to a real company in 2010, seeding us with the capital to begin our mission to “accelerate the growth of clean energy businesses in the Midwest”. Now three years later, we have scores and scores of partners which fund us through sponsorship donations to our programs, and we have played a key role in launching several new companies, and helping them acquire funding and reach their milestones. In three years we have grown from two people to nine, now with an annual budget of over $3M. We started with the following simple plan (verbatim from our original submission): “The short-term objective of ICE is to fortify and enhance the platform for collaboration necessary to create a robust ecosystem for clean energy innovation. This includes launching a number of initiatives designed to source, evaluate, and launch new clean energy businesses derived from university research.

  2. Updating United States Advanced Battery Consortium and Department of Energy battery technology targets for battery electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jeremy; Pesaran, Ahmad; Bae, Chulheung; Elder, Ron; Cunningham, Brian

    2014-12-01

    Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) offer significant potential to reduce the nation's consumption of petroleum based products and the production of greenhouse gases however, their widespread adoption is limited largely by the cost and performance limitations of modern batteries. With recent growth in efforts to accelerate BEV adoption (e.g. the Department of Energy's (DOE) EV Everywhere Grand Challenge) and the age of existing BEV battery technology targets, there is sufficient motivation to re-evaluate the industry's technology targets for battery performance and cost. Herein we document the analysis process that supported the selection of the United States Advanced Battery Consortium's (USABC) updated BEV battery technology targets. Our technology agnostic approach identifies the necessary battery performance characteristics that will enable the vehicle level performance required for a commercially successful, mass market full BEV, as guided by the workgroup's OEM members. The result is an aggressive target, implying that batteries need to advance considerably before BEVs can be both cost and performance competitive with existing petroleum powered vehicles.

  3. Identification and characterization of an anaerobic ethanol-producing cellulolytic bacterial consortium from Great Basin hot springs with agricultural residues and energy crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chao; Deng, Yunjin; Wang, Xingna; Li, Qiuzhe; Huang, Yifan; Liu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    In order to obtain the cellulolytic bacterial consortia, sediments from Great Basin hot springs (Nevada, USA) were sampled and enriched with cellulosic biomass as the sole carbon source. The bacterial composition of the resulting anaerobic ethanol-producing celluloytic bacterial consortium, named SV79, was analyzed. With methods of the full-length 16S rRNA librarybased analysis and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, 21 bacteria belonging to eight genera were detected from this consortium. Clones with closest relation to the genera Acetivibrio, Clostridium, Cellulosilyticum, Ruminococcus, and Sporomusa were predominant. The cellulase activities and ethanol productions of consortium SV79 using different agricultural residues (sugarcane bagasse and spent mushroom substrate) and energy crops (Spartina anglica, Miscanthus floridulus, and Pennisetum sinese Roxb) were studied. During cultivation, consortium SV79 produced the maximum filter paper activity (FPase, 9.41 U/ml), carboxymethylcellulase activity (CMCase, 6.35 U/ml), and xylanase activity (4.28 U/ml) with sugarcane bagasse, spent mushroom substrate, and S. anglica, respectively. The ethanol production using M. floridulus as substrate was up to 2.63 mM ethanol/g using gas chromatography analysis. It has high potential to be a new candidate for producing ethanol with cellulosic biomass under anoxic conditions in natural environments.

  4. Agriculture/municipal/industrial waste management and resource recovery feasibility study : renewable energy clusters and improved end-use efficiency : a formula for sustainable development[Prepared for the North Okanagan Waste to Energy Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-10-15

    The North Okanagan Waste to Energy Consortium initiated a study that evaluated the technical, environmental and economic feasibility of a proposed biomass to renewable energy eco-system, using the technologies of anaerobic digestion (AD), cogeneration and hydroponics in a centralized waste treatment and recovery facility. The Okanagan Valley is well suited for the demonstration plant because of its concentration of food producers and processors and abundance of rich organic waste stream. The agricultural, municipal and industrial waste management consortium consisted of a dairy farm, 5 municipalities and local waste handlers. The consortium proposed to combine several organic waste streams such as dairy manure, slaughterhouse offal and source separated municipal solid waste (MSW) to produce biogas in an anaerobic digester. The methane would be processed into renewable energy (heat and electricity) for a hydroponics barley sprout operation. It is expected that the synergies resulting from this project would increase productivity, end-use efficiency and profitability. This study reviewed the basics of AD technology, technological options and evaluated several technology providers. The type and quantity of waste available in the area was determined through a waste audit and analysis. The potential to market the system by-products locally was also reviewed as well as the general economic viability of a centralized system. The study also evaluated site selection, preliminary design and costing, with reference to proximity to feedstock and markets, access to roads, impacts on neighbours and insurance of minimal environmental impact. 84 refs., 82 figs., 10 appendices.

  5. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  6. Development Of Sustainable Biobased Products And Bioenergy In Cooperation With The Midwest Consortium For Sustainable Biobased Products And Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Ladisch; Randy Woodson

    2009-03-18

    Collaborative efforts of Midwest Consortium have been put forth to add value to distiller's grains by further processing them into fermentable sugars, ethanol, and a protein rich co-product consistent with a pathway to a biorenewables industry (Schell et al, 2008). These studies were recently published in the enclosed special edition (Volume 99, Issue 12) of Bioresource Technology journal. Part of them have demonstrated the utilization of distillers grains as additional feedstock for increased ethanol production in the current dry grind process (Kim et al., 2008a, b; Dien et al.,2008, Ladisch et al., 2008a, b). Results showed that both liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) were effective for enhancing digestibility of distiller's grains. Enzymatic digestion of distiller's grains resulted in more than 90% glucose yield under standard assay conditions, although the yield tends to drop as the concentration of dry solids increases. Simulated process mass balances estimated that hydrolysis and fermentation of distillers grains can increase the ethanol yield by 14% in the current dry milling process (Kim et al., 2008c). Resulting co-products from the modified process are richer in protein and oil contents than conventional distiller's grains, as determined both experimentally and computationally. Other research topics in the special edition include water solubilization of DDGS by transesterification reaction with phosphite esters (Oshel el al., 2008) to improve reactivity of the DDGS to enzymes, hydrolysis of soluble oligomers derived from DDGS using functionalized mesoporous solid catalysts (Bootsma et al., 2008), and ABE (acetone, butanol, ethanol) production from DDGS by solventogenic Clostridia (Ezeji and Blaschek, 2008). Economic analysis of a modified dry milling process, where the fiber and residual starch is extracted and fermented to produce more ethanol from the distillers grains while producing highly

  7. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, Stephen [EWI, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  8. Radiogenomics Consortium (RGC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Radiogenomics Consortium's hypothesis is that a cancer patient's likelihood of developing toxicity to radiation therapy is influenced by common genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

  9. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to

  10. Final Report to the National Energy Technology Laboratory on FY09-FY13 Cooperative Research with the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittal, Vijay [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-11-04

    The Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) was formed in 1999 in response to a call from U.S. Congress to restart a federal transmission reliability R&D program to address concerns about the reliability of the U.S. electric power grid. CERTS is a partnership between industry, universities, national laboratories, and government agencies. It researches, develops, and disseminates new methods, tools, and technologies to protect and enhance the reliability of the U.S. electric power system and the efficiency of competitive electricity markets. It is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). This report provides an overview of PSERC and CERTS, of the overall objectives and scope of the research, a summary of the major research accomplishments, highlights of the work done under the various elements of the NETL cooperative agreement, and brief reports written by the PSERC researchers on their accomplishments, including research results, publications, and software tools.

  11. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A&E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton`s initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force.

  12. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program is a collaborative University-Industry R&D Consortium that is managed and administered by the South Carolina Energy R&D Center. AGTSR is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry-defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. The consortium is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation and is sponsored by the U.S. DOE - Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The program is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. At present, there are 78 performing member universities representing 36 states, and six cost-sharing U.S. gas turbine corporations. Three RFP`s have been announced and the fourth RFP is expected to be released in December, 1995. There are 31 research subcontracts underway at performing member universities. AGTSR has also organized three workshops, two in combustion and one in heat transfer. A materials workshop is in planning and is scheduled for February, 1996. An industrial internship program was initiated this past summer, with one intern positioned at each of the sponsoring companies. The AGTSR consortium nurtures close industry-university-government collaboration to enhance synergism and the transition of research results, accelerate and promote evolutionary-revolutionary R&D, and strives to keep a prominent U.S. industry strong and on top well into the 21st century. This paper will present the objectives and benefits of the AGTSR program, progress achieved to date, and future planned activity in fiscal year 1996.

  13. 76 FR 16819 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Consortium for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ...--Consortium for Energy, Environment and Demilitarization Notice is hereby given that, on February 14, 2011... seq. (``the Act''), Consortium for Energy, Environment and Demilitarization (``CEED'') has filed... departments and agencies in the fields of energy, environment and demilitarization; (b) participate...

  14. Status report on energy recovery from municipal solid waste: technologies, lessons and issues. Information bulletin of the energy task force of the urban consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    A review is presented of the lessons learned and issues raised regarding the recovery of energy from solid wastes. The review focuses on technologies and issues significant to currently operating energy recovery systems in the US - waterwall incineration, modular incineration, refuse derived fuels systems, landfill gas recovery systems. Chapters are: Energy Recovery and Solid Waste Disposal; Energy Recovery Systems; Lessons in Energy Recovery; Issues in Energy Recovery. Some basic conclusions are presented concerning the state of the art of energy from waste. Plants in shakedown or under construction, along with technologies in the development stages, are briefly described. Sources of additional information and a bibliography are included. (MCW)

  15. The BADER Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    officials and UD Alumni. Senators Coons and Carper and Representative Carney also attended. Dr. Stanhope travelled to Capitol Hill to visit the...offices of Senators Coons (D-DE) and Carper (D-DE). The briefing meetings resulted in plans for a spring BADER Consortium event on the Hill and a visit...Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital Davis, Samuel, PhD BADER Consortium Affiliate Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) de Lateur, Barbara J., MD, MS

  16. FY 2000 report on the results of the regional consortium R and D project - Regional consortium R and D field. Third year report. Advanced multi-axis machining system with non-rotating tools; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo - chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu bun'ya. 6 jiku koseido heru kako system no kaihatsu (dai 3 nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    As element technology to continuously control attitude and feed of tools, development was made of precision machining technology, 6-axis CAM/CAE system and high speed high precision NC control technology. A high precision non-rotating tool machine was trial-manufactured which enables the heightening of precision in machining of mold curved surfaces/complicated shaped parts, and the practicality was verified. In FY 2000, as to the machining technology relation, it was verified that it is possible to machine the mirror surface at 0.1{mu}mRy using diamond non-rotating tool to aluminum materials. In CAD/CAM relations, a high speed high precision CAM/NC interface system based on ISO14649 was developed. Then, by the tool path made by this system, cutting experiment/evaluation were conducted. Further, a new system for cutting reversely tapered grooves was designed, and the cutting experiment was carried out. In the NC relation, development was made of the NC system loaded with the work coordinate interpolation function for conducting high precision multi-axial interpolation on high speed NC board and also of the high speed servo network using IEEE1394. (NEDO)

  17. FY 2000 report on the results of the regional consortium R and D project - Regional consortium field. Second year report. Development of the technology to combine plastic and metal using biodegradable natural polymer; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo - chiiki consortium bun'ya. Seibunkaisei tennen plastic to kinzoku no fukugoka gijutsu no kaihatsu (dai 2 nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The development was proceeded with of the electromagnetic wave shielding technology composed of plastic body, chitosan containing biodegradable coating and electroless metal plating layer. Key technologies are for formation of biodegradable electroless plating use coating using chitosan as chemical adsorption carrier of Pd and for separation of the body and the metal thin film by the environment-harmony method for recovery of the material. Studies were made in the following 5 fields: 1) method to produce low molecular chitin and chitosan; 2) application of biodegradable materials to electromagnetic wave shielding; 3) evaluation of physical properties and function of a new electromagnetic wave shielding system; 4) R and D of the degradation method of the new electromagnetic wave shielding system; 5) comprehensive investigational study. In FY 2000, in 1), conditions for production of chitosan degrading enzymes were determined, and also the scale of bio-reactor was increased up to 20L. Further, chitosan was so re-synthesized that it disperses to the electroless plating use primer. (NEDO)

  18. Analyzing opportunities for energy conservation in municipal fleet management: service delivery patterns, equipment, supply, operations, and maintenance. Information bulletin of the energy task force of the urban consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    Vehicle fleet management as a five-step process is portrayed and the multiple energy conservation opportunities within each step are examined. The five steps described are, configuration of service area and service delivery patterns, equipping the fleet, operating the fleet, maintaining the fleet, and supplying the fleet with fuel. A systems approach to decision making about municipal fleets is outlined. Management options, control techniques, and devices are suggested for each of the five steps. Reference is made to analytic tools which will assist in deliberating options at each of these steps. These tools are presented in a list. Four concise case studies of jurisdictions which are taking deliberate steps to reduce fuel use are presented. Key opportunities for fuel conservation are then summarized, followed by a selected bibliography, and listing of reference materials and additional resources.

  19. Fiscal 2000 project of inviting proposals for international joint research - invitation for international proposal (Energy conservation No.4). Development of passive cooling mechanism fit for high-temperature high-humidity region; 2000 nendo kokusai kyodo kenkyu teian kobo jigyo - kokusai teian kobo (Shoe No.4). Koon tashitsu chiiki tekigogata passive reikyaku kiko no kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Efforts are made in cooperation with Vietnam to develop a heat insulating material for buildings, to be used for passive cooling mechanisms symbiotic with the environment and capable of energy conservation. Vegetables are planted on the surface of this building material. Activities are conducted in the three domains of (1) the development of energy conservation-conscious basic materials, (2) selection of vegetables, and (3) the simulation of the effect of the developed materials on temperature. The basic type of the newly developed building material is an asbestos-free vegetable fiber-reinforced cement slate which is covered by such vegetables as members of the Passifloraceae, Vitaceae, and Araliaceae. Conducted in domain (1) are surveys of the actual state of basic material manufacturing in Vietnam and studies of the basic properties of vegetable fiber, properties displayed by vegetable fiber under various chemical environments, selection of vegetable fiber as the basic aggregate, mineral fiber, and the basic material manufacturing conditions. The result of heat load calculation carried out using SMASH for Windows ver.2, which is a program developed for thermal load calculation for houses, shows that the new material lowers the temperature by approximately 3 degrees C. (NEDO)

  20. Aspiration toward geothermal energy utilization in regional development plan. Part 6. ; Hydrothermal fluid utilization business in Matsuo-mura of Iwate prefecture. Chiiki keikaku ni okeru 'chinetsu riyo' eno hofu. 6. ; Iwateken Matsuomura no chinetsu nessui riyo jigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otobe, Y.; Furutate, E.

    1992-10-31

    Twenty six years have passed since the first geothermal power station was constructed in Matsuo-mura of Iwate Prefecture, Japan. This paper describes the history, the present situation and the future conception of the geothermal energy utilization in this village. This village includes Hachimantai of a vantage ground in the center and has the gross area of 233.8km[sup 2], the annual average temperature of 8.3 centigrade and the continuous snow cover period of about 100 days. The hot water leading facility was cooperatively constructed by Japan Metals and Chemicals, Hachimantai Hot Spring Development and Matsuo-mura. The total working expense is 539.3 million yen. Hot water sources are the condensate from the condenser of geothermal power plant and hot spring. This mixed hot water of 4.3 t/min is led to respective facilities. The hot water supplying channel has the length of 12.8km from the power station through the Hachimantai hot spring resort, Kamiyogi to Takaishino. Respective total areas of greenhouses using hydrothermal fluid in both districts are 1,075ha and the inlet temperature of hot water is 60 centigrade and kinds of crop are 5 like green pepper and others. Takaishino agricultural park has selected flower and ornamental plant culture such as poppy anemone, stock and statice which are suitable for this district of low temperature and insufficient sunshine. The planted area is 10,700m[sup 2]. 2 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Research results from the advanced lead-acid battery consortium point the way to longer life and higher specific energy for lead/acid electric-vehicle batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moseley, P.T. [The International Lead Zinc Research Organization, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1998-05-18

    Amidst the welter of publicity devoted to the newer battery chemistries, the remarkable progress made by lead/acid battery technologists in response to the needs of the emerging electric-vehicle market has tended to be overlooked. The flooded design of battery, launched by Gaston Plante around 1860, has given way to a valve-regulated variant which has a history dating only from the 1970s. The key parameters of this `maintenance free` battery have been improved markedly during the course of the development programme of the advanced lead-acid battery consortium (ALABC), and it is likely that lead/acid will continue to feature strongly in motive-power applications as a result of its cost advantage and of its enhanced effectiveness. (orig.)

  2. The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maunsell John HR

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium (NPRC ends its first year, it is worth looking back to see how the experiment has worked. In order to encourage dissemination of the details outlined in this Editorial, it will also be published in other journals in the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium.

  3. Hawaii Space Grant Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Luke P.

    2005-01-01

    The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium is composed of ten institutions of higher learning including the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, the University of Hawai'i at Hilo, the University of Guam, and seven Community Colleges spread over the 4 main Hawaiian islands. Geographic separation is not the only obstacle that we face as a Consortium. Hawai'i has been mired in an economic downturn due to a lack of tourism for almost all of the period (2001 - 2004) covered by this report, although hotel occupancy rates and real estate sales have sky-rocketed in the last year. Our challenges have been many including providing quality educational opportunities in the face of shrinking State and Federal budgets, encouraging science and technology course instruction at the K-12 level in a public school system that is becoming less focused on high technology and more focused on developing basic reading and math skills, and assembling community college programs with instructors who are expected to teach more classes for the same salary. Motivated people can overcome these problems. Fortunately, the Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium (HSGC) consists of a group of highly motivated and talented individuals who have not only overcome these obstacles, but have excelled with the Program. We fill a critical need within the State of Hawai'i to provide our children with opportunities to pursue their dreams of becoming the next generation of NASA astronauts, engineers, and explorers. Our strength lies not only in our diligent and creative HSGC advisory board, but also with Hawai'i's teachers, students, parents, and industry executives who are willing to invest their time, effort, and resources into Hawai'i's future. Our operational philosophy is to FACE the Future, meaning that we will facilitate, administer, catalyze, and educate in order to achieve our objective of creating a highly technically capable workforce both here in Hawai'i and for NASA. In addition to administering to programs and

  4. The Genomic Standards Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Field

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A vast and rich body of information has grown up as a result of the world's enthusiasm for 'omics technologies. Finding ways to describe and make available this information that maximise its usefulness has become a major effort across the 'omics world. At the heart of this effort is the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC, an open-membership organization that drives community-based standardization activities, Here we provide a short history of the GSC, provide an overview of its range of current activities, and make a call for the scientific community to join forces to improve the quality and quantity of contextual information about our public collections of genomes, metagenomes, and marker gene sequences.

  5. IPD-Work consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Virtanen, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    to advance research on associations between work-related psychosocial risk factors and health; (ii) demonstrate as unfounded Choi et al's assertion that IPD-Work has underestimated associations between job strain and health endpoints; these include the dichotomous measurement of job strain, potential......Established in 2008 and comprising over 60 researchers, the IPD-Work (individual-participant data meta-analysis in working populations) consortium is a collaborative research project that uses pre-defined meta-analyses of individual-participant data from multiple cohort studies representing a range......-Work's findings have also generated disagreement as they challenge the importance of job strain as a major target for coronary heart disease (CHD) prevention, this is reflected in the critical discussion paper by Choi et al (1). In this invited reply to Choi et al, we aim to (i) describe how IPD-Work seeks...

  6. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  7. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  8. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  9. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  10. Microbial dehalogenation of trichlorophenol by a bacterial consortium: characterization and mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chlorinated phenolic compounds are a class of toxic and refractory organic pollutants. The pollution caused by chlorophenols poses serious ecological and environmental problems. A stable bacterial consortium capable of reductively dechlorinating trichlorophenol was isolated using chlorophenol as the sole source of carbon and energy. The physiological characteristics of the mixed cultures were studied and the results show that the consortium could use pyruvate as the carbon and energy source. The fermentation of pyruvate, sulfate reduction and dechlorination process proceeded strictly in succession within this consortium. The effect of specific inhibitors on the dechlorinating activity of the consortium was investigated, and the results indicate that sulfate and molybdate (1 mmol/L) have a strong inhibitive influence on the dechlorination activity. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique was applied to analyzing the composition of the consortium and the results reveal that one major subpopulation within the consortium was phylogenetically affiliated to gamma and delta subclass of Proteobacteria.

  11. Atlantic Coast Environmental Indicators Consortium

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — n 2000, the US EPA granted authority to establish up to five Estuarine Indicator Research Programs. These Programs were designed to identify, evaluate, recommend and...

  12. The International Human Epigenome Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Hirst, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC) coordinates the generation of a catalog of high-resolution reference epigenomes of major primary human cell types. The studies now presented (see the Cell Press IHEC web portal at http://www.cell.com/consortium/IHEC) highlight the coordinated ac...... achievements of IHEC teams to gather and interpret comprehensive epigenomic datasets to gain insights in the epigenetic control of cell states relevant for human health and disease. PAPERCLIP.......The International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC) coordinates the generation of a catalog of high-resolution reference epigenomes of major primary human cell types. The studies now presented (see the Cell Press IHEC web portal at http://www.cell.com/consortium/IHEC) highlight the coordinated...

  13. The Pittsburgh Breast Cancer Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Protein Autovac in Patients with Brest Cancer CPharmexa). This trial was initiated in June 2003. The PBCC accrued 5 of the planned 11 patients. This...AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-01-1-0374 TITLE: The Pittsburgh Breast Cancer Consortium...3. DATES COVERED 1 AUG 2001 - 31 JUL 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Pittsburgh Breast Cancer Consortium 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  14. The ocean sampling day consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate...... the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our...

  15. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  16. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  17. FY 1999 results of the regional consortium R and D project/the regional consortium energy R and D. 1st year. Development of the energy-saving type production technology of high-purity/transparent silica glass; 1999 nendo kojundo tomei sekiei glass no sho energy gata seizo gijutsu no kaihatsu seika hokokusho. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    For the purpose of achieving the remarkable energy conservation, high accuracy and low cost in the production of high-purity/transparent silica glass, the developmental research was conducted on slip casting method. In the development of technology to synthesize silica powder by the sol-gel method, monodisperse - polydisperse high-purity colloidal silica was obtained. In the development of technology to make silica power ultra-highly pure, a process was found out in which silica particles can be obtained by applying moderate amounts of ammonium bicarbonate and aqueous ammonia to the solution of silicic acid for heating. In the slip cast forming, a high-density forming body with a mean particle size of 1.5{mu}m was obtained. In the trial manufacture of reflector model, a translucent silica glass sintered body was obtained by transcribing the gypsum type dimensional shape in high purity. Besides, experimental researches were conducted on the examination of gypsum type/resin type and evaluation of physical properties, heat deterioration characteristics of the actual multi-layer film and trial manufacture of the heat resistant film, analysis/evaluation of trace impurities inside silica glass, conditions for the manufacture of dense silica glass sheets, etc. (NEDO)

  18. SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Timothy [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Ball, Kia [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Fournier, Ashley [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance

    2014-01-21

    In 2010 the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) received a $20 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Building Neighborhood Program (BBNP). This grant, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also included sub-grantees in 13 communities across the Southeast, known as the Southeast Consortium. The objective of this project was to establish a framework for energy efficiency retrofit programs to create models for replication across the Southeast and beyond. To achieve this goal, SEEA and its project partners focused on establishing infrastructure to develop and sustain the energy efficiency market in specific localities across the southeast. Activities included implementing minimum training standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency through strategic marketing and outreach and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency through a variety of financing mechanisms. The anticipated outcome of these activities would be best practice models for program design, marketing, financing, data collection and evaluation as well as increased market demand for energy efficiency retrofits and products. The Southeast Consortium’s programmatic impacts along with the impacts of the other BBNP grantees would further the progress towards the overall goal of energy efficiency market transformation. As the primary grantee SEEA served as the overall program administrator and provided common resources to the 13 Southeast Consortium sub-grantees including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection, reporting and compliance. Sub-grantee programs were located in cities across eight states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each sub

  19. Overview of the carbon products consortium (CPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, C.L. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) is an industry, university, government cooperative research team which has evolved over the past seven years to produce and evaluate coal-derived feedstocks for carbon products. The members of the Carbon Products Consortium are UCAR Carbon Company, Koppers Industries, CONOCO, Aluminum Company of America, AMOCO Polymers, and West Virginia University. The Carbon and Insulation Materials Technology Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Fiber Materials Inc., and BASF Corporation are affiliates of the CPC. The initial work on coal-derived nuclear graphites was supported by a grant to WVU, UCAR Carbon, and ORNL from the U.S. DOE New Production Reactor program. More recently, the CPC program has been supported through the Fossil Energy Materials program and through PETC`s Liquefaction program. The coal processing technologies involve hydrogenation, extraction by solvents such as N-methyl pyrolidone and toluene, material blending, and calcination. The breadth of carbon science expertise and manufacturing capability available in the CPC enables it to address virtually all research and development issues of importance to the carbon products industry.

  20. Corn in consortium with forages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Maria de Paula Garcia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic premises for sustainable agricultural development with focus on rural producers are reducing the costs of production and aggregation of values through the use crop-livestock system (CLS throughout the year. The CLS is based on the consortium of grain crops, especially corn with tropical forages, mainly of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The study aimed to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn crop intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The experiment was conducted at the Fazenda de Ensino, Pesquisa e Extensão – FEPE  of the Faculdade de Engenharia - UNESP, Ilha Solteira in an Oxisol in savannah conditions and in the autumn winter of 2009. The experimental area was irrigated by a center pivot and had a history of no-tillage system for 8 years. The corn hybrid used was simple DKB 390 YG at distances of 0.90 m. The seeds of grasses were sown in 0.34 m spacing in the amount of 5 kg ha-1, they were mixed with fertilizer minutes before sowing  and placed in a compartment fertilizer seeder and fertilizers were mechanically deposited in the soil at a depth of 0.03 m. The experimental design used was a randomized block with four replications and five treatments: Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CTD of the corn; Panicum maximum cv. Mombaça sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CMD of the corn; Urochloa brizantha cv. Xaraés sown during the occasion of nitrogen fertilization (CBD of the corn; Urochloa ruziziensis cv. Comumsown during the nitrogen fertilization (CRD of the corn and single corn (control. The production components of corn: plant population per hectare (PlPo, number of ears per hectare (NE ha-1, number of rows per ear (NRE, number of kernels per row on the cob (NKR, number of grain in the ear (NGE and mass of 100 grains (M100G were not influenced by consortium with forage. Comparing grain yield (GY single corn and maize intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum

  1. FY 2000 report on the results of the regional consortium R and D project - Regional consortium field. Third year report. R and D of the manufacturing technology of hybrid type biocompatible hard tissue substituting materials; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo - chiiki consortium bun'ya. Hybrid gata seitai yugo kinosei kososhiki daitai sozai seizo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu (dai 3 nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    As instrument materials substituting for hard tissue such as tooth root and artificial hip joint, the technology development is being proceeded with of the use of high-biocompatible {beta} Ti alloys coated by hydroxy apatite. Studies were made in the following 6 fields: 1) design of high-biocompatible {beta} Ti alloys, system control and dynamic evaluation; 2) development of high efficiency calcium phosphate ceramics (hydroxy apatite) and development of surface coating technology; 3) development of melting casting technology of high-biocompatible {beta} Ti alloys; 4) biological evaluation of biocompatibility of high-biocompatible {beta} Ti alloys and completion of dental precision casting technology; 5) basic research on affinity of low rigidity Ti alloys (trial manufacture); 6) development of technology of precision processing and precision finishing processing of alloys. In 5), in the test on affinity of the trial-manufactured alloys, stainless steel and existing Ti alloys, it was verified that the trial-manufactured alloys were excellent in affinity. (NEDO)

  2. Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium field / Development of technology to treat aquatic environment by using microorganisms fixed on carbon fabrics (abbreviation: carbon/aquatic environment project) (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium bun`ya / tanso sen`i nansoshiki eno biseibutsu kochaku gensho wo riyoshita mizukankyo seibi gijutsu no kaihatsu (ryakusho: tanso mizu kankyo project) daiichi nendo seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Out of the development of technology to arrange the aquatic environment using phenomena of microorganism fixation on carbon fiber soft textures, the paper stated the fiscal 1997 result. On carbon fibers in a state of swaying in water, microorganisms in water fix in an amazingly large quantity. A catalog was compiled of 58 kinds of carbon fabrics trially woven and knitted. When carbon fiber is used as activated sludge carrier, activity of microorganism lasts more than one year. Only a little amount of surplus sludge is generated. The fixed microorganisms are more active in case of carbon fiber than in case of nylon and polyester fibers. Fiber texture models of carbon fiber fixing activated sludge groups were proposed. By pump operation, the water flow inside/outside microorganism groups is being accelerated. Several new strains of bacillus carboniphilus were isolated/identified from soil and marsh. To grasp relationships of characteristics among three elements such as the state of aquatic environment, fiber, and microorganism group, the experiment was prepared. Preliminary work is conducted to derive a simple equation for facility design, and experimental directions to obtain design conditions were proposed. 6 refs., 166 figs., 47 tabs.

  3. Fiscal 1998 regional consortium R and D project (Regional consortium field). Report on R and D of production technology of hybrid-type biocompatible hard tissue replacing materials (1st fiscal year); 1998 nendo chiiki konsoshiamu kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki konsoshiamu bun'ya (hybrid gata seitai yugo kinosei kososhiki daitai sozai seizo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This project aims at development of high-strength high- biocompatible {beta}-type Ti alloy with lower modulli of elasticity composed of non-toxic elements, phosphate calcium ceramics for improving the biocompatibility and coating technology, and establishment of production technology of hybrid-type biocompatible hard tissue replacing materials. In fiscal 1998, the project promoted the following: Design of high-biocompatible {beta}-type Ti alloy materials, development of thermomechanical treatment for improving dynamic characteristics of such alloy, survey on practical melting and casting technologies and dental precision casting process, evaluation of the biocompatibility of the alloy by cytotoxicity, selection of tools for precision machining and surface finishing, control of contents, orientation and precipitation of biocompatible crystals such as {beta}- Ca(PO{sub 3}){sub 2} fibers for further improvement of the biocompatibility. This paper also outlines the survey results on the market needs, market size and market share for the feasibility of these materials. (NEDO)

  4. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  5. Isolation and Characteristics of a Microbial Consortium for Effectively Degrading Phenanthrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Xu Hongke; Guo Shaohui

    2007-01-01

    A microbial consortium (named W4) capable of aerobic biodegradation of solid phenanthrene as the sole source of carbon and energy was isolated by selective enrichment from petroleum-contaminated soil in the Henan oilfield,China. The strains of the consortium were identified as Sphingomonas cloacae, Rhizobium sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Achromobacter xylosoxidans respectively by means of genetic methods. The major metabolites of phenanthrene were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The biodegradation percentage of solid phenanthrene at 200 mg/L in liquid medium after 7 days of growth was greater than 99%. The degradation of phenanthrene was compared between individual predominant strains and the microbial consortium in different treatment processes. The microbial consortium showed a significant improvement of phenanthrene degradation rates in either static or shaking culture. The degradation percentage of phenanthrene by the consortium W4 decreased to some degree when C 16 coexisted, however it was hardly affected by C30. Furthermore, the ability of consortium W4 to remediate oil sludge from the Dagang oil refinery was studied by composting; and it was found that the consortium W4 could obviously remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and paraffinic hydrocarbons. All the results indicated that the microbial consortium W4 had a promising application in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments and could be potentially used in microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR).

  6. COAL ASH RESOURCES RESEARCH CONSORTIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC, pronounced �cars�) is the core coal combustion by-product (CCB) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCBs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. CARRC continued the partnership of industry partners, university researchers, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) addressing needs in the CCB industry through technical research and development projects. Technology transfer also continued through distribution and presentation of the results of research activities to appropriate audiences, with emphasis on reaching government agency representatives and end users of CCBs. CARRC partners have evolved technically and have jointly developed an understanding of the layers of social, regulatory, legal, and competition issues that impact the success of CCB utilization as applies to the CCB industry in general and to individual companies. Many CARRC tasks are designed to provide information on CCB performance including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC activities from 1993�1998 included a variety of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. The tasks summarized in this report are 1) The Demonstration of CCB Use in Small Construction Projects, 2) Application of CCSEM (computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy) for Coal Combustion By-Product Characterization, 3) Development of a Procedure to Determine Heat of Hydration for Coal Combustion By-Products, 4) Investigation of the Behavior of High

  7. STRUCTURE OF CONSORTIUM DESTRUCTIVE COMPONENTS IN THE INDUSTRIAL AREA OF KRIVYI RIG BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kachinskaya

    2014-07-01

    of destructive components of the block consortiums and their use in monitoring should be based on regulation of energy balance, material parameters and biomass of determinants of consortium, changes in components of autotrophic and heterotrophic blocks of consortium, estimation of function of biogeochemical threshold by coefficients that reflect the intensity of allocation of acids and contrast of destruction and acid-base conditions. Кey words: consortium ecosystems, biodiversity, structural organization, ground mesofauna

  8. Consortium for Health and Military Performance (CHAMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center's work addresses a wide scope of trauma exposure from the consequences of combat, operations other than war, terrorism, natural and humanmade disasters,...

  9. Power Electronics, Energy Harvesting and Renewable Energies Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The research in the Power Electronics, Energy Harvesting and Renewable Energies Laboratory (PEHREL) is mainly focused on investigation, modeling, simulation, design,...

  10. ZATPAC: a model consortium evaluates teen programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Kathryn; Murphy, Dana; Parsons, Chris

    2009-09-01

    How do we advance the environmental literacy of young people, support the next generation of environmental stewards and increase the diversity of the leadership of zoos and aquariums? We believe it is through ongoing evaluation of zoo and aquarium teen programming and have founded a consortium to pursue those goals. The Zoo and Aquarium Teen Program Assessment Consortium (ZATPAC) is an initiative by six of the nation's leading zoos and aquariums to strengthen institutional evaluation capacity, model a collaborative approach toward assessing the impact of youth programs, and bring additional rigor to evaluation efforts within the field of informal science education. Since its beginning in 2004, ZATPAC has researched, developed, pilot-tested and implemented a pre-post program survey instrument designed to assess teens' knowledge of environmental issues, skills and abilities to take conservation actions, self-efficacy in environmental actions, and engagement in environmentally responsible behaviors. Findings from this survey indicate that teens who join zoo/aquarium programs are already actively engaged in many conservation behaviors. After participating in the programs, teens showed a statistically significant increase in their reported knowledge of conservation and environmental issues and their abilities to research, explain, and find resources to take action on conservation issues of personal concern. Teens also showed statistically significant increases pre-program to post-program for various conservation behaviors, including "I talk with my family and/or friends about things they can do to help the animals or the environment," "I save water...," "I save energy...," "When I am shopping I look for recycled products," and "I help with projects that restore wildlife habitat."

  11. Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber comprises a power anechoic chamber and one transverse electromagnetic cell for characterizing radiofrequency (RF) responses of...

  12. Distributed Energy Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) is an extension of the power electronics testing capabilities of the Photovoltaic System Evaluation Laboratory...

  13. Introduction to Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium is an alliance of neuroscience journals that have agreed to accept manuscript reviews from other members of the Consortium.Its goals are to support efficient and thorough peer review of original research in neuroscience, speed the publication of research reports, and reduce the burden on peer reviewers.

  14. STRUCTURE OF CONSORTIUM DESTRUCTIVE COMPONENTS IN THE INDUSTRIAL AREA OF KRIVYI RIG BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kachinskaya V.V.

    2014-08-01

    of destructive components of the block consortiums and their use in monitoring should be based on regulation of energy balance, material parameters and biomass of determinants of consortium, changes in components of autotrophic and heterotrophic blocks of consortium, estimation of function of biogeochemical threshold by coefficients that reflect the intensity of allocation of acids and contrast of destruction and acid-base conditions.

  15. Geothermal development in the Oguni Area. Oguni chiiki no chinetsu kaihatsu ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Toru

    1989-12-30

    At the Oguni Town officials they are trying to develop some promissing enterprises utilizing abundant geothermal energy available in the area. This paper reports on an attempt to make an indoor skiing ground with artificial snow making use of geothermal energy. Brine for refregirant use having a temperature of {minus}25 centigrade is produced by using a refregirating machine operated by a turbine which is driven by geothermal steam. By use of this refregirant a snow room (12.7 times 5.5 times 5.5 m{sup 3}) is air-conditioned at a temperature of {minus}5 centigrade. Discharging cooled water at the rate of 3l/min together with cool compressed air through nozzles at a wall, artificial snow is made on the floor of the room which is also cooled to a temperature of {minus}5 centigrade. Snow fall is found to be quite uneven throughout the floor, reaching 48 cm at the point of maximum depth for about 9 hour's snow making. The energy is supplied at the rate of about 40000Kcal/h to the refregirating machine in the stationary state of snow making. 1 ref., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Joel [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industry-driven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  17. Establishing an International Soil Modelling Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Soil is one of the most critical life-supporting compartments of the Biosphere. Soil provides numerous ecosystem services such as a habitat for biodiversity, water and nutrients, as well as producing food, feed, fiber and energy. To feed the rapidly growing world population in 2050, agricultural food production must be doubled using the same land resources footprint. At the same time, soil resources are threatened due to improper management and climate change. Soil is not only essential for establishing a sustainable bio-economy, but also plays a key role also in a broad range of societal challenges including 1) climate change mitigation and adaptation, 2) land use change 3) water resource protection, 4) biotechnology for human health, 5) biodiversity and ecological sustainability, and 6) combating desertification. Soils regulate and support water, mass and energy fluxes between the land surface, the vegetation, the atmosphere and the deep subsurface and control storage and release of organic matter affecting climate regulation and biogeochemical cycles. Despite the many important functions of soil, many fundamental knowledge gaps remain, regarding the role of soil biota and biodiversity on ecosystem services, the structure and dynamics of soil communities, the interplay between hydrologic and biotic processes, the quantification of soil biogeochemical processes and soil structural processes, the resilience and recovery of soils from stress, as well as the prediction of soil development and the evolution of soils in the landscape, to name a few. Soil models have long played an important role in quantifying and predicting soil processes and related ecosystem services. However, a new generation of soil models based on a whole systems approach comprising all physical, mechanical, chemical and biological processes is now required to address these critical knowledge gaps and thus contribute to the preservation of ecosystem services, improve our understanding of climate

  18. Performance analysis in Japanese field test program; Field test data kara no chiiki hatsuden kaiseki hoho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, H.; Kurokawa, K.; Uchida, D. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Otani, K.; Sakuta, K.; Tsuda, I. [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan); Oshiro, T.; Sakamoto, K. [Japan Quality Assurance Organization, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    Power generation characteristics are investigated using data collected in photovoltaic power generation field tests being undertaken by NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization). The photovoltaic power generation system performance is evaluated by examining loss factors leading to degradation in system performance, with weather conditions such as variation in insolation and air temperature, inverter performance, and shadows cast by surrounding buildings taken into consideration. As the result, it is found that the important loss factors are degradation in module performance due to elevated temperature, drift in the maximum output control, degraded inverter performance due to input power variation, effect of shadows, etc. It is learned that system is greatly affected by degradation in module performance due to increased temperature in summer and by shadows in winter, the two being responsible for the output coefficient dropping to approximately 75% throughout the year. The output coefficient frequency distribution charts for the 75 test sites confirm that the rate is as low as 70-80% at many sites. As for the system operating time, it tends to be longer in West Japan where the annual insolation rate is higher. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  19. NASA Space Radiation Transport Code Development Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Lawrence W

    2005-01-01

    Recently, NASA established a consortium involving the University of Tennessee (lead institution), the University of Houston, Roanoke College and various government and national laboratories, to accelerate the development of a standard set of radiation transport computer codes for NASA human exploration applications. This effort involves further improvements of the Monte Carlo codes HETC and FLUKA and the deterministic code HZETRN, including developing nuclear reaction databases necessary to extend the Monte Carlo codes to carry out heavy ion transport, and extending HZETRN to three dimensions. The improved codes will be validated by comparing predictions with measured laboratory transport data, provided by an experimental measurements consortium, and measurements in the upper atmosphere on the balloon-borne Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB). In this paper, we present an overview of the consortium members and the current status and future plans of consortium efforts to meet the research goals and objectives of this extensive undertaking.

  20. The LBNL/JSU/AGMUS Science Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses the 11 year of accomplishments of the science consortium of minority graduates from Jackson State University and Ana G. Mendez University at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  1. International Radical Cystectomy Consortium: A way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Johar Raza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC is an emerging operative alternative to open surgery for the management of invasive bladder cancer. Studies from single institutions provide limited data due to the small number of patients. In order to better understand the related outcomes, a world-wide consortium was established in 2006 of patients undergoing RARC, called the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium (IRCC. Thus far, the IRCC has reported its findings on various areas of operative interest and continues to expand its capacity to include other operative modalities and transform it into the International Radical Cystectomy Consortium. This article summarizes the findings of the IRCC and highlights the future direction of the consortium.

  2. Molecular characterization of a toluene-degrading methanogenic consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficker, M; Krastel, K; Orlicky, S; Edwards, E

    1999-12-01

    A toluene-degrading methanogenic consortium enriched from creosote-contaminated aquifer material was maintained on toluene as the sole carbon and energy source for 10 years. The species in the consortium were characterized by using a molecular approach. Total genomic DNA was isolated, and 16S rRNA genes were amplified by using PCR performed with kingdom-specific primers that were specific for 16S rRNA genes from either members of the kingdom Bacteria or members of the kingdom Archaea. A total of 90 eubacterial clones and 75 archaeal clones were grouped by performing a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Six eubacterial sequences and two archaeal sequences were found in the greatest abundance (in six or more clones) based on the RFLP analysis. The relative abundance of each putative species was estimated by using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and the presence of putative species was determined qualitatively by performing slot blot hybridization with consortium DNA. Both archaeal species and two of the six eubacterial species were detected in the DNA and FISH hybridization experiments. A phylogenetic analysis of these four dominant organisms suggested that the two archaeal species are related to the genera Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum. One of the eubacterial species is related to the genus Desulfotomaculum, while the other is not related to any previously described genus. By elimination, we propose that the last organism probably initiates the attack on toluene.

  3. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology.

  4. Biodegradation mechanisms and kinetics of azo dye 4BS by a microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fang; Hu, Wenrong; Li, Yuezhong

    2004-10-01

    A microbial consortium consisting of a white-rot fungus 8-4* and a Pseudomonas 1-10 was isolated from wastewater treatment facilities of a local dyeing house by enrichment, using azo dye Direct Fast Scarlet 4BS as the sole source of carbon and energy, which had a high capacity for rapid decolorization of 4BS. To elucidate the decolorization mechanisms, decolorization of 4BS was compared between individual strains and the microbial consortium under different treatment processes. The microbial consortium showed a significant improvement on dye decolorization rates under either static or shaking culture, which might be attributed to the synergetic reaction of single strains. From the curve of COD values and the UV-visible spectra of 4BS solutions before and after decolorization cultivation with the microbial consortium, it was found that 4BS could be mineralized completely, and the results had been used for presuming the degrading pathway of 4BS. This study also examined the kinetics of 4BS decolorization by immobilized microbial consortium. The results demonstrated that the optimal decolorization activity was observed in pH range between four and 9, temperature range between 20 and 40 degrees C and the maximal specific decolorization rate occurred at 1,000 mg l(-1) of 4BS. The proliferation and distribution of microbial consortium were also microscopically observed, which further confirmed the decolorization mechanisms of 4BS.

  5. Energy Materials Research Laboratory (EMRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energy Materials Research Laboratory at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) creates a cross-disciplinary laboratory facility that lends itself to the...

  6. Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NREL's Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility (DERTF) is a working laboratory for interconnection and systems integration testing. This state-of-the-art facility...

  7. Water Research Consortium U.S. Department of Energy Grant Award Number DE-FG02-05ER64132 Final Technical Report For Period Beginning: 15 September 2005 And Ending: 31 December 2009 Report Date: 16 March 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R. Billingsley

    2010-03-18

    This report summarizes the activities of the INRA Water Research Consortium (IWRC) for the period beginning September 15, 2005 and ending December 16, 2010. This report compares accomplishments to project objectives, documents the activities associated with this project, and lists products developed during the course of the project. The Water Resources Research Needs Assessment team received funding from the Inland Northwest Research Alliance Water Resources Steering Committee to facilitate a structured needs assessment process that could provide a basis for future targeted research efforts to improve regional water resources management in the Inland Northwest region. The original INRA proposal specifically mentions the need to conduct a detailed assessment of the information and research needs of policy makers and water user groups during a period of increasing competition for scarce water supplies. A particular focus of this assessment would be to understand what types of research might facilitate water resource management during periods of drought. The specific goals of the Needs Assessment project were to: (1) Quickly ascertain the perceptions of diverse stakeholders in this region; (2) Condense this complex information into a format that can be shared with the INRA scientific panel, and (3) Develop of a realistic set of research needs & priorities that can shape future INRA-funded research activities.

  8. National University Consortium on Microwave Research (NUCOMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Robert J.; Agee, Forrest J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper introduces a new cooperative research program of national scale that is focused on crucial research issues in the development of high energy microwave sources. These have many applications in the DOD and industry. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), in coopertaion with the Phillips Laboratory, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the Army Research Laboratory, has established a tri-service research consortium to investigate novel high energy microwave sources. The program is part of the DODs 'Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative' and will be funded at a rate of $DLR3.0M per year for up to five years. All research performed under this program will be unclassified. Under its auspices, HPM scientists at nine US universities will be attacking twenty-two separate research projects under the leadership of Neville Luhmann at UC-Davis, Victor Granatstein at Maryland, Magne Kristiansen at Texas Tech, Edl Schamiloglu at New Mexico, John Nation at Cornell, Ned Birdsall at UC-Berkeley, George Caryotakis at Standord, Ronald Gilgenbach at Michigan, and Anthony Lin at UCLA. To facilitate the rapid transition of research results into the industrial community, formal collaborative subcontracts are already in place with James Benford at Physics International, Carter Armstrong at Northrop, and Glen Huffman at Varian Associates. Although this new program officially only came into existence in mid-March of this year, it builds on over a decade of microwave research efforts funded by the plasma physics office at AFOSR. It also is synergistic with the ongoing Tri-Service Vacuum Electronics Initiative led by Robert Parker of NRL as well as with the AFOSR's and Rome Laboratory's long standing Advanced Thermionic Research Initiative. An overview will be given of the broad spectrum of research objectives encompassed by NUCOMR. Areas of collaboration and technology transfer will be highlighted. The areas in which the three university consortia will conduct

  9. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-03-31

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as “Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification” project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative

  10. Microbial Degradation of Aniline by Bacterial Consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN-LONG WANG; ZE-YU MAO; WEI-ZHONG WU

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the characteristics of microbial degradation of aniline by a stable bacterial consortium. Methods The bacterial consortium was isolated from activated sludge treating chemical wastewater using aniline as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen by enrichment and isolation technique. The biomass was measured as optical density (OD) at 510 nm using a spectrophotometer. Aniline concentrations were determined by spectrophotometer. The intermediates of aniline degradation were identified by GC/MS method. Results The bacterial consortium could grow at a range of aniline concentrations between 50 and 500 mg/L. The optimal pH and temperature for aniline degradation were determined to be 7.0 and 30, respectively. The presence of NH4NO3 as an additional nitrogen source (100-500 mg/L) had no adverse effect on bacterial growth and aniline degradation. The presence of heavy metal ions, such as Co2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Mn2+ and Cu2+ had an inhibitory effect on aniline degradation. Conclusions The isolated bacterial consortium candegrade aniline up to 500 mg/L effectively and tolerate some heavy metal ions that commonly exist in chemical wastewater. It has a potential to be applied in the practical treatment of aniline-containingwastewater.

  11. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    TBI Translational Research Consortium Executive Committee Steering Committee Model of Injury Working Group Neuroprotection Working Group Regeneration ...Report, Holcomb Page 22 Specific aim #3.1: To study neuroprotection and enhanced neurological recovery with erythropoietin ( Epo ) and Epo ...derivatives after MTBI. - #3.1.1 To study the effects of Epo and Epo derivatives on neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and outcome after experimental MTBI

  12. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Griffith (Linda); M. Cowan (Morton); L.D. Notarangelo (Luigi Daniele); R. Kohn (Robert); J. Puck (Jennifer); S.-Y. Pai (Sung-Yun); B. Ballard (Barbara); S.C. Bauer (Sarah); J. Bleesing (Jack); M. Boyle (Marcia); R.W. Brower (Ronald); R.H. Buckley (Rebecca); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); L.M. Burroughs (Lauri); F. Candotti (Fabio); A. Cant (Andrew); T. Chatila (Talal); C. Cunningham-Rundles (Charlotte); M.C. Dinauer (Mary); J. Dvorak (Jennie); A. Filipovich (Alexandra); L.A. Fleisher (Lee); H.B. Gaspar (Bobby); T. Gungor (Tayfun); E. Haddad (Elie); E. Hovermale (Emily); F. Huang (Faith); A. Hurley (Alan); M. Hurley (Mary); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); E.M. Kang (Elizabeth); B.R. Logan (Brent); J.R. Long-Boyle (Janel); H. Malech (Harry); S.A. McGhee (Sean); S. Modell (Sieglinde); S. Modell (Sieglinde); H.D. Ochs (Hans); R.J. O'Reilly (Richard); R. Parkman (Robertson); D. Rawlings (D.); J.M. Routes (John); P. Shearer (P.); T.N. Small (Trudy); H. Smith (H.); K.E. Sullivan (Kathleen); P. Szabolcs (Paul); A.J. Thrasher (Adrian); D. Torgerson; P. Veys (Paul); K. Weinberg (Kenneth); J.C. Zuniga-Pflucker (Juan Carlos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SC

  13. The Digital Preservation Consortium: Mission and Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Donald J.; Kenney, Anne

    The development of the National Information Infrastructure (NII) and the growing use of the Internet are creating a rapidly-changing environment for collaborative preservation and access. Within this environment, the Digital Preservation Consortium (DPC) seeks to advance the use and utility of digital technology for the preservation of and access…

  14. Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-COMM) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayfield, Stephen P. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-12-04

    The Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-Comm) was established in 2010 to conduct research to enable commercial viability of alternative liquid fuels produced from algal biomass. The main objective of CAB-Comm was to dramatically improve the viability of algae as a source of liquid fuels to meet US energy needs, by addressing several significant barriers to economic viability. To achieve this goal, CAB-Comm took a diverse set of approaches on three key aspects of the algal biofuels value chain: crop protection; nutrient utilization and recycling; and the development of genetic tools. These projects have been undertaken as collaboration between six academic institutions and two industrial partners: University of California, San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Rutgers University; University of California, Davis; Johns Hopkins University; Sapphire Energy; and Life Technologies.

  15. CREAT A CONSORTIUM AND DEVELOP PREMIUM CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John M. Andresen

    2003-08-01

    The Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and matching funds from industry and academic institutions continued to excel in developing innovative technologies to use coal and coal-derived feedstocks to produce premium carbon product. During Budget Period 5, eleven projects were supported and sub-contracted were awarded to seven organizations. The CPCPC held two meetings and one tutorial at various locations during the year. Budget Period 5 was a time of growth for CPCPC in terms of number of proposals and funding requested from members, projects funded and participation during meetings. Although the membership was stable during the first part of Budget Period 5 an increase in new members was registered during the last months of the performance period.

  16. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on area consortium research and development business. Area consortium for venture business development by building base for small business (abuse double protected next generation card system based on steganography); 1998 nendo venture kigyo ikuseigata chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu (chusho kigyo sozo kibangata). Steganography gijutsu wo riyoshita jisedaigata fusei shiyo taju boshi guard system no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    A card system is developed using BPCS (Business Planning and Control System) steganography, with electronic data imbedded in the card. Under the system, the visual recognition of the user and the mechanical verification of the card are carried out simultaneously, with the card rejecting any abuse. In fiscal 1998, a system was built by way of trial, constituted of technologies of encoding, decoding, and packaging data into an IC (integrated circuit) card. A photograph of the user's face is attached to the card, the card carries an 8KB IC memory device, and the device stores data of the photograph of the user's face etc. A password has to be inputted before any data may be taken out. A customized key is required to display the imbedded personal data and, for the restoration of the key data, the personal key known only to the owner and the company key that is kept by the card managing company need to be collated with each other. Multiple checking is available for the prevention of abuse, which include the collation of face photographs, collation with display by inputting the password, and request for the customized key to confirm the presence of authority to read the imbedded personal data. (NEDO)

  17. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on research and development project for regional consortiums. Regional consortium field (Development of a three-dimensional high-speed bio-micromanipulation system (the second year)); 1998 nendo chiiki consortium bun'ya. Sanjigen kosoku bio micro manipuration system no kaihatsu (dai 2 nendo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Research and development are made on a bio-micromanipulation system that can substitute human being to perform three-dimensionally selective, large-quantity, repeated, high-speed and high-accuracy processing in micro and nano zones in bio-technologies. Fiscal 1998 has incorporated different component technologies into the common platform structured in last year to structure a high-speed laser manipulator separating device and a three-dimensional micromanipulation device and to perform basic experiments. The structure can sort out arbitrarily only the selected species from a large quantity of microorganisms dispersed in aqueous solution, and separate them at a high speed. Intended objects are trapped by laser beam, and substances other than those intended are removed from the electric field. Then, the trapped objects are moved by laser beam and recovered. This operation can be performed even at DNA level. A positioning and fixing device for cell anatomy was manufactured on a trial basis. In addition, a three-dimensional micromanipulation device was structured, and basic experiments were carried out on force measurement and control. A micro flow path forming technology was established by using a micro processing technology. This paper also describes a commercialization survey. (NEDO)

  18. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on research and development project for regional consortiums. Regional consortium field (Development of super devices for medical treatment devices using three-dimensional micro processing technology (the second year)); 1998 nendo chiiki consortium bun'ya. Maikuro sanjigen kako gijutsu ni yoru iryo kikiyo super device no kaihatsu (dai 2 nendo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    It is intended to develop super devices for medical treatment devices using a three-dimensional micro processing technology by developing and combining precision processing technologies accumulated in the Suwa area. Main targets were placed on device size reduction, and a high reliability portable chemical liquid sustaining injector. This paper describes achievements made in fiscal 1998. Micromotors currently used have as low output torque as 1/4 of the target. Enhancement of reduction gear mechanism efficiency and durability is the problem to be solved. Microtubes with an inner diameter of 0.1 mm were produced on a trial basis by using four kinds of materials. The delivery mechanism assured the targeted flow rate successfully by using the direct cum screw system, but reduction in driving torque is desired. Completion of the cartridge system is also in the realm of aim. Joints will be moved closer to commercialization by selecting materials taking into account the chemical resistance and disposition. Micro connectors and cables still have problems for development. The bubble sensor was virtually decided to be of optical type from the points of detection performance requirements. Detectors and peripheral devices will be reduced in dimensions, and their reliability will be enhanced. The flow rate sensor has a problem to be solved in responsiveness to intermittent flows. (NEDO)

  19. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on area consortium research and development business. Area consortium for venture business development by building base for small business (high-precision, real-time measurement of shapes, deformation, and distortion); 1998 nendo venture kigyo ikuseigata chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu (chusho kigyo sozo kibangata). Koseido jitsujikan keijo henkei hizumi keisokuho no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Measurements are analyzed by a Fourier transform phase shift method incorporating the 3-dimensional image processing technique developed at Wakayama University. The system is to exhibit micrometer-order accuracy in the measurement of shapes and nanometer-order accuracy in the measurement of flatness distribution on an object, is easy to handle at the working site, and is inexpensive, non-contact, high in accuracy, and totally automatic, capable of measuring shapes, deformation, movement, stress, and distortion. To be also developed is an inexpensive system easy to operate at the working site, which uses a measuring method based on the phase shift scan moire method, capable of non-contact real-time processing of 30 images per second. Studies are conducted to optimize the performance for higher speeds, studies are conducted to realize automation, higher speeds, and reduction in size, and prototypes will be built corresponding to different objects of measurement. Studies are to begin in connection with business applying the new technology, mass production, commercialization, and standardization. The initial goals have roughly been achieved, and development will continue. (NEDO)

  20. Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER) exploits radiation chemistry techniques to study chemical reactions (and other phenomena) by subjecting samples to...

  1. High Energy Solid State Laser Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A suite of laboratories with advanced spectroscopic and laser equipment, this facility develops materials and techniques for advanced solid state high energy lasers....

  2. The COPD Biomarker Qualification Consortium (CBQC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casaburi, Richard; Celli, Bartolome; Crapo, James

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Knowledge about the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has advanced dramatically over the last 30 years. Unfortunately, this has had little impact in terms of new treatments. Over the same time frame, only one new class of medication for COPD......, and no interested party has been in a position to undertake such a process. In order to facilitate the development of novel tools to assess new treatments, the Food and Drug Administration, in collaboration with the COPD Foundation, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute and scientists from the pharmaceutical...... industry and academia conducted a workshop to survey the available information that could contribute to new tools. Based on this, a collaborative project, the COPD Biomarkers Qualification Consortium, was initiated. The Consortium in now actively preparing integrated data sets from existing resources...

  3. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsztein, Alexandra M; Brooks, Philip J; Dugan, Vivien G; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guo, Max; Howcroft, T Kevin; Kelley, Christine A; Kuo, Lillian S; Labosky, Patricia A; Lenzi, Rebecca; McKie, George A; Mohla, Suresh; Procaccini, Dena; Reilly, Matthew; Satterlee, John S; Srinivas, Pothur R; Church, Elizabeth Stansell; Sutherland, Margaret; Tagle, Danilo A; Tucker, Jessica M; Venkatachalam, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a) generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b) defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies,

  4. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

    2010-12-08

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  5. The STRONG STAR Multidisciplinary PTSD Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    myocardial infarction and pre- dicting variables. J. Psychosom. Res. 69, 143e150. Harvey, B.H., Brand, L., Jeeva, Z., Stein, D.J., 2006. Cortical...For the STRONG STAR Consortium. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com j our na l h omepa g e: www.e l se v ie r.c om /l oca te/ psyne ue n 0306

  6. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Consortium Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-01

    This is the third progress report of the M.I.T. Home Automation and Healthcare Consortium-Phase Two. It covers majority of the new findings, concepts...research projects of home automation and healthcare, ranging from human modeling, patient monitoring, and diagnosis to new sensors and actuators, physical...aids, human-machine interface and home automation infrastructure. This report contains several patentable concepts, algorithms, and designs.

  7. Midwest superconductivity consortium. 1993 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, in the fourth year of operations further strengthened its mission to advance the science and understanding of high T{sub c} superconductivity. The goals of the organization and the individual projects continue to reflect the current needs for new knowledge in the field and the unique capabilities of the institutions involved. Group efforts and cooperative laboratory interactions to achieve the greatest possible synergy under the Consortium continue to be emphasized. Industrial affiliations coupled with technology transfer initiatives were expanded. Activities of the participants during the past year achieved an interactive and high level of performance. The number of notable achievements in the field contributed by Consortium investigators increased. The programmatic research continues to focus upon key materials-related problems in two areas. The first area has a focus upon {open_quotes}Synthesis and Processing{close_quotes} while the second is centered around {open_quotes}Limiting Features in Transport Properties of High T{sub c} Materials{close_quotes}.

  8. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C; Bleesing, Jack J H; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C; Dvorak, Christopher C; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Fleisher, Thomas A; Bobby Gaspar, Hubert; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M; Logan, Brent R; Long-Boyle, Janel R; Malech, Harry L; McGhee, Sean A; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D; O'Reilly, Richard J; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J; Routes, John M; Shearer, William T; Small, Trudy N; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2014-02-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease through retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to encourage training of junior investigators, establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues, work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness, and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for primary immunodeficiency diseases. To date, the PIDTC has funded 2 pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans and B-cell reconstitution in patients with SCID after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first 2 PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives.

  9. Removal of triphenylmethane dyes by bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriaa, Jihane; Khaireddine, Monia; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2012-01-01

    A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila)-(CM-4) was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L) and malachite green (50 mg/L) dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes.

  10. Removal of Triphenylmethane Dyes by Bacterial Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihane Cheriaa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila-(CM-4 was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L and malachite green (50 mg/L dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes.

  11. Building partnerships: Models for the future. Energy and aging consortium. Held in Washington, DC on January 29-31, 1992. Includes executive summary. Report for 30 September 1990-30 June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolliver, L.M.P.; Wilson, M.K.

    1993-06-01

    The aims of the project were to expand the number of state energy and aging consortia (EAC) and the technical assistance information currently available, to identify the characteristics of successful EAC consortia models, and to extend the current EAC dissemination network. The objectives were: (1) to develop eight (8) state energy and aging consortia, (2) to identify a range of best practice models for EAC development and those factors that made them successful, (3) to develop a communications and technical information dissemination network between national-state and state-state consortia members.

  12. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2001-06-28

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the US petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the first quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. The SWC is in its infancy; however, interest from the petroleum and natural gas industry has grown substantially during this reporting period. As of December 31, 2000, nineteen members have joined the consortium and several other companies have expressed interest. During the last three months, efforts were focused on the development of the necessary infrastructure and membership base to begin the consortium technology development activities. These efforts included: (1) preparing a draft constitution and bylaws, (2) developing draft membership application forms, (3) developing an intellectual property statement, (4) providing overview presentations to trade association meetings, and (5) marketing the consortium individually to potential members. These activities are discussed in further detail in this first quarterly technical progress report.

  13. Energy Sciences Network (ESnet)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energy Sciences Network is the Department of Energy’s high-speed network that provides the high-bandwidth, reliable connections that link scientists at national...

  14. Latest Developments of the Isprs Student Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detchev, I.; Kanjir, U.; Reyes, S. R.; Miyazaki, H.; Aktas, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    The International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) Student Consortium (SC) is a network for young professionals studying or working within the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and other related geo-spatial sciences. The main goal of the network is to provide means for information exchange for its young members and thus help promote and integrate youth into the ISPRS. Over the past four years the Student Consortium has successfully continued to fulfil its mission in both formal and informal ways. The formal means of communication of the SC are its website, newsletter, e-mail announcements and summer schools, while its informal ones are multiple social media outlets and various social activities during student related events. The newsletter is published every three to four months and provides both technical and experiential content relevant for the young people in the ISPRS. The SC has been in charge or at least has helped with organizing one or more summer schools every year. The organization's e-mail list has over 1,100 subscribers, its website hosts over 1,300 members from 100 countries across the entire globe, and its public Facebook group currently has over 4,500 joined visitors, who connect among one another and share information relevant for their professional careers. These numbers show that the Student Consortium has grown into a significant online-united community. The paper will present the organization's on-going and past activities for the last four years, its current priorities and a strategic plan and aspirations for the future four-year period.

  15. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  16. On the Need to Establish an International Soil Modeling Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, H.; Vanderborght, J.; Schnepf, A.

    2014-12-01

    Soil is one of the most critical life-supporting compartments of the Biosphere. Soil provides numerous ecosystem services such as a habitat for biodiversity, water and nutrients, as well as producing food, feed, fiber and energy. To feed the rapidly growing world population in 2050, agricultural food production must be doubled using the same land resources footprint. At the same time, soil resources are threatened due to improper management and climate change. Despite the many important functions of soil, many fundamental knowledge gaps remain, regarding the role of soil biota and biodiversity on ecosystem services, the structure and dynamics of soil communities, the interplay between hydrologic and biotic processes, the quantification of soil biogeochemical processes and soil structural processes, the resilience and recovery of soils from stress, as well as the prediction of soil development and the evolution of soils in the landscape, to name a few. Soil models have long played an important role in quantifying and predicting soil processes and related ecosystem services. However, a new generation of soil models based on a whole systems approach comprising all physical, mechanical, chemical and biological processes is now required to address these critical knowledge gaps and thus contribute to the preservation of ecosystem services, improve our understanding of climate-change-feedback processes, bridge basic soil science research and management, and facilitate the communication between science and society. To meet these challenges an international community effort is required, similar to initiatives in systems biology, hydrology, and climate and crop research. Our consortium will bring together modelers and experimental soil scientists at the forefront of new technologies and approaches to characterize soils. By addressing these aims, the consortium will contribute to improve the role of soil modeling as a knowledge dissemination instrument in addressing key

  17. BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE BY A MICROORGANISM CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alimohammadi, A. R. Mesdaghinia, M. Mahmoodi, S. Nasseri, A. H. Mahvi and J. Nouri

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE is one of the ether oxygenates which its use has been increased within the last twenty years. This compound is produced from isobutylene and methanol reaction that is used as octane index enhancer and also increases dissolved oxygen in gasoline and decreases carbon monoxide emission in four phased motors because of better combustion of gasoline. High solubility in water (52 g/L, high vapor pressure (0.54 kg/cm3, low absorption to organic carbon of soil and presence of MTBE in the list of potentially-carcinogens of U.S EPA has made its use of great concern. The culture media used in this study was Mineral Salt Medium (MSM. The study lasted for 236 days and in three different concentrations of MTBE of 200, 5 and 0.8 mg/L. A control sample was also used to compare the results. This research studied the isolation methods of microbial consortium in the MTBE polluted soils in Tehran and Abadan petroleum refinery besides MTBE degradation. The results showed the capability of bacteria in consuming MTBE as carbon source. Final microbial isolation was performed with several microbial passages as well as keeping consortium in a certain amount of MTBE as the carbon source.

  18. Fermentative hydrogen production by microbial consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maintinguer, Sandra I.; Fernandes, Bruna S.; Duarte, Iolanda C.S.; Saavedra, Nora Katia; Adorno, M. Angela T.; Varesche, M. Bernadete [Department of Hydraulics and Sanitation, School of Engineering of Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense, 400, 13566-590 Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil)

    2008-08-15

    Heat pre-treatment of the inoculum associated to the pH control was applied to select hydrogen-producing bacteria and endospores-forming bacteria. The source of inoculum to the heat pre-treatment was from a UASB reactor used in the slaughterhouse waste treatment. The molecular biology analyses indicated that the microbial consortium presented microorganisms affiliated with Enterobacter cloacae (97% and 98%), Clostridium sp. (98%) and Clostridium acetobutyricum (96%), recognized as H{sub 2} and volatile acids' producers. The following assays were carried out in batch reactors in order to verify the efficiencies of sucrose conversion to H{sub 2} by the microbial consortium: (1) 630.0 mg sucrose/L, (2) 1184.0 mg sucrose/L, (3) 1816.0 mg sucrose/L and (4) 4128.0 mg sucrose/L. The subsequent yields were obtained as follows: 15% (1.2 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), 20% (1.6 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), 15% (1.2 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose) and 4% (0.3 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), respectively. The intermediary products were acetic acid, butyric acid, methanol and ethanol in all of the anaerobic reactors. (author)

  19. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Ainsztein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators.

  20. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 6 Report Promoting a Southeast Hydrogen Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this project task was to establish a technical consortium to promote the deployment of hydrogen technologies and infrastructure in the Southeast. The goal was to partner with fuel cell manufacturers, hydrogen fuel infrastructure providers, electric utilities, energy service companies, research institutions, and user groups to improve education and awareness of hydrogen technologies in an area that is lagging behind other parts of the country in terms of vehicle and infrastructure demonstrations and deployments. This report documents that effort.

  1. The virtual atomic and molecular data centre (VAMDC) consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubernet, M. L.; Antony, B. K.; Ba, Y. A.; Babikov, Yu L.; Bartschat, K.; Boudon, V.; Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.; Daniel, F.; Delahaye, F.; Del Zanna, G.; de Urquijo, J.; Dimitrijević, M. S.; Domaracka, A.; Doronin, M.; Drouin, B. J.; Endres, C. P.; Fazliev, A. Z.; Gagarin, S. V.; Gordon, I. E.; Gratier, P.; Heiter, U.; Hill, C.; Jevremović, D.; Joblin, C.; Kasprzak, A.; Krishnakumar, E.; Leto, G.; Loboda, P. A.; Louge, T.; Maclot, S.; Marinković, B. P.; Markwick, A.; Marquart, T.; Mason, H. E.; Mason, N. J.; Mendoza, C.; Mihajlov, A. A.; Millar, T. J.; Moreau, N.; Mulas, G.; Pakhomov, Yu; Palmeri, P.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Perevalov, V. I.; Piskunov, N.; Postler, J.; Quinet, P.; Quintas-Sánchez, E.; Ralchenko, Yu; Rhee, Y.-J.; Rixon, G.; Rothman, L. S.; Roueff, E.; Ryabchikova, T.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Scheier, P.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmitt, B.; Stempels, E.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Tyuterev, Vl G.; Vujčić, V.; Wakelam, V.; Walton, N. A.; Zatsarinny, O.; Zeippen, C. J.; Zwölf, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) Consortium is a worldwide consortium which federates atomic and molecular databases through an e-science infrastructure and an organisation to support this activity. About 90% of the inter-connected databases handle data that are used for the interpretation of astronomical spectra and for modelling in many fields of astrophysics. Recently the VAMDC Consortium has connected databases from the radiation damage and the plasma communities, as well as promoting the publication of data from Indian institutes. This paper describes how the VAMDC Consortium is organised for the optimal distribution of atomic and molecular data for scientific research. It is noted that the VAMDC Consortium strongly advocates that authors of research papers using data cite the original experimental and theoretical papers as well as the relevant databases. .

  2. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Garima

    Fossil fuels have been the major source for liquid transportation fuels for ages. However, decline in oil reserves and environmental concerns have raised a lot of interest in alternative and renewable energy sources. One promising alternative is the conversion of plant biomass into ethanol. The primary biomass feed stocks currently being used for the ethanol industry have been food based biomass (corn and sugar cane). However, interest has recently shifted to replace these traditional feed-stocks with more abundant, non-food based cellulosic biomass such as agriculture wastes (corn stover) or crops (switch grass). The use of cellulosic biomass as feed stock for the production of ethanol via bio-chemical routes presents many technical challenges not faced with the use of corn or sugar-cane as feed-stock. Recently, a new process called consolidated Bio-processing (CBP) has been proposed. This process combines simultaneous saccharification of lignocellulose with fermentation of the resulting sugars into a single process step mediated by a single microorganism or microbial consortium. Although there is no natural microorganism that possesses all properties of lignocellulose utilization and ethanol production desired for CBP, some bacteria and fungi exhibit some of the essential traits. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most attractive host organism for the usage of this strategy due to its high ethanol productivity at close to theoretical yields (0.51g ethanol/g glucose consumed), high osmo- and ethanol- tolerance, natural robustness in industrial processes, and ease of genetic manipulation. Introduction of the cellulosome, found naturally in microorganisms, has shown new directions to deal with recalcitrant biomass. In this case enzymes work in synergy in order to hydrolyze biomass more effectively than in case of free enzymes. A microbial consortium has been successfully developed, which ensures the functional assembly of minicellulosome on the yeast surface

  3. The Black Rock Forest Consortium: A narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzetto-More, Nicole Antoinette

    The Black Rock Forest is a 3,785-acre wilderness area whose richly forested landscape represents the splendor of the Hudson Valley Region of New York State. Although originally intended to become the home of wealthy banker James Stillman, it was his son Ernest whose love of conservation caused him to embrace the then new and revolutionary practice of sustainable forestry and establish Black Rock in 1928. Due to Ernest Stillman's foresight, the property was protected from development and bequeathed to Harvard University following his death for the establishment of an experimental forest. The modern environmental movement in America began when the Black Rock Forest was threatened with development by Consolidated Edison, and the people of the surrounding community banded together, battling tirelessly for over 17 years to stop the degradation of this historic forest. The outcome of this crusade marked a hallmark win for the environment leaving an illustrious and inveterate legacy. The campaign resulted in the watershed legislation the National Environmental Policy Act, the formation of several environmental advocacy groups, the creation of the Council on Environmental Quality of the Executive Office of the President, as well as set a precedent for communities to initiate and win cases against major corporations in order to safeguard natural resources. In the midst of the controversy it became apparent that alternative futures for the Forest needed to be explored. As a result of a committee report and one man's vision, the idea emerged to create a consortium that would purchase and steward the Forest. With a formation that took nearly fifteen years, the Black Rock Forest Consortium was formed, a unique amalgamation of K--12 public and private schools, colleges and universities, and science and cultural centers that successfully collaborate to enhance scientific research, environmental conservation, and education. The Consortium works to bridge the gaps between learners

  4. A consortium approach to glass furnace modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.-L.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

    1999-04-20

    Using computational fluid dynamics to model a glass furnace is a difficult task for any one glass company, laboratory, or university to accomplish. The task of building a computational model of the furnace requires knowledge and experience in modeling two dissimilar regimes (the combustion space and the liquid glass bath), along with the skill necessary to couple these two regimes. Also, a detailed set of experimental data is needed in order to evaluate the output of the code to ensure that the code is providing proper results. Since all these diverse skills are not present in any one research institution, a consortium was formed between Argonne National Laboratory, Purdue University, Mississippi State University, and five glass companies in order to marshal these skills into one three-year program. The objective of this program is to develop a fully coupled, validated simulation of a glass melting furnace that may be used by industry to optimize the performance of existing furnaces.

  5. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium. Progress report, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bement, A.L. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. Programmatic research focuses upon key materials-related problems; principally, synthesis and processing and properties limiting transport phenomena. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 113 publications. publications. Two Master`s Degrees and one Ph.D. were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved two MISCON group meetings (held in July and January), twenty external speakers, 36 collaborations, 10 exchanges of samples and/or measurements, and one (1) gift of equipment from industry. Research achievements this past year expanded our understanding of processing phenomena on structure property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  6. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master`s Degrees and 9 Doctor`s of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors.

  7. Consortium sandbox: building and sharing resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mark D

    2014-06-25

    Some common challenges of biomedical product translation-scientific, regulatory, adoption, and reimbursement-can best be addressed by the broad sharing of resources or tools. But, such aids remain undeveloped because the undertaking requires expertise from multiple research sectors as well as validation across organizations. Biomedical resource development can benefit from directed consortia-a partnership framework that provides neutral and temporary collaborative environments for several, oftentimes competing, organizations and leverages the aggregated intellect and resources of stakeholders so as to create versatile solutions. By analyzing 369 biomedical research consortia, we tracked consortia growth around the world and gained insight into how this partnership model advances biomedical research. Our analyses suggest that research-by-consortium provides benefit to biomedical science, but the model needs further optimization before it can be fully integrated into the biomedical research pipeline.

  8. [Activity of NTDs Drug-discovery Research Consortium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namatame, Ichiji

    2016-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are an extremely important issue facing global health care. To improve "access to health" where people are unable to access adequate medical care due to poverty and weak healthcare systems, we have established two consortiums: the NTD drug discovery research consortium, and the pediatric praziquantel consortium. The NTD drug discovery research consortium, which involves six institutions from industry, government, and academia, as well as an international non-profit organization, is committed to developing anti-protozoan active compounds for three NTDs (Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and African sleeping sickness). Each participating institute will contribute their efforts to accomplish the following: selection of drug targets based on information technology, and drug discovery by three different approaches (in silico drug discovery, "fragment evolution" which is a unique drug designing method of Astellas Pharma, and phenotypic screening with Astellas' compound library). The consortium has established a brand new database (Integrated Neglected Tropical Disease Database; iNTRODB), and has selected target proteins for the in silico and fragment evolution drug discovery approaches. Thus far, we have identified a number of promising compounds that inhibit the target protein, and we are currently trying to improve the anti-protozoan activity of these compounds. The pediatric praziquantel consortium was founded in July 2012 to develop and register a new praziquantel pediatric formulation for the treatment of schistosomiasis. Astellas Pharma has been a core member in this consortium since its establishment, and has provided expertise and technology in the area of pediatric formulation development and clinical development.

  9. Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage (NEES) EFRC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage (NEES) EFRC is a multi-institutional research center, one of 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers established by the...

  10. Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayman Hawari; Nolan Hertel; Mohamed Al-Sheikhly; Laurence Miller; Abdel-Moeze Bayoumi; Ali Haghighat; Kenneth Lewis

    2010-12-29

    2 Project Summary: The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nation’s premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering

  11. Regional Development and the European Consortium of Innovative Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Saskia Loer; Kokkeler, Ben; van der Sijde, P. C.

    2002-01-01

    The European Consortium of Innovative Universities is a network that shares information not just among universities but with affiliated incubators, research parks, and other regional entities. The learning network contributes to regional development.(JOW)

  12. Kinetics and characteristics of phenanthrene degradation by a microbial consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jin; Xu Hongke; An Mingquan; Yan Guiwen

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics and characteristics of phenanthrene degradation by a microbial consortium W4 isolated from Henan Oilfield were investigated. The degradation percentage of solid phenanthrene at 200 mg/L in liquid medium after 6 days of incubation was higher than 95% under the condition of 37 ℃ and 120 r/min by this microbial consortium. The degradation of phenanthrene could be fitted to a first-order kinetic model with the half-life of 1.25 days. The optimum conditions for degradation of phenanthrene by consortium W4 were as follows: temperature about 37 ℃, pH from 6.0 to 7.0 and salinity about 8.0 g/L.It was concluded that microbial consortium W4 might degrade phenanthrene via both salicylic acid and o-phthalic acid pathways by analyzing products with GC-MS.

  13. Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium collaborates on epidemiologic studies to address the high burden of prostate cancer and to understand the causes of etiology and outcomes among men of African ancestry.

  14. Methyltert-butyl Ether (MTBE Degradation by a Microbial Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Mortazavi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE is added to reformulated gasoline to meet the 1990 Clean Air Act directives. Widespread use of MTBE in gasoline has resulted in groundwater contamination. Because of its undesirable effects on drinking water and ecologically harmful effects, MTBE removal has become a public health and environmental concern. In this study, we have isolated a mixed bacterial culture which is capable of degrading the MTBE as a sole carbon and energy source. This consortium was developed from mixed urban and petrochemical activated sludge after 4 month's enrichment. Enrichment was conducted in batch reactor, fitted with a screw cap and butyl rubber septum. MTBE concentration was measured in head space by gas chromatography. Degradation was determined by MTBE removal. MTBE biodegradation was depended to Dissolved Oxygen (DO concentration and not affected by the changes in concentration of trace element solution or other stimulator Substances. Degradation rates were nearly 1.478 mg MTBE h-1 g-1 (wet biomass and didn't change with MTBE concentration (up 500 mg L-1.

  15. [Japan Spastic Paraplegia Research Consortium (JASPAC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2014-10-01

    Japan Spastic Paraplegia Research Consortium (JASPAC), a nationwide clinical and genetic survey of patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), was started in 2006 as a project of the Research Committee for Ataxic Diseases of the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare, Japan. To date (April 4, 2014), 448 indexed patients with HSP have been registered from 46 prefectures in Japan. We are now performing molecular testing of the HSP patients using Sanger sequencing (SPG4, SPG11, SPG31, and ARSACS), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array (SPG1, 2, 3A, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17, 20, 21, 31, 33, 39, 42, ABCD1, alsin, and ARSACS), and resequencing microarray (SPG1, 2, 3A, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 17, 20, 21, 31, 33, and ABCD1). In 206 Japanese families with autosomal dominant HSP, SPG4 was the most common form, accounting for 38%, followed by SPG3A (5%), SPG31 (5%), SPG10 (2%), and SPG8 (1%). In 88 patients with autosomal recessive HSP, although SPG11 was the most common form, accounting for 6%, most showed significant genetic heterogeneity. The results of molecular testing will be applicable to patients in terms of improved positive diagnosis, follow-up, and genetic counseling. JASPAC will contribute to elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying HSP, and will facilitate the development of better treatments for HSP.

  16. AGRICOH: A Consortium of Agricultural Cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelia H. Zahm

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available AGRICOH is a recently formed consortium of agricultural cohort studies involving 22 cohorts from nine countries in five continents: South Africa (1, Canada (3, Costa Rica (2, USA (6, Republic of Korea (1, New Zealand (2, Denmark (1, France (3 and Norway (3. The aim of AGRICOH, initiated by the US National Cancer Institute (NCI and coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC, is to promote and sustain collaboration and pooling of data to investigate the association between a wide range of agricultural exposures and a wide range of health outcomes, with a particular focus on associations that cannot easily be addressed in individual studies because of rare exposures (e.g., use of infrequently applied chemicals or relatively rare outcomes (e.g., certain types of cancer, neurologic and auto-immune diseases. To facilitate future projects the need for data harmonization of selected variables is required and is underway. Altogether, AGRICOH provides excellent opportunities for studying cancer, respiratory, neurologic, and auto-immune diseases as well as reproductive and allergic disorders, injuries and overall mortality in association with a wide array of exposures, prominent among these the application of pesticides.

  17. Astroparticle Physics European Consortium Town Meeting Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The Astroparticle Physics European Consortium (APPEC) invites you to a town meeting at the Grand Amphithéatre de Sorbonne in Paris on the 6th and 7th April 2016 to discuss an update of the 2011 APPEC Astroparticle Physics roadmap, to be published in September 2016. In 2014 APPEC decided to launch an update of the 2011 Roadmap, transforming it to a “resource aware” roadmap. The intention was to gauge the financial impact of the beginnings of operation of the large global scale observatories put forward in the previous roadmap and to examine the possibilities of international coordination of future global initiatives. The APPEC Scientific Advisory Committee examined the field and prepared a set of recommendations. Based on these recommendations, the APPEC General Assembly drafted a set of “considerations” to be published by end of February 2016 and be debated in an open dialogue with the community, through the web page but primarily at the town meeting of 6-7 April. Based on this debate the final re...

  18. Consortium analysis of 7 candidate SNPs for ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, S.J.; Vierkant, R.A.; Johnatty, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium selected 7 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), for which there is evidence from previous studies of an association with variation in ovarian cancer or breast cancer risks. The SNPs selected for analysis were F31I (rs2273535) in AURKA, N372H...... for SNPs identified from relatively large initial studies shows the importance of replicating associations by a consortium approach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7/15...

  19. Biodeterioration studies of thermoplastics in nature using indigenous bacterial consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Shahbaz Anwar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastics, poly vinyl chloride and low-density polyethylene were treated in the presence of indigenously developed bacterial consortium in laboratory and natural conditions. The consortium was developed using four bacteria, selected on the basis of utilization of PVC as primary carbon source, namely P. otitidis, B. aerius, B. cereus and A. pedis isolated from the plastic waste disposal sites in Northern India. The comparative in-vitro treatment studies as revealed by the spectral and thermal data, illustrated the relatively better biodegradation potential of developed consortium for PVC than the LDPE. Further, the progressive treatments of both the thermoplastics were conducted for three months under natural conditions. For this purpose, bioformulation of consortium was prepared and characterized for the viability up to 70 days of storage at 25±1ºC. The consortium treated polymer samples were monitored through SEM and FT-IR spectroscopy. Analytical data revealed the biodeterioration potential of the developed consortium for PVC and LDPE, which could help in disposing the plastic waste.

  20. Enrichment strategy to select functional consortium from mixed cultures: Consortium from rumen liquor for simultaneous cellulose degradation and hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Aijie; Ren, Nanqi [State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Gao, Lingfang; Xu, Jifei; Liu, Chong; Lee, Duu-Jong [School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Strain isolation using conventional roll tube/plating technique is time consuming and is able to culture in vitro only a small fraction of existing microbes in a natural microflora. This paper proposed a simple and rapid method to select the as-simple-as-possible biological consortium by serially diluting the original mixed culture. The diluted which remains, while the one diluted in serial loses the target function, is defined as the functional consortium of the original mixed culture. Since the microbial structure and the reaction pathway incorporated with the functional consortium is much simpler than its original mother liquor, detailed analysis on the strain interaction is possible without the risk of losing key functional strains as often caused from conventional isolation method. The rumen liquor that can degrade cellulose and produce hydrogen is used as a demonstration example. A ''rumen cellulose-degrading bacterial consortium'' (RCBC) was identified using the proposed enrichment strategy. (author)

  1. Hydrogen production by geobacter species and a mixed consortium in a microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Douglas F; Wagner, Rachel C; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-12-01

    A hydrogen utilizing exoelectrogenic bacterium (Geobacter sulfurreducens) was compared to both a nonhydrogen oxidizer (Geobacter metallireducens) and a mixed consortium in order to compare the hydrogen production rates and hydrogen recoveries of pure and mixed cultures in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). At an applied voltage of 0.7 V, both G. sulfurreducens and the mixed culture generated similar current densities (ca. 160 A/m3), resulting in hydrogen production rates of ca. 1.9 m(3) H2/m3/day, whereas G. metallireducens exhibited lower current densities and production rates of 110 +/- 7 A/m3 and 1.3 +/- 0.1 m3 H2/m3/day, respectively. Before methane was detected in the mixed-culture MEC, the mixed consortium achieved the highest overall energy recovery (relative to both electricity and substrate energy inputs) of 82% +/- 8% compared to G. sulfurreducens (77% +/- 2%) and G. metallireducens (78% +/- 5%), due to the higher coulombic efficiency of the mixed consortium. At an applied voltage of 0.4 V, methane production increased in the mixed-culture MEC and, as a result, the hydrogen recovery decreased and the overall energy recovery dropped to 38% +/- 16% compared to 80% +/- 5% for G. sulfurreducens and 76% +/- 0% for G. metallireducens. Internal hydrogen recycling was confirmed since the mixed culture generated a stable current density of 31 +/- 0 A/m3 when fed hydrogen gas, whereas G. sulfurreducens exhibited a steady decrease in current production. Community analysis suggested that G. sulfurreducens was predominant in the mixed-culture MEC (72% of clones) despite its relative absence in the mixed-culture inoculum obtained from a microbial fuel cell reactor (2% of clones). These results demonstrate that Geobacter species are capable of obtaining similar hydrogen production rates and energy recoveries as mixed cultures in an MEC and that high coulombic efficiencies in mixed culture MECs can be attributed in part to the recycling of hydrogen into current.

  2. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2001-09-14

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the US petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the four quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. During this reporting period, Penn State primary focus was on finalizing all subcontracts, planning the SWC technology transfer meeting and two workshops in the southern US, and preparing the next SWC newsletter. Membership in the SWC now stands at 49.

  3. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2002-09-27

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the eighth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) issuing subcontracts, (2) SWC membership class expansion, (3) planning SWC technology transfer meetings, and (4) extending selected 2001 project periods of performance. In addition, a literature search that focuses on the use of lasers, microwaves, and acoustics for potential stripper well applications continued.

  4. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2003-04-08

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the ninth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing and hosting two fall technology transfer meetings, (2) SWC membership class expansion, and (3) planning the SWC 2003 Spring meeting. In addition, a literature search that focuses on the use of lasers, microwaves, and acoustics for potential stripper well applications continued.

  5. Fiscal 2000 achievement report on the venture business assisting type regional consortium - Minor business creation base type. Development of 1-chip multifunctional motion sensor and its application to intelligent module; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo seika hokokusho. 1 chip gata takino undo sensor no kaihatsu to intelligent module eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The aim is to embody an intelligent micromodule for sensing bodily motions. For this purpose, technologies were established for high accuracy/high aspect ratio etching of crystals and for detecting angular velocity and acceleration, and a 1-chip multifunctional motion sensor was developed. The results of the efforts are briefly described below. A 1-chip multifunctional motion sensor (device size: 16 times 6 times 0.3mm) was developed, capable of simultaneously detecting uniaxial acceleration and uniaxial angular velocity, and an operating circuit was established for the detection. Using the 1-chip multifunctional motion sensor, a wrist watch type intelligent module was developed, capable of discriminating between various patterns of human behavior (walking, jogging, desk work, etc.). An intelligent module and the host computer were connected by wire or radio enabling the real-time observation of a patient's kinetic behavior, and this helped develop an application program allowing the quantification of the rate of recovery of patients undergoing rehabilitation. Using an intelligent module, an application program was developed enabling a laryngeal patient to establish communication by a physical action in case of emergency. (NEDO)

  6. Fiscal 2000 achievement report on the venture business assisting type regional consortium - Minor business creation base type. Development of touch panel display operated by micro-Peltier device; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo seika hokokusho. Micro Peltier soshi ni yoru shokkaku display no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The project aims to develop a small, light, and inexpensive touch panel display that enables visually handicapped people to transmit information by use of their manual sensation. Information from computers or the like is exhibited on the display in arrays of hillocks and dents. For improvement on display resolution and for cost reduction, efforts are made (1) to employ micro-Peltier devices for the simplification of the hillock-dent display mechanism and for the realization of a high resolution tactile display and (2) to establish a technology for manufacturing low-cost micro-Peltier devices. In the tactile display to be developed, the hillocks and dents are formed using gas-filled tiny balloons. The balloons are 2-dimensionally arranged, with the gas therein to be expanded and contracted via micro-Peltier devices. Difference between hillock-dent arrays and changes therein with the passage of time provide information. The gas in the balloons is inflated and contracted through the operation of micro-Peltier devices. In concrete terms, efforts were made to develop (1) a prototype hillock-dent display, (2) a technology for manufacturing high-performance low-cost micro-Peltier devices, and (3) a software program for computers to drive tactile displays. (NEDO)

  7. Fiscal 2000 achievement report on the venture business assisting type regional consortium - Minor business creation base type. Research and development of anisotropic conductive material coping with fine pitch design; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo seika hokokusho. Fine pitch taio ihosei dodenzai no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The pitch between electrodes in electric parts, for example semiconductor devices, is becoming increasingly fine, with electronic appliances, which are portable information terminals mainly, growing higher in performance and smaller in size and weight. Efforts were exerted to develop an anisotropic conductive material capable of dealing with fine pitch designs and provided with an insulating structure having an insulating lattice of pores formed by photolithography generally applied to the manufacture of semiconductor devices. For the manufacture of homogeneous particles, a special emulsification method (membrane emulsification) was applied for making the particles as homogeneous as possible. A special classifier was used to shape them into particles of the intended size. The particles were made conductive by coatings of nickel and gold. For their organization into a membrane, a technology of building a lattice with pores of the several {mu}m rule and another for filling the pores with conductive particles were required. A lattice with pores arranged therein was completed using two technologies of photolithography and laser application. A technology for guiding conductive particles into the lattice pores was also established. (NEDO)

  8. Antioxidant activity of the probiotic consortium in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saule Saduakhasova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Available evidence suggests that probiotics have different biological functions that depend on several mechanisms, such as antioxidant and DNA-protective activities. The probiotic consortium includes bacterial cultures such as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, and other bacterial cultures isolated from traditional Kazakh dairy products (ayran, kumys, shubat, and healthy clinical material. The aim of this study was to investigate the total antioxidant activity of the consortium of probiotic bacteria and to determine the activity of superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and DNA-protective action. Material and methods: In vitro comet assay was used to determine the antigenotoxicity of the probiotic consortium. Total antioxidant activity was determined using a method of analysis with Trolox as the equivalent. The analysis method of superoxide dismutase activity assesses the inhibition rate of the nitroblue tetrazolium reduction to formazan by superoxide dismutase. Determination of glutathione reductase activity is based on the measurement of the NADPH oxidation speed. Results: A significantly high level of the total antioxidant activity of the probiotic consortium intact cells (15.3 mM/ml was observed whereas the activity index of  lysate  was 11.1 mM/ml. The superoxide dismutase activity of probiotic consortium lysate was evaluated, with values that peaked at 0.24 U/mg protein. The superoxide dismutase activity of the consortium was lower in comparison to L.fernentum E-3 and L.fernentum E-18 cultures with values of 0.85 U/mg and 0.76 U/mg protein, respectively. SOD activity of probiotic consortium whole cells was not observed, which is typical for lactic acid bacteria. Glutathione reductase plays an important role in the optimal protection from oxidative stress. Glutathione reductase activity of the studied probiotic consortium was low; moreover, the activity of the lysate was two times

  9. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kartik; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Hooper, Eric; National Astronomy Consortium

    2015-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC; see https://sites.google.com/site/nraonac/) is a growing national partnership between majority and minority universities and institutions with the goal of increasing the numbers of under-represented minorities and students who might otherwise be overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM, or related, careers. The NAC model is based on the successful 'Posse Foundation' model for undergraduate success and incorporates all its major components: pre-training of cohorts to prepare them for the research experience, joint weekly cohort activities throughout the research summer, peer- and multiple mentoring, weekly discussion of various aspects of professional and career development, continued engagement of students in science after return to home institution and lifelong mentoring. The mentors also form a cohort, exchanging information and learning from each other. With its partner institutions, the NAC aims to build a complete pipeline from undergraduate through career for the next generation of scientists and engineers. Our annual goal is to create two to three cohorts of four to five students at each site (currently NRAO-Charlottesville, NRAO-Socorro and U. Wisconsin - Madison). Recruitment occurs in the fall semester with seminars and colloquia in partnership with faculty at the minority serving institutions and the GRAD-MAP program at the University of Maryland. In this talk we describe in detail all the components of the NAC and report on our progress. We are keen to interact and partner with new universities and institutions and encourage them to contact the NAC at nac4stem@googlegroups.com.

  10. Evaluation of production of lettuce and radish in consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Santos Valete Damasceno

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the viability of radish-lettuce consortium, as well as the best arrangement for the development of the vegetables. The experiment was carried out in randomized block design, in the University of Mato Grosso – UNEMAT, Campus Alta Floresta. It were evaluated the cropping system of lettuce, radish, and the consortium between cultures in two arrangements (three rows of lettuce with two rows of radish and three rows of radish with two rows of lettuce, with 6 replications. Evaluated characteristics were total fresh weight, commercial fresh weight, leaf fresh weight and number of leaves by plants. Means were compared by Scott-Knott test, at 5% of probability. The arrangement with three lettuce crop rows and two radish proved feasible, with promising for use in the consortium system.

  11. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2002-09-30

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the second topical report. The SWC has grown and diversified its membership during its first 24 months of existence. The Consortium is now focused on building strategic alliances with additional industrial, state, and federal entities to expand further the SWC membership base and transfer technologies as they are developed. In addition, the Consortium has successfully worked to attract state support to co-fund SWC projects. Penn State has entered a co-funding arrangement with the New York State Energy Development Authority (NYSERDA) which has provided $200,000 over the last two years to co-fund stripper well production-orientated projects that have relevance to New York state producers. During this reporting period, the Executive Council approved co-funding for 14 projects that have a total project value of $2,116,897. Since its inception, the SWC has approved cofunding for 27 projects that have a total project value of $3,632,109.84. The SWC has provided $2,242,701 in co-funding for these projects and programmatically maintains a cost share of 39%.

  12. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium - Final Progress Report October 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bement, Arden L.

    2001-10-23

    The basic mission of the Consortium was to advance the science and understanding of high-T{sub c} superconductivity and to promote the development of new materials and improved processing technology. Focused group efforts were the key element of the research program. One program area is the understanding of the layered structures involved in candidate materials and the factors that control their formation, stability and relationship superconductor properties. The other program area had a focus upon factors that limit or control the transport properties such as weak links, flux lattice behavior, and interfaces. Interactions among Consortium d with industrial armiates were an integral part of the program.

  13. Augmentation of a Microbial Consortium for Enhanced Polylactide (PLA) Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nimisha R; Sekhar, Vini C; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2016-03-01

    Bioplastics are eco-friendly and derived from renewable biomass sources. Innovation in recycling methods will tackle some of the critical issues facing the acceptance of bioplastics. Polylactic acid (PLA) is the commonly used and well-studied bioplastic that is presumed to be biodegradable. Considering their demand and use in near future, exploration for microbes capable of bioplastic degradation has high potential. Four PLA degrading strains were isolated and identified as Penicillium chrysogenum, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Serratia marcescens and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. A consortium of above strains degraded 44 % (w/w) PLA in 30 days time in laboratory conditions. Subsequently, the microbial consortium employed effectively for PLA composting.

  14. Special issue on the "Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors Research and Development Progress"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Martin, William R.

    2017-04-01

    In this special issue of the Journal of Computational Physics, the research and development completed at the time of manuscript submission by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is presented. CASL is the first of several Energy Innovation Hubs that have been created by the Department of Energy. The Hubs are modeled after the strong scientific management characteristics of the Manhattan Project and AT&T Bell Laboratories, and function as integrated research centers that combine basic and applied research with engineering to accelerate scientific discovery that addresses critical energy issues. Lifetime of a Hub is expected to be five or ten years depending upon performance, with CASL being granted a ten year lifetime.

  15. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Foland, Andrew Dean

    2007-01-01

    Energy is the central concept of physics. Unable to be created or destroyed but transformable from one form to another, energy ultimately determines what is and isn''t possible in our universe. This book gives readers an appreciation for the limits of energy and the quantities of energy in the world around them. This fascinating book explores the major forms of energy: kinetic, potential, electrical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear.

  16. Computational Astrophysics Consortium 3 - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, Stan [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2014-08-29

    Final project report for UCSC's participation in the Computational Astrophysics Consortium - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis. As an appendix, the report of the entire Consortium is also appended.

  17. The Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1990--1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-02-25

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) . This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management by the Consortium universities resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. The term waste management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration. (2) Research programs at the leading edge, providing training to faculty and students and feeding into the education programs. (3) Education and research at the campuses, as well as from three field sites. (4) Ties with other multi-disciplinary university facilities. (5) Ties with two National Laboratories located in New Mexico. (6) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a proposed satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (7) An outreach program to interest others in environmental management, especially precollege students, minority students and practitioners in the field. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the first year.

  18. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Final report, October 10, 1994--March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, R.H.; Parekh, B.K.; Meloy, T.

    1997-12-31

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium is a group comprised of representatives from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, that was formed to pursue research in areas related to the treatment and processing of fine coal. Each member performed research in their respective areas of expertise and the report contained herein encompasses the results that were obtained for the three major tasks that the Consortium undertook from October, 1994 through March, 1997. In the first task, conducted by Virginia Polytechnic Institute, novel methods (both mechanical and chemical) for dewatering fine coal were examined. In the second task, the Center for Applied Energy Research examined novel approaches for destabilization of [highly stable] flotation froths. And in the third task, West Virginia University developed physical and mathematical models for fine coal spirals. The Final Report is written in three distinctive chapters, each reflecting the individual member`s task report. Recommendations for further research in those areas investigated, as well as new lines of pursuit, are suggested.

  19. JV Task 120 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Loreal Heebink; David Hassett; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher

    2009-03-28

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') is the core coal combustion product (CCP) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCPs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCP utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program, which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCP performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 2007 to 2009 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCPs. The tasks were included in four categories: (1) Environmental Evaluations of CCPs; (2) Evaluation of Impacts on CCPs from Emission Controls; (3) Construction and Product-Related Activities; and (4) Technology Transfer and Maintenance Tasks. All tasks are designed to work toward achieving the CARRC overall goal and supporting objectives. The various tasks are coordinated in order to provide broad and useful technical data for CARRC members

  20. The Bellarmine Outreach Consortium: An Innovative Approach to Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algren, Chris L.; Hockenberger, Susan

    The Bellarmine Outreach Consortium, which provides access to baccalaureate and masters education in nursing for registered nurses in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Tennessee, is described. The components of a marketing process for colleges are also considered, with attention to product, place, price, and promotion. The nursing department of…

  1. On the Consortium for Business Object Promotion (CBOP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the goals and visions of a consortium inJapan, named Cons ortium for Business Object Promotion (CBOP), discussing its background, activiti es, and basic technical approaches to share and exchanging various types of Busi ness Objects. Especially, Object Pattern Technologies used in CBOP should be di scussed.

  2. NASA Consortium awards funding to Virginia Tech's geospatial program

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Lynn

    2004-01-01

    NASA has selected a partnership between the Virginia Space Grant Consortium (VSGC) and Virginia Tech to receive a $100,000 grant for geospatial education and work force development. The grant, awarded through the NASA Space Grant College and Fellowship program, allows the partners to continue the already successful Virginia Geospatial Extension Program that was established in July 2003.

  3. Academic Library Consortium in Jordan: An Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mustafa H.; Suleiman, Raid Jameel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Due to the current financial and managerial difficulties that are encountered by libraries in public universities in Jordan and the geographical diffusion of these academic institutions, the idea of establishing a consortium was proposed by the Council of Higher Education to combine these libraries. This article reviews the reality of…

  4. Genomic standards consortium workshop: metagenomics, metadata and metaanalysis (M3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterk, Peter; Hirschman, Lynette; Field, Dawn; Wooley, John

    2010-01-01

    The M3 workshop has, as its primary focus, the rapidly growing area of metagenomics, including the metadata standards and the meta-analysis approaches needed to organize, process and interpret metagenomics data. The PSB Workshop builds on the first M3 meeting, a Special Interest Group (SIG) meeting at ISMB 2009, organized by the Genomics Standards Consortium.

  5. Teach Louisiana Consortium: A Fifth Year Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Broussard, Michelle; Stringer, Angelle

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a fifth year program evaluation of a private provider program for teacher certification in Louisiana. The study sought to evaluate the success of the Teach Louisiana Consortium program in terms of teacher placement, teacher retention, administrative satisfaction, teacher attitudes, and teacher pedagogical knowledge. Initial…

  6. The mammalian gene function resource: The International Knockout Mouse Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bradley (Allan); K. Anastassiadis (Konstantinos); A. Ayadi (Abdelkader); J.F. Battey (James); C. Bell (Cindy); M.-C. Birling (Marie-Christine); J. Bottomley (Joanna); S.D.M. Brown (Steve); F. Bürger (Friederike); C.J. Bult (Carol); W. Bushell (Wendy); F.S. Collins (Francis); C. Desaintes (Christian); B. Doe (Brendan); E. Aris (Economides); J.T. Eppig (Janan); R.H. Finnell (Richard); C. Fletcher (Colin); M. Fray (Martin); D. Frendewey (David); R.H. Friedel (Roland); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J. Hansen; Y. Hérault (Yann); G. Hicks (Geoffrey); A. Hörlein (Andreas); C. Houghton (Catherine); M. Hrabé De Angelis (Martin); D. Huylebroeck (Danny); V. Iyer (Vivek); P.J. de Jong (Pieter); J.A. Kadin (James); C. Kaloff (Cornelia); K. Kennedy (Karen); M. Koutsourakis (Manousos); K.C. Kent Lloyd (K.); S. Marschall (Susan); J. Mason (Jeremy); C. McKerlie (Colin); M.P. McLeod (Michael); H. von Melchner (Harald); M. Moore (Matt); A.O. Mujica (Alejandro); A. Nagy (Andras); M. Nefedov (Mikhail); L.M. Nutter (Lauryl); G. Pavlovic (Guillaume); J.L. Peterson (Jane); I. Pollock; R. Ramirez-Solis (Ramiro); D.E. Rancourt (Derrick); M. Raspa (Marcello); J.E. Remacle (Jacques); M. Ringwald (Martin); B. Rosen (Barry); N. Rosenthal (Nadia); J. Rossant (Janet); P. Ruiz Noppinger (Patricia); S. Ryder; J.Z. Schick (Joel Zupicich); F. Schnütgen (Frank); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); C. Seisenberger (Claudia); M. Selloum (Mohammed); E.M. Simpson (Elizabeth); W.C. Skarnes (William); D. Smedley (Damian); W.L. Stanford (William); A. Francis Stewart (A.); K. Stone (Kevin); K. Swan (Kate); H. Tadepally (Hamsa); J.L. Teboul (Jean Louis); G.P. Tocchini-Valentini (Glauco); D. Valenzuela (David); A.P. West (Anthony); K.-I. Yamamura (Ken-Ichi); Y. Yoshinaga (Yuko); M. Wurst (Martin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn 2007, the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) made the ambitious promise to generate mutations in virtually every protein-coding gene of the mouse genome in a concerted worldwide action. Now, 5 years later, the IKMC members have developed highthroughput gene trapping and, i

  7. The Worker Rights Consortium Makes Strides toward Legitimacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Werf, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the rapid growth of the Workers Rights Consortium, a student-originated group with 44 member institutions which opposes sweatshop labor conditions especially in the apparel industry. Notes disagreements about the number of administrators on the board of directors and about the role of industry representives. Compares this group with the…

  8. It Takes a Consortium to Support Open Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Judy

    2009-01-01

    If the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER) has its way, expensive textbooks may go the way of typewriters and carbon paper. Ideally, Internet access for all students would allow educators to replace commercially printed textbooks with interactive digital textbooks and personal learning environments. However, until…

  9. Preface of the Proceedings of the Doctoral Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinciarelli, A.; Pelachaud, C.; Cowie, R.; Nijholt, A.

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects the contributions presented at the ACII 2009 Doctoral Consortium, the event aimed at gathering PhD students with the goal of sharing ideas about the theories behind affective computing; its development; and its application. Published papers have been selected out a large number

  10. 25 CFR 1000.23 - How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool... Admission into the Applicant Pool § 1000.23 How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool? To be considered for admission in the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must submit an application to the...

  11. The University of Utah Clinical Genetics Research Program as an NF1 Consortium Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    chair of the Biology Committee, and he organized a symposium of investigators and clinicians who were part of a MPNST (malignant peripheral nerve sheath...tumor) Consortium and the MPNST Committee of the NF1 Consortium that convened as a satellite meeting of the full NF1 Consortium meeting in Atlanta

  12. 77 FR 43237 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Work Plan Review Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Genome in a Bottle Consortium--Work Plan Review Workshop.... SUMMARY: NIST announces the Genome in a Bottle Consortium meeting to be held on Thursday and Friday, August 16 and 17, 2012. The Genome in a Bottle Consortium is planning to develop the reference...

  13. 78 FR 47674 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Progress and Planning Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Genome in a Bottle Consortium--Progress and Planning... workshop. SUMMARY: NIST announces the Genome in a Bottle Consortium meeting to be held on Thursday and Friday, August 15 and 16, 2013. The Genome in a Bottle Consortium is developing the reference...

  14. 77 FR 38770 - Notice of Consortium on “nSoft Consortium”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Notice of Consortium on ``nSoft Consortium'' AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: On June 3, 2011, the... feasibility of establishing a NIST/Industry Consortium on Neutron Metrology for Soft Materials...

  15. Biohydrogen and methane production via a two-step process using an acid pretreated native microalgae consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Reyes, Julian; Buitrón, Germán

    2016-12-01

    A native microalgae consortium treated under thermal-acidic hydrolysis was used to produce hydrogen and methane in a two-step sequential process. Different acid concentrations were tested, generating hydrogen and methane yields of up to 45mLH2gVS(-1) and 432mLCH4gVS(-1), respectively. The hydrogen production step solubilized the particulate COD (chemical oxygen demand) up to 30%, creating considerable amounts of volatile fatty acids (up to 10gCODL(-1)). It was observed that lower acid concentration presented higher hydrogen and methane production potential. The results revealed that thermal acid hydrolysis of a native microalgae consortium is a simple but effective strategy for producing hydrogen and methane in the sequential process. In addition to COD removal (50-70%), this method resulted in an energy recovery of up to 15.9kJ per g of volatile solids of microalgae biomass, one of the highest reported.

  16. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Confounded by kinetic energy? Suspect that teaching about simple machines isn t really so simple? Exasperated by electricity? If you fear the study of energy is beyond you, this entertaining book will do more than introduce you to the topic. It will help you actually understand it. At the book s heart are easy-to-grasp explanations of energy basics work, kinetic energy, potential energy, and the transformation of energy and energy as it relates to simple machines, heat energy, temperature, and heat transfer. Irreverent author Bill Robertson suggests activities that bring the basic concepts of energy to life with common household objects. Each chapter ends with a summary and an applications section that uses practical examples such as roller coasters and home heating systems to explain energy transformations and convection cells. The final chapter brings together key concepts in an easy-to-grasp explanation of how electricity is generated. Energy is the second book in the Stop Faking It! series published by NS...

  17. JV Task 6 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Erick Zacher

    2008-04-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP), which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCB performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 1998 to 2007 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. CARRC topical reports were prepared on several completed tasks. Specific CARRC 1998B2007 accomplishments included: (1) Development of several ASTM International Standard Guides for CCB utilization applications. (2) Organization and presentation of training courses for CCB professionals and teachers. (3) Development of online resources including the Coal Ash Resource Center, Ash from Biomass in Coal (ABC) of cocombustion ash characteristics, and the Buyer's Guide to Coal-Ash Containing Products. In addition

  18. Hydrogen Production by Geobacter Species and a Mixed Consortium in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Call, D. F.

    2009-10-09

    A hydrogen utilizing exoelectrogenic bacterium (Geobacter sulfurreducens) was compared to both a nonhydrogen oxidizer (Geobacter metallireducens) and a mixed consortium in order to compare the hydrogen production rates and hydrogen recoveries of pure and mixed cultures in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). At an applied voltage of 0.7 V, both G. sulfurreducens and the mixed culture generated similar current densities (ca. 160 A/m3), resulting in hydrogen production rates of ca. 1.9 m3 H2/m 3/day, whereas G. metallireducens exhibited lower current densities and production rates of 110 ± 7 A/m3 and 1.3 ± 0.1 m3 H2/m3/day, respectively. Before methane was detected in the mixed-culture MEC, the mixed consortium achieved the highest overall energy recovery (relative to both electricity and substrate energy inputs) of 82% ± 8% compared to G. sulfurreducens (77% ± 2%) and G. metallireducens (78% ± 5%), due to the higher coulombic efficiency of the mixed consortium. At an applied voltage of 0.4 V, methane production increased in the mixed-culture MEC and, as a result, the hydrogen recovery decreased and the overall energy recovery dropped to 38% ± 16% compared to 80% ± 5% for G. sulfurreducens and 76% ± 0% for G. metallireducens. Internal hydrogen recycling was confirmed since the mixed culture generated a stable current density of 31 ± 0 A/m3 when fed hydrogen gas, whereas G. sulfurreducens exhibited a steady decrease in current production. Community analysis suggested that G. sulfurreducens was predominant in the mixed-culture MEC (72% of clones) despite its relative absence in the mixed-culture inoculum obtained from a microbial fuel cell reactor (2% of clones). These results demonstrate that Geobacter species are capable of obtaining similar hydrogen production rates and energy recoveries as mixed cultures in an MEC and that high coulombic efficiencies in mixed culture MECs can be attributed in part to the recycling of hydrogen into current. Copyright

  19. A University Consortium on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assanis, Dennis; Atreya, Arvind; Bowman, Craig; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Cheng, Wai; Davidson, David; Dibble, Robert; Edwards, Chris; Filipi, Zoran; Golden, David; Green, William; Hanson, Ronald; Hedrick, J Karl; Heywood, John; Im, Hong; Lavoie, George; Sick, Volker; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2007-03-31

    Over the course of this four year project, the consortium team members from UM, MIT, Stanford, and Berkeley along with contributors from Sandia National Labs and LLNL, have produced a wide range of results on gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The work spanned a wide range of activities including engine experiments, fundamental chemical kinetics experiments, and an array of analytical modeling techniques and simulations. Throughout the project a collaborative approach has produced a many significant new insights into HCCI engines and their behavior while at the same time we achieved our key consortium goal: to develop workable strategies for gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The major accomplishments in each task are summarized, followed by detailed discussion.

  20. p-Cresol mineralization by a nitrifying consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Luna, C. D.; Gomez, J.; Houbron, E.; Cuervo Lopez, F. M.; Texier, A. C.

    2009-07-01

    Nitrification and denitrification processes are considered economically feasible technologies for nitrogen removal from wastewater. Knowledge of the toxic or inhibitory effects of cresols on the nitrifying respiratory process is still insufficient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinetic behavior and oxidizing ability of a nitrifying consortium exposed to p-cresol in batch cultures. Biotransformation of p-cresol was investigated by identifying the different intermediates formed. (Author)

  1. FLYSUB-Consortium Tracking and RICH Performance Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aria [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Azumoun, Bob [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blatnik, Marie [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pak, Robert [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Purschke, Martin [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Di Ruzza, Benedetto [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Woody, Craig [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bhopatkar, Vallary [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Hohlmann, Marcus [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Twigger, Jessie [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Zhang, Aiwu [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Dehmelt, Klaus [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Deshpande, Abhay [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Feege, Nils [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Hemmick, Thomas [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Bai, Xinzhang [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Gnanvo, Kondo [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Gu, Chao [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Liyanage, Nilanga [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Majka, Richard [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Smirnov, Nikolai [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-09-23

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experiments of FLYSUB-Consortium who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2013-2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The ultimate goal of this test-beam effort is to test and verify the performance of the individual components according to their expectation.

  2. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium, Post Traumatic Hypopituitarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    10 Aug 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Mission Connect MTBI Translational Research Consortium 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Post traumatic hypopituitarism 5b...distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to identify the incidence of post traumatic hypopituitarism ...June 21, 2010; however, none have reached the six month milestone for blood testing 15. SUBJECT TERMS post traumatic hypopituitarism 16. SECURITY

  3. Meeting Report from the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Workshop 9

    OpenAIRE

    Davidsen, Tanja; Madupu, Ramana; Sterk, Peter; Field, Dawn; Garrity, George; Gilbert, Jack; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Kolker, Eugene; Kottmann, Renzo; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Morrison, Norman; Schriml, Lynn; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 9th workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), held at the J. Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, MD, USA. It was the first GSC workshop to have open registration and attracted over 90 participants. This workshop featured sessions that provided overviews of the full range of ongoing GSC projects. It included sessions on Standards in Genomic Sciences, the open access journal of the GSC, building standards for genome annotation, the M5 platf...

  4. Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Canada, Britain, and Spain. We found that the energy industry is not in crisis ; however, U.S. government policies, laws, dollars, and even public...CEIMAT (Centro de Investagaciones Energeticas , Medioambeintales y Tecnologicas) Research and development Page 3 of 28ENERGY 8/10/04http://www.ndu.edu...meet an emerging national crisis (war), emergency (natural disaster), or major impact event (Y2K). Certain resources are generally critical to the

  5. Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-01

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the eighth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in State College, PA to review and select projects for SWC co-funding; (2) Participation in the 2006 PA CleanEnergy Expo Energy Theater to air the DVD on ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering American's Forgotten Wells''; (3) New member additions; (4) Improving communications; and (5) Planning of the fall technology meetings.

  6. Final Technical Report. DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. January 15, 2010 - March 31, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagher, Habib [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Viselli, Anthony [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Goupee, Andrew [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Thaler, Jeffrey [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Brady, Damian [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Browne, Peter [HDR, Inc., Omaha, NE (United States); Browning, James [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Chung, Jade [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Coulling, Alexander [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Deese, Heather [Island Institute, Rockland, ME (United States); Fowler, Matthew [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Holberton, Rebecca [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Anant, Jain [Intertek, Duluth, GA (United States); Jalbert, Dustin [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Johnson, Theresa [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Jonkman, Jason [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Karlson, Benjamin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kimball, Richard [Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, ME (United States); Koo, Bonjun [Technip, Paris (France); Lackner, Matthew [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Lambrakos, Kostas [Technip, Paris (France); Lankowski, Matthew [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Leopold, Adrienne [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Lim, Ho-Joon [Technip, Paris (France); Mangum, Linda [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Martin, Heather [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Masciola, Marco [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Maynard, Melissa [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); McCleave, James [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Mizrahi, Robert [New Jersey Audubon Society, Bernardsville, NJ (United States); Molta, Paul [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Pershing, Andrew [Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States); Pettigrew, Neal [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Prowell, Ian [MMI Engineering, Oakland, CA (United States); Qua, Andrew [Kleinschmidt Associates, Pittsfield, ME (United States); Sherwood, Graham [Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States); Snape, Thomas [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Steneck, Robert [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Stewart, Gordon [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Stockwell, Jason [Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States); Swift, Andrew H. P. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Thomas, Dale [Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, ME (United States); Viselli, Elizabeth [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Zydlewski, Gayle [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)

    2013-06-11

    This is the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy-funded program, DE-0002981: DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. The project objective was the partial validation of coupled models and optimization of materials for offshore wind structures. The United States has a great opportunity to harness an indigenous abundant renewable energy resource: offshore wind. In 2010, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) estimated there to be over 4,000 GW of potential offshore wind energy found within 50 nautical miles of the US coastlines (Musial and Ram, 2010). The US Energy Information Administration reported the total annual US electric energy generation in 2010 was 4,120 billion kilowatt-hours (equivalent to 470 GW) (US EIA, 2011), slightly more than 10% of the potential offshore wind resource. In addition, deep water offshore wind is the dominant US ocean energy resource available comprising 75% of the total assessed ocean energy resource as compared to wave and tidal resources (Musial, 2008). Through these assessments it is clear offshore wind can be a major contributor to US energy supplies. The caveat to capturing offshore wind along many parts of the US coast is deep water. Nearly 60%, or 2,450 GW, of the estimated US offshore wind resource is located in water depths of 60 m or more (Musial and Ram, 2010). At water depths over 60 m building fixed offshore wind turbine foundations, such as those found in Europe, is likely economically infeasible (Musial et al., 2006). Therefore floating wind turbine technology is seen as the best option for extracting a majority of the US offshore wind energy resource. Volume 1 - Test Site; Volume 2 - Coupled Models; and Volume 3 - Composite Materials

  7. Waste Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC), National Environmental Design. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, B.E.

    1994-10-01

    The 4th Annual Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) for National Environmental Design was held on April 10--14 in Las Cruces, New Mexico. The purpose of the WERC is to train students in the area of site remediation and restoration. Consistent with the Cooperative Agreement`s 3rd Task, the ultimate goal of WERC is to provide training for potential engineers and scientists for the DOE`s remediation and restoration efforts. WERC is sponsored by the Department of Energy and is housed at New Mexico State University. Two student groups from West Virginia University`s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering traveled to New Mexico. Group 1 was composed of graduate students and Group 2 was composed of undergraduate students. Students who participated in this program were exposed to all aspects of the solution of a real life environmental problem.

  8. Metabolic commensalism and competition in a two-species microbial consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjarke Bak; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Heydorn, Arne

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed metabolic interactions and the importance of specific structural relationships in a benzyl alcohol-degrading microbial consortium comprising two species, Pseudomonas putida strain R1 and Acinetobacter strain C6, both of which are able to utilize benzyl alcohol as their sole carbon...... and energy source. The organisms were grown either as surface-attached organisms (biofilms) in How chambers or as suspended cultures in chemostats. The numbers of CFU of P. putida RI and Acinetobacter strain C6 were determined in chemostats and from the effluents of the flow chambers. When the two species...... positioning in the biofilm. In the initial phase of biofilm development, the growth activity of P. putida R1 was shown to be higher near microcolonies of Acinetobacter strain C6. High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis showed that in the effluent of the Acinetobacter strain C6 monoculture biofilm...

  9. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-07

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, ``WERC`` includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), Navajo Community College, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management to reach thousands of students by the three Consortium universities and the affiliate college resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (The term waste or environmental management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration.) (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing training to students and information to faculty feeding into the education programs. (4) Education and technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos & Sandia) located in New Mexico, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach program of special interest to pre-college students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the second year.

  10. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-07

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), Navajo Community College, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management to reach thousands of students by the three Consortium universities and the affiliate college resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (The term waste or environmental management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration.) (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing training to students and information to faculty feeding into the education programs. (4) Education and technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos Sandia) located in New Mexico, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach program of special interest to pre-college students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the second year.

  11. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2001-09-12

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. the consortium creates a partnership with the US petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the third quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. During this reporting period the SWC entered into a co-funding arrangement with the New York State Energy Development Authority (NYSERDA) to provide an additional $100,000 in co-funding for stripper well production-orientated projects.The SWC hosted its first meeting in which members proposed research projects to the SWC membership. The meeting was held on April 9-10, 2001 in State College, Pennsylvania. Twenty three proposals were submitted to the SWC for funding consideration. Investigators of the proposed projects provided the SWC membership with a 20 minute (15 minute technical discussion, 5 minute question and answer session) presentation. Of the 23 proposals, the Executive Council approved $921,000 in funding for 13 projects. Penn State then immediately started the process of issuing subcontracts to the various projects approved for funding.

  12. Report on the FY 1999 feasibility study for the international joint research in the Asian area. 6; 1999 nendo Asia chiiki kokusai kyodo kenkyu kanosei chosa hokokusho. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The paper surveyed the situation of the recent economic crisis, social circumstances, trends of energy policies, etc. in Asian countries. The energy consumption in Asian countries mainly including ASEAN countries and China is expected to show a large growth hereinafter together with a rapid economic growth on a long-term basis. Further, the harmony with the environmental problem has been requested. This problem is important also to Japan from a viewpoint of the regional response to the stabilized energy supply/environmental problems. The response to global environmental problems in these countries and the promotion of development/spread of new energy/energy conservation are strongly desired. For the spread of these technologies, it is effective to actually construct/operate/maintain plants under the joint research with Japan from viewpoints of personnel training, technology improvement, PR effects, etc. It is helpful also for Japan from the aspect of technology development such as data acquisition. It is necessary to accurately grasp the needs and technical levels of the other country in the case of carrying out the joint research. The survey was made about 7 countries including Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, India, China and Vietnam. (NEDO)

  13. Decolorization and biodegradation of reactive dyes and dye wastewater by a developed bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saratale, R G; Saratale, G D; Chang, J S; Govindwar, S P

    2010-11-01

    A bacterial consortium (consortium GR) consisting of Proteus vulgaris NCIM-2027 and Micrococcus glutamicus NCIM-2168 could rapidly decolorize and degrade commonly-used sulfonated reactive dye Green HE4BD and many other reactive dyes. Consortium GR shows markedly higher decolorization activity than that of the individual strains. The preferable physicochemical parameters were identified to achieve higher dye degradation and decolorization efficiency. The supplementation of cheap co-substrates (e.g., extracts of agricultural wastes) could enhance the decolorization performance of consortium GR. Extent of mineralization was determined with TOC and COD measurements, showing nearly complete mineralization of Green HE4BD by consortium GR (up to 90% TOC and COD reduction) within 24 h. Oxidoreductive enzymes seemed to be involved in fast decolorization/degradation process with the evidence of enzymes induction in the bacterial consortium. Phytotoxicity and microbial toxicity studies confirm that the biodegraded products of Green HE4BD by consortium GR are non-toxic. Consortium GR also shows significant biodegradation and decolorization activities for mixture of reactive dyes as well as the effluent from actual dye manufacturing industry. This confers the possibility of applying consortium GR for the treatment of industrial wastewaters containing dye pollutants.

  14. Overview of the Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, S S; Akolkar, B; Concannon, P; Erlich, H; Hilner, J E; Julier, C; Morahan, G; Nerup, J; Nierras, C; Pociot, F; Todd, J A

    2009-12-01

    The Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) is an international, multicenter research program with two primary goals. The first goal is to identify genomic regions and candidate genes whose variants modify an individual's risk of type I diabetes (T1D) and help explain the clustering of the disease in families. The second goal is to make research data available to the research community and to establish resources that can be used by, and that are fully accessible to, the research community. To facilitate the access to these resources, the T1DGC has developed a Consortium Agreement (http://www.t1dgc.org) that specifies the rights and responsibilities of investigators who participate in Consortium activities. The T1DGC has assembled a resource of affected sib-pair families, parent-child trios, and case-control collections with banks of DNA, serum, plasma, and EBV-transformed cell lines. In addition, both candidate gene and genome-wide (linkage and association) studies have been performed and displayed in T1DBase (http://www.t1dbase.org) for all researchers to use in their own investigations. In this supplement, a subset of the T1DGC collection has been used to investigate earlier published candidate genes for T1D, to confirm the results from a genome-wide association scan for T1D, and to determine associations with candidate genes for other autoimmune diseases or with type II diabetes that may be involved with beta-cell function.

  15. Geodesy and the UNAVCO Consortium: Three Decades of Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, L. R.; Miller, M. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    UNAVCO, a non-profit, university consortium that supports geoscience research using geodesy, began with the ingenious recognition that the nascent Global Positioning System constellation (GPS) could be used to investigate earth processes. The consortium purchased one of the first commercially available GPS receivers, Texas Instrument's TI-4100 NAVSTAR Navigator, in 1984 to measure plate deformation. This early work was highlighted in a technology magazine, GPSWorld, in 1990. Over a 30-year period, UNAVCO and the community have helped advance instrument design for mobility, flexibility, efficiency and interoperability, so research could proceed with higher precision and under ever challenging conditions. Other innovations have been made in data collection, processing, analysis, management and archiving. These innovations in tools, methods and data have had broader impacts as they have found greater utility beyond research for timing, precise positioning, safety, communication, navigation, surveying, engineering and recreation. Innovations in research have expanded the utility of geodetic tools beyond the solid earth science through creative analysis of the data and the methods. For example, GPS sounding of the atmosphere is now used for atmospheric and space sciences. GPS reflectrometry, another critical advance, supports soil science, snow science and ecological research. Some research advances have had broader impacts for society by driving innovations in hazards risk reduction, hazards response, resource management, land use planning, surveying, engineering and other uses. Furthermore, the geodetic data is vital for the design of space missions, testing and advancing communications, and testing and dealing with interference and GPS jamming. We will discuss three decades (and counting) of advances by the National Science Foundation's premiere geodetic facility, consortium and some of the many geoscience principal investigators that have driven innovations in

  16. Fiscal 1997 report on a feasibility study of international joint researches in the Asian region; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (Asia chiiki kokusai kyodo kenkyu kanosei chosa (4)hokokusho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    It is thought that the energy consumption in Asian countries with ASEAN and China as center will a marked growth also in future together with a rapid economic growth, but harmony with environmental problems and economic growth is being taken as a serious problem. This is an important issue also to Japan from viewpoints of secure energy supply and regional response to the environmental issue. Accordingly, strongly desired is positive response to global environmental issues and promotion in development/spread of new energy/energy conservation in these countries. For the spread of the technologies, actual construction/operation of plants by joint researches with Japan are effective from aspects of personnel raising, technical improvement, PR effects, etc. This is also helpful for Japan in terms of technological development because Japan can also get the unobtainable data from the operation under appropriate conditions. This is a report on the studies of the trends of global environmental problems in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, India and China. 3 figs., 72 tabs.

  17. Overview of the Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, SS; Akolkar, B; Concannon, P; Erlich, H.; Hilner, JE; Julier, C.; Morahan, G; J. Nerup; Nierras, C.; Pociot, F; Todd, JA.

    2009-01-01

    The Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) is an international, multicenter research program with two primary goals. The first goal is to identify genomic regions and candidate genes whose variants modify an individual’s risk of type I diabetes (T1D) and help explain the clustering of the disease in families. The second goal is to make research data available to the research community and to establish resources that can be used by, and that are fully accessible to, the research community...

  18. Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-06-30

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the ninth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract awards for the nine projects selected at the 2006 Spring meeting; (2) Continue distribution of the DVD on ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering American's Forgotten Wells''; (3) Improving communications; (4) New member recruitment; (5) Identify SWC projects to be showcased for booth exhibition, preparing an exhibit, promoting and marketing for the 2006 Oklahoma Oil and Gas Trade Expo organized by the OK Marginal Well Commission, Oklahoma City, OK; and (6) Identify projects and draft agenda for the fall technical workshop in Pittsburgh, PA.

  19. Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Morrison; Sharon Elder

    2006-01-24

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the sixth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Organized and hosted two technology transfer meetings; (2) Collaborated with the Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Association (POGAM) to host a Natural Gas Outlook conference in Pittsburgh, PA; (3) Provided a SWC presentation at the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) meeting in Jackson Hole, WY; and (4) Completed and released a stripper well industry documentary entitled: ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering America's Forgotten Wells''.

  20. The Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Jorge G; Teasdale, Thomas A; Hajjar, Ihab; Shaughnessy, Marianne; Mintzer, Michael J

    2007-03-01

    This paper describes the activities of the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI), a group dedicated to creating, using, and evaluating e-learning to enhance geriatrics education. E-learning provides a relatively new approach to addressing geriatrics educators' concerns, such as the shortage of professionals trained to care for older people, overcrowded medical curricula, the move to transfer teaching venues to community settings, and the switch to competency-based education models. However, this innovative education technology is facing a number of challenges as its use and influence grow, including proof of effectiveness and efficiency. CELGI was created in response to these challenges, with the goal of facilitating the development and portability of e-learning materials for geriatrics educators. Members represent medical and nursing schools, the Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare system, long-term care facilities, and other institutions that rely on continuing streams of quality health education. CELGI concentrates on providing a coordinated approach to formulating and adapting specifications, standards, and guidelines; developing education and training in e-learning competencies; developing e-learning products; evaluating the effect of e-learning materials; and disseminating these materials. The vision of consortium members is that e-learning for geriatric education will become the benchmark for valid and successful e-learning throughout medical education.

  1. A programmable Escherichia coli consortium via tunable symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa Kerner

    Full Text Available Synthetic microbial consortia that can mimic natural systems have the potential to become a powerful biotechnology for various applications. One highly desirable feature of these consortia is that they can be precisely regulated. In this work we designed a programmable, symbiotic circuit that enables continuous tuning of the growth rate and composition of a synthetic consortium. We implemented our general design through the cross-feeding of tryptophan and tyrosine by two E. coli auxotrophs. By regulating the expression of genes related to the export or production of these amino acids, we were able to tune the metabolite exchanges and achieve a wide range of growth rates and strain ratios. In addition, by inverting the relationship of growth/ratio vs. inducer concentrations, we were able to "program" the co-culture for pre-specified attributes with the proper addition of inducing chemicals. This programmable proof-of-concept circuit or its variants can be applied to more complex systems where precise tuning of the consortium would facilitate the optimization of specific objectives, such as increasing the overall efficiency of microbial production of biofuels or pharmaceuticals.

  2. The Latin American Consortium of Studies in Obesity (LASO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, L. E.; Casas, J. P.; Herrera, V. M.; Miranda, J. J.; Perel, P.; Pichardo, R.; González, A.; Sanchez, J. R.; Ferreccio, C.; Aguilera, X.; Silva, E.; Oróstegui, M.; Gómez, L. F.; Chirinos, J. A.; Medina-Lezama, J.; Pérez, C. M.; Suárez, E.; Ortiz, A. P.; Rosero, L.; Schapochnik, N.; Ortiz, Z.; Ferrante, D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Current, high-quality data are needed to evaluate the health impact of the epidemic of obesity in Latin America. The Latin American Consortium of Studies of Obesity (LASO) has been established, with the objectives of (i) Accurately estimating the prevalence of obesity and its distribution by sociodemographic characteristics; (ii) Identifying ethnic, socioeconomic and behavioural determinants of obesity; (iii) Estimating the association between various anthropometric indicators or obesity and major cardiovascular risk factors and (iv) Quantifying the validity of standard definitions of the various indexes of obesity in Latin American population. To achieve these objectives, LASO makes use of individual data from existing studies. To date, the LASO consortium includes data from 11 studies from eight countries (Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Peru, Puerto Rico and Venezuela), including a total of 32 462 subjects. This article describes the overall organization of LASO, the individual studies involved and the overall strategy for data analysis. LASO will foster the development of collaborative obesity research among Latin American investigators. More important, results from LASO will be instrumental to inform health policies aiming to curtail the epidemic of obesity in the region. PMID:19438980

  3. Multiple Syntrophic Interactions in a Terephthalate-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lykidis, Athanasios; Chen, Chia-Lung; Tringe, Susannah G.; McHardy, Alice C.; Copeland, Alex 5; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2010-08-05

    Terephthalate (TA) is one of the top 50 chemicals produced worldwide. Its production results in a TA-containing wastewater that is treated by anaerobic processes through a poorly understood methanogenic syntrophy. Using metagenomics, we characterized the methanogenic consortium tinside a hyper-mesophilic (i.e., between mesophilic and thermophilic), TA-degrading bioreactor. We identified genes belonging to dominant Pelotomaculum species presumably involved in TA degradation through decarboxylation, dearomatization, and modified ?-oxidation to H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and acetate. These intermediates are converted to CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} by three novel hyper-mesophilic methanogens. Additional secondary syntrophic interactions were predicted in Thermotogae, Syntrophus and candidate phyla OP5 and WWE1 populations. The OP5 encodes genes capable of anaerobic autotrophic butyrate production and Thermotogae, Syntrophus and WWE1 have the genetic potential to oxidize butyrate to COsub 2}/H{sub 2} and acetate. These observations suggest that the TA-degrading consortium consists of additional syntrophic interactions beyond the standard H{sub 2}-producing syntroph ? methanogen partnership that may serve to improve community stability.

  4. A Three-Component Microbial Consortium from Deep-Sea Salt-Saturated Anoxic Lake Thetis Links Anaerobic Glycine Betaine Degradation with Methanogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta La Cono

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities inhabiting the deep-sea salt-saturated anoxic lakes of the Eastern Mediterranean operate under harsh physical-chemical conditions that are incompatible with the lifestyle of common marine microorganisms. Here, we investigated a stable three-component microbial consortium obtained from the brine of the recently discovered deep-sea salt-saturated Lake Thetis. The trophic network of this consortium, established at salinities up to 240, relies on fermentative decomposition of common osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB. Similarly to known extreme halophilic anaerobic GB-degrading enrichments, the initial step of GB degradation starts with its reductive cleavage to trimethylamine and acetate, carried out by the fermenting member of the Thetis enrichment, Halobacteroides lacunaris TB21. In contrast to acetate, which cannot be easily oxidized in salt-saturated anoxic environments, trimethylamine represents an advantageous C1-substrate for methylotrophic methanogenic member of the Thetis enrichment, Methanohalophilus sp. TA21. This second member of the consortium likely produces hydrogen via methylotrophic modification of reductive acetyl-CoA pathway because the initial anaerobic GB cleavage reaction requires the consumption of reducing equivalents. Ecophysiological role of the third member of the Thetis consortium, Halanaerobium sp. TB24, which lacks the capability of either GB or trimethylamine degradation, remains yet to be elucidated. As it is true for cultivated members of family Halanaerobiaceae, the isolate TB24 can obtain energy primarily by fermenting simple sugars and producing hydrogen as one of the end products. Hence, by consuming of TB21 and TA21 metabolites, Halanaerobium sp. TB24 can be an additional provider of reducing equivalents required for reductive degradation of GB. Description of the Thetis GB-degrading consortium indicated that anaerobic degradation of osmoregulatory molecules may play important role in the

  5. Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negus-deWys, J. (ed.)

    1990-03-01

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, now in its fifteenth year, is entering the transition period to commercial use. The industry cost-shared proposals to the consortium, represented in the presentations included in these proceedings, attest to the interest developing in the industrial community in utilizing the geopressured-geothermal resource. Sixty-five participants attended these sessions, two-thirds of whom represented industry. The areas represented by cost-shared proposals include (1) thermal enhanced oil recovery, (2) direct process use of thermal energy, e.g., aquaculture and agriculture, (3) conversion of thermal energy to electricity, (4) environment related technologies, e.g., use of supercritical processes, and (5) operational proposals, e.g., a field manual for scale inhibitors. It is hoped that from this array of potential use projects, some will persist and be successful in proving the viability of using the geopressured-geothermal resource. Such industrial use of an alternative and relatively clean energy resource will benefit our nation and its people.

  6. Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negus-deWys, J. (ed.)

    1990-03-01

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, now in its fifteenth year, is entering the transition period to commercial use. The industry cost-shared proposals to the consortium, represented in the presentations included in these proceedings, attest to the interest developing in the industrial community in utilizing the geopressured-geothermal resource. Sixty-five participants attended these sessions, two-thirds of whom represented industry. The areas represented by cost-shared proposals include (1) thermal enhanced oil recovery, (2) direct process use of thermal energy, e.g., aquaculture and agriculture, (3) conversion of thermal energy to electricity, (4) environment related technologies, e.g., use of supercritical processes, and (5) operational proposals, e.g., a field manual for scale inhibitors. It is hoped that from this array of potential use projects, some will persist and be successful in proving the viability of using the geopressured-geothermal resource. Such industrial use of an alternative and relatively clean energy resource will benefit our nation and its people.

  7. 25 CFR 1000.16 - What criteria must a Tribe/Consortium satisfy to be eligible for admission to the “applicant pool”?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .../Consortium satisfy to be eligible for admission to the “applicant pool”? To be admitted into the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must either be an Indian Tribe or a Consortium of Indian Tribes and...

  8. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), RO-077125 Magurele (Romania); Cabellos, O. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Kodeli, I. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Koning, A. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Konobeyev, A.Yu. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Leeb, H. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Atominstitut, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8–10, 1040 Wien (Austria); Rochman, D. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sauvan, P. [Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, C. Juan del Rosal, 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sublet, J.-C. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Trkov, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Dupont, E. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris (France); Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J. [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  9. Final Report: Appalachian Consortium. Evaluation of a Dissemination and Diffusion Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsbery Systems Analysis, Ltd., Flushing, NY.

    The Appalachian Consortium was evaluated as an organization for the dissemination of educational information regarding programs for the early identification of preschool handicapped children. Chapter I provides a historical overview and discusses the Consortium's independence from the Appalachian Educational Laboratory. The chapter also indicates…

  10. The Launch of the Philadelphia Education Research Consortium: Lessons Learned from the First Year of Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The Philadelphia Education Research Consortium (PERC) was launched in July 2014 as an innovative place-based consortium of educational research partners from multiple sectors. Its primary objective is to provide research and analyses on some of the city's most pressing education issues. As such, PERC's research agenda is driven by both traditional…

  11. 77 FR 12041 - Applications for New Awards; Migrant Education Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grants Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... Applications for New Awards; Migrant Education Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grants Program AGENCY: Office...: Migrant Education Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grants Program; Notice inviting applications for new... appropriate entities to improve the delivery of services to migrant children whose education is...

  12. Ophthalmic epidemiology in Europe : the "European Eye Epidemiology" (E3) consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delcourt, Cecile; Korobelnik, Jean-Francois; Buitendijk, Gabrielle H. S.; Foster, Paul J.; Hammond, Christopher J.; Piermarocchi, Stefano; Peto, Tunde; Jansonius, Nomdo; Mirshahi, Alireza; Hogg, Ruth E.; Bretillon, Lionel; Topouzis, Fotis; Deak, Gabor; Grauslund, Jakob; Broe, Rebecca; Souied, Eric H.; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Sahel, Jose; Daien, Vincent; Lehtimaki, Terho; Hense, Hans-Werner; Prokofyeva, Elena; Oexle, Konrad; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Cumberland, Phillippa M.; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Fauser, Sascha; Bertelsen, Geir; Hoyng, Carel; Bergen, Arthur; Silva, Rufino; Wolf, Sebastian; Lotery, Andrew; Chakravarthy, Usha; Fletcher, Astrid; Klaver, Caroline C. W.

    2016-01-01

    The European Eye Epidemiology (E3) consortium is a recently formed consortium of 29 groups from 12 European countries. It already comprises 21 population-based studies and 20 other studies (case-control, cases only, randomized trials), providing ophthalmological data on approximately 170,000 Europea

  13. 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NIH Pain Consortium will convene the 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research, featuring keynote speakers and expert panel sessions on Innovative Models and Methods. The first keynote address will be delivered by David J. Clark, MD, PhD, Stanford University entitled “Challenges of Translational Pain Research: What Makes a Good Model?” |

  14. 77 FR 25406 - Consortium on “Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME)”: Membership Fee Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology Consortium on ``Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME... NIST/Industry Consortium on Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME)''. The notice stated...

  15. Mineralization of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate by a Four-Member Aerobic Bacterial Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Luis; Breen, Alec; Thomas, Nikki; Federle, Thomas W.; Sayler, Gary S.

    1991-01-01

    A bacterial consortium capable of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) mineralization under aerobic conditions was isolated from a chemostat inoculated with activated sludge. The consortium, designated KJB, consisted of four members, all of which were gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that grew in pairs and short chains. Three isolates had biochemical properties characteristic of Pseudomonas spp.; the fourth showed characteristics of the Aeromonas spp. Cell suspensions were grown together in minimal medium with [14C]LAS as the only carbon source. After 13 days of incubation, more than 25% of the [14C]LAS was mineralized to 14CO2 by the consortium. Pure bacterial cultures and combinations lacking any one member of the KJB bacterial consortium did not mineralize LAS. Three isolates carried out primary biodegradation of the surfactant, and one did not. This study shows that the four bacteria complemented each other and synergistically mineralized LAS, indicating catabolic cooperation among the four consortium members. PMID:16348496

  16. Experience of the Paris Research Consortium Climate-Environment-Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joussaume, Sylvie; Pacteau, Chantal; Vanderlinden, Jean Paul

    2016-04-01

    It is now widely recognized that the complexity of climate change issues translates itself into a need for interdisciplinary approaches to science. This allows to first achieve a more comprehensive vision of climate change and, second, to better inform the decision-making processes. However, it seems that willingness alone is rarely enough to implement interdisciplinarity. The purpose of this presentation is to mobilize reflexivity to revisit and analyze the experience of the Paris Consortium for Climate-Environment-Society. The French Consortium Climate-Environment-Society aims to develop, fund and coordinate interdisciplinary research into climate change and its impacts on society and environment. Launched in 2007, the consortium relies on the research expertise of 17 laboratories and federation in the Paris area working mainly in the fields of climatology, hydrology, ecology, health sciences, and the humanities and social sciences. As examples, economists and climatologists have studied greenhouse gas emission scenarios compatible with climate stabilization goals. Historical records have provided both knowledge about past climate change and vulnerability of societies. Some regions, as the Mediterranean and the Sahel, are particularly vulnerable and already have to cope with water availability, agricultural production and even health issues. A project showed that millet production in West Africa is expected to decline due to warming in a higher proportion than observed in recent decades. Climate change also raises many questions concerning health: combined effects of warming and air quality, impacts on the production of pollens and allergies, impacts on infectious diseases. All these issues lead to a need for approaches integrating different disciplines. Furthermore, climate change impacts many ecosystems which, in turn, affect its evolution. Our experience shows that interdisciplinarity supposes, in order to take shape, the conjunction between programming

  17. Development of natural gas in the South American region and internationalization of a market thereof; Nanbei chiiki ni okeru tennen gasu kaihatsu to shijo no kokusaika

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, N. [Japan Petroleum Development Association, Tokyo (Japan); Terada, S. [Mitsubishi Research Institute, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    Recently, natural gas development in the South American region is actively advanced. Especially, southern countries have formed the customs union 'Mercosur' (the South America south cooperation market), and an energy supply network such as the natural gas pipeline has been formed with the integration of the market. In this paper, a present state of development project, an installment balance situation, a production situation, a relation infrastructure and a trend of the market of natural gas in South America especially each country of the southern district are described. And, the introduction of foreign capital is also advancing with the restructuring related to the natural gas business in these countries. Therefore, those trends are also described. In the South American countries, Argentina has abundant natural gas reserves which is the next quantity to Venezuela, and has coped with the development of natural gas since early times. According to the prediction of future demand trend of natural gas, Argentina, Bolivia and Trinidad Tobago are mentioned as an exporter of natural gas, and Brazil and Chile are mentioned as an importer of natural gas. (NEDO)

  18. Metabolism of nitrate esters by a consortium of two bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, J L; Haïdour, A; Duque, E; Piñar, G; Calvo, V; Oliva, J M

    1996-03-01

    The products of condensation of organic alcohols and nitric acid are nitrate esters with the general structure C-O-NO2. These products are widely employed as vasodilators and explosives, and are true xenobiotic compounds, as they do not occur in nature. We have isolated and characterized a consortium of two microorganisms, Arthrobacter ilicis and Agrobacterium radiobacter, that mineralized recalcitrant ethylene glycol dinitrate. The Arthrobacter strain was the actual degrading microorganism, although the second microbe facilitated mineralization. The biodegradation of ethylene glycol dinitrate by A. ilicis involved the progressive elimination of the nitro groups from the organic molecule to generate ethylene glycol, which was then mineralized. Waters polluted with ethylene glycol dinitrate have been shown amenable to biological treatment in a pilot plant with wastewaters generated during the synthesis of the chemical in a factory.

  19. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowcock, A.M.; Barnes, R.I. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Gerken, S.C.; Leppert, M. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Shiang, R. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Jabs, E.W.; Warren, A.C.; Antonarakis, S. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Retief, A.E. [Univ. of Stellenbosch, Tygerberg (South Africa); Vergnaud, G. [Centre d`Etudes du Bouchet, Vert le Petit (France)] [and others

    1993-05-01

    The CEPH consortium map of chromosome 13 is presented. This map contains 59 loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 94 different probe and restriction enzyme combinations contributed by 9 laboratories. A total of 25 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The map extends from loci in the centromeric region of chromosome 13 to the terminal band of the long arm. Multipoint linkage analyses provided estimates that the male, female, and sex-averaged maps extend for 158, 203, and 178cM respectively. The largest interval is 24 cM and is between D13Z1 (alphaRI) and ATP1AL1. The mean genetic distance between the 25 uniquely placed loci is 7 cM. 76 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Collaboration in a Wireless Grid Innovation Testbed by Virtual Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treglia, Joseph; Ramnarine-Rieks, Angela; McKnight, Lee

    This paper describes the formation of the Wireless Grid Innovation Testbed (WGiT) coordinated by a virtual consortium involving academic and non-academic entities. Syracuse University and Virginia Tech are primary university partners with several other academic, government, and corporate partners. Objectives include: 1) coordinating knowledge sharing, 2) defining key parameters for wireless grids network applications, 3) dynamically connecting wired and wireless devices, content and users, 4) linking to VT-CORNET, Virginia Tech Cognitive Radio Network Testbed, 5) forming ad hoc networks or grids of mobile and fixed devices without a dedicated server, 6) deepening understanding of wireless grid application, device, network, user and market behavior through academic, trade and popular publications including online media, 7) identifying policy that may enable evaluated innovations to enter US and international markets and 8) implementation and evaluation of the international virtual collaborative process.

  1. Advances in Metal Supported Cells in the METSOFC EU Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenna, B. J.; Christiansen, N.; Schauperl, R.;

    2013-01-01

    ). Further success was attained with even larger cell areas of 12 × 12 cm2 squares, which facilitated integration into small stacks at Topsoe Fuel Cell having powers approaching 1/2 kW. Development of MSC stacks showed that the MSCs could achieve similar or better performance, compared to most standard...... industrial anode supported ceramic cells. The best stacked MSCs had power densities approaching 275 mW cm–2 (at 680 °C and 0.8 V). Furthermore, extended testing at AVL determined extra stack performance and reliability characteristics, including behavior toward sulfur and simulated diesel reformate......, and tolerance to thermal cycles and load cycles. These and other key outcomes of the METSOFC consortium are covered, along with associated work supported by the Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation....

  2. 76 FR 20633 - Announcement of Meeting to Explore Feasibility of Establishing a NIST/Industry Consortium on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Establishing a NIST/Industry Consortium on Neutron Measurements for Soft Materials Manufacturing AGENCY... National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) invites interested parties to attend a pre-consortium... industry interest in creating a NIST/industry consortium focused on advanced neutron-based probes for...

  3. Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-02-27

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. Activities during this time period were: (1) Nomination and election of Executive Council members for 2006-07 term, (2) Release the 2006 GSTC request-for-proposals (RFP), (3) Recruit and invoice membership for FY2006, (4) Improve communication efforts, and (5) Continue planning the GSTC spring meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006.

  4. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 3 OF 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Joel [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  5. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 2 OF 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Joel [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  6. Modeling and simulation challenges pursued by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Kothe, Douglas B.

    2016-05-01

    The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the first Energy Innovation Hub of the Department of Energy, was established in 2010 with the goal of providing modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities that support and accelerate the improvement of nuclear energy's economic competitiveness and the reduction of spent nuclear fuel volume per unit energy, and all while assuring nuclear safety. To accomplish this requires advances in M&S capabilities in radiation transport, thermal-hydraulics, fuel performance and corrosion chemistry. To focus CASL's R&D, industry challenge problems have been defined, which equate with long standing issues of the nuclear power industry that M&S can assist in addressing. To date CASL has developed a multi-physics "core simulator" based upon pin-resolved radiation transport and subchannel (within fuel assembly) thermal-hydraulics, capitalizing on the capabilities of high performance computing. CASL's fuel performance M&S capability can also be optionally integrated into the core simulator, yielding a coupled multi-physics capability with untapped predictive potential. Material models have been developed to enhance predictive capabilities of fuel clad creep and growth, along with deeper understanding of zirconium alloy clad oxidation and hydrogen pickup. Understanding of corrosion chemistry (e.g., CRUD formation) has evolved at all scales: micro, meso and macro. CFD R&D has focused on improvement in closure models for subcooled boiling and bubbly flow, and the formulation of robust numerical solution algorithms. For multiphysics integration, several iterative acceleration methods have been assessed, illuminating areas where further research is needed. Finally, uncertainty quantification and data assimilation techniques, based upon sampling approaches, have been made more feasible for practicing nuclear engineers via R&D on dimensional reduction and biased sampling. Industry adoption of CASL's evolving M

  7. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In

  8. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  9. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In

  10. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  11. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  12. Comparative evaluation of the hydrogen production by mixed consortium, synthetic co-culture and pure culture using distillery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Preeti; Roy, Shantonu; Das, Debabrata

    2015-12-01

    Wastewater comprises of various carbon sources. So, the use of microbial consortium may improve the hydrogen production and organic reduction. The present study deals with biohydrogen production by acidogenic mixed consortia (AMC), synthetic co-culture (Klebsiella pneumoniae IIT-BT 08 and Citrobacter freundii IIT-BT L139) and pure culture using distillery effluent (DE). Higher hydrogen yield was observed in case of AMC (9.17 mol/kg CODreduced) as compared to the synthetic co-culture and pure culture. PCR-DGGE analysis indicated that the consortium was predominated by species closely affiliated to Clostridium sp. The average hydrogen production rate was 267 mL/Lh. The maximum hydrogen production rate (Rm), hydrogen production potential (P) and lag time (λ) by AMC using DE were 507.2 mL/Lh, 3729 m/L and 2.04 h, respectively. Maximum gaseous energy recovery by AMC was found to be higher by 21.9% and 45.4% than that of using co-culture and pure culture respectively.

  13. Ultrasonically enhanced delivery and degradation of PAHs in a polymer-liquid partitioning system by a microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaza, Pedro A; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2009-09-01

    The current study examined the effects of ultrasonic irradiation on mass transfer and degradation of PAHs, by an enriched consortium, when delivered from polymeric matrices. Rates of release into methanol under sonicated conditions, relative to unmixed cases, for phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene were increased approximately fivefold, when delivered from Desmopan 9370 A (polyurethane). Similar effects were observed in Hytrel and Kraton D4150 K polymers as well as recycled Bridgestone tires. Enhancements were also displayed as shifts to higher release equilibria under sonicated conditions, relative to non-sonicated cases, agreeing with current knowledge in sonochemistry and attributed to cavitation. Ultrasonic effects on microbial activity were also investigated and cell damage was found to be non- permanent with consortium re-growth being observed after sonic deactivation. Finally, the lumped effect of sonication on degradation of phenanthrene delivered from Desmopan was examined under the absence and presence of sonication. Rates of degradation were found to be increased by a factor of four demonstrating the possibility of using ultrasonic irradiation for improved mass transport in solid-liquid systems. Cellular inactivation effects were not evident, and this was attributed to the attenuation of sonic energy arising from the presence of solid polymer materials in the medium. The findings of the study demonstrate that sonication can be used to improve mass transport of poorly soluble compounds in microbial degradations, and alleviate limiting steps of soil remediation processes proposed in previous research.

  14. 2006 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of Western Lewis County for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium. This data set covers...

  15. Communal microaerophilic-aerobic biodegradation of Amaranth by novel NAR-2 bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Giek Far; Rashid, Noor Aini Abdul; Chua, Lee Suan; Ab llah, Norzarini; Nasiri, Rozita; Ikubar, Mohamed Roslan Mohamad

    2012-02-01

    A novel bacterial consortium, NAR-2 which consists of Citrobacter freundii A1, Enterococcus casseliflavus C1 and Enterobacter cloacae L17 was investigated for biodegradation of Amaranth azo dye under sequential microaerophilic-aerobic condition. The NAR-2 bacterial consortium with E. casseliflavus C1 as the dominant strain enhanced the decolorization process resulting in reduction of Amaranth in 30 min. Further aerobic biodegradation, which was dominated by C. freundii A1 and E. cloacae L17, allowed biotransformation of azo reduction intermediates and mineralization via metabolic pathways including benzoyl-CoA, protocatechuate, salicylate, gentisate, catechol and cinnamic acid. The presence of autoxidation products which could be metabolized to 2-oxopentenoate was elucidated. The biodegradation mechanism of Amaranth by NAR-2 bacterial consortium was predicted to follow the steps of azo reduction, deamination, desulfonation and aromatic ring cleavage. This is for the first time the comprehensive microaerophilic-aerobic biotransformation pathways of Amaranth dye intermediates by bacterial consortium are being proposed.

  16. Isolation and genetic identification of PAH degrading bacteria from a microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, M Carmen; González, Natalia; Bautista, L Fernando; Sanz, Raquel; Simarro, Raquel; Sánchez, Irene; Sanz, José L

    2009-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH; naphthalene, anthracene and phenanthrene) degrading microbial consortium C2PL05 was obtained from a sandy soil chronically exposed to petroleum products, collected from a petrochemical complex in Puertollano (Ciudad Real, Spain). The consortium C2PL05 was highly efficient degrading completely naphthalene, phenanthrene and anthracene in around 18 days of cultivation. The toxicity (Microtox method) generated by the PAH and by the intermediate metabolites was reduced to levels close to non-toxic in almost 40 days of cultivation. The identified bacteria from the contaminated soil belonged to gamma-proteobacteria and could be include in Enterobacter and Pseudomonas genus. DGGE analysis revealed uncultured Stenotrophomonas ribotypes as a possible PAH degrader in the microbial consortium. The present work shows the potential use of these microorganisms and the total consortium for the bioremediation of PAH polluted areas since the biodegradation of these chemicals takes place along with a significant decrease in toxicity.

  17. 2015 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) LiDAR: WA DNR Lands (P2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 2014, WSI, a Quantum Spatial Inc. (QSI) company, was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)...

  18. 2015 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) LiDAR: WA DNR Lands (P1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 2014, WSI, a Quantum Spatial Inc. (QSI) company, was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)...

  19. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Tulalip Partnership

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In October 2012, WSI (Watershed Sciences, Inc.) was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC)to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on a...

  20. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Nooksack

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In July 2012, WSI (Watershed Sciences, Inc.) was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on a...

  1. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Yakima County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 77 square miles and covers a...

  2. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Snohomish County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 167 square miles and covers a...

  3. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Saddle Mountain

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In October 2013, WSI, a Quantum Spatial Company (QSI), was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data...

  4. The International Consortium for the Investigation of Renal Malignancies (I-ConFIRM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Consortium for the Investigation of Renal Malignancies (I-ConFIRM) was formed to promote international, multidisciplinary collaborations to advance our understanding of the etiology and outcomes of kidney cancer.

  5. 76 FR 38666 - Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium/Dauphin Island...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... Nutrition (CFSAN) and the Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium/Dauphin Island Sea Lab (DISL). The goal... Island Sea Lab (DISL). FDA is authorized to enforce the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the...

  6. 2009 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Lewis County survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium. This data...

  7. 2000 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Kitsap Peninsula, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 1,146 square miles and covers part...

  8. 2011 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Quinault River Basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on the Quinault River Basin survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium and...

  9. 2014 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Willapa Valley (Delivery 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In January, 2014 WSI, a Quantum Spatial (QSI) company, was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data...

  10. Federal Laboratory Consortium Recognizes Unituxin Collaborators with Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) presented an Excellence in Technology Transfer award to the group that collaborated to bring Unituxin (dinutuximab, also known as ch14.18), an immunotherapy for neuroblastoma, to licensure.

  11. Degradation of atrazine by microbial consortium in an anaerobic submerged biological filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, Simin; Baghapour, Mohammad Ali; Derakhshan, Zahra; Faramarzian, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    Atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) (ATZ) is one of the components of S-triazine. Due to its certain characteristics, ATZ causes pollution in various ecosystems and has been of concern for its probable carcinogenic effects on humans. Researchers have used chemical and physical methods for removing ATZ from the environment. Although these methods are quick, they have not been capable of complete mineralization. Therefore, researchers are looking for methods with lower energy consumption and cost and higher efficiency. In this study, biodegradation of ATZ by microbial consortium was evaluated in the aquatic environment. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of ATZ removal from aqueous environments by using an anaerobic submerged biological filter in four concentration levels of atrazine and three hydraulic retention times. The maximum efficiencies of ATZ and soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) were 51.1 and 45.6%, respectively. There was no accumulation of ATZ in the biofilm and the loss of ATZ in the control reactor was negligible. This shows that ATZ removal in this system was due to biodegradation. Furthermore, the results of modeling showed that the Stover-Kincannon model had desirable fitness (R² > 99%) in loading ATZ in this biofilter.

  12. Stimulation of methane generation from nonproductive coal by addition of nutrients or a microbial consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth J.P.; Voytek, Mary A.; Corum, Margo D.; Orem, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Biogenic formation of methane from coal is of great interest as an underexploited source of clean energy. The goal of some coal bed producers is to extend coal bed methane productivity and to utilize hydrocarbon wastes such as coal slurry to generate new methane. However, the process and factors controlling the process, and thus ways to stimulate it, are poorly understood. Subbituminous coal from a nonproductive well in south Texas was stimulated to produce methane in microcosms when the native population was supplemented with nutrients (biostimulation) or when nutrients and a consortium of bacteria and methanogens enriched from wetland sediment were added (bioaugmentation). The native population enriched by nutrient addition included Pseudomonas spp., Veillonellaceae, and Methanosarcina barkeri. The bioaugmented microcosm generated methane more rapidly and to a higher concentration than the biostimulated microcosm. Dissolved organics, including long-chain fatty acids, single-ring aromatics, and long-chain alkanes accumulated in the first 39 days of the bioaugmented microcosm and were then degraded, accompanied by generation of methane. The bioaugmented microcosm was dominated by Geobacter sp., and most of the methane generation was associated with growth of Methanosaeta concilii. The ability of the bioaugmentation culture to produce methane from coal intermediates was confirmed in incubations of culture with representative organic compounds. This study indicates that methane production could be stimulated at the nonproductive field site and that low microbial biomass may be limiting in situ methane generation. In addition, the microcosm study suggests that the pathway for generating methane from coal involves complex microbial partnerships.

  13. Effect of whey fermented by Enterococcus faeciumin consortium with Veilonella parvulaon ruminal bacteria in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higor Fábio Carvalho Bezerra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of whey fermented by Enterococus faecium in consortium with Veilonella parvula in vitro on ruminal microorganisms in different substrates, with or without monensin. The first experiment was carried out in a completely randomized design, in a 6 × 3 factorial arrangement (six substrates × three whey levels with two replicates. In experiment two, a 2 × 3 × 4 factorial arrangement (with and without monensin, three foods and four levels of fermented whey was used, in a randomized design with four replicates, totaling 24 treatments. There was no interaction among the wheys and the substrates in the variable for pectin, starch, and carboxymethyl cellulose. There was a greater growth of amylolytic and pectinolytic microorganisms and a lower growth of proteolytic and cellulolytic microorganisms. A significant effect of optical density was found in the media without substrate and that containing trypticase and glucose due to the addition of fermented whey. There was interaction for the pH at 24 hours among whey, food and monensin. For ammonia at 24 hours there was effect for food, whey and monensin, and interaction among factors. For microbial protein at 24 hours, there was effect for food, whey, monensin and no interaction among sources of variation. The use of whey fermented by bacteria Enterococcus faeciumand Veilonella parvula improves microbial protein synthesis by ruminal bacteria in media containing different energy sources. The combination of fermented whey and monensin shows variable results in relation to microbial growth.

  14. Indiana Advanced Electric Vehicle Training and Education Consortium (I-AEVtec)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruthers, James; Dietz, J.; Pelter, Libby; Chen, Jie; Roberson, Glen; McGinn, Paul; Kizhanipuram, Vinodegopal

    2013-01-31

    The Indiana Advanced Electric Vehicle Training and Education Consortium (I-AEVtec) is an educational partnership between six universities and colleges in Indiana focused on developing the education materials needed to support electric vehicle technology. The I-AEVtec has developed and delivered a number of degree and certificate programs that address various aspects of electric vehicle technology, including over 30 new or significantly modified courses to support these programs. These courses were shared on the SmartEnergyHub. The I-AEVtec program also had a significant outreach to the community with particular focus on K12 students. Finally, the evGrandPrix was established which is a university/college student electric go-kart race, where the students get hands-on experience in designing, building and racing electric vehicles. The evGrandPrix now includes student teams from across the US as well as from Europe and it is currently being held on Opening Day weekend for the Indy500 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

  15. Stimulation of methane generation from nonproductive coal by addition of nutrients or a microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth J P; Voytek, Mary A; Corum, Margo D; Orem, William H

    2010-11-01

    Biogenic formation of methane from coal is of great interest as an underexploited source of clean energy. The goal of some coal bed producers is to extend coal bed methane productivity and to utilize hydrocarbon wastes such as coal slurry to generate new methane. However, the process and factors controlling the process, and thus ways to stimulate it, are poorly understood. Subbituminous coal from a nonproductive well in south Texas was stimulated to produce methane in microcosms when the native population was supplemented with nutrients (biostimulation) or when nutrients and a consortium of bacteria and methanogens enriched from wetland sediment were added (bioaugmentation). The native population enriched by nutrient addition included Pseudomonas spp., Veillonellaceae, and Methanosarcina barkeri. The bioaugmented microcosm generated methane more rapidly and to a higher concentration than the biostimulated microcosm. Dissolved organics, including long-chain fatty acids, single-ring aromatics, and long-chain alkanes accumulated in the first 39 days of the bioaugmented microcosm and were then degraded, accompanied by generation of methane. The bioaugmented microcosm was dominated by Geobacter sp., and most of the methane generation was associated with growth of Methanosaeta concilii. The ability of the bioaugmentation culture to produce methane from coal intermediates was confirmed in incubations of culture with representative organic compounds. This study indicates that methane production could be stimulated at the nonproductive field site and that low microbial biomass may be limiting in situ methane generation. In addition, the microcosm study suggests that the pathway for generating methane from coal involves complex microbial partnerships.

  16. A walk around a comet with the Rosetta Plasma Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Burch, Jim; Carr, Chris; Eriksson, Anders; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Nilsson, Hans; Cupido, Emanuele; Goldstein, Ray; Henri, Pierre; Koenders, Christoph; Richter, Ingo

    2014-05-01

    Comets present a variety of plasma phenomena, which the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC) is in a unique place to investigate. In particular, the possibility of long term in-situ monitoring of the evolution of the coma and its various plasma regions from a spacecraft moving at walking speed (meters per second) has no counterpart on any other space mission. In addition to much more details on the physics of features discovered on flyby missions like Giotto, e.g. the contact surface and ion pick-up processes, it will be possible to see how they evolve, study their stability, and to discover any entirely new phenomena. In this presentation, we show some data and results obtained earlier in the mission and recently during the recommissioning of the RPC after hibernation, with our expectations for the comet phase, particularly early activity signatures in the coming months. Among the first signs of cometary activity we expect to be ring and shell distributions of pick-up cometary ions directly detectable by the Ion Composition Analyzer (RPC-ICA) and the Ion and Electron Sensor (RPC-IES), and the ion cyclotron waves they generate should be picked up by the Fluxgate Magnetometer (RPC-MAG). Early electron density enhancements will be visible in the spacecraft potential accessible by the Langmuir probes (RPC-LAP) and any associated high frequency waves by the Mutual Impedance Probe (RPC-MIP).

  17. Photocatalytic Removal of Microbiological Consortium and Organic Matter in Greywater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmiye Cemre Birben

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate TiO2 photocatalytic degradation of synthetically-prepared greywater samples with differing compositional contents of organic matter (OM, anion concentration, and microbiological consortium. Treatment efficiency was followed through removal of organic matter content in terms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, specific spectroscopic parameters, and bacterial inactivation. Photocatalytic degradation kinetics were expressed by pseudo first-order kinetic modeling. The best DOC removal rates were attained for greywater samples containing OM with lower molecular size fractions. In addition, either enhancing or reducing the effect of common anions as radical scavengers were observed depending on the composition and concentration of variables in the greywater matrix. Moreover, possibility of a photocatalytic disinfection process was found to be of a bacteria type specific in OM-loaded synthetic greywater samples. Photocatalytic destruction of fecal streptococci required longer irradiation periods under all conditions. Bacterial removal rates were found to be in the order of total coliform > fecal coliform > fecal streptococci, for low organic load greywater, and fecal coliform > total coliform > fecal streptococci, for high organic load greywater.

  18. Adaptation of a methanogenic consortium to arsenite inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Freire, Lucia; Moore, Sarah E; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, James A

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous metalloid known for its adverse effects to human health. Microorganisms are also impacted by As toxicity, including methanogenic archaea, which can affect the performance of process in which biological activity is required (i.e. stabilization of activated sludge in wastewater treatment plants). The novel ability of a mixed methanogenic granular sludge consortium to adapt to the inhibitory effect of arsenic (As) was investigated by exposing the culture to approximately 0.92 mM of As(III) for 160 d in an arsenate (As(V)) reducing bioreactor using ethanol as the electron donor. The results of shaken batch bioassays indicated that the original, unexposed sludge was severely inhibited by arsenite (As(III)) as evidenced by the low 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) determined, i.e., 19 and 90 μM for acetoclastic- and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, respectively. The tolerance of the acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the sludge to As(III) increased 47-fold (IC50 = 910 μM) and 12-fold (IC50= 1100 μM), respectively, upon long-term exposure to As. In conclusion, the methanogenic community in the granular sludge demonstrated a considerable ability to adapt to the severe inhibitory effects of As after a prolonged exposure period.

  19. Bioremediation of textile azo dyes by aerobic bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senan, Resmi C; Abraham, T Emilia

    2004-08-01

    An aerobic bacterial consortium consisting of two isolated strains (BF1, BF2) and a strain of Pseudomonas putida (MTCC1194) was developed for the aerobic degradation of a mixture of textile azodyes and individual azodyes at alkaline pH (9-10.5) and salinity (0.9-3.68 g/l) at ambient temperature (28 +/- 2 degrees C). The degradation efficiency of the strains in different media (mineral media and in the Simulated textile effluent (STE)) and at different dye concentrations were studied. The presence of a H2O2 independent oxidase-laccase (26.5 IU/ml) was found in the culture filtrate of the organism BF2. The analysis of the degraded products by TLC and HPLC, after the microbial treatment of the dyes showed the absence of amines and the presence of low molecular weight oxidative degradation products. The enzymes present in the crude supernatant was found to be reusable for the dye degradation.

  20. The Global Cancer Genomics Consortium: interfacing genomics and cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The Global Cancer Genomics Consortium (GCGC) is an international collaborative platform that amalgamates cancer biologists, cutting-edge genomics, and high-throughput expertise with medical oncologists and surgical oncologists; they address the most important translational questions that are central to cancer research and treatment. The annual GCGC symposium was held at the Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer, Mumbai, India, from November 9 to 11, 2011. The symposium showcased international next-generation sequencing efforts that explore cancer-specific transcriptomic changes, single-nucleotide polymorphism, and copy number variations in various types of cancers, as well as the structural genomics approach to develop new therapeutic targets and chemical probes. From the spectrum of studies presented at the symposium, it is evident that the translation of emerging cancer genomics knowledge into clinical applications can only be achieved through the integration of multidisciplinary expertise. In summary, the GCGC symposium provided practical knowledge on structural and cancer genomics approaches, as well as an exclusive platform for focused cancer genomics endeavors.

  1. Phosphorus mobilizing consortium Mammoth P™ enhances plant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Baas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P is a critical nutrient used to maximize plant growth and yield. Current agriculture management practices commonly experience low plant P use efficiency due to natural chemical sorption and transformations when P fertilizer is applied to soils. A perplexing challenge facing agriculture production is finding sustainable solutions to deliver P more efficiently to plants. Using prescribed applications of specific soil microbial assemblages to mobilize soil bound—P to improve crop nutrient uptake and productivity has rarely been employed. We investigated whether inoculation of soils with a bacterial consortium developed to mobilize soil P, named Mammoth PTM, could increase plant productivity. In turf, herbs, and fruits, the combination of conventional inorganic fertilizer combined with Mammoth PTM increased productivity up to twofold compared to the fertilizer treatments without the Mammoth PTM inoculant. Jalapeño plants were found to bloom more rapidly when treated with either Mammoth P. In wheat trials, we found that Mammoth PTM by itself was able to deliver yields equivalent to those achieved with conventional inorganic fertilizer applications and improved productivity more than another biostimulant product. Results from this study indicate the substantial potential of Mammoth PTM to enhance plant growth and crop productivity.

  2. Geodata fusion study by the Open Geospatial Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percivall, George

    2013-05-01

    Making new connections in existing data is a powerful method to gain understanding of the world. Data fusion is not a new topic, but new approaches provide opportunities to enhance this ubiquitous process. Interoperability based on open standards is radically changing the classical domains of data fusion while inventing entirely new ways to discern relationships in data with little structure. Associations based on locations and times are of the most primary type. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) conducted a Fusion Standards study with recommendations implemented in testbeds. In the context of this study, Data Fusion was defined as: "the act or process of combining or associating data or information regarding one or more entities considered in an explicit or implicit knowledge framework to improve one's capability (or provide a new capability) for detection, identification, or characterization of that entity". Three categories were used to organize this study: Observation Fusion, Feature fusion, and Decision fusion. The study considered classical fusion as exemplified by the JDL and OODA models as well as how fusion is achieved by new technology such as web-based mash-ups and mobile Internet. The study considers both OGC standards as well open standards from other standards organizations. These technologies and standards aid in bringing structure to unstructured data as well as enabling a major new thrust in Decision Fusion.

  3. Consortium Building and Licensing by University Libraries in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex C. Klugkist

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available There are 13 university libraries in the Netherlands. Together with the Royal Library in The Hague and the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences in Amsterdam they form an association, the Association UKB. The UKB is a voluntary association with no formal legal basis. It is a platform for discussing and developing joint policy in the area of scientific information provision and services in the Netherlands. Her main interests include designing a national information infrastructure, organising loans between libraries, developing digital information services, granting consortium-related licenses, agreeing on pricing policies with respect to publishers, co-ordinating collection development and shared cataloguing and indexing. The UKB co-operates closely with PICA, a Dutch corporation for library automation and information, which was founded by a number of Dutch libraries and is now merged with OCLC. Especially in the field of licensing, the UKB has taken a number of important actions over the last few years: For example, it was on the UKB’s initiative that various licensing deals with information providers were concluded. This paper deals with the results achieved so far and reviews some of the experienced successes and problems.

  4. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingguang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY; Frenkel, Anatoly [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Rodriguez, Jose [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Adzic, Radoslav [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bare, Simon R. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Hulbert, Steve L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karim, Ayman [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mullins, David R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Overbury, Steve [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  5. SUNrises on the International Plant Nucleus Consortium: SEB Salzburg 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graumann, Katja; Bass, Hank W; Parry, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear periphery is a dynamic, structured environment, whose precise functions are essential for global processes-from nuclear, to cellular, to organismal. Its main components-the nuclear envelope (NE) with inner and outer nuclear membranes (INM and ONM), nuclear pore complexes (NPC), associated cytoskeletal and nucleoskeletal components as well as chromatin are conserved across eukaryotes (Fig. 1). In metazoans in particular, the structure and functions of nuclear periphery components are intensely researched partly because of their involvement in various human diseases. While far less is known about these in plants, the last few years have seen a significant increase in research activity in this area. Plant biologists are not only catching up with the animal field, but recent findings are pushing our advances in this field globally. In recognition of this developing field, the Annual Society of Experimental Biology Meeting in Salzburg kindly hosted a session co-organized by Katja Graumann and David E. Evans (Oxford Brookes University) highlighting new insights into plant nuclear envelope proteins and their interactions. This session brought together leading researchers with expertise in topics such as epigenetics, meiosis, nuclear pore structure and functions, nucleoskeleton and nuclear envelope composition. An open and friendly exchange of ideas was fundamental to the success of the meeting, which resulted in founding the International Plant Nucleus Consortium. This review highlights new developments in plant nuclear envelope research presented at the conference and their importance for the wider understanding of metazoan, yeast and plant nuclear envelope functions and properties.

  6. Development of the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium: Risk Factor Associations by Heterogeneity of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Weight; 999=unknown WEIGHT Weight in pounds 999 if unknown WAIST Waist circumference in inches 999=unknown HIP Hip circumference in...Consortium: Risk Factor Associations by Heterogeneity of Disease PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Shelley Tworoger CONTRACTING...Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium: Risk 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Factor Associations by Heterogeneity of Disease 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0561 5c

  7. The ENIGMA Consortium: large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Paul M.; Stein, Jason L.; Medland, Sarah E.; Hibar, Derrek P.; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Renteria, Miguel E.; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud

    2014-01-01

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replication of finding...

  8. The ENIGMA Consortium: large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Paul M.; Stein, Jason L.; Medland, Sarah E.; Hibar, Derrek P.; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Renteria, Miguel E.; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud

    2014-01-01

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replication of finding...

  9. The ENIGMA Consortium: Large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Paul M.; Stein, Jason L.; Medland, Sarah E.; Hibar, Derrek P.; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Renteria, Miguel E.; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud

    2014-01-01

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replication of finding...

  10. The ENIGMA Consortium: Large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Paul; Stein, J.L.; Medland, Sarah Elizabeth; Hibar, Derrek; Vásquez, Arias; Rentería, Miguel; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret; Martin, Nicholas; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replicatio...

  11. Decolorization of azo dyes (Direct Blue 151 and Direct Red 31) by moderately alkaliphilic bacterial consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvine Lalnunhlimi; Veenagayathri Krishnaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Removal of synthetic dyes is one of the main challenges before releasing the wastes discharged by textile industries. Biodegradation of azo dyes by alkaliphilic bacterial consortium is one of the environmental-friendly methods used for the removal of dyes from textile effluents. Hence, this study presents isolation of a bacterial consortium from soil samples of saline environment and its use for the decolorization of azo dyes, Direct Blue 151 (DB 151) and Direct Red 31 (DR 31). The d...

  12. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium Annual Report. Volume 2. 1988 Discussing, Using, and Recognizing Plans (NLP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    Encontro Portugues de Inteligencia Artificial (EPIA), Oporto, Portugal, September 1985. [15] N. J. Nilsson. Principles Of Artificial Intelligence. Tioga...FI1 F COPY () RADC-TR-89-259, Vol II (of twelve) Interim Report October 1969 AD-A218 154 NORTHEAST ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONSORTIUM ANNUAL...7a. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION Northeast Artificial Of p0ilcabe) Intelligence Consortium (NAIC) Rome_____ Air___ Development____Center

  13. The Pharmaceutical Industry Beamline of Pharmaceutical Consortium for Protein Structure Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Nishijima, K

    2002-01-01

    The Pharmaceutical Industry Beamline was constructed by the Pharmaceutical Consortium for Protein Structure Analysis which was established in April 2001. The consortium is composed of 22 pharmaceutical companies affiliating with the Japan Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association. The beamline is the first exclusive on that is owned by pharmaceutical enterprises at SPring-8. The specification and equipments of the Pharmaceutical Industry Beamline is almost same as that of RIKEN Structural Genomics Beamline I and II. (author)

  14. The New Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.J. Bond; K. Kostelnik; R.A. Wharton; A. Kadak

    2006-06-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundation to enable future economic growth. The next generation energy workforce in the U.S. is a critical element in meeting both national and global energy needs. The Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) was established in 2005 in response to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements. CAES, located at the new Idaho National Laboratory (INL), will address critical energy education, research, policy study and training needs. CAES is a unique joint partnership between the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA), the State of Idaho, an Idaho University Consortium (IUC), and a National University Consortium (NUC). CAES will be based in a new facility that will foster collaborative academic and research efforts among participating institutions.

  15. Results From the John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium. A Success Story for NASA and Northeast Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Marsha M.; Barna, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium was established by NASA in 2002 to formulate and implement an integrated, interdisciplinary research program to address risks faced by astronauts during long-duration space missions. The consortium is comprised of a preeminent team of Northeast Ohio institutions that include Case Western Reserve University, the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, The National Center for Space Exploration Research, and the NASA Glenn Research Center. The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium research is focused on fluid physics and sensor technology that addresses the critical risks to crew health, safety, and performance. Effectively utilizing the unique skills, capabilities and facilities of the consortium members is also of prime importance. Research efforts were initiated with a general call for proposals to the consortium members. The top proposals were selected for funding through a rigorous, peer review process. The review included participation from NASA's Johnson Space Center, which has programmatic responsibility for NASA's Human Research Program. The projects range in scope from delivery of prototype hardware to applied research that enables future development of advanced technology devices. All of the projects selected for funding have been completed and the results are summarized. Because of the success of the consortium, the member institutions have extended the original agreement to continue this highly effective research collaboration through 2011.

  16. Oil Production by a Consortium of Oleaginous Microorganisms grown on primary effluent wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jacqueline; Hetrick, Mary; French, Todd; Hernandez, Rafael; Donaldson, Janet; Mondala, Andro; Holmes, William

    2011-01-01

    Municipal wastewater could be a potential growth medium that has not been considered for cultivating oleaginous microorganisms. This study is designed to determine if a consortium of oleaginous microorganism can successfully compete for carbon and other nutrients with the indigenous microorganisms contained in primary effluent wastewater. RESULTS: The oleaginous consortium inoculated with indigenous microorganisms reached stationary phase within 24 h, reaching a maximum cell concentration of 0.58 g L -1. Water quality post-oleaginous consortium growth reached a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of approximately 81%, supporting the consumption of the glucose within 8 h. The oleaginous consortium increased the amount of oil produced per gram by 13% compared with indigenous microorganisms in raw wastewater. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) results show a substantial population increase in bacteria within the first 24 h when the consortium is inoculated into raw wastewater. This result, along with the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) results, suggests that conditions tested were not sufficient for the oleaginous consortium to compete with the indigenous microorganisms.

  17. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel

  18. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1992--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-15

    In February, 1990, The Secretary of Energy, James Watkins, approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program proposed by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, ``WERC`` includes as its founding members NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Sandia National Laboratories. The Navajo Community College joined the program later in 1991. The program has the mission of expanding the nation`s capability to address the issues related to management of all types of waste. The program is unique and innovative in many aspects. It provides an integrated approach to this national need, and includes: (1) Education in waste management at the educational institutions resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing hands-on training at the leading edge to students and information feeding into the education programs. (4) Education by technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos & Sandia) located in New Mexico and with the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach programs of special interest to precollege students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the third year.

  19. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1992--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-15

    In February, 1990, The Secretary of Energy, James Watkins, approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program proposed by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes as its founding members NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Sandia National Laboratories. The Navajo Community College joined the program later in 1991. The program has the mission of expanding the nation's capability to address the issues related to management of all types of waste. The program is unique and innovative in many aspects. It provides an integrated approach to this national need, and includes: (1) Education in waste management at the educational institutions resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing hands-on training at the leading edge to students and information feeding into the education programs. (4) Education by technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos Sandia) located in New Mexico and with the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach programs of special interest to precollege students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the third year.

  20. Thirty Years of Innovation in Seismology with the IRIS Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumy, D. F.; Woodward, R.; Aderhold, K.; Ahern, T. K.; Anderson, K. R.; Busby, R.; Detrick, R. S.; Evers, B.; Frassetto, A.; Hafner, K.; Simpson, D. W.; Sweet, J. R.; Taber, J.

    2015-12-01

    The United States academic seismology community, through the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Consortium, has promoted and encouraged a rich environment of innovation and experimentation in areas such as seismic instrumentation, data processing and analysis, teaching and curriculum development, and academic science. As the science continually evolves, IRIS helps drive the market for new research tools that enable science by establishing a variety of standards and goals. This has often involved working directly with manufacturers to better define the technology required, co-funding key development work or early production prototypes, and purchasing initial production runs. IRIS activities have helped establish de-facto international standards and impacted the commercial sector in areas such as seismic instrumentation, open-access data management, and professional development. Key institutional practices, conducted and refined over IRIS' thirty-year history of operations, have focused on open-access data availability, full retention of maximum-bandwidth, continuous data, and direct community access to state-of-the-art seismological instrumentation and software. These practices have helped to cultivate and support a thriving commercial ecosystem, and have been a key element in the professional development of multiple generations of seismologists who now work in both industry and academia. Looking toward the future, IRIS is increasing its engagement with industry to better enable bi-directional exchange of techniques and technology, and enhancing the development of tomorrow's workforce. In this presentation, we will illustrate how IRIS has promoted innovations grown out of the academic community and spurred technological advances in both academia and industry.

  1. Computerized comprehensive data analysis of Lung Imaging Database Consortium (LIDC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan Jun; Pu Jiantao; Zheng Bin; Wang Xingwei; Leader, Joseph K. [Department of Radiology, Imaging Research Division, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) is the largest public CT image database of lung nodules. In this study, the authors present a comprehensive and the most updated analysis of this dynamically growing database under the help of a computerized tool, aiming to assist researchers to optimally use this database for lung cancer related investigations. Methods: The authors developed a computer scheme to automatically match the nodule outlines marked manually by radiologists on CT images. A large variety of characteristics regarding the annotated nodules in the database including volume, spiculation level, elongation, interobserver variability, as well as the intersection of delineated nodule voxels and overlapping ratio between the same nodules marked by different radiologists are automatically calculated and summarized. The scheme was applied to analyze all 157 examinations with complete annotation data currently available in LIDC dataset. Results: The scheme summarizes the statistical distributions of the abovementioned geometric and diagnosis features. Among the 391 nodules, (1) 365 (93.35%) have principal axis length {<=}20 mm; (2) 120, 75, 76, and 120 were marked by one, two, three, and four radiologists, respectively; and (3) 122 (32.48%) have the maximum volume overlapping ratios {>=}80% for the delineations of two radiologists, while 198 (50.64%) have the maximum volume overlapping ratios <60%. The results also showed that 72.89% of the nodules were assessed with malignancy score between 2 and 4, and only 7.93% of these nodules were considered as severely malignant (malignancy {>=}4). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that LIDC contains examinations covering a diverse distribution of nodule characteristics and it can be a useful resource to assess the performance of the nodule detection and/or segmentation schemes.

  2. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2014 Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhyee, Sean H; Farrugia, Lynn; Campleman, Sharan L; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    The Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry was established in 2010 by the American College of Medical Toxicology. The Registry includes all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. The Registry was queried for all cases entered between January 1 and December 31, 2014. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, gender, ethnicity), source of consultation, reasons for consultation, agents involved in toxicological exposures, signs, symptoms, clinical findings, fatalities, and treatment. In 2014, 9172 cases were entered in the Registry across 47 active member sites. Females accounted for 51.1 % of cases. The majority (65.1 %) of cases were adults between the ages of 19 and 65. Caucasians made up the largest identified ethnic group (48.9 %). Most Registry cases originated from the inpatient setting (93.5 %), with a large majority of these consultations coming from the emergency department or inpatient admission services. Intentional and unintentional pharmaceutical exposures continued to be the most frequent reasons for consultation, accounting for 61.7 % of cases. Among cases of intentional pharmaceutical exposure, 62.4 % were associated with a self-harm attempt. Non-pharmaceutical exposures accounted for 14.1 % of Registry cases. Similar to the past years, non-opioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and opioids were the most commonly encountered agents. Clinical signs or symptoms were noted in 81.9 % of cases. There were 89 recorded fatalities (0.97 %). Medical treatment (e.g., antidotes, antivenom, chelators, supportive care) was rendered in 62.3 % of cases. Patient demographics and exposure characteristics in 2014 Registry cases remain similar to prior years. The majority of consultations arose in the acute care setting (emergency department or inpatient) and involved exposures to pharmaceutical products. Among exposures, non-opioid analgesics, sedative/hypnotics, and opioids were the most frequently

  3. Energies; Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    In the framework of the National Debate on the energies in a context of a sustainable development some associations for the environment organized a debate on the nuclear interest facing the renewable energies. The first part presents the nuclear energy as a possible solution to fight against the greenhouse effect and the associated problem of the wastes management. The second part gives information on the solar energy and the possibilities of heat and electric power production. A presentation of the FEE (French wind power association) on the situation and the development of the wind power in France, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  4. Microbial hydrogen production from sewage sludge bioaugmented with a constructed microbial consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotay, Shireen Meher; Das, Debabrata [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2010-10-15

    A constructed microbial consortium was formulated from three facultative H{sub 2}-producing anaerobic bacteria, Enterobacter cloacae IIT-BT 08, Citrobacter freundii IIT-BT L139 and Bacillus coagulans IIT-BT S1. This consortium was tested as the seed culture for H{sub 2} production. In the initial studies with defined medium (MYG), E. cloacae produced more H{sub 2} than the other two strains and it also was found to be the dominant member when consortium was used. On the other hand, B. coagulans as a pure culture gave better H{sub 2} yield (37.16 ml H{sub 2}/g COD{sub consumed}) than the other two strains using sewage sludge as substrate. The pretreatment of sludge included sterilization (15% v/v), dilution and supplementation with 0.5% w/v glucose, which was found to be essential to screen out the H{sub 2} consuming bacteria and ameliorate the H{sub 2} production. Considering (1:1:1) defined consortium as inoculum, COD reduction was higher and yield of H{sub 2} was recorded to be 41.23 ml H{sub 2}/g COD{sub reduced}. Microbial profiling of the spent sludge showed that B. coagulans was the dominant member in the constructed consortium contributing towards H{sub 2} production. Increase in H{sub 2} yield indicated that in consortium, the substrate utilization was significantly higher. The H{sub 2} yield from pretreated sludge (35.54 ml H{sub 2}/g sludge) was comparatively higher than that reported in literature (8.1-16.9 ml H{sub 2}/g sludge). Employing formulated microbial consortium for biohydrogen production is a successful attempt to augment the H{sub 2} yield from sewage sludge. (author)

  5. Study of a plugging microbial consortium using crude oil as sole carbon source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Yan Guiwen; An Mingquan; Liu Jieli; Zhang Houming; Chen Yun

    2008-01-01

    A microbial consortium named Y4 capable of producing biopolymers was isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil in the Dagang Oilfield, China. It includes four bacterial strains: Y4-1 (Paenibacillus sp.), Y4-2 (Actinomadura sp.), Y4-3 (Uncultured bacterium clone) and Y4-4 (Brevibacillus sp.). The optimal conditions for the growth of the consortium Y4 were as follows: temperature about 46 ℃,pH about 7.0 and salinity about 20.0 g/L. The major metabolites were analyzed with gas chromatographymass spectrometry (GC-MS). A comparison was made between individual strains and the microbial consortium for biopolymer production in different treatment processes. The experimental results showed that the microbial consortium Y4 could produce more biopolymers than individual strains, and the reason might be attributed to the synergetic action of strains. The biopolymers were observed with optical and electron microscopes and analyzed by paper chromatography. It was found that the biopolymers produced by the microbial consortium Y4 were insoluble in water and were of reticular structure, and it was concluded that the biopolymers were cellulose. Through a series of simulation experiments with sand cores, it was found that the microbial consortium Y4 could reduce the permeability of reservoir beds, and improve the efficiency of water flooding by growing biomass and producing biopolymers.The oil recovery was enhanced by 3.5% on average. The results indicated that the consortium Y4 could be used in microbial enhanced oil recovery and play an important role in bioremediation of oil polluted environments.

  6. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The member institutions of the Consortium continue to play a significant role in increasing the number of African Americans who enter the environmental professions through the implementation of the Consortium`s RETT Plan for Research, Education, and Technology Transfer. The four major program areas identified in the RETT Plan are as follows: (1) minority outreach and precollege education; (2) undergraduate education and postsecondary training; (3) graduate and postgraduate education and research; and (4) technology transfer.

  7. Modeling and simulation challenges pursued by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turinsky, Paul J., E-mail: turinsky@ncsu.edu [North Carolina State University, PO Box 7926, Raleigh, NC 27695-7926 (United States); Kothe, Douglas B., E-mail: kothe@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the first Energy Innovation Hub of the Department of Energy, was established in 2010 with the goal of providing modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities that support and accelerate the improvement of nuclear energy's economic competitiveness and the reduction of spent nuclear fuel volume per unit energy, and all while assuring nuclear safety. To accomplish this requires advances in M&S capabilities in radiation transport, thermal-hydraulics, fuel performance and corrosion chemistry. To focus CASL's R&D, industry challenge problems have been defined, which equate with long standing issues of the nuclear power industry that M&S can assist in addressing. To date CASL has developed a multi-physics “core simulator” based upon pin-resolved radiation transport and subchannel (within fuel assembly) thermal-hydraulics, capitalizing on the capabilities of high performance computing. CASL's fuel performance M&S capability can also be optionally integrated into the core simulator, yielding a coupled multi-physics capability with untapped predictive potential. Material models have been developed to enhance predictive capabilities of fuel clad creep and growth, along with deeper understanding of zirconium alloy clad oxidation and hydrogen pickup. Understanding of corrosion chemistry (e.g., CRUD formation) has evolved at all scales: micro, meso and macro. CFD R&D has focused on improvement in closure models for subcooled boiling and bubbly flow, and the formulation of robust numerical solution algorithms. For multiphysics integration, several iterative acceleration methods have been assessed, illuminating areas where further research is needed. Finally, uncertainty quantification and data assimilation techniques, based upon sampling approaches, have been made more feasible for practicing nuclear engineers via R&D on dimensional reduction and biased sampling. Industry adoption of CASL

  8. [Intensification capability of dominant consortium on landscaping water remediation by compound ecological filter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Yu; Fang, Ma; Jiang, Qin-Peng

    2007-06-01

    Zeolite and coal cinder were took as main substrates to construct micro-ecological filter to remedy landscaping water. Screening and domesticating dominant consortium to intensify remedying process, aboriginal colony and naked substrate was contrast. It was showed that, removal efficiency of NH4(+) -N, TN, and TP by and dominant colony increased with rest time. Removal efficiency of NH4(+) -N by naked system was the highest, then dominant consortium system. Removal efficiency of TN by dominant consortium system was the highest and increased evidently with rest time. TP removal by aboriginal colony system was the best. NO2(-) -N in naked system was the lowest, which in dominant consortium system was lower than aboriginal system. TN concentration along hydraulic distance kept falling in dominant colony system; TP concentration along hydraulic distance in aboriginal system kept the lowest. Abundant nitrous and nitride bacterium in dominant colony made nitrification swift and thoroughly, cut accumulation of middle production and hasten nitrogen removal. Dominant consortium kept high activity in long time, which intensified removal of nitrogenous contamination. Cooperation of multi-colony enhanced P removal capacity of system.

  9. Enhancement of methane production from cassava residues by biological pretreatment using a constructed microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; He, Jiang; Tian, Min; Mao, Zhonggui; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Hongjian

    2011-10-01

    In the study, a stable thermophilic microbial consortium with high cellulose-degradation ability was successfully constructed. That several species of microbes coexisted in this consortium was proved by DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) and sequence analysis. The cooperation and symbiosis of these microbes in this consortium enhanced their cellulose-degradation ability. The pretreatment of cassava residues mixing with distillery wastewater prior to anaerobic digestion was investigated by using this microbial consortium as inoculums in batch bioreactors at 55 °C. The experimental results showed that the maximum methane yield (259.46 mL/g-VS) of cassava residues was obtained through 12h of pretreatment by this microbial consortium, which was 96.63% higher than the control (131.95 mL/g-VS). In addition, it was also found that the maximum methane yield is obtained when the highest filter paper cellulase (FPase), carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) and xylanase activity and soluble COD (sCOD) are produced.

  10. Decolorization of azo dyes (Direct Blue 151 and Direct Red 31) by moderately alkaliphilic bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalnunhlimi, Sylvine; Krishnaswamy, Veenagayathri

    2016-01-01

    Removal of synthetic dyes is one of the main challenges before releasing the wastes discharged by textile industries. Biodegradation of azo dyes by alkaliphilic bacterial consortium is one of the environmental-friendly methods used for the removal of dyes from textile effluents. Hence, this study presents isolation of a bacterial consortium from soil samples of saline environment and its use for the decolorization of azo dyes, Direct Blue 151 (DB 151) and Direct Red 31 (DR 31). The decolorization of azo dyes was studied at various concentrations (100-300mg/L). The bacterial consortium, when subjected to an application of 200mg/L of the dyes, decolorized DB 151 and DR 31 by 97.57% and 95.25% respectively, within 5 days. The growth of the bacterial consortium was optimized with pH, temperature, and carbon and nitrogen sources; and decolorization of azo dyes was analyzed. In this study, the decolorization efficiency of mixed dyes was improved with yeast extract and sucrose, which were used as nitrogen and carbon sources, respectively. Such an alkaliphilic bacterial consortium can be used in the removal of azo dyes from contaminated saline environment.

  11. Decolorization of azo dyes (Direct Blue 151 and Direct Red 31 by moderately alkaliphilic bacterial consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvine Lalnunhlimi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Removal of synthetic dyes is one of the main challenges before releasing the wastes discharged by textile industries. Biodegradation of azo dyes by alkaliphilic bacterial consortium is one of the environmental-friendly methods used for the removal of dyes from textile effluents. Hence, this study presents isolation of a bacterial consortium from soil samples of saline environment and its use for the decolorization of azo dyes, Direct Blue 151 (DB 151 and Direct Red 31 (DR 31. The decolorization of azo dyes was studied at various concentrations (100–300 mg/L. The bacterial consortium, when subjected to an application of 200 mg/L of the dyes, decolorized DB 151 and DR 31 by 97.57% and 95.25% respectively, within 5 days. The growth of the bacterial consortium was optimized with pH, temperature, and carbon and nitrogen sources; and decolorization of azo dyes was analyzed. In this study, the decolorization efficiency of mixed dyes was improved with yeast extract and sucrose, which were used as nitrogen and carbon sources, respectively. Such an alkaliphilic bacterial consortium can be used in the removal of azo dyes from contaminated saline environment.

  12. Copper removal using a heavy-metal resistant microbial consortium in a fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpio, Isis E Mejias; Machado-Santelli, Glaucia; Sakata, Solange Kazumi; Ferreira Filho, Sidney Seckler; Rodrigues, Debora Frigi

    2014-10-01

    A heavy-metal resistant bacterial consortium was obtained from a contaminated river in São Paulo, Brazil and utilized for the design of a fixed-bed column for the removal of copper. Prior to the design of the fixed-bed bioreactor, the copper removal capacity by the live consortium and the effects of copper in the consortium biofilm formation were investigated. The Langmuir model indicated that the sorption capacity of the consortium for copper was 450.0 mg/g dry cells. The biosorption of copper into the microbial biomass was attributed to carboxyl and hydroxyl groups present in the microbial biomass. The effect of copper in planktonic cells to form biofilm under copper rich conditions was investigated with confocal microscopy. The results revealed that biofilm formed after 72 h exposure to copper presented a reduced thickness by 57% when compared to the control; however 84% of the total cells were still alive. The fixed-bed bioreactor was set up by growing the consortium biofilm on granular activated carbon (GAC) and analyzed for copper removal. The biofilm-GAC (BGAC) column retained 45% of the copper mass present in the influent, as opposed to 17% in the control column that contained GAC only. These findings suggest that native microbial communities in sites contaminated with heavy metals can be immobilized in fixed-bed bioreactors and used to treat metal contaminated water.

  13. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education From the SW Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Warren

    2011-03-22

    This report describes the final expenditures for the INIE project during FY 08/09. (There were no expenditures during FY09/10 or during FY10/11.) To see the list of accomplishments done using the INIE funds, please see the reports included here. The last of the FY 07/08 funds were brought forward and used to complete two distance education modules teaching reactor experiments. These modules and parts from the modules are still being used and are being disseminated off-campus as a part of our distance education effort. The second largest expenditure was sending students to the ANS to present student papers on work that they had done the previous year underwritten by INIE funds. The remaining expenditures were IDC charges and minor travel expenses to give students a tour of a medical facility. Once again we wish to express of sincere appreciation of the INIE program and hope that the return on investment is appreciated by the DOE. Although INIE has come to a close, looking back at all the Consortium has accomplished is astounding. And, as was hoped, these funds have proved to be a springboard for continuing work, particularly at Texas A&M. With the resurgence of nuclear power, the utilities have realized that the nuclear workforce in the near future will be too small for the task of bringing dozens of new plants on line and have turned their attention to the URRs to help feed the workforce pipeline. The distance education modules developed at the A&M are soon to be broadcast throughout the country to help train a new generation of nuclear workers. Our students at the Nuclear Science Center at being snapped up by the nuclear power plants after graduating. Our research projects at A&M have all ended with new data, new ways of looking at old problems, and produced a covey of good students. I want to say 'Thanks' with utmost sincerity because without the INIE funds our efforts would yield a small fraction of the accomplishments you see in this report.

  14. Open Geospatial Consortium standards supporting Lake Maggiore Early Warning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata, Massimiliano; Antonovic, Milan; Molinari, Monia; Pozzoni, Maurizio

    2013-04-01

    management to OGC services with internally implemented software (GeoShield [7]). The presentation illustrates the case study focusing on selected technical solution and strength, weakness and opportunities that the authors identified in the conduction of this experimentation. References: [1] http://www.ti.ch [2] http://www.pcilocarno.ch [3] http://www.supsi.ch/ist [4] Klopfer, M., Simonis, I. (Eds.), SANY - An Open Service Architecture for Sensor Networks, SANY Consortium, 2009. [5] http://www.tridec-online.eu [6] http://istgeo.ist.supsi.ch/software/istsos [7] http://sites.google.com/site/geoshieldproject

  15. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    : one in April, one in June, one in September. April's effort was dedicated to surveying the mound at MC118 with the Surface-Source-Deep-Receiver (SSDR) seismic surveying system. This survey was completed in June and water column and bottom samples were collected via box coring. A microbial filtering system developed by Consortium participants at the University of Georgia was also deployed, run for {approx}12 hours and retrieved. The September cruise, designed to deploy, test, and in some cases recover, geochemical and microbial instruments and experiments took place aboard Harbor Branch's Seward Johnson and employed the Johnson SeaLink manned submersible. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in a previously submitted report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. In addition, Barrodale Computing Services Ltd. (BCS) completed their work; their final report is the bulk of the semiannual report that precedes (abstract truncated)

  16. Builder System Performance Package Targeting 30% - 40% Savings in Space Conditioning Energy Use: December 2002 - December 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-06-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Building (CARB) describes recommended best practices to achieve 30% - 40% energy savings without compromising health or safety in houses built in cold climates, hot-humid climates, and hot-dry climates.

  17. Genome Sequence of Bacillus endophyticus and Analysis of Its Companion Mechanism in the Ketogulonigenium vulgare-Bacillus Strain Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Nan; Du, Jin; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Gao, Feng; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus strains have been widely used as the companion strain of Ketogulonigenium vulgare in the process of vitamin C fermentation. Different Bacillus strains generate different effects on the growth of K. vulgare and ultimately influence the productivity. First, we identified that Bacillus endophyticus Hbe603 was an appropriate strain to cooperate with K. vulgare and the product conversion rate exceeded 90% in industrial vitamin C fermentation. Here, we report the genome sequencing of the B. endophyticus Hbe603 industrial companion strain and speculate its possible advantage in the consortium. The circular chromosome of B. endophyticus Hbe603 has a size of 4.87 Mb with GC content of 36.64% and has the highest similarity with that of Bacillus megaterium among all the bacteria with complete genomes. By comparing the distribution of COGs with that of Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus cereus and B. megaterium, B. endophyticus has less genes related to cell envelope biogenesis and signal transduction mechanisms, and more genes related to carbohydrate transport and metabolism, energy production and conversion, as well as lipid transport and metabolism. Genome-based functional studies revealed the specific capability of B. endophyticus in sporulation, transcription regulation, environmental resistance, membrane transportation, extracellular proteins and nutrients synthesis, which would be beneficial for K. vulgare. In particular, B. endophyticus lacks the Rap-Phr signal cascade system and, in part, spore coat related proteins. In addition, it has specific pathways for vitamin B12 synthesis and sorbitol metabolism. The genome analysis of the industrial B. endophyticus will help us understand its cooperative mechanism in the K. vulgare-Bacillus strain consortium to improve the fermentation of vitamin C.

  18. Field and laboratory studies of methane oxidation in an anoxic marine sediment: Evidence for a methanogen-sulfate reducer consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Alperin, Marc J.; Albert, Daniel B.; Martens, Christopher S.

    1994-12-01

    Field and laboratory studies of anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, suggest that anaerobic methane oxidation is mediated by a consortium of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A seasonal survey of methane oxidation and CO2 reduction rates indicates that methane production was confined to sulfate-depleted sediments at all times of year, while methane oxidation occurred in two modes. In the summer, methane oxidation was confined to sulfate-depleted sediments and occurred at rates lower than those of CO2 reduction. In the winter, net methane oxidation occurred in an interval at the base of the sulfate-containing zone. Sediment incubation experiments suggest both methanogens and sulfate reducers were responsible for the observed methane oxidation. In one incubation experiment both modes of oxidation were partially inhibited by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (a specific inhibitor of methanogens). This evidence, along with the apparent confinement of methane oxidation to sulfate-depleted sediments in the summer, indicates that methanogenic bacteria are involved in methane oxidation. In a second incubation experiment, net methane oxidation was induced by adding sulfate to homogenized methanogenic sediments, suggesting that sulfate reducers also play a role in the process. We hypothesize that methanogens oxidize methane and produce hydrogen via a reversal of CO2 reduction. The hydrogen is efficiently removed and maintained at low concentrations by sulfate reducers. Pore water H2 concentrations in the sediment incubation experiments (while net methane oxidation was occurring) were low enough that methanogenic bacteria could derive sufficient energy for growth from the oxidation of methane. The methanogen-sulfate reducer consortium is consistent not only with the results of this study, but may also be a feasible mechanism for previously documented anaerobic methane oxidation in both freshwater and marine environments.

  19. Genome Sequence of Bacillus endophyticus and Analysis of Its Companion Mechanism in the Ketogulonigenium vulgare-Bacillus Strain Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Jia

    Full Text Available Bacillus strains have been widely used as the companion strain of Ketogulonigenium vulgare in the process of vitamin C fermentation. Different Bacillus strains generate different effects on the growth of K. vulgare and ultimately influence the productivity. First, we identified that Bacillus endophyticus Hbe603 was an appropriate strain to cooperate with K. vulgare and the product conversion rate exceeded 90% in industrial vitamin C fermentation. Here, we report the genome sequencing of the B. endophyticus Hbe603 industrial companion strain and speculate its possible advantage in the consortium. The circular chromosome of B. endophyticus Hbe603 has a size of 4.87 Mb with GC content of 36.64% and has the highest similarity with that of Bacillus megaterium among all the bacteria with complete genomes. By comparing the distribution of COGs with that of Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus cereus and B. megaterium, B. endophyticus has less genes related to cell envelope biogenesis and signal transduction mechanisms, and more genes related to carbohydrate transport and metabolism, energy production and conversion, as well as lipid transport and metabolism. Genome-based functional studies revealed the specific capability of B. endophyticus in sporulation, transcription regulation, environmental resistance, membrane transportation, extracellular proteins and nutrients synthesis, which would be beneficial for K. vulgare. In particular, B. endophyticus lacks the Rap-Phr signal cascade system and, in part, spore coat related proteins. In addition, it has specific pathways for vitamin B12 synthesis and sorbitol metabolism. The genome analysis of the industrial B. endophyticus will help us understand its cooperative mechanism in the K. vulgare-Bacillus strain consortium to improve the fermentation of vitamin C.

  20. Bacterial consortium for copper extraction from sulphide ore consisting mainly of chalcopyrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Romo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mining industry is looking forward for bacterial consortia for economic extraction of copper from low-grade ores. The main objective was to determine an optimal bacterial consortium from several bacterial strains to obtain copper from the leach of chalcopyrite. The major native bacterial species involved in the bioleaching of sulphide ore (Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferriphilum were isolated and the assays were performed with individual bacteria and in combination with At. thiooxidans. In conclusion, it was found that the consortium integrated by At. ferrooxidans and At. thiooxidans removed 70% of copper in 35 days from the selected ore, showing significant differences with the other consortia, which removed only 35% of copper in 35 days. To validate the assays was done an escalation in columns, where the bacterial consortium achieved a higher percentage of copper extraction regarding to control.

  1. Evaluating robustness of a diesel-degrading bacterial consortium isolated from contaminated soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydow, Mateusz; Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Szczepaniak, Zuzanna;

    2016-01-01

    It is not known whether diesel-degrading bacterial communities are structurally and functionally robust when exposed to different hydrocarbon types. Here, we exposed a diesel-degrading consortium to model either alkanes, cycloalkanes or aromatic hydrocarbons as carbon sources to study its...... structural resistance. The structural resistance was low, with changes in relative abundances of up to four orders of magnitude, depending on hydrocarbon type and bacterial taxon. This low resistance is explained by the presence of hydrocarbon-degrading specialists in the consortium and differences in growth...... kinetics on individual hydrocarbons. However, despite this low resistance, structural and functional resilience were high, as verified by re-exposing the hydrocarbon-perturbed consortium to diesel fuel. The high resilience is either due to the short exposure time, insufficient for permanent changes...

  2. Performance assessment of a submerged membrane bioreactor using a novel microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Kangmin; Lee, Kyungpyo; Kim, In-Soo; Jang, Am

    2016-06-01

    The performance of a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) with and without a novel microbial consortium (NMBR vs. CMBR) was compared to provide deeper insights into the effects of changes in water quality and dissolved organic matter (DOM) characteristics by a novel microbial consortium on the fouling characteristics of MBR processes. Despite similar operating conditions and identical DOM properties in the feed waters, NMBR exhibited a lower propensity to release polysaccharide-like compounds with low molecular weight by bacterial activities compared to CMBR. These compounds have a great fouling potential for MBR processes. Therefore, an increase in the transmembrane pressure (TMP) of NMBR (normalized TMP (TMP/TMP0): 1.14) was much slower and less significant than that observed in CMBR (TMP/TMP0: 2.61). These observations imply that the novel microbial consortium can efficiently mitigate membrane fouling by hydrophilic DOM in MBR processes.

  3. A distributed health data network analysis of survival outcomes: the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Samprit; Cafri, Guy; Isaacs, Abby J; Graves, Stephen; Paxton, Elizabeth; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Sedrakyan, Art

    2014-12-17

    The International Consortium for Orthopaedic Registries is a multinational initiative established by the United States Food and Drug Administration to develop a health data network aimed at providing a robust infrastructure to facilitate evidence-based decision-making on performance of medical devices. Through the International Consortium for Orthopaedic Registries, individual data holders have complete control of their data and can choose to participate in studies of their choice. In this article, we present an overview of the data extraction process and the analytic strategy employed to answer several device performance-related questions in total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. In the process, we discuss some nuances pertinent to International Consortium for Orthopaedic Registries data that pose certain statistical challenges, and we briefly suggest strategies to be adopted to address them.

  4. Ecofriendly degradation, decolorization and detoxification of textile effluent by a developed bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phugare, Swapnil S; Kalyani, Dayanand C; Surwase, Shripad N; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2011-07-01

    Present study illustrates the effectual decolorization and degradation of the textile effluent using a developed bacterial consortium SDS, consisted of bacterial species Providencia sp. SDS and Pseudomonas aeuroginosa strain BCH, originally isolated from dye contaminated soil. The intensive metabolic activity of the consortium SDS led to complete decolorization of textile effluent within 20 h at pH 7 and temperature 30°C. Significant induction in the activities of veratryl alcohol oxidase, laccase, azoreductase and DCIP reductase were observed during decolorization, which indicates their involvement in decolorization and degradation process. The decolorization and biodegradation was monitored using UV-vis spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, HPLC and HPTLC analysis. Toxicological analysis of effluent before and after treatment was performed using classical Allium cepa test. Investigations of various toxicological parameters viz, oxidative stress response, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and phytotoxicity, collectively concludes that, the toxicity of effluent reduces significantly after treatment with consortium SDS.

  5. Bacterial consortium for copper extraction from sulphide ore consisting mainly of chalcopyrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, E; Weinacker, D F; Zepeda, A B; Figueroa, C A; Chavez-Crooker, P; Farias, J G

    2013-01-01

    The mining industry is looking forward for bacterial consortia for economic extraction of copper from low-grade ores. The main objective was to determine an optimal bacterial consortium from several bacterial strains to obtain copper from the leach of chalcopyrite. The major native bacterial species involved in the bioleaching of sulphide ore (Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferriphilum) were isolated and the assays were performed with individual bacteria and in combination with At. thiooxidans. In conclusion, it was found that the consortium integrated by At. ferrooxidans and At. thiooxidans removed 70% of copper in 35 days from the selected ore, showing significant differences with the other consortia, which removed only 35% of copper in 35 days. To validate the assays was done an escalation in columns, where the bacterial consortium achieved a higher percentage of copper extraction regarding to control.

  6. Bacterial consortium for copper extraction from sulphide ore consisting mainly of chalcopyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, E.; Weinacker, D.F.; Zepeda, A.B.; Figueroa, C.A.; Chavez-Crooker, P.; Farias, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    The mining industry is looking forward for bacterial consortia for economic extraction of copper from low-grade ores. The main objective was to determine an optimal bacterial consortium from several bacterial strains to obtain copper from the leach of chalcopyrite. The major native bacterial species involved in the bioleaching of sulphide ore (Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferriphilum) were isolated and the assays were performed with individual bacteria and in combination with At. thiooxidans. In conclusion, it was found that the consortium integrated by At. ferrooxidans and At. thiooxidans removed 70% of copper in 35 days from the selected ore, showing significant differences with the other consortia, which removed only 35% of copper in 35 days. To validate the assays was done an escalation in columns, where the bacterial consortium achieved a higher percentage of copper extraction regarding to control. PMID:24294251

  7. Décoloration d’effluents de distillerie par un consortium microbien

    OpenAIRE

    Jiranuntipon, Suhuttaya

    2009-01-01

    Les effluents de distillerie de mélasse de canne à sucre génèrent une pollution environnementale due à, d’une part de grands volumes et d’autres part à la présence de composés de couleur brune foncée, connus sous le nom de mélanoïdines. Dans cette étude, un consortium bactérien CONS8 isolé dans des sédiments de chute d'eau a été choisi comme consortium apte à la décoloration de la mélasse. On a montré que le consortium CONS8 pouvait décolorer, trois eaux usées synthétiques différentes, élabor...

  8. Bacterial community structure and predicted alginate metabolic pathway in an alginate-degrading bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Akihisa; Miura, Toyokazu; Kawata, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nishio, Naomichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Methane fermentation is one of the effective approaches for utilization of brown algae; however, this process is limited by the microbial capability to degrade alginate, a main polysaccharide found in these algae. Despite its potential, little is known about anaerobic microbial degradation of alginate. Here we constructed a bacterial consortium able to anaerobically degrade alginate. Taxonomic classification of 16S rRNA gene, based on high-throughput sequencing data, revealed that this consortium included two dominant strains, designated HUA-1 and HUA-2; these strains were related to Clostridiaceae bacterium SK082 (99%) and Dysgonomonas capnocytophagoides (95%), respectively. Alginate lyase activity and metagenomic analyses, based on high-throughput sequencing data, revealed that this bacterial consortium possessed putative genes related to a predicted alginate metabolic pathway. However, HUA-1 and 2 did not grow on agar medium with alginate by using roll-tube method, suggesting the existence of bacterial interactions like symbiosis for anaerobic alginate degradation.

  9. Phylogenetic characterization of a corrosive consortium isolated from a sour gas pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan-Roblero, J; Romero, J M; Amaya, M; Le Borgne, S

    2004-06-01

    Biocorrosion is a common problem in oil and gas industry facilities. Characterization of the microbial populations responsible for biocorrosion and the interactions between different microorganisms with metallic surfaces is required in order to implement efficient monitoring and control strategies. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis was used to separate PCR products and sequence analysis revealed the bacterial composition of a consortium obtained from a sour gas pipeline in the Gulf of Mexico. Only one species of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was detected in this consortium. The rest of the population consisted of enteric bacteria with different characteristics and metabolic capabilities potentially related to biocorrosion. Therefore, several types of bacteria may be involved in biocorrosion arising from natural biofilms that develop in industrial facilities. The low abundance of the detected SRB was evidenced by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). In addition, the localized corrosion of pipeline steel in the presence of the consortium was clearly observed by ESEM after removing the adhered bacteria.

  10. Field Evaluation of a Near Zero Energy Home in Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G.; Reeves, P.

    2008-08-01

    The authors evaluated a zero energy home built by Ideal Homes in Edmond, Oklahoma, that included an extensive package of energy-efficient technologies and a photovoltaic array for site electricity generation. The home was part of a Building America research project in partnership with the Building Science Consortium to exhibit high efficiency technologies while keeping costs within the reach of average home buyers.

  11. Recommendations From the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilton, Katherine S; Bowers, Barbara J; Heath, Hazel; Shannon, Kay; Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Prentice, Dawn; Siegel, Elena O; Meyer, Julienne; Chu, Charlene H; Ploeg, Jenny; Boscart, Veronique M; Corazzini, Kirsten N; Anderson, Ruth A; Mueller, Christine A

    2016-02-01

    In response to the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics' global agenda for clinical research and quality of care in long-term care homes (LTCHs), the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long Term Care Homes (the Consortium) was formed to develop nursing leadership capacity and address the concerns regarding the current state of professional nursing practice in LTCHs. At its invitational, 2-day inaugural meeting, the Consortium brought together international nurse experts to explore the potential of registered nurses (RNs) who work as supervisors or charge nurses within the LTCHs and the value of their contribution in nursing homes, consider what RN competencies might be needed, discuss effective educational (curriculum and practice) experiences, health care policy, and human resources planning requirements, and to identify what sustainable nurse leadership strategies and models might enhance the effectiveness of RNs in improving resident, family, and staff outcomes. The Consortium made recommendations about the following priority issues for action: (1) define the competencies of RNs required to care for older adults in LTCHs; (2) create an LTCH environment in which the RN role is differentiated from other team members and RNs can practice to their full scope; and (3) prepare RN leaders to operate effectively in person-centered care LTCH environments. In addition to clear recommendations for practice, the Consortium identified several areas in which further research is needed. The Consortium advocated for a research agenda that emphasizes an international coordination of research efforts to explore similar issues, the pursuit of examining the impact of nursing and organizational models, and the showcasing of excellence in nursing practice in care homes, so that others might learn from what works. Several studies already under way are also described.

  12. Self-organization, layered structure, and aggregation enhance persistence of a synthetic biofilm consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Brenner

    Full Text Available Microbial consortia constitute a majority of the earth's biomass, but little is known about how these cooperating communities persist despite competition among community members. Theory suggests that non-random spatial structures contribute to the persistence of mixed communities; when particular structures form, they may provide associated community members with a growth advantage over unassociated members. If true, this has implications for the rise and persistence of multi-cellular organisms. However, this theory is difficult to study because we rarely observe initial instances of non-random physical structure in natural populations. Using two engineered strains of Escherichia coli that constitute a synthetic symbiotic microbial consortium, we fortuitously observed such spatial self-organization. This consortium forms a biofilm and, after several days, adopts a defined layered structure that is associated with two unexpected, measurable growth advantages. First, the consortium cannot successfully colonize a new, downstream environment until it self-organizes in the initial environment; in other words, the structure enhances the ability of the consortium to survive environmental disruptions. Second, when the layered structure forms in downstream environments the consortium accumulates significantly more biomass than it did in the initial environment; in other words, the structure enhances the global productivity of the consortium. We also observed that the layered structure only assembles in downstream environments that are colonized by aggregates from a previous, structured community. These results demonstrate roles for self-organization and aggregation in persistence of multi-cellular communities, and also illustrate a role for the techniques of synthetic biology in elucidating fundamental biological principles.

  13. Validating genetic risk associations for ovarian cancer through the international Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearce, C L; Near, A M; Van Den Berg, D J;

    2009-01-01

    The search for genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer risk has focused on pathways including sex steroid hormones, DNA repair, and cell cycle control. The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC) identified 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes in these pathways, which had...... been genotyped by Consortium members and a pooled analysis of these data was conducted. Three of the 10 SNPs showed evidence of an association with ovarian cancer at P... and risk of ovarian cancer suggests that this pathway may be involved in ovarian carcinogenesis. Additional follow-up is warranted....

  14. Development of Three Bacteria Consortium for the Bioremediation of Crude Petroleum-oil in Contaminated Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdualdaim M. Mukred

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have to developed active microbial consortium that could be of higher degradation of crude oil contaminated groundwater, wastewater aeration pond and biopond at the oil refinery Terengganu Malaysia. Among four isolates that showed good growth only three different isolates (Acinetobacter faecalis WD2, Staphylococcus. sp DD3 and Neisseria elongate TDA4. were selected based on the growth ability and degradation. Significant growth and effectiveness of hydrocarbon biodegradation of the bacterial consortium examined bacterial strains and their mixtures in both were observed after 5, 10 and 15 days of degradation. Gas chromatography showed that more than 96 and 98% degradation of total hydrocarbon by consortia sp respectively.

  15. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2012 experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Timothy; Wax, Paul; Smith, Eric; Hart, Katherine; Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). All cases are entered prospectively and include only suspected and confirmed toxic exposures cared for at the bedside by board-certified or board-eligible medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The primary aims of establishing this Registry include the development of a realtime toxico-surveillance system in order to identify and describe current or evolving trends in poisoning and to develop a research tool in toxicology. ToxIC allows for extraction of data from medical records from multiple sites across a national and international network. All cases seen by medical toxicologists at participating institutions were entered into the database. Information characterizing patients entered in 2012 was tabulated and data from the previous years including 2010 and 2011 were included so that cumulative numbers and trends could be described as well. The current report includes data through December 31st, 2012. During 2012, 38 sites with 68 specific institutions contributed a total of 7,269 cases to the Registry. The total number of cases entered into the Registry at the end of 2012 was 17,681. Emergency departments remained the most common source of consultation in 2012, accounting for 61 % of cases. The most common reason for consultation was for pharmaceutical overdose, which occurred in 52 % of patients including intentional (41 %) and unintentional (11 %) exposures. The most common classes of agents were sedative-hypnotics (1,422 entries in 13 % of cases) non-opioid analgesics (1,295 entries in 12 % of cases), opioids (1,086 entries in 10 % of cases) and antidepressants (1,039 entries in 10 % of cases). N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was the most common antidote administered in 2012, as it was in previous years, followed by the opioid antagonist naloxone, sodium bicarbonate, physostigmine and flumazenil. Anti-crotalid Fab

  16. Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01

    The Wyoming Business Council, representing the state’s interests, is participating in a collaborative evaluation of energy development opportunities with the NGNP Industry Alliance (an industry consortium), the University of Wyoming, and the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory. Three important energy-related goals are being pursued by the State of Wyoming: Ensuring continued reliable and affordable sources of energy for Wyoming’s industries and people Restructuring the coal economy in Wyoming Restructuring the natural gas economy in Wyoming

  17. 34 CFR 614.4 - Which member of the consortium must act as the lead applicant and fiscal agent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Which member of the consortium must act as the lead applicant and fiscal agent? 614.4 Section 614.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... TEACHERS TO USE TECHNOLOGY § 614.4 Which member of the consortium must act as the lead applicant and...

  18. Study Abroad: A Review of the Kentucky Institute for International Studies (KIIS) and Geographers' Role in the Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambrook, Richard Alan

    2008-01-01

    The Kentucky Institute for International Studies is a consortium of colleges and universities that provides semester length and short summer semester over-seas study programs. This article traces the growth of the consortium from its roots at Murray State University in 1975 through the celebration of its thirtieth anniversary in 2005. Aspects…

  19. From Franchise Network to Consortium: The Evolution and Operation of a New Kind of Further and Higher Education Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Freda; Fisher, Roy; Webb, Keith

    2003-01-01

    The Consortium for Post-Compulsory Education and Training (CPCET) is a single subject consortium of further education and higher education providers of professional development relating to in-service teacher training for the whole of the post-compulsory sector. Involving more than 30 partners spread across the North of England, CPCET evolved from…

  20. 76 FR 66040 - Announcement of Meeting To Explore Feasibility of Establishing a NIST/Industry Consortium on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Announcement of Meeting To Explore Feasibility of Establishing a NIST/Industry Consortium on ``Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME)'' AGENCY: National... Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) invites interested parties to attend a pre-consortium...

  1. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report draft, 1995--1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The HBCU/MI ET Consortium was established in January 1990, through a memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among its member institutions. This group of research-oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCUs/MIs) agreed to work together to initiate or revise educational programs, develop research partnerships with public and private sector organizations, and promote technology development and transfer to address the nation`s critical environmental problems. While the Consortium`s Research, Education and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan is the cornerstone of its overall program efforts, the initial programmatic activities of the Consortium focused on environmental education at all levels with the objective of addressing the underrepresentation of minorities in the environmental professions. This 1996 Annual Report provides an update on the activities of the Consortium with a focus on environmental curriculum development for the Technical Qualifications Program (TQP) and Education for Sustainability.

  2. Modular Zero Energy. BrightBuilt Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States); Butterfield, Karla [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-03-01

    With funding from the Building America Program, part of the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Office, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) worked with BrightBuilt Home (BBH) to evaluate and optimize building systems. CARB’s work focused on a home built by Black Bros. Builders in Lincolnville, Maine (International Energy Conservation Code Climate Zone 6). As with most BBH projects to date, modular boxes were built by Keiser Homes in Oxford, Maine.

  3. At the Heart of the Issue: The Alumni Magazine Consortium Brings New Life to Campus Periodicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Elise

    1983-01-01

    The costs of producing an alumni magazine led to the establishment of the Alumni Magazine Consortium by John Hopkins, Rensselaer Polytechnic, Franklin and Marshall College, Worcester Polytechnic, and Hartwick College. A 16-page core of material in the center of each magazine is wrapped with a client school manuscript. (MLW)

  4. Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium: Accelerating Evidence-Based Practice of Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert C; Goddard, Katrina A B; Jarvik, Gail P; Amendola, Laura M; Appelbaum, Paul S; Berg, Jonathan S; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Leslie G; Biswas, Sawona; Blout, Carrie L; Bowling, Kevin M; Brothers, Kyle B; Burke, Wylie; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Chung, Wendy K; Clayton, Ellen W; Cooper, Gregory M; East, Kelly; Evans, James P; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Garraway, Levi A; Garrett, Jeremy R; Gray, Stacy W; Henderson, Gail E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Holm, Ingrid A; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Hutter, Carolyn M; Janne, Pasi A; Joffe, Steven; Kaufman, David; Knoppers, Bartha M; Koenig, Barbara A; Krantz, Ian D; Manolio, Teri A; McCullough, Laurence; McEwen, Jean; McGuire, Amy; Muzny, Donna; Myers, Richard M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ou, Jeffrey; Parsons, Donald W; Petersen, Gloria M; Plon, Sharon E; Rehm, Heidi L; Roberts, J Scott; Robinson, Dan; Salama, Joseph S; Scollon, Sarah; Sharp, Richard R; Shirts, Brian; Spinner, Nancy B; Tabor, Holly K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Veenstra, David L; Wagle, Nikhil; Weck, Karen; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Wolf, Susan M; Wynn, Julia; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2016-06-02

    Despite rapid technical progress and demonstrable effectiveness for some types of diagnosis and therapy, much remains to be learned about clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) and its role within the practice of medicine. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium includes 18 extramural research projects, one National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) intramural project, and a coordinating center funded by the NHGRI and National Cancer Institute. The consortium is exploring analytic and clinical validity and utility, as well as the ethical, legal, and social implications of sequencing via multidisciplinary approaches; it has thus far recruited 5,577 participants across a spectrum of symptomatic and healthy children and adults by utilizing both germline and cancer sequencing. The CSER consortium is analyzing data and creating publically available procedures and tools related to participant preferences and consent, variant classification, disclosure and management of primary and secondary findings, health outcomes, and integration with electronic health records. Future research directions will refine measures of clinical utility of CGES in both germline and somatic testing, evaluate the use of CGES for screening in healthy individuals, explore the penetrance of pathogenic variants through extensive phenotyping, reduce discordances in public databases of genes and variants, examine social and ethnic disparities in the provision of genomics services, explore regulatory issues, and estimate the value and downstream costs of sequencing. The CSER consortium has established a shared community of research sites by using diverse approaches to pursue the evidence-based development of best practices in genomic medicine.

  5. Biodegradation of phenanthrene using adapted microbial consortium isolated from petrochemical contaminated environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janbandhu, Anjali; Fulekar, M H

    2011-03-15

    In developing countries like India, there are many industrial areas discharging effluent containing large amount of polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) which causes hazardous effect on the soil-water environment. The objective of this study was to isolate and characterize high-efficiency PAH-degrading microbial consortium from 3 decade old petrochemical refinery field located in Nagpur, Maharashtra with history of PAH disposal. Based on biochemical tests and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis the consortium was identified as Sphingobacterium sp., Bacillus cereus and a novel bacterium Achromobacter insolitus MHF ENV IV with effective phenanthrene-degrading ability. The biodegradation data of phenanthrene indicates about 100%, 56.9% and 25.8% degradation at the concentration of 100mg/l, 250 mg/l and 500 mg/l respectively within 14 days. The consortium and its monoculture isolates also utilized variety of other hydrocarbons for growth. To best of our knowledge this is the first time that Achromobacter insolitus has been reported to mineralize phenanthrene effectively. GC-MS analysis of phenanthrene degradation confirmed biodegradation by detection of intermediates like salicylaldehyde, salicylic acid and catechol. All the results indicated that the microbial consortium have a promising application in bioremediation of petrochemical contaminated environments and could be potentially useful for the study of PAH degradation and for bioremediation purposes.

  6. Biodegradation of the low concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil by microbial consortium during incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojun; Lin, Xin; Li, Peijun; Liu, Wan; Wang, Li; Ma, Fang; Chukwuka, K S

    2009-12-30

    The biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (8.15 mg PAHs kg(-1) soil) in aged contaminated soil by isolated microbial consortium (five fungi and three bacteria) during the incubation of 64d is reported. The applied treatments were: (1) biodegradation by adding microbial consortium in sterile soils (BM); (2) biodegradation by adding microbial consortium in non-sterile soils (BMN); and (3) biodegradation by in situ "natural" microbes in non-sterile soils (BNN). The fungi in BM and BMN soils grew rapidly 0-4d during the incubation and then reached a relative equilibrium. In contrast the fungi in BNN soil remained at a constant level for the entire time. Comparison with the fungi, the bacteria in BNN soils grew rapidly during the incubation 0-2d and then reached a relative equilibrium, and those in BM and BMN soils grew slowly during the incubation of 64 d. After 64 d of incubation, the PAH biodegradations were 35%, 40.7% and 41.3% in BNN, BMN and BM, respectively. The significant release of sequestrated PAHs in aged contaminated soil was observed in this experiment, especially in the BM soil. Therefore, although bioaugmentation of introduced microbial consortium increased significantly the biodegradation of PAHs in aged contaminated soil with low PAH concentration, the creation of optimum of the environmental situation might be the best way to use bioremediation successfully in the field.

  7. African-Caribbean cancer consortium for the study of viral, genetic and environmental cancer risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odedina Folakemi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is a short summary of a meeting of the "African-Caribbean Cancer Consortium", jointly organized by the University of Pittsburgh, Department of Epidemiology and the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, held in Montego Bay, Jamaica as a satellite meeting at the Caribbean Health Research Council, 52nd Annual Council and Scientific meeting on May 4, 2007.

  8. The Brown University Traumatic Brain Injury Research Consortium and the Norman Prince Neurosciences Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogg, Jeffrey; Spader, Heather; Wilcox, Bethany J; Ellermeier, Anna; Correira, Steven; Chodobski, Adam; Szmydynger-Chodobska, Joanna; Raukar, Neha; Machan, Jason T; Crisco, Joseph J; LaFrance, W Curt

    2014-05-01

    This article provides an overview of the Brown University Traumatic Brain Injury Research Consortium (TBIRC) and summarizes the multidisciplinary basic and clinical neuroscience work being conducted by investigators at Brown University and the affiliate hospitals in association with the Norman Prince Neurosciences Institute (NPNI).

  9. The ENIGMA Consortium: Large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Thompson (Paul); J.L. Stein; S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); D.P. Hibar (Derrek); A.A. Vásquez (Arias); M.E. Rentería (Miguel); R. Toro (Roberto); N. Jahanshad (Neda); G. Schumann (Gunter); B. Franke (Barbara); M.J. Wright (Margaret); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); I. Agartz (Ingrid); M. Alda (Martin); S. Alhusaini (Saud); L. Almasy (Laura); J. Almeida (Julia); K. Alpert (Kathryn); N.C. Andreasen; O.A. Andreassen (Ole); L.G. Apostolova (Liana); K. Appel (Katja); N.J. Armstrong (Nicola); B. Aribisala (Benjamin); M.E. Bastin (Mark); M. Bauer (Michael); C.E. Bearden (Carrie); Ø. Bergmann (Ørjan); E.B. Binder (Elisabeth); J. Blangero (John); H.J. Bockholt; E. Bøen (Erlend); M. Bois (Monique); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); T. Booth (Tom); I.J. Bowman (Ian); L.B.C. Bralten (Linda); R.M. Brouwer (Rachel); H.G. Brunner; D.G. Brohawn (David); M. Buckner; J.K. Buitelaar (Jan); K. Bulayeva (Kazima); J. Bustillo; V.D. Calhoun (Vince); D.M. Cannon (Dara); R.M. Cantor; M.A. Carless (Melanie); X. Caseras (Xavier); G. Cavalleri (Gianpiero); M.M. Chakravarty (M. Mallar); K.D. Chang (Kiki); C.R.K. Ching (Christopher); A. Christoforou (Andrea); S. Cichon (Sven); V.P. Clark; P. Conrod (Patricia); D. Coppola (Domenico); B. Crespo-Facorro (Benedicto); J.E. Curran (Joanne); M. Czisch (Michael); I.J. Deary (Ian); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); A. den Braber (Anouk); G. Delvecchio (Giuseppe); C. Depondt (Chantal); L. de Haan (Lieuwe); G.I. de Zubicaray (Greig); D. Dima (Danai); R. Dimitrova (Rali); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); H. Dong (Hongwei); D.J. Donohoe (Dennis); A. Duggirala (Aparna); M.D. Dyer (Matthew); S.M. Ehrlich (Stefan); C.J. Ekman (Carl Johan); T. Elvsåshagen (Torbjørn); L. Emsell (Louise); S. Erk; T. Espeseth (Thomas); J. Fagerness (Jesen); S. Fears (Scott); I. Fedko (Iryna); G. Fernandez (Guillén); S.E. Fisher (Simon); T. Foroud (Tatiana); P.T. Fox (Peter); C. Francks (Clyde); S. Frangou (Sophia); E.M. Frey (Eva Maria); T. Frodl (Thomas); V. Frouin (Vincent); H. Garavan (Hugh); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); D.C. Glahn (David); B. Godlewska (Beata); R.Z. Goldstein (Rita); R.L. Gollub (Randy); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); O. Grimm (Oliver); O. Gruber (Oliver); T. Guadalupe (Tulio); R.E. Gur (Raquel); R.C. Gur (Ruben); H.H.H. Göring (Harald); S. Hagenaars (Saskia); T. Hajek (Tomas); G.B. Hall (Garry); J. Hall (Jeremy); J. Hardy (John); C.A. Hartman (Catharina); J. Hass (Johanna); W. Hatton; U.K. Haukvik (Unn); K. Hegenscheid (Katrin); J. Heinz (Judith); I.B. Hickie (Ian); B.C. Ho (Beng ); D. Hoehn (David); P.J. Hoekstra (Pieter); M. Hollinshead (Marisa); A.J. Holmes (Avram); G. Homuth (Georg); M. Hoogman (Martine); L.E. Hong (L.Elliot); N. Hosten (Norbert); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); H.E. Hulshoff Pol (Hilleke); K.S. Hwang (Kristy); C.R. Jack Jr. (Clifford); S. Jenkinson (Sarah); C. Johnston; E.G. Jönsson (Erik); R.S. Kahn (René); D. Kasperaviciute (Dalia); S. Kelly (Steve); S. Kim (Shinseog); P. Kochunov (Peter); L. Koenders (Laura); B. Krämer (Bernd); J.B.J. Kwok (John); J. Lagopoulos (Jim); G. Laje (Gonzalo); M. Landén (Mikael); B.A. Landman (Bennett); J. Lauriello; S. Lawrie (Stephen); P.H. Lee (Phil); S. Le Hellard (Stephanie); H. Lemaître (Herve); C.D. Leonardo (Cassandra); C.-S. Li (Chiang-shan); B. Liberg (Benny); D.C. Liewald (David C.); X. Liu (Xinmin); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); E. Loth (Eva); A. Lourdusamy (Anbarasu); M. Luciano (Michelle); F. MacCiardi (Fabio); M.W.J. Machielsen (Marise); G.M. MacQueen (Glenda); U.F. Malt (Ulrik); R. Mandl (René); D.S. Manoach (Dara); J.-L. Martinot (Jean-Luc); M. Matarin (Mar); R. Mather; M. Mattheisen (Manuel); M. Mattingsdal (Morten); A. Meyer-Lindenberg; C. McDonald (Colm); A.M. McIntosh (Andrew); F.J. Mcmahon (Francis J); K.L. Mcmahon (Katie); E. Meisenzahl (Eva); I. Melle (Ingrid); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); S. Mohnke (Sebastian); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); D.W. Morris (Derek W); E.K. Moses (Eric); B.A. Mueller (Bryon ); S. Muñoz Maniega (Susana); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); B. Müller-Myhsok (Bertram); B. Mwangi (Benson); M. Nauck (Matthias); K. Nho (Kwangsik); T.E. Nichols (Thomas); L.G. Nilsson; A.C. Nugent (Allison); L. Nyberg (Lisa); R.L. Olvera (Rene); J. Oosterlaan (Jaap); R.A. Ophoff (Roel); M. Pandolfo (Massimo); M. Papalampropoulou-Tsiridou (Melina); M. Papmeyer (Martina); T. Paus (Tomas); Z. Pausova (Zdenka); G. Pearlson (Godfrey); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); C.P. Peterson (Charles); A. Pfennig (Andrea); M. Phillips (Mary); G.B. Pike (G Bruce); J.B. Poline (Jean Baptiste); S.G. Potkin (Steven); B. Pütz (Benno); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); J. Rasmussen (Jerod); M. Rietschel (Marcella); M. Rijpkema (Mark); S.L. Risacher (Shannon); J.L. Roffman (Joshua); R. Roiz-Santiañez (Roberto); N. Romanczuk-Seiferth (Nina); E.J. Rose (Emma); N.A. Royle (Natalie); D. Rujescu (Dan); M. Ryten (Mina); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); A. Salami (Alireza); T.D. Satterthwaite (Theodore); J. Savitz (Jonathan); A.J. Saykin (Andrew); C. Scanlon (Cathy); L. Schmaal (Lianne); H. Schnack (Hugo); N.J. Schork (Nicholas); S.C. Schulz (S.Charles); R. Schür (Remmelt); L.J. Seidman (Larry); L. Shen (Li); L. Shoemaker (Lawrence); A. Simmons (Andrew); S.M. Sisodiya (Sanjay); C. Smith (Colin); J.W. Smoller; J.C. Soares (Jair); S.R. Sponheim (Scott); R. Sprooten (Roy); J.M. Starr (John); V.M. Steen (Vidar); S. Strakowski (Stephen); V.M. Strike (Vanessa); J. Sussmann (Jessika); P.G. Sämann (Philipp); A. Teumer (Alexander); A.W. Toga (Arthur); D. Tordesillas-Gutierrez (Diana); D. Trabzuni (Danyah); S. Trost (Sarah); J. Turner (Jessica); M. van den Heuvel (Martijn); N.J. van der Wee (Nic); K.R. van Eijk (Kristel); T.G.M. van Erp (Theo G.); N.E.M. van Haren (Neeltje E.); D. van 't Ent (Dennis); M.J.D. van Tol (Marie-José); M.C. Valdés Hernández (Maria); D.J. Veltman (Dick); A. Versace (Amelia); H. Völzke (Henry); R. Walker (Robert); H.J. Walter (Henrik); L. Wang (Lei); J.M. Wardlaw (J.); M.E. Weale (Michael); M.W. Weiner (Michael); W. Wen (Wei); L.T. Westlye (Lars); H.C. Whalley (Heather); C.D. Whelan (Christopher); T.J.H. White (Tonya); A.M. Winkler (Anderson); K. Wittfeld (Katharina); G. Woldehawariat (Girma); A. Björnsson (Asgeir); D. Zilles (David); M.P. Zwiers (Marcel); A. Thalamuthu (Anbupalam); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); N.B. Freimer (Nelson); N.S. Lawrence (Natalia); D.A. Drevets (Douglas)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscien

  10. The ENIGMA Consortium : large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, Paul M.; Stein, Jason L.; Medland, Sarah E.; Hibar, Derrek P.; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Renteria, Miguel E.; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Almeida, Jorge; Alpert, Kathryn; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Appel, Katja; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Aribisala, Benjamin; Bastin, Mark E.; Bauer, Michael; Bearden, Carrie E.; Bergmann, Orjan; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Blangero, John; Bockholt, Henry J.; Boen, Erlend; Bois, Catherine; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Booth, Tom; Bowman, Ian J.; Bralten, Janita; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Brunner, Han G.; Brohawn, David G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan; Bulayeva, Kazima; Bustillo, Juan R.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cantor, Rita M.; Carless, Melanie A.; Caseras, Xavier; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chang, Kiki D.; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Christoforou, Andrea; Cichon, Sven; Clark, Vincent P.; Conrod, Patricia; Coppola, Giovanni; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; Deary, Ian J.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; den Braber, Anouk; Delvecchio, Giuseppe; Depondt, Chantal; de Haan, Lieuwe; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dima, Danai; Dimitrova, Rali; Djurovic, Srdjan; Dong, Hongwei; Donohoe, Gary; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Dyer, Thomas D.; Ehrlich, Stefan; Ekman, Carl Johan; Elvsashagen, Torbjorn; Emsell, Louise; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fagerness, Jesen; Fears, Scott; Fedko, Iryna; Fernandez, Guillen; Fisher, Simon E.; Foroud, Tatiana; Fox, Peter T.; Francks, Clyde; Frangou, Sophia; Frey, Eva Maria; Frodl, Thomas; Frouin, Vincent; Garavan, Hugh; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Glahn, David C.; Godlewska, Beata; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Gollub, Randy L.; Grabe, Hans J.; Grimm, Oliver; Gruber, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.; Goering, Harald H. H.; Hagenaars, Saskia; Hajek, Tomas; Hall, Geoffrey B.; Hall, Jeremy; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hass, Johanna; Hatton, Sean N.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hickie, Ian B.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoehn, David; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J.; Homuth, Georg; Hoogman, Martine; Hong, L. Elliot; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Hwang, Kristy S.; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnston, Caroline; Joensson, Erik G.; Kahn, Rene S.; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kelly, Sinead; Kim, Sungeun; Kochunov, Peter; Koenders, Laura; Kraemer, Bernd; Kwok, John B. J.; Lagopoulos, Jim; Laje, Gonzalo; Landen, Mikael; Landman, Bennett A.; Lauriello, John; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Lee, Phil H.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Lemaitre, Herve; Leonardo, Cassandra D.; Li, Chiang-shan; Liberg, Benny; Liewald, David C.; Liu, Xinmin; Lopez, Lorna M.; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Luciano, Michelle; Macciardi, Fabio; Machielsen, Marise W. J.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Malt, Ulrik F.; Mandl, Rene; Manoach, Dara S.; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Derek W.; Moses, Eric K.; Mueller, Bryon A.; Munoz Maniega, Susana; Muehleisen, Thomas W.; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Mwangi, Benson; Nauck, Matthias; Nho, Kwangsik; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars-Goeran; Nugent, Allison C.; Nyberg, Lars; Olvera, Rene L.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pandolfo, Massimo; Papalampropoulou-Tsiridou, Melina; Papmeyer, Martina; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peterson, Charles P.; Pfennig, Andrea; Phillips, Mary; Pike, G. Bruce; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Potkin, Steven G.; Puetz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rietschel, Marcella; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roiz-Santianez, Roberto; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rose, Emma J.; Royle, Natalie A.; Rujescu, Dan; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Salami, Alireza; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Savitz, Jonathan; Saykin, Andrew J.; Scanlon, Cathy; Schmaal, Lianne; Schnack, Hugo G.; Schork, Andrew J.; Schulz, S. Charles; Schuer, Remmelt; Seidman, Larry; Shen, Li; Shoemaker, Jody M.; Simmons, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W.; Soares, Jair C.; Sponheim, Scott R.; Sprooten, Emma; Starr, John M.; Steen, Vidar M.; Strakowski, Stephen; Strike, Lachlan; Sussmann, Jessika; Saemann, Philipp G.; Teumer, Alexander; Toga, Arthur W.; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trost, Sarah; Turner, Jessica; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J.; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G. M.; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; van 't Ent, Dennis; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Hernandez, Maria C. Valdes; Veltman, Dick J.; Versace, Amelia; Voelzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Walter, Henrik; Wang, Lei; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; Westlye, Lars T.; Whalley, Heather C.; Whelan, Christopher D.; White, Tonya; Winkler, Anderson M.; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Zilles, David; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Schofield, Peter R.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Lawrence, Natalia S.; Drevets, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics

  11. Study on bioadsorption and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons by a microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nana; Bao, Mutai; Sun, Peiyan; Li, Yiming

    2013-12-01

    A microbial consortium isolated from Shengli oilfield polluted sludge was capable of degrading naphthalene (NAP), phenanthrene (PHE), pyrene (PYR) and crude oil. It performed high biodegradation activity and emulsifiability for petroleum hydrocarbons, and was tolerant to 6.2mM Cu(2+), 2.7 mM Zn(2+) and 9.5mM Pb(2+). Biodegradation rates of NAP, PHE, PYR and crude oil were 53%, 21%, 32% and 44% in the presence of heavy metal (Cu(2+), 1.7 mM and Zn(2+), 2mM), respectively. Exploration on the adsorption and uptake of petroleum hydrocarbons by microbe suggested the stability of surface adsorption and cell uptake by live microbial consortium followed a decreasing order of NAP > PHE ≈ PYR > crude oil. The adsorption by heat-killed microbial consortium was constant for PAHs, while decreased for crude oil. Experiments on enzymatic degradation indicated that the metabolic efficiency of periplasmic, cytoplasmic and extracellular enzymes secreted by the microbial consortium for diverse substrates was different.

  12. Biological Removal of Phosphate Using Phosphate Solubilizing Bacterial Consortium from Synthetic Wastewater: A Laboratory Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak Paul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological phosphate removal is an important process having gained worldwide attention and widely used for removing phosphorus from wastewater. The present investigation was aimed to screen the efficient phosphate solubilizing bacterial isolates and used to remove phosphate from synthetic wastewater under shaking flasks conditions. Pseudomonas sp. JPSB12, Enterobacter sp. TPSB20, Flavobacterium sp. TPSB23 and mixed bacterial consortium (Pseudomonas sp. JPSB12+Enterobacter sp. TPSB20+Flavobacterium sp. TPSB23 were used for the removal of phosphate. Among the individual strains, Enterobacter sp. TPSB20 was removed maximum phosphate (61.75% from synthetic wastewater in presence of glucose as a carbon source. The consortium was effectively removed phosphate (74.15-82.50% in the synthetic wastewater when compared to individual strains. The pH changes in culture medium with time and extracellular phosphatase activity (acid and alkaline were also investigated. The efficient removal of phosphate by the consortium may be due to the synergistic activity among the individual strains and phosphatase enzyme activity. The use of bacterial consortium in the remediation of phosphate contaminated aquatic environments has been discussed.

  13. Customer Satisfaction Perceptions of Dislocated Workers Served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Dava Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of satisfaction of dislocated workers served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium. Four WIN Job Centers participated in this study: Northeast Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Corinth, Northwest Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Oxford,…

  14. Consortia for Engineering, Science and Technology Libraries in India: A Case Study of INDEST Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, S. K.; Deshpande, N. J.

    2007-10-01

    The present scenario of the INDEST Consortium among engineering, science and technology (including astronomy and astrophysics) libraries in India is discussed. The Indian National Digital Library in Engineering Sciences & Technology (INDEST) Consortium is a major initiative of the Ministry of Human Resource Development, Government of India. The INDEST Consortium provides access to 16 full text e-resources and 7 bibliographic databases for 166 institutions as members who are taking advantage of cost effective access to premier resources in engineering, science and technology, including astronomy and astrophysics. Member institutions can access over 6500 e-journals from 1092 publishers. Out of these, over 150 e-journals are exclusively for the astronomy and physics community. The current study also presents a comparative analysis of the key features of nine major services, viz. ACM Digital Library, ASCE Journals, ASME Journals, EBSCO Databases (Business Source Premier), Elsevier's Science Direct, Emerald Full Text, IEEE/IEE Electronic Library Online (IEL), ProQuest ABI/INFORM and Springer Verlag's Link. In this paper, the limitations of this consortium are also discussed.

  15. Biological treatment of textile dyes by agar-agar immobilized consortium in a packed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Yogesh; Gupte, Akshaya

    2015-03-01

    The decolorization of Acid Maroon V was investigated using bacterial consortium EDPA containing Enterobacter dissolvens AGYP1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa AGYP2 immobilized in different entrapment matrices. The consortium displayed 96% removal of dye (100 mg/l) within 6 h when immobilized in agar-agar. Under optimum concentrations of agar-agar (3.0% w/v) and cell biomass (0.9 g% w/v), the consortium displayed decolorization for 18 successive batches of Acid Maroon V and also decolorized 14 other different textile dyes. A packed bed reactor under batch mode showed 89% decolorization of dye after 56 repetitive cycles. Under continuous flow mode, maximum color removal was achieved with bed length of 36 cm, hydraulic retention time of 2.66 h, and dye concentration of 100 mg/l. Additionally, the reactor decolorized relatively higher concentrations (100-2000 mg/l) of dye. The synthetic dye wastewater containing five textile dyes was decolorized 92% with 62% COD reduction using an immobilized consortium.

  16. Report of the 13th Annual International Pachyonychia Congenita Consortium Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittié, L; Kaspar, R L; Sprecher, E; Smith, F J D

    2017-03-27

    The International Pachyonychia Congenita Consortium (IPCC) is a group of physicians and scientists from around the world dedicated to developing therapies for pachyonychia congenita, a rare autosomal dominant skin disorder. The research presented at the 13th Annual Research Symposium of the IPCC, held on 10-11 May 2016, in Scottsdale, AZ, U.S.A., is reported here.

  17. LBL/JSU/AGMUS science consortium annual report, FY 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    In 1983, a formal Memorandum of Understanding joined the Ana G. Mendez University System (AGMUS), Jackson State University (JSU), and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in a consortium designed to advance the science and technology programs of JSU and AGMUS. This is the first such collaboration between a Hispanic university system, a historically Black university, and a national laboratory. The goals of this alliance are basic and direct: to develop and effect a long-term, comprehensive program that will enable the campuses of AGMUS and JSU to provide a broad, high-quality offering in the natural and computer sciences, to increase the number of minority students entering these fields, and to contribute to scientific knowledge and the federal government`s science mission through research. This report documents the progress toward these goals and includes individual success stories. The LBL/JSU/AGMUS Science Consortium has developed plans for utilizing its program successes to help other institutions to adopt or adapt those elements of the model that have produced the greatest results. Within the five-year plan formulated in 1990 are eight major components, each with defining elements and goals. These elements have become the components of the Science Consortium`s current plan for expansion and propagation.

  18. Bioremediation of crude oil waste contaminated soil using petrophilic consortium and Azotobacter sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fauzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to determine the effect Petrophilic and Azotobacter sp. consortium on the rate of degradation of hydrocarbons, Azotobacter growth, and Petrophilic fungi growth in an Inceptisol contaminated with crude oil waste originating from Balongan refinery, one of Pertamina (Indonesia’s largest state-owned oil and gas company units in Indramayu – West Java. This study was conducted from March to April 2014 in the glasshouse of research station of the Faculty of Agriculture, Padjadjaran University at Ciparanje, Jatinangor District, Sumedang Regency of West Java. This study used a factorial completely randomized design with two treatments. The first treatment factor was Petrophilic microbes (A consisting of four levels (without treatment, 2% Petrophilic fungi, 2% Petrophilic bacteria, and the 2% Petrophilic consortium, and Azotobacter sp. The second treatment factor was Azotobacter sp. (B consisting of four levels (without treatment, 0.5%, Azotobacter sp., 1% Azotobacter sp., and 1.5% Azotobacter sp. The results demonstrated interaction between Petrophilic microbes and Azotobacter sp. towards hydrocarbon degradation rate, but no interaction was found towards the growth rate of Azotobacter sp. and Petrophilic fungi. Treatments of a1b3 (2% consortium of Petrophilic fungi with 1.5% Azotobacter sp. and a3b3 (2% Petrophilic consortium and 1.5% Azotobacter sp. had hydrocarbon degradation rate at 0.22 ppm/day for each treatment, showing the highest hydrocarbon degradation rate.

  19. Pathways of methanol conversion in a thermophilic anaerobic (55 degrees C) sludge consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, P.L.; Stams, A.J.M.; Field, J.A.; Dijkema, C.; Lier, van J.B.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    The pathway of methanol conversion by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium was elucidated by recording the fate of carbon in the presence and absence of bicarbonate and specific inhibitors. Results indicated that about 50% of methanol was directly converted to methane by the methylotrophic methanogen

  20. NSF Antarctic and Arctic Data Consortium; Scientific Research Support & Data Services for the Polar Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, P. J.; Pundsack, J. W.; Carbotte, S. M.; Tweedie, C. E.; Grunow, A.; Lazzara, M. A.; Carpenter, P.; Sjunneskog, C. M.; Yarmey, L.; Bauer, R.; Adrian, B. M.; Pettit, J.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Science Foundation Antarctic & Arctic Data Consortium (a2dc) is a collaboration of research centers and support organizations that provide polar scientists with data and tools to complete their research objectives. From searching historical weather observations to submitting geologic samples, polar researchers utilize the a2dc to search andcontribute to the wealth of polar scientific and geospatial data.The goals of the Antarctic & Arctic Data Consortium are to increase visibility in the research community of the services provided by resource and support facilities. Closer integration of individual facilities into a "one stop shop" will make it easier for researchers to take advantage of services and products provided by consortium members. The a2dc provides a common web portal where investigators can go to access data and samples needed to build research projects, develop student projects, or to do virtual field reconnaissance without having to utilize expensive logistics to go into the field.Participation by the international community is crucial for the success of a2dc. There are 48 nations that are signatories of the Antarctic Treaty, and 8 sovereign nations in the Arctic. Many of these organizations have unique capabilities and data that would benefit US ­funded polar science and vice versa.We'll present an overview of the Antarctic & Arctic Data Consortium, current participating organizations, challenges & opportunities, and plans to better coordinate data through a geospatial strategy and infrastructure.

  1. The Establishment of the Pfizer-Canine Comparative Oncology and Genomics Consortium Biospecimen Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Mazcko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Canine Comparative Oncology and Genomics Consortium (CCOGC was formed in 2004 in an effort to capitalize on the generation of a domestic dog genome sequence assembly [1], which created new opportunities to investigate canine cancers at the molecular level [2]. [...

  2. IGEMS: The Consortium on Interplay of Genes and Environment Across Multiple Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nancy L; Christensen, Kaare; Dahl, Anna K

    2013-01-01

    The Interplay of Genes and Environment across Multiple Studies (IGEMS) group is a consortium of eight longitudinal twin studies established to explore the nature of social context effects and gene-environment interplay in late-life functioning. The resulting analysis of the combined data from ove...

  3. Parenting Interventions in Early Head Start: The Buffering Toxic Stress Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Lisa; Blair, Clancy; Boyd, Misty L.; Constantino, John N.; Hallam, Rena A.; Han, Myae; Hustedt, Jason; Harden, Brenda Jones; Raver, C. Cybele; Sarche, Michelle; Vu, Jennifer A.; Watamura, Sarah Enos; Meyer, Aleta; Fortunato, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The Buffering Toxic Stress Consortium was created by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation within the Administration for Children and Families to test preventive interventions for Early Head Start families facing toxic stress, as conceptualized by Shonkoff, Boyce, and McEwen in their influential 2009 article. Because relationships…

  4. Nursing Faculty Collaborate with Embedded Librarians to Serve Online Graduate Students in a Consortium Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Ladonna; Stahr, Beth; Meeker, Bonnie Juve'

    2010-01-01

    Nursing and library faculty face many information literacy challenges when graduate nursing programs migrate to online course delivery. The authors describe a collaborative model for providing cost-effective online library services to new graduate students in a three-university consortium. The embedded librarian service links a health sciences…

  5. The Georgia Higher Education Consortium: A Model for Linking Early Intervention Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Peggy A.; Vail, Cynthia O.; McCormick, Katherine; Malone, D. Michael

    2001-01-01

    A higher education consortium (HEC) in early intervention (EI) is described. An evaluation of the model found that benefits to faculty of HEC participation included development and implementation of EI coursework, development of interdisciplinary collaborative relationships, increased knowledge of state resources, and enhanced knowledge of EI…

  6. A History of the Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium and Its Model Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Kim B.; Cupper, Robert D.; Scot Drysdale, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    With the support of a grant from the Sloan Foundation, nine computer scientists from liberal arts colleges came together in October, 1984 to form the Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium (LACS) and to create a model curriculum appropriate for liberal arts colleges. Over the years the membership has grown and changed, but the focus has remained…

  7. Genome Consortium for Active Teaching: Meeting the Goals of BIO2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. Malcolm; Ledbetter, Mary Lee S.; Hoopes, Laura L. M.; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Heyer, Laurie J.; Rosenwald, Anne; Fowlks, Edison; Tonidandel, Scott; Bucholtz, Brooke; Gottfried, Gail

    2007-01-01

    The Genome Consortium for Active Teaching (GCAT) facilitates the use of modern genomics methods in undergraduate education. Initially focused on microarray technology, but with an eye toward diversification, GCAT is a community working to improve the education of tomorrow's life science professionals. GCAT participants have access to affordable…

  8. 78 FR 40084 - Proposed Requirement-Migrant Education Program Consortium Incentive Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... CFR Chapter II Proposed Requirement--Migrant Education Program Consortium Incentive Grant Program... maximum duration of grants awarded to State educational agencies (SEAs) under the Migrant Education... participate in ] high-quality consortia that improve the interstate or intrastate coordination of...

  9. RSC Classroom Research Consortium Project: 1990-91/Year-Two Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Mary Anne

    In 1989, a consortium of four community colleges in Southern California (i.e., Cerritos College, Mt. San Antonio College, Rancho Santiago College, and Rio Hondo College) received a Title III grant of $2.5 million to support the development of innovative teaching and learning programs. The specific goals of the project are to increase the academic…

  10. China Academic Library and Information System: An Academic Library Consortium in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Longji; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Hongyang

    2000-01-01

    Describes CALIS (China Academic Library and Information System), a nationwide academic library consortium funded primarily by the Chinese government to serve multiple resource-sharing functions among the participating libraries, including online searching, interlibrary loan, document delivery, and coordinated purchasing and cataloging, by…

  11. Academically Ambitious and Relevant Higher Education Research: The Legacy of the Consortium of Higher Education Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichler, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    The Consortium of Higher Education Researchers (CHER) was founded in 1988 to stimulate international communication and collaboration of higher education researchers. A need was felt to offset the isolation of the small numbers of scholars in this area of expertise in many countries, as well as the isolation of individual disciplines addressing…

  12. Medical Physics Residency Consortium: collaborative endeavors to meet the ABR 2014 certification requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brent C; Duhon, John; Yang, Claus C; Wu, H Terry; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Gibbons, John P

    2014-03-06

    In 2009, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center (MBPCC) established a Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Program to provide opportunities for medical physics residency training to MS and PhD graduates of the CAMPEP-accredited Louisiana State University (LSU)-MBPCC Medical Physics Graduate Program. The LSU-MBPCC Program graduates approximately six students yearly, which equates to a need for up to twelve residency positions in a two-year program. To address this need for residency positions, MBPCC has expanded its Program by developing a Consortium consisting of partnerships with medical physics groups located at other nearby clinical institutions. The consortium model offers the residents exposure to a broader range of procedures, technology, and faculty than available at the individual institutions. The Consortium institutions have shown a great deal of support from their medical physics groups and administrations in developing these partnerships. Details of these partnerships are specified within affiliation agreements between MBPCC and each participating institution. All partner sites began resident training in 2011. The Consortium is a network of for-profit, nonprofit, academic, community, and private entities. We feel that these types of collaborative endeavors will be required nationally to reach the number of residency positions needed to meet the 2014 ABR certification requirements and to maintain graduate medical physics training programs.

  13. Construction and Characterization of a Cellulolytic Consortium Enriched from the Hindgut of Holotrichia parallela Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of rice straw by cooperative microbial activities is at present the most attractive alternative to fuels and provides a basis for biomass conversion. The use of microbial consortia in the biodegradation of lignocelluloses could reduce problems such as incomplete synergistic enzymes, end-product inhibition, and so on. In this study, a cellulolytic microbial consortium was enriched from the hindgut of Holotrichia parallela larvae via continuous subcultivation (20 subcultures in total under static conditions. The degradation ratio for rice straw was about 83.1% after three days of cultivation, indicating its strong cellulolytic activity. The diversity analysis results showed that the bacterial diversity and richness decreased during the consortium enrichment process, and the consortium enrichment process could lead to a significant enrichment of phyla Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, classes Clostridia, Epsilonproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria, and genera Arcobacter, Treponema, Comamonas, and Clostridium. Some of these are well known as typical cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic microorganisms. Our results revealed that the microbial consortium identified herein is a potential candidate for use in the degradation of waste lignocellulosic biomass and further highlights the hindgut of the larvae as a reservoir of extensive and specific cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic microbes.

  14. Construction and Characterization of a Cellulolytic Consortium Enriched from the Hindgut of Holotrichia parallela Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Ping; Huang, Jiangli; Zhang, Zhihong; Wang, Dongsheng; Tian, Xiaojuan; Ding, Jiannan

    2016-01-01

    Degradation of rice straw by cooperative microbial activities is at present the most attractive alternative to fuels and provides a basis for biomass conversion. The use of microbial consortia in the biodegradation of lignocelluloses could reduce problems such as incomplete synergistic enzymes, end-product inhibition, and so on. In this study, a cellulolytic microbial consortium was enriched from the hindgut of Holotrichia parallela larvae via continuous subcultivation (20 subcultures in total) under static conditions. The degradation ratio for rice straw was about 83.1% after three days of cultivation, indicating its strong cellulolytic activity. The diversity analysis results showed that the bacterial diversity and richness decreased during the consortium enrichment process, and the consortium enrichment process could lead to a significant enrichment of phyla Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, classes Clostridia, Epsilonproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria, and genera Arcobacter, Treponema, Comamonas, and Clostridium. Some of these are well known as typical cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic microorganisms. Our results revealed that the microbial consortium identified herein is a potential candidate for use in the degradation of waste lignocellulosic biomass and further highlights the hindgut of the larvae as a reservoir of extensive and specific cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic microbes. PMID:27706065

  15. Bio-hydrogen production from tempeh and tofu processing wastes via fermentation process using microbial consortium: A mini-review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengga, Wara Dyah Pita; Wati, Diyah Saras; Siregar, Riska Yuliana; Wulandari, Ajeng Riswanti; Lestari, Adela Ayu; Chafidz, Achmad

    2017-03-01

    One of alternative energies that can replace fossil fuels is hydrogen. Hydrogen can be used to generate electricity and to power combustion engines for transportation. Bio-hydrogen produced from tempeh and tofu processing waste can be considered as a renewable energy. Bio-hydrogen produced from tempeh and tofu processing waste is beneficial because the waste of soybean straw and tofu processing waste is plentiful, cheap, renewable and biodegradable. Specification of tempeh and tofu processing waste were soybean straw and sludge of tofu processing. They contain carbohydrates (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin) and methane. This paper reviews the optimal condition to produce bio-hydrogen from tempeh and tofu processing waste. The production of bio-hydrogen used microbial consortium which were enriched from cracked cereals and mainly dominated by Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium roseum. The production process of bio-hydrogen from tempeh and tofu processing waste used acid pre-treatment with acid catalyzed hydrolysis to cleave the bond of hemicellulose and cellulose chains contained in biomass. The optimal production of bio-hydrogen has a yield of 6-6.8 mL/g at 35-60 °C, pH 5.5-7 in hydraulic retention time (HRT) less than 16 h. The production used a continuous system in an anaerobic digester. This condition can be used as a reference for the future research.

  16. A Fungal-Prokaryotic Consortium at the Basalt-Zeolite Interface in Subseafloor Igneous Crust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Ivarsson

    Full Text Available We have after half a century of coordinated scientific drilling gained insight into Earth´s largest microbial habitat, the subseafloor igneous crust, but still lack substantial understanding regarding its abundance, diversity and ecology. Here we describe a fossilized microbial consortium of prokaryotes and fungi at the basalt-zeolite interface of fractured subseafloor basalts from a depth of 240 m below seafloor (mbsf. The microbial consortium and its relationship with the surrounding physical environment are revealed by synchrotron-based X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM, and Raman spectroscopy. The base of the consortium is represented by microstromatolites-remains of bacterial communities that oxidized reduced iron directly from the basalt. The microstromatolites and the surrounding basalt were overlaid by fungal cells and hyphae. The consortium was overgrown by hydrothermally formed zeolites but remained alive and active during this event. After its formation, fungal hyphae bored in the zeolite, producing millimetre-long tunnels through the mineral substrate. The dissolution could either serve to extract metals like Ca, Na and K essential for fungal growth and metabolism, or be a response to environmental stress owing to the mineral overgrowth. Our results show how microbial life may be maintained in a nutrient-poor and extreme environment by close ecological interplay and reveal an effective strategy for nutrient extraction from minerals. The prokaryotic portion of the consortium served as a carbon source for the eukaryotic portion. Such an approach may be a prerequisite for prokaryotic-eukaryotic colonisation of, and persistence in, subseafloor igneous crust.

  17. Removal of a mixture of pesticides by a Streptomyces consortium: Influence of different soil systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, María S; Raimondo, Enzo E; Amoroso, María J; Benimeli, Claudia S

    2017-04-01

    Although the use of organochlorine pesticides (OPs) is restricted or banned in most countries, they continue posing environmental and health concerns, so it is imperative to develop methods for removing them from the environment. This work is aimed to investigate the simultaneous removal of three OPs (lindane, chlordane and methoxychlor) from diverse types of systems by employing a native Streptomyces consortium. In liquid systems, a satisfactory microbial growth was observed accompanied by removal of lindane (40.4%), methoxychlor (99.5%) and chlordane (99.8%). In sterile soil microcosms, the consortium was able to grow without significant differences in the different textured soils (clay silty loam, sandy and loam), both contaminated or not contaminated with the OPs-mixture. The Streptomyces consortium was able to remove all the OPs in sterile soil microcosm (removal order: clay silty loam > loam > sandy). So, clay silty loam soil (CSLS) was selected for next assays. In non-sterile CSLS microcosms, chlordane removal was only about 5%, nonetheless, higher rates was observed for lindane (11%) and methoxychlor (20%). In CSLS slurries, the consortium exhibited similar growth levels, in the presence of or in the absence of the OPs-mixture. Not all pesticides were removed in the same way; the order of pesticide dissipation was: methoxychlor (26%)>lindane (12.5%)>chlordane (10%). The outlines of microbial growth and pesticides removal provide information about using actinobacteria consortium as strategies for bioremediation of OPs-mixture in diverse soil systems. Texture of soils and assay conditions (sterility, slurry formulation) were determining factors influencing the removal of each pesticide of the mixture.

  18. A Fungal-Prokaryotic Consortium at the Basalt-Zeolite Interface in Subseafloor Igneous Crust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Bengtson, Stefan; Skogby, Henrik; Lazor, Peter; Broman, Curt; Belivanova, Veneta; Marone, Federica

    2015-01-01

    We have after half a century of coordinated scientific drilling gained insight into Earth´s largest microbial habitat, the subseafloor igneous crust, but still lack substantial understanding regarding its abundance, diversity and ecology. Here we describe a fossilized microbial consortium of prokaryotes and fungi at the basalt-zeolite interface of fractured subseafloor basalts from a depth of 240 m below seafloor (mbsf). The microbial consortium and its relationship with the surrounding physical environment are revealed by synchrotron-based X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and Raman spectroscopy. The base of the consortium is represented by microstromatolites-remains of bacterial communities that oxidized reduced iron directly from the basalt. The microstromatolites and the surrounding basalt were overlaid by fungal cells and hyphae. The consortium was overgrown by hydrothermally formed zeolites but remained alive and active during this event. After its formation, fungal hyphae bored in the zeolite, producing millimetre-long tunnels through the mineral substrate. The dissolution could either serve to extract metals like Ca, Na and K essential for fungal growth and metabolism, or be a response to environmental stress owing to the mineral overgrowth. Our results show how microbial life may be maintained in a nutrient-poor and extreme environment by close ecological interplay and reveal an effective strategy for nutrient extraction from minerals. The prokaryotic portion of the consortium served as a carbon source for the eukaryotic portion. Such an approach may be a prerequisite for prokaryotic-eukaryotic colonisation of, and persistence in, subseafloor igneous crust.

  19. An Industry/Academe Consortium for Achieving 20% wind by 2030 through Cutting-Edge Research and Workforce Training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Marr, Jeffrey D.G. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Milliren, Christopher [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Kaveh, Mos [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Mohan, Ned [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Stolarski, Henryk [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Glauser, Mark [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Arndt, Roger [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2013-12-01

    establish unique, open-access research facilities and creation of university-industry research collaborations in wind energy were achieved through this project. The University of Minnesota, through the establishment of the Eolos Wind Energy Consortium and the Eolos Wind Research Field Station continue to develop new research collaborations with industry partners.

  20. Contributions of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) to the 6th International Symposium on High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy (Gamma 2016)

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Abeysekara, U; Abril, Ó; Acero, F; Acharya, B S; Adams, C; Agnetta, G; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A; Albert, A; Alcubierre, M; Alfaro, J; Alfaro, R; Allafort, A J; Aloisio, R; Amans, J -P; Amato, E; Ambrogi, L; Ambrosi, G; Ambrosio, M; Anderson, J; Anduze, M; Angüner, E O; Antolini, E; Antonelli, L A; Antonucci, M; Antonuccio, V; Antoranz, P; Aramo, C; Aravantinos, A; Araya, M; Arcaro, C; Arezki, B; Argan, A; Armstrong, T; Arqueros, F; Arrabito, L; Arrieta, M; Asano, K; Ashley, M; Aubert, P; Singh, C B; Babic, A; Backes, M; Bais, A; Bajtlik, S; Balazs, C; Balbo, M; Balis, D; Balkowski, C; Ballester, O; Ballet, J; Balzer, A; Bamba, A; Bandiera, R; Barber, A; Barbier, C; Barcelo, M; Barkov, M; Barnacka, A; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; Basso, S; Bastieri, D; Bauer, C; Becciani, U; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Beckmann, V; Bednarek, W; Benbow, W; Ventura, D Benedico; Berdugo, J; Berge, D; Bernardini, E; Bernardini, M G; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Bertucci, B; Besel, M -A; Beshley, V; Bhatt, N; Bhattacharjee, P; Bhattacharyya, W; Bhattachryya, S; Biasuzzi, B; Bicknell, G; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bilinsky, A; Bilnik, W; Biondo, B; Bird, R; Bird, T; Bissaldi, E; Bitossi, M; Blanch, O; Blasi, P; Blazek, J; Bockermann, C; Boehm, C; Bogacz, L; Bogdan, M; Bohacova, M; Boisson, C; Boix, J; Bolmont, J; Bonanno, G; Bonardi, A; Bonavolontà, C; Bonifacio, P; Bonnarel, F; Bonnoli, G; Borkowski, J; Bose, R; Bosnjak, Z; Böttcher, M; Bousquet, J -J; Boutonnet, C; Bouyjou, F; Bowman, L; Braiding, C; Brantseg, T; Brau-Nogué, S; Bregeon, J; Briggs, M; Brigida, M; Bringmann, T; Brisken, W; Bristow, D; Britto, R; Brocato, E; Bron, S; Brook, P; Brooks, W; Brown, A M; Brügge, K; Brun, F; Brun, P; Brun, P; Brunetti, G; Brunetti, L; Bruno, P; Buanes, T; Bucciantini, N; Buchholtz, G; Buckley, J; Bugaev, V; Bühler, R; Bulgarelli, A; Bulik, T; Burton, M; Burtovoi, A; Busetto, G; Buson, S; Buss, J; Byrum, K; Cadoux, F; Tovar, J Calvo; Cameron, R; Canelli, F; Canestrari, R; Capalbi, M; Capasso, M; Capobianco, G; Caproni, A; Caraveo, P; Cardenzana, J; Cardillo, M; Carius, S; Carlile, C; Carosi, A; Carosi, R; Carquín, E; Carr, J; Carroll, M; Carter, J; Carton, P -H; Casandjian, J -M; Casanova, S; Casanova, S; Cascone, E; Casiraghi, M; Castellina, A; Mora, J Castroviejo; Catalani, F; Catalano, O; Catalanotti, S; Cauz, D; Cavazzani, S; Cerchiara, P; Chabanne, E; Chadwick, P; Chaleil, T; Champion, C; Chatterjee, A; Chaty, S; Chaves, R; Chen, A; Chen, X; Chen, X; Cheng, K; Chernyakova, M; Chiappetti, L; Chikawa, M; Chinn, D; Chitnis, V R; Cho, N; Christov, A; Chudoba, J; Cieślar, M; Ciocci, M A; Clay, R; Colafrancesco, S; Colin, P; Colley, J -M; Colombo, E; Colome, J; Colonges, S; Conforti, V; Connaughton, V; Connell, S; Conrad, J; Contreras, J L; Coppi, P; Corbel, S; Coridian, J; Cornat, R; Corona, P; Corti, D; Cortina, J; Cossio, L; Costa, A; Costantini, H; Cotter, G; Courty, B; Covino, S; Covone, G; Crimi, G; Criswell, S J; Crocker, R; Croston, J; Cuadra, J; Cumani, P; Cusumano, G; 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Albuquerque, I Freire Mota; Coromina, L Freixas; Fresnillo, L; Fruck, C; Fuessling, M; Fugazza, D; Fujita, Y; Fukami, S; Fukazawa, Y; Fukuda, T; Fukui, Y; Funk, S; Furniss, A; Gäbele, W; Gabici, S; Gadola, A; Galindo, D; Gall, D D; Gallant, Y; Galloway, D; Gallozzi, S; Galvez, J A; Gao, S; Garcia, A; Garcia, B; Gil, R García; López, R Garcia; Garczarczyk, M; Gardiol, D; Gargano, C; Gargano, F; Garozzo, S; Garrecht, F; Garrido, L; Garrido-Ruiz, M; Gascon, D; Gaskins, J; Gaudemard, J; Gaug, M; Gaweda, J; Gebhardt, B; Gebyehu, M; Geffroy, N; Genolini, B; Gerard, L; Ghalumyan, A; Ghedina, A; Ghislain, P; Giammaria, P; Giannakaki, E; Gianotti, F; Giarrusso, S; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Gieras, T; Giglietto, N; Gika, V; Gimenes, R; Giomi, M; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giovannini, G; Girardot, P; Giro, E; Giroletti, M; Gironnet, J; Giuliani, A; Glicenstein, J -F; Gnatyk, R; Godinovic, N; Goldoni, P; Gomez, G; Gonzalez, M M; González, A; Gora, D; Gothe, K S; Gotz, D; Goullon, J; Grabarczyk, T; Graciani, R; Graham, J; Grandi, P; Granot, J; Grasseau, G; Gredig, R; Green, A J; Green, A M; Greenshaw, T; Grenier, I; Griffiths, S; Grillo, A; Grondin, M -H; Grube, J; Grudzinska, M; Grygorczuk, J; Guarino, V; Guberman, D; Gunji, S; Gyuk, G; Hadasch, D; Hagedorn, A; Hagge, L; Hahn, J; Hakobyan, H; Hara, S; Hardcastle, M J; Hassan, T; Hatanaka, K; Haubold, T; Haupt, A; Hayakawa, T; Hayashida, M; Heller, M; Heller, R; Helo, J C; Henault, F; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hermel, R; Llorente, J Herrera; Llorente, J Herrera; Herrero, A; Hervet, O; Hidaka, N; Hinton, J; Hirai, W; Hirotani, K; Hnatyk, B; Hoang, J; Hoffmann, D; Hofmann, W; Holch, T; Holder, J; Hooper, S; Horan, D; Hörandel, J; Hörbe, M; Horns, D; Horvath, P; Hose, J; Houles, J; Hovatta, T; Hrabovsky, M; Hrupec, D; Huet, J -M; Huetten, M; Hughes, G; Hui, D; Humensky, T B; Hussein, M; Iacovacci, M; Ibarra, A; Ikeno, Y; Illa, J M; Impiombato, D; Inada, T; Incorvaia, S; Infante, L; Inome, Y; Inoue, S; Inoue, T; Inoue, Y; Iocco, F; Ioka, K; Iori, M; Ishio, K; Ishio, K; Israel, G L; Iwamura, Y; Jablonski, C; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquemier, J; Jamrozy, M; Janecek, P; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, D; Jankowsky, F; Jean, P; Jegouzo, I; Jenke, P; Jimenez, J J; Jingo, M; Jingo, M; Jocou, L; Jogler, T; Johnson, C A; Jones, M; Josselin, M; Journet, L; Jung, I; Kaaret, P; Kagaya, M; Kakuwa, J; Kalekin, O; Kalkuhl, C; Kamon, H; Kankanyan, R; Karastergiou, A; Kärcher, K; Karczewski, M; Karkar, S; Karn, P; Kasperek, J; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Katarzyński, K; Kato, S; Katz, U; Kawanaka, N; Kaye, L; Kazanas, D; Kelley-Hoskins, N; Kersten, J; Khélifi, B; Kieda, D B; Kihm, T; Kimeswenger, S; Kisaka, S; Kishida, S; Kissmann, R; Klepser, S; Kluźniak, W; Knapen, J; Knapp, J; Knödlseder, J; Koch, B; Köck, F; Kocot, J; Kohri, K; Kokkotas, K; Kokkotas, K; Kolitzus, D; Komin, N; Kominis, I; Kong, A; Konno, Y; Kosack, K; Koss, G; Kossatz, M; Kowal, G; Koyama, S; Kozioł, J; Kraus, M; Krause, J; Krause, M; Krawzcynski, H; Krennrich, F; Kretzschmann, A; Kruger, P; Kubo, H; Kudryavtsev, V; Mezek, G Kukec; Kuklis, M; Kuroda, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; La Palombara, N; La Parola, V; La Rosa, G; Laffon, H; Lahmann, R; Lakicevic, M; Lalik, K; Lamanna, G; Landriu, D; Landt, H; Lang, R G; Lapington, J; Laporte, P; Fèvre, J -P Le; Flour, T Le; Sidaner, P Le; Lee, S -H; Lee, W H; Lees, J -P; Lefaucheur, J; Leffhalm, K; Leich, H; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Lelas, D; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Leonard, R; Leoni, R; Lessio, L; Leto, G; Leveque, A; Lieunard, B; Limon, M; Lindemann, R; Lindfors, E; Linhoff, L; Liolios, A; Lipniacka, A; Lockart, H; Lohse, T; Łokas, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; Lopatin, A; Lopez, M; Loreggia, D; Louge, T; Louis, F; Louys, M; Lucarelli, F; Lucchesi, D; Lüdecke, H; Luigi, T; Luque-Escamilla, P L; Lyard, E; Maccarone, M C; Maccarone, T; Maccarone, T J; Mach, E; Madejski, G M; Madonna, A; Magniette, F; Magniez, A; Mahabir, M; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Malaguti, G; Malaspina, G; Mallot, A K; Malouf, A; Maltezos, S; Malyshev, D; Mancilla, A; Mandat, D; Maneva, G; Manganaro, M; Mangano, S; Manigot, P; Mankushiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maragos, N; Marano, D; Marchegiani, P; Marcomini, J A; Marcowith, A; Mariotti, M; Marisaldi, M; Markoff, S; Martens, C; Martí, J; Martin, J -M; Martin, L; Martin, P; Martínez, G; Martínez, M; Martínez, O; Martynyuk-Lototskyy, K; Marx, R; Masetti, N; Massimino, P; Mastichiadis, A; Mastroianni, S; Mastropietro, M; Masuda, S; Matsumoto, H; Matsuoka, S; Matthews, N; Mattiazzo, S; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Maxted, N; Maya, J; Mayer, M; Mazin, D; Mazziotta, M N; Comb, L Mc; McCubbin, N; McHardy, I; Medina, C; Mehrez, F; Melioli, C; Melkumyan, D; Melse, T; Mereghetti, S; Merk, M; Mertsch, P; Meunier, J -L; Meures, T; Meyer, M; Meyrelles, J L; Miccichè, A; Michael, T; Michałowski, J; Mientjes, P; Mievre, I; Mihailidis, A; Miller, J; Mineo, T; Minuti, M; Mirabal, N; Mirabel, F; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Mitchell, A; Mizuno, T; Moderski, R; Mognet, I; Mohammed, M; Moharana, R; Mohrmann, L; Molinari, E; Molyneux, P; Monmarthe, E; Monnier, G; Montaruli, T; Monte, C; Monteiro, I; Mooney, D; Moore, P; Moralejo, A; Morello, C; Moretti, E; Mori, K; Morris, P; Morselli, A; Moscato, F; Motohashi, D; Mottez, F; Moudden, Y; Moulin, E; Mueller, S; Mukherjee, R; Munar, P; Munari, M; Mundell, C; Mundet, J; Muraishi, H; Murase, K; Muronga, A; Murphy, A; Nagar, N; Nagataki, S; Nagayoshi, T; Nagesh, B K; Naito, T; Nakajima, D; Nakajima, D; Nakamori, T; Nakayama, K; Nanni, J; Naumann, D; Nayman, P; Nellen, L; Nemmen, R; Neronov, A; Neyroud, N; Nguyen, T; Nguyen, T T; Trung, T Nguyen; Nicastro, L; Nicolau-Kukliński, J; Niederwanger, F; Niedźwiecki, A; Niemiec, J; Nieto, D; Nievas-Rosillo, M; Nikolaidis, A; Nikołajuk, M; Nishijima, K; Nishikawa, K -I; Nishiyama, G; Noda, K; Noda, K; Nogues, L; Nolan, S; Northrop, R; Nosek, D; Nöthe, M; Novosyadlyj, B; Nozka, L; Nunio, F; Oakes, L; O'Brien, P; Ocampo, C; Occhipinti, G; Ochoa, J P; de Bhroithe, A OFaolain; Oger, R; Ohira, Y; Ohishi, M; Ohm, S; Ohoka, H; Okazaki, N; Okumura, A; Olive, J -F; Olszowski, D; Ong, R A; Ono, S; Orienti, M; Orito, R; Orlati, A; Osborne, J; Ostrowski, M; Ottaway, D; Otte, N; Öttl, S; Ovcharov, E; Oya, I; Ozieblo, A; Padovani, M; Pagano, I; Paiano, S; Paizis, A; Palacio, J; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Panagiotidis, K; Panazol, J -L; Paneque, D; Panter, M; Panzera, M R; Paoletti, R; Paolillo, M; Papayannis, A; Papyan, G; Paravac, A; Paredes, J M; Pareschi, G; Park, N; Parsons, D; Paśko, P; Pavy, S; Pech, M; Peck, A; Pedaletti, G; Pe'er, A; Peet, S; Pelat, D; Pepato, A; Perez, M d C; Perri, L; Perri, M; Persic, M; Persic, M; Petrashyk, A; Petrucci, P -O; Petruk, O; Peyaud, B; Pfeifer, M; Pfeiffer, G; Piano, G; Pieloth, D; Pierre, E; de Pinho, F Pinto; García, C Pio; Piret, Y; Pisarski, A; Pita, S; Platos, Ł; Platzer, R; Podkladkin, S; Pogosyan, L; Pohl, M; Poinsignon, P; Pollo, A; Porcelli, A; Porthault, J; Potter, W; Poulios, S; Poutanen, J; Prandini, E; Prandini, E; Prast, J; Pressard, K; Principe, G; Profeti, F; Prokhorov, D; Prokoph, H; Prouza, M; Pruchniewicz, R; Pruteanu, G; Pueschel, E; Pühlhofer, G; Puljak, I; Punch, M; Pürckhauer, S; Pyzioł, R; Queiroz, F; Quel, E J; Quinn, J; Quirrenbach, A; Rafighi, I; Rainò, S; Rajda, P J; Rameez, M; Rando, R; Rannot, R C; Rataj, M; Ravel, T; Razzaque, S; Reardon, P; Reichardt, I; Reimann, O; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reisenegger, A; Renaud, M; Renner, S; Reposeur, T; Reville, B; Rezaeian, A; Rhode, W; Ribeiro, D; Prado, R Ribeiro; Ribó, M; Richards, G; Richer, M G; Richtler, T; Rico, J; Ridky, J; Rieger, F; Riquelme, M; Ristori, P R; Rivoire, S; Rizi, V; Roache, E; Rodriguez, J; Fernandez, G Rodriguez; Vázquez, J J Rodríguez; Rojas, G; Romano, P; Romeo, G; Roncadelli, M; Rosado, J; Rose, J; Rosen, S; Lees, S Rosier; Ross, D; Rouaix, G; Rousselle, J; Rovero, A C; Rowell, G; Roy, F; Royer, S; Rubini, A; Rudak, B; Rugliancich, A; Rujopakarn, W; Rulten, C; Rupiński, M; Russo, F; Russo, F; Rutkowski, K; Saavedra, O; Sabatini, S; Sacco, B; Sadeh, I; Saemann, E O; Safi-Harb, S; Saggion, A; Sahakian, V; Saito, T; Sakaki, N; Sakurai, S; Salamon, A; Salega, M; Salek, D; Greus, F Salesa; Salgado, J; Salina, G; Salinas, L; Salini, A; Sanchez, D; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sandaker, H; Sandoval, A; Sangiorgi, P; Sanguillon, M; Sano, H; Santander, M; Santangelo, A; Santos, E M; Santos-Lima, R; Sanuy, A; Sapozhnikov, L; Sarkar, S; Satalecka, K; Satalecka, K; Sato, Y; Savalle, R; Sawada, M; Sayède, F; Schanne, S; Schanz, T; Schioppa, E J; Schlenstedt, S; Schmid, J; Schmidt, T; Schmoll, J; Schneider, M; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovanek, P; Schubert, A; Schullian, E -M; Schultze, J; Schulz, A; Schulz, S; Schure, K; Schussler, F; Schwab, T; Schwanke, U; Schwarz, J; Schweizer, T; Schwemmer, S; Schwendicke, U; Schwerdt, C; Sciacca, E; Scuderi, S; Segreto, A; Seiradakis, J -H; Sembroski, G H; Semikoz, D; Sergijenko, O; Serre, N; Servillat, M; Seweryn, K; Shafi, N; Shalchi, A; Sharma, M; Shayduk, M; Shellard, R C; Shibata, T; Shigenaka, A; Shilon, I; Shum, E; Sidoli, L; Sidz, M; Sieiro, J; Siejkowski, H; Silk, J; Sillanpää, A; Simone, D; Simpson, H; Singh, B B; Sinha, A; Sironi, G; Sitarek, J; Sizun, P; Sliusar, V; Sliusar, V; Smith, A; Sobczyńska, D; Sol, H; Sottile, G; Sowiński, M; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spiga, R; Stadler, R; Stahl, O; Stamerra, A; Stanič, S; Starling, R; Staszak, D; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stefanik, S; Stegmann, C; Steiner, S; Stella, C; Stephan, M; Stergioulas, N; Sternberger, R; Sterzel, M; Stevenson, B; Stinzing, F; Stodulska, M; Stodulski, M; Stolarczyk, T; Stratta, G; Straumann, U; Stringhetti, L; Strzys, M; Stuik, R; Sulanke, K -H; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Suric, T; Sushch, I; Sutcliffe, P; Sykes, J; Szanecki, M; Szepieniec, T; Szwarnog, P; Tacchini, A; Tachihara, K; Tagliaferri, G; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, K; Takahashi, M; Takalo, L; Takami, S; Takata, J; Takeda, J; Talbot, G; Tam, T; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, T; Tanaka, Y; Tanci, C; Tanigawa, S; Tavani, M; Tavecchio, F; Tavernet, J -P; Tayabaly, K; Taylor, A; Tejedor, L A; Telezhinsky, I; Temme, F; Temnikov, P; Tenzer, C; Terada, Y; Terrazas, J C; Terrier, R; Terront, D; Terzic, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Teshima, M; Testa, V; Tezier, D; Thayer, J; Thornhill, J; Thoudam, S; Thuermann, D; Tibaldo, L; Tiengo, A; Timpanaro, M C; Tiziani, D; Tluczykont, M; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tokanai, F; Tokarz, M; Toma, K; Tomastik, J; Tomono, Y; Tonachini, A; Tonev, D; Torii, K; Tornikoski, M; Torres, D F; Torres, M; Torresi, E; Toso, G; Tosti, G; Totani, T; Tothill, N; Toussenel, F; Tovmassian, G; Toyama, T; Travnicek, P; Trichard, C; Trifoglio, M; Pujadas, I Troyano; Trzeciak, M; Tsinganos, K; Tsujimoto, S; Tsuru, T; Uchiyama, Y; Umana, G; Umetsu, Y; Upadhya, S S; Uslenghi, M; Vagelli, V; Vagnetti, F; Valdes-Galicia, J; Valentino, M; Vallania, P; Valore, L; van Driel, W; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vandenbroucke, J; Vanderwalt, J; Vasileiadis, G; Vassiliev, V; Vázquez, J R; Acosta, M L Vázquez; Vecchi, M; Vega, A; Vegas, I; Veitch, P; Venault, P; Venema, L; Venter, C; Vercellone, S; Vergani, S; Verma, K; Verzi, V; Vettolani, G P; Veyssiere, C; Viana, A; Viaux, N; Vicha, J; Vigorito, C; Vincent, P; Vincent, S; Vink, J; Vittorini, V; Vlahakis, N; Vlahos, L; Voelk, H; Voisin, V; Vollhardt, A; Volpicelli, A; von Brand, H; Vorobiov, S; Vovk, I; Vrastil, M; Vu, L V; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, R; Wagner, R; Wagner, S J; Wakely, S P; Walstra, T; Walter, R; Walther, T; Ward, J E; Ward, M; Warda, K; Warren, D; Wassberg, S; Watson, J J; Wawer, P; Wawrzaszek, R; Webb, N; Wegner, P; Weiner, O; Weinstein, A; Wells, R; Werner, F; Wetteskind, H; White, M; White, R; Więcek, M; Wierzcholska, A; Wiesand, S; Wijers, R; Wilcox, P; Wild, N; Wilhelm, A; Wilkinson, M; Will, M; Will, M; Williams, D A; Williams, J T; Willingale, R; Wilson, N; Winde, M; Winiarski, K; Winkler, H; Winter, M; Wischnewski, R; Witt, E; Wojcik, P; Wolf, D; Wood, M; Wörnlein, A; Wu, E; Wu, T; Yadav, K K; Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, T; Yamane, N; Yamazaki, R; Yanagita, S; Yang, L; Yelos, D; Yoshida, A; Yoshida, M; Yoshida, T; Yoshiike, S; Yoshikoshi, T; Yu, P; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zaharijas, G; Zajczyk, A; Zampieri, L; Zandanel, F; Sanchez, R Zanmar; Zaric, D; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zdziarski, A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H; Zhao, A; Zhdanov, V; Ziegler, A; Ziemann, J; Ziętara, K; Zink, A; Ziółkowski, J; Zitelli, V; Zoli, A; Zorn, J; Żychowski, P

    2016-01-01

    List of contributions from the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) Consortium presented at the 6th International Symposium on High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy (Gamma 2016), July 11-15, 2016, in Heidelberg, Germany.

  1. Danish Energy Efficiency Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togeby, Mikael; Larsen, Anders; Dyhr-Mikkelsen, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    was assigned with this task. The evaluation aimed to answer the crucial questions: Is the overall design of the portfolio of instruments appropriate? Does the impact of the instruments justify the costs, so that we reach the national goals in a cost efficient way? Will the current instrument portfolio be able...... on households and the public sector, obligations for energy companies (electricity, natural gas, district heating, and oil) to deliver documented savings, strict building codes, special instructions for the public sector, and an Electricity Saving Trust. A political agreement from 2005 states that an evaluation...... of the entire Danish energy efficiency policy portfolio must be carried out before end 2008 and put forward for discussion among governing parties no later than February 2009. A consortium comprising Ea Energy Analyses, Niras, the Department of Society and Globalisation (Roskilde University) and 4-Fact...

  2. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the

  3. Enhanced decolorization and biodegradation of textile azo dye Scarlet R by using developed microbial consortium-GR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saratale, R G; Saratale, G D; Kalyani, D C; Chang, J S; Govindwar, S P

    2009-05-01

    A developed consortium-GR, consisting of Proteus vulgaris NCIM-2027 (PV) and Micrococcus glutamicus NCIM-2168 (MG), completely decolorized an azo dye Scarlet R under static anoxic condition with an average decolorization rate of 16,666 microg h(-1); which is much faster than that of the pure cultures (PV, 3571 microg h(-1); MG, 2500 microg h(-1)). Consortium-GR gave best decolorization performance with nearly complete mineralization of Scarlet R (over 90% TOC and COD reduction) within 3h, much shorter relative to the individual strains. Induction in the riboflavin reductase and NADH-DCIP reductase was observed in the consortium, suggesting the involvement of these enzymes during the fast decolorization process. The FTIR and GC-MS analysis showed that 1,4-benzenediamine was formed during decolorization/degradation of Scarlet R by consortium-GR. Phytotoxicity studies revealed no toxicity of the biodegraded products of Scarlet R by consortium-GR. In addition, consortium-GR applied for mixture of industrial dyes showed 88% decolorization under static condition with significant reduction in TOC (62%) and COD (68%) within 72 h, suggesting potential application of this microbial consortium in bioremediation of dye-containing wastewater.

  4. Dissimilatory reduction of perchlorate and other common pollutants by a consortium enriched from tidal flats of the Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nirmala Bardiya; Jae-Ho Bae

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To enrich a facultative anaerobic bacterial consortium from the Yellow Sea and assess its ability to reduce perchlorate and other co-pollutants. Methods: Bacterial consortium collected from the tidal flats of the Yellow Sea was enriched in an anoxic medium containing perchlorate as the electron (e-) acceptor and acetate as the electron (e-) donor. The enriched consortium was then tested for perchlorate reduction under different perchlorate concentrations and in the presence of nitrate by using standard anaerobic techniques. The complete enzymatic reduction of perchlorate to chloride was confirmed by chlorite dismutation. Ability of the consortium to grow with alternate e- acceptors was also tested with acetate as the e- donor. Results: The enriched consortium could rapidly reduce perchlorate up to the initial concentration of 25.65 mmol/L. In the presence of nitrate, perchlorate reduction did not occur immediately and reduction of nitrate started after a lag phase, with concomitant accumulation of nitrite. The perchlorate-enriched consortium could reduce chlorate, oxygen, Cr (VI), and selenate as the alternate e- acceptors but failed to utilize sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, and nitrite. Conclusions: The consortium from the tidal flats of the Yellow Sea could reduce perchlorate and co-contaminants such as chlorate, nitrate, Cr (VI), and selenate under heterotrophic conditions with acetate as the e- donor and carbon source. While perchlorate was completely dismutated into innocuous chloride and oxygen, accumulation of nitrite occurred during the reduction of nitrate.

  5. Biodegradation of phenanthrene in bioaugmented microcosm by consortium ASP developed from coastal sediment of Alang-Sosiya ship breaking yard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vilas; Patel, Janki; Madamwar, Datta

    2013-09-15

    A phenanthrene-degrading bacterial consortium (ASP) was developed using sediment from the Alang-Sosiya shipbreaking yard at Gujarat, India. 16S rRNA gene-based molecular analyses revealed that the bacterial consortium consisted of six bacterial strains: Bacillus sp. ASP1, Pseudomonas sp. ASP2, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain ASP3, Staphylococcus sp. ASP4, Geobacillus sp. ASP5 and Alcaligenes sp. ASP6. The consortium was able to degrade 300 ppm of phenanthrene and 1000 ppm of naphthalene within 120 h and 48 h, respectively. Tween 80 showed a positive effect on phenanthrene degradation. The consortium was able to consume maximum phenanthrene at the rate of 46 mg/h/l and degrade phenanthrene in the presence of other petroleum hydrocarbons. A microcosm study was conducted to test the consortium's bioremediation potential. Phenanthrene degradation increased from 61% to 94% in sediment bioaugmented with the consortium. Simultaneously, bacterial counts and dehydrogenase activities also increased in the bioaugmented sediment. These results suggest that microbial consortium bioaugmentation may be a promising technology for bioremediation.

  6. Marine Renewable Energy Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigeant, Paul [Univ. of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, MA (United States); Miller, John [Univ. of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, MA (United States); Howes, Brian [Univ. of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, MA (United States); McGowan, Jon G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Baldwin, Kenneth [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Grilli, Annette [Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); Terray, Eugene [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., Woods Hole, MA (United States)

    2013-10-08

    Project Goals: The funding provided by this contract supported the following activities: A) Test Site Development; B) Seed Grant Funded Technology Development; C) Stakeholder Activities The first year of funding was dedicated to the formation of the NE MREC University Consortium which was comprised of University of Massachusetts Dartmouth (UMD) and Amherst (UMA), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), University of New Hampshire (UNH), and the University of Rhode Island (URI). The consortium worked together to encourage research and promote benefits of obtaining energy from ocean wind, waves, tides and currents. In addition, NE MREC’s goal was to fund projects aimed at potential test sites with the first year funding going to studies of the potential for tidal device testing in Muskeget Channel, at the General Sullivan Bridge in New Hampshire, and for wave device testing at the proposed National Offshore Renewable Energy Innovation Zone (NOREIZ) located off the Massachusetts coast. The project spanned 4.5 years and addressed three specific tasks that are interrelated but also served as independent investigations.

  7. [Bad memories: understanding and removal of pathogenic consequences of immunological memory in inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The IMPAM consortium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamradt, T; Radbruch, A; Chang, H-D

    2012-08-01

    The Research Consortium IMPAM (IMprinting of the PAthogenic Memory for rheumatic inflammation) has recently been funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research in Germany. Within this consortium ten different research groups, coordinated by the German Rheumatism Research Center (DRFZ) and the University Hospital Jena, will examine the molecular dialogue between immune system memory cells and mesenchymal cells in chronic rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis. The consortium's aim is to understand and modulate these interactions therapeutically, such that the pathogenic imprinting of proinflammatory memory cells can be extinguished and the anti-inflammatory capacity of the patients' regulatory cells can be restored.

  8. Optimization and kinetics evaluation of biodegradation of synthetic azo reactive dye by fungal consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitradevi, V; Sivakumar, V

    2011-10-01

    Wastewater containing direct dyes discharged from various industries, in particular, textile industry, often cause many environmental problems. Among the various effluent treatment methods, biological methods found to be cost effective and do not end up in secondary pollutants. In this study, an attempt has been made to study the decolorization of cibacron yellow S-3R, an azo reactive dye by using fungal cultures such as Coriolus versicolor, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Pleurotus ostreatus, and Myrothecium verrucaria. The fungi were able to decolorize individually the azo reactive dye cibacron yellow S-3R to an extent of nearly in the range 75 - 85%, whereas the mixed fungal consortium was able to decolorize to an extent of nearly 95%.The study is extended with the kinetics of decolorization of Cibacron yellow S-3R using mixed fungal consortium containing equal proportions of the cultures. The experimental results show that decolorization kinetics follow second order rate equation.

  9. A stable synergistic microbial consortium for simultaneous azo dye removal and bioelectricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Victor Bochuan; Chua, Song-Lin; Cai, Zhao; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Zhang, Qichun; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Cao, Bin; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Yang, Liang

    2014-03-01

    Microbial species coexist in natural or engineered settings, where they encounter extensive competition and cooperation. Interactions occurring through metabolite exchange or direct contact might be important in establishment of functional biodegradation consortium. Understanding these interactions can facilitate manipulation of selected communities and exploitation of their capacity for specific industrial applications. Here, a simple dual-species consortium (Pseudomonas putida and Shewanella oneidensis) was established for examining simultaneous Congo red bioremediation in planktonic culture and power generation in anode biofilms. Compared to mono-species cultures, co-cultures generated higher current densities and could concurrently degrade Congo red over 72h. Disabling the large secreted adhesion protein, LapA, of P. putida greatly enhanced S. oneidensis biofilm formation on the anode, which increased power generation in co-cultures. This demonstrates simultaneous control of specific planktonic and biofilm communities could be effective in manipulating microbial communities for targeted applications.

  10. The Arizona Universities Library Consortium patron-driven e-book model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Richardson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Building on Arizona State University's patron-driven acquisitions (PDA initiative in 2009, the Arizona Universities Library Consortium, in partnership with the Ingram Content Group, created a cooperative patron-driven model to acquire electronic books (e-books. The model provides the opportunity for faculty and students at the universities governed by the Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR to access a core of e-books made accessible through resource discovery services and online catalogs. These books are available for significantly less than a single ABOR university would expend for the same materials. The patron-driven model described is one of many evolving models in digital scholarship, and, although the Arizona Universities Library Consortium reports a successful experience, patron-driven models pose questions to stakeholders in the academic publishing industry.

  11. Report of the 13(th) Genomic Standards Consortium Meeting, Shenzhen, China, March 4-7, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jack A; Bao, Yiming; Wang, Hui; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Edmunds, Scott C; Morrison, Norman; Meyer, Folker; Schriml, Lynn M; Davies, Neil; Sterk, Peter; Wilkening, Jared; Garrity, George M; Field, Dawn; Robbins, Robert; Smith, Daniel P; Mizrachi, Ilene; Moreau, Corrie

    2012-05-25

    This report details the outcome of the 13(th) Meeting of the Genomic Standards Consortium. The three-day conference was held at the Kingkey Palace Hotel, Shenzhen, China, on March 5-7, 2012, and was hosted by the Beijing Genomics Institute. The meeting, titled From Genomes to Interactions to Communities to Models, highlighted the role of data standards associated with genomic, metagenomic, and amplicon sequence data and the contextual information associated with the sample. To this end the meeting focused on genomic projects for animals, plants, fungi, and viruses; metagenomic studies in host-microbe interactions; and the dynamics of microbial communities. In addition, the meeting hosted a Genomic Observatories Network session, a Genomic Standards Consortium biodiversity working group session, and a Microbiology of the Built Environment session sponsored by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

  12. The Henry street consortium population-based competencies for educating public health nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Cross, Sharon; Keller, Linda O; Nelson, Pamela; Schoon, Patricia M; Henton, Pat

    2011-01-01

    The Henry Street Consortium, a collaboration of nurse educators from universities and colleges and public health nurses (PHNs) from government, school, and community agencies, developed 11 population-based competencies for educating nursing students and the novice PHN. Although many organizations have developed competency lists for experts, the Consortium developed a set of competencies that clearly define expectations for the beginning PHN. The competencies are utilized by both education and practice. They guide nurse educators and PHNs in the creation of learning experiences that develop population-based knowledge and skills for baccalaureate nursing students. Public health nursing leaders use the competencies to frame their expectations and orientations for nurses who are new to public health nursing. This paper explains the meaning of each of the 11 population-based competencies and provides examples of student projects that demonstrate competency development. Strategies are suggested for nurse educators and PHNs to promote effective population-based student projects in public health agencies.

  13. 2014 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Cedar River Watershed (Delivery 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In September 2013, WSI, a Quantum Spatial company (QSI), was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)...

  14. Response surface methodology for optimization of medium for decolorization of textile dye Direct Black 22 by a novel bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohana, Sarayu; Shrivastava, Shalini; Divecha, Jyoti; Madamwar, Datta

    2008-02-01

    Decolorization and degradation of polyazo dye Direct Black 22 was carried out by distillery spent wash degrading mixed bacterial consortium, DMC. Response surface methodology (RSM) involving a central composite design (CCD) in four factors was successfully employed for the study and optimization of decolorization process. The hyper activities and interactions between glucose concentration, yeast extract concentration, dye concentration and inoculum size on dye decolorization were investigated and modeled. Under optimized conditions the bacterial consortium was able to decolorize the dye almost completely (>91%) within 12h. Bacterial consortium was able to decolorize 10 different azo dyes. The optimum combination of the four variables predicted through RSM was confirmed through confirmatory experiments and hence this bacterial consortium holds potential for the treatment of industrial waste water. Dye degradation products obtained during the course of decolorization were analyzed by HPTLC.

  15. 2002 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Unclassified Topographic LiDAR: Puget Sound Lowlands Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 730 square miles and covers the...

  16. 2012 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Quinault River Watershed, Washington (Delivery 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on the Quinault watershed survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium. This...

  17. The EMSO-ERIC Pan-European Consortium: Data Benefits and Lessons Learned as the Legal Entity Forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, M.M.R.; Favali, P.; Beranzoli, L.; Blandin, J.; Cagatay, N.M.; Cannat, M.; Dañobeitia, J.J.; Delory, E.; de Miranda, J.M.A.; Del Rio Fernandez, J.; De Stigter , H.; Gillooly, M.; Grant, F.; Hall, P.O.J.; Hartman, S.E.; Hernandez-Brito, J.; Lanteri, N.; Mienert, J.; Oaie, G.; Piera, J.; Radulescu, V.; Rolin, J.-F.; Ruhl, H.A.; Waldmann, C.

    2016-01-01

    The European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory (EMSO) European Research Infrastructure Consortium (ERIC) provides power, communications, sensors, and data infrastructure for continuous, high-resolution, (near-)real-time, interactive ocean observations across a multidisciplinary

  18. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology and Waste Management Consortium annual report, 1990--1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    The HBCU/MI Environmental Technology and Waste Management Consortium was established in January 1990, through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among the member institutions. This group of research-oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MI) agreed to work together to initiate research, technology development and education programs to address the nation`s critical environmental problems. As a group the HBCU/MI Consortium is uniquely positioned to reach women and the minority populations of African Americans, Hispanics and American Indians. As part of their initial work, they developed the Research, Education, and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan to actualize the Consortium`s guiding principles. In addition to developing a comprehensive research agenda, four major programs were begun to meet these goals. This report summarizes the 1990--1991 progress.

  19. Microbial Corrosion of API 5L X-70 Carbon Steel by ATCC 7757 and Consortium of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various cases of accidents involving microbiology influenced corrosion (MIC were reported by the oil and gas industry. Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB have always been linked to MIC mechanisms as one of the major causes of localized corrosion problems. In this study, SRB colonies were isolated from the soil in suspected areas near the natural gas transmission pipeline in Malaysia. The effects of ATCC 7757 and consortium of isolated SRB upon corrosion on API 5L X-70 carbon steel coupon were investigated using a weight loss method, an open circuit potential method (OCP, and a potentiodynamic polarization curves method in anaerobic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS were then used to determine the corrosion morphology in verifying the SRB activity and corrosion products formation. Results from the study show that the corrosion rate (CR of weight loss method for the isolated SRB is recorded as 0.2017 mm/yr compared to 0.2530 mm/yr for ATCC 7757. The Tafel plot recorded the corrosion rate of 0.3290 mm/yr for Sg. Ular SRB and 0.2500 mm/yr for Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The results showed that the consortia of isolated SRB were of comparable effects and features with the single ATCC 7757 strain.

  20. Development of an efficient bacterial consortium for the potential remediation of hydrocarbons from contaminated sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustuvmani Patowary

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic biodegradability of hydrocarbons and the distribution of proficient degrading microorganisms in the environment are very crucial for the implementation of bioremediation practices. Among others, one of the most favorable methods that can enhance the effectiveness of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environment is the application of biosurfactant producing microbes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of native bacterial consortia towards total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH with special emphasis to poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate TPH degrading bacterial strains from various petroleum contaminated soil of Assam, India and develop a robust bacterial consortium for bioremediation of crude oil of this native land. From a total of 23 bacterial isolates obtained from three different hydrocarbons contaminated samples 5 isolates, namely KS2, PG1, PG5, R1 and R2 were selected as efficient crude oil degraders with respect to their growth on crude oil enriched samples. Isolates KS2, PG1 and R2 are biosurfactant producers and PG5, R1 are non-producers. Fourteen different consortia were designed involving both biosurfactant producing and non-producing isolates. Consortium 10, which comprises two Bacillus strains namely, Bacillus pumilus KS2 and Bacillus cereus R2 (identified by 16s rRNA sequencing has shown the best result in the desired degradation of crude oil. The consortium showed degradation up to 84.15% of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH after five weeks of incubation, as revealed from gravimetric analysis. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared and GCMS (Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analyses were correlated with gravimetric data which reveals that the consortium has removed a wide range of petroleum hydrocarbons in comparison with abiotic control including different aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons.

  1. DARPA-URI Consortium Meetings on Submicron Heterostructures of Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    B 35, 7464 (1987). 46. S. Rodriguez, A. Camacho and L. Quiroga, "Electrostatic and Magnetostatic Modes in Semiconductor Superlattices", (to appear in...AD-RI93 499 DARPA-URI CONSORTIUM MEETINGS ON SUSMICRON IETEROSTRUCTURES OF DILUTED MAGNETIC SEMICONDUCTORS (U) PURDUE UNIV LRFRYETTE IN 1987 N91114-86...o FILE COPY (SUBMICRON HETEROSTRUCTURES ,it OF DILUTED MAGNETIC SEMICONDUCTORS ANNUAL REPORT 1986-87 The Principal Investigators along with their co

  2. Microbial Consortium with High Cellulolytic Activity (MCHCA for enhanced biogas production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof ePoszytek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of lignocellulosic biomass as a substrate in agricultural biogas plants is very popular and yields good results. However, the efficiency of anaerobic digestion, and thus biogas production, is not always satisfactory due to the slow or incomplete degradation (hydrolysis of plant matter. To enhance the solubilization of the lignocellulosic biomass various physical, chemical and biological pretreatment methods are used.The aim of this study was to select and characterize cellulose-degrading bacteria, and to construct a microbial consortium, dedicated for degradation of maize silage and enhancing biogas production from this substrate.Over one hundred strains of cellulose-degrading bacteria were isolated from: sewage sludge, hydrolyzer from an agricultural biogas plant, cattle slurry and manure. After physiological characterization of the isolates, sixteen strains (representatives of Bacillus, Providencia and Ochrobactrum genera were chosen for the construction of a Microbial Consortium with High Cellulolytic Activity, called MCHCA. The selected strains had a high endoglucanase activity (exceeding 0.21 IU/mL CMCase activity and a wide range of tolerance to various physical and chemical conditions. Lab-scale simulation of biogas production using the selected strains for degradation of maize silage was carried out in a two-bioreactor system, similar to those used in agricultural biogas plants.The obtained results showed that the constructed MCHCA consortium is capable of efficient hydrolysis of maize silage, and increases biogas production by even 38%, depending on the inoculum used for methane fermentation. The results in this work indicate that the mesophilic Microbial Consortium with High Cellulolytic Activity has a great potential for application on industrial scale in agricultural biogas plants.

  3. Development of an Efficient Bacterial Consortium for the Potential Remediation of Hydrocarbons from Contaminated Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patowary, Kaustuvmani; Patowary, Rupshikha; Kalita, Mohan C; Deka, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic biodegradability of hydrocarbons and the distribution of proficient degrading microorganisms in the environment are very crucial for the implementation of bioremediation practices. Among others, one of the most favorable methods that can enhance the effectiveness of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environment is the application of biosurfactant producing microbes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of native bacterial consortia toward total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) with special emphasis to poly aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate TPH degrading bacterial strains from various petroleum contaminated soil of Assam, India and develop a robust bacterial consortium for bioremediation of crude oil of this native land. From a total of 23 bacterial isolates obtained from three different hydrocarbons contaminated samples five isolates, namely KS2, PG1, PG5, R1, and R2 were selected as efficient crude oil degraders with respect to their growth on crude oil enriched samples. Isolates KS2, PG1, and R2 are biosurfactant producers and PG5, R1 are non-producers. Fourteen different consortia were designed involving both biosurfactant producing and non-producing isolates. Consortium 10, which comprises two Bacillus strains namely, Bacillus pumilus KS2 and B. cereus R2 (identified by 16s rRNA sequencing) has shown the best result in the desired degradation of crude oil. The consortium showed degradation up to 84.15% of TPH after 5 weeks of incubation, as revealed from gravimetric analysis. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) and GCMS (Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer) analyses were correlated with gravimetric data which reveals that the consortium has removed a wide range of petroleum hydrocarbons in comparison with abiotic control including different aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons.

  4. Training Highly Qualified Health Research Personnel: The Pain in Child Health Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl L von Baeyer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pain in Child Health (PICH is a transdisciplinary, international research training consortium. PICH has been funded since 2002 as a Strategic Training Initiative in Health Research of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, with contributions from other funding partners and the founding participation of five Canadian universities. The goal of PICH has been to create a community of scholars in pediatric pain to improve child health outcomes.

  5. Genomic analysis reveals key aspects of prokaryotic symbiosis in the phototrophic consortium "Chlorochromatium aggregatum"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhenfeng; Müller, Johannes; Li, Tao;

    2013-01-01

    'Chlorochromatium aggregatum' is a phototrophic consortium, a symbiosis that may represent the highest degree of mutual interdependence between two unrelated bacteria not associated with a eukaryotic host. 'Chlorochromatium aggregatum' is a motile, barrel-shaped aggregate formed from a single cell...... of "Candidatus Symbiobacter mobilis," a polarly flagellated, non-pigmented, heterotrophic bacterium, which is surrounded by approximately 15 epibiont cells of Chlorobium chlorochromatii, a non-motile photolithoautotrophic green sulfur bacterium....

  6. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium Annual Report 1987. Volume 2, Part B. Discussing, Using, and Recognizing Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    1978. Williams. B.C. Qualitative Analysis of MOS Circuits. Artificial Inteligence . 1984. 24.. Wilson. K. From Association to Structure. Amsterdam:North...D-A208 378 RADC-TR-88-324, Vol II (of nine), Part B Interim Report March 1969 4. NORTHEAST ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONSORTIUM ANNUAL REPORT 1987...II (of nine), Part B 6a. NAME OF PERFORMING ORGANIZATION 6b. OFFICE SYMBOL 7a. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION Northeast Artificial (ff ’aolicbl

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of a Chitinophaga Strain Isolated from a Lignocellulose Biomass-Degrading Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Luciano T.; Lopes, Erica M.; Fernandes, Camila C.; Fernandes, Gabriela C.; Sacco, Lais P.; Carareto Alves, Lucia M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chitinophaga comprises microorganisms capable of degrading plant-derived carbohydrates, serving as a source of new tools for the characterization and degradation of plant biomass. Here, we report the draft genome assembly of a Chitinophaga strain with 8.2 Mbp and 7,173 open reading frames (ORFs), isolated from a bacterial consortium that is able to degrade lignocellulose. PMID:28104646

  8. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium (NAIC). Volume 2. Discussing, Using, and Recognizing Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    knowledge and meta-reasoning. In Proceedings of EP14-85 ("Encontro Portugues de Inteligencia Artificial "), pages 138-154, Oporto, Portugal, 1985. [19] N, J...See reverse) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Northeast Artificial Intelligence...ABSTRACTM-2.,-- The Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium (NAIC) was created by the Air Force Systems Command, Rome Air Development Center, and

  9. Report of the 13th Genomic Standards Consortium Meeting, Shenzhen, China, March 4–7, 2012.

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Jack A; Bao, Yiming; Wang, Hui; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Edmunds, Scott C; Morrison, Norman; Meyer, Folker; Schriml, Lynn M.; Davies, Neil; Sterk, Peter; Wilkening, Jared; Garrity, George M.; Field, Dawn; Robbins, Robert; Smith, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    This report details the outcome of the 13th Meeting of the Genomic Standards Consortium. The three-day conference was held at the Kingkey Palace Hotel, Shenzhen, China, on March 5–7, 2012, and was hosted by the Beijing Genomics Institute. The meeting, titled From Genomes to Interactions to Communities to Models, highlighted the role of data standards associated with genomic, metagenomic, and amplicon sequence data and the contextual information associated with the sample. To this end the meet...

  10. Decolorization of synthetic melanoidins-containing wastewater by a bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiranuntipon, Suhuttaya; Chareonpornwattana, Supat; Damronglerd, Somsak; Albasi, Claire; Delia, Marie-Line

    2008-11-01

    The presence of melanoidins in molasses wastewater leads to water pollution both due to its dark brown color and its COD contents. In this study, a bacterial consortium isolated from waterfall sediment was tested for its decolorization. The identification of culturable bacteria by 16S rDNA based approach showed that the consortium composed of Klebsiella oxytoca, Serratia mercescens, Citrobacter sp. and unknown bacterium. In the context of academic study, prevention on the difficulties of providing effluent as well as its variations in compositions, several synthetic media prepared with respect to color and COD contents based on analysis of molasses wastewater, i.e., Viandox sauce (13.5% v/v), caramel (30% w/v), beet molasses wastewater (41.5% v/v) and sugarcane molasses wastewater (20% v/v) were used for decolorization using consortium with color removal 9.5, 1.13, 8.02 and 17.5%, respectively, within 2 days. However, Viandox sauce was retained for further study. The effect of initial pH and Viandox concentration on decolorization and growth of bacterial consortium were further determined. The highest decolorization of 18.3% was achieved at pH 4 after 2 day of incubation. Experiments on fresh or used medium and used or fresh bacterial cells, led to conclusion that the limitation of decolorization was due to nutritional deficiency. The effect of aeration on decolorization was also carried out in 2 L laboratory-scale suspended cell bioreactor. The maximum decolorization was 19.3% with aeration at KLa=2.5836 h(-1) (0.1 vvm).

  11. Inhibitory effects of sulfur compounds on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Moon, Kyung-Eun; Kim, Tae Gwan; Lee, Sang-Don; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-12-01

    Kinetic and enzymatic inhibition experiments were performed to investigate the effects of methanethiol (MT) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium. In the coexistence of MT and H2S, the oxidation of methane was delayed until MT and H2S were completely degraded. MT and H2S could be degraded, both with and without methane. The kinetic analysis revealed that the methane-oxidizing consortium showed a maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax) of 3.7 mmol g-dry cell weight (DCW)(-1) h(-1) and a saturation constant (Km) of 184.1 μM. MT and H2S show competitive inhibition on methane oxidation, with inhibition values (Ki) of 1504.8 and 359.8 μM, respectively. MT was primary removed by particulate methane monooxygenases (pMMO) of the consortium, while H2S was degraded by the other microorganisms or enzymes in the consortium. DNA and mRNA transcript levels of the pmoA gene expressions were decreased to ∼10(6) and 10(3)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after MT and H2S degradation, respectively; however, both the amount of the DNA and mRNA transcript recovered their initial levels of ∼10(7) and 10(5)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after methane oxidation, respectively. The gene expression results indicate that the pmoA gene could be rapidly reproducible after methane oxidation. This study provides comprehensive information of kinetic interactions between methane and sulfur compounds.

  12. A comparison of cataloged variation between International HapMap Consortium and 1000 Genomes Project data

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background Since publication of the human genome in 2003, geneticists have been interested in risk variant associations to resolve the etiology of traits and complex diseases. The International HapMap Consortium undertook an effort to catalog all common variation across the genome (variants with a minor allele frequency (MAF) of at least 5% in one or more ethnic groups). HapMap along with advances in genotyping technology led to genome-wide association studies which have identified common var...

  13. Kinetic study approach of remazol black-B use for the development of two-stage anoxic-oxic reactor for decolorization/biodegradation of azo dyes by activated bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafale, Nishant; Wate, Satish; Meshram, Sudhir; Nandy, Tapas

    2008-11-30

    The laboratory-isolated strains Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Proteus mirabilis, Bacillus circulance, NAD 1 and NAD 6 were observed to be predominant in the bacterial consortium responsible for effective decolorization of the azo dyes. The kinetic characteristics of azo dye decolorization by bacterial consortium were determined quantitatively using reactive vinyl sulfonated diazo dye, remazol black-B (RB-B) as a model substrate. Effects of substrate (RB-B) concentration as well as different substrates (azo dyes), environmental parameters (temperature and pH), glucose and other electron donor/co-substrate on the rate of decolorization were investigated to reveal the key factor that determines the performance of dye decolorization. The activation energy (E(a)) and frequency factor (K(0)) based on the Arrhenius equation was calculated as 11.67 kcal mol(-1) and 1.57 x 10(7)mg lg MLSS(-1)h(-1), respectively. The Double-reciprocal or Lineweaver-Burk plot was used to evaluate V(max), 15.97 h(-1) and K(m), 85.66 mg l(-1). The two-stage anoxic-oxic reactor system has proved to be successful in achieving significant decolorization and degradation of azo dyes by specific developed bacterial consortium with a removal of 84% color and 80% COD for real textile effluents vis-à-vis >or=90% color and COD removal for synthetic dye solution.

  14. Role of Solar Water Heating in Multifamily Zero Energy Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Williamson, James [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-04-01

    With support from the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) worked with a developer in western Massachusetts to evaluate a SDHW system on a 12-unit apartment building. Olive Street Development completed construction in the spring of 2014, and CARB has been monitoring the performance of the water-heating systems since May 2014.

  15. The Mississippi University Research Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass: Production of Alternative Fuels from Waste Biomass Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drs. Mark E. Zapp; Todd French; Lewis Brown; Clifford George; Rafael Hernandez; Marvin Salin (from Mississippie State University); Drs. Huey-Min Hwang, Ken Lee, Yi Zhang; Maria Begonia (from Jackson State University); Drs. Clint Williford; Al Mikell (from the University of Mississippi); Drs. Robert Moore; Roger Hester (from the University of Southern Mississippi).

    2009-03-31

    The Mississippi Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass was formed via funding from the US Department of Energy's EPSCoR Program, which is administered by the Office of Basic Science. Funding was approved in July of 1999 and received by participating Mississippi institutions by 2000. The project was funded via two 3-year phases of operation (the second phase was awarded based on the high merits observed from the first 3-year phase), with funding ending in 2007. The mission of the Consortium was to promote the utilization of biomass, both cultured and waste derived, for the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. These scientific efforts, although generally basic in nature, are key to the development of future industries within the Southeastern United States. In this proposal, the majority of the efforts performed under the DOE EPSCoR funding were focused primarily toward the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks and biogas from waste products. However, some of the individual projects within this program investigated the production of other products from biomass feeds (i.e. acetic acid and biogas) along with materials to facilitate the more efficient production of chemicals from biomass. Mississippi is a leading state in terms of raw biomass production. Its top industries are timber, poultry production, and row crop agriculture. However, for all of its vast amounts of biomass produced on an annual basis, only a small percentage of the biomass is actually industrially produced into products, with the bulk of the biomass being wasted. This situation is actually quite representative of many Southeastern US states. The research and development efforts performed attempted to further develop promising chemical production techniques that use Mississippi biomass feedstocks. The three processes that were the primary areas of interest for ethanol production were syngas fermentation, acid hydrolysis followed by hydrolyzate fermentation, and

  16. TOXIC EFFECTS OF LINEAR ALKYLBENZENE SULFONATE, ANTHRACENE AND THEIR MIXTURE ON GROWTH OF A MICROBIAL CONSORTIUM ISOLATED FROM POLLUTED SEDIMENT

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS), anthracene and a LAS-anthracene mixture on the growth of a microbial consortium isolated from polluted sediment. The microbial consortium was grown in a sterile glass bottle with mineral medium containing 1 g/L of glucose. Microbial growth inhibition produced by LAS, anthracene and combinations of LAS and anthracene was determined by viable count in nutritive agar; inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) was ...

  17. The ProteomeXchange consortium in 2017: supporting the cultural change in proteomics public data deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Csordas, Attila; Sun, Zhi; Jarnuczak, Andrew; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Ternent, Tobias; Campbell, David S.; Bernal-Llinares, Manuel; Okuda, Shujiro; Kawano, Shin; Moritz, Robert L.; Carver, Jeremy J.; Wang, Mingxun; Ishihama, Yasushi; Bandeira, Nuno; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The ProteomeXchange (PX) Consortium of proteomics resources (http://www.proteomexchange.org) was formally started in 2011 to standardize data submission and dissemination of mass spectrometry proteomics data worldwide. We give an overview of the current consortium activities and describe the advances of the past few years. Augmenting the PX founding members (PRIDE and PeptideAtlas, including the PASSEL resource), two new members have joined the consortium: MassIVE and jPOST. ProteomeCentral remains as the common data access portal, providing the ability to search for data sets in all participating PX resources, now with enhanced data visualization components. We describe the updated submission guidelines, now expanded to include four members instead of two. As demonstrated by data submission statistics, PX is supporting a change in culture of the proteomics field: public data sharing is now an accepted standard, supported by requirements for journal submissions resulting in public data release becoming the norm. More than 4500 data sets have been submitted to the various PX resources since 2012. Human is the most represented species with approximately half of the data sets, followed by some of the main model organisms and a growing list of more than 900 diverse species. Data reprocessing activities are becoming more prominent, with both MassIVE and PeptideAtlas releasing the results of reprocessed data sets. Finally, we outline the upcoming advances for ProteomeXchange. PMID:27924013

  18. The CTSA Consortium's Catalog of Assets for Translational and Clinical Health Research (CATCHR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey-Rice, Jana; Mapes, Brandy; Basford, Melissa; Zufelt, Anneliese; Wehbe, Firas; Harris, Paul; Alcorn, Michael; Allen, David; Arnim, Margaret; Autry, Susan; Briggs, Michael S; Carnegie, Andrea; Chavis-Keeling, Deborah; De La Pena, Carlos; Dworschak, Doris; Earnest, Julie; Grieb, Terri; Guess, Marilyn; Hafer, Nathaniel; Johnson, Tesheia; Kasper, Amanda; Kopp, Janice; Lockie, Timothy; Lombardo, Vincetta; McHale, Leslie; Minogue, Andrea; Nunnally, Beth; O'Quinn, Deanna; Peck, Kelly; Pemberton, Kieran; Perry, Cheryl; Petrie, Ginny; Pontello, Andria; Posner, Rachel; Rehman, Bushra; Roth, Deborah; Sacksteder, Paulette; Scahill, Samantha; Schieri, Lorri; Simpson, Rosemary; Skinner, Anne; Toussant, Kim; Turner, Alicia; Van der Put, Elaine; Wasser, June; Webb, Chris D; Williams, Maija; Wiseman, Lori; Yasko, Laurel; Pulley, Jill

    2014-04-01

    The 61 CTSA Consortium sites are home to valuable programs and infrastructure supporting translational science and all are charged with ensuring that such investments translate quickly to improved clinical care. Catalog of Assets for Translational and Clinical Health Research (CATCHR) is the Consortium's effort to collect and make available information on programs and resources to maximize efficiency and facilitate collaborations. By capturing information on a broad range of assets supporting the entire clinical and translational research spectrum, CATCHR aims to provide the necessary infrastructure and processes to establish and maintain an open-access, searchable database of consortium resources to support multisite clinical and translational research studies. Data are collected using rigorous, defined methods, with the resulting information made visible through an integrated, searchable Web-based tool. Additional easy-to-use Web tools assist resource owners in validating and updating resource information over time. In this paper, we discuss the design and scope of the project, data collection methods, current results, and future plans for development and sustainability. With increasing pressure on research programs to avoid redundancy, CATCHR aims to make available information on programs and core facilities to maximize efficient use of resources.

  19. The ENIGMA Consortium: large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Paul M; Stein, Jason L; Medland, Sarah E; Hibar, Derrek P; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Renteria, Miguel E; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J; Martin, Nicholas G; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Almeida, Jorge; Alpert, Kathryn; Andreasen, Nancy C; Andreassen, Ole A; Apostolova, Liana G; Appel, Katja; Armstrong, Nicola J; Aribisala, Benjamin; Bastin, Mark E; Bauer, Michael; Bearden, Carrie E; Bergmann, Orjan; Binder, Elisabeth B; Blangero, John; Bockholt, Henry J; Bøen, Erlend; Bois, Catherine; Boomsma, Dorret I; Booth, Tom; Bowman, Ian J; Bralten, Janita; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Brohawn, David G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan; Bulayeva, Kazima; Bustillo, Juan R; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cantor, Rita M; Carless, Melanie A; Caseras, Xavier; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chang, Kiki D; Ching, Christopher R K; Christoforou, Andrea; Cichon, Sven; Clark, Vincent P; Conrod, Patricia; Coppola, Giovanni; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Deary, Ian J; de Geus, Eco J C; den Braber, Anouk; Delvecchio, Giuseppe; Depondt, Chantal; de Haan, Lieuwe; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dima, Danai; Dimitrova, Rali; Djurovic, Srdjan; Dong, Hongwei; Donohoe, Gary; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Dyer, Thomas D; Ehrlich, Stefan; Ekman, Carl Johan; Elvsåshagen, Torbjørn; Emsell, Louise; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fagerness, Jesen; Fears, Scott; Fedko, Iryna; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Foroud, Tatiana; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Frangou, Sophia; Frey, Eva Maria; Frodl, Thomas; Frouin, Vincent; Garavan, Hugh; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Glahn, David C; Godlewska, Beata; Goldstein, Rita Z; Gollub, Randy L; Grabe, Hans J; Grimm, Oliver; Gruber, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Göring, Harald H H; Hagenaars, Saskia; Hajek, Tomas; Hall, Geoffrey B; Hall, Jeremy; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hass, Johanna; Hatton, Sean N; Haukvik, Unn K; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hickie, Ian B; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoehn, David; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J; Homuth, Georg; Hoogman, Martine; Hong, L Elliot; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Hwang, Kristy S; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnston, Caroline; Jönsson, Erik G; Kahn, René S; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kelly, Sinead; Kim, Sungeun; Kochunov, Peter; Koenders, Laura; Krämer, Bernd; Kwok, John B J; Lagopoulos, Jim; Laje, Gonzalo; Landen, Mikael; Landman, Bennett A; Lauriello, John; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lee, Phil H; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Lemaître, Herve; Leonardo, Cassandra D; Li, Chiang-Shan; Liberg, Benny; Liewald, David C; Liu, Xinmin; Lopez, Lorna M; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Luciano, Michelle; Macciardi, Fabio; Machielsen, Marise W J; Macqueen, Glenda M; Malt, Ulrik F; Mandl, René; Manoach, Dara S; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Moses, Eric K; Mueller, Bryon A; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Mwangi, Benson; Nauck, Matthias; Nho, Kwangsik; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars-Göran; Nugent, Allison C; Nyberg, Lars; Olvera, Rene L; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Papalampropoulou-Tsiridou, Melina; Papmeyer, Martina; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Penninx, Brenda W; Peterson, Charles P; Pfennig, Andrea; Phillips, Mary; Pike, G Bruce; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Potkin, Steven G; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rietschel, Marcella; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L; Roffman, Joshua L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rujescu, Dan; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Salami, Alireza; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Savitz, Jonathan; Saykin, Andrew J; Scanlon, Cathy; Schmaal, Lianne; Schnack, Hugo G; Schork, Andrew J; Schulz, S Charles; Schür, Remmelt; Seidman, Larry; Shen, Li; Shoemaker, Jody M; Simmons, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soares, Jair C; Sponheim, Scott R; Sprooten, Emma; Starr, John M; Steen, Vidar M; Strakowski, Stephen; Strike, Lachlan; Sussmann, Jessika; Sämann, Philipp G; Teumer, Alexander; Toga, Arthur W; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trost, Sarah; Turner, Jessica; Van den Heuvel, Martijn

    2014-06-01

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replication of findings, in a total of 24,997 subjects. By meta-analyzing results from many sites, ENIGMA has detected factors that affect the brain that no individual site could detect on its own, and that require larger numbers of subjects than any individual neuroimaging study has currently collected. ENIGMA's first project was a genome-wide association study identifying common variants in the genome associated with hippocampal volume or intracranial volume. Continuing work is exploring genetic associations with subcortical volumes (ENIGMA2) and white matter microstructure (ENIGMA-DTI). Working groups also focus on understanding how schizophrenia, bipolar illness, major depression and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affect the brain. We review the current progress of the ENIGMA Consortium, along with challenges and unexpected discoveries made on the way.

  20. The ProteomeXchange consortium in 2017: supporting the cultural change in proteomics public data deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Eric W; Csordas, Attila; Sun, Zhi; Jarnuczak, Andrew; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Ternent, Tobias; Campbell, David S; Bernal-Llinares, Manuel; Okuda, Shujiro; Kawano, Shin; Moritz, Robert L; Carver, Jeremy J; Wang, Mingxun; Ishihama, Yasushi; Bandeira, Nuno; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2017-01-04

    The ProteomeXchange (PX) Consortium of proteomics resources (http://www.proteomexchange.org) was formally started in 2011 to standardize data submission and dissemination of mass spectrometry proteomics data worldwide. We give an overview of the current consortium activities and describe the advances of the past few years. Augmenting the PX founding members (PRIDE and PeptideAtlas, including the PASSEL resource), two new members have joined the consortium: MassIVE and jPOST. ProteomeCentral remains as the common data access portal, providing the ability to search for data sets in all participating PX resources, now with enhanced data visualization components.We describe the updated submission guidelines, now expanded to include four members instead of two. As demonstrated by data submission statistics, PX is supporting a change in culture of the proteomics field: public data sharing is now an accepted standard, supported by requirements for journal submissions resulting in public data release becoming the norm. More than 4500 data sets have been submitted to the various PX resources since 2012. Human is the most represented species with approximately half of the data sets, followed by some of the main model organisms and a growing list of more than 900 diverse species. Data reprocessing activities are becoming more prominent, with both MassIVE and PeptideAtlas releasing the results of reprocessed data sets. Finally, we outline the upcoming advances for ProteomeXchange.

  1. A survey on the attitudes of doctors towards health insurance payment in the medical consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Ge; WU Tao; XU Wei-guo

    2011-01-01

    Background Medical consortium is a specific vertical integration model of regional medical resources.To improve medical resources utilization and control the health insurance costs by fee-for-service plans (FFS),capitation fee and diagnosis-related groups (DRGs),it is important to explore the attitudes of doctors towards the different health insurance payment in the medical consortium in Shanghai.Methods A questionnaire survey was carried out randomly on 50 doctors respectively in 3 different levels medical institutes.Results The statistical results showed that 90% of doctors in tertiary hospitals had the tendency towards FFS,whereas 78% in secondary hospitals towards DRGs and 84% in community health centers towards capitation fee.Conclusions There are some obvious differences on doctors' attitudes towards health insurance payment in 3 different levels hospitals.Thus,it is feasible that health insurance payment should be supposed to the doctors' attitudes using the bundled payments along with the third-party payment as a supervisor within consortium.

  2. The Long Road to Becoming a “Consortium of Swiss University Libraries”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Neubauer

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the idea that co-operative licensing of electronically researchable information products would bring positive benefits for academic libraries has probably been grasped by libraries in general, what is often lacking is a highperformance infrastructure, which would ensure its complicated management and extend the consortium in the medium term. This leads to the conclusion that the benefits of consortium-based solutions are relatively easy to present and would easily be accepted by those „affected“. On the other hand, the concrete workload often falls upon a few enthusiastic librarians. Up to a few months ago, the situation in Switzerland was no different, whereby in this country, the complex underlying political conditions made the situation particularly difficult for academic libraries. In the meantime, a consortium has managed to establish itself on a national level and the first products licenced in co-operation are in use. The following exposition gives a brief introduction to Switzerland’s specific situation and also sketches the basic structures of this co-operation model.

  3. High-efficient nitrogen removal by coupling enriched autotrophic-nitrification and aerobic-denitrification consortiums at cold temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Shiqiang; Yao, Shuo; Ni, Jinren

    2014-06-01

    This study paid particular attention to total nitrogen removal at low temperature (10°C) by excellent coupling of enriched autotrophic nitrifying and heterotrophic denitrifying consortiums at sole aerobic condition. The maximum specific nitrifying rate of the nitrifying consortium reached 8.85mgN/(gSSh). Further test in four identical lab-scale sequencing batch reactors demonstrated its excellent performance for bioaugmentation in potential applications. On the other hand, the aerobic denitrifying consortium could achieve a specific denitrifying rate of 32.93mgN/(gSSh) under dissolved oxygen of 1.0-1.5mg/L at 10°C. Coupling both kinds of consortiums was proved very successful for a perfect total nitrogen (TN) removal at COD/N of 4 and dissolved oxygen of 1.5-4.5mg/L, which was hardly reached by any single consortium reported previously. The encouraging results from coupling aerobic consortiums implied a huge potential in practical treatment of low-strength domestic wastewater (200-300mg/L COD) during wintertime.

  4. CERTS: Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions - Research Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph

    2003-07-30

    Historically, the U.S. electric power industry was vertically integrated, and utilities were responsible for system planning, operations, and reliability management. As the nation moves to a competitive market structure, these functions have been disaggregated, and no single entity is responsible for reliability management. As a result, new tools, technologies, systems, and management processes are needed to manage the reliability of the electricity grid. However, a number of simultaneous trends prevent electricity market participants from pursuing development of these reliability tools: utilities are preoccupied with restructuring their businesses, research funding has declined, and the formation of Independent System Operators (ISOs) and Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs) to operate the grid means that control of transmission assets is separate from ownership of these assets; at the same time, business uncertainty, and changing regulatory policies have created a climate in which needed investment for transmission infrastructure and tools for reliability management has dried up. To address the resulting emerging gaps in reliability R&D, CERTS has undertaken much-needed public interest research on reliability technologies for the electricity grid. CERTS' vision is to: (1) Transform the electricity grid into an intelligent network that can sense and respond automatically to changing flows of power and emerging problems; (2) Enhance reliability management through market mechanisms, including transparency of real-time information on the status of the grid; (3) Empower customers to manage their energy use and reliability needs in response to real-time market price signals; and (4) Seamlessly integrate distributed technologies--including those for generation, storage, controls, and communications--to support the reliability needs of both the grid and individual customers.

  5. Modular Pebble Bed Reactor Project, University Research Consortium Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew

    2000-07-01

    This project is developing a fundamental conceptual design for a gas-cooled, modular, pebble bed reactor. Key technology areas associated with this design are being investigated which intend to address issues concerning fuel performance, safety, core neutronics and proliferation resistance, economics and waste disposal. Research has been initiated in the following areas: · Improved fuel particle performance · Reactor physics · Economics · Proliferation resistance · Power conversion system modeling · Safety analysis · Regulatory and licensing strategy Recent accomplishments include: · Developed four conceptual models for fuel particle failures that are currently being evaluated by a series of ABAQUS analyses. Analytical fits to the results are being performed over a range of important parameters using statistical/factorial tools. The fits will be used in a Monte Carlo fuel performance code, which is under development. · A fracture mechanics approach has been used to develop a failure probability model for the fuel particle, which has resulted in significant improvement over earlier models. · Investigation of fuel particle physio-chemical behavior has been initiated which includes the development of a fission gas release model, particle temperature distributions, internal particle pressure, migration of fission products, and chemical attack of fuel particle layers. · A balance of plant, steady-state thermal hydraulics model has been developed to represent all major components of a MPBR. Component models are being refined to accurately reflect transient performance. · A comparison between air and helium for use in the energy-conversion cycle of the MPBR has been completed and formed the basis of a master’s degree thesis. · Safety issues associated with air ingress are being evaluated. · Post shutdown, reactor heat removal characteristics are being evaluated by the Heating-7 code. · PEBBED, a fast deterministic neutronic code package suitable for

  6. Simultaneous removal of Cr(Ⅵ) and phenol in consortium culture of Bacillus sp. and Pseudomonas putida Migula (CCTCC AB92019)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yun-guo; PAN Cui; XIA Wen-bin; ZENG Guang-ming; ZHOU Ming; LIU Yuan-yuan; KE Jie; HUANG Chao

    2008-01-01

    The simultaneous removal of Cr(Ⅵ) and phenol in a consortium culture containing Cr(Ⅵ) reducer, Bacillus sp. and phenol degrader, Pseudomonas putida Migula (CCTCC AB92019) was studied. Phenol was used as the sole carbon source. Bacillus sp. utilized metabolites formed from phenol degradation as electron donors and energy source for Cr(Ⅵ) reduction. Optimum Cr(Ⅵ) reduction was observed at a phenol concentration of 150 mg/L and an initial Cr(Ⅵ) concentration of 15 mg/L. Both the Cr(Ⅵ) reduction and phenol degradation were influenced by the cell composition of the culture, but the phenol degradation was not significantly affected by the content of Bacillus sp. The experiments also showed that the amount of phenol degraded was more than that stoichiometrically required for Cr(Ⅵ) reduction.

  7. Breast cancer risk and 6q22.33: combined results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kirchhoff

    Full Text Available Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341 was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC. In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA. Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.06, p = 0.023. There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I(2 = 49.3%; p = <0.004. In CIMBA, we observed an inverse association with the minor allele of rs2180341 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80-1.00, p = 0.048, indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk.

  8. The response of maize (Zea mays L.) plant assisted with bacterial consortium and fertilizer under oily sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Asim; Saddiqui, Samina; Bano, Asghari

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of PGPR consortium and fertilizer alone and in combination on the physiology of maize grown under oily sludge stress environment as well on the soil nutrient status. Consortium was prepared from Bacillus cereus (Acc KR232400), Bacillus altitudinis (Acc KF859970), Comamonas (Delftia) belonging to family Comamonadacea (Acc KF859971) and Stenotrophomonasmaltophilia (Acc KF859973). The experiment was conducted in pots with complete randomized design with four replicates and kept in field. Oily sludge was mixed in ml and Ammonium nitrate and Diammonium phosphate (DAP) were added at 70 ug/g and 7 ug/g at sowing. The plant was harvested at 21 d for estimation of protein, proline and antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD). To study the degradation, total petroleum hydrocarbon was extracted by soxhelt extraction and extract was analyzed by GC-FID at different period after incubation. Combined application of consortium and fertilizer enhanced the germination %, protein and, proline content by 90,130 and 99% higher than untreated maize plants. Bioavailability of macro and micro nutrient was also enhanced with consortium and fertilizer in oily sludge. The consortium and fertilizer in combined treatment decreased the superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase dismutase (POD) of the maize leaves grown in oily sludge. Degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPHs) was 59% higher in combined application of consortium and fertilizer than untreated maize at 3 d. The bacterial consortium can enhanced the maize tolerance to oily sludge and enhanced degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPHs). The maize can be considered as tolerant plant species to remediate oily sludge contaminated soils.

  9. FY 2001 report on the results of the immediately effective type new regional consortium R and D project. Development of the computer/human cooperation type guard robot for crime prevention/disaster prevention use using IT technology; 2001 nendo sokkogata chiiki shinsei konsosiamu kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo kenkyu. IT gijutsu wo mochiita keisanki ningen kyocho gata bohan bosai you keibi robotto no kaihatsu seika hokoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-01

    In the light of the enlargement of demand/market of disaster prevention guard in association with changes in the social environment, development of a practical robot that automatically patrols and guards a building instead of a guard. The completed 'prototype guard robot' has a height of about 185cm and has a diameter of 65cm and moves by 4-wheel running at the maximum speed of 3km/h by the cooperative control for smoothly displacing/uniting the autonomous function and operational signals from remote operators. The robot recognizes the environment by various sensors (omniazimuth, laser, ultrasonic waves, light, infrared rays), patrols the inside of the building and lets the guard center (operator) know of it in case of emergency. The robot is also able to fight a fire by a fire extinguisher in the judgment of operator. As to the power supply, the robot can automatically change the consumed battery at battery exchange station and continue the automatical patrol and guard. Moreover, the autonomous function for going up/down in an elevator was developed by which the robot can move to different floors from the floor where he is using elevator. (NEDO)

  10. Perspectives on Norwegian-Russian energy cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourmistrov, Anatoli; Mellemvik, Frode; Vasiliev, Sergey Vasiliev (eds.)

    2011-07-01

    Review from publisher: Perspectives on Norwegian#Hyphen#Russian Energy Cooperation, September 2011 NAREC : Norwegian#Hyphen# Russian Education and Research Consortium for International Business Development in the field of Energy The book illustrates the kind of knowledge and competence possessed by the NAREC partner academic institutions: Part I highlights and discusses opportunities and barriers for the Norwegian#Hyphen#Russian energy cooperation in the High North. Part II considers and exemplifies the High North as an arena for increasing modernization and innovations. Part III devoted to advanced technologies for developing the High North.(Author)

  11. Bioremoval of Am-241 and Cs-137 from liquid radioactive wasters by bacterial consortiums; Biorremocao de Am-241 e Cs-137 de rejeitos radioativos liquidos por consorcios bacterianos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Rafael Vicente de Padua; Lima, Josenilson B. de; Gomes, Mirella C.; Borba, Tania R.; Bellini, Maria Helena; Marumo, Julio Takehiro; Sakata, Solange Kazumi, E-mail: rpadua@ipen.b, E-mail: sksakata@ipen.b, E-mail: jblima@ipen.b, E-mail: mbmarumo@ipen.b, E-mail: jtmarumo@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper evaluates the capacity of two bacterial consortiums of impacted areas in removing the Am-241 and Cs-137 from liquid radioactive wastes.The experiments indicated that the two study consortiums were able to remove 100% of the Cs-137 and Am-241 presents in the waste from 4 days of contact. These results suggest that the bio removal with the selected consortiums, can be a viable technique for the treatment of radioactive wastes containing Am-241 and Cs-137

  12. Fishing for teratogens: a consortium effort for a harmonized zebrafish developmental toxicology assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Jonathan S; Stedman, Donald B; Hillegass, Jedd M; Zhang, Cindy X; Panzica-Kelly, Julie; Coburn, Aleasha; Enright, Brian P; Tornesi, Belen; Amouzadeh, Hamid R; Hetheridge, Malcolm; Gustafson, Anne-Lee; Augustine-Rauch, Karen A

    2014-05-01

    A consortium of biopharmaceutical companies previously developed an optimized Zebrafish developmental toxicity assay (ZEDTA) where chorionated embryos were exposed to non-proprietary test compounds from 5 to 6 h post fertilization and assessed for morphological integrity at 5 days post fertilization. With the original 20 test compounds, this achieved an overall predictive value for teratogenicity of 88% of mammalian in vivo outcome [Gustafson, A. L., Stedman, D. B., Ball, J., Hillegass, J. M., Flood, A., Zhang, C. X., Panzica-Kelly, J., Cao, J., Coburn, A., Enright, B. P., et al. (2012). Interlaboratory assessment of a harmonized Zebrafish developmental toxicology assay-Progress report on phase I. Reprod. Toxicol. 33, 155-164]. In the second phase of this project, 38 proprietary pharmaceutical compounds from four consortium members were evaluated in two laboratories using the optimized method using either pond-derived or cultivated-strain wild-type Zebrafish embryos at concentrations up to 100μM. Embryo uptake of all compounds was assessed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty eight of 38 compounds had a confirmed embryo uptake of >5%, and with these compounds the ZEDTA achieved an overall predictive value of 82% and 65% at the two respective laboratories. When low-uptake compounds (≤ 5%) were retested with logarithmic concentrations up to 1000μM, the overall predictivity across all 38 compounds was 79% and 62% respectively, with the first laboratory achieving 74% sensitivity (teratogen detection) and 82% specificity (non-teratogen detection) and the second laboratory achieving 63% sensitivity (teratogen detection) and 62% specificity (non-teratogen detection). Subsequent data analyses showed that technical differences rather than strain differences were the primary contributor to interlaboratory differences in predictivity. Based on these results, the ZEDTA harmonized methodology is currently being used for compound assessment at lead

  13. Microbial Consortium with High Cellulolytic Activity (MCHCA) for Enhanced Biogas Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poszytek, Krzysztof; Ciezkowska, Martyna; Sklodowska, Aleksandra; Drewniak, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    The use of lignocellulosic biomass as a substrate in agricultural biogas plants is very popular and yields good results. However, the efficiency of anaerobic digestion, and thus biogas production, is not always satisfactory due to the slow or incomplete degradation (hydrolysis) of plant matter. To enhance the solubilization of the lignocellulosic biomass various physical, chemical and biological pretreatment methods are used. The aim of this study was to select and characterize cellulose-degrading bacteria, and to construct a microbial consortium, dedicated for degradation of maize silage and enhancing biogas production from this substrate. Over 100 strains of cellulose-degrading bacteria were isolated from: sewage sludge, hydrolyzer from an agricultural biogas plant, cattle slurry and manure. After physiological characterization of the isolates, 16 strains (representatives of Bacillus, Providencia, and Ochrobactrum genera) were chosen for the construction of a Microbial Consortium with High Cellulolytic Activity, called MCHCA. The selected strains had a high endoglucanase activity (exceeding 0.21 IU/mL CMCase activity) and a wide range of tolerance to various physical and chemical conditions. Lab-scale simulation of biogas production using the selected strains for degradation of maize silage was carried out in a two-bioreactor system, similar to those used in agricultural biogas plants. The obtained results showed that the constructed MCHCA consortium is capable of efficient hydrolysis of maize silage, and increases biogas production by even 38%, depending on the inoculum used for methane fermentation. The results in this work indicate that the mesophilic MCHCA has a great potential for application on industrial scale in agricultural biogas plants.

  14. Contribution of hot spring bacterial consortium in cadmium and lead bioremediation through quadratic programming model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Sudip Kumar; Raut, Sangeeta; Dora, Tapas Kumar [Department of Biotechnology, Gandhi Institute of Engineering and Technology, Gunupur, Rayagada 765 022, Odisha (India); Mohapatra, Pradeep Kumar Das, E-mail: pkdmvu@gmail.com [Department of Microbiology, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore 721 102, West Bengal (India)

    2014-01-30

    Highlights: • Adsorption of cadmium and lead using hot spring microbial consortium. • Development of empirical models for % adsorption using ANOVA and response surface methodology. • Fitting of the kinetics of adsorption to Freundlich and Langmuir model. • Optimization of the operating parameters to maximize the % of adsorption. -- Abstract: In the present investigation, a number of experiments have been conducted to isolate microbial strains from Taptapani Hot Spring Odisha, India for bioremediation of cadmium and lead. The strains Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (SS1), Aeromonas veronii (SS2) and Bacillus barbaricus (SS3) have shown better adaptation to metal tolerance test, with different concentrations of cadmium and lead and hence have been selected for further studies of metal microbial interaction and optimization. The results of bioremediation process indicate that consortium of thermophilic isolates adsorbed heavy metals more effectively than the individually treated isolates. Therefore, A 24 full factorial central composite design has been employed to analyze the effect of metal ion concentration, microbial concentration and time on removal of heavy metals with consortium. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) shows a high coefficient of determination value. The kinetic data have been fitted to pseudo-first order and second-order models. The isotherm equilibrium data have been well fitted by the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The optimum removal conditions determined for initial ion concentration was 0.3 g/l; contact time 72 h; microbial concentration, 3 ml/l; and pH 7. At optimum adsorption conditions, the adsorption of cadmium and lead are found to be 92% and 93%, respectively, and presence of metals was confirmed through EDS analysis.

  15. Cellulosic ethanol production using a yeast consortium displaying a minicellulosome and β-glucosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sujin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulosic biomass is considered as a promising alternative to fossil fuels, but its recalcitrant nature and high cost of cellulase are the major obstacles to utilize this material. Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP, combining cellulase production, saccharification, and fermentation into one step, has been proposed as the most efficient way to reduce the production cost of cellulosic bioethanol. In this study, we developed a cellulolytic yeast consortium for CBP, based on the surface display of cellulosome structure, mimicking the cellulolytic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum. Results We designed a cellulolytic yeast consortium composed of four different yeast strains capable of either displaying a scaffoldin (mini CipA containing three cohesin domains derived from C. thermocellum, or secreting one of the three types of cellulases, C. thermocellum CelA (endoglucanase containing its own dockerin, Trichoderma reesei CBHII (exoglucanase fused with an exogenous dockerin from C. thermocellum, or Aspergillus aculeatus BGLI (β-glucosidase. The secreted dockerin-containing enzymes, CelA and CBHI, were randomly assembled to the surface-displayed mini CipA via cohesin-dockerin interactions. On the other hand, BGLI was independently assembled to the cell surface since we newly found that it already has a cell adhesion characteristic. We optimized the cellulosome activity and ethanol production by controlling the combination ratio among the four yeast strains. A mixture of cells with the optimized mini CipA:CelA:CBHII:BGLI ratio of 2:3:3:0.53 produced 1.80 g/l ethanol after 94 h, indicating about 20% increase compared with a consortium composed of an equal amount of each cell type (1.48 g/l. Conclusions We produced cellulosic ethanol using a cellulolytic yeast consortium, which is composed of cells displaying mini cellulosomes generated via random assembly of CelA and CBHII to a mini CipA, and cells displaying BGLI independently. One

  16. Efficiency of inhibitor for biocorrosion influenced by consortium sulfate reducing bacteria on carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahat, Nur Akma; Othman, Norinsan Kamil [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Sahrani, Fathul Karim [School of Environment and Natural Resources Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    The inhibition efficiency of benzalkonium chloride (BKC) in controlling biocorrosion on the carbon steel surfaces has been investigated. The carbon steel coupons were incubated in the presence of consortium SRB (C-SRB) with and without BKC for the difference medium concentration. The corrosion rate and inhibition efficiency have been evaluated by a weight loss method. The morphology of biofilm C-SRB on the steel surfaces were characterized with variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VPSEM). The results revealed that BKC exhibits a low corrosion rate, minimizing the cell growth and biofilm development on the carbon steel surfaces.

  17. Promotores As Advocates for Community Improvement: Experiences of the Western States REACH Su Comunidad Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutcher, Rachel; Moore-Monroy, Martha; Bello, Elizur; Doyle, Seth; Ibarra, Jorge; Kunz, Susan; Munoz, Rocio; Patton-Lopez, Megan; Sharkey, Joseph R; Wilger, Susan; Alfero, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    The REACH Su Comunidad Consortium worked with 10 communities to address disparities in access to healthy food and physical activity opportunities among Hispanic populations through policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) strategies. Community health workers took leadership roles in the implementation of PSE strategies in partnership with local multisector coalitions. This article describes the role of community health workers in PSE change, the technical and professional development support provided to the REACH Su Comunidad Communities, and highlights professional development needs of community health workers engaging in PSE strategies.

  18. Feasibility of bio-hydrogen production from sewage sludge using defined microbial consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shireen Meher Kotay; Debabrata Das [Fermentation Technology Lab., Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, W.B., INDIA-721302 (India)

    2006-07-01

    Biological hydrogen production potential of a defined microbial consortium consisting of three facultative anaerobes, Enterobacter cloacae IIT-BT 08, Citrobacter freundii IIT-BT L139 and Bacillus coagulans IIT-BT S1 was studied. In this investigation their individual and combinatorial H{sub 2} production capabilities have been studied on defined media and pretreated sewage sludge. Defined medium, MYG (1% w/v Malt extract, 0.4% w/v yeast extract and 1% w/v glucose) with glucose as limiting substrate has been found to be most suitable for hydrogen production. Individually E. cloacae clearly gave higher yield (276 ml H{sub 2}/ g COD reduced) using defined medium than the other two strains. There was no considerable difference in maximal yield of hydrogen from individual and combinatorial (1:1:1 consortium) modes suggesting that E. cloacae dominated in the consortia on defined medium. Contradictorily, B. coagulans gave better bio-hydrogen yield (37.16 ml H{sub 2}/ g COD consumed) than the other two strains when activated sewage sludge was used as substrate. The pretreatment of sludge included sterilization, (15% v/v) dilution and supplementation with 0.5% w/v glucose which was found to be essential to screen out the hydrogen consuming bacteria and ameliorate the hydrogenation. Considering (1:1:1) consortium as inoculum, interestingly yield of hydrogen was recorded to increase to 41.23 ml H{sub 2}/ g COD reduced inferring that in consortium, the substrate utilization was significantly higher. The hydrogen yield from pretreated sludge obtained in this study (35.54 ml H{sub 2}/ g sludge) has been found to be distinctively higher than the earlier reports (8.1 - 16.9 ml H{sub 2} / g sludge). However it was lower compared to the yield obtained from co-digestion of (83:17) food waste and sewage sludge (122 ml H{sub 2}/ g carbohydrate COD). Employing formulated microbial consortia for bio-hydrogen production from sewage sludge was an attempt to augment the hydrogen yield from

  19. Feasibility of bio-hydrogen production from sewage sludge using defined microbial consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shireen Meher Kotay; Debabrata Das [Fermentation Technology Lab., Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, W.B., INDIA-721302 (India)

    2006-07-01

    Biological hydrogen production potential of a defined microbial consortium consisting of three facultative anaerobes, Enterobacter cloacae IIT-BT 08, Citrobacter freundii IIT-BT L139 and Bacillus coagulans IIT-BT S1 was studied. In this investigation their individual and combinatorial H{sub 2} production capabilities have been studied on defined media and pretreated sewage sludge. Defined medium, MYG (1% w/v Malt extract, 0.4% w/v yeast extract and 1% w/v glucose) with glucose as limiting substrate has been found to be most suitable for hydrogen production. Individually E. cloacae clearly gave higher yield (276 ml H{sub 2}/ g COD reduced) using defined medium than the other two strains. There was no considerable difference in maximal yield of hydrogen from individual and combinatorial (1:1:1 consortium) modes suggesting that E. cloacae dominated in the consortia on defined medium. Contradictorily, B. coagulans gave better bio-hydrogen yield (37.16 ml H{sub 2}/g COD consumed) than the other two strains when activated sewage sludge was used as substrate. The pretreatment of sludge included sterilization, (15% v/v) dilution and supplementation with 0.5%w/v glucose which was found to be essential to screen out the hydrogen consuming bacteria and ameliorate the hydrogenation. Considering (1:1:1) consortium as inoculum, interestingly yield of hydrogen was recorded to increase to 41.23 ml H{sub 2}/ g COD reduced inferring that in consortium, the substrate utilization was significantly higher. The hydrogen yield from pretreated sludge obtained in this study (35.54 ml H{sub 2} g sludge) has been found to be distinctively higher than the earlier reports (8.1 - 16.9 ml H{sub 2}/g sludge). However it was lower compared to the yield obtained from co-digestion of (83:17) food waste and sewage sludge (122 ml H{sub 2}/g carbohydrate COD). Employing formulated microbial consortia for bio-hydrogen production from sewage sludge was an attempt to augment the hydrogen yield from sludge

  20. Effect of Probiotic Consortium on the Local Inflammatory Process in Chronic Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanagul Khasenbekova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inflammatory periodontal disease is one of the major concerns of researchers and clinicians, because it can lead to tooth loss and an increased risk of systemic pathologies, even at the age of 35. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of gelatin-based probiotic consortium on the local and general factors of inflammation in rats with chronic periodontitis. Methods: The study object was a complex of probiotic bacteria based in an odourless 6% gelatin plate with neutral flavour. A cellular biomass of the consortium consists of following lactobacilli: Lactobacillus casei subsp. pseudoplantarum, Lactobacillus caseisubsp.casei, L.fermentum, and L. helveticus. The viable cell number was 2.5 x 109 CFU/ml. The model of chronic periodontitis was reproduced in the white random-bred rats that weighed 160-220g, by keeping them on a low-protein diet. After three months, symptoms associated with medium and severe chronic periodontitis were observed in the rats. Application was carried out on the oral mucosa of rats 1 time per day for 14 days. The stickers lacking consortium of microorganisms were used as the placebo. The "Solcoseril" gel was chosen as a comparator. The hematologic, biochemical, and morphological characteristics were investigated. Results: A complete clearance of periodontal pockets was observed during an objective examination of the experimental group rats on the 14th day of the experiment. Moreover, a gingival mucous turned pink, and there were no cyanosis tissues. The local changes were accompanied by improvement in hematological parameters, such as a reduction of blood eosinophilia and neutrophilia, and a recovery of the white blood cells number to the normal degree within the group that received the probiotic complex. A decrease of the acute plethora of microvasculature was observed morphologically as a result of the treatment. There were signs of basal layer activation of the stratified squamous epithelium

  1. Global health education consortium: 20 years of leadership in global health and global health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velji, Anvar

    2011-06-01

    The Global Health Education Consortium (GHEC) is a group of universities and institutions committed to improving the health and human rights of underserved populations worldwide through improved education and training of the global health workforce. In the early 1990s, GHEC brought together many of the global health programs in North America to improve competencies and curricula in global health as well as to involve member institutions in health policy, development issues, and delivery of care in the inner cities, marginalized areas, and abroad.

  2. Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium Guidelines for HLA-B Genotype and Abacavir Dosing: 2014 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M A; Hoffman, J M; Freimuth, R R; Klein, T E; Dong, B J; Pirmohamed, M; Hicks, J K; Wilkinson, M R; Haas, D W; Kroetz, D L

    2014-05-01

    The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Guidelines for HLA-B Genotype and Abacavir Dosing were originally published in April 2012. We reviewed recent literature and concluded that none of the evidence would change the therapeutic recommendations in the original guideline; therefore, the original publication remains clinically current. However, we have updated the Supplementary Material online and included additional resources for applying CPIC guidelines to the electronic health record. Up-to-date information can be found at PharmGKB (http://www.pharmgkb.org).

  3. Efficiency of inhibitor for biocorrosion influenced by consortium sulfate reducing bacteria on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat, Nur Akma; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Sahrani, Fathul Karim

    2015-09-01

    The inhibition efficiency of benzalkonium chloride (BKC) in controlling biocorrosion on the carbon steel surfaces has been investigated. The carbon steel coupons were incubated in the presence of consortium SRB (C-SRB) with and without BKC for the difference medium concentration. The corrosion rate and inhibition efficiency have been evaluated by a weight loss method. The morphology of biofilm C-SRB on the steel surfaces were characterized with variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VPSEM). The results revealed that BKC exhibits a low corrosion rate, minimizing the cell growth and biofilm development on the carbon steel surfaces.

  4. Atrazine degradation by a simple consortium of Klebsiella sp. A1 and Comamonas sp. A2 in nitrogen enriched medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunyu; Li, Yang; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Xia; Ma, Cuiqing; Tang, Hongzhi; Xu, Ping

    2010-02-01

    A simple consortium consisted of two members of Klebsiella sp. A1 and Comamonas sp. A2 was isolated from the sewage of a pesticide mill in China. One member of Klebsiella sp. A1 is a novel strain that could use atrazine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. The consortium showed high atrazine-mineralizing efficiency and about 83.3% of 5 g l(-1) atrazine could be mineralized after 24 h degradation. Contrary to many other reported microorganisms, the consortium was insensitive to some nitrogenous fertilizers commonly used, not only in presence of 200 mg l(-1) atrazine but also in 5 g l(-1) atrazine mediums. After 24 h incubation, 200 mg l(-1) atrazine was completely mineralized despite of the presence of urea, (NH(4))(2)CO(3) and (NH(4))(2)HPO(4) in the medium. Very minor influence was observed when NH(4)Cl was added as additional nitrogen source. Advantages of the simple consortium, high mineralizing efficiency and insensitivity to most of exogenous nitrogen sources, all suggested application potential of the consortium for the bioremediation of atrazine-contaminated soils and waters.

  5. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report 1994--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The HBCU/MI ET Consortium was established in January 1990, through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among its member institutions. This group of research oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MIs) agreed to work together to initiate or revise education programs, develop research partnerships with public and private sector organizations, and promote technology development to address the nation`s critical environmental contamination problems. The Consortium`s Research, Education and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan became the working agenda. The Consortium is a resource for collaboration among the member institutions and with federal an state agencies, national and federal laboratories, industries, (including small businesses), majority universities, and two and four-year technical colleges. As a group of 17 institutions geographically located in the southern US, the Consortium is well positioned to reach a diverse group of women and minority populations of African Americans, Hispanics and American Indians. This Report provides a status update on activities and achievements in environmental curriculum development, outreach at the K--12 level, undergraduate and graduate education, research and development, and technology transfer.

  6. Naphthalene degradation by bacterial consortium (DV-AL) developed from Alang-Sosiya ship breaking yard, Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vilas; Jain, Siddharth; Madamwar, Datta

    2012-03-01

    Naphthalene degrading bacterial consortium (DV-AL) was developed by enrichment culture technique from sediment collected from the Alang-Sosiya ship breaking yard, Gujarat, India. The 16S rRNA gene based molecular analyzes revealed that the bacterial consortium (DV-AL) consisted of four strains namely, Achromobacter sp. BAB239, Pseudomonas sp. DV-AL2, Enterobacter sp. BAB240 and Pseudomonas sp. BAB241. Consortium DV-AL was able to degrade 1000 ppm of naphthalene in Bushnell Haas medium (BHM) containing peptone (0.1%) as co-substrate with an initial pH of 8.0 at 37°C under shaking conditions (150 rpm) within 24h. Maximum growth rate and naphthalene degradation rate were found to be 0.0389 h(-1) and 80 mg h(-1), respectively. Consortium DV-AL was able to utilize other aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, phenol, carbazole, petroleum oil, diesel fuel, and phenanthrene and 2-methyl naphthalene as sole carbon source. Consortium DV-AL was also efficient to degrade naphthalene in the presence of other pollutants such as petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals.

  7. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is

  8. FY 1999 report of the project on the waste-fueled power generation in the north area of Malaysia; 1999 nendo Malaysia hokubu chiiki gomi hatsuden project seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Penang Island, in the northern part of Malaysia, where the urbanization is well advanced and sites for waste disposal are scarce, was selected as a target area for the research on introduction of solid waste (henceforth called reuse) power generation system. About 500 tons of refuse are generated daily in Penang Island, and are disposed of in a coastal landfill site at Jelutong near the center of George Town, the state capital. Although the landfill site is already beyond its capacity, it is still in use because there are no other disposal sites in the island. For this reason, there is widespread concern about coastal environmental pollution. Therefore, the Municipal Council of Penang Island has studied feasibility of transferring refuse to a new landfill site at the peninsula side of Penang State across the Penang Bridge over the sea channel which separates the island and the peninsula. However, this transfer and landfill method has not been realized yet. In view of improvement of these situations regarding solid waste management is Penang Island, it is proposed in this report, as the result of the research, introduction of power generation system fueled already-accumulated refuse in this disposal site together with refuse to be collected every day. The study was started in September 1999 and was completed in March 2000. Japan Environmental Consultants, Ltd. investigated the present situation of solid waste management in Penang Island, analyzed refuse properties, and studied the refuse fueled power generation technology with the cooperation of SIRIM (Environmental and Energy Technology Centre) and PTM (Pusat Tenaga Malaysia, Malaysia Energy Centre) in Malaysia. In concrete, the research team established a scheme of an integrated system most suitable for the refuse treatment including refuse power generation in Penang Island, the famous resort of northern Malaysia, and studied its feasibility. The proposed system is combination of selective pulverizing classifiers

  9. Biodegradation of crude oil by a defined co-culture of indigenous bacterial consortium and exogenous Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Kaiyun; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xueping; Hu, Xiaoxin; Cao, Liya; Yuan, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study biodegradation of crude oil by defined co-cultures of indigenous bacterial consortium and exogenous Bacillus subtilis. Through residual oil analysis, it is apparent that the defined co-culture displayed a degradation ratio (85.01%) superior to indigenous bacterial consortium (71.32%) after 7days of incubation when ratio of inoculation size of indigenous bacterial consortium and Bacillus subtilis was 2:1. Long-chain n-alkanes could be degraded markedly by Bacillus subtilis. Result analysis of the bacterial community showed that a decrease in bacterial diversity in the defined co-culture and the enrichment of Burkholderiales order (98.1%) degrading hydrocarbons. The research results revealed that the promising potential of the defined co-culture for application to degradation of crude oil.

  10. Chemometric formulation of bacterial consortium-AVS for improved decolorization of resonance-stabilized and heteropolyaromatic dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Madhava Anil; Kumar, Vaidyanathan Vinoth; Premkumar, Manickam Periyaraman; Baskaralingam, Palanichamy; Thiruvengadaravi, Kadathur Varathachary; Dhanasekaran, Anuradha; Sivanesan, Subramanian

    2012-11-01

    A bacterial consortium-AVS, consisting of Pseudomonas desmolyticum NCIM 2112, Kocuria rosea MTCC 1532 and Micrococcus glutamicus NCIM 2168 was formulated chemometrically, using the mixture design matrix based on the design of experiments methodology. The formulated consortium-AVS decolorized acid blue 15 and methylene blue with a higher average decolorization rate, which is more rapid than that of the pure cultures. The UV-vis spectrophotometric, Fourier transform infra red spectrophotometric and high performance liquid chromatographic analysis confirm that the decolorization was due to biodegradation by oxido-reductive enzymes, produced by the consortium-AVS. The toxicological assessment of plant growth parameters and the chlorophyll pigment concentrations of Phaseolus mungo and Triticum aestivum seedlings revealed the reduced toxic nature of the biodegraded products.

  11. Hydrolysis of carbaryl by a Pseudomonas sp. and construction of a microbial consortium that completely metabolizes carbaryl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapalamadugu, S; Chaudhry, G R

    1991-03-01

    Two Pseudomonas spp. (isolates 50552 and 50581) isolated from soil degraded 1-naphthol and carbaryl, an N-methylcarbamate pesticide, respectively. They utilized these compounds as a sole source of carbon. 1-Naphthol was completely metabolized to CO2 by the isolate 50552, while the carbaryl was first hydrolyzed to 1-naphthol and then converted into a brown-colored compound by the isolate 50581. The colored metabolite was not degraded, but 1-naphthol produced by the isolate 50581 during the exponential phase of growth was metabolized by the isolate 50552. The two isolates were used to construct a bacterial consortium which completely catabolized carbaryl to CO2. No metabolite was detected in the cell cultures of the consortium. The isolate 50581 harbored a 50-kb plasmid pCD1, while no plasmid was detected in the isolate 50552. The isolated bacteria individually or as a consortium may be used for detoxification of certain industrial and agricultural wastes.

  12. Improving long term outcomes in urea cycle disorders-report from the Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisbren, Susan E; Gropman, Andrea L; Batshaw, Mark L

    2016-07-01

    The Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium (UCDC) has conducted, beginning in 2006, a longitudinal study (LS) of eight enzyme deficiencies/transporter defects associated with the urea cycle. These include N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency (NAGSD); Carbamyl phosphate synthetase 1 deficiency (CPS1D); Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD); Argininosuccinate synthetase deficiency (ASSD) (Citrullinemia); Argininosuccinate lyase deficiency (ASLD) (Argininosuccinic aciduria); Arginase deficiency (ARGD, Argininemia); Hyperornithinemia, hyperammonemia, homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome (or mitochondrial ornithine transporter 1 deficiency [ORNT1D]); and Citrullinemia type II (mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier deficiency [CITRIN]). There were 678 UCD patients enrolled in 14 sites in the U.S., Canada, and Europe at the writing of this paper. This review summarizes findings of the consortium related to outcome, focusing primarily on neuroimaging findings and neurocognitive function. Neuroimaging studies in late onset OTCD offered evidence that brain injury caused by biochemical dysregulation may impact functional neuroanatomy serving working memory processes, an important component of executive function and regulation. Additionally, there were alteration in white mater microstructure and functional connectivity at rest. Intellectual deficits in OTCD and other urea cycle disorders (UCD) vary. However, when neuropsychological deficits occur, they tend to be more prominent in motor/performance areas on both intelligence tests and other measures. In some disorders, adults performed significantly less well than younger patients. Further longitudinal follow-up will reveal whether this is due to declines throughout life or to improvements in diagnostics (especially newborn screening) and treatments in the younger generation of patients.

  13. Seeking genetic susceptibility variants for colorectal cancer: the EPICOLON consortium experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Abulí, Anna; Muñoz, Jenifer; Bessa, Xavier; Brea-Fernández, Alejandro; Ferro, Marta; Giráldez, María Dolores; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Jover, Rodrigo; Piqué, Josep M; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Carracedo, Angel

    2012-03-01

    The EPICOLON consortium was initiated in 1999 by the Gastrointestinal Oncology Group of the Spanish Gastroenterology Association. It recruited consecutive, unselected, population-based colorectal cancer (CRC) cases and control subjects matched by age and gender without personal or familial history of cancer all over Spain with the main goal of gaining knowledge in Lynch syndrome and familial CRC. This epidemiological, prospective and multicentre study collected extensive clinical data and biological samples from ∼2000 CRC cases and 2000 controls in Phases 1 and 2 involving 25 and 14 participating hospitals, respectively. Genetic susceptibility projects in EPICOLON have included candidate-gene approaches evaluating single-nucleotide polymorphisms/genes from the historical category (linked to CRC risk by previous studies), from human syntenic CRC susceptibility regions identified in mouse, from the CRC carcinogenesis-related pathways Wnt and BMP, from regions 9q22 and 3q22 with positive linkage in CRC families, and from the mucin gene family. This consortium has also participated actively in the identification 5 of the 16 common, low-penetrance CRC genetic variants identified so far by genome-wide association studies. Finishing their own pangenomic study and performing whole-exome sequencing in selected CRC samples are among EPICOLON future research prospects.

  14. FORGE Canada Consortium: outcomes of a 2-year national rare-disease gene-discovery project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Chandree L; Majewski, Jacek; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Samuels, Mark E; Fernandez, Bridget A; Bernier, Francois P; Brudno, Michael; Knoppers, Bartha; Marcadier, Janet; Dyment, David; Adam, Shelin; Bulman, Dennis E; Jones, Steve J M; Avard, Denise; Nguyen, Minh Thu; Rousseau, Francois; Marshall, Christian; Wintle, Richard F; Shen, Yaoqing; Scherer, Stephen W; Friedman, Jan M; Michaud, Jacques L; Boycott, Kym M

    2014-06-01

    Inherited monogenic disease has an enormous impact on the well-being of children and their families. Over half of the children living with one of these conditions are without a molecular diagnosis because of the rarity of the disease, the marked clinical heterogeneity, and the reality that there are thousands of rare diseases for which causative mutations have yet to be identified. It is in this context that in 2010 a Canadian consortium was formed to rapidly identify mutations causing a wide spectrum of pediatric-onset rare diseases by using whole-exome sequencing. The FORGE (Finding of Rare Disease Genes) Canada Consortium brought together clinicians and scientists from 21 genetics centers and three science and technology innovation centers from across Canada. From nation-wide requests for proposals, 264 disorders were selected for study from the 371 submitted; disease-causing variants (including in 67 genes not previously associated with human disease; 41 of these have been genetically or functionally validated, and 26 are currently under study) were identified for 146 disorders over a 2-year period. Here, we present our experience with four strategies employed for gene discovery and discuss FORGE's impact in a number of realms, from clinical diagnostics to the broadening of the phenotypic spectrum of many diseases to the biological insight gained into both disease states and normal human development. Lastly, on the basis of this experience, we discuss the way forward for rare-disease genetic discovery both in Canada and internationally.

  15. Creation of the Probiotic Consortium on the Base of Strains of Bifidobacterium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozhakhmetov, S. S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, a widespread circulation of disbiotic conditions among the population of all ages in Kazakhstan requires an active development in industry for both preparations and products with probiotic properties. The gained bacterial isolates, Bifidobacterium adolescentis 180, B. breve 204, B. breve 584 and B. breve 587 were used in our researches and screening showed they possess high probiotic properties. The consortium possesses strong antimicrobial activity to pathogenic and potentially-pathogenic microflora, insulated during disbacteriosis, as well as from vagina and urea. They are able to produce vitamin B12 and also have antimutagenic activity. As a result, the consortium on the base of strains of Bifidobacterium spp. was received, possessing the following advantages: contains live mass of microbial, antagonistically active strains B. breve and B. adolescentis; contains more than 10^9 alive Bifidobacteria; does not contain plasmids, which means that it could not be a carrier of antibiotic stability for Gram-positive receptive pathogenic and potentially-pathogenic microflora.

  16. System engineering and management in a large and diverse multinational consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David; O'Sullivan, Brian; Thatcher, John; Renouf, Ian; Wright, Gillian; Wells, Martyn; Glasse, Alistair; Grozinger, Ulrich; Sykes, Jon; Smith, Dave; Eccleston, Paul; Shaughnessy, Bryan

    2008-07-01

    This paper elaborates the system engineering methods that are being successfully employed within the European Consortium (EC) to deliver the Optical System of the Mid Infa-Red Instrument (MIRI) to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The EC is a Consortium of 21 institutes located in 10 European countries and, at instrument level, it works in a 50/50 partnership with JPL who are providing the instrument cooler, software and detector systems. The paper will describe how the system engineering approach has been based upon proven principles used in the space industry but applied in a tailored way that best accommodates the differences in international practices and standards with a primary aim of ensuring a cost-effective solution which supports all science requirements for the mission. The paper will recall how the system engineering has been managed from the definition of the system requirements in early phase B, through the successful Critical Design Review at the end of phase C and up to the test and flight build activities that are presently in progress. Communication and coordination approaches will also be discussed.

  17. Clinical utilization of genomics data produced by the international Pseudomonas aeruginosa consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschi, Luca; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Boyle, Brian; Dupont, Marie-Josée; Laroche, Jérôme; Larose, Stéphane; Maaroufi, Halim; Fothergill, Joanne L.; Moore, Matthew; Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Aaron, Shawn D.; Barbeau, Jean; Bell, Scott C.; Burns, Jane L.; Camara, Miguel; Cantin, André; Charette, Steve J.; Dewar, Ken; Déziel, Éric; Grimwood, Keith; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Harrison, Joe J.; Heeb, Stephan; Jelsbak, Lars; Jia, Baofeng; Kenna, Dervla T.; Kidd, Timothy J.; Klockgether, Jens; Lam, Joseph S.; Lamont, Iain L.; Lewenza, Shawn; Loman, Nick; Malouin, François; Manos, Jim; McArthur, Andrew G.; McKeown, Josie; Milot, Julie; Naghra, Hardeep; Nguyen, Dao; Pereira, Sheldon K.; Perron, Gabriel G.; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Rainey, Paul B.; Rousseau, Simon; Santos, Pedro M.; Stephenson, Anne; Taylor, Véronique; Turton, Jane F.; Waglechner, Nicholas; Williams, Paul; Thrane, Sandra W.; Wright, Gerard D.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Tucker, Nicholas P.; Tümmler, Burkhard; Winstanley, Craig; Levesque, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    The International Pseudomonas aeruginosa Consortium is sequencing over 1000 genomes and building an analysis pipeline for the study of Pseudomonas genome evolution, antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. Metadata, including genomic and phenotypic data for each isolate of the collection, are available through the International Pseudomonas Consortium Database (http://ipcd.ibis.ulaval.ca/). Here, we present our strategy and the results that emerged from the analysis of the first 389 genomes. With as yet unmatched resolution, our results confirm that P. aeruginosa strains can be divided into three major groups that are further divided into subgroups, some not previously reported in the literature. We also provide the first snapshot of P. aeruginosa strain diversity with respect to antibiotic resistance. Our approach will allow us to draw potential links between environmental strains and those implicated in human and animal infections, understand how patients become infected and how the infection evolves over time as well as identify prognostic markers for better evidence-based decisions on patient care. PMID:26483767

  18. Clinical utilization of genomics data produced by the international Pseudomonas aeruginosa consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eFreschi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The International Pseudomonas aeruginosa Consortium is sequencing over 1000 genomes and building an analysis pipeline for the study of Pseudomonas genome evolution, antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. Metadata, including genomic and phenotypic data for each isolate of the collection, are available through the International Pseudomonas Consortium Database (http://ipcd.ibis.ulaval.ca/. Here, we present our strategy and the results that emerged from the analysis of the first 389 genomes. With as yet unmatched resolution, our results confirm that P. aeruginosa strains can be divided into three major groups that are further divided into subgroups, some not previously reported in the literature. We also provide the first snapshot of P. aeruginosa strain diversity with respect to antibiotic resistance. Our approach will allow us to draw potential links between environmental strains and those implicated in human and animal infections, understand how patients become infected and how the infection evolves over time as well as identify prognostic markers for better evidence-based decisions on patient care.

  19. Competitive advantage of bacteriocinogenic strains within lactic acid bacteria consortium of raw milk cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Rogelj

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of gene determinants for different bacteriocins has been already demonstrated in traditional Slovenian types of raw milk cheeses ‘Tolminc’ and ‘Kraški’. These genes were present also in the cultivable microbiota. In this research the aim was to establish how the presence of gene determinants for bacteriocins in microbial consortia is reflected in its antimicrobial activity. In addition, one of the goals was to determine whether the strains that carry gene determinants for bacteriocins have any competitive growth advantage in microbial population. Microbial consortium of ‘Tolminc’ cheese was propagated in milk and examined at the end of propagation its antimicrobial activity and the presence of gene determinants for bacteriocins. Comparison of the results obtained before and after propagation leaded to the conclusion that most of the strains possessing gene determinants for bacteriocins were unable to persist during propagation. The strains which did persist during propagation carried gene determinants for enterocins P, L50B and cytolysin. Antimicrobial activity of consortium before and after propagation was not substantially different and cannot be attributed to any of detected bacteriocins.

  20. International Consortium on Mammographic Density: Methodology and population diversity captured across 22 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Valerie A; Burton, Anya; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Hipwell, John H; Dickens, Caroline; Salem, Dorria; Kamal, Rasha; Hartman, Mikael; Lee, Charmaine Pei Ling; Chia, Kee-Seng; Ozmen, Vahit; Aribal, Mustafa Erkin; Flugelman, Anath Arzee; Lajous, Martín; Lopez-Riduara, Ruy; Rice, Megan; Romieu, Isabelle; Ursin, Giske; Qureshi, Samera; Ma, Huiyan; Lee, Eunjung; van Gils, Carla H; Wanders, Johanna O P; Vinayak, Sudhir; Ndumia, Rose; Allen, Steve; Vinnicombe, Sarah; Moss, Sue; Won Lee, Jong; Kim, Jisun; Pereira, Ana; Garmendia, Maria Luisa; Sirous, Reza; Sirous, Mehri; Peplonska, Beata; Bukowska, Agnieszka; Tamimi, Rulla M; Bertrand, Kimberly; Nagata, Chisato; Kwong, Ava; Vachon, Celine; Scott, Christopher; Perez-Gomez, Beatriz; Pollan, Marina; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Giles, Graham; Hopper, John; Stone, Jennifer; Rajaram, Nadia; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Mariapun, Shivaani; Yaffe, Martin J; Schüz, Joachim; Chiarelli, Anna M; Linton, Linda; Boyd, Norman F

    2016-02-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a quantitative trait, measurable in all women, and is among the strongest markers of breast cancer risk. The population-based epidemiology of MD has revealed genetic, lifestyle and societal/environmental determinants, but studies have largely been conducted in women with similar westernized lifestyles living in countries with high breast cancer incidence rates. To benefit from the heterogeneity in risk factors and their combinations worldwide, we created an International Consortium on Mammographic Density (ICMD) to pool individual-level epidemiological and MD data from general population studies worldwide. ICMD aims to characterize determinants of MD more precisely, and to evaluate whether they are consistent across populations worldwide. We included 11755 women, from 27 studies in 22 countries, on whom individual-level risk factor data were pooled and original mammographic images were re-read for ICMD to obtain standardized comparable MD data. In the present article, we present (i) the rationale for this consortium; (ii) characteristics of the studies and women included; and (iii) study methodology to obtain comparable MD data from original re-read films. We also highlight the risk factor heterogeneity captured by such an effort and, thus, the unique insight the pooled study promises to offer through wider exposure ranges, different confounding structures and enhanced power for sub-group analyses.

  1. Microbial consortium influence upon steel corrosion rate, using polarisation resistance and electrochemical noise techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Gayosso, M.J.; Zavala Olivares, G.; Ruiz Ordaz, N.; Juarez Ramirez, C.; Garcia Esquivel, R.; Padilla Viveros, A

    2004-10-01

    The microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is a process, which affects the oil industry, particularly the hydrocarbons extraction, transport and storage. MIC evaluation has been normally based upon microbiological tests, and just a few references mention alternating methods, such as the electrochemical techniques, which can be used as criteria for their evaluation. In this work, two different electrochemical laboratory techniques, polarisation resistance and electrochemical noise were used, in order to determine the corrosion behaviour of a microbial consortium, obtained from a gas transporting pipeline, located in the southeast of Mexico. The bacteria population growth was found to be different for sessile and plancktonic microorganisms. Moreover, long incubation times were required to reach the maximum concentration of sessile bacteria. The electrochemical techniques used in this study exhibited a similar tendency on the corrosion rate behaviour with time, and values above 0.3 mm year{sup -1} were observed at the end of the experiments. The experiments were complemented with surface analysis. Scanning electron microscope observation of APIXL52 steel coupons, exposed to the consortium action, revealed bacteria presence, as well as a damaged steel surface. A type of localized corrosion was observed on the metal surface, and it was associated to the bacteria effect.

  2. Deep-biosphere consortium of fungi and prokaryotes in Eocene subseafloor basalts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson, S; Ivarsson, M; Astolfo, A; Belivanova, V; Broman, C; Marone, F; Stampanoni, M

    2014-11-01

    The deep biosphere of the subseafloor crust is believed to contain a significant part of Earth's biomass, but because of the difficulties of directly observing the living organisms, its composition and ecology are poorly known. We report here a consortium of fossilized prokaryotic and eukaryotic micro-organisms, occupying cavities in deep-drilled vesicular basalt from the Emperor Seamounts, Pacific Ocean, 67.5 m below seafloor (mbsf). Fungal hyphae provide the framework on which prokaryote-like organisms are suspended like cobwebs and iron-oxidizing bacteria form microstromatolites (Frutexites). The spatial inter-relationships show that the organisms were living at the same time in an integrated fashion, suggesting symbiotic interdependence. The community is contemporaneous with secondary mineralizations of calcite partly filling the cavities. The fungal hyphae frequently extend into the calcite, indicating that they were able to bore into the substrate through mineral dissolution. A symbiotic relationship with chemoautotrophs, as inferred for the observed consortium, may be a pre-requisite for the eukaryotic colonization of crustal rocks. Fossils thus open a window to the extant as well as the ancient deep biosphere.

  3. Characterization of a Bioflocculant Produced by a Consortium of Halomonas sp. Okoh and Micrococcus sp. Leo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony I. Okoh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The physicochemical and flocculating properties of a bioflocculant produced by a bacterial consortium composed of Halomonas sp. Okoh and Micrococcus sp. Leo were investigated. The purified bioflocculant was cation and pH dependent, and optimally flocculated kaolin clay suspension at a dosage of 0.1 mg/mL. The flocculating activity of the bioflocculant was stimulated in the presence of Ca2+, Mn2+, Al3+ and had a wide pH range of 2–10, with the highest flocculating activity of 86% at pH 8. The bioflocculant was thermostable and retained more than 70% of its flocculating activity after being heated at 80 °C for 30 min. Thermogravimetric analyses revealed a partial thermal decomposition of the biofloculant at 400 °C. The infrared spectrum showed the presence of hydroxyl, carboxyl and amino moieties as functional groups. The bioflocculant produced by the bacterial consortium appears to hold promising alternative to inorganic and synthetic organic flocculants that are widely used in wastewater treatment.

  4. Characterization of microalgae-bacteria consortium cultured in landfill leachate for carbon fixation and lipid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Zhou, Yan; Huang, Sheng; Qiu, Duanyang; Schideman, Lance; Chai, Xiaoli; Zhao, Youcai

    2014-03-01

    The characteristics of cultivating high-density microalgae-bacteria consortium with landfill leachate was tested in this study. Landfill leachate was collected from Laogang landfill operated for over 10 years in Shanghai, China. The maximum biomass concentration of 1.58g L(-1) and chlorophyll a level of 22mg L(-1) were obtained in 10% leachate spike ratio. Meanwhile, up to 90% of the total nitrogen in landfill leachate was removed in culture with 10% leachate spike ratio with a total nitrogen concentration of 221.6mg L(-1). The fluorescence peak of humic-like organic matters red shifted to longer wavelengths by the end of culture, indicating that microalgae-bacteria consortium was effective for treating landfill leachate contaminants. Furthermore, with the leachate spike ratio of 10%, the maximum lipid productivity and carbon fixation were 24.1 and 65.8mg L(-1)d(-1), respectively. Results of this research provide valuable information for optimizing microalgae culture in landfill leachate.

  5. A rapid selection strategy for an anodophilic consortium for microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Aijie

    2010-07-01

    A rapid selection method was developed to enrich for a stable and efficient anodophilic consortium (AC) for microbial fuel cells (MFCs). A biofilm sample from a microbial electrolysis cell was serially diluted up to 10-9 in anaerobic phosphate buffer solution and incubated in an Fe(III)-acetate medium, and an Fe(III)-reducing AC was obtained for dilutions up to 10-6. The activity of MFC inoculated with the enrichment AC was compared with those inoculated with original biofilm or activated sludge. The power densities and Coulombic efficiencies of the AC (226 mW/m2, 34%) were higher than those of the original biofilm (209 mW/m2, 23%) and activated sludge (192 mW/m2, 19%). The start-up period of the AC (60 h) was also shorter than those obtained with the other inocula (biofilm, 95 h; activated sludge, 300 h). This indicated that such a strategy is highly efficient for obtaining an anodophilic consortium for improving the performance of an MFC. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Teaching About Critical Earth Issues in the 2U Semester Online Consortium (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysession, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    In the spring of 2014 Washington University will present one of the first courses, entitled 'Critical Earth Issues,' in a new experiment in online education to be carried out by a consortium of Universities working with the production company 2U. The consortium, consisting of Washington University in St. Louis, Boston College, Brandeis University, Emory University, Northwestern University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the University of Notre Dame, will all offer courses that can be taken by each other's students. In addition, three affiliate institutions so far (Baylor University, Southern Methodist University, and Temple University) have agree to allow their students to take online courses from this consortium, and transfer credit will be granted from the consortium institution teaching a particular course to students from other institutions as well. A total of eleven courses from the seven consortium schools are being taught in the fall of 2013. 'Critical Earth Issues,' to be taught the next spring, will be the first geoscience course taught. The structure of the course will be very different from traditional MOOCs. Half of the course (80 minutes per week) will be asynchronous and produced in advance by the company 2U. This is designed to take the place of the lecture component of a class, but it can take a variety of forms. While there are traditional lecture segments and filmed demos, these are also broken up by assignments for the students in order to make the 'lecture' segment more interactive. Sometimes the students will have to answer short or long questions before they can go on to the next part of the asynchronous material. Students can only get to the assignment at the end if they work their way through all the produced and interactive segments. This material will often also prompt them to upload an 'assignment,' such as uploading photos of different rocks that are used for the buildings at their host institution (to be shared

  7. Bacterial diversity of a consortium degrading high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a two-liquid phase biosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafortune, Isabelle; Juteau, Pierre; Déziel, Eric; Lépine, François; Beaudet, Réjean; Villemur, Richard

    2009-04-01

    High-molecular-weight (HMW) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that persist in the environment due to their low solubility in water and their sequestration by soil and sediments. Although several PAH-degrading bacterial species have been isolated, it is not expected that a single isolate would exhibit the ability to degrade completely all PAHs. A consortium composed of different microorganisms can better achieve this. Two-liquid phase (TLP) culture systems have been developed to increase the bioavailability of poorly soluble substrates for uptake and biodegradation by microorganisms. By combining a silicone oil-water TLP system with a microbial consortium capable of degrading HMW PAHs, we previously developed a highly efficient PAH-degrading system. In this report, we characterized the bacterial diversity of the consortium with a combination of culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of part of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) sequences combined with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to monitor the bacterial population changes during PAH degradation of the consortium when pyrene, chrysene, and benzo[a]pyrene were provided together or separately in the TLP cultures. No substantial changes in bacterial profiles occurred during biodegradation of pyrene and chrysene in these cultures. However, the addition of the low-molecular-weight PAHs phenanthrene or naphthalene in the system favored one bacterial species related to Sphingobium yanoikuyae. Eleven bacterial strains were isolated from the consortium but, interestingly, only one-IAFILS9 affiliated to Novosphingobium pentaromativorans-was capable of growing on pyrene and chrysene as sole source of carbon. A 16S rDNA library was derived from the consortium to identify noncultured bacteria. Among 86 clones screened, 20 were affiliated to different bacterial species-genera. Only three strains were represented in the screened clones. Eighty

  8. Fifteen Years of Collaborative Innovation and Achievement: NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium 15-Year Program Performance and Results Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Michaela M.; Bowen, Brent D.; Fink, Mary M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.; Avery, Shelly; Carstenson, Larry; Dugan, James; Farritor, Shane; Joyce, James; Rebrovich, Barb

    2003-01-01

    Condensing five years of significant work into a brief narrative fitting PPR requirements gave the affiliates of the Nebraska Space Grant a valuable chance for reflection. Achievements of Space Grant in Nebraska were judiciously chosen for this document that best illustrate the resultant synergism of this consortium, keeping in mind that these examples are only a representation of greater activity throughout the state. Following are highlights of many of the finer and personal achievements for Nebraska Space Grant. The Consortium welcomes inquiries to elaborate on any of these accomplishments.

  9. 25 CFR 1000.17 - What documents must a Tribe/Consortium submit to OSG to apply for admission to the applicant pool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What documents must a Tribe/Consortium submit to OSG to apply for admission to the applicant pool? 1000.17 Section 1000.17 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT.../Consortium submit to OSG to apply for admission to the applicant pool? In addition to the...

  10. 25 CFR 1000.50 - What must a Tribe/Consortium seeking a planning grant submit in order to meet the planning phase...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must a Tribe/Consortium seeking a planning grant submit in order to meet the planning phase requirements? 1000.50 Section 1000.50 Indians OFFICE OF THE... seeking a planning grant submit in order to meet the planning phase requirements? A Tribe/Consortium...

  11. The Mississippi University Research Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass: Production of Alternative Fuels from Waste Biomass Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drs. Mark E. Zapp; Todd French; Lewis Brown; Clifford George; Rafael Hernandez; Marvin Salin (from Mississippie State University); Drs. Huey-Min Hwang, Ken Lee, Yi Zhang; Maria Begonia (from Jackson State University); Drs. Clint Williford; Al Mikell (from the University of Mississippi); Drs. Robert Moore; Roger Hester (from the University of Southern Mississippi).

    2009-03-31

    The Mississippi Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass was formed via funding from the US Department of Energy's EPSCoR Program, which is administered by the Office of Basic Science. Funding was approved in July of 1999 and received by participating Mississippi institutions by 2000. The project was funded via two 3-year phases of operation (the second phase was awarded based on the high merits observed from the first 3-year phase), with funding ending in 2007. The mission of the Consortium was to promote the utilization of biomass, both cultured and waste derived, for the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. These scientific efforts, although generally basic in nature, are key to the development of future industries within the Southeastern United States. In this proposal, the majority of the efforts performed under the DOE EPSCoR funding were focused primarily toward the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks and biogas from waste products. However, some of the individual projects within this program investigated the production of other products from biomass feeds (i.e. acetic acid and biogas) along with materials to facilitate the more efficient production of chemicals from biomass. Mississippi is a leading state in terms of raw biomass production. Its top industries are timber, poultry production, and row crop agriculture. However, for all of its vast amounts of biomass produced on an annual basis, only a small percentage of the biomass is actually industrially produced into products, with the bulk of the biomass being wasted. This situation is actually quite representative of many Southeastern US states. The research and development efforts performed attempted to further develop promising chemical production techniques that use Mississippi biomass feedstocks. The three processes that were the primary areas of interest for ethanol production were syngas fermentation, acid hydrolysis followed by hydrolyzate fermentation, and

  12. Fiscal 1999 geothermal development promotion survey report. Data processing (No. B-5 - Musadake region - Phase 3); 1999 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa data shori hokokusho. No. B-5 Musadake chiiki (Dai 3 ji)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis was conducted into the results of a survey on the state of existence of geothermal energy resources in the Musadake region, Shibetsu-gun, Hokkaido. The region was volcanically active in the period from the Neogene period into the quaternary, with some volcanos still active even today. The geological structure on the whole is characterized by the Musadake/Mt. Shitabanupuri fault which is the major structure running NNE-SSW and having a folding structure. It is inferred that Musadake is the heat source responsible for the underground temperature distribution in this region. The maximum temperature of 274 degrees C is recorded at borehole N11-MD-3 in the northeastern part of Musadake, and the temperature falls rapidly as the distance from the borehole increases. Ejection of geothermal fluids is observed at boreholes N11-MD-3 and N11-MD-4. It is inferred that the deep-seated geothermal water is of the neutral Cl type with Cl concentration estimated at approximately 12,000 mg/liter. Steam composition is characterized by a gas concentration level that is as high as 3-4 vol.%. The gas is composedly mainly of CO2 and contains some hydrocarbons. Fluids in this region are classified into water mixing into deep-seated geothermal water and groundwater originating in meteoric water. (NEDO)

  13. FY 1997 report on the research for construction of NEDO`s vision. Regional environment and international collaboration; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (NEDO vision sakutei ni muketa chosa kenkyu). Chiiki kankyo to kokusai kyoryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    It is necessary for NEDO to transfer the energy technology to developing countries and conduct collaborations with them efficiently. First of all, environments of the community were analyzed from a viewpoint of natural environment, social and cultural environment, and industrial and economic environment. Then, this report outlines the organizations of domestic and international aid agencies which have potentials to conduct alliance and collaboration with NEDO, and also illustrates their activities including financing and technology exchange, regional activities, and progress of activities. Alliances and collaborations with NGOs of each international organization were analyzed on the aspect of the fields and know-how of alliance with NGOs, selection standards of NGOs and necessary systems and organizations to make effective alliance and collaboration with NGOs, and some case studies were taken. Organization, purposes and activities of NGOs in Asian countries are introduced, and their current situations are illustrated. Finally, some proposals were offered to make alliances and collaborations with aid agencies and NGOs. They are concerned about the fields and know-how of alliance with NGOs, selection standards of NGOs and necessary systems and organizations to make effective alliance and collaboration with NGOs. 44 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Effect of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene on methane oxidation and community structure of methanotrophic consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun-Ah; Lee, Eun-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-01-01

    The methane oxidation rate and community structure of a methanotrophic consortium were analyzed to determine the effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) on methane oxidation. The maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax ) of the consortium was 326.8 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1), and it had a half-saturation constant (Km ) of 143.8 μM. The addition of TCE or PCE resulted in decreased methane oxidation rates, which were decreased from 101.73 to 5.47-24.64 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio, and to 61.95-67.43 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. TCE and PCE were non-competitive inhibitors for methane oxidation, and their inhibition constants (Ki ) were 33.4 and 132.0 μM, respectively. When the methanotrophic community was analyzed based on pmoA using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), the pmoA gene copy numbers were shown to decrease from 7.3 ± 0.7 × 10(8) to 2.1-5.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio and to 2.5-7.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. Community analysis by microarray demonstrated that Methylocystis (type II methanotrophs) were the most abundant in the methanotrophic community composition in the presence of TCE. These results suggest that toxic effects caused by TCE and PCE change not only methane oxidation rates but also the community structure of the methanotrophic consortium.

  15. Earth Hazards Consortium: a Unique Approach to Student-Centered Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, C. P.; Granados, H. D.; Durant, A.; Wolf, R. E.; Girard, G.; Javier, I. H.; Cisneros, M.; Rose, W.; Sánchez, S. S.; Stix, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Earth Hazards (EHaz) consortium consists of six research-based universities in the United States (Michigan Technological University, University at Buffalo), Canada (McGill University, Simon Fraser University) and México (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad de Colima) funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, and the Secretaría de Educación Pública of México, as part of the North American Free Trade Agreement. The objective of the consortium is to expose students to a wide variety of scientific and cultural perspectives in the mitigation of geological natural hazards in North America. This four year program is multi-faceted, including student exchanges, graduate level, web-based courses in volcanology, and intensive group field trips. In 2005 to 2006, a total of 27 students were mobilized among the three countries. In this first year, the videoconferencing course focused on caldera supervolcanoes with weekly discussion leaders from various fields of volcanology. At the end of the course the students participated in a field trip to Long Valley and Yellowstone calderas. Also during the first year of the program, México hosted an International Course on Volcanic Hazards Map Construction. The course was attended by graduate students from Mexico and the United States, included lectures from noted guest speakers, and involved a field trip to Popocatepetl volcano. A student survey demonstrated that during the videoconferencing the students benefited by the weekly interaction with well- known volcanologists at the top of their field. Students who participated in the field trip benefited from an outstanding opportunity to link the theoretical concepts covered during the course with the field aspects of supervolcano systems, as well as the opportunity to network amongst their peers. Feedback from students who went abroad indicates that the program provided support for internship opportunities

  16. Earth Hazards Consortium: a Novel Approach to Student Education in Geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, C. P.; Delgado Granados, H.; Escobar Wolf, R.; Durant, A.; Girard, G.; Calder, E.; Dominguez, T.; Roberge, J.; Rose, W.; Stix, J.; Varley, N.; Williams-Jones, G.; Hernandez Javier, I.; Salinas Sanchez, S.

    2007-05-01

    The Earth Hazards (Ehaz) consortium consists of six research-based universities in the United States (Michigan Technological University, University of New York at Buffalo), Canada (McGill University, Simon Fraser University) and Mexico (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad de Colima) funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, and the Secretaría de Educación Pública of Mexico, as part of the North American Free Trade Agreement. The objective of the consortium is to expose students to a wide variety of scientific and cultural perspectives in the mitigation of geological natural hazards in North America. This four-year program is multi-faceted, including student exchanges, graduate level, web-based courses in volcanology, and intensive group field trips. In 2005 to 2006, a total of 27 students were mobilized among the three countries. In this first year, the videoconferencing course focused on caldera "Supervolcanoes" with weekly discussion leaders from various fields of volcanology. At the end of the course the students participated in a field trip to Long Valley and Yellowstone calderas. Also during the first year of the program, Mexico hosted an International Course on Volcanic Hazards Map Construction. The course was attended by graduate students from Mexico and the United States, included lectures from noted guest speakers, and involved a field trip to Popocatépetl volcano. The multi-university course focus for 2007 is Volcanic Edifice Failure with a field trip planned in August 2007 to the Cascades and Western Canada. A student survey from 2006 demonstrated that (1) during the videoconferencing the students benefited by the weekly interaction with well-known volcanologists at the top of their field, (2) the field trip provided an outstanding opportunity for participants to link the theoretical concepts covered during the course with the field aspects of supervolcano systems, as well as the

  17. A strategy for providing electronic library services to members of the AGATE Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. Garth

    1995-01-01

    In November, 1992, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin established a Task Force to evaluate conditions which have lead to the precipitous decline of the US General Aviation System and to recommend actions needed to re-establish US leadership in General Aviation. The Task Force Report and a report by Dr. Bruce J. Holmes, Manager of the General Aviation/Commuter Office at NASA Langley Research Center provided the directions for the formation of the Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE), a consortium of government, industry and university committed to the revitalization of the US General Aviation Industry. One of the recommendations of the Task Force Report was that 'a central repository of information should be created to disseminate NASA research as well as other domestic and foreign aeronautical research that has been accomplished, is ongoing or is planned... A user friendly environment should be created.' This paper describes technical and logistic issues and recommends a plan for providing technical information to members of the AGATE Consortium. It is recommended that the General Aviation office establish and maintain an electronic literature page on the AGATE server. This page should provide a user friendly interface to existing technical report and index servers identified in the report and listed in the Recommendations section. A page should also be provided which gives links to Web resources. A list of specific resources is provided in the Recommendations section. Links should also be provided to a page with tips on searching, a form to provide for feedback and suggestions from users for other resources. Finally, a page should be maintained which provides pointers to other resources like the LaRCsim workstation simulation software which is avail from LaRC at no cost. The developments of the Web is very dynamic. These developments should be monitored regularly by the GA staff and links to additional resources should be provided on the server as

  18. Neighborhood Energy/Economic Development project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    Energy costs impact low income communities more than anyone else. Low income residents pay a larger percentage of their incomes for energy costs. In addition, they generally have far less discretionary energy use to eliminate in response to increasing energy prices. Furthermore, with less discretionary income, home energy efficiency improvements are often too expensive. Small neighborhood businesses are in the same situation. Improved efficiency in the use of energy can improve this situation by reducing energy costs for residents and local businesses. More importantly, energy management programs can increase the demand for local goods and services and lead to the creation of new job training and employment opportunities. In this way, neighborhood based energy efficiency programs can support community economic development. The present project, undertaken with the support of the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force, was intended to serve as a demonstration of energy/economic programming at the neighborhood level. The San Francisco Neighborhood Energy/Economic Development (NEED) project was designed to be a visible demonstration of bringing the economic development benefits of energy management home to low-income community members who need it most. To begin, a Community Advisory Committee was established to guide the design of the programs to best meet needs of the community. Subsequently three neighborhood energy/economic development programs were developed: The small business energy assistance program; The youth training and weatherization program; and, The energy review of proposed housing development projects.

  19. 32 CFR 37.515 - Must I do anything additional to determine the qualification of a consortium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... qualification of a consortium? 37.515 Section 37.515 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE... Evaluation Recipient Qualification § 37.515 Must I do anything additional to determine the qualification of a... previously or under the agreement. Total Funding...

  20. The Metagenomics and Metadesign of the Subways and Urban Biomes (MetaSUB) International Consortium inaugural meeting report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-03

    The Metagenomics and Metadesign of the Subways and Urban Biomes (MetaSUB) International Consortium is a novel, interdisciplinary initiative comprised of experts across many fields, including genomics, data analysis, engineering, public health, and architecture. The ultimate goal of the MetaSUB Consortium is to improve city utilization and planning through the detection, measurement, and design of metagenomics within urban environments. Although continual measures occur for temperature, air pressure, weather, and human activity, including longitudinal, cross-kingdom ecosystem dynamics can alter and improve the design of cities. The MetaSUB Consortium is aiding these efforts by developing and testing metagenomic methods and standards, including optimized methods for sample collection, DNA/RNA isolation, taxa characterization, and data visualization. The data produced by the consortium can aid city planners, public health officials, and architectural designers. In addition, the study will continue to lead to the discovery of new species, global maps of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) markers, and novel biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). Finally, we note that engineered metagenomic ecosystems can help enable more responsive, safer, and quantified cities.