WorldWideScience

Sample records for chicken cr1 retrotransposons

  1. Analysis of CR1 Repeats in the Zebra Finch Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Liu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Most bird species have smaller genomes and fewer repeats than mammals. Chicken Repeat 1 (CR1 repeat is one of the most abundant families of repeats, ranging from ~133,000 to ~187,000 copies accounting for ~50 to ~80% of the interspersed repeats in the zebra finch and chicken genomes, respectively. CR1 repeats are believed to have arisen from the retrotransposition of a small number of master elements, which gave rise to multiple CR1 subfamilies in the chicken. In this study, we performed a global assessment of the divergence distributions, phylogenies, and consensus sequences of CR1 repeats in the zebra finch genome. We identified and validated 34 CR1 subfamilies and further analyzed the correlation between these subfamilies. We also discovered 4 novel lineage-specific CR1 subfamilies in the zebra finch when compared to the chicken genome. We built various evolutionary trees of these subfamilies and concluded that CR1 repeats may play an important role in reshaping the structure of bird genomes.

  2. Drosophila: Retrotransposons Making up Telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casacuberta, Elena

    2017-07-19

    Drosophila and extant species are the best-studied telomerase exception. In this organism, telomere elongation is coupled with targeted retrotransposition of Healing Transposon (HeT-A) and Telomere Associated Retrotransposon (TART) with sporadic additions of Telomere Associated and HeT-A Related (TAHRE), all three specialized non-Long Terminal Repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons. These three very special retroelements transpose in head to tail arrays, always in the same orientation at the end of the chromosomes but never in interior locations. Apparently, retrotransposon and telomerase telomeres might seem very different, but a detailed view of their mechanisms reveals similarities explaining how the loss of telomerase in a Drosophila ancestor could successfully have been replaced by the telomere retrotransposons. In this review, we will discover that although HeT-A, TART, and TAHRE are still the only examples to date where their targeted transposition is perfectly tamed into the telomere biology of Drosophila, there are other examples of retrotransposons that manage to successfully integrate inside and at the end of telomeres. Because the aim of this special issue is viral integration at telomeres, understanding the base of the telomerase exceptions will help to obtain clues on similar strategies that mobile elements and viruses could have acquired in order to ensure their survival in the host genome.

  3. LTR retrotransposons in fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Muszewska

    Full Text Available Transposable elements with long terminal direct repeats (LTR TEs are one of the best studied groups of mobile elements. They are ubiquitous elements present in almost all eukaryotic genomes. Their number and state of conservation can be a highlight of genome dynamics. We searched all published fungal genomes for LTR-containing retrotransposons, including both complete, functional elements and remnant copies. We identified a total of over 66,000 elements, all of which belong to the Ty1/Copia or Ty3/Gypsy superfamilies. Most of the detected Gypsy elements represent Chromoviridae, i.e. they carry a chromodomain in the pol ORF. We analyzed our data from a genome-ecology perspective, looking at the abundance of various types of LTR TEs in individual genomes and at the highest-copy element from each genome. The TE content is very variable among the analyzed genomes. Some genomes are very scarce in LTR TEs (8000 elements. The data shows that transposon expansions in fungi usually involve an increase both in the copy number of individual elements and in the number of element types. The majority of the highest-copy TEs from all genomes are Ty3/Gypsy transposons. Phylogenetic analysis of these elements suggests that TE expansions have appeared independently of each other, in distant genomes and at different taxonomical levels. We also analyzed the evolutionary relationships between protein domains encoded by the transposon pol ORF and we found that the protease is the fastest evolving domain whereas reverse transcriptase and RNase H evolve much slower and in correlation with each other.

  4. Retrotransposon Domestication and Control in Dictyostelium discoideum

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    Marek Malicki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements, identified in all eukaryotes, are mobile genetic units that can change their genomic position. Transposons usually employ an excision and reintegration mechanism, by which they change position, but not copy number. In contrast, retrotransposons amplify via RNA intermediates, increasing their genomic copy number. Hence, they represent a particular threat to the structural and informational integrity of the invaded genome. The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, model organism of the evolutionary Amoebozoa supergroup, features a haploid, gene-dense genome that offers limited space for damage-free transposition. Several of its contemporary retrotransposons display intrinsic integration preferences, for example by inserting next to transfer RNA genes or other retroelements. Likely, any retrotransposons that invaded the genome of the amoeba in a non-directed manner were lost during evolution, as this would result in decreased fitness of the organism. Thus, the positional preference of the Dictyostelium retroelements might represent a domestication of the selfish elements. Likewise, the reduced danger of such domesticated transposable elements led to their accumulation, and they represent about 10% of the current genome of D. discoideum. To prevent the uncontrolled spreading of retrotransposons, the amoeba employs control mechanisms including RNA interference and heterochromatization. Here, we review TRE5-A, DIRS-1 and Skipper-1, as representatives of the three retrotransposon classes in D. discoideum, which make up 5.7% of the Dictyostelium genome. We compile open questions with respect to their mobility and cellular regulation, and suggest strategies, how these questions might be addressed experimentally.

  5. [Ulysses retrotransposon aspartate proteinase (Drosophila virilis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, D A; Savvateeva, L V; Dergousova, N I; Rumsh, L D

    2002-01-01

    Retrotransposones are mobile genetic elements occurring in genomes of bacteria, plants or animals. Retrotransposones were found to contain nucleotide sequences encoding proteins which are homological to retroviral aspartic proteinases. Our research has been focused on Ulysses which is mobile genetic element found in Drosophila virilis. We suggested a primary structure of Ulysses proteinase using comparative analysis of amino acid sequences of retroviral proteinases and proteinases from retrotransposones. The appropriate cDNA fragment has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The purification of recombinant protein (12 kD) has been carried out by affinity chromatography using pepstatine-agarose. The obtained protein has proteolytic activity at optimum pH 5.5 like the majority of aspartic proteinases.

  6. Retrotransposons and non-protein coding RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Willerslev, Eske

    2009-01-01

    does not merely represent spurious transcription. We review examples of functional RNAs transcribed from retrotransposons, and address the collection of non-protein coding RNAs derived from transposable element sequences, including numerous human microRNAs and the neuronal BC RNAs. Finally, we review...

  7. Citrus and Prunuscopia-like retrotransposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asíns, M J; Monforte, A J; Mestre, P F; Carbonell, E A

    1999-08-01

    Many of the world's most important citrus cultivars ("Washington Navel", satsumas, clementines) have arisen through somatic mutation. This phenomenon occurs fairly often in the various species and varieties of the genus.The presence of copia-like retrotransposons has been investigated in fruit trees, especially citrus, by using a PCR assay designed to detect copia-like reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences. Amplification products from a genotype of each the following species Citrus sinensis, Citrus grandis, Citrus clementina, Prunus armeniaca and Prunus amygdalus, were cloned and some of them sequenced. Southern-blot hybridization using RT clones as probes showed that multiple copies are integrated throughout the citrus genome, while only 1-3 copies are detected in the P. armeniaca genome, which is in accordance with the Citrus and Prunus genome sizes. Sequence analysis of RT clones allowed a search for homologous sequences within three gene banks. The most similar ones correspond to RT domains of copia-like retrotransposons from unrelated plant species. Cluster analysis of these sequences has shown a great heterogeneity among RT domains cloned from the same genotype. This finding supports the hypothesis that horizontal transmission of retrotransposons has occurred in the past. The species presenting a RT sequence most similar to citrus RT clones is Gnetum montanum, a gymnosperm whose distribution area coincides with two of the main centers of origin of Citrus spp. A new C-methylated restriction DNA fragment containing a RT sequence is present in navel sweet oranges, but not in Valencia oranges from which the former originated suggesting, that retrotransposon activity might be, at least in part, involved in the genetic variability among sweet orange cultivars. Given that retrotransposons are quite abundant throughout the citrus genome, their activity should be investigated thoroughly before commercializing any transgenic citrus plant where the transgene(s) is part

  8. Fatigue Properties of Aged Mod. 9Cr-1Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Whan; Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Chan Bock

    2007-01-01

    Ferritic/Martensitic steel has a good mechanical properties and a lower thermal expansion coefficient than austenitic stainless steel. Mechanical property of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel is less than austenitic stainless steel at high temperature. High temperature mechanical properties are affected by precipitation for Mod. 9Cr-1Mo. FMS steel is used for long time at high temperature and the effect of aging on mechanical properties is very important. In this study, low cycle fatigue properties with aging were investigated

  9. Full Length Research Paper LTR-retrotransposons-based molecular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LTR-retrotransposons possess unique properties that make them appropriate for investigating relationships between closely related species and populations. The aim of the current study was to employ Ty1-copia group retrotransposons as molecular markers in cultivated Egyptian cottons, G. barbadense L. Restriction site ...

  10. Convergent evolution of ribonuclease h in LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustyantsev, Kirill; Novikova, Olga; Blinov, Alexander; Smyshlyaev, Georgy

    2015-05-01

    Ty3/Gypsy long terminals repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are structurally and phylogenetically close to retroviruses. Two notable structural differences between these groups of genetic elements are 1) the presence in retroviruses of an additional envelope gene, env, which mediates infection, and 2) a specific dual ribonuclease H (RNH) domain encoded by the retroviral pol gene. However, similar to retroviruses, many Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons harbor additional env-like genes, promoting concepts of the infective mode of these retrotransposons. Here, we provide a further line of evidence of similarity between retroviruses and some Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons. We identify that, together with their additional genes, plant Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons of the Tat group have a second RNH, as do retroviruses. Most importantly, we show that the resulting dual RNHs of Tat LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses emerged independently, providing strong evidence for their convergent evolution. The convergent resemblance of Tat LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses may indicate similar selection pressures acting on these diverse groups of elements and reveal potential evolutionary constraints on their structure. We speculate that dual RNH is required to accelerate retrotransposon evolution through increased rates of strand transfer events and subsequent recombination events. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. [Non-LTR retrotransposons: LINEs and SINEs in plant genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xu-Dong; Ling, Hong-Qing

    2006-06-01

    Retrotransposons are one of the drivers of genome evolution. They include LTR (long terminal repeat) retrotransposons, which widespread in Eukaryotagenomes, show structural similarity to retroviruses. Non-LTR retrotransposons were first discovered in animal genomes and then identified as ubiquitous components of nuclear genomes in many species across the plant kingdom. They constitute a large fraction of the repetitive DNA. Non-LTR retrotransposons are divided into LINEs (long interspersed nuclear elements) and SINEs (short interspersed nuclear elements). Transposition of non-LTR retrotransposons is rarely observed in plants indicating that most of them are inactive and/or under regulation of the host genome. Transposition is poorly understood, but experimental evidence from other genetic systems shows that LINEs are able to transpose autonomously while non-autonomous SINEs depend on the reverse transcription machinery of other retrotransposons. Phylogenic analysis shows LINEs are probably the most ancient class of retrotransposons in plant genomes, while the origin of SINEs is unknown. This review sums up the above data and wants to show readers a clear picture of non-LTR retrotransposons.

  12. Copia and Gypsy retrotransposons activity in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Retrotransposons are heterogeneous sequences, widespread in eukaryotic genomes, which refer to the so-called mobile DNA. They resemble retroviruses, both in their structure and for their ability to transpose within the host genome, of which they make up a considerable portion. Copia- and Gypsy-like retrotransposons are the two main classes of retroelements shown to be ubiquitous in plant genomes. Ideally, the retrotransposons life cycle results in the synthesis of a messenger RNA and then self-encoded proteins to process retrotransposon mRNA in double stranded extra-chromosomal cDNA copies which may integrate in new chromosomal locations. Results The RT-PCR and IRAP protocol were applied to detect the presence of Copia and Gypsy retrotransposon transcripts and of new events of integration in unstressed plants of a sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) selfed line. Results show that in sunflower retrotransposons transcription occurs in all analyzed organs (embryos, leaves, roots, and flowers). In one out of sixty-four individuals analyzed, retrotransposons transcription resulted in the integration of a new element into the genome. Conclusion These results indicate that the retrotransposon life cycle is firmly controlled at a post transcriptional level. A possible silencing mechanism is discussed. PMID:20030800

  13. LTR-retrotransposons-based molecular markers in cultivated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-07-03

    Jul 3, 2006 ... LTR-retrotransposons represent a standard component of the Gossypium Genome (Zaki and Abdel Ghany,. 2003). The analysis of the molecular existence and distribution of ancient and active LTR-retrotransposons, therefore, provides a comprehensive evaluation of the evolutionary history of Gossypium.

  14. Sequencing the extrachromosomal circular mobilome reveals retrotransposon activity in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Lanciano

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons are mobile genetic elements abundant in plant and animal genomes. While efficiently silenced by the epigenetic machinery, they can be reactivated upon stress or during development. Their level of transcription not reflecting their transposition ability, it is thus difficult to evaluate their contribution to the active mobilome. Here we applied a simple methodology based on the high throughput sequencing of extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA forms of active retrotransposons to characterize the repertoire of mobile retrotransposons in plants. This method successfully identified known active retrotransposons in both Arabidopsis and rice material where the epigenome is destabilized. When applying mobilome-seq to developmental stages in wild type rice, we identified PopRice as a highly active retrotransposon producing eccDNA forms in the wild type endosperm. The mobilome-seq strategy opens new routes for the characterization of a yet unexplored fraction of plant genomes.

  15. Sequencing the extrachromosomal circular mobilome reveals retrotransposon activity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanciano, Sophie; Carpentier, Marie-Christine; Llauro, Christel; Jobet, Edouard; Robakowska-Hyzorek, Dagmara; Lasserre, Eric; Ghesquière, Alain; Panaud, Olivier; Mirouze, Marie

    2017-02-01

    Retrotransposons are mobile genetic elements abundant in plant and animal genomes. While efficiently silenced by the epigenetic machinery, they can be reactivated upon stress or during development. Their level of transcription not reflecting their transposition ability, it is thus difficult to evaluate their contribution to the active mobilome. Here we applied a simple methodology based on the high throughput sequencing of extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA) forms of active retrotransposons to characterize the repertoire of mobile retrotransposons in plants. This method successfully identified known active retrotransposons in both Arabidopsis and rice material where the epigenome is destabilized. When applying mobilome-seq to developmental stages in wild type rice, we identified PopRice as a highly active retrotransposon producing eccDNA forms in the wild type endosperm. The mobilome-seq strategy opens new routes for the characterization of a yet unexplored fraction of plant genomes.

  16. Identification of retrotransposon-like sequences in Iranian river buffalo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-03-29

    % of a genome (Waterston et al., 2002). Mobile elements can be divided into two classes: Class I includes retrotransposons and class II includes DNA tran- sposons ... including dog, cat, horse, cattle, donkey, kangaroo, etc.

  17. Retrotransposons as regulators of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbarbary, Reyad A; Lucas, Bronwyn A; Maquat, Lynne E

    2016-02-12

    Transposable elements (TEs) are both a boon and a bane to eukaryotic organisms, depending on where they integrate into the genome and how their sequences function once integrated. We focus on two types of TEs: long interspersed elements (LINEs) and short interspersed elements (SINEs). LINEs and SINEs are retrotransposons; that is, they transpose via an RNA intermediate. We discuss how LINEs and SINEs have expanded in eukaryotic genomes and contribute to genome evolution. An emerging body of evidence indicates that LINEs and SINEs function to regulate gene expression by affecting chromatin structure, gene transcription, pre-mRNA processing, or aspects of mRNA metabolism. We also describe how adenosine-to-inosine editing influences SINE function and how ongoing retrotransposition is countered by the body's defense mechanisms. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Sequencing the extrachromosomal circular mobilome reveals retrotransposon activity in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Lanciano, Sophie; Carpentier, M. C.; Llauro, C.; Jobet, E.; Robakowska-Hyzorek, D.; Lasserre, E.; Ghesquière, Alain; Panaud, O.; Mirouze, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Retrotransposons are mobile genetic elements abundant in plant and animal genomes. While efficiently silenced by the epigenetic machinery, they can be reactivated upon stress or during development. Their level of transcription not reflecting their transposition ability, it is thus difficult to evaluate their contribution to the active mobilome. Here we applied a simple methodology based on the high throughput sequencing of extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA) forms of active retrotransposon...

  19. Irradiation hardening of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo-Seog; Kim, Sung-Ho; Choo, Kee-Nam; Kim, Do-Sik

    2009-01-01

    An irradiation test of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel was carried out in the OR5 test hole of HANARO of a 30 MW thermal power at 390±10degC up to a fast neutron fluence of 4.4x10 19 (n/cm 2 ) (E > 1.0 MeV). The dpa of the irradiated specimens was evaluated to be 0.034 - 0.07. Tensile and impact tests of the irradiated Mod.9Cr-1Mo were done in the hot cell of the IMEF. The change of the tensile strength by irradiation was similar to the change of the yield strength. The increase of the yield and tensile strengths was up to 18% and 10% respectively. The elongation reduction of the weldment was up to 65%. (author)

  20. Chicken Picadillo

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/recipe/chickenpicadillo.html Chicken Picadillo To use the sharing features on this ... together on a busy weeknight Ingredients 1 pound chicken breast, boneless, skinless, cut into thin strips 2 ...

  1. Chicken Stew

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/recipe/chickenstew.html Chicken Stew To use the sharing features on this ... leftovers for lunch the next day! Ingredients 8 chicken pieces (breasts or legs) 1 cup water 2 ...

  2. Impingement wastage experiments with 9Cr 1Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore, S., E-mail: skishore@igcar.gov.in [IGCAR (India); Beauchamp, François; Allou, Alexandre [CEA (France); Kumar, A. Ashok; Chandramouli, S.; Rajan, K.K. [IGCAR (India)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Sodium heated steam generators are crucial components of fast breeder reactors. • A leak in steam generator tube will cause sodium water reaction that damages the tubes. • A collaborative study by CEA and IGCAR was conducted to quantify the extent of damage on 9Cr 1Mo tube due to a steam/water leak. • It was compared against the predictions of PROPANA code. - Abstract: Steam Generator (SG) is one of the vital components of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR). The main safety concern with SG is a probable sodium–water reaction. In case, one of its water/steam carrying tubes leaks, water/steam gets into contact with sodium causing sodium-water reaction, which is highly exothermic and producing corrosive NaOH and hydrogen. The ejecting reaction products at high temperature, impinges upon adjacent tubes by a process called impingement wastage. It could damage one of the neighboring tubes in a short time, if the detection and protection systems are failing. IGCAR and CEA carried out a collaborative study on impingement wastage of 9Cr 1Mo steel, which is one of the candidate materials for SFR SG tubes. The studies comprise of experimental works at IGCAR and simulation works with PROPANA code at CEA. This paper brings out the data and experience gained through this cooperative work.

  3. Transferability of retrotransposon primers derived from Persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) across other plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X Y; Hu, Q N; Zhang, Q L; Wang, Y B; Luo, Z R

    2013-06-06

    Retrotransposon-based molecular markers are powerful molecular tools. However, these markers are not readily available due to the difficulty in obtaining species-specific retrotransposon primers. Although recent techniques enabling the rapid isolation of retrotransposon sequences have facilitated primer development, this process nonetheless remains time-consuming and costly. Therefore, research into the transferability of retrotransposon primers developed from one plant species onto others would be of great value. The present study investigated the transferability of retrotransposon primers derived from 'Luotian-tianshi' persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) across other fruit crops, as well as within the genus using inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism molecular marker. Fourteen of the 26 retrotransposon primers tested (53.85%) produced robust and reproducible amplification products across all fruit crops tested, indicating their applicability across plant species. Four of the 13 fruit crops showed the best transferability performances: persimmon, grape, citrus, and peach. Furthermore, similarity coefficients and UPGMA clustering indicated that these primers could further offer a potential tool for germplasm differentiation, parentage identification, genetic diversity assessment, classification, and phylogenetic studies across a variety of plant species. Transferability was further confirmed by examining published primers derived from Rosaceae, Gramineae, and Solanaceae. This study is one of the few currently available studies concerning the transferability of retrotransposon primers across plant species in general, and is the first successful study of the transferability of retrotransposon primers derived from persimmon. The primers presented here will help reduce costs for future retrotransposon primer development and therefore contribute to the popularization of retrotransposon molecular markers.

  4. Retrotransposons. An RNA polymerase III subunit determines sites of retrotransposon integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridier-Nahmias, Antoine; Tchalikian-Cosson, Aurélie; Baller, Joshua A; Menouni, Rachid; Fayol, Hélène; Flores, Amando; Saïb, Ali; Werner, Michel; Voytas, Daniel F; Lesage, Pascale

    2015-05-01

    Mobile genetic elements are ubiquitous. Their integration site influences genome stability and gene expression. The Ty1 retrotransposon of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae integrates upstream of RNA polymerase III (Pol III)-transcribed genes, yet the primary determinant of target specificity has remained elusive. Here we describe an interaction between Ty1 integrase and the AC40 subunit of Pol III and demonstrate that AC40 is the predominant determinant targeting Ty1 integration upstream of Pol III-transcribed genes. Lack of an integrase-AC40 interaction dramatically alters target site choice, leading to a redistribution of Ty1 insertions in the genome, mainly to chromosome ends. The mechanism of target specificity allows Ty1 to proliferate and yet minimizes genetic damage to its host. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. BARE retrotransposons are translated and replicated via distinct RNA pools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chang

    Full Text Available The replication of Long Terminal Repeat (LTR retrotransposons, which can constitute over 80% of higher plant genomes, resembles that of retroviruses. A major question for retrotransposons and retroviruses is how the two conflicting roles of their transcripts, in translation and reverse transcription, are balanced. Here, we show that the BARE retrotransposon, despite its organization into just one open reading frame, produces three distinct classes of transcripts. One is capped, polyadenylated, and translated, but cannot be copied into cDNA. The second is not capped or polyadenylated, but is destined for packaging and ultimate reverse transcription. The third class is capped, polyadenylated, and spliced to favor production of a subgenomic RNA encoding only Gag, the protein forming virus-like particles. Moreover, the BARE2 subfamily, which cannot synthesize Gag and is parasitic on BARE1, does not produce the spliced sub-genomic RNA for translation but does make the replication competent transcripts, which are packaged into BARE1 particles. To our knowledge, this is first demonstration of distinct RNA pools for translation and transcription for any retrotransposon.

  6. Modeling the amplification dynamics of human Alu retrotransposons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale J Hedges

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons have had a considerable impact on the overall architecture of the human genome. Currently, there are three lineages of retrotransposons (Alu, L1, and SVA that are believed to be actively replicating in humans. While estimates of their copy number, sequence diversity, and levels of insertion polymorphism can readily be obtained from existing genomic sequence data and population sampling, a detailed understanding of the temporal pattern of retrotransposon amplification remains elusive. Here we pose the question of whether, using genomic sequence and population frequency data from extant taxa, one can adequately reconstruct historical amplification patterns. To this end, we developed a computer simulation that incorporates several known aspects of primate Alu retrotransposon biology and accommodates sampling effects resulting from the methods by which mobile elements are typically discovered and characterized. By modeling a number of amplification scenarios and comparing simulation-generated expectations to empirical data gathered from existing Alu subfamilies, we were able to statistically reject a number of amplification scenarios for individual subfamilies, including that of a rapid expansion or explosion of Alu amplification at the time of human-chimpanzee divergence.

  7. Modeling the amplification dynamics of human alu retrotransposons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons have had a considerable impact on the overall architecture of the human genome. Currently, there are three lineages of retrotransposons (Alu, L1, and SVA that are believed to be actively replicating in humans. While estimates of their copy number, sequence diversity, and levels of insertion polymorphism can readily be obtained from existing genomic sequence data and population sampling, a detailed understanding of the temporal pattern of retrotransposon amplification remains elusive. Here we pose the question of whether, using genomic sequence and population frequency data from extant taxa, one can adequately reconstruct historical amplification patterns. To this end, we developed a computer simulation that incorporates several known aspects of primate Alu retrotransposon biology and accommodates sampling effects resulting from the methods by which mobile elements are typically discovered and characterized. By modeling a number of amplification scenarios and comparing simulation-generated expectations to empirical data gathered from existing Alu subfamilies, we were able to statistically reject a number of amplification scenarios for individual subfamilies, including that of a rapid expansion or explosion of Alu amplification at the time of human-chimpanzee divergence.

  8. The Microprocessor controls the activity of mammalian retrotransposons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heras, Sara R.; Macias, Sara; Plass, Mireya

    2013-01-01

    RNA biogenesis, also recognizes and binds RNAs derived from human long interspersed element 1 (LINE-1), Alu and SVA retrotransposons. Expression analyses demonstrate that cells lacking a functional Microprocessor accumulate LINE-1 mRNA and encoded proteins. Furthermore, we show that structured regions...

  9. Forward and reverse genetics: The LORE1 retrotransposon insertion mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukai, Eigo; Malolepszy, Anna; Sandal, Niels Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    The endogenous Lotus retrotransposon 1 (LORE1) transposes in the germ line of Lotus japonicus plants that carry an active element. This feature of LORE1 has been exploited for generation of a large non-transgenic insertion mutant population, where insertions have been annotated using next-generat...

  10. Chicken Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickett, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how a visit from a flock of chickens provided inspiration for the children's chicken art. The gentle clucking of the hens, the rooster crowing, and the softness of the feathers all provided rich aural, tactile, visual, and emotional experiences. The experience affirms the importance and value of direct…

  11. Creep behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, B.K.; Isaac Samuel, E.

    2011-01-01

    Creep deformation and fracture behaviour of indigenously developed modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for steam generator (SG) tube application has been examined at 823, 848 and 873 K. Creep tests were performed on flat creep specimens machined from normalised and tempered SG tubes at stresses ranging from 125 to 275 MPa. The stress dependence of minimum creep rate obeyed Norton's power law. Similarly, the rupture life dependence on stress obeyed a power law. The fracture mode remained transgranular at all test conditions examined. The analysis of creep data indicated that the steel obey Monkman-Grant and modified Monkman-Grant relationships and display high creep damage tolerance factor. The tertiary creep was examined in terms of the variations of time to onset of tertiary creep with rupture life, and a recently proposed concept of time to reach Monkman-Grant ductility, and its relationship with rupture life that depends only on damage tolerance factor. SG tube steel exhibited creep-rupture strength comparable to those reported in literature and specified in the nuclear design code RCC-MR.

  12. The oxidation behaviour of Fe-9Cr-1Mo steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, P.C.; Holmes, D.R.; Whittaker, A.; Brierley, R.A.; Garrett, J.C.P.

    1983-01-01

    The oxidation behaviour of Fe9Cr1Mo steels over a wide range of conditions covering likely operating environments has been determined. In particular the effects of temperature, gas composition and materials variables on production materials have been investigated. From this work the mechanisms of protective and breakaway corrosion have broadly been elucidated. The vital role of carbon deposition in the oxide and carburisation of the metal has been determined. Aspects of the breakaway and protective oxidation mechanisms have been incorporated into a statistical model for predicting breakaway initiation and boiler component life. The results obtained from the tube life calculations indicate very low probabilities of component failure for coolant gas compositions containing up to the equivalent of 825 vppm H 2 O and 1%CO. For a more aggressive gas at the upper limit of CO concentration (2%CO) there is a small probability of failure within 25 years for finned boiler tubes. Current work may in time allow these constraints composition to be relaxed. The information gained has been used in the design of Heysham II/Torness to reduce the probabilities of 9Cr component failure to insignificant levels. (author)

  13. Pancreatic stellate cells and CX3CR1: occurrence in normal pancreas, acute and chronic pancreatitis and effect of their activation by a CX3CR1 agonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masahiko; Ito, Tetsuhide; Nakamura, Taichi; Hijioka, Masayuki; Igarashi, Hisato; Oono, Takamasa; Kato, Masaki; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Koichi; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Jensen, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous studies suggest important roles of the chemokine, fractalkine (CX3CL1) in acute/chronic pancreatitis, however the possible mechanisms of the effects are unclear. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can play important roles in pancreatitis, secreting inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, as well as proliferation. Therefore, we investigated CX3CL1 receptor (CX3CR1) occurrence in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues, and the effects of CX3CL1 on activated-PSCs. Methods CX3CR1 expression/localization in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues were evaluated with immunohistochemical analysis. CX3CR1 expression and effects of CX3CL1 on activated-PSCs were examined with realtime-PCR, BrdU assays and Western Blotting. Results In normal pancreas, acinar cells expressed CX3CR1 within granule-like-formations in the cytoplasm, whereas in acute/chronic pancreatitis, acinar, ductal and activated-PSCs expressed CX3CR1 on cell membranes. With activation of normal PSCs, CX3CR1 is increased. CX3CL1 activated multiple signaling cascades in PSCs. CX3CL1, did not induce inflammatory-genes expression in activated-PSCs, but induced proliferation. Conclusions CX3CR1s are expressed in normal pancreas. Expression is increased in acute/chronic pancreatitis and the CX3CR1s are activated. CX3CL1 induces proliferation of activated-PSCs without increasing release of inflammatory-mediators. These results suggest that CX3CR1 activation of PSCs could be important in their effects in pancreatitis, especially to PSCs proliferation in pancreatitis where CX3CL1 levels are elevated. PMID:24681877

  14. Activation of an endogenous retrotransposon associated with epigenetic changes in Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukai, Eigo; Stougaard, Jens; Hayashi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Long terminal repeat retrotransposons occupy a large portion of genomes in flowering plants. In spite of their abundance, the majority are silenced and rarely transpose. One of the examples of a highly active retrotransposon is Lotus Retrotransposon 1(LORE1), of the model legume Lotus japonicus...... significance of LORE1 as a member of chromovirus, a chromodomain containing clade of the Gypsy superfamily. Then we discuss possibilities and methodologies for using endogenous transposable elements as mutagens to generate gene tagging populations in plants...

  15. Prairie Chicken

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — An outline of the general range occupied by greayter and lesser prairie chickens. The range was delineated by expert opinion, then varified by local wildlife...

  16. Neuronal Cx3cr1 Deficiency Protects against Amyloid β-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworzak, Jenny; Renvoisé, Benoît; Habchi, Johnny; Yates, Emma V.; Combadière, Christophe; Knowles, Tuomas P.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Blackstone, Craig; Paulsen, Ole; Murphy, Philip M.

    2015-01-01

    Cx3cr1, the receptor for the chemokine Cx3cl1 (fractalkine), has been implicated in the progression and severity of Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology in mice, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. A complicating factor is that Cx3cr1 has been demonstrated in both neurons and microglia. Here, we have dissected the differences between neuronal and microglial Cx3cr1, specifically by comparing direct amyloid-β-induced toxicity in cultured, mature, microglia-depleted hippocampal neurons from wild-type and Cx3cr1-/- mice. Wild-type neurons expressed both Cx3cl1 and Cx3cr1 and released Cx3cl1 in response to amyloid-β. Knockout of neuronal Cx3cr1 abated amyloid-β-induced lactate dehydrogenase release. Furthermore, amyloid-β differentially induced depression of pre- and postsynaptic components of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, in a peptide conformation-dependent manner. Knockout of neuronal Cx3cr1 abated effects of both amyloid-β conformational states, which were differentiable by aggregation kinetics and peptide morphology. We obtained similar results after both acute and chronic treatment of cultured neurons with the Cx3cr1 antagonist F1. Thus, neuronal Cx3cr1 may impact Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology by modulating conformational state-dependent amyloid-β-induced synaptotoxicity. PMID:26038823

  17. Neuronal Cx3cr1 Deficiency Protects against Amyloid β-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Dworzak

    Full Text Available Cx3cr1, the receptor for the chemokine Cx3cl1 (fractalkine, has been implicated in the progression and severity of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in mice, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. A complicating factor is that Cx3cr1 has been demonstrated in both neurons and microglia. Here, we have dissected the differences between neuronal and microglial Cx3cr1, specifically by comparing direct amyloid-β-induced toxicity in cultured, mature, microglia-depleted hippocampal neurons from wild-type and Cx3cr1-/- mice. Wild-type neurons expressed both Cx3cl1 and Cx3cr1 and released Cx3cl1 in response to amyloid-β. Knockout of neuronal Cx3cr1 abated amyloid-β-induced lactate dehydrogenase release. Furthermore, amyloid-β differentially induced depression of pre- and postsynaptic components of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, in a peptide conformation-dependent manner. Knockout of neuronal Cx3cr1 abated effects of both amyloid-β conformational states, which were differentiable by aggregation kinetics and peptide morphology. We obtained similar results after both acute and chronic treatment of cultured neurons with the Cx3cr1 antagonist F1. Thus, neuronal Cx3cr1 may impact Alzheimer's disease-like pathology by modulating conformational state-dependent amyloid-β-induced synaptotoxicity.

  18. Metabolic Effects of CX3CR1 Deficiency in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Shah

    Full Text Available The fractalkine (CX3CL1-CX3CR1 chemokine system is associated with obesity-related inflammation and type 2 diabetes, but data on effects of Cx3cr1 deficiency on metabolic pathways is contradictory. We examined male C57BL/6 Cx3cr1-/- mice on chow and high-fat diet to determine the metabolic effects of Cx3cr1 deficiency. We found no difference in body weight and fat content or feeding and energy expenditure between Cx3cr1-/- and WT mice. Cx3cr1-/- mice had reduced glucose intolerance assessed by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests at chow and high-fat fed states, though there was no difference in glucose-stimulated insulin values. Cx3cr1-/- mice also had improved insulin sensitivity at hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, with higher glucose infusion rate, rate of disposal, and hepatic glucose production suppression compared to WT mice. Enhanced insulin signaling in response to acute intravenous insulin injection was demonstrated in Cx3cr1-/- by increased liver protein levels of phosphorylated AKT and GSK3β proteins. There were no differences in adipose tissue macrophage populations, circulating inflammatory monocytes, adipokines, lipids, or inflammatory markers. In conclusion, we demonstrate a moderate and reproducible protective effect of Cx3cr1 deficiency on glucose intolerance and insulin resistance.

  19. Plant centromeric retrotransposons: a structural and cytogenetic perspective

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neumann, Pavel; Navrátilová, Alice; Koblížková, Andrea; Kejnovský, Eduard; Hřibová, Eva; Hobza, Roman; Widmer, A.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Macas, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2011), s. 1-16 ISSN 1759-8753 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500960802; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004; GA ČR GA522/09/0083 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513; CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : plant chromosomes * retrotransposons * cytogenetic perspective Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  20. PwRn1, a novel Ty3/gypsy-like retrotransposon of Paragonimus westermani: molecular characters and its differentially preserved mobile potential according to host chromosomal polyploidy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Yoon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrotransposons have been known to involve in the remodeling and evolution of host genome. These reverse transcribing elements, which show a complex evolutionary pathway with diverse intermediate forms, have been comprehensively analyzed from a wide range of host genomes, while the information remains limited to only a few species in the phylum Platyhelminthes. Results A LTR retrotransposon and its homologs with a strong phylogenetic affinity toward CsRn1 of Clonorchis sinensis were isolated from a trematode parasite Paragonimus westermani via a degenerate PCR method and from an insect species Anopheles gambiae by in silico analysis of the whole mosquito genome, respectively. These elements, designated PwRn1 and AgCR-1 – AgCR-14 conserved unique features including a t-RNATrp primer binding site and the unusual CHCC signature of Gag proteins. Their flanking LTRs displayed >97% nucleotide identities and thus, these elements were likely to have expanded recently in the trematode and insect genomes. They evolved heterogeneous expression strategies: a single fused ORF, two separate ORFs with an identical reading frame and two ORFs overlapped by -1 frameshifting. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that the elements with the separate ORFs had evolved from an ancestral form(s with the overlapped ORFs. The mobile potential of PwRn1 was likely to be maintained differentially in association with the karyotype of host genomes, as was examined by the presence/absence of intergenomic polymorphism and mRNA transcripts. Conclusion Our results on the structural diversity of CsRn1-like elements can provide a molecular tool to dissect a more detailed evolutionary episode of LTR retrotransposons. The PwRn1-associated genomic polymorphism, which is substantial in diploids, will also be informative in addressing genomic diversification following inter-/intra-specific hybridization in P. westermani populations.

  1. Stress-induced rearrangement of Fusarium retrotransposon sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, N; Roncero, M I

    1996-11-27

    Rearrangement of fusarium oxysporum retrotransposon skippy was induced by growth in the presence of potassium chlorate. Three fungal strains, one sensitive to chlorate (Co60) and two resistant to chlorate and deficient for nitrate reductase (Co65 and Co94), were studied by Southern analysis of their genomic DNA. Polymorphism was detected in their hybridization banding pattern, relative to the wild type grown in the absence of chlorate, using various enzymes with or without restriction sites within the retrotransposon. Results were consistent with the assumption that three different events had occurred in strain Co60: genomic amplification of skippy yielding tandem arrays of the element, generation of new skippy sequences, and deletion of skippy sequences. Amplification of Co60 genomic DNA using the polymerase chain reaction and divergent primers derived from the retrotransposon generated a new band, corresponding to one long terminal repeat plus flanking sequences, that was not present in the wild-type strain. Molecular analysis of nitrate reductase-deficient mutants showed that generation and deletion of skippy sequences, but not genomic amplification in tandem repeats, had occurred in their genomes.

  2. An evolutionary arms race between KRAB zinc-finger genes ZNF91/93 and SVA/L1 retrotransposons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, F.M.J.; Greenberg, D.; Nguyen, N.; Haeussler, M.; Ewing, A.D.; Katzman, S.; Paten, B.; Salama, S.R.; Haussler, D.

    2014-01-01

    Throughout evolution primate genomes have been modified by waves of retrotransposon insertions1, 2, 3. For each wave, the host eventually finds a way to repress retrotransposon transcription and prevent further insertions. In mouse embryonic stem cells, transcriptional silencing of retrotransposons

  3. Expression pattern of Ccr2 and Cx3cr1 in inherited retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Hideo; Koso, Hideto; Okano, Kiichiro; Sundermeier, Thomas R; Saito, Saburo; Watanabe, Sumiko; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Sakai, Tsutomu

    2015-10-12

    Though accumulating evidence suggests that microglia, resident macrophages in the retina, and bone marrow-derived macrophages can cause retinal inflammation which accelerates photoreceptor cell death, the details of how these cells are activated during retinal degeneration (RD) remain uncertain. Therefore, it is important to clarify which cells play a dominant role in fueling retinal inflammation. However, distinguishing between microglia and macrophages is difficult using conventional techniques such as cell markers (e.g., Iba-1). Recently, two mouse models for visualizing chemokine receptors were established, Cx3cr1 (GFP/GFP) and Ccr2 (RFP/RFP) mice. As Cx3cr1 is expressed in microglia and Ccr2 is reportedly expressed in activated macrophages, these mice have the potential to distinguish microglia and macrophages, yielding novel information about the activation of these inflammatory cells and their individual roles in retinal inflammation. In this study, c-mer proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (Mertk) (-/-) mice, which show photoreceptor cell death due to defective retinal pigment epithelium phagocytosis, were employed as an animal model of RD. Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice were established by breeding Mertk (-/-) , Cx3cr1 (GFP/GFP) , and Ccr2 (RFP/RFP) mice. The retinal morphology and pattern of inflammatory cell activation and invasion of Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice were evaluated using retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) flat mounts, retinal sections, and flow cytometry. Four-week-old Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice showed Cx3cr1-GFP-positive microglia in the inner retina. Cx3cr1-GFP and Ccr2-RFP dual positive activated microglia were observed in the outer retina and subretinal space of 6- and 8-week-old animals. Ccr2-RFP single positive bone marrow-derived macrophages were observed to migrate into the retina of Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice. These invading cells were still observed in the

  4. Prediction of retrotransposons and assessment of genetic variability based on developed retrotransposon-based insertion polymorphism (RBIP) markers in Pyrus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuang; Zong, Yu; Yue, Xiaoyan; Postman, Joseph; Teng, Yuanwen; Cai, Danying

    2015-02-01

    Interspecific hybridization has been considered the major mode of evolution in Pyrus (pear), and thus, the genetic relationships within this genus have not been well documented. Retrotransposons are ubiquitous components of plant genomes and 42.4 % of the pear genome was reported to be long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, implying that retrotransposons might be significant in the evolution of Pyrus. In this study, 1,836 putative full-length LTR retrotransposons were isolated and 196 retrotransposon-based insertion polymorphism (RBIP) primers were developed, of which 24 pairs to the Ppcr1 subfamily of copia retrotransposons were used to analyze genetic diversity among 110 Pyrus accessions from Eurasia. Our results showed that Ppcr1 replicated many times in the development of cultivated Asian pears. The genetic structure analysis and the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) dendrogram indicated that all accessions could be divided into Oriental and Occidental groups. In Oriental pears, wild pea pears clustered separately into independent groups in accordance with their morphological classifications. Cultivars of P. ussuriensis Maxim, P. pyrifolia Nakai, and P. pyrifolia Chinese white pear were mingled together, which inferred that hybridization events occurred during the development of the cultivated Asian pears. In Occidental pears, two clades were obtained in the UPGMA dendrogram in accordance with their geographical distribution; one contained the European species and the other included species from North Africa and West Asia. New findings in this study will be important to further understand the phylogeny of Pyrus and origins of cultivated pears.

  5. The Effect of Hold Time on Creep-Fatigue in 9Cr-1Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Tae Young; Kim, Dae Whan; Kim, Yong Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Kyoung Ho [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    9Cr-1Mo steel is a candidate material for reactor vessel for VHTR. Because 9Cr-1Mo steel has a good mechanical properties and a lower thermal expansion coefficient than austenitic stainless steel. The reactor vessel of VHTR is operated at about 450 .deg. C. At this temperature, fatigue occurs during start-up and cool-down, and creep occurs during normal operation. Creep-fatigue damage by the interaction between fatigue and creep is an important factor that limits VHTR reactor vessel life. In this study, Effect of hold time on low cycle fatigue behavior of 9Cr-1Mo at 600 .deg. C was investigated in air.

  6. The Effect of Hold Time on Creep-Fatigue in 9Cr-1Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Tae Young; Kim, Dae Whan; Kim, Yong Wan; Baek, Kyoung Ho

    2009-01-01

    9Cr-1Mo steel is a candidate material for reactor vessel for VHTR. Because 9Cr-1Mo steel has a good mechanical properties and a lower thermal expansion coefficient than austenitic stainless steel. The reactor vessel of VHTR is operated at about 450 .deg. C. At this temperature, fatigue occurs during start-up and cool-down, and creep occurs during normal operation. Creep-fatigue damage by the interaction between fatigue and creep is an important factor that limits VHTR reactor vessel life. In this study, Effect of hold time on low cycle fatigue behavior of 9Cr-1Mo at 600 .deg. C was investigated in air

  7. Fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1 deficiency sensitizes mice to the behavioral changes induced by lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley Keith W

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between fractalkine (CX3CL1 and fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1 regulate microglial activation in the CNS. Recent findings indicate that age-associated impairments in CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 are directly associated with exaggerated microglial activation and an impaired recovery from sickness behavior after peripheral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which an acute LPS injection causes amplified and prolonged microglial activation and behavioral deficits in CX3CR1-deficient mice (CX3CR1-/-. Methods CX3CR1-/- mice or control heterozygote mice (CX3CR1+/- were injected with LPS (0.5 mg/kg i.p. or saline and behavior (i.e., sickness and depression-like behavior, microglial activation, and markers of tryptophan metabolism were determined. All data were analyzed using Statistical Analysis Systems General Linear Model procedures and were subjected to one-, two-, or three-way ANOVA to determine significant main effects and interactions. Results LPS injection caused a prolonged duration of social withdrawal in CX3CR1-/- mice compared to control mice. This extended social withdrawal was associated with enhanced mRNA expression of IL-1β, indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO and kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO in microglia 4 h after LPS. Moreover, elevated expression of IL-1β and CD14 was still detected in microglia of CX3CR1-/- mice 24 h after LPS. There was also increased turnover of tryptophan, serotonin, and dopamine in the brain 24 h after LPS, but these increases were independent of CX3CR1 expression. When submitted to the tail suspension test 48 and 72 h after LPS, an increased duration of immobility was evident only in CX3CR1-/- mice. This depression-like behavior in CX3CR1-/- mice was associated with a persistent activated microglial phenotype in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Conclusions Taken together, these data indicate that a deficiency of CX3CR1

  8. Fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) deficiency sensitizes mice to the behavioral changes induced by lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Interactions between fractalkine (CX3CL1) and fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) regulate microglial activation in the CNS. Recent findings indicate that age-associated impairments in CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 are directly associated with exaggerated microglial activation and an impaired recovery from sickness behavior after peripheral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which an acute LPS injection causes amplified and prolonged microglial activation and behavioral deficits in CX3CR1-deficient mice (CX3CR1-/-). Methods CX3CR1-/- mice or control heterozygote mice (CX3CR1+/-) were injected with LPS (0.5 mg/kg i.p.) or saline and behavior (i.e., sickness and depression-like behavior), microglial activation, and markers of tryptophan metabolism were determined. All data were analyzed using Statistical Analysis Systems General Linear Model procedures and were subjected to one-, two-, or three-way ANOVA to determine significant main effects and interactions. Results LPS injection caused a prolonged duration of social withdrawal in CX3CR1-/- mice compared to control mice. This extended social withdrawal was associated with enhanced mRNA expression of IL-1β, indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO) in microglia 4 h after LPS. Moreover, elevated expression of IL-1β and CD14 was still detected in microglia of CX3CR1-/- mice 24 h after LPS. There was also increased turnover of tryptophan, serotonin, and dopamine in the brain 24 h after LPS, but these increases were independent of CX3CR1 expression. When submitted to the tail suspension test 48 and 72 h after LPS, an increased duration of immobility was evident only in CX3CR1-/- mice. This depression-like behavior in CX3CR1-/- mice was associated with a persistent activated microglial phenotype in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Conclusions Taken together, these data indicate that a deficiency of CX3CR1 is permissive to

  9. Heat treatment effects on impact toughness of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels irradiated to 100 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    Plates of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels were given four different heat treatments: two normalizing treatments were used and for each normalizing treatment two tempers were used. Miniature Charpy specimens from each heat treatment were irradiated to ∼19.5 dpa at 365 degrees C and to ∼100 dpa at 420 degrees C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). In previous work, the same materials were irradiated to 4-5 dpa at 365 degrees C and 35-36 dpa at 420 degrees C in FFTF. The tests indicated that prior austenite grain size, which was varied by the different normalizing treatments, had a significant effect on impact behavior of the 9Cr-1MoVNb but not on the 12Cr-1MoVW. Tempering treatment had relatively little effect on the shift in DBTT for both steels. Conclusions are presented on how heat treatment can be used to optimize impact properties

  10. Heat treatment effects on impact toughness of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels irradiated to 100 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Plates of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels were given four different heat treatments: two normalizing treatments were used and for each normalizing treatment two tempers were used. Miniature Charpy specimens from each heat treatment were irradiated to {approx}19.5 dpa at 365{degrees}C and to {approx}100 dpa at 420{degrees}C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). In previous work, the same materials were irradiated to 4-5 dpa at 365{degrees}C and 35-36 dpa at 420{degrees}C in FFTF. The tests indicated that prior austenite grain size, which was varied by the different normalizing treatments, had a significant effect on impact behavior of the 9Cr-1MoVNb but not on the 12Cr-1MoVW. Tempering treatment had relatively little effect on the shift in DBTT for both steels. Conclusions are presented on how heat treatment can be used to optimize impact properties.

  11. Chicken and Food Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Chicken and Food Poisoning Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Americans eat more chicken every year than any other meat. Chicken can ...

  12. Retrotransposon silencing by DNA methylation can drive mammalian genomic imprinting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Suzuki

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Among mammals, only eutherians and marsupials are viviparous and have genomic imprinting that leads to parent-of-origin-specific differential gene expression. We used comparative analysis to investigate the origin of genomic imprinting in mammals. PEG10 (paternally expressed 10 is a retrotransposon-derived imprinted gene that has an essential role for the formation of the placenta of the mouse. Here, we show that an orthologue of PEG10 exists in another therian mammal, the marsupial tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii, but not in a prototherian mammal, the egg-laying platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, suggesting its close relationship to the origin of placentation in therian mammals. We have discovered a hitherto missing link of the imprinting mechanism between eutherians and marsupials because tammar PEG10 is the first example of a differentially methylated region (DMR associated with genomic imprinting in marsupials. Surprisingly, the marsupial DMR was strictly limited to the 5' region of PEG10, unlike the eutherian DMR, which covers the promoter regions of both PEG10 and the adjacent imprinted gene SGCE. These results not only demonstrate a common origin of the DMR-associated imprinting mechanism in therian mammals but provide the first demonstration that DMR-associated genomic imprinting in eutherians can originate from the repression of exogenous DNA sequences and/or retrotransposons by DNA methylation.

  13. Retrotransposon Proliferation Coincident with the Evolution of Dioecy in Asparagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkess, Alex; Mercati, Francesco; Abbate, Loredana; McKain, Michael; Pires, J Chris; Sala, Tea; Sunseri, Francesco; Falavigna, Agostino; Leebens-Mack, Jim

    2016-09-08

    Current phylogenetic sampling reveals that dioecy and an XY sex chromosome pair evolved once, or possibly twice, in the genus Asparagus Although there appear to be some lineage-specific polyploidization events, the base chromosome number of 2n = 2× = 20 is relatively conserved across the Asparagus genus. Regardless, dioecious species tend to have larger genomes than hermaphroditic species. Here, we test whether this genome size expansion in dioecious species is related to a polyploidization and subsequent chromosome fusion, or to retrotransposon proliferation in dioecious species. We first estimate genome sizes, or use published values, for four hermaphrodites and four dioecious species distributed across the phylogeny, and show that dioecious species typically have larger genomes than hermaphroditic species. Utilizing a phylogenomic approach, we find no evidence for ancient polyploidization contributing to increased genome sizes of sampled dioecious species. We do find support for an ancient whole genome duplication (WGD) event predating the diversification of the Asparagus genus. Repetitive DNA content of the four hermaphroditic and four dioecious species was characterized based on randomly sampled whole genome shotgun sequencing, and common elements were annotated. Across our broad phylogenetic sampling, Ty-1 Copia retroelements, in particular, have undergone a marked proliferation in dioecious species. In the absence of a detectable WGD event, retrotransposon proliferation is the most likely explanation for the precipitous increase in genome size in dioecious Asparagus species. Copyright © 2016 Harkess et al.

  14. Creep-fatigue-environment interaction of 9Cr-1Mo-V-Nb steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Akiyoshi; Asada, Yasuhide

    1996-01-01

    An extension of the creep-fatigue damage model has been conducted in the present study. The original damage model has been developed to the predict the creep-fatigue life of 9Cr-1Mo-V-Nb steel (Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel) in a very high vacuum environment. The present study is to extend an applicability of the model to the creep-fatigue damage accumulation in the air environment. (orig.)

  15. TLR4-dependent internalization of CX3CR1 aggravates sepsis-induced immunoparalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xin-Yu; Fang, Shang-Ping; Zhou, Miao; Luo, Jing; Wei, Juan; Wen, Xue-Ping; Yan, Xiao-Di; Zou, Zui

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis, the most severe manifestation of infection, poses a major challenge to health-care systems around the world. Limited ability to clean and remove the pathogen renders difficulty in septic patients to recover from the phase of immunoparalysis. The present study found the vital role of CX3CR1 internalization on sepsis-induced immunoparalysis. A mouse model with cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and cell model with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were employed to explore the relationship between CX3CR1 internalization and septic immunoparalysis. Immunoparalysis model in mice was established 4 days after CLP with significantly decreased proinflammatory cytokines. Flow cytometry analysis found a decreased surface expression of CX3CR1 during immunoparalysis, which was associated with reduced mRNA level and increased internalization of CX3CR1. G-protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) and β-arrestin2 were significantly increased during septic immunoparalysis and involved in the internalization of CX3CR1. TLR4 -/- or TLR4 inhibitor-treated macrophages exhibited an inhibited expression of GRK2 and β-arrestin2, along with reduced internalization of CX3CR1. Moreover, the knockdown of GRK2 and β-arrestin2 inhibited the internalization of CX3CR1 and led to a higher response on the second hit, which was associated with an increased activation of NF-κB. The critical association between internalization of CX3CR1 and immunosuppression in sepsis may provide a novel reference for clinical therapeutics.

  16. Residual stresses in 2 1/4Cr1Mo welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidler, R.; Jerram, K.

    1978-01-01

    Two separate investigations, initiated in an attempt to explain the large amount of residual stress scatter previously observed in the weld metal of eighteen nominally identical thick-section 2 1/4Cr1Mo butt welds, are described in this paper. The first examined the detailed surface residual stress distributions in 2 1/4Cr1Mo manual arc circumferential butt welds in 80mm and 100mm thick 1/2Cr1/2Mo1/4V steam pipe. High residual stresses were found in the regions of overlap between adjacent weld beads, with low values in virgin weld metal. The second utilised single pass manual metal arc bead-in-groove welds to investigate the effects of preheat and weld metal composition on weld metal residual stresses. In four weld metals, mild steel, 1/2Cr1/2Mo1/4V, 1Cr1/2Mo, and 2 1/4Cr1Mo, the residual stresses were very similar, becoming less tensile (or more compressive) with increase of preheat, while the residual stresses in the fifth weld metal (12Cr) were significantly different, being compressive and less affected by preheat. In both investigations the effects have been described in terms of the basic metallurgical phenomena occurring in the weld metal. (author)

  17. SREBP controls oxygen-dependent mobilization of retrotransposons in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfica Sehgal

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons are mobile genetic elements that proliferate through an RNA intermediate. Transposons do not encode transcription factors and thus rely on host factors for mRNA expression and survival. Despite information regarding conditions under which elements are upregulated, much remains to be learned about the regulatory mechanisms or factors controlling retrotransposon expression. Here, we report that low oxygen activates the fission yeast Tf2 family of retrotransposons. Sre1, the yeast ortholog of the mammalian membrane-bound transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP, directly induces the expression and mobilization of Tf2 retrotransposons under low oxygen. Sre1 binds to DNA sequences in the Tf2 long terminal repeat that functions as an oxygen-dependent promoter. We find that Tf2 solo long terminal repeats throughout the genome direct oxygen-dependent expression of adjacent coding and noncoding sequences, providing a potential mechanism for the generation of oxygen-dependent gene expression.

  18. New aspartic proteinase of Ulysses retrotransposon from Drosophila virilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, D A; Dergousova, N I; Rumsh, L D

    2004-06-01

    This work is focused on the investigation of a proteinase of Ulysses mobile genetic element from Drosophila virilis. The primary structure of this proteinase is suggested based on comparative analysis of amino acid sequences of aspartic proteinases from retroviruses and retrotransposons. The corresponding cDNA fragment has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein accumulated in inclusion bodies. The recombinant protein (12 kD) was subjected to refolding and purified by affinity chromatography on pepstatin-agarose. Proteolytic activity of the protein was determined using oligopeptide substrates melittin and insulin B-chain. It was found that the maximum of the proteolytic activity is displayed at pH 5.5 as for the majority of aspartic proteinases. We observed that hydrolysis of B-chain of insulin was totally inhibited by pepstatin A in the micromolar concentration range. The molecular weight of the monomer of the Ulysses proteinase was determined by MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry.

  19. CX3CR1 is a modifying gene of survival and progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Lopez-Lopez

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the association of functional variants of the human CX3CR1 gene (Fractalkine receptor with the risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, the survival and the progression rate of the disease symptoms in a Spanish ALS cohort. 187 ALS patients (142 sporadic [sALS] and 45 familial and 378 controls were recruited. We investigated CX3CR1 V249I (rs3732379 and T280M (rs3732378 genotypes and their haplotypes as predictors of survival, the progression rate of the symptoms (as measured by ALSFRS-R and FVC decline and the risk of suffering ALS disease. The results indicated that sALS patients with CX3CR1 249I/I or 249V/I genotypes presented a shorter survival time (42.27 ± 4.90 than patients with 249V/V genotype (67.65 ± 7.42; diff -25.49 months 95%CI [-42.79,-8.18]; p = 0.004; adj-p = 0.018. The survival time was shorter in sALS patients with spinal topography and CX3CR1 249I alleles (diff =  -29.78 months; 95%CI [-49.42,-10.14]; p = 0.003. The same effects were also observed in the spinal sALS patients with 249I-280M haplotype (diff =  -27.02 months; 95%CI [-49.57, -4.48]; p = 0.019. In the sALS group, the CX3CR1 249I variant was associated with a faster progression of the disease symptoms (OR = 2.58; 95IC% [1.32, 5.07]; p = 0.006; adj-p = 0.027. There was no evidence for association of these two CX3CR1 variants with ALS disease risk. The association evidenced herein is clinically relevant and indicates that CX3CR1 could be a disease-modifying gene in sALS. The progression rate of the disease's symptoms and the survival time is affected in patients with one or two copies of the CX3CR1 249I allele. The CX3CR1 is the most potent ALS survival genetic factor reported to date. These results reinforce the role of the immune system in ALS pathogenesis.

  20. Influence of Normalizing Temperature on the Microstructure and Hardness of 9Cr-1Mo ODS Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ki Nam; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyu Tae [Dongguk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Oxide dispersion strengthened(ODS) steel has superior high-temperature strength and creep properties because fine oxide particles having an excellent stability at high temperatures are uniformly distributed in the matrix. ODS steel has being developed for structure materials of sodium fast cooled reactor(SFR) because of its excellent irradiation resistance and mechanical properties. 9Cr-1Mo ODS steel has better high temperature strength and irradiation resistance than common 9Cr-1Mo steel because Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-sized particles which interrupt dislocation movement and grain boundary slip are uniformly dispersed in the martensite matrix. The mechanical properties of the ODS steels are mainly determined by their microstructures, and the microstructure is considerably decided by the heat-treatment conditions. This study focused on the effect of normalizing temperature on microstructure and hardness of 9Cr-1Mo martensitic ODS steel so as to optimize the heat-treatment condition. In this study, the effect of normalizing temperature on mechanical property and microstructures of 9Cr-1Mo martensitic ODS steel was investigated. It was shown that the microhardness was steadily increased with increasing of the normalizing temperature. According to TEM observation, mechanical property of 9Cr-1Mo ODS steel was significantly affected by lath width. These observations, could be useful to understand the relationship between normalizing temperature and microstructure.

  1. Stress-controlled inelastic behavior of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Kosei.

    1989-01-01

    Interest in the ferritic steels of higher chromium concentration has increased recently because of an economical combination of mechanical and corrosion properties at elevated temperatures. A modified 9 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steel, developed in the United States, has been expected as an alternative structural material for fast breeder reactor components, in which Type 304 stainless steel or 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel is currently used. For application of this material to the structural components, a lot of work has been done to develop evaluation methods for the deformation behavior and strength properties. The authors have studied the inelastic behavior and the creep-fatigue properties of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel at elevated temperatures, and proposed a constitutive equation and a creep-fatigue damage equation based on the overstress concept. In this paper, the applicability is discussed of the constitutive equation to stress-controlled inelastic behavior, such as creep strain hardening and stress cycling

  2. Magnetotransport properties of Cr1−δTe thin films with strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available P-type ferromagnetic Cr1-δTe thin films with the Curie temperature of 170K were epitaxially grown on GaAs substrate. Low-temperature magnetotransport study reveals that the film has a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA and an anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR ratio up to 8.1%. Furthermore, reduced anomalous Hall effect is observed at low temperatures in Cr1-δTe, suggesting the possible crossover of the contribution to AHE from the intrinsic mechanism to extrinsic skew scattering. Distinctive from conventional transition metal ferromagnets, the AMR ratio is also greatly suppressed at low temperatures. Our work demonstrates that epitaxial Cr1-δTe films are interesting platforms for studying the physics underlying the strong PMA and large AMR.

  3. The use of CR1aa for ovine in vitro embryo production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulnawati

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of CR1aa as a simple medium for maturation, fertilization and culture of ovine embryo in vitro. Oocytes were collected by slicing method in Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS supplemented with 5% Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS and 100 IU/ml penicillin streptomycin. Oocytes were matured in Tissue Culture Medium (TCM-199 as control or CR1aa as treatment medium. Both maturation medium were supplemented with 10% Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS, 10 IU/ml Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH, 10 IU/ml Luteinizing Hormone (LH, 1 μg/ml Estradiol and 100 IU/ml penicillin-streptomycin. Oocytes were incubated in 5% CO2 incubator, 38˚C for 24 h. Matured oocytes were fertilized in BO or CR1aa medium, supplemented with 2.5 mM caffeine benzoate and 20 mg /ml heparin. After 18 h in vitro fertilization, oocytes were cultured in TCM-199 or CR1aa medium, both supplemented with 5% FBS, 5 mg/ml insulin and 100 IU/ml penicillin streptomycin. Results showed that the highest maturation rate was found in TCM-199 medium (73.27% and significantly different (P0.05 between cleavage rate of ovine embryos in TCM-199 and CR1aa medium (39.45% vs 50.94%. In conclusion, optimum result on ovine in vitro embryo production can be achieved from a combination of TCM-199 as maturation medium and CR1aa as fertilization and culture medium.

  4. Fracture behavior of unirradiated HT-9 and modified 9Cr-1Mo welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1983-05-01

    Fracture toughness tests on HT-9 weld and HAZ samples and modified 9Cr-1Mo weld samples were performed at 93, 205, 427 and 538 0 C. Specimens were of circular compact tension type fabricated from welded material with the notch orientation parallel to the fusion line. The test results were analyzed using the J-integral approach. The results demonstrated that the toughness of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo was not significantly reduced due to welding. However, the tearing modulus of the welded material was lower than that of base metal, indicating that the alloys become less resistant to crack propagation as a result of welding

  5. Substitution of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel for austentic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, V.K.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes the current program to develop a high-strength ferritic-martensitic steel. The alloy is essentially Fe-9% Cr-1% Mo with small additions of V and Nb and is known as modifed 9 Cr-1 Mo steel. Its elevated-temperature properties and design allowable stresses match those of type 304 stainless steel for temperatures up to 600 0 C and exceed those of other ferritic steels by factors of 2 to 3. The improved strength of this alloy permits its use in place of stainless steels for many applications

  6. Mechanical behavior of 9Cr-1Mo-1V steel due to creep fatigue deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Tae; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Lee, Hak Sun; Oh, Sang Hyun; Kwun, Sook In; Kim, Chung Seok

    2005-01-01

    Creep-fatigue tests with trapezoid load wave were performed on a 9Cr-1Mo-1V steel at high temperature(550 .deg. C). Trapezoid load wave is considering about hold time for creep effects. we could find out some information in the relationship between number of cycles to failure and hold time. The number of cycles to failure depended on hold time. The cyclic behavior of 9Cr-1Mo-1V steel was characterized by cyclic softening with increasing number of cycles in high temperature. Also we could observe some cavity in the specimens. The size of cavity was different from each hold time

  7. Evaluation of dynamic fracture toughness of cold worked 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayanan, S.; Sasikala, G.; Ray, S.K.

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic J-R curves for cold worked 9Cr-1Mo steel have been estimated from instrumented impact test data at ambient temperature on pre-cracked Charpy specimens using three methods of analysis, namely those by Ray et al., Schindler, and Sreenivasan and Mannan. It is concluded that of these three, Schindler's method is the best suited for the purpose since it gives consistent variations with cold work of dynamic J-R curves and dynamic fracture toughness. Cold work results in substantial degradation in dynamic fracture toughness of 9Cr-1Mo steel

  8. iPBS: a universal method for DNA fingerprinting and retrotransposon isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalendar, Ruslan; Antonius, Kristiina; Smýkal, Petr; Schulman, Alan H

    2010-11-01

    Molecular markers are essential in plant and animal breeding and biodiversity applications, in human forensics, and for map-based cloning of genes. The long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are well suited as molecular markers. As dispersed and ubiquitous transposable elements, their "copy and paste" life cycle of replicative transposition leads to new genome insertions without excision of the original element. Both the overall structure of retrotransposons and the domains responsible for the various phases of their replication are highly conserved in all eukaryotes. Nevertheless, up to a year has been required to develop a retrotransposon marker system in a new species, involving cloning and sequencing steps as well as the development of custom primers. Here, we describe a novel PCR-based method useful both as a marker system in its own right and for the rapid isolation of retrotransposon termini and full-length elements, making it ideal for "orphan crops" and other species with underdeveloped marker systems. The method, iPBS amplification, is based on the virtually universal presence of a tRNA complement as a reverse transcriptase primer binding site (PBS) in LTR retrotransposons. The method differs from earlier retrotransposon isolation methods because it is applicable not only to endogenous retroviruses and retroviruses, but also to both Gypsy and Copia LTR retrotransposons, as well as to non-autonomous LARD and TRIM elements, throughout the plant kingdom and to animals. Furthermore, the inter-PBS amplification technique as such has proved to be a powerful DNA fingerprinting technology without the need for prior sequence knowledge.

  9. Switching of dominant retrotransposon silencing strategies from posttranscriptional to transcriptional mechanisms during male germ-cell development in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kota Inoue

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian genomes harbor millions of retrotransposon copies, some of which are transpositionally active. In mouse prospermatogonia, PIWI-interacting small RNAs (piRNAs combat retrotransposon activity to maintain the genomic integrity. The piRNA system destroys retrotransposon-derived RNAs and guides de novo DNA methylation at some retrotransposon promoters. However, it remains unclear whether DNA methylation contributes to retrotransposon silencing in prospermatogonia. We have performed comprehensive studies of DNA methylation and polyA(+ RNAs (transcriptome in developing male germ cells from Pld6/Mitopld and Dnmt3l knockout mice, which are defective in piRNA biogenesis and de novo DNA methylation, respectively. The Dnmt3l mutation greatly reduced DNA methylation levels at most retrotransposons, but its impact on their RNA abundance was limited in prospermatogonia. In Pld6 mutant germ cells, although only a few retrotransposons exhibited reduced DNA methylation, many showed increased expression at the RNA level. More detailed analysis of RNA sequencing, nascent RNA quantification, profiling of cleaved RNA ends, and the results obtained from double knockout mice suggest that PLD6 works mainly at the posttranscriptional level. The increase in retrotransposon expression was larger in Pld6 mutants than it was in Dnmt3l mutants, suggesting that RNA degradation by the piRNA system plays a more important role than does DNA methylation in prospermatogonia. However, DNA methylation had a long-term effect: hypomethylation caused by the Pld6 or Dnmt3l mutation resulted in increased retrotransposon expression in meiotic spermatocytes. Thus, posttranscriptional silencing plays an important role in the early stage of germ cell development, then transcriptional silencing becomes important in later stages. In addition, intergenic and intronic retrotransposon sequences, in particular those containing the antisense L1 promoters, drove ectopic expression of nearby

  10. Analysis of Hopi/Osr27 and Houba/Tos5/Osr13 retrotransposons in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozde Yuzbasioglu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated Hopi/Osr27 (gypsy and Houba/Tos5/Osr13 (copy retrotransposon movements in 10-day-old roots and leaves of Oryza sativa cvs. Ipsala, Beser and Osmancik-97. Seeds from these three cultivars were germinated between filter papers in Petri dishes for 10 days. Three biologically independent (nonrelated seeds were germinated for each cultivar. Then, roots and leaves grown from the same rice plant were harvested and used for genomic DNA isolation. Inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism–polymerase chain reaction with suitable primers was performed with each DNA template to analyze the movements of Hopi/Osr27 and Houba/Tos5/Osr13 retrotransposons. Polymorphism ratios were evaluated both among cultivars and among roots and leaves from the same cultivar. The polymorphism ratios ranged from 0% to 17% for Hopi/Osr27 and from 10% to 87% for Houba/Tos5/Osr13. The obtained results at retrotransposon and varietal levels indicated that the retrotransposon type and genotype dependence are responsible for the occurrence of different variations. Transposable elements are very important for understanding the relationship between cultivars and evolution. Our findings are expected to contribute to the understanding of spontaneous genomic insertion events and their effects on the genetic and epigenetic changes during rice development.

  11. Retrotransposon hypomethylation in melanoma and expression of a placenta-specific gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin C Macaulay

    Full Text Available In the human placenta, DNA hypomethylation permits the expression of retrotransposon-derived genes that are normally silenced by methylation in somatic tissues. We previously identified hypomethylation of a retrotransposon-derived transcript of the voltage-gated potassium channel gene KCNH5 that is expressed only in human placenta. However, an RNA sequence from this placental-specific transcript has been reported in melanoma. This study examined the promoter methylation and expression of the retrotransposon-derived KCNH5 transcript in 25 melanoma cell lines to determine whether the acquisition of 'placental' epigenetic marks is a feature of melanoma. Methylation and gene expression analysis revealed hypomethylation of this retrotransposon in melanoma cell lines, particularly in those samples that express the placental KCNH5 transcript. Therefore we propose that hypomethylation of the placental-specific KCNH5 promoter is frequently associated with KCNH5 expression in melanoma cells. Our findings show that melanoma can develop hypomethylation of a retrotransposon-derived gene; a characteristic notably shared with the normal placenta.

  12. PpRT1: the first complete gypsy-like retrotransposon isolated in Pinus pinaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheta, Margarida; Cordeiro, Jorge; Oliveira, M; Miguel, Célia

    2007-02-01

    We have isolated and characterized a complete retrotransposon sequence, named PpRT1, from the genome of Pinus pinaster. PpRT1 is 5,966 bp long and is closely related to IFG7 gypsy retrotransposon from Pinus radiata. The long terminal repeats (LTRs) have 333 bp each and show a 5.4% sequence divergence between them. In addition to the characteristic polypurine tract (PPT) and the primer binding site (PBS), PpRT1 carries internal regions with homology to retroviral genes gag and pol. The pol region contains sequence motifs related to the enzymes protease, reverse transcriptase, RNAseH and integrase in the same typical order known for Ty3/gypsy-like retrotransposons. PpRT1 was extended from an EST database sequence indicating that its transcription is occurring in pine tissues. Southern blot analyses indicate however, that PpRT1 is present in a unique or a low number of copies in the P. pinaster genome. The differences in nucleotide sequence found between PpRT1 and IFG7 may explain the strikingly different copy number in the two pine species genome. Based on the homologies observed when comparing LTR region among different gypsy elements we propose that the highly conserved LTR regions may be useful to amplify other retrotransposon sequences of the same or close retrotransposon family.

  13. Identification of irradiated chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelberg, A.; Heide, L.; Boegl, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    Frozen chicken and chicken parts were irradiated at a dose of 5 kGy with Co-60. The irradiated chicken and chicken parts were identified by determination of three radiation-induced hydrocarbons from the lipid fraction. Isolation was carried out by high-vacuum distillation with a cold-finger apparatus. The detection of the hydrocarbons was possible in all irradiated samples by gaschromatography/mass spectrometry. (orig.) [de

  14. Processing parameters for the mechanical working of 9 Cr-1 Mo steel: processing maps approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaprasad, P.V.; Mannan, S.L.; Prasad, Y.V.R.K. [Indira Ghandi Centre for Atomic Research, Tamilnadu (India)

    2004-12-15

    Processing and instability maps using a dynamic materials model have been developed for 9Cr-1Mo steel in the temperature range 850 to 1200{sup o}C and strain rate range 0.001-100 s{sup -1} with a view to optimising its hot workability. The efficiency of power dissipation increased with increase in temperature and decrease in strain rate. The 9Cr-1Mo material exhibited two dynamic recrystallisation domains, one with a peak efficiency of 37% occurring at 950{sup o}C and 0.001 s{sup -1} and the other with a peak efficiency of 35% occurring at 1200{sup o}C and 0.1 s{sup -1}. These results are in good agreement with those found in industry. (author)

  15. The rate(time)- dependent mechanical behavior modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moosbrugger, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, constitutive equations are presented for the nonisothermal small strain behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel between 25degC - 600degC. The basic framework uses the superposition of nonlinear kinematic hardening rules as proposed by Chaboche and coworkes. A framework for accounting for isotropic softening is presented wherein this softening can be included in a drag stress, in a yield stress or as a decrease in the saturation level of kinematic hardening or some combination of these; a single isotropic softening equation is used as determined from experiments. The behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel between 25degC - 600degC has been investigated by Swindeman, and Majors et. al. and many important features have been discussed. Here, model parameters are determined from available isothermal uniaxial data and some correlations with isothermal and nonisothermal tests are presented. (J.P.N.)

  16. Evolutionary genomics revealed interkingdom distribution of Tcn1-like chromodomain-containing Gypsy LTR retrotransposons among fungi and plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blinov Alexander

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromodomain-containing Gypsy LTR retrotransposons or chromoviruses are widely distributed among eukaryotes and have been found in plants, fungi and vertebrates. The previous comprehensive survey of chromoviruses from mosses (Bryophyta suggested that genomes of non-seed plants contain the clade which is closely related to the retrotransposons from fungi. The origin, distribution and evolutionary history of this clade remained unclear mainly due to the absence of information concerning the diversity and distribution of LTR retrotransposons in other groups of non-seed plants as well as in fungal genomes. Results In present study we preformed in silico analysis of chromodomain-containing LTR retrotransposons in 25 diverse fungi and a number of plant species including spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii (Lycopodiophyta coupled with an experimental survey of chromodomain-containing Gypsy LTR retrotransposons from diverse non-seed vascular plants (lycophytes, ferns, and horsetails. Our mining of Gypsy LTR retrotransposons in genomic sequences allowed identification of numerous families which have not been described previously in fungi. Two new well-supported clades, Galahad and Mordred, as well as several other previously unknown lineages of chromodomain-containing Gypsy LTR retrotransposons were described based on the results of PCR-mediated survey of LTR retrotransposon fragments from ferns, horsetails and lycophytes. It appeared that one of the clades, namely Tcn1 clade, was present in basidiomycetes and non-seed plants including mosses (Bryophyta and lycophytes (genus Selaginella. Conclusions The interkingdom distribution is not typical for chromodomain-containing LTR retrotransposons clades which are usually very specific for a particular taxonomic group. Tcn1-like LTR retrotransposons from fungi and non-seed plants demonstrated high similarity to each other which can be explained by strong selective constraints and the

  17. New antiferromagnetic semiconductor CuCr1.5Sb0.5S4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesler, Ya.A.; Koroleva, L.I.; Mikheev, M.G.; Odintsov, A.G.; Filimonov, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    New halcogenide compound with spinel-antiferromagnetic semiconductor CuCr 1.5 Sb 0.5 S 4 are obtained and studied for the first time. Magnetic properties of this compound, namely, magnetization linear dependence, maximum on PHI(T) curve in the low-temperature area and realization of the Curie-Weis law for paramagnetic susceptibility with negative paramagnetic temperature testiby to the fact that this compound is antiferromagnetic

  18. Microstructure and elevated-temperature erosion-oxidation behaviour of aluminized 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Huttunen, E.; Honkanen, M.; Tsipas, Sophia Alexandra; Omar, H.; Tsipas, D.

    2012-01-01

    Degradation of materials by a combination of erosive wear and atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures constitutes a problem in some power generation processes, such as fluidized-bed combustion. In this work, 9Cr-1Mo steel, a common tube material in combustion chambers, is coated by a pack cementation method from an Al-containing pack in order to improve the resistance to erosion-oxidation at elevated temperatures. The resulting coating is studied in terms of microstructure and microhar...

  19. Thermal Aging Evaluation of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo Steel using Nonlinear Rayleigh Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young-Sang; Kim, Hoe-Woong; Kim, Jong-Bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Marino, Daniel; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, L.J [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta (United States); Ruiz, Alberto [UMSNH, Morelia (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    Thermal aging can pose a high risk to decreases in the mechanical properties such as strength or creep resistance. This can lead to an unexpected failure during long term operation. Nonlinear NDE techniques are preferred over conventional NDE techniques (linear ultrasonic measurements) because nonlinear ultrasonic techniques have shown their capability to detect a microstructural damage in the structures undergoing fatigue and creep. These nonlinear ultrasonic techniques make use of the fact that the dislocation density increases, which will create a nonlinear distortion of an ultrasonic wave; this damage causes the generation of measurable higher harmonic components in an initially mono-chromatic ultrasonic signal. This study investigates the recently developed non-contact nonlinear ultrasonic technique to detect the microstructural damage of mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel based on nonlinear Rayleigh wave with varying propagation distances. Nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave measurements using a non-contact, air-coupled ultrasonic transducer have been applied for the thermal aging evaluation of modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steel. Thermal aging for various heat treatment times of mod.. 9Cr-1Mo steel specimens is performed to obtain the nucleation and growth of precipitated particles in specimens. The amplitudes of the first and second harmonics are measured along the propagation distance and the relative nonlinearity parameter is obtained from these amplitudes. The relative nonlinearity parameter shows a similar trend with the Rockwell C hardness.

  20. B cell lymphomas express CX3CR1 a non-B cell lineage adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasson, U.; Ek, S.; Merz, H.

    2008-01-01

    normally is not expressed on B cells, is expressed both at the mRNA and protein level in several subtypes of lymphoma. CX3CR1 has also shown to be involved in the homing to specific tissues that express the ligand, CX3CL1, in breast and prostate cancer and may thus be involved in dissemination of lymphoma......To study the differential expression of cell membrane-bound receptors and their potential role in growth and/or survival of the tumor cells, highly purified follicular lymphoma cells were analyzed, using gene expression analysis, and compared to non-malignant B cell populations. Filtering...... the genome for overexpressed genes coding for cell membrane-bound proteins/receptors resulted in a hit list of 27 identified genes. Among these, we have focused on the aberrant over expression of CX3CR1, in different types of B cell lymphoma, as compared to non-malignant B cells. We show that CX3CR1, which...

  1. Toughness of 2,25Cr-1Mo steel and weld metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acarer, Mustafa; Arici, Gökhan; Acar, Filiz Kumdali; Keskinkilic, Selcuk; Kabakci, Fikret

    2017-09-01

    2,25Cr-1Mo steel is extensively used at elevated temperature structural applications in fossil fire power plants for steam pipes, nozzle chambers and petrochemical industry for hydrocracking unit due to its excellent creep resistance and good redundant to oxidation. Also they should have acceptable weldability and toughness. The steels are supplied in quenched and tempered condition and their welded components are subjected to post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). Tempering process is carried out at 690-710°C to improve toughness properties. However they are sensitive to reheat cracking and temper embrittlement. To measure temper embrittlement of the steels and their weld metal, temper embrittlement factor and formula (J factor - Watanabe and X formula- Bruscato) are used. Step cooling heat treatment is also applied to determine temper embrittlement. In this study, toughness properties of Cr Mo (W) steels were reviewed. Also transition temperature curves of 2,25Cr-1Mo steel and its weld metal were constructed before and after step cool heat treatment as experimental study. While 2,25Cr-1Mo steel as base metal was supplied, all weld metal samples were produced in Gedik Welding Company. Hardness measurements and microstructure evaluation were also carried out.

  2. Hydrogen induced plastic damage in pressure vessel steel of 2.25Cr-1Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, G.W.; Song, Y.J.

    1995-01-01

    2.25Cr-1Mo steel is generally employed as a hydrogenation reaction vessel material used at elevated temperature and in a hydrogen containing environment. During service of the reaction vessel, a large number of hydrogen atoms would enter its wall. When the reaction vessel is shutdown and the temperature reduces to about ambient temperature, the hydrogen atoms remaining in the wall would induce plastic damage in the steel. The mechanism of hydrogen induced plastic damage is different for various materials with different microstructures. Investigations have demonstrated that the hydrogen induced plastic damage in carbide annealed carbon steels is caused by hydrogen accelerating the initiating and growing of microvoids from the carbide particles. However, SEM examination on the fracture surface of hydrogen charged tensile specimen of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel show that a large number of fisheyes appear on the fracture surface. This indicates that hydrogen induced plastic damage in 2.25Cr-1Mo steel is related to the occurrence of fisheye cracks during plastic deformation. By means of micro-fracture mechanics to analyze fisheye crack occurrence from the first generation microvoid, the mechanism of hydrogen induced plastic damage in the pressure vessel steel is investigated

  3. The integrity of 9Cr-1Mo to stainless steel transition joints in AGR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, D.W.; Neumann, P.; Soo, J.

    1982-01-01

    The metallurgical aspects of the transition joint between 9Cr-1Mo and 316 stainless steel boiler tube sections are reviewed. A large minimum superheat margin (106 0 C) between the dryout zone and the 9Cr-1Mo to stainless steel transition joint was specified in the original design to eliminate the risk of wetting the stainless steel which is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. However, small defects were discovered in the welds between the 9Cr-1Mo and Sanicro (72%Ni-16%Cr-10%Fe) transition piece, resulting from dilution of the weld pool by nickel from the transition piece. This led to the possibility of weld failure as a result of creep crack growth in service, and any significant reduction in operating temperature would mean that the large superheat margin could not be sustained. The creep properties of the joints, together with the transition joint temperature distribution, enabled tube failure rates to be determined as a function of operating temperature. A probabilistic model was developed so that the transition joint could be operated within a temperature 'window', the lower temperature limit being determined by stress corrosion considerations and the upper limit being set by creep rate limitations. This allows full load performance from the boilers throughout the anticipated life of the plant. (author)

  4. Human Retrotransposon Insertion Polymorphisms Are Associated with Health and Disease via Gene Regulatory Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The human genome hosts several active families of transposable elements (TEs, including the Alu, LINE-1, and SVA retrotransposons that are mobilized via reverse transcription of RNA intermediates. We evaluated how insertion polymorphisms generated by human retrotransposon activity may be related to common health and disease phenotypes that have been previously interrogated through genome-wide association studies (GWAS. To address this question, we performed a genome-wide screen for retrotransposon polymorphism disease associations that are linked to TE induced gene regulatory changes. Our screen first identified polymorphic retrotransposon insertions found in linkage disequilibrium (LD with single nucleotide polymorphisms that were previously associated with common complex diseases by GWAS. We further narrowed this set of candidate disease associated retrotransposon polymorphisms by identifying insertions that are located within tissue-specific enhancer elements. We then performed expression quantitative trait loci analysis on the remaining set of candidates in order to identify polymorphic retrotransposon insertions that are associated with gene expression changes in B-cells of the human immune system. This progressive and stringent screen yielded a list of six retrotransposon insertions as the strongest candidates for TE polymorphisms that lead to disease via enhancer-mediated changes in gene regulation. For example, we found an SVA insertion within a cell-type specific enhancer located in the second intron of the B4GALT1 gene. B4GALT1 encodes a glycosyltransferase that functions in the glycosylation of the Immunoglobulin G (IgG antibody in such a way as to convert its activity from pro- to anti-inflammatory. The disruption of the B4GALT1 enhancer by the SVA insertion is associated with down-regulation of the gene in B-cells, which would serve to keep the IgG molecule in a pro-inflammatory state. Consistent with this idea, the B4GALT1 enhancer

  5. Repetitive DNA and Plant Domestication: Variation in Copy Number and Proximity to Genes of LTR-Retrotransposons among Wild and Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascagni, Flavia; Barghini, Elena; Giordani, Tommaso; Rieseberg, Loren H; Cavallini, Andrea; Natali, Lucia

    2015-11-24

    The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) genome contains a very large proportion of transposable elements, especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons. However, knowledge on the retrotransposon-related variability within this species is still limited. We used next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to perform a quantitative and qualitative survey of intraspecific variation of the retrotransposon fraction of the genome across 15 genotypes--7 wild accessions and 8 cultivars--of H. annuus. By mapping the Illumina reads of the 15 genotypes onto a library of sunflower long terminal repeat retrotransposons, we observed considerable variability in redundancy among genotypes, at both superfamily and family levels. In another analysis, we mapped Illumina paired reads to two sets of sequences, that is, long terminal repeat retrotransposons and protein-encoding sequences, and evaluated the extent of retrotransposon proximity to genes in the sunflower genome by counting the number of paired reads in which one read mapped to a retrotransposon and the other to a gene. Large variability among genotypes was also ascertained for retrotransposon proximity to genes. Both long terminal repeat retrotransposon redundancy and proximity to genes varied among retrotransposon families and also between cultivated and wild genotypes. Such differences are discussed in relation to the possible role of long terminal repeat retrotransposons in the domestication of sunflower. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. Pancreatic stellate cells and CX3CR1: occurrence in normal pancreas and acute and chronic pancreatitis and effect of their activation by a CX3CR1 agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masahiko; Ito, Tetsuhide; Nakamura, Taichi; Hijioka, Masayuki; Igarashi, Hisato; Oono, Takamasa; Kato, Masaki; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Koichi; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Jensen, Robert T

    2014-07-01

    Numerous studies suggest important roles of the chemokine, fractalkine (CX3CL1), in acute/chronic pancreatitis; however, the possible mechanisms of the effects are unclear. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can play important roles in pancreatitis, secreting inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, as well as proliferation. Therefore, we investigated CX3CL1 receptor (CX3CR1) occurrence in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues and the effects of CX3CL1 on activated PSCs. CX3CR1 expression/localization in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues was evaluated with immunohistochemical analysis. CX3CR1 expression and effects of CX3CL1 on activated PSCs were examined with real-time polymerase chain reaction, BrdU (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine) assays, and Western blotting. In normal pancreas, acinar cells expressed CX3CR1 within granule-like formations in the cytoplasm, whereas in acute/chronic pancreatitis, acinar, ductal, and activated PSCs expressed CX3CR1 on cell membranes. With activation of normal PSCs, CX3CR1 is increased. CX3CL1 activated multiple signaling cascades in PSCs. CX3CL1 did not induce inflammatory genes expression in activated PSCs, but induced proliferation. CX3CR1s are expressed in normal pancreas. Expression is increased in acute/chronic pancreatitis, and the CX3CR1s are activated. CX3CL1 induces proliferation of activated PSCs without increasing release of inflammatory mediators. These results suggest that CX3CR1 activation of PSCs could be important in their effects in pancreatitis, especially to PSC proliferation in pancreatitis where CX3CL1 levels are elevated.

  7. Characteristics of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel for Reactor Pressure Vessel of Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Ryu, W. S.; Han, Chang Hee; Yoon, J. H.; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2004-11-15

    Many researches and developments have been progressed for the construction of VHTR by 2020 in Korea. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been receiving attention for the application to the reactor pressure vessel material of VHTR. We collected and analyzed the research data for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel in order to understand the characteristics of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. The modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is a modified alloy system similar to conventional 9Cr-1Mo grade ferritic steel. Modifications include additions of vanadium, niobium, and nitrogen, as well as lower carbon content. In this report, we summarized the change of microstructure and mechanical properties after tempering, thermal aging, and irradiation. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has high strength and thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and good resistance to corrosion. But the irradiation embrittlement behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel should be evaluated and the evaluation methodology also should be developed. At the same time, the characteristics of weldment which is the weak part in pressure vessel should be evaluated.

  8. Envelope-like retrotransposons in the plant kingdom: evidence of their presence in gymnosperms (Pinus pinaster).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Célia; Simões, Marta; Oliveira, Maria Margarida; Rocheta, Margarida

    2008-11-01

    Retroviruses differ from retrotransposons due to their infective capacity, which depends critically on the encoded envelope. Some plant retroelements contain domains reminiscent of the env of animal retroviruses but the number of such elements described to date is restricted to angiosperms. We show here the first evidence of the presence of putative env-like gene sequences in a gymnosperm species, Pinus pinaster (maritime pine). Using a degenerate primer approach for conserved domains of RNaseH gene, three clones from putative envelope-like retrotransposons (PpRT2, PpRT3, and PpRT4) were identified. The env-like sequences of P. pinaster clones are predicted to encode proteins with transmembrane domains. These sequences showed identity scores of up to 30% with env-like sequences belonging to different organisms. A phylogenetic analysis based on protein alignment of deduced aminoacid sequences revealed that these clones clustered with env-containing plant retrotransposons, as well as with retrotransposons from invertebrate organisms. The differences found among the sequences of maritime pine clones isolated here suggest the existence of different putative classes of env-like retroelements. The identification for the first time of env-like genes in a gymnosperm species may support the ancestrality of retroviruses among plants shedding light on their role in plant evolution.

  9. Identification of a non-LTR retrotransposon from the gypsy moth

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.J. Garner; J.M. Slavicek

    1999-01-01

    A family of highly repetitive elements, named LDT1, has been identified in the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar. The complete element is 5.4 kb in length and lacks long-terminal repeats, The element contains two open reading frames with a significant amino acid sequence similarity to several non-LTR retrotransposons. The first open reading frame contains...

  10. Genetic diversity of cultivated flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) germplasm assessed by retrotransposon-based markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smýkal, P; Bačová-Kerteszová, N; Kalendar, R; Corander, J; Schulman, A H; Pavelek, M

    2011-05-01

    Retrotransposon segments were characterized and inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP) markers developed for cultivated flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) and the Linum genus. Over 75 distinct long terminal repeat retrotransposon segments were cloned, the first set for Linum, and specific primers designed for them. IRAP was then used to evaluate genetic diversity among 708 accessions of cultivated flax comprising 143 landraces, 387 varieties, and 178 breeding lines. These included both traditional and modern, oil (86), fiber (351), and combined-use (271) accessions, originating from 36 countries, and 10 wild Linum species. The set of 10 most polymorphic primers yielded 141 reproducible informative data points per accession, with 52% polymorphism and a 0.34 Shannon diversity index. The maximal genetic diversity was detected among wild Linum species (100% IRAP polymorphism and 0.57 Jaccard similarity), while diversity within cultivated germplasm decreased from landraces (58%, 0.63) to breeding lines (48%, 0.85) and cultivars (50%, 0.81). Application of Bayesian methods for clustering resulted in the robust identification of 20 clusters of accessions, which were unstratified according to origin or user type. This indicates an overlap in genetic diversity despite disruptive selection for fiber versus oil types. Nevertheless, eight clusters contained high proportions (70-100%) of commercial cultivars, whereas two clusters were rich (60%) in landraces. These findings provide a basis for better flax germplasm management, core collection establishment, and exploration of diversity in breeding, as well as for exploration of the role of retrotransposons in flax genome dynamics.

  11. How a retrotransposon exploits the plant's heat stress response for its activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V Cavrak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons are major components of plant and animal genomes. They amplify by reverse transcription and reintegration into the host genome but their activity is usually epigenetically silenced. In plants, genomic copies of retrotransposons are typically associated with repressive chromatin modifications installed and maintained by RNA-directed DNA methylation. To escape this tight control, retrotransposons employ various strategies to avoid epigenetic silencing. Here we describe the mechanism developed by ONSEN, an LTR-copia type retrotransposon in Arabidopsis thaliana. ONSEN has acquired a heat-responsive element recognized by plant-derived heat stress defense factors, resulting in transcription and production of full length extrachromosomal DNA under elevated temperatures. Further, the ONSEN promoter is free of CG and CHG sites, and the reduction of DNA methylation at the CHH sites is not sufficient to activate the element. Since dividing cells have a more pronounced heat response, the extrachromosomal ONSEN DNA, capable of reintegrating into the genome, accumulates preferentially in the meristematic tissue of the shoot. The recruitment of a major plant heat shock transcription factor in periods of heat stress exploits the plant's heat stress response to achieve the transposon's activation, making it impossible for the host to respond appropriately to stress without losing control over the invader.

  12. Transcriptionally active LTR retrotransposons in Eucalyptus genus are differentially expressed and insertionally polymorphic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Helena Sanches; Domingues, Douglas Silva; Silva, Juliana Costa; Borges, Rafael Junqueira; Matioli, Fábio Filippi; Fontes, Marcos Roberto de Mattos; Marino, Celso Luis

    2015-08-14

    In Eucalyptus genus, studies on genome composition and transposable elements (TEs) are particularly scarce. Nearly half of the recently released Eucalyptus grandis genome is composed by retrotransposons and this data provides an important opportunity to understand TE dynamics in Eucalyptus genome and transcriptome. We characterized nine families of transcriptionally active LTR retrotransposons from Copia and Gypsy superfamilies in Eucalyptus grandis genome and we depicted genomic distribution and copy number in two Eucalyptus species. We also evaluated genomic polymorphism and transcriptional profile in three organs of five Eucalyptus species. We observed contrasting genomic and transcriptional behavior in the same family among different species. RLC_egMax_1 was the most prevalent family and RLC_egAngela_1 was the family with the lowest copy number. Most families of both superfamilies have their insertions occurring Eucalyptus species. Using EST analysis and qRT-PCRs, we observed transcriptional activity in several tissues and in all evaluated species. In some families, osmotic stress increases transcript values. Our strategy was successful in isolating transcriptionally active retrotransposons in Eucalyptus, and each family has a particular genomic and transcriptional pattern. Overall, our results show that retrotransposon activity have differentially affected genome and transcriptome among Eucalyptus species.

  13. The role of retrotransposons in gene family expansions in the human and mouse genomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janoušek, Václav; Laukaitis, C. M.; Yanchukov, Alexey; Karn, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 9 (2016), s. 2632-2650 ISSN 1759-6653 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0303 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : gene families * transposable elements * retrotransposons * LINE * LTR * SINE Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.979, year: 2016

  14. A widespread occurrence of extra open reading frames in plant Ty3/gypsy retrotransposons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Steinbauerová, Veronika; Neumann, Pavel; Novák, Petr; Macas, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 139, 11-12 (2011), s. 1543-1555 ISSN 0016-6707 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : Additional ORFs * LTR retrotransposons * Repetitive DNA * Plant genome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.148, year: 2011

  15. LTR retrotransposon dynamics in the evolution of the olive (Olea europaea) genome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barghini, E.; Natali, L.; Giordani, T.; Cossu, R.M.; Scalabrin, S.; Cattonaro, F.; Šimková, Hana; Vrána, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav; Morgante, M.; Cavallini, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 91-100 ISSN 1340-2838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : LTR retrotransposons * next-generation sequencing * olive Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.267, year: 2015

  16. MASiVEdb: the Sirevirus Plant Retrotransposon Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bousios Alexandros

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sireviruses are an ancient genus of the Copia superfamily of LTR retrotransposons, and the only one that has exclusively proliferated within plant genomes. Based on experimental data and phylogenetic analyses, Sireviruses have successfully infiltrated many branches of the plant kingdom, extensively colonizing the genomes of grass species. Notably, it was recently shown that they have been a major force in the make-up and evolution of the maize genome, where they currently occupy ~21% of the nuclear content and ~90% of the Copia population. It is highly likely, therefore, that their life dynamics have been fundamental in the genome composition and organization of a plethora of plant hosts. To assist studies into their impact on plant genome evolution and also facilitate accurate identification and annotation of transposable elements in sequencing projects, we developed MASiVEdb (Mapping and Analysis of SireVirus Elements Database, a collective and systematic resource of Sireviruses in plants. Description Taking advantage of the increasing availability of plant genomic sequences, and using an updated version of MASiVE, an algorithm specifically designed to identify Sireviruses based on their highly conserved genome structure, we populated MASiVEdb (http://bat.infspire.org/databases/masivedb/ with data on 16,243 intact Sireviruses (total length >158Mb discovered in 11 fully-sequenced plant genomes. MASiVEdb is unlike any other transposable element database, providing a multitude of highly curated and detailed information on a specific genus across its hosts, such as complete set of coordinates, insertion age, and an analytical breakdown of the structure and gene complement of each element. All data are readily available through basic and advanced query interfaces, batch retrieval, and downloadable files. A purpose-built system is also offered for detecting and visualizing similarity between user sequences and Sireviruses, as

  17. Tolerogenic CX3CR1+ B cells suppress food allergy-induced intestinal inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z Q; Wu, Y; Song, J P; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Zheng, P Y; Yang, P C

    2013-10-01

    B lymphocytes are an important cell population of the immune regulation; their role in the regulation of food allergy has not been fully understood yet. This study aims to investigate the role of a subpopulation of tolerogenic B cells (TolBC) in the generation of regulatory T cells (Treg) and in the suppression of food allergy-induced intestinal inflammation in mice. The intestinal mucosa-derived CD5+ CD19+ CX3CR1+ TolBCs were characterized by flow cytometry; a mouse model of intestinal T helper (Th)2 inflammation was established to assess the immune regulatory role of this subpopulation of TolBCs. A subpopulation of CD5+ CD19+ CX3CR1+ B cells was detected in the mouse intestinal mucosa. The cells also expressed transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and carried integrin alpha v beta 6 (αvβ6). Exposure to recombinant αvβ6 and anti-IgM antibody induced naive B cells to differentiate into the TGF-β-producing TolBCs. Coculturing this subpopulation of TolBCs with Th0 cells generated CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs. Adoptive transfer with the TolBCs markedly suppressed the food allergy-induced intestinal Th2 pattern inflammation in mice. CD5+ CD19+ CX3CR1+ TolBCs are capable of inducing Tregs in the intestine and suppress food allergy-related Th2 pattern inflammation in mice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Homogeneous and Heterogeneous (Fex, Cr1-x)(OH)3 Precipitation: Implications for Cr Sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chong; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Bo; Hu, Yandi

    2016-02-16

    The formation of (Fe, Cr)(OH)3 nanoparticles determines the fate of aqueous Cr in many aquatic environments. Using small-angle X-ray scattering, precipitation rates of (Fe, Cr)(OH)3 nanoparticles in solution and on quartz were quantified from 0.1 mM Fe(III) solutions containing 0-0.25 mM Cr(III) at pH = 3.7 ± 0.2. Concentration ratio of aqueous Cr(III)/Fe(III) controlled the chemical composition (x) of (Fex, Cr1-x)(OH)3 precipitates, solutions' supersaturation with respect to precipitates, and the surface charge of quartz. Therefore, the aqueous Cr(III)/Fe(III) ratio affected homogeneous (in solution) and heterogeneous (on quartz) precipitation rates of (Fex, Cr1-x)(OH)3 through different mechanisms. The sequestration mechanisms of Cr(III) in precipitates were also investigated. In solutions with high aqueous Cr(III)/Fe(III) ratios, surface enrichment of Cr(III) on the precipitates occurred, resulting in slower particle growth in solutions. From solutions with 0-0.1 mM Cr(III), the particles on quartz grew from 2 to 4 nm within 1 h. Interestingly, from solution with 0.25 mM Cr(III), particles of two distinct sizes (2 and 6 nm) formed on quartz, and their sizes remained unchanged throughout the reaction. Our study provided new insights on homogeneous and heterogeneous precipitation of (Fex, Cr1-x)(OH)3 nanoparticles, which can help determine the fate of Cr in aquatic environments.

  19. Creep-fatigue evaluation method for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Y.; Aoto, K.

    1997-01-01

    As creep-fatigue evaluation methods on normalized and tempered Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for design use, the time fraction rule and the simplified conventional ductility exhaustion rule are investigated for the prediction of tension strain hold creep-fatigue damage of this material. For the above investigation, stress relaxation behaviour during strain hold has to be analyzed using stress-strain-time relation. The initial value of stress relaxation was determined by cyclic stress-strain curves in continuous cycling fatigue tests. Cyclic stress-strain behaviour of Mod.9Cr-1Mo(NT) steel is different from that of austenitic stainless steels, so this effect was considered. Stress relaxation analysis was performed using static creep strain-time relation and conventional hardening rule. The time fraction by using the above stress relaxation analysis results can give good prediction for creep-fatigue life of Mod.9Cr-1Mo(NT) steel. For design use it is practical to be able to estimate creep damages conservatively by both strain behaviour of cyclic plastic (in continuous cycling fatigue tests) and monotonic creep (in standard creep tests). The life reduction by strain hold at the minimum peak of compressive stress in creep-fatigue tests was examined, and this effects can be evaluated by the relationship between the location of oxidation and the effective deformation at crack tip. In an accelerated oxidation environment, for example in high temperature and high pressure steam, a different approach for life reduction should be developed based on the mechanism of growth of oxide and crack growth with oxidation. However, in the creep damage dominant region, its effect is saturated and the effect of cavity growth along grain boundary becomes dominant for long-term strain hold in the high temperature conditions. (author). 6 refs, 6 figs

  20. Structure, elastic properties and phase stability of Cr1-xAlxN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayrhofer, P.H.; Music, D.; Reeswinkel, Th.; Fuss, H.-G.; Schneider, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of composition and metal sublattice population on the phase stability, structure and elastic properties of cubic (c), hexagonal (h) and orthorhombic spin-polarized Cr 1-x Al x N was studied using ab initio calculations. Excellent correlation between ab initio and experimentally obtained lattice parameters and elastic constants was obtained. The energy of formation suggests that the cubic phase can be stabilized for x in the range 0.48-0.75, depending on the metal sublattice population. The broad range of x, which is also observed in experiments, can be understood by considering the Al distribution induced changes in the configurational contribution to the total energy

  1. Effect of boron on the hot ductility of 2.25Cr1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, S.-H.; Guo, A.-M.; Shen, D.-D.; Yuan, Z.-X.; Liu, J.; Xu, T.-D.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of boron on the hot ductility of 2.25Cr1Mo steel is investigated by means of a Gleeble 2000 thermomechanical simulator. There is a trough in the hot ductility-temperature curve, which is located between 1000 and 700 deg. C. The ductility trough shifts to lower temperatures with increasing boron content and the hot brittle range becomes shallow and narrow. In general, boron may improve the steel hot ductility in that it may retard the formation of pro-eutectoid ferrite and increase grain boundary cohesion. These effects may be related to the segregation of boron to austenite grain boundaries

  2. The RNAPII-CTD Maintains Genome Integrity through Inhibition of Retrotransposon Gene Expression and Transposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J Aristizabal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available RNA polymerase II (RNAPII contains a unique C-terminal domain that is composed of heptapeptide repeats and which plays important regulatory roles during gene expression. RNAPII is responsible for the transcription of most protein-coding genes, a subset of non-coding genes, and retrotransposons. Retrotransposon transcription is the first step in their multiplication cycle, given that the RNA intermediate is required for the synthesis of cDNA, the material that is ultimately incorporated into a new genomic location. Retrotransposition can have grave consequences to genome integrity, as integration events can change the gene expression landscape or lead to alteration or loss of genetic information. Given that RNAPII transcribes retrotransposons, we sought to investigate if the RNAPII-CTD played a role in the regulation of retrotransposon gene expression. Importantly, we found that the RNAPII-CTD functioned to maintaining genome integrity through inhibition of retrotransposon gene expression, as reducing CTD length significantly increased expression and transposition rates of Ty1 elements. Mechanistically, the increased Ty1 mRNA levels in the rpb1-CTD11 mutant were partly due to Cdk8-dependent alterations to the RNAPII-CTD phosphorylation status. In addition, Cdk8 alone contributed to Ty1 gene expression regulation by altering the occupancy of the gene-specific transcription factor Ste12. Loss of STE12 and TEC1 suppressed growth phenotypes of the RNAPII-CTD truncation mutant. Collectively, our results implicate Ste12 and Tec1 as general and important contributors to the Cdk8, RNAPII-CTD regulatory circuitry as it relates to the maintenance of genome integrity.

  3. Reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blass, J.J.; Battiste, R.L.; O'Connor, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The provisions of ASME B ampersand PV Code Case N-47 currently include reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of weldments. To provide experimental confirmation of such factors for modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel, tests of tubular specimens were conducted at 538 degree C (1000 degree F). Three creep-rupture specimens with longitudinal welds were tested in tension; and, of three with circumferential welds, two were tested in tension and one in torsion. In each specimen with a circumferential weld, a nonuniform axial distribution of strain was easily visible. The test results were compared to an existing empirical model of creep-rupture life. For the torsion test, the comparison was based on a definition of equivalent normal stress recently adopted in Code Case N-47. Some 27 fatigue specimens, with longitudinal, circumferential, or no welds, were tested under axial or torsional strain control. In specimens with welds, fatigue cracking initiated at fusion lines. In axial tests cracks grew in the circumferential direction, and in torsional tests cracks grew along fusion lines. The test results were compared to empirical models of fatigue life based on two definition of equivalent normal strain range. The results have provided some needed confirmation of the reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments currently under consideration by ASME Code committees. 8 refs., 5 figs

  4. Tensile properties and flow behavior analysis of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kanwarjeet; Latha, S.; Nandagopal, M.; Mathew, M. D.; Laha, K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-11-01

    The tensile properties and flow behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube have been investigated in the framework of various constitutive equations for a wide range of temperatures (300-923 K) and strain rates (3 × 10-3 s-1, 3 × 10-4 s-1 and 3 × 10-5 s-1). The tensile flow behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube was most accurately described by Voce equation. The variation of instantaneous work hardening rate (θ = dσ/dε) and σθ with stress (σ) indicated two stage behavior characterized by rapid decrease at low stresses (transient stage) followed by a gradual decrease in high stresses (Stage III). The variation of work hardening parameters and work hardening rate in terms of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ with temperature exhibited three distinct regimes. Rapid decrease in flow stress and work hardening parameters and rapid shift of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ towards low stresses with increase in temperature indicated dynamic recovery at high temperatures. Tensile properties of the material have been best predicted from Voce equation.

  5. Microstructure of HFIR-irradiated 12-Cr 1 MoVW ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitek, J.M.; Klueh, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    As part of the fusion materials development program in the United States, a 12 Cr-1 MoVW ferritic steel was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to a damage level of 36 dpa at 300, 400, 500, and 600 0 C. During irradiation in HFIR, a transmutation reaction of nickel results in the production of helium, to a level of 99 at. ppM in the present experiment. The microstructures were evaluated after irradiation and the results are presented. Cavities were found at all temperatures. Small cavities (3 to 9 nm) were observed after irradiation at 300, 500 and 600 0 C. At 500 and 600 0 C, the cavities were found preferentially at dislocations, lath boundaries, and prior austenite grain boundaries. After irradiation at 400 0 C, larger cavities (4 to 30 nm) were observed homogeneously distributed throughout the tempered martensite structure. The maximum swelling was 0.07% after irradiation at 400 0 C. Comparision of the results with other studies in which helium was not present at such high levels indicated helium enhances the swelling of 12 Cr-1 MoVW

  6. Hydrogen storage in TiCr1.2(FeV)x BCC solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Sydney F.; Huot, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    The Ti-V-based BCC solid solutions have been considered attractive candidates for hydrogen storage due to their relatively large hydrogen absorbing capacities near room temperature. In spite of this, improvements of some issues should be achieved to allow the technological applications of these alloys. Higher reversible hydrogen storage capacity, decreasing the hysteresis of PCI curves, and decrease in the cost of the raw materials are needed. In the case of vanadium-rich BCC solid solutions, which usually have large hydrogen storage capacities, the search for raw materials with lower cost is mandatory since pure vanadium is quite expensive. Recently, the substitutions of vanadium in these alloys have been tried and some interesting results were achieved by replacing vanadium by commercial ferrovanadium (FeV) alloy. In the present work, this approach was also adopted and TiCr 1.2 (FeV) x alloy series was investigated. The XRD patterns showed the co-existence of a BCC solid solution and a C14 Laves phase in these alloys. SEM analysis showed the alloys consisted of dendritic microstructure and C14 colonies. The amount of C14 phase increases when the amount of (FeV) decreases in these alloys. Concerning the hydrogen storage, the best results were obtained for the TiCr 1.2 (FeV) 0.4 alloy, which achieved 2.79 mass% of hydrogen storage capacity and 1.36 mass% of reversible hydrogen storage capacity

  7. Effects of As2O3 on DNA methylation, genomic instability, and LTR retrotransposon polymorphism in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erturk, Filiz Aygun; Aydin, Murat; Sigmaz, Burcu; Taspinar, M Sinan; Arslan, Esra; Agar, Guleray; Yagci, Semra

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic is a well-known toxic substance on the living organisms. However, limited efforts have been made to study its DNA methylation, genomic instability, and long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon polymorphism causing properties in different crops. In the present study, effects of As2O3 (arsenic trioxide) on LTR retrotransposon polymorphism and DNA methylation as well as DNA damage in Zea mays seedlings were investigated. The results showed that all of arsenic doses caused a decreasing genomic template stability (GTS) and an increasing Random Amplified Polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) profile changes (DNA damage). In addition, increasing DNA methylation and LTR retrotransposon polymorphism characterized a model to explain the epigenetically changes in the gene expression were also found. The results of this experiment have clearly shown that arsenic has epigenetic effect as well as its genotoxic effect. Especially, the increasing of polymorphism of some LTR retrotransposon under arsenic stress may be a part of the defense system against the stress.

  8. CX3CR1 deficiency alters hippocampal-dependent plasticity phenomena blunting the effects of enriched environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eMaggi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years several evidence demonstrated that some features of hippocampal biology, like neurogenesis, synaptic transmission, learning and memory performances are deeply modulated by social, motor and sensorial experiences. Fractalkine/CX3CL1 is a transmembrane chemokine abundantly expressed in the brain by neurons, where it modulates glutamatergic transmission and long-term plasticity processes regulating the intercellular communication between glia and neurons, being its specific receptor CX3CR1 expressed by microglia. In this paper we investigated the role of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling on experience-dependent hippocampal plasticity processes. At this aim wt and CX3CR1GFP/GFP mice were exposed to long-lasting-enriched environment (EE and the effects on hippocampal functions were studied by electrophysiological recordings of long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic activity, behavioral tests of learning and memory in the Morris water maze paradigm and analysis of neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG.We found that CX3CR1 deficiency increases hippocampal plasticity and spatial memory blunting the potentiating effects of EE. In contrast, exposure to EE increased the number and migration of neural progenitors in the DG of both wt and CX3CR1GFP/GFP mice. These data indicate that CX3CL1/CX3CR1-mediated signaling is crucial for a normal experience-dependent modulation of hippocampal functions.

  9. Interaction of high cycle fatigue and creep in 9%Cr-1%Mo steel at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasina, R.; Lukas, P.; Kunz, L.; Sklenicka, V.

    1995-01-01

    High-cycle-fatigue/creep experiments were performed on a 9%Cr-1%Mo tempered martensite ferritic steel at 873 K in air. The stress ratio R = σ min /σ max ranged from -1 (''pure'' fatigue) to 1 (''pure'' creep). The maximum stress σ max was kept constant at 240 MPa.The lifetime depends on the stress ratio R in a non-monotonic way. In the stress ratio interval 0.6 mean of the stress cycle. In the stress ratio interval -1 a . The fatigue/creep interaction occurs in between these intervals. The fatigue/creep loading induces transformation of the tempered martensite ferritic structure into an equiaxed subgrain structure. The resulting subgrain size depends strongly on the stress ratio. (author)

  10. Basic investigation for life assessment technology of modified 9CR-1Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Hiroyuki [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Ohtani, Ryuichi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Fujii, Kazuya [Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Kimura, Kazushige; Ishii, Ryuichi; Fujiyama, Kazunari; Hongo, Shigetada; Iseki, Takashi; Uchida, Hiroshi [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    For the basic study of life assessment technologies for aged components made of mod.9Cr-1Mo steel, specimens were artificially deteriorated by aging, creep and fatigue tests at elevated temperatures. And metallurgical and mechanical properties were examined. The change in the precipitates caused the decrease in toughness. The creep damage in base metal corresponded to the decrease in hardness. The fatigue damage in base metal correlated to the maximum length of a crack among micro-cracks initiated during fatigue cycle. In the welded joint, the creep fracture occurred by the formation and growth of voids in the fine grained region of HAZ near base metal. The creep damage was associated with the increase in both number and area fraction of voids. (orig.)

  11. High strain rate tensile properties of annealed 2 1/4 Cr--1 Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Oakes, R.E. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The high strain rate tensile properties of annealed 2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel were determined and the tensile behavior from 25 to 566 0 C and strain rates of 2.67 x 10 -6 to 144/s were described. Above 0.1/s at 25 0 C, both the yield stress and the ultimate tensile strength increased rapidly with increasing strain rate. As the temperature was increased, a dynamic strain aging peak appeared in the ultimate tensile strength-temperature curves. The peak height was a maximum at about 350 0 C and 2.67 x 10 -6 /s. With increasing strain rate, a peak of decreased height occurred at progressively higher temperatures. The major effect of strain rate on ductility occurred at elevated temperatures, where a decrease in strain rate caused an increase in total elongation and reduction in area

  12. Hydrogen diffusion in the Laves-phase compound TiCr1.78

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzolai, G.; Coluzzi, B.; Biscarini, A.; Mazzolai, F.M.; Tuissi, A.; Agresti, F.; Principi, G.; Lo Russo, S.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Young's modulus and of the internal friction (IF) has been investigated between 80 and 300 K at acoustical frequencies in the hexagonal (C14) Laves-phase TiCr 1.78 charged with hydrogen. In this compound H occupies tetrahedral interstitial sites which are grouped in interlinked hexagons. A mechanical relaxation has been found at around 120 K (f = 5.4 kHz), which appears to be due to tunnelling transitions of delocalized H from one hexagon to the other. The rate of H absorption has been investigated at high temperature (660-1200 K) and the H diffusion coefficient has been derived from the pressure measurement as a function of time. A cumulative Arrhenius plot of IF and absorption diffusion data exhibits a non-exponential behaviour, which is due to a change in the diffusion mechanism from over-barrier hopping at high temperature to phonon-assisted tunnelling at low temperature.

  13. Elevated temperature creep and fatigue damage of a 2.25 Cr--1 Mo steel weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Avyle, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    In weldments between dissimilar metals wide variations occur in metallurgical structure and mechanical properties, so that for good structural design it is necessary to understand the mechanical response of individual microstructural segments of the weld. This study investigates elevated temperature properties of a 2.25 Cr--1 Mo ferritic steel base metal welded with Chromenar 382V (Inconel 82) filler metal. Creep and low-cycle fatigue tests at 866 0 K (1100 0 F) show the filler metal and heat affected zone to be much stronger than the base metal. Optical microscopy does not show significant aging effects in the short-term fatigue tests or creep tests of 1180 hour duration

  14. Cyclic and isothermal oxidation behavior of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proy, M.; Utrilla, M. v.; Otero, E.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic and isothermal oxidation of chromium-molybdenum steel 2.25Cr-1Mo were analyzed at 550 degree centigrade and 650 degree centigrade during 360 hours in air atmospheres. The cycles were performed with two stages; one of heating in furnace during 90 minutes and then the sample were cooled to 50 degree centigrade by air flow. Thermogravimetric analyses were performed to obtain high temperature corrosion kinetics. Several characterization techniques have been used to identify the corrosion mechanism, as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Optical Microscopy (OM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Thermal cycling tests can changes the corrosion mechanism, due cracks propagation in oxide scale, that witch can favors the access of oxidant agent to the substrate. (Author)

  15. Heat treated 9 Cr-1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-08-21

    The invention relates to a composition and heat treatment for a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The novel combination of composition and heat treatment produces a heat treated material containing both large primary titanium carbides and small secondary titanium carbides. The primary titanium carbides contribute to creep strength while the secondary titanium carbides act to maintain a higher level of chromium in the finished steel for increased oxidation resistance, and strengthen the steel by impeding the movement of dislocations through the crystal structure. The heat treated material provides improved performance at comparable cost to commonly used high-temperature steels such as ASTM P91 and ASTM P92, and requires heat treatment consisting solely of austenization, rapid cooling, tempering, and final cooling, avoiding the need for any hot-working in the austenite temperature range.

  16. Microstructural evaluation and non-destructive examination of 2.25 Cr--1 Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Avyle, J.A.; Jones, W.B.; Gieske, J.H.

    1978-07-01

    Specimens of 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel were damaged to various levels by creep and combined creep-fatigue cycling at 886 0 K (1100 0 F) with hold periods. Ultrasonic shear wave velocity measurements were performed and showed small changes with large amounts of creep or fatigue damage; these changes were deemed too small for practical application. Measurements of magnetic properties were unsuccessful in following damage. Optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were performed on the samples. TEM observations showed that microstructural changes which occurred at 886 0 K (1100 0 F) did not occur homogeneously throughout the matrix; during creep, carbide spheroidization and coarsening began in widely separated regions, with an increasing fraction of the material undergoing the process with time. A precipitate was observed to form during fatigue which did not occur during simple aging or creep

  17. Chemical reduction of rust on 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel surface in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, N.; Shimoyashiki, S.

    1986-01-01

    Low-alloy Fe-2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steel has been favored for the tube material of steam generators in fast breeder reactors (FBRs). However, this material rusts easily due to moisture condensation on its surface when left in air. Therefore, measures to prevent tube materials from rusting have been taken during manufacturing of the steam generators. When rust is present on tube surfaces, its oxygen and iron dissolve into liquid sodium. When the concentration of these impurities in the sodium increases rapidly, the cold traps can become choked locally and lose their removal ability. This work has been done, therefore, to clarify reduction processes of rust in sodium and to select optimum operating temperatures of steam generators in the initial operation

  18. Cryogenic deformation microstructures of 32Mn-7Cr-1Mo-0.3N austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Ruidong; Qiu Liang; Wang Tiansheng; Wang Cunyu; Zheng Yangzeng

    2005-01-01

    The cryogenic deformation microstructures of impact and tensile specimens of 32Mn-7Cr-1Mo-0.3N austenitic steel were investigated using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the deformation microstructures of the impact specimens are mainly composed of stacking faults, network dislocation, slip bands, and a few mechanical twins and ε-martensite. These microstructures cross with each other in a crystal angle. The deformation microstructures of the tensile specimens consist only of massive slip bands, in which a few mechanical twins and ε-martenite are located. Because of the larger plastic deformation the slip band traces become bent. All the deformation microstructures are formed on the {111} planes and along the orientation

  19. Fatigue crack growth and endurance data on 9% Cr 1% Mo steels for AGR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priddle, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental investigations have been carried out on 9%Cr 1%Mo steels to examine: (1) The significance of carburisation on the fatigue endurance of plain and welded boiler tubes, and tube spacer strip; (2) the high cycle fatigue endurance of spacer strip and spacer weld metal; (3) fatigue crack growth rates in spacer strip and spacer weld metal. This report summarises the results of these investigations and where necessary compares the data to that in current data sheets. The effects of carburisation are variable depending on the structure and type of carburisation. The fatigue endurance properties of spacer strip and spacer weld metal are also similar and need not be considered separately for assessment or design purposes. Fatigue crack growth rates in spacer strip and space weld metal are similar and are influenced by both stress ratio and temperature. A design curve from a fast reactor data sheet may be used as an upper bound to these fatigue crack growth results. (author)

  20. Corrosion of an Fe-12 Cr-1 Mo VW steel in thermally-convective lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    A thermal-convection loop of Fe-12 Cr-1 Mo VW steel circulated pure lithium between 500 and 350 0 C for 10,088 h. Periodic weighings of coupons at different temperatures around the loop revealed small weight losses and corrosion rates. Surface analysis showed a relatively thin corrosion layer with an underlying carbide-free zone and some depletion of chromium from the hottest specimen. While some mass transfer of chromium and nickel was detected, this mechanism did not strongly influence the weight loss process as it does with austenitic steels. Therefore, it appeared that reactions with carbon and nitrogen must be the dominant corrosion processes such that weight loss was maximized at the lowest temperature (350 0 C). Overall, the lithium-steel reactions in the temperature range of this experiment were relatively sluggish and the corrosion was not severe

  1. Electron beam welding of heavy section 3Cr-1.5Mo alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.F.; David, S.A.; Nasreldin, A.

    1986-01-01

    Welding of thick section steels is a common practice in the fabrication of pressure vessels for energy systems. The fabrication cost is strongly influenced by the speed at which these large components can be welded. Conventional welding processes such as shielded metal arc (SMA) and submerged arc (SA) are time-consuming and expensive. Hence there is a great need to reduce welding time and the tonnage of weld metal deposited. Electron beam welding (EBW) is a process that potentially could be used to achieve dramatic reduction in the welding time and costs. The penetrating ability of the beam produces welds with high depth-to-width ratios at relatively high travel speeds, making it possible to weld thick sections with one or two passes without filler metals and other consumables. The paper describes a study that was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of using a high power electron beam welding machine to weld heavy section steel. The main emphasis of this work was concentrated on determining the mechanical properties of the resulting weldment, characterizing the microstructure of the various weldment regions, and comparing these results with those from other processes. One of the steels selected for the heavy section electron beam welding study was a new 3 Cr-1.5 Mo-0.1 V alloy. The steel was developed at the AMAX Materials Research Center by Wada and co-workers for high temperature, high pressure hydrogen service as a possible improved replacement for 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steels. The excellent strength and toughness of this steel make it a promising candidate for future pressure vessels such as those for coal gasifiers. The work was conducted on 102 mm (4 in.) thick plates of this material in the normalized-and-tempered condition

  2. Hardness prediction for the repair welding of 2.25Cr-1Mo pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oddy, A.S.; Chandel, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    Reactor vessels used for the hydrotreating of heavy oils and tar sand bitumen are frequently made of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel in thicknesses of 150 to 300 nm. Defects developed during installation or service are often repaired by welding. For practical reasons, postweld heat treatment of the repair welds is undesirable. This has led to continued effort to develop weld repair techniques that do not involve postweld heat treatment. Recently a six-layer automatic gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) technique has been proposed for the repair welding of nuclear reactor vessels made of SA508 Class 2 Steel. In this technique, the second and third passes refine the microstructure of the first pass, and the last three passes temper the first pass. Alberry has developed a set of empirical rules predicting the hardness after each pass in multipass welds made in SA508 Class 2 Steels. This algorithm has been used to predict the number of layers required to achieve desired hardness. A transformation and tempering algorithm for 2.25Cr-1Mo, similar to that of the above steel, is presented. The tempering algorithm of Alberry suffers from several minor problems and can be improved. A mathematically correct method for the calculation of the tempering occurring in an anisothermal cycle is demonstrated. In addition, the rules used to relate the softening that occurs during temperature are heuristic. Separate rules are proposed for the kinetics of softening depending on the peak temperature. A re-examination of those rules reveals that they can be recast in the form of a single rule for the material examined. Reassessing the basic data presented by Alberry leads to a single softening rule with better theoretical justification

  3. Recycling of CR1 by phorbol ester-activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malbran, A.; Frank, M.M.; Fries, L.

    1986-01-01

    PMN CR1 is internalized when these cells are stimulated with phorbol esters. To elucidate the fate of these receptors and ligand bound to them, the authors studied the uptake and disposition of 125 I-C3b by phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu)-treated PMN. C3b monomers bind to PDBu-treated PMN with a K(d) of 4.75 +/- 1.06 x 1 -8 M at 0 0 C in reduced ionic strength. This C3b remains almost entirely dissociable by high ionic strength buffer unless the cells are warmed. At 37 0 C, PDBu-treated PMN internalize monomer C3b into a non-strippable pool, reaching a plateau level of approx. 50% of bound ligand. Exocytosis of the internalized C3b was studied by washing the PMN in cold PBS, then rewarming to 37 0 . A progressive release of internalized C3b is observed, with kinetics similar to internalization and reaching a plateau of 48 +/- 4.2% at 15 minutes. Released C3b is precipitable by 10% TCA, suggesting that release does not require passage through the lysosomal compartment. PMN preloaded with 1mM chloroquine behave identically in the exocytosis phase, supporting this hypothesis. The non-recycling pool of 125 I-C3b is stable for at least 30 minutes at 37 0 . Uptake of chemically cross-linked C3b dimers by PMN is followed by slower and less complete exocytosis of internal counts, suggesting diversion into the non-releaseable pool. Activated PMN CR1 is partially recycled via a prelysosomal compartment. Minimal cross-linking shifts receptor-ligand complexes into a non-recycling, possibly lysosomal, pool

  4. Unified inelastic constitutive equations incorporating dynamic strain aging for Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaguchi, Masatsugu; Takahashi, Yukio

    1998-01-01

    A unified constitutive model considering dynamic strain aging effect was developed in order to describe inelastic deformation behavior of the Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel precisely. The inelastic behavior of the steel was summarized as follows. A rate dependent deformation was observed above 500degC, and there was no rate dependency under 400degC. However, stress relaxation behavior was observed even at rate independent temperature region. Further, a stress after relaxation depended on prior loading strain rate, and it showed a higher value as the strain rate was slow. A feature of the proposed constitutive model was that an applied stress consists of three stress components: a back stress, an overstress and an aging stress which corresponds to dynamics strain aging and shows a negative strain rate dependency. The aging stress was measured by strain rate change tests, and it showed larger values as the strain rates were slow and the temperatures were low. The backstress and the overstress were measured by strain dip tests. The backstress was approximately rate independent under 400degC, however it showed rate dependency above 500degC. The overstress showed larger values as the strain rates were fast and the temperatures were high. The material constants were determined systematically based on the measured values of each internal variable. In order to evaluate the validity of the constitutive model, numerical simulations were done for various inelastic deformation behavior of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel. The simulations agreed with experimental results very well in all cases. (author)

  5. Development of an efficient retrotransposon-based fingerprinting method for rapid pea variety identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smýkal, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Fast and efficient DNA fingerprinting of crop cultivars and individuals is frequently used in both theoretical population genetics and in practical breeding. Numerous DNA marker technologies exist and the ratio of speed, cost and accuracy are of importance. Therefore even in species where highly accurate and polymorphic marker systems are available, such as microsatellite SSR (simple sequence repeats), also alternative methods may be of interest. Thanks to their high abundance and ubiquity, temporary mobile retrotransposable elements come into recent focus. Their properties, such as genome wide distribution and well-defined origin of individual insertions by descent, predetermine them for use as molecular markers. In this study, several Ty3-gypsy type retrotransposons have been developed and adopted for the inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP) method, which is suitable for fast and efficient pea cultivar fingerprinting. The method can easily distinguish even between genetically closely related pea cultivars and provide high polymorphic information content (PIC) in a single PCR analysis.

  6. Host factors that promote retrotransposon integration are similar in distantly related eukaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Kumar Rai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses and Long Terminal Repeat (LTR-retrotransposons have distinct patterns of integration sites. The oncogenic potential of retrovirus-based vectors used in gene therapy is dependent on the selection of integration sites associated with promoters. The LTR-retrotransposon Tf1 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is studied as a model for oncogenic retroviruses because it integrates into the promoters of stress response genes. Although integrases (INs encoded by retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons are responsible for catalyzing the insertion of cDNA into the host genome, it is thought that distinct host factors are required for the efficiency and specificity of integration. We tested this hypothesis with a genome-wide screen of host factors that promote Tf1 integration. By combining an assay for transposition with a genetic assay that measures cDNA recombination we could identify factors that contribute differentially to integration. We utilized this assay to test a collection of 3,004 S. pombe strains with single gene deletions. Using these screens and immunoblot measures of Tf1 proteins, we identified a total of 61 genes that promote integration. The candidate integration factors participate in a range of processes including nuclear transport, transcription, mRNA processing, vesicle transport, chromatin structure and DNA repair. Two candidates, Rhp18 and the NineTeen complex were tested in two-hybrid assays and were found to interact with Tf1 IN. Surprisingly, a number of pathways we identified were found previously to promote integration of the LTR-retrotransposons Ty1 and Ty3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, indicating the contribution of host factors to integration are common in distantly related organisms. The DNA repair factors are of particular interest because they may identify the pathways that repair the single stranded gaps flanking the sites of strand transfer following integration of LTR retroelements.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of LTR-retrotransposons in oil palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beulé, Thierry; Agbessi, Mawussé Dt; Dussert, Stephane; Jaligot, Estelle; Guyot, Romain

    2015-10-15

    The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) is a major cultivated crop and the world's largest source of edible vegetable oil. The genus Elaeis comprises two species E. guineensis, the commercial African oil palm and E. oleifera, which is used in oil palm genetic breeding. The recent publication of both the African oil palm genome assembly and the first draft sequence of its Latin American relative now allows us to tackle the challenge of understanding the genome composition, structure and evolution of these palm genomes through the annotation of their repeated sequences. In this study, we identified, annotated and compared Transposable Elements (TE) from the African and Latin American oil palms. In a first step, Transposable Element databases were built through de novo detection in both genome sequences then the TE content of both genomes was estimated. Then putative full-length retrotransposons with Long Terminal Repeats (LTRs) were further identified in the E. guineensis genome for characterization of their structural diversity, copy number and chromosomal distribution. Finally, their relative expression in several tissues was determined through in silico analysis of publicly available transcriptome data. Our results reveal a congruence in the transpositional history of LTR retrotransposons between E. oleifera and E. guineensis, especially the Sto-4 family. Also, we have identified and described 583 full-length LTR-retrotransposons in the Elaeis guineensis genome. Our work shows that these elements are most likely no longer mobile and that no recent insertion event has occurred. Moreover, the analysis of chromosomal distribution suggests a preferential insertion of Copia elements in gene-rich regions, whereas Gypsy elements appear to be evenly distributed throughout the genome. Considering the high proportion of LTR retrotransposon in the oil palm genome, our work will contribute to a greater understanding of their impact on genome organization and evolution

  8. LINE retrotransposon RNA is an essential structural and functional epigenetic component of a core neocentromeric chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderly C Chueh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously identified and characterized the phenomenon of ectopic human centromeres, known as neocentromeres. Human neocentromeres form epigenetically at euchromatic chromosomal sites and are structurally and functionally similar to normal human centromeres. Recent studies have indicated that neocentromere formation provides a major mechanism for centromere repositioning, karyotype evolution, and speciation. Using a marker chromosome mardel(10 containing a neocentromere formed at the normal chromosomal 10q25 region, we have previously mapped a 330-kb CENP-A-binding domain and described an increased prevalence of L1 retrotransposons in the underlying DNA sequences of the CENP-A-binding clusters. Here, we investigated the potential role of the L1 retrotransposons in the regulation of neocentromere activity. Determination of the transcriptional activity of a panel of full-length L1s (FL-L1s across a 6-Mb region spanning the 10q25 neocentromere chromatin identified one of the FL-L1 retrotransposons, designated FL-L1b and residing centrally within the CENP-A-binding clusters, to be transcriptionally active. We demonstrated the direct incorporation of the FL-L1b RNA transcripts into the CENP-A-associated chromatin. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the FL-L1b RNA transcripts led to a reduction in CENP-A binding and an impaired mitotic function of the 10q25 neocentromere. These results indicate that LINE retrotransposon RNA is a previously undescribed essential structural and functional component of the neocentromeric chromatin and that retrotransposable elements may serve as a critical epigenetic determinant in the chromatin remodelling events leading to neocentromere formation.

  9. Retrotransposon-associated long non-coding RNAs in mice and men

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ganesh, Sravya; Svoboda, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 468, č. 6 (2016), s. 1049-1060 ISSN 0031-6768 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP305/12/G034; GA MŠk LO1419 EU Projects: European Commission 647403; European Commission 607720 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : lncRNA * Retrotransposon * line * sine * ltr * MaLR Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.156, year: 2016

  10. The Influence of LINE-1 and SINE Retrotransposons on Mammalian Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Sandra R; Doucet, Aurélien J; Kopera, Huira C; Moldovan, John B; Garcia-Perez, José Luis; Moran, John V

    2015-04-01

    Transposable elements have had a profound impact on the structure and function of mammalian genomes. The retrotransposon Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1), by virtue of its replicative mobilization mechanism, comprises ∼17% of the human genome. Although the vast majority of human LINE-1 sequences are inactive molecular fossils, an estimated 80-100 copies per individual retain the ability to mobilize by a process termed retrotransposition. Indeed, LINE-1 is the only active, autonomous retrotransposon in humans and its retrotransposition continues to generate both intra-individual and inter-individual genetic diversity. Here, we briefly review the types of transposable elements that reside in mammalian genomes. We will focus our discussion on LINE-1 retrotransposons and the non-autonomous Short INterspersed Elements (SINEs) that rely on the proteins encoded by LINE-1 for their mobilization. We review cases where LINE-1-mediated retrotransposition events have resulted in genetic disease and discuss how the characterization of these mutagenic insertions led to the identification of retrotransposition-competent LINE-1s in the human and mouse genomes. We then discuss how the integration of molecular genetic, biochemical, and modern genomic technologies have yielded insight into the mechanism of LINE-1 retrotransposition, the impact of LINE-1-mediated retrotransposition events on mammalian genomes, and the host cellular mechanisms that protect the genome from unabated LINE-1-mediated retrotransposition events. Throughout this review, we highlight unanswered questions in LINE-1 biology that provide exciting opportunities for future research. Clearly, much has been learned about LINE-1 and SINE biology since the publication of Mobile DNA II thirteen years ago. Future studies should continue to yield exciting discoveries about how these retrotransposons contribute to genetic diversity in mammalian genomes.

  11. Identification and chromosomal localization of the monkey retrotransposon in Mesa sp

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balint-Kurti, P.; Clendennen, S.; Doleželová, Marie; Valárik, Miroslav; Doležel, Jaroslav; Beetham, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 263, č. 6 (2000), s. 908-915 ISSN 0026-8925 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV521/96/K117; GA AV ČR IAA5020803; GA MŠk ME 376 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : In situ hybridization * chromosomal localization * monkey retrotransposon Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.462, year: 2000

  12. Host factors that promote retrotransposon integration are similar in distantly related eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Sudhir Kumar; Sangesland, Maya; Lee, Michael; Esnault, Caroline; Cui, Yujin; Chatterjee, Atreyi Ghatak; Levin, Henry L

    2017-12-01

    Retroviruses and Long Terminal Repeat (LTR)-retrotransposons have distinct patterns of integration sites. The oncogenic potential of retrovirus-based vectors used in gene therapy is dependent on the selection of integration sites associated with promoters. The LTR-retrotransposon Tf1 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is studied as a model for oncogenic retroviruses because it integrates into the promoters of stress response genes. Although integrases (INs) encoded by retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons are responsible for catalyzing the insertion of cDNA into the host genome, it is thought that distinct host factors are required for the efficiency and specificity of integration. We tested this hypothesis with a genome-wide screen of host factors that promote Tf1 integration. By combining an assay for transposition with a genetic assay that measures cDNA recombination we could identify factors that contribute differentially to integration. We utilized this assay to test a collection of 3,004 S. pombe strains with single gene deletions. Using these screens and immunoblot measures of Tf1 proteins, we identified a total of 61 genes that promote integration. The candidate integration factors participate in a range of processes including nuclear transport, transcription, mRNA processing, vesicle transport, chromatin structure and DNA repair. Two candidates, Rhp18 and the NineTeen complex were tested in two-hybrid assays and were found to interact with Tf1 IN. Surprisingly, a number of pathways we identified were found previously to promote integration of the LTR-retrotransposons Ty1 and Ty3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, indicating the contribution of host factors to integration are common in distantly related organisms. The DNA repair factors are of particular interest because they may identify the pathways that repair the single stranded gaps flanking the sites of strand transfer following integration of LTR retroelements.

  13. Links between human LINE-1 retrotransposons and hepatitis virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Tomoyuki

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for approximately 80% of liver cancers, the third most frequent cause of cancer mortality. The most prevalent risk factors for HCC are infections by hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus. Findings suggest that hepatitis virus-related HCC might be a cancer in which LINE-1 retrotransposons, often termed L1, activity plays a potential role. Firstly, hepatitis viruses can suppress host defense factors that also control L1 mobilization. Secondly, many recent studies also have indicated that hypomethylation of L1 affects the prognosis of HCC patients. Thirdly, endogenous L1 retrotransposition was demonstrated to activate oncogenic pathways in HCC. Fourthly, several L1 chimeric transcripts with host or viral genes are found in hepatitis virus-related HCC. Such lines of evidence suggest a linkage between L1 retrotransposons and hepatitis virus-related HCC. Here, I briefly summarize current understandings of the association between hepatitis virus-related HCC and L1. Then, I discuss potential mechanisms of how hepatitis viruses drive the development of HCC via L1 retrotransposons. An increased understanding of the contribution of L1 to hepatitis virus-related HCC may provide unique insights related to the development of novel therapeutics for this disease.

  14. Retrotransposon-Based Molecular Markers for Analysis of Genetic Diversity within the Genus Linum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikova, Nataliya V.; Kudryavtseva, Anna V.; Zelenin, Alexander V.; Lakunina, Valentina A.; Yurkevich, Olga Yu.; Speranskaya, Anna S.; Dmitriev, Alexey A.; Krinitsina, Anastasia A.; Belenikin, Maxim S.; Uroshlev, Leonid A.; Snezhkina, Anastasiya V.; Sadritdinova, Asiya F.; Koroban, Nadezda V.; Amosova, Alexandra V.; Samatadze, Tatiana E.; Guzenko, Elena V.; Lemesh, Valentina A.; Savilova, Anastasya M.; Rachinskaia, Olga A.; Kishlyan, Natalya V.; Rozhmina, Tatiana A.; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L.; Muravenko, Olga V.

    2014-01-01

    SSAP method was used to study the genetic diversity of 22 Linum species from sections Linum, Adenolinum, Dasylinum, Stellerolinum, and 46 flax cultivars. All the studied flax varieties were distinguished using SSAP for retrotransposons FL9 and FL11. Thus, the validity of SSAP method was demonstrated for flax marking, identification of accessions in genebank collections, and control during propagation of flax varieties. Polymorphism of Fl1a, Fl1b, and Cassandra insertions were very low in flax varieties, but these retrotransposons were successfully used for the investigation of Linum species. Species clusterization based on SSAP markers was in concordance with their taxonomic division into sections Dasylinum, Stellerolinum, Adenolinum, and Linum. All species of sect. Adenolinum clustered apart from species of sect. Linum. The data confirmed the accuracy of the separation in these sections. Members of section Linum are not as closely related as members of other sections, so taxonomic revision of this section is desirable. L. usitatissimum accessions genetically distant from modern flax cultivars were revealed in our work. These accessions are of utmost interest for flax breeding and introduction of new useful traits into flax cultivars. The chromosome localization of Cassandra retrotransposon in Linum species was determined. PMID:25243121

  15. Evolutionary characterization of Ty3/gypsy-like LTR retrotransposons in the parasitic cestode Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-An

    2016-11-01

    Cyclophyllidean cestodes including Echinococcus granulosus have a smaller genome and show characteristics such as loss of the gut, a segmented body plan, and accelerated growth rate in hosts compared with other tissue-invading helminths. In an effort to address the molecular mechanism relevant to genome shrinkage, the evolutionary status of long-terminal-repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, which are known as the most potent genomic modulators, was investigated in the E. granulosus draft genome. A majority of the E. granulosus LTR retrotransposons were classified into a novel characteristic clade, named Saci-2, of the Ty3/gypsy family, while the remaining elements belonged to the CsRn1 clade of identical family. Their nucleotide sequences were heavily corrupted by frequent base substitutions and segmental losses. The ceased mobile activity of the major retrotransposons and the following intrinsic DNA loss in their inactive progenies might have contributed to decrease in genome size. Apart from the degenerate copies, a gag gene originating from a CsRn1-like element exhibited substantial evidences suggesting its domestication including a preserved coding profile and transcriptional activity, the presence of syntenic orthologues in cestodes, and selective pressure acting on the gene. To my knowledge, the endogenized gag gene is reported for the first time in invertebrates, though its biological function remains elusive.

  16. Different histories of two highly variable LTR retrotransposons in sunflower species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascagni, Flavia; Cavallini, Andrea; Giordani, Tommaso; Natali, Lucia

    2017-11-15

    In the Helianthus genus, very large intra- and interspecific variability related to two specific retrotransposons of Helianthus annuus (Helicopia and SURE) exists. When comparing these two sequences to sunflower sequence databases recently produced by our lab, the Helicopia family was shown to belong to the Maximus/SIRE lineage of the Sirevirus genus of the Copia superfamily, whereas the SURE element (whose superfamily was not even previously identified) was classified as a Gypsy element of the Ogre/Tat lineage of the Metavirus genus. Bioinformatic analysis of the two retrotransposon families revealed their genomic abundance and relative proliferation timing. The genomic abundance of these families differed significantly among 12 Helianthus species. The ratio between the abundance of long terminal repeats and their reverse transcriptases suggested that the SURE family has relatively more solo long terminal repeats than does Helicopia. Pairwise comparisons of Illumina reads encoding the reverse transcriptase domain indicated that SURE amplification may have occurred more recently than that of Helicopia. Finally, the analysis of population structure based on the SURE and Helicopia polymorphisms of 32 Helianthus species evidenced two subpopulations, which roughly corresponded to species of the Helianthus and Divaricati/Ciliares sections. However, a number of species showed an admixed structure, confirming the importance of interspecific hybridisation in the evolution of this genus. In general, these two retrotransposon families differentially contributed to interspecific variability, emphasising the need to refer to specific families when studying genome evolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of genetic variation for the LINE-1 retrotransposon from next generation sequence data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos Kenneth

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In humans, copies of the Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 (LINE-1 retrotransposon comprise 21% of the reference genome, and have been shown to modulate expression and produce novel splice isoforms of transcripts from genes that span or neighbor the LINE-1 insertion site. Results In this work, newly released pilot data from the 1000 Genomes Project is analyzed to detect previously unreported full length insertions of the retrotransposon LINE-1. By direct analysis of the sequence data, we have identified 22 previously unreported LINE-1 insertion sites within the sequence data reported for a mother/father/daughter trio. Conclusions It is demonstrated here that next generation sequencing data, as well as emerging high quality datasets from individual genome projects allow us to assess the amount of heterogeneity with respect to the LINE-1 retrotransposon amongst humans, and provide us with a wealth of testable hypotheses as to the impact that this diversity may have on the health of individuals and populations.

  18. Retrotransposon-Encoded Reverse Transcriptase in the Genesis, Progression and Cellular Plasticity of Human Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinibaldi-Vallebona, Paola; Matteucci, Claudia; Spadafora, Corrado

    2011-01-01

    LINE-1 (Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements) and HERVs (Human Endogenous Retroviruses) are two families of autonomously replicating retrotransposons that together account for about 28% of the human genome. Genes harbored within LINE-1 and HERV retrotransposons, particularly those encoding the reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme, are generally expressed at low levels in differentiated cells, but their expression is upregulated in transformed cells and embryonic tissues. Here we discuss a recently discovered RT-dependent mechanism that operates in tumorigenesis and reversibly modulates phenotypic and functional variations associated with tumor progression. Downregulation of active LINE-1 elements drastically reduces the tumorigenic potential of cancer cells, paralleled by reduced proliferation and increased differentiation. Pharmacological RT inhibitors (e.g., nevirapine and efavirenz) exert similar effects on tumorigenic cell lines, both in culture and in animal models. The HERV-K family play a distinct complementary role in stress-dependent transition of melanoma cells from an adherent, non-aggressive, to a non-adherent, highly malignant, growth phenotype. In synthesis, the retrotransposon-encoded RT is increasingly emerging as a key regulator of tumor progression and a promising target in a novel anti-cancer therapy

  19. Creep Rupture Analysis and Life Estimation of 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 2.25Cr-1Mo and Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Prabir Kumar

    2018-04-01

    This paper highlights a comparative assessment of creep life of 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 2.25Cr-1Mo and modified 9Cr-1Mo steels based on accelerated creep rupture tests. Creep rupture test data have been analysed and creep life of the above mentioned materials have been assessed using Larson Miller parameter at the stress levels of 60 and 42 MPa for different temperatures. Limiting steam temperatures for minimum design life of 105 h at 42 and 60 MPa for the above mentioned steels have also been calculated. Microstructural studies for the three above mentioned steels are also done.

  20. Interaction of complement-solubilized immune complexes with CR1 receptors on human erythrocytes. The binding reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, H H; Svehag, S E; Jarlbaek, L

    1986-01-01

    showed no binding. IC solubilized in 50% human serum in the presence of autologous RBC bound rapidly to RBC-CR1, with maximal binding within less than 1 min at 37 degrees C. Release of CR1-bound IC under these conditions occurred slowly, requiring more than 30 min. Only binding of 'partially' solubilized...... of an intact classical pathway in preparing the IC for binding to RBC-CR1. C-solubilized IC could be absorbed to solid-phase conglutinin or antibody to C3c and C4c, and these ligands were able to inhibit the binding of solubilized IC to RBC. Heparin also exerted a marked, dose-dependent inhibitory effect...

  1. Review of time-dependent fatigue behavior and life prediction for 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, M.K.; Majumdar, S.

    1982-01-01

    Available data on creep-fatigue life and fracture behavior of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel are reviewed. Whereas creep-fatigue interaction is important for Type 304 stainless steel, oxidation effects appear to dominate the time-dependent fatigue behavior of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. Four of the currently available predictive methods - the Linear Damage Rule, Frequency Separation Equation, Strain Range Partitioning Equation, and Damage Rate Equation - are evaluated for their predictive capability. Variations in the parameters for the various predictive methods with temperature, heat of material, heat treatment, and environment are investigated. Relative trends in the lives predicted by the various methods as functions of test duration, waveshape, etc., are discussed. The predictive methods will need modification in order to account for oxidation and aging effects in the 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. Future tests that will emphasize the difference between the various predictive methods are proposed

  2. Effects of HFIR irradiation at 550C on the microstructure and toughness of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hu, W.L.; Huang, F.H.; Johnson, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    Results are reported for base metal and weld metal specimens of HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo following irradiation in HFIR at 55 0 C to 5 dpa. The DBTT shifts in irradiated base metal specimens were 30 0 C for HT-9 and 90 0 C for 9Cr-1Mo with further shifts of 20 0 C for weld metal. Concurrently, strength as measured by hardness increased 15 percent for HT-9 and 25 percent for 9Cr-1Mo. The hardness increases can be attributed in part to defect clusters 1.5 to 3.0 nm in diameter at densities approaching 10 17 cm -3 and also to lower rates of cavity nucleation ahead of the propagating crack

  3. The Chicken Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    Uses the chicken problem for sixth grade students to scratch the surface of systems of equations using intuitive approaches. Provides students responses to the problem and suggests similar problems for extensions. (ASK)

  4. Eggcited about Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carolyn; Brown, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe St Peter's Primary School's and Honiton Primary School's experiences of keeping chickens. The authors also describe the benefits they bring and the reactions of the children. (Contains 5 figures.)

  5. LTR retrotransposon landscape in Medicago truncatula: more rapid removal than in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jin-Song

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTR elements are ubiquitous Eukaryotic TEs that transpose through RNA intermediates. Accounting for significant proportion of many plant genomes, LTR elements have been well established as one of the major forces underlying the evolution of plant genome size, structure and function. The accessibility of more than 40% of genomic sequences of the model legume Medicago truncatula (Mt has made the comprehensive study of its LTR elements possible. Results We use a newly developed tool LTR_FINDER to identify LTR retrotransposons in the Mt genome and detect 526 full-length elements as well as a great number of copies related to them. These elements constitute about 9.6% of currently available genomic sequences. They are classified into 85 families of which 64 are reported for the first time. The majority of the LTR retrotransposons belong to either Copia or Gypsy superfamily and the others are categorized as TRIMs or LARDs by their length. We find that the copy-number of Copia-like families is 3 times more than that of Gypsy-like ones but the latter contribute more to the genome. The analysis of PBS and protein-coding domain structure of the LTR families reveals that they tend to use only 4–5 types of tRNAs and many families have quite conservative ORFs besides known TE domains. For several important families, we describe in detail their abundance, conservation, insertion time and structure. We investigate the amplification-deletion pattern of the elements and find that the detectable full-length elements are relatively young and most of them were inserted within the last 0.52 MY. We also estimate that more than ten million bp of the Mt genomic sequences have been removed by the deletion of LTR elements and the removal of the full-length structures in Mt has been more rapid than in rice. Conclusion This report is the first comprehensive description and analysis of LTR retrotransposons in the

  6. Postirradiation notch ductility tests of ESR alloy HT-9 and modified 9Cr-1Mo alloy from UBR reactor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    During this period, irradiation exposures at 300 0 C and 150 0 C to approx. 8 x 10 19 n/cm 2 , E > 0.1 MeV, were completed for the Alloy HT-9 plate and the modified Alloy 9Cr-1Mo plates, respectively. Postirradiation tests of Charpy-V (C/sub v/) specimens were completed for both alloys; other specimen types included in the reactor assemblies were fatigue precracked Charpy-V (PCC/sub v/), half-size Charpy-V, and in the case of the modified 9Cr-1Mo, 2.54 mm thick compact tension specimens

  7. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for advanced steam generator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, C.R.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasa, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from several types of mechanical property tests conducted on a number of commercial heats of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. Data from long term creep-rupture tests conducted on base and weldment material were compared with an analytical model which has been shown to give good agreement between measured and predicted values. Weldment material had somewhat inferior creep-rupture strength in comparison to base material due to a soft zone at the edge of the HAZ. Data are presented from elevated temperature tensile and creep-rupture tests conducted on material thermally aged for periods of up to 75,000 h (8.6 years). Some reduction in strength was shown to occur in comparison to unaged material. Models were developed for predicting the reduction in short term elevated temperature tensile and yield strength for material thermally aged in the temperature range of 482 to 704 degrees C. Results from Charpy impact tests conducted on material thermally aged at 538 degrees C for periods of up to 75,000 h show an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature

  8. High temperature tensile testing of modified 9Cr-1Mo after irradiation with high energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Hamilton, M.L.; Maloy, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the effect of tensile test temperatures ranging from 50 to 600 deg. C on the tensile properties of a modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel after high energy proton irradiation at about 35-67 deg. C to doses from 1 to 3 dpa and 9 dpa. For the specimens irradiated to doses between 1 and 3 dpa, it was observed that the yield strength and ultimate strength decreased monotonically as a function of tensile test temperature, whereas the uniform elongation (UE) remained at approximately 1% for tensile test temperatures up to 250 deg. C and then increased for tensile test temperatures up to and including 500 deg. C. At 600 deg. C, the UE was observed to be less than the values at 400 and 500 deg. C. UE of the irradiated material tensile tested at 400-600 deg. C was observed to be greater than the values for the unirradiated material at the same temperatures. Tensile tests on the 9 dpa specimens followed similar trends

  9. Effects of welding on toughness of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, W. S.; Kim, S. H.; Yoon, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear energy is being seriously considered to meet the increasing demand for a world-wide energy supply without environmental effects. Generation IV reactors are being developed to produce a reliable energy safely and with an economic benefit. Since these new reactors require an elevated temperature, ferritic/martensitic steels are attracting attention as candidate materials for the reactor vessel of a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) and the cladding of a sodium fast reactor (SFR,) due to their high strength and thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and good resistance to corrosion. in recent years, new ferritic/martensitic steels have been developed for ultra supercritical fossil power plants. Advanced technologies for a steel fabrication have improved the elevated temperature properties of ferritic/martensitic steels to make them comparable with austenitic stainless steels. The microstructural stability of the pressure vessel, cladding and core structural materials of the VHTR and SCWR is very important. Welding process affects the microstructure and residual stress, so the toughness of ferritic/martensitic steels decreases in general. In this paper; Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel is welded by SMAW with V-groove, and the effects of welding on tensile and impact properties are evaluated. The upper self energy of the weldment was only 57% of that of the base metal, and the DBTT T 41J and T 68J index temperatures of the weldment were higher than those of the base metal by 17 deg. C, 38 deg. C and 37 deg. C, respectively. (authors)

  10. Properties of welded joints of 2,25Cr-1Mo steel with various carbon content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vornovitskij, I.N.; Brodetskaya, E.Z.; Pozdnyakova, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Properties of welded joints of 2,25 Cr - 1 Mo steel pipelines with different carbon content are considered. It is shown that application of electrodes developed in some countries for welding permits in many cases to exclude heat treatment of welded joints owing to high ductility of weld deposited metal. To improve the ductility, it is necessary to limit both carbon content down to 0,03-0,06% and detrimental elements (sulfur, phosphorus). Heat affected zone hardness may be increased at the expense of carbon. Weld deposited metal possesses the highest long-term strength at the given test temperature; in this case long-term strength of welded joints and base metal is practically the same. The long-term strength of high-carbon steel is higher at the test temperature of 565 deg C as compared to mean-carbon and low-carbon steels, whose long-term strength is practically equal at this temperature. The long-term strength of high-carbon and mean-carbon steels is practically the same and higher as compared with low-carbon one at the test temperature of 510 deg C

  11. Reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of modified 9Cr-1 Mo steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blass, J.J.; Battiste, R.L.; O'Connor, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the provisions of ASME B and PV code Case N-47 currently include reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of weldments. To provide experimental confirmation of such factors for modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel, tests of tubular specimens were conducted at 538 degrees C (1000 degrees F). Three creep-rupture specimens with longitudinal welds were tested in tension; and, of three with circumferential welds, two were tested in tension and one in torsion. In each specimen with a circumferential weld, a nonuniform axial distribution of strain was easily visible. The test results were compared to an existing empirical model of creep-rupture life. For the torsion test, the comparison was based on a definition of equivalent normal stress recently adopted in code Case N-47. some 27 fatigue specimens, with longitudinal, circumferential, or no welds, were tested under axial or torsional strain control. In specimens with welds, fatigue cracking initiated at fusion lines. In axial tests cracks grew in the circumferential direction, and in torsional tests cracks grew along fusion lines

  12. Microstructure and elevated-temperature erosion-oxidation behaviour of aluminized 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen-Saarivirta, E.; Honkanen, M.; Tsipas, S. A.; Omar, H.; Tsipas, D.

    2012-10-01

    Degradation of materials by a combination of erosive wear and atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures constitutes a problem in some power generation processes, such as fluidized-bed combustion. In this work, 9Cr-1Mo steel, a common tube material in combustion chambers, is coated by a pack cementation method from an Al-containing pack in order to improve the resistance to erosion-oxidation at elevated temperatures. The resulting coating is studied in terms of microstructure and microhardness and tested for its resistance against impacts by sand particles in air at temperatures of 550-700 °C under several conditions, with thickness changes and appearance of the exposed surfaces being studied. The coating was found to contain several phases and layers, the outermost of which was essentially Al-rich and contained e.g., small AlN precipitates. The microhardness values for such coating ranged from 950 to 1100 HV20g. The coating provided the substrate with increased protection particularly against normal particle impacts, as manifested by smaller thickness losses for coated specimens as compared to uncoated counterparts. However, much of the coating was lost under all test conditions, despite the fact that particle debris formed a homogeneous layer on the surface. These results are described and discussed in this paper.

  13. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for advanced steam generator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, C.R.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from several types of mechanical property tests conducted on a number of commercial heats of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. Data from long term creep-rupture tests conducted on base and weldment material were compared with an analytical model which has been shown to give good agreement between measured and predicted values. Weldment material had somewhat inferior creep-rupture strength in comparison to base material due to a soft zone at the edge of the HAZ. Data are presented from elevated temperature tensile and creep-rupture tests conducted n material thermally aged for periods of up to 75,000 h (8.6 years). Some reduction in strength was shown to occur in comparison to unaged material. Models were developed for predicting the reduction in short term elevated temperature tensile and yield strength for material thermally aged in the temperature range of 482 to 704 degree C. Results from Charpy impact tests conducted on material thermally aged at 538 degree C for periods of up to 75,000 h showed an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature. Finally, results from transmission electron microscopy studies were presented to explain changes in mechanical properties due to thermal aging. These observations showed that Laves phase precipitation and recovery occurs on prolonged exposure of this alloy in this temperature range. 9 refs

  14. Ion bombardment damage in a modified Fe-9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, K.; Lee, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    A normalized-and-tempered Fe-9Cr-1Mo steel, with small Nb and V additions, was bombarded with 4-MeV iron ions to 100 dpa at 400, 450, 500, 550, and 600 0 C. Major damage feature was dislocation tangles which coarsened with increasing bombardment temperature. Sparse cavities were heterogeneously distributed at 500 and 550 0 C. Incorporation of helium and deuterium simultaneously in the bombardments at rates of 10 and 45 appM/dpa, respectively, introduced very high concentrations of small cavities at all temperatures, many of them on grain boundaries. These cavities were shown to be promoted by helium. A small fraction of the matrix cavities exhibited bias-driven growth at 500 and 550 0 C, with swelling 0 C higher than the peak swelling temperature found in neutron irradiations, which is compatible with the higher damage rate used in the ion bombardments. High concentrations of subgrain boundaries and dislocations resulting from the heat treatment, and unbalanced cavity and dislocation sink strengths in the damage structures contribute to the swelling resistance. Such resistance may not be permanent. High densities of bubbles on grain boundaries indicate a need for helium embrittlement tests

  15. Microstructural changes during creep and life assessment of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Kota; Maruyama, Kouichi; Komine, Ryuji; Nagae, Yuji.

    1997-01-01

    Several microstructural changes take place in a material during the course of creep. These changes can be a measure of creep life. In this paper, microstructural changes in Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel were studied and it was examined which is a good measure of creep life. Microscopic structural changes, such as void growth, lath structure uniformly oriented to the tensile axis and elongation of grains, are evident only in the necked portion of ruptured specimens. These macroscopic structural changes are not useful for creep life assessment. Lath width increases and dislocation density within lath decreases with increasing creep duration. These changes in dislocation substructure start in the early stage of creep life, and cause the increase of strain rate in the tertiary creep stage. The lath width and the dislocation density reach a saturated value before rupture. The saturated values are independent of temperature, and uniquely related to creep stress normalized by shear modulus. The extent of these microstructural changes are greater at lower stresses under which the material is practically used. These facts suggest that the lath width and the dislocation density within lath can be a useful measure of creep life. Hardness of crept specimens is closely related to the lath width and the dislocation density within lath. The changes of these microstructural features can be evaluated by the measurement of hardness. (author)

  16. Evaluation of creep residual life for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel based on Omega method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Isamu; Torihata, Shoji; Kihara, Shigemitu; Umaki, Hideo; Maruyama, Kouichi.

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the accuracy of creep residual life prediction by the Omega method which is based on creep deformation, a series of creep tests on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel were conducted at 500degC, 550degC and 600degC, and the Omega method was applied to the residual life estimation. The main results obtained are as follows: (1) There was a obvious linear portion, which corresponded to the tertiary creep, in the relationship between logarithm of strain and strain. So it was easy to define the Omega value as a gradient of linear portion. (2) It was proved that the Omega value depended on stress and temperature in such a way as it was the larger, the lower the stress and the lower the temperature. (3) By using the Omega value and strain rate which were determined experimentally, the residual life could be predicted within a factor of 1.5 at the stage of 50% and 80% of actual life. It was confirmed that the accuracy of this method was higher than that of the former method based on rupture time. (4) To apply this method to the residual life evaluation of operating plant materials, the Omega value has to be determined in the lower stress condition. So it is important to develop the extrapolation method of the Omega value based on the laboratory acceleration test to the longer service life. (author)

  17. Wastage Behavior of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Tube Material by Sodium-Water Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ji Young; Kim, Jong Man; Kim, Tae Joon; Choi, Jong Hyeun; Kim, Byung Ho; Park, Nam Cook

    2009-01-01

    The development of a sodium-heated steam generator with safety and reliability is an essential requirement from the viewpoint of the economic efficiency of a sodium-cooled fast reactor. In most cases, these steam generators, which are in the process of development or operating, are of a shell-in tube type, with a high pressure water/steam inside the tubes and low pressure sodium on the shell-side, with a single wall tube as a barrier between these fluids. Therefore, if there is a hole or a crack in a heat transfer tube, a leakage of water/steam into the sodium may occur, resulting in a sodium-water reaction. When such a leak occurs, so-called 'wastage' is the result which may cause damage to or a failure of the adjacent tubes. If a steam generator is operated for some time in this condition, it is possible that it might create an intermediate leak state which would then give rise to the problems of a multi-target wastage in a very short time. Therefore, it is very important to predict these phenomena quantitatively from the view of designing a steam generator and its leak detection systems. The objective of this study is a basic investigating of the sodium-water reaction phenomena by small water/steam leaks. For this, wastage tests for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel were conducted

  18. Wastage Characteristics of a Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Tube Material for a SFR SG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ji-Young; Kim, Jong-Man; Kim, Tae-Joon; Choi, Jong-Hyeun; Kim, Byung-Ho; Park, Nam-Cook

    2009-01-01

    The development of a sodium heated steam generator with a safety and reliability is an essential requirement from the viewpoint of the economical efficiency of a sodium cooled fast reactor. In most cases these steam generators which are in the process of development, or operating, are of a shell-in tube type, with a high pressure water/steam inside the tubes and low pressure sodium on the shell-side, with a single wall tube as a barrier between these fluids. Therefore, if there is a hole or a crack in a heat transfer tube, a leakage of water/steam into the sodium may occur, resulting in a sodium-water reaction. When such a leak occurs, important phenomena, so-called 'wastage' is the result which may cause damage to or a failure of the adjacent tubes. If a steam generator is operated for some time with this condition, it is possible that it might create an intermediate leak state which would then give rise to the problems of a multi-target wastage in a very short time. Therefore, it is very important to predict these phenomena quantitatively from the view of designing a steam generator and its leak detection systems. The objective of this study is a basic investigating of the sodium-water reaction phenomena by small water/steam leaks. For this, wastage tests for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel are being prepared

  19. Impression creep behaviour of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridhin Raj, V.R.; Kottda, Ravi Sankar; Kamaraj, M.; Maduraimuthu, V.M.; Vasudevan, M.

    2016-01-01

    P91 steel (9Cr-1Mo) steel is extensively used in power plants for super heater coils, headers and steam piping. The aim of the present work is to study the creep behaviour of different zones of A-TIG weld joint using impression creep technique and compare it with that of the TIG weld joint. P91 steel weld joints were made by A-TIG welding without using any filler material and multi-pass TIG welding is done using ER90S-B9 filler rods. Welds were subjected to post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). Impression creep tests were carried out at 650 °C on the base metal, weld metal and HAZ regions. Optical Microscope and TEM were used to correlate microstructures with observed creep rates. The FGHAZ showed significantly higher impression creep rate compared to that of the base metal and weld metal. Fine grain size and relatively coarser M 23 C 6 carbide particles are responsible for higher creep rate. The impression creep rate of A-TIG weld metal and coarse grain HAZ was found to be lower than that of base metal. This is attributed to the higher grain size in weld metal and coarse HAZ attributed to the higher grain size in weld metal and to the higher peak temperature observed during A-TIG welding. (author)

  20. Ratchetting deformation behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and applicability of existing constitutive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaguchi, Masatsugu; Takahashi, Yukio

    2001-01-01

    A series of ratchetting deformation tests was conducted on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at 550degC under uniaxial and multiaxial stress conditions. Ratchetting behavior depended on various parameters such as mean stress, stress/strain rate and those range, hold time and prior cyclic deformation. Under uniaxial conditions, untraditional ratchetting behavior was observed; the ratchetting deformation rate was the fastest when the stress ratio was equal to -1, while no ratchetting deformation was predicted by conventional constitutive models. In order to discuss the reason for this untraditional ratchetting behavior, a lot of monotonic compression tests were conducted and compared with tension data. The material showed a difference of deformation resistance of about 30 MPa between tension and compression at high strain rates. Furthermore, the authors' previous model and Ohno-Wang model were applied to the test conditions to evaluate their description capability for ratchetting behavior of the material. It was shown that the authors' model has a tendency to overestimate the ratchetting deformation and that the Ohno-Wang model has a tendency to underestimate the uniaxial ratchetting deformation at small stress rates. (author)

  1. Creep damage behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakthivel, T.; Laha, K.; Vasudevan, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Creep deformation and rupture behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints fabricated by single-pass activated TIG (A-TIG) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) processes have been investigated at 923 K over a stress range of 50 to 110 MPa after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). The weld joints exhibited significantly lower creep rupture lives than the base metal at lower applied stresses. Creep rupture location of the weld joints were found to occur in the ICHAZ. An extensive localized creep deformation, coarsening of M 23 C 6 precipitates in the ICHAZ with creep exposure led to the premature type IV failure of the joints. The coarsening of M 23 C 6 precipitates was extensive in the mid-section of the ICHAZ than the sub-surface of the joints, and was more predominant in the SMAW joint. While A-TIG weld joint exhibited reduced creep cavitation and coarsening of M 23 C 6 precipitates due to lower deformation constraints by adjacent regions in the ICHAZ. Hence, A-TIG weld joint exhibited higher creep rupture life than the SMAW joint. (author)

  2. Transfer of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel technology through cooperative programs (1980-1985)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, V.K.; DiStefano, J.R.; Patriarca, P.

    1986-06-01

    The principal objective of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) 9Cr-1Mo steel development program has been to provide the data and analyses required by designers for use of the alloy in advanced liquid metal reactors to reduce technical tasks and plant capital costs. It was recognized early that designers would not consider use of any material for nuclear applications unless there was a considerable body of experience already established. Toward this end, the plan has been to get the alloy accepted in Section I (Power Boilers), Section II (Materials Specifications), Section VIII (Pressure Vessels), and Section III (Nuclear power Plant Components) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code as logical steps in the process. To achieve this objective, extensive interaction with the industrial community was considered mandatory. Accordingly, an intensive effort to achieve technology transfer was initiated, which resulted in the involvement of many organizations. This report is a compilation of 47 status sheets describing 35 participating organizations and funding sources, purpose of the interactions, material and product forms utilized, summary of the work completed, findings, and appropriate references. These interactions contributed significantly toward the fulfillment of the program goals

  3. Fatigue crack growth behaviour of 21/4Cr1Mo steel tube at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulloch, J.H.; Buchanan, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth characteristics of 21/4Cr1Mo steel tube have been examined at 588 0 C over the frequency range 0.02-20 Hz and dwell time range 10-960 min. All tests were conducted under load control in laboratory air at an R-ratio of 0.5. The elevated temperature fatigue crack growth characteristics were adequately described in terms of the stress intensity range ΔKAPPA. The continuous cyclic test data exhibited a significant effect of frequency that agreed well with predicted effects using a simple mathematical model of the high temperature fatigue process. With the dwell time range of 10-100 min there was a significant dwell time effect on the critical ΔKAPPA level for creep-fatigue interactive growth. At dwell times > 100 min the dwell time effect saturates. When creep-fatigue interactive growth occurs, growth rates reside above the maximum for continuum-controlled fatigue crack growth, and exhibit a da/dN varies as ΔKAPPA 10 dependence; failure is then intergranular in nature. (author)

  4. Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposon Content in Eight Diploid Sunflower Species Inferred from Next-Generation Sequence Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetreault, Hannah M.; Ungerer, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    The most abundant transposable elements (TEs) in plant genomes are Class I long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons represented by superfamilies gypsy and copia. Amplification of these superfamilies directly impacts genome structure and contributes to differential patterns of genome size evolution among plant lineages. Utilizing short-read Illumina data and sequence information from a panel of Helianthus annuus (sunflower) full-length gypsy and copia elements, we explore the contribution of these sequences to genome size variation among eight diploid Helianthus species and an outgroup taxon, Phoebanthus tenuifolius. We also explore transcriptional dynamics of these elements in both leaf and bud tissue via RT-PCR. We demonstrate that most LTR retrotransposon sublineages (i.e., families) display patterns of similar genomic abundance across species. A small number of LTR retrotransposon sublineages exhibit lineage-specific amplification, particularly in the genomes of species with larger estimated nuclear DNA content. RT-PCR assays reveal that some LTR retrotransposon sublineages are transcriptionally active across all species and tissue types, whereas others display species-specific and tissue-specific expression. The species with the largest estimated genome size, H. agrestis, has experienced amplification of LTR retrotransposon sublineages, some of which have proliferated independently in other lineages in the Helianthus phylogeny. PMID:27233667

  5. Pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Run; Yang, Xia; Chen, Lu; Chang, Hong-tao; Liu, Hong-ying; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Xin-wei; Wang, Chuan-qing

    2014-01-01

    Shigellosis in chickens was first reported in 2004. This study aimed to determine the pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens and the possibility of cross-infection between humans and chickens. The pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens was examined via infection of three-day-old SPF chickens with Shigella strain ZD02 isolated from a human patient. The virulence and invasiveness were examined by infection of the chicken intestines and primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells. The results showed Shigella can cause death via intraperitoneal injection in SPF chickens, but only induce depression via crop injection. Immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy revealed the Shigella can invade the intestinal epithelia. Immunohistochemistry of the primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells infected with Shigella showed the bacteria were internalized into the epithelial cells. Electron microscopy also confirmed that Shigella invaded primary chicken intestinal epithelia and was encapsulated by phagosome-like membranes. Our data demonstrate that Shigella can invade primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and chicken intestinal mucosa in vivo, resulting in pathogenicity and even death. The findings suggest Shigella isolated from human or chicken share similar pathogenicity as well as the possibility of human-poultry cross-infection, which is of public health significance.

  6. Asian-Style Chicken Wraps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/recipe/asianstylechickenwraps.html Asian-Style Chicken Wraps To use the sharing features on this ... Tbsp lime juice (or about 2 limes) For chicken: 1 Tbsp peanut oil or vegetable oil 1 ...

  7. Effect of carbon activity on the creep behaviour of 21/4Cr, 1Mo steel in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordwell, J.E.; Charnock, W.; Nicholson, R.D.

    1979-02-01

    The creep endurance and creep cracking behaviour of 2 1/4Cr, 1Mo steel in sodium at 475 0 C have been studied at three different sodium carbon activities. Creep endurance was found to increase with increasing carbon activity of the sodium. Tests carried out in high carbon activity sodium were discontinued before fracture. Creep crack initiation displacement at notches decreased with increasing carbon activity, presumably as a result of notch tip carburisation. The plastic zones at the tips of blunt notches in specimens exposed in high carbon activity sodium were preferentially carburised. These observations were similar to those made previously on 9Cr, 1Mo steel. One difference detected metallographically was that in a high carburising environment uniform carburisation was obtained in the 2 1/4Cr, 1Mo steel specimens whereas carburisation gradients were observed in the 9Cr, 1Mo steel. Creep crack propagation rates for given notch opening displacement rates in low and intermediate carbon activity sodium were indistinguishable. However, the strenthening that resulted from the mild carburisation of the specimen in the intermediate carbon activity sodium caused slower notch opening displacement rates and crack propagation rates than in the low carbon activity sodium, when the rates were compared at the same crack length. (author)

  8. Quantification by image analysis of grain size of the high temperature phase (austenite) of martensitic steels 9Cr-1Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcelo, F.; Brachet, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    In martensitic steels, the austenitic grain size before transformation may influence mechanical properties. 9Cr-1Mo steel (EM10) is used in hexagonal pipes fabrication in fast neutrons reactors. Image analysis allows to quantify the older grain size in function of the austenization heat treatment conditions. (A.B.). 2 figs

  9. Mechanical behaviour of SFR materials: proposition of fatigue weld joint coefficient for MOD9CR-1MO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancelet, O.; Matheron, Ph.

    2012-01-01

    Mod 9Cr-1Mo steel (T91) is a candidate material for steam generator of SFR (Sodium Fast Reactors). In order to validate this choice, it is necessary, firstly to verify that it is able to withstand the planned environmental and operating conditions, and secondly to check if it is covered by the existing design codes, concerning its procurement, fabrication, welding, examination methods and mechanical design rules. A large R and D program on mod9Cr-1Mo steel has been undertaken at CEA in order to characterize the behavior of this material and of its welded junctions. In this program, the role of the Laboratory for structural Integrity and Standards (LISN) is to develop high temperature defect assessment procedures under fatigue and creep loadings. In this frame, complementary studies are conducted in order to validate the existing methods (developed for the fast reactors) and to get new experimental data on Mod9Cr-1Mo steel. In particular, some new experiments are conducted on specimen with a weld joint and compared with classical experiments on base metal specimen. These results associated with finite element modeling allow to propose a weld joint coefficient at 550 degrees C for the Mod9Cr1Mo steel. (authors)

  10. Development of bovine embryos cultured in CR1aa and IVD101 media using different oxygen tensions and culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somfai, Tamás; Inaba, Yasushi; Aikawa, Yoshio; Ohtake, Masaki; Kobayashi, Shuji; Konishi, Kazuyuki; Nagai, Takashi; Imai, Kei

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to optimise the culture conditions for the in vitro production of bovine embryos. The development of in vitro fertilised bovine oocytes in CR1aa supplemented with 5% calf serum and IVD101 culture media were compared using traditional microdrops and Well of the Well (WOW) culture systems either under 5% or 20% oxygen tension. After 7 days of culture, a significantly higher blastocyst formation rate was obtained for embryos cultured in CR1aa medium compared to those cultured in IVD101, irrespective of O2 tensions and culture systems. The blastocyst formation in IVD101 was suppressed under 20% O2 compared to 5% O2 . Despite their similar total cell numbers, higher rates of inner cell mass (ICM) cells were observed in blastocysts developed in IVD101 medium than in those developed in CR1aa, irrespective of O2 tensions. There was no significant difference in blastocyst formation, total, ICM and trophectoderm (TE) cell numbers between embryos obtained by microdrop and WOW culture systems irrespective of the culture media and O2 tensions used. In conclusion, CR1aa resulted in higher blastocyst formation rates irrespective of O2 tension, whereas IVD101 supported blastocyst formation only under low O2 levels but enhanced the proliferation of ICM cells.

  11. Corrosion critique of the 2 1/4 Cr--1 Mo steel for LMFBR steam generation system applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zima, G.E.

    1977-07-01

    The unstabilized ferritic steel of nominal composition, 2 1 / 4 Cr-1Mo, has been proposed for critical structural assignments in LMFBR powerplants, specifically: the tubing, tubesheet and shell of the evaporator and superheater components. The interest in this steel has been based on a presumably favorable general corrosion property spectrum, acceptable mechanical properties and fabricability, and certain economies associated with the low alloy content. This report is an attempt at a general corrosion assessment for the 2 1 / 4 Cr-1Mo steel and an identification of corrosion problem areas potential to this steel from the sodium and water/steam systems of the proposed working environment. There is a considerable area of uncertainty in the sodium-side response of 2 1 / 4 Cr-1Mo steel, centered in the loss and redisposition of carbon during long-term exposure to sodium of various impurity backgrounds. It is submitted that present evidence relating to the water/steam-side corrosion behavior of the 2 1 / 4 Cr-1Mo steel, under nominal and conceivable perturbed environmental conditions, constitutes the principal concern for the proposed LMFBR powerplant applications of this steel. It is suggested that this unfavorable corrosion aspect represents an inherent limitation of the low alloy content of this steel, probably largely independent of melting and processing recourses, and it is a sufficient basis to question the incentive for a continuation of the collateral studies of this steel for the proposed LMFBR steam generation system assignments

  12. Characterizing and improving the toughness of thick-sectioned 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo electroslag weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, G.R.; Frost, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    Efforts to improve the toughness of electroslag weldments consisted of four endeavors: process control, changes caused in 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel by electroslag welding and post-weld heat treatment, electrochemical reactions during the electroslag welding, and toughness testing.

  13. Effects of sodium environment on the mechanical properties of Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.

    Mechanical property data on isothermally annealed, thermally aged, and sodium-exposed Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel are analyzed to evaluate the influence of the sodium environment as well as the effects of the microstructural and compositional changes that occur in the steel during long-term exposure to sodium. Correlations are developed to predict the environmental effects on tensile, creep, fatigue, and creep-fatigue properties of Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in sodium. The results indicate that at temperatures <823 K (550 deg. C), degradation of mechanical properties is essentially due to thermal aging. Loss of carbon from the steel reduces both the tensile and creep-rupture strength, but has little or no effect on the fatigue properties. The cyclic properties of Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in sodium are superior to those in air. The creep-fatigue behaviour in sodium is significantly different from that in an air environment. The creep-fatigue data are analyzed using the interactive damage rate equations to predict the time-dependent fatigue bahaviour of isothermally annealed Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in sodium. (author)

  14. Effects of sodium environment on the mechanical properties of Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.

    1983-09-01

    Mechanical property data on isothermally annealed, thermally aged, and sodium-exposed Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel are analyzed to evaluate the influence of the sodium environment as well as the effects of the microstructural and compositional changes that occur in the steel during long-term exposure to sodium. Correlations are developed to predict the environmental effects on tensile, creep, fatigue, and creep-fatigue properties of Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in sodium. The results indicate that at temperatures 0 C), degradation of mechanical properties is essentially due to thermal aging. Loss of carbon from the steel reduces both the tensile and creep-rupture strength, but has little or no effect on the fatigue properties. The cyclic properties of Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in sodium are superior to those in air. The creep-fatigue behavior in sodium is significantly different from that in an air environment. The creep-fatigue data are analyzed using the interactive damage rate equations to predict the time-dependent fatigue behavior of isothermally annealed Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in sodium. 15 references, 7 figures, 1 table

  15. Genomic analysis of the causative agents of coccidiosis in domestic chickens

    KAUST Repository

    Reid, Adam J.; Blake, Damer P.; Ansari, Hifzur R.; Billington, Karen; Browne, Hilary P.; Bryant, Josephine; Dunn, Matt; Hung, Stacy S.; Kawahara, Fumiya; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Malas, Tareq B.; Mourier, Tobias; Naghra, Hardeep; Nair, Mridul; Otto, Thomas D.; Rawlings, Neil D.; Rivailler, Pierre; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Sanders, Mandy; Subramaniam, Chandra; Tay, Yea-Ling; Woo, Yong; Wu, Xikun; Barrell, Bart; Dear, Paul H.; Doerig, Christian; Gruber, Arthur; Ivens, Alasdair C.; Parkinson, John; Rajandream, Marie-Adè le; Shirley, Martin W.; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Berriman, Matthew; Tomley, Fiona M.; Pain, Arnab

    2014-01-01

    Global production of chickens has trebled in the past two decades and they are now the most important source of dietary animal protein worldwide. Chickens are subject to many infectious diseases that reduce their performance and productivity. Coccidiosis, caused by apicomplexan protozoa of the genus Eimeria, is one of the most important poultry diseases. Understanding the biology of Eimeria parasites underpins development of new drugs and vaccines needed to improve global food security. We have produced annotated genome sequences of all seven species of Eimeria that infect domestic chickens, which reveal the full extent of previously described repeat-rich and repeat-poor regions and show that these parasites possess the most repeat-rich proteomes ever described. Furthermore, while no other apicomplexan has been found to possess retrotransposons, Eimeria is home to a family of chromoviruses. Analysis of Eimeria genes involved in basic biology and host-parasite interaction highlights adaptations to a relatively simple developmental life cycle and a complex array of co-expressed surface proteins involved in host cell binding.

  16. Genomic analysis of the causative agents of coccidiosis in domestic chickens

    KAUST Repository

    Reid, Adam J.

    2014-10-01

    Global production of chickens has trebled in the past two decades and they are now the most important source of dietary animal protein worldwide. Chickens are subject to many infectious diseases that reduce their performance and productivity. Coccidiosis, caused by apicomplexan protozoa of the genus Eimeria, is one of the most important poultry diseases. Understanding the biology of Eimeria parasites underpins development of new drugs and vaccines needed to improve global food security. We have produced annotated genome sequences of all seven species of Eimeria that infect domestic chickens, which reveal the full extent of previously described repeat-rich and repeat-poor regions and show that these parasites possess the most repeat-rich proteomes ever described. Furthermore, while no other apicomplexan has been found to possess retrotransposons, Eimeria is home to a family of chromoviruses. Analysis of Eimeria genes involved in basic biology and host-parasite interaction highlights adaptations to a relatively simple developmental life cycle and a complex array of co-expressed surface proteins involved in host cell binding.

  17. Determinants of Genomic RNA Encapsidation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposons Ty1 and Ty3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Pachulska-Wieczorek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons are transposable genetic elements that replicate intracellularly, and can be considered progenitors of retroviruses. Ty1 and Ty3 are the most extensively characterized LTR retrotransposons whose RNA genomes provide the template for both protein translation and genomic RNA that is packaged into virus-like particles (VLPs and reverse transcribed. Genomic RNAs are not divided into separate pools of translated and packaged RNAs, therefore their trafficking and packaging into VLPs requires an equilibrium between competing events. In this review, we focus on Ty1 and Ty3 genomic RNA trafficking and packaging as essential steps of retrotransposon propagation. We summarize the existing knowledge on genomic RNA sequences and structures essential to these processes, the role of Gag proteins in repression of genomic RNA translation, delivery to VLP assembly sites, and encapsidation.

  18. Induction and Maintenance of CX3CR1-Intermediate Peripheral Memory CD8+ T Cells by Persistent Viruses and Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Louse Gordon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The induction and maintenance of T cell memory is critical to the success of vaccines. A recently described subset of memory CD8+ T cells defined by intermediate expression of the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 was shown to have self-renewal, proliferative, and tissue-surveillance properties relevant to vaccine-induced memory. We tracked these cells when memory is sustained at high levels: memory inflation induced by cytomegalovirus (CMV and adenovirus-vectored vaccines. In mice, both CMV and vaccine-induced inflationary T cells showed sustained high levels of CX3R1int cells exhibiting an effector-memory phenotype, characteristic of inflationary pools, in early memory. In humans, CX3CR1int CD8+ T cells were strongly induced following adenovirus-vectored vaccination for hepatitis C virus (HCV (ChAd3-NSmut and during natural CMV infection and were associated with a memory phenotype similar to that in mice. These data indicate that CX3CR1int cells form an important component of the memory pool in response to persistent viruses and vaccines in both mice and humans. : Gordon et al. demonstrate that CX3CR1int peripheral memory T cells are a substantial component of memory inflation induced by persistent CMVs and adenoviral vaccination. They are characterized by sustained proliferation and an effector-memory phenotype linked to these expanded CD8+ T cell memory responses. Core phenotypic features are shared by humans and mice. Keywords: cytomegalovirus, T cells, memory, adenovirus, vaccination, CX3CR1, memory inflation, mouse, human

  19. An examination of the potential for 9%Cr1%Mo steel as thick section tubeplates in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orr, J.; Sanderson, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The steam generator units of future commercial demonstration fast reactors are likely to have a requirement for heavy section tubeplates (up to 500mm thick) with good elevated temperature strength and creep-fatigue resistance. A comparison of the mechanical properties available for ferritic steels has suggested that 9%Cr1%Mo steel would be a strong candidate material for this application. Although this steel is covered in some national specifications for tubes, pipes, plates and forgings and is also well established in the UK nuclear industry, international experience to date is confined to sections less than ca 150mm. The potential of 9%Cr1%Mo steel for use in thick sections has therefore been assessed in the present study by using simulation heat treatments. The work reported here involved the laboratory-scale cooling of bar samples to simulate water-quenching rates in cylindrical sections up to 720mm diameter (ie: equivalent to 500mm thick plate). The tensile properties at ambient and 525 0 C and impact fracture appearance transition temperatures were determined for material tempered after cooling at simulated thick section rates; the transformation characteristics as influenced by the net chromium equivalent were also established. The results of this work show that 9%Cr1%Mo steel may be fully hardened in the equivalent of the section sizes examined,and the mechanical properties of tempered material show only a small reduction from those of thin section normalised and tempered 9%Cr1%Mo steel. These findings support the potential usage of heavy section 9%Cr1%Mo steel envisaged for fast reactor steam generator tubeplates

  20. Gamma radiation and chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toropilova, D.; Takac, L.; Toropila, M.; Tomko, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    In our work, we focused the effect of low doses of gamma radiation on metabolic parameters in chickens. In the first group of chickens we monitor changes of the concentration in glucose and cholesterol after whole body irradiation dose of chicken (3 Gy). In the second group of chickens we studied the combined effect of radiation and intraperitoneal application solution of zinc chloride to changes of the concentration in glucose and total cholesterol. In the tissues of organisms are found only in a very small amount of microelements however are of particular importance in a number of enzymatic catalytic and regulatory processes. Zinc is found in all cells of the body. However, it is the highest percentage of zinc contained in muscle and bone cells. Resorption takes place in the small intestine, especially in the duodenum. For both groups of chickens, we performed analyzes on the 3 rd , 7 th , 14 th , 21 st and 30 day. Results and an overview of the work can be helpful in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and in preventing diseases from exposure to radiation, but also in the case of the consequences after nuclear accidents. (authors)

  1. Chicken from Farm to Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on fresh chicken. However, if chicken is processed, additives such as MSG, salt, or sodium erythorbate may be added but must be listed on the label. [ Top of Page ] Foodborne Organisms Associated with Chicken As on any perishable meat, fish, or poultry, bacteria can be found on raw ...

  2. Low levels of LTR retrotransposon deletion by ectopic recombination in the gigantic genomes of salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahry, Matthew Blake; Sun, Cheng; Chong, Rebecca A; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2015-02-01

    Across the tree of life, species vary dramatically in nuclear genome size. Mutations that add or remove sequences from genomes-insertions or deletions, or indels-are the ultimate source of this variation. Differences in the tempo and mode of insertion and deletion across taxa have been proposed to contribute to evolutionary diversity in genome size. Among vertebrates, most of the largest genomes are found within the salamanders, an amphibian clade with genome sizes ranging from ~14 to ~120 Gb. Salamander genomes have been shown to experience slower rates of DNA loss through small (i.e., genomes. However, no studies have addressed DNA loss from salamander genomes resulting from larger deletions. Here, we focus on one type of large deletion-ectopic-recombination-mediated removal of LTR retrotransposon sequences. In ectopic recombination, double-strand breaks are repaired using a "wrong" (i.e., ectopic, or non-allelic) template sequence-typically another locus of similar sequence. When breaks occur within the LTR portions of LTR retrotransposons, ectopic-recombination-mediated repair can produce deletions that remove the internal transposon sequence and the equivalent of one of the two LTR sequences. These deletions leave a signature in the genome-a solo LTR sequence. We compared levels of solo LTRs in the genomes of four salamander species with levels present in five vertebrates with smaller genomes. Our results demonstrate that salamanders have low levels of solo LTRs, suggesting that ectopic-recombination-mediated deletion of LTR retrotransposons occurs more slowly than in other vertebrates with smaller genomes.

  3. Young, intact and nested retrotransposons are abundant in the onion and asparagus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitte, C; Estep, M C; Leebens-Mack, J; Bennetzen, J L

    2013-09-01

    Although monocotyledonous plants comprise one of the two major groups of angiosperms and include >65 000 species, comprehensive genome analysis has been focused mainly on the Poaceae (grass) family. Due to this bias, most of the conclusions that have been drawn for monocot genome evolution are based on grasses. It is not known whether these conclusions apply to many other monocots. To extend our understanding of genome evolution in the monocots, Asparagales genomic sequence data were acquired and the structural properties of asparagus and onion genomes were analysed. Specifically, several available onion and asparagus bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) with contig sizes >35 kb were annotated and analysed, with a particular focus on the characterization of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons. The results reveal that LTR retrotransposons are the major components of the onion and garden asparagus genomes. These elements are mostly intact (i.e. with two LTRs), have mainly inserted within the past 6 million years and are piled up into nested structures. Analysis of shotgun genomic sequence data and the observation of two copies for some transposable elements (TEs) in annotated BACs indicates that some families have become particularly abundant, as high as 4-5 % (asparagus) or 3-4 % (onion) of the genome for the most abundant families, as also seen in large grass genomes such as wheat and maize. Although previous annotations of contiguous genomic sequences have suggested that LTR retrotransposons were highly fragmented in these two Asparagales genomes, the results presented here show that this was largely due to the methodology used. In contrast, this current work indicates an ensemble of genomic features similar to those observed in the Poaceae.

  4. Characterization of active reverse transcriptase and nucleoprotein complexes of the yeast retrotransposon Ty3 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofari, G; Gabus, C; Ficheux, D; Bona, M; Le Grice, S F; Darlix, J L

    1999-12-17

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the distantly related yeast Ty3 retrotransposon encode reverse transcriptase (RT) and a nucleic acid-binding protein designated nucleocapsid protein (NCp) with either one or two zinc fingers, required for HIV-1 replication and Ty3 transposition, respectively. In vitro binding of HIV-1 NCp7 to viral 5' RNA and primer tRNA(3)(Lys) catalyzes formation of nucleoprotein complexes resembling the virion nucleocapsid. Nucleocapsid complex formation functions in viral RNA dimerization and tRNA annealing to the primer binding site (PBS). RT is recruited in these nucleoprotein complexes and synthesizes minus-strand cDNA initiated at the PBS. Recent results on yeast Ty3 have shown that the homologous NCp9 promotes annealing of primer tRNA(i)(Met) to a 5'-3' bipartite PBS, allowing RNA:tRNA dimer formation and initiation of cDNA synthesis at the 5' PBS (). To compare specific cDNA synthesis in a retrotransposon and HIV-1, we have established a Ty3 model system comprising Ty3 RNA with the 5'-3' PBS, primer tRNA(i)(Met), NCp9, and for the first time, highly purified Ty3 RT. Here we report that Ty3 RT is as active as retroviral HIV-1 or murine leukemia virus RT using a synthetic template-primer system. Moreover, and in contrast to what was found with retroviral RTs, retrotransposon Ty3 RT was unable to direct cDNA synthesis by self-priming. We also show that Ty3 nucleoprotein complexes were formed in vitro and that the N terminus of NCp9, but not the zinc finger, is required for complex formation, tRNA annealing to the PBS, RNA dimerization, and primer tRNA-directed cDNA synthesis by Ty3 RT. These results indicate that NCp9 chaperones bona fide cDNA synthesis by RT in the yeast Ty3 retrotransposon, as illustrated for NCp7 in HIV-1, reinforcing the notion that Ty3 NCp9 is an ancestor of HIV-1 NCp7.

  5. The role of retrotransposons in gene family expansions: insights from the mouse Abp gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoušek, Václav; Karn, Robert C; Laukaitis, Christina M

    2013-05-29

    Retrotransposons have been suggested to provide a substrate for non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) and thereby promote gene family expansion. Their precise role, however, is controversial. Here we ask whether retrotransposons contributed to the recent expansions of the Androgen-binding protein (Abp) gene families that occurred independently in the mouse and rat genomes. Using dot plot analysis, we found that the most recent duplication in the Abp region of the mouse genome is flanked by L1Md_T elements. Analysis of the sequence of these elements revealed breakpoints that are the relicts of the recombination that caused the duplication, confirming that the duplication arose as a result of NAHR using L1 elements as substrates. L1 and ERVII retrotransposons are considerably denser in the Abp regions than in one Mb flanking regions, while other repeat types are depleted in the Abp regions compared to flanking regions. L1 retrotransposons preferentially accumulated in the Abp gene regions after lineage separation and roughly followed the pattern of Abp gene expansion. By contrast, the proportion of shared vs. lineage-specific ERVII repeats in the Abp region resembles the rest of the genome. We confirmed the role of L1 repeats in Abp gene duplication with the identification of recombinant L1Md_T elements at the edges of the most recent mouse Abp gene duplication. High densities of L1 and ERVII repeats were found in the Abp gene region with abrupt transitions at the region boundaries, suggesting that their higher densities are tightly associated with Abp gene duplication. We observed that the major accumulation of L1 elements occurred after the split of the mouse and rat lineages and that there is a striking overlap between the timing of L1 accumulation and expansion of the Abp gene family in the mouse genome. Establishing a link between the accumulation of L1 elements and the expansion of the Abp gene family and identification of an NAHR-related breakpoint in

  6. Strategy for Developing Local Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofjan Iskandar

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Chicken industry in Indonesia offer jobs for people in the village areas . The balance in development industry of selected and local chicken has to be anticipated as there has been threat of reducing importation of grand parent stock of selected chicken due to global avian influenza . In the mean time, high appreciation to the local chicken has been shown by the existence of local chicken farms in the size of business scale . For local chicken business, the government has been built programs, projects, and infrastructures, although the programs and projects were dropped scattered in to several institutions, which were end up with less significant impact to the people. Therefore, it is the time that the government should put more efforts to integrate various sources . focusing in enhancing local chicken industry .

  7. Microglia and their CX3CR1 signaling are involved in hippocampal- but not olfactory bulb-related memory and neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshef, Ronen; Kreisel, Tirzah; Beroukhim Kay, Dorsa; Yirmiya, Raz

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that microglia play an important role in cognitive and neuroplasticity processes, at least partly via microglial CX3C receptor 1 (CX3CR1) signaling. Furthermore, microglia are responsive to environmental enrichment (EE), which modulates learning, memory and neurogenesis. In the present study we examined the role of microglial CX3CR1 signaling in hippocampal- and olfactory-bulb (OB)-related memory and neurogenesis in homozygous mice with microglia-specific transgenic expression of GFP under the CX3CR1 promoter (CX3CR1(-/-) mice), in which the CX3CR1 gene is functionally deleted, as well as heterozygous CX3CR1(+/-) and WT controls. We report that the CX3CR1-deficient mice displayed better hippocampal-dependent memory functioning and olfactory recognition, along with increased number and soma size of hippocampal microglia, suggestive of mild activation status, but no changes in OB microglia. A similar increase in hippocampal-dependent memory functioning and microglia number was also induced by pharmacological inhibition of CX3CR1 signaling, using chronic (2weeks) i.c.v. administration of CX3CR1 blocking antibody. In control mice, EE improved hippocampal-dependent memory and neurogenesis, and increased hippocampal microglia number and soma size, whereas odor enrichment (OE) improved olfactory recognition and OB neurogenesis without changing OB microglia status. In CX3CR1-deficient mice, EE and OE did not produce any further improvement in memory functioning or neurogenesis and had no effect on microglial status. These results support the notion that in the hippocampus microglia and their interactions with neurons via the CX3CR1 play an important role in memory functioning and neurogenesis, whereas in the OB microglia do not seem to be involved in these processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of cooling rates on the transformation behaviour of 9Cr-1Mo-0.07C steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.; Raghunathan, V.S.

    1992-01-01

    The choice of various decomposition mechanisms of austenite in a 9Cr-1 Mo-0.07C steel under different rates of cooling has been studied. The techniques employed were electron probe micro-analysis, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The observed morphological features may be explained based on the predominance of the two types of transformation, austenite → martensite and austenite → ferrite during cooling. In the steel used in this study, decomposition of austenite to proeutectoid ferrite was favoured at cooling rates less than about 2 Ks -1 . The mechanism by which the supersaturated proeutectoid ferrite relieves its excess solute concentration was also studied. A ''microstructural map'' has been proposed to predict the constitution at the end of any given cooling rate for 9Cr-1 Mo-0.07C steel. The choice of commercial treatment has been rationalized with respect to the resultant microstructural constituents. (Author)

  9. Chicken Astrovirus Infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    35 nm in diameter with a ... named chicken astrovirus (CAstV) isolated from broiler chicks (Baxendale and Mebatsion, 2004). CAstV has .... successfully used the RT-PCR method to detect CAstV in field samples from across the USA while Day et ...

  10. Recent expansion of heat-activated retrotransposons in the coral symbiont Symbiodinium microadriaticum

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Jit Ern

    2017-10-20

    Rising sea surface temperature is the main cause of global coral reef decline. Abnormally high temperatures trigger the breakdown of the symbiotic association between corals and their photosynthetic symbionts in the genus Symbiodinium. Higher genetic variation resulting from shorter generation times has previously been proposed to provide increased adaptability to Symbiodinium compared to the host. Retrotransposition is a significant source of genetic variation in eukaryotes and some transposable elements are specifically expressed under adverse environmental conditions. We present transcriptomic and phylogenetic evidence for the existence of heat stress-activated Ty1-copia-type LTR retrotransposons in the coral symbiont Symbiodinium microadriaticum. Genome-wide analyses of emergence patterns of these elements further indicate recent expansion events in the genome of S. microadriaticum. Our findings suggest that acute temperature increases can activate specific retrotransposons in the Symbiodinium genome with potential impacts on the rate of retrotransposition and the generation of genetic variation under heat stress.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 20 October 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.179.

  11. Coevolution between a family of parasite virulence effectors and a class of LINE-1 retrotransposons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Sacristán

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Parasites are able to evolve rapidly and overcome host defense mechanisms, but the molecular basis of this adaptation is poorly understood. Powdery mildew fungi (Erysiphales, Ascomycota are obligate biotrophic parasites infecting nearly 10,000 plant genera. They obtain their nutrients from host plants through specialized feeding structures known as haustoria. We previously identified the AVR(k1 powdery mildew-specific gene family encoding effectors that contribute to the successful establishment of haustoria. Here, we report the extensive proliferation of the AVR(k1 gene family throughout the genome of B. graminis, with sequences diverging in formae speciales adapted to infect different hosts. Also, importantly, we have discovered that the effectors have coevolved with a particular family of LINE-1 retrotransposons, named TE1a. The coevolution of these two entities indicates a mutual benefit to the association, which could ultimately contribute to parasite adaptation and success. We propose that the association would benefit 1 the powdery mildew fungus, by providing a mechanism for amplifying and diversifying effectors and 2 the associated retrotransposons, by providing a basis for their maintenance through selection in the fungal genome.

  12. Regulation of rice root development by a retrotransposon acting as a microRNA sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jungnam; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2017-08-26

    It is well documented that transposable elements (TEs) can regulate the expression of neighbouring genes. However, their ability to act in trans and influence ectopic loci has been reported rarely. We searched in rice transcriptomes for tissue-specific expression of TEs and found them to be regulated developmentally. They often shared sequence homology with co-expressed genes and contained potential microRNA-binding sites, which suggested possible contributions to gene regulation. In fact, we have identified a retrotransposon that is highly transcribed in roots and whose spliced transcript constitutes a target mimic for miR171. miR171 destabilizes mRNAs encoding the root-specific family of SCARECROW-Like transcription factors. We demonstrate that retrotransposon-derived transcripts act as decoys for miR171, triggering its degradation and thus results in the root-specific accumulation of SCARECROW-Like mRNAs. Such transposon-mediated post-transcriptional control of miR171 levels is conserved in diverse rice species.

  13. Study of the 1.25Cr-1Mo-0.25V steel microstructure after a carburization phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonetti, S., E-mail: ssimonet@uns.edu.ar [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Departamentos de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria Mecanica, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, 11 de Abril 461, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Lanz, C. [Departamento de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Brizuela, G.; Juan, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2010-08-20

    We studied the changes in the structure and carbide particle size in 1.25Cr-1Mo-0.25V steel under 600 deg. C and 168 MPa, after 4000 h service. We used microscopy and microanalysis techniques to analyze the carbide particles. We performed a complementary theoretical study on the chemical bonding and electronic structure of the carbide-Fe matrix interaction. The results contribute to the understanding of the changes in the alloy microstructure caused by the carburization phenomenon.

  14. Effect of Alloy 625 Buffer Layer on Hardfacing of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Using Nickel Base Hardfacing Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Gopa; Das, C. R.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Murugesan, S.; Dasgupta, Arup

    2016-04-01

    Dashpot piston, made up of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, is a part of diverse safety rod used for safe shutdown of a nuclear reactor. This component was hardfaced using nickel base AWS ER NiCr-B alloy and extensive cracking was experienced during direct deposition of this alloy on dashpot piston. Cracking reduced considerably and the component was successfully hardfaced by application of Inconel 625 as buffer layer prior to hardface deposition. Hence, a separate study was undertaken to investigate the role of buffer layer in reducing the cracking and on the microstructure of the hardfaced deposit. Results indicate that in the direct deposition of hardfacing alloy on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, both heat-affected zone (HAZ) formed and the deposit layer are hard making the thickness of the hard layer formed equal to combined thickness of both HAZ and deposit. This hard layer is unable to absorb thermal stresses resulting in the cracking of the deposit. By providing a buffer layer of Alloy 625 followed by a post-weld heat treatment, HAZ formed in the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is effectively tempered, and HAZ formed during the subsequent deposition of the hardfacing alloy over the Alloy 625 buffer layer is almost completely confined to Alloy 625, which does not harden. This reduces the cracking susceptibility of the deposit. Further, unlike in the case of direct deposition on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, dilution of the deposit by Ni-base buffer layer does not alter the hardness of the deposit and desired hardness on the deposit surface could be achieved even with lower thickness of the deposit. This gives an option for reducing the recommended thickness of the deposit, which can also reduce the risk of cracking.

  15. Fracture characteristic in creep of a 5 Cr-1/2 Mo steel at 600 and 6500C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, R.L.C. de; Monteiro, S.N.; Silveira, T.L.

    The creep behavior of a 5 Cr-1/2 Mo steel was studied at 600 and 650 0 C. The caracteristics of fracture, observed by optical and scanning metallography, displayed a transition from intergranular to transgranular mode of rupture in the range of temperatures and stresses studied. This behavior was dicussed based upon the possible mechanisms for creep deformation taking place in this material [pt

  16. Microstructure and annealing behavior of a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel after dynamic plastic deformation to different strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Mishin, Oleg; Tao, N.R.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructure, hardness and tensile properties of a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel processed by dynamic plastic deformation (DPD) to different strains (0.5 and 2.3) have been investigated in the as-deformed and annealed conditions. It is found that significant structural refinement and a high level...... in a loss of strength with only a small gain in ductility, coarsening combined with pronounced partial recrystallization enables a combination of appreciably increased ductility and comparatively high strength....

  17. Effect of cold work on decarburization of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel in high temperature sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Norichika; Yoshida, Eiichi; Wada, Yusaku.

    1994-01-01

    It is known that the mechanical properties of a 2.25Cr-1Mo steel deteriorated due to the decarburization during immersion in the melt sodium at high temperatures. In low-alloy steel as well as a 2.25Cr-1Mo steel, precipitation reactions of carbides are known to be accelerated by cold working and aging. Thus, it may be expected that cold working and aging effectively suppress the decarburization of the mechanical properties of a 2.25Cr-1Mo steel because the decarburization will be restrained owing to fixation of carbon as precipitates of the carbides. In the present article, effects of cold-working and heat treatments on the kinetics of the decarburization of a 2.25Cr-1Mo steel has been studied experimentally. The annealed, cold-rolled, and normalized and tempered specimens were immersed in the melt of sodium at 500, 600 and 700degC for 425, 437 and 432h, respectively. On the basis of the observations obtained from these specimens, the experiment was also carried out at 450, 500 and 550degC for 2270 and 5465h. The microstructures before and after the immersion were observed with optical and scanning electron microscopes. An average concentration of carbon in each specimen was analyzed by an inert gas fusion method. The carbides extracted from the specimens were identified by X-ray diffraction. At immersion temperatures of 450 and 500degC, a 10% reduction of the decarburization in thickness by cold-working is sufficiently effective for retardation of the decarburization at both 2270 and 5465h. Whereas, at 550degC, more than 30% reduction in thickness by cold-working is needed for it at 2270h but even 80% reduction in thickness by cold-working causes merely slight retardation of the decarburization at 5465h. (author)

  18. Combined equilibrium and non-equilibrium phosphorus segregation to grain boundaries in a 2.25Cr1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, S.-H.; Shen, D.-D.; Yuan, Z.-X.; Liu, J.; Xu, T.-D.; Weng, L.-Q.

    2003-01-01

    Grain boundary segregation of phosphorus in a P-doped 2.25Cr1Mo steel during ageing at 540 deg. C after quenching from 980 deg. C is examined by Auger electron spectroscopy. The segregation is a combined effect of equilibrium segregation and non-equilibrium segregation. The effect of phosphorus non-equilibrium segregation is to enhance the kinetics of its equilibrium segregation

  19. The influence of heating rate on reheat-cracking in a commercial 2 1/4Cr1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hippsley, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    The effects of elevated heating rate on stress-relief cracking in a commercial 2 1/4 Cr1Mo steel have been investigated. A SEN bend-specimen stress-relaxation test was used to assess reheat cracking susceptibility and fracture mechanisms for an initial post-weld heating rate of 1000 Kh - 1 . Two factors controlling the influence of heating rate on the final severity of cracking were identified, i.e. the rate of stress-relaxation with respect to temperature, and the time available for crack-growth. The factors were found to counteract each other, but in the case of commercial 2 1/4 Cr1Mo steel, the crack-growth factor outweighed the relaxation factor, resulting in a reduction in the propensity to stress-relief cracking at the elevated heating rate. However, by reference to the results of a separate investigation concerning A508/2 MnMoNiCr steel it was demonstrated that the balance between these two factors may be reversed in other alloy systems, with the consequence that reheat cracking is exacerbated by increasing the initial heating rate. A computer model was addressed to the stress-relaxation test conditions using data from the commercial 2 1/4 Cr1Mo steel. The model predictions exhibited reasonable agreement with experimental test results for both 100 Kh - 1 and 1000 Kh - 1 heating rates. (author)

  20. Exfoliation and van der Waals heterostructure assembly of intercalated ferromagnet Cr1/3TaS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Yuji; Moriya, Rai; Arai, Miho; Masubuchi, Satoru; Pyon, Sunseng; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Ueno, Keiji; Machida, Tomoki

    2017-12-01

    Ferromagnetic van der Waals (vdW) materials are in demand for spintronic devices with all-two-dimensional-materials heterostructures. Here, we demonstrate mechanical exfoliation of magnetic-atom-intercalated transition metal dichalcogenide Cr1/3TaS2 from its bulk crystal; previously such intercalated materials were thought difficult to exfoliate. Magnetotransport in exfoliated tens-of-nanometres-thick flakes revealed ferromagnetic ordering below its Curie temperature T C ~ 110 K as well as strong in-plane magnetic anisotropy; these are identical to its bulk properties. Further, van der Waals heterostructure assembly of Cr1/3TaS2 with another intercalated ferromagnet Fe1/4TaS2 is demonstrated using a dry-transfer method. The fabricated heterojunction composed of Cr1/3TaS2 and Fe1/4TaS2 with a native Ta2O5 oxide tunnel barrier in between exhibits tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR), revealing possible spin injection and detection with these exfoliatable ferromagnetic materials through the vdW junction.

  1. Isolation, identification and characterization of Paenibacillus polymyxa CR1 with potentials for biopesticide, biofertilization, biomass degradation and biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weselowski, Brian; Nathoo, Naeem; Eastman, Alexander William; MacDonald, Jacqueline; Yuan, Ze-Chun

    2016-10-18

    Paenibacillus polymyxa is a plant-growth promoting rhizobacterium that could be exploited as an environmentally friendlier alternative to chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Various strains have been isolated that can benefit agriculture through antimicrobial activity, nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, plant hormone production, or lignocellulose degradation. However, no single strain has yet been identified in which all of these advantageous traits have been confirmed. P. polymyxa CR1 was isolated from degrading corn roots from southern Ontario, Canada. It was shown to possess in vitro antagonistic activities against the common plant pathogens Phytophthora sojae P6497 (oomycete), Rhizoctonia solani 1809 (basidiomycete fungus), Cylindrocarpon destructans 2062 (ascomycete fungus), Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 (bacterium), and Xanthomonas campestris 93-1 (bacterium), as well as Bacillus cereus (bacterium), an agent of food-borne illness. P. polymyxa CR1 enhanced growth of maize, potato, cucumber, Arabidopsis, and tomato plants; utilized atmospheric nitrogen and insoluble phosphorus; produced the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA); and degraded and utilized the major components of lignocellulose (lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose). P. polymyxa CR1 has multiple beneficial traits that are relevant to sustainable agriculture and the bio-economy. This strain could be developed for field application in order to control pathogens, promote plant growth, and degrade crop residues after harvest.

  2. Carbon transfer between 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo alloy and austenitic steels (experiments in anisothermal loops)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baque, P.; Besson, M.; Champeix, L.; Donati, J.R.; Oberlin, C.; Saint-Paul, P.

    1976-01-01

    Studies on carbon transfer between the ferritic steel 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo and the austenitic steels 316L and 321H have shown that there is not any measurable carbon transfer in the operating conditions of the secondary circuit of PHENIX (475 deg C was the maximal temperature of the 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo steel). A significant carbon transfer has been observed between the ferritic steel and the 316L steel when the 321H was replaced by the 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo steel in the same thermohydraulic conditions (the ferritic steel was then used up to 545 deg C). This experiment has demonstrated the importance of the temperature and the initial carbon content of the ferritic steel as parameters in the decarburization process. It appears that decarburization may not be sensitive to the thermohydraulic conditions at least in the range investigated in those experiments. In the other hand the 316L steel is observed to have been carburized, the degree of carburization remaining appreciably constant and independent on the temperature between 400 deg C and 550 deg C [fr

  3. Susceptibility of 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel to liquid metal induced embrittlement by lithium-lead solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, B.A.; Edwards, G.R.

    1984-08-01

    An investigation has been conducted on the liquid metal induced embrittlement susceptibility of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel exposed to lithium and 1a/o lead-lithium at temperatures between 190 0 C and 525 0 C. This research was part of an ongoing effort to evaluate the compatibility of liquid lithium solutions with potential fusion reactor containment materials. Of particular interest was the microstructure present in a weld heat-affected zone, a microstructure known to be highly susceptible to corrosive attack by liquid lead-lithium solutions. Embrittlement susceptibility was determined by conducting tension tests on 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel exposed to an inert environment as well as to a lead-lithium liquid and observing the change in tensile behavior. The 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel was also given a base plate heat treatment to observe its embrittlement susceptibility to 1a/o lead-lithium. The base plate microstructure was severely embrittled at temperatures less than 500 0 C. Tempering the base plate was effective in restoring adequate ductility to the steel

  4. Thermal fatigue strength estimation of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel under creep-fatigue interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwahara, Kazuo; Nitta, Akihito; Kitamura, Takayuki

    1980-01-01

    A 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel is one of principal materials for high temperature equipments in nuclear and thermal power plants. The authors experimentally analyzed the high temperature fatigue strength and creep strength of a 2-1/4 Cr-1Mo steel main steam pipe which had been used in a thermal plant for operation up to 130,000 hours, and pointed out that the strain-range vs. life curves crossed each other due to the difference of temperature-strain phase in thermal fatigue. This suggests that it is difficult to estimate thermal fatigue life of steel materials having been subjected to different temperature-strain phase on the basis of isothermal low-cycle fatigue life at the upper limit temperature of thermal fatigue, and that it is urgently required to establish an appropriate method of evaluating thermal fatigue life. The authors attempted to prove that the strain range partitioning method used for the evaluation of thermal fatigue life in SUS 304 steels is applicable to this 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel. Consequently, it was found that the thermal fatigue life could be estimated within a factor of 2.5 by the application of this method. (author)

  5. Initiation of Stress Corrosion Cracking of 26Cr-1Mo Ferritic Stainless Steels in Hot Chloride Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, H. S.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    Elongation measurements of 26Cr-1Mo ferritic stainless steels undergoing stress corrosion in boiling LiCl solution allow the induction period to be distinguished from the propagation period of cracks by the deviation of elongation from the logarithmic creep law. Localised corrosion cells are activated exclusively at slip steps by loading and developed into corrosion trenches. No cracks have developed from the corrosion trenches until the induction period is exceeded. The induction period is regarded as a time for localised corrosion cells to achieve a critical degree of occlusion for crack initiation. The repassivation rate of exposed metal by creep or emergence of slip steps decreases as the load increases and is very sensitive to the microstructural changes that affect slip tep height. The greater susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of either prestrained or grain coarsened 26Cr-1Mo alloy compared with that of mill annealed material results from a significant reduction of repassivation rate associated with the increased slip step height. The angular titanium carbonitrides particles dispersed in Ti-stabilized 26Cr-1Mo alloy have a detrimental effect on the resistance to stress corrosion cracking

  6. DIRS1-like retrotransposons are widely distributed among Decapoda and are particularly present in hydrothermal vent organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnivard Eric

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transposable elements are major constituents of eukaryote genomes and have a great impact on genome structure and stability. Considering their mutational abilities, TEs can contribute to the genetic diversity and evolution of organisms. Knowledge of their distribution among several genomes is an essential condition to study their dynamics and to better understand their role in species evolution. DIRS1-like retrotransposons are a particular group of retrotransposons according to their mode of transposition that implies a tyrosine recombinase. To date, they have been described in a restricted number of species in comparison with the LTR retrotransposons. In this paper, we determine the distribution of DIRS1-like elements among 25 decapod species, 10 of them living in hydrothermal vents that correspond to particularly unstable environments. Results Using PCR approaches, we have identified 15 new DIRS1-like families in 15 diverse decapod species (shrimps, lobsters, crabs and galatheid crabs. Hydrothermal organisms show a particularly great diversity of DIRS1-like elements with 5 families characterized among Alvinocarididae shrimps and 3 in the galatheid crab Munidopsis recta. Phylogenic analyses show that these elements are divergent toward the DIRS1-like families previously described in other crustaceans and arthropods and form a new clade called AlDIRS1. At larger scale, the distribution of DIRS1-like retrotransposons appears more or less patchy depending on the taxa considered. Indeed, a scattered distribution can be observed in the infraorder Brachyura whereas all the species tested in infraorders Caridea and Astacidea harbor some DIRS1-like elements. Conclusion Our results lead to nearly double both the number of DIRS1-like elements described to date, and the number of species known to harbor these ones. In this study, we provide the first degenerate primers designed to look specifically for DIRS1-like retrotransposons. They

  7. A murine model for developmental dysplasia of the hip: ablation of CX3CR1 affects acetabular morphology and gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Feldman

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH is a debilitating condition whose distinguishing signs include incomplete formation of the acetabulum leading to dislocation of the femur, accelerated wear of the articular cartilage and joint laxity resulting in osteoarthritis. It is a complex disorder having environmental and genetic causes. Existing techniques fail to detect milder forms of DDH in newborns leading to hip osteoarthritis in young adults. A sensitive, specific and cost effective test would allow identification of newborns that could be non-invasively corrected by the use of a Pavlik harness. Previously, we identified a 2.5 MB candidate region on human chromosome 3 by using linkage analysis of a 4 generation, 72 member family. Whole exome sequencing of the DNA of 4 severely affected members revealed a single nucleotide polymorphism variant, rs3732378 co-inherited by all 11 affected family members. This variant causes a threonine to methionine amino acid change in the coding sequence of the CX3CR1 chemokine receptor and is predicted to be harmful to the function of the protein To gain further insight into the function of this mutation we examined the effect of CX3CR1 ablation on the architecture of the mouse acetabulum and on the murine gait. Methods The hips of 5 and 8 weeks old wild type and CX3CR1 KO mice were analyzed using micro-CT to measure acetabular diameter and ten additional dimensional parameters. Eight week old mice were gait tested using an inclined treadmill with and without load and then underwent micro-CT analysis. Results (1 KO mice showed larger a 5–17% larger diameter left acetabula than WT mice at both ages. (2 At 8 weeks the normalized area of space (i.e. size discrepancy between the femur head and acetabulum is significantly larger [38% (p = 0.001–21% (p = 0.037] in the KO mice. (3 At 8 weeks gait analysis of these same mice shows several metrics that are consistent with impairment in

  8. Field Acceptability and Consumption of CR1M and Potential New Food Items during the Hot Weather Ration Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    DSTO Scottsdale Menu A Chicken with Vegetables 1x175g Sports Beverage Tropical (1L) # 1x70g Original Jerky Pieces 1x25g Fruit Muesli Mix 1x60g...BBQ Shapes 1x45g 1x25g Honey Roasted Nuts Teriyaki Jerky Bar 1x50g 1x25g Jam Sandwich Biscuit # Chocolate Protein Bar 1x45g...Gum 1x70g 1x10g 1x140g 2xpkt4 Cracked Pepper Vita Wheat BBQ Chicken Tropical Fruit Grains Fruitful Muesli Mix 1x36g 1x250g

  9. Preliminary Survey of Ectoparasites Infesting Chickens (Gallus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ectoparasites of chickens in four areas of Sokoto metropolis, Nigeria, on 160 chickens raised under free-range ... 90% mortality of local free range chickens. Arthropod ... some cases premature death. ... from the birds by displaying the feathers.

  10. LTRsift: a graphical user interface for semi-automatic classification and postprocessing of de novo detected LTR retrotransposons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinbiss Sascha

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons are a class of eukaryotic mobile elements characterized by a distinctive sequence similarity-based structure. Hence they are well suited for computational identification. Current software allows for a comprehensive genome-wide de novo detection of such elements. The obvious next step is the classification of newly detected candidates resulting in (super-families. Such a de novo classification approach based on sequence-based clustering of transposon features has been proposed before, resulting in a preliminary assignment of candidates to families as a basis for subsequent manual refinement. However, such a classification workflow is typically split across a heterogeneous set of glue scripts and generic software (for example, spreadsheets, making it tedious for a human expert to inspect, curate and export the putative families produced by the workflow. Results We have developed LTRsift, an interactive graphical software tool for semi-automatic postprocessing of de novo predicted LTR retrotransposon annotations. Its user-friendly interface offers customizable filtering and classification functionality, displaying the putative candidate groups, their members and their internal structure in a hierarchical fashion. To ease manual work, it also supports graphical user interface-driven reassignment, splitting and further annotation of candidates. Export of grouped candidate sets in standard formats is possible. In two case studies, we demonstrate how LTRsift can be employed in the context of a genome-wide LTR retrotransposon survey effort. Conclusions LTRsift is a useful and convenient tool for semi-automated classification of newly detected LTR retrotransposons based on their internal features. Its efficient implementation allows for convenient and seamless filtering and classification in an integrated environment. Developed for life scientists, it is helpful in postprocessing and refining

  11. LTRsift: a graphical user interface for semi-automatic classification and postprocessing of de novo detected LTR retrotransposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbiss, Sascha; Kastens, Sascha; Kurtz, Stefan

    2012-11-07

    Long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are a class of eukaryotic mobile elements characterized by a distinctive sequence similarity-based structure. Hence they are well suited for computational identification. Current software allows for a comprehensive genome-wide de novo detection of such elements. The obvious next step is the classification of newly detected candidates resulting in (super-)families. Such a de novo classification approach based on sequence-based clustering of transposon features has been proposed before, resulting in a preliminary assignment of candidates to families as a basis for subsequent manual refinement. However, such a classification workflow is typically split across a heterogeneous set of glue scripts and generic software (for example, spreadsheets), making it tedious for a human expert to inspect, curate and export the putative families produced by the workflow. We have developed LTRsift, an interactive graphical software tool for semi-automatic postprocessing of de novo predicted LTR retrotransposon annotations. Its user-friendly interface offers customizable filtering and classification functionality, displaying the putative candidate groups, their members and their internal structure in a hierarchical fashion. To ease manual work, it also supports graphical user interface-driven reassignment, splitting and further annotation of candidates. Export of grouped candidate sets in standard formats is possible. In two case studies, we demonstrate how LTRsift can be employed in the context of a genome-wide LTR retrotransposon survey effort. LTRsift is a useful and convenient tool for semi-automated classification of newly detected LTR retrotransposons based on their internal features. Its efficient implementation allows for convenient and seamless filtering and classification in an integrated environment. Developed for life scientists, it is helpful in postprocessing and refining the output of software for predicting LTR

  12. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α regulates chemotactic migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells through directly transactivating the CX3CR1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiansuo Zhao

    Full Text Available CX3CR1 is an important chemokine receptor and regulates the chemotactic migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells. Up to now, its regulatory mechanism remains largely undefined. Here, we report that hypoxia upregulates the expression of CX3CR1 in pancreatic cancer cells. When hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α expression was knocked down in vitro and in vivo, the expression of CX3CR1 was significantly decreased. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that HIF-1α bound to the hypoxia-response element (HRE; 5'-A/GCGTG-3' of CX3CR1 promoter under normoxia, and this binding was significantly enhanced under hypoxia. Overexpression of HIF-1α significantly upregulated the expression of luciferase reporter gene under the control of the CX3CR1 promoter in pancreatic cancer cells. Importantly, we demonstrated that HIF-1α may regulate cancer cell migration through CX3CR1. The HIF-1α/CX3CR1 pathway might represent a valuable therapeutic target to prevent invasion and distant metastasis in PDAC.

  13. The effects of minor alloy modifications and heat treatment on the microstructure and creep rupture behavior of 2.25Cr-1Mo Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, J.A.; Chung, D.W.; Parker, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of alloy additions on the microstructure of simulated cooled and tempered 2.25Cr-1Mo steels have been studied using transmission electron microscopy. Carbide precipitation sequences have been identified in the modification 3Cr-1Mo-1Mn-1Ni and compared to those in 2.25Cr-1Mo steels modified with Mn and Ni and also with Ti, V and B. The influence of minor compositional changes on the creep rupture behavior of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel has been studied at 500 C, 560 C, and 600 C. The most significant effect of alloy modifications on creep properties resulted from additions of Mn and Cr. Preliminary studies show that 1% Mn and 0.5Mn + 1Ni + 0.75Cr additions significantly reduce creep strength at all three temperatures for tests up to 2000 hours duration. The 3Cr-1Mo-1Mn-1Ni steel showed improvements in rupture ductility at all temperatures when compared with the base 2.25Cr-1Mo steel and the manganese-nickel modifications. Plots of the Larson-Miller parameter for both these modifications lay within the scatter band for commercial 2.25Cr-1Mo steels

  14. Recognizing the SINEs of Infection: Regulation of Retrotransposon Expression and Modulation of Host Cell Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Dunker

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Short interspersed elements (SINEs are a family of retrotransposons evolutionarily derived from cellular RNA polymerase III transcripts. Over evolutionary time, SINEs have expanded throughout the human genome and today comprise ~11% of total chromosomal DNA. While generally transcriptionally silent in healthy somatic cells, SINE expression increases during a variety of types of stresses, including DNA virus infection. The relevance of SINE expression to viral infection was largely unexplored, however, recent years have seen great progress towards defining the impact of SINE expression on viral replication and host gene expression. Here we review the origin and diversity of SINE elements and their transcriptional control, with an emphasis on how their expression impacts host cell biology during viral infection.

  15. DNA methylation inhibits expression and transposition of the Neurospora Tad retrotransposon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Cambareri, E B; Kinsey, J A

    2001-06-01

    Tad is a LINE-like retrotransposon of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We have analyzed both expression and transposition of this element using strains with a single copy of Tad located in the 5' noncoding sequences of the am (glutamate dehydrogenase) gene. Tad in this position has been shown to carry a de novo cytosine methylation signal which causes reversible methylation of both Tad and am upstream sequences. Here we find that methylation of the Tad sequences inhibits both Tad expression and transposition. This inhibition can be relieved by the use of 5-azacytidine, a drug which reduces cytosine methylation, or by placing the Tad/am sequences in a dim-2 genetic background.

  16. Using CR1aa versus KSOM as the culture medium for in vitro embryo production of cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Triwulaninngsih

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available This research has been conducted at the laboratory of in vitro fertilization in the Department of Animal Science University of Wisconsin, USA. These embryos can be used for improving genetic value of Indonesian cattle. Oocytes were matured in TCM- 199 medium (in 5% CO2 incubator and at 390C enriched with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH 10 μl/ml, oestradiol 17 β 1μl/ml and 10% Fetal Calf Serum (FCS. The oocytes were fertilized in vitro with motile sperm and incubation between sperm and oocytes in fertilization medium Tyroide Albumin Lactate Pyruvate (TALP for 20 hours. All zygotes were cultured in CR1aa (n=1549 medium versus modification of protein-free pottasium simplex optimized medium (KSOM (n=675 up to blastocyst stage and were fed FCS 5 μl/50 μl medium on day 6, as treatment A and B respectively. Data were analyzed by completely randomized design with SAS program. Percentages of cleavage, morula, blastocyst, expanded blastocyst, unfertilized and degenerated ova in this study were 91.4% vs 75.6 %; 75.6% vs 58.9%; 61.5% vs 38.5%; 31.2% vs 5.1%, 8.6% vs 24.4%, 15.7% vs 8% which were significantly different (P<0.01 for treatment CR1aa and KSOM respectively. Based on this study, CR1aa medium is better culture medium than KSOM for efficient in vitro production (IVP of bovine embryos.

  17. Gas6 Promotes Inflammatory (CCR2hiCX3CR1lo) Monocyte Recruitment in Venous Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurance, Sandrine; Bertin, François-René; Ebrahimian, Talin; Kassim, Yusra; Rys, Ryan N; Lehoux, Stéphanie; Lemarié, Catherine A; Blostein, Mark D

    2017-07-01

    Coagulation and inflammation are inter-related. Gas6 (growth arrest-specific 6) promotes venous thrombosis and participates to inflammation through endothelial-innate immune cell interactions. Innate immune cells can provide the initiating stimulus for venous thrombus development. We hypothesize that Gas6 promotes monocyte recruitment during venous thrombosis. Deep venous thrombosis was induced in wild-type and Gas6-deficient (-/-) mice using 5% FeCl 3 and flow reduction in the inferior vena cava. Total monocyte depletion was achieved by injection of clodronate before deep venous thrombosis. Inflammatory monocytes were depleted using an anti-C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) antibody. Similarly, injection of an anti-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) antibody induced CCL2 depletion. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence were used to characterize the monocytes recruited to the thrombus. In vivo, absence of Gas6 was associated with a reduction of monocyte recruitment in both deep venous thrombosis models. Global monocyte depletion by clodronate leads to smaller thrombi in wild-type mice. Compared with wild type, the thrombi from Gas6 -/- mice contain less inflammatory (CCR2 hi CX 3 CR1 lo ) monocytes, consistent with a Gas6-dependent recruitment of this monocyte subset. Correspondingly, selective depletion of CCR2 hi CX 3 CR1 lo monocytes reduced the formation of venous thrombi in wild-type mice demonstrating a predominant role of the inflammatory monocytes in thrombosis. In vitro, the expression of both CCR2 and CCL2 were Gas6 dependent in monocytes and endothelial cells, respectively, impacting monocyte migration. Moreover, Gas6-dependent CCL2 expression and monocyte migration were mediated via JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase). This study demonstrates that Gas6 specifically promotes the recruitment of inflammatory CCR2 hi CX 3 CR1 lo monocytes through the regulation of both CCR2 and CCL2 during deep venous thrombosis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Reactor Pressure Vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potirniche, Gabriel; Barlow, Fred D.; Charit, Indrajit; Rink, Karl

    2013-01-01

    A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions; Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process; Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens; Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds; Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life; Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates; Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses; Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage; Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength; Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads; and Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

  19. Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Teactor Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potirniche, Gabriel [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Barlow, Fred D. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Charit, Indrajit [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Rink, Karl [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2013-11-26

    A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions; Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process; Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens; Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds; Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life; Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates; Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses; Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage; Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength; Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads; and Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

  20. Efficient DNA Fingerprinting Based on the Targeted Sequencing of Active Retrotransposon Insertion Sites Using a Bench-Top High-Throughput Sequencing Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Monden, Yuki; Yamamoto, Ayaka; Shindo, Akiko; Tahara, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    In many crop species, DNA fingerprinting is required for the precise identification of cultivars to protect the rights of breeders. Many families of retrotransposons have multiple copies throughout the eukaryotic genome and their integrated copies are inherited genetically. Thus, their insertion polymorphisms among cultivars are useful for DNA fingerprinting. In this study, we conducted a DNA fingerprinting based on the insertion polymorphisms of active retrotransposon families (Rtsp-1 and LI...

  1. Effect of heat treatment on the impact properties of a 12Cr-1Mo-V-W steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, B.A.; Wilcox, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of austenitization and tempering treatments on the strength and impact properties of a 12Cr-1Mo-V-W steel. Data are reported for austenitization temperatures covering the range 900 to 1250 0 C and tempering treatments of 600 to 800 0 C. A 50 0 C improvement in the ductile brittle transition temperature is achieved through heat treatment. This is found to result from elimination of delta ferrite and associated carbides at the delta ferrite-matrix interface. 17 figures

  2. Effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties of a commercial 12Cr-1Mo steel (HT-9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1981-08-01

    The microstructure of a commercial 12Cr-1Mo steel (HT-9) and its associated effect on strength and toughness properties is being studied in a continuing program aimed at qualifying the alloy for use in fusion energy machines. Interim results show this alloy is subject to a degree of tempered martensite embrittlement and temper embrittlement. For applications projected for fusion machines at lower temperatures, a new heat treatment (1000 0 C, 1 h, air-cooled followed by 650 0 C tempering) at lower temperatures and shorter times than the vendor-recommended heat treatment has been identified. Microstructural differences between the treatments are discussed, and mechanical properties are correlated. 6 figures

  3. Impact properties of 2 1/4 Cr--1 Mo steel after ten years EBR-II service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, J.A.; Server, W.L.; Sheckherd, J.W.; Longua, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    The material studied in this investigation was obtained from a 2 1 / 4 Cr--1 Mo steel superheated steam line which had been in service for approximately 90,000 hours. Of that 90,000 hours, approximately 40,000 hours were at a temperature of approximately 820 0 F and a pressure of 1250 psi, and 35,000 hours were at a temperature of 500 0 F and 1250 psi. The results of optical metallography and instrumented impact testing performed on the materials are presented

  4. Market trials of irradiated chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, John A.; Olson, Dennis G.

    1998-01-01

    The potential market for irradiated chicken breasts was investigated using a mail survey and a retail trial. Results from the mail survey suggested a significantly higher level of acceptability of irradiated chicken than did the retail trial. A subsequent market experiment involving actual purchases showed levels of acceptability similar to that of the mail survey when similar information about food irradiation was provided

  5. Evaluation of strength property variations across 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints using automated ball indentation (ABI) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaraju, S.; GaneshKumar, J.; Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.; Laha, K.

    2017-01-01

    The variations of strength properties across 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints fabricated by different arc welding processes such as shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), tungsten inert gas (TIG) and activated tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) have been evaluated employing automatic ball indentation (ABI) technique. ABI tests were conducted at 298 K across various zones of the weld joints comprising of base metal, weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) and intercritical HAZ (ICHAZ) regions. The flow curves obtained from ABI tests were correlated with corresponding conventional tensile test results. In general, the tensile strength decreased systematically across the weld joint from weld metal to base metal. Inter critical HAZ exhibited the least strength implying that it is the weakest zone. The incomplete phase transformation in the ICHAZ during weld thermal cycle caused the softening. The A-TIG weld metal exhibited higher UTS and strain hardening values due to higher carbon in the martensite. The strain hardening exponent exhibited only slight variation across the various regions of the weld joints. A-TIG weld joint exhibited higher weld metal and HAZ strength, marginally higher UTS to YS ratio in the weld metal and HAZ compared to that of the other two processes. Hence, among the three welding processes chosen, A-TIG welding process is found to be superior in producing a 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint with better strength properties.

  6. Fractographic examination of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo Charpy specimens irradiated in the AD-2 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hu, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    Fracture surface topologies have been examined using scanning electron microscopy for 20 selected half sized Charpy impact specimens of HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo in order to provide improved understanding of fracture toughness degradation as a result of irradiation for Path E alloys. The specimen matrix included unirradiated specimens and specimens irradiated in EBR-II in the AD-2 experiment. Also, hardness measurements have been made on selected irradiated Charpy specimens. The results of examinations indicate that irradiation hardening due to G-phase formation at 390 0 C is responsible for the large shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) found in HT-9. Toughness degradation in HT-9 observed following higher temperature irradiations is attributed to precipitation at delta ferrite stringers. Reductions in toughness as a consequence of irradiation in Modified 9Cr-1Mo are attributed to in-reactor precipitation of (V,Nb)C and M 23 C 6 . It is shown that crack propagation rates for ductile and brittle failure modes can be measured, that they differ by over an order of magnitude and that unexpected multiple shifts in fracture mode from ductile to brittle failure can be attributed to the effect of delta ferrite stringers on crack propagation rates

  7. [Curcumin down-regulates CX3CR1 expression in spinal cord dorsal horn and DRG in neuropathic pain rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jinwei; Zheng, Changjian; Cao, Hong; Li, Jun; Lian, Qingquan

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the effects of curcumin on the behavior of chronic constrictive injury (CCI) rats and the CX3CR1 expression in spinal cord dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Seventy-two male SD rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: 1) Sham operation group (Sham); 2) Chronic constrictive injury group (CCI); 3) Curcumin treated group (Cur), administrated with curcumin 100 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) ip for 14 days after CCI; 4) Solvent contrast group (SC), administrated with an equal volume of solvent for 14 days after CCI. Paw thermal withdrawal (PTWL) and paw mechanical withdrawal threshold (PMWT) were measured on 2 pre-operative and 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14 post-operative days respectively. The lumbar segments L4-5 of the spinal cord and the L4, L5 DRG were removed at 3, 7, 14 days after surgery. The expression of CX3CR1 was determined by immunohistochemical staining. Compared with Sham group, PTWL and PMWT in CCI group were significantly lower on each post-operative day (PDRG. In Cur group, PTWL were higher than in CCI group on 7, 10, 14 post-operative day (Pdorsal root ganglia.

  8. Evaluation of environmental effect on creep-fatigue of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Beinan; Ishikawa, Akiyoshi; Asada, Yasuhide.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study, a trial evaluation was made to evaluate the environmental effect of air separately from the behavior of material origin. Data with 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel at 550degC in air were subjected to the evaluation based on data of the steel in high vacuum with a newly developed procedure using the overstress concept. An empirical expression was proposed to describe the environmental effect of air on the creep-fatigue behavior. Following conclusions were obtained in the present study on a separation of the environmental effect of air on a creep-fatigue behavior of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel at 550degC. 1) The environmental effect of air reduces a fatigue life, that is, it increases the time-independent damage component of the creep-fatigue. 2) The environmental effect of air brings on the frequency effect which is mainly dependent upon a strain rate or time in a compression going stroke. Other environmental effect on F-S or compression hold-time cycles depends upon the strain rate in compression. 3) The rate-time dependent damage component, that is, the creep damage is reduced by the environmental effect of air. That means a creep-fatigue life recovers in air environment. (author)

  9. Postirradiation fracture toughness tests of ESR alloy HT-9 and modified 9Cr-1Mo alloy from UBR reactor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Reed, J.R.; Sprague, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Alloy HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo are being evaluated for potential applications as first wall materials in magnetic fusion reactors. Objectives of the current research task were to test fatigue-precracked Charpy-V (PCC/sub v/) specimens from representative plates irradiated in the UBR reactor at 149 0 C or 300 0 C, and, to compare the results against postirradiation notch ductility data developed previously for the materials. Both plates represent electroslag refined (ESR) melt processing. PCC/sub v/ specimens of Alloy HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo alloy were irradiated at 300 0 C and 149 0 C, respectively, to approx.0.8 X 10 20 n/cm 2 , E > 0.1 MeV. During this period, postirradiation tests for fracture toughness were completed and results compared to notch ductility determinations from standard Charpy-V (C/sub v/) specimens irradiated in the same reactor experiments. Fracture surface examinations by SEM are also reported

  10. Solidification Segregation and Homogenization Behavior of 1Cr-1.25Mo-0.25V Steel Ingot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Bae [Dae-gu Mechatronics and Materials Institute, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Na, Young-Sang; Seo, Seong-Moon [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Je-Hyun [Changwon National University, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    As a first step to optimizing the homogenization heat treatment following high temperature upset forging, the solidification segregation and the homogenization behaviors of solute elements were quantitatively analyzed for 1Cr-1.25Mo-0.25V steel ingot by electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA). The random sampling approach, which was designed to generate continuous compositional profiles of each solute element, was employed to clarify the segregation and homogenization behaviors. In addition, ingot castings of lab-scale and a 16-ton-sized 1Cr-1.25Mo-0.25V steel were simulated using the finite element method in three dimensions to understand the size effect of the ingot on the microsegregation and its reduction during the homogenization heat treatment. It was found that the microsegregation in a large-sized ingot was significantly reduced by the promotion of solid state diffusion due to the extremely low cooling rate. On the other hand, from the homogenization point of view, increasing the ingot size causes a dramatic increase in the dendrite arm spacing, and hence the homogenization of microsegregation in a large-sized ingot appears to be practically difficult.

  11. An experimental study on impingement wastage of Mod 9Cr 1Mo steel due to sodium water reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore, S., E-mail: skishore@igcar.gov.in [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Ashok Kumar, A.; Chandramouli, S.; Nashine, B.K.; Rajan, K.K.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Chetal, S.C. [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium heated steam generators are crucial components of fast breeder reactors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A leak in steam generator tube will cause sodium water reaction that damages the tubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental study was conducted to quantify the extent of damage on Mod 9Cr 1Mo tube due to a water leak. - Abstract: Sodium heated steam generator (SG) is a crucial component in the heat transport system of a fast breeder reactor (FBR). In case, one of its water/steam carrying tubes becomes defective, water/steam leaks into sodium, flowing in the shell side, causing sodium-water reaction, which is highly exothermic and producing corrosive NaOH. The reaction jet originating from a leaking tube may impinge on its adjacent tube, resulting in damage of the tube. Impingement wastage refers to this kind of damage, occurring to a tube of sodium heated SG, owing to a small water/steam leak from a neighboring tube. Extensive research works have been conducted all over the world to study various aspects of this phenomenon. Experimental studies were carried out in Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) to understand the effect of impingement wastage on Mod 9Cr 1Mo, which is the tube material of prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR) SG. This paper brings out the data and experience gained through the experiments.

  12. Evaluation of strength property variations across 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints using automated ball indentation (ABI) technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaraju, S. [Nuclear Recycle Board, BARCF, Kalpakkam (India); GaneshKumar, J.; Vasantharaja, P. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Vasudevan, M., E-mail: dev@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Laha, K. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2017-05-17

    The variations of strength properties across 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints fabricated by different arc welding processes such as shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), tungsten inert gas (TIG) and activated tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) have been evaluated employing automatic ball indentation (ABI) technique. ABI tests were conducted at 298 K across various zones of the weld joints comprising of base metal, weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) and intercritical HAZ (ICHAZ) regions. The flow curves obtained from ABI tests were correlated with corresponding conventional tensile test results. In general, the tensile strength decreased systematically across the weld joint from weld metal to base metal. Inter critical HAZ exhibited the least strength implying that it is the weakest zone. The incomplete phase transformation in the ICHAZ during weld thermal cycle caused the softening. The A-TIG weld metal exhibited higher UTS and strain hardening values due to higher carbon in the martensite. The strain hardening exponent exhibited only slight variation across the various regions of the weld joints. A-TIG weld joint exhibited higher weld metal and HAZ strength, marginally higher UTS to YS ratio in the weld metal and HAZ compared to that of the other two processes. Hence, among the three welding processes chosen, A-TIG welding process is found to be superior in producing a 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint with better strength properties.

  13. 7 CFR 65.160 - Ground chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground chicken. 65.160 Section 65.160 Agriculture... OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.160 Ground chicken. Ground chicken means...

  14. 7 CFR 65.120 - Chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chicken. 65.120 Section 65.120 Agriculture Regulations..., PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.120 Chicken. Chicken has the meaning given the term in...

  15. Bone marrow chimeric mice reveal a role for CX₃CR1 in maintenance of the monocyte-derived cell population in the olfactory neuroepithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Jana; Blomster, Linda V; Chinnery, Holly R; Weninger, Wolfgang; Jung, Steffen; McMenamin, Paul G; Ruitenberg, Marc J

    2010-10-01

    Macrophages in the olfactory neuroepithelium are thought to play major roles in tissue homeostasis and repair. However, little information is available at present about possible heterogeneity of these monocyte-derived cells, their turnover rates, and the role of chemokine receptors in this process. To start addressing these issues, this study used Cx₃cr1(gfp) mice, in which the gene sequence for eGFP was knocked into the CX₃CR1 gene locus in the mutant allele. Using neuroepithelial whole-mounts from Cx₃cr1(gfp/+) mice, we show that eGFP(+) cells of monocytic origin are distributed in a loose network throughout this tissue and can be subdivided further into two immunophenotypically distinct subsets based on MHC-II glycoprotein expression. BM chimeric mice were created using Cx₃cr1(gfp/+) donors to investigate turnover of macrophages (and other monocyte-derived cells) in the olfactory neuroepithelium. Our data indicate that the monocyte-derived cell population in the olfactory neuroepithelium is actively replenished by circulating monocytes and under the experimental conditions, completely turned over within 6 months. Transplantation of Cx₃cr1(gfp/gfp) (i.e., CX₃CR1-deficient) BM partially impaired the replenishment process and resulted in an overall decline of the total monocyte-derived cell number in the olfactory epithelium. Interestingly, replenishment of the CD68(low)MHC-II(+) subset appeared minimally affected by CX₃CR1 deficiency. Taken together, the established baseline data about heterogeneity of monocyte-derived cells, their replenishment rates, and the role of CX₃CR1 provide a solid basis to further examine the importance of different monocyte subsets for neuroregeneration at this unique frontier with the external environment.

  16. Infection-Induced Retrotransposon-Derived Noncoding RNAs Enhance Herpesviral Gene Expression via the NF-κB Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Karijolich

    Full Text Available Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs are highly abundant, RNA polymerase III-transcribed noncoding retrotransposons that are silenced in somatic cells but activated during certain stresses including viral infection. How these induced SINE RNAs impact the host-pathogen interaction is unknown. Here we reveal that during murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 infection, rapidly induced SINE RNAs activate the antiviral NF-κB signaling pathway through both mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS-dependent and independent mechanisms. However, SINE RNA-based signaling is hijacked by the virus to enhance viral gene expression and replication. B2 RNA expression stimulates IKKβ-dependent phosphorylation of the major viral lytic cycle transactivator protein RTA, thereby enhancing its activity and increasing progeny virion production. Collectively, these findings suggest that SINE RNAs participate in the innate pathogen response mechanism, but that herpesviruses have evolved to co-opt retrotransposon activation for viral benefit.

  17. Lipoxygenase in chicken muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, S.; Bergman, M.; Sklan, D.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of lipoxygenase-type enzymes was demonstrated in chick muscles. Examination of the oxidation products of [ 14 C]arachidonic acid revealed the presence of 15-lipoxygenase. The enzyme was partially purified by affinity chromatography on linoleoyl-aminoethyl-Sepharose. The enzyme was stable on frozen storage, and activity was almost completely preserved after 12-month storage at -20 degree C. During this period the content of cis,cis-1,4-pentadiene fatty acids decreased slightly. It is suggested that lipoxygenase may be responsible for some of the oxidative changes occurring in fatty acids on frozen storage of chicken meat

  18. Genome-wide analysis of LTR-retrotransposon diversity and its impact on the evolution of the genus Helianthus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascagni, Flavia; Giordani, Tommaso; Ceccarelli, Marilena; Cavallini, Andrea; Natali, Lucia

    2017-08-18

    Genome divergence by mobile elements activity and recombination is a continuous process that plays a key role in the evolution of species. Nevertheless, knowledge on retrotransposon-related variability among species belonging to the same genus is still limited. Considering the importance of the genus Helianthus, a model system for studying the ecological genetics of speciation and adaptation, we performed a comparative analysis of the repetitive genome fraction across ten species and one subspecies of sunflower, focusing on long terminal repeat retrotransposons at superfamily, lineage and sublineage levels. After determining the relative genome size of each species, genomic DNA was isolated and subjected to Illumina sequencing. Then, different assembling and clustering approaches allowed exploring the repetitive component of all genomes. On average, repetitive DNA in Helianthus species represented more than 75% of the genome, being composed mostly by long terminal repeat retrotransposons. Also, the prevalence of Gypsy over Copia superfamily was observed and, among lineages, Chromovirus was by far the most represented. Although nearly all the same sublineages are present in all species, we found considerable variability in the abundance of diverse retrotransposon lineages and sublineages, especially between annual and perennial species. This large variability should indicate that different events of amplification or loss related to these elements occurred following species separation and should have been involved in species differentiation. Our data allowed us inferring on the extent of interspecific repetitive DNA variation related to LTR-RE abundance, investigating the relationship between changes of LTR-RE abundance and the evolution of the genus, and determining the degree of coevolution of different LTR-RE lineages or sublineages between and within species. Moreover, the data suggested that LTR-RE abundance in a species was affected by the annual or perennial

  19. Linking maternal and somatic 5S rRNA types with different sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locati, Mauro D; Pagano, Johanna F B; Ensink, Wim A; van Olst, Marina; van Leeuwen, Selina; Nehrdich, Ulrike; Zhu, Kongju; Spaink, Herman P; Girard, Geneviève; Rauwerda, Han; Jonker, Martijs J; Dekker, Rob J; Breit, Timo M

    2017-04-01

    5S rRNA is a ribosomal core component, transcribed from many gene copies organized in genomic repeats. Some eukaryotic species have two 5S rRNA types defined by their predominant expression in oogenesis or adult tissue. Our next-generation sequencing study on zebrafish egg, embryo, and adult tissue identified maternal-type 5S rRNA that is exclusively accumulated during oogenesis, replaced throughout the embryogenesis by a somatic-type, and thus virtually absent in adult somatic tissue. The maternal-type 5S rDNA contains several thousands of gene copies on chromosome 4 in tandem repeats with small intergenic regions, whereas the somatic-type is present in only 12 gene copies on chromosome 18 with large intergenic regions. The nine-nucleotide variation between the two 5S rRNA types likely affects TFIII binding and riboprotein L5 binding, probably leading to storage of maternal-type rRNA. Remarkably, these sequence differences are located exactly at the sequence-specific target site for genome integration by the 5S rRNA-specific Mutsu retrotransposon family. Thus, we could define maternal- and somatic-type MutsuDr subfamilies. Furthermore, we identified four additional maternal-type and two new somatic-type MutsuDr subfamilies, each with their own target sequence. This target-site specificity, frequently intact maternal-type retrotransposon elements, plus specific presence of Mutsu retrotransposon RNA and piRNA in egg and adult tissue, suggest an involvement of retrotransposons in achieving the differential copy number of the two types of 5S rDNA loci. © 2017 Locati et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  20. Cyclic and isothermal oxidation behavior of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel; Estudio del comportamiento del acero 2.25Cr-1Mo frente a los fenomenos de oxidacion ciclica e isoterma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proy, M.; Utrilla, M. v.; Otero, E.

    2014-04-01

    Cyclic and isothermal oxidation of chromium-molybdenum steel 2.25Cr-1Mo were analyzed at 550 degree centigrade and 650 degree centigrade during 360 hours in air atmospheres. The cycles were performed with two stages; one of heating in furnace during 90 minutes and then the sample were cooled to 50 degree centigrade by air flow. Thermogravimetric analyses were performed to obtain high temperature corrosion kinetics. Several characterization techniques have been used to identify the corrosion mechanism, as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Optical Microscopy (OM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Thermal cycling tests can changes the corrosion mechanism, due cracks propagation in oxide scale, that witch can favors the access of oxidant agent to the substrate. (Author)

  1. Ancient Origin of the U2 Small Nuclear RNA Gene-Targeting Non-LTR Retrotransposons Utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kenji K; Jurka, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Most non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons encoding a restriction-like endonuclease show target-specific integration into repetitive sequences such as ribosomal RNA genes and microsatellites. However, only a few target-specific lineages of non-LTR retrotransposons are distributed widely and no lineage is found across the eukaryotic kingdoms. Here we report the most widely distributed lineage of target sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons, designated Utopia. Utopia is found in three supergroups of eukaryotes: Amoebozoa, SAR, and Opisthokonta. Utopia is inserted into a specific site of U2 small nuclear RNA genes with different strength of specificity for each family. Utopia families from oomycetes and wasps show strong target specificity while only a small number of Utopia copies from reptiles are flanked with U2 snRNA genes. Oomycete Utopia families contain an "archaeal" RNase H domain upstream of reverse transcriptase (RT), which likely originated from a plant RNase H gene. Analysis of Utopia from oomycetes indicates that multiple lineages of Utopia have been maintained inside of U2 genes with few copy numbers. Phylogenetic analysis of RT suggests the monophyly of Utopia, and it likely dates back to the early evolution of eukaryotes.

  2. Mammalian-specific genomic functions: Newly acquired traits generated by genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mammals, including human beings, have evolved a unique viviparous reproductive system and a highly developed central nervous system. How did these unique characteristics emerge in mammalian evolution, and what kinds of changes did occur in the mammalian genomes as evolution proceeded? A key conceptual term in approaching these issues is "mammalian-specific genomic functions", a concept covering both mammalian-specific epigenetics and genetics. Genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes are reviewed as the representative, mammalian-specific genomic functions that are essential not only for the current mammalian developmental system, but also mammalian evolution itself. First, the essential roles of genomic imprinting in mammalian development, especially related to viviparous reproduction via placental function, as well as the emergence of genomic imprinting in mammalian evolution, are discussed. Second, we introduce the novel concept of "mammalian-specific traits generated by mammalian-specific genes from LTR retrotransposons", based on the finding that LTR retrotransposons served as a critical driving force in the mammalian evolution via generating mammalian-specific genes.

  3. Void formation and helium effects in 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels irradiated in HFIR and FFTF at 400/degree/C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Klueh, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Martensitic/ferritic 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels doped with up to 2 wt% Ni have up to 450 appm He after HFIR irradiation to /approximately/38 dpa, but only 5 appm He after 47 dpa in FFTF. No fine He bubbles and few or no larger voids were observable in any of these steels after FFTF irradiation at 407/degree/C. By contrast, many voids were found in the undoped steels (30-90 appm He) irradiated in HFIR at 400/degree/C, while voids plus many more fine He bubbles were found in the Ni-doped steels (400-450 appm He). Irradiation in both reactors at /approximately/400/degree/C produced significant changes in the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary, dislocation, and precipitation structures that were sensitive to alloy composition, including doping with Ni. However, for each specific alloy the irradiation-produced changes were exactly the same comparing samples irradiated in FFTF and HFIR, particularly the Ni-doped steels. Therefore, the increased void formation appears solely due to the increased helium generation found in HFIR. While the levels of void swelling are relatively low after 37-39 dpa in HFIR (0.1-0.4%), details of the microstructural evolution suggest that void nucleation is still progressing, and swelling could increase with dose. The effect of helium on void swelling remains a valid concern for fusion application that requires higher dose experiments. 15 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs

  4. Impact of Low-Energy Ion Beam Implantation on the Expression of Ty1-copia-like Retrotransposons in Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ya Huiyuan; Jiao Zhen; Gu Yunhong; Wang Weidong; Qin Guangyong; Huo Yuping

    2007-01-01

    Retrotransposon-like elements are major constituents of most eukaryotic genomes. For example, they account for roughly 90% of the wheat (Triticum aestivum) genome. Previous study on a wheat strain treated by low-energy N + ions indicated the variations in AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism ) markers. One such variation was caused by the re-activation of Ty1-copia-like retrotransposons, implying that the mutagenic effects of low-energy ions might work through elevated activation of retrotransposons. In this paper an expression profile of Ty1-copia-like retrotransposons in wheat treated by low-energy N + ions is reported. The reverse transcriptase (RT) domains of these retrotransposons were amplified by reverse-transcriptional polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and sequentially cloned. 42 and 65 clones were obtained from the treated (CL) and control materials (CK), respectively. Sequence analysis of each clone was performed by software. Phylogeny and classification were calculated responding to the sequences of the RT domains. All the results show that there is much difference in the RT domain between the control sample and the treated sample. Especially, the RT domains from the treated group encode significantly more functional ORF (open reading frames) than those from the control sample. This observation suggests that the treated sample has higher activation of retrotransposons, possibly as a consequence of low-energy ion beam irradiation. It also suggests that retrotransposons in the two groups impact the host gene expression in two different ways and carry out different functions in wheat cells

  5. Biogas Production from Chicken Manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Dalkılıç

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, animal manures are burned for heating in Turkey. It is also used as soil conditioner which has adverse environmental effects. Although, the use of renewable energy sources in Turkey is very limited, the application studies on biogas production from animal manure are increasing. 25-30% of total animal manures produced in Turkey are composed of chicken manure. The works on biogas production from chicken manure are very limited in Turkey. In this paper, biogas production studies from chicken manure in Turkey and in the World are reviewed.

  6. Effect of HTGR helium on fatigue and creep properties of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurumaji, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Kudo, A.

    1982-01-01

    Low cycle fatigue and creep tests have been carried out on 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel (candidate steel for VHTR reactor pressure vessel) in helium environment containing 200 approx. 300 μatm of H 2 , 100 approx. 150 μatm CO, 7 approx. 10 μatm CH 4 , 7 approx. 10 μatm CO 2 and 1 μatm H 2 O (JAERI B Helium). Fatigue life in helium environment was longer than that in air at 450 0 C. This results can be explained by supposing that oxidation at the crack tip causes the wedge effect to promote crack propagation in air. On the otherhand, creep rupture strength showed no significant difference in both helium and air. Equivalent creep rupture strength in both helium and air may be due to the fact that detrimental internal oxidation and carburization or decarburization hardly occur at 400 approx. 450 0 C

  7. Low cycle fatigue of 2.25Cr1Mo steel with tensile and compressed hold loading at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Yu, Dunji; Zhao, Zizhen; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Gang; Chen, Xu, E-mail: xchen@tju.edu.cn

    2016-06-14

    A series of uniaxial strain-controlled fatigue and creep-fatigue tests of the bainitic 2.25Cr1Mo steel forging were performed at 455 °C in air. Three different hold periods (30 s, 120 s, 300 s) were employed at maximum tensile strain and compressive strain under fully reversed strain cycling. Both tensile and compressive holds significantly reduce the fatigue life. Fatigue life with tensile hold is shorter than that with compressive hold. A close relationship is found between the reduction of fatigue life and the amount of stress relaxation. Microstructural examination by scanning electron microscope reveals that strain hold introduces more crack sources, which can be probably ascribed to the intensified oxidation and the peeling-off of oxide layers. A modified plastic strain energy approach considering stress relaxation effect is proposed to predict the creep-fatigue life, and the predicted lives are in superior agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Microstructural evaluation and non-destructive examination of 2. 25 Cr--1 Mo steel. [886/sup 0/K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Den Avyle, J.A.; Jones, W.B.; Gieske, J.H.

    1978-07-01

    Specimens of 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel were damaged to various levels by creep and combined creep-fatigue cycling at 886/sup 0/K (1100/sup 0/F) with hold periods. Ultrasonic shear wave velocity measurements were performed and showed small changes with large amounts of creep or fatigue damage; these changes were deemed too small for practical application. Measurements of magnetic properties were unsuccessful in following damage. Optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were performed on the samples. TEM observations showed that microstructural changes which occurred at 886/sup 0/K (1100/sup 0/F) did not occur homogeneously throughout the matrix; during creep, carbide spheroidization and coarsening began in widely separated regions, with an increasing fraction of the material undergoing the process with time. A precipitate was observed to form during fatigue which did not occur during simple aging or creep.

  9. Evaluation of ferritic alloy Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo after neutron irradiation: Microstructural development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1986-10-01

    As part of a program to provide a data base on the bainitic alloy Fe-2-1/4-1Mo for fusion energy applications, microstructural examinations are reported for nine specimen conditions for 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel which had been irradiated by fast neutrons over the temperature range 390 to 510 0 C. Void swelling is found following irradiation at 400 0 C to 480 0 C. Concurrently dislocation structure and precipitation developed. Peak void swelling, void density, dislocation density and precipitate number density formed at the lowest temperature, approximately 400 0 C, whereas mean void size, and mean precipitate size increased with increasing irradiation temperature. The examination results are used to provide interpretation of in-reactor creep, density change and post irradiation tensile behavior

  10. Mechanical and physical properties of 2 1/4 Cr--1 Mo steel in support of CRBRP steam generator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, C.R.; Williams, R.K.; Klueh, R.L.; Hebble, T.L.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical and physical property tests on annealed 2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel were conducted in an effort to define behavior in support of the design of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) steam generator design. Interim empirical expressions and/or data are reported from the results of tensile, creep, fatigue, creep-fatigue, subcritical crack growth, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal expansion tests and analysis. These expressions cover behavior, where appropriate, over a range of temperatures from 25 to as high as 700 0 C. Comparisons between thermal conductivity and diffusivity values and those found in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code indicated that the new values were significantly higher than those found presently in the Code. The importance and complexity of obtaining valid mechanical and physical properties for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) steam generator are discussed. (U.S.)

  11. Mathematical description for the stress-strain behavior of annealed 21/4 Cr--1 Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Hebble, T.L.

    1976-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed series of tensile tests on one heat of annealed 2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel over the range 25 to 593 0 C (75 to 1100 0 F) and at nominal strain rates of 0.4, 0.04, 0.004, and 0.0004/min. To determine an empirical relationship to represent the flow behavior, we fitted the true-stress true-strain data from these tests to several proposed models. The models fit were those proposed by Holloman, Ludwik, Ludwigson, and Voce. From a comparison of the standard error of estimate, the Voce equation was concluded to be the best mathematical description of the data under most test conditions and the best single representation over the wide range of test conditions

  12. Effect of normalization heat treatment on creep and tensile properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panneer Selvi, S.; Sakthivel, T.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.

    2016-01-01

    Creep and tensile properties have been investigated on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel subjected to single and double normalization heat treatments. Optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopic investigation revealed the presence of refined prior austenite grain size and fine M 23 C 6 precipitates in the double normalized steel compared to the steel subjected to single normalization heat treatment. Increased creep strain and significant reduction in creep rupture life were observed with the double normalized steel in comparison with single normalized steel. Increased tensile ductility coupled with marginal decrease in tensile strength at higher test temperature was observed with double normalized steel compared to single normalized steel. It has been attributed to the presence of refined prior austenite grain size and coarsening of Nb rich MX precipitates in double normalized steel. (author)

  13. Study on Creep Damage Model of 1Cr1Mo1/4V Steel for Turbine Rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Woo Sung; Song, Gee Wook; Kim, Bum Shin; Chang, Sung Ho; Fleury, Eric

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the dominant damage mechanisms in high-temperature steam turbine facilities such as rotor and casing are creep and fatigue damages. Even though coupling of creep and fatigue should be considered while predicting the life of turbine facilities, the remaining life of large steam turbine facilities is generally determined on the basis of creep damage because the turbines must generate stable base-load power and because they are operated at a high temperature and pressure for a long time. Almost every large steam turbine in Korea has been operated for more than 20 years and is made of steel containing various amounts of principal alloying elements nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and vanadium. In this study, creep damage model of 1Cr1Mo1/4V steel for turbine rotor is proposed and that can assess the high temperature creep life of large steam turbine facilities is proposed

  14. Magnetic properties and phase stability of half-metal-type Co2Cr1-xFexGa alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Umetsu, R.Y.; Fujita, A.; Oikawa, K.; Kainuma, R.; Fukamichi, K.; Ishida, K.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic properties and phase stability of half-metal-type Co 2 Cr 1-x Fe x Ga alloys were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer and in a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the L2 1 -type single-phase is obtainable for the entire concentration of x and that the value of the saturation magnetic moment M s at 4.2K in the lower composition range of x is in agreement with the generalized Slater-Pauling line, while it is rather larger than the generalized Slater-Pauling line above x=0.6. The Curie temperature T c monotonically increases, whereas the transition temperature from the L2 1 - to B2-type phase T t B2/L2 1 is almost constant at 1082+/-13K with increasing x

  15. The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the creep life of a 2.25% Cr1% Mo Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonsdale, D.; Flewitt, P.E.J.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of superimposed hydrostatic pressures on the creep life of a 2.25% Cr 1% Mo steel, with a bainitic microstructure, is examined. Creep tests have been carried out at 923K with uniaxial stresses in the range 55 to 80 MPa and superimposed hydrostatic pressures up to 35 MPa. Optical and scanning electron microscopy have been used to evaluate the contribution of the hydrostatic stress to grain boundary cavitation. Increasing the hydrostatic pressure for a given uniaxial stress suppresses cavitation, but little changes the secondary creep rate, thereby excending the creep life. Furthermore, the time to failure depends on both the applied uniaxial stress and the hydrostatic pressure and not simply the principal stress. (orig.) [de

  16. Corrosion of path A PCA and 12 Cr-1 MoVW steel in thermally convective lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Exposure of path A PCA alloys to thermally convective lithium for 6700 h at 600 and 570 0 C resulted in corrosion reactions that were similar to what is observed for other austenitic alloys exposed under similar conditions. It corroded more rapidly than type 316 stainless steel, and the presence of nitride stringers in PCA did not affect the measured weight losses. Consideration of the weight change and surface analysis data for 12 Cr-1 MoVW steel exposed to thermally convective lithium between 500 and 350 0 C for 10,088 h revealed that reactions with carbon and nitrogen were probably the principal corrosion processes for this alloy in this temperature range. Corrosion was not severe

  17. A novel linkage map of sugarcane with evidence for clustering of retrotransposon-based markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palhares Alessandra C

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of sugarcane as a sustainable crop has unlimited applications. The crop is one of the most economically viable for renewable energy production, and CO2 balance. Linkage maps are valuable tools for understanding genetic and genomic organization, particularly in sugarcane due to its complex polyploid genome of multispecific origins. The overall objective of our study was to construct a novel sugarcane linkage map, compiling AFLP and EST-SSR markers, and to generate data on the distribution of markers anchored to sequences of scIvana_1, a complete sugarcane transposable element, and member of the Copia superfamily. Results The mapping population parents (‘IAC66-6’ and ‘TUC71-7’ contributed equally to polymorphisms, independent of marker type, and generated markers that were distributed into nearly the same number of co-segregation groups (or CGs. Bi-parentally inherited alleles provided the integration of 19 CGs. The marker number per CG ranged from two to 39. The total map length was 4,843.19 cM, with a marker density of 8.87 cM. Markers were assembled into 92 CGs that ranged in length from 1.14 to 404.72 cM, with an estimated average length of 52.64 cM. The greatest distance between two adjacent markers was 48.25 cM. The scIvana_1-based markers (56 were positioned on 21 CGs, but were not regularly distributed. Interestingly, the distance between adjacent scIvana_1-based markers was less than 5 cM, and was observed on five CGs, suggesting a clustered organization. Conclusions Results indicated the use of a NBS-profiling technique was efficient to develop retrotransposon-based markers in sugarcane. The simultaneous maximum-likelihood estimates of linkage and linkage phase based strategies confirmed the suitability of its approach to estimate linkage, and construct the linkage map. Interestingly, using our genetic data it was possible to calculate the number of retrotransposon scIvana_1 (~60

  18. Tensile properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by shear punch testing and correlation with microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthik, V., E-mail: karthik@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603102 (India); Laha, K.; Parameswaran, P.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Kasiviswanathan, K.V.; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, Baldev [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603102 (India)

    2011-10-15

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel (P91) is subjected to a series of heat treatments consisting of soaking for 5 min at the selected temperatures in the range 973 K-1623 K (below Ac{sub 1} to above Ac{sub 4}) followed by oil quenching and tempering at 1033 K for 1 h to obtain different microstructural conditions. The tensile properties of the different microstructural conditions are evaluated from small volumes of material by shear punch test technique. A new methodology for evaluating yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and strain hardening exponent from shear punch test by using correlation equations without employing empirical constants is presented and validated. The changes in the tensile properties are related to the microstructural changes of the steel investigated by electron microscopic studies. The steel exhibits minimum strength and hardness when soaked between Ac{sub 1} and Ac{sub 3} (intercritical range) temperatures due to the replacement of original lath martensitic structure with subgrains. The finer martensitic microstructure produced in the steel after soaking at temperatures above Ac{sub 3} leads to a monotonic increase in hardness and strength with decreasing strain hardening exponent. For soaking temperatures above Ac{sub 4}, the hardness and strength of the steel increases marginally due to the formation of soft {delta} ferrite. - Highlights: > A methodology presented for computing tensile properties from shear punch test. > UTS and strain hardening estimated using extended analysis of blanking models. > The analysis methodology validated for different heat treated 9Cr-1Mo steel. > Changes in tensile properties of steel correlated with microstructures.

  19. Influence of the fabrication process parameters on microstructures and mechanical properties of 10Cr-1Mo ODS steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hyun Ju; Kim, Ki Baik; Choi, Byoung Kwon; Kang, Suk Hoon; Noh, Sang Hoon; Kim, Ga Eon; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FM steels have been developed as the most promising core structural material for high- temperature components operating in severe environments such as nuclear fusion and fission systems owing to its excellent elevated temperature strength and radiation resistance stemming from the addition of extremely thermally stable oxide particles dispersed in a ferritic/martensitic matrix. To realize the structural components such as plates, sheets and tubes in SFR, the development of manufacturing processes is an essential issue for the ODS FM steel. While the ODS steel has superior radiation resistance and high temperature strength, in comparison with the existing commercial steels, it is difficult for the ODS steel to obtain sufficient workability for the fabrication due to high hardness and low ductility at room temperature, meaning that the manufacturing of the ODS plate including cladding tube can be complicated by the low cold workability. In order to prevent the ODS steel from any damage during the manufacturing process, thus, the introduction of intermediate heat treatments between cold rolling processes is necessary. This study investigates effects of the fabrication process parameters such as the cold working ratio, the intermediate and final heat treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 10Cr-1Mo ODS steel. In an effort to optimize the manufacturing route of the ODS FM steel, the microstructural and mechanical evolutions for the ODS plate manufactured by a control of the fabrication process parameters were evaluated in the present study. In the present study, the effect of a cold rolling and intermediate heat treatments on microstructures and mechanical properties of 10Cr-1Mo FM ODS steel were investigated. During the manufacturing route the hardness measurements remained below the critical value of 400 Hv. Intermediate heat treatment with slow cooling led to a softened ferritic structures which can be further

  20. Creep-fatigue behavior of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel at 5500C in air and vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asayama, T.; Cheng, S.Z.; Asada, Y.; Mitsuhashi, S.; Tachibana, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Following studies on creep-fatigue behaviors of 304 steel at 650 0 C (Asada et al (1980) and Morishita et al (1984), (1985), (1987)), 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel was studied on its creep-fatigue behaviors at 550 0 C in air and vacuum of 100 and 0.1 μPa. The present study intends to give a base for an evaluation of the environmental effect through obtaining a pure creep-fatigue behavior of this steel which is free from the environmental effect. In the previous studies on 304 steel, tests were conducted in three kinds of environment of air, 100 and 0.1 μPa vacuum. It seemed to be plausible that the 0.1 μPa vacuum shows the pure creep-fatigue behavior of 304 steel at 650 0 C which is almost completely free from the environment. A creep-fatigue life in 0.1 μPa vacuum is almost one order of magnitude higher than that in air. The 100 μPa vacuum suggested that the environmental effect of air still remains but is so small that a creep-fatigue life in 100 μPa is same to that in 0.1 μPa in some strain wave forms. The present study intends to examine if similar observations are obtained with 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel at 550 0 C. This paper describes the analysis of the overstress and damages, in addition to a creep-fatigue result. (orig.GL)

  1. TGF-β1 Downregulates the Expression of CX3CR1 by Inducing miR-27a-5p in Primary Human NK Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis, Stefano; Caliendo, Fabio; Dondero, Alessandra; Casu, Beatrice; Romano, Filomena; Loiacono, Fabrizio; Moretta, Alessandro; Bottino, Cristina; Castriconi, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Activity of human natural killer (NK) cells against cancer cells is deeply suppressed by TGF-β1, an immunomodulatory cytokine that is released and activated in the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, our previous data showed that TGF-β1 modifies the chemokine receptor repertoire of NK cells. In particular, it decreases the expression of CX 3 CR1 that drives these effectors toward peripheral tissues, including tumor sites. To identify possible mechanisms mediating chemokine receptors modulation, we analyzed the microRNA profile of TGF-β1-treated primary NK cells. The analysis pointed out miR-27a-5p as a possible modulator of CX 3 CR1. We demonstrated the functional interaction of miR-27a-5p with the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of CX 3 CR1 mRNA by two different experimental approaches: by the use of a luciferase assay based on a reporter construct containing the CX 3 CR1 3'UTR and by transfection of primary NK cells with a miR-27a-5p inhibitor. We also showed that the TGF-β1-mediated increase of miR-27a-5p expression is a consequence of miR-23a-27a-24-2 cluster induction. Moreover, we demonstrated that miR-27a-5p downregulates the surface expression of CX 3 CR1. Finally, we showed that neuroblastoma cells induced in resting NK cells a downregulation of the CX 3 CR1 expression that was paralleled by a significant increase of miR-27a-5p expression. Therefore, the present study highlights miR-27a-5p as a pivotal TGF-β1-induced regulator of CX 3 CR1 expression.

  2. Molecular characterization of chicken syndecan-2 proteoglycan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ligong; Couchman, John R; Smith, Jacqueline

    2002-01-01

    A partial syndecan-2 sequence (147 bp) was obtained from chicken embryonic fibroblast poly(A)+ RNA by reverse transcription-PCR. This partial sequence was used to produce a 5'-end-labelled probe. A chicken liver cDNA library was screened with this probe, and overlapping clones were obtained......Da. Western blotting of chicken embryonic fibroblast cell lysates with species-specific monoclonal antibody mAb 8.1 showed that chicken syndecan-2 is substituted with heparan sulphate, and that the major form of chicken syndecan-2 isolated from chicken fibroblasts is consistent with the formation of SDS......-resistant dimers, which is common for syndecans. A 5'-end-labelled probe hybridized to two mRNA species in chicken embryonic fibroblasts, while Northern analysis with poly(A)+ RNAs from different tissues of chicken embryos showed wide and distinct distributions of chicken syndecan-2 during embryonic development...

  3. Genome-wide LORE1 retrotransposon mutagenesis and high-throughput insertion detection in Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbanski, Dorian Fabian; Malolepszy, Anna; Stougaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Insertion mutants facilitate functional analysis of genes, but for most plant species it has been difficult to identify a suitable mutagen and to establish large populations for reverse genetics. The main challenge is developing efficient high-throughput procedures for both mutagenesis and insert......Insertion mutants facilitate functional analysis of genes, but for most plant species it has been difficult to identify a suitable mutagen and to establish large populations for reverse genetics. The main challenge is developing efficient high-throughput procedures for both mutagenesis...... plants. The identified insertions showed that the endogenous LORE1 retrotransposon is well suited for insertion mutagenesis due to its homogenous gene targeting and exonic insertion preference. Since LORE1 transposition occurs in the germline, harvesting seeds from a single founder line and cultivating...... progeny generates a complete mutant population. This ease of LORE1 mutagenesis combined with the efficient FSTpoolit protocol, which exploits 2D pooling, Illumina sequencing, and automated data analysis, allows highly cost-efficient development of a comprehensive reverse genetic resource....

  4. Identification and chromosomal distribution of copia-like retrotransposon sequences in the coffee (Coffea L. genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Carlos Herrera

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of copia-like transposable elements in seven coffee (Coffea sp. species, including the cultivated Coffea arabica, was investigated. The highly conserved domains of the reverse transcriptase (RT present in the copia retrotransposons were amplified by PCR using degenerated primers. Fragments of roughly 300 bp were obtained and the nucleotide sequence was determined for 36 clones, 19 of which showed good quality. The deduced amino acid sequences were compared by multiple alignment analysis. The data suggested two distinct coffee RT groups, designated as CRTG1 and CRTG2. The sequence identities among the groups ranged from 52 to 60% for CRTG1 and 74 to 85% for CRTG2. The multiple alignment analysis revealed that some of the clones in CRTG1 were closely related to the representative elements present in other plant species such as Brassica napus, Populus ciliata and Picea abis. Furthermore, the chromosomal localization of the RT domains in C. arabica and their putative ancestors was investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis. FISH signals were observed throughout the chromosomes following a similar dispersed pattern with some localized regions exhibiting higher concentrations of those elements, providing new evidence of their relative conservation and stability in the coffee genome

  5. A LTR copia retrotransposon and Mutator transposons interrupt Pgip genes in cultivated and wild wheats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, Michela; Cenci, Alberto; Janni, Michela; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2008-04-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins involved in plant defence. Wheat pgip genes have been isolated from the B (Tapgip1) and D (Tapgip2) genomes, and now we report the identification of pgip genes from the A genomes of wild and cultivated wheats. By Southern blots and sequence analysis of BAC clones we demonstrated that wheat contains a single copy pgip gene per genome and the one from the A genome, pgip3, is inactivated by the insertion of a long terminal repeat copia retrotranspon within the fourth LRR. We demonstrated also that this retrotransposon insertion is present in Triticum urartu and all the polyploidy wheats assayed, but is absent in T. monococcum (Tmpgip3), suggesting that this insertion took place after the divergence between T. monococcum and T. urartu, but before the formation of the polyploid wheats. We identified also two independent insertion events of new Class II transposable elements, Vacuna, belonging to the Mutator superfamily, that interrupted the Tdipgip1 gene of T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides. The occurrence of these transposons within the coding region of Tdipgip1 facilitated the mapping of the Pgip locus in the pericentric region of the short arm of chromosome group 7. We speculate that the inactivation of pgip genes are tolerated because of redundancy of PGIP activities in the wheat genome.

  6. In-situ Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies on the pitting corrosion of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel in neutral chloride solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, S.; Nanda Gopala Krishna, D.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2018-01-01

    In-situ Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies were performed for the identification of native and corroded surface oxide layers of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. The Raman data obtained for native oxide layer of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel revealed that it was mainly composed of oxides of Fe and Cr. The presence of alloying element Mo was found to be less significant in the native oxide film. The oxides of Cr were dominant at the surface and were found to be decreasing closer to metal/oxide layer interface. The changes in the chemical composition of the native films upon in-situ pitting during potentiostatic polarization experiment were characterized by in-situ Raman analysis. The corrosion products of potentiostatically polarized modified 9Cr-1Mo steel was composed of dominant Fe (III) phases viz., γ- Fe2O3, α and γ - FeOOH along with the oxides of chromium. The results from Raman analysis were corroborated with the XPS experiments on as received and pitted samples of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel specimens. It was observed that the oxides of Cr and Mo contributed for the stability of the surface layer by forming Cr2O3 and MoO3. Also, the study attempted to find out the intermediate corrosion products inside the metastable pits to account for the pseudo passive behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel in 0.1 M NaCl solution.

  7. Effect of Welding Processes on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Residual Stresses of Plain 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, S.; Vasantharaja, P.; Brahadees, G.; Vasudevan, M.; Mahadevan, S.

    2017-12-01

    9Cr-1Mo steel designated as P9 is widely used in the construction of power plants and high-temperature applications. It is chosen for fabricating hexcan fuel subassembly wrapper components of fast breeder reactors. Arc welding processes are generally used for fabricating 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints. A-TIG welding process is increasingly being adopted by the industries. In the present study, shielded metal arc (SMA), tungsten inert gas (TIG) and A-TIG welding processes are used for fabricating the 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints of 10 mm thickness. Effect of the above welding processes on the microstructure evolution, mechanical properties and residual stresses of the weld joints has been studied in detail. All the three weld joints exhibited comparable strength and ductility values. 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint fabricated by SMAW process exhibited lower impact toughness values caused by coarser grain size and inclusions. 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint fabricated by TIG welding exhibited higher toughness due to finer grain size, while the weld joint fabricated by A-TIG welding process exhibited adequate toughness values. SMA steel weld joint exhibited compressive residual stresses in the weld metal and HAZ, while TIG and A-TIG weld joint exhibited tensile residual stresses in the weld metal and HAZ.

  8. Nondestructive testing for microstructural characterization in 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel towards assessment of fabrication quality and in-service degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, T.; Rao, K.B.S.; Raj, Baldev [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    1999-07-01

    The paper discusses the usefulness of non destructive testing for microstructural characterization in 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements and spectral analysis have been used in a complementary way for characterizing Ac{sub 1} and Ac{sub 3} temperatures, amount of martensite and ferrite, dissolution of V{sub 4}C{sub 3} and NbC and formation of {delta}-ferrite. The microstructural degradation occurring due to thermal ageing and creep has also been studied by ultrasonic velocity measurements. Magnetic Barkhausen noise technique has been used for estimating the extent of various regions in heat affected zone (HAZ) of 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel weldment. The same technique has been used for the assessment of low cycle fatigue damage in 9Cr-1Mo steel. The study establishes that non destructive methods can be used for the assessment of fabrication quality and in service degradation of the components. (author)

  9. Substituted 7-amino-5-thio-thiazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidines as potent and selective antagonists of the fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlström, Sofia; Nordvall, Gunnar; Sohn, Daniel; Hettman, Andreas; Turek, Dominika; Åhlin, Kristofer; Kers, Annika; Claesson, Martina; Slivo, Can; Lo-Alfredsson, Yvonne; Petersson, Carl; Bessidskaia, Galina; Svensson, Per H; Rein, Tobias; Jerning, Eva; Malmberg, Åsa; Ahlgen, Charlotte; Ray, Colin; Vares, Lauri; Ivanov, Vladimir; Johansson, Rolf

    2013-04-25

    We have developed two parallel series, A and B, of CX3CR1 antagonists for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. By modifying the substituents on the 7-amino-5-thio-thiazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidine core structure, we were able to achieve compounds with high selectivity for CX3CR1 over the closely related CXCR2 receptor. The structure-activity relationships showed that a leucinol moiety attached to the core-structure in the 7-position together with α-methyl branched benzyl derivatives in the 5-position displayed promising affinity, and selectivity as well as physicochemical properties, as exemplified by compounds 18a and 24h. We show the preparation of the first potent and selective orally available CX3CR1 antagonists.

  10. Tensile flow behaviour of 2.25Cr-1Mo ferritic steel base metal an simulated heat affected zone structures of 2.25 Cr-1Mo weld joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Rao, K.B.S.; Mannan, S. L.; Sastry, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Tensile tests in the temperature range 298 to 873 K have been performed on 2.25Cr-1Mo base metal and simulated heat affected zone (HAZ) structures of its weld joint, namely coarse grain bainite, fine grain bainite and intercritical structure. Tensile flow behaviour of all the microstructural conditions could be adequately described by the Hollomon equation (σ = K 1 ε n1 ) at higher (>623 K) temperatures. Deviation from the Hollomon equation was observed at low strains and lower ( 1 ε n1 + exp (K 2 + n 2 ε), was found to describe the flow curve. In general, the flow parameters n 1 , K 1 , n 2 and K 2 were found to decrease with increase in temperature except in the intermediate temperature range (423 to 623 K). Peaks/plateaus were observed in their variation with temperature in the intermediate temperature range coinciding with the occurrence of serrated flow in the load-elongation curve. The n 1 value increased and the K 1 value decreased with the type of microstructure in the order: coarse grain bainite, fine grain bainite, base metal and intercritical structure. The variation of n 1 with microstructure has been rationalized on the basis of mean free path (MFP) of dislocations which is directly related to the inter-particle spacing. Larger MFP of dislocations lead to higher strain hardening exponents n 1 . (orig.)

  11. CX3CR1 is expressed by human B lymphocytes and mediates [corrected] CX3CL1 driven chemotaxis of tonsil centrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Corcione

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fractalkine/CX(3CL1, a surface chemokine, binds to CX(3CR1 expressed by different lymphocyte subsets. Since CX(3CL1 has been detected in the germinal centres of secondary lymphoid tissue, in this study we have investigated CX(3CR1 expression and function in human naïve, germinal centre and memory B cells isolated from tonsil or peripheral blood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate unambiguously that highly purified human B cells from tonsil and peripheral blood expressed CX(3CR1 at mRNA and protein levels as assessed by quantitative PCR, flow cytometry and competition binding assays. In particular, naïve, germinal centre and memory B cells expressed CX(3CR1 but only germinal centre B cells were attracted by soluble CX(3CL1 in a transwell assay. CX(3CL1 signalling in germinal centre B cells involved PI3K, Erk1/2, p38, and Src phosphorylation, as assessed by Western blot experiments. CX(3CR1(+ germinal centre B cells were devoid of centroblasts and enriched for centrocytes that migrated to soluble CX(3CL1. ELISA assay showed that soluble CX(3CL1 was secreted constitutively by follicular dendritic cells and T follicular helper cells, two cell populations homing in the germinal centre light zone as centrocytes. At variance with that observed in humans, soluble CX(3CL1 did not attract spleen B cells from wild type mice. OVA immunized CX(3CR1(-/- or CX(3CL1(-/- mice showed significantly decreased specific IgG production compared to wild type mice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose a model whereby human follicular dendritic cells and T follicular helper cells release in the light zone of germinal centre soluble CX(3CL1 that attracts centrocytes. The functional implications of these results warrant further investigation.

  12. Application of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo as a structural material in saturated steam cycle LMFBR systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licina, G.J.; Busboom, H.J.; Ring, P.J.; Roy, P.; Schmidt, C.G.; Spalaris, C.N.

    1982-02-01

    The suitability and incentives were examined for using 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel as a structural material for the entire primary and secondary sodium systems in a 1000 MWe pool-type Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor. The critical properties, advantages and disadvantages of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo, and data needed for design were described for each major component in the reactor. The relative importance of alloy properties to the successful use of ferritics in LMFBR was identified. Licensing issues, likely to surface if ferritic alloys were to be used for critical reactor components, were discussed

  13. Role of fractalkine/CX3CR1 signaling pathway in the recovery of neurological function after early ischemic stroke in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Zhi; Wang, Chun; Wang, Qian; Lin, Yong-Zhong; Ge, Yu-Song; Li, Dong-Mei; Mao, Geng-Sheng

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to explore the role of fractalkine/CX3C chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1) signaling pathway in the recovery of neurological functioning after an early ischemic stroke in rats. After establishment of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) models, 50 rats were divided into blank, sham, model, positive control and CX3CR1 inhibitor groups. Neurological impairment, walking and grip abilities, and cortical and hippocampal infarctions were evaluated by Zea Longa scoring criterion, beam-walking assay and grip strength test, and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. qRT-PCR and Western blotting were performed to detect mRNA and protein expressions. ELISA was conducted to measure concentration of sFractalkine (sFkn), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and TNF-α. The recovery rate of neurological functioning impairment and reduced walking and grip abilities was faster in the positive control and CX3CR1 inhibitor groups than the model group. The model, positive control and CX3CR1 inhibitor groups showed increased mRNA and protein expression of chemokine C-X3-C motif ligand 1 (CX3CL1) and CX3CR1, concentration of sFkn, IL-1β and TNF-α, and size of cortical and cerebral infarctions while decreased expression of NGF and BDNF compared with the blank and sham groups. Compared with the model group, the mRNA and protein expression of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1, concentration of sFkn, IL-1β and TNF-α, and size of cortical and cerebral infarctions decreased while expression of NGF and BDNF increased in the positive control and CX3CR1 inhibitor groups. Thus, the study suggests that inhibition of fractalkine/CX3CR1 signaling pathway promotes the recovery of neurological functioning after the occurrence of an early ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of the material in creep-exposed critical 12Cr-1Mo-V ferritic steel components of the pressure section of power plant steam boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzanski, J.

    2002-01-01

    Metallographic examinations were carried out on ferritic 12Cr-1Mo-V steel with tempered martensite structure after 68,000 - 145,000 hr service in creep conditions. Structural evolution related to the form of martensite, carbide precipitation and internal damage due to long-term action of thermally activated processes was discussed. A generalised scheme of structural evolution and progress of the internal damage was developed in correlation with the life exhaustion ratio. Principles of the classification for ferritic 12Cr-1Mo-V steel after long-term-service were proposed together with the method for evolution of the state of the material for the industrial practice. (author)

  15. Comparative genomic analysis reveals multiple long terminal repeats, lineage-specific amplification, and frequent interelement recombination for Cassandra retrotransposon in pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hao; Du, Jianchang; Li, Leiting; Jin, Cong; Fan, Lian; Li, Meng; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Shaoling

    2014-06-04

    Cassandra transposable elements belong to a specific group of terminal-repeat retrotransposons in miniature (TRIM). Although Cassandra TRIM elements have been found in almost all vascular plants, detailed investigations on the nature, abundance, amplification timeframe, and evolution have not been performed in an individual genome. We therefore conducted a comprehensive analysis of Cassandra retrotransposons using the newly sequenced pear genome along with four other Rosaceae species, including apple, peach, mei, and woodland strawberry. Our data reveal several interesting findings for this particular retrotransposon family: 1) A large number of the intact copies contain three, four, or five long terminal repeats (LTRs) (∼20% in pear); 2) intact copies and solo LTRs with or without target site duplications are both common (∼80% vs. 20%) in each genome; 3) the elements exhibit an overall unbiased distribution among the chromosomes; 4) the elements are most successfully amplified in pear (5,032 copies); and 5) the evolutionary relationships of these elements vary among different lineages, species, and evolutionary time. These results indicate that Cassandra retrotransposons contain more complex structures (elements with multiple LTRs) than what we have known previously, and that frequent interelement unequal recombination followed by transposition may play a critical role in shaping and reshaping host genomes. Thus this study provides insights into the property, propensity, and molecular mechanisms governing the formation and amplification of Cassandra retrotransposons, and enhances our understanding of the structural variation, evolutionary history, and transposition process of LTR retrotransposons in plants. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. Insertion of a solo LTR retrotransposon associates with spur mutations in 'Red Delicious' apple (Malus × domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mengxue; Sun, Qibao; Zhou, Junyong; Qiu, Huarong; Guo, Jing; Lu, Lijuan; Mu, Wenlei; Sun, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Insertion of a solo LTR, which possesses strong bidirectional, stem-specific promoter activities, is associated with the evolution of a dwarfing apple spur mutation. Spur mutations in apple scions revolutionized global apple production. Since long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are tightly related to natural mutations, inter-retrotransposon-amplified polymorphism technique and genome walking were used to find sequences in the apple genome based on these LTRs. In 'Red Delicious' spur mutants, a novel, 2190-bp insertion was identified as a spur-specific, solo LTR (sLTR) located at the 1038th nucleotide of another sLTR, which was 1536 bp in length. This insertion-within-an-insertion was localized within a preexisting Gypsy-50 retrotransposon at position 3,762,767 on chromosome 4. The analysis of transcriptional activity of the two sLTRs (the 2190- and 1536-bp inserts) indicated that the 2190-bp sLTR is a promoter, capable of bidirectional transcription. GUS expression in the 2190-bp-sense and 2190-bp-antisense transgenic lines was prominent in stems. In contrast, no promoter activity from either the sense or the antisense strand of the 1536-bp sLTR was detected. From ~150 kb of DNA on each side of the 2190 bp, sLTR insertion site, corresponding to 300 kb of the 'Golden Delicious' genome, 23 genes were predicted. Ten genes had predicted functions that could affect shoot development. This first report, of a sLTR insertion associated with the evolution of apple spur mutation, will facilitate apple breeding, cloning of spur-related genes, and discovery of mechanisms behind dwarf habit.

  17. Isolation and characterization of reverse transcriptase fragments of LTR retrotransposons from the genome of Chenopodium quinoa (Amaranthaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolano, Bozena; Bednara, Edyta; Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna

    2013-10-01

    High heterogeneity was observed among conserved domains of reverse transcriptase ( rt ) isolated from quinoa. Only one Ty1- copia rt was highly amplified. Reverse transcriptase sequences were located predominantly in pericentromeric region of quinoa chromosomes. The heterogeneity, genomic abundance, and chromosomal distribution of reverse transcriptase (rt)-coding fragments of Ty1-copia and Ty3-gypsy long terminal repeat retrotransposons were analyzed in the Chenopodium quinoa genome. Conserved domains of the rt gene were amplified and characterized using degenerate oligonucleotide primer pairs. Sequence analyses indicated that half of Ty1-copia rt (51 %) and 39 % of Ty3-gypsy rt fragments contained intact reading frames. High heterogeneity among rt sequences was observed for both Ty1-copia and Ty3-gypsy rt amplicons, with Ty1-copia more heterogeneous than Ty3-gypsy. Most of the isolated rt fragments were present in quinoa genome in low copy numbers, with only one highly amplified Ty1-copia rt sequence family. The gypsy-like RNase H fragments co-amplified with Ty1-copia-degenerate primers were shown to be highly amplified in the quinoa genome indicating either higher abundance of some gypsy families of which rt domains could not be amplified, or independent evolution of this gypsy-region in quinoa. Both Ty1-copia and Ty3-gypsy retrotransposons were preferentially located in pericentromeric heterochromatin of quinoa chromosomes. Phylogenetic analyses of newly amplified rt fragments together with well-characterized retrotransposon families from other organisms allowed identification of major lineages of retroelements in the genome of quinoa and provided preliminary insight into their evolutionary dynamics.

  18. Internal-bore-welding of 2 1/4 Cr--1 Mo steel tube-to-tubesheet joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorhead, A.J.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    In order to avoid the disadvantages of the conventional face-side tube-to-tubesheet weld, the steam generators for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (a power-producing demonstration LMFBR) will be built using a relatively new technique known as internal-bore-welding (IBW). In IBW the tube does not pass through the tubesheet but rather is welded to a short stub machined on the tube side of the tubesheet. This joint has the important advantages of being inspectable by radiography and eliminating the crevice; however, it is much more difficult to weld than is the face-side design. Because of the close proximity of the tubes, there is not room for an orbiting-arc welding head on the outside of the tube. Consequently, this weld must be made by welding from the inside- or bore-side of the tube. The results are presented of the initial phases of a program undertaken at ORNL to develop improved bore-side welding equipment, to gain further understanding of this technique, and to develop mechanical property data for autogeneous welds in 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel tube and tubesheet materials

  19. Evaluation of ferritic alloy Fe-2-1/4Cr-1Mo after neutron irradiation - microstructure development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1984-05-01

    Microstructural examinations are reported for nine specimen conditions of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel which had been irradiated by fast neutrons over the temperature range 390 to 510 0 C. Two heats of material were involved, each with a different preirradiation heat treatment, one irradiated to a peak fluence of 5.1 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or 24 dpa and the other to 2.4 x 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or 116 dpa. Void swelling is found following irradiation at 400 0 C in both conditions and to 480 0 C in the higher fluence conditions. Concurrently dislocation structure and precipitation formed. Peak void swelling, void density, dislocation density and precipitate number density developed at the lowest temperature, approx. 400 0 C, whereas mean void size, and mean precipitate size increased with increasing irradiation temperature. The examination results are used to provide interpretation of in-reactor creep, density change and post irradiation tensile behavior

  20. Carbide Precipitation in 2.25 Cr-1 Mo Bainitic Steel: Effect of Heating and Isothermal Tempering Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dépinoy, Sylvain; Toffolon-Masclet, Caroline; Urvoy, Stéphane; Roubaud, Justine; Marini, Bernard; Roch, François; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Gourgues-Lorenzon, Anne-Françoise

    2017-05-01

    The effect of the tempering heat treatment, including heating prior to the isothermal step, on carbide precipitation has been determined in a 2.25 Cr-1 Mo bainitic steel for thick-walled applications. The carbides were identified using their amount of metallic elements, morphology, nucleation sites, and diffraction patterns. The evolution of carbide phase fraction, morphology, and composition was investigated using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, as well as thermodynamic calculations. Upon heating, retained austenite into the as-quenched material decomposes into ferrite and cementite. M7C3 carbides then nucleate at the interface between the cementite and the matrix, triggering the dissolution of cementite. M2C carbides precipitate separately within the bainitic laths during slow heating. M23C6 carbides precipitate at the interfaces (lath boundaries or prior austenite grain boundaries) and grow by attracting nearby chromium atoms, which results in the dissolution of M7C3 and, depending on the temperature, coarsening, or dissolution of M2C carbides, respectively.

  1. Creep-fatigue behavior of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel at 5500C in air and vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asayama, T.; Cheng, S.Z.; Asada, Y.; Mitsuhashi, S.; Tachibana, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Creep-fatigue tests were conducted with 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel at 550 0 C under various strain wave forms in air and vacuum of 100 and 0.1 μPa. No indication of environmental effect of air was observed in 0.1 μPa vacuum in which a strain rate effect diminished. However, there observed still a time/rate dependent life reduction in a case of wave forms with a longer tension going time than compression. In addition, there observed an effect of mean stress with this steel. An analysis of stress-strain response showed the response is not affected by the test environment. Internal stresses of back and drag stress were obtained with this steel and an overstress was predicted based on phenomenology. A pure creep-fatigue life reduction was predicted based on a damage model composed of the overstress. The prediction showed a scatter of a factor of two. An effect of air environment was evaluated based on the prediction procedure. The method should be improved to include the effect of mean stress on creep-fatigue behavior of this steel

  2. Characterizing microstructural changes in ferritic steels by positron annihilation spectroscopy: Studies on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hari Babu, S., E-mail: shb@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Rajkumar, K.V. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Hussain, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kokilamedu 603 104, TN (India); Amarendra, G.; Sundar, C.S. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Positron lifetime technique probing microstructure of ferritic/martensitic steels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Correlation between positron lifetime, ultrasonic and hardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complementary nature of positron annihilation spectroscopy in probing defects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Distinguishing precipitation stages by positron annihilation spectroscopy. - Abstract: Applicability of positron annihilation spectroscopy in probing the microstructural changes in ferritic steels has been investigated with thermal treatment studies on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, during 300-1273 K. Positron lifetime results are compared with those of ultrasonic velocity and hardness techniques with two initial microstructural conditions i.e., normalized and tempered condition as well as only normalized condition. In first case, positron lifetime is found to be sensitive to small changes in metal carbide precipitation which could not be probed by other two techniques. In later case, positron lifetime is found to be sensitive to defect annealing until 673 K and in distinguishing the growth and coarsening of metal carbide precipitation stages during 773-1073 K. The present study suggests that by combining positron lifetime, ultrasonic velocity and hardness measurements, it is possible to distinguish distinct microstructures occurring at different stages.

  3. Multiaxial fatigue criterion for 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel for use in high-temperature structural design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blass, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    An improved multiaxial fatigue failure criterion is described that is based on a definition of equivalent inelastic strain range incorporating the shear and normal components of inelastic strain range on the planes of maximum inelastic shear strain range. Optimum values of certain parameters contained in the formulation were obtained by the method of least squares from the results of combined axial-torsional strain cycling test of 2--1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel conducted at 538 degrees C (1000 degrees F). The ability of this criterion to correlate the test results was compared with that of the Mises equivalent inelastic strain range criterion and was found to be superior. A procedure is described for calculating the required shear and normal components of strain range under general multiaxial strain cycling conditions. An improved definition of equivalent total strain range based on these considerations is directly applicable to the method of estimating fatigue damage in ASME Code Case N-47. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  4. On the abrasion of heat-treated 2.8C21Cr1Mo white cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rubaie, Kassim S.; Preti, Orlando [Centro Universitario SOCIESC, Joinville (Brazil). Engenharia Mecanica; Pohl, Michael [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffe

    2016-09-15

    The abrasion behaviour of heat-treated 2.8C21Cr1Mo cast iron was studied. The specimens were destabilised at two temperatures, 980 and 1050 C, for 4 h, air hardened, and then tempered at five temperatures, 220, 320, 400, 500, and 620 C, for 2 h followed by air cooling. Using a pin-on-plate abrasion apparatus, the specimens were abraded on four types of bonded abrasives (silicon carbide, corundum, flint, and glass). The effect of work hardening on the abrasion resistance was investigated. It was found that the increase in alloy hardness produced by heat treatment had little effect on the abrasion resistance against silicon carbide or corundum; the inverse was true against flint or glass. The as-hardened structure containing 40% retained austenite gave the best abrasion resistance, whereas the hardened and tempered at 620 C showed the worst. Both bulk hardness and matrix hardness before wear correlated poorly with the abrasion resistance. Therefore, a general model ''equivalent hardness'' was developed, in which the hardness of the abraded matrix was considered. With this model, the abrasion behaviour can be clearly analysed.

  5. The morphology and ageing behaviour of δ-ferrite in a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, R.; Singh, R.N.; Sinha, T.K.; Kashyap, B.P.

    1992-01-01

    Dual phase (martensite + δ-ferrite) microstructures were developed in a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, by austenitising at 1523-1623 K, followed by water-quenching. These duplex structures were thermally aged at 973 K for ageing periods varying from 30 min to 21 h. Morphological aspects of δ-ferrite phase and its response to age-hardening were studied by optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis and microhardness testing. It was observed that austenitizing at 1523 K produced fine, acicular δ-ferrite while the δ-ferrite formed by austenitising at higher temperatures (1573-623 K) were massive, irregular-shaped and banded. Moreover the presence of δ-ferrite caused an abnormally strong (110) reflection, observed in X-ray diffraction patterns of martensite plus δ-ferrite structures. This behaviour is thought to be due to development of (110) texture in δ-ferrite phase. Thermal ageing at 973 K caused age-hardening of δ-ferrite with a peak hardness attained after 3.6 ks of ageing. Electron microscopic results suggest that the observed hardening was caused by the formation of Fe 2 Mo Laves phase. (orig.)

  6. Reaction of hydrogen with the Laves phase (C14) TiCr1.78-xMnx compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agresti, F.; Lo Russo, S.; Maddalena, A.; Principi, G.; Mazzolai, G.; Coluzzi, B.; Biscarini, A.; Mazzolai, F.M.; Tuissi, A.

    2009-01-01

    The lattice constants a and c of the as cast hexagonal (C14) Laves phase TiCr 1.78-x Mn x (x = 0, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8) have been measured by X-ray diffraction at room temperature as a function of the Mn content. It has been found that a decreases with increasing x while c remains almost unchanged. Being this alloy interesting as material for solid state hydrogen storage, pressure-composition isotherms have been traced on desorption mode for the H 2 gas pressure and temperature varying from 10 to 0.01 MPa and from 209 to 307 K, respectively. From the temperature dependence of the plateau pressure the molar quantities ΔH-bar H 2 and ΔS-bar H 2 associated with the hydride decomposition have been determined as a function of the Mn content. With increasing x, both ΔH-bar H 2 and ΔS-bar H 2 progressively decrease, and the desorption pressure initially decreases (for x ≤ 0.4) then slightly increases. At the same time, the pseudo-plateaus become flatter.

  7. The effects of microstructure on the temper embrittlement susceptibility of a 2 1/4Cr1Mo forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gage, G.; Edwards, B.C.; Hudson, J.A.

    This paper describes the results of a detailed metallurgical assessment of the microstructural stability and temper embrittlement susceptibility of a 255mm thick 2 1/4Cr1Mo steel forging which was manufactured by a process typical of that used for the tube plates of steam generator units. Ageing effects were studied over the temperature range 450-575 deg. C for times up to 20,000h. Grain boundary compositional changes were monitored using Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and microstructural changes determined by both transmission electron microscopy and X-ray analysis. Brittle intergranular failure was produced in the lower shelf energy regime and AES analysis showed that this was associated with the grain boundary segregation of phosphorus. This segregation was shown to exhibit equilibrium characteristics and was consistent with that of phosphorus segregation in α-iron. Implying no significant alloy-impurity interaction. The shift in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature was not uniquely a function of the grain boundary segregation but was shown to be dependent upon both the level of grain boundary solute segregation and the type of precipitate particles present. Heat treatment conditions which promoted the formation of M 6 C precipitates were particularly deleterious to toughness. (author)

  8. Doping effects on structural and magnetic properties of Heusler alloys Fe2Cr1-xCoxSi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifan; Ren, Lizhu; Zheng, Yuhong; He, Shikun; Liu, Yang; Yang, Ping; Yang, Hyunsoo; Teo, Kie Leong

    2018-05-01

    In this work, 30nm Fe2Cr1-xCoxSi (FCCS) magnetic films were deposited on Cr buffered MgO (100) substrates by sputtering. Fe2Cr0.5Co0.5Si exhibits the largest magnetization and optimal ordered L21 cubic structure at in-situ annealing temperature (Tia) of 450°C. The Co composition dependence of crystalline structures, surface morphology, defects, lattice distortions and their correlation with the magnetic properties are analyzed in detail. The Co-doped samples show in-plane M-H loops with magnetic squareness ratio of 1 and increasing anisotropy energy density with Co composition. Appropriate Co doping composition promotes L21 phase but higher Co composition converts L21 to B2 phase. Doping effect and lattice mismatch both are proved to increase the defect density. In addition, distortions of the FCCS lattice are found to be approximately linear with Co composition. The largest lattice distortion (c/a) is 0.969 for Fe2Cr0.25Co0.75Si and the smallest is 0.983 for Fe2CrSi. Our analyses suggest that these tetragonal distortions mainly induced by an elastic stress from Cr buffer account for the large in-plane anisotropy energy. This work paves the way for further tailoring the magnetic and structural properties of quaternary Heusler alloys.

  9. Application of Chaboche viscoplastic theory for predicting the cyclic behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo (T91)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chellapandi, P.; Ramesh, R.; Chetal, S.C.; Bhoje, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    Modified 9Cr 1Mo (grade 91) is the structural material for the SG of 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. This material is codified in RCC-MR (1993). SG top tubesheet and its connecting shell see the hot sodium temperature of about 800 K. The steam temperature is about 770 K at 17 MPa. It is envisaged that this component can meet the creep fatigue damage rules of RCC-MR with 'elastic route' itself. One of the important material data needed to use the simplified rules given in RCC-MR (1993) is 'symmetrization coefficient' (Ks) which is not yet included in RCC-MR. Ks values are established from numerous stress strain cyclic data generated theoretically by using Chaboche viscoplastic model and recommended for the inclusion in the RCC-MR. The Chaboche model for grade 91 material has 20 material parameters which are identified based on the uniaxial monotonic and cyclic data available in RCC-MR (1993) as well as the published data and many uniaxial monotonic, cyclic, creep data are compared well with the predictions. (author). 4 refs, 21 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Chicken pox in pregnancy : an obstetric concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2010-10-01

    Chicken pox is a common viral infection presenting with fever and discrete vesicular lesions. This infection can be widely detected in developing countries, especially for those tropical countries. The pregnant can get chicken pox, and this becomes an important obstetrical concern. In this specific paper, the author hereby details and discusses on chicken pox in pregnancy. Clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are briefly summarized. In addition, the effects of chicken pox on pregnancy as well as the vertical transmission are also documented.

  11. Changes of lipids in irradiated chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moersel, J.T.; Wende, I.; Schwarz, K.

    1991-01-01

    Chickens were irradiated in a 6 deg Co gamma irradiation source. The irradiation has been done to reduce or eliminate Salmonella. The experiments were done to test this decontamination method of chickens if changes of lipids take place. It was to be seen, that peroxidation of lipids was more rapidly as in control. The time of storage of irradiated chickens has to be shorter because of changes in lipids. After irradiation the chickens had trade quality. (orig.) [de

  12. Isolation of two new retrotransposon sequences and development of molecular and cytological markers for Dasypyrum villosum (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Jiang, Yun; Xuan, Pu; Guo, Yuanlin; Deng, Guangbing; Yu, Maoqun; Long, Hai

    2017-10-01

    Dasypyrum villosum is a valuable genetic resource for wheat improvement. With the aim to efficiently monitor the D. villosum chromatin introduced into common wheat, two novel retrotransposon sequences were isolated by RAPD, and were successfully converted to D. villosum-specific SCAR markers. In addition, we constructed a chromosomal karyotype of D. villosum. Our results revealed that different accessions of D. villosum showed slightly different signal patterns, indicating that distribution of repeats did not diverge significantly among D. villosum accessions. The two SCAR markers and FISH karyotype of D. villosum could be used for efficient and precise identification of D. villosum chromatin in wheat breeding.

  13. Nunukan Chicken: Genetic Characteristics, Phenotype and Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tike Sartika

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Nunukan chicken is a local chicken from East Kalimantan which spreads out in Tarakan and Nunukan Islands . The chicken has a specific buff color and Columbian type feather and also has very late feathering (VLF trait . The Nunukan cocks and hens have no wing and tail primary feather; the tail feathers are short and fragile . The VLF trait is known to have association with a K gene on the Z chromosome. The chicken is efficient in protein metabolism . Sulfur amino acids (cystine and methionine that needed for feather growth, could be utilized for meat and egg production . The egg production of Nunukan chicken was better than the Kampung chicken . The average of hen day, hen house and peak production of Nunukan chicken was 45 . 39.1 and 62%, respectively, while the Kampung chicken was 35 .9, 30 .9 and 48%, respectively . Based on genetic analysis, the external genotype characteristic of the Nunukan chicken is ii ce ss Idld pp. It means that the phenotype appearance of the Nunukan chicken was columbian and gold feathering type, yellow and white shank color and single comb type. This phenotype is similar to Merawang Chicken . The genetic introgression of the Nunukan chicken is affected by the Rhode Island Red with the genetic introgression value of 0.964 .

  14. Campylobacter prevalence in retail chicken liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foodborne campylobacteriosis has been linked to undercooked chicken liver. It is unknown how commonly chicken livers are contaminated with Campylobacter. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Campylobacter on chicken livers available at retail. For each of five weeks, t...

  15. Retrotransposons Are the Major Contributors to the Expansion of the Drosophila ananassae Muller F Element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Wilson; Shaffer, Christopher D; Chen, Elizabeth J; Quisenberry, Thomas J; Ko, Kevin; Braverman, John M; Giarla, Thomas C; Mortimer, Nathan T; Reed, Laura K; Smith, Sheryl T; Robic, Srebrenka; McCartha, Shannon R; Perry, Danielle R; Prescod, Lindsay M; Sheppard, Zenyth A; Saville, Ken J; McClish, Allison; Morlock, Emily A; Sochor, Victoria R; Stanton, Brittney; Veysey-White, Isaac C; Revie, Dennis; Jimenez, Luis A; Palomino, Jennifer J; Patao, Melissa D; Patao, Shane M; Himelblau, Edward T; Campbell, Jaclyn D; Hertz, Alexandra L; McEvilly, Maddison F; Wagner, Allison R; Youngblom, James; Bedi, Baljit; Bettincourt, Jeffery; Duso, Erin; Her, Maiye; Hilton, William; House, Samantha; Karimi, Masud; Kumimoto, Kevin; Lee, Rebekah; Lopez, Darryl; Odisho, George; Prasad, Ricky; Robbins, Holly Lyn; Sandhu, Tanveer; Selfridge, Tracy; Tsukashima, Kara; Yosif, Hani; Kokan, Nighat P; Britt, Latia; Zoellner, Alycia; Spana, Eric P; Chlebina, Ben T; Chong, Insun; Friedman, Harrison; Mammo, Danny A; Ng, Chun L; Nikam, Vinayak S; Schwartz, Nicholas U; Xu, Thomas Q; Burg, Martin G; Batten, Spencer M; Corbeill, Lindsay M; Enoch, Erica; Ensign, Jesse J; Franks, Mary E; Haiker, Breanna; Ingles, Judith A; Kirkland, Lyndsay D; Lorenz-Guertin, Joshua M; Matthews, Jordan; Mittig, Cody M; Monsma, Nicholaus; Olson, Katherine J; Perez-Aragon, Guillermo; Ramic, Alen; Ramirez, Jordan R; Scheiber, Christopher; Schneider, Patrick A; Schultz, Devon E; Simon, Matthew; Spencer, Eric; Wernette, Adam C; Wykle, Maxine E; Zavala-Arellano, Elizabeth; McDonald, Mitchell J; Ostby, Kristine; Wendland, Peter; DiAngelo, Justin R; Ceasrine, Alexis M; Cox, Amanda H; Docherty, James E B; Gingras, Robert M; Grieb, Stephanie M; Pavia, Michael J; Personius, Casey L; Polak, Grzegorz L; Beach, Dale L; Cerritos, Heaven L; Horansky, Edward A; Sharif, Karim A; Moran, Ryan; Parrish, Susan; Bickford, Kirsten; Bland, Jennifer; Broussard, Juliana; Campbell, Kerry; Deibel, Katelynn E; Forka, Richard; Lemke, Monika C; Nelson, Marlee B; O'Keeffe, Catherine; Ramey, S Mariel; Schmidt, Luke; Villegas, Paola; Jones, Christopher J; Christ, Stephanie L; Mamari, Sami; Rinaldi, Adam S; Stity, Ghazal; Hark, Amy T; Scheuerman, Mark; Silver Key, S Catherine; McRae, Briana D; Haberman, Adam S; Asinof, Sam; Carrington, Harriette; Drumm, Kelly; Embry, Terrance; McGuire, Richard; Miller-Foreman, Drew; Rosen, Stella; Safa, Nadia; Schultz, Darrin; Segal, Matt; Shevin, Yakov; Svoronos, Petros; Vuong, Tam; Skuse, Gary; Paetkau, Don W; Bridgman, Rachael K; Brown, Charlotte M; Carroll, Alicia R; Gifford, Francesca M; Gillespie, Julie Beth; Herman, Susan E; Holtcamp, Krystal L; Host, Misha A; Hussey, Gabrielle; Kramer, Danielle M; Lawrence, Joan Q; Martin, Madeline M; Niemiec, Ellen N; O'Reilly, Ashleigh P; Pahl, Olivia A; Quintana, Guadalupe; Rettie, Elizabeth A S; Richardson, Torie L; Rodriguez, Arianne E; Rodriguez, Mona O; Schiraldi, Laura; Smith, Joanna J; Sugrue, Kelsey F; Suriano, Lindsey J; Takach, Kaitlyn E; Vasquez, Arielle M; Velez, Ximena; Villafuerte, Elizabeth J; Vives, Laura T; Zellmer, Victoria R; Hauke, Jeanette; Hauser, Charles R; Barker, Karolyn; Cannon, Laurie; Parsamian, Perouza; Parsons, Samantha; Wichman, Zachariah; Bazinet, Christopher W; Johnson, Diana E; Bangura, Abubakarr; Black, Jordan A; Chevee, Victoria; Einsteen, Sarah A; Hilton, Sarah K; Kollmer, Max; Nadendla, Rahul; Stamm, Joyce; Fafara-Thompson, Antoinette E; Gygi, Amber M; Ogawa, Emmy E; Van Camp, Matt; Kocsisova, Zuzana; Leatherman, Judith L; Modahl, Cassie M; Rubin, Michael R; Apiz-Saab, Susana S; Arias-Mejias, Suzette M; Carrion-Ortiz, Carlos F; Claudio-Vazquez, Patricia N; Espada-Green, Debbie M; Feliciano-Camacho, Marium; Gonzalez-Bonilla, Karina M; Taboas-Arroyo, Mariela; Vargas-Franco, Dorianmarie; Montañez-Gonzalez, Raquel; Perez-Otero, Joseph; Rivera-Burgos, Myrielis; Rivera-Rosario, Francisco J; Eisler, Heather L; Alexander, Jackie; Begley, Samatha K; Gabbard, Deana; Allen, Robert J; Aung, Wint Yan; Barshop, William D; Boozalis, Amanda; Chu, Vanessa P; Davis, Jeremy S; Duggal, Ryan N; Franklin, Robert; Gavinski, Katherine; Gebreyesus, Heran; Gong, Henry Z; Greenstein, Rachel A; Guo, Averill D; Hanson, Casey; Homa, Kaitlin E; Hsu, Simon C; Huang, Yi; Huo, Lucy; Jacobs, Sarah; Jia, Sasha; Jung, Kyle L; Wai-Chee Kong, Sarah; Kroll, Matthew R; Lee, Brandon M; Lee, Paul F; Levine, Kevin M; Li, Amy S; Liu, Chengyu; Liu, Max Mian; Lousararian, Adam P; Lowery, Peter B; Mallya, Allyson P; Marcus, Joseph E; Ng, Patrick C; Nguyen, Hien P; Patel, Ruchik; Precht, Hashini; Rastogi, Suchita; Sarezky, Jonathan M; Schefkind, Adam; Schultz, Michael B; Shen, Delia; Skorupa, Tara; Spies, Nicholas C; Stancu, Gabriel; Vivian Tsang, Hiu Man; Turski, Alice L; Venkat, Rohit; Waldman, Leah E; Wang, Kaidi; Wang, Tracy; Wei, Jeffrey W; Wu, Dennis Y; Xiong, David D; Yu, Jack; Zhou, Karen; McNeil, Gerard P; Fernandez, Robert W; Menzies, Patrick Gomez; Gu, Tingting; Buhler, Jeremy; Mardis, Elaine R; Elgin, Sarah C R

    2017-08-07

    The discordance between genome size and the complexity of eukaryotes can partly be attributed to differences in repeat density. The Muller F element (∼5.2 Mb) is the smallest chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster , but it is substantially larger (>18.7 Mb) in D. ananassae To identify the major contributors to the expansion of the F element and to assess their impact, we improved the genome sequence and annotated the genes in a 1.4-Mb region of the D. ananassae F element, and a 1.7-Mb region from the D element for comparison. We find that transposons (particularly LTR and LINE retrotransposons) are major contributors to this expansion (78.6%), while Wolbachia sequences integrated into the D. ananassae genome are minor contributors (0.02%). Both D. melanogaster and D. ananassae F-element genes exhibit distinct characteristics compared to D-element genes ( e.g. , larger coding spans, larger introns, more coding exons, and lower codon bias), but these differences are exaggerated in D. ananassae Compared to D. melanogaster , the codon bias observed in D. ananassae F-element genes can primarily be attributed to mutational biases instead of selection. The 5' ends of F-element genes in both species are enriched in dimethylation of lysine 4 on histone 3 (H3K4me2), while the coding spans are enriched in H3K9me2. Despite differences in repeat density and gene characteristics, D. ananassae F-element genes show a similar range of expression levels compared to genes in euchromatic domains. This study improves our understanding of how transposons can affect genome size and how genes can function within highly repetitive domains. Copyright © 2017 Leung et al.

  16. The reverse transcriptase encoded by LINE-1 retrotransposons in the genesis, progression and therapy of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria eSciamanna

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In higher eukaryotic genomes, Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 (LINE-1 retrotransposons represent a large family of repeated genomic elements. They transpose using a reverse transcriptase (RT, which they encode as part of the ORF2p product. RT inhibition in cancer cells, either via RNA interference-dependent silencing of active LINE-1 elements, or using RT inhibitory drugs, reduces cancer cell proliferation, promotes their differentiation and antagonizes tumor progression in animal models. Indeed, the nonnucleoside RT inhibitor efavirenz has recently been tested in a phase II clinical trial with metastatic prostate cancer patients. An in-depth analysis of ORF2p in a mouse model of breast cancer showed ORF2p to be precociously expressed in precancerous lesions and highly abundant in advanced cancer stages, while being barely detectable in normal breast tissue, providing a rationale for the finding that RT-expressing tumours are therapeutically sensitive to RT inhibitors. We summarise mechanistic and gene profiling studies indicating that highly abundant LINE-1-derived RT can sequester RNA substrates for reverse transcription in tumor cells, entailing the formation of RNA:DNA hybrid molecules and impairing the overall production of regulatory miRNAs, with a global impact on the cell transcriptome. Based on these data, LINE-1-ORF2 encoded RT has a tumor-promoting potential that is exerted at an epigenetic level. We propose a model whereby LINE1-RT drives a previously unrecognized global regulatory process, the deregulation of which drives cell transformation and tumorigenesis and possibly implicated in cancer cell heterogeneity.

  17. The reverse transcriptase encoded by LINE-1 retrotransposons in the genesis, progression and therapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamanna, Ilaria; De Luca, Chiara; Spadafora, Corrado

    2016-02-01

    In higher eukaryotic genomes, Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 (LINE-1) retrotransposons represent a large family of repeated genomic elements. They transpose using a reverse transcriptase (RT), which they encode as part of the ORF2p product. RT inhibition in cancer cells, either via RNA interference-dependent silencing of active LINE-1 elements, or using RT inhibitory drugs, reduces cancer cell proliferation, promotes their differentiation and antagonizes tumor progression in animal models. Indeed, the nonnucleoside RT inhibitor efavirenz has recently been tested in a phase II clinical trial with metastatic prostate cancer patients. An in-depth analysis of ORF2p in a mouse model of breast cancer showed ORF2p to be precociously expressed in precancerous lesions and highly abundant in advanced cancer stages, while being barely detectable in normal breast tissue, providing a rationale for the finding that RT-expressing tumours are therapeutically sensitive to RT inhibitors. We summarise mechanistic and gene profiling studies indicating that highly abundant LINE-1-derived RT can “sequester” RNA substrates for reverse transcription in tumor cells, entailing the formation of RNA:DNA hybrid molecules and impairing the overall production of regulatory miRNAs, with a global impact on the cell transcriptome. Based on these data, LINE-1-ORF2 encoded RT has a tumor-promoting potential that is exerted at an epigenetic level. We propose a model whereby LINE1-RT drives a previously unrecognized global regulatory process, the deregulation of which drives cell transformation and tumorigenesis and possibly implicated in cancer cell heterogeneity.

  18. Retrotransposon long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) is activated during salamander limb regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Kuo, Dwight; Nathanson, Jason; Satoh, Akira; Pao, Gerald M.; Yeo, Gene W.; Bryant, Susan V.; Voss, S. Randal; Gardiner, David M.; Hunter, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Salamanders possess an extraordinary capacity for tissue and organ regeneration when compared to mammals. In our effort to characterize the unique transcriptional fingerprint emerging during the early phase of salamander limb regeneration, we identified transcriptional activation of some germline-specific genes within the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that is indicative of cellular reprogramming of differentiated cells into a germline-like state. In this work, we focus on one of these genes, the long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposon, which is usually active in germ cells and silent in most of the somatic tissues in other organisms. LINE-1 was found to be dramatically upregulated during regeneration. In addition, higher genomic LINE-1 content was also detected in the limb regenerate when compared to that before amputation indicating that LINE-1 retrotransposition is indeed active during regeneration. Active LINE-1 retrotransposition has been suggested to have a potentially deleterious impact on genomic integrity. Silencing of activated LINE-1 by small RNAs has been reported to be part of the machinery aiming to maintain genomic integrity. Indeed, we were able to identify putative LINE-1-related piRNAs in the limb blastema. Transposable element-related piRNAs have been identified frequently in the germline in other organisms. Thus, we present here a scenario in which a unique germline-like state is established during axolotl limb regeneration, and the re-activation of LINE-1 may serve as a marker for cellular dedifferentiation in the early-stage of limb regeneration. PMID:22913491

  19. Retrotransposons Are the Major Contributors to the Expansion of the Drosophila ananassae Muller F Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Leung

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The discordance between genome size and the complexity of eukaryotes can partly be attributed to differences in repeat density. The Muller F element (∼5.2 Mb is the smallest chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster, but it is substantially larger (>18.7 Mb in D. ananassae. To identify the major contributors to the expansion of the F element and to assess their impact, we improved the genome sequence and annotated the genes in a 1.4-Mb region of the D. ananassae F element, and a 1.7-Mb region from the D element for comparison. We find that transposons (particularly LTR and LINE retrotransposons are major contributors to this expansion (78.6%, while Wolbachia sequences integrated into the D. ananassae genome are minor contributors (0.02%. Both D. melanogaster and D. ananassae F-element genes exhibit distinct characteristics compared to D-element genes (e.g., larger coding spans, larger introns, more coding exons, and lower codon bias, but these differences are exaggerated in D. ananassae. Compared to D. melanogaster, the codon bias observed in D. ananassae F-element genes can primarily be attributed to mutational biases instead of selection. The 5′ ends of F-element genes in both species are enriched in dimethylation of lysine 4 on histone 3 (H3K4me2, while the coding spans are enriched in H3K9me2. Despite differences in repeat density and gene characteristics, D. ananassae F-element genes show a similar range of expression levels compared to genes in euchromatic domains. This study improves our understanding of how transposons can affect genome size and how genes can function within highly repetitive domains.

  20. Retrotransposons Are the Major Contributors to the Expansion of the Drosophila ananassae Muller F Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Christopher D.; Chen, Elizabeth J.; Quisenberry, Thomas J.; Ko, Kevin; Braverman, John M.; Giarla, Thomas C.; Mortimer, Nathan T.; Reed, Laura K.; Smith, Sheryl T.; Robic, Srebrenka; McCartha, Shannon R.; Perry, Danielle R.; Prescod, Lindsay M.; Sheppard, Zenyth A.; Saville, Ken J.; McClish, Allison; Morlock, Emily A.; Sochor, Victoria R.; Stanton, Brittney; Veysey-White, Isaac C.; Revie, Dennis; Jimenez, Luis A.; Palomino, Jennifer J.; Patao, Melissa D.; Patao, Shane M.; Himelblau, Edward T.; Campbell, Jaclyn D.; Hertz, Alexandra L.; McEvilly, Maddison F.; Wagner, Allison R.; Youngblom, James; Bedi, Baljit; Bettincourt, Jeffery; Duso, Erin; Her, Maiye; Hilton, William; House, Samantha; Karimi, Masud; Kumimoto, Kevin; Lee, Rebekah; Lopez, Darryl; Odisho, George; Prasad, Ricky; Robbins, Holly Lyn; Sandhu, Tanveer; Selfridge, Tracy; Tsukashima, Kara; Yosif, Hani; Kokan, Nighat P.; Britt, Latia; Zoellner, Alycia; Spana, Eric P.; Chlebina, Ben T.; Chong, Insun; Friedman, Harrison; Mammo, Danny A.; Ng, Chun L.; Nikam, Vinayak S.; Schwartz, Nicholas U.; Xu, Thomas Q.; Burg, Martin G.; Batten, Spencer M.; Corbeill, Lindsay M.; Enoch, Erica; Ensign, Jesse J.; Franks, Mary E.; Haiker, Breanna; Ingles, Judith A.; Kirkland, Lyndsay D.; Lorenz-Guertin, Joshua M.; Matthews, Jordan; Mittig, Cody M.; Monsma, Nicholaus; Olson, Katherine J.; Perez-Aragon, Guillermo; Ramic, Alen; Ramirez, Jordan R.; Scheiber, Christopher; Schneider, Patrick A.; Schultz, Devon E.; Simon, Matthew; Spencer, Eric; Wernette, Adam C.; Wykle, Maxine E.; Zavala-Arellano, Elizabeth; McDonald, Mitchell J.; Ostby, Kristine; Wendland, Peter; DiAngelo, Justin R.; Ceasrine, Alexis M.; Cox, Amanda H.; Docherty, James E.B.; Gingras, Robert M.; Grieb, Stephanie M.; Pavia, Michael J.; Personius, Casey L.; Polak, Grzegorz L.; Beach, Dale L.; Cerritos, Heaven L.; Horansky, Edward A.; Sharif, Karim A.; Moran, Ryan; Parrish, Susan; Bickford, Kirsten; Bland, Jennifer; Broussard, Juliana; Campbell, Kerry; Deibel, Katelynn E.; Forka, Richard; Lemke, Monika C.; Nelson, Marlee B.; O'Keeffe, Catherine; Ramey, S. Mariel; Schmidt, Luke; Villegas, Paola; Jones, Christopher J.; Christ, Stephanie L.; Mamari, Sami; Rinaldi, Adam S.; Stity, Ghazal; Hark, Amy T.; Scheuerman, Mark; Silver Key, S. Catherine; McRae, Briana D.; Haberman, Adam S.; Asinof, Sam; Carrington, Harriette; Drumm, Kelly; Embry, Terrance; McGuire, Richard; Miller-Foreman, Drew; Rosen, Stella; Safa, Nadia; Schultz, Darrin; Segal, Matt; Shevin, Yakov; Svoronos, Petros; Vuong, Tam; Skuse, Gary; Paetkau, Don W.; Bridgman, Rachael K.; Brown, Charlotte M.; Carroll, Alicia R.; Gifford, Francesca M.; Gillespie, Julie Beth; Herman, Susan E.; Holtcamp, Krystal L.; Host, Misha A.; Hussey, Gabrielle; Kramer, Danielle M.; Lawrence, Joan Q.; Martin, Madeline M.; Niemiec, Ellen N.; O'Reilly, Ashleigh P.; Pahl, Olivia A.; Quintana, Guadalupe; Rettie, Elizabeth A.S.; Richardson, Torie L.; Rodriguez, Arianne E.; Rodriguez, Mona O.; Schiraldi, Laura; Smith, Joanna J.; Sugrue, Kelsey F.; Suriano, Lindsey J.; Takach, Kaitlyn E.; Vasquez, Arielle M.; Velez, Ximena; Villafuerte, Elizabeth J.; Vives, Laura T.; Zellmer, Victoria R.; Hauke, Jeanette; Hauser, Charles R.; Barker, Karolyn; Cannon, Laurie; Parsamian, Perouza; Parsons, Samantha; Wichman, Zachariah; Bazinet, Christopher W.; Johnson, Diana E.; Bangura, Abubakarr; Black, Jordan A.; Chevee, Victoria; Einsteen, Sarah A.; Hilton, Sarah K.; Kollmer, Max; Nadendla, Rahul; Stamm, Joyce; Fafara-Thompson, Antoinette E.; Gygi, Amber M.; Ogawa, Emmy E.; Van Camp, Matt; Kocsisova, Zuzana; Leatherman, Judith L.; Modahl, Cassie M.; Rubin, Michael R.; Apiz-Saab, Susana S.; Arias-Mejias, Suzette M.; Carrion-Ortiz, Carlos F.; Claudio-Vazquez, Patricia N.; Espada-Green, Debbie M.; Feliciano-Camacho, Marium; Gonzalez-Bonilla, Karina M.; Taboas-Arroyo, Mariela; Vargas-Franco, Dorianmarie; Montañez-Gonzalez, Raquel; Perez-Otero, Joseph; Rivera-Burgos, Myrielis; Rivera-Rosario, Francisco J.; Eisler, Heather L.; Alexander, Jackie; Begley, Samatha K.; Gabbard, Deana; Allen, Robert J.; Aung, Wint Yan; Barshop, William D.; Boozalis, Amanda; Chu, Vanessa P.; Davis, Jeremy S.; Duggal, Ryan N.; Franklin, Robert; Gavinski, Katherine; Gebreyesus, Heran; Gong, Henry Z.; Greenstein, Rachel A.; Guo, Averill D.; Hanson, Casey; Homa, Kaitlin E.; Hsu, Simon C.; Huang, Yi; Huo, Lucy; Jacobs, Sarah; Jia, Sasha; Jung, Kyle L.; Wai-Chee Kong, Sarah; Kroll, Matthew R.; Lee, Brandon M.; Lee, Paul F.; Levine, Kevin M.; Li, Amy S.; Liu, Chengyu; Liu, Max Mian; Lousararian, Adam P.; Lowery, Peter B.; Mallya, Allyson P.; Marcus, Joseph E.; Ng, Patrick C.; Nguyen, Hien P.; Patel, Ruchik; Precht, Hashini; Rastogi, Suchita; Sarezky, Jonathan M.; Schefkind, Adam; Schultz, Michael B.; Shen, Delia; Skorupa, Tara; Spies, Nicholas C.; Stancu, Gabriel; Vivian Tsang, Hiu Man; Turski, Alice L.; Venkat, Rohit; Waldman, Leah E.; Wang, Kaidi; Wang, Tracy; Wei, Jeffrey W.; Wu, Dennis Y.; Xiong, David D.; Yu, Jack; Zhou, Karen; McNeil, Gerard P.; Fernandez, Robert W.; Menzies, Patrick Gomez; Gu, Tingting; Buhler, Jeremy; Mardis, Elaine R.; Elgin, Sarah C.R.

    2017-01-01

    The discordance between genome size and the complexity of eukaryotes can partly be attributed to differences in repeat density. The Muller F element (∼5.2 Mb) is the smallest chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster, but it is substantially larger (>18.7 Mb) in D. ananassae. To identify the major contributors to the expansion of the F element and to assess their impact, we improved the genome sequence and annotated the genes in a 1.4-Mb region of the D. ananassae F element, and a 1.7-Mb region from the D element for comparison. We find that transposons (particularly LTR and LINE retrotransposons) are major contributors to this expansion (78.6%), while Wolbachia sequences integrated into the D. ananassae genome are minor contributors (0.02%). Both D. melanogaster and D. ananassae F-element genes exhibit distinct characteristics compared to D-element genes (e.g., larger coding spans, larger introns, more coding exons, and lower codon bias), but these differences are exaggerated in D. ananassae. Compared to D. melanogaster, the codon bias observed in D. ananassae F-element genes can primarily be attributed to mutational biases instead of selection. The 5′ ends of F-element genes in both species are enriched in dimethylation of lysine 4 on histone 3 (H3K4me2), while the coding spans are enriched in H3K9me2. Despite differences in repeat density and gene characteristics, D. ananassae F-element genes show a similar range of expression levels compared to genes in euchromatic domains. This study improves our understanding of how transposons can affect genome size and how genes can function within highly repetitive domains. PMID:28667019

  1. Creep-Rupture Properties and Corrosion Behaviour of 21/4 Cr-1 Mo Steel and Hastelloy X-Alloys in Simulated HTGR Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystrup, Aage; Rittenhouse, P. L.; DiStefano, J. R.

    Hastelloy X and 2/sup 1///sub 4/ Cr-1 Mo steel are being considered as structural alloys for components of a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) system. Among other mechanical properties, the creep behavior of these materials in HTGR primary coolant helium must be established to form part...

  2. Evaluation of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel for liquid lithium containment. II. Effects of post-weld heat treatment and niobium content. Annual report, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.L.; Edwards, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The lithium corrosion resistance of the regular grade of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel can be vastly improved with a proper postweld heat treatment, but even greater improvements are needed. Results indicate that if weldments were tempered sufficiently long at 760C to remove all Mo/sub 2/C from the microstructure, even greater resistance to attack by low nitrogen lithium could be achieved. Corrosion tests should eventually be performed on regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments which have been given a long-term (> 25 h) post-weld temper at 760C. Lithium corrosion resistance of regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel may also be improved by employing a quench and temper heat treatment. Quenched microstructures have more homogenous distribution of carbides than isothermally annealed microstructures, and if properly tempered, should provide excellent lithium corrosion resistance. Furthermore, the toughness of such a lower bainite microstructure should be better than that of the ferrite-bainitic microstructure created by an isothermal anneal. Numerous parameters, all potentially deleterious to the lithium corrosion resistance of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, remain to be investigated; two such variables are velocity effects and lead content in the lithium.

  3. Fine mapping of genetic variants in BIN1, CLU, CR1 and PICALM for association with cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauwe, John S. K.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Karch, Celeste M.; Sadler, Brooke; Lee, Mo; Mayo, Kevin; Latu, Wayne; Su'a, Manti; Fagan, Anne M.; Holtzman, David M.; Morris, John C.; Goate, Alison M.; Saradha, A.; Abdi, Hervé; Abeliovich, Asa; Abellan van Kan, Gabor; Abner, Erin; Acharya, Deepa; Adams, Nicholas; Adler, Daniel; Agrusti, Antonella; Agyemang, Alex; Ahdidan, Jamila; Ahn, Jae Eun; Aisen, Paul; Aksu, Yaman; Al-Akhras, Mousa; Alarcon, Marcelo; Alberca, Roman; Alexander, Gene; Alexander, Daniel; Almeida, Fabio; Amlien, Inge; Anand, Shyam; Andrew, Marilee; Angersbach, Steve; Anjum, Ayesha; Aoyama, Eiji; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Armor, Tom; Arnold, Steven; Asatryan, Albert; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Ashiga, Hirokazu; Assareh, Arezoo; Le Page, Aurelie; Avants, Brian; Avinash, Gopal; Awasthi, Sukrati; Ayan-Oshodi, Mosun; Babic, Tomislav; Baek, Young; Bagci, Ulas; Bai, Shuyang; Baird, Geoffrey; Baker, John; Banks, Sarah; Bard, Jonathan; Barnes, Josephine; Barret, Olivier; Bartlett, Jonathan; Bartzokis, George; Barua, Neil; Bauer, Corinna; Becker, James; Becker, J. Alex; Beckett, Laurel; Bednar, Martin; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Bek, Stephan; Belmokhtar, Nabil; Bernard, Charlotte; Bertram, Lars; Bhaskar, Uday; Biffi, Alessandro; Bigler, Erin; Bilgic, Basar; Bishop, Courtney; Bittner, Daniel; Black, Ronald; Blennow, Kaj; Bogorodzki, Piotr; Bokde, Arun; Bonner-Jackson, Aaron; Boppana, Madhu; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Bowes, Mike; Bowman, Gene; Braskie, Meredith; Braunewell, Karl; Breitner, Joihn; Brewer, James; Brickman, Adam; Britschgi, Markus; Broadbent, Steve; Brogren, Jacob; Brooks, David; Browndyke, Jeffrey; Brunton, Simon; Buchert, Ralph; Buchsbaum, Monte; Buckley, Chris; Buerger, Katharina; Burger, Cyrill; Burnham, Samantha; Burns, Jeffrey; Burton, David; Butman, John; Cabeza, Rafael; Cairns, Nigel; Callhoff, Johanna; Calvini, Piero; Cantillon, Marc; Capella, Heraldo; Cardona-Sanclemente, Luis Eduardo; Carle, Adam; Carmasin, Jeremy; Carranza-Ath, Fredy; Casabianca, Jodi; Casanova, Ramon; Cash, David; Cedarbaum, Jesse; Cella, Massimo; Celsis, Pierre; Chaney, Megan; Chanu, Pascal; Chao, Linda; Charil, Arnaud; Chemali, Zeina; Chen, Kewei; Chen, Minhua; Chen, Rong; Chen, Baojiang; Chen, Jake; Chen, Gennan; Chen, Wei; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Chertkow, Howard; Cheung, Charlton; Cheung, Vinci; Chiang, Gloria; Chiba, Koji; Chin, Simon; Chisholm, Jane; Cho, Youngsang; Choe, John; Choubey, Suresh; Christensen, Anette Luther; Clark, Chris; Clark, David; Clarkson, Matt; Clayton, David; Clunie, David; Coimbra, Alexandre; Compton, David; Coppola, Giovanni; Cover, Keith S.; Crane, Paul; Crans, Gerald; Croop, Robert; Crowther, Daniel; Crum, William; Cui, Yue; Curry, Charles; Curtis, Steven; Cutter, Gary; Daiello, Lori; Dake, Michael; Dale, Anders; Daliri, Mohammad Reza; Damato, Vito Domenico; Darby, Eveleen; Darkner, Sune; Davatzikos, Christos; Dave, Jay; David, Renaud; Davidson, Julie; de Bruijne, Marleen; de Meyer, Geert; de Nunzio, Giorgio; Decarli, Charles; Dechairo, Bryan; DeDuck, Kristina; Dehghan, Hossein; Dejkam, Arsalan; Delfino, Manuel; Dellavedova, Luca; Delpassand, Ebrahim; Delrieu, Julien; Deniz, Oscar; Denney, Douglas; DeOrchis, Vincent; Dépy Carron, Delphine; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Devanand, Davangere; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Dickerson, Bradford; Ding, Xiaobo; Dinov, Ivo; Dobson, Howard; Dodge, Hiroko; Donohue, Michael; Dore, Vincent; Dorflinger, Ernest; Dowling, Maritza; Duan, Xujun; Dubal, Dena; Duchesne, Simon; Duff, Kevin; Dukart, Jürgen; Durazzo, Timothy; Dykstra, Kevin; Earl, Nancy; Edula, Goutham; Ekin, Ahmet; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Emahazion, Tesfai; Engelman, Corinne; Epstein, Noam; Erten-Lyons, Deniz; Eskildsen, Simon; Falcone, Guido; Fan, Yong; Fan, Lingzhong; Farb, Norman; Farnum, Michael; Farrer, Lindsay; Farzan, Ali; Faux, Noel; Feldman, Howard; Feldman, Susan; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Fernandes, Michel; Fernandez, Elsa; Ferrarini, Luca; Ferreira, Manuel Joao; Ferrer, Eugene; Figurski, Michal; Filipovych, Roman; Fillit, Howard; Finch, Stephen; Finlay, Daniel; Fiot, Jean-Baptiste; Flenniken, Derek; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Fletcher, Evan; Flynn Longmire, Crystal; Focke, Niels; Forman, Mark; Forsythe, Alan; Fox, Steven; Fox-Bosetti, Sabrina; Francis, Alexander L.; Franco-Villalobos, Conrado; Franko, Edit; Freeman, Stefanie; Friedrich, Christoph M.; Friesenhahn, Michel; Frings, Lars; Frisoni, Giovanni; Fritzsche, Klaus; Fujimoto, Yoko; Fujiwara, Ken; Fullerton, Terence; Furney, Simon; Gallins, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Gan, Ke; Garcia, Maria Teresa; Garg, Gaurav; Gaser, Christian; Gastineau, Edward; Gauthier, Serge; Gavett, Brandon; Gavidia, Giovana; Gazdzinski, Stefan; Ge, Qi; Gemme, Gianluca; Geraci, Joseph; German, Dwight; Ghassabi, Zeinab; Gieschke, Ronald; Gil, Juan E.; Gill, Ryan; Gitelman, Darren; Gleason, Carey; Godbey, Michael; Goghari, Vina; Gold, Michael; Goldberg, Terry; Gomeni, Roberto; Gong, Shangwenyan; Gonzales, Celedon; Goodro, Robert; Gordon, Brian; Gorriz, Juan Manuel; Grachev, Igor; Grandey, Emily; Grasela, Thaddeus; Gratt, Jeremy; Gray, Katherine; Greenberg, Barry; Gregg, Keith; Gregory, Erik; Greicius, Michael; Greve, Douglas; Grill, Joshua; Gross, Alden; Gross, Alan; Guignot, Isabelle; Guo, Qimiao; Guo, Hongbin; Guo, Lianghao; Guo, Jeffrey; Habeck, Christian; Hai, Yizhen; Haight, Thaddeus; Hammarstrom, Per; Hampel, Harald; Han, Jian; Han, Tony; Hanif, Muhammad; Hanna, Yousef; Hardy, Peter; Harvey, Danielle; Hasan, Md Kamrul; Hayashi, Toshihiro; Hazart, Aurelien; He, Huiguang; He, Yong; Head, Denise; Heckemann, Rolf; Heidebrink, Judith; Henderson, David; Henrard, Sébastien; Herholz, Karl; Hernandez, Monica; Herskovits, A. Zara; Hess, Christopher; Hildenbrand, Maike; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoffman, John; Holder, Daniel; Honigberg, Lee; Hoppin, Jack; Horsfield, Mark; Hou, Yangyang; Hsu, Ailing; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Hu, Zhiwei; Hu, Xiaolan; Hu, Zhenghui; Hu, William; Huang, Chien-Chih; Huang, Chingwen; Huang, Shuai; Huang, Yifan; Huang, Juebin; Huang, Chun-Jung; Huang, Shu-Pang; Huang, Fude; Hubbard, Rebecca; Huentelman, Matthew; Hui, Shen; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Hurko, Orest; Hurt, Stephen; Huyck, Susan; Hwang, Scott; Hyun, JungMoon; Ifeachor, Emmanuel; Iglesias, Martina; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki; Immermann, Fred; Inoue, Lurdes; Insel, Philip; Irizarry, Michael; Irungu, Benson mwangi; Ishibashi, Taro; Ishii, Kenji; Ismail, Sara; Ismail, Shahina; Ito, Kaori; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Iyer, Madhumitha; Jacobson, Mark; Jafari, Aria; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Jaffe, Carl; Jagust, William; Jara, Hernan; Jasperse, Bas; Jedynak, Bruno; Jefferson, Angela; Jennings, J. Richard; Jessen, Walter; Jia, Fucang; Jiang, Tianzi; Jing, Huang; Johnson, David K.; Jones, Richard; Juengling, Freimut; Juh, Rahyeong; Julin, Per; Uday Bhaskar, K.; Kadish, Bill; Kahle-Wrobleski, Kristin; Kallam, Hanimi Reddy; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Kaneko, Tomoki; Kaneta, Tomohiro; Karageorgiou, Elissaios; Karantzoulis, Stella; Karlawish, Jason; Katz, Elyse; Kaushik, Sandeep S.; Kauwe, John; Kawakami, Hirofumi; Kazimipoor, Borhan; Kelleher, Thomas; Kennedy, Richard; Kerr, Douglas; Kerrouche, Nacer; Khalil, Iya; Khalil, Andre; Killeen, Neil; Killiany, Ron; Kim, Ana; Kim, Yeonhee; Kim, Heeyoung; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Hyoungkyu; Kim, Seongkyun; Kim, Hyewon; Kimberg, Daniel; Kimura, Tokunori; King, Richard; Kirby, Justin; Kirsch, Wolff; Klimas, Michael; Kline, Richard; Kling, Mitchel; Klopfenstein, Erin; Kobayashi, Dione; Koikkalainen, Juha; Kokomoor, Anders; Kolasny, Anthony; Koppel, Jeremy; Korolev, Igor; Kotran, Nickolas; Kouassi, Alex; Kowalczyk, Adam; Kozma, Lynn; Kratzer, Martina; Kuceyeski, Amy; Kuhn, Félix Pierre; Kulkarni, Mauktik; Kumar, Sreedhar; Kuo, Hsun Ting; Kuo, Julie; Kurosawa, Ken; Kwon, Oh Hun; Laforet, Genevieve; Lai, Song; Lakatos, Anita; Lam, On Ki; Lampron, Antoine; Landau, Susan; Landen, Jaren; Lane, Richard; Langbaum, Jessica; Langford, Dianne; Lanius, Vivian; Lavault, Romain; Laxamana, Joel; Le, Trung; Leahy, Richard; Lee, Noah; Lee, Dongsoo; Lee, Vita; Lee, Joseph H.; Lee, Jong-Min; Lefkimmiatis, Stamatis; Lemaitre, Herve; Lenz, Robert; Lester, Gayle; Levey, Allan; Li, Wenjun; Li, Shanshan; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Gang; Li, Ming; Li, Chin-Shang; Li, Lexin; Li, Jinhe; Li, Quanzheng; Li, Yi; Li, Rui; Li, Shi-jiang; Liang, Peipeng; Liang, Lichen; Liang, Kuchang; Liao, Yuan-Lin; Lin, Ling-chih; Lin, Mingkuan; Lin, Ai-Ling; Lin, Lan; Liu, Tianming; Liu, Meijie; Liu, Tao; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiuwen; Liu, Sophia; Liu, Dazhong; Liu, Songling; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Pu; Lo, Raymond; Lobanov, Victor; Loewenstein, David; Logovinsky, Veronika; Long, Xiaojing; Long, Ziyi; Looi, Jeffrey; Lu, Po-Haong; Lukic, Ana; Lull, Juan J.; Luo, Xiongjian; Lynch, John; Ma, Lei; Mackin, Scott; Magda, Sebastian; Maglio, Silvio; Mak, Henry Ka-Fung; Malave, Vicente; Maldjian, Joseph; Mandal, Pravat; Mangin, Jean-Francois; Manjon, Jose; Manohar, Deepak; Mansouri, Chemseddine; Mantri, Ninad; Manzour, Amir; Marambaud, Philippe; Marchewka, Artur; Marek, Kenneth; Markind, Samuel; Marshall, Gad; Martinez Torteya, Antonio; Mather, Mara; Mathis, Chester; Matoug, Sofia; Matsuo, Yoshiyuki; Matthews, Dawn; McArdle, John; McEvoy, Linda; McGeown, William; McIntyre, John; McQuail, Joseph; Meadowcroft, Mark; Meda, Shashwath; Mehta, Nirav; Mendonca, Brian; Menendez, Manuel; Meredith, Jere; Merrill, David; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Metti, Andrea; Meyer, Carsten; Mez, Jesse; Mickael, Guedj; Miftahof, Roustem; Mikhno, Arthur; Miller, David; Millikin, Colleen; Min, Ye; Mirza, Mubeena; Mitsis, Effie; Mohan, Ananth; Montana, Giovanni; Moore, Dana; Moradi Birgani, Parmida; Moratal, David; Morimoto, Bruce; Mortamet, Bénédicte; Moscato, Pablo; Motyl, Rafal; Mueller, Kathyrne; Mueller, Susanne; Mueller, Notger; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Mulder, Emma; Murayama, Shigeo; Murphy, Michael; Murray, Brian; Musiek, Erik; Myers, Amanda; Najafi, Shahla; Nazarparvar, Babak; Nazeri, Arash; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Neu, Scott; Neves, Simone; Ng, Yen-Bee; Nguyen, Nghi; Nguyen Xuan, Tuong; Nicodemus, Kristin; Niecko, Timothy; Nielsen, Casper; Notomi, Keiji; Nuneez Benjumea, Francisco; O'Bryant, Sid; O'Neil, Alison; Obisesan, Thomas; Oh, Dong Hoon; Oh, Joonmi; Okonkwo, Ozioma; Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Olmos, Salvador; Ortner, Marion; Ostrowitzki, Susanne; Oswald, Annahita; Ott, Brian; Ourselin, Sebastien; Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Paiva, Renata; Pan, Zhifang; Pande, Yogesh; Pardo, Jose; Pardoe, Heath; Park, Hyunjin; Park, Moon Ho; Park, Sang hyun; Park, Kee Hyung; Park, Sujin; Parsey, Ramin; Parveen, Riswana; Paskavitz, James; Patel, Yogen; Patil, Manasi; Pawlak, Mikolaj; Payoux, Pierre; Pearson, Jim; Peavy, Guerry; Pell, Gaby; Peng, Yahong; Pennec, Xavier; Pepin, Jean louis; Perea, Rodrigo; Perneczky, Robert; Petitti, Diana; Petrella, Jeffrey; Peyrat, Jean-Marc; Pezoa, Jorge; Pham, Chi-Tuan; Phillips, Nicole; Pierson, Ronald; Piovezan, Mauro; Podhorski, Adam; Pollari, Mika; Pontecorvo, Michael; Poppenk, Jordan; Posner, Holly; Potkin, Steven; Potter, Elizabeth; Poulin, Stephane; Prasad, Gautam; Prenger, Kurt; Prince, Jerry; Priya, Anandh; Puchakayala, Shashidhar Reddy; Qiu, Anqi; Qiu, Ruolun; Qiu, Wendy; Qualls, Constance Dean; Rabie, Huwaida; Rajeesh, Rajeesh; Rallabandi, V. P. Subramanyam; Ramage, Amy; Randolph, Christopher; Rao, Anil; Rao, Divya; Raubertas, Richard; Ray, Debashis; Razak, Hana; Redolfi, Alberto; Reed, Bruce; Reid, Andrew; Reilhac, Anthonin; Reinsberger, Claus; Restrepo, Lucas; Retico, Alessandra; Rezaeitabar, Yousef; Richards, John; Richter, Mirco; Riddle, William; Ries, Michele; Rincón, Mariano; Rischall, Matt; Robieson, Weining; Rocha-Rego, Vanessa; Rogalski, Emily; Rogers, Elizabeth; Rojas, Ignacio; Rojas Balderrama, Javier; Romero, Klaus; Rorden, Chris; Rosand, Jonathan; Rosen, Allyson; Rosen, Ori; Rosenberg, Paul; Ross, David; Ross, Joel; Roubini, Eli; Rousseau, François; Rowe, Christopher; Rubin, Daniel; Rubright, Jonathan; Ruiz, Agustin; Rusinek, Henry; Ryan, Laurie; Saad, Ahmed; Sabbagh, Marway; Sabuncu, Mert; Sachs, Michael; Sacuiu, Simona; Sadeghi, Ali; Said, Yasmine; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Sakata, Muneyuki; Salat, David; Salmon, David; Salomi, Sharmila; Salter, Hugh; Samwald, Matthias; Sanchez, Luciano; Sanders, Elizabeth; Sanjo, Nobuo; Sarnel, Haldun; Sato, Shinji; Sato, Hajime; Saumier, Daniel; Savio, Alexandre; Sawada, Ikuhisa; Saykin, Andrew; Schaffer, J. David; Scharre, Douglas; Schegerin, Marc; Schlosser, Gretchen; Schmand, Ben; Schmansky, Nick; Schmidt, Mark; Schneider, Lon; Schramm, Hauke; Schuerch, Markus; Schwartz, Craig; Schwartz, Eben; Schwarz, Adam; Seethamraju, Ravi; Seixas, Flavio; Selnes, Per; Senjem, Matthew; Senlin, Wang; Seo, Sang Won; Sethuraman, Gopalan; Sevigny, Jeffrey; Sfikas, Giorgos; Sghedoni, Roberto; Shah, Said Khalid; Shahbaba, Babak; Shams, Soheil; Shattuck, David; Shaw, Leslie; Sheela, Jaba; Shen, Weijia; Shen, Qian; Shera, David; Sherman, John; Sherva, Richard; Shi, Feng; Shukla, Vinay; Shuler, Catherine; Shulman, Joshua; Siegel, Rene; Siemers, Eric; Silveira, Margarida; Silver, Michael; Silverman, Daniel; Sim, Ida; Simmons, Andy; Simoes, Rita; Simon, Melvin; Simpson, Ivor; Singh, Simer Preet; Singh, Nikhil; Siuciak, Judy; Sjögren, Niclas; Skup, Martha; Small, Gary; Smith, Michael; Smith, Charles; Smith, Benjamin; Smyth, Timothy; Snow, Sarah; Soares, Holly; Soldea, Octavian; Solomon, Alan; Solomon, Paul; Som, Subhojit; Song, Changhong; Song, Mingli; Sorensen, Greg; Soudah, Eduardo; Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Spenger, Christian; Sperling, Reisa; Spiegel, René; Spies, Lothar; Squarcia, Sandro; Squire, Larry; Staff, Roger; Stern, Yaakov; Straw, Jack; Strittmatter, Stephen; Stühler, Elisabeth; Styren, Scot; Subramanian, Vijayalakshmi; Sugishita, Morihiro; Sukkar, Rafid; Sun, Ying; Sun, Yu; Sun, Jia; Sundell, Karen; Suri, Muhammad; Suzuki, Akiyuki; Svetnik, Vladimir; Swan, Melanie; Takahasi, Tetsuhiko; Takeuchi, Tomoko; Tanaka, Shoji; Tancredi, Daniel; Tang, Songyuan; Tao, Dacheng; Tao, Wenwen; Tariot, Pierre; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Teng, Edmond; Terlizzi, Rita; Thiele, Frank; Thomas, Ronald; Thomas, Benjamin; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Wesley; Thornton-Wells, Tricia; Thurfjell, Lennart; Titeux, Laurence; Tokuda, Takahiko; Toledo, Juan B.; Tolli, Tuomas; Toma, Ahmed; Tomita, Naoki; Toro, Roberto; Tosun, Duygu; Tousian, Mona; Toussaint, Paule; Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Tractenberg, Rochelle E.; Trittschuh, Emily; Trojanowski, John; Truran, Diana; Tsechpenakis, Gavriil; Tucker-Drob, Elliot; Tufail, Ahsan; Tung, Joyce; Ueda, Yoji; Ullrich, Lauren; Umadevi Venkataraju, Kannan; Umar, Nisser; Uzunbas, Gokhan; van de Nes, Joseph; van der Brug, Marcel; van Horn, John; van Leemput, Koen; van Train, Kenneth; van Zeeland, Ashley; Vasanawala, Minal; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Verwaerde, Philippe; Videbaek, Charlotte; Vidoni, Eric; Vigneron, Vincent; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Vitolo, Ottavio; Vounou, Maria; Wade, Sara; Walhovd, Kristine B.; Wan, Hong; Wang, Lubin; Wang, Xu; Wang, Ze; Wang, Angela; Wang, Tiger; Wang, Yongmei Michelle; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Wei; Wang, Huali; Wang, Yue; Wang, Li-San; Wang, Huanli; Wang, Alex; Wang, Yalin; Wang, Lei; Ward, Michael; Warfield, Simon; Waring, Stephen; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Webb, David; Wei, Lili; Weiner, Michael; Wen, Shu-Hui; Wenjing, Li; Wenzel, Fabian; Westlye, Lars T.; Whitcher, Brandon; Whitlow, Christopher; Whitwell, Jennifer; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Williams, David; Wilmot, Beth; Wingo, Thomas; Winkler, Andreas; Wiste, Heather; Wolfson, Tanya; Wolke, Ira; Wolz, Robin; Woo, Jongwook; Woo, Ellen; Woods, Lynn; Worth, Andrew; Worth, Eric; Wouters, Hans; Wu, Teresa; Wu, Ellen; Wu, Yi-Gen; Wu, Liang; Wu, Xiaoling; Wyman, Bradley; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Xiao, Liu; Xiao, Guanghua; Xie, Sharon; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ye; Xu, Yi-Zheng; Xu, Guofan; Yamane, Tomohiko; Yamashita, Fumio; Yan, Yunyi; Yan, Pingkun; Yang, Jinzhong; Yang, Qing X.; Yang, Zijiang; Yang, Guang; Yang, Wenlu; Yang, Eric; Yang, Zhitong; Ye, Jieping; Ye, Jong; Ye, Liang; Ye, Byoung Seok; Yee, Laura; Yesavage, Jerome; Ying, Song; Yoo, Bongin; Young, Jonathan; Yu, Dongchuan; Yu, Shiwei; Yuan, Kai; Yuan, Guihong; Yushkevich, Paul; Zaborszky, Laszlo; Zagorodnov, Vitali; Zagorski, Michael; Zawadzki, Rezi; Zeitzer, Jamie; Zhang, Huixiong; Zhang, Tianhao; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Linda; Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Kurt; Zhao, Jim; Zhao, Peng; Zhao, Qinying; Zhen, Xiantong; Zheng, Yuanjie; Zhijun, Yao; Zhou, Sheng; Zhou, Bin; Zhu, Wanlin; Zhu, Hongtu; Zhu, Wen; Zito, Giancarlo; Zou, Heng

    2011-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have identified variants in BIN1, CLU, CR1 and PICALM that show replicable association with risk for disease. We have thoroughly sampled common variation in these genes, genotyping 355 variants in over 600 individuals for whom

  4. Effect of niobium on the embrittlement of 2.25 Cr and 2.25 Cr-1Mo steels by phosphous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, J.L.B.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of niobium on the temper embrittlement of 2.25Cr and 2.25 Cr-1Mo steels doped with phosphorus is evaluated. The transition temperatures of the samples tempered at 650 0 C and aged at different temperatures for niobium steels. (M.J.C.) [pt

  5. Evaluation of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel for liquid lithium containment. II. Effects of post-weld heat treatment and niobium content. Annual report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.L.; Edwards, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The lithium corrosion resistance of the regular grade of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel can be vastly improved with a proper postweld heat treatment, but even greater improvements are needed. Results indicate that if weldments were tempered sufficiently long at 760C to remove all Mo 2 C from the microstructure, even greater resistance to attack by low nitrogen lithium could be achieved. Corrosion tests should eventually be performed on regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments which have been given a long-term (> 25 h) post-weld temper at 760C. Lithium corrosion resistance of regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel may also be improved by employing a quench and temper heat treatment. Quenched microstructures have more homogenous distribution of carbides than isothermally annealed microstructures, and if properly tempered, should provide excellent lithium corrosion resistance. Furthermore, the toughness of such a lower bainite microstructure should be better than that of the ferrite-bainitic microstructure created by an isothermal anneal. Numerous parameters, all potentially deleterious to the lithium corrosion resistance of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, remain to be investigated; two such variables are velocity effects and lead content in the lithium

  6. Characterization of mechanical properties and electrochemical behaviour in a Hank´s solution of 316L/Cr1-xAlxN system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, D M; Caicedo, J C; Zambrano, G; Aperador, W; Benitez-Castro, A M; Giraldo-Betancur, A L; Muñoz-Saldaña, J; Yañez-Limón, J M; Sanchez, O

    2017-01-01

    Cr 1-x Al x N hard coatings were successfully deposited by R.F. reactive magnetron co-sputtering in an Ar/N2 gas mixture using chromium and aluminium targets on 316L stainless steel substrates. Crystallographic orientations associated to the Cr 1-x Al x N FCC based in the conjugate complex of CrN and w-AlN phases, with ao=4.18Å lattice parameter for the ternary Cr 1-x Al x N compound were identified by X-Ray diffraction. The thickness and roughness of the deposited coatings are 1.00±0.05nm and 2.65±0.6nm, respectively. The mechanical properties were determined by nanoindentation leading to a hardness of 27.8±2.6GPa and elastic modulus of 346GPa. The corrosion resistance of the coated 316L/Cr 1-x Al x N system under simulated body fluid (SBF, Hank’s solution) was determined via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A reduction in the corrosion rate of 99% in relation to uncoated 316L stainless steel substrate was found by Tafel. Thus, these coatings seem to be excellent candidates to be used in biomedical applications. (paper)

  7. CX3CL1/CX3CR1 and CCL2/CCR2 Chemokine/Chemokine Receptor Complex in Patients with AMD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Mads Krüger; Singh, Amardeep; Faber, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The chemokine receptors CX3CR1 and CCR2 have been implicated in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The evidence is mainly derived from experimental cell studies and murine models of AMD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between expression...... of CX3CR1 and CCR2 on different leukocyte subsets and AMD. Furthermore we measured the plasma levels of ligands CX3CL1 and CCL2. METHODS: Patients attending our department were asked to participate in the study. The diagnosis of AMD was based on clinical examination and multimodal imaging techniques...... positive correlation between CCR2 and CX3CR1 expression on CD8+ cells (r = 0.727, p = 0.0001). We found no difference in plasma levels of CX3CL1 and CCL2 among the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show a down regulation of CX3CR1 on CD8+ cells; this correlated to a low expression of CCR2 on CD8+ cells...

  8. Residual creep life assessment by change of martensitic lath structure in modified 9Cr-1Mo steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Kota; Takeda, Masaaki; Maruyama, Kouichi; Komine, Ryuji; Nagae, Yuji

    1998-01-01

    Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel has a martensitic lath structure. Recovery of the lath structure takes place in the course of creep. Microstructural degradation due to the recovery results in the acceleration of creep rate and the subsequent failure of a specimen. Change of lath width during creep of the steel was quantitatively investigated to propose a residual life assessment methodology based on the recovery process. Since the steel was tempered at 1053 K, the lath structure is thermally stable at the testing temperatures (848 K - 923 K). However, recovery of lath structure readily takes place during creep, indicating that the recovery is induced by creep deformation. Lath width d increases with creep strain and saturates to a value d s determined by creep stress. The increase of d is faster at a higher stress and temperature. A normalized change in lath width, Δd/Δd s , was introduced to explain the variation of lath growth rate with creep stress and temperature. Δd is the change in lath width from the initial value d 0 , and Δd s is the difference between d s , and d 0 . Δd/Δd s is uniquely related to creep strain ε and the relationship is independent of creep stress as well as creep temperature. This Δd/Δd s -ε relationship obtained by an accelerated creep test at a higher temperature or stress is applicable to any creep condition including service conditions of engineering plants. Creep strain can be evaluated from the measurement of Δd/Δd s based on the Δd/Δd s -ε relationship. A creep curve under any creep condition can readily be calculated by creep data of the steel. Combining these information one can assess residual life of a structural component made of the steel. (author)

  9. Wastage Behavior of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Tube Material by Sodium-Water Reaction (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ji Young; Kim, Jong Man; Kim, Tae Joon; Choi, Jong Hyeun; Kim, Byung Ho; Lee, Yong Bum; Park, Nam Cook

    2010-01-01

    The Korea Advanced LIquid MEtal Reactor (KALIMER) steam generator is a helical coil, vertically oriented, shell-and-tube type heat exchanger with fixed tube-sheet. The conceptual design and outline drawing of the steam generator are shown. Flow is counter-current, with sodium on the shell side and water/steam on the tube side. Sodium flow enters the steam generator through the upper inlet nozzles and then flows down through the tube bundle. Feedwater enters the steam generator through the feedwater nozzles at the bottom of steam generator. Therefore, if there is a hole or a crack in a heat transfer tube, a leakage of water/steam into the sodium may occur, resulting in a sodium-water reaction. When such a leak occurs, so-called 'wastage' is the result which may cause damage to or a failure of the adjacent tubes. If a steam generator is operated for some time in this condition, it is possible that it might create an intermediate leak state which would then give rise to the problems of a multi-target wastage in a very short time. Therefore, it is very important to predict these phenomena quantitatively from the view of designing a steam generator and its leak detection systems. The objective of this study is a basic investigating of the sodium-water reaction phenomena by small water/steam leaks. For this, wastage tests for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel tube material were conducted, and an empirical formula of the wastage rate for this material was obtained from the results

  10. Characterization and carbon monoxide oxidation activity of La1-ySryCr1-xRuxO3 perovskites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. MARINOVA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of CO over La1-ySryCr1-xRuxO3 perovskite type oxides with y=0.3 and 0 £ x £ 0.100 have been studied. X-ray fluorescence analysis confirmed that content of elements in the bulk corresponds to the established nominal perovskite stoichiometry, indicating that no significant oxidation of ruthenium into volatile polyvalent oxides with their consequented escape from the sample occurred in air up to the temperature of 1000°C. According to X-ray diffraction analysis, all sampls achieved the perovskite hexagonal with the presence of some SrCrO4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of ruthenium samples shows higher Ru and Sr surface concentraitions than in the bulk. The binding energy for Ru3p is virtually the same in all samples and consistent with that of Ru4+ (463.6-464.3eV. Kinetic studies were performed in a differential recycle reactor with a recycling ratio 80. The results show that substitution of Ru4+ for Cr3+ in La1-ySryCrO3 leads to a significant increase in both the activity and the activation energy. The global CO oxidation rate, referred on the BET surface area, correlates with the surface Ru4+ atomic concentraiton. Hence, the activity reflect the surface enrichment in ruthenium. Moreover, an identical apparent activation energy E = 93 kJ/mol and the same specific rate per ruthenium surface ion were obtained for samples with a Ru content x ³ 0.05 suggest that exposed Ru4+ ions mainly participate in the reaction.

  11. Survey of welding processes for field fabrication of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel pressure vessels. [128 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotke, G.E.

    1980-04-01

    Any evaluation of fabrication methods for massive pressure vessels must consider several welding processes with potential for heavy-section applications. These include submerged-arc and shielded metal-arc, narrow-joint modifications of inert-gas metal-arc and inert-gas tungsten-arc processes, electroslag, and electron beam. The advantage and disadvantages of each are discussed. Electroslag welding can be dropped from consideration for joining of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel because welds made with this method do not provide the required mechanical properties in the welded and stress relieved condition. The extension of electron-beam welding to sections as thick as 4 or 8 inches (100 or 200 mm) is too recent a development to permit full evaluation. The manual shielded metal-arc and submerged-arc welding processes have both been employed, often together, for field fabrication of large vessels. They have the historical advantage of successful application but present other disadvantages that make them otherwise less attractive. The manual shielded metal-arc process can be used for all-position welding. It is however, a slow and expensive technique for joining heavy sections, requires large amounts of skilled labor that is in critically short supply, and introduces a high incidence of weld repairs. Automatic submerged-arc welding has been employed in many critical applications and for welding in the flat position is free of most of the criticism that can be leveled at the shielded metal-arc process. Specialized techniques have been developed for horizontal and vertical position welding but, used in this manner, the applications are limited and the cost advantage of the process is lost.

  12. Chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CX3CR1 differentially regulate functional responses of bone-marrow endothelial progenitors during atherosclerotic plaque regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlea-Pana, Oana; Yao, Longbiao; Heuser-Baker, Janet; Wang, Qiongxin; Wang, Qilong; Georgescu, Constantin; Zou, Ming-Hui; Barlic-Dicen, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Aims Atherosclerosis manifests itself as arterial plaques, which lead to heart attacks or stroke. Treatments supporting plaque regression are therefore aggressively pursued. Studies conducted in models in which hypercholesterolaemia is reversible, such as the Reversa mouse model we have employed in the current studies, will be instrumental for the development of such interventions. Using this model, we have shown that advanced atherosclerosis regression occurs when lipid lowering is used in combination with bone-marrow endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) treatment. However, it remains unclear how EPCs home to regressing plaques and how they augment atherosclerosis reversal. Here we identify molecules that support functional responses of EPCs during plaque resolution. Methods and results Chemokines CXCL1 and CX3CL1 were detected in the vascular wall of atheroregressing Reversa mice, and their cognate receptors CXCR2 and CX3CR1 were observed on adoptively transferred EPCs in circulation. We tested whether CXCL1–CXCR2 and CX3CL1–CX3CR1 axes regulate functional responses of EPCs during plaque reversal. We show that pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 or CX3CR1, or genetic inactivation of these two chemokine receptors interfered with EPC-mediated advanced atherosclerosis regression. We also demonstrate that CXCR2 directs EPCs to regressing plaques while CX3CR1 controls a paracrine function(s) of these cells. Conclusion CXCR2 and CX3CR1 differentially regulate EPC functional responses during atheroregression. Our study improves understanding of how chemokines and chemokine receptors regulate plaque resolution, which could determine the effectiveness of interventions reducing complications of atherosclerosis. PMID:25765938

  13. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of chicken anaemia virus obtained from backyard and commercial chickens in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwayelu, D O; Todd, D; Olaleye, O D

    2008-12-01

    This work reports the first molecular analysis study of chicken anaemia virus (CAV) in backyard chickens in Africa using molecular cloning and sequence analysis to characterize CAV strains obtained from commercial chickens and Nigerian backyard chickens. Partial VP1 gene sequences were determined for three CAVs from commercial chickens and for six CAV variants present in samples from a backyard chicken. Multiple alignment analysis revealed that the 6% and 4% nucleotide diversity obtained respectively for the commercial and backyard chicken strains translated to only 2% amino acid diversity for each breed. Overall, the amino acid composition of Nigerian CAVs was found to be highly conserved. Since the partial VP1 gene sequence of two backyard chicken cloned CAV strains (NGR/CI-8 and NGR/CI-9) were almost identical and evolutionarily closely related to the commercial chicken strains NGR-1, and NGR-4 and NGR-5, respectively, we concluded that CAV infections had crossed the farm boundary.

  14. Genomic change, retrotransposon mobilization and extensive cytosine methylation alteration in Brassica napus introgressions from two intertribal hybridizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueli Zhang

    Full Text Available Hybridization and introgression represent important means for the transfer and/or de novo origination of traits and play an important role in facilitating speciation and plant breeding. Two sets of introgression lines in Brassica napus L. were previously established by its intertribal hybridizations with two wild species and long-term selection. In this study, the methods of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP, sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (SSAP and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP were used to determine their genomic change, retrotransposon mobilization and cytosine methylation alteration in these lines. The genomic change revealed by the loss or gain of AFLP bands occurred for ∼10% of the total bands amplified in the two sets of introgressions, while no bands specific for wild species were detected. The new and absent SSAP bands appeared for 9 out of 11 retrotransposons analyzed, with low frequency of new bands and their total percentage of about 5% in both sets. MSAP analysis indicated that methylation changes were common in these lines (33.4-39.8% and the hypermethylation was more frequent than hypomethylation. Our results suggested that certain extents of genetic and epigenetic alterations were induced by hybridization and alien DNA introgression. The cryptic mechanism of these changes and potential application of these lines in breeding were also discussed.

  15. Genomic change, retrotransposon mobilization and extensive cytosine methylation alteration in Brassica napus introgressions from two intertribal hybridizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueli; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Sun, Genlou; Li, Zaiyun

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization and introgression represent important means for the transfer and/or de novo origination of traits and play an important role in facilitating speciation and plant breeding. Two sets of introgression lines in Brassica napus L. were previously established by its intertribal hybridizations with two wild species and long-term selection. In this study, the methods of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP), sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (SSAP) and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) were used to determine their genomic change, retrotransposon mobilization and cytosine methylation alteration in these lines. The genomic change revealed by the loss or gain of AFLP bands occurred for ∼10% of the total bands amplified in the two sets of introgressions, while no bands specific for wild species were detected. The new and absent SSAP bands appeared for 9 out of 11 retrotransposons analyzed, with low frequency of new bands and their total percentage of about 5% in both sets. MSAP analysis indicated that methylation changes were common in these lines (33.4-39.8%) and the hypermethylation was more frequent than hypomethylation. Our results suggested that certain extents of genetic and epigenetic alterations were induced by hybridization and alien DNA introgression. The cryptic mechanism of these changes and potential application of these lines in breeding were also discussed.

  16. Tye7 regulates yeast Ty1 retrotransposon sense and antisense transcription in response to adenylic nucleotides stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servant, Géraldine; Pinson, Benoit; Tchalikian-Cosson, Aurélie; Coulpier, Fanny; Lemoine, Sophie; Pennetier, Carole; Bridier-Nahmias, Antoine; Todeschini, Anne Laure; Fayol, Hélène; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Lesage, Pascale

    2012-07-01

    Transposable elements play a fundamental role in genome evolution. It is proposed that their mobility, activated under stress, induces mutations that could confer advantages to the host organism. Transcription of the Ty1 LTR-retrotransposon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated in response to a severe deficiency in adenylic nucleotides. Here, we show that Ty2 and Ty3 are also stimulated under these stress conditions, revealing the simultaneous activation of three active Ty retrotransposon families. We demonstrate that Ty1 activation in response to adenylic nucleotide depletion requires the DNA-binding transcription factor Tye7. Ty1 is transcribed in both sense and antisense directions. We identify three Tye7 potential binding sites in the region of Ty1 DNA sequence where antisense transcription starts. We show that Tye7 binds to Ty1 DNA and regulates Ty1 antisense transcription. Altogether, our data suggest that, in response to adenylic nucleotide reduction, TYE7 is induced and activates Ty1 mRNA transcription, possibly by controlling Ty1 antisense transcription. We also provide the first evidence that Ty1 antisense transcription can be regulated by environmental stress conditions, pointing to a new level of control of Ty1 activity by stress, as Ty1 antisense RNAs play an important role in regulating Ty1 mobility at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional stages.

  17. Chicken Soup for the Portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Edward J.

    The popular "Chicken Soup for the Soul" series of books demonstrates the tremendous desire of people in all walks of life to tell their stories. A professor of reading/language arts methods for students in a program leading to teacher certification reads to his classes every day from a wide variety of materials, including stories from…

  18. The Chicken and Egg Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkon, Ivette

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a project on chickens and eggs undertaken by 5-year-old children in a bilingual school in Mexico City. It describes the three phases of the project and includes photographs and other documentation of the children's work.

  19. Visuospatial selective attention in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Devarajan; Ramamurthy, Deepa L; Schwarz, Jason S; Knudsen, Eric I

    2014-05-13

    Voluntary control of attention promotes intelligent, adaptive behaviors by enabling the selective processing of information that is most relevant for making decisions. Despite extensive research on attention in primates, the capacity for selective attention in nonprimate species has never been quantified. Here we demonstrate selective attention in chickens by applying protocols that have been used to characterize visual spatial attention in primates. Chickens were trained to localize and report the vertical position of a target in the presence of task-relevant distracters. A spatial cue, the location of which varied across individual trials, indicated the horizontal, but not vertical, position of the upcoming target. Spatial cueing improved localization performance: accuracy (d') increased and reaction times decreased in a space-specific manner. Distracters severely impaired perceptual performance, and this impairment was greatly reduced by spatial cueing. Signal detection analysis with an "indecision" model demonstrated that spatial cueing significantly increased choice certainty in localizing targets. By contrast, error-aversion certainty (certainty of not making an error) remained essentially constant across cueing protocols, target contrasts, and individuals. The results show that chickens shift spatial attention rapidly and dynamically, following principles of stimulus selection that closely parallel those documented in primates. The findings suggest that the mechanisms that control attention have been conserved through evolution, and establish chickens--a highly visual species that is easily trained and amenable to cutting-edge experimental technologies--as an attractive model for linking behavior to neural mechanisms of selective attention.

  20. The Sinbad retrotransposon from the genome of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni, and the distribution of related Pao-like elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Maria E

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Of the major families of long terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons, the Pao/BEL family is probably the least well studied. It is becoming apparent that numerous LTR retrotransposons and other mobile genetic elements have colonized the genome of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni. Results A proviral form of Sinbad, a new LTR retrotransposon, was identified in the genome of S. mansoni. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Sinbad belongs to one of five discreet subfamilies of Pao/BEL like elements. BLAST searches of whole genomes and EST databases indicated that members of this clade occurred in species of the Insecta, Nematoda, Echinodermata and Chordata, as well as Platyhelminthes, but were absent from all plants, fungi and lower eukaryotes examined. Among the deuterostomes examined, only aquatic species harbored these types of elements. All four species of nematode examined were positive for Sinbad sequences, although among insect and vertebrate genomes, some were positive and some negative. The full length, consensus Sinbad retrotransposon was 6,287 bp long and was flanked at its 5'- and 3'-ends by identical LTRs of 386 bp. Sinbad displayed a triple Cys-His RNA binding motif characteristic of Gag of Pao/BEL-like elements, followed by the enzymatic domains of protease, reverse transcriptase (RT, RNAseH, and integrase, in that order. A phylogenetic tree of deduced RT sequences from 26 elements revealed that Sinbad was most closely related to an unnamed element from the zebrafish Danio rerio and to Saci-1, also from S. mansoni. It was also closely related to Pao from Bombyx mori and to Ninja of Drosophila simulans. Sinbad was only distantly related to the other schistosome LTR retrotransposons Boudicca, Gulliver, Saci-2, Saci-3, and Fugitive, which are gypsy-like. Southern hybridization and bioinformatics analyses indicated that there were about 50 copies of Sinbad in the S. mansoni genome. The presence of ESTs

  1. Structural characterization of copia-type retrotransposons leads to insights into the marker development in a biofuel crop, Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, Jatropha curcas L. has attracted worldwide attention for its potential as a source of biodiesel. However, most DNA markers have demonstrated high levels of genetic similarity among and within jatropha populations around the globe. Despite promising features of copia-type retrotransposons as ideal genetic tools for gene tagging, mutagenesis, and marker-assisted selection, they have not been characterized in the jatropha genome yet. Here, we examined the diversity, evolution, and genome-wide organization of copia-type retrotransposons in the Asian, African, and Mesoamerican accessions of jatropha, then introduced a retrotransposon-based marker for this biofuel crop. Results In total, 157 PCR fragments that were amplified using the degenerate primers for the reverse transcriptase (RT) domain of copia-type retroelements were sequenced and aligned to construct the neighbor-joining tree. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that isolated copia RT sequences were classified into ten families, which were then grouped into three lineages. An in-depth study of the jatropha genome for the RT sequences of each family led to the characterization of full consensus sequences of the jatropha copia-type families. Estimated copy numbers of target sequences were largely different among families, as was presence of genes within 5 kb flanking regions for each family. Five copia-type families were as appealing candidates for the development of DNA marker systems. A candidate marker from family Jc7 was particularly capable of detecting genetic variation among different jatropha accessions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to metaphase chromosomes reveals that copia-type retrotransposons are scattered across chromosomes mainly located in the distal part regions. Conclusion This is the first report on genome-wide analysis and the cytogenetic mapping of copia-type retrotransposons of jatropha, leading to the discovery of families bearing high potential as DNA

  2. Role of fractalkine/CX3CR1 interaction in light-induced photoreceptor degeneration through regulating retinal microglial activation and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excessive exposure to light enhances the progression and severity of some human retinal degenerative diseases. While retinal microglia are likely to be important in neuron damage associated with these diseases, the relationship between photoreceptor damage and microglial activation remains poorly understood. Some recent studies have indicated that the chemokine fractalkine is involved in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was performed to investigate the cross-talk between injured photoreceptors and activated retinal microglia, focusing on the role of fractalkine and its receptor CX3CR1 in light-induced photoreceptor degeneration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both in vivo and in vitro experiments were involved in the research. In vivo, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to blue light for 24 hours. In vitro, the co-culture of primary retinal microglia and a photoreceptor cell line (661W cell was exposed to blue light for five hours. Some cultures were pretreated by the addition of anti-CX3CR1 neutralizing antibody or recombinant fractalkine. Expression of fractalkine/CX3CR1 and inflammatory cytokines was detected by immunofluorescence, real-time PCR, Western immunoblot analysis, and ELISA assay. TUNEL method was used to detect cell apoptosis. In addition, chemotaxis assay was performed to evaluate the impact of soluble fractalkine on microglial migration. Our results showed that the expression of fractalkine that was significantly upregulated after exposure to light, located mainly at the photoreceptors. The extent of photoreceptor degeneration and microglial migration paralleled the increased level of fractalkine/CX3CR1. Compared with the control, the expression of inflammatory cytokines was significantly downregulated in the anti-CX3CR1 neutralizing antibody-treated group, and the number of photoreceptors was also well preserved. The addition of recombinant full-length fractalkine or soluble

  3. Assessment of genetic diversity among Indian potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) collection using microsatellite and retrotransposon based marker systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vishakha; Nandineni, Madhusudan R

    2014-04-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) is an important non-cereal crop throughout the world and is highly recommended for ensuring global food security. Owing to the complexities in genetics and inheritance pattern of potato, the conventional method of cross breeding for developing improved varieties has been difficult. Identification and tagging of desirable traits with informative molecular markers would aid in the development of improved varieties. Insertional polymorphism of copia-like and gypsy-like long terminal repeat retrotransposons (RTN) were investigated among 47 potato varieties from India using Inter-Retrotransposon Amplified Polymorphism (IRAP) and Retrotransposon Microsatellite Amplified Polymorphism (REMAP) marker techniques and were compared with the DNA profiles obtained with simple sequence repeats (SSRs). The genetic polymorphism, efficiency of polymorphism and effectiveness of marker systems were evaluated to assess the extent of genetic diversity among Indian potato varieties. A total of 139 polymorphic SSR alleles, 270 IRAP and 98 REMAP polymorphic bands, showing polymorphism of 100%, 87.9% and 68.5%, respectively, were used for detailed characterization of the genetic relationships among potato varieties by using cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA). IRAP analysis resulted in the highest number of polymorphic bands with an average of 15 polymorphic bands per assay unit when compared to the other two marker systems. Based on pair-wise comparison, the genetic similarity was calculated using Dice similarity coefficient. The SSRs showed a wide range in genetic similarity values (0.485-0.971) as compared to IRAP (0.69-0.911) and REMAP (0.713-0.947). A Mantel's matrix correspondence test showed a high positive correlation (r=0.6) between IRAP and REMAP, an intermediate value (r=0.58) for IRAP and SSR and the lowest value (r=0.17) for SSR and REMAP. Statistically significant cophenetic correlation coefficient values, of 0.961, 0.941 and 0

  4. Improvements in the susceptibility to hydrogen attack and stress-relief cracking of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanaka, T.; Sato, S.; Shimomura, J.; Aso, K.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of sulphur content at extremely low level on the susceptibility to hydrogen attack and stress-relief cracking in 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steels was studied. The reduction of sulphur content and/or the addition of REM (rare earth metal) or Ca in accordance with sulphur content remarkably improve the resistivity against hydrogen attack and stress-relief cracking. Micro-structural examination has showed that there exist Mn-REM-S-Al-O complex particles in the REM-added steels. It is concluded that the effect of REM on hydrogen attack and stress-relief cracking is to reduce ''the free sulphur'' in 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steels

  5. The structure, magnetism, and electrical-transport properties of the Heusler alloys Co2Cr1-xFexAl (x=0.2-0.6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ming; Wolf, Anne L.; Zhang, L.; Tegus, O.; Brueck, Ekkes; Wu Guangheng; Boer, Frank R. de

    2005-01-01

    We synthesize the polycrystalline Heusler compounds Co 2 Cr 1-x Fe x Al (x=0.2-0.6). The x-ray diffraction patterns show A2 structure rather than L2 1 structure. The magnetic moment and the Curie temperature increase with increasing x. The electrical resistivity characterizes the Co 2 Cr 1-x Fe x Al compounds to be not typical metals and the temperature dependence of the resistivity changes from metallic to semiconductinglike behavior with increasing Cr concentrations. We attribute the fact, which we observe for most of the compounds smaller magnetic moments than the theoretical values and the low magnetoresistance in these alloys, to the considerably high level of Co-(Cr, Fe)-type disorder

  6. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of the nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiselt, Ch.Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Moeslang, A.; Odette, G.R.; Yamamoto, T.; Gragg, D.

    2011-01-01

    The realization of fusion power as an attractive energy source requires advanced structural materials that can cope with ultra-severe thermo-mechanical loads and high neutron fluxes experienced by fusion power plant components, such as the first wall, divertor and blanket structures. Towards this end, two variants of a 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2 O 3 reduced activation ferritic (RAF-) ODS steel were produced by ball milling phase blended Fe-13Cr-1W, 0.3Y 2 0 3 and 0.3Ti powders in both argon and hydrogen atmospheres. The milled powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The as-HIPed alloys were then hot rolled into 6 mm plates. Microstructural, tensile and fracture toughness characterization of the hot rolled alloys are summarized here and compared to results previously reported for the as-HIPed condition.

  7. Carcass characteristics of South African native chicken lines | Van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venda and Ovambo chicken lines were evaluated. The highest dressed-carcass mass was recorded for Ovambo chickens and the highest percentage breast muscle was recorded for Naked-Neck chickens. Percentage fat and fatty acid ...

  8. Genomic characterization of recent chicken anemia virus isolates in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicken infectious anemiavirus (CIAV) causes diseases in young chickens, which include increased pathogenicity of secondary infectious agents, generalized lymphoid depletion, and immune-repression. In the present study, we have identified 22 CIAV strains isolated from several commercial chicken farm...

  9. Small water/steam leaks in sodium heated steam generators: Evaluation of the reaction zone - effects on 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo structural material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumm, K.

    1975-01-01

    On the basis of experimental data the geometry of a small leak reaction zone can be predicted for given leak sizes and steam generator operation conditions. The effects of small leaks on 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo material have been studied and completed with test results from foreign investigators. The results have to be considered as preliminary ones which have to be further qualified by additional information. (author)

  10. Mechanical properties data of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel for the experimental very high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo; Kikuyama, Toshihiko; Fukaya, Kiyoshi; Kodaira, Tsuneo

    1978-11-01

    This is a collection of mechanical properties data of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel necessary for structural design and safety analysis of the pressure vessel of the Experimental Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR). These include physical properties, mechanical properties, temper embrittlement, creep with fatigue, fracture toughness and irradiation effects. A review of the data shows the research areas to be carried out particularly in the future for more data. (author)

  11. Creep-fatigue evaluation method for weld joint of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel Part II: Plate bending test and proposal of a simplified evaluation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Masanori, E-mail: ando.masanori@jaea.go.jp; Takaya, Shigeru, E-mail: takaya.shigeru@jaea.go.jp

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Creep-fatigue evaluation method for weld joint of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel is proposed. • A simplified evaluation method is also proposed for the codification. • Both proposed evaluation method was validated by the plate bending test. • For codification, the local stress and strain behavior was analyzed. - Abstract: In the present study, to develop an evaluation procedure and design rules for Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints, a method for evaluating the creep-fatigue life of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints was proposed based on finite element analysis (FEA) and a series of cyclic plate bending tests of longitudinal and horizontal seamed plates. The strain concentration and redistribution behaviors were evaluated and the failure cycles were estimated using FEA by considering the test conditions and metallurgical discontinuities in the weld joints. Inelastic FEA models consisting of the base metal, heat-affected zone and weld metal were employed to estimate the elastic follow-up behavior caused by the metallurgical discontinuities. The elastic follow-up factors determined by comparing the elastic and inelastic FEA results were determined to be less than 1.5. Based on the estimated elastic follow-up factors obtained via inelastic FEA, a simplified technique using elastic FEA was proposed for evaluating the creep-fatigue life in Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints. The creep-fatigue life obtained using the plate bending test was compared to those estimated from the results of inelastic FEA and by a simplified evaluation method.

  12. Creep-fatigue evaluation method for weld joint of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel Part II: Plate bending test and proposal of a simplified evaluation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masanori; Takaya, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Creep-fatigue evaluation method for weld joint of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel is proposed. • A simplified evaluation method is also proposed for the codification. • Both proposed evaluation method was validated by the plate bending test. • For codification, the local stress and strain behavior was analyzed. - Abstract: In the present study, to develop an evaluation procedure and design rules for Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints, a method for evaluating the creep-fatigue life of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints was proposed based on finite element analysis (FEA) and a series of cyclic plate bending tests of longitudinal and horizontal seamed plates. The strain concentration and redistribution behaviors were evaluated and the failure cycles were estimated using FEA by considering the test conditions and metallurgical discontinuities in the weld joints. Inelastic FEA models consisting of the base metal, heat-affected zone and weld metal were employed to estimate the elastic follow-up behavior caused by the metallurgical discontinuities. The elastic follow-up factors determined by comparing the elastic and inelastic FEA results were determined to be less than 1.5. Based on the estimated elastic follow-up factors obtained via inelastic FEA, a simplified technique using elastic FEA was proposed for evaluating the creep-fatigue life in Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints. The creep-fatigue life obtained using the plate bending test was compared to those estimated from the results of inelastic FEA and by a simplified evaluation method.

  13. Wear behavior of 2-1/4 Cr-1Mo tubing against alloy 718 tube-support material in sodium-cooled steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, W.L.

    1983-05-01

    A series of prototypic steam generator 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo tube/alloy 718 tube support plate wear tests were conducted in direct support of the Westinghouse Nuclear Components Division -- Breeder Reactor Components Project Large Scale steam Generator design. The initial objective was to verify the acceptable wear behavior of softer, ''over-aged'' alloy 718 support plate material. For all interfaces under all test conditions, resultant wear damage was adhesive in nature with varying amounts of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo tube material being adhesively transferred to the alloy 718 tube supports. Maximum tube wear depths exceeded the initially established design allowable limit of 127 μm (.005 in.) at 17 of the 18 interfaces tested. A decrease in contact stresses produced acceptable tube wear depths below a readjusted maximum design allowable value of 381 μm (.015 in.). Additional conservatisms associated with the simulation of a 40-year lifetime of rubbing in a one-week laboratory test provided further confidence that the 381 μm maximum tube wear allowance would not be exceeded in service. Softer, ''over-aged'' alloy 718 material was found to produce slightly less wear damage on 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo tubing than fully age hardened material. Also, air formed oxide films on the alloy 718 reduced initial tube wear and delayed the onset of adhesive surface damage. However, at high surface stress levels, these films were not sufficiently stable to provide adequate long term protection from adhesive wear. The results of the present work and those of previous test programs suggest that the successful in-sodium tribological performance of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo/alloy 718 rubbing couples is dependent upon the presence of lubricative surface films, such as oxides and/or surface reaction or deposition products. 11 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Small water/steam leaks in sodium heated steam generators: Evaluation of the reaction zone - effects on 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo structural material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumm, K

    1975-07-01

    On the basis of experimental data the geometry of a small leak reaction zone can be predicted for given leak sizes and steam generator operation conditions. The effects of small leaks on 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo material have been studied and completed with test results from foreign investigators. The results have to be considered as preliminary ones which have to be further qualified by additional information. (author)

  15. Influence of dynamic sodium environment on the creep-fatigue behaviour of Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, R.; Ganesan, V.; Mariappan, K.; Sukumaran, G.; Sandhya, R.; Mathew, M.D.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The effects of dynamic sodium on the CFI behaviour of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel has investigated. → The cyclic stress response of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel under flowing sodium environment is similar to that of air environment. → The creep-fatigue endurance of the alloy is found to decrease with introduction of hold time and with increase in the duration of hold time and the factor of life increase in sodium compared to air environment is reduced with increase in hold time. → In contrast to air environment, tensile holds were found to be more damaging than compression hold in sodium environment. → Design rules based on air environment can be safely applied for the components operating in sodium environment. - Abstract: The use of liquid sodium as a heat transfer medium for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) necessitates a clear understanding of the effects of dynamic sodium on low cycle fatigue (LCF), creep and creep-fatigue interaction (CFI) behaviour of reactor structural materials. Mod. 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel is the material of current interest for the steam generator components of sodium cooled fast reactors. The steam generator has a design life of 30-40 years. The effects of dynamic sodium on the LCF and CFI behaviour of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel have been investigated at 823 and 873 K. The CFI life of the steel showed marginal increase under flowing sodium environment when compared to air environment. Hence, the design rules for creep-fatigue interaction based on air tests can be safely applied for components operating in sodium environment. This paper attempts to explain the observed LCF and CFI results based on the detailed metallography and fractography conducted on the failed samples.

  16. Effect of electroacupuncture on the cervicospinal P2X7 receptor/fractalkine/CX3CR1 signaling pathway in a rat neck-incision pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y H; Li, C W; Wang, J Y; Tan, L H; Duanmu, C L; Jing, X H; Chang, X R; Liu, J L

    2017-06-01

    Increasing evidence supports that acupuncture intervention is an effective approach for intraoperative and postoperative pain. Neuron-microglia crosstalk, mediated by the purinergic P2X7 receptor (R)/fractalkine/CX3CR1 cascade in the spinal cord dorsal horn, plays a pivotal role in pain processing. However, its involvement in the analgesic effect of electroacupuncture (EA) remains unclear. In this study, a rat neck-incision pain model was established by making a longitudinal incision along the midline of the neck and subsequent repeated mechanical stimulation. EA stimulation was applied to bilateral LI18, LI4-PC6, or ST36-GB34. The thermal pain threshold, cervicospinal ATP concentration, expression levels of purinergic P2XR and P2YR subunits mRNAs, and fractalkine, CX3CR1 and p38 MAPK proteins, were detected separately. The neck incision induced strong thermal hyperalgesia and upregulation of spinal ATP within 48 h. No significant change was found in thermal hyperalgesia after a single session of EA intervention. However, a single session of EA dramatically enhanced the neck incision-induced upregulation of ATP and upregulated the expression of P2X7R, which was reversed by two sessions of EA. Two sessions of EA at bilateral LI18 or LI4-PC6 attenuated hyperalgesia significantly, accompanied with downregulation of P2X7R/fractalkine/ CX3CR1 signaling after three sessions of EA. EA stimulation of LI18 or LI4-PC6 alleviates thermal hyperalgesia in neck-incision pain rats, which may be associated with its effects in regulating the neck incision-induced increase of ATP and P2X7R and subsequently suppressing fractalkine/CX3CR1 signaling in the cervical spinal cord.

  17. Associations of fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) and CCR5 gene variants with hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis in chronic renal failure patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci, Binnur; Bagci, Gokhan; Huzmeli, Can; Sezgin, Ilhan; Ozdemir, Ozturk

    2016-07-01

    We aimed to investigate the associations of fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) V249I, T280M and CCR5-59029 A/G gene polymorphisms in chronic renal failure (CRF) subjects undergoing hemodialysis and to evaluate possible associations of these polymorphisms with hypertension (HT), diabetes mellitus (DM) and atherosclerosis (AS). A total of 225 CRF subjects undergoing hemodialysis and 201 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. CRF subjects were divided into three major subgroups according to comorbidities including HT (n = 127), DM (n = 65) and AS (n = 33). Genotyping was done using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The II genotype and I allele frequencies of CX3CR1 V249I polymorphism were found significantly more frequent in CRF subjects, CRF subjects with DM and CRF subjects with AS compared with controls (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). G allele frequency of CCR5 polymorphism was found significantly more prevalent in CRF subjects with DM than that of controls. Further, GG genotype and G allele frequencies of CCR5 polymorphism were significantly more prevalent in CRF subjects with AS compared with controls (p < 0.05). We also explored these polymorphisms among CRF subjects with and without following comorbidities: HT, DM, AS. We found significant association between CRF subjects with HT and without HT in terms of genotype and allele frequencies of V249I polymorphism (p < 0.05). CX3CR1 T280M polymorphism was not found significantly different in none of the comparisons. These data demonstrate possible associations between CX3CR1 V249I and CCR5-59029 A/G polymorphisms and/or HT, DM and AS in CRF subjects.

  18. Microstructural evolution in modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic steel irradiated with mixed high-energy proton and neutron spectra at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sencer, B.H.; Garner, F.A.; Gelles, D.S.; Bond, G.M.; Maloy, S.A.

    2002-01-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic steel was exposed at 32-57 deg. C to a mixed proton/neutron particle flux and spectrum at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The microstructure of unirradiated 9Cr-1Mo consists of laths, dislocations and carbides. Examination of electron diffraction patterns obtained from extraction replicas of unirradiated 9Cr-1Mo revealed that the precipitate microstructure was primarily dominated by M 23 C 6 carbides. The post-irradiation microstructure contained black-spot damage in addition to precipitates and dislocations. Examination of electron diffraction patterns revealed diffuse rings from M 23 C 6 carbides, indicating amorphization and/or nanocrystallinity. Crystalline MC carbides were also found. No cavity formation was found although a significant amount of helium and hydrogen generation had been generated. TEM-EDS examination of extraction replicas for carbides from unirradiated and irradiated samples did not show any detectable changes in composition of either M 23 C 6 or MC carbides. There was also no evident change in carbide size. Lattice images of M 23 C 6 carbides revealed an amorphous microstructure following irradiation, but MC carbides were still crystalline

  19. Some elevated temperature tensile and strain-controlled fatigue properties for a 9%Cr1Mo steel heat treated to simulate thick section material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, S.J.; Jacques, S.

    Current interest has been expressed in the usage of thick section 9%Cr1%Mo steel, particularly for UK Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR) steam generator tubeplates. This paper presents the results of some preliminary mechanical property test work on a single cast of the steel, heat treated to simulate heavy ruling sections encompassing thicknesses likely to be met in the CDFR context. The microstructures of the simulated thick section material were found to remain predominantly as tempered martensite even at the slowest transformation cooling rates used (50 deg. C/h). The effect of microstructure is reflected in the elevated temperature proof stress, tensile strength and strain-controlled fatigue endurance which were found to be comparable with the properties established for thin section normalised and tempered 9%Cr1%Mo steel. These results are extremely encouraging and, taken in conjunction with the results from other simulation work on this material, further demonstrate the potential of thick section 9%Cr1%Mo steel. (author)

  20. Enteric disease in broiler chickens following experimental infection with chicken parvovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-old broiler chickens were inoculated orally with the chicken parvovirus strain, chicken parvovirus-P1. In four independent experiments, characteristic clinical signs of enteric disease including watery, mustard color diarrhea and growth retardation were observed following infection. The virus wa...

  1. Immortalization of chicken preadipocytes by retroviral transduction of chicken TERT and TR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Tianmu; Wu, Chunyan; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Yuxiang; Wang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    The chicken is an important agricultural animal and model for developmental biology, immunology and virology. Excess fat accumulation continues to be a serious problem for the chicken industry. However, chicken adipogenesis and obesity have not been well investigated, because no chicken preadipocyte cell lines have been generated thus far. Here, we successfully generated two immortalized chicken preadipocyte cell lines through transduction of either chicken telomerase reverse transcriptase (chTERT) alone or in combination with chicken telomerase RNA (chTR). Both of these cell lines have survived >100 population doublings in vitro, display high telomerase activity and have no sign of replicative senescence. Similar to primary chicken preadipocytes, these two cell lines display a fibroblast-like morphology, retain the capacity to differentiate into adipocytes, and do not display any signs of malignant transformation. Isoenzyme analysis and PCR-based analysis confirmed that these two cell lines are of chicken origin and are free from inter-species contamination. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the generation of immortal chicken cells by introduction of chTERT and chTR. Our established chicken preadipocyte cell lines show great promise as an in vitro model for the investigation of chicken adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, and obesity and its related diseases, and our results also provide clues for immortalizing other avian cell types. PMID:28486516

  2. Immortalization of chicken preadipocytes by retroviral transduction of chicken TERT and TR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    Full Text Available The chicken is an important agricultural animal and model for developmental biology, immunology and virology. Excess fat accumulation continues to be a serious problem for the chicken industry. However, chicken adipogenesis and obesity have not been well investigated, because no chicken preadipocyte cell lines have been generated thus far. Here, we successfully generated two immortalized chicken preadipocyte cell lines through transduction of either chicken telomerase reverse transcriptase (chTERT alone or in combination with chicken telomerase RNA (chTR. Both of these cell lines have survived >100 population doublings in vitro, display high telomerase activity and have no sign of replicative senescence. Similar to primary chicken preadipocytes, these two cell lines display a fibroblast-like morphology, retain the capacity to differentiate into adipocytes, and do not display any signs of malignant transformation. Isoenzyme analysis and PCR-based analysis confirmed that these two cell lines are of chicken origin and are free from inter-species contamination. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the generation of immortal chicken cells by introduction of chTERT and chTR. Our established chicken preadipocyte cell lines show great promise as an in vitro model for the investigation of chicken adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, and obesity and its related diseases, and our results also provide clues for immortalizing other avian cell types.

  3. Phosphorylation of chicken growth hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramburo, C.; Montiel, J.L.; Donoghue, D.; Scanes, C.G.; Berghman, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that chicken growth hormone (cGH) can be phosphorylated has been examined. Both native and biosynthetic cGH were phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (and γ- 32 P-ATP). The extent of phosphorylation was however less than that observed with ovine prolactin. Under the conditions employed, glycosylated cGH was not phosphorylated. Chicken anterior pituitary cells in primary culture were incubated in the presence of 32 P-phosphate. Radioactive phosphate was incorporated in vitro into the fraction immunoprecipitable with antisera against cGH. Incorporation was increased with cell number and time of incubation. The presence of GH releasing factor (GRF) increased the release of 32 P-phosphate labeled immunoprecipitable GH into the incubation media but not content of immunoprecipitable GH in the cells. The molecular weight of the phosphorylated immunoreactive cGH in the cells corresponded to cGH dimer

  4. A radioimmunoassay for chicken avidin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulomaa, M.S.; Elo, H.A.; Tuohimaa, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    A double-antibody solid-phase radioimmunoassay for chicken avidin is reported. Avidin was labelled with 125 I by the chloramine-T method. The bound and free avidin were separated with a second antibody bound to a solid matrix. In the logit-log scale the standard curve was linear from 1-2 to 100-200ng of avidin/ml. Cross-reaction of ovalbumin was less than 0.015%. Saturation of biotin-binding sites of avidin with an excess of biotin decreased radioimmunoassay values by about 15%. Recovery studies indicated that avidin can be assayed from all chicken tissues studied with radioimmunoassay, whereas the [ 14 C]biotin/bentonite method gave poor recoveries for avidin in the liver and kidney. Radioimmunoassay and the [ 14 C]biotin/bentonite method gave similar concentrations for oviduct avidin. (author)

  5. Are happy chickens safer chickens? Poultry welfare and disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Tom

    2006-08-01

    1. Contaminated chicken meat remains an internationally important vehicle for human infection with Salmonella and Campylobacter spp. In addition, the last 20 years has seen an international pandemic of human salmonellosis caused by the contamination of eggs with Salmonella Enteritidis. 2. It has been a long held scientific view that Campylobacter spp. and most, if not all of the common zoonotic salmonella, are essentially commensal in chickens. They usually form part of the gut flora and contaminate chicken carcases, for example, by faecal spillage at slaughter. Even when certain salmonella serovars like S. Enteritidis are invasive in laying hens overt evidence of clinical disease is rare and the birds appear to behave normally. 3. Are these bacteria just 'passing through' the avian host and only transient members of the bacterial flora or is there a more dynamic perspective to this infection/colonisation process? Chickens mount antibody responses to both pathogens, which indicate something other than commensalism. Such immune responses, however, do not always result in the clearance of the pathogen. 4. Not all animals in a group will carry salmonella or campylobacter, even under experimental conditions, and will vary, especially those that are outbred, in their responses to pathogen challenge. Identifying the reasons behind this could have important implications for disease control. 5. Both salmonella and campylobacter are more likely to be found in animals, which are compromised and this may explain at least part of the variations seen. Animals are more susceptible to infection when they are in a poor environment, fed a poor diet and/or under physical or psychological stress. 6. Work in this area has naturally focused on pathogens of medical significance and has shown that neurotransmitters such as noradrenaline can markedly alter pathogen behaviour. Other host responses like Interferon gamma can also affect host tissues in a way, which facilitates invasion by

  6. Characterization of the Chicken Ovarian Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodriguez, Gustavo

    2002-01-01

    .... Unlike other ovarian cancer models, which require experimental induction of ovarian tumors, chickens develop ovarian adenocarcinoma spontaneously, with an incidence ranging from 13 to 40 percent...

  7. Characterization of the Chicken Ovarian Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodriguez, Gustavo C

    2004-01-01

    .... Unlike other ovarian cancer models, which require experimental induction of ovarian tumors, chickens develop ovarian adenocarcinoma spontaneously, with an incidence ranging from 13 to 40 percent...

  8. Characterization of the Chicken Ovarian Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodriguez, Gustavo C

    2005-01-01

    .... Unlike other ovarian cancer models, which require experimental induction of ovarian tumors, chickens develop ovarian adenocarcinoma spontaneously, with an incidence ranging from 13 to 40 percent...

  9. Characterization of the Chicken Ovarian Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodriguez, Gustavo

    2003-01-01

    .... Unlike other ovarian cancer models, which require experimental induction of ovarian tumors, chickens develop ovarian adenocarcinoma spontaneously, with an incidence ranging from 13 to 40 percent...

  10. Characterization of the Chicken Ovarian Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodriquez, Gustavo

    2001-01-01

    .... Unlike other ovarian cancer models, which require experimental induction of ovarian tumors, chickens develop ovarian adenocarcinoma spontaneously, with an incidence ranging from 13 to 40 percent...

  11. An evaluation of a SVA retrotransposon in the FUS promoter as a transcriptional regulator and its association to ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L Savage

    Full Text Available Genetic mutations of FUS have been linked to many diseases including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration. A primate specific and polymorphic retrotransposon of the SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA family is present upstream of the FUS gene. Here we have demonstrated that this retrotransposon can act as a classical transcriptional regulatory domain in the context of a reporter gene construct both in vitro in the human SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cell line and in vivo in a chick embryo model. We have also demonstrated that the SVA is composed of multiple distinct regulatory domains, one of which is a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR. The ability of the SVA and its component parts to direct reporter gene expression supported a hypothesis that this region could direct differential FUS expression in vivo. The SVA may therefore contribute to the modulation of FUS expression exhibited in and associated with neurological disorders including ALS where FUS regulation may be an important parameter in progression of the disease. As VNTRs are often clinical associates for disease progression we determined the extent of polymorphism within the SVA. In total 2 variants of the SVA were identified based within a central VNTR. Preliminary analysis addressed the association of these SVA variants within a small sporadic ALS cohort but did not reach statistical significance, although we did not include other parameters such as SNPs within the SVA or an environmental factor in this analysis. The latter may be particularly important as the transcriptional and epigenetic properties of the SVA are likely to be directed by the environment of the cell.

  12. Crowing Sound Analysis of Gaga' Chicken; Local Chicken from South Sulawesi Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Aprilita Bugiwati, Sri Rachma; Ashari, Fachri

    2008-01-01

    Gaga??? chicken was known as a local chicken at South Sulawesi Indonesia which has unique, specific, and different crowing sound, especially at the ending of crowing sound which is like the voice character of human laughing, comparing with the other types of singing chicken in the world. 287 birds of Gaga??? chicken at 3 districts at the centre habitat of Gaga??? chicken were separated into 2 groups (163 birds of Dangdut type and 124 birds of Slow type) which is based on the speed...

  13. Flavour Chemistry of Chicken Meat: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasena, Dinesh D.; Ahn, Dong Uk; Nam, Ki Chang; Jo, Cheorun

    2013-01-01

    Flavour comprises mainly of taste and aroma and is involved in consumers’ meat-buying behavior and preferences. Chicken meat flavour is supposed to be affected by a number of ante- and post-mortem factors, including breed, diet, post-mortem ageing, method of cooking, etc. Additionally, chicken meat is more susceptible to quality deterioration mainly due to lipid oxidation with resulting off-flavours. Therefore, the intent of this paper is to highlight the mechanisms and chemical compounds responsible for chicken meat flavour and off-flavour development to help producers in producing the most flavourful and consistent product possible. Chicken meat flavour is thermally derived and the Maillard reaction, thermal degradation of lipids, and interaction between these 2 reactions are mainly responsible for the generation of flavour and aroma compounds. The reaction of cysteine and sugar can lead to characteristic meat flavour specially for chicken and pork. Volatile compounds including 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, 2-furfurylthiol, methionol, 2,4,5-trimethyl-thiazole, nonanol, 2-trans-nonenal, and other compounds have been identified as important for the flavour of chicken. However 2-methyl-3-furanthiol is considered as the most vital chemical compound for chicken flavour development. In addition, a large number of heterocyclic compounds are formed when higher temperature and low moisture conditions are used during certain cooking methods of chicken meat such as roasting, grilling, frying or pressure cooking compared to boiled chicken meat. Major volatile compounds responsible for fried chicken are 3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-trithiolanes, 2,4,6-trimethylperhydro-1,3,5-dithiazines, 3,5-diisobutyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 3-methyl-5-butyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 3-methyl-5-pentyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 2,4-decadienal and trans-4,5-epoxy-trans-2-decenal. Alkylpyrazines were reported in the flavours of fried chicken and roasted chicken but not in chicken broth. The main reason for flavour deterioration

  14. Flavour chemistry of chicken meat: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasena, Dinesh D; Ahn, Dong Uk; Nam, Ki Chang; Jo, Cheorun

    2013-05-01

    Flavour comprises mainly of taste and aroma and is involved in consumers' meat-buying behavior and preferences. Chicken meat flavour is supposed to be affected by a number of ante- and post-mortem factors, including breed, diet, post-mortem ageing, method of cooking, etc. Additionally, chicken meat is more susceptible to quality deterioration mainly due to lipid oxidation with resulting off-flavours. Therefore, the intent of this paper is to highlight the mechanisms and chemical compounds responsible for chicken meat flavour and off-flavour development to help producers in producing the most flavourful and consistent product possible. Chicken meat flavour is thermally derived and the Maillard reaction, thermal degradation of lipids, and interaction between these 2 reactions are mainly responsible for the generation of flavour and aroma compounds. The reaction of cysteine and sugar can lead to characteristic meat flavour specially for chicken and pork. Volatile compounds including 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, 2-furfurylthiol, methionol, 2,4,5-trimethyl-thiazole, nonanol, 2-trans-nonenal, and other compounds have been identified as important for the flavour of chicken. However 2-methyl-3-furanthiol is considered as the most vital chemical compound for chicken flavour development. In addition, a large number of heterocyclic compounds are formed when higher temperature and low moisture conditions are used during certain cooking methods of chicken meat such as roasting, grilling, frying or pressure cooking compared to boiled chicken meat. Major volatile compounds responsible for fried chicken are 3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-trithiolanes, 2,4,6-trimethylperhydro-1,3,5-dithiazines, 3,5-diisobutyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 3-methyl-5-butyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 3-methyl-5-pentyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 2,4-decadienal and trans-4,5-epoxy-trans-2-decenal. Alkylpyrazines were reported in the flavours of fried chicken and roasted chicken but not in chicken broth. The main reason for flavour deterioration

  15. Flavour Chemistry of Chicken Meat: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh D. Jayasena

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Flavour comprises mainly of taste and aroma and is involved in consumers’ meat-buying behavior and preferences. Chicken meat flavour is supposed to be affected by a number of ante- and post-mortem factors, including breed, diet, post-mortem ageing, method of cooking, etc. Additionally, chicken meat is more susceptible to quality deterioration mainly due to lipid oxidation with resulting off-flavours. Therefore, the intent of this paper is to highlight the mechanisms and chemical compounds responsible for chicken meat flavour and off-flavour development to help producers in producing the most flavourful and consistent product possible. Chicken meat flavour is thermally derived and the Maillard reaction, thermal degradation of lipids, and interaction between these 2 reactions are mainly responsible for the generation of flavour and aroma compounds. The reaction of cysteine and sugar can lead to characteristic meat flavour specially for chicken and pork. Volatile compounds including 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, 2-furfurylthiol, methionol, 2,4,5-trimethyl-thiazole, nonanol, 2-trans-nonenal, and other compounds have been identified as important for the flavour of chicken. However 2-methyl-3-furanthiol is considered as the most vital chemical compound for chicken flavour development. In addition, a large number of heterocyclic compounds are formed when higher temperature and low moisture conditions are used during certain cooking methods of chicken meat such as roasting, grilling, frying or pressure cooking compared to boiled chicken meat. Major volatile compounds responsible for fried chicken are 3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-trithiolanes, 2,4,6-trimethylperhydro-1,3,5-dithiazines, 3,5-diisobutyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 3-methyl-5-butyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 3-methyl-5-pentyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 2,4-decadienal and trans-4,5-epoxy-trans-2-decenal. Alkylpyrazines were reported in the flavours of fried chicken and roasted chicken but not in chicken broth. The main reason for

  16. Production of crispy bread snacks containing chicken meat and chicken meat powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HULYA CAKMAK

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Chicken meat in two different forms (chicken meat and chicken meat powder were added into white flour and whole wheat blend baguette bread formulations for protein enrichment and finally developing new and healthy snacks. The chicken meat and powder levels were 10% for white flour baguette, and 15% for whole wheat blend. The dried baguette samples were packaged under 100% N2, and physical, chemical, microbiological and sensorial properties were evaluated during 3 months of storage. Protein content of chicken meat powder added samples were found statistically higher than chicken meat added samples. Hardness of the snacks was significantly affected from type of chicken meat, such as values were higher for chicken meat added samples than chicken meat powder added samples. Lipid oxidation of the snacks was determined by TBA analysis, and TBA value for whole wheat mixture snack with 15% of chicken meat was the highest among all during storage. The highest overall acceptance score was obtained from white flour snack with 10% chicken meat. There was no coliform bacteria detected during storage and the results of yeast-mold count and aerobic plate count of snacks remained between the quantitative ranges.

  17. Phase stability predictions of Cr1−x, Mx)2(Al1−y, Ay)(C1−z, Xz) (M = Ti, Hf, Zr; A = Si, X = B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Lin; Music, Denis; Baben, Moritz to; Schneider, Jochen M

    2014-01-01

    The phase stability of (Cr 1−x , M x ) 2 (Al 1−y , A y )(C 1−z , X z ) (M = Ti, Hf, Zr; A = Si, X = B, space group P6 3 /mmc, prototype Cr 2 AlC) was studied using ab initio calculations. Based on the energy of mixing data as well as the density of states (DOS) analysis, (Cr 1−x , Zr x ) 2 AlC and (Cr 1−x , Hf x ) 2 AlC are predicted to be unstable, whereas (Cr 1−x , Ti x ) 2 AlC, Cr 2 (Al 1−y , Si y )C and Cr 2 Al(C 1−z , B z ) are predicted to be stable or metastable. The density of states analysis reveals that small differences in the position of the Fermi level alters the phase stability: (Cr 1−x , Zr x ) 2 AlC and (Cr 1−x , Hf x ) 2 AlC are predicted to be unstable or metastable as the Fermi level lies at a peak position. While the Cr dominated DOS for (Cr 1−x , Ti x ) 2 AlC plateaus at the Fermi level indicating stability. Implications of these results for the vapour phase condensation of self-healing Cr 2 AlC based materials are discussed. (paper)

  18. Campylobacter jejuni diarrhea model in infant chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanyal, S. C.; Islam, K. M.; Neogy, P. K.; Islam, M.; Speelman, P.; Huq, M. I.

    1984-01-01

    To study the pathogenic mechanisms of Campylobacter jejuni infection, 36- to 72-h-old chickens were fed 10(3) to 10(6) live cells, using strains isolated from 40 patients with watery diarrhea and 6 with bloody mucoid diarrhea from whom no other known enteropathogen was detected. Chickens of Starbro

  19. Ectoparasites and Haemoparasites of Indigenous Chicken ( Gallus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research undertook the study of ectoparasites and haemoparasites found on and in the body of indigenous chicken (Gallus domesticus). Six hundred and nineteen ectoparasites were collected from 375 chicken from 28 households in and around Ibadan city between February and November, 1999. Of these, 455 ...

  20. Enteric parvovirus infections of chickens and turkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicken and turkey parvoviruses are members of the Parvovirus family. Comparative sequence analysis of their genome structure revealed that they should form a new genus within the vertebrate Parvovirinae subfamily. The first chicken and turkey parvoviruses were identified by electron microscopy duri...

  1. What's so special about chicken immunology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    What’s so special about chickens? Firstly, chickens are not only an invaluable model for studying immunology, they also provide the world’s main source of meat and will be a key protein source needed to feed the growing human population into the future. Poultry meat production is highly efficient ...

  2. Characterization of the chicken muscle insulin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamo, M.; Simon, J.; Rosebrough, R.W.; McMurtry, J.P.; Steele, N.C.; LeRoith, D.

    1987-01-01

    Insulin receptors are present in chicken skeletal muscle. Crude membrane preparations demonstrated specific 125 I-insulin binding. The nonspecific binding was high (36-55% of total binding) and slightly lower affinity receptors were found than are typically observed for crude membrane insulin binding in other chicken tissues. Affinity crosslinking of 125 I-insulin to crude membranes revealed insulin receptor alpha-subunits of Mr 128K, intermediate between those of liver (134K) and brain (124K). When solubilized and partially purified on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) affinity columns, chicken muscle insulin receptors exhibited typical high affinity binding, with approximately 10(-10) M unlabeled insulin producing 50% inhibition of the specific 125 I-insulin binding. WGA purified chicken muscle insulin receptors also exhibited insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the beta-subunit, which appeared as phosphorylated bands of 92- and 81K. Both bands were immunoprecipitated by anti-receptor antiserum (B10). WGA purified membranes also demonstrated dose-dependent insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of the exogenous substrate poly(Glu,Tyr)4:1. However, unlike chicken liver, chicken muscle insulin receptor number and tyrosine kinase activity were unaltered by 48 hr of fasting or 48 hr of fasting and 24 hr of refeeding. Thus, despite the presence of insulin receptors in chicken muscle showing normal coupling to receptor tyrosine kinase activity, nutritional alterations modulate these parameters in a tissue-specific manner in chickens

  3. Nano-nutrition of chicken embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodzik, Marta; Sawosz, Filip; Sawosz, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    factors of chicken embryo pectoral muscles. ND, Gln, and Gln/ND solutions (50 mg/L) were injected into fertilized broiler chicken eggs at the beginning of embryogenesis. Muscle tissue was dissected at day 20 of incubation and analysed for gene expression of FGF2, VEGF-A, and MyoD1. ND and especially Gln...

  4. Breeding program for indigenous chicken in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngeno, K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract

    Ngeno, K. (2015). Breeding program for indigenous chicken in Kenya. Analysis of diversity in indigenous chicken populations. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, the Netherlands

    The objective of this research was to generate knowledge required for the

  5. Recurrent emergence of structural variants of LTR retrotransposon CsRn1 evolving novel expression strategy and their selective expansion in a carcinogenic liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seon-Hee; Kong, Yoon; Bae, Young-An

    2017-06-01

    Autonomous retrotransposons, in which replication and transcription are coupled, encode the essential gag and pol genes as a fusion or separate overlapping form(s) that are expressed in single transcripts regulated by a common upstream promoter. The element-specific expression strategies have driven development of relevant translational recoding mechanisms including ribosomal frameshifting to satisfy the protein stoichiometry critical for the assembly of infectious virus-like particles. Retrotransposons with different recoding strategies exhibit a mosaic distribution pattern across the diverse families of reverse transcribing elements, even though their respective distributions are substantially skewed towards certain family groups. However, only a few investigations to date have focused on the emergence of retrotransposons evolving novel expression strategy and causal genetic drivers of the structural variants. In this study, the bulk of genomic and transcribed sequences of a Ty3/gypsy-like CsRn1 retrotransposon in Clonorchis sinensis were analyzed for the comprehensive examination of its expression strategy. Our results demonstrated that structural variants with single open reading frame (ORF) have recurrently emerged from precedential CsRn1 copies encoding overlapping gag-pol ORFs by a single-nucleotide insertion in an upstream region of gag stop codon. In the parasite genome, some of the newly evolved variants appeared to undergo proliferative burst as active master lineages together with their ancestral copies. The genetic event was similarly observed in Opisthorchis viverrini, the closest neighbor of C. sinensis, whereas the resulting structural variants might have failed to overcome purifying selection and comprised minor remnant copies in the Opisthorchis genome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Effect of Pulsed Streamer-like Discharge in Liquid on Transcriptional Activation of Retrotransposon Genes of a Red Alga, Porphyra Yezoensis

    OpenAIRE

    Ohno, T.; Li, Z.; Lin, X.F.; Zhang, W.B.; Takano, H.; Takio, S.; Namihira, T.; Akiyama, H.; オオノ, ツヨシ; ナミヒラ, タカオ; アキヤマ, ヒデノリ; 大野, 剛史; 浪平, 隆男; 秋山, 秀典

    2007-01-01

    Retrotransposons are mobile genetic elements thataccomplished transposition via an RNA intermediate.These elements can be transcriptionally activated by stressfactors, such as UV light, ozone, pathogens, woundingand drought. A red alga, porphyra yezoensis has recentlybeen recognized as a model plant for fundamental andapplied study in marine biological science. In this paper,pulsed streamer-like discharge in liquid was used as a newstress condition, and the transcription level of a copia-like...

  7. Microglia and Aging: The Role of the TREM2–DAP12 and CX3CL1-CX3CR1 Axes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Mecca

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the species, microglial cells represent 5–20% of glial cells in the adult brain. As the innate immune effector of the brain, microglia are involved in several functions: regulation of inflammation, synaptic connectivity, programmed cell death, wiring and circuitry formation, phagocytosis of cell debris, and synaptic pruning and sculpting of postnatal neural circuits. Moreover, microglia contribute to some neurodevelopmental disorders such as Nasu-Hakola disease (NHD, and to aged-associated neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and others. There is evidence that human and rodent microglia may become senescent. This event determines alterations in the microglia activation status, associated with a chronic inflammation phenotype and with the loss of neuroprotective functions that lead to a greater susceptibility to the neurodegenerative diseases of aging. In the central nervous system (CNS, Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 2-DNAX activation protein 12 (TREM2-DAP12 is a signaling complex expressed exclusively in microglia. As a microglial surface receptor, TREM2 interacts with DAP12 to initiate signal transduction pathways that promote microglial cell activation, phagocytosis, and microglial cell survival. Defective TREM2-DAP12 functions play a central role in the pathogenesis of several diseases. The CX3CL1 (fractalkine-CX3CR1 signaling represents the most important communication channel between neurons and microglia. The expression of CX3CL1 in neurons and of its receptor CX3CR1 in microglia determines a specific interaction, playing fundamental roles in the regulation of the maturation and function of these cells. Here, we review the role of the TREM2-DAP12 and CX3CL1-CX3CR1 axes in aged microglia and the involvement of these pathways in physiological CNS aging and in age-associated neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Effect of Activated Flux on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Residual Stresses of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduraimuthu, V.; Vasudevan, M.; Muthupandi, V.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2012-02-01

    A novel variant of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding called activated-TIG (A-TIG) welding, which uses a thin layer of activated flux coating applied on the joint area prior to welding, is known to enhance the depth of penetration during autogenous TIG welding and overcomes the limitation associated with TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steels. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a specific activated flux for enhancing the depth of penetration during autogeneous TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. In the current work, activated flux composition is optimized to achieve 6 mm depth of penetration in single-pass TIG welding at minimum heat input possible. Then square butt weld joints are made for 6-mm-thick and 10-mm-thick plates using the optimized flux. The effect of flux on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and residual stresses of the A-TIG weld joint is studied by comparing it with that of the weld joints made by conventional multipass TIG welding process using matching filler wire. Welded microstructure in the A-TIG weld joint is coarser because of the higher peak temperature in A-TIG welding process compared with that of multipass TIG weld joint made by a conventional TIG welding process. Transverse strength properties of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weld produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base materials. The average toughness values of A-TIG weld joints are lower compared with that of the base metal and multipass weld joints due to the presence of δ-ferrite and inclusions in the weld metal caused by the flux. Compressive residual stresses are observed in the fusion zone of A-TIG weld joint, whereas tensile residual stresses are observed in the multipass TIG weld joint.

  9. Directional differentiation of chicken embryonic stem cells into ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chicken embryonic stem (ES) cells are useful for producing transgenic chickens and preserving genetic material in avian species. In this study, the differentiation potential of chicken ES cells was investigated in vitro. Chicken ES cells were differentiated into osteoblasts cultured for 15 to 21 days in the induction media ...

  10. Elevated-temperature tensile properties of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel irradiated in the EBR-II, AD-2 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Vitek, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of irradiated on the tensile properties of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel was determined for specimens irradiation in EBR-II at 390 to 550 0 C. Unirradiated control specimens and specimens aged for 5000 h at the irradiation temperatures were also tested. Irradiation to approximately 9 dpa at 390 0 C increased the strength and decreased the ductility compared with the unirradiated and aged specimens. Softening occurred in samples irradiated and tested at 450, 500, and 550 0 C

  11. A continuous damage approach for the analysis of creep-fatigue behavior of 2 1/4 Cr - 1 Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomuc, R.; Biron, A.; Bui-Quoc, T.

    1985-01-01

    Components made from 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo in thermal and nuclear power plants have usually been designed for lifetimes as long as forty years at service temperatures approaching 593 o C. While several experimental investigations on the creep-fatigue behaviour of such materials have been reported, a detailed analysis of material behavior under these loading conditions is not available, to the authors knowledge. The aim of the present paper is to report the results of an analysis on these experimental data using a recently developed procedure. (author)

  12. Effect of Ni Addition on the Wear and Corrosion Resistance of Fe-20Cr-1.7C-1Si Hardfacing Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Hoon; Kim, Ki Nam; Kim, Seon Jin

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the corrosion resistance of Fe-20Cr-1.7C-1Si hardfacing alloy without a loss of wear resistance, the effect of Ni addition was investigated. As expected, the corrosion resistance of the alloy increased with increasing Ni concentration. The wear resistance of the alloy did not decrease, even though the hardness decreased, up to Ni concentration of 5 wt.%. This was attributed to the fact that the decrease in hardness was counterbalanced by the strain-induced martensitic transformation. The wear resistance of the alloy, however, decreased abruptly with increases of the Ni concentration over 5 wt.%.

  13. Efficient DNA fingerprinting based on the targeted sequencing of active retrotransposon insertion sites using a bench-top high-throughput sequencing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monden, Yuki; Yamamoto, Ayaka; Shindo, Akiko; Tahara, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    In many crop species, DNA fingerprinting is required for the precise identification of cultivars to protect the rights of breeders. Many families of retrotransposons have multiple copies throughout the eukaryotic genome and their integrated copies are inherited genetically. Thus, their insertion polymorphisms among cultivars are useful for DNA fingerprinting. In this study, we conducted a DNA fingerprinting based on the insertion polymorphisms of active retrotransposon families (Rtsp-1 and LIb) in sweet potato. Using 38 cultivars, we identified 2,024 insertion sites in the two families with an Illumina MiSeq sequencing platform. Of these insertion sites, 91.4% appeared to be polymorphic among the cultivars and 376 cultivar-specific insertion sites were identified, which were converted directly into cultivar-specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using these insertion sites, which corresponded well with known pedigree information, thereby indicating their suitability for genetic diversity studies. Thus, the genome-wide comparative analysis of active retrotransposon insertion sites using the bench-top MiSeq sequencing platform is highly effective for DNA fingerprinting without any requirement for whole genome sequence information. This approach may facilitate the development of practical polymerase chain reaction-based cultivar diagnostic system and could also be applied to the determination of genetic relationships. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  14. Diaspora, a large family of Ty3-gypsy retrotransposons in Glycine max, is an envelope-less member of an endogenous plant retrovirus lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Sho T; Panbehi, Bahman; Das, Arpita; Laten, Howard M

    2005-05-05

    The chromosomes of higher plants are littered with retrotransposons that, in many cases, constitute as much as 80% of plant genomes. Long terminal repeat retrotransposons have been especially successful colonizers of the chromosomes of higher plants and examinations of their function, evolution, and dispersal are essential to understanding the evolution of eukaryotic genomes. In soybean, several families of retrotransposons have been identified, including at least two that, by virtue of the presence of an envelope-like gene, may constitute endogenous retroviruses. However, most elements are highly degenerate and are often sequestered in regions of the genome that sequencing projects initially shun. In addition, finding potentially functional copies from genomic DNA is rare. This study provides a mechanism to surmount these issues to generate a consensus sequence that can then be functionally and phylogenetically evaluated. Diaspora is a multicopy member of the Ty3-gypsy-like family of LTR retrotransposons and comprises at least 0.5% of the soybean genome. Although the Diaspora family is highly degenerate, and with the exception of this report, is not represented in the Genbank nr database, a full-length consensus sequence was generated from short overlapping sequences using a combination of experimental and in silico methods. Diaspora is 11,737 bp in length and contains a single 1892-codon ORF that encodes a gag-pol polyprotein. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is closely related to Athila and Calypso retroelements from Arabidopsis and soybean, respectively. These in turn form the framework of an endogenous retrovirus lineage whose members possess an envelope-like gene. Diaspora appears to lack any trace of this coding region. A combination of empirical sequencing and retrieval of unannotated Genome Survey Sequence database entries was successfully used to construct a full-length representative of the Diaspora family in Glycine max. Diaspora is presently the

  15. Oral DNA Vaccine in Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Davoud Jazayeri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Attenuated Salmonella has been used as a carrier for DNA vaccine. However, in vitro and in vivo studies on the bacteria following transfection of plasmid DNA were poorly studied. In this paper, eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding avian influenza virus (AIV subtype H5N1 genes, pcDNA3.1/HA, NA, and NP, were transfected into an attenuated Salmonella enteric typhimurium SV4089. In vitro stability of the transfected plasmids into Salmonella were over 90% after 100 generations. The attenuated Salmonella were able to invade MCF-7 (1.2% and MCF-10A (0.5% human breast cancer cells. Newly hatched specific-pathogen-free (SPF chicks were inoculated once by oral gavage with 109 colony-forming unit (CFU of the attenuated Salmonella. No abnormal clinical signs or deaths were recorded after inoculation. Viable bacteria were detected 3 days after inoculation by plating from spleen, liver, and cecum. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and polymerase chain reaction (PCR were carried out for confirmation. Salmonella was not detected in blood cultures although serum antibody immune responses to Salmonella O antiserum group D1 factor 1, 9, and 12 antigens were observed in all the inoculated chickens after 7 days up to 35 days. Our results showed that live attenuated S. typhimurium SV4089 harboring pcDNA3.1/HA, NA, and NP may provide a unique alternative as a carrier for DNA oral vaccine in chickens.

  16. Study on structural and optical properties of α-(AlxCr1-x)2O3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangir, Ravindra; Kumar, Dharmendra; Srihari, Velaga; Ganguli, Tapas

    2018-04-01

    We report on structural and optical properties for ternary α-(AlxCr1-x)2O3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) solid solutions synthesized by using solid sate reaction method. Single R-3c phase was obtained for the Aluminum composition of 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Due to difference in the ionic radia of Al3+ and Cr3+, in plane lattice parameter showed deviation from the vegard's law. Optical absorption spectra for the solid solutions showed a blue shift of ˜ 0.5 eV in the optical gap. It has also been observed that Cr 3d level shifted towards the O 2p level in the valance band which indicates the enhancement of hybridization in the d and p levels, which is related to the delocalization of hole states, responsible for p-type conduction in wide band gap semiconductors. The results suggests that ternary α-(AlxCr1-x)2O3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) can be useful in the field of UV transparent electronics and UV photodetectors.

  17. Correlation of microstructure and low cycle fatigue properties for 13.5Cr1.1W0.3Ti ODS steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, P., E-mail: pei.he@kit.edu; Klimenkov, M.; Möslang, A.; Lindau, R.; Seifert, H.J.

    2014-12-15

    Reduced activation oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are prospective structural materials for the blanket system and first wall components in Tokamak-type fusion reactors. Under the pulsed operation, these components will be predominantly subjected to cyclic thermal–mechanical loading which leads to inevitable fatigue damage. In this work, strain controlled isothermal fatigue tests were conducted for 13.5Cr1.1W0.3Ti ODS steel at 550 °C. The total strain range varied from 0.54% to 0.9%. After thermomechanical processing, 13.5CrWTi–ODS steel exhibits a remarkable lifetime extension with a factor of 10–20 for strain ranges Δε ⩽ 0.7%. 13.5Cr ODS steel shows no cyclic softening at all during the whole testing process irrespective of the strain range. TEM observations reveal ultrastable grain structure and constant dislocation densities around 10{sup 14} m{sup −2}, independent of the number of cycles or the applied strain amplitude. The presence of the stabilized ultrafine Y–Ti–O dispersoids enhances the microstructural stability and therefore leads to outstanding fatigue resistance for 13.5Cr1.1W0.3Ti–ODS steel.

  18. Magnetic phase diagram of Co(Cr1-xA lx) 2O4 (x = 0.0-1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padam, R.; Sarkar, T.; Mathieu, R.; Thota, S.; Pal, D.

    2017-08-01

    We report the role of Al substitution in the magnetic properties of spinel CoCr2O4 by means of temperature dependent dc and ac magnetization and heat capacity measurements. Various compositions (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 1.0) of polycrystalline Co(Cr1-xAlx)2O4 samples have been prepared by sol-gel processing and their crystal structure was investigated by X-ray diffraction which was found to crystallize in the normal cubic spinel structure. For x ≤ 0.1, the system exhibits multiple magnetic orderings (long range ferrimagnetic ordering TC, spin-spiral ordering TS, and lock-in transition TL), similar to that of the parent compound, CoCr2O4. However, all the compositions between x = 0.1 and 0.5 exhibit long range ferrimagnetic ordering below TC and also a short range order at low temperature. Spin-glass like ordering was noticed between x = 0.6 and 0.8 due to the diluted B-site occupancy, whereas the end compound CoAl2O4 (x = 1.0) shows antiferromagnetic behavior. On the basis of these results, we propose a magnetic phase diagram for the Co(Cr1-xAlx)2O4 series as a function of the Al content (x) and measuring temperature (T).

  19. Correlation of microstructure and low cycle fatigue properties for 13.5Cr1.1W0.3Ti ODS steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, P.; Klimenkov, M.; Möslang, A.; Lindau, R.; Seifert, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced activation oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are prospective structural materials for the blanket system and first wall components in Tokamak-type fusion reactors. Under the pulsed operation, these components will be predominantly subjected to cyclic thermal–mechanical loading which leads to inevitable fatigue damage. In this work, strain controlled isothermal fatigue tests were conducted for 13.5Cr1.1W0.3Ti ODS steel at 550 °C. The total strain range varied from 0.54% to 0.9%. After thermomechanical processing, 13.5CrWTi–ODS steel exhibits a remarkable lifetime extension with a factor of 10–20 for strain ranges Δε ⩽ 0.7%. 13.5Cr ODS steel shows no cyclic softening at all during the whole testing process irrespective of the strain range. TEM observations reveal ultrastable grain structure and constant dislocation densities around 10 14 m −2 , independent of the number of cycles or the applied strain amplitude. The presence of the stabilized ultrafine Y–Ti–O dispersoids enhances the microstructural stability and therefore leads to outstanding fatigue resistance for 13.5Cr1.1W0.3Ti–ODS steel

  20. Analytical description of the effects of melting practice and heat treatment on the creep properties of a 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, M.K.

    1977-01-01

    2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel is used worldwide as an elevated-temperature structural material, particularly in steam generation systems. Since this material is often used at service temperatures up to 600 0 C, successful design requires a consideration of its creep properties. Unfortunately, the development of an analytical description of the creep behavior of 2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel is complicated by two phenomena. First, the creep strength of this material is quite sensitive to heat treatment. Second, this material tends to exhibit nonclassical creep under some conditions. In addition, especially in nuclear applications, the material used may be air-melted, vacuum-arc remelted (VAR), or electroslag remelted (ESR). Available creep data from air-melted, VAR, and ESR material have been analyzed. Heat treatments included both annealed and isothermally annealed, with and without a subsequent ''postweld'' heat treatment. It has been found that the elevated-temperature ultimate tensile strength (UTS) is a useful indicator of creep strength for a given heat of material regardless of melting practice or heat treatment. Meanwhile, the nonclassical creep behavior has been attributed to a change in creep mechanism which has been mathematically modeled

  1. Experimental study and modelling of high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffard, V.

    2004-12-01

    Chromium martensitic stainless steels are under development since the 70's with the prospect of using them as structural components in thermal and nuclear power plants. The modified 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel is already used, especially in England and Japan, as a material for structural components in thermal power plants where welding is a commonly used joining technique. New generations of chromium martensitic stainless steels with improved mechanical properties for high pressure and temperature use are currently under development. However, observations of several in-service premature failures of welded components in 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel, outline a strong need for understanding the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments. The present study aimed at experimentally determining and then modelling the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of both 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments (typically in the temperature range from 450 C to 650 C). The base metal was first studied as the reference material. It was especially evidenced that tempered chromium martensitic steels exhibit a change in both creep flow and damage behaviour for long term creep exposure. As a consequence, the classically performed extrapolation of 1,000 hours creep data to 100,000 hours creep lifetime predictions might be very hazardous. Based on experimental observations, a new model, integrating and coupling multiple creep flow and damage mechanisms, was developed in the framework of the mechanics of porous media. It was then successfully used to represent creep flow and damage behaviour of the base metal from high to low stress levels even for complex multiaxial loading conditions. Although the high temperature creep properties of the base metal are quite good, the occurrence of premature failure in weldments in high temperature creep conditions largely focused the attention of the scientific community. The lower creep strength of the weld component was also

  2. Toxigenic penicillia spoiling frozen chicken nuggets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigmann, Evelin Francine; Saccomori, Fernanda; Bernardi, Angelica Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Frozen chicken nuggets are classified as pre-prepared frozen meals. These products are convenient to consumers as they are easy to prepare and allow for long storage by freezing. Over the years, spoilage of frozen food products caused by fungi has been a continual problem for the food industry...... of filamentous fungi involved in the spoilage of frozen chicken nuggets and determine their ability to produce mycotoxins under laboratorial conditions. A total of 7 samples of frozen chicken nuggets were analyzed by dilution plating in potato dextrose agar (PDA). These products had been returned by customers...

  3. Campylobacter jejuni infection in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, A Singh; Shivaprasad, H L; Schaberg, D; Wier, F; Weber, S; Bandli, D

    2006-03-01

    Day-old, straight-run broiler chickens were procured from a hatchery located in the Pacific Northwest. The chickens were subdivided individually into nine groups of 20 chickens. The chickens were tagged, housed in isolation chambers on wire, fed commercial broiler feed, and given water ad libitum. Three isolates of Campylobacter jejuni of poultry origin and one of human origin were tested in this study. Various C. jejuni cultures were inoculated into 9-day-old chickens by crop gavage. Four groups of 20 chickens were inoculated at a dose level of 0.5 ml of 1 x 10(2) colony-forming units (CFU)/ml. The other four groups were inoculated with 0.5 ml of 1 X 10(4) CFU/ml. One group of 20 chickens was kept as an uninoculated control group. Four randomly selected chickens from each of the inoculated and uninoculated groups were necropsied at 5, 12, and 19 days postinoculation (DPI). The C. jejuni was cultured and enumerated from a composite of the upper and midintestine and the cecum. Body weights of all chicken groups at 7 days of age and at 5, 12, and 19 DPI were measured and statistically analyzed. No significant differences were present in the mean body weights (MBWs) of 7-day-old, 5 DPI, and 12 DPI male and female broiler chickens inoculated with C. jejuni at both dose levels compared with uninoculated controls. Differences in MBWs of the male and female broilers at 19 DPI were observed in some of the groups. Results of the C. jejuni culture enumeration mean (CEM) of composite intestine samples at 5 DPI from all inoculated chicken groups, irrespective of the dose level, ranged from (2.5 +/- 5.0) x 10(2) to (2.8 +/- 4.8) x 10(5) CFU/g (mean +/- SD). Results of cecum C. jejuni CEM at 5 DPI inoculated at both dose levels ranged from (2.5 +/- 5.0) x 10(6) to (1 +/- 0.0) x 10(7) CFU/g in all treatment groups irrespective of the dose level. CEM results from the composite intestine samples at 12 and 19 DPI increased by 1 log unit, or sometimes more. Results of cecum C. jejuni

  4. Quality Evaluation of Chicken Nugget Formulated with Various Contents of Chicken Skin and Wheat Fiber Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hack-Youn; Kim, Kon-Joong; Lee, Jong-Wan; Kim, Gye-Woong; Choe, Ju-Hui; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of various mixtures of the chicken skin and wheat fiber on the properties of chicken nuggets. Two skin and fiber mixtures (SFM) were prepared using the following formulations; SFM-1: chicken skin (50%), wheat fiber (20%), and ice (30%); and SFM-2: chicken skin (30%), wheat fiber (20%), and ice (50%). Chicken nugget samples were prepared by adding the following amounts of either SFM-1 or SFM-2: 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, and 10%. The water content for samples formulated with SFM-1 or SFM-2 was higher than in the control (pchicken nuggets was higher than that of cooked chicken nuggets for all the samples tested. Chicken nuggets formulated with SFM-1 and SFM-2 displayed higher cooking yields than the control sample. The hardness of the control sample was also lower than the samples containing SFM-1 and SFM-2. The sensory evaluation showed no significant differences between the control and the samples containing SFM. Therefore, the incorporation of a chicken skin and wheat fiber mixture improved the quality of chicken nuggets. PMID:26761796

  5. A 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylase/lyase demethylates the retrotransposon Tos17 and promotes its transposition in rice

    KAUST Repository

    La, Honggui; Ding, Bo; Mishra, Gyan Prakash; Zhou, Bo; Yang, Hongmei; Bellizzi, Maria Del Rosario; Chen, Songbiao; Meyers, Blake C.; Peng, Zhaohua; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Wang, Guoliang

    2011-01-01

    DNA 5-methylcytosine (5-meC) is an important epigenetic mark for transcriptional gene silencing in many eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, 5-meC DNA glycosylase/lyases actively remove 5-meC to counter-act transcriptional gene silencing in a locus-specific manner, and have been suggested to maintain the expression of transposons. However, it is unclear whether plant DNA demethylases can promote the transposition of transposons. Here we report the functional characterization of the DNA glycosylase/lyase DNG701 in rice. DNG701 encodes a large (1,812 amino acid residues) DNA glycosylase domain protein. Recombinant DNG701 protein showed 5-meC DNA glycosylase and lyase activities in vitro. Knockout or knockdown of DNG701 in rice plants led to DNA hypermethylation and reduced expression of the retrotransposon Tos17. Tos17 showed less transposition in calli derived from dng701 knockout mutant seeds compared with that in wild-type calli. Overexpression of DNG701 in both rice calli and transgenic plants substantially reduced DNA methylation levels of Tos17 and enhanced its expression. The overexpression also led to more frequent transposition of Tos17 in calli. Our results demonstrate that rice DNG701 is a 5-meC DNA glycosylase/lyase responsible for the demethylation of Tos17 and this DNA demethylase plays a critical role in promoting Tos17 transposition in rice calli.

  6. Hybridogenesis and a potential case of R2 non-LTR retrotransposon horizontal transmission in Bacillus stick insects (Insecta Phasmida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavariello, Claudia; Luchetti, Andrea; Martoni, Francesco; Bonandin, Livia; Mantovani, Barbara

    2017-02-06

    Horizontal transfer (HT) is an event in which the genetic material is transferred from one species to another, even if distantly related, and it has been demonstrated as a possible essential part of the lifecycle of transposable elements (TEs). However, previous studies on the non-LTR R2 retrotransposon, a metazoan-wide distributed element, indicated its vertical transmission since the Radiata-Bilateria split. Here we present the first possible instances of R2 HT in stick insects of the genus Bacillus (Phasmida). Six R2 elements were characterized in the strictly bisexual subspecies B. grandii grandii, B. grandii benazzii and B. grandii maretimi and in the obligatory parthenogenetic taxon B. atticus. These elements were compared with those previously retrieved in the facultative parthenogenetic species B. rossius. Phylogenetic inconsistencies between element and host taxa, and age versus divergence analyses agree and support at least two HT events. These HT events can be explained by taking into consideration the complex Bacillus reproductive biology, which includes also hybridogenesis, gynogenesis and androgenesis. Through these non-canonical reproductive modes, R2 elements may have been transferred between Bacillus genomes. Our data suggest, therefore, a possible role of hybridization for TEs survival and the consequent reshaping of involved genomes.

  7. Contrasted patterns of evolution of the LINE-1 retrotransposon in perissodactyls: the history of a LINE-1 extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookdeo, Akash; Hepp, Crystal M; Boissinot, Stéphane

    2018-01-01

    LINE-1 (L1) is the dominant autonomously replicating non-LTR retrotransposon in mammals. Although our knowledge of L1 evolution across the tree of life has considerably improved in recent years, what we know of L1 evolution in mammals is biased and comes mostly from studies in primates (mostly human) and rodents (mostly mouse). It is unclear if patterns of evolution that are shared between those two groups apply to other mammalian orders. Here we performed a detailed study on the evolution of L1 in perissodactyls by making use of the complete genome of the domestic horse and of the white rhinoceros. This mammalian order offers an excellent model to study the extinction of L1 since the rhinoceros is one of the few mammalian species to have lost active L1. We found that multiple L1 lineages, carrying different 5'UTRs, have been simultaneously active during the evolution of perissodactyls. We also found that L1 has continuously amplified and diversified in horse. In rhinoceros, L1 was very prolific early on. Two successful families were simultaneously active until ~20my ago but became extinct suddenly at exactly the same time. The general pattern of L1 evolution in perissodactyls is very similar to what was previously described in mouse and human, suggesting some commonalities in the way mammalian genomes interact with L1. We confirmed the extinction of L1 in rhinoceros and we discuss several possible mechanisms.

  8. Not so bad after all: retroviruses and long terminal repeat retrotransposons as a source of new genes in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naville, M; Warren, I A; Haftek-Terreau, Z; Chalopin, D; Brunet, F; Levin, P; Galiana, D; Volff, J-N

    2016-04-01

    Viruses and transposable elements, once considered as purely junk and selfish sequences, have repeatedly been used as a source of novel protein-coding genes during the evolution of most eukaryotic lineages, a phenomenon called 'molecular domestication'. This is exemplified perfectly in mammals and other vertebrates, where many genes derived from long terminal repeat (LTR) retroelements (retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons) have been identified through comparative genomics and functional analyses. In particular, genes derived from gag structural protein and envelope (env) genes, as well as from the integrase-coding and protease-coding sequences, have been identified in humans and other vertebrates. Retroelement-derived genes are involved in many important biological processes including placenta formation, cognitive functions in the brain and immunity against retroelements, as well as in cell proliferation, apoptosis and cancer. These observations support an important role of retroelement-derived genes in the evolution and diversification of the vertebrate lineage. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylase/lyase demethylates the retrotransposon Tos17 and promotes its transposition in rice

    KAUST Repository

    La, Honggui

    2011-09-06

    DNA 5-methylcytosine (5-meC) is an important epigenetic mark for transcriptional gene silencing in many eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, 5-meC DNA glycosylase/lyases actively remove 5-meC to counter-act transcriptional gene silencing in a locus-specific manner, and have been suggested to maintain the expression of transposons. However, it is unclear whether plant DNA demethylases can promote the transposition of transposons. Here we report the functional characterization of the DNA glycosylase/lyase DNG701 in rice. DNG701 encodes a large (1,812 amino acid residues) DNA glycosylase domain protein. Recombinant DNG701 protein showed 5-meC DNA glycosylase and lyase activities in vitro. Knockout or knockdown of DNG701 in rice plants led to DNA hypermethylation and reduced expression of the retrotransposon Tos17. Tos17 showed less transposition in calli derived from dng701 knockout mutant seeds compared with that in wild-type calli. Overexpression of DNG701 in both rice calli and transgenic plants substantially reduced DNA methylation levels of Tos17 and enhanced its expression. The overexpression also led to more frequent transposition of Tos17 in calli. Our results demonstrate that rice DNG701 is a 5-meC DNA glycosylase/lyase responsible for the demethylation of Tos17 and this DNA demethylase plays a critical role in promoting Tos17 transposition in rice calli.

  10. Population structure of four Thai indigenous chicken breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekchay, Supamit; Supakankul, Pantaporn; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Wilantho, Alisa; Chareanchim, Wanwisa; Tongsima, Sissades

    2014-03-27

    In recent years, Thai indigenous chickens have increasingly been bred as an alternative in Thailand poultry market. Due to their popularity, there is a clear need to improve the underlying quality and productivity of these chickens. Studying chicken genetic variation can improve the chicken meat quality as well as conserving rare chicken species. To begin with, a minimal set of molecular markers that can characterize the Thai indigenous chicken breeds is required. Using AFLP-PCR, 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from Thai indigenous chickens were obtained by DNA sequencing. From these SNPs, we genotyped 465 chickens from 7 chicken breeds, comprising four Thai indigenous chicken breeds--Pradhuhangdum (PD), Luenghangkhao (LK), Dang (DA) and Chee (CH), one wild chicken--the red jungle fowls (RJF), and two commercial chicken breeds--the brown egg layer (BL) and commercial broiler (CB). The chicken genotypes reveal unique genetic structures of the four Thai indigenous chicken breeds. The average expected heterozygosities of PD=0.341, LK=0.357, DA=0.349 and CH=0.373, while the references RJF= 0.327, CB=0.324 and BL= 0.285. The F(ST) values among Thai indigenous chicken breeds vary from 0.051 to 0.096. The F(ST) values between the pairs of Thai indigenous chickens and RJF vary from 0.083 to 0.105 and the FST values between the Thai indigenous chickens and the two commercial chicken breeds vary from 0.116 to 0.221. A neighbour-joining tree of all individual chickens showed that the Thai indigenous chickens were clustered into four groups which were closely related to the wild RJF but far from the commercial breeds. Such commercial breeds were split into two closely groups. Using genetic admixture analysis, we observed that the Thai indigenous chicken breeds are likely to share common ancestors with the RJF, while both commercial chicken breeds share the same admixture pattern. These results indicated that the Thai indigenous chicken breeds may descend from the

  11. Analysis of Consumers' Preferences and Price Sensitivity to Native Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-A; Jung, Yoojin; Jo, Cheorun; Park, Ji-Young; Nam, Ki-Chang

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzed consumers' preferences and price sensitivity to native chickens. A survey was conducted from Jan 6 to 17, 2014, and data were collected from consumers (n=500) living in Korea. Statistical analyses evaluated the consumption patterns of native chickens, preference marketing for native chicken breeds which will be newly developed, and price sensitivity measurement (PSM). Of the subjects who preferred broilers, 24.3% do not purchase native chickens because of the dryness and tough texture, while those who preferred native chickens liked their chewy texture (38.2%). Of the total subjects, 38.2% preferred fried native chickens (38.2%) for processed food, 38.4% preferred direct sales for native chicken distribution, 51.0% preferred native chickens to be slaughtered in specialty stores, and 32.4% wanted easy access to native chickens. Additionally, the price stress range (PSR) was 50 won and the point of marginal cheapness (PMC) and point of marginal expensiveness (PME) were 6,980 won and 12,300 won, respectively. Evaluation of the segmentation market revealed that consumers who prefer broiler to native chicken breeds were more sensitive to the chicken price. To accelerate the consumption of newly developed native chicken meat, it is necessary to develop a texture that each consumer needs, to increase the accessibility of native chickens, and to have diverse menus and recipes as well as reasonable pricing for native chickens.

  12. Alternative fish feed production from waste chicken feathers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Jumini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this This devotion has been done to provide education and training of the utilization of waste chicken manure, making flour chicken feathers as a fish feed alternative, that can overcome some of the problems that waste chicken feathers from the center cutting broiler chickens in the village Krasak enough, it causes pollution, and not used optimally; Low public awareness of awareness of environmental pollution; the lack of public knowledge about the utilization of waste chicken feathers, and processing technology, as well as to address the needs of fish feed more expensive, need alternative feed ingredients. This service program has provided insight to the public about waste chicken feathers so that it can be used as a new entrepreneurial startups. To achieve these objectives have been done of activity as follows: 1 Provide counseling and understanding of the community will be a negative impact on the environment of waste chicken feathers. 2 Provide counseling utilization of waste chicken feathers for people in nearby farms. 3 Make a chicken feather meal of chicken feather waste as an alternative fish feed to improve digestibility of chicken feathers. 3 The formation of the group for increasing the economic income of the family. This service activities program runs quite well with demonstrated some activity, namely: 1 Change Behavior Society (knowledge transfer; 2 Chicken Feather Extension Waste Utilization; 3 Making Unit Waste Chicken Feathers; 4 Establishment of New Business of Diversified Waste Chicken Feathers.

  13. Characterization of village chicken production performance under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With a total population size of about 65 million, chicken make up the largest share in terms of number ... each PA, 40 households were randomly selected, making a total sample size ..... Production potential and qualitative traits of indigenous ...

  14. The chicken foot digital replant training model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassopoulos, Thanassi; Loh, Charles Yuen Yung

    2015-01-01

    A simple, readily available digital replantation model in the chicken foot is described. This high fidelity model will hopefully allow trainees in hand surgery to gain further experience in replant surgery prior to clinical application.

  15. Flavour Chemistry of Chicken Meat: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jayasena, Dinesh D.; Ahn, Dong Uk; Nam, Ki Chang; Jo, Cheorun

    2013-01-01

    Flavour comprises mainly of taste and aroma and is involved in consumers’ meat-buying behavior and preferences. Chicken meat flavour is supposed to be affected by a number of ante- and post-mortem factors, including breed, diet, post-mortem ageing, method of cooking, etc. Additionally, chicken meat is more susceptible to quality deterioration mainly due to lipid oxidation with resulting off-flavours. Therefore, the intent of this paper is to highlight the mechanisms and chemical compounds res...

  16. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of chicken anaemia virus obtained from backyard and commercial chickens in Nigeria : research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.O. Oluwayelu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the first molecular analysis study of chicken anaemia virus (CAV in backyard chickens in Africa using molecular cloning and sequence analysis to characterize CAV strains obtained from commercial chickens and Nigerian backyard chickens. Partial VP1 gene sequences were determined for three CAVs from commercial chickens and for six CAV variants present in samples from a backyard chicken. Multiple alignment analysis revealed that the 6 % and 4 % nucleotide diversity obtained respectively for the commercial and backyard chicken strains translated to only 2 % amino acid diversity for each breed. Overall, the amino acid composition of Nigerian CAVs was found to be highly conserved. Since the partial VP1 gene sequence of two backyard chicken cloned CAV strains (NGR/Cl-8 and NGR/Cl-9 were almost identical and evolutionarily closely related to the commercial chicken strains NGR-1, and NGR-4 and NGR-5, respectively, we concluded that CAV infections had crossed the farm boundary.

  17. Insights into the chicken IgY with emphasis on the generation and applications of chicken recombinant monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Warren; Syed Atif, Ali; Tan, Soo Choon; Leow, Chiuan Herng

    2017-08-01

    The advantages of chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) antibodies as immunodiagnostic and immunotherapeutic biomolecules has only been recently recognized. Even so, chicken antibodies remain less-well characterized than their mammalian counterparts. This review aims at providing a current overview of the structure, function, development and generation of chicken antibodies. Additionally, brief but comprehensive insights into current knowledge pertaining to the immunogenetic framework and diversity-generation of the chicken immunoglobulin repertoire which have contributed to the establishment of recombinant chicken mAb-generating methods are discussed. Focus is provided on the current methods used to generate antibodies from chickens with added emphasis on the generation of recombinant chicken mAbs and its derivative formats. The advantages and limitations of established protocols for the generation of chicken mAbs are highlighted. The various applications of recombinant chicken mAbs and its derivative formats in immunodiagnostics and immunotherapy are further detailed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Gentamicin pharmacokinetics in the chicken inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Eric C; Park, Debra L; Durham, Dianne; Girod, Douglas A

    2004-06-01

    Avians have the unique ability to regenerate cochlear hair cells that are lost due to ototoxins or excessive noise. Many methodological techniques are available to damage the hair cells for subsequent scientific study. A recent method utilizes topical application of an ototoxic drug to the round window membrane. The current study examines the pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in the inner ear of chickens following topical application to the round window membrane or a single systemic high dose given intraperitoneally. Chickens were given gentamicin topically or systemically and survived for 1, 4, 12, 24, or 120 h (controls at 4 and 120 h). Serum and perilymph samples were obtained prior to sacrifice and measured for gentamicin levels. Results revealed higher levels of gentamicin in the perilymph of topically treated chickens than systemically treated chickens, with significant amounts of gentamicin still present in both at the latest survival time of 5 days. As expected, systemically treated chickens had much higher levels of gentamicin in the serum than topically treated chickens. Advantages and disadvantages to each method of drug administration are discussed.

  19. Determination of the onset of ductile crack extension in 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo steel by multi-specimen J integral testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druce, S.G.

    1982-02-01

    Results obtained at AERE Harwell as part of the first phase of the European Group on Fracture round robin activity into ductile crack initiation detection are presented and discussed. Data are analysed using the current ASTM Jsub(IC) testing procedure and by an alternative procedure. Difficulties in the definition of 'initiation' are highlighted and deficiencies of the ASTM procedure exposed. The ASTM Jsub(IC) value for 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo steel was determined as 0.21 MN/m. The alternative procedure provides a more accurate evaluation of the 'initiation' value of J, that is, at the point of crack advance in excess of that due to crack tip blunting. Using this procedure the 'initiation' value, Jsub(i), was measured as 0.14 MN/m. (author)

  20. Effect of various lanthanum sol-gel coatings on the 330Cb (Fe-35Ni-18Cr-1Nb-2Si) oxidation at 900 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buscail, H., E-mail: buscail@iut.u-clermont1.fr [Clermont Universite- LVEEM, 8 rue J.B. Fabre, BP 219, 43006 Le Puy en Velay (France); Issartel, C.; Riffard, F.; Rolland, R.; Perrier, S. [Clermont Universite- LVEEM, 8 rue J.B. Fabre, BP 219, 43006 Le Puy en Velay (France); Fleurentin, A. [CETIM, 52 av Felix Louat, BP 80067, 60304 Senlis (France); Josse, C. [L' ICB UMR5209 CNRS, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon (France)

    2011-11-01

    The influence of a lanthanum sol-gel coating on the oxide scale adherence has been studied during the 330Cb (Fe-35Ni-18Cr-1Nb-2Si) oxidation at 900 deg. C, in air. The alloy oxidation is performed in order to generate a protective chromia scale acting as a good barrier against carburization. Argon annealing of lanthanum sol-gel coatings have been performed at various temperatures in order to find the best conditions to insure the scale adherence. Kinetic results show that lanthanum sol-gel coatings lead to a lower oxidation rate compared to blank specimens. Thermal cycling tests on lanthanum the sol-gel coated specimen show that the oxide scale formed at 900 deg. C, in air, is adherent.

  1. Cooperation on impingement wastage experiment of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel using SWAT-1R sodium-water reaction test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauchamp, F.; Allou, A.; Nishimura, M.; Umeda, R.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: • 6 experiments were carried out in the SWAT-1R facility of JAEA Oarai R&D Center to study the wastage resistance of the Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel (T91) straight tubes. • These experiments were performed under the cooperation between CEA and JAEA. • The experiments were conducted successfully: - all the tubes were punctured by the reaction jet, - wastage and steam/water leak rates were obtained, - experimental results brought some new determining sets of wastage data on T91. • This fruitful cooperation has contributed to: - expanding the wastage database on T91, - upgrading wastage rates prediction from modelling, - the safety demonstration of future steam generators units

  2. Microstructural changes due to laser peening in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel subjected to creep damage at 823K and 923K in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasone, Yuji; Kizuki, Yuta; Suzuki, Hayao; Minowa, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    The present study has investigated microstructural changes due to laser peening in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel subjected to creep. The EBSD or Electron Backscatter Diffraction studies have been made on round-bar type specimens creeping at applied stresses of 230 and 240 MPa at 823 K and 105 MPa at 923K in air. Prior to the creep tests, laser peening was applied to specimens at laser power of 8.4-22GW/cm 2 per pulse in water. Microstructural change in each specimen after its creep test was investigated by EBSD/SEM. The EBSD/SEM analyses revealed that the laser peening treatment makes creep rupture time longer and it reveals local misorientation value for rupture. (author)

  3. Effects of heat treatment condition on the mechanical properties and weldability of 10Cr-1Mo-VNbN cast steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shon, Dae Young; Bang, Kook Soo; Lee, Kyong Woon; Chi, Byung Ha

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical properties and weldability such as HAZ hardness, cold cracking susceptibility and hot ductility of two differently heat treated 10Cr-1Mo-VNbN cast steels were measured and compared. Because of high hardenability of the cast steel, as-annealed cast steel showed martensitic microstructure and thus had higher hardness than annealed-normalized-tempered cast steel which had tempered martensite. Because the welding electrode used resulted in a high hardness weld metal, both cast steels showed same weld metal cold cracking susceptibility even though the as-annealed cast steel had higher HAZ hardness than the annealed-normalized-tempered cast steel. Both cast steels had excellent hot ductility in high temperature range, indicating no risk of grain boundary liquation cracking in the HAZ. However, the as-annealed cast steel showed an inferior ductility in the intermediate temperature range of 1000∼1150 .deg. C because of larger unrecrystallized grain size

  4. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a novel near-α titanium alloy Ti6.0Al4.5Cr1.5Mn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-bin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Shanghai Special Casting Engineering Technology Research Center, Shanghai 201605 (China); Wang, Shu-sen; Gao, Peng-yue; Jiang, Tao [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Lu, Xiong-gang; Li, Chong-he [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Shanghai Special Casting Engineering Technology Research Center, Shanghai 201605 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Based on previous Ti-Al-Cr-Mn quaternary system thermodynamic database, a novel near-α titanium alloy Ti-6.0Al-4.5Cr-1.5Mn alloy was designed and successfully prepared by the water-cooled copper crucible. Microscopic observation showed that both as-cast and annealing status consist of α phase, which coincides with the theoretical expectation. The mechanical properties at room temperature were measured and this alloy possesses good mechanical properties, its average yield-strength reaches 1051.5 MPa and tensile-strength is up to 1091.2 MPa while its average elongation is just 8.3%. Compared with the TA15, it has better mechanical strength and worse elongation. In the new alloy Laves phase Cr{sub 2}Ti were detected by XRD pattern and TEM, which may cause the alloy's poor plasticity.

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a novel near-α titanium alloy Ti6.0Al4.5Cr1.5Mn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hong-bin; Wang, Shu-sen; Gao, Peng-yue; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Xiong-gang; Li, Chong-he

    2016-01-01

    Based on previous Ti-Al-Cr-Mn quaternary system thermodynamic database, a novel near-α titanium alloy Ti-6.0Al-4.5Cr-1.5Mn alloy was designed and successfully prepared by the water-cooled copper crucible. Microscopic observation showed that both as-cast and annealing status consist of α phase, which coincides with the theoretical expectation. The mechanical properties at room temperature were measured and this alloy possesses good mechanical properties, its average yield-strength reaches 1051.5 MPa and tensile-strength is up to 1091.2 MPa while its average elongation is just 8.3%. Compared with the TA15, it has better mechanical strength and worse elongation. In the new alloy Laves phase Cr 2 Ti were detected by XRD pattern and TEM, which may cause the alloy's poor plasticity.

  6. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the elevated temperature tensile flow behavior of service-exposed 2.25Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girish Shastry, C.; Parameswaran, P.; Mathew, M.D.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Mannan, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    The elevated temperature tensile flow behavior of service-exposed 2.25Cr-1Mo steel has been critically examined with respect to strain rate sensitivity (m) and apparent activation energy (Q) for tensile deformation. The predominant role of forest dislocations in determining the relative flow response at true plastic strains greater than 0.01 is inferred from the profile of 'm' against flow stress. The variation of 'm' with temperature and strain is discussed based on the kinetics of dislocation generation and recovery. The decrease in Q with the increase in strain rate or temperature is attributed to the increase in recovery processes like dislocation annihilation and subcell/subgrain formation. This suggestion has been supported by transmission electron microscopy

  7. Dynamic Shear Deformation and Failure of Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-1Fe Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Chun; Chen, Pengwan

    2018-01-05

    To study the dynamic shear deformation and failure properties of Ti-6Al-4V (Ti-64) alloy and Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-1Fe (Ti-55511) alloy, a series of forced shear tests on flat hat shaped (FHS) specimens for the two investigated materials was performed using a split Hopkinson pressure bar setup. The evolution of shear deformation was monitored by an ultra-high-speed camera (Kirana-05M). Localized shear band is induced in the two investigated materials under forced shear tests. Our results indicate that severe strain localization (adiabatic shear) is accompanied by a loss in the load carrying capacity, i.e., by a sudden drop in loading. Three distinct stages can be identified using a digital image correlation technique for accurate shear strain measurement. The microstructural analysis reveals that the dynamic failure mechanisms for Ti-64 and Ti-55511 alloys within the shear band are of a cohesive and adhesive nature, respectively.

  8. Effect of microstructural evolution by isothermal aging on the mechanical properties of 9Cr-1WVTa reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min-Gu [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hoon, E-mail: lee1626@kims.re.kr [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Joonoh; Park, Jun Young; Lee, Tae-Ho [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Namhyun [Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Chan Kim, Hyoung [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The influence of microstructural changes caused by aging condition on tensile and Charpy impact properties was investigated for reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) 9Cr-1WVTa steels having single martensite and a mixed microstructure of martensite and ferrite. For the mixed microstructure of martensite and ferrite, the Charpy impact properties deteriorated in both as-normalized and tempered conditions due to the ferrite and the accompanying M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides at the ferrite grain boundaries which act as path and initiation sites for cleavage cracks, respectively. However, aging at 550 °C for 20–100 h recovered gradually the Charpy impact toughness without any distinct drop in strength, as a result of the spheroidization of the coarse M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides at the ferrite grain boundaries, which makes crack initiation more difficult.

  9. Analysis of elevated temperature flow and work hardening behaviour of service-exposed 2.25Cr-1Mo steel using Voce equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girish Shastry, C.; Mathew, M.D.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Mannan, S.L.

    2004-01-01

    The Voce equation was used to model the tensile flow and work-hardening behaviour of a service-exposed 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. The applicability of Voce parameters obtained from the fit to experimental true stress-true strain datasets for estimating the validity of the fit was examined. The Voce equation was found to model the stress-strain curve closely. The Voce parameter n v was correlated to the underlying dislocation activities. It was found that the values of Voce parameters at various temperatures and strain rates can be used to infer the operating recovery mechanism during stage III hardening. A low absolute value of n v is indicative of recovery by cross-slip, whereas the high temperature transition to climb or sub-boundary migration driven recovery is accompanied by an increase in the value of n v

  10. Periodic oxide cracking on Fe2.25Cr1Mo produced by high-temperature fatigue tests with a compression hold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, R.L.; Weertman, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Long, straight cracks perpendicular to the stress axis are seen on the oxidized surface of specimens of Fe2.25Cr1Mo cycled with a compressive hold at high temperatures. The cracks in the oxide are periodically spaced. They resemble cracks observed in a brittle film on a ductile substrate after a tension test of the substrate. They also resemble the parallel multiple fractures that occur in a brittle matrix of a composite with ductile fibers undergoing tension. The authors apply both the model of a brittle film on a ductile substrate and of the brittle matrix composite to explain the observed intercrack spacing. Cracks in the oxide film lead to localized oxidation of the metal in the region around their intersection with the oxide-metal interface. These cracks are seen to penetrate the metal. Stress concentrations from deep grooves that form during compression hold fatigue, together with crack initiation from the oxide, lead to a shortened cycle life

  11. Inelastic behavior of modified 9Cr-1 Mo steel under basic loading conditions at elevated temperature and evaluation of two unified constitutive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Mizuno, Mamoru.

    1993-01-01

    The purposes of this paper are to elucidate fundamental material properties of modified 9Cr-1 Mo steel as a candidate material for next-generation fast breeder reactors and to obtain information for the formulation of a practical unified constitutive model. For these purposes, monotonous tension, uniaxial symmetric cycles, uniaxial symmetric cycles with hold time, creep, stress control uniaxial symmetric cycles, cyclic relaxation and circular cyclic loading tests are performed. Then these results are simulated by two unified constitutive models, i.e. the Chaboche model and Bodner-Partom model. The results of simulation show that the Chaboche model can describe all the experimental results with relatively high accuracy, and that the identification of material constants of the model is easy. The Bodner-Partom model can similarly describe the results, but the determination of material constants is difficult. (author)

  12. An analysis of a set of creep data for a 9Cr-1Mo-0.2V (P91 type) steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadek, J.; Sustek, V.; Pahutova, M.

    1997-01-01

    Recently published creep data for a 9Cr-1Mo-0.2V steel are analysed and an attempt is made to interpret them applying the concept of thermally activated detachment of dislocations from carbide particles as the rate controlling process. For the data, very high and stress dependent apparent activation energy of creep, Q c , and very high and temperature dependent apparent stress exponent, m c , are characteristic. The modelling of creep behavior applying the above mentioned concept is shown to fail to account for this temperature and applied stress dependence of minimum creep strain rate and/or the values of Q c and m c following from the data analysis. It is suggested that the behavior of the dislocation substructure, which is affected by the presence of carbide particles, must be introduced into any model to adequately describe the unusual creep behavior of the steel of interest. (orig.)

  13. Fatigue-creep life prediction for a notched specimen of 2[1]/[4]Cr-1Mo steel at 600 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tatsuo; Sakane, Masao; Fukuda, Yoshio; Igari, Toshihide; Miyahara, Mitsuo; Okazaki, Masakazu

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the life prediction of 2[1]/[4]Cr-1Mo notched specimens subjected to fast-fast, slow-slow and hold-time loadings at 600 C. The crack initiation lives of notched specimens were estimated based on the local stress-strain calculated by inelastic finite element analyses. For the life prediction, combinations of seven different constitutive models and five fatigue-creep damage laws were used. The applicability of the constitutive model and damage law is discussed. The constitutive models predict similar stress-strain relations at the notch root, leading to similar predicted lives. The damage model, however, has a much larger influence on the life prediction. ((orig.))

  14. Cyclic creep, mechanical ratchetting and amplitude history dependence of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and evaluation of unified constitutive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamada, Hiroshi

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to elucidate inelastic behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel as a candidate material for the next-generation fast breeder reactor and to provide the information for the formulation of a unified constitutive model. For this purpose, cyclic creep, mechanical ratchetting and amplitude history dependence of cyclic hardening were first examined at 550degC. As a result, systematic cyclic creep and mechanical ratchetting behavior were observed under various loading conditions, and little amplitude history dependence was found. Then these results were simulated by three unified constitutive models, i.e. the Chaboche, Bodner-Partom and modified Chaboche models. The simulated results show that these models cannot describe the cyclic creep and mechanical ratchetting behavior with high accuracy, but succeed in describing the inelastic behavior of amplitude variation experiments. (author)

  15. High temperature corrosion behavior of different grain size specimens of 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel in SO2+O2 environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, D.; Mitra, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    The investigation is primarily aimed at the high temperature corrosion behavior of different grain sizes of 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel at SO 2 +O 2 (mixed oxidation and sulfidation). The various grain sizes (18 μm,26 μm, 48 μm, and 72 μm) are obtained by different annealing treatment. Isothermal corrosion studies are carried out in different grain size specimens at 973K for 8 hours. The corrosion growth rate and the reaction kinetics are studied by weight gain method. The external scales of the post corroded specimen are studied in Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to examine the corrosion products morphology on the scale. X-ray mapping analysis of the different elements (Fe, O, Cr and S) is carried out by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) attached with SEM. The X-ray Diffraction Analysis (XRD) is also carried out to identify the corrosion products in the external scale. Finally, it is concluded that that the corrosion rate of 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel strongly depend on grain sizes of the specimens. The corrosion rate increases with the decreases of grain size. The finer grain (18 μm) show higher corrosion rate than the coarse grains (72 μm). The weight gain kinetics follows the parabolic growth rate which further indicates that the corrosion process is diffusion controlled. The scale analysis shows the thicker scale and extensive scale cracking and spallations in case of finer grain size specimen (18 μm), whereas the coarse grain specimen (72 μm) shows compact and adherent layer. The XRD analysis shows that the corrosion products consist of mixtures of iron oxides( Fe 3 O 4 and Fe 2 O 3 ) and iron sulfides (FeS). The details mechanism of the corrosion is discussed to explain the difference in corrosion rate for different grain sizes. (author)

  16. The effect of lead concentration on the corrosion susceptibility of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in a lead-lithium liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, B.D.; Edwards, G.R.; Hoffman, N.J.

    1982-01-01

    The intergranular penetration of 21/4Cr-1Mo steel by lead-lithium liquids containing 0, 17.6, and 53 w/o lead has been investigated at temperatures from 300 0 C to 600 0 C for times up to 1000 hours. Limited tests using a 99.3 w/o lead-lithium liquid were also conducted. Tempering was found to remove the susceptibility of as-quenched 21/4Cr-1Mo steel to penetration at 500 0 C by lead-lithium liquids containing up to 53 w/o lead. Penetration by the 99.3 w/o lead-lithium liquid in 1000 hours at 500 0 C was found to be negligible even when the steel was in the as-quenched condition. An Arrhenius analysis yielded the same low initial activation energy (approx. equal to25 kJ/mole) for liquids containing 0, 17.6, and 53 w/o lead. The initial penetration rate for lead-free lithium was significantly greater than that for the lead-bearing liquids, a factor thought to be related to the effect of lead on the wettability of the liquid. The same secondary activation energy (approx. equal to120 kJ/mole) was also found for the three liquids. Furthermore, the secondary penetration rate was found to be insensitive to lead content. Anomalous behavior at 500 0 C, observed in this study as well as in previous studies, is discussed, and a hypothetical explanation for the behavior is presented. (orig.)

  17. Improvement of village chicken production in a mixed (chicken-ram) farming system in Burkina Faso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kondombo, S.R.

    2005-01-01

    Keywords:Village chickens, sheep, production system, feeding, fattening, integration,Burkina Faso.Animal production in general and chickens

  18. Campylobacter jejuni strains of human and chicken origin are invasive in chickens after oral challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Katrine Nørrelund; Bang, Dang Duong; Andresen, Lars Ole

    2006-01-01

    to be associated with the Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS) in humans. The minimum dose for establishing colonization in the clay-old chickens was approximately 2 cfu, whereas two- to threefold higher doses were required for establishing colonization in the 14-day-old chickens. Two of the C jejuni strains were shown...

  19. Microbiological Safety of Chicken Litter or Chicken Litter-Based Organic Fertilizers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chicken litter or chicken litter-based organic fertilizers are usually recycled into the soil to improve the structure and fertility of agricultural land. As an important source of nutrients for crop production, chicken litter may also contain a variety of human pathogens that can threaten humans who consume the contaminated food or water. Composting can inactivate pathogens while creating a soil amendment beneficial for application to arable agricultural land. Some foodborne pathogens may have the potential to survive for long periods of time in raw chicken litter or its composted products after land application, and a small population of pathogenic cells may even regrow to high levels when the conditions are favorable for growth. Thermal processing is a good choice for inactivating pathogens in chicken litter or chicken litter-based organic fertilizers prior to land application. However, some populations may become acclimatized to a hostile environment during build-up or composting and develop heat resistance through cross-protection during subsequent high temperature treatment. Therefore, this paper reviews currently available information on the microbiological safety of chicken litter or chicken litter-based organic fertilizers, and discusses about further research on developing novel and effective disinfection techniques, including physical, chemical, and biological treatments, as an alternative to current methods.

  20. Sensory characteristics and consumer preference for chicken meat in Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sow, T M A; Grongnet, J F

    2010-10-01

    This study identified the sensory characteristics and consumer preference for chicken meat in Guinea. Five chicken samples [live village chicken, live broiler, live spent laying hen, ready-to-cook broiler, and ready-to-cook broiler (imported)] bought from different locations were assessed by 10 trained panelists using 19 sensory attributes. The ANOVA results showed that 3 chicken appearance attributes (brown, yellow, and white), 5 chicken odor attributes (oily, intense, medicine smell, roasted, and mouth persistent), 3 chicken flavor attributes (sweet, bitter, and astringent), and 8 chicken texture attributes (firm, tender, juicy, chew, smooth, springy, hard, and fibrous) were significantly discriminating between the chicken samples (Pchicken, the live spent laying hen, and the ready-to-cook broiler (imported) were very well represented and clearly distinguished from the live broiler and the ready-to-cook broiler. One hundred twenty consumers expressed their preferences for the chicken samples using a 5-point Likert scale. The hierarchical cluster analysis of the preference data identified 4 homogenous consumer clusters. The hierarchical cluster analysis results showed that the live village chicken was the most preferred chicken sample, whereas the ready-to-cook broiler was the least preferred one. The partial least squares regression (PLSR) type 1 showed that 72% of the sensory data for the first 2 principal components explained 83% of the chicken preference. The PLSR1 identified that the sensory characteristics juicy, oily, sweet, hard, mouth persistent, and yellow were the most relevant sensory drivers of the Guinean chicken preference. The PLSR2 (with multiple responses) identified the relationship between the chicken samples, their sensory attributes, and the consumer clusters. Our results showed that there was not a chicken category that was exclusively preferred from the other chicken samples and therefore highlight the existence of place for development of

  1. Creating leptin-like biofunctions by active immunization against chicken leptin receptor in growing chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, M M; Wu, S Q; Shao, X B; Li, X W; Chen, Z; Ying, S J; Shi, Z D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, immunization against chicken leptin receptor (cLEPR) extracellular domain (ECD) was applied to investigate leptin regulation and LEPR biofunction in growing chicken pullets. A recombinant protein (cLEPR ECD) based on the cLEPR complemenary DNA sequence corresponding to the 582nd to 796th amino acid residues of cLEPR mature peptide was prepared and used as antigen. Immunization against cLEPR ECD in growing chickens increased anti-cLEPR ECD antibody titers in blood, enhanced proportions of phosphorylated janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and served as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) protein in liver tissue. Chicken live weight gain and abdominal fat mass were significantly decreased (P chickens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Metagenomic Analysis of Chicken Gut Microbiota for Improving Metabolism and Health of Chickens — A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Young Choi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chicken is a major food source for humans, hence it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in nutrient absorption in chicken. In the gastrointestinal tract (GIT, the microbiota plays a central role in enhancing nutrient absorption and strengthening the immune system, thereby affecting both growth and health of chicken. There is little information on the diversity and functions of chicken GIT microbiota, its impact on the host, and the interactions between the microbiota and host. Here, we review the recent metagenomic strategies to analyze the chicken GIT microbiota composition and its functions related to improving metabolism and health. We summarize methodology of metagenomics in order to obtain bacterial taxonomy and functional inferences of the GIT microbiota and suggest a set of indicator genes for monitoring and manipulating the microbiota to promote host health in future.

  3. Identification of SSR and retrotransposon-based molecular markers linked to morphological characters in oily sunfl ower (Helianthus annuus L.) under natural and water-limited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Soleimani Gezeljeh; Darvishzadeh, Reza; Ebrahimi, Asa; Bihamta, Mohammad Reza

    2018-03-01

    Sunflower is an important source of edible oil. Drought is known as an important factor limiting the growth and productivity of field crops in most parts of the world. Agricultural biotechnology mainly aims at developing crops with higher tolerance to the challenging environmental conditions, such as drought. This study examined a number of morphological characters, along with relative water content (RWC) in 100 inbred sunflower lines. A 10 × 10 simple lattice design with two replications was employed to measure the mentioned parameters under natural and water-limited states during two successive years. In molecular trial, 30 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs, as well as 14 inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP) and 14 retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism (REMAP) primer combinations were used for DNA fingerprinting of the lines. Most of the examined characters had lower average values under water-limited than natural states. Maximum and minimum reductions were observed in the cases of yield and oil percentage, respectively. The broad-sense heritabilities for all the examined characters were 0.20-0.73 and 0.10-0.34 under natural and water-limited states, respectively. In the studied samples, 8.97% of the 435 possible locus pairs of the SSRs represented significant linkage disequilibrium (LD) levels. In the association analysis using SSR markers, 22 and 21 markers were identified (P ≤ 0.05) for the studied characters under natural and water-limited states, respectively. The corresponding values were 50 and 37 using retrotransposon-based molecular markers. Some detected markers were communal between the characters under water-limited and natural states. This was in line with the phenotypic correlations detected between the characters. Communal markers facilitate the simultaneous selection of several characters and can thus improve the efficacy of selection based on markers in the plant-breeding activities.

  4. Comparative studies of the endonucleases from two related Xenopus laevis retrotransposons, Tx1L and Tx2L: target site specificity and evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, S; Pont-Kingdon, G; Carroll, D

    2000-01-01

    In the genome of the South African frog, Xenopus laevis, there are two complex families of transposable elements, Tx1 and Tx2, that have identical overall structures, but distinct sequences. In each family there are approximately 1500 copies of an apparent DNA-based element (Tx1D and Tx2D). Roughly 10% of these elements in each family are interrupted by a non-LTR retrotransposon (Tx1L and Tx2L). Each retrotransposon is flanked by a 23-bp target duplication of a specific D element sequence. In earlier work, we showed that the endonuclease domain (Tx1L EN) located in the second open reading frame (ORF2) of Tx1L encodes a protein that makes a single-strand cut precisely at the expected site within its target sequence, supporting the idea that Tx1L is a site-specific retrotransposon. In this study, we express the endonuclease domain of Tx2L (Tx2L EN) and compare the target preferences of the two enzymes. Each endonuclease shows some preference for its cognate target, on the order of 5-fold over the non-cognate target. The observed discrimination is not sufficient, however, to explain the observation that no cross-occupancy is observed - that is, L elements of one family have never been found within D elements of the other family. Possible sources of additional specificity are discussed. We also compare two hypotheses regarding the genome duplication event that led to the contemporary pseudotetraploid character of Xenopus laevis in light of the Tx1L and Tx2L data.

  5. An evaluation procedure of sodium environmental effects on FBR grade SUS316 (316FR) and Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. On the basis of the studies up to the fiscal year of 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of sodium environmental effects on structural materials of fast breeder reactors (FBR's) is one of the key issues for the integrity of the plants. The Elevated Temperature Structural Design Guide for Monju (ETSDG) incorporated an evaluation procedure of sodium environmental effects in the Appendix MA.2, for the conventional steels, such as SUS304, SUS316, SUS321 and 2 1/4Cr-1Mo. Following the establishment of the ETSDG, a new material with superior elevated temperature properties, FBR grade SUS316 (316FR), has been developed, and studies on Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel (Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel) has been performed, for the application to demonstration reactors and successive large-scale reactors. These materials were shown to have, at least equal, or better compatibility with sodium compared with the conventional steels. Moreover, studies have been continued with the conventional steels, particularly with SUS304, for the further validation of the procedure in the ETSDG, especially in terms of long-term properties. Those studies provide basis for the study on 316FR. This report proposed an evaluation procedure of sodium environmental effects on 316FR and Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel, which is to be incorporated into the structural design guide for demonstration fast breeder reactors. The procedure is summarized as follows: (1) Corrosion allowance of 316FR and Mod.9Cr-1Mo can be evaluated by the equation determined in the ETSTG. (2) Strength reduction factors on design allowable values are not necessary for either steel. Strength reduction due to the transfer of carbon and nitrogen, etc does not occur with 316FR, which was the same as SUS304. Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel does not show strength reduction, contrary to 2 l/4Cr-1Mo, similar ferritic steel. (3) Corrosion allowance can be determined separately for thin-walled components. The procedure allows design without correction factors for Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel, which was not possible for 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in the ETSDG. (author)

  6. MCU-Based Solar Powered Chicken Feeder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenor M. Reyes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Poultry is a great potential industry particularly in Batangas Province. The method of feeding chicken needs to be considered as chicken must be fed regularly to be more productive. The conventional method of feeding chicken is the need to continuously provide the food, be alert and conscious on the food remaining in cages and to feed the chickens in a correct period of time to avoid the decline of the production. Growers also find it difficult to manage their businesses effectively because they need to be around the cages every now and then to monitor the poultry. Timing and exactness are the key to provide a uniform time in feeding the chickens. This will benefit the owner of the business in terms of time and effort. Another advantage of this project is in terms of savings to the owner of the poultry business. This technology was designed to automatically feed chickens at a given period of time and to give alarm when the feeds are running out of supply. The power to be supplied to this prototype will be drawn from the sun by means of solar panels and will be stored in typical car battery. The feeds will be stored in a container and evenly distributed by using a conveyor to the feeding basin of the poultry. It will be more efficient than manual conventional way of feeding because less effort will be needed in feeding the chickens and less feeds will be wasted. In addition to that, the stored power can also be used for lighting purposes for the growers to save energy and energy bills.

  7. Antiviral Activity of Lambda Interferon in Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Antje; Soubies, Sebastien; Härtle, Sonja; Schusser, Benjamin; Kaspers, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are essential components of the antiviral defense system of vertebrates. In mammals, functional receptors for type III IFN (lambda interferon [IFN-λ]) are found mainly on epithelial cells, and IFN-λ was demonstrated to play a crucial role in limiting viral infections of mucosal surfaces. To determine whether IFN-λ plays a similar role in birds, we produced recombinant chicken IFN-λ (chIFN-λ) and we used the replication-competent retroviral RCAS vector system to generate mosaic-transgenic chicken embryos that constitutively express chIFN-λ. We could demonstrate that chIFN-λ markedly inhibited replication of various virus strains, including highly pathogenic influenza A viruses, in ovo and in vivo, as well as in epithelium-rich tissue and cell culture systems. In contrast, chicken fibroblasts responded poorly to chIFN-λ. When applied in vivo to 3-week-old chickens, recombinant chIFN-λ strongly induced the IFN-responsive Mx gene in epithelium-rich organs, such as lungs, tracheas, and intestinal tracts. Correspondingly, these organs were found to express high transcript levels of the putative chIFN-λ receptor alpha chain (chIL28RA) gene. Transfection of chicken fibroblasts with a chIL28RA expression construct rendered these cells responsive to chIFN-λ treatment, indicating that receptor expression determines cell type specificity of IFN-λ action in chickens. Surprisingly, mosaic-transgenic chickens perished soon after hatching, demonstrating a detrimental effect of constitutive chIFN-λ expression. Our data highlight fundamental similarities between the IFN-λ systems of mammals and birds and suggest that type III IFN might play a role in defending mucosal surfaces against viral intruders in most if not all vertebrates. PMID:24371053

  8. Thermomechanical Model and Bursting Tests to Evaluate the Risk of Swelling and Bursting of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Steam Generator Tubes during a Sodium-Water Reaction Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The MECTUB code was developed to evaluate the risk of swelling and bursting of Steam Generator (SG tubes. This code deals with the physic of intermediate steam-water leaks into sodium which induce a Sodium-Water Reaction (SWR. It is based on a one-dimensional calculation to describe the thermomechanical behavior of tubes under a high internal pressure and a fast external overheating. The mechanical model of MECTUB is strongly correlated with the kind of the material of the SG tubes. It has been developed and validated by using experiments performed on the alloy 800. A change to tubes made of Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel requires more knowledge of Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel behavior which influences the bursting time at high temperatures (up to 1200°C. Studies have been initiated to adapt the mechanical model and to qualify it for this material. The first part of this paper focuses on the mechanical law modelling (elasticity, plasticity, and creep for Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and on overheating thermal data. In a second part, the results of bursting tests performed on Modified 9Cr-1Mo tubes in the SQUAT facility of CEA are used to validate the mechanical model of MECTUB for the Modified 9Cr-1Mo material.

  9. Effect of antibiotic, Lacto-lase and probiotic addition in chicken feed on protein and fat content of chicken meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Noor Amiza; Abdullah, Aminah

    2015-09-01

    This research was conducted to investigate the effect of chicken feed additives (antibiotic, Lacto-lase® and probiotic) on protein and fat content of chicken meat. Chicken fed with control diet (corn-soy based diet) served as a control. The treated diets were added with zinc bacitracin (antibiotic), different amount of Lacto-lase® (a mixture of probiotic and enzyme) and probiotic. Chicken were slaughtered at the age of 43-48 days. Each chicken was divided into thigh, breast, drumstick, drumette and wing. Protein content in chicken meat was determined by using macro-Kjeldahl method meanwhile Soxhlet method was used to analyse fat content. The result of the study showed that the protein content of chicken breast was significantly higher (p≤0.05) while thigh had the lowest protein content (p≤0.05). Antibiotic fed chicken was found to have the highest protein content among the treated chickens but there was no significant different with 2g/kg Lacto-lase® fed chicken (p>0.05). All thighs were significantly higher (p≤0.05) in fat content except for drumette of control chicken while breast contained the lowest fat content compared to other chicken parts studied. The control chicken meat contained significantly higher (p≤0.05) amount of fat compared to the other treated chickens. Chicken fed with 2g/kg Lacto-lase® had the lowest (p≤0.05) fat content. The result of this study indicated that the addition of Lacto-lase® as a replacement of antibiotic in chicken feed will not affect the content of protein and fat of chicken meat.

  10. Intronic L1 retrotransposons and nested genes cause transcriptional interference by inducing intron retention, exonization and cryptic polyadenylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristel Kaer

    Full Text Available Transcriptional interference has been recently recognized as an unexpectedly complex and mostly negative regulation of genes. Despite a relatively few studies that emerged in recent years, it has been demonstrated that a readthrough transcription derived from one gene can influence the transcription of another overlapping or nested gene. However, the molecular effects resulting from this interaction are largely unknown.Using in silico chromosome walking, we searched for prematurely terminated transcripts bearing signatures of intron retention or exonization of intronic sequence at their 3' ends upstream to human L1 retrotransposons, protein-coding and noncoding nested genes. We demonstrate that transcriptional interference induced by intronic L1s (or other repeated DNAs and nested genes could be characterized by intron retention, forced exonization and cryptic polyadenylation. These molecular effects were revealed from the analysis of endogenous transcripts derived from different cell lines and tissues and confirmed by the expression of three minigenes in cell culture. While intron retention and exonization were comparably observed in introns upstream to L1s, forced exonization was preferentially detected in nested genes. Transcriptional interference induced by L1 or nested genes was dependent on the presence or absence of cryptic splice sites, affected the inclusion or exclusion of the upstream exon and the use of cryptic polyadenylation signals.Our results suggest that transcriptional interference induced by intronic L1s and nested genes could influence the transcription of the large number of genes in normal as well as in tumor tissues. Therefore, this type of interference could have a major impact on the regulation of the host gene expression.

  11. Analysis of plant LTR-retrotransposons at the fine-scale family level reveals individual molecular patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingues Douglas S

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sugarcane is an important crop worldwide for sugar production and increasingly, as a renewable energy source. Modern cultivars have polyploid, large complex genomes, with highly unequal contributions from ancestral genomes. Long Terminal Repeat retrotransposons (LTR-RTs are the single largest components of most plant genomes and can substantially impact the genome in many ways. It is therefore crucial to understand their contribution to the genome and transcriptome, however a detailed study of LTR-RTs in sugarcane has not been previously carried out. Results Sixty complete LTR-RT elements were classified into 35 families within four Copia and three Gypsy lineages. Structurally, within lineages elements were similar, between lineages there were large size differences. FISH analysis resulted in the expected pattern of Gypsy/heterochromatin, Copia/euchromatin, but in two lineages there was localized clustering on some chromosomes. Analysis of related ESTs and RT-PCR showed transcriptional variation between tissues and families. Four distinct patterns were observed in sRNA mapping, the most unusual of which was that of Ale1, with very large numbers of 24nt sRNAs in the coding region. The results presented support the conclusion that distinct small RNA-regulated pathways in sugarcane target the lineages of LTR-RT elements. Conclusions Individual LTR-RT sugarcane families have distinct structures, and transcriptional and regulatory signatures. Our results indicate that in sugarcane individual LTR-RT families have distinct behaviors and can potentially impact the genome in diverse ways. For instance, these transposable elements may affect nearby genes by generating a diverse set of small RNA's that trigger gene silencing mechanisms. There is also some evidence that ancestral genomes contribute significantly different element numbers from particular LTR-RT lineages to the modern sugarcane cultivar genome.

  12. Performance of Chickens under Semi-scavenging Conditions: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance of Chickens under Semi-scavenging Conditions: A Case Study of ... per household was lost per year due to diseases, predators, accidents, and theft. ... as well as chicken house construction so as to avoid the risks of predators.

  13. Directional differentiation of chicken embryonic stem cells into ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-01

    Aug 1, 2011 ... In this study, the differentiation potential of chicken ES cells was investigated ... Key words: Chicken embryonic stem cells, in vitro, directional differentiation, .... synthesized by using the Revert Aid first strand cDNA synthesis kit.

  14. Haematological and serum biochemical profiles of broiler chickens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MOLM) on the haematological and serum biochemical profile of broiler chickens. Fresh Moringa leaves (FML) were shade-dried for four days and milled into meal. A total of two hundred broilers unsexed chickens (Anak strain) were randomly ...

  15. Evaluation of Bacteriological Quality of Ready-to-eat Chicken Products by Total Viable Count Method

    OpenAIRE

    Ramiz Raja; Asif Iqbal; Yasir Hafiz; Mehboob Willayet; Shakoor Bhat; Mudasir Rather

    2012-01-01

    The present investigation describes the total viable count of ready-to-eat chicken products (chicken patties and chicken rolls) in Srinagar city during two seasons viz. autumn and winter. A total of 120 ready-to-eat chicken products comprising of 60 chicken patties and 60 chicken rolls were tested. The mean bacterial count of 60 chicken patties and 60 chicken rolls was 5.1281 and 4.9395 log10 cfu/g. Bacillus cereus strains were isolated from 25 of chicken patties and 22 of the chicken rolls r...

  16. SENSORY CHARACTERISTICS OF NATIVE CHICKEN QUEEN PINEAPPLE-CURED HAM

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Lilibeth A. Roxas; Nikko A. Roxas

    2015-01-01

    The potential of Native Chicken to be processed into palatable ham was conducted making use of Queen Pineapple (QP) crude extract as one of the curing ingredients. Primarily, the main goal is to develop a protocol in the manufacture of processed native chicken ham and determine the organoleptic quality of native chicken ham product. The age of the bird and maturity of the fruit were considered for the best organoleptic quality of chicken ham. In this study, the combine injectio...

  17. RAW CHICKEN LEG AND BREAST SENSORY EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Baston

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we presented a method of sensorial evaluation for chicken meat (red and white. This is a descriptive method of analysis. It was perform with trained assessors for chicken refrigerated raw meat organoleptical evaluation. The sensorial attributes considered were: external aspect of anatomical part of chicken analyzed by slime, the surface odor, the skin and muscle color and muscular elasticity. Color was determined for the skin and white and red muscles. Our scale of analysis is formed by three values that characterize each quality attribute. The trained assessor appreciated the sensorial quality of raw anatomical part of chicken as excellent, acceptable and unacceptable. The objectives were: to establish the sensorial attributes to be analyzed for each type of muscular fiber, to describe the quality of each considered attribute and to realize a sensorial scale of quantification for the considered sensorial attributes. Our purpose was to determine the quality of the red and white refrigerated raw chicken anatomical parts (respectively for legs and breasts after one week of storage.

  18. Foodborne disease prevention and broiler chickens with reduced Campylobacter infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrndorff, Simon; Rangstrup-Christensen, Lena; Nordentoft, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Studies have suggested that flies play a linking role in the epidemiology of Campylobacter spp. in broiler chickens and that fly screens can reduce the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. We examined the year-round and long-term effects of fly screens in 10 broiler chicken houses (99 flocks...... broiler chicken flocks....

  19. Comparative developmental trajectory of four strains of chicken ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated egg traits, embryonic growth, and early growth rate in four strains of chicken. A total of 1200 hatching eggs, 300 each from four strains of chicken were used for this study. The strains included Nigerian indigenous chicken (NIC), Arbor acre, Hubbard, and Marshall broiler strains. Embryonic weights, yolk ...

  20. The role of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21) in promoting C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex formation on normal peripheral human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke Hansen

    2002-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes are known to activate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement, leading to C3-fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. The process is mediated via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), with complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) playing...... a subsidiary role. In this study, we examine the relative contributions of CR1 and CR2 to the deposition of C3 fragments and MAC on B lymphocytes under circumstances where all complement pathways are operational. C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation were assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes...... in the presence of 30% autologous serum. Blocking the CR2 ligand-binding site with monoclonal antibody (mAb) FE8 resulted in significant reduction (37.9+/-11.9%) in C3-fragment deposition, whereas MAC formation was only marginally affected (12.1+/-22.2% reduction). Blocking the CR1 binding-site resulted...

  1. Chicken astrovirus as an aetiological agent of runting-stunting syndrome in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyung-Il; Linnemann, Erich; Icard, Alan H; Durairaj, Vijay; Mundt, Egbert; Sellers, Holly S

    2018-04-01

    Despite descriptions of runting-stunting syndrome (RSS) in broiler chickens dating back over 40 years, the aetiology has not yet been described. A novel chicken astrovirus (CkAstV) was isolated in an LMH liver cell line from the intestines of chickens affected with RSS. Clinical RSS is characterized by retarded growth and cystic crypt lesions in the small intestine. In 1-day-old broiler chickens infected with the CkAstV isolate, virus was only detected in the intestinal epithelial cells during the first few days after infection. Notably, the preferred host cells are the crypt epithelial cells following initial replication in the villous epithelial cells, thus implying viral preference for immature intestinal cells. Nevertheless, the CkAstV isolate did not induce remarkable pathological changes, despite the presence of the virus in situ. Serial chicken-to-chicken passages of the virus induced increased virulence, as displayed by decreased weight gain and the presence of cystic lesions in the small intestine reproducing clinical RSS in chickens. The analysis of the full-length genome sequences from the isolated CkAstV and the CkAstV from the bird-to-bird passages showed >99 % similarity. The data obtained in this study suggest that the CkAstV isolate is capable of inducing RSS following serial bird-to-bird passages in broilers and is as an aetiological agent of the disease.

  2. Out-of-plane spin-orientation dependent magnetotransport properties in the anisotropic helimagnet CR1/3NbS2 [Spin-Orbit Coupling Induced Anisotropy in the Magnetotransport of the Chiral Helimagnet Cr1=3NbS2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornstein, Alexander C.; Chapman, Benjamin J.; Ghimire, Nirmal J.; Oak Ridge National Lab.; Technology Div.); Mandrus, David G.; Oak Ridge National Lab.; Technology Div.); Parker, David S.; Technology Div.); Lee, Minhyea

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) has been crucial for controlling magnetic anisotropy in magnetic multilayer films. It has been shown that electronic structure can be altered via interface SOC by varying the superlattice structure, resulting in spontaneous magnetization perpendicular or parallel to the plane. In lieu of magnetic thin films, we study the similarly anisotropic helimagnet Cr1/3NbS2 where the spin-polarization direction, controlled by the applied magnetic field, can modify the electronic structure. As a result, the direction of spin polarization can modulate the density of states and in turn affect the in-plane electrical conductivity. In Cr1/3NbS2, we found an enhancement of in-plane conductivity when the spin polarization is out-of-plane as compared to in-plane spin polarization. This is consistent with the increase in density of states near the Fermi energy at the same spin configuration, found from first-principles calculations. We also observe unusual field dependence of the Hall signal in the same temperature range. This is unlikely to originate from the noncollinear spin texture but rather further indicates strong dependence of electronic structure on spin orientation relative to the plane

  3. NUMERICAL MODELLING OF CHICKEN-FOOT FOUNDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipman Tandjiria

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the chicken-foot foundation using the finite element method. The foundation is considered as a reinforced concrete slab resting on a number of reinforced concrete pipes filled with and surrounded by in-situ soil. The soil and the pipes were modelled by isoparametric solid elements while the slab was modelled by isoparametric thick-plate elements. The study was intended to illustrate the basic mechanism of the chicken-foot foundation. Three cases have been considered for the parametric studies. The parameters investigated are thickness of slab, length of pipes and spacing between pipes. It is shown that such a foundation improves the behaviour of the raft foundation. It is also found that all the parameters used in the parametric studies influence the behaviour of the chicken-foot foundation.

  4. Complete sequence of Tvv1, a family of Ty 1 copia-like retrotransposons of Vitis vinifera L., reconstituted by chromosome walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelsy, F.; Merdinoglu, D.

    2002-09-01

    A chromosome-walking strategy was used to sequence and characterize retrotransposons in the grapevine genome. The reconstitution of a family of retroelements, named Tvv1, was achieved by six successive steps. These elements share a single, highly conserved open reading frame 4,153 nucleotides-long, putatively encoding the gag, pro, int, rt and rh proteins. Comparison of the Tvv1 open reading frame coding potential with those of drosophila copia and tobacco Tnt1, revealed that Tvv1 is closely related to Ty 1 copia-like retrotransposons. A highly variable untranslated leader region, upstream of the open reading frame, allowed us to differentiate Tvv1 variants, which represent a family of at least 28 copies, in varying sizes. This internal region is flanked by two long terminal repeats in direct orientation, sized between 149 and 157 bp. Among elements theoretically sized from 4,970 to 5,550 bp, we describe the full-length sequence of a reference element Tvv1-1, 5,343 nucleotides-long. The full-length sequence of Tvv1-1 compared to pea PDR1 shows a 53.3% identity. In addition, both elements contain long terminal repeats of nearly the same size in which the U5 region could be entirely absent. Therefore, we assume that Tvv1 and PDR1 could constitute a particular class of short LTRs retroelements.

  5. Identification of an Internal Ribosome Entry Segment in the 5′ Region of the Mouse VL30 Retrotransposon and Its Use in the Development of Retroviral Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Lastra, Marcelo; Ulrici, Sandrine; Gabus, Caroline; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    1999-01-01

    Mouse virus-like 30S RNAs (VL30m) constitute a family of retrotransposons, present at 100 to 200 copies, dispersed in the mouse genome. They display little sequence homology to Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV), do not encode virus-like proteins, and have not been implicated in retroviral carcinogenesis. However, VL30 RNAs are efficiently packaged into MLV particles that are propagated in cell culture. In this study, we addressed whether the 5′ region of VL30m could replace the 5′ leader of MoMLV functionally in a recombinant vector construct. Our data confirm that the putative packaging sequence of VL30 is located within the 5′ region (nucleotides 362 to 1149 with respect to the cap structure) and that it can replace the packaging sequence of MoMLV. We also show that VL30m contains an internal ribosome entry segment (IRES) in the 5′ region, as do MoMLV, Friend murine leukemia virus, Harvey murine sarcoma virus, and avian reticuloendotheliosis virus type A. Our data show that both the packaging and IRES functions of the 5′ region of VL30m RNA can be efficiently used to develop retrotransposon-based vectors. PMID:10482590

  6. Identification of an internal ribosome entry segment in the 5' region of the mouse VL30 retrotransposon and its use in the development of retroviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Lastra, M; Ulrici, S; Gabus, C; Darlix, J L

    1999-10-01

    Mouse virus-like 30S RNAs (VL30m) constitute a family of retrotransposons, present at 100 to 200 copies, dispersed in the mouse genome. They display little sequence homology to Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV), do not encode virus-like proteins, and have not been implicated in retroviral carcinogenesis. However, VL30 RNAs are efficiently packaged into MLV particles that are propagated in cell culture. In this study, we addressed whether the 5' region of VL30m could replace the 5' leader of MoMLV functionally in a recombinant vector construct. Our data confirm that the putative packaging sequence of VL30 is located within the 5' region (nucleotides 362 to 1149 with respect to the cap structure) and that it can replace the packaging sequence of MoMLV. We also show that VL30m contains an internal ribosome entry segment (IRES) in the 5' region, as do MoMLV, Friend murine leukemia virus, Harvey murine sarcoma virus, and avian reticuloendotheliosis virus type A. Our data show that both the packaging and IRES functions of the 5' region of VL30m RNA can be efficiently used to develop retrotransposon-based vectors.

  7. Retrotransposons of the Tnt1B family are mobile in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and can induce alternative splicing of the host gene upon insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leprinc, A S; Grandbastien, M A; Christian, M

    2001-11-01

    Active retrotransposons have been identified in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia by their ability to disrupt the nitrate reductase gene in chlorate-resistant mutants selected from protoplast-derived cultures. In mutants E23 and F97, two independent insertions of Tnp2, a new retrotransposon closely related to the tobacco Tnt1 elements, were detected in the nitrate reductase gene. These two Tnp2 elements are members of the Tnt1B subfamily which shows that Tnt1B elements can be active and mutagenic in the N. plumbaginifolia genome. Furthermore, these results suggest that Tnt1B is the most active family of Tntl elements in N. plumbaginifolia, whereas in tobacco only members of the Tnt1A subfamily were found inserted in the nitrate reductase gene. The transcriptional regulations of Tnp2 and Tnt1A elements are most probably different due to non-conserved U3 regions. Our results thus support the hypothesis that different Nicotiana species contain different active Tntl subfamilies and that only one active Tntl subfamily might be maintained in each of these species. The Tnp2 insertion found in the F97 mutant was found to be spliced out of the nitrate reductase mRNA by activation of cryptic donor and acceptor sites in the nitrate reductase and the Tnp2 sequences respectively.

  8. Experimental study and modelling of high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel weldments; Etude experimentale et modelisation, du comportement, de l'endommagement et de la rupture en fluage a haute temperature de joint soudes en acier 9Cr1Mo-NbV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffard, V

    2004-12-15

    Chromium martensitic stainless steels are under development since the 70's with the prospect of using them as structural components in thermal and nuclear power plants. The modified 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel is already used, especially in England and Japan, as a material for structural components in thermal power plants where welding is a commonly used joining technique. New generations of chromium martensitic stainless steels with improved mechanical properties for high pressure and temperature use are currently under development. However, observations of several in-service premature failures of welded components in 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel, outline a strong need for understanding the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments. The present study aimed at experimentally determining and then modelling the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of both 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments (typically in the temperature range from 450 C to 650 C). The base metal was first studied as the reference material. It was especially evidenced that tempered chromium martensitic steels exhibit a change in both creep flow and damage behaviour for long term creep exposure. As a consequence, the classically performed extrapolation of 1,000 hours creep data to 100,000 hours creep lifetime predictions might be very hazardous. Based on experimental observations, a new model, integrating and coupling multiple creep flow and damage mechanisms, was developed in the framework of the mechanics of porous media. It was then successfully used to represent creep flow and damage behaviour of the base metal from high to low stress levels even for complex multiaxial loading conditions. Although the high temperature creep properties of the base metal are quite good, the occurrence of premature failure in weldments in high temperature creep conditions largely focused the attention of the scientific community. The lower creep strength of the weld component was also

  9. Facilitating functional annotation of chicken microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gresham Cathy R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modeling results from chicken microarray studies is challenging for researchers due to little functional annotation associated with these arrays. The Affymetrix GenChip chicken genome array, one of the biggest arrays that serve as a key research tool for the study of chicken functional genomics, is among the few arrays that link gene products to Gene Ontology (GO. However the GO annotation data presented by Affymetrix is incomplete, for example, they do not show references linked to manually annotated functions. In addition, there is no tool that facilitates microarray researchers to directly retrieve functional annotations for their datasets from the annotated arrays. This costs researchers amount of time in searching multiple GO databases for functional information. Results We have improved the breadth of functional annotations of the gene products associated with probesets on the Affymetrix chicken genome array by 45% and the quality of annotation by 14%. We have also identified the most significant diseases and disorders, different types of genes, and known drug targets represented on Affymetrix chicken genome array. To facilitate functional annotation of other arrays and microarray experimental datasets we developed an Array GO Mapper (AGOM tool to help researchers to quickly retrieve corresponding functional information for their dataset. Conclusion Results from this study will directly facilitate annotation of other chicken arrays and microarray experimental datasets. Researchers will be able to quickly model their microarray dataset into more reliable biological functional information by using AGOM tool. The disease, disorders, gene types and drug targets revealed in the study will allow researchers to learn more about how genes function in complex biological systems and may lead to new drug discovery and development of therapies. The GO annotation data generated will be available for public use via AgBase website and

  10. Evaluation of inelastic constitutive models under plasticity-creep interaction for 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel: Results of joint work (A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, T.; Ohno, N.; Suzuki, A.; Igari, T.

    1987-01-01

    The authorization of constitutive models under plasticity-creep condition and life estimation methods in fatigue-creep regime is expected to be achieved from the viewpoint of design purposes of high temperature components of reactor structures. The present Subcommittee has performed the cooperative project consisting of the following two parts: (A) To review and evaluate inelastic constitutive models relevant to the material response under plasticity-creep interaction and (B) to recommend some adequate methods to estimate material life under fatigue-creep interaction by taking account of the effect of plasticity-creep interaction on the stress-strain hysteresis loops. The material treated is normalized and tempered 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel at 600 0 C. The part (A) plays a preliminary role for the part (B), since the constitutive models examined in the part (A) were used to describe the stress-strain hysteresis loops necessary to predict analytically the lives under fatigue-creep interaction. In the part (A), thererfore, it is important to check how accurately the constitutive models simulate the stress-strain hysteresis loops especially by taking account of the effect of plasticity-creep interaction. (orig./GL)

  11. Fatigue strength of welds and welded materials of high-temperature steels resistant to pressurized hydrogen of the type 2.25% Cr/1% Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlat, J.; Cheviet, A.; Million, A.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine systematically the creep strength of welded joints (base material, heat influence zone and welded seam) and of pure welding materials of the type 2 1/4-3% Cr/1% Mo. According to the AD standard rules, the rule which stipulates that the creep strength of welded seams under full stress be calculated with the strength characteristic value reduced by 20% applies to all heat-resistant steels, if no rupture stress values for the welded joints are available. Manufacturers of steel and weld fillers together with the Union of Technical Control Associations (VdTUeV) have prepared a test programme according to which on the one hand welded joints are tested at right angles to their seams, and on the other pure welding material is tested with respect to its creep strength. The development of the testes and their results have been described. The first results are available as VdTUeV material performance sheets, for 2 materials, and as provisional VdTUeV specification sheets, for 3 weld fillers. With the tested materials, it becomes practically feasible to reduce the creep strength of longitudinally welded pressure-bearing components by about 20% of wall thickness. (orig.) [de

  12. Impurity Antimony-Induced Creep Property Deterioration and Its Suppression by Rare Earth Ceriumfor a 9Cr-1Mo Ferritic Heat-Resistant Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yewei Xu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature creep properties of three groups of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel samples, undoped, doped with Sb, and doped with Sb and Ce, are evaluated under the applied stresses from 150 MPa to 210 MPa and at the temperatures from 873–923 K. The creep behavior follows the temperature-compensated power law as well as the Monkman-Grant relation. The creep activation energy for the Sb-doped steel (519 kJ/mol is apparently lower than that for the undoped one (541 kJ/mol, but it is considerably higher for the Sb+Ce-doped steel (621 kJ/mol. Based on the obtained relations, both the creep lifetimes under 50 MPa, 80 MPa, and 100 MPa in the range 853–923 K and the 105 h creep rupture strengths at 853 K, 873 K, and 893 K are predicted. It is demonstrated that the creep properties of the Sb-doped steel are considerably deteriorated but those of the Sb+Ce-doped steel are significantly improved as compared with the undoped steel. Microstructural and microchemical characterizations indicate that the minor addition of Ce can stabilize the microstructure of the steel by segregating to grain boundaries and dislocations, thereby offsetting the deleterious effect of Sb by coarsening the microstructure and weakening the grain boundary.

  13. Effect of a high heat flux on the corrosion of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel in superheated steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griess, J.C.; DeVan, J.H.; Maxwell, W.A.

    1977-01-01

    A series of corrosion tests was conducted to determine the effect of heat flux on the corrosion of 2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel in superheated steam. The tests were conducted with a constant heat flux of (126 kW/m 2 ) 40,000 Btu hr -1 ft -2 and surface temperatures varying from 950 to 1000 0 F (510 to 541 0 C) on each specimen. Specimens were exposed for varying lengths of time, ranging from 500 to 6000 hr. Essentially all the corrosion product oxide remained on the steel during the first 2000 hr, but after that time, exfoliation of the oxide began. The percentage of corrosion product oxide lost from the specimen increased with exposure time; about 33 percent was missing after 6000 hr. After an initial period of rapid corrosion, the average corrosion rate was constant at 1.8 mils/year (45 μm/year). In contrast, isothermal specimens exposed to superheated steam at 930 0 F (499 0 C) in the same test facility corroded at a decreasing rate throughout the test. Metallographic sections showed that, with heat transfer across the specimen-steam interface, both cracks and porosity developed in the oxide, even on short exposure, a face that was undoubtedly responsible for the early exfoliation of the oxide and the constant corrosion rate

  14. Enhancement effect of inter-pass annealing during equal channel angular pressing on grain refinement and ductility of 9Cr1Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Ting, E-mail: hao.ting@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Tangi, Haiyin [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Luo, Guangnan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang, Xianping; Liu, Changsong [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Fang, Qianfeng, E-mail: qffang@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-06-14

    To obtain enhanced mechanical property in both the strength and the ductility, 9Cr1Mo steel (T91) was severely deformed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) combined with an additional inter-pass annealing. Tensile results show that the additional inter-pass annealing can significantly improve the ductility (i.e. 18% of the total elongation after four-pass extrusion with the inter-pass annealing) but slightly decrease the tensile strength comparing with the case without the inter-pass annealing (i.e. 10% of the total elongation after four-pass ECAP processing). The average grain size of the two passes ECAP-processed materials with the inter-pass annealing (~0.8 µm) is smaller than that of the sample without inter-pass annealing (~2 µm), and the fraction of the high angle grain boundaries in the samples with the inter-pass annealing (~40%) is higher than that of ~34% (two-pass ECAP) without the inter-pass annealing based on electron backscattering diffraction analysis. The crystallite size and dislocation density were evaluated by means of the modified Williamson-Hall plot based on X-ray diffraction analysis. The microstructural analysis indicates that the enhanced ductility of the ECAP processed and inter-pass annealed materials can be attributed to the relatively smaller grain sizes, larger crystallite sizes and lower dislocation densities.

  15. Enhancement effect of inter-pass annealing during equal channel angular pressing on grain refinement and ductility of 9Cr1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Ting; Tangi, Haiyin; Luo, Guangnan; Wang, Xianping; Liu, Changsong; Fang, Qianfeng

    2016-01-01

    To obtain enhanced mechanical property in both the strength and the ductility, 9Cr1Mo steel (T91) was severely deformed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) combined with an additional inter-pass annealing. Tensile results show that the additional inter-pass annealing can significantly improve the ductility (i.e. 18% of the total elongation after four-pass extrusion with the inter-pass annealing) but slightly decrease the tensile strength comparing with the case without the inter-pass annealing (i.e. 10% of the total elongation after four-pass ECAP processing). The average grain size of the two passes ECAP-processed materials with the inter-pass annealing (~0.8 µm) is smaller than that of the sample without inter-pass annealing (~2 µm), and the fraction of the high angle grain boundaries in the samples with the inter-pass annealing (~40%) is higher than that of ~34% (two-pass ECAP) without the inter-pass annealing based on electron backscattering diffraction analysis. The crystallite size and dislocation density were evaluated by means of the modified Williamson-Hall plot based on X-ray diffraction analysis. The microstructural analysis indicates that the enhanced ductility of the ECAP processed and inter-pass annealed materials can be attributed to the relatively smaller grain sizes, larger crystallite sizes and lower dislocation densities.

  16. Effect of cobalt on microstructure and properties of AlCr1.5CuFeNi2Cox high-entropy alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukshal, Vikas; Patnaik, Amar; Bhat, I. K.

    2018-04-01

    The present paper investigates the effect of Co addition on the alloying behaviour, microstructure and the resulting properties of cast AlCr1.5CuFeNi2Cox high-entropy alloys intended to be used for high temperature applications. The elements Al, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni and Co (Purity > 99) weighing approximately 800 g was melted in a high temperature vacuum induction furnace. The microstructure, phase transformation, density, microhardness and compressive strength of the samples were analysed using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopes (SEM), Vickers microhardness tester and universal Testing machine. The crystalline structure of the alloys exhibits simple FCC and BCC phases. The microstructures investigation of the alloys shows the segregation of copper in the interdendritic region resulting in Cu-rich FCC phase. The addition of Co further enhances the formation of FCC phase resulting in the decrease in micro hardness value of the alloys, which varies from 471 HV to 364 HV with increase in the cobalt content from x = 0 to x = 1 (molar ratio). The similar decreasing trend is also observed for the compressive strength of the alloys.

  17. En route to the conductivity bottleneck in p-type CuCr1-xMxO2-ySy (M = Li, Mg)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, P.; Mazumder, N.; Akhtar, A. J.; Roy, R.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2017-05-01

    We extend our material design concept [P. Mandal et al. J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 49, 275109, (2016); N. Mazumder et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 3539, (2013)] further aiming to overcome the conductivity bottleneck (1 Scm-1) in p-type transparent conducting oxide (TCO). In this work, we execute the strategy of simultaneous cationic-anionic hole doping in the prototype p-TCO CuCrO2. CuCr1-xMxO2-ySy (M = Li, Mg) is prepared by solid state heating at 1150 °C. Using Rietveld analysis, the presence of Mgcr•, Licr • and SO×areconfirmed and quantified. The diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra are acquired to determine the dominant optical gap (˜ 3.5 eV) and found to be affected little upon site selective hole doping. From temperature dependence (80 - 300 K) of DC conductivity (σdc), (Licr •+SO×)dopingcan be identified to be the more plausible alternative to reach the bottleneck threshold compared to (Mgcr •+SO×) albeit of smaller σdc at 300 K.

  18. Creep life assessment of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel. Pt. 1. Quantitative evaluation of microstructural damage in creep rupture specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Kota; Maruyama, Kouichi; Komine, Ryuji; Nagae, Yuji

    1997-03-01

    Several microstructural changes take place in a material during the course of creep. These changes can be a measure of creep life consumption. In this paper, microstructural changes in Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel were studied in order to examine their ability as the measure of creep life consumption. Macroscopic structural changes, such as void growth, rotation of lath structure toward the tensile axis and elongation of grains, are evident only in the necked portion of ruptured specimens. These macroscopic structural changes are not useful for creep life assessment. Lath width increases and dislocation density within lath decreases with increasing creep duration. These changes in dislocation substructure start in the early stage of creep life, and cause the increase of strain rate in the tertiary creep stage. The lath width and the dislocation density reach a stationary value before rupture. The stationary values are independent of temperature, and uniquely related to creep stress normalized by shear modulus. The extent of these microstructural changes are greater at lower stresses under which the material is practically used. These facts suggest that the lath width and the dislocation density within lath can be a useful measure of creep life consumption. Hardness of crept specimens is closely related to the lath width and the dislocation density within lath. The changes of these microstructural features can be evaluated by the measurement of hardness. (author)

  19. Evaluation of inelastic constitutive models under plasticity-creep interaction for 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel: Results of joint work (A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, T.; Ohno, N.; Suzuki, A.; Igari, T.

    1987-01-01

    In order to evaluate the validity of existing inelastic constitutive models under the condition of plasticity-creep interaction, ten kinds of constitutive models were applied to sixteen bench mark problems of four categories, and the calculated results were compared with the experiments of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel at 600 0 C. The present bench mark project provides the following remarks: (1) The strain rate effect on the stress-strain relation can be represented, in some degree, even by a simple superposition model of classical type, and some of unified models describe the saturation of increase in flow stress with higher strain rate. (2) The characteristics of the plasticity-creep interaction were predicted by the modified superposition model as well as by unified ones in the actual calculations for the propounded problems. (3) Although the sophisticated unified constitutive models tend to give qualitatively better results, the complicated procedures in determining material parameters from the data of conventional tests need some improvements. The subcommittee has been reorganized to focus her attention in applying thus developed results under uniaxial stress state to multiaxial one, and the out-put will be expected to report in a couple of years

  20. Effect of glycine and alanine supplementation on development of cattle embryos cultured in CR1aa medium with or without cumulus cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kr. BREDBACKA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of alanine (1 mM and glycine (10 mM supplementation on bovine embryo development in vitro was investigated. Presumptive bovine zygotes, produced by in vitro maturation and insemination of oocytes, were cultured for 144 h in CR1aa medium in the absence (Experiments 1 and 2 or presence of cumulus cells (Experiment 3. In Experiment 1, the proportion of morulae and blastocysts of cleaved embryos in glycine-supplemented medium was not different from that of the control medium (34% in both mediaglycine-enriched medium (69.5 vs. 53.3, P = 0.016. In Experiment 2, addition of alanine did not improve the formation of morulae and blastocysts (13% vs. 21% in control medium, and the mean cell numbers in morulae and blastocysts were lower than those in the control group (34.3 vs. 68.7, P = 0.007. In the presence of cumulus cells, the combined supplementation of glycine and alanine increased the proportion of morulae and blastocysts over that in the control medium (31% vs. 14%, P = 0.003.;

  1. Creep-rupture behavior of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, Alloy 800H and Hastelloy Alloy X in a simulated HTGR helium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, G.Y.; Wolwowicz, R.J.

    1979-12-01

    Creep-rupture testing was conducted on 1 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, Alloy 800H and Hastelloy Alloy X in flowing helium containing nominal concentration of following gases: 1500 μatm H 2 , 450 μatm CO, 50 μatm CH 4 , 50 μatm H 2 O and 5 μatm CO 2 . This environment is believed to represent maximum permissible levels of impurities in the primary coolant for the steam-cycle system of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) when it is operating continuously with a water and/or steam leak at technical specification limits. Two or three heats of material for each alloy were investigated. Tests were conducted at 482 0 C and 760 0 C (1200 0 F and 1400 0 F) for Alloy 800H, and at 760 0 C and 871 0 C (1400 0 F and 1600 0 F) for Hastelloy Alloy X for times up to 10,000 h. Selected tests were performed on same heat of material in both air and helium environments to make a direct comparison of creep-rupture behaviors between two environments. Metallurgical evaluation was performed on selected post test specimens with respect to gas-metal interactions which included oxidation, carburization and/or decarburization. Correlation between gaseous corrosion and creep-rupture behavior was attempted. Limited tests were also performed to investigate the specimen size effects on creep-rupture behavior in the helium environment

  2. Effect of tensile deformation on micromagnetic parameters in 0.2% carbon steel and 2.25Cr-1Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moorthy, V.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, B. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Group; Kashyap, B.P. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Bombay (India). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science

    1999-04-23

    The influence of prior tensile deformation on the magnetic Barkhausen emission (MBE) and the hysteresis (B-H) curve has been studied in 0.2% carbon steel and 2.25Cr-1Mo steel under different tempered conditions. This study shows that the micromagnetic parameters can be used to identify the four stages of deformation, namely (1) perfectly elastic, (2) microplastic yielding, (3) macroyielding and (4) progressive plastic deformation. However, it is observed that the MBE profile shows more distinct changes at different stages of tensile deformation than the hysteresis curve. It has been established that the beginning of microplastic yielding and macroyielding can be identified from the MBE profile which is not possible from the stress-strain plot. The onset of microplastic yielding can be identified from the decrease in the MBE peak height. The macroyielding can be identified from the merging of the initially present two-peak MBE profile into a single central peak with relatively higher peak height and narrow profile width. The difference between the variation of MBE and hysteresis curve parameters with strain beyond macroyielding indicates the difference in the deformation state of the surface and bulk of the sample.

  3. Microstructure-strength relations in a hardenable stainless steel with 16 pct Cr, 1.5 pct Mo, and 5 pct Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobner, P. J.; Blšs, V.

    1984-07-01

    Metallographic studies have been conducted on a 0.024 pct C-16 pct Cr-1.5 pct Mo-5 pct Ni stainless steel to study the phase reactions associated with heat treatments and investigate the strengthening mechanisms of the steel. In the normalized condition, air cooled from 1010 °C, the microstructure consists of 20 pct ferrite and 80 pct martensite. Tempering in a temperature range between 500 and 600 °C results in a gradual transformation of martensite to a fine mixture of ferrite and austenite. At higher tempering temperatures, between 600 and 800 °C, progressively larger quantities of austenite form and are converted during cooling to proportionally increasing amounts of fresh martensite. The amount of retained austenite in the microstructure is reduced to zero at 800 °C, and the microstructure contains 65 pct re-formed martensite and 35 pct total ferrite. Chromium rich M23C6 carbides precipitate in the single tempered microstructures. The principal strengthening is produced by the presence of martensite in the microstructure. Additional strengthening is provided by a second tempering treatment at 400 °C due to the precipitation of ultrafine (Cr, Mo) (C,N) particles in the ferrite.

  4. Construction of long-term isochronous stress-strain curves by a modeling of short-term creep curves for a Grade 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo-Gon; Yin, Song-Nan; Koo, Gyeong-Hoi

    2009-01-01

    This study dealt with the construction of long-term isochronous stress-strain curves (ISSC) by a modeling of short-term creep curves for a Grade 9Cr-1Mo steel (G91) which is a candidate material for structural applications in the next generation nuclear reactors as well as in fusion reactors. To do this, tensile material data used in the inelastic constitutive equations was obtained by tensile tests at 550degC. Creep curves were obtained by a series of creep tests with different stress levels of 300MPa to 220MPa at an identical controlled temperature of 550degC. On the basis of these experimental data, the creep curves were characterized by Garofalo's creep model. Three parameters of P 1 , P 2 and P 3 in Garofalo's model were properly optimized by a nonlinear least square fitting (NLSF) analysis. The stress dependency of the three parameters was found to be a linear relationship. But, the P 3 parameter representing the steady state creep rate exhibited a two slope behavior with different stress exponents at a transient stress of about 250 MPa. The long-term creep curves of the G91 steel was modeled by Garofalo's model with only a few short-term creep data. Using the modeled creep curves, the long-term isochronous curves up to 10 5 hours were successfully constructed. (author)

  5. Microstructural evolution of a 2.25Cr - 1 Mo steel during austenitization and temper: austenite grain growth, carbide precipitation sequence and effects on mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depinoy, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    This work aims at optimizing tensile and toughness properties of a 2.25Cr - 1Mo steel by controlling its microstructure through heat treatments. To this aim, phase transformations during austenitization, quenching and tempering have to be understood. Quantitative microstructural analyses were performed by means of SEM, TEM and XRD to characterize and model metallurgical evolution of the steel at each step of the heat treatment. The evolution of austenite during the austenitization stage, and its influence on the resulting as-quenched microstructure were thoroughly investigated. Austenite grain growth was modelled in order to understand its mechanisms, including the limited growth phenomenon observed at lower temperatures. The effect of austenitization conditions on further decomposition of austenite and on mechanical properties after quenching + tempering was experimentally determined. An optimal austenitization condition was selected and applied to study the tempering stage. Carbide precipitation was studied for various tempering temperatures and amounts of time. M3C carbides precipitate first, followed by M2C and M7C3; M23C6 are the equilibrium carbides. The influence of carbide precipitation on mechanical properties was studied. Tensile properties are closely linked to the tempering conditions in the range investigated, while impact toughness remains stable. (author) [fr

  6. Nano-nutrition of chicken embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawosz, Filip; Pineda, Lane Manalili; Hotowy, Anna

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the quantity and quality of nutrients stored in the egg might not be optimal for the fast rate of chicken embryo development in modern broilers, and embryos could be supplemented with nutrients by in ovo injection. Recent experiments showed that in ovo feeding reduces...... broiler eggs was randomly divided into a Control group without injection and injected groups with hydrocolloids of Nano-Ag, ATP or a complex of Nano-Ag and ATP (Nano-Ag/ATP). The embryos were evaluated on day 20 of incubation. The results indicate that the application of ATP to chicken embryos increases...

  7. Specificity of chicken and mammalian transferrins in myogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beach, R.L.; Popiela, Heinz; Festoff, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    Chicken transferrins isolated from eggs, embryo extract, serum or ischiatic-peroneal nerves are able to stimulate incorporation of ( 3 H)thymidine, and promote myogenesis by primary chicken muscles cells in vitro. Mammalian transferrins (bovine, rat, mouse, horse, rabbit, and human) do not promote ( 3 H)thymidine incorporation or myotube development. Comparison of the peptide fragments obtained after chemical or limited proteolytic cleavage demonstrates that the four chicken transferrins are all indistinguishable, but they differ considerably from the mammalian transferrins. The structural differences between chicken and mammalian transferrins probably account for the inability of mammalian transferrins to act as mitogens for, and to support myogenesis of, primary chicken muscle cells. (author)

  8. Alteration of Diastereoisomeric and Enantiomeric Profiles of Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) in Adult Chicken Tissues, Eggs, and Hatchling Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaobo; Qiao, Lin; Sun, Runxia; Luo, Xiaojun; Zheng, Jing; Xie, Qilai; Sun, Yuxin; Mai, Bixian

    2017-05-16

    The concentrations and enantiomer fractions (EFs) of α-, β-, and γ-hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) were measured in chicken diet sources (soil and chicken feed), home-raised adult chicken (Gallus domesticus) tissues, eggs during incubation, and hatchling chicken tissues. HBCD concentrations were not detected-0.69 ng/g dry weight (dw) and 25.6-48.4 ng/g dw in chicken feed and soil, respectively. HBCDs were detected in all adult chicken tissues, except the brain, at median levels of 13.1-44.0 ng/g lipid weight (lw). The proportions of α-HBCD in total HBCDs increased from 51% in soil to more than 87% in adult chicken tissues. The accumulation ratios (ARs) of α-HBCD from diet to adult chicken tissues were 4.27 for liver, 11.2 for fat, and 7.64-12.9 for other tissues, respectively. The AR and carry-over rate (COR) of α-HBCD from diet to eggs were 22.4 and 0.226, respectively. The concentrations of α-HBCD in hatchling chicken liver (median: 35.4 ng/g lw) were significantly lower than those in hatchling chicken pectoral muscle (median: 130 ng/g lw). The EFs of α-HBCD decreased from soil to adult chicken tissues and from eggs to hatchling chicken liver. Meanwhile, the EFs of γ-HBCD increased from soil to adult chicken tissues. These results indicate the preferential enrichment of (-)-α-HBCD and (+)-γ-HBCD in chickens. The alteration of diastereoisomeric and enantiomeric patterns of HBCDs might be influenced by the different absorption and elimination rates of the six HBCD enantiomers as well as variations in HBCD metabolism in chickens.

  9. Mobilization of retrotransposons as a cause of chromosomal diversification and rapid speciation: the case for the Antarctic teleost genus Trematomus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvinet, J; Graça, P; Belkadi, L; Petit, L; Bonnivard, E; Dettaï, A; Detrich, W H; Ozouf-Costaz, C; Higuet, D

    2018-05-09

    The importance of transposable elements (TEs) in the genomic remodeling and chromosomal rearrangements that accompany lineage diversification in vertebrates remains the subject of debate. The major impediment to understanding the roles of TEs in genome evolution is the lack of comparative and integrative analyses on complete taxonomic groups. To help overcome this problem, we have focused on the Antarctic teleost genus Trematomus (Notothenioidei: Nototheniidae), as they experienced rapid speciation accompanied by dramatic chromosomal diversity. Here we apply a multi-strategy approach to determine the role of large-scale TE mobilization in chromosomal diversification within Trematomus species. Despite the extensive chromosomal rearrangements observed in Trematomus species, our measurements revealed strong interspecific genome size conservation. After identifying the DIRS1, Gypsy and Copia retrotransposon superfamilies in genomes of 13 nototheniid species, we evaluated their diversity, abundance (copy numbers) and chromosomal distribution. Four families of DIRS1, nine of Gypsy, and two of Copia were highly conserved in these genomes; DIRS1 being the most represented within Trematomus genomes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping showed preferential accumulation of DIRS1 in centromeric and pericentromeric regions, both in Trematomus and other nototheniid species, but not in outgroups: species of the Sub-Antarctic notothenioid families Bovichtidae and Eleginopsidae, and the non-notothenioid family Percidae. In contrast to the outgroups, High-Antarctic notothenioid species, including the genus Trematomus, were subjected to strong environmental stresses involving repeated bouts of warming above the freezing point of seawater and cooling to sub-zero temperatures on the Antarctic continental shelf during the past 40 millions of years (My). As a consequence of these repetitive environmental changes, including thermal shocks; a breakdown of epigenetic regulation that

  10. Profiling of Human Molecular Pathways Affected by Retrotransposons at the Level of Regulation by Transcription Factor Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, Daniil; Penzar, Dmitry; Garazha, Andrew; Sorokin, Maxim; Tkachev, Victor; Borisov, Nicolas; Poltorak, Alexander; Prassolov, Vladimir; Buzdin, Anton A.

    2018-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses and retrotransposons also termed retroelements (REs) are mobile genetic elements that were active until recently in human genome evolution. REs regulate gene expression by actively reshaping chromatin structure or by directly providing transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We aimed to identify molecular processes most deeply impacted by the REs in human cells at the level of TFBS regulation. By using ENCODE data, we identified ~2 million TFBS overlapping with putatively regulation-competent human REs located in 5-kb gene promoter neighborhood (~17% of all TFBS in promoter neighborhoods; ~9% of all RE-linked TFBS). Most of REs hosting TFBS were highly diverged repeats, and for the evolutionary young (0–8% diverged) elements we identified only ~7% of all RE-linked TFBS. The gene-specific distributions of RE-linked TFBS generally correlated with the distributions for all TFBS. However, several groups of molecular processes were highly enriched in the RE-linked TFBS regulation. They were strongly connected with the immunity and response to pathogens, with the negative regulation of gene transcription, ubiquitination, and protein degradation, extracellular matrix organization, regulation of STAT signaling, fatty acids metabolism, regulation of GTPase activity, protein targeting to Golgi, regulation of cell division and differentiation, development and functioning of perception organs and reproductive system. By contrast, the processes most weakly affected by the REs were linked with the conservative aspects of embryo development. We also identified differences in the regulation features by the younger and older fractions of the REs. The regulation by the older fraction of the REs was linked mainly with the immunity, cell adhesion, cAMP, IGF1R, Notch, Wnt, and integrin signaling, neuronal development, chondroitin sulfate and heparin metabolism, and endocytosis. The younger REs regulate other aspects of immunity, cell cycle progression and

  11. Profiling of Human Molecular Pathways Affected by Retrotransposons at the Level of Regulation by Transcription Factor Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniil Nikitin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous retroviruses and retrotransposons also termed retroelements (REs are mobile genetic elements that were active until recently in human genome evolution. REs regulate gene expression by actively reshaping chromatin structure or by directly providing transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs. We aimed to identify molecular processes most deeply impacted by the REs in human cells at the level of TFBS regulation. By using ENCODE data, we identified ~2 million TFBS overlapping with putatively regulation-competent human REs located in 5-kb gene promoter neighborhood (~17% of all TFBS in promoter neighborhoods; ~9% of all RE-linked TFBS. Most of REs hosting TFBS were highly diverged repeats, and for the evolutionary young (0–8% diverged elements we identified only ~7% of all RE-linked TFBS. The gene-specific distributions of RE-linked TFBS generally correlated with the distributions for all TFBS. However, several groups of molecular processes were highly enriched in the RE-linked TFBS regulation. They were strongly connected with the immunity and response to pathogens, with the negative regulation of gene transcription, ubiquitination, and protein degradation, extracellular matrix organization, regulation of STAT signaling, fatty acids metabolism, regulation of GTPase activity, protein targeting to Golgi, regulation of cell division and differentiation, development and functioning of perception organs and reproductive system. By contrast, the processes most weakly affected by the REs were linked with the conservative aspects of embryo development. We also identified differences in the regulation features by the younger and older fractions of the REs. The regulation by the older fraction of the REs was linked mainly with the immunity, cell adhesion, cAMP, IGF1R, Notch, Wnt, and integrin signaling, neuronal development, chondroitin sulfate and heparin metabolism, and endocytosis. The younger REs regulate other aspects of immunity, cell cycle

  12. Investigation some characteristics of chicken feather’s rachis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paşayev, N.; Kocatepe, S.; Maraş, N.; Soylak, M.; Erol, M.

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, obtaining the natural protein fibers from chicken feathers, which are obtained as a by-product in the production of chicken meat and which cause environmental pollution and important part is waste, has been drawn to the perspective of scientists. So, the investigations about the chicken feather fibers reveal important properties of these fibers. Chicken feather fibers are obtained by mechanical cutting of the barbs which have fibrous structure, the structure branched from rachis and constitute the body of the feather. The rachis part of chicken feather constitutes approximately half of the weight of the feathers. So, it is necessary to examine the properties of the chicken feathers in order to gain their industrialization. This study is concerned with the mechanical and physical properties of the material that is taken as a by-product in the production of fibers from chicken feathers and constitutes the rachis part of the feathers.

  13. PIXE analysis of chinese chicken-blood stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, E.K.; Wang, C.W.; Yu, Y.C.; Liu, T.Y.; Cheng, H.S.; Zhu, H.X.; Yang, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the chemical compositions of chicken-blood stone Ji Xue Shi measured by Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). The experimental result show that for the red portion of chicken-blood stone, the concentration of Hg is as high as 20 wt%, and the concentration of S can be above 10 wt%. For the non-red portion the main chemical compositions are Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 . The obtained chemical compositions are close to those of kaolinite for Balin chicken-blood stone, and of pyrophyllite for Changhua chicken-blood stone, respectively. So far many Changhua chicken-blood stones and Balin chicken-blood stones were found in China, the PIXE method can be used to explore the provenance of available chicken-blood stones. (author)

  14. Genotypes and oxacillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from chicken and chicken meat in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, P; Bystroń, J; Bania, J; Podkowik, M; Empel, J; Mroczkowska, A

    2014-12-01

    The genotypes and oxacillin resistance of 263 Staphylococcus aureus isolates cultured from chicken cloacae (n = 138) and chicken meat (n = 125) was analyzed. Fifteen spa types were determined in the studied S. aureus population. Among 5 staphylococcal protein A gene (spa) types detected in S. aureus from chicken, t002, t3478, and t13620 were the most frequent. Staphylococcus aureus isolates from meat were assigned to 14 spa types. Among them, the genotypes t002, t056, t091, t3478, and t13620 were dominant. Except for 4 chicken S. aureus isolates belonging to CC398, the remaining 134 isolates were clustered into multilocus sequence clonal complex (CC) 5. Most of meat-derived isolates were assigned to CC5, CC7, and CC15, and to the newly described spa-CC12954 complex belonging to CC1. Except for t011 (CC398), all other spa types found among chicken isolates were also present in isolates from meat. Four S. aureus isolated from chicken and one from meat were identified as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) with oxacillin minimum inhibitory concentrations from 16 to 64 μg/mL. All MRSA were assigned to spa types belonging to ST398, and included 4 animal spa t011 SCCmecV isolates and 1 meat-derived spa t899, SCCmecIV isolate. Borderline oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (BORSA) isolates, shown to grow on plates containing 2 to 3 μg/mL of oxacillin, were found within S. aureus isolates from chicken (3 isolates) and from meat (19 isolates). The spa t091 and t084 dominated among BORSA from chicken meat, whereas t548 and t002 were found within animal BORSA. We report for the first time the presence of MRSA in chicken in Poland. We demonstrate that MRSA CC398 could be found in chicken meat indicating potential of introduction of animal-associated genotypes into the food chain. We also report for the first time the possibility of transmission of BORSA isolates from chicken to meat. ©2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  15. Mean total arsenic concentrations in chicken 1989-2000 and estimated exposures for consumers of chicken.

    OpenAIRE

    Lasky, Tamar; Sun, Wenyu; Kadry, Abdel; Hoffman, Michael K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate mean concentrations of total arsenic in chicken liver tissue and then estimate total and inorganic arsenic ingested by humans through chicken consumption. We used national monitoring data from the Food Safety and Inspection Service National Residue Program to estimate mean arsenic concentrations for 1994-2000. Incorporating assumptions about the concentrations of arsenic in liver and muscle tissues as well as the proportions of inorganic and organic a...

  16. Growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity of chicken GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, S; Gineste, C; Gaylinn, B D

    2014-08-01

    Two peptides with sequence similarities to growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) have been identified by analysis of the chicken genome. One of these peptides, chicken (c) GHRH-LP (like peptide) was previously found to poorly bind to chicken pituitary membranes or to cloned and expressed chicken GHRH receptors and had little, if any, growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity in vivo or in vitro. In contrast, a second more recently discovered peptide, cGHRH, does bind to cloned and expressed cGHRH receptors and increases cAMP activity in transfected cells. The possibility that this peptide may have in vivo GH-releasing activity was therefore assessed. The intravenous (i.v.) administration of cGHRH to immature chickens, at doses of 3-100 μg/kg, significantly increased circulating GH concentrations within 10 min of injection and the plasma GH levels remained elevated for at least 30 min after the injection of maximally effective doses. The plasma GH responses to cGHRH were comparable with those induced by human (h) or porcine (p) GHRH preparations and to that induced by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH). In marked contrast, the i.v. injection of cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on circulating GH concentrations in immature chicks. GH release was also increased from slaughterhouse chicken pituitary glands perifused for 5 min with cGHRH at doses of 0.1 μg/ml or 1.0 μg/ml, comparable with GH responses to hGHRH1-44. In contrast, the perifusion of chicken pituitary glands with cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on GH release. In summary, these results demonstrate that cGHRH has GH-releasing activity in chickens and support the possibility that it is the endogenous ligand of the cGHRH receptor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence and quantification of Listeria monocytogenes in chicken offal at the retail level in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, C H; Goh, S G; Loo, Y Y; Chang, W S; Lye, Y L; Puspanadan, S; Tang, J Y H; Nakaguchi, Y; Nishibuchi, M; Mahyudin, N A; Radu, S

    2013-06-01

    A total of 216 chicken offal samples (chicken liver = 72; chicken heart = 72; chicken gizzard = 72) from wet markets and hypermarkets in Selangor, Malaysia, were examined for the presence and density of Listeria monocytogenes by using a combination of the most probable number and PCR method. The prevalence of L. monocytogenes in 216 chicken offal samples examined was 26.39%, and among the positive samples, the chicken gizzard showed the highest percentage at 33.33% compared with chicken liver (25.00%) and chicken heart (20.83%). The microbial load of L. monocytogenes in chicken offal samples ranged from Malaysia.

  18. Effects of irradiation on bacterial load and Listeria monocytogenes in raw chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varabioff, Y.; Mitchell, G.E.; Nottingham, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    After irradiation of chickens to a dose of 2.5 kGy, the decrease in the standard plate count (SPC) was similar in air and in vacuum-packaged chickens. During storage at 4 degrees C for 15 d, the SPC increased progressively in both types of packaged chickens. At the end of the storage period, the SPC was higher in air-packaged chicken than in vacuum-packaged chickens. In irradiated chickens, Listeria monocytogenes was only recovered from the vacuum-packaged chickens after 7 d cold storage. In unirradiated chickens, L. monocytogenes proliferated similarly in both air- and vacuum-packaged chickens

  19. Cross-reactivity to fish and chicken meat - a new clinical syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuehn, A; Codreanu-Morel, F; Lehners-Weber, C

    2016-01-01

    fish and chicken meat in patients with allergy to chicken meat without sensitization to hen's eggs. METHODS: Patients with food allergy to fish and chicken meat (n = 29) or chicken meat only (n = 7) were recruited. IgE-reactive chicken proteins were identified (Edman, MS analysis) and quantified (ELISA...... for the fish homologues as well. Fish and chicken meat allergens were highly cross-reactive while high inhibition rates with fish or chicken allergens correlated with the patients' primary sensitization to fish or chicken. In cooked or roasted foods, enolase and aldolase were detectable in chicken breast while...

  20. Isolation of chicken embryonic stem cell and preparation of chicken chimeric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yani; Yang, Haiyan; Zhang, Zhentao; Shi, Qingqing; Wang, Dan; Zheng, Mengmeng; Li, Bichun; Song, Jiuzhou

    2013-03-01

    Chicken embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were separated from blastoderms at stage-X and cultured in vitro. Alkaline phosphatase activity and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 staining was conducted to detect ESCs. Then, chicken ESCs were transfected with linearized plasmid pEGFP-N1 in order to produce chimeric chicken. Firstly, the optimal electrotransfection condition was compared; the results showed the highest transfection efficiency was obtained when the field strength and pulse duration was 280 V and 75 μs, respectively. Secondly, the hatchability of shedding methods, drilling a window at the blunt end of egg and drilling a window at the lateral shell of egg was compared, the results showed that the hatchability was the highest for drilling a window at the lateral shell of egg. Thirdly, the hatchability of microinjection (ESCs was microinjected into chick embryo cavity) was compared too, the results showed there were significant difference between the injection group transfected with ESCs and that of other two groups. In addition, five chimeric chickens were obtained in this study and EGFP gene was expressed in some organs, but only two chimeric chicken expressed EGFP gene in the gonad, indicating that the chimeric chicken could be obtained through chick embryo cavity injection by drilling a window at the lateral shell of egg.

  1. Phenotypic and Genotypic Detection of Campylobacter jejuni at Local Chicken and Chicken Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rosyidi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The Objective of this study was to identify the existence of Campylobacter jejuni based on phenotypic and genotypic characteristic in local chicken and chicken meats. Samples of local chicken intestine and meat were tested for the bacterial existence. Phenotypic examination was carried out by means of cultivation followed by gram staining and biochemical tests. Genotypic examination was conducted by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using genus specific16S rRNA gene at 816 bp and membrane-associated protein A (mapA gene at 589 bp as Campylobacter jejuni species-specific gene. The result of phenotypic detection revealed the existence of Campylobacter spp as gram negative, curved rod shape, oxidase positive, urease negative and motile. Genotypic examination also indicated the existence of bacteria using both primers. However, no Campylobacter jejuni detected from meat of the chickens. The results suggest that the method of PCR using a primer detecting species-specific gene of Campylobacter jejuni gives a rapid and accurate detection of the bacteria as compared to that using phenotypic and biochemical test. Identification of Campylobacter spp from chicken meats should be improved with enrichment method and sample collection. (Animal Production 12(2: 128-134 (2010Key Words: Campylobacter jejuni, mapA gene, local chicken

  2. Comparison of non-volatile umami components in chicken soup and chicken enzymatic hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yan; Yang, Xiao; Ding, Qi; Zhang, Yu-Yu; Sun, Bao-Guo; Chen, Hai-Tao; Sun, Ying

    2017-12-01

    Umami taste is an important part to the taste of chicken. To isolate and identify non-volatile umami compounds, fractions from chicken soup and hydrolysate were prepared and analyzed. Amino acids were analyzed by amino acid analyzer. Organic acids and nucleotides were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Separation procedures utilizing ultrafiltration, Sephadex G-15 and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography were used to isolate umami taste peptides. Combined with sensory evaluation and LC-Q-TOF-MS, the amino acid sequences of 12 oligopeptides were determined. The amount of taste compounds was higher in chicken enzymatic hydrolysate than that of chicken soup. Eight oligopeptides from chicken enzymatic hydrolysate were identified, including Ala-Asp, Ala-Met, His-Ser, Val-Glu, Ala-Glu, Asp-Ala-Gly, Glu-Asp and Ala-Glu-Ala. Four oligopeptides from chicken soup were identified, including Val-Thr, Ala-His, Ala-Phe and Thr-Glu. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental induction of chicken amyloid A amyloidosis in white layer chickens by inoculation with inactivated vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Wazir Ahmad; Hirai, Takuya; Niazmand, Mohammad Hakim; Okumura, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Ryoji

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the amyloidogenic potential of inactivated vaccines and the localized production of serum amyloid A (SAA) at the injection site in white layer chickens. Hens in the treated group were injected intramuscularly three times with high doses of inactivated oil-emulsion Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine and multivalent viral and bacterial inactivated oil-emulsion vaccines at two-week intervals. Chickens in the control group did not receive any inoculum. In the treated group, emaciation and granulomas were present, while several chickens died between 4 and 6 weeks after the first injection. Hepatomegaly was seen at necropsy, and the liver parenchyma showed inconsistent discolouration with patchy green to yellowish-brown areas, or sometimes red-brown areas with haemorrhage. Amyloid deposition in the liver, spleen, duodenum, and at injection sites was demonstrated using haematoxylin and eosin staining, Congo red, and immunohistochemistry. The incidence of chicken amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis was 47% (28 of 60) in the treated group. In addition, RT-PCR was used to identify chicken SAA mRNA expression in the liver and at the injection sites. Furthermore, SAA mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization in fibroblasts at the injection sites, and also in hepatocytes. We believe that this is the first report of the experimental induction of systemic AA amyloidosis in white layer chickens following repeated inoculation with inactivated vaccines without the administration of amyloid fibrils or other amyloid-enhancing factors.

  4. Elevated Expression of Fractalkine (CX3CL1 and Fractalkine Receptor (CX3CR1 in the Dorsal Root Ganglia and Spinal Cord in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis: Implications in Multiple Sclerosis-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a central nervous system (CNS disease resulting from a targeted autoimmune-mediated attack on myelin proteins in the CNS. The release of Th1 inflammatory mediators in the CNS activates macrophages, antibodies, and microglia resulting in myelin damage and the induction of neuropathic pain (NPP. Molecular signaling through fractalkine (CX3CL1, a nociceptive chemokine, via its receptor (CX3CR1 is thought to be associated with MS-induced NPP. An experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model of MS was utilized to assess time dependent gene and protein expression changes of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1. Results revealed significant increases in mRNA and the protein expression of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG and spinal cord (SC 12 days after EAE induction compared to controls. This increased expression correlated with behavioural thermal sensory abnormalities consistent with NPP. Furthermore, this increased expression correlated with the peak neurological disability caused by EAE induction. This is the first study to identify CX3CL1 signaling through CX3CR1 via the DRG /SC anatomical connection that represents a critical pathway involved in NPP induction in an EAE model of MS.

  5. Complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21) cooperate in the binding of hydrolyzed complement factor 3 (C3i) to human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton; Prodinger, Wolfgang Maria; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The C3b-binding receptor, CR1/CD35, supports CR2/CD21-mediated activation of complement by human B lymphocytes, possibly by associating with CR2 to promote or stabilize the binding of hydrolyzed C3 (C3i), the primary component of the AP convertase, C3i-Bb. To evaluate this hypothesis, we examined...... the uptake kinetics and binding equilibria for C3i dimer interaction with human blood cells in the absence and presence of CR1- and CR2-blocking mAb. C3i displayed dual uptake kinetics to B lymphocytes, comprising of rapid binding to CR1 and slower binding to CR2. The forward rate constants (k(1)) for CR1...... and CR2, operating independently, differed ca. 9-fold (k(1)=193+/-9.4 and 22.2+/-6.0 x 10(3) M(-1)s(-1), respectively). Equilibrium binding of C3i to B lymphocytes was also complex, varying in strength by ca. 13-fold over the C3i concentration range examined. The maximum association constant (K(a, max...

  6. Production Performance of Indigenous Chicken under Semi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study to evaluate four indigenous chicken – namely: Horasi, Kuchi, Naked neck and Frizzled in order to obtain grand-parent and parent stocks was carried out at Tanzania Livestock Research Institute, Mpwapwa district of Dodoma, Tanzania. The perfomance of the ecotypes were compared so as to come out with the best ...

  7. Generation of chickens expressing Cre recombinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Philip A; Pedersen, Darlene; Ching, Kathryn; Collarini, Ellen J; Izquierdo, Shelley; Jacob, Roy; van de Lavoir, Marie-Cecile

    2016-10-01

    Cre recombinase has been extensively used for genome engineering in transgenic mice yet its use in other species has been more limited. Here we describe the generation of transgenic chickens expressing Cre recombinase. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive chicken primordial germ cells were stably transfected with β-actin-Cre-recombinase using phiC31 integrase and transgenic chickens were generated. Cre recombinase activity was verified by mating Cre birds to birds carrying a floxed transgene. Floxed sequences were only excised in offspring from roosters that inherited the Cre recombinase but were excised in all offspring from hens carrying the Cre recombinase irrespective of the presence of the Cre transgene. The Cre recombinase transgenic birds were healthy and reproductively normal. The Cre and GFP genes in two of the lines were closely linked whereas the genes segregated independently in a third line. These founders allowed development of GFP-expressing and non-GFP-expressing Cre recombinase lines. These lines of birds create a myriad of opportunities to study developmentally-regulated and tissue-specific expression of transgenes in chickens.

  8. First week nutrition for broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamot, David

    2017-01-01

    During the first week of life, broiler chickens undergo various developmental changes that are already initiated during incubation. Ongoing development of organs such as the gastro- intestinal tract and the immune system may affect the nutritional requirements during this age period. Despite the

  9. Alternative anticoccidial treatment of broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elmusharaf, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes the effects of mannanoligosaccharides (MOS) and electromagnetic fields (EMF) in broiler chickens infected with Eimeria parasites. The question addressed was whether ingestion of MOS or exposure to EMF would counteract the coccidiosis-induced depression of growth performance and

  10. Generation of antiviral transgenic chicken using spermatogonial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted in order to generate anti-viral transgenic chickens through transfected spermatogonial stem cell with fusion gene EGFP-MMx. After injecting fusion gene EGFP-MMx into testes, tissues frozen section, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and dot blot of testes was performed at 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 ...

  11. Review of environmental enrichment for broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riber, A.B.; De Weerd, Van H.A.; Jong, De I.C.; Steenfeldt, S.

    2018-01-01

    Welfare problems are commonly found in both conventional and organic production of broiler chickens. In order to reduce the extent of welfare problems, it has been suggested to provide stimulating, enriched environments. The aim of the present paper is to provide a review of the effect on behavior

  12. Responsive Reading: Caring for Chicken Little

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maderazo, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Media images and news about current events have the potential to strike like acorns. In these moments, children, like Chicken Little, need caring adults who can help them understand what is happening. As early childhood educators, one must recognize and provide opportunities to guide children's social and emotional well-being in addition to…

  13. The major histocompatibility complex in the chicken

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillemot, F; Kaufman, J F; Skjoedt, K

    1989-01-01

    The chicken B complex is the first non-mammalian MHC characterized at the molecular level. It differs from the human HLA and murine H-2 complexes in the small size of the class I (B-F) and class II (B-L) genes and their close proximity. This proximity accounts for the absence of recombination...

  14. Lymphoid cells in chicken intestinal epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, P

    1975-01-01

    The intraepithelial lymphoid cells of chicken small intestine were studied by light microscopy using 1 mu Epon sections, and by electron microscopy. Three cell types were found: small lymphocytes, large lymphoid cells, and granular cells. These cells correspond to the theliolymphocytes and globule...

  15. Comparative Study of Human Liver Ferritin and Chicken Liver by Moessbauer Spectroscopy. Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M. I. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Division of Applied Biophysics, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation); Milder, O. B.; Semionkin, V. A. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Prokopenko, P. G. [Russian State Medical University, Faculty of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Malakheeva, L. I. [Simbio Holding, Science Consultation Department (Russian Federation)

    2004-12-15

    A comparative study of normal human liver ferritin and livers from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease was made by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Small differences of quadrupole splitting and isomer shift were found for human liver ferritin and chicken liver. Moessbauer parameters for liver from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease were the same.

  16. Comparative Study of Human Liver Ferritin and Chicken Liver by Moessbauer Spectroscopy. Preliminary Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Milder, O. B.; Semionkin, V. A.; Prokopenko, P. G.; Malakheeva, L. I.

    2004-01-01

    A comparative study of normal human liver ferritin and livers from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease was made by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Small differences of quadrupole splitting and isomer shift were found for human liver ferritin and chicken liver. Moessbauer parameters for liver from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease were the same.

  17. Creep life assessment of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel. Pt. 2. Quantitative evaluation of microstructural damage in creep-interrupted specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Kota; Maruyama, Kouichi; Komine, Ryuji; Nagae, Yuji

    1998-02-01

    Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel has a martensitic lath structure. Recovery of the lath structure takes place in the course of creep. Microstructural degradation due to the recovery results in the acceleration of creep rate and the subsequent failure of a specimen. Change of lath width during creep of the steel was quantitatively investigated to propose a residual life assessment methodology based on the recovery process. Since the steel was tempered at 1053K, the lath structure is thermally stable at the testing temperatures (848K-923K). However, recovery of lath structure readily takes place during creep, indicating that the recovery is induced by creep deformation. Lath width d increases with creep strain and saturates to a value d s determined by creep stress. The increase of d is faster at a higher stress and temperature. A normalized change in lath width, Δd/Δd s , was introduced to explain the variation of lath growth rate with creep stress and temperature. Δd is the change in lath width from the initial value d 0 , and Δd s is the difference between d s and d 0 . Δd/Δd s is uniquely related to creep strain ε and the relationship is independent of creep stress as well as creep temperature. This Δd/Δd s -ε relationship obtained by an accelerated creep test at a higher temperature or stress is applicable to any creep condition including service conditions of engineering plants. Creep strain can be evaluated from the measurement of Δd/Δd s based on the Δd/Δd s -ε relationship. A creep curve under any creep condition can readily be calculated by creep data of the steel. Combining these information one can assess residual life of a structural component made of the steel. (author)

  18. Comparison of the effects of long-term thermal aging and HFIR irradiation on the microstructural evolution of 9Cr-1MoVNb steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Klueh, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Both thermal aging at 482--704 degree C for up to 25,000h and HFIR irradiation at 300--600 degree C for up to 39 dpa produce substantial changes in the as-tempered microstructure of 9Cr-1MoVNb martensitic/ferritic steel. However, the changes in the dislocation/subgrain boundary and the precipitate structures caused by thermal aging or neutron irradiation are quite different in nature. During thermal aging, the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary and carbide precipitate structures remain stable below 650 degree C, but coarsen and recover somewhat at 650--704 degree C. The formation of abundant intergranular Laves phase, intra-lath dislocation networks, and fine dispersions of VC needles are thermal aging effects that are superimposed upon the as-tempered microstructure at 482--593 degree C. HFIR irradiation produces dense dispersions of very small ''black'' dislocations loops at 300 degree C and produces helium bubbles and voids at 400 degree C At 300--500 degree C, there is considerable recovery of the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary structure and microstructural/microcompositional instability of the as-tempered carbide precipitates during irradiation. By contrast, the as-tempered microstructure remains essentially unchanged during irradiation at 600 degree C. Comparison of thermally aged with irradiation material suggests that the instabilities of the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary and precipitate structures at lower irradiation temperatures are radiation-induced effects, whereas the absence of both Laves phase and fine VC needles during irradiation is a radiation-retarded thermal effect

  19. Ghost microstructure evolution and identification in the coarse grain heat affected zone of 2.25Cr-1Mo-V-Ti steel using tint etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyongwoon [Corporate R& D Institute, Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction,Gwigok-dong, Gyeongsangnam-do Seongsan-gu, Changwon-si 642-792 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seonghyeong; Na, Hyesung [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, San 30 Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chungyun, E-mail: kangcy@pusan.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, San 30 Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Microstructural characteristics of the CGHAZ (coarse grained heat affected zone) made of the 2.25Cr-1Mo-V-Ti material for the thermal power plant boiler tube were discussed using the technique of tint etching. To conduct the micro structural characterization, the sample on which CGHAZ was produced by using a high temperature thermal cycle simulator, Gleeble 3500 equipment was used for comparative analyses using the existing Nital etching (ASTM E407-74) and the alkaline etching (ASTM E40785). The latter was used to observe a specific phase. For the microstructure on which the alkaline etching was experimented, the shape of a black strip (Ghost microstructure) in a few microns was observed, which was not observed from the Nital etching. It was found from the phase identifications based EPMA, EBSD and TEM experiments that the image of the black strip in a few microns represented the alpha phase in which C, Cr and Mo became segregated. In addition, it was verified that austenite and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} phase were present around the segregated zone. Based on such results, the mechanism by which the image of the black strip in a few microns was formed at the CGHAZ. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of the appeared black strip in the CGHAZ. - Highlights: •Ghost microstructure was observed which was not observed from the nital etching. •Ghost microstructure has high concentrations of carbon and molybdenum than matrix. •Schematic illustration proposed of why Ghost microstructure was generated. •Ghost microstructure caused by partial dissolution of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation.

  20. Influence of microstructural development during annealing at 780oC on creep resistance of ferritic-martensitic T91 (9%Cr-1%Mo-V-Nb) steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Cicco, H; Zavaleta Gutierrez, N; Marrero, J; Luppo, M.I; Danon, C.A

    2006-01-01

    Due to its good properties of creep resistance, toughness and rust resistance, martensitic-ferritic 9%Cr-1%Mo steels are widely used for the production of heating plant components, boilers, heat exchangers, piping and tubing, etc. The effectiveness in steels of MX c